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400 Edition W h a t ’s

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N o r t h

June 2010

G e o r g i a

The Music Man

at the Cumming Playhouse

FREE


June 2010 Carole Lee, Founder/Creative Design Linda Merritt, Founder/Sales/Executive Editor Bob Merritt, Director of Sales Beth Snider, Founder/Sales/Creative Design Nancy Wright, Proofing

Contributing Writers: Anne Amerson

Sharon Keating

Clay Cunningham

Steven Leibel

Dr. Mark Feinsilber

Dr. Joyce Nations

Nancy Forrest

Donald Pruitt

Robin Toms Grier

Linda Ragland

Martha Hynson

Patrick Snider

Staff Writers: Rhonda Bailey

Linda Merritt

Carole Lee

Beth Snider

Bob Merritt

Nancy Wright

400 Edition is published monthly in Dahlonega, Georgia, with distribution in three counties. Viewpoints expressed by contributing writers are not necessarily those of the publishers, staff or advertisers. 400 Edition is not liable for inaccurate or erroneous information posted in advertising or event submissions. Ads must be submitted and paid in full by the 20th of every month, unless arrangements have been made in advance. Content and presentation of advertisements is subject to editorial review and modification. Ad dimensions and pricing may be obtained by calling 706-867-6455 or 866867-7557. These specs may also be viewed at www.400edition.com. Writers may submit material to editor@400edition. com. Submissions are subject to approval by the editor and may be edited for space, requirements, and style. The deadline for submissions is the 15th of each month. Contents of this publication become the property of 400 Edition and the original author and cannot be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. This publication is printed by Walton Press in Monroe, GA.

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From the Editor... T

he staff at 400 Edition would like to thank all of you for the wonderful feedback we have gotten on the May issue. As I told one of my choir buddies, “That is music to my ears.” We all like to hear good positive things about the work we do. But in every good spell, a little rain may fall. That’s all right. We need the rain too. We want to apologize to Mary Otway, one of the mothers we highlighted last month. The magazine said that Mary was originally from Hell’s Kitchen, New York. That should be corrected to say that Mary was born on a farm outside of Thompsonville, Michigan. We are so sorry for any hurt feelings concerning this. So accept our apology. Mary, you are a grand lady. During the month of June we will be celebrating Father’s Day. I wish everyone could have had a dad like mine. He was about 32 years old when I was born. I had three older brothers and one older sister, so I was spoiled to the hilt. My dad was a tall handsome man and he loved his family so very much. He came from a large family and we were all very close. When I was very young we would go to my grandparents (my dad’s parents) every Sunday for lunch. So I had my grandparents and all those aunts, uncles, and cousins to love me too. The men in the Gibbs family were all coal miners. Yes, there is coal in Arkansas and I am truly a coal miner’s daughter. As I got older Daddy was strict with me where boys were concerned, and the ones who knew my dad were scared of him. But he only wanted the best for me. After my mom died, Daddy continued to send me a birthday card every

year. He died when he was 84 years old and I felt like I had lost not only my daddy but my best buddy as well. I have no regrets about how much I loved my dad and he knew it. If your father is still living, be good to him and do something extra special for him on June 20. Another school year has come and gone. We want to congratulate all the young men and women who graduated from high school and college. You have a wonderful life ahead of you. Use your God-given talents and make the most of your life. Our family would like to say best wishes to Jesse Cash. This talented young man will be going to college this fall to continue his music education. God bless you, Jesse; we love you. Again, thank you to our writers and advertisers who make this magazine possible. Readers, we hope you contact the writers, and shop with our advertisers. Tell them you saw them in 400 Edition. Until next month…stay happy!

On the Cover D

on’t you just love show business? There is something exciting about it, whether you are a performer or in the audience. Matt Pino and Lauren Rosenzweig helped to make this month’s cover photo shoot exciting and fun to watch. Beth Snider of 400 Edition once again did an outstanding job on shooting our cover photo. Special thanks also to Linda Heard, Executive Director of The Cumming Playhouse. Linda got the ball rolling on this and arranged for it to all come together. Also thanks to Jerry Harlow and Rob Hardie, Next Stage Theatre, for their help. See more about them in the cover article. If you haven’t guessed by now, the cover is letting you know that The Music Man will be performed live onstage at the Cumming Playhouse from July 9 to July 31. Matt and Lauren play Professor Harold Hill and Marian Paroo in this exciting musical set in 1912. It is a flag-waving, feel-good, musical comedy about smalltown America. The cast and the music will have you clapping your hands in delight. If you haven’t attended a production at the Playhouse, you are missing a treat. Start making plans now and get your tickets before they sell out. The Cumming Playhouse is located at 101 School Street in downtown Cumming. Call 770-781-9178 for reservations and more information, or visit their website at www.playhousecumming. com. Learn more about the Cumming Playhouse and The Music Man on pages 16 and 17. See you at the Cumming Playhouse! Don’t hold back; tell us how you really feel about 400 Edition. We love receiving feedback from our readers and advertisers. Call us at 706-867-6455, toll free at 866-867-7557, or send an email to info@400edition.com.


Contents

June 2010 Volume 7, Issue 1

Fatherly Quotes, page 10

Happy Father’s Day

Columns

13 To Your Health

8 Father’s Day Statistics

10 Fatherly Quotes

continued

14 Mind & Heart

10 A Reflection

15 Comma Momma

20 Father—A Powerful Name

19 Health Matters

20 Father’s Day Coloring Page

21 Gardening Tasks: June

Columns

4 Reflections

9 Your Vision Source

22 Fun by 400 27 Through a Woman’s Eyes 30 Knowing Wine 31 Real Men Cook – Peruvian Aji

12 Leibel on the Law

A list of major distribution pointsJune in North can be found online at www.400edition.com. 2010 Georgia • www.400edition.com

400 Edition




Life is a mirror. We look forward, that’s the future. We look back, remember and learn—that’s a reflection.

A Gnome By Any Other Name is—“Little People” by Bob Merritt

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efore Walt Disney, parents and grandparents told us kids about the “little people” who lived in the woods around us. Curiosity got the best of us and we ventured into the woods where the big trees grew and the rocky ledges were fitting places for gnomes. Many times we got caught and received a stern warning once again. Every time a twig snapped or the leaves rustled and no one was there, we swore it was done by the little people. I believe that the gnomes like it where they feel safe. Many of North Georgia’s residents are welcoming them into their yards by displaying homes and living arrangements; I hope you are a believer, but even if you aren’t, the yard art says volumes. These pictures say more than words ever will. Every kid, no matter what age, should have the chance to stretch their imagination and even become a believer. If it was good enough for Walt Disney, it’s good enough for me. Art Millican, the owner of Sleepy Hollow in Blairsville, sent me a little history on the little people. Read for your enjoyment. Do fairies, gnomes and goblins really exist? Suspend your disbelief for a moment and consider these real-life creatures from a fantastical world. Most of us have grown up with the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen. They wrote wonderful stories populated by fairies, gnomes, trolls, goblins, and other strange creatures that inhabited their worlds. But are these creatures only stuff of folklore and imagination? Or do they truly have a basis in reality? Gnomes come in several types. The most common is the forest gnome, who rarely comes in contact with man. The garden gnome lives in old gardens and enjoys telling melancholy tales. House gnomes have the most knowledge of man, often

speaking his language. It is from this family that gnome kings are chosen. Farm gnomes resemble their house brethren, but are more conservative in manner and dress. Originating in Scandinavia, gnomes later migrated to the United States sometime in the late 1800s. Gnomes are usually an average of 15 centimeters tall, but with their caps on, they appear much taller. Their feet are somewhat pigeon-toed, which gives them an extra bit of speed and agility through the woods and grass. The males weigh 300 grams, and females are around 250-275 grams. The male wears a pointed red hat, blue brown-green pants, and either felt boots, birch shoes, or wooden clogs. Around his waist is a belt with a tool kit attached, holding a knife, hammer, etc. He has a fair face—though he boasts a rosy nose and cheeks—and a long beard that turns gray sooner than his hair. Gnomes are guardians of the forest and the forest animals, though they have little affection for cats, either wild or domestic. They are known for freeing wildlife from man’s traps and for operating on farm animals whose owners have neglected them or who are simply too poor to afford a veterinarian. Their enemies are mainly trolls, and other beings who would try to destroy them or their homes. Otherwise they are mostly peaceful beings. Gnomes tend to live in hilly meadows, forests, and wooded areas. They make their homes in the trunks of trees, with hidden entrances from another tree. If they feel safe in their surroundings they will build above-ground houses that resemble hobbit houses. Most gnomes are seven times stronger than a man, can run at speeds of 35 miles per hour, and have better sight than a hawk. These abilities help the gnome do many things, such as finding wounded or dying animals, which they feel they are responsible for. Many people say that gnomes have elevated practical jokes to an art form, and enjoy playing pranks on humans who wander into their woods. They especially love gems and jewelry and are considered by many to be the best gem cutters and collectors of the fairy world. After working for Walt Disney Studios, Art Millican felt the need to help the fairies, gnomes, and goblins by making their presence known, so they would be received as friends and protected by friends and believers. So Art, his mother Pat, and helper Wendi build homes for the little people described in Art’s account here. Sleepy Hollow is a show place of how the little people live and are protected. From a long deck and walk area at Sleepy Hollow, you and the kids can view from afar the villages built for the gnomes. I cannot promise that you will see anybody; but if you think you did, you may have, and nobody will doubt you. It’s OK to take pictures, because you may want to set up your own sanctuary in your yard, or deep in the woods. Art will be happy to help you get started. He even has fantasy houses for big kids. Visit his studio and showroom; but most of all, have fun and use your imagination. See their ad in this issue for directions. Load up the car with kids and take them on an outing unusual even by North Georgia mountain standards. Tell them you saw them in 400 Edition.


Riding for Fun and Charity I

met Tony at a charity ride about seven years ago, and the others have been added to the group one at a time over the years. We get together as often as possible for Saturday rides in the North Georgia mountains, sometimes extending into North Carolina and Tennessee. The North Georgia mountains offer the scenic views and winding roads that attract motorcyclists from all over the southeast, and other parts of the country as well. Looking back over the past few years, I doubt there is a paved road anywhere in North Georgia we haven’t traveled. We visit museums and State Parks, and attend several of the North Georgia festivals. Our most recent Saturday ride took us to Chattanooga, where we had lunch and then rode back home. Another recent Saturday ride took us to Cherokee, North Carolina, near the start of the Blue Ridge Parkway. We rode about 75 miles on the Parkway to the Mt. Pisgah Lodge, where we had lunch before returning home. We also enjoy riding in fund-raiser events for charities. The events raise money by charging the bikers entry fees, and encouraging the bikers to ask family, friends, and businesses to contribute. These are some of the annual charity rides we enjoy: One of our favorites is the annual Ride for Kids, organized by the Pediatric Brain Tumor

Foundation and scheduled for June 6 this year. The Foundation organizes this event in 24 cities across the U.S. The ride raises funds for pediatric brain tumor research and to help needy children with treatments. The project started in 1984 and has raised more than $54 million. Georgia bikers have contributed over $4.8 million of that total. This year the ride, featuring several hundred bikes, starts at North Point Mall and ends in Dahlonega. Another of our favorite charity rides is the David P. Land Memorial Ride, which raises money for the Georgia Sheriffs’ Youth Homes. Then there is the annual Georgia Police Memorial Ride honoring law enforcement personnel who have lost their lives in the line of duty. In December each year, there are several toy rides that collect toys for children who would otherwise get little for Christmas. Instead of cash entry fees, bikers contribute toys. For example, one of these rides asks us to bring three toys. The ride makes a stop in Cumming, where we leave a toy. The next stop

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

by Charlie Stuckey

is

Dawsonville, and we leave the second toy. The final stop is Dahlonega, where the third toy is dropped off. Thanks to McDonald’s on Highway 136 in Cumming for allowing us to use them as a place to shoot photos. This location has always been an oasis for bikers, as a stop-off or meeting place for the charity rides, or for just plain fun rides. Pictured above: Tony Gulla, Clint & Jeanne Matthews, Al & Cheryl Hogan, Charlie Stuckey, and Randy Davis.

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“Tribute to Heroes” Paver Project

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Book Review

by Stacy Millican

Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen by Susan Gregg Gilmore

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atherine Grace and Martha Ann grew up under their daddy’s watchful eye after their beloved mother died in a drowning accident when Catherine Grace was only six years old and her sister was four. Their daddy was the town preacher, grandson to the founder of the only church in Ringgold, Georgia. Reverend Cline knew from the time Catherine Grace was little that she wanted out of Ringgold. He did not discourage Catherine Grace from her dream, nor did he prevent her from sitting on the picnic table at the local Dairy Queen every summer, eating Dilly Bars while planning her escape. On one side of Reverend Cline and his girls lived Gloria Jean, divorced five times over and considered by most townspeople to be the town tramp. Gloria Jean was Catherine Grace and Martha Ann’s mama’s best friend and became the girls’ surrogate mother after their own mama’s accident. Gloria Jean filled in, answering all types of female questions and sharing tips on everything from nail polish to how to make strawberry jam. It was with the money-making strawberry jam over several summers that Catherine Grace was able to save up enough to get out of Ringgold and off to Atlanta. Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen is a book about forgiveness in a variety of relationships. Any book club could have a tremendous discussion about this book. It’s also about relationships between a man and woman, those we choose to love, and those we choose not to love. There are many layers to Looking for Salvation... I love it when a book makes me think, has me laughing out loud, crying in sections, and finally smiling at the end, yet still pondering on it days afterward. It’s a beauty of a book. Stacy Millican is a freelance writer, book review blogger, and passionate reader living in Dahlonega.



400 Edition

n Saturday, May 15, Cleveland Better Home Town hosted a ribboncutting for the newly installed “Tribute to Heroes” pavers at the Freedom Vigil monument in front of the White County Courthouse. The organization appropriately enough chose to hold this special dedication ceremony on Armed Forces Day. Almost 200 people attended the ceremony, including a number of local veterans as well as individuals who had purchased brick pavers for the monument. Judge Garrison Baker, Chairman of Cleveland Better Home Town, emceed the ceremony, and during his welcoming remarks thanked Kevin Wren, president of Hard Rock Pavers, for his support of the Freedom Vigil monument. “The beautiful granite base was donated by Hard Rock Pavers in 2007, and they were responsible for installing the Tribute to Heroes pavers, and worked tirelessly to ensure the monument was ready for today’s dedication,” said Baker. He also recognized Gwen Owens, whose husband, the late Bob Owens, played a role in the original design of the monument. Baker acknowledged special guests First Sergeant David Kaiser and Staff Sergeant Richard Sinyard of the 876th Engineer Company out of Toccoa, and acknowledged the many elected officials and public safety officials present. Special thanks went to Fire Chief Bert Smith of the Helen Fire Department for providing a ladder truck from which to hang a 10-foot American flag in honor of our veterans. Cleveland Better Home Town also invited

Bob Harkins, the father of Sgt. Jason Harkins, to speak at the ceremony. Sgt. Harkins was a native of White County who gave the ultimate sacrifice; he died serving his county in Iraq in 2007. Bob Harkins told the crowd how important Jason’s hometown was to him, and that they chose to bring their son home to White County rather than have him buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Postmaster Louise Nix and Commander Mike Allen placed a wreath at the foot of the monument during a rendition of “Taps” by the Vintage Vocals. The ribbon-cutting with the invited dignitaries concluded the project’s dedication ceremony. It’s not too late to purchase your Tribute to Heroes paver. Orders will continue to be taken, and pavers will be installed as orders are received. For more information, call Cleveland Better Home Town at 706-969-3336 or visit the website at www.clevelandbetterhometown.org.

Local Real Estate Broker Louise McTaggart Still Going Strong

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ouise McTaggart, owner and broker of Louise McTaggart & Associates in Blairsville, has been in real estate for 23 years. Past retirement age, she stays active selling real estate and contributing to the community through many projects and initiatives. Even in a slow real estate market, Louise is optimistic. “I began my real estate career in 1987 and the market was slow, as it is today. I was warned that it was a bad time to go into real estate, but the market came back then and it will come back again.” A native of Hayesville, NC, Louise taught science at Hayesville High School for many years before opening and managing a retail business in Hiawassee for 13 years. She started buying real estate, and discovered that it allowed her to participate in activities that she really enjoys. “I like being outdoors and meeting various types of people. I’ve worked with a wide range of customers and clients, and the challenges of meeting their needs has been fulfilling. I enjoy

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

getting outdoors, showing and walking property, highlighting the plants and animals that are native to the area.” With over 20 years in real estate, Louise has seen many changes in the industry. Early on, for example, transactions required just a singlepage contract that was completed by hand; they now involve a seven-page contract that can be completed and emailed on the computer. When advising new agents, Louise stresses the importance of perseverance, continuing education, professionalism, and knowledge of the area and the properties available. This hard work has paid off, as Louise has been the recipient of the Phoenix Award for qualifying for the Million Dollar Club for ten consecutive years, has been named Realtor of the Year, and was Board President in 2002 for the Northeast Georgia Board of Realtors. Louise is a respected resident of the mountains and an asset to the community. Call her for your real estate needs, or just stop by to say hi.


June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition




Celebrate Father’s Day: June 20, 2010 T

he idea of Father’s Day was conceived exactly a century ago, by Sonora Dodd of Spokane, Washington, while she listened to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Dodd wanted a special day to honor her father, William Smart, a widowed Civil War veteran who was left to raise his six children on a farm. A day in June was chosen for the first Father’s Day celebration—June 19, 1910, proclaimed by Spokane’s mayor because it was the month of Smart’s birth. The first presidential proclamation honoring fathers was issued in 1966 when President Lyndon Johnson designated the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Father’s Day has been celebrated annually since 1972 when President Richard Nixon signed the public law that made it permanent.

64.3 million

Estimated number of fathers across the nation. Source: Unpublished data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation

Thinking of You, Dad 9,003

The number of men’s clothing stores around the country (as of 2006), a good place to buy Dad a tie or shirt.

14,012

The number of hardware stores (as of 2006), a place to buy hammers, wrenches, screwdrivers, and other items high on the list of Father’s Day gifts. Additionally, there were 6,749 home centers across the country in 2006.

23,270

Number of sporting goods stores in 2006. These stores are good places to purchase traditional gifts for Dad, such as fishing rods and golf clubs.

78 million

The number of Americans who participated in a barbecue in the last year—it’s probably safe to assume many of these barbecues took place on Father’s Day.

Mr. Mom 140,000

Estimated number of stay-at-home dads in 2008. These married fathers with children younger than 15 have remained out of the



400 Edition

labor force for at least one year primarily so they can care for the family while their wives work outside the home. These fathers cared for 234,000 children. Among these stay-at-home dads, 54 percent had two or more children, and 52 percent had an annual family income of $50,000 or more.

25%

$2.4 billion

Amount of child support received by custodial fathers in 2005; they were due $3.3 billion. In contrast, custodial mothers received $22.4 billion of the $34.7 billion in support that was due.

43%

How Many Fathers?

Percentage of custodial fathers who received all child support that was due, not significantly different from the corresponding percentage for custodial mothers. These fathers received an average of $6,210 in child support in 2005, compared with $5,981 for mothers who received full support. (These figures are not statistically different from each other.)

25.8 million

36%

Among the nation’s 11.3 million preschoolers whose mothers are employed, the percentage who are regularly cared for by their father during their mother’s working hours. This amounted to 2.9 million children.

Number of fathers who were part of marriedcouple families with children younger than 18 in 2008. • 22 percent were raising three or more children younger than 18 (among married-couple family households only). • 2 percent lived in someone else’s home.

1.8 million

Number of single fathers in 2008. Currently, among single parents living with their children, 16 percent are men. • 8 percent were raising three or more children younger than 18. • About 51 percent were divorced, 25 percent were never married, 19 percent were separated, and 5 percent were widowed. • 43 percent had an annual family income of $50,000 or more.

85%

Among the 30.2 million fathers living with children younger than 18, the percentage who lived with their biological children only. In addition, 11 percent lived with stepchildren, 4 percent with adopted children, and fewer than 1 percent with foster children.

Child-Support Payments 31% Percentage of custodial fathers who were due child support. They numbered 678,000.

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

Percentage of custodial fathers with childsupport agreements or awards.

72%

Percentage of custodial fathers receiving noncash support, such as gifts or coverage of expenses, on behalf of their children. The corresponding proportion for mothers was 59 percent.

Time with Daddy 53% and 71%

Percentages of children younger than 6 who ate breakfast and dinner, respectively, with their father every day in 2006. The corresponding percentages who ate with their mother were 58 percent and 80 percent. (The percentages of children who ate breakfast with their mother or father, respectively, were not significantly different from each another.)

36%

Percentage of children younger than 6 who had 15 or more outings with their father in the last month, as of 2006.

6

Average times children ages 3 to 5 were read to by their fathers in the previous week, as of 2006.

66%

Percentage of children younger than 6 who were praised three or more times a day by their fathers. From www.census.gov, Facts for Features.


Your Vision Source! I

f you notice a sudden increase in the number of floaters, or a dark curtain or veil that comes across your vision and does not go away, you need to have it checked immediately. It can be a retinal detachment. A retinal detachment occurs on the back part of the eye where the sensory retina separates from the underlying tissue. The retina is a thin tissue that lines the inside of the back of the eye. When we look at things, the light from objects we are trying to see enters the eye. The light image is then focused on the retina by the cornea and the lens of the eye. The retina then sends the images to the brain via the optic nerve, and we see. A retinal detachment is painless, but visual symptoms almost always appear before it occurs. Early symptoms may include a sudden shower or a gradual increase in the number of floaters. Floaters appear like “cobwebs” or spots in your vision. You may also experience flashes of light and a curtain over the vision along with the floaters. This condition needs to be treated immediately. If left untreated, it will progress, resulting in significant loss of vision. A retinal detachment can occur at any age, but it is more common in people over 40. More men than women have retinal detachments, and more whites than AfricanAmericans. Those most at risk for a retinal detachment include those with a history of high myopia (near-sightedness), cataract surgery, ocular trauma, glaucoma, or retinal degeneration, or those with a family history of retinal detachments. A retinal detachment can also occur as a result of a hole or tear in the retina. Once the retina has torn, liquid from the vitreous gel inside the eye can pass through the tear and build up behind the retina and cause it to separate. As more of the liquid accumulates behind the retina, it leads to the full retina detaching. A retinal detachment almost always affects only one eye. Surgery is the only effective treatment for a retinal detachment. Treatment for a

by Dr. Joyce M. Nations

retinal detachment depends on the severity of the detachment. Small holes or tears are treated with laser surgery called cryopexy. During this laser surgery, tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. A scleral buckle is a surgery for a retinal detachment that requires a hospital stay. A small synthetic band is attached to the outside of the eyeball; this relieves the pull, or traction, on the retina and supports the layers of the retina. Sometimes it is necessary to perform a vitrectomy, where the vitreous (the gel-like substance that fills the eye) is removed and a gas is injected into the eye. The gas pushes the retina back against the wall of the eye. The eye makes more fluid, which gradually replaces the gas. Most retinal detachments can be successfully treated with surgeries. However the visual outcome is not always predictable. It may take several months to get the final visual result after surgery, and a second surgery is sometimes needed. Results are usually better if the surgery is performed before the macula (central vision) detaches. This is why you should see your eye care professional immediately if you see a sudden increase in the number of floaters, flashes of light, or a dark veil across your vision. Dr. Nations practices at Cherokee Eye Group at 591 East Main Street in Canton and at Dawson Eye Group at 5983 Hwy. 53 East, Suite 250, in Dawsonville. She received her Doctor of Optometry degree and her Masters of Public Health degree in 1993 from the University of Alabama. She is a member of the American Optometric Association, Georgia Optometric Association, and Vision Source.

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition




Fatherly Quotes “A father carries pictures where his money used to be.”  – Author Unknown “A father is always making his baby into a little woman.  And when she is a woman he turns her back again.”  – Enid Bagnold “A king, realizing his incompetence, can either delegate or abdicate his duties. A father can do neither. If only sons could see the paradox, they would understand the dilemma.” -- Marlene Dietrich “A new father quickly learns that his child invariably comes to the bathroom at precisely the times when he’s in there, as if he needed company. The only way for this father to be certain of bathroom privacy is to shave at the gas station.” -- Bill Cosby “A man never stands as tall as when he kneels to help a child.” – Knights of Pythagoras “A truly rich man is one whose children run into his arms when his hands are empty.” – Unknown “A wise son maketh a glad father.” -- Proverbs 10:1 “Blessed indeed is the man who hears many gentle voices call him father!” – Lydia M. Child “By the time a man realizes that maybe his father was right, he usually has a son who thinks he’s wrong.” – Charles Wadsworth “Father asked us what was God’s noblest work. Anna said men, but I said babies. Men are often bad, but babies never are.” -- Louisa May Alcott “Father! - to God himself we cannot

give a holier name.” – William Wordsworth “Fatherhood is pretending the present you love most is soap-on-arope.” – Bill Cosby “Fathers, like mothers, are not born. Men grow into fathers—and fathering is a very important stage in their development.” -- David M. Gottesman “Fifth Commandment: Honor thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.” -Exodus 20:12 “I am indebted to my father for living, but to my teacher for living well.” -- Alexander the Great “I cannot think of any need in childhood as strong as the need for a father’s protection.” – Sigmund Freud “I don’t care how poor a man is; if he has family, he’s rich.” – M*A*S*H, Colonel Potter “If the new American father feels bewildered and even defeated, let him take comfort from the fact that whatever he does in any fathering situation has a fifty percent chance of being right.” – Bill Cosby “I don’t know who my grandfather was; I am much more concerned to know what his grandson will be.” -- Abraham Lincoln “It doesn’t matter who my father was; it matters who I remember he was.” – Anne Sexton “It is easier for a father to have children than for children to have a real father.” – Pope John XXIII

“It is much easier to become a father than to be one.” – Kent Nerburn

that night, the father prayed, Dear God, make me the kind of man my son wants me to be.” – Anonymous

“It is a wise father that knows his own child.” – William Shakespeare

“Sometimes the poorest man leaves his children the richest inheritance.” – Ruth E. Renkel

“It would seem that something which means poverty, disorder and violence every single day should be avoided entirely, but the desire to beget children is a natural urge.”  – Phyllis Diller “Love and fear. Everything the father of a family says must inspire one or the other.” – Joseph Joubert “Lucky that man whose children make his happiness in life and not his grief, the anguished disappointment of his hopes. “ – Euripides “Making the decision to have a child is momentous.  It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.”  – Elizabeth Stone “My father was an amazing man. The older I got, the smarter he got.” – Mark Twain “My father didn’t tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.” – Clarence B. Kelland “My grandfather always said that living is like licking honey off a thorn.” -- Louis Adamic “Noble fathers have noble children.” – Euripides

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“The greatest gift I ever had came from God, and I call him Dad!” – Anonymous “The most important thing that a father can do for his children is to love their mother.” – Theodore M. Hesburgh “To be a successful father, there’s one absolute rule: when you have a kid, don’t look at it for the first two years.” – Ernest Hemingway “When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much he had learned in seven years.” – Mark Twain

“One father is worth more than a hundred schoolmasters.” – English Proverb

“You don’t have to deserve your mother’s love. You have to deserve your father’s. He’s more particular.” -- Robert Frost

“One night a father overheard his son pray: Dear God, make me the kind of man my Daddy is. Later

Compiled from various internet sites.

A Reflection

what a face, not merely because of its beauty, but because it is a mirror of my own. This is not only in feature, but in its action. The joy I express when I see you smile will always be

“Spread the diaper in the position of the diamond with you at bat.  Then fold second base down to home and set the baby on the pitcher’s mound.  Put first base and third together, bring up home plate and pin the three together.  Of course, in case of rain, you gotta call the game and start all over again.”  – Jimmy Piersal, on how to diaper a baby, 1968

by Matthew Loafman

shown in a smile of my own, while the pain that you feel is beyond burden to my brow.

I have never experienced such vulnerability as I feel now. My world is no longer my own, but has branched off in the form of a child. My mood will forever be a reflection of yours, and my life measured by the triumphs and trials of your own.

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

How can it be that the strength to live and the willingness to die can come from such a small soul? How swiftly it comes. In a flash my life is given to help create your own…and now there are two. O what a picture a face can paint. This poem was written by one of my grandsons after the birth of his second daughter. – The Editor


A Family Fun Festival at Lakota Cove

by Walter Reeves

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ou are invited to the Lakota Cove July Fun Festival on July 3 from 11:00am to 6:00pm. Lakota Cove is pulling out all the stops to make sure you and your family and friends have a good time. The festival will entertain you with music, music, music by local music artist Bill Pounds. Sit in the shade and eat, or walk around and enjoy your family time. This will be an art festival, so browse around and enjoy the presentations. S’mores will be provided for the kids; all the trimmings will be furnished to make your hot dog just the way you like it. Hayrides for everyone. The flaps on the tents will be tied back for a special sale. If you see something you like, buy it that day and pick it up the next, or it can be delivered. Come and stay awhile and experience a day of family fun. See you there. Call 770-893-3405 or see www. lakotacove. com for more information. Lakota Cove is located on Old Mill White Road.

515, go through Jasper and turn left onto Burnt Mountain Road. Go to 3-way stop; turn right onto Cove road and go 7 miles. Old Mill White Road will be on your right. Directions from Dawsonville: Take Highway 53 from Georgia 400 and go 6 miles, passing through Old Dawsonville. Continue on Hwy 53 approximately 6 miles to Steve Tate Road on right. Look for IGA Grocery. Follow Steve Tate Road to the circle intersection. As you circle left, you will be on Cove Road. Go approximately 6 miles to Old Mill White Road on left. Signs on both sides of road. Park anywhere.

Directions from Highway 515: From Highway

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition

11


Leibel on the Law Small Children and Swimming Pools

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ummertime is HOT in Georgia. Pretty days filled with sunshine and humid weather. Everyone just wants to jump into a pool! Problem is, kids especially like to jump into pools, especially little kids. Drownings of smaller children happen during summer months. Unsupervised children in summertime present challenges to parents and other loved ones. Children also present challenges to landowners with swimming pools, as the children are drawn to the cool water of a swimming pool. The death of a young child caused by a pool drowning in a neighbor’s swimming pool presents special issues for a lawyer to deal with. Most often these deaths involve a trespass of a young child into a neighbor’s property—property they have not received permission to enter. As a lawyer who has handled pool drowning cases, I look for the way the neighbor has secured his pool against uninvited visits. As pools are a known hazard for wandering children, they need to be

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properly fenced to avoid a trespass that leads to a pool death, or injury. Because these trespasses involve “attractive nuisances,” the family of a child killed by drowning is often compensated. The law provides liability for the death of a child trespasser where it is likely that a child will trespass. The Courts find that where a landowner or user maintains a swimming pool without adequate measures in place to prevent children from coming onto the property, then the property owner becomes liable to the family of the injured or killed child. This is because children, because of their age, do not discover the condition or realize the risk involved in their entry. Thus reasonable care must be exercised to prevent access or otherwise protect kids from getting hurt or killed. As a personal injury lawyer who has handled many cases involving the loss of a child, I am deeply sympathetic to those parents and grandparents who have lost a child.

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

by Steven K. Leibel

Whether the loss is caused by an auto accident, or through other means, a loss of a child can never be fully compensated. Pool owners, please use care to protect children from unsupervised visits to your pool. Steven Leibel is a Georgia personal injury lawyer with offices in Dawson County and in Dahlonega. He currently serves as a member of the Georgia Bar Board of Governors for the Enotah Circuit. He is a Commission member of the Georgia Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund Commission. He is AV rated by Martindale Hubbell for his legal ability and ethical conduct. He can be reached at 706-867-7575 or 404-8920700. Questions about his column can be sent to his email at steven@leibel.com. Nothing in this column can be construed as the giving of legal advice. Legal advice can only be made through an attorney-client relationship. The statements made in this column are for general education purposes only.


NORTHSIDE HOSPITAL Reduce Your Skin Cancer Risk

To Your Health by Patti Owen, MN, RN, director of oncology services, Northside Hospital

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fter a long, cold winter, most of us are happy for the warmth of the sun to return. But with the beautiful weather also come the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays, which can be dangerous to exposed skin. According to the American Cancer Society, more than one million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year, making it the most commonly diagnosed cancer. Skin protection is the most effective preventive measure you can take against skin cancer. And by making it a part of your family’s daily routine, every time you step outdoors, you are doing your part to keep your family safe.

Protect Yourself Northside offers these tips to protect your skin: • Schedule “sun-time” for early or later in the day. Peak sunburn hours are between 10 am and 4 pm. • Apply plenty of sunscreen (lip balm, too), with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15, on all exposed skin before going outside. • Apply sun block at least 20 minutes before going outside, and again every 30 minutes. If your skin is exposed to water, either through swimming or sweating, use water-resistant sunscreen. • Protect yourself on cloudy days, too. Even though the weather is overcast, UV rays still travel through clouds.

• Wear a wide-brimmed hat, long-sleeved shirt, and long pants when in the sun. • Wear tightly woven, brightcolored clothing that covers most of the body. It is more effective at blocking the sun’s rays and preventing unnecessary exposure. • Wear sunglasses. Choose wraparound sunglasses that absorb at least 99% of UV rays, to help protect your eyes and the skin around them. • Don’t use tanning lamps—with or without sunscreen.

Digital mapping for early diagnosis of skin cancer Both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are highly curable when found and treated early. It is important to closely examine your skin from time to time for changes in the moles on your body. Noticing changes is key to the early detection of skin cancer. Many dermatologists now recommend baseline total-body photography for patients who are at high risk for skin cancer. While physicians used to rely on memory and self-written notes to track changes on a patient’s skin, MoleMap creates a digital “map” of the skin’s surface. Offered at Northside Hospital, the technology is used by physicians as a baseline for comparison when a suspicious change is found, possibly leading to the early detection of melanoma. For more information about MoleMap, call 1-800-368-6223.

Mom, I’m Bored! T

hese are some of the most dreaded words of the summer vacation! Now, we have a way to beat the summer boredom blues—sign up for brand new summer day camps. We have some really fun day camps scheduled, including photography, jewelry making, art, scrapbooking, rock and roll, kids’ cuisine, LEGO Battle Bots, and many more choices. Your child can attend mornings, afternoons, or all-day camps. Lunch can be brought from home or purchased in the dining hall. For more details, visit our web site (northgeorgia.edu/ce/) and click on “Summer Camps – register now!” on the right side. Or give us a call at 706-864-1918 and we will be glad to send you a summer camp guide, answer your questions, or register your child today. June 2010 • www.400edition.com

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Placebo Effects and the Expectation of Help in Therapy

Mind and heart mind & heart

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ecently, an old friend and colleague of mine up in Massachusetts e-mailed me a copy of a very interesting article recently published in the Boston Globe. The article took a fresh and comprehensive look at research surrounding the “placebo effect,” best defined as the beneficial effect on a patient following a particular treatment that arises from the patient’s expectations concerning the treatment rather than from the treatment itself. This phenomenon has both intrigued and befuddled researchers for decades, although a 2007 study conducted by researchers at Columbia University seemed to demonstrate that brain activity changed in subjects receiving what they were told was an actual analgesic skin cream for arm pain, when in fact the cream was an inert placebo instead. PET brain scans administered to these subjects at the time showed increases in the production of cortical opioids, a substance produced by the body and released by the brain to offset pain. My own field, clinical psychology, has provided perhaps the most fertile environment within which to study this phenomenon. It has long been known, for example, that successful and productive psychotherapy is based upon more than just the knowledge and expertise of the therapist. While these elements are important, to be sure, it is perhaps even more important that a patient develops, both at the outset of therapy and later as the process unfolds, an expectation of help. This belief,

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formed from the patient’s perceptions of the therapist and of that therapist’s potential to produce positive change, can create a powerful placebo effect that may account for much or most of the success of the treatment intervention. We know from earlier studies that patients’ initial, intuitive impressions of therapists during intake appointments can be largely independent of the therapists’ level of experience. A landmark study (and one that many psychologists are not fond of quoting!) carried out back in the 1960s involved randomly (and blindly) assigning patients participating in initial intake appointments at a local mental health center to two different groups of “clinicians.” One group featured bona fide mental health professionals with an average of 10-20 years’ clinical experience; the other group was comprised of professional “stooges” (housewives, accountants, teachers, etc.) posing as clinicians to conduct the initial interviews. After the initial intake interviews were completed, patients from both groups were interviewed and asked questions about their impressions of their therapists. Interestingly enough, and particularly germane to the topic being discussed here, the investigators found that there were no significant differences between the two patient groups in the expectations of help levels that were imparted to them by the clinicians. In other words, it appeared that clinical experience was not a prerequisite for one’s being able to convey a June 2010 • www.400edition.com

Mark P. Feinsilber, Ph.D.

sense of hope and trust to a prospective patient. Contemporary thinking about the placebo effect and how to best harness it in both medical and psychological treatment venues has progressed considerably. Many helping professionals now realize that the conveyance of an expectation of help to patients in a genuine and caring manner can constitute far more than just a “good bedside manner.” On the contrary, we have learned over the years that a patient’s belief in a treatment intervention, whether the treatment be pharmacological or interactional, is indeed a critical variable in generating positive treatment outcomes. Mark P. Feinsilber, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist with over 20 years’ experience treating adults, children, adolescents, couples, and families; and is a founding member of the Behavioral Health Association of Forsyth (BHAF). His practice is located at 6030 Bethelview Road, Suite 401, in Cumming. Appointments or other consultations can be arranged by calling the administrative office at 770-205-5760, and more detailed information can be found at www.APSDoc.com.


Comma Momma “Stop Saying That!”

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need to stick a note on my bathroom mirror that says “Our language changes. Get over it.” Most of the time, I’m cool with the changes I see and hear, because I know that’s how language works. But some usages still make me nuts. The first time I heard a computer instructor say “Hover your mouse over” something, I wanted to jump up and yell, “You can’t say ‘hover your mouse over’ something; hover is intransitive and never takes an object. Sheesh.” The standard use of hover: “The hummingbird hovered over the blossom” or “The chopper hovered over the accident.” Since hover doesn’t take an object, we wouldn’t say “The hummingbird hovered its beak [that’s the object] over the blossom” or “The chopper hovered its somethingor-other over the accident.” Even Microsoft Word’s lame grammar-checking feature objects to that; it says “Verb Confusion (consider revising).” Still, “hover your mouse over” is becoming a common expression in computer instruction. And I have to admit that “hover your mouse over the icon” communicates the instruction more efficiently than does “point your mouse at the icon and let it rest there for a few seconds but don’t click.” A reader wrote recently to take issue with a phrase she keeps hearing in news reports: went missing. “Whatever happened to the correct word ‘disappeared’!?” she asked. Good question—one that a number of language bloggers have been asking for the last couple of years. The went/gone missing expression has actually been around a good while, and is apparently quite common in the UK. Harrumph. It still sounds too colloquial for my taste. Another usage that sets my teeth on edge is grow your business (or grow your money). We grow tomatoes, or we grow corn; but growing your business or growing your money always sounds odd. Embarrassingly, I can’t tell you why that usage

by Nancy Wright

sounds so unidiomatic to me. Why should I insist that you say, “Here’s how to make your business grow” instead of “Here’s how to grow your business”? The answer is, I shouldn’t. What’s going on here is perfectly natural—and perfectly annoying to many of us. Here’s the inescapable truth: Our language will change based on usage, not on someone’s ideas of rules. Jan Freeman, language columnist for the Boston Globe, put it this way [emphasis at the end added by me]: “People who object to such language changes sometimes say, ‘Just because everyone does it, that doesn’t make it right.’ But what’s true about speeding or tax fiddling does not apply to language change; if everyone does it, that does, eventually, make it right.” So yes, I get it: The usages we’ve grown up with are changing before our very eyes. New words appear (can you say googling or blog or texting?), and while not all of the new coinages survive the test of popular usage to become part of the language, some eventually do become acceptable as standard English. I read of a language purist who used to rage at new coinages, castigating the culprits at every opportunity. At some point he decided instead to just sit back and admire the creativity and ingenuity of speakers and writers who come up with clever new usages. I should try to take the same position; it would lower my blood pressure considerably. But don’t look for that to happen. I’ll still be easy to spot: I’ll be the one jumping up and down and frothing at the mouth like the Tasmanian Devil, yelling “Stop saying that!” Nancy Wright formats technical books for a specialty publishing house in New York. She and her husband live in White County; you can contact her at adairmill@ windstream.net. You can visit the forums at www.400edition.com to read some earlier columns.

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition 15


Cover story —The Cumming Playhouse prese Cumming Playhouse Announces Season Offerings by Linda W. Heard, Executive Director

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he Cumming Playhouse is very pleased with the new season contract with Next Stage Theatre Company. We have high expectations for the success of the musicals planned through February 2011; they include Gypsy the Musical, It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas (the musical version of Miracle on 34th Street), and Evita in the spring. Summer 2010 will bring The Music Man, sure to be a favorite with families and students on summer vacation, and visitors to our town. The musical’s smalltown setting is well suited to Cumming and the surrounding communities. Jerry Harlow and Rob Hardie of Next Stage Theatre Company have some exciting and creative ideas planned for the show, which include bringing the show as near to the audience as possible. The grand finale alone will be worth the price of the ticket, so do make your plans to see The Music Man. If “Seventy-Six Trombones” is not already engraved in your memory from having seen this show in the past, this joyous grand finale by Next Stage Theatre Company is certain to secure a place in your heart for quite some time. These musicals will provide a plethora of audition opportunities for local actors and performers. Audition information will be posted on our web site (www. playhousecumming.com) on each show’s page. In addition to the musicals scheduled this season, the Gypsy Theatre Company will open with The Graduate in August, followed by Snow White in September. Off Broadway Productions will present To Kill a Mockingbird in November. Interspersed throughout the play schedule are concerts such as Stan Estes and Friends and Classic Southern Rock, with many local

2010 holiday presentations planned. The business model of the Cumming Playhouse is somewhat different from most community theatres. The operation and facility are owned by the City of Cumming and functions as a department of the city, with an annual budget. The goal of the Playhouse is to replace all monies budgeted each year through ticket proceeds, grants, and sponsorships, while providing quality shows and performance opportunities. By design, we have chosen to have multiple theatre companies perform on our stage in order to bring a variety of plays and musicals. This also provides a broader opportunity for those who have the desire and talent to participate, and allows us to produce more shows during the year. The city partners with the theatre companies, assisting at times with costs such as royalties, advertising, and promotion. All tickets are sold through the Playhouse via the website. We do not charge for the venue per se, but rather share in the ticket proceeds. The Playhouse has a loyal patron base, both individual and corporate, that has continued to support the Playhouse by attendance and contributions during the recent challenging economic times. The Playhouse works to keep ticket prices reasonable to assure the community’s access to the shows. We do hope you will visit soon; and before the performance, check out Tam’s Backstage Food & Spirits, located on the lower level of the Playhouse. Makes for a perfect evening out! Please visit our website (www. playhousecumming.com) for current information on dates and times as well as show descriptions, audition opportunities, and ticket purchases.


ents The Music Man The Music Man is Coming to Town

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erfect for America’s birthday, The Music Man by Meredith Willson will be showing live onstage at the Cumming Playhouse from July 9 to July 31. According to director Rob Hardie, this family musical is right at home in Cumming. “This is the perfect setting for The Music Man,” says Hardie. “It’s a classic, all-American town, and there is no better way to celebrate our great nation than with this great musical. This will be a great show for the young and old and everywhere in between.” The plot of The Music Man takes place in small River City, Iowa, and revolves around Professor Harold Hill, played by Matt Pino, a con man posing as a children’s band organizer and leader who sells band instruments and uniforms to the naïve townsfolk before leaving town with their money. However, cautious Marian Paroo the librarian, played by Lauren Rosenzweig, sees through Hill’s plan, but can’t help but fall in love with the suave salesman. Hardie is very excited about working at the Cumming Playhouse again. “I have wanted to direct another show in Cumming since I directed Chicago with Rosewater two years ago,” said Hardie. “The audiences here are the best and they really love what happens on the stage.” Pino and Rosenzweig are also enjoying working together as they prepare to perform before Cumming audiences. “I love working with Matt,” said Rosenzweig. “He has such a grasp on his character and is completely devoted to his craft. Put that together with his magnificent ability

to always be a perfect gentleman, and I can’t think of a better partner to work with.” “I must say,” adds Pino, “considering the wide array of performers I have had the pleasure of working with, Lauren is a true gem. She has a brilliant smile that warms your heart and I know our audiences will be able to instantly connect with her and fall in love with her.” “It is the most loved American musical of all time,” adds Hardie. “Great songs, dances, and one of

by Jerry Harlow the best casts I have ever worked with. I would not be surprised if people come back a second or even third time.” The Music Man will be the premiere production of the new Next Stage Theatre Company, co-founded by Hardie and Jerry Harlow (pictured bottom right). “We have high expectations for the success of the musicals they are planning,” said Linda Heard, Executive Director of the playhouse. In addition to The Music Man, other upcoming shows

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

include Gypsy, It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas, and Evita. Tickets are $20, $15, and $12.50; showing July 9 through July 31 on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons. The Cumming Playhouse is located at 101 School Street in downtown Cumming. Call 770-781-9178 for reservations and more information, or visit their website at www. playhousecumming.com.

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Scottish Festival and Highland Games

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n Colonial America, there were only trails cut through the forests that spread from New Hampshire to Georgia. The Appalachian Mountains were a stern barrier between the Atlantic and the unknown interior of the continent. The movement of families, individuals, and communities from one place to another has been the shaping of history. Over the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road came the Scots and other settlers into the Southern Appalachians. Many Scots came to American

directly from Scotland, while others went to Ulster, Ireland, and then to America; they were known as Scots-Irish. The Highland Clearances were displacements of the population of the Scottish Highlands during the 18th and 19th centuries. Scots were forced to give up their lands to English gentry, and this led to a mass emigration. They were middle-class farmers and craftsmen who came from poor rural counties of Northern Ireland, where English rule had grown increasingly severe and where the 1740 famine in Ulster hastened their departure. As pioneers, Scots proved their mettle and arrived when the colonists needed them. Wherever they settled, they started schools and churches. Scottish Americans have made monumental achievements and invaluable contributions that led to America’s preeminence in the fields of science, technology, medicine, government, politics, architecture, literature, media, and visual and performing arts. North Georgia, with its beautiful mountains, clean flowing streams, and moderate temperatures, was a great place for the Scots and others who came into the region in the early 1800s to put down roots. Commemorating Scottish heritage, the Blairsville Scottish Festival and Highland Games is now in its seventh year. Nestled in the mountains of North Georgia, Meeks Park, with its meandering streams, shaded picnic areas, and grassy meadows, is the perfect backdrop for the Blairsville Scottish Festival & Highland Games. The BSFHG has evolved

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

into one of the best festivals of its kind in the southeast. Recognized for the third year in a row as a Top 20 Event by the Southeast Tourism Society, the Games are held the second weekend in June each year. Festivities begin with a Kilted Golf Classic at Butternut Creek Golf Course on Friday morning, and a Ceilidh (a Scottish party) Friday evening. Gates open at 8:00am Saturday and Sunday. Opening ceremonies are at 12:00 noon Saturday, with Massed Bands and the Parade of Tartans, and closing ceremonies are late Sunday afternoon. According to tradition, the old kings and chiefs of Scotland used the Highland Games as a way of choosing the best men for their retinue and men-at-arms. Scottish men have tested their strength against each other at Highland gatherings for centuries. Today’s Scottish athletes combine strength, skill, and endurance to compete in time-honored events such as the Clachneart, Sheaf Toss, and Hammer Throw. Other competitions include the Kilted Mile Race, Bonniest or Boniest Knees, Clan Tug of War, and the Haiggis Hurl. Scotland has a proud musical tradition, interwoven with its history and culture. It includes Highland dancing, bagpipes, and fiddles, and encompasses a range of styles and forms that emerged from different strands of the country’s historical, geographical, and social heritage. The bagpipes are one of the most famous icons of Scotland, and the piping tradition is still going strong in the 21st century, as witnessed in the Massed Pipe and Drum Bands. Musical entertainment and Highland dancing take place continually throughout the park. Suzanne Long works as a team with her Border Collies, herding sheep. She provides information on the history of the breed and how their instincts and heritage developed into the wonderful dog we see today. The Gordon Setter from Scotland can trace its ancient lineage back to at least 1620, but these handsome dogs came into prominence in the kennels of the 4th Duke of Gordon in the 1820s. See demonstrations of the pointing abilities of the Gordon Setter as they display the discipline and style this breed is so famous for. A centuries-old breed, Scottish Highland Cattle have survived under extremely harsh conditions in the rugged Highlands of Scotland. Dr. Bob Gordon of the Georgia Falconry Association will be at the Games on Saturday. Falconry was well understood in Britain and Scotland. The local kings became enthusiasts, and falcons came to be of great value. One well-known falconer was Mary, Queen of Scots. For children of all ages there is the “Passport to the Clans,” which encourages the children to visit the Clan tents and learn something unique about each Clan represented. To inform children and their parents that Scotland is the birthplace of the game of golf, there is also a 4-hole


miniature golf course. For the younger kids there is the space walk in the shape of a Scottish castle, and face painting. A train complete with a conductor takes them for a ride through the festival grounds. For children ages 6-13 there is the children’s version of Scottish Athletics: the caber toss, putting the stone, and tossing the sheaf. Reenactors provide an accurate and educational portrayal of the daily life of the period, and of the more warlike aspects of life in what was a formative period in Scottish history. A highlight of the Festival is the Mini Cooper Parade. Members of the AtlantaMINIS and their sister club, the Smoky Mountain MINIS, are happy to show off their stylish automobiles. A Worship Service and “Kirkin’ o’ the Tartans (blessing of the Tartans) in Scott’s Braid is conducted Sunday morning. Shop the many vendors selling Scottish food, clothing, jewelry, souvenirs, pottery, music, books, children’s toys, and more. Join us for a Scottish weekend in the “Highlands of Georgia” to experience Scottish history firsthand. For more information contact the BlairsvilleUnion County Chamber of Commerce at 706-745-5789, 877745-5789, or www. blairsvillescottishfestival. org.

Health Matters: Speaking from the Heart by John P. Vansant, MD, FACC

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urrently, as well as historically, a major goal of clinical cardiology has been to develop a non-invasive test (modality) that provides accurate and predictive information regarding the presence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) that would be comparable to the invasive “gold standard” coronary angiography (commonly referred to as a cardiac cath). The list of such tests has grown rapidly over the past decade, predominately due to remarkable technological advances resulting in very sophisticated imaging capabilities. With that said, some of the most basic and more readily available tests continue to provide important and valuable information. The value of a test lies not only in its ability to determine the presence of disease, but also in its ability to determine prognosis. Which test a physician may chose depends upon many factors. A critical part of the decision in selecting a test is largely based upon “patient factors” such as age, sex, and body habitus, coupled with an assessment of the likelihood that disease is present. The likelihood of disease presence is determined in large part by the risk factors we discussed in last month’s article. Additionally, a particular study may be selected dependent upon the specific goal. Is the goal to make a diagnosis, or to establish a probability (risk) of the patient who has known CAD of having a future event (heart attack or death)? Many tests actually accomplish both goals at the same time. A specific test result will provide important information for determining a particular treatment plan. I feel it would be informative to briefly discuss some aspects of the currently used tests for diagnosing and evaluating patients for CAD.

Exercise Electrocardiogram (Treadmill Test)

A time-honored test, readily available, and comparatively inexpensive.

However, the patient must be able to vigorously exercise, thereby excluding many individuals who have orthopedic or neurological health conditions or simply have had a long-term sedentary life style. The diagnostic accuracy for detecting CAD is lower than most other available tests, and typically the treadmill test carries an unacceptably high false-positive rate in women. This test may best be used in males who have a moderate (intermediate) risk for CAD. If positive in this population, then further, more definitive tests would be ordered.

Radionuclide Perfusion Scan (Nuclear SPECT Scan)

The most frequently utilized cardiac imaging study in patients with suspected or known CAD, and the study with the most comprehensive clinical data available for defining a prognosis (likelihood) of the patient having future adverse events. The test does require some radiation exposure. The diagnostic principle of the test depends upon the fact that if CAD is present, the blood flow to a particular part of the heart muscle will have detectably lower radioactive tracer activity than the areas of the heart that have normal blood flow. The most accurate results are obtained when the interpretation of the study is performed by an experienced Nuclear Cardiologist.

Echocardiogram (Stress ECHO)

A test favored by many cardiologists. A positive result is highly predictive for the presence of CAD. However, a negative result (normal study) is not as accurate for predicting the absence of disease as the Nuclear SPECT Scan. The diagnostic principle is based upon the observer being able to determine the presence of abnormal heart muscle movement (contraction) resulting from the decrease in blood flow to a specific area of the heart. Therefore, the test is very dependent upon the expertise of the cardiologist performing the study, and in many cases, due to the patient being overweight or other anatomical conditions, it may be difficult to see all

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

areas of the heart. This will decrease the accuracy for detecting the presence of CAD in some cases.

Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA)

A developing modality with clinical ambitions of replacing the need for the patient to have an “invasive” study (coronary angiography). However, due to factors such as cost, degree of radiation exposure, technology availability, limited numbers of experienced physicians, and the need for still more evidence-based clinical data…this is a test that is not yet “prime time.” Other tests (modalities) currently used but with less frequency: (1) Cardiac PET (positron emission tomography), (2) Cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and (3) Coronary Calcium Score. These tests have their specific place in the global arena of evaluating patients with known or suspected CAD. However, their use and availability are not comparable to the former modalities discussed. For the sake of brevity, we will leave these for a later discussion. Clinical cardiology has experienced remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment assessment of patients with CAD. We have attempted to provide only a brief overview of a few of the many choices your physician has at hand to provide you with excellence of care if CAD ever becomes a clinical question for your health. John P. Vansant, MD, FACC is Board Certified in Nuclear Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Rheumatology and is nationally recognized for his academic and clinical accomplishments in Nuclear Cardiology.

400 Edition 19


Father—A Powerful Name R

emember the days when you were hanging out with some friends or siblings, and got into an argument which led to a fight? You explain it all to your parents, and Mom’s getting some antiseptic and bandages ready, when Dad looks up from the paper, and after you have your “talk,” he jokingly says, “Did you win?” You both share a laugh and pat each other on the back. Remember those days? It’s a good feeling, thinking of how Dad is always there to get your back. Dad, Pop, Father, any way you look at it, he’s the man who’s helped your mother raise you and teach you right from wrong, good from bad, and how to throw a punch. When you stop and think about it, what does father really mean to you? Growing up as I did, in a middle-class modern family, we had our share of problems, financially and

psychologically. Mom and Dad did their best to keep these problems hidden, but I was always curious and poking around. Once, I learned my parents were having trouble with some bills. I asked if there was anything I could do to help, and Dad said in his stern but caring tone, “Son, you’re helping already. You, your mom, and your brother are what keeps me going. You’re a good boy, and I love you.” Now you can’t really understand your father, until you understand his childhood. My father grew up in a different setting than I did. While I lived a pretty easy life, consisting of regular menial chores, my father lived through a different childhood. He didn’t do just regular chores, like garbage duty or washing dishes. He was up at the crack of dawn, feeding the cows and chickens, baling hay, and doing things I’ve

Father’s Day Coloring Page!

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June 2010 • www.400edition.com

by Aaron Snider

never done in my life. He did this without help or guidance from his father, and ultimately became a strong-hearted man as he grew. And as he grew, settled down, and started raising a family, he made a huge spiritual leap in his life when he accepted Jesus Christ at 40 years of age. I’m proud of the man my father has become. Father. It’s a powerful word. Some of us grew up without a biological male we could call father. Some, like my Dad, didn’t have a father who stuck around. But you know that no matter what, you’ve always got someone up in heaven watching over you. And He is your heavenly father. So to me, father means a man who is there to pick you off the ground, to tell you that things are going to be okay, and to put you back up on the horse so you can keep riding. Thanks, Dad. I love you, too.


Gardening Tasks:

June FIRST WEEK

• How much water should you apply? Each week a shrub needs one gallon per foot of height. • Low limbs in the way when you mow? You can safely remove one fourth of the foliage of any healthy tree during the growing season. • Collect the seeds from foxglove stalks. Scratch the soil around the plant, scatter the seed, and cover with a bit of earth. Water occasionally and the seedlings that sprout this year will bloom next year. • Look for small new seedlings under your Lenten rose. They can be transplanted now to other spots. • Lure slugs and snails under a hollowed out half-cantaloupe near your hosta. Check at noon every few days and scrape them into a bucket of soapy water.

SECOND WEEK • Use soaker hoses and a water timer to irrigate annuals, perennials, and shrubs. The hose conserves water and the timer makes it easy. Most hoses apply 1 gallon per foot per hour. • Check your lawn for circular dead brown spots. Could be “Brown Patch,” but correct your fertilization and watering practices before you reach for a fungicide. • Remove stakes and guy wires from trees that have been planted for several months. They can stand on their own now. • Mulch your vegetable garden. Try using three sheets of newspaper to cover the ground around each plant, then cover

the paper with straw or leaves. Otherwise, pine straw or wheat straw by itself works fine.

THIRD WEEK • Plant annuals in small beds that make a visual impact but are still easy to water. Try color bowls or large container plantings near the entry to your home • Fertilize outdoor houseplants regularly. Constant watering in the summer washes nutrients from the soil. • Raise the height of your mower by one notch. It will help your lawn grass withstand dry weather. Remove the faded flowers from geraniums and marigolds to help them make more blooms. • Pick okra and squash regularly. Just one fully ripe fruit halts blooming on the entire plant.

FOURTH WEEK • Keep your lawnmower blade sharp. A ragged cut makes grass use more water. • Big green caterpillars on parsley and fennel are the precursors to beautiful swallowtail butterflies. Try not to kill them if you can help it. • Tree roots are almost bone dry. Give them 15 gallons per inch of trunk thickness once each week if regulations allow. Visit www.georgiadrought.com. • Prune back your hydrangeas when most of the blooms have faded. You’ll quickly get lots of new branches, which may give more flowers this fall. • If restrictions allow, water your lawn only once per week but make it a deep, thorough soaking: one inch of precipitation.

Walter Reeves hosts a radio call-in show on WSB-AM every Saturday morning from 6:00 to 10:00am. He is the host of Your Southern Garden on GPB and writes a weekly column in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Get answers to your garden questions at www. walterreeves.com. June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition 21


Fun 400 by

Courtesy of ActivityConnection.com. Answers on page 29.

Father’s Day The following list of words can be found vertically, horizontally, diagonally, forwards, and backwards. BBQ CHILD DAD DAUGHTER FAMILY FATHER FISHING GRANDPA HOLIDAY HUGS JUNE KIDS

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KISSES LOVE NECKTIE PLAY POP SHARE SHIRT SON SPORTS SUNDAY PAPA

A P A P U R N C F D C H I L

V H Q H C Y L A K A Z P N E

M R U R H G M P I U J B T R

I G X N E I N L S G G N A E

S O L Z L D K A S H X H E N

Y N E Y W F R Y E T S K Y U

T D A D M J G O S E T N I J

H O L I D A Y H S R T J P D

G V E M V R J S F E G R Y O

R H I O E A E S P N A K I J

A I T G N V L H I O J G W H

N T K K O Z O H T H R D J N

D P C G S R S L Q A M T H G

P V E J T I U B I T F E S V

A K N W F L B Y A D N U S C

Sudoku

Famous Fathers & Sons

Fill in the grid so that all nine columns down, all nine rows across, and all nine 3-by-3 boxes contain the numbers 1 through 9, each number used only once. That’s all there is to it. There’s no math involved.

Match the fathers in the lefthand column with their sons in the right-hand column.

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

Andy Taylor ____ Ward Cleaver ____ Henry Fonda ____ Fred Sanford ____ King Solomon ____ Kirk Douglas ____ Martin Sheen ____ Ricky Ricardo ____ Henry Mitchell ____ Zeus ____ Homer Simpson ____ King David ____ Barney Rubble ____ Zacharias ____ Adam ____ Bobby Bond ____ Bob Cratchit____ Polonius ____ John Adams ____ Jacob ____ Dr. Huxtable ____ Ozzie Nelson ____ Abraham ____ Bruce Lee ____ George Bush ____

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l. m. n. o. p. q. r. s. t. u. v. w. x. y.

Beaver Peter Opie Tiny Tim Cain and Abel Bam-Bam John Quincy Barry Laertes Bart John the Baptist Joseph Theo Michael Charlie Ricky and David Solomon Isaac Brandon Little Ricky Apollo Dennis the Menace Jonathan George W. Lamont


Events!

Tip: Keep in mind that 400 Edition is now released on or about the 1st of each month. Your event needs to be submitted via our web site 30-45 days prior to your event date and no later than the 20th of the month. We have to have all the information requested on the submission form, so be sure your form is complete. Just go to 400edition.com and click “Submit an Event” on the home page.

June 6 - D Day June 14 - Flag Day June 20 - Father’s Day June 21 - First day of summer

Alpharetta Kick It 3v3 Tour

June 26-27, 9:00am to 5:00pm. The largest 3v3 soccer tour in the world brings top-notch competition, entertainment, and excitement to Alpharetta. The tournament will take place at the Polo Club of Atlanta Complex in Forsyth County, across from Vickery Village. The Alpharetta event provides local athletes the opportunity to qualify for the Kick It 3v3 Regional Championships, where teams compete for a spot at the Kick It 3v3 World Championships hosted by ESPN’s Wide World of Sports® Complex in Orlando. Visit awesomealpharetta.com for more information.

Build a Birdhouse

June 5, 11:00am to 2:00pm at Scottsdale Farms. Build a birdhouse with a Scottsdale staff member. We will show moms and dads how to build a birdhouse with their children. Bring your hammer and safety glasses. $5 per house for materials, please. For more information: Monica, 770-777-5875 or scottsdalefarms@bellsouth.net.

Blairsville Friday Night Concert Series

7:00pm every Friday, Union County Historical Society, One Town Square at the Old Courthouse. Performers’ schedule at www.unioncountyhistory. org. For more information: Sam Ensley, history1@windstream.net or 706-754-5493.

Monthly Cruise In

June 5, 1:00pm to 5:00pm, Two Town Square in Downtown Blairsville. If you’re a car, truck, or bike enthusiast, this is the place to be. Blairsville Cruisers invite any classic vehicle owner to participate; registration is free. All free to the public. Vendors welcomed, and so

are volunteers. For more information: www.blairsvillecruisers.com.

Kids Fishing Rodeo June 12, 8:00am to 12:00pm. Vogel State Park. Fishing event for kids 12 and younger. Vogel’s Wolf Creek will be stocked with plenty of trout. Prizes will be given to the lucky ticket holders; families will enjoy watching the children as they have a blast. To register prior to fishing, an adult must be accompanied by his or her child or children. Coke refreshments will be provided. A limited number of fishing poles will be provided (first-come, firstserved basis). $5 parking. For more information: 706-745-2628.

Highland Games and Scottish Festival

June 12 and 13, 9:00am to 5:00pm, 11 Pool Lane, Meeks Park off Highway 515. Something for everyone: traditional games, highland music and dancing, pipes and drums performances, falconry and border collie demonstrations, and food with a Scottish flair. Discover your Clan at the Heritage Tent. Attend a bagpipe, fiddle, or harp workshop, or cheer the “wee ones” at special highland games. No wonder this event is named one of the Top 20 events by the Southeast Tourism Society. Admission free, free parking. For more information: www.blairsvillescottishfestival. org; Blairsville Union County Chamber of Commerce, admin@blairsvillechamber.com or 706-745-5786

Mountain Gospel Singing Convention

June 26, 1:00pm. One Town Square. Join the 2010 Class of the Union County Historical Society Singing School for shape note at the Old Courthouse. Free parking and admission. For more information: Sam Ensley, history1@windstream.net

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition 23


Events, Events,

or 706-745-5493; www. MountainGospelConvention.org.

Cleveland

Cumming

Mountain Fling

June 10, 8:30am to 4:30pm at the White County Chamber of Commerce. Learn to use social media tools to build your customer base. “Today, you have to make sure you acquire MySpace so you are LinkedIn, in case you StumbleUpon any FriendFeeds on Facebook that are so delicious that you Digg it so much it puts you in such a Twitter that you want to Blog about it, post photos on Flickr, and videos on YouTube.” If you have no idea what the above paragraph is talking about, then you might want to join us for an overview of Social Media. Part I - The Basics, 8:30am to 11:30am; Part II - Intermediate, 1:30pm to 4:30pm. Each 3-hour session is $35. For more information or to register: www.gainesvillesbdc.org, or Dede Gossage, 770-531-5681. Questions: dgossage@georgiasbdc.org.

Social Media Part I & Part II

Business Accelerating Group

June 26, 9:00am to 4pm; June 27, 11:00am to 4:00pm. North Georgia Technical College off Highway 515. Beautiful arts & crafts gifts from the Mountain Regional Arts & Crafts Guild, with members from North Georgia, Southwest North Carolina, and Southeast Tennessee. Free admission and parking. For more information: www.mtnregartscraftsguild.org

Farmers Market

June 26, 7:00am to 11:00am. Grand opening, new Farmers Market. For more information: www.ucfarmersmarket.com.

Mountain Fling Arts & Crafts Show June 26 & 27, 9:00am to 4:00pm, North Georgia Technical College. For more information: www. unioncountyhistory.org.

June 2, 12:00noon to 1:30pm at Golden Corral. Please join us for our weekly meeting each Wednesday at noon at Golden Corral in Cumming (Market Place Blvd. at the corner of Buford Dam Rd., in front of Best Buy). Business Network International® (BNI) is a business referral organization whose primary purpose is to assist its members to find and exchange qualified business referrals for each other and develop effective wordof-mouth marketing techniques. Unlike many other networking groups, BNI provides its members with a professional structure and an ongoing training system, enabling members to network in a deliberate and focused manner to produce tangible results. For more information about BNI: www.Referrals4Life.com; about the Cumming Chapter, aka BAG (Business Accelerating Group): Annette@PaintedLadyEnterprises.com; about any upcoming meeting: Annette Walden Mason, 770-887-6792 or paintedlady1@bellsouth.net.

Dahlonega A Day In A Miner’s Life

June 5, 9:00am to 4:45 p.m. Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site on the square. Peek back at life in the 1830s with demonstrations on gold panning, blacksmithing, shingle making, pioneer tools, candle making, folk toys, spinning, pine needle basket making, and more. $3.50-$5. For more information: 706-864-2257.

Appalachian Jam

June 5, 12, 19, 26, 2:00pm to 5:00pm. Every Saturday until October 9, come listen to the sounds and songs of yesteryear. North Georgia’s mountain music singers and pickers will appear on the grounds of the historic Dahlonega Gold Museum. Enjoy acoustic and old-time strings as the sounds of yesterday fill the air. For more information: 706-864-3513.

“Iron Man 2”

June 3, 7:00pm, and June 6, 2:00pm. Holly Theatre. Ticket price: $6 for all shows. Robert Downey Jr. returns as Tony Stark, the wealthy playboy whose exploits as Iron Man are now public knowledge after his admission at the close of the first film. In the follow-up, Stark is pitted against his Russian archnemesis, Whiplash

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June 2010 • www.400edition.com

(Mickey Rourke), and corporate rival Justin Hammer (Sam Rockwell). Rated PG-13. Run Time: 123 minutes. To purchase tickets: 706-864-3759 or www.hollytheater.com. (Tickets can be purchased at will-call an hour before each show.)

The Georgia Legacy Foundation Documentary Film Concert

June 12, 6:00pm, Holly Theatre. Ticket price: $25. The Georgia Legacy Foundation has been working for two years on a documentary film about the mixture of rich blues, R&B, soul, and funk music that originated in Georgia. From Blind Willie to James Brown and Ray Charles, Georgia has given birth to some of the greatest artists. We intend to celebrate and recognize the living artist of our time and document the event at the Holly during the Pure Georgia Music Concert. You can expect performances by Bill Sheffield, Rita Graham, Sammy Blue, Willie Hill, Frankie Lee Robinson, Robert Lee Coleman, Robin Brown, Merritt Smith, Mike Young, Reggie Blue, Newton Collier, Princess Riley, and Steven Charles. These musicians have played with the likes of Howlin’ Wolf, Buddy Guy, B.B. King, Muddy Waters, Albert King, Taj Mahal, and many others. Come be a part of history. To purchase tickets: 706-864-3759 or www.hollytheater.com

“Shrek 4”

June 10, 7:00pm; June 11, 4:00pm and 7:00pm; June 13, 2:00pm and 5:00pm; Holly Theatre.Ticket price: $6 for all shows. Longing for the days when he felt like a “real ogre,” Shrek is duped into signing a pact with the smoothtalking dealmaker, Rumpelstiltskin. Shrek suddenly finds himself in a twisted, alternate version of Far Far Away, where ogres are hunted, Rumpelstiltskin is king, and Shrek and Fiona have never met. Now, it’s up to Shrek to undo all he’s done in the hopes of saving his friends, restoring his world, and reclaiming his one True Love. Rated PG. Run time: 93 minutes. To purchase tickets: 706-864-3759 or www.hollytheater.com. (Tickets can be purchased at will-call an hour before each show.)

Dawsonville Outdoor Adventure Weekend

June 5-6, 8:00am to 5:00pm. Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge. Celebrate the fun of the great outdoors. Bring


Events, Events!

the family for an early morning kids’ Fishing Rodeo on Saturday. Participate in trail maintenance and guided hikes to honor National Trails Day. $5 parking. For more information: 706-265-1969.

Gainesville

Social Media Part I & Part II

June 11, doors open at 6:00pm, and dinner service begins at 6:30pm. Our Summer Concert Series kicks off with the fabulous Butch & The Buckheads, with a special appearance by Elvis (Dawsonville’s own Damon Hendrix). The concert will be held at the Peach Brandy Cottage in Dawsonville. Donate $30 per ticket. This includes dinner and the concert; no coolers please. Proceeds to benefit the Dawson County Humane Society, so your evening of fun may be fully deductible. There’s no easier or more fun way to help out. Please make your checks payable to “Dawson County Humane Society” and mail or bring them to Peach Brandy Cottage, 3 Shepherd’s Lane, Dawsonville.

June 22, 8:30am to 4:30pm at the SBDC Computer Lab at the Featherbone Center on 999 Chestnut Street in Gainesville. Learn to use social media tools to build your customer base. “Today, you have to make sure you acquire MySpace so you are LinkedIn, in case you StumbleUpon any FriendFeeds on Facebook that are so delicious that you Digg it so much it puts you in such a Twitter that you want to Blog about it, post photos on Flickr, and videos on YouTube.” If you have no idea what the above paragraph is talking about, then you might want to join us for an overview of Social Media. Part I - The Basics, 8:30am to 11:30am; Part II - Intermediate, 1:30pm to 4:30pm. Each 3-hour session is $35. For more information or to register: www.gainesvillesbdc.org, or Dede Gossage, 770-531-5681. Questions: dgossage@georgiasbdc.org.

Essence Women’s Conference - World Race

An Evening with Charles Young Walls

Butch & The Buckheads

June 4, 7:00pm to 9:30pm at The Father’s House - Christ Fellowship Church. Have missions in your heart but don’t know where to start? Is it easier to start a local jail ministry than a global mission? What do you have to do to get prepared? Learn from some awesome women of God who have committed their lives to the Great Commission. Appetizers and child care will be provided. Please register at www.EssenceWomen.org. For more information: Beth Snider, 706-216-3248 or beth@3by400.com.

Ellijay Standard Flower Show

June 11 from 2:00pm to 7:00pm; June 12 from 10:00am to 3:00pm, at the Gilmer Arts and Heritage Association building at 207 Dalton Street in Ellijay. Last year’s Standard Flower Show by the Garden Club of Ellijay was awarded First Place in the country in their category (clubs with 21-49 members) by The National Garden Club. The event is free and open to the public—so come see elaborate floral designs and local horticultural specimens, and take home some ideas for your home and garden. For more information: Barbara Dunson, 706-635-6157.

gospel. “Pass-the-hat” donations. $5 parking. For more information: 800573-9659, ext. 305.

Visiting Artist Series at Unicoi June 5, 12, 19 and 26, 11:00am to 7:00pm. June 6, 13, 20 and 27, 10:00am to 2:00pm; Unicoi State

Park and Lodge. Each weekend from Memorial Day through mid-November. Several talented artists and craftspeople from Georgia and surrounding states will demonstrate and have samples of their work for sale. $5 parking. For more information: 800-573-9659, ext. 305.

June 24, 6:00pm to 8:00pm. Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green Street, NE. Free Admission. Charles Young Walls will demonstrate his approach to portraiture. Please come and watch a more open and sensitive process to begin a portrait that allows for the subject and artist to collaborate as the sitting progresses. Charles will discuss aspects essential to creating portraits that evoke the sitter’s unique humanity. For more information: 770-536-2575.

Helen Hot Air Balloon Race

June 3-5. 37th Annual Helen to the Atlantic Hot Air Balloon Race. Race begins at 7:00am on June 3 (weather permitting). First balloon to make it to I-95 is declared the winner. Other balloon activities and tethered rides will be available in the early mornings, and evenings after 6:30pm. For more information: www.helenga.org/helen-ga-events.

Saturday Evening Concert Series

June 5, 12, 19 and 26, 8:00pm to 9:00pm, Unicoi State Park and Lodge. Every Saturday from Memorial Day through mid-November. Some of the best musicians in the area perform a variety of music, from Appalachian Mountain to bluegrass to Southern

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition 25


Events!

Family Camp for All Ages

June 7-11, 9:00am to 12:00pm, Unicoi State Park and Lodge. Make your family vacation memorable by attending fun classes and outdoor workshops with your family. Activities include canoeing, archery, wilderness survival, stream studies, and more. No age limit. Register in advance. $20 adult, $10 child five and older. $70 maximum per family. $5 parking. For more information: 706-878-2201, ext. 305.

Amphibian Monitoring Workshop

June 11, 7:30pm to 9:30 pm. Smithgall Woods Conservation Park. Georgia Adopt-a-Stream staff will review the natural history of amphibians, the reasons they are important, and which species are found in Georgia, and will lead a hike to view amphibians and learn frog calls. Co-sponsored by Georgia Adopt-a-Stream, the intent of this program is to develop “citizen scientists” to help monitor numbers and diversity of frog and salamander species. Register by June 4. $5 plus $5 parking. For more information: 706-878-3087.

Youth Fishing Days at Buck Shoals

June 19, 8:30am to 4:00pm. Smithgall Woods Conservation Park. Children and their special “big person” can fish in a lake stocked with catfish, bass, and bream. Fish caught can be kept. Bring your own bait and rods. Some rods are available for loan. Call for directions to Buck Shoals. Note: This is not held at Smithgall Woods. $5 parking. For more information: 706-878-3087.

Hiawassee 5th Annual Taste of the Southern Highlands

June 22, 6:00pm to 8:00pm. Come experience the ultimate mountain tasting experience at Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds in Hiawassee, presenting restaurants, wineries, and resorts from Towns and surrounding counties. Enjoy the culinary treats of our local area. Five free tastings with entrance fee. $20 for adults; $7 for children 6-12; children 5 and under are free. For more information: Amy Gibby Rosser, 706-896-4131 x 1233, or argibby@towns.k12.ga.us.

Ray Stevens in Concert

July 3, 7:00pm at Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds. Celebrate Independence

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June 2010 • www.400edition.com

Day weekend as multi-platinum recording artist, songwriter, and twotime Grammy winner Ray Stevens takes the stage at the Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds. Tickets are $42 and are available at the door as early as 8:30am; in advance by phone or online at www.georgiamountainfairgrounds. com. For more information: Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, 706-896-4191 or gamtfair@windstream.net.

4th of July Fireworks

July 4, 9:45pm at Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds. Gather your friends and family this summer and celebrate Independence Day at the Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds with a fireworks extravaganza. This is sure to be a show that will light up the mountain sky and end your Fourth of July with a bang. Free to view; donations to Lions Club appreciated. For more information: Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, 706-896-4191 or gamtfair@windstream.net.

LaGrange June Hydrangea Festival

June 10-13. The Marquis de Lafayette statue will be surrounded by a profusion of pink and blue blossoms when the 10th Annual Hydrangea Festival blooms on LaGrange Square. Festival highlights: an old-fashioned garden party and wine tasting at a pre-Civil War garden at Hills & Dales Estate; an outdoor “Picnic with the Pops” concert performed by the LaGrange Symphony Orchestra; a Parisian Marketplace featuring original works by Southern artists; the openair Market on Main for farm-fresh vegetables, colorful flowers and fresh-baked goodies; a “Color Wheels” family-friendly bike ride; private garden tours; musical entertainment; children’s hands-on art activities; Saturday morning chicory coffee and beignets; and masses of hydrangeas decorating the square and for sale in three-gallon pots. The fun kicks off on Thursday when 1,600 visitors pedal into town as part of the Bicycle Riders Across Georgia’s annual trek, and are met with entertainment and the debut of Fifi the French skunk, mascot of the Hydrangea Festival. For more information: www.lagrangechamber.com.


Through a Woman’s Eyes

by Martha Hynson

Soul Food She is like the merchant ships, bringing her food from afar. She gets up while it is still dark; she provides food for her family and portions for her servant girls. — Proverbs 31:14-15

W

hen my children were young, it sometimes seemed like we lived at the ballpark. It doesn’t take long to get tired of concession stand fare, so I began bringing along some healthful alternatives to chips and candy. I soon became known as “the health food mom.” I held this title for a while, until the year my son played ball with a boy whose brother was highly allergic to all types of food additives. This dedicated mom always brought a supply of raw organic vegetables for her kids to munch on. She regularly traveled several hundred miles in order to provide the food her son needed to stay healthy. It was worth it to her, however, because of the remarkable difference it made in his health. Whenever I read Proverbs 31:14, I think of this sweet mother “bringing her food from afar.” Thankfully, organic produce is much more readily available now, so we don’t have to drive halfway across the state to buy wholesome food; but I believe this verse has another, deeper, meaning. Jesus referred to himself as the Bread of Life, and providing our family with a steady diet of this Bread is even more important than making sure we buy nutritious food. Without realizing it, however, I believe many of us often settle for spiritual “concession stand food.” We lead such busy lives; it’s easy to fall into the habit of feeding ourselves and our family whatever’s handy. Unfortunately, what’s convenient is usually whatever the media is dishing up, often the equivalent of spiritual junk food. Like the woman in Proverbs 31, we must be willing to sacrifice in order to nourish our families. Proverbs 31:15 says, “She gets up while it is still dark to provide

food for her family and portions for her servant girls.” I believe this woman’s primary focus in those early hours was spending time with her Heavenly Father. Of course, if you’re like me, your first reaction to this verse might be to reason that, if you had servant girls, you too might have a little more time in the mornings. As it is, even though you’re usually up before the sun, there really is no “first thing” in the morning. You roll out of bed and almost immediately the baby needs changing, someone can’t find their homework (or sports equipment, underwear, etc.) and so it goes throughout the day. So what can we busy wives and mothers do? One thing I’ve found helpful is to remind myself that all the little things that seem to take up my time are actually God-given opportunities for me to feed my family. After all, what good does it do to prepare a meal if you never serve it? It’s when my loved ones see me going through my day with a joyful attitude, that their souls are nourished. In order to have that joyful attitude, however, I need to spend time with God, so I find myself once again wondering, what can busy wives and mothers do? I believe our friend from Proverbs knew the secret of a balanced life. As we read the rest of the chapter, we see that she, too, was busy. In fact one of the reasons I’ve avoided spending too much time reading about her in the past is that she seemed so organized and efficient and seemed to accomplish so much. I’ve come to believe, however, that I, too, can accomplish all the good things God has for me to do if I’m willing to live by the secret found in verses 14 and 15. I think the

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

significant thing to learn from these verses is not the importance of getting up before dawn, but the value of putting God first every day, all day. Just as taking nutritious food to the ball field enables me to avoid eating junk, taking time to make God’s word accessible throughout my day is key in making sure I’m feeding my spirit well. One way I’ve tried to do this is to put verses in places where I’m sure to see them. For instance, I have a Post-it Note hanging at eye level on my bathroom mirror with a verse I want to memorize. I’m sure to read that verse because, even if I don’t have time to sit down with my Bible, I never leave the house in the morning without looking in the mirror. (I’m sure there’s a lesson I need to learn from that!) Of course, I don’t want to eat and serve only snacks, even if they are nutritious. Just as it’s important for my family to sit down to regular meals together, I need to spend regular, uninterrupted time with God. There’s no “one size fits all” answer for finding this time. Each of us has different schedules and demands. The good news is that God’s in the business of making a little into more than enough if we offer it to him. It will require time and sacrifice but, like my friend from the ballpark, if we dedicate ourselves to providing what our family truly needs, I believe we’ll find that it’s well worth the effort! Martha Hynson is a wife, mom, teacher, and freelance writer from Watkinsville, Georgia.

400 Edition 27


Remembering a Friend: Charlie Ridley O

n April 23, 2010, Charlie Ridley went to be with his Lord. He left behind a loving wife, Julia, and a family of children and grandchildren. He also left behind many friends; I count myself one. Several years ago Linda and I owned a magazine, The North Georgia Star, and we were called on by Charlie to cover an event in Lumpkin County. From that day forward, Charlie and I had a close friendship. Charlie was a true friend of Lumpkin County. After his retirement he sought to serve the county and was elected the sole county commissioner (1996-2000). He saw a lot of potential in the county, and used his office to accomplish much of that potential. Too bad for the county that his term was up before he saw all of his programs completed. Charlie was known to be a friend of the county’s children and senior citizens, and supported them in all their programs. When Charlie took office, very few of the county’s roads were paved; but Charlie fixed that. By the end of his term he had blacktopped all of the county’s roads, including back roads, driveway entrances, church parking lots, and the roads running through every cemetery. Charlie often said, “No one should get their shoes muddy while going to church or attending a funeral.” He was responsible for the start-up of Rainbow Children’s Home, where Lumpkin County’s abused or neglected children could be cared for. Charlie had a big heart. As commissioner he felt compelled to give back to the county that had given his family so much. Local residents remember the store his mom and dad ran until their deaths. Charlie and I hit it off from the very start, which was strange since as a rule I stayed away from politicians like they had the plague. Charlie had something that made him different, and anytime he asked for our help, we found it impossible to say no. Many of you never knew about the opportunities Charlie tried to bring to the county. He saw a future for Lumpkin County when they were offered the chance to be the first in the country to build and operate a coal-fired incinerator that would turn the county’s garbage and trash into a

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stone-like material that could be sold and used in many applications, such as road paving and landscaping materials. We agreed with Charlie totally, but others did not and soon the program was accepted by another state and Lumpkin County lost out. Years later Dennis Weaver, who played Chester on “Gunsmoke,” chose Lumpkin County as the first county to be offered another process that would recycle waste materials into treated fence posts. The

financial possibilities for the county were immense, but again it was shot down by other politicians who had no foresight or imagination. Charlie saw the possibilities for his county and in spite of opposition left a legacy that may never be equaled. Charlie was a man of vision. More than once he called me in to explain some idea to me. I felt honored to have his trust, and marveled at his sincerity and vision. Charlie had a lot of Cherokee blood in his veins and maybe that’s why conserving the county’s resources was so important to him. On one of those days when Charlie called me in, I accepted his offer to go with him to see the progress of his dream project, Yahoola Creek Park. The recreational project was envisioned by Charlie to be a crown jewel for the county. It would be a place like no other in the state, one that would attract families for picnics, children’s trout fishing, tournaments for tennis, soccer, baseball, and

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

by Bob Merritt

football. The layout of the sports and family complex showed the vision Charlie had. I had the privilege of seeing a side of Charlie that few ever saw. As I sat across from him on one particular day, he leaned back in his chair and said, “Where can we go for a while? I need to get away for a couple of hours.” I replied, “Let’s go to the Chestatee Zoo.” As it turned out, Charlie had never been to this particular zoo and he fell in love with it. The head keeper and owner were friends of mine and gave us free rein with the animals in the petting zoo. Charlie got away from his troubles that day and I photographed him, in his suit, handling a brown bear cub, a Siberian tiger cub, and other animals. The day of Charlie’s funeral, the procession traveled down Highway 9 from the Dawsonville First Baptist Church, through Dahlonega to the Yahoola Creek Cemetery. Charlie traveled for his last time through a portion of the county and the city he had loved all of his life. He was laid to rest on a hilltop with a view of the beautiful North Georgia mountains and within a short distance of where he had lived with his mom and dad. Charlie had a family that he loved, and they loved and honored him. Charlie was a member of Dawsonville First Baptist Church, where he gave of his time, talents, and money to further God’s work. When they weren’t in Florida, he and Julia sat behind us in church. On a recent Sunday Julia and her family of children and grandchildren were back at church, sitting behind us. Charlie was missed by all. I consider it a privilege to have rubbed shoulders with a man like Charlie Ridley. He made a tremendous contribution to this world and we know he is safe in God’s arms.


Answers from page 22. Courtesy Activity Connection.

Father’s Day Word Search

Famous Fathers & Sons

Sudoku

Andy Taylor c. Opie Ward Cleaver a. Beaver Henry Fonda b. Peter Fred Sanford y. Lamont King Solomon w. Jonathan Kirk Douglas n. Michael Martin Sheen o. Charlie

Bob Cratchit d. Tiny Tim

Ricky Ricardo t. Little Ricky

Polonius i. Laertes (characters in Shakespeare’s Hamlet)

Henry Mitchell v. Dennis the Menace

John Adams g. John Quincy

Zeus u. Apollo

Jacob l. Joseph

Homer Simpson j. Bart

Dr. Huxtable m. Theo

King David q. Solomon

Ozzie Nelson p. Ricky and David

Barney Rubble f. BamBam Zacharias k. John the Baptist Adam e. Cain and Abel

Abraham r. Isaac Bruce Lee s. Brandon. George Bush x. George W

Bobby Bond h. Barry

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

400 Edition 29


400 Edition Wining & Dining

Knowing Wine

by Nancy Forrest

M isty Creek Vineyards, Mocksville, NC

M

arge, Kathy, and Barry Nichols purchased their 56-acre estate in 2001 and planted fruit trees and 14 acres of French vinifera and FrenchAmerican hybrid grapes. Their varietals include Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, and Chambourcin. They opened their tasting room in July 2009 and expect their winery to be completed by 2012. Marge, who at 87 is the glue that holds the family together, is a highly accomplished ceramicist and a gifted artist in oils and acrylics; her works have been shown in numerous galleries and juried competitions. Her son Barry, retired as a Chief Information Officer and industry consultant, spent 33 years at the Kennedy Space Center and was with the team that put a man on the moon during the Apollo program. Barry’s wife Kathy is a teacher of over 30 years, and descends from a family that moved from England to Merritt Island, Florida, just after the Civil War and helped start the well-known Indian River Citrus industry. Marge and Barry’s roots in North Carolina go deep, with 13 generations of family. Barry and Kathy have two grown children. Misty Creek’s vineyards and tasting room lie between the communities of Huntsville and Farmington near the Shallow Ford of the Yadkin River. Native Americans used this area for centuries as a meeting ground and natural fish trap. In the early 1700s the ford served as a safe place to cross the Yadkin River on the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia to Augusta, Georgia. The deep cut of this early pioneer trail is still evident today on both banks of the Yadkin River. In 1756 Daniel Boone built a cabin on the Sugar Creek approximately two miles east of Farmington, and by 1770 a road cut from this area to Mulberry Fields (near Wilkesboro) became known as the Daniel Boone Trail. In 1780 during the American Revolution, a large group of Tories crossed the Shallow Ford, to be defeated by Whig forces. Fourteen Tories were buried in a small plot west of the crossing, and almost immediately the brash colonials built a pig lot over their final resting place to forever commemorate this event. Later in 1781 Lord Cornwallis crossed the Shallow Ford in pursuit of General Nathaniel Green’s “Green Mountain Boys,” the two forces meeting at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in Greensboro. After

the war in 1792, Charles Hunt purchased 250 acres and began to plan 111 half-acre lots to establish the city of Huntsville. Huntsville narrowly missed being voted North Carolina’s state capital. In April 1865 Union General George Stoneman’s cavalry crossed the Shallow Ford and routed the Confederacy’s Yadkin Home Guard, subsequently looting Huntsville and ransacking the town of Bethania as one of the final acts of the Civil War. The Nichols family purchased this land in early 2001, naming it Misty Creek after the natural spring that bisects the property. They immediately began a series of improvements that included a lake, roads, and irrigation, and planted the first four acres of grapes. The following year an additional 10 acres were planted, and Syrah was added to the vineyard. Finished in June 2009, the tasting room sits on the site of a pioneer cabin originally built in 1800 as a mule barn, and overlooks the old road bed. The deep well and original entry road for this pioneer homestead are very evident, and they continue to find handmade bricks, shards of pottery, spear points, and other evidence of long habitation. The vineyard is located in Davie County, named for William R. Davie, a revolutionary war leader, minister to France, and later governor of North Carolina.

Varietal Selections

Misty Creek currently offers four varietal selections:

Wine of the Month

Oberon Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, CA

Aromas of fruit. Fine tannins on the finish. Flavors of vanilla and toffee.

2006 Merlot ($15.95)

Elegant red wine of medium body, whose delicate flavors of ripe plums and dark currants are naturally enhanced by the clay soils of North Carolina’s vineyards; presenting a soft experience on the palate, lingering through a gentle finish. Will age well in your cellar. Medalist in 2009 North Carolina State Fair.

2006 Chambourcin ($16.95)

2006 Chardonnay ($15.95)

Stainless-steel-fermented white wine, aged for over three years. Exhibits a light honeycomb color and the delicate aromas of spring flowers, tree fruit, pineapple, citrus, and caramels. Crisp and cool to complement the heat of summer.

Their signature red wine, made from a French-American hybrid and aged over three years in a combination of French and American oak. Its mellow palate, with mild tannins, expresses the subtle aromas of black pepper, cinnamon, cranberries, raspberries, and dark chocolate.

2006 Cabernet Sauvignon ($14.95)

Coming in 2010:

Smooth and silky semi-dry red wine in the traditional French style, aged for over three years in a combination of French and American oak. Robust aroma with hints of blackberries, red currants, raisins, and black cherries. Mild tannins and a smooth finish

• Syrah • Barrel House Blend (60% Syrah, 40% Cabernet Sauvignon) • Misty Rose - a sweeter Rosé wine

Hours of operation Friday: 4:00 to 8:00pm Saturday : 10:00am to 8:00pm Sunday: 2:00 to 6:00pm


Real Men Cook 1/4 head of lettuce, torn into pieces (iceberg is fine, romaine is better) 3 jalapeno chiles, seeds and veins removed 1/4 cup mayonnaise 5 green onions 1/2 bunch of cilantro leaves (try to avoid the stems) 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder

by Patrick Snider

P

ut all ingredients into a blender or food processor and process until smooth. It should come out bright green in color. Dee’s tips: I have seen it made up and put into a squeeze bottle like you’d use for mustard, and just set on the table to use as you will. Serve it with Cuban bread or some other really nice full-bodied bread. We have used it as a chutney/sauce with a steak, and it was GREAT then too. Serve it with your favorite chips, such as Doritos, or use as a sauce in a veggie taco or sandwich. The ideas are limited only by your imagination. Go crazy with it! Enjoy!

Peruvian Aji

Grilling Basics

K

nowing the difference between direct and indirect styles of grilling, and which style complements your main course, is the start to a great meal. The grill type can be gas or charcoal, while the style of grilling—direct or indirect—should be based on the thickness of the food and the required cooking time.

Direct Grilling

• Best technique for foods such as hot dogs, brats, steaks, hamburgers, fish, and pork chops. Any main course that is 2 inches thick or less should be grilled using the direct grilling method.

• Fire is built directly underneath the food to be grilled. The food is cooked by direct heat, placed 3 to 6 inches from heat source. • Coals are layered directly underneath the food and lit. • The lid can be left up or down. Typically food is grilled with lid down to ensure even doneness. • Food is cooked much quicker than in the indirect grilling technique.

Indirect Grilling

• Best technique for foods such as beef roasts, pork roasts, whole turkeys, and whole chickens. Any main course that is greater than 2 inches thick should be grilled using the indirect grilling method.

• Fire is built to the side of where the food is to be grilled. The food is cooked by radiant heat rather

than direct heat (as if in an oven). • Coals are lit using only one half of the grill or surrounding outside edge. No hot coals should be directly underneath the food. • When indirect grilling with a gas grill, the burner below the area where the food will be placed is turned off after preheating. A drip pan is placed directly under the food. • The lid must be left down, acting as an oven door. • Food is cooked slower than in the direct grilling technique.

Pre-heat

Gas grills need preheating for at least 10 minutes before cooking (internal temperature should reach 500º F). Light the grill and shut the lid with grill burner set on high. For indirect grilling, the burner below the area where the food will be placed is turned off after preheating. A drip pan is placed directly under the food. Charcoal grills also need preheating. Before lighting, open bottom vents of grill. When using indirect grilling, coals are typically placed on the opposite half from where the food is to be placed. Another method is banking the coals into a ring around the outer edges of the food. How much charcoal? Start by spreading one layer of charcoal on bottom of grill, extending 1 to 2 inches from where food will be placed. This should be plenty

of charcoal for normal grilling. Pyramid this charcoal, add lighter fluid, and start fire (leaving grate off). Charcoal must be red hot and have a thin white coating of ash; this typically takes 20 to 30 minutes. Before grilling, use tongs to spread hot coals into a single layer once again or set up for indirect grilling. Replace grate. Add up to 8 to 10 coals every 30 minutes to add cooking time if needed (generally during indirect grilling). Preheating grills at a high temperature setting helps to seal the juices of your meat when you first place the meat on the pre-heated grill. Decrease temperature or raise grill grate after sealing, to insure meat is cooked thoroughly and not merely burned on the outside. An easy method for estimating the grilling temperature is to place the palm of your hand near the level at which the food will be positioned above the heat source to see how long it can remain before being removed due to heat. If you can leave your hand above the heat source without discomfort for: Approximately 5 to 6 seconds = low to medium heat Approximately 3 seconds = medium to medium high heat Approximately 2 seconds = high heat (pre-heat)

FYI …

The term barbecuing refers to an indirect grilling technique for cooking foods slowly for long periods of time using indirect low

June 2010 • www.400edition.com

heat generated by smoldering logs or woodchips. The best temperature for barbecuing is between 200º and 300º F. If temperature rises above 300º it is considered direct grilling. Prepare for grilling by spraying the grate with a no-stick cooking spray (or brush on vegetable oil), to assist with clean-up later as well as to keep the food from sticking. Do this before starting the grill, when grate is cool. On a charcoal grill, use a spray bottle filled with water to tame flames that flare up from the food drippings. If flames get out of hand on a gas grill, the safe practice is to shut the gas off until flames are extinguished, and then relight. Cleaning the grate soon after cooking is the best way to keep it clean. If you have a grate that will fit into your self-cleaning oven, you can clean your oven and grill grate at the same time. Typically, a wire brush is used to remove leftover food.

Safety

• Do not add starter fluid to coals that are already hot.

• Do not use a grill during heavy winds. • Keep grill in an open area, away from flammables. • Be within reach of a water hose or have a small fire extinguisher readily available. Courtesy RecipesTips.com, www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/

400 Edition 31


Next Stage Theatre Company Proudly Presents...

Meredith WiLlson ‘s

T HE MUSIC M AN Book, Music, and Lyrics by:

Meredith WilLson Story by:

Meredith WilLson and

Franklin Lacey Directed by: Rob

THE MUSIC MAN

Is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212.541.4684 Fax: 212.397.4684 www.MTIShows.com

HardIE Show Dates: July 9−31 8 PM Evenings / 3 PM Sunday Matinee The Cumming Playhouse 101 School Street Cumming, Georgia 30040 www.playhousecumming.com 770.781.9178


400 Edition June 2010