Page 1

opportunity

Enfield The regeneration of Enfield

INSIDE

WELCOME TO MERIDIAN WATER

Town of plenty

MADE IN ENFIELD

This sporting life

The third way

Autumn 2011 Issue One


Opportunity in Enfield...

We’re there! SEGRO plc is a commercial property investment and development company that has  become Europe’s leading provider of flexible business space. Operating in eight countries,  the company has 1,600 customers, £5.4 billion in property assets and 5.5 million sq m   in lettable space. SEGRO continues to invest in the London Borough of Enfield, a core market within its  Greater London portfolio.

NAVIGATION PARK  Morson Road, Enfield EN3 4TJ TO LET  Design and build opportunity for warehouse / industrial  space up to 200,000 sq ft on 8.1 acres. Suitable for light and  general industrial, warehouse and distribution uses (B1(C),   B2 and B8 use classes). 

PHASE 2 CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING A  SINGLE UNIT OF UP TO 200,000 SQ FT

MORSON ROAD

PHASE 1 LET TO GEOPOST UK LTD 37,500 SQ FT

Find the perfect space for your business at

SEGRO.com/enfield

VIEW 406  Advent Way, Edmonton, London, N18 3BH

A406 NORTH CIRCULAR ROAD

TO LET  Prime design & build opportunity for warehouse /  industrial units up to 93,300 sq ft in a prominent location. Find the perfect space for your business at

SEGRO.com/edmonton PHASE 1 UNDER OFFER PRE-LET FOR HOTEL USE

For further information, please contact:

A1055 MERIDIAN WAY

Sam Smith  samantha.smith@cbre.com

Paul Fitch p.fitch@glenny.co.uk


CONTENTS

19

04 Talking heads Three development decision makers offer their takes on Enfield’s strengths as an investment opportunity.

08 Quality of life It’s not just leafy suburbs that makes Enfield so attractive.

03

15 Transport From the M25 to high speed railways, Enfield has always been wellconnected, but there are plans for yet more improvement.

19 M  eridian Water Exploring the making of a £1.3 billion waterfront eco-village, Enfield Council’s ambitious vision for regeneration.

37 08 24 Map Putting a place to a name in London’s most northern borough.

31 Sport and leisure A world-class

26 Projects A snapshot of the big changes

Olympics venue is just the beginning of a sporting legacy beyond London 2012.

proposed, planned and underway in Enfield.

31

37 Sustainability Lee Valley Corridor is emerging as a hub of green industry where businesses are trailblazing the latest in ecofriendly technology.

opportunity

Enfield

43 Made in Enfield Global brands and high street favourites are produced in London’s second-largest industrial zone.

For contacts and feedback visit: www.opportunityenfield.com

Published on behalf of:

Enfield Council, Civic Centre, Silver Street, Enfield EN1 3XY www.enfield.gov.uk T: 020 8379 1000 Director of regeneration, leisure and culture: Neil Rousell neil.rousell@enfield.gov.uk

Published by:

Lower Ground Floor, 189 Lavender Hill, London SW11 5TB www.3foxinternational.com T: 020 7978 6840 Executive editor: Siobhán Crozier Designer: Andy Ritchie – bn1creative Production editor: Rachael Schofield head of business development: Paul Gussar Business development manager: Sophie Gosling Production assistant: Jeri Dumont Office manager: Sue Mapara Subscriptions manager: Simon Maxwell Managing director: Toby Fox Printed by: Wyndeham Grange Images: Enfield Council, David Tothill, Lee Valley Regional Park, St Modwen Properties, Winvic, Warburtons, North London Waste Authority, Fusion Lifestyle, Enfield Homes, Mulalley and Company, BAA Airports Ltd.

© 3Fox International Limited 2011. All material is ­strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written p ­ ermission of 3Fox International Limited is strictly f­ orbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no ­responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this ­magazine are not n ­ ecessarily those of 3Fox International Limited or Enfield Council.


The council chief

04 talking heads

We talk to three of Enfield’s development decision makers on the borough’s potential and how it can attract investment for the future

Rob Leak, Enfield Council’s chief executive, has been working to attract investment to Enfield since he arrived over eight years ago. “The ambition of the council is a fair society,” he says. “We recognise that we have a serious housing shortage and that 25,000 of our residents are currently looking for work. That is what motivates me.” Previously Lambeth’s deputy chief executive, Leak’s record includes strong commercial experience as both financial and managing director of retail companies. Since becoming council chief executive in 2003, Leak has overseen a dramatic improvement in efficiency and a big increase in Enfield’s attractiveness to private sector investors. Leak’s business acumen, honed in the private sector, offers particular insight into London’s investment climate and economic layout. The capital is often perceived as uniformly affluent, whereas in reality conditions vary greatly between – and even within – individual boroughs. While Enfield is relatively comfortable, its north and west are considerably better off than its south and east. “Places like Hadley Wood offer opportunities for premium private sector housing,” says Leak, “while the south and east offer a lot of available land.” East Enfield in particular benefits from more industrial land than many other parts of north London. “This offers opportunities for distribution, green industry and food processing, including centres for both Tesco and John Lewis,” adds Leak. “Broadly, poor boroughs want businesses for job creation and more affluent ones want housing.”

THREE CHEERS


on investment. We also have a wide range of opportunities – our town centre, the rebuilding of industrial parks, and new distribution centres, as well as private sector and social housing. Enfield is not just a house-building opportunity.” Enfield is well placed, physically and economically. “We’re in the London-Stansted-Cambridge corridor: a very helpful position to be in,” says Leak. “We have excellent communications, we’re very near central London and we have loads of places for people and businesses to locate.”

05 talking heads

Targeting investment to the needs of specific areas is vitally important, but so is the reduction of risk. “If you want investment, lower the risk profile for private investors. While the market is tough, you have to get all the ducks in a row,” he adds. “When land is owned by the local authority and a scheme requires some demolition or decanting, the council has to be as proactive as it can.” Reducing risk, however, may not be enough: in the current economic circumstances there is inevitable competition among London boroughs, meaning investment opportunities have to be good value for money. This stiffer competition also increases the importance of building strong relationships

“If you want investment, lower the risk profile for private investors” Rob Leak with potential investors. “At Enfield we have an open-door policy for developers, and a dedicated regeneration team, separate from planning. I can tell developers that the council will be proactive.” Does Enfield have a USP that sets it apart from its north London neighbours? “Every authority has its advantages,” says Leak. “Haringey’s is Tottenham [Hotspur FC] stadium, Waltham Forest’s is the town centre. Enfield’s are our relatively low land values and prospect of a healthy return

The politician Councillor Del Goddard is passionate about two things: the council’s intention to deliver additional and improved homes in settled communities of mixed tenure; and attracting investors to Enfield, creating employment for its residents. “We understand the need to develop and improve the quality of our housing stock,” he says. “We understand the industrial and commercial context, the clusters and how we can improve that. We understand that the infrastructure that supports both is also crucial. The central message is that all of this is interconnected – and we understand that too.” Since Enfield’s political colour changed from blue to red in May 2010, Cllr Goddard has been overseeing development as cabinet member for regeneration and improving localities. As a veteran of the local political scene, he has a clear insight into how to encourage volume house-builders and major employers to invest in this part of north London, create sustainable neighbourhoods and communities and overcome the economic stagnation and decline of the last few decades. “There are two contexts: the residential and the commercial,” says Cllr Goddard. On the former, he says: “Some of our housing stock – by its very age and how it was built after the war – needs replacing, so there is plenty of opportunity for schemes. We want people to come forward

with different ideas and financing models about how they might work with us to rebuild and create much more sustainable housing.” Not all of Enfield’s sites comprise large-scale estates, however, so Cllr Goddard is working with other councils to co-ordinate an approach for the many small-size sites available, through the North London Strategic Alliance. “The initiative brings together small sites in packages to enable builders and developers to build those out effectively,” says Cllr Goddard. “That’s an offer to the smaller builder who likes to build 20 or 30 houses or flats with some retail.” On the business front, Enfield has more commercial space than most other London boroughs, a fact that Cllr Goddard cites as one of its major strengths. “We’re always interested in working with those owners with substantial >

“We want people to come forward with different ideas ... ” Del Goddard


06 talking heads

holdings in the borough,” he says. “We also own two industrial estates in Edmonton. We want businesses to invest to increase employment, by intensifying the employment use. We’re equally interested in small businesses and seeing a supply of managed workspace for young entrepreneurs.” One sector of business choosing Enfield as a base is green technology. “The recycling of plastics to support our food industry is a recent gain,” says Cllr Goddard, “and there’s the green sector around Edmonton with Coca-Cola and others. We want to see it develop into a major cluster that can attract research and development in the future. Moving further north, Picketts Lock may well be developed into a major sports and leisure cluster. We also have a major food and drinks industry both in production and distribution.” Another prime selling point is Enfield’s infrastructure, with businesses attracted by the transport links, the access to skilled workers, and the potential to expand. “We’ve got the North Circular, the A10 and the M25, so it’s easy to reach the M1 or the A1,” Cllr Goddard says. “That’s one reason why John Lewis moved from Watford, to be closer to Stratford. “Logistics and distribution are becoming online shopping or a supply-and-fit service – buy a hi-fi or white goods and they install the item, so there’s also a need for trained plumbers or electricians.”

The developer Eamon O’Malley, director of Mulalley and Company based in Redbridge, has worked on projects all over London so he is well placed to judge the merits of Enfield as an investment destination. He is full of praise for the borough, as well as for the council’s attitude to investors. As a builder and developer, he has three key requirements when looking for projects: “Timing; opportunities to enhance an area; and confidence that we can sell our products.” Enfield ticks all of these boxes. Mulalley with One Housing Group will start work on the £80 million mixed-use Ladderswood development in New Southgate in 2012. This flagship regeneration project will provide almost 500 new homes as well as a new community centre and over 3,000sq m of commercial space. Mulalley also built Enfield’s main library, which opened in 2010. “Now is the time for Enfield,” O’Malley says. “It has been overlooked for quite a long time, but now it offers very good opportunities and these are being helped by some very proactive councillors.” Another plus point, according to O’Malley, is that Enfield now has just the right sort of projects coming up for the current economic climate: “Enfield’s timing is very good for development.” This, in his view, was not always the case as the borough previously lacked focus. The Ladderswood site exemplified this: “It was not a good first sight of Enfield, coming along the North Circular Road. There was an awful gasholder, an industrial estate well past its sell-by date and a lot of poor quality housing. The whole place was rundown.” O’Malley identifies several specific reasons for Enfield’s attractiveness: “It has great communications links with the

Piccadilly line at Arnos Grove and the line at nearby New Southgate offering quick and easy access to central London. There is also excellent bus availability and speedy access to the regional road system. Some other north London boroughs are not so fortunate.” Then, reinforcing Rob Leak’s judgement, there’s the low cost of land. “Although Enfield is part of the London housing market, which remains healthy compared with most of the rest of the country, its land prices are still lower than several other areas in London.” This is especially important for social housing, he says, making it feasible in the current economic climate to build houses on local authority land. As well as social housing, the borough provides excellent opportunities for “good quality suburban houses”. The relationship with the local council is all-important and not just for developments on council-owned land. Here again, Enfield scores highly. “A key driver is planning,” says O’Malley. “Objections and delays inhibit development and the whole process can be very lengthy and expensive. What you have now in Enfield is a consensus that the borough needs investment and the local authority is acting very positively on that. “We are very keen on Enfield and are now looking for new opportunities in the borough,” he adds. It seems that Ladderswood and the library could be just the start of Mulalley and One Housing Group’s investment in this dynamic part of north London. n

“Now is the time for Enfield ... it offers very good opportunities” Eamon O’Malley


08 QUALITY OF LIFE

BELOW: Enfield’s Old Market, a quintessentially British way of life. RIGHT: Simple pleasures. FAR RIGHT: The new concourse at Edmonton Green.

TOWN OF plen


OF nty

quality of life

09

Enfield is a diverse London borough, which combines traditional leafy suburbs with inner-city challenges, close to the city’s urban advantages and gentler countryside pleasures, with thriving business clusters in a place with big plans for renewal. Elizabeth Pears reports

O

ne might suspect London’s northernmost borough has enjoyed being in the shadow of the big city, allowing a life of simple pleasures to tick along uninterrupted. While other parts of London have transformed beyond recognition, Enfield has clung to its heritage and preserved a quintessentially British way of life centered on the thing it prizes most: community. In this old market town, shop parades still thrive, pubs stay full, schools perform well and housing – at an average price of £271,560 – is among the most affordable in London. Lifelong borough resident and Enfield town centre manager, Mark Rudling, says: “We have something other London suburbs lack – we retain a certain amount of character. Our 700-year-old market still operates but we have added to that a fantastic cosmopolitan shopping centre with all the high street favourites as well as independent traders. “Overlooking the market is the newly-opened, Grade II listed King’s Head pub, which is over 100 years old. The restoration has been beautifully done with stained glass windows and other 19th century period features. There’s so much that’s special in this borough that we just don’t shout about enough.” Enfield’s rich past is everywhere: the magnificent 413-acre Trent Park is the grounds of the former royal hunting forest, Enfield Chase, once a regular haunt of Henry VIII. That explains why two thirds of the borough remains open space, one third protected Metropolitan Greenbelt with the rest Green Flag >


Enfield

“�

We are dedicated to creating and sustaining Enfield as a place that residents are proud to call home and where businesses can invest and prosper.

To find out more about our exciting regeneration programme contact the Discover Enfield Team Email: discover@enfield.gov.uk or Tel: 020 8379 4514 www.discoverenfield.com www.enfield.gov.uk


“People come from other London boroughs to enjoy a country park without leaving the city”  eil Isaac, assistant director of waste, N street scene and parks, Enfield Council

BELOW: A picturesque street of 16th to 18th century homes, known as Gentleman’s Row, is a reminder of Enfield’s glamorous past. BOTTOM: Forty Hall is a Grade I listed manor house set on 260 acres of open space.

With all of this on offer just 12 miles from central London, it comes as no surprise that up to 20,000 people each year are settling in the happy buffer between Home Counties haven and the bright lights of the city. Pilgrims vary between first-time buyers seduced by the affordable price tags to jaded city slickers who want to trade in a one-bed flat with window boxes for a Victorian semidetached and swathes of back garden. Enfield has even caught the eye of city bankers looking for a mid-week refuge, accessible to the office as a pad in town but at a fraction of the cost.

B

eyond its lush landscape, the borough’s trump card is its enviable transport links. Travel between Enfield and central London takes less than 30 minutes from any of its 22 train stations with fast links to Stansted Airport and Liverpool Street. The M25 curls around the top of the borough and marks its borders with Hertfordshire and Essex. To the south is the North Circular (A406) a major route linking Enfield to its neighbours Haringey, Waltham Forest and beyond. Running through its centre is the Great Cambridge Road (A10), which connects the south of the borough to the north and separates the east from the west with each quarter possessing its own individual character. Tree-lined streets in Southgate, Cockfosters and Winchmore Hill in the southwest corner are quiet, much sought-after suburbs with the added benefit of being served by London’s Piccadilly Line. They neighbour Palmers Green – a lively area which is home to the UK’s largest Greek and Turkish Cypriot communities whose influence is imprinted in local >

11 quality of life

Victorian parks, golf courses, farmland and proper village greens that together attract three million visitors annually. Sporting activity is a way of life in Enfield with hundreds of clubs run by volunteers. Enfield Council is committed to getting more young people, particularly girls, involved in sport. The listed Queen Elizabeth II stadium, near Enfield Town, which launched the careers of Lord Sebastian Coe and sprint champion Linford Christie, has been revamped and is the new home of Enfield Town FC. Another exciting development is Tottenham Hotspur FC’s £45 million training ground for its first team and youth academy, which opens next year in north Enfield, just off Whitewebbs Lane. It will provide a base for the club’s charitable foundation with £3.5 million of sports coaching pledged to young people. Neil Isaac, Enfield Council’s assistant director of waste, street scene and parks, says: “London is greener than people think but Enfield is special and what it offers is substantial. “It’s not just people who live here who enjoy the parks; people come from other London boroughs to enjoy a country park without leaving the city.”


quality of life

12

businesses: jewellers, banqueting suites, wholesalers, coffee shops and quality Mediterranean restaurants. To the north is Hadley Wood – home to Enfield’s A-List residents, the celebrities and football players who can afford to pay between £700,000 and £9 million for their discreet retreat. Estate agent Daniel Bennett, of local firm Ian Gibbs, says: “When buyers come to us they have identified Enfield as somewhere they want to live. “They realise Enfield is close to the city and West End shows but an equally short distance from an Essex country pub, while having everything you need like cinemas, pubs, parks and shops on your doorstep. “Not many people know that there are also some lovely pubs along the River Lee where you can enjoy a nice summer’s day looking across the water. Walking around the area is fantastic with all the greenery and historic buildings to look at.” Those buildings include the Grade II listed Wright’s Flour Mill in Ponders End and Grade I listed Forty Hall, the prized jewel in Enfield’s historic crown. The former Tudor palace – Elizabeth I and Edward learned of their father’s death while staying there – is now a museum set on 260 acres of gardens and parklands and its own lake. More historic highlights: on the grounds of Enfield’s popular Millfield Arts Centre sits 18th century Millfield House; and Enfield Town Library won Best Built Project at the London Planning Awards for its restoration of the old Carnegie Library. The home of the first ever gramophone collection now boasts a contemporary design featuring a cafe that spills out on to a green. But if all this suggests a borough happy to rest on its civic laurels, the council is fully aware of the work to be done in cleaning up neglected parts of the borough as well as providing new homes, schools, community facilities and jobs to accommodate its expanding population. Long overdue regeneration is happening in New Southgate including an £80 million redevelopment of the Ladderswood Estate, with 491 new homes to be completed by 2014, and the refurbishment of 251 rotting houses together with 100 new homes along the North Circular.

BUSINESS AS USUAL Huw Jones, chief executive of the North London Chamber of Commerce, discusses the future of London’s second busiest industrial corridor. “Industry in Enfield is going through an evolution. Traditional manufacturing industry has gone; new industries are coming through quite strongly, particularly in short-term manufacturing and food production. We are home to big companies like Warburtons (pictured), Greggs, Coca-Cola and flour producer GR Wright & Sons. It has never been a case of industry in Enfield going all the way down and coming back up again – we’re just dealing with different companies which have different ways of working. That’s business, I suppose. The key to Enfield’s success is land availability and distribution networks. Vacancy rates are low. Ford went out but then GeoPost UK came in. The reason people come to this area is because it works for business. There is such a significant amount of opportunity in Enfield because of the land and the willingness to look at

T

he real magic is set to happen to the east of the A10 – the Upper Lee Valley – once home to the big industries that gave Enfield its nickname of London’s Workshop. As mass production dwindled over the past two decades, unemployment crept in. Stephen Tapper, assistant director in the regeneration, leisure and culture department, says: “If we are being honest about things, there is a divide. While there are communities with nice residential streets and access to good parks in the east, there are pockets of considerable deprivation. Our regeneration work addresses those areas that need uplift in order to turn them into places that are as attractive as other parts of the borough.” Substantial amounts of money – the proposed Meridian Water Masterplan in the borough’s south-east corner alone

ABOVE: Enfield has retained much of its heritage. RIGHT: The borough’s industrial corridor runs along the banks of the River Lee.

how we shape things. We are not good at shouting about what we do. There are companies that print and embroider t-shirts and employ up to 90 people, but you would never know they were there. Various clusters of industries have come together and grown: green industries, food and logistics. We are working with them to help them take on more people. We are also setting up apprenticeships across all sectors to ensure local people are equipped with the necessary skills to take advantage of those opportunities. Our vision would be green industries housed on eco-parks, because we are already strong in that area. We are getting those businesses to spread the word so we attract the right businesses: sustainable and looking to employ locals. It can work for employment and also for supply chain. Partnerships have already come out of the location. GR Wright’s now supplies flour to Warburtons, showing how the supply chain can develop. The [civil] disturbances in August changed how businesses are thinking. It has given them a reason to work together. We’re not just discussing how can we

represents an investment of £1.3 billion – are being invested in the eastern corridor consisting of Ponders End, Brimsdown and Edmonton. The council wants to play to its strengths: its transport links and the longest network of waterways in London, which include the River Lee and the 26-mile long Lee Valley Regional Park. Meridian Water, located in Edmonton Green, will be an eco-village of 5,000 new homes on or near the waterfront as well as businesses, schools, a health centre and a shopping district, helping to create 3,000 jobs. Tapper continues: “There are lots of nice things in the Lee Valley; a kind of hidden London that we want to make better use of. “It adds a different dimension to your life to be able to come out of your business or your home and have a short walk to a tow path next to the River Lee – that’s a nice thing to be able to do.” The waterfront development will continue at Columbia Wharf in Ponders End, Enfield’s most deprived area and a priority regeneration site named as one of the London Mayor’s green spaces. Its recreation ground has recently benefited from a £1 million improvement. A borough-wide target of 1,000 new homes by 2026 has been set and plans are in the pipeline for 450 on the former


ensure this doesn’t happen again, but how do we grow and develop the area into a place where people can live, work and prosper. We are now setting an agenda for a measured and sustainable climate for growth. The local authority has been really good about talking to the business community because business understands business better than the council does. Industry in Enfield has not suffered as much as other parts of London but what we haven’t seen is businesses investing in growth. We expect that to come. Businesses have already managed their way through the recession by cutting people’s hours or working a fourday week. We know what we have been through and things are on the up.”

13 quality of life

“A kind of hidden London that we want to make better use of”  tephen Tapper, assistant director, S regeneration, leisure and culture, Enfield Council

Middlesex University Queensway Campus site at Ponders End. Daisy Johnson, principal planning and regeneration officer for Ponders End, says: “It is an area of need, but it’s also an area of opportunity. It sits in the London to Peterborough growth corridor [a Government Growth Area] and the Upper Lee Valley [an Opportunity Area in the London Plan]. “We want it to become a sustainable, vibrant, lively place with an improved town centre, improved green spaces, better connected places, new housing and a new joint primary and secondary school.” The council have facilitated a new £27 million school which will also include the first secondary school in Ponders End. On the site of an old gasworks, it will eventually cater for up to 1,900 pupils. Former headteacher Bridget Evans, Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme director at Enfield Council, says: “A school of this standard will attract informed parents to the area. As admission will be on a proximity basis, the closer you are the greater the chance you will get in. “A good school can mean house prices increasing in value. It will kickstart regeneration in an area that has been crying out for it.” So, as lovely as Enfield’s past is, the next chapter in its history could prove even more enticing. n


Fairview are proud to have been established in Enfield since 1961. As a privately owned residential developer, we have an impressive history of developing new homes throughout London and the South East.

Clockwise from top: Pembroke Park in Crawley, Kings Tower in Croydon, Carterhatch Place in Enfield, Ovaltine in Kings Langley and Bydewell Grange in Hertford.

Fairview. Building a Greater London Closer to home, we have recently acquired land at Drapers Road, Enfield, to transform the disused reservoir site. To register interest please telephone 0800 731 4477.

www.fairview.co.uk


15 transport

THE L THIRD WAY Enfield is already wellconnected by rail, road and London Underground. But a scheme in the pipeline for an additional railway line will speed up life for Enfield residents, present and future. Mark Smullian reports

ook at Enfield on a map and there’s no doubting its excellent road, rail and tube connections. The City of London is half an hour away by public transport, as is the West End, while Stansted Airport is only 45 minutes by road. Among the borough’s most advantageous features are its three rail lines. The furthest east, with stops at Enfield Lock, Brimsdown, Ponders End and Angel Road, is the line linking Stansted Airport to Liverpool Street via Tottenham Hale. The next line includes Enfield Town station, to the east of the town centre, and is connected to Liverpool Street via Edmonton Green and Seven Sisters; to the west of the centre is Enfield Chase, with its line to Moorgate in the City via Finsbury Park. All the rail lines link up with the Victoria Line, with its fast routes into the West End, while there’s a multitude of Piccadilly Line stations to the west of the borough, such as Oakwood, which can take you to Theatreland, Harrods, or all the way to Heathrow. New trains have come into service on the Victoria Line this year after a lengthy upgrade, and there are plans to improve the Piccadilly Line to give extra capacity. All pretty impressive. But there’s one small problem: the rail line to the east, through Tottenham Hale, simply has too many trains trying to use one set of tracks in each direction. As well as the fast trains to Cambridge and Stansted, it also has the local stopping trains. This stopping service doesn’t meet demand, but no more local trains can run as they’d slow down the Cambridge and Stansted services to an unacceptable degree. >


16 transport ABOVE: Stations such as Arnos Grove on the Piccadilly line provide easy access to central London, Theatreland and Heathrow.

The imperative for improvement has been given added impetus with the arrival of Meridian Water (see pages 19 to 22), a £1.3 billion redevelopment of land that includes the area around the little-used Angel Road station. It includes 5,000 new homes for up to 17,000 new residents, planned over a 15-year period, and a consequent increase in numbers using the Stansted-Liverpool Street line. At present Angel Road is barely served outside peak periods, and the line cannot accommodate the four trains an hour deemed necessary for a ‘turn up and go’ service, as exists on most of the rest of London’s commuter rail lines. The best solution would be an extra line, or lines, built on spare land to the east of the existing one. Current Londonbound platforms would become “islands”, with their far side used by local trains. But hope is in sight, as Angel Road is an essential part of Network Rail and Transport for London’s (TfL’s) favoured option to improve the Lee Valley’s rail services. This £67 million scheme would involve the construction of a facility at Brimsdown Station, in north-east Enfield, to allow local trains to turn around and head back to Stratford. This would enable a four-times-an-hour service, rather than twice an hour, although the constraints of demand on the line would still leave these trains unevenly spaced. Stations would also be improved, including the upgrading of Angel Road into something suitable to serve Meridian Water. Geoff Hobbs, head of rail planning at TfL, says: “The allsinging, all dancing extra line option would cost £250 million. It would provide three, or even four, tracks from Brimsdown to Lea Bridge Road, which gives a better result, with a 15 minute frequency and more capacity to ensure that trains run reliably. “The business case stacks up well, giving a 2.9:1 rate of return, which is quite good as a cost-benefit ratio,” he says. “That comes from opening up the area for development, having an extra 50,000 passengers, and from faster journey times as taking the local trains off that line would speed up the Stansted and Cambridge expresses.” For comparison,

Crossrail, the government’s priority rail scheme in London, gives almost exactly the same rate of return at 3.1 to 1.

E

ven without Meridian Water the argument for a new line is compelling. Enfield’s submission to Network Rail’s Route Utilisation Strategy, an exercise that looks at capacity and constraints on the system, concludes that the two lines via Tottenham Hale and Edmonton Green were effectively full, giving ”a seriously sub-optimal railway network”. It adds: “It should be stressed that more infrastructure will be needed, not may be needed”, and calls for a minimum of four trains an hour to all local stations. The council complains that while the proposed timetable from December 2011 gives local stations such as Brimsdown and Ponders End four trains an hour, because they’re bunched together it amounts to only two trains per hour. It says it “supports strongly” the proposal for a third track, or even a fourth, and raises the possibility of new stations at Carterhatch and Picketts Lock. David Taylor, the council’s head of traffic and transportation, says: “The three-to-four track option is the preferred one. There is finite capacity there and the line through Tottenham Hale has a particular problem. “Passenger capacity is not an issue at the moment because, from December, there will be longer trains so they will carry more passengers. The problem is that while we can increase the length of trains we cannot increase their frequency, and key regeneration areas like Angel Road have a poor service.” The council also hopes to persuade the train operators to run four trains an hour on the branch to Enfield Town, which at present has only a 30-minute service outside peak periods. Once Meridian Water is factored in, the case for the third line becomes even more compelling. Tens of thousands of new residents will want to reach the new shopping developments at Stratford, jobs in Docklands or the City and the heart of London, without waiting for an infrequent and convoluted


17 transport

RIGHT: Angel Road Station is part of TfL’s scheme to improve Lee Valley’s rail services, with the hope of an additional third rail track doubling its hourly service.

service. With a train station and rail line already at the heart of the development, the opportunity to transform the connectivity of the area is just waiting to be taken up. As Hobbs says: “It’s essential we make efforts to persuade the Department for Transport of the merits of the third track idea and get it as high up the government’s priority list as we can.” This desire to see improved services here was strongly supported by Network Rail in its July 2011 London and South East Rail Utilisation Strategy. The strategy backs both TfL’s and the council’s proposals for improved rail services, making a case for the creation of this third line through Enfield. The decision now lies with the Department for Transport and the Treasury. “Network Rail says the new line is a good idea, which is a necessary but not sufficient condition for it to happen,” Hobbs adds. “The big bit is the money, as railways in Britain do not pay for themselves and government approval is needed for the funding.” What is the likelihood of government funding? We’ll find out on 2 July next year, with publication by the Department for Transport of the prosaically named High Level Output Specification, which shows the rail projects the government plans to invest in between 2014-‘19. n

“It’s essential we make efforts to persuade the Department for Transport of the merits of the third track”  eoff Hobbs, head of rail planning, G Transport for London

ON THE ROAD It’s not just rail that keeps Enfield well connected, it’s also at a great point in London’s road infrastructure. The A10 goes north to Hertford and south to the City, giving access to the M25 and the national motorway system. This in turns means easy access to Stansted Airport via the M11, taking a mere 45 minutes, which has proved vital to the import and export activities of many of Enfield’s businesses. Enfield is also well-connected to the London-StanstedCambridge-Peterborough growth corridor, and well positioned to take advantage of its links to England’s ‘silicon fen’ around the University of Cambridge and the science parks in that area. The M25 is vital to the borough’s road connectivity, but can be congested. This should ease with completion of the programme to widen it to four lanes each way, complete on many sections of the motorway, and nearly finished on the section near Enfield.


Asset Management plc is privileged to be working with the London Borough of Enfield in its delivery of the Masterplan for Meridian Water at Central Leeside. Â

With the Masterplan set to join the planning policy framework for Enfield early next year, Dwyer looks forward to continuing its collaboration with the Council and the other stakeholders at Meridian Water, to help with implementation for the benefit of Central Leeside and the surrounding communities of North London. The Group’s 25 year track record in urban regeneration, coupled with its extensive expertise, capital resources and direct involvement with one of the key landholdings within Meridian Water, will provide invaluable support to the wider efforts to transform the area into a major mixed-use development opportunity.

Dwyer Asset Management plc Proud sponsors of Meridian Water at Central Leeside


Meridian Water

Welcome to

meridian WATER Investment will transform Meridian Water’s vast urban landscape and help to deliver vital economic and social benefits for eastern Enfield, creating new urban geography in London’s Lee Valley. Paul Coleman reports

B

ulky blue sheds and rusty gasholders punctuate one half of Meridian Water’s vast swathe of land. The other half of this part of Edmonton features a labyrinth of trading estate streets lined with industrial units. Meridian Water’s massive area and convenient location has hooked potential investors. Seventy-two of Meridian Water’s 85 hectares are available for possible development just six miles from London’s Olympic Park. “Meridian Water is London’s next big development phase after the Olympic Park,” says Neil Rousell, Enfield Council’s director of regeneration, leisure and culture. “It is the most substantial investment opportunity in outer London.” People currently visit this immense area but don’t realise they’re at Meridian Water. Many come simply to snap up a plaited bamboo table lamp or a woven sea-grass seat. Meridian Water easily swallows Ikea’s immense, azure blue Tottenham-Edmonton store. Rousell explains that the British Oxygen Company’s (BOC’s) massive pastel blue sheds were transported from Teesside and rebuilt at Meridian Water. >

19


20 MERIDIAN WATER

“Teesside built ships in these sheds,” he says. “BOC built massive boilers inside them at Meridian Water.” Now only partly used, BOC’s towering sheds stand back politely from the Lee Navigation. This wide canalised artery leaves a north-south line through Meridian Water. Gliding kayakers and chugging narrow boats love the Lee. Coots upend and dive to feed on thriving aquatic plants. Happy dogs take their contented owners for long walks. Cyclists zip along a manicured towpath. Rousell believes Meridian Water will offer current and new residents a genuine prospect of ‘waterside living’. Inward investment could build up to 5,000 new homes within 15-20 years. About 3,000 jobs could be created in enterprises as diverse as knowledge, IT, bio-fuels and recycling. An estimated £1.3 billion investment would create these homes, jobs and the infrastructure needed to support Edmonton’s new neighbourhood. An evolving Meridian Water Masterplan envisages a high school with a sixth form and two primary schools, both with nurseries. The masterplan foresees a police office, a library and a community hall. Two new road bridges would be needed and new shopping areas created. Meridian Water’s central new feature will be an east-west ‘community spine’, a pedestrian- and cycle-friendly route lined with new walkways, a new square, water crossing, shops, homes and offices. The spine would reconnect Meridian Water’s disparate sections and revive historical buildings like the old Atlas linoleum factory. National Grid is already preparing its plans for Meridian Water’s large western flank. The company is seeking a development partner to build 750 new homes and one of the masterplan’s new primary schools. National Grid hopes to break ground in late 2014. Before then, a pedestrian tunnel from National Grid-owned land will allow Edmonton residents to walk to Meridian Water’s retail offering; cars and bus passes can then be left at home.

SO WHERE IS MERIDIAN WATER? Meridian Water is located in Edmonton where the south-east corner of Enfield meets the neighbouring boroughs of Haringey and Waltham Forest. Edmonton Green is its nearest town centre. The site is bounded by the Lee Valley Regional Park to the east and by Conduit Lane and London’s semi-orbital North Circular (A406) to the north. Tottenham Marshes and the Banbury Reservoir are to the south. Meridian Water sits at the foot of the Lee Valley industrial area, which is London’s second largest industrial zone after Park Royal.

The area’s significance and size compares with other regional growth areas such as Greenwich Peninsula and Cricklewood-Brent Cross. Meridian Water makes up a core section of the London-StanstedCambridge-Peterborough growth corridor. The vast 85-hectare site is a strategic opportunity area identified in both the Mayor’s London Plan and the Lee Valley Regional Park Plan. Meridian Water is just six miles from London’s 2012 Olympic Park and Stratford International rail station and only eight miles from London’s West End. Three of London’s busiest airports – Heathrow, Stansted and City – can be reached in less than 45 minutes.

Locally sourced energy Further investment would create a 45-kilometre decentralised energy network (DEN). LondonWaste’s nearby Edmonton incinerator could become a ‘low carbon anchor’. Heat by-product would be converted to supply cheaper combined heat and power to Meridian Water’s new energy efficient homes and low-carbon industries. Detailed technological practicalities are being finalised but Stephen Tapper, Enfield’s assistant director in the regeneration, leisure and culture department, notes Meridian Water’s DEN proposals are far more developed than other tentatively touted DENs across London. “Meridian Water’s DEN already has the heat source and infrastructure,” says Tapper. “Cheaper, greener energy could benefit local businesses and bring real economic benefits.” Tapper explains that Meridian Water’s new residents could enjoy sustainable living in energy efficient homes using renewable power and locally produced energy. New schools would be within easy walking distance. The Lee Valley Park’s walkways and waterways would be a short stroll away. “Families in London want this kind of lifestyle where they can live in eco-homes in an eco-friendly neighbourhood,” says Tapper.

>


New homes Enfield’s local development framework suggests that 40% of new homes in regeneration schemes should be affordable. However, the council is fully aware that development viability is critical. “We need a mixture of family and one- and two-bedroom homes,” says Rousell. “There’ll be a mix of ownership models, including shared ownership as well as social housing.” After LDA Design drafted the masterplan, Enfield Council asked BNP Paribas Real Estate to assess Meridian Water’s development viability. Initially, BNP suggested an efficient developer could build 135 homes per year. In practice, homes might be delivered even faster: several development phases could concurrently get under way on different parts of Meridian Water. Enfield and the Homes and Communities Agency are studying funding models.

Land ownership Meridian Water’s relatively small number of large landowners has helped to kick-start masterplanning. Enfield Council has set up a Meridian Water Landowners’ Panel that includes National Grid, Tesco, Ikea and other parties. Ikea owns the freehold on its store and also a vast piece of open land to the rear. Dwyer Asset Management’s portfolio includes the former BOC sheds now used as storage. Prupim, part of Prudential, owns the successful Ravenside Retail Park, which will be fully integrated with Meridian Water. HSBC Pension Fund owns the vast bulk of Meridian Water’s eastern side, including the complex Lee Valley and Hastingwood trading estates. Metals and Waste Recycling, the UK’s third largest metals recycler, owns its HQ site near Angel Road station, the only portion of Meridian Water north of the North Circular. Elsewhere, Arriva owns a sizeable bus depot at Meridian Water’s southern tip. Thames Water owns a large slice of green belt land close to the reservoir. “We’re working with Thames Water to open this area as a park,” says Tapper.

Edmonton gains ABOVE: Business as usual on the River Lee. LEFT: An artist’s impression of life on the new waterfront. FAR LEFT: An aerial view of the 85 hectare Merdian Water site.

Meridian Water’s development will bring big economic and social gains to the people of Edmonton and Enfield but also to Londoners. Rousell sees Meridian Water as a vital part of Edmonton’s expansion and a growth point within the Lee Valley’s overall investment and regeneration opportunities. Meridian Water is part of a London arc of opportunity sweeping up from Barking Riverside in the Thames Gateway to the Royal Docks enterprise zone. It covers Stratford City, the Olympic Village and Park and Tottenham Hotspur FC’s proposed new stadium at Northumberland Park. Recycling industries could drive much of Meridian Water’s regeneration. Enfield Council is working to relocate Metals and Waste, a firm that recycles 90% of materials from scrap cars. It typifies Eastern Enfield’s historical legacy of attracting ‘backyard industries’. Fifteen years ago, this was regarded as a problem, but rocketing raw materials costs created vibrant recycling markets. Eastern Enfield’s growing core of recycling activities creates a distinct advantage for Meridian Water. The council is helping a growing cluster of green and recycling companies to expand at Meridian Water. >

21 MERIDIAN WATER

A four-minute train ride from Meridian Water’s nearby rail station, Angel Road, takes commuters to Tottenham Hale’s new urban centre. Angel Road is only 25 minutes from Liverpool Street Station in the City of London. Enfield Council is working with Network Rail, Transport for London and National Express East Anglia on a proposal to create a third line from Tottenham to Brimsdown. The new track would enable four trains an hour to call at Angel Road within the next 10 years. Angel Road is a two-platform, unstaffed, London Zone Four station on the Hertford East via Tottenham Hale branch of the Lee Valley Line. Station access is difficult - but not for long.


Meridian Water LEFT: Eco-friendly homes planned for Meridian Water. BELOW: Ikea in Edmonton will be reconfigured as part of the regeneration plans.

22

They include a company on the Hastingwood Trading Estate that refits heating systems to render them more sustainable. Another Meridian Water firm produces bio-diesel fuel from used cooking fat. Nearby, a new company is recycling plastics cast off by Edmonton’s established food and soft drink manufacturers. Tapper hopes new ‘green’ jobs will benefit local people and attract new residents. “Meridian Water is an opportunity for Enfield to help foster new supply chains for emerging industries,” he says. People living at the nearby Shires Estate, at Edmonton Green and across Eastern Enfield need new local opportunities to improve their quality of life. Eastern Enfield contains some of the most deprived communities in the capital yet possesses a large school-age population with a legion of ambitious, educated and talented young people. A co-ordinated multi-agency effort to deliver Meridien Water is being steered by the Meridian Water Delivery Board, an evolving stakeholder body that includes the Greater London Assembly, Transport for London (TfL), the Homes and Communities Agency, North London Business and the North London Strategic Alliance. The delivery board began working in April 2010. Thames Water and other utility companies are including Meridian Water in their plans. TfL and Network Rail are actively planning new and revamped rail and road connections (see box). Network Rail has analysed a proposal, included in its latest London and South East Rail Utilisation Strategy, that would increase Lee Valley to London commuter trains serving Angel Road, Meridian Water’s nearby station.

Did yOu knOw ? The first ever household gas meters were invented in Edmonton and produced at a Meridian Water factory where Tesco and Ikea now stand.

Regeneration at the Olympic Park led to major increases in rail capacity at Stratford station. Similarly, investment and regeneration at Meridian Water could spur action on a new third rail line that would increase capacity at Angel Road (see page 15). The future looks bright for Meridian Water. Rousell and Tapper are confident of its success even in a recovering property market. “We want people to enjoy living and working at Meridian Water in Edmonton’s newest environment,” says Rousell. “The masterplan for Meridian Water is all about developing a strong community in Edmonton with a neighbourhood feel,” he adds. “We want people to feel that Meridian Water and Edmonton can be their place and a home for future generations.” n


Thames Water supporting regeneration – investing in north London It’s our job to provide the water and sewerage services our customers need for the long term, so we’re already planning the support needed for Enfield’s future development. We’re currently investing nearly £5bn – the water industry’s biggest investment programme – to ensure people can rely on our services around the clock, in north London and across the Thames Valley. This includes maintaining and improving our pipes, pumping stations and treatment works. At Deephams Sewage Works, for example, we are improving treatment standards to boost water quality in the River Lee and Salmon’s Brook, cater for a growing population and reduce the risk of flooding.

We’re also continuing to invest in supplying highquality tap water to local homes and businesses, as well as replacing old pipework and tackling leaks. There are a number of regeneration proposals in the borough, including the Meridian Water development, which will mean significant growth in the area. We are committed to working with Enfield Council to ensure that new water mains and sewers are in place in time to serve this and other growth areas. For more information about Thames Water and its work in urban regeneration please go to our website

www.thameswater.co.uk


Projects overview

magnificent ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

2 NEW SOUTHGATE > The Ladderswood Estate regenerated; the New Southgate Industrial Estate redeveloped; and shopping facilities enhanced.

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

New Southgate

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

MAP: The Seven ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ regeneration ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ key ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ sites ■ ■ located ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ throughout ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ the ■ ■ ■ ■borough. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Continue overleaf ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ for details on the ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■first ■ six ■ projects, ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ and ■ see ■ ■ ■ 19 ■ ■ page ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ for ■ an ■ in-depth ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■feature ■ ■ on ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Meridian ■ ■ ■ Water. ■ ■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 7■ Meridian water ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ project ■ ■ ■ the ■ ■ ■ The biggest in ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ includes ■ ■ ■ an■ eco■ ■ ■ borough ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ village, waterfront ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ homes ■ ■ and ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ businesses. page ■ ■ ■ ■ See ■ ■ ■ 19 ■ for ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ the Meridian Water feature. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

>

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 6■ ENFIELD TOWN ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■homes ■ ■ and ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ New shops and ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ traffic ■ ■ ■ ■ in ■ a■ ■ improved flows ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ preserved market ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ town ■ ■area. ■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Cockfosters

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

M25

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Hadley Wood

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

4 Ponders end > Strong community spirit is shaping a transformed gateway to the Lee Valley Park, with new homes, school, public realm and leisure facilities.

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

3 HIGHMEAD, 3 HIGHMEAD > £25 million of highquality housing to improve the housing mix, plus 1,092sq m of retail and commercial space.

>

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

5 SHIRES ■ ■ ■ ESTATE ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Neighbourhood ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ empowerment and a four■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■scheme ■ ■ ■ renew ■ ■ two ■ ■ year to ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■and ■ ■ ■ 17-storey towers ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ low-rise ■ ■ ■ housing. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

1 EDMONTON GREEN > A revitalised town centre with 1,065 new homes, new youth and community centres and improved station.

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Along with the £1.3 billion Meridian Water scheme millions of pounds are being invested in six other key regeneration projects across much of the borough, as Enfield gets ready for growth ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

seven ■

24

■ ■


■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

B

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

2

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

7

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Angel Road

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

5

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

3 ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

1

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Ponders End

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Edmo nton Green

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

4

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

RD L AR

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Southbury

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

25

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

U IRC

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

N. C

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

M25

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Brimsdown

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Bush Hill Park

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Enfield Lock

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

5

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

A40

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Enfield Town

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

6

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Palmers Green

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Turkey Street

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Winchmore Hill

■ ■

Arnos Grove

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

FO

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

ST

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Grange Park

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Enfield Chase

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

5

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Gordon Hill

■ ■

Southgate

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

M2

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

F IELD RD 0 - EN A 11

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

RD ■

■ ■

Y

■ ■

LE

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

M RA

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

EW A

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Crews Hill ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

DG

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

RI

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

E

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Y

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

-T H

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

05

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

PROJECTS OVERVIEW

A10 ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

GE ROA D

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

LL

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

A10 - GREA T CA MB R ID

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

HI

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

Y

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

RT

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

R

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

KE

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

BA

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

A10

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

NE

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

LA

■ ■

■ ■

EEN

■ ■

GR

■ ■


Project by project RIGHT: Asda is one of many big names that have moved to the Edmonton Green area.

26

EDMONTON GREEN

BELOW: The south wing of Edmonton Green Shopping Centre recently enjoyed a £1 million makeover.

Enfield Council and Edmonton residents are striving to ensure that a new masterplan recreates Edmonton Green as an open, safer and vibrant district town centre where people will choose to live, work and shop. Already, the council and its partners are delivering improvements to reduce persistent social and economic deprivation. For instance, a new fourstorey, 73-bed Travelodge hotel will increase local economic activity and provide much needed jobs.

A refurbished South Mall shopping area will offer cafes, restaurants and leisure facilities. Councillor Del Goddard, cabinet member for business and regeneration, says: “We’re reinforcing the retail network of this part of north London: Wood Green, Edmonton Green and Enfield Town.” The Montagu Recreation Pavilion gives local people a flexible, multipurpose community centre. The Edmonton Eagles Boxing Club now enjoys modernised and dedicated training facilities. These improvements followed the complete refurbishment of three housing towers and the building of 1,065 new homes – all part of one of Europe’s largest housing renewal schemes. But much more is being done to attract investment to the area: promoting social enterprises, increasing the skill sets of local people and creating new young entrepreneurs are high on the agenda. A £3.4 million investment at the Craig Park Youth Centre will create an Edmonton Youth Hub. Young people, some of whom

will run the Hub, will access advice, information and support services inside a safe yet iconic building. The refurbishment of the 40-yearold Green Towers Community Centre will provide local people with a multipurpose and fully accessible facility at Plevna Road. Travellers using Edmonton Green station to commute to central London will benefit from new Oyster gatelines, and possibly step-free access. A longer-term aim is to establish in people’s minds a clear relationship between Edmonton Green and the new jobs, homes and shops that will be created at Meridian Water. New transport and physical links between the two places will achieve this goal. “The masterplan will drive investment in an area with great regeneration potential,” says principal planning and regeneration officer Suzanne Johnson. “Edmonton Green town centre also enjoys a more affordable property market compared to other areas in London.”


NEW SOUTHGATE

RIGHT: Enfield Council is working closely with residents to breathe new life into New Southgate.

27

PONDERS END Enfield Council is working closely with an active community development trust, voluntary groups and local residents to transform Ponders End into a vibrant local centre. A widely supported Framework for Change lays out development possibilities for Ponders End Central, Waterfront, South Street and Alma Road. Residents’ views on a possibly farreaching renewal of the Alma Road estate are being sought. At the heart of Ponders End Central is the Queensway Campus site, including the listed Broadbent building, where the ambition is for up to 450 apartments and family homes. The loss of the ‘student pound’ when Middlesex University left Queensway sharpened the need for revitalisation. The council is assembling land for development on the high street in front of the campus, so that shops and community uses accompany new homes in a vibrant high street hub. Nearby, the £27 million school for 1,900 pupils gained planning permission in July and will be completed in 2013. Public realm improvements planned from Ponders End station along South Street will create a safer, more attractive route for pupils. Ponders End is located close to the cinemas, restaurants and sports facilities at Picketts Lock. “We’d like to see better connections with the Lee Valley’s reservoirs so Ponders End can become a true gateway to the Lee Valley Regional Park,” says head of neighbourhood regeneration, Sharon Strutt. Like other areas with an industrial past, Ponders End has suffered high levels of unemployment – a team of job brokers at South Street helps the longer-term unemployed find work and training. Nevertheless, Ponders End industries still provide local jobs, including at the historic Wright’s Flour Mill. Locals maintain a strong community spirit. Residents, businesses and the council are shaping Ponders End’s future through the Vision Team, which will lead to the creation of a stronger Ponders End partnership for change. At Ponders End Park local people significantly influenced proposals to turn an outmoded recreation ground into an attractive park, which will improve access between the High Street and South Street and change perceptions of the area. “Ponders End has great potential as a vibrant part of the Upper Lee Valley corridor,” says Strutt.

PROJECT BY PROJECT

Enfield Council aims to shape development in New Southgate to create an attractive neighbourhood that meets the needs of existing residents. The New Southgate Masterplan covers an area that represents the borough’s western gateway and offers opportunity for mixed-use development. The plan includes regeneration of the Ladderswood Estate, redevelopment of the New Southgate Industrial Estate and improvements to shopping areas at New Southgate and around Charles Holden’s iconic Arnos Grove tube station. New Southgate sits close to Enfield’s western borders with Barnet and Haringey. Enfield Council and local residents are determined to improve the Ladderswood Estate neighbourhood where high unemployment and deprivation persist. This environment also suffers from underused green spaces. A gasholder dominates the skyline. Local residents are being closely involved in the plan to demolish all 251 existing Ladderswood units and replace them with 491 new apartments and family homes. About 60% of the new homes will be private and 40% affordable. Of the affordable, 70% will be socially rented and 30% shared ownership. Mullalley, in partnership with One Housing Group, have been selected as Enfield’s development partner for this transformational £80 million scheme. Work will start next year with the first local residents expected to move into their new homes in 2014. Mulalley director Eamon O’Malley says: “We look forward to continuing to work with Enfield and One Housing Group to deliver this important regeneration of a neglected area of north London.” Enfield’s Western Gateway site sits close to north London’s orbital North Circular Road. Occupied by large DIY retail units and the disused gasholder, the Gateway site represents a ripe landmark development opportunity. “The objective is to secure exemplar schemes that will contribute to a safer environment, a good mix of housing and new jobs,” says Suzanne Johnson, Enfield’s principal planning and regeneration officer. “The masterplan will transform this part of New Southgate into an attractive, well connected and sustainable community.”

LEFT: Ponders End is already a lively community.


Highmead

LEFT: The Shires Estate, Edmonton, from above. BOTTOM: Residents of all ages got together last summer to create a community garden.

The Highmead housing renewal project aims to encourage people to buy high quality homes in the Edmonton Angel district centre and boost the local economy. Councillor Del Goddard, cabinet member for business and regeneration, says: “Altering the housing mix is a key issue in areas like Highmead, with a high proportion of social housing where we want to see a mix of private and social housing. Bringing in or retaining residents with more disposable incomes would be beneficial to retail and to the high street.” Planning consent was secured last February. Lead architect Hawkins Brown was appointed to deliver Enfield Council’s vision for a high quality development at the 0.6-hectare site. Highmead is about 25 minutes by rail to Liverpool Street Station from nearby Silver Street and White Hart Lane. Development partner Countryside Properties was selected in September 2011 along with their partner Newlon. The council had already acquired vacant possession, undertook demolition works and obtained a detailed planning consent before marketing the site. Hawkins Brown director Russell Brown says: “Innovative design that is particular to this place will attract new developers and housing providers to Edmonton.” The £25 million development opportunity includes 120 homes with 38% offered as affordable. High quality apartments will be set in a larger contemporary block. Contemporary family homes will be arranged in four smaller mews-style sections surrounding a community garden. Rooftop solar heating will be extensively used. In addition, the plan involves providing 1,092sq m of modern retail and commercial space on the area’s busy Fore Street artery. A multi-purpose community building will be built on Alpha Road. The former council estate was decanted in readiness for its regeneration. The 11-storey Highmead tower, built in the 1960s and widely accepted as in poor condition, is due for demolition later this year along with an outmoded shopping parade. Enfield Council leader, councillor Doug Taylor, says: “The new plans for Highmead demonstrate the council’s commitment to architecture of the highest quality.”

28 PROJECT BY PROJECT

SHIRES ESTATE Local residents, Enfield Council and its EdmontonLeeside partners are working closely on a major spatial development plan that will improve life on the Shires council estate in Edmonton. The Shires ‘front-runner’ neighbourhood development plan seeks to improve the quality of life for estate residents. Lifts have already been upgraded and new communal flooring laid. A refurbished tenants’ space will enable meetings, clubs and events to take place regularly. A working group has established a range of other shortterm improvements. Residents and housing staff have trained and worked together to significantly reduce drug usage, gang activity, anti-social behaviour and the presence of aggressive dogs. Neighbourhood ‘vanguard’ funds are now helping residents to shape a local area plan, notably by building up the capacity of the estate’s fledgling residents’ association. Active residents passionately want further improvements but need the association to secure wider support across the estate. Technically located in Edmonton, the Shires Estate stands close to Angel Road rail station. The North Circular Road separates the Shires Estate from the vast investment opportunity site at Meridian Water. A popular community garden, established last summer by Shires residents working with Enfield Council and Enfield Homes, has helped to improve life on the estate. “The garden shows how people can come together,” says Sharon Strutt, Enfield’s head of neighbourhood regeneration. “Shires residents now have an opportunity to contribute to the future shape of their neighbourhood.”

RIGHT: The Highmead scheme will replace a tower block and provide 120 brand new homes.


ENFIELD TOWN

29 PROJECT BY PROJECT

Enfield Town’s economy has benefited from immense improvements over the last five years. The Palace Xchange extension to the town’s Palace Gardens Shopping Centre was recently followed by an impressive new award-winning public library. Yet Enfield Council remains determined to further enhance the town’s position as the borough’s main shopping, leisure and cultural destination. For instance, the council is talking with potential development partners about high quality retail, office and leisure development around Enfield Town station, a rail terminus and gateway connected to Liverpool Street. Nearby, the former bingo hall at Burleigh Way has already been demolished to prepare for Christian Action’s mixed-use development that includes 42 residential units. All of the new homes will be affordable after funding was secured from the Homes and Communities Agency. This development transforms a derelict site next to the Market Square into a new route fronted by new shops and cafes.

The council will always conserve the town’s strengths such as its attractive historic buildings, quaint and quiet streets, clean rivers, tidy park and bustling market square. For example, the council acted decisively to improve traffic flows around the area’s major road junctions. “Enfield’s new retail heart has fulfilled expectations,” says Stephen Tapper, assistant director in Enfield Council’s regeneration, leisure and culture department. “Footfall remains good despite the recession. Development prospects look bright.” n

ABOVE: Enfield Town bustles with coffee shops , pubs and restaurants. LEFT: An aerial view of Enfield Town, the borough’s premier shopping destination.


31 SPORT and LEISURE

THIS SPORTING LIFE Olympic legacy means much more than medals and national pride, sporting hopes or improved facilities. In Enfield, it’s about engaging residents to take advantage of investment in sports and leisure centres, getting local people to use the stunning Lee Valley Regional Park and establishing the borough as a golfing destination. Noella Pio Kivlehan reports

A

s the city’s boroughs gear up for the London 2012 Olympics with varying levels of involvement in the great spectacle, one in particular is proud to boast of a crucial role in preparing Team GB to win those sought-after medals. The north London borough of Enfield, and its facilities at the Lee Valley Athletic Centre, is to be an official training venue for the UK’s athletes. As well as supporting the athletes, Enfield is hoping the games will have a greater effect on the area overall. “We have an Olympics policy and strategy which has five main aims (see box, over). Really, we want to make sure that we benefit from the Olympics,” says Simon Gardner, head of leisure and culture at Enfield Council. The borough is proactive about its London 2012 Games connection, with all of its leisure facilities getting star treatment and millions of pounds being pumped into Enfield’s five council-owned sports centres, used annually by 1.7 million people. The timing is coincidental to the Olympics as the upgrades have come about due to a change >

ABOVE: Lee Valley Athletics Centre is the training ground for many of the UK’s top athletes and 2012 hopefuls.


Enfield’s OlympicS legacy strategy The council has a strategy to make sure that the borough capitalises on the London 2012 games. It sets out how Enfield plans to maximise the opportunities presented by the Games to ensure the borough’s residents and businesses benefit from the legacy of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.
Enfield aims to:

32 SPORT AND LEISURE

■ Maximise volunteering and training opportunities for residents ■ Engage more young people in active sport by working with schools and colleges ■ Build on, and expand, opportunities to participate in sports and cultural activities for all of our communities ■ Maximise regeneration and employment opportunities especially in the cultural, leisure and sporting industries ■ Develop the council’s structures and community sector capacity to deliver a legacy from the 2012 Games

in the centres’ operator, which is now Fusion Lifestyle. Nevertheless, the cash injection has helped boost the borough’s sport and leisure reputation. “Over the last few months, there has been an ongoing £8.9 million programme of upgrades to our centres. This includes improved gym and changing facilities, new pitches and better reception areas,” says Gardner, adding that the work should be finished by October 2012. More council money has been allocated towards arts and events. “Despite the tough economic climate and government cuts, Enfield’s budget is £200,000 for arts and events,” said Gardner. “This is every year for the next three years.” Part of this will be used to motivate the people of Enfield to get fitter. “The borough is keen to promote activities among its residents and get more people taking part in physical activity,” says Gardner. “For instance, in June, 500 women took part in a 10-kilometre night hike, and we have held a sports event for school children, called “Go Enfield Go!” Other schemes, says Gardner, include trying to fill the parks with activities such as football and hockey, and golf promotions. “We are starting to do those promotions now. We have eight golf courses, so we are keen to make Enfield a destination for golf.” The courses include council-owned Whitewebbs Park, Lee Valley and private courses such as Bush Hill Park, Enfield and Crews Hill.

A

nother important development in the borough is the Queen Elizabeth II Stadium. Opened in 1953 the track, on which the likes of Lord Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett trained, was in desperate need of refurbishment when, in 2008, a £1.2 million revamp was announced – a major boost for the capital’s commitment to sport after 2012. The stadium’s central arena will be used by Enfield Town FC for all its league matches. Enfield Town Ladies FC could also move to the site, to develop girls and ladies football in the borough. To achieve all these goals, council departments are combining their efforts. “We work with health colleagues

and with youth service colleagues, and we work very closely with the PE team for the school improvement service,” says Gardner. The council also works closely with the Lee Valley Regional Parks Authority (LVRPA). The authority runs a 26-mile linear park, stretching along the banks of the River Lee from Ware in Hertfordshire, down through Essex and north London and on past the Olympic Park to the East India Dock Basin on the River Thames. The park offers nature, sport and leisure, heritage sites, gardens, parklands, farms and riverside trails, enjoyed by 4.5 million visitors a year. LVRPA chief executive Shaun Dawson says: “We are proud of the fact that Lee Valley Regional Park has something for everyone, from white water rafting and ice skating to farms and nature trails.” The launch of Lee Valley White Water Centre has helped to boost figures. “The centre is unique in >


“There has been an ongoing £8.9 million programme of upgrades to our centres”

LEFT: Southbury Leisure Centre has been recently refurbished. MIDDLE: One of the centre’s two 3G football pitches.

 imon Gardner, head of leisure and S culture at Enfield Council

33 SPORT AND LEISURE

FIT FOR PURPOSE: Enfield Council’S leisure centres ■ Albany Leisure Centre: facilities include a 25m swimming pool, an octagonal learning pool, a gym and exercise studio ■ Edmonton Leisure Centre: a large, multipurpose centre. Facilities include a state of the art gym, exercise studio, spinning area, pools, flumes, sports hall, play centre and creche 
 ■ Southbury Leisure Centre: offers a 25m swimming pool, a large gym, exercise studio and sports hall 
 ■ Southgate Leisure Centre: features a gym, 33.3m swimming pool, poolside sauna, steam rooms and a spinning studio ■ Arnos Pool Aspire Sports Fitness Centre: a dual use facility comprising a four-court sports hall, gym and a range of group exercise classes

LEFT: Improved reception and changing facilities at the Albany Leisure Centre in Enfield. BOTTOM: An artist’s impression of the enhanced frontage, on track for completion in 2012.


opportunity

ENFIELD

Opportunity Enfield partners group Joining together to support Enfield

Ardmore Chris Langdon clangdon@ardmoregroup.co.uk

Avanta John Ashworth john.ashworth@avanta.uk.com Blakedown Sport & Play Ltd Marketing department marketing@sportandplay.co.uk Ingleton Wood LLP Andrew Shepherd andrew.shepherd@ingletonwood.co.uk Derrick Wade Waters Mark Joslin mj@dww.co.uk Fusion Lifestyle Ken Biggs ken.biggs@fusion-lifestyle.com Pinnacle ESP Dan Margetson dmargetson@pinnacle-esp.co.uk Warburtons Craig Morris craig.morris@warburtons.co.uk

For more information about these companies, visit www.opportunityenfield.com/links


35 SPORT AND LEISURE

that it is the only Olympics venue open to the public before the London 2012 Games; it is also the first to be confirmed for a major event after the Games, when it hosts the 2015 Canoe Slalom World Championships. Dawson adds: “This summer, thousands of people booked rafting, canoeing and kayaking sessions and visited to watch and eat and drink at the cafe. As with all our sports facilities, the Lee Valley White Water Centre caters for all levels of skills, from elite athletes to aspiring athletes, schools and community groups. It is also popular with major companies who booked rafting sessions for corporate team building days. After 2012, visitors will also benefit from the VeloPark, hockey and tennis centres that are located on the Olympic Park and we will apply the same ethos in ensuring the facilities can be enjoyed by anyone.” And that ethos extends to sporting and leisure activities across the whole borough. n

“The Lee Valley White Water Centre caters for all levels of skills, from elite athletes to aspiring athletes, schools and community groups”  haun Dawson, chief executive of Lee S Valley Regional Park Authority

A RAFT OF NEW FACILITIES: The Lee Valley White Water Centre opened on 22 April 2011 on time and on budget. It is the first and only new Olympics venue open to the public for use before the London 2012 Games. It will host the Canoe Slalom events at the Games. However, the Lee Valley Regional Parks Authority’s (LVRPA’s) plans for a white water centre predate the Olympics bid; the centre was designed with legacy in mind from the very start. It has two separate courses – the 300m Olympic Standard Competition Course, with a 5.5m descent, and the 160m Legacy Loop with a 1.6m descent – perfect for training and developing the next generation of champions and opening up canoeing, kayaking and rafting to new audiences. In its first summer the centre sold 17,000 tickets. Within the first month alone 2,556 people tried the same course that Olympians will raft next summer. The centre is one of four London 2012 Games venues that LVRPA will run after the Games, including the Lee Valley VeloPark and Lee Valley Hockey and Tennis Centres.

TOP: The Lee Valley White Water Centre offers the public a chance to try canoeing, kayaking and rafting. ABOVE: The main building has a cafe, changing rooms and a spectator facility.


LondonWaste EcoPark Supporting an evolving Enfield The LondonWaste EcoPark in Edmonton N18 plays a vital role in Enfield; LondonWaste Ltd has a major contract with the North London Waste Authority (NLWA) to provide waste disposal and treatment services for its seven constituent boroughs (Enfield, Barnet, Camden, Hackney, Haringey, Islington, and Waltham Forest). The company also operates a transport contract, collecting material from Household Waste Recycling Centres. As a major employer and service provider in the area, the company remains committed and expert in delivering a cost effective and valuable service to the community and businesses in Enfield. The company largely employs local people through involvement with job centres, agencies and, via long term links with Schools and Further Education, helps to prepare young people and adults for employment. The EcoPark will remain an important site of industrial land within Enfield, of around 15 hectares in size, housing a number of waste management centres, primarily composting, recycling and energy recovery. Its long term use for waste management is protected by Mayoral policies which recognise the strategic importance of resource management to the capital. The site will be further developed over forthcoming years continuing to help London achieve its sustainability goals. Rest assured that in the meantime waste and recyclables collected from the seven constituent boroughs will continue to be delivered to LondonWaste for treatment, separation, recycling and composting.

To find out more about the services we provide and plans for the future visit our website www.londonwaste.co.uk

Tel: 020 8803 1322 www.londonwaste.co.uk Advent Way, London N18 3AG

The Energy Centre exports eighty-five percent of the electricity it generates to the National Grid, which is enough to power 72,000 homes as well as all the other centres in the EcoPark. The Compost Centre produces a high quality compost which can then be reused in agriculture, local allotments, parks and gardens. Up to 45,000 tonnes of organic waste a year is saved from going to landfill sites. Over 5million tonnes of waste was diverted from landfill from 2000 – 2010. Improvement plans will introduce a semi automated system for recycling bulky items in 2012.

London Borough of

Enfield


Enfield has long had a thriving industrial quarter. As traditional manufacturers have shut up shop, green-tech businesses have been lining up to take their place. Waste not, want not, says Elizabeth Pears

O

nce upon a time, it was believed that the only way to get rid of waste was to bury it. Now, amid concern about climate change and rapidly filling landfill sites, we’re waking up to the fact that waste is no longer simply rubbish but a valuable resource that can create new products or energy. Enfield is capitalising on this new market, emerging as a major hub for sustainable businesses. Edmonton has long had a low-tech waste and recycling industry, which is now being modernised, and the borough’s green and carbon reduction (G&CR) sector has steadily developed over the past 40 years from only two businesses in 1971, to 53 different companies in 2011, employing a workforce of 1,518 people. Thirty-six of these companies sprang up in the last decade. Research by consultant Innovas found that Enfield now has the second largest workforce in ‘recovery and recycling’ of the 32 London boroughs. Specialisms range from waste collection or dismantling ‘end of life’ vehicles and IT equipment to producing energy and recycling materials for reuse.

Companies are initially attracted by Enfield’s location, its ease of access to major routes and ability to accommodate firms of different sizes. As more businesses flock to the area, they are able to reap the advantages of being grouped together through complementary partnership working. They can also take advantage of the other industries in the area. For example, some green companies are supplying local food manufacturers with locally produced, recycled packaging. Such ‘closed loop’ strategies help to reduce transport costs. In the future, another big draw for green businesses could be a decentralised energy network. Enfield Council and the North London Strategic Alliance have just completed an initial feasibility study into such a scheme, with a very positive outcome. Such a network would use waste to generate energy, meaning a cheaper and stable supply for industry, and reduced waste going to landfill or incinerators. The scheme would be part of the Mayor of London’s target of supplying a quarter of London’s energy from decentralised sources by 2025. >

LondonWaste’s EcoPark in Edmonton, one of the borough’s many sustainable businesses, houses a number of waste management centres involved in composting, recycling and energy recovery (see page 41).

37 SUSTAINABILITY

GREEN MACHINES


CASE STUDY

1. Biffa

Waste management and recycling Gibbs Road, Montagu Road Trading Estate, Edmonton Number of employees: 250 When did it move to Enfield, and why? Biffa moved to Enfield in 2010 after buying out Greenstar UK in a £135 million deal and taking over its existing site.

38 SUSTAINABILITY

According to Mike Topham, Biffa’s director responsible for recycling: “Enfield is in an ideal location for a mega materials recycling facility (MRF): an industrial area in Europe’s biggest conurbation, with connections to big arterial roads like the M25 and the North Circular.” What exactly does it do? The 16,250sq m site in Edmonton – London’s largest MRF – is licensed to process up to 350,000 tonnes of recyclables per year, and handles a further 150,000 tonnes annually through its waste transfer station. This capacity means it will process nearly 10% of north London’s waste, and take waste from other areas in the south-east and home counties. The facility has been designed to process both domestic and commercial dry recyclables including paper, cardboard, plastic, metal and glass containers. Recyclables salvaged here are sold to reprocessing outlets mostly in the UK, although some material, particularly fibre for paper, is exported mainly to the Far East. Green credentials? Biffa uses some of the best sorting equipment to meet its exacting standards, such as improved screen drives for more efficient paper processing, optical sorting technology for recycling foil and plastic film, and a higher number of separators to boost recovery and quality. This cutting edge technology means it can capture more plastic which is then forwarded to their other facilities for further reprocessing. The advantage to this is that local authorities that prefer mixed recycling (‘everything in one box’) can be confident that waste will still be usable.

ABOVE: Manufacturing and recycling at CocaCola’s Edmonton site, which achieved zero waste in 2010.

CASE STUDY

2. Coca-Cola Enterprises Edmonton: Nobel Road, Eley Trading Estate Enfield: Bancroft Way (off Mollison Ave), EN3 Number of employees: 250 on Edmonton site

When did it move to Enfield? The global giant first moved to Edmonton in 1974 and then to a second site in Enfield in 1989. What exactly does it do? At the Edmonton site, manufacturing and recycling. At Enfield, distribution to suppliers in the region.

LEFT: Biffa’s site in Edmonton is London’s largest materials recycling facility.

Green credentials? Edmonton is one of Coca-Cola’s best-performing sites for water and energy efficiency. The amount of water use has been reduced by 12% since 2007, and it recently installed a more efficient boiler system which has reduced gas use and contributed to an overall 10% reduction in energy across the whole site. It achieved zero waste in 2010, which means everything was reused with nothing going to a landfill. Earlier this year, the Enfield distribution site installed a compressed biomethane fuelling station which will be used by a special fleet of distribution vehicles. Vehicles powered with biomethane have extremely low emissions of local pollutants compared to modern petrol and diesel vehicles. To further reduce its carbon footprint, Coca-Cola Edmonton is considering installing solar panels to create renewable energy. >


When it comes to materials recycling we’ve got it sorted. Biffa has provided real commitment to investment and innovation in recycling technology by building a network of Materials Recycling Facilities (MRFs). These include large scale sites in Manchester, Walsall and our new state-of-the-art plant at Edmonton within the Borough of Enfield. Our Edmonton facility is one of the capital’s largest MRFs and has been fitted out with the most modern technology for the high quality processing of recyclable materials. The site provides a solution for households and businesses, both locally and further afield. This helps improve the environment and contributes to stimulating the economy. All our MRFs are based upon the segregation and processing of recycling materials, which typically include all forms of paper, plastics, card and cardboard, steel and aluminium cans. With locations throughout the UK and a combined capacity of 1.5 million tonnes annually there is always an outlet for your recycling requirements.

You can find out more about our complete range of services by visiting www.biffa.co.uk or call us on 0800 601 601.


Savills Planning Savills is pleased to announce that following the recent acquisition of LPP we have expanded our dedicated team of planners to 170, advising the public and private sectors from London and 15 ofďŹ ces across the UK.

Roger Hepher Head of Planning and Regeneration +44 (0) 845 1550 138 rhepher@savills.com

savills.co.uk


41 SUSTAINABILITY

ABOVE: The London EcoPark serves over a million households in north London and is working to recycle half of all their waste.

CASE STUDY

3.London EcoPark

Operated by LondonWaste and owned by the North London Waste Authority (NLWA) Advent Way, Edmonton Number of employees: 220 across three north London sites How long has it been in Enfield? The energy-from-waste facility has been in operation since 1971, while the Compost Centre facility opened in 2006. What exactly does it do? The London Waste EcoPark is home to a number of waste management centres, primarily engaged in composting, recycling and energy recovery. It receives waste from 1.7 milllion households within the North London Waste Authority’s constituent boroughs – Enfield, Camden, Barnet, Hackney, Haringey, Islington and Waltham Forest. Green credentials? The Energy Centre burns waste unsuitable for recycling and converts it into electricity, via steam-powered turbines. It exports 85% of the electricity it generates to the National Grid, enough to power 72,000 homes, as well as the other centres in the EcoPark.

The Compost Centre uses grass cuttings, kitchen scraps and foliage from parks and green spaces across north London to make high quality compost, which can then be reused in agriculture, local allotments, parks and gardens. Annually, up to 45,000 tonnes of organic waste is saved from going to landfill sites. NLWA has helped reduce the waste produced in north London by four per cent through outreach work, encouraging residents and businesses to cut their waste. It is working to meet a target of half of all household waste being recycled, with a 35% reduction in the amount of waste being sent to landfill by 2020. n 




ACHIEVING REGENERATION Notting Hill Housing is a social enterprise which has been at the forefront of vibrant urban regeneration since 1963. Notting Hill has over 25,000 homes across London and the South East and employs 800 staff. We understand that vibrant communities need more than just great houses. We run employment training and youth programmes; set up and manage community nurseries and run environmental campaigns; and we are constantly rethinking initiatives to improve the lives and futures of our customers. In 2010, Notting Hill took on the renovation and regeneration of the North Circular Road sites after the scale of local road improvements was downgraded. The strong partnership between Notting Hill and Enfield Council has already transformed much of the local area including: ÂŁ10 million committed to refurbish over 250 homes, due to finish next year; housing or re-housing 118 existing tenants, with remaining homes available for new tenants nominated by Enfield Council; the eviction of a large number of squatters

REFURBISHMENTS

CONSTRUCTION TRAINING

NOTTING HILL TENANTS

To complement the refurbishment of the existing properties we are also proposing a new development programme that will: deliver further high quality sustainable homes for rent, shared ownership and sale; regenerate vacant and derelict sites and some existing properties that have been compromised by the road improvements; provide new landscaping and tree planting to enhance the environment and improve security.

NEW HOMES FOR ENFIELD

NEW LANDSCAPING


43 made in enfield

MADE in enfield Enfield was once known as London’s workshop, famous for manufacturing, among many other things, the Lee Enfield Rifle. These days its business profile is very different, with the borough’s transport links and ample space attracting companies from the burgeoning green industries sector as well as huge national brands. Pamela Buxton reports

I

ABOVE: John Lewis Partnership’s new customer delivery hub located at Innova Park.

n the 1970s, half of Enfield’s workforce was in food and drink manufacturing. Like in so much of the capital, and the country, jobs in this sector have now declined – in Enfield’s case from a peak of 50,000 to 5,000, with local firms now more likely to manufacture goods abroad and use their Enfield base to manage or package them. Notable exceptions include the giant Coca-Cola bottling plant in Edmonton; baker Warburtons, which employs 250 at its site in Brimsdown; and Greggs, which opened its south-east regional headquarters in the borough in 1986. At the other extreme, 85% of businesses employ fewer than 10 people, according to Enfield Council’s 2011 Local Economic Assessment report (LEA). As manufacturing has shrunk, so other sectors have grown. One of these is logistics and distribution, with companies taking advantage of the borough’s extensive road transport links both to London markets and out to Hertfordshire, Essex and the South East through direct access to the M25, then M1, M11 and A1. One giant >


44 MADE IN ENfield

BELOW: Baker Greggs takes full advantage of Enfield’s excellent road transport links. BOTTOM: The Warburtons site in Brimsdown.

brand doing exactly this is the John Lewis Partnership, which has moved into a new 8,080sq m customer delivery hub employing 90 people at Innova Park, off Junction 25 of the M25. This location serves stores in Stratford, Welwyn Garden City and Watford and “is a good strategic base for us to reach a wide area,” according to a John Lewis spokeswoman. Crucially, Enfield’s outer London position means it also offers scope for development. Unlike some spaceconstrained boroughs, Enfield has ‘elbow room’, with development sites large enough for the huge facilities needed by the logistics industry. “Enfield offers land and site opportunities that others don’t have,” says Huw Jones, chief executive of the North London Chamber of Commerce (NLCC). “It’s not hard to sell the borough as soon as you get people here.” One company about to take advantage of this is Tesco, which is opening a purpose-built 11,150sq m customer order facility in early 2012 in G-Park. This will employ 500 people to assemble online customer orders from in and around the north of London. Enfield was just right for Tesco’s needs, says a spokesman for the supermarket group. “It’s very well-placed for easy access to the motorway network and distribution system for north London.” Another growth area has been the environmental industry, with a cluster of green and carbon reduction businesses growing up over the past five years stimulated by the introduction of carbon-reduction targets. It now has 27 businesses in this sector, mostly in the east of the borough. These include highly sophisticated companies such as Greenstar, which moved into the area last year and now employs 230 staff in its materials recovery facility.


“Enfield offers land and site opportunities that others don’t have”  Huw Jones, chief executive of the North London Chamber of Commerce

45 MADE IN ENfield

This processes 10% of North London’s waste, sorting dry waste into steel, aluminium, ground glass, and different grades of plastic, and selling them back to industry. Within six months of opening in Enfield Greenstar had been acquired by Biffa, which is planning further expansion with the establishment of a plastic bottle recycling plant on the local Eley Estate. Another aspect of this green cluster involves plans to develop a decentralised energy network that would enable Enfield’s two power stations in Brimsdown to use waste heat to heat water in homes and businesses in the area. This could be an added appeal for those moving to Enfield, says Fiona Crehan, enterprise and investment officer at Enfield Council. “If we can offer housing that’s eco-friendly, that may attract a broader social mix. Enfield wants to attract more affluent people into the borough, which will in turn help the retail sector.”

F

or indeed, retail is another target for growth. According to the LEA, Enfield is ‘under-shopped’ and has the potential for 4,270 more town-centre jobs by 2025. The Enfield Business and Retailers Association (EBRA) is working with the council on ways to grow the retail footprint in both Enfield town centre and the retail parks, with plans progressing for the redevelopment of a vacant office site close to the rail station (see page 29). In this way, it is hoped to encourage locals to spend their money in the borough, rather than elsewhere. Construction is also an important sector, with a workforce of 6,825 across 1,160 businesses, and a construction training centre launched by the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London in 2009. One of the larger businesses in the sector is Ardmore, which has been building prefabricated pods for the Olympic Village in Stratford from its base in Brimsdown. Ardmore also has its own training centre. Even with all this to offer its growing business sectors, there are areas that need to improve to widen the borough’s appeal. For example, the NLCC is campaigning for more stopping trains (see pages 15 to 17). Another issue is skills and training. Although Enfield has the ninth-largest working-age population in London, it has only the 17th-largest number of jobs, with rising unemployment not helped by an influx of low-skilled and unemployed people from other boroughs. >

ABOVE and LEFT: Together with the council, Enfield Business and Retailers Association is working to increase the footfall in the town centre.


LEFT: CocaCola’s plant in Edmonton is a vital part of the borough’s manufacturing sector.

46 MADE IN ENfield BELOW: One of the recycling conveyor belts at Greenstar’s materials recovery facility, now part of Biffa.

According to the LEA, 18% of the working age population claim out-of-work benefits, and youth unemployment rose by 21% between 2005 and 2010. The NLCC is keen to encourage apprenticeships and work with local education providers to help fill skills gaps, to meet employers’ needs for skilled employees in growing sectors such as green industries, food, retail, construction and health and social care. This is urgently needed: currently 48,100 working age people in the borough have low or no skills. The NLCC has launched a campaign to create 20 apprenticeships for local people. Four have already been created at Johnson Matthey, a specialist in catalytic systems and exhaust emission control. It has also set up a strategic business forum to interface with the business community, as well as an ambassadors group for the larger corporates. “Enfield wants to hear what businesses want,” says NLCC’s Huw Jones. “The chamber’s

role is an enabling one, getting them to start talking and contributing to discussions about what Enfield will look like in 10 years time. The drive has to come from the private sector to revive and grow.” Enfield businesses should also benefit from plans for a London/Anglia Corridor local enterprise partnership (LEP). The recent riots in the area, including the burning of a Sony distribution centre, were a setback, but the town centre has recovered quickly from the disturbances. “People haven’t given up on Enfield. The town has sprung back into life. Retailers and businesses have rallied,” says Neil Rousell, director of regeneration, leisure and culture at Enfield Council. If anything, such events make attracting investment and employment to the area all the more important to develop growth sectors and ensure that locals benefit from the new opportunities that these should bring. n

London/Anglia LEP The London/Anglia local enterprise partnership (LEP) will be one of the new business-led bodies designed to drive growth through a partnership between the private, public and community sectors. The North London Strategic Alliance and North London Business are leading creation of the LEP, conceived as an economic corridor stretching from the Olympic Park through north London, along the M11 and out to Stansted Airport, Peterborough and the fringes of Cambridge. Enfield is one of six London boroughs involved, along with Hackney, Islington, Redbridge, Waltham Forest and Haringey. The aim is to enable the creation of more than 25,000 new jobs and 15,000 new homes by 2025 by lobbying for greater inward investment, helping to raise skills levels, and facilitating diversification of the economy by focusing on growth areas such as logistics, food, leisure and IT.


t u n o o i h t t i W anisa g r o just ir s a ’ f t i ag o ab +44(0)20 7978 6840 www.3foxinternational.com

‘More than magazines’

We can bring together all the major players for you under one roof; in fact tackle every aspect of your event to ensure it runs smoothly.


New Ladderswood

Opportunity Enfield Issue 1  

Opportunity Enfield is a business publication publicising the work of regeneration organisations in the borough.