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GOOD TIMES HARD TIMES LET´S GET READY FOR 2013


ALSO SHREDS UP

WE WANTED A BIKE TO RIDE LIKE A TRAIL BIKE AND DESCEND LIKE A DH BIKE. SO, WE LIGHTENED UP THE ENDURO, BOOSTED ITS TRAVEL TO 165MM AND MADE IT PEDAL AND CLIMB EVEN BETTER THAN BEFORE, MAKING SURE THE ENDURO KEEPS EVOLVING. IN BOTH DIRECTIONS. SEE THE FULL ENDURO RANGE AT SPECIALIZED.COM


EDITORIAL

COVER FABIAN RAPP PORTRAIT SEBAS ROMERO

HE IS HERE. SHE IS HERE. AND EVERYONE IS GETTING READY. Movember – excuse me – November has just passed and we already know that 2013 is going to be amazing! By now, enduro is on everyone’s lips. The industry and riders are excited about next season. 2012 was a year that will go down in history in the evolution of this young “discipline” (but already old idea). It was a year full of ups and downs: initial enthusiasm about a UCI Enduro World Cup, which everyone expected, but never came; then chatter and rumors flying around about an alternative at the spectacular end of season race in Finale Ligure and finally the announcement of the Enduro World Series. Within one year enduro has gained worldwide recognition, attracting riders from all disciplines pushing the sport even further. Voilà. All’s well that ends well? No! Because now we need to use the time to recall the past year, evaluate it, and do it even better in 2013. Every one of us has gained experiences and learned from it – let’s at least hope so. That leaves us right at the heart of this issue: Winter is here! Put on warm clothes, or just escape southwards? What suits you, who trains how, and where is the best place to be? Have fun reading this issue. We’ll see each other in 2013, even bigger, stronger, and better. That’s a promise! Robin Schmitt DIRECTOR, ENDURO MOUNTAINBIKE MAGAZINE


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CONTENTS

ISSUE 02

03 Editorial Enduro writes history 06 Design & Innovation Award by Enduro Mountainbike Magazine 08 Biketest Scott Genius 700 SL 22 Bye Bye Winter! The warmest, brightest, and cleverest gadgets 36 Winter Workout #1 Pump it up 50 Biketest Morewood Jabula 58 Biketest Trek Rumblefish Elite 62 Winter Workout #2 with the Cube Action Team 72 Travel Living like Kings in Spain ... 84 SuperEnduro Finale Ligure Future in the making 92 Heroes of Work We are Enduro 94 Cooperation Partners ¥Viva ENDURO! 98 Resources This issue’s products 100 Masthead & Preview


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The Design & Innovation Award is an avantgardist prize by Enduro Mountainbike Magazine, in collaboration with a select jury consisting of well-respected, international characters of the bicycle industry awarding the best and most innovative products in the following categories: bikes, parts, accessories and equipment. More details: www.enduro-mtb.com/en/design-innovation-award


DANIEL GEIGER

FABIEN BAREL

PHOTOGRAPHER DESIGNER ARTIST

3-TIME WORLD CHAMP MASTERMIND LEGEND

(GER)

(FRA)

ENDURO

MOUNTAINBIKE MAGAZINE

CESAR ROJO

ENRICO GUALA

EX-WORLDCUP RACER ENGINEER GENIUS

ORGANIZER ENDURO WORLD SERIES VISIONARY

(ESP)

(ITA)


08 PHOTOS FABIAN RAPP WORDS ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION MICHAELA JAMMERS


CONTENT

SCOTT GENIUS 700 SL BIKE TEST


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“Genius” - titles call for quality, fueling high expectations. This name wants to state: Don’t settle for average – I am the top of the crop! With their Genius 700 SL, Scott wants to

be no less than the very best in the trail bike and all-mountain arena. For the considerable price of 7,499 Euro, it is supposed to fulfill the maxim “faster-lighter-bigger-better” and to top all


the prior models. To achieve that, the youngest addition to the Genius family is equipped with 27.5” wheels, a carbon chassis, and a completely new frame design.

In alpine terrain or at an enduro race, what is the Scott Genius really capable of? More “wanna-be” or a true “meantto-be”? We did not spare any efforts to figure this out. >>


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PUTTING THE BIKE TO THE TEST THE SCOTT GENIUS 700 SL NEEDED TO PROVE SUCCESSFUL DURING THE RACE AS WELL AS IN HIGH ALPINE TERRAIN. The components give a true mission statement: slim Schwalbe Nobby-Nic tires in 2.25”, XX trigger shifters, carbon Syncros wheels, and other carbon parts show the clear focus of the Genius 700 SL on propulsion prowess. For this reason, the Genius hints that it can be a lot, but does not necessarily want to. Thanks to the variable geometry setup via Flip-Chip and IDS-SL dropout, there is still room for individual adjustment. The heart of the carbon chassis is the Nude 2 rear shock, developed in cooperation with DT-Swiss. Its “dual air spring” technology deploys two levels of rear travel with different characteristics. Via the Twinloc lever on the handlebar, the rear travel is easily reduced to 100mm by “turning off” the second air chamber. A more progressive spring curve and steeper seat and steering angles result-

ing from less sag are the desired effect. Pushing the lever another time will lock out the suspension. In general, the suspension performance is optimized for the full travel mode (150mm). The Twinloc lever also simultaneously regulates the Fox 34 TALAS Factory fork’s “CTD” (climb-trail-descend). A brilliant reference to dial in your chassis is the “Scott Suspension Setup Tool” available on the Scott homepage. Considering the rider’s weight and riding style, it offers us a good starting point: for 75kg body weight, 105 PSI is suggested. As a geometry setup via FlipChip, we chose the slack setup with a steering angle of 67.7°. During the practical test, the Genius had to demonstrate its abilities on alpine trails as well as in low mountain range terrain under racing conditions. >>


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After having taken a seat on the bike it turned out to be quite compact, and for 650B newbies the general variation in length and height, compared to a 26” bike, hardly makes a difference. The rider will learn to appreciate an intense sense of wellbeing on board the Genius – which doesn’t come as a surprise, since you are nicely positioned in the center of the bike. At the German enduro series’ final in Treuchtlingen, the Genius 700 SL had to prove its abilities under racing conditions on stages that were quite varied. Uphill: by pushing the Twinloc lever all the way down, every uphill seemed to lose its scare-factor due to the rear lockout and a fork lowered to 120 mm of travel. Without a doubt, the low rotating mass of the wheel-tire combination

contributed to the ease of climbing as well. Additionally, the steep seat angle (74°) and the low front ensured an ideal pedaling position and ergonomics. On flat or flowing terrain, the traction mode offered an ideal compromise of grip and propulsion with its 100mm of rear travel. In combination with the Reverb Stealth from RockShox, the Twinloc lever always provided maximum performance and efficiency in racing mode, although the synchronized operation requires a little bit of practice. After a long pedaling passage, “riding your butt off,” a sudden downhill appears. Click: full rear travel at hand. After familiarization, the fingers find their way to the lever effortlessly. Good accessibility and operability of the lever during a race is crucial. >>


HELMET Poc Trabec GLASSES Oakley Radar XL JACKET Scott SHORTS Scott AMT PROTECTION Bluegrass Bobcat Knee pad


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THE GENIUS IS AN OUTSTANDING TRAIL ROCKET. yet FOR TOUGH ENDURO RACES, IT LACKS A LITTLE BEEF.


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Downhill: on steep, tight turns that demand precise change of direction, the Genius needs a strong hand on the handlebars with its 440mm long chainstays. Smooth running and stability on the trail? This is where the 650B Genius is at home! Even the slim 2.25er Nobby Nic Evo tires with Pacestar compound surprised us in open turns and off camber trails with sufficient grip. Nevertheless, a large-volume tire would enhance the downhill performance considerably. Basically the Genius reveals a calm and neutral character – which is lacking a little vitality and instinct to play. A severe disadvantage? Probably not for most riders: they benefit from the clear advantages of the 27.5”-concept, including better bump absorption and enhanced traction from the tires. Due to the progressive suspension and the big wheels, the Genius passed little challenges effortlessly with its very defined handling. On rougher terrain we hit some bumps: “Comfort? No chance! Fast? Hell yeah!” For less experienced riders (or racers), a plusher suspension action may make more sense, creating a greater feeling of safety in high speed sections. Another tiny flaw: the chassis doesn’t quite seem to work in harmony with-


FACTS SCOTT GENIUS 700 SL FRAME: CARBON, 150 MM TRAVEL FORK: FOX 34 TALAS FACTORY CTD FIT KASHIMA AIR 150 - 120 MM TRAVEL REAR SHOCK: SCOTT / DT NUDE2 BRAKES: AVID X0 CARBON, 180 MM / 180 MM DRIVETRAIN: SRAM X0 / XX HANDLEBAR / STEM: SYNCROS FL1.0 CARBON WHEELS: SYNCROS FL1.0 CARBON 650B TELESCOPIC SEAT POST: ROCK SHOX REVERB STEALTH TIRES: SCHWALBE NOBBY NIC EVO 650B X 2.25“ PACESTAR-COMPOUND SIZES: S / M (TESTED) / L / XL PRICE: 7499 EUR WEIGHT: 11,80 KG INFO: WWW.SCOTT-SPORTS.COM

out some tinkering. The progressive suspension coupled with the relatively linear Fox 34 CTD up front only began working together once we lowered the air pressure in the rear shock about 5 PSI (equals the recommended“soft set up” of the Scott Suspension Setup Tools). An advantage of the soft set up: the angles are slacker, the bottom bracket lower, and the suspension plusher – and thanks to the Twinloc lever, maximum efficiency is guaranteed at the push of a button. Still, the acceleration is brilliant, even in fulltravel-mode.

Conclusion: altogether, the Genius offers a consistent overall performance. For most riders, it’s a real trail rocket: this is where the Genius will have its main target audience. For racers that desire less travel and tend to prefer a tight set up, the Genius 700 SL is an extremely fast racing machine on more moderate enduro trails. The Genius benefits from fast acceleration and the often confident handling. On more challenging downhills, the Scott is missing some beef and an aggressive downhill-oriented geometry.


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GEOMETRY SETTINGS: the Flip-Chip on the lower rear shock mount allows an adjustment of the head tube and seat angle of about 0.5째, as well as the height of the bottom bracket by about 6mm.

TWINLOC LEVER SYSTEM: the Twinloc lows the simultaneous adjustment of th sion elements. Three positions are poss open, traction mode (100mm), and lock


lever alhe suspensible: ked out.

PRO & CON: the light and slim tires from Schwalbe are fast-rolling but reduce the downhill performance. Furthermore, wider 27.5� tires would display better rollover qualities even more compared to the 26�.

LOVE FOR DETAIL: the IDS-SL dropouts offer incredible wheel compatibility: 142mm x 12mm, 135mm x 12mm, and 135mm/ quick release. We also like the well-placed post mount brake setup.


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CONTENT

ACCES SORIES BYE WINTER THE BEST, WARMEST, BRIGHTEST (!) AND CLEVEREST GADGETS TO FIGHT MUD AND WINTER THAT HAVE BEEN ROAMING AROUND IN OUR OFFICE AND HEADS.


PHOTO OLIVER ROGGENBUCK (2)

MARSHGUARD. STAY CLEAN, DUDE! There are many different “splashguards,” but none of them are as simple and clever as the MarshGuard. Thanks to its flexible material, this splashguard is combinable with almost any fork and attached in no time with the help of some zip ties. Despite its solid design, it very efficiently catches most splashes that are whirled up from the front wheel: it’s simple, light, and clever. The MarshGuard helps you keep clear vision and is a must-have on wet, muddy days! Since it didn’t bother us – lazy as we are – we kept it on our bike, even on dry days. Of course, this was only in case a nasty mud puddle was to appear…

www.marshguard.com 10 €


PHOTO OLIVER ROGGENBUCK

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GORE ALP-X 2.0 GORE-TEX ACTIVE JACKET. Wonderland GORE-TEX is putting an end to wet dreams. For most enduro and singletrack riders, the ALP-X 2.0 from Gore’s high-end assortment is a neat way to be protected from the elements. With seemingly uncountable features, the very light, waterproof, and breathable jacket manages to harmonize minimalistic design with the highest functionality. You can withstand even the most adverse conditions with its body-fit cut and expandable back panel. Discreetly placed reflector stripes keep you safe in the dark and make sure you are seen.

www.goreapparel.com 260 â‚Ź


O‘NEAL WINTER GLOVE. Everyone who wants to avoid riding with Granny’s oven mitts during the cold season is well served with these fluffy warm winter gloves by O’Neal. A water- and wind-resistant coating, as well as thin palms inside, ensures maximum comfort and a perfect fit.

www.oneal.com / 40 €

SMART: LEZYNE RAP TOOL. A tool specially designed for the winter? Almost! If a little repair should take longer than expected – which is likely to happen every now and then on the way back home (this usually happens to Enduro staff member Manne) – you would be well-equipped with the removable LED light of this multi- tool. Available as a 7-, 14-, and 21-piece tool.

www.lezyne.com 17 /20 /30 €

ALL-WEATHER SHOE: SCOTT MTB HEATER. Fashionable shoes are a sensitive issue – and not only for women! But in the cold and muddy seasons, a classic black color and convincing functions, as in the Scott MTB Heater, are sufficient. With its light, water-resistant outer material, and a high rise above the ankle, this shoe is ideal for every sort of weather. Due to its compact and light design, the Heater is mainly meant for temperatures above freezing.

www.scott-sports.com 160 €


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LET‘S GET DIRTY: SCHWALBE DIRTY DAN. Enduro riders are usually looking for the best compromise for the widest array of conditions. With regard to tires, this means the lowest rolling resistance with the best possible grip and safety. At about 920 grams, the Dirty Dan FR in 2.35” is definitely not a lightweight. But what use is a fast rolling light tire filled with mud, barely offering any grip under adverse conditions? Right. No use at all. Our test rider Dan(iel) “threw on” his namesake “dirty” and witnessed Dirty Dan work its magic. With its rough, mud-penetrating lugs, this Schwalbe tire not only guarantees security on downhills, but is also

very convenient on muddy uphills. There were parts of the track where his buddies failed miserably and their wheels were spinning, but Daniel passed masterfully – despite his tiny calves. Besides, rolling resistance is relative on muddy tracks. What really counts are grip, guidance, and a not too squishy feeling in the lateral borderline when it gets down to harder ground. Lateral curve claws ensure a soft transition while cornering. No sign of losing control! Thanks to a soft Vertstar rubber composition, the Dirty Dan grips well on stone or roots too. Price: € 55. www.schwalbe.de


PHOTO OLIVER ROGGENBUCK (3)


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LUPINE BETTY R12. If you have used the early nightfall and long-lasting workdays as a reason to avoid riding, you are now out of excuses: with its brutal 3600 lumen, the Lupine Betty R12 shines stronger than the xenon light of a Porsche Cayenne. The light only weighs 150 grams and can be attached to your helmet or handlebar with an optional fixture. Store the battery in your backpack or attach it to your bike. Another nice feature: attached to your seatpost, the diodes of the battery can be used as a backlight. Via radio remote control, you can choose between four individually adjustable levels of brightness. Its light-beam is very steady and, thanks to the 26°- radiation angle, illuminates the track broadly and brightly! The Lupine Betty is usable from -30°C up to +55°C. The only excuse not to use it would be the price of €875. But that’s the thing about freedom… www.lupine2013.de


PHOTO ROBIN SCHMITT


PHOTO OLIVER ROGGENBUCK

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FREELAP STOPWATCH-KIT. The racing season is over and the next one only starts in a couple of months? What to do during the months in between? Racing, of course… with your buddies on your home tracks. Ideally with the Freelap Stopwatch-Kit: rock-paper-scissors will determine who will have to go down to the finish line to position the transmitter to mark the goal. Every rider wears their own watch, which allows them to start with a timer function. Simple, right? That’s how you go from stage to stage puttig together easily a small race…

www.freelap.ch 315 €


PEDRO‘S MINI PIT KIT 2.0. One mud puddle after another and no soapy, bikinied car-wash girl awaiting you and your dirty bike at home?! That’s usually how we feel. For everyone with the same problems of daily life, we suggest Pedro’s Mini Pit Kit 3.0 with all-purpose cleaner, degreaser, etc… These gadgets help to foam it up!

www.pedros.com 44,5 €

GOPRO HERO3 SILVER EDITION. Recording your winter trip to the warm south for your friends? Now you can record your epic adventures better than ever before: GoPro consistently keeps enhancing their popular HERO2 helmet cam and presents the HERO3 Silver Edition as another good reason to use up your Christmas money. In addition to its enhanced image and audio quality, this resilient action camera is now equipped with WLAN and is therefore able to be wirelessly controlled via smartphone app or water-resistant mini remote. The extensive supply of accessories and fixtures is unchanged.

www.gopro.com 350 €


PHOTO MANFRED STROMBERG

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EVOC BIKE TRAVEL BAG. The best way to keep your bike protected during the winter would probably be a big bag, just like the Evoc Travel Bag. Pack up your bike, send it down south, and just join it for the flight. The travel bag weighs 8.6 kg and is foldable, offering ideal protection for your bike with its many thoughtful features. It’s sized perfectly: even downhill bikes and 29ers can fit, and only the handlebar, pedals, and wheels need to be detached! Lockable zippers and sturdy wheels for transportation ensure a stress-free and safe trip to the airport!

www.evocsports.com 340 € 360 € (multicolor)


CG DIRT DEVIL GAME. For quite some time now, there has existed an entertaining bike-game for Android and iOS. Perfect for the lonely winter days of the off-season, “CG Dirt Devil” stands for the downhill-icon Cedric Gracia, who has successfully specialized the game with his “crazy Frenchman”-character. The rules of the game are easy to explain: tilt your smartphone to navigate Cedric through a tricky downhill course. Besides the common obstacles, you need to overcome cows, wheelchair users, yetis, groupies willing to procreate (CG is obviously the master of drive-by-mating – try it!) as well as grannies with rolling pins (the groupies’ mothers?). You can crash this seemingly resilient Frenchman three times. After that, it will be ‘game over’ and you will receive a short video message from Cedric with a personalized, usually bitchy comment depending on your success. By the way, there is a high score as well. The Enduro team managed to make it to the 2196 meter mark – who can do better?

www.itunes.apple.com 1,80 €


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UVEX G.GL 9 RECON READY. Right before our deadline, we received a package with the UVEX G.GL 9 Recon Ready goggles. They seemed like normal goggles, but their true secret is hidden inside – the RECON MOD Live System. These goggles allow you to check your current speed, traveled distance, and altitude on the integrated mini-LCD display. You can even localize your buddies around you. The goggles are also available with lenses for the winter so you are perfectly geared up for the next winter vacation. During the upcoming weeks, we will test the goggles and the integrated RECON system. For everyone who can’t wait: the UVEX G.GL 9 RECON Ready is available at your trusted retailer or at: www.uvex-core-range.com

www.uvex-corerange.com 500 €


036 PHOTOS OLIVER ROGGENBUCK WORDS DANIEL HÄBERLE TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER


CONTENT

WORKOUT – FUN GUARANTEED

What’s better than mixing business with pleasure? The sudden and dramatic spread of pump tracks offers exceptional workout conditions for every ambitious enduro rider. Pump tracks not only push the fun meter all the way to the top, but also help to improve riding techniques and fitness. All of these are important aspects to make use of during an ordinary ride, as well as during a focused workout. Everything that works well on the pump track can be applied off-road. >>


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You begin with the build-up of speed – which the name ‘pump track’ itself already connotes – you have to pump the terrain in order to gain speed. In addition, manualling and jumping improve important and useful skills that can be transferred well to deep-tread everyday life. To “read” the terrain and deliberately push to increase speed pays off, since this way is usually faster than dull pedaling on hazards. On top of that, it saves you a lot of energy and provides a certain flow to your sequence of movements. The im-

provement of your ability to react, due to the fast series of rollers and berms on a pump track, features another advantage that we can transfer to trail riding. This is where the entire locomotor system is being trained, especially regarding coordination. Legs and arms, as well as upper body and mind, need to be in perfect synchronicity. Sufficient practice and exercise eventually turn everything from being hard work, to automaticity and ease. You loosen up from workout to workout and are able to increase your speed. >>


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“PUMP TRACKS ARE EXTREMELY USEFUL, ESPECIALLY IN REGARDS TO THE PRECISION AND COORDINATION OF UPPER AND LOWER BODY. IT IS ALSO GOOD CARDIO-TRAINING BECAUSE YOU’RE TOTALLY OUT OF BREATH AFTER ONLY A FEW LAPS.” JEROME CLEMENTZ, TEAM CANNONDALE


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Change of direction: a pump track is not a never-ending straight line but a cohesive system with corresponding berms. The right feeling for berms is crucial. Most

people forget or simply do not manage to take advantage of the berms in order to use them as a chance to benefit from momentum or even to accelerate. >>


“GENERALLY SPEAKING, IT HELPS YOU WITH ANY KIND OF DISCIPLINE IN MOUNTAIN BIKING, AS IT IS ALWAYS ABOUT THE MOMENTUM, SECTIONS TO RIDE STANDING UP, AND TURNS THAT HAVE EXTREME IMPACT ON YOUR GROUND SPEED. YOUR FLOW IS OF EXTREME IMPORTANCE! YOU USUALLY KNOW THE ENDURO STAGES ONLY PARTIALLY, OR NOT AT ALL, WHICH MAKES IT EVEN MORE IMPORTANT TO RIDE SMOOTHLY AND WITH THE GOOD TEMPO THAT COMES THROUGH FLOW.” ANDRE WAGENKNECHT, CUBE ACTION TEAM


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No matter whether it’s a single fast round or 15 continuous laps, everything varies according to the intention of the individual. This is where the perfect combination of fun and workout becomes full circle and we forget

about the sweaty smell of monotonous gyms. It isn’t surprising at all, as a refurbished greenhouse offers a pump track, and therefore first class opportunities to enjoy long winter nights. >>

“MOST OF ALL, WE RIDE PU THE FACT THAT IT IS A PER SAME TIME IS A PLEASANT MOUNDS AND ROLLERS ON DEFINABLY HANDLED FAST SURFING. THIS IS EXACTLY WELL ON PUMP TRACKS.” CAROLIN & ANITA GEHRIG, TWINS MTB-RACING


UMP TRACKS FOR FUN. RFECT WORKOUT AT THE T SIDE-EFFECT … THE N ENDURO TRACKS ARE TER BY PUMPING AND WHAT YOU PRACTICE


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WHAT KIND OF BIKE DO I NEED TO RIDE PUMP TRACKS? There is not really a specific answer to this question, as pump tracks can basically be ridden with almost any twowheeled contraption including BMX, MTB, 20”, 26”, 29”, aluminum, carbon, and steel. Generally, however, we may say that the majority of ambitious pump track riders go for compact 26” hardtails with suspension forks. We built up such a workout bike, of course including a gentle touch of love for detail. A light and stiff Merida alu-

minum frame (Hardy Team) serves as the basis. Yet again, this is where we apply a general rule: as much as necessary, as little as possible. An easily modulated rear brake is totally sufficient for pumping, just as you only need a single speed. Our main focus is on light, stiff, and at the same time solid wheels. Our solution: the specifically designed Acros 1G single-speed hubs, combined with DT spokes, aluminum nipples, light rims, Eclipse tubes, and fast rolling Continental Speed King tires. This guarantees


acceleration, stability, and low rotating mass. The front is equipped with a firm tuned RockShox Argyle RC fork. The cockpit is completed by an Acros headset in combination with a stem by Renthal, the cult brand based in England. Weight: 9.4 kg without having to make any sacrifices. Is light weight mandatory? Not necessarily. As soon as the weight fetishism is at the expense of stability and riding quality, this is where the weight negotiation stops– even on pump tracks.

WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DO I NEED TO RIDE PUMP TRACKS? Biking could hardly be any less complicated than on pump tracks: A helmet and bike are the only necessary tools. Other than that, maintenance of the track, as well as due respect to locals, goes without saying. As soon as you have internalized these basics, you are ready to start pumping and pulling – except maybe for when it’s bad weather. But that’s why we have a roof over our heads for now …


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THE COCKPIT: Renthal Fatbar and Duo stem, Avid Elixir Carbon brakes, carbon spacer and an Acros headset. A matte black RockShox Argyle, tightly tuned, paves the way ahead. What else could you ask for?

THE WHEELS: Continental Speed King – this tire delivers as promised. And as the bottom line of decadence: 59g Eclipse tubes. The Acros 1G VR hubs go without a disk brake system, providing a greater flange distance and more stability, despite the radial lacing design.

MERIDA HARDY TEAM The Hardy Team frame, by Merida (in our case a prototype), not only looks especially neat, but also lives up to its promises: its 1.6 kg offers the perfect basis for a light hardtail. 9.4 kg, including pedals without any risky experiments, speaks for itself. The frame will weigh 1.9 kg for series production (designed for hard dirt tracks). PRICE: 329,00 EUR (FRAME) WEIGHT: 9,4 KG INFO: WWW.MERIDA-BIKES.COM


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P S A S R E M A SS I V E E Y E A R H D O D H O O R E W Y S T E M S A N W I L L B E T O D U CM E S AM 13 TR THE N SPENSION S NOW. 20 CTURER IN ESIGN SU FA TD EAR PIVOT R MANY Y IKE MANU SPLIT PIVO NB ED S FO TUBE TH AFRICA NG-AWAIT T. KE OU LO THE S IRST AND O THE MAR F T ES ITS

PHOTOS FABIAN RAPP WORDS FABIAN SCHOLZ TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER


CONTENT


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In cooperation with kinematics guru Dave Weagle, Morewood developed the Jabula, a bike completely different from the usual designs of the company. The Jabula utilizes extensive hydro-forming, carbon fiber seatstays, and split pivot design – just a few of its many fundamental innovations. The split pivot design is supposed to minimize pedaling influences during acceleration. So much for theory – how does the Jabula perform in practice? Plug & play: as soon as we held the Jabula in our hands, we took it out for a spontaneous enduro race in bike park Beerfelden in southern Germany. In the end, second place marked a successful debut for the Jabula. One of the keys to its success are the high-quality components of the 5000Euro bike, including highlights like the BOS Deville fork and a Cane Creek Double Barrel Air shock which provides 170 mm of rear wheel travel. All the other features, like the DT Swiss EX 1750 wheels, light Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires, Formula’s snappy The One brakes, the SRAM X0 crankset, the telescopic RockShox Reverb seatpost, and the Spank cockpit parts complete the overall package. “Jabula” is Zulu and basically means “to be happy.” It seemed like we had a little less luck with our second test ride – but let’s start at the beginning.

The slightly high but central seating position provides a solid feel-good factor. The balanced geometry, made up of a 66.5° head tube angle and other solid numbers, shows that the bike is designed for fun on enduro tours and in the bike park, rather than for the absolute extreme. The 433mm short chainstays equip the Jabula with sufficient agility and friskiness, but at the same time offer a solid smoothness in high-speed sections. The Jabula only requires little effort in fast curvy sections or to get onto the rear wheel. The crew had to face unexpected complications with the BOS fork and the Cane Creek suspension. In fact, the BOS Deville failed after only one day due to a defective damping unit. Thanks to the fast reaction of the German distributor Sports Nut, we were provided with an exchange fork in no time, which then managed to win us over with its familiar and particularly sensitive response characteristics. According to Sports Nut, the French BOS headquarters detected the cause of the defective damping in the inside of the fork and rectified the flaws of all the affected forks. The Morewood’s suspension setup proved to be quite demanding regarding its handling at the beginning of the test rides. The cause for this was the Double Barrel Air shock, which is equipped with five external setup options, >>


HELMET iXS Metis GOOGLE POC Iris DH JERSEY iXS Crappus BC SHORTS POC Flow PROTECTION iXS SLOPE-SERIES EVO Knee pads


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FACTS MOREWOOD JABULA FRAME: ALU, CARBON SEATSTAYS, 170 MM TRAVEL FORK: BOS DEVILLE 170 MM TRAVEL REAR SHOCK: CANE CREEK DOUBLE BARREL AIR BRAKES: FORMULA THE ONE, 203 MM / 180 MM DRIVE TRAIN: SRAM X0 / 2X10 HANDLEBAR / STEM: SPANK SUBROSA 747 MM / OOZY 60 MM WHEELS: DT SWISS EX1750 TELESCOPIC SEATPOST: ROCK SHOX REVERB TIRES: SCHWALBE HANS DAMPF 2.25“ PACESTAR-COMPOUND SIZES: S / M (TESTED) / L / XL PRICE: 4999 EUR WEIGHT: 14,10 KG INFO: WWW.MOREWOODBIKES.COM


allowing the Jabula to be adjusted to any imaginable requirement. This is possible because of the high- and low-speed compression, high- and low-speed rebound, and the air spring adjustment. However, even after countless adjustment trials, the Cane Creek tuning seemed inappropriate for Jabula’s kinematics: we found it was too progressive and it was not possible to take advantage of the entire travel, even with extreme levels of sag. After consultation with Cane Creek, we established that the shock was from a faulty batch and was equipped with too little air capacity. After fitting a flawless exchange shock, the suspension was able to fully exploit its performance. The time-consuming basic setup paid off: the rear suspension has been impressive ever since, and with its lush damping performance the rear wheel was basically glued to the ground. Despite its great downhill performance, we noticed some pedaling influences

on the rear suspension during uphills. This was mainly noticeable in the small chainring and during out-of-saddle pedaling. While pedaling in the saddle, the bobbing was hardly noticeable. One thing is certain: the rear suspension is especially designed for ideal downhill performances, and that’s why we have to lower our expectations slightly regarding pedaling Bottom line: The rather neatly equipped Jabula was not able to completely meet the high expectations of the test crew in practice. One of the reasons might have been the numerous attempts until the Morewood was able to show off its performance abilities and qualities. With its 170mm of suspension travel and masterful handling, it definitely has a focus on heading downhill. Bike park, home track, or alpine freeride trails constitute the Jabula’s expertise. This is where the Jabula lives up to its name!


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➤ CANE CREEK DOUBLE BARREL

AIR: a plethora of adjustments for everyone, or is this overkill? Even some of the testers thought this had too many options for enduro. “In contrast to downhill, you ride so many different tracks within a really short time frame in enduro, which neither makes perfect fine tuning possible nor reasonable.” ➤

SPANK OOZY STEM: the mounting of this light all-mountain stem unfortunately did not manage to keep the handlebar reliably on track during the test. The construction, with only one screw at the steerer tube, caused concerns for some of the testers.


➤ BOS DEVILLE:

usually synonymous with and guaranteed for the best performances, the French fork’s damping failed twice during this time’s test runs. After exchanging the fork, everything was back to normal: top-notch!

➤ SPLIT PIVOT DESIGN:

The split pivot rear suspension scores with nice bump absorption and hardly stiffened during braking – in contrast to the classic Morewood single pivot rear ends. Complaints: the acceleration influences in the small chainring and during out-ofsaddle pedaling. But let’s be honest: the Jabula is not meant to be a mountain goat!


058

OCTOBER 2012 IN DAVOS, THE SWISS ALPS. WE ARE ON OUR WAY WITH A SCOTT GENIUS, MOREWOOD JABULA, AND THE TREK RUMBLEFISH PRO! YOU READ CORRECTLY, WITH THE TREK RUMBLEFISH: THREE BIKES, THREE CATEGORIES, AND NOW ONE GOAL:

FOTO FABIAN RAPP TEXT MAX-PHILIP SCHMITT TRANSLATION MICHAELA JAMMERS


CONTENT


060

We were particularly excited about the Trek Rumblefish with its 29” wheels, but – to be quite honest – a little nervous as well. Before we even started, there was a bit of a fight over the other two bikes. Nobody wanted to go downhill in alpine terrain on a 29er with only 120mm of travel. As it turned out, after the first turn the Trek was already lots of fun on

the primarily flowing and open trails. That’s when we got excited about taking the first more technical and steeper sections. Especially in those more challenging technical sections, the big 29 inch wheels were a plus. They created security throughout the steeper parts of the trail, and offered a bit more riding comfort and a smoother feel in rough terrain. You could have easily thought

CONCLUSION: The Trek Rumblefish Pro was a convincing trail and single-track bike with its linear suspension and balanced geometry. A telescopic seat post, as well as a shorter and wider stem/bar combo, would push the fun factor even more.


you had another inch of rear travel at hand. This was not least because of the DRCV suspension technology built into the Trek, which ensured linear spring characteristics providing a harmonic feeling of the suspension. Don’t underestimate the need for more pressure on the 29 inch front wheel to push it through tight curves. After a couple of hundred meters of downhill there was

the first climb. With its comfortable and sporty seating position, the Rumblefish climbs very efficiently. Quick acceleration, even though the suspension is fairly pedal-neutral ,seems a little dull due to the big wheels. Thanks to the more efficient roll-over characteristics of the big wheels, obstacles on climbs or rough terrain can be left behind effortlessly.

FULL FORCE: The DRCV technology combines two air chambers and therefore the advantages of a low volume rear shock while pedaling with the features of a high volume rear shock on big hits: efficiency and good bump absorption in one package.

PRICE: 3999 â‚Ź WEIGHT: 12,8 Kg INFO: www.trekbikes.com


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TIM

ELIM

YO U

R W

WITH THE FIRST GERMAN ENDURO SEASON OVER, ALL ENDURO NEWBIES ABLY HAD TO FIND OUT WHERE THEIR STRENGTHS LIE – AND ESPECIALLY W THEY DON’T. BY TAKING THE CUBE ACTION TEAM RIDERS ANDRÉ WAGENKNEC LUDWIG DÖHL AS EXAMPLES, WE WANT TO PROVE THAT THERE IS NO SUCH TH A UNIVERSAL FORMULA, BUT THAT IT IS UP TO EACH INDIVIDUAL TO WORK ON HER OWN WEAKNESSES. JUST LIKE LUDWIG AND ANDRÉ: THE FIRST AN EX-C COUNTRY RIDER, AND THE LATTER AN EX-DOWNHILL RIDER …


CONTENT

ME TO

MINATE

WEAKNESSE

S

S PROBWHERE CHT AND HING AS N HIS OR CROSSILLUSTRATIONS ALBERT ESCODA WORDS ANDRÉ WAGENKNECHT TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER


064

Ludwig Döhl Skills over endurance „As I come from a cross-country background, my training during the last few years was pretty much focused on endurance. Even though I still pedaled many kilometers on a racing bike this spring, I continuously increased my units on a mountain bike as the season was approaching, usually with interval training. Generally speaking, I kind of slacked on my endurance training in order to polish my biking technique. Still, this doesn’t mean that I don’t do long rides anymore or that I only chill out at the bike park. In fact, it only means that my training is now a lot more multifaceted. One thing I’ve changed, for example, is that I ride technical sections on singletracks several times, in order to find the perfect line or to try to ride more fluently by purposely pedaling less and trying to generate speed by pumping. Whereas I used to ride the whole trail full speed, I now take more time and try to perfect my riding style. Overall, I would say that I increasingly play with the terrain, also because an enduro bike has a lot more to offer compared to my hardtail. Nevertheless, I plan on participating in a marathon race or two during the upcoming year in order not to lose my fitness.“

son. I had never owned a fully before and I used to cope with the downhills in cross-country by adhering to the motto ‘save energy and relax.’ In enduro, it was suddenly all about tenths of a second and not about cutting in on someone. An example par excellence for this was when André and I were riding the downhill track in Winterberg, Germany. Arriving at the bottom of the trail, I told him he was riding like a beginner because I had loads of space to overtake in every single turn. During our second test run, we stopped at all the elementary spots and he explained to me why he decided to ride one specific line. With every following key spot, I understood more and more what it was all about. It is not about making your way against hundreds of competitors, but about getting as much speed out of the turns as possible to master the trail as smoothly as possible.”

High-speed sections & jumps “Another relic from my hardtail times is my inhibition regarding large jumps or extremely fast sections. Even though I manage to jump almost anything at a race, it always costs quite a mental effort. During workouts at home, I usually do not manage to force myself and therefore skip the jumps. When riding with team colleagues, we tend to push Line choice each other. “I was facing some problems regarding Normally, André rides first, because he line choice at the beginning of the sea- has the soundest riding style and >>


Open your eyes to chose the perfect line! It saves a lot of effort, it allows taking more speed through corners and reduces wear and tear on your bike!


066

the most practice in enduro. He can actually get me to do difficult jumps and, most of the time, I think he is less comfortable with doing that than I am myself. I want to ride more with the downhill bike next year, and I might actually compete in a downhill race or two in order to gain confidence in speed and jumps. Concentration “When I started racing enduro, I might have been able to ride single sections pretty fast, but I used to crash on almost every stage as well. This was partly due to the fact that I was not used to these high

speeds, and also due to a lack of concentration. Instead of completely focusing my concentration on myself and the track, I sometimes even checked out the spectators next to the track. Even though it is extremely hard to train ‘concentration,’ I found a couple of ways that work for me. You simply have to find some really difficult things that need your entire concentration to actually succeed. And by these ‘really difficult things,’ I do not mean big drops or challenging trails, but rather things like juggling or slacklining. I often even combine different exercises with one another.

TIME TO

ELIMINATE

YO U

R WEAKNESSES

“WE HAV THE IND SESSION SION TH AS A UN HAS TO P OBJECTI

André Wagenknech


For instance, I juggle with three balls while I balance on a large stability ball. If I do not entirely concentrate during this exercise, I slip off the ball. This is exactly the kind of concentration I need during the start and throughout a race to complete a smooth and flawless ride.” André Wagenknecht “To be honest, during my time as a downhill rider, I never used to be a ‘workoutnerd,’ unfortunately. Instead, I was one of the guys who were looking for their freedom, even during biking. It was always important to me to do exactly what I felt

like. During the junior years, we already had workout timetables, but I realized eventually that I was not exactly that kind of guy and that the mind plays a big role, too. Therefore, the motto was ‘be fit and have fun’ – somehow, the plan worked out. Changing over to enduro was a new challenge for me. The biking itself hasn’t changed – it is still all about time – but new aspects have been added. And then there was the great BAMMMMM! Damn it! I really need to be fit for only three to four minutes. I definitely imagined the shift to enduro to be a lot easier. >>

VE TALKED QUITE A LOT ABOUT DIVIDUALLY LAID OUT WORKOUT NS AND CAME TO THE CONCLUHAT THERE IS NO SUCH THING NIVERSAL FORMULA. EVERYONE PURSUE THEIR PERSONAL IVE.”

ht, about specific enduro training


068


I had always been doing just fine with my fitness on short stages, but as soon as they got a little longer I was totally screwed. In my opinion, a very well trained rider with a good technique is generally faster than the best rider (technically speaking) with only moderate fitness. For me, this means that I have to catch up to Ludwig, regarding fitness, whereas he has to pick up some more technical skills. So in the end, we complement

each other pretty well. I haven’t had a good and enjoyable season like this one for a very long time, which is the result of the extremely positive atmosphere throughout the team. Ludwig and I are now looking for some motivation for the winter season. This also means getting off of the bike and onto the skis (Nordic and alpine) for once. Runners and swimming trunks will find use, just like the ‘half-a-liter-beer-measurements’ for the brain!”

“I WILL PROBABLY HAVE TO SUFFER THROUGH THE WINTER IN SEVERAL DIFFERENT STAGES. THE MOST DIFFICULT PART ABOUT IT IS TO CONQUER ONE’S WEAKER SELF.” André Wagenknecht, commenting on his winter workout plans


070

ANDRÉ’S WORKOUT TIPS “To stay fit over the winter, I often do some easy and simple exercises, which everyone can basically do at home. The most difficult part is to actually conquer your weaker self. I basically work with my own body weight; I neither use weights nor fitness machines. All I use as a training aid is the ‘Blackroll’ to strengthen proprioception. All exercises with three sets of twenty repetitions and a continuous increase of the number of repetitions in the course of the winter. I currently train at a lower intensity level, meaning easy rides or runs in combination with a couple of exercises for stomach, legs, shoulders and back. For this, I currently only use my body weight, a stability ball and light weights. I set a maximum of three times a week for the exercises, with three to four sets each. To train my stamina, I usually bike, go running, or cross-country skiing three days in a row, followed by a break for a day or two. At the moment, I basically train for the workout. This means that I am currently only under a little amount of stress, which relaxes me for the upcoming workouts. You actually lose more throughout the season than you might think. You tend to get stiff and stressed. We’ll do a performance test in December. It’ll get more intense after that ...”

VARYING PUSH-UPS For this, the Blackroll is positioned under the toes. I usually start by supporting myself with my hands shoulder distance apart and then decrease the distance between my hands with each set. The closer the hands come together, the more the forearm muscle is trained.

PULL-U

I hold my hands on just like I hold the bike. Make sure that lar to your grip on a ryone holding the ba around only trains not the desired ent Again, I vary the dis the arms. The farthe apart, the meane the exer


UPS

n the pull-up bar handlebar on a t the grip is simia handlebar. Evear the other way the biceps, and tire upper body. stance between er the hands are er and harder rcise.

SINGLE LEG SQUATS Single leg squats are a mixture of strength and balance exercises. Precise movement is essential, because otherwise this exercise can be harmful for the knee joints. I always try to keep the knee behind the toes when squatting down and I lift the non-weight bearing leg to the front.

SIT-UPS For this exercise, I put the Blackroll underneath my butt and do ‘simple’ sit-ups. I vary this exercise by turning the upper body either left or right.

LATERAL PUSH-UPS This exercise is done by supporting myself with one forearm on the ground and my ankle positioned on the Blackroll. I move my hip up and down from the ground. This is a very good exercise for the lateral back muscles. Make sure to stay straight and, just like all the other exercises, do them smoothly.


072

Living like

KINGS in

SPAIN The Spanish La Fenasosa bike park is a paradise fit for royalty. Here, the blend of cultures not only represents the owners, but also applies in a metaphorical sense. This is where German professionalism meets the Swiss love for detail, Mediterranean atmosphere, and Spanish food – prepared, organized, and lived by a Belgian.

PHOTOS & WORDS ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER


CONTENT


074

THE BASE OF

PARADISE.


“El Jefe” of the bike park, JeanPhilippe, is a man who lives without compromises – at least when it comes to the well-being of his guests. For about five years now, the former Moto GP racer has run the park on his private property near Alicante: an estate with a small castle on 1, 000 hectares of land. The castle offers a royal accommodation to its visitors, where they can socialize and be provided with homemade specialties, house wine, and – if they are lucky – freshly collected mushrooms. We were lucky! Another culinary highlight is the Valencian paella for lunch. Pretty knightly and rustic – like ancient times… qualities you often miss nowadays. But it is still exactly what you wish

for in the postmodern era. No electricity at night, but instead dark and peaceful solitude. A country lifestyle, isolated from civilization. However, WLAN has been installed recently. This much flair lets you forget about the main purpose of your stay pretty easily: biking. The property offers numerous demanding enduro trails, as well as various ways of getting uphill. The most convenient one is the shuttle to the peak, operated by former military trucks. Riders organize side by side with one another, everyone in their modern knight’s armor, ready to defeat the mountain. We decided to go for the “real” enduro, pedaling power and open face helmet – although we did make use of the shuttle service every now and then. >>


076

SPANISH LEGEND JACOBO SANTANA WAS A DOWNHILL OF THE FIRST DAYS. AFTER TEN YEARS OF ABSTINENCE HE IS BACK WITH ENDURO


LER R E, O.


078

“EL JEFE” HIMSELF   SERVING P


F PAELLA

The first day was dedicated to settling in: the rugged rocks and larger jumps offer challenges and ideal workout conditions for enduro riders. From natural trails via north-shore bridges and wood parks up to table lines – there is enough for every taste. La Fenasosa has a lot to offer. The bike park follows the same principle as its owner and operator Jean-Philippe: “If you go biking, then enjoy it 100%.”


080


082

INFO GUIDE LA FENASOSA

BEST TRAC ACCO BOAR PRICE JOUR CONT


GOOD TIMES, THE FINEST MEALS & BEST POSSIBLE COMPANY INCLUDED: LA FENASOSA IS A PLACE YOU’D LIKE TO COME BACK TO.

T TIME FOR TRAVELING: SPRING AND FALL. CLOSED IN AUGUST, DUE TO HEAT CKS: MORE THAN 10 TRACKS SUITABLE FOR ENDURO OMODATION: IN A 19TH CENTURY CASTLE, LOCATED DIRECTLY ON THE PREMISES. RD AND LODGING 115 € / DAY AND PERSON OR 170 € / DAY AND DOUBLE ROOM E: 16 EURO / DAY FOR TERRAIN ACCESS. 15 EURO / DAY FOR SHUTTLE RNEY: BY PLANE TO ALICANTE, PICKUP ON REQUEST TACT: WWW.LAFENASOSA.COM


84

IN 2012 AT THE SUPERENDURO IN FINALE LIGURE, A WINNER YET AGAIN HAD TO BE FOUND. BUT THIS YEAR’S CENTER OF ATTENTION WAS NOT THE RACE ITSELF, IT WAS THE YEAR 2013 AND THE MILLION DOLLAR QUESTION …


CONTENT

PHOTOS MATTEO CAPPE / SUPERENDUROMTB.COM WORDS ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION MICHAELA JAMMERS


86

What will happen in 2013? Who is going to ride for which team? Is there going to be an enduro world series and if there is, who is going to be in charge? This year’s paddock was full of rumors, strategies, and (still) secret bike tech-

nologies for the upcoming year. Except for the occasional one, the “who’s who” of the enduro scene was present. It was pretty obvious: 2013 had already started in their heads, in their planning, and also in concrete agreements. Those of


you who have followed the Italian SuperEnduro series have noticed that the technical, physical, and mental requirements have increased proportionally to the racing teams. Is this an event solely for pros now? Probably not. But still, a

strong tendency towards professionalizing everything seems to be the goal of organizer Enrico Guala. “Enduro is a very serious business – there are brands out there investing millions of dollars in this sector,” stated Enrico >>


88

in a serious tone during an interview that lasted for several hours. In the entire hubbub about the alleged cancellation of the enduro world cup by the UCI, a lot has been lost in translation. Shout outs for an alternative “world series” were arising. Even organizers unfamiliar with the enduro scene showed great interest. Temporarily, it almost looked like there

were formations of different groups which were all working on their own world series – a great risk, which could make the whole progress and credibility of this sport suffer. Once the switch has been changed and the train has passed, it will take a lot of time to get that train back on track. An immediate turn is not possible. That’s why fast reaction was crucial.


3 PEOPLE, 2 OPINIONS, AND 1 VISION: Chris Roberts (www.nakedracing.com) and Enrico Guala (on the picture with Franco) both wanted an enduro world series for 2013. Under the overall control of Chris Ball, Enrico Guala (SuperEnduro), Fred Glo (Coupe de France), and Darren Kinnaird (Crankworx Events Inc.)

Said and done! Under the overall control of the former UCI coordinator Chris Ball, Enrico Guala (SuperEnduro), Fred Glo (Coupe de France), and Darren Kinnaird (Crankworx Events Inc.) founded the Enduro Mountain Bike Association in October, which will organize the enduro world series in 2013. The rapid development of enduro as a sport is seen in the pro riders’ times: three stages

were almost identical to the prior year, some even longer or slower. Nevertheless, the times of the pro riders were up to 30 seconds (!) faster than in 2011. In a nutshell: 2013 can come and, thanks to the enduro world series, is going to be even more exciting. Rapidly increasing standards, support, and interest go without saying.


90 FULL OF RUMORS & SPECULATIONS: Extensive talks, negotiations, and discussions about enduro and the upcoming season defined the topic at the dinner table, during long nights, and any other time. No surprise, ACC (Ibis) won the women‘s category.

NOW OR NEVER: Enrico shows the flag for end the world series. He is authentically and hone ling with the topic – the opposite to the curren chio-mascot of the UCI. Together with Chris B other organizers, Enrico is running the EMBA.


duro and estly deant PinocBall and two .

INTENSE UNTIL THE VERY END: As opposed to downhill, cross country, or marathon, you don’t know where you are placed until the very end. Even better to be standing on the podium afterwards: Dan Atherton (GT), Davide Sottocornola (Ibis), and Curtis Keene (Specialized).

ENDURO IS NO LONGER A FOOTNOTE: Full Expo areas and more than 500 participants speak for itself. The major issue for the organizers: making everyone happy from the world elite all the way to the amateurs. Stages, time limits of the transfer stages, and the order in which to start need to be calculated precisely.


92

HEROES OF WORK ROBIN SCHMITT

MAX-P

Currently situated in Barcelona, Robin and the creative cluster around the Blackmedia crew and Cero Design are preparing quite a lot that will impress you guys. Oh, and don’t worry: silly 3D glasses are not a necessity for that …

While his d in Spain, M organizing Magazine # cells are de Innovation

AARON STEINKE

FABIAN

A man well aware of compromises: in addition to his university studies, Aaron works full-time for Enduro – hopefully with a completed degree in 2013. He unifies his IT and editing knowledge with his merciless enthusiasm for bikes. Let’s go!

Master of d of the pum competitor are undeni Morewood pump track

FABIAN RAPP

OLIVER

Boooom! The one and only. Chasing down the hills with us in Davos like there’s no tomorrow and still manages to pull the finest pics out of his hat – excuse me – camera! Helmets off! Oops, I mean hats off! WWW.FABIANRAPP.COM

Indoor – ou photos that in the pum sories page and a good

WWW.ROGG


K

CONTENT

THE PEOPLE BEHIND THIS ISSUE

PHILIP SCHMITT

DANIEL HÄBERLE

dear brother is totally losing it Max is occupied with moving, g, and preparing for Downtown #03. All of his leftover brain ealing with the new Design & n Award …

Pumping iron like a madman. If Daniel would spend as much time at the gym as he does on the pump track, he would probably have broader shoulders than Arnold Schwarzenegger. But he is fit nonetheless: see you next year, at the races!

N SCHOLZ

design, mechanical engineer, god mp tracks, and consistent top 10 r at enduro races – Fabi’s skills iable. That’s why he took the d for a spin and chased down the k with the Merida.

R ROGGENBUCK

utdoor? Doesn’t matter! It’s the t count in the end. Like the ones mp track story and on the acceses. He brings along fresh spirit d eye to enrich our magazine!

GENBUCK-PHOTODESIGN.DE

CHRISTIAN LÄMMLE Even though this issue has just been released, Chris has (also) recently used his grey matter for something else … of course for our benefit. Find out more about that, shortly! Note: It’s going to be awesome! WWW.LAEMMLEDESIGN.COM

ANDRE WAGENKNECHT Fast action: the charismatic Cube Action Team rider provided us with an awesome and straightforward workout story in no time: there is no such thing as a “simple” solution.


MAP OF COOPERATION PARTNERS ENDURO

SPECIAL THANKS TO: BASTIAN DIETZ


WANT TO BECOME A COOPERATION PARTNER? MAIL US: MPSCHMITT@ENDURO-MTB.COM


MAP OF COOPERATION PARTNERS ENDURO

AMERICA

ASIA

01

17

02

18

15 04

03

20

23

21

24


WANT TO BECOME A COOPERATION PARTNER? MAIL US: MPSCHMITT@ENDURO-MTB.COM

EUROPE 08

11

05 12

19

09 11

06

14

13

13

13

07 14

10

25


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RESOURCES

PRODUCTS ISSUE #002

ACROS www.acros.de mail@acros.de

GORE www.goreapparel.de customercare@eu.goreapparel.com

OAKLEY www.oakley.co customercare

BLUEGRASS www.bluegrasseagle.com bluegrass@bluegrasseagle.com

LEZYNE www.lezyne.com info@lezyne.com

O‘NEAL www.oneal.co sales@oneal.

CONTINENTAL www.conti-online.com 2wheel.marketing@conti.de

LUPINE www.lupine2013.de info@lupine.de

PEDROS www.pedros.c pedrosmail@

ECLIPSE www.eclipse.ch eclipseswiss@gmail.com

IXS www.hostettler.de marcel.ulrich@ixs.com

POC www.pocspor info@pocspor

EVOC www.evocsports.com info@evocsports.com

MARSHGUARD www.marshguard.com marshguard@gmail.com

RENTHAL www.renthal.c mail@rentha

FREELAP www.freelap.ch contact@freelap.ch

MERIDA www.merida-bikes.com Phone: +886-4-8526171

ROCK SHOX www.sram.co Phone: +1-312

GOPRO www.gopro.com support@gopro.com

MOREWOOD www.morewoodbikes.com info@morewoodbikes.com

SRAM www.sram.co Phone: +1-312


CONTENT

om e-europe@oakley.com

om .com

com @pedros.com

rts.com rts.com

com al.com

SCHWALBE www.schwalbe.de info@schwalbe.com

om 2-664-8800

SCOTT www.scott-sports.com Phone: +41 26 460 16 16

om 2-664-8800

TREK www.trekbikes.com support@trekbikes.com


100

MASTHEAD

Enduro is a free digital mountainbike magazine that comes out six times per year. EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 41 Publishing & Marketing UG Rutesheimer Strasse 40 71229 Leonberg Deutschland info@enduro-mtb.com www.enduro-mtb.com DIRECTORS Robin Schmitt & Max-Philip Schmitt EDITORS Daniel Häberle, Aaron Steinke, Fabian Scholz, Florian Storch, Fabian Arzberger, Ferdinand Brunold, Trevor Worsey, André Wagenknecht, Patrick Sauter DESIGN & POSTPRODUCTION Christian Lämmle (www.laemmledesign.com) PHOTOGRAPHERS Fabian Rapp, Oliver Roggenbuck, Tom Bause, Sebas Romero, Daniel Geiger, Sebastian Schieck, Irmo Keizer, Matteo Cappé, Manfred Stromberg, Philip Ruopp, Hoshi Yoshida ILLUSTRATIONS Albert Escoda WEBSITE Aaron Steinke COMMUNICATION & SOCIAL MEDIA Manfred Schmitt TRANSLATION Lisa Gretemeier, Michaela Jammers REVISION John Morse, Trevor Worsey SPECIAL THANKS Johann Flickinger (www.wmcc.de) ADVERTISING Max-Philip Schmitt mpschmitt@enduro-mtb.com +49 177 5992289

© 2012 BY 41 PUBLISHING & MARKETING UG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT OR THE RELATED FILES MAY BE REPRODUCED OR TRANSMITTED IN ANY FORM, BY ANY MEANS (ELECTRONIC, PHOTOCOPYING, RECORDING, OR OTHERWISE) WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


CONTENT

AMAZING THINGS WILL HAPPEN!

PHOTO FABIAN RAPP

everything you have to know, must have, and may need in 2013

Enduro #003 will come out in March 2013 www.enduro-mtb.com

Profile for 41 Publishing & Marketing UG

Enduro Mountainbike Magazine Issue 002  

The most exciting mountainbike magazine of all time stands for lifestyle, emotions and the best stories & tests. Digital and for free!

Enduro Mountainbike Magazine Issue 002  

The most exciting mountainbike magazine of all time stands for lifestyle, emotions and the best stories & tests. Digital and for free!

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