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opportunity

Enfield The regeneration of Enfield

INSIDE

WELCOME TO MERIDIAN WATER

Town of plenty

MADE IN ENFIELD

This sporting life

The third way

Autumn 2011 Issue One


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CONTENTS

19

04 Talking heads Three development decision makers offer their takes on Enfield’s strengths as an investment opportunity.

08 Quality of life It’s not just leafy suburbs that makes Enfield so attractive.

03

15 Transport From the M25 to high speed railways, Enfield has always been wellconnected, but there are plans for yet more improvement.

19 M  eridian Water Exploring the making of a £1.3 billion waterfront eco-village, Enfield Council’s ambitious vision for regeneration.

37 08 24 Map Putting a place to a name in London’s most northern borough.

31 Sport and leisure A world-class

26 Projects A snapshot of the big changes

Olympics venue is just the beginning of a sporting legacy beyond London 2012.

proposed, planned and underway in Enfield.

31

37 Sustainability Lee Valley Corridor is emerging as a hub of green industry where businesses are trailblazing the latest in ecofriendly technology.

opportunity

Enfield

43 Made in Enfield Global brands and high street favourites are produced in London’s second-largest industrial zone.

For contacts and feedback visit: www.opportunityenfield.com

Published on behalf of:

Enfield Council, Civic Centre, Silver Street, Enfield EN1 3XY www.enfield.gov.uk T: 020 8379 1000 Director of regeneration, leisure and culture: Neil Rousell neil.rousell@enfield.gov.uk

Published by:

Lower Ground Floor, 189 Lavender Hill, London SW11 5TB www.3foxinternational.com T: 020 7978 6840 Executive editor: Siobhán Crozier Designer: Andy Ritchie – bn1creative Production editor: Rachael Schofield head of business development: Paul Gussar Business development manager: Sophie Gosling Production assistant: Jeri Dumont Office manager: Sue Mapara Subscriptions manager: Simon Maxwell Managing director: Toby Fox Printed by: Wyndeham Grange Images: Enfield Council, David Tothill, Lee Valley Regional Park, St Modwen Properties, Winvic, Warburtons, North London Waste Authority, Fusion Lifestyle, Enfield Homes, Mulalley and Company, BAA Airports Ltd.

© 3Fox International Limited 2011. All material is ­strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written p ­ ermission of 3Fox International Limited is strictly f­ orbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no ­responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this ­magazine are not n ­ ecessarily those of 3Fox International Limited or Enfield Council.


The council chief

04 talking heads

We talk to three of Enfield’s development decision makers on the borough’s potential and how it can attract investment for the future

Rob Leak, Enfield Council’s chief executive, has been working to attract investment to Enfield since he arrived over eight years ago. “The ambition of the council is a fair society,” he says. “We recognise that we have a serious housing shortage and that 25,000 of our residents are currently looking for work. That is what motivates me.” Previously Lambeth’s deputy chief executive, Leak’s record includes strong commercial experience as both financial and managing director of retail companies. Since becoming council chief executive in 2003, Leak has overseen a dramatic improvement in efficiency and a big increase in Enfield’s attractiveness to private sector investors. Leak’s business acumen, honed in the private sector, offers particular insight into London’s investment climate and economic layout. The capital is often perceived as uniformly affluent, whereas in reality conditions vary greatly between – and even within – individual boroughs. While Enfield is relatively comfortable, its north and west are considerably better off than its south and east. “Places like Hadley Wood offer opportunities for premium private sector housing,” says Leak, “while the south and east offer a lot of available land.” East Enfield in particular benefits from more industrial land than many other parts of north London. “This offers opportunities for distribution, green industry and food processing, including centres for both Tesco and John Lewis,” adds Leak. “Broadly, poor boroughs want businesses for job creation and more affluent ones want housing.”

THREE CHEERS


on investment. We also have a wide range of opportunities – our town centre, the rebuilding of industrial parks, and new distribution centres, as well as private sector and social housing. Enfield is not just a house-building opportunity.” Enfield is well placed, physically and economically. “We’re in the London-Stansted-Cambridge corridor: a very helpful position to be in,” says Leak. “We have excellent communications, we’re very near central London and we have loads of places for people and businesses to locate.”

05 talking heads

Targeting investment to the needs of specific areas is vitally important, but so is the reduction of risk. “If you want investment, lower the risk profile for private investors. While the market is tough, you have to get all the ducks in a row,” he adds. “When land is owned by the local authority and a scheme requires some demolition or decanting, the council has to be as proactive as it can.” Reducing risk, however, may not be enough: in the current economic circumstances there is inevitable competition among London boroughs, meaning investment opportunities have to be good value for money. This stiffer competition also increases the importance of building strong relationships

“If you want investment, lower the risk profile for private investors” Rob Leak with potential investors. “At Enfield we have an open-door policy for developers, and a dedicated regeneration team, separate from planning. I can tell developers that the council will be proactive.” Does Enfield have a USP that sets it apart from its north London neighbours? “Every authority has its advantages,” says Leak. “Haringey’s is Tottenham [Hotspur FC] stadium, Waltham Forest’s is the town centre. Enfield’s are our relatively low land values and prospect of a healthy return

The politician Councillor Del Goddard is passionate about two things: the council’s intention to deliver additional and improved homes in settled communities of mixed tenure; and attracting investors to Enfield, creating employment for its residents. “We understand the need to develop and improve the quality of our housing stock,” he says. “We understand the industrial and commercial context, the clusters and how we can improve that. We understand that the infrastructure that supports both is also crucial. The central message is that all of this is interconnected – and we understand that too.” Since Enfield’s political colour changed from blue to red in May 2010, Cllr Goddard has been overseeing development as cabinet member for regeneration and improving localities. As a veteran of the local political scene, he has a clear insight into how to encourage volume house-builders and major employers to invest in this part of north London, create sustainable neighbourhoods and communities and overcome the economic stagnation and decline of the last few decades. “There are two contexts: the residential and the commercial,” says Cllr Goddard. On the former, he says: “Some of our housing stock – by its very age and how it was built after the war – needs replacing, so there is plenty of opportunity for schemes. We want people to come forward

with different ideas and financing models about how they might work with us to rebuild and create much more sustainable housing.” Not all of Enfield’s sites comprise large-scale estates, however, so Cllr Goddard is working with other councils to co-ordinate an approach for the many small-size sites available, through the North London Strategic Alliance. “The initiative brings together small sites in packages to enable builders and developers to build those out effectively,” says Cllr Goddard. “That’s an offer to the smaller builder who likes to build 20 or 30 houses or flats with some retail.” On the business front, Enfield has more commercial space than most other London boroughs, a fact that Cllr Goddard cites as one of its major strengths. “We’re always interested in working with those owners with substantial >

“We want people to come forward with different ideas ... ” Del Goddard


06 talking heads

holdings in the borough,” he says. “We also own two industrial estates in Edmonton. We want businesses to invest to increase employment, by intensifying the employment use. We’re equally interested in small businesses and seeing a supply of managed workspace for young entrepreneurs.” One sector of business choosing Enfield as a base is green technology. “The recycling of plastics to support our food industry is a recent gain,” says Cllr Goddard, “and there’s the green sector around Edmonton with Coca-Cola and others. We want to see it develop into a major cluster that can attract research and development in the future. Moving further north, Picketts Lock may well be developed into a major sports and leisure cluster. We also have a major food and drinks industry both in production and distribution.” Another prime selling point is Enfield’s infrastructure, with businesses attracted by the transport links, the access to skilled workers, and the potential to expand. “We’ve got the North Circular, the A10 and the M25, so it’s easy to reach the M1 or the A1,” Cllr Goddard says. “That’s one reason why John Lewis moved from Watford, to be closer to Stratford. “Logistics and distribution are becoming online shopping or a supply-and-fit service – buy a hi-fi or white goods and they install the item, so there’s also a need for trained plumbers or electricians.”

The developer Eamon O’Malley, director of Mulalley and Company based in Redbridge, has worked on projects all over London so he is well placed to judge the merits of Enfield as an investment destination. He is full of praise for the borough, as well as for the council’s attitude to investors. As a builder and developer, he has three key requirements when looking for projects: “Timing; opportunities to enhance an area; and confidence that we can sell our products.” Enfield ticks all of these boxes. Mulalley with One Housing Group will start work on the £80 million mixed-use Ladderswood development in New Southgate in 2012. This flagship regeneration project will provide almost 500 new homes as well as a new community centre and over 3,000sq m of commercial space. Mulalley also built Enfield’s main library, which opened in 2010. “Now is the time for Enfield,” O’Malley says. “It has been overlooked for quite a long time, but now it offers very good opportunities and these are being helped by some very proactive councillors.” Another plus point, according to O’Malley, is that Enfield now has just the right sort of projects coming up for the current economic climate: “Enfield’s timing is very good for development.” This, in his view, was not always the case as the borough previously lacked focus. The Ladderswood site exemplified this: “It was not a good first sight of Enfield, coming along the North Circular Road. There was an awful gasholder, an industrial estate well past its sell-by date and a lot of poor quality housing. The whole place was rundown.” O’Malley identifies several specific reasons for Enfield’s attractiveness: “It has great communications links with the

Piccadilly line at Arnos Grove and the line at nearby New Southgate offering quick and easy access to central London. There is also excellent bus availability and speedy access to the regional road system. Some other north London boroughs are not so fortunate.” Then, reinforcing Rob Leak’s judgement, there’s the low cost of land. “Although Enfield is part of the London housing market, which remains healthy compared with most of the rest of the country, its land prices are still lower than several other areas in London.” This is especially important for social housing, he says, making it feasible in the current economic climate to build houses on local authority land. As well as social housing, the borough provides excellent opportunities for “good quality suburban houses”. The relationship with the local council is all-important and not just for developments on council-owned land. Here again, Enfield scores highly. “A key driver is planning,” says O’Malley. “Objections and delays inhibit development and the whole process can be very lengthy and expensive. What you have now in Enfield is a consensus that the borough needs investment and the local authority is acting very positively on that. “We are very keen on Enfield and are now looking for new opportunities in the borough,” he adds. It seems that Ladderswood and the library could be just the start of Mulalley and One Housing Group’s investment in this dynamic part of north London. n

“Now is the time for Enfield ... it offers very good opportunities” Eamon O’Malley


08 QUALITY OF LIFE

BELOW: Enfield’s Old Market, a quintessentially British way of life. RIGHT: Simple pleasures. FAR RIGHT: The new concourse at Edmonton Green.

TOWN OF plen


OF nty

quality of life

09

Enfield is a diverse London borough, which combines traditional leafy suburbs with inner-city challenges, close to the city’s urban advantages and gentler countryside pleasures, with thriving business clusters in a place with big plans for renewal. Elizabeth Pears reports

O

ne might suspect London’s northernmost borough has enjoyed being in the shadow of the big city, allowing a life of simple pleasures to tick along uninterrupted. While other parts of London have transformed beyond recognition, Enfield has clung to its heritage and preserved a quintessentially British way of life centered on the thing it prizes most: community. In this old market town, shop parades still thrive, pubs stay full, schools perform well and housing – at an average price of £271,560 – is among the most affordable in London. Lifelong borough resident and Enfield town centre manager, Mark Rudling, says: “We have something other London suburbs lack – we retain a certain amount of character. Our 700-year-old market still operates but we have added to that a fantastic cosmopolitan shopping centre with all the high street favourites as well as independent traders. “Overlooking the market is the newly-opened, Grade II listed King’s Head pub, which is over 100 years old. The restoration has been beautifully done with stained glass windows and other 19th century period features. There’s so much that’s special in this borough that we just don’t shout about enough.” Enfield’s rich past is everywhere: the magnificent 413-acre Trent Park is the grounds of the former royal hunting forest, Enfield Chase, once a regular haunt of Henry VIII. That explains why two thirds of the borough remains open space, one third protected Metropolitan Greenbelt with the rest Green Flag >


Enfield

“�

We are dedicated to creating and sustaining Enfield as a place that residents are proud to call home and where businesses can invest and prosper.

To find out more about our exciting regeneration programme contact the Discover Enfield Team Email: discover@enfield.gov.uk or Tel: 020 8379 4514 www.discoverenfield.com www.enfield.gov.uk


“People come from other London boroughs to enjoy a country park without leaving the city”  eil Isaac, assistant director of waste, N street scene and parks, Enfield Council

BELOW: A picturesque street of 16th to 18th century homes, known as Gentleman’s Row, is a reminder of Enfield’s glamorous past. BOTTOM: Forty Hall is a Grade I listed manor house set on 260 acres of open space.

With all of this on offer just 12 miles from central London, it comes as no surprise that up to 20,000 people each year are settling in the happy buffer between Home Counties haven and the bright lights of the city. Pilgrims vary between first-time buyers seduced by the affordable price tags to jaded city slickers who want to trade in a one-bed flat with window boxes for a Victorian semidetached and swathes of back garden. Enfield has even caught the eye of city bankers looking for a mid-week refuge, accessible to the office as a pad in town but at a fraction of the cost.

B

eyond its lush landscape, the borough’s trump card is its enviable transport links. Travel between Enfield and central London takes less than 30 minutes from any of its 22 train stations with fast links to Stansted Airport and Liverpool Street. The M25 curls around the top of the borough and marks its borders with Hertfordshire and Essex. To the south is the North Circular (A406) a major route linking Enfield to its neighbours Haringey, Waltham Forest and beyond. Running through its centre is the Great Cambridge Road (A10), which connects the south of the borough to the north and separates the east from the west with each quarter possessing its own individual character. Tree-lined streets in Southgate, Cockfosters and Winchmore Hill in the southwest corner are quiet, much sought-after suburbs with the added benefit of being served by London’s Piccadilly Line. They neighbour Palmers Green – a lively area which is home to the UK’s largest Greek and Turkish Cypriot communities whose influence is imprinted in local >

11 quality of life

Victorian parks, golf courses, farmland and proper village greens that together attract three million visitors annually. Sporting activity is a way of life in Enfield with hundreds of clubs run by volunteers. Enfield Council is committed to getting more young people, particularly girls, involved in sport. The listed Queen Elizabeth II stadium, near Enfield Town, which launched the careers of Lord Sebastian Coe and sprint champion Linford Christie, has been revamped and is the new home of Enfield Town FC. Another exciting development is Tottenham Hotspur FC’s £45 million training ground for its first team and youth academy, which opens next year in north Enfield, just off Whitewebbs Lane. It will provide a base for the club’s charitable foundation with £3.5 million of sports coaching pledged to young people. Neil Isaac, Enfield Council’s assistant director of waste, street scene and parks, says: “London is greener than people think but Enfield is special and what it offers is substantial. “It’s not just people who live here who enjoy the parks; people come from other London boroughs to enjoy a country park without leaving the city.”


quality of life

12

businesses: jewellers, banqueting suites, wholesalers, coffee shops and quality Mediterranean restaurants. To the north is Hadley Wood – home to Enfield’s A-List residents, the celebrities and football players who can afford to pay between £700,000 and £9 million for their discreet retreat. Estate agent Daniel Bennett, of local firm Ian Gibbs, says: “When buyers come to us they have identified Enfield as somewhere they want to live. “They realise Enfield is close to the city and West End shows but an equally short distance from an Essex country pub, while having everything you need like cinemas, pubs, parks and shops on your doorstep. “Not many people know that there are also some lovely pubs along the River Lee where you can enjoy a nice summer’s day looking across the water. Walking around the area is fantastic with all the greenery and historic buildings to look at.” Those buildings include the Grade II listed Wright’s Flour Mill in Ponders End and Grade I listed Forty Hall, the prized jewel in Enfield’s historic crown. The former Tudor palace – Elizabeth I and Edward learned of their father’s death while staying there – is now a museum set on 260 acres of gardens and parklands and its own lake. More historic highlights: on the grounds of Enfield’s popular Millfield Arts Centre sits 18th century Millfield House; and Enfield Town Library won Best Built Project at the London Planning Awards for its restoration of the old Carnegie Library. The home of the first ever gramophone collection now boasts a contemporary design featuring a cafe that spills out on to a green. But if all this suggests a borough happy to rest on its civic laurels, the council is fully aware of the work to be done in cleaning up neglected parts of the borough as well as providing new homes, schools, community facilities and jobs to accommodate its expanding population. Long overdue regeneration is happening in New Southgate including an £80 million redevelopment of the Ladderswood Estate, with 491 new homes to be completed by 2014, and the refurbishment of 251 rotting houses together with 100 new homes along the North Circular.

BUSINESS AS USUAL Huw Jones, chief executive of the North London Chamber of Commerce, discusses the future of London’s second busiest industrial corridor. “Industry in Enfield is going through an evolution. Traditional manufacturing industry has gone; new industries are coming through quite strongly, particularly in short-term manufacturing and food production. We are home to big companies like Warburtons (pictured), Greggs, Coca-Cola and flour producer GR Wright & Sons. It has never been a case of industry in Enfield going all the way down and coming back up again – we’re just dealing with different companies which have different ways of working. That’s business, I suppose. The key to Enfield’s success is land availability and distribution networks. Vacancy rates are low. Ford went out but then GeoPost UK came in. The reason people come to this area is because it works for business. There is such a significant amount of opportunity in Enfield because of the land and the willingness to look at

T

he real magic is set to happen to the east of the A10 – the Upper Lee Valley – once home to the big industries that gave Enfield its nickname of London’s Workshop. As mass production dwindled over the past two decades, unemployment crept in. Stephen Tapper, assistant director in the regeneration, leisure and culture department, says: “If we are being honest about things, there is a divide. While there are communities with nice residential streets and access to good parks in the east, there are pockets of considerable deprivation. Our regeneration work addresses those areas that need uplift in order to turn them into places that are as attractive as other parts of the borough.” Substantial amounts of money – the proposed Meridian Water Masterplan in the borough’s south-east corner alone

ABOVE: Enfield has retained much of its heritage. RIGHT: The borough’s industrial corridor runs along the banks of the River Lee.

how we shape things. We are not good at shouting about what we do. There are companies that print and embroider t-shirts and employ up to 90 people, but you would never know they were there. Various clusters of industries have come together and grown: green industries, food and logistics. We are working with them to help them take on more people. We are also setting up apprenticeships across all sectors to ensure local people are equipped with the necessary skills to take advantage of those opportunities. Our vision would be green industries housed on eco-parks, because we are already strong in that area. We are getting those businesses to spread the word so we attract the right businesses: sustainable and looking to employ locals. It can work for employment and also for supply chain. Partnerships have already come out of the location. GR Wright’s now supplies flour to Warburtons, showing how the supply chain can develop. The [civil] disturbances in August changed how businesses are thinking. It has given them a reason to work together. We’re not just discussing how can we

represents an investment of £1.3 billion – are being invested in the eastern corridor consisting of Ponders End, Brimsdown and Edmonton. The council wants to play to its strengths: its transport links and the longest network of waterways in London, which include the River Lee and the 26-mile long Lee Valley Regional Park. Meridian Water, located in Edmonton Green, will be an eco-village of 5,000 new homes on or near the waterfront as well as businesses, schools, a health centre and a shopping district, helping to create 3,000 jobs. Tapper continues: “There are lots of nice things in the Lee Valley; a kind of hidden London that we want to make better use of. “It adds a different dimension to your life to be able to come out of your business or your home and have a short walk to a tow path next to the River Lee – that’s a nice thing to be able to do.” The waterfront development will continue at Columbia Wharf in Ponders End, Enfield’s most deprived area and a priority regeneration site named as one of the London Mayor’s green spaces. Its recreation ground has recently benefited from a £1 million improvement. A borough-wide target of 1,000 new homes by 2026 has been set and plans are in the pipeline for 450 on the former


ensure this doesn’t happen again, but how do we grow and develop the area into a place where people can live, work and prosper. We are now setting an agenda for a measured and sustainable climate for growth. The local authority has been really good about talking to the business community because business understands business better than the council does. Industry in Enfield has not suffered as much as other parts of London but what we haven’t seen is businesses investing in growth. We expect that to come. Businesses have already managed their way through the recession by cutting people’s hours or working a fourday week. We know what we have been through and things are on the up.”

13 quality of life

“A kind of hidden London that we want to make better use of”  tephen Tapper, assistant director, S regeneration, leisure and culture, Enfield Council

Middlesex University Queensway Campus site at Ponders End. Daisy Johnson, principal planning and regeneration officer for Ponders End, says: “It is an area of need, but it’s also an area of opportunity. It sits in the London to Peterborough growth corridor [a Government Growth Area] and the Upper Lee Valley [an Opportunity Area in the London Plan]. “We want it to become a sustainable, vibrant, lively place with an improved town centre, improved green spaces, better connected places, new housing and a new joint primary and secondary school.” The council have facilitated a new £27 million school which will also include the first secondary school in Ponders End. On the site of an old gasworks, it will eventually cater for up to 1,900 pupils. Former headteacher Bridget Evans, Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme director at Enfield Council, says: “A school of this standard will attract informed parents to the area. As admission will be on a proximity basis, the closer you are the greater the chance you will get in. “A good school can mean house prices increasing in value. It will kickstart regeneration in an area that has been crying out for it.” So, as lovely as Enfield’s past is, the next chapter in its history could prove even more enticing. n


Fairview are proud to have been established in Enfield since 1961. As a privately owned residential developer, we have an impressive history of developing new homes throughout London and the South East.

Clockwise from top: Pembroke Park in Crawley, Kings Tower in Croydon, Carterhatch Place in Enfield, Ovaltine in Kings Langley and Bydewell Grange in Hertford.

Fairview. Building a Greater London Closer to home, we have recently acquired land at Drapers Road, Enfield, to transform the disused reservoir site. To register interest please telephone 0800 731 4477.

www.fairview.co.uk


15 transport

THE L THIRD WAY Enfield is already wellconnected by rail, road and London Underground. But a scheme in the pipeline for an additional railway line will speed up life for Enfield residents, present and future. Mark Smullian reports

ook at Enfield on a map and there’s no doubting its excellent road, rail and tube connections. The City of London is half an hour away by public transport, as is the West End, while Stansted Airport is only 45 minutes by road. Among the borough’s most advantageous features are its three rail lines. The furthest east, with stops at Enfield Lock, Brimsdown, Ponders End and Angel Road, is the line linking Stansted Airport to Liverpool Street via Tottenham Hale. The next line includes Enfield Town station, to the east of the town centre, and is connected to Liverpool Street via Edmonton Green and Seven Sisters; to the west of the centre is Enfield Chase, with its line to Moorgate in the City via Finsbury Park. All the rail lines link up with the Victoria Line, with its fast routes into the West End, while there’s a multitude of Piccadilly Line stations to the west of the borough, such as Oakwood, which can take you to Theatreland, Harrods, or all the way to Heathrow. New trains have come into service on the Victoria Line this year after a lengthy upgrade, and there are plans to improve the Piccadilly Line to give extra capacity. All pretty impressive. But there’s one small problem: the rail line to the east, through Tottenham Hale, simply has too many trains trying to use one set of tracks in each direction. As well as the fast trains to Cambridge and Stansted, it also has the local stopping trains. This stopping service doesn’t meet demand, but no more local trains can run as they’d slow down the Cambridge and Stansted services to an unacceptable degree. >


16 transport ABOVE: Stations such as Arnos Grove on the Piccadilly line provide easy access to central London, Theatreland and Heathrow.

The imperative for improvement has been given added impetus with the arrival of Meridian Water (see pages 19 to 22), a £1.3 billion redevelopment of land that includes the area around the little-used Angel Road station. It includes 5,000 new homes for up to 17,000 new residents, planned over a 15-year period, and a consequent increase in numbers using the Stansted-Liverpool Street line. At present Angel Road is barely served outside peak periods, and the line cannot accommodate the four trains an hour deemed necessary for a ‘turn up and go’ service, as exists on most of the rest of London’s commuter rail lines. The best solution would be an extra line, or lines, built on spare land to the east of the existing one. Current Londonbound platforms would become “islands”, with their far side used by local trains. But hope is in sight, as Angel Road is an essential part of Network Rail and Transport for London’s (TfL’s) favoured option to improve the Lee Valley’s rail services. This £67 million scheme would involve the construction of a facility at Brimsdown Station, in north-east Enfield, to allow local trains to turn around and head back to Stratford. This would enable a four-times-an-hour service, rather than twice an hour, although the constraints of demand on the line would still leave these trains unevenly spaced. Stations would also be improved, including the upgrading of Angel Road into something suitable to serve Meridian Water. Geoff Hobbs, head of rail planning at TfL, says: “The allsinging, all dancing extra line option would cost £250 million. It would provide three, or even four, tracks from Brimsdown to Lea Bridge Road, which gives a better result, with a 15 minute frequency and more capacity to ensure that trains run reliably. “The business case stacks up well, giving a 2.9:1 rate of return, which is quite good as a cost-benefit ratio,” he says. “That comes from opening up the area for development, having an extra 50,000 passengers, and from faster journey times as taking the local trains off that line would speed up the Stansted and Cambridge expresses.” For comparison,

Crossrail, the government’s priority rail scheme in London, gives almost exactly the same rate of return at 3.1 to 1.

E

ven without Meridian Water the argument for a new line is compelling. Enfield’s submission to Network Rail’s Route Utilisation Strategy, an exercise that looks at capacity and constraints on the system, concludes that the two lines via Tottenham Hale and Edmonton Green were effectively full, giving ”a seriously sub-optimal railway network”. It adds: “It should be stressed that more infrastructure will be needed, not may be needed”, and calls for a minimum of four trains an hour to all local stations. The council complains that while the proposed timetable from December 2011 gives local stations such as Brimsdown and Ponders End four trains an hour, because they’re bunched together it amounts to only two trains per hour. It says it “supports strongly” the proposal for a third track, or even a fourth, and raises the possibility of new stations at Carterhatch and Picketts Lock. David Taylor, the council’s head of traffic and transportation, says: “The three-to-four track option is the preferred one. There is finite capacity there and the line through Tottenham Hale has a particular problem. “Passenger capacity is not an issue at the moment because, from December, there will be longer trains so they will carry more passengers. The problem is that while we can increase the length of trains we cannot increase their frequency, and key regeneration areas like Angel Road have a poor service.” The council also hopes to persuade the train operators to run four trains an hour on the branch to Enfield Town, which at present has only a 30-minute service outside peak periods. Once Meridian Water is factored in, the case for the third line becomes even more compelling. Tens of thousands of new residents will want to reach the new shopping developments at Stratford, jobs in Docklands or the City and the heart of London, without waiting for an infrequent and convoluted


17 transport

RIGHT: Angel Road Station is part of TfL’s scheme to improve Lee Valley’s rail services, with the hope of an additional third rail track doubling its hourly service.

service. With a train station and rail line already at the heart of the development, the opportunity to transform the connectivity of the area is just waiting to be taken up. As Hobbs says: “It’s essential we make efforts to persuade the Department for Transport of the merits of the third track idea and get it as high up the government’s priority list as we can.” This desire to see improved services here was strongly supported by Network Rail in its July 2011 London and South East Rail Utilisation Strategy. The strategy backs both TfL’s and the council’s proposals for improved rail services, making a case for the creation of this third line through Enfield. The decision now lies with the Department for Transport and the Treasury. “Network Rail says the new line is a good idea, which is a necessary but not sufficient condition for it to happen,” Hobbs adds. “The big bit is the money, as railways in Britain do not pay for themselves and government approval is needed for the funding.” What is the likelihood of government funding? We’ll find out on 2 July next year, with publication by the Department for Transport of the prosaically named High Level Output Specification, which shows the rail projects the government plans to invest in between 2014-‘19. n

“It’s essential we make efforts to persuade the Department for Transport of the merits of the third track”  eoff Hobbs, head of rail planning, G Transport for London

ON THE ROAD It’s not just rail that keeps Enfield well connected, it’s also at a great point in London’s road infrastructure. The A10 goes north to Hertford and south to the City, giving access to the M25 and the national motorway system. This in turns means easy access to Stansted Airport via the M11, taking a mere 45 minutes, which has proved vital to the import and export activities of many of Enfield’s businesses. Enfield is also well-connected to the London-StanstedCambridge-Peterborough growth corridor, and well positioned to take advantage of its links to England’s ‘silicon fen’ around the University of Cambridge and the science parks in that area. The M25 is vital to the borough’s road connectivity, but can be congested. This should ease with completion of the programme to widen it to four lanes each way, complete on many sections of the motorway, and nearly finished on the section near Enfield.


Asset Management plc is privileged to be working with the London Borough of Enfield in its delivery of the Masterplan for Meridian Water at Central Leeside.  

With the Masterplan set to join the planning policy framework for Enfield early next year, Dwyer looks forward to continuing its collaboration with the Council and the other stakeholders at Meridian Water, to help with implementation for the benefit of Central Leeside and the surrounding communities of North London. The Group’s 25 year track record in urban regeneration, coupled with its extensive expertise, capital resources and direct involvement with one of the key landholdings within Meridian Water, will provide invaluable support to the wider efforts to transform the area into a major mixed-use development opportunity.

Dwyer Asset Management plc Proud sponsors of Meridian Water at Central Leeside


Meridian Water

Welcome to

meridian WATER Investment will transform Meridian Water’s vast urban landscape and help to deliver vital economic and social benefits for eastern Enfield, creating new urban geography in London’s Lee Valley. Paul Coleman reports

B

ulky blue sheds and rusty gasholders punctuate one half of Meridian Water’s vast swathe of land. The other half of this part of Edmonton features a labyrinth of trading estate streets lined with industrial units. Meridian Water’s massive area and convenient location has hooked potential investors. Seventy-two of Meridian Water’s 85 hectares are available for possible development just six miles from London’s Olympic Park. “Meridian Water is London’s next big development phase after the Olympic Park,” says Neil Rousell, Enfield Council’s director of regeneration, leisure and culture. “It is the most substantial investment opportunity in outer London.” People currently visit this immense area but don’t realise they’re at Meridian Water. Many come simply to snap up a plaited bamboo table lamp or a woven sea-grass seat. Meridian Water easily swallows Ikea’s immense, azure blue Tottenham-Edmonton store. Rousell explains that the British Oxygen Company’s (BOC’s) massive pastel blue sheds were transported from Teesside and rebuilt at Meridian Water. >

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20 MERIDIAN WATER

“Teesside built ships in these sheds,” he says. “BOC built massive boilers inside them at Meridian Water.” Now only partly used, BOC’s towering sheds stand back politely from the Lee Navigation. This wide canalised artery leaves a north-south line through Meridian Water. Gliding kayakers and chugging narrow boats love the Lee. Coots upend and dive to feed on thriving aquatic plants. Happy dogs take their contented owners for long walks. Cyclists zip along a manicured towpath. Rousell believes Meridian Water will offer current and new residents a genuine prospect of ‘waterside living’. Inward investment could build up to 5,000 new homes within 15-20 years. About 3,000 jobs could be created in enterprises as diverse as knowledge, IT, bio-fuels and recycling. An estimated £1.3 billion investment would create these homes, jobs and the infrastructure needed to support Edmonton’s new neighbourhood. An evolving Meridian Water Masterplan envisages a high school with a sixth form and two primary schools, both with nurseries. The masterplan foresees a police office, a library and a community hall. Two new road bridges would be needed and new shopping areas created. Meridian Water’s central new feature will be an east-west ‘community spine’, a pedestrian- and cycle-friendly route lined with new walkways, a new square, water crossing, shops, homes and offices. The spine would reconnect Meridian Water’s disparate sections and revive historical buildings like the old Atlas linoleum factory. National Grid is already preparing its plans for Meridian Water’s large western flank. The company is seeking a development partner to build 750 new homes and one of the masterplan’s new primary schools. National Grid hopes to break ground in late 2014. Before then, a pedestrian tunnel from National Grid-owned land will allow Edmonton residents to walk to Meridian Water’s retail offering; cars and bus passes can then be left at home.

SO WHERE IS MERIDIAN WATER? Meridian Water is located in Edmonton where the south-east corner of Enfield meets the neighbouring boroughs of Haringey and Waltham Forest. Edmonton Green is its nearest town centre. The site is bounded by the Lee Valley Regional Park to the east and by Conduit Lane and London’s semi-orbital North Circular (A406) to the north. Tottenham Marshes and the Banbury Reservoir are to the south. Meridian Water sits at the foot of the Lee Valley industrial area, which is London’s second largest industrial zone after Park Royal.

The area’s significance and size compares with other regional growth areas such as Greenwich Peninsula and Cricklewood-Brent Cross. Meridian Water makes up a core section of the London-StanstedCambridge-Peterborough growth corridor. The vast 85-hectare site is a strategic opportunity area identified in both the Mayor’s London Plan and the Lee Valley Regional Park Plan. Meridian Water is just six miles from London’s 2012 Olympic Park and Stratford International rail station and only eight miles from London’s West End. Three of London’s busiest airports – Heathrow, Stansted and City – can be reached in less than 45 minutes.

Locally sourced energy Further investment would create a 45-kilometre decentralised energy network (DEN). LondonWaste’s nearby Edmonton incinerator could become a ‘low carbon anchor’. Heat by-product would be converted to supply cheaper combined heat and power to Meridian Water’s new energy efficient homes and low-carbon industries. Detailed technological practicalities are being finalised but Stephen Tapper, Enfield’s assistant director in the regeneration, leisure and culture department, notes Meridian Water’s DEN proposals are far more developed than other tentatively touted DENs across London. “Meridian Water’s DEN already has the heat source and infrastructure,” says Tapper. “Cheaper, greener energy could benefit local businesses and bring real economic benefits.” Tapper explains that Meridian Water’s new residents could enjoy sustainable living in energy efficient homes using renewable power and locally produced energy. New schools would be within easy walking distance. The Lee Valley Park’s walkways and waterways would be a short stroll away. “Families in London want this kind of lifestyle where they can live in eco-homes in an eco-friendly neighbourhood,” says Tapper.

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New homes Enfield’s local development framework suggests that 40% of new homes in regeneration schemes should be affordable. However, the council is fully aware that development viability is critical. “We need a mixture of family and one- and two-bedroom homes,” says Rousell. “There’ll be a mix of ownership models, including shared ownership as well as social housing.” After LDA Design drafted the masterplan, Enfield Council asked BNP Paribas Real Estate to assess Meridian Water’s development viability. Initially, BNP suggested an efficient developer could build 135 homes per year. In practice, homes might be delivered even faster: several development phases could concurrently get under way on different parts of Meridian Water. Enfield and the Homes and Communities Agency are studying funding models.

Land ownership Meridian Water’s relatively small number of large landowners has helped to kick-start masterplanning. Enfield Council has set up a Meridian Water Landowners’ Panel that includes National Grid, Tesco, Ikea and other parties. Ikea owns the freehold on its store and also a vast piece of open land to the rear. Dwyer Asset Management’s portfolio includes the former BOC sheds now used as storage. Prupim, part of Prudential, owns the successful Ravenside Retail Park, which will be fully integrated with Meridian Water. HSBC Pension Fund owns the vast bulk of Meridian Water’s eastern side, including the complex Lee Valley and Hastingwood trading estates. Metals and Waste Recycling, the UK’s third largest metals recycler, owns its HQ site near Angel Road station, the only portion of Meridian Water north of the North Circular. Elsewhere, Arriva owns a sizeable bus depot at Meridian Water’s southern tip. Thames Water owns a large slice of green belt land close to the reservoir. “We’re working with Thames Water to open this area as a park,” says Tapper.

Edmonton gains ABOVE: Business as usual on the River Lee. LEFT: An artist’s impression of life on the new waterfront. FAR LEFT: An aerial view of the 85 hectare Merdian Water site.

Meridian Water’s development will bring big economic and social gains to the people of Edmonton and Enfield but also to Londoners. Rousell sees Meridian Water as a vital part of Edmonton’s expansion and a growth point within the Lee Valley’s overall investment and regeneration opportunities. Meridian Water is part of a London arc of opportunity sweeping up from Barking Riverside in the Thames Gateway to the Royal Docks enterprise zone. It covers Stratford City, the Olympic Village and Park and Tottenham Hotspur FC’s proposed new stadium at Northumberland Park. Recycling industries could drive much of Meridian Water’s regeneration. Enfield Council is working to relocate Metals and Waste, a firm that recycles 90% of materials from scrap cars. It typifies Eastern Enfield’s historical legacy of attracting ‘backyard industries’. Fifteen years ago, this was regarded as a problem, but rocketing raw materials costs created vibrant recycling markets. Eastern Enfield’s growing core of recycling activities creates a distinct advantage for Meridian Water. The council is helping a growing cluster of green and recycling companies to expand at Meridian Water. >

21 MERIDIAN WATER

A four-minute train ride from Meridian Water’s nearby rail station, Angel Road, takes commuters to Tottenham Hale’s new urban centre. Angel Road is only 25 minutes from Liverpool Street Station in the City of London. Enfield Council is working with Network Rail, Transport for London and National Express East Anglia on a proposal to create a third line from Tottenham to Brimsdown. The new track would enable four trains an hour to call at Angel Road within the next 10 years. Angel Road is a two-platform, unstaffed, London Zone Four station on the Hertford East via Tottenham Hale branch of the Lee Valley Line. Station access is difficult - but not for long.


Meridian Water LEFT: Eco-friendly homes planned for Meridian Water. BELOW: Ikea in Edmonton will be reconfigured as part of the regeneration plans.

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They include a company on the Hastingwood Trading Estate that refits heating systems to render them more sustainable. Another Meridian Water firm produces bio-diesel fuel from used cooking fat. Nearby, a new company is recycling plastics cast off by Edmonton’s established food and soft drink manufacturers. Tapper hopes new ‘green’ jobs will benefit local people and attract new residents. “Meridian Water is an opportunity for Enfield to help foster new supply chains for emerging industries,” he says. People living at the nearby Shires Estate, at Edmonton Green and across Eastern Enfield need new local opportunities to improve their quality of life. Eastern Enfield contains some of the most deprived communities in the capital yet possesses a large school-age population with a legion of ambitious, educated and talented young people. A co-ordinated multi-agency effort to deliver Meridien Water is being steered by the Meridian Water Delivery Board, an evolving stakeholder body that includes the Greater London Assembly, Transport for London (TfL), the Homes and Communities Agency, North London Business and the North London Strategic Alliance. The delivery board began working in April 2010. Thames Water and other utility companies are including Meridian Water in their plans. TfL and Network Rail are actively planning new and revamped rail and road connections (see box). Network Rail has analysed a proposal, included in its latest London and South East Rail Utilisation Strategy, that would increase Lee Valley to London commuter trains serving Angel Road, Meridian Water’s nearby station.

Did yOu knOw ? The first ever household gas meters were invented in Edmonton and produced at a Meridian Water factory where Tesco and Ikea now stand.

Regeneration at the Olympic Park led to major increases in rail capacity at Stratford station. Similarly, investment and regeneration at Meridian Water could spur action on a new third rail line that would increase capacity at Angel Road (see page 15). The future looks bright for Meridian Water. Rousell and Tapper are confident of its success even in a recovering property market. “We want people to enjoy living and working at Meridian Water in Edmonton’s newest environment,” says Rousell. “The masterplan for Meridian Water is all about developing a strong community in Edmonton with a neighbourhood feel,” he adds. “We want people to feel that Meridian Water and Edmonton can be their place and a home for future generations.” n


Thames Water supporting regeneration – investing in north London It’s our job to provide the water and sewerage services our customers need for the long term, so we’re already planning the support needed for Enfield’s future development. We’re currently investing nearly £5bn – the water industry’s biggest investment programme – to ensure people can rely on our services around the clock, in north London and across the Thames Valley. This includes maintaining and improving our pipes, pumping stations and treatment works. At Deephams Sewage Works, for example, we are improving treatment standards to boost water quality in the River Lee and Salmon’s Brook, cater for a growing population and reduce the risk of flooding.

We’re also continuing to invest in supplying highquality tap water to local homes and businesses, as well as replacing old pipework and tackling leaks. There are a number of regeneration proposals in the borough, including the Meridian Water development, which will mean significant growth in the area. We are committed to working with Enfield Council to ensure that new water mains and sewers are in place in time to serve this and other growth areas. For more information about Thames Water and its work in urban regeneration please go to our website

www.thameswater.co.uk


Projects overview

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2 NEW SOUTHGATE > The Ladderswood Estate regenerated; the New Southgate Industrial Estate redeveloped; and shopping facilities enhanced.

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MAP: The Seven ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ regeneration ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ key ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ sites ■ ■ located ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ throughout ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ the ■ ■ ■ ■borough. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Continue overleaf ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ for details on the ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■first ■ six ■ projects, ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ and ■ see ■ ■ ■ 19 ■ ■ page ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ for ■ an ■ in-depth ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■feature ■ ■ on ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Meridian ■ ■ ■ Water. ■ ■ ■ ■

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■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 7■ Meridian water ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ project ■ ■ ■ the ■ ■ ■ The biggest in ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ includes ■ ■ ■ an■ eco■ ■ ■ borough ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ village, waterfront ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ homes ■ ■ and ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ businesses. page ■ ■ ■ ■ See ■ ■ ■ 19 ■ for ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ the Meridian Water feature. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 6■ ENFIELD TOWN ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■homes ■ ■ and ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ New shops and ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ traffic ■ ■ ■ ■ in ■ a■ ■ improved flows ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ preserved market ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ town ■ ■area. ■ ■ ■

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4 Ponders end > Strong community spirit is shaping a transformed gateway to the Lee Valley Park, with new homes, school, public realm and leisure facilities.

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3 HIGHMEAD, 3 HIGHMEAD > £25 million of highquality housing to improve the housing mix, plus 1,092sq m of retail and commercial space.

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5 SHIRES ■ ■ ■ ESTATE ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Neighbourhood ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ empowerment and a four■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■scheme ■ ■ ■ renew ■ ■ two ■ ■ year to ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■and ■ ■ ■ 17-storey towers ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ low-rise ■ ■ ■ housing. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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1 EDMONTON GREEN > A revitalised town centre with 1,065 new homes, new youth and community centres and improved station.

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Along with the £1.3 billion Meridian Water scheme millions of pounds are being invested in six other key regeneration projects across much of the borough, as Enfield gets ready for growth ■

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Bush Hill Park

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Grange Park

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