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it, clients, contractors, developers and manufacturers must make investments to enable this shift in supply. The payback time can vary depending on where in the world it’s made and what business model is used. Business models are elaborated on in the Circular Economy section page 179 to 249. The critical mass can be achieved by taking down buildings that are designed for disassembly. In this case, the building needs to stand for one lifetime, which is several decades (unless you look to Asia, where some buildings have a lifespan of only one to two decades.)

Photo: To ensure structural integrity, the building elements must be tested and the personnel well-educated to successfully deliver material quality. This could open doors for new businesses and certifications in the industry.

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Photo © GXN

How to design

This is a long term and unsure investment, since it is not guaranteed that the materials will be retrieved again unless the owner of the building or the stakeholders are very aware of it. The manufacturers can also choose to

lease out their building components and let the users of the building lease the service on building component. This is a quick way to get the technology spread and for manufacturers to keep control. When the mass is achieved, a completely new business of the handling and storing the reused components will emerge. These companies are from ere on referred to as the ’material stock’.

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Building A Circular Future  

This book presents findings, case studies, background and context for the project ’Building a Circular Future’, and consist of three main ch...

Building A Circular Future  

This book presents findings, case studies, background and context for the project ’Building a Circular Future’, and consist of three main ch...

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