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...consideration and care built in

OPPORTUNITY ENFIELD / The regeneration of Enfield

urban regeneration with excellence...

Mulalley - building and regenerating communities throughout London Winter 2014 Issue Five

Transforming the Ladderswood Estate into a vibrant community where people want to live. Providing new energy efficient homes, a community centre and commercial space creating jobs for local people

The regeneration of Enfield Scaling new heights Go Ape! in the great outdoors / Shop front retail revival / Trading up housing hotspots Winter 2014 Issue Five


FAIRVIEW INVESTING IN ENFIELD Building a greater London.

For over fifty years, Fairview New Homes has been building high quality housing on urban brownfield sites and has become a recognised leader in this highly competitive field.

Renaissance,

at Drapers Road, Enfield, is a stunning development of 45 three and four bedroom houses and one, two and three bedroom apartments. This now completed development of family homes and smaller apartments has also proved to be extremely popular with purchasers, with marketing commencing in April 2013 and the last unit being reserved just 6 months later in September 2013.

Meridian Water Gateway to the future “Meridian Water provides a clear framework to enable public and private sector investment to deliver significant economic growth as well as much needed housing. We have the plan, but more than this, we have the capacity to deliver and delivery is what we are all about.� Rob Leak - Chief Executive, Enfield Council

Based in Enfield, Fairview New Homes continue to deliver new homes within Greater London and The South East.

Be part of this premiere project; contact Peter George, Programme Director Neighbourhood Regeneration peter.george@enfield.gov.uk or 020 8379 3318

Planning permission is anticipated imminently with construction starting before the end of 2014, and apartments being available mid 2015.

Vogue,

at Eaton Road, Enfield, provides 36 quality one, two and three bedroom apartments. The site was purchased by Fairview New Homes in January 2012, was granted planning permission by the London Borough of Enfield in February 2013 and was first marketed in October 2013. This now completed scheme has proved extremely popular, with purchasers, with all units reserved by early February 2014. The success of this development highlights the attractiveness of Enfield Town as a place to reside.

Cecil Road, Enfield. Fairview New Homes acquired this site from the London Borough of Enfield in March 2013 and submitted a planning application in October 2013. The scheme will deliver much needed accommodation in the town centre area and will provide welcoming entrance to the adjacent Town Park.

To register an interest please call 0208 366 1271 or register online at www.fairview.co.uk

www.meridianwater.co.uk/oe

Fairview New Homes recognises the desirability of Enfield as a place to live, work, and relax and is delighted to be working with Enfield Council to deliver much needed new homes. Our record of delivery in Enfield is plain to see.

We are actively seeking new opportunities and both brownfield and greenfield sites will be considered, with or without Planning Permission. We are committed to working with vendors to shape a deal that is right for each site. Please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard Paterson at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk or call 0208 366 1271.


Renaissance, atat Drapers Drapers Road, Road, Enfield, Enfield, Renaissance,

stunning isis aa stunning development of 45 three and four bedroom houses and one, development of 45 three and four bedroom houses and one, two andthree threebedroom bedroomapartments. apartments. and Thisnow nowcompleted completeddevelopment developmentofoffamily familyhomes homes and and smaller smaller This apartments has also proved to be extremely popular with apartments has also proved to be extremely popular with purchasers,with withmarketing marketingcommencing commencingininApril April2013 2013 and and the the purchasers, last unit being reserved just 6 months later in September 2013. last unit being reserved just 6 months later in September 2013.

Cecil Road, Enfield. Fairview New Homes acquired this Cecil Road, Enfield. Fairview New Homes acquired this site from the London Borough of Enfield in March 2013 and

submitted planningBorough application in October 2013.2013 The and scheme site from theaLondon of Enfield in March will deliver much needed accommodation the town submitted a planning application in Octoberin2013. Thecentre scheme area and will provide welcoming entranceintothe thetown adjacent Town will deliver much needed accommodation centre Park. area and will provide welcoming entrance to the adjacent Town Park. Planning permission is anticipated imminently with construction starting permission before the end of 2014, and apartments being available Planning is anticipated imminently with construction mid 2015. starting before the end of 2014, and apartments being available mid 2015. To register an interest please call 0208 366 1271 or register at www.fairview.co.uk Toonline register an interest please call 0208 366 1271 or register online at www.fairview.co.uk Fairview New Homes recognises the desirability of Enfield as a place toNew live, Homes work, and relax andthe is delighted to be with Fairview recognises desirability of working Enfield as a Enfield Council to deliver much needed new homes. Our record place to live, work, and relax and is delighted to be working with of delivery in Enfield is plain see. new homes. Our record Enfield Council to deliver muchtoneeded

of delivery in Enfield is plain to see.

We are actively seeking new opportunities and both brownfield and greenfield sites will be considered, with or without Planning Permission. We are committed to working with vendors to shape a deal that is right for each site. We are actively seeking new opportunities and both brownfield and greenfield sites will be considered, with or without Planning Permission. We are committed to working with vendors to shape a deal that is right for eachPaterson site. at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk or call 0208 366 1271. Please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard

Please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard Paterson at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk or call 0208 366 1271.


The new Alma Estate

The new Highmead Estate

The new Highmead estate

Modern Apprentices at Highmead

COUNTRYSIDE IS SUPPORTING ENFIELD COUNCIL IN 2015 Countryside works in partnership with public and private sector organisations to regenerate housing estates and secure the provision of high quality mixed-use and mixed-tenure schemes. Our projects are developed with local authorities, housing associations and local communities and we regard partnering as key to delivering this. We have undertaken more than 35 estate regeneration schemes since the 1980s and we have been building new homes in London and the South East since 1958. We are proud to be working with our partners EnďŹ eld Council, Newlon Housing Trust and local residents and businesses to regenerate the Highmead Estate in Edmonton and the Alma Estate in Ponders End; the two new schemes will deliver over 900 new homes together with new community facilities, a GP surgery, retail and high quality public spaces. We are also working with the Council to regenerate the New Avenue Estate in Southgate.

For further information please visit: www.countryside-properties.com


Editorial director Siobhán Crozier Head of design Rachael Schofield Art direction Katrin Smejkal Deputy editor Maria Shahid Chief reporter James Wood Production assistant Chris Hazeldine Business development director Paul Gussar Business development manager Sophie Gosling Office manager Sue Mapara Subscriptions manager Simon Maxwell Managing director Toby Fox

Contents

7 News Updates on regeneration schemes and Enfield’s economic development. 11 Parks and leisure The borough is rich in green spaces, where commercial enterprise can also be accommodated – the Opportunity Enfield editorial team goes ape. 16 Restaurants Enfield has a diverse and entrepreneurial community, resulting in a rich mix of cuisines to suit all tastes.

32 Retail With several thriving town centres and a ribbon of larger-scale retail developing along the Great Cambridge Road, Enfield is proving a serious destination for major investment in the sector. 38 Housing With attractive neighbourhoods, family homes with gardens, and better transport connections, Enfield is emerging as a good bet for househunters.

22 Map Location of development schemes.

42 Connectivity Enfield will soon join the London Overground map, and with Crossrail 2 on the horizon, transport is improving.

24 Projects A summary of major regeneration projects – planned, under way and completed – throughout Enfield.

46 Sitematch Segro’s Navigation Park offers flexible space with excellent transport links.

Cover Image David Tothill Images Stephen James Enfield, Rimini Restaurant, David Tothill, Enfield Council, Fairview New Homes, Segro, Prezzo, Geronimo Inns, Pollard Thomas Edwards architects, Hawkins/Brown, Karakusevic Carson Architects, Maccreanor Lavington Architects, HTA Design LLP, IS Group, NowMedia | nowmedia.co.uk, Atkinsons Residential, Crossrail, Transport for London Printed by PPG Print Published by 375 Kennington Lane London SE11 5QY 020 7978 6840 3foxinternational.com Enfield Council Civic Centre, Silver Street, Enfield EN1 3XA enfield.gov.uk improvingenfield.com Subscriptions and feedback opportunityenfield.com © 3Fox International Limited 2014. All material is ­strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written ­permission of 3Fox International Limited is strictly ­forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no ­responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this ­magazine are not ­necessarily those of 3Fox International Limited.

5 Contents Issue 5 Winter 2014


A fashion fix, fresh food, your everyday essentials or just a chance to have fun everything you could want in one place

The choice is amazing • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

St. Modwen, the UK’s leading regeneration specialist, owns and manages Edmonton Green, ensuring that it remains a lively and friendly space for all the community to enjoy.

Asda Lidl Sports Direct JD Sports Wilko Boots Peacocks Blue Inc Many restaurants and cafes including Costa Coffee 40 market stalls Post Office Library Travelodge Hotel Leisure

Footfall continues to increases and in the last two years alone has risen by 15% to 215,000 visitors per week.

edmontongreencentre.co.uk facebook.com/edmontongreen

www.stmodwen.co.uk


NEWS

Meridian Water bid submitted

Reservoir transformation complete

Enfield Council has become the first local authority in London to submit a bid to the Greater London Authority (GLA) for an area to be identified as a key housing zone. The £1.5 billion regeneration scheme, Meridian Water (above), has been put forward for identification as a housing zone – an initiative launched by the mayor of London and the chancellor of the exchequer in June to accelerate the number of houses being built in the capital, by lifting planning restrictions and providing additional funding. Meridian Water was one of five zones initially shortlisted by the GLA and was chosen by the mayor of London to publicise the launch of the initiative. Enfield Council said that including the scheme among the chosen zones would help to speed up the delivery of up to 5,000 new homes at the site, as well as encouraging more homes to be built in areas close to the development. Leader of Enfield Council, Doug Taylor, said: “A housing zone would help to stimulate the construction of additional homes in areas adjoining Meridian Water, potentially increasing total supply in both areas from around 5,000 homes to approximately 8,500 homes. “If we receive funding support from the GLA to make Meridian Water a housing zone we could start work on key infrastructure later this year, which would be brilliant news for Enfield.” The deadline for local authorities to submit bids for housing zone designation was 30 September 2014.

Developer Fairview New Homes has finished building 45 homes on the site of a former reservoir in Enfield. The scheme, named Renaissance (below), features everything from one-bedroom apartments to fourbedroom family homes, all of which were sold off-plan. The reservoir was drained and buildings on the site demolished before the start of construction. Sales and marketing director at Fairview New Homes, Jim Holliday, said: “We are extremely proud of our Renaissance development, both for its design and for the range of housing we managed to incorporate to meet the needs of people in Enfield. “Fairview New Homes is deeply rooted in Enfield and we are committed to providing new private and affordable homes here.”

7 News Issue 5 Winter 2014


Enfield Business Centre relaunched

NEWS

The Enfield Business Centre (pictured below) has reopened after an extensive refurbishment programme. The launch, in September 2014, was attended by business leaders in the borough, where the council laid out its vision to attract industrial occupiers into Enfield and help businesses grow, and pledged to create several thousand jobs. Investment of £500,000 from the London mayor’s Outer London Fund was allocated for the renovation work. Enfield Council leader, Councillor Doug Taylor, set out how the authority wants to tap into the heritage of the borough to attract new entrepreneurs. He said: “Enfield’s history is steeped in technology and innovation and there is no reason why [the borough] could not be a hub for industrial pioneers once more, which is why, through initiatives such as Enfield Business Centre, [the] council is committed to encouraging new businesses to flourish and prosper. We are here in a light, airy and contemporary space and I think it symbolises that Enfield is open for business. “Enfield Council is committed to creating 40,000 new jobs by helping people access and sustain employment, supporting local businesses to recruit, and by helping people increase their skills and qualifications. “We’ll do that by continuing to create great conditions for business, help people find and keep jobs, and support our local businesses to employ local residents. We aim to raise the skills and qualification levels of our population so businesses can find the experts they need in our borough, attract additional investment to Enfield and increase the number of jobs available.”

8 News Opportunity Enfield

“Enfield Council is committed to encouraging new businesses to flourish and prosper”

The heat is on An initiative to provide low carbon heating to homes and businesses across Enfield’s Lee Valley has begun. The council, the Greater London Authority and North London Waste Authority launched the Lee Valley Heat Network scheme at City Hall on 21 July (above). The project proposes a “system of pipes that move heat in the form of hot water from where it is created to where it is needed, in a similar way to an electricity network”. The first phase of the project will be rolled out across the borough’s £1.5 billion Meridian Water development, supplied by the ‘energy-from-waste’ facility at Edmonton EcoPark. Other housing schemes in Enfield could also benefit, including Ladderswood, Alma and New Avenue estates. The council estimates the Lee Valley Heat Network will reduce the carbon footprint of homes heated by the network by an estimated 50% compared with conventional fuels.


Business advice service launched A free advice service has been launched to help London businesses take advantage of green industries. The Retrofit London service (launch pictured below), which is being led by Enfield Council, will be available to more than 175 small and medium sized enterprises operating in Enfield, Haringey, Waltham Forest and Lewisham. It will advise the SMEs on how to access energy saving and carbon reduction markets and secure accreditations required to work in these new markets. Councillor Alan Sitkin, Enfield Council’s cabinet member for economic development, said: “Enfield Council is committed to supporting local businesses, and we want to do all we can to help them tap into the energy saving markets. “This sector is recognised as a key area for future growth and job creation and we want to make sure our local businesses can access these new market opportunities.”

Swift sale on Segro units

Council appoints Lovell for Electric Quarter

The developer Segro has pre-let eight industrial units at its View 406 scheme in Enfield (pictured left). The 4,097sq m speculative development on Advent Way includes a five-storey, 96-bedroom Premier Inn hotel, as well as 15 industrial units. Pre-lets have been signed one month ahead of completing the project, and Segro has said a further four units are under offer. Units are being taken by businesses operating in urban distribution, trade counters, light industrial and storage facilities. Those to sign for space include local company Garden Foods, manufacturing firm Nicholls and Clarke and technical services company Hilti. Alan Holland, business unit director for Greater London at Segro, said: “View 406 was Segro’s first speculative development in north London, which is a key growth market for us and we are delighted to have let eight of the 15 units with a further four under offer a month ahead of completion. “These deals are representative of the demand that we are seeing in the market for high quality, flexible industrial and distribution accommodation.”

Lovell has signed a £50 million contract with Enfield Council to undertake a mixed-use development at a key town centre site. 
 
 The Electric Quarter scheme in Ponders End will deliver new homes, commercial and retail space off the High Street and Queensway.

 Subject to the proposals completing the planning and public consultation process, construction work is set to start in 2015. 

 The scheme proposes around 160 homes for open market sale and 88 homes for affordable and intermediate rent, as well as 1,050sq m of non-residential space. 

 Key elements include the revitalisation of the High Street frontage, with the creation of small-scale retail units and a new High Street base for Ponders End Library. 

 All homes will be built to high energyefficiency standards, achieving Level 4 of the Code for Sustainable Homes. The scheme will boost the local economy with additional retail floor space and the creation of jobs. Lovell will provide up to 10 construction apprenticeships, offering the chance for young people to gain trade qualifications, along with work experience placements. The company aims to draw at least 30% of its construction workers from the local area. 

 The Electric Quarter project – named after electric light bulb inventor Joseph Swan who lived on Ponders End High Street – was awarded to Lovell through a competitive tendering process.

Preferred Crossrail route extended to Enfield Enfield Council has welcomed the Transport for London (TfL) decision to extend Crossrail 2 to New Southgate. The council has lobbied for the proposed extension earlier this year, after an initial consultation in 2013 showed massive support for Crossrail 2, leading TfL to look at extending the route to New Southgate. Crossrail 2 is proposed as a high-frequency, high-capacity rail line running through London and into Surrey and Hertfordshire, which is planned to add capacity to London’s rail network and support economic regeneration across the region. Enfield Council leader, Councillor Doug Taylor, said: “This line will attract investment, business and visitors to the area, giving it a significant boost and helping to make the whole borough, and New Southgate in particular, a more profitable and attractive destination for shoppers and visitors. “The news that Crossrail 2 is coming to New Southgate is a massive deal for this borough,” added Taylor. “It will significantly improve transport links to Enfield and give residents greater mobility and freedom to access job opportunities and services. It would reduce congestion, drive economic growth and revitalise the borough’s economy.”

9 News Issue 5 Winter 2014


VIEW

At AdVEnt BuSInESS PARk

LASt 3 REMAInInG unItS AVAILABLE

REMAiNiNG uNiTs AvAiLABLE

A development of 15 new BREEAM ‘Excellent’ industrial units, in an established area with extensive frontage to the A406 North Circular Road. With the last remaining units ranging from 6,260 sq ft - 22,350 sq ft, the development offers excellent accessibility and will create a high quality business park with units perfectly suited to trade counter use. The scheme is highly sustainable, meeting or exceeding the targets set by London Borough of Enfield and the GLA, achieving BREEAM ‘Excellent’.

unit 2

6,260 sq ft

unit 6

9,390 sq ft

unit 7

12,960 sq ft

units 6 & 7

Can be combined

• 15% roof lights • Electrically operated loading doors • Fully fitted offices in the remaining units • Yard depths of 12.5m (unit 2) and 18m (units 6 & 7) • self-contained, secure yards • Ample car parking • security – including estate gates and CCTv

For more information please contact the joint agents:

www.SEGRO.com/view406

William Abbott william.abbott@cbre.com

John McDougal j.mcdougal@glenny.co.uk

Sam Smith samantha.smith@cbre.com

John Bell j.bell@glenny.co.uk


Monkey business

Above The Opportunity Enfield team dices with danger on one of the zip wires at Go Ape! in Enfield’s Trent Park. Right Checking in at the Go Ape! cabin.

Commercial operator Go Ape! has turned the treetops of Enfield’s Trent Park into an extreme obstacle course – while the natural forest remains undisturbed for visitors who prefer the gentle enjoyment of nature, rather than thrill-seeking, adrenalinefuelled fun. James Wood visits Enfield’s top leisure attraction

11 Parks and leisure Issue 5 Winter 2014


Those who take pleasure in a stroll through the peaceful environs of Enfield’s Trent Park are oblivious to the mayhem unfolding high up in the trees nearby. Obscured from sight, the only sounds to accompany the birdsong in the forest are the occasional muted squeal and the mechanical whizz of fast moving pullies on wire. Fear not. An advanced species has not colonised the trees of these 167 hectares of ancient woodland. This is Go Ape! – one of Enfield’s most popular leisure attractions, which is drawing in increasing numbers since it opened in March 2012. In 2013, 24,416 hedonists defied vertigo and put their lives in the grip of a harness attached around their waist. The number of visitors is projected to rise to 27,886 before the end of 2014. Ascending narrow ladders, swinging on ropes into nets, balancing on thin wooden beams, stepping across rickety drawbridges, and zipping down thin wires at speed across five different sections at up to fifteen metres in the air. Feel out of breath? Opportunity Enfield found out the hard way that Go Ape! is not for the faint-hearted. We are in good company. Celebrities including actor Russell Crowe, Olympic diver Tom Daley and entrepreneur and star of TV’s Dragon’s Den, Duncan Bannatyne, have all reportedly enjoyed the thrills of leaping around in the treetops of Go Ape! courses across the country. Initial community concern about the attraction impacting negatively on the historic grounds has died down since the site opened. So expansive is the forest that Go Ape! is barely noticeable to those who come to Trent Park for a bit of peace and quiet. “Really, it is about experiencing the forest in a different way,” says Ben Davies, Go Ape!’s business development manager. “There was a small amount of concern initially, but there always seems to be a bit of misunderstanding about what we do. “Rather than having a negative influence on the

natural environment of the forest, we are really very empathetic of it – it is what Go Ape!’s all about.” The challenge for people to “unleash their inner Tarzan” is proving popular with all ages. Those on stag parties and hen dos can be found taking part in the course, as well as children attending for parties and school trips. “It’s great to contribute towards getting young people out and about and doing something away from their Playstations,” says Davies. The extreme obstacle course concept was originally inspired by a trip to France in 2001, when the founders, a young couple named Rebecca and Tristram Mayhew, were inspired by a treetop adventure course in Auvergne. Convinced that the concept could work in the UK, the pair returned to England in 2002 and set up the first Go Ape! course in Thetford Forest, which straddles the Norfolk and Suffolk border. From there, Go Ape! really went bananas. More than 50 centres have opened across the country in the last 12 years – but according to Davies, the Enfield base has particular advantages. “Trent Park is our only site that is accessible from the London tube network – it’s just a 10 minute walk to Cockfosters station,” he says. “The other major advantage is that it really has that woodland feel that helps add to the experience. “In a lot of the parks in London, you’re very aware of where you are, but Trent Park is not like that. It’s just a bit more wild and you really feel like you’re out of the city.” Go Ape! is boosting both revenue and the number of visitors to Enfield. Despite the initial local murmurs, Davies says the process of obtaining planning permission was straightforward. Concern about a modern day leisure attraction being out of keeping with Trent Park’s wild setting and history – dating back to a time when Henry IV used the site as a hunting ground – proved unfounded.

“Trent Park is our only site that is accessible from the London tube network”

Right Safety first – getting to grips with harness clips at Go Ape! in Trent Park.

12 Parks and leisure Opportunity Enfield

Right Other obstacles at Go Ape! include rickety drawbridges, nets and wobbly wooden planks at up to 15 metres high. Opportunity Enfield’s James Wood and Rachael Schofield put on brave faces.


13 Parks and leisure Issue 5 Winter 2014


“The council is very keen to work with more commerical operators in the borough’s parks”

Above Don’t look down – reaching the holding platform brings momentary relief.

14 Parks and leisure Opportunity Enfield

Go Ape! is barely noticeable to those visiting the park for purposes other than monkeying around. And there are plenty more reasons to motivate a visit to Trent Park. The conservation area is home to Grade II-listed buildings such as the distinctive red bricks of The Orangery, which backs on to a swimming pool and is fronted by a courtyard. The estate was owned by Sir Philip Sassoon, who entertained guests including Charlie Chaplin and Winston Churchill at Trent Park in the first half of the 20th century. An avenue of lime trees, an obelisk, ornamental lakes and a water garden draw nature lovers. Nicky Fiedler, assistant director of public realm at Enfield Council, says: “In the future, the council is very keen to work with more commercial operators in the borough’s parks – and in a way that complements them and supports their future provision. We are currently looking at how to do this.” Innovative ways in which to combine the enjoyment residents derive from ambling through Enfield’s historic parklands, with business opportunities to bring income into the borough is a challenge Enfield Council is ready to face. And up there in the treetops, Go Ape! is testament to the high level of success that can be achieved.


Energy in Enfield Expert energy export

LondonWaste EcoPark in Edmonton N18 plays a vital role in Enfield, as a key service provider: we are contracted by North London Waste Authority (NLWA) to manage the waste of its seven constituent boroughs (Enfield, Barnet, Camden, Hackney, Haringey, Islington and Waltham Forest). LondonWaste Ltd also operates a number of Household Waste & Recycling Centres together with a transport contract.

London Borough of

The company remains committed and expert in delivering a cost effective valuable service to the community. We largely employ local people through involvement with job centres, agencies and, via long-term links with schools, apprentice schemes and further education, help to prepare young people and adults for employment in the green sector. The EcoPark is an important site of industrial land around 15 hectares in size and houses a number of centres which add value to waste, primarily composting, transfer and energy recovery. The plans for new waste infrastructure will bring investment for fresh recycling and waste services over the next 30 years and will create new job opportunities. Rest assured that in the meantime waste and recyclable materials collected from local boroughs will continue to be delivered to us for treatment, separation, recycling and composting. Giving back Our successes are shared in a number of ways. By using rubbish as a resource we are able to give dividends to our sole shareholder NLWA, support local mayor’s charities, assist schools and colleges as well as a variety of community groups. We also share our matured compost and host weekly tours to demonstrate how our activities support you.

Close to 7 million tonnes of your household waste has been diverted from landfill from 2000 – 2013

Enfield

Your household waste is transformed into energy – enough energy to power 72,000 homes throughout the year is exported to the National Grid and the rest powers all the other centres in the EcoPark. Over 35,000 tonnes of organic waste is diverted from landfill to the Compost Centre. We produce a high quality accredited compost which is then used in agriculture, local allotments, parks and gardens and community groups. Improvement plans will ensure that these essential public services continue well into the future. NLWA is soon to begin consulting on its future plans at the EcoPark. For more information on these plans please visit www.northlondonheatandpower.london

Tel: 020 8884 5525 www.londonwaste.co.uk Advent Way, London N18 3AG

LondonWaste EcoPark

Support for local charities

Energy recovery


All in good taste

Right From small family businesses to national chains, gastronomy is becoming a feature of Enfield’s economy. And with an international offering, it is drawing gourmets from beyond the borough boundaries.

16 Restaurants Opportunity Enfield

Foodies find themselves spoilt at Enfield’s restaurants, where a rich mix of different cuisines reflects the diversity of the borough’s communities. From Turkish restaurants and curry houses to independent Greek and Italian eateries and big name brands, Lucy Purdy hits the tasting trail


For owner James Greer, running one of Enfield’s best-loved restaurants has long been a passion. The crisp white tablecloths and cosy red interior walls hold memories of 16 years of fine dining at The Beautiful South: romantic dinners, birthdays, family celebrations, enjoyment and laughter, bound up within the plates and serviettes, etched upon the wooden floorboards, sewn into its very fabric. It sits opposite Enfield Chase station, the dark green and white sign distinctive yet familiar to passersby, serving up a much-cherished blend of French and London cuisine: seafood, meat, vegetarian dishes, above all, seasonal, tasty and heartfelt food. Of course, in the years that have passed since it opened its doors, Enfield has changed. “The fact that we’re on the edge of London doesn’t matter anymore,” explains Greer with a smile. “Oyster cards have shrunk London, opened it up. Enfield is a lot closer for a lot of people now, and I’m feeling very positive about the future. “There’s a real mix of people coming into Enfield now and we do very well, particularly in the evenings. Even 16 years ago, the kind of cuisine I was doing meant I had to be somewhere with a little bit of money around. And Enfield ticked that box. Now, a lot of new people are relocating to the area. Professionals are moving into the more expensive apartments that have been built and they don’t always have large kitchens, or gardens, so they like to come here. On the other hand, we get a lot of retired people, who come back time and time again, particularly at lunchtimes. They like the set menus: people have their favourite dishes!” The chefs at The Beautiful South know their craft. They make their own gravlax – a Scandinavian departure from the restaurant’s Gallic focus – but it is a firm favourite: salmon pickled with sugar, gin, dill and lemon juice. Crab with prawns is another big seller, as are the fishcakes made fresh each day. Chicken liver, confit of duck, Dover sole, calamari and the in-house red cabbage pickle all go down well too, says Greer. He has nine members of staff, sources fish and meat at Billingsgate and Smithfield markets and also buys from two local butchers and a greengrocer. And Greer speaks with real warmth of the borough where he chose to run his business. “Enfield is a lovely place. London is in reach, as are the airports, yet travel 10 or 15 minutes and you’re out in open fields. We have people coming to us from Brookmans Park, Cockfosters and Hadley Wood as well as further afield. The recession of 2008 was the worst I can remember. But now there is a feeling of optimism. I’m very positive.” Enfield has a particularly strong offer of Turkish, Greek, Italian and Indian restaurants. One of the most popular in the latter category is Chaseside Restaurant, which Salim Ullah helps run in Chase Side, operating a successful business but one which claims to put customer satisfaction before profit.

“We realised that everything comes as a package,” Ullah says. “It’s the menu, the quality of service, the food and the atmosphere. You can’t just get one right; you have to do them all. We have the expertise and the passion and we try to provide great value for money in terms of food and service. We like to make our customers feel as important as we consider them to be.” Nestled in a quieter location, a short walk from Enfield town centre, the restaurant is nevertheless close to a densely populated residential area – and thriving. Ullah and his brothers decided to win customers’ hearts through their stomachs rather than deploying fancy marketing gimmicks, and tackled with glee the challenge of creating a top class menu when they opened in 2002.

Above and left Rimini Restaurant – a good selection of wines and popular with families.

17 Restaurants Issue 5 Winter 2014


The Enfield Top 20

TripAdvisor December 2014

“We support more than 30 local restaurants and cafes, all independently owned and operated. In recent years, the diversity of restaurants has become bolder, with people setting up some very cool places”

18 Restaurants Opportunity Enfield

Nostos Taverna The Poppadom Saathi Aksular, Hertford Road La Caverna Aksular, Palmers Green Spice of India Savoy Spice Cafe Alleyne’s Table Table (Inn on the Park) Jolly Butchers Juboraj Robin Hood The Beautiful South Fish and Chips Enfield Tandoori Nando’s The Cricketers Grizzlies Jolly Farmers

“We sent my brother Rahim to India,” he explains. “He trained at some of the big hotels there, sampling and learning the truly traditional dishes. Everyone can cook chicken tikka masala, most people can make curry, but the really traditional cuisines are different, they are technical. He then trained for six months in Bradford – the curry capital of the UK – and learned how to create the flavour wow factor.” Now hungry customers at Chaseside are served up a wide range of dishes: food from Pakistan, Goa, creamy Persian dishes and rich, Bangladeshi king prawn curries, “The prawns are cooked with their shells on, to maximise the flavour,” notes Ullah. Just down the road, Emma Rigby runs the awardwinning Love Your Doorstep Enfield website, a rapidly growing community of local residents sharing information on what to do and where to find it. The project won the Enfield Innovation Competition in 2013 and has quickly become a go-to place to share all that is happening in the borough. Rigby cites Enfield’s wide diversity of restaurants as one of the strongest weapons in its arsenal of leisure options. “The local Love Your Doorstep community ask daily for recommendations on where to eat. We support more than 30 local restaurants and cafes, all independently owned and operated,” she says. “In recent years, the diversity of restaurants has become bolder, with people setting up some very cool places.” This shows that the recession is firmly behind us, believes Rigby, and demonstrates the willingness of local business owners to take risks in order to make Enfield a great place, for visitors and residents alike. And given that Love Your Doorstep was set up in the wake of the London riots to strengthen the bonds between local businesses, does Rigby believe food – with all its universal appeal and endless diversity – can help unite people? “Absolutely,” she says. “Enfield is a diverse, multicultural community and lots of communities here use eating to bring people together. This is prominent in Enfield.” Abdul Mukith, who oversees servings of traditional and contemporary Indian food at Saathi, a restaurant also based in Chase Side, echoes this notion. He believes there is something in the air in the borough, a strong sense of family and a desire to celebrate these ties which keeps the restaurant scene buzzing and competitive, urging innovation and attentive customer service. “I’ve been in Enfield all my life. I went to school in Enfield and then we had the restaurant here. It’s a great area because of the people,” Mukith explains. “We have quite a small restaurant but it always fills up fast and has a really cosy atmosphere. We have new dishes quite often and specialities too. But our success is all down to the people here.” Further up, in buzzing Green Lanes, Palmers Green, there is a tasty blend of eateries. Rimini Restaurant does a line in Italian pasta and pizzas – with friendly, pizza dough-tossing chefs helping to distract hungry little ones before their dinner. The restaurant recently expanded


Right, top right and top left The Kings Head, Geronimo Inns’ Winchmore Hill base, offers specials and frequently changing menus in comfortable, airy surroundings.

19 Restaurants Issue 5 Winter 2014


Right Award-winning Prezzo finds heritage buildings and its Enfield restaurant is housed in a former coaching inn.

into much larger premises, giving more people the chance to enjoy such treats as its garlic bread, calzone pizza and limoncello liqueur. Nearby, Turkish restaurant Aksular has become well known for its kebabs. Here, customers can dine near to the comforting heat of the grills, the smell of roasting meat wafting through the restaurant, with breakfasts to full-blown family banquets on offer, and takeaways too. In Ponders End High Street, the 90-seater Gazan Restaurant serves a wide selection of mezes and meats and is popular with family groups. Big brands have been drawn to Enfield too. Prezzo, Nando’s and Pizza Express have found a home in Enfield Town, where there is a strong upward churn of operators. Award-winning Italian food outlet, Prezzo, selects heritage buildings for its outlets and its Enfield restaurant is in an old coaching inn, with high ceilings, contemporary interiors and a garden for alfresco dining. Spokesman Eddie Gershon said: “Prezzo is always keen to open in vibrant town and city centres and this is the case with Enfield. The town centre is busy and well supported by local people and those using it from further afield. Enfield also offers a good workforce too.” TGI Fridays and Pizza Hut are represented further up Southbury Road, often visited by cinema-goers, before or after a visit to the nearby Cineworld. And if you head toward central London, Edmonton Green has a huge range of options. Turkish restaurant 20 Restaurants Opportunity Enfield

Kervan is considered by many a local institution, with a reassuringly loud buzz as it gets packed out by families at weekends, and there is a string of Caribbean eateries too. Winchmore Hill, with its strong community scene and beautiful village green, is particularly strong for good pub food. The Kings Head, operated by Geronimo Inns, prompts customers to come for the latest menu because the food on offer changes so frequently. Sunday roasts, bar snacks and a special BBQ menu are all up for the taking. A snapshot reveals starters including rabbit and game terrine with cornichons, plum and apple chutney and toast. For the main course, a sea bass with minted fennel and radish salad and lemon roasted potato are on offer, and pecan pie with vanilla ice cream for pud. The nearby Salisbury Arms pub is also well-known for its fresh food, offering monthly seasonal specials along with dishes such as salt and pepper squid with lime mayonnaise and Paris brown, flat and oyster mushrooms on rye toast. Also, on the Green another popular Turkish restaurant Şamdan has been here since 2008. It offers traditional Anatolian cuisine in sumptuous surroundings, with the additional attraction of occasional belly-dancing and traditional music. With a thriving independent restaurant scene and big brands hot on each other’s heels in heading to Enfield, the borough’s foodies are able to sample a selection of international cuisines, all on their own doorstep.

“Prezzo is always keen to open in vibrant town and city centres and this is the case with Enfield. The town centre is busy and well supported by local people and those using it from further afield. Enfield also offers a good workforce too”


Supporting regeneration in Enfield

As the provider of water and sewerage services for London and the Thames Valley, we are planning for the long-term needs of our customers and supporting future development in Enfield. Upgrading Deephams Sewage Works

We are proposing a major upgrade to Deephams Sewage Works to significantly improve the quality of the treated wastewater that flows into the Salmons Brook, a tributary of the River Lee. The upgrade will also allow the sewage works to treat the sewage from the forecasted population increase in the area already served by the works, improve treatment facilities that are becoming old and worn out, and cope with the heavier winter rainfall and warmer summer temperatures that are predicted due to climate change. During the construction of the upgrade, at least 20 per cent of construction roles will be filled by local people. We will also offer apprenticeships and training for local workers, as well as contracting opportunities for businesses and suppliers close to the site.

During our second phase of consultation in spring 2014, most respondents told us that they supported our plans to reduce odour from the sewage works – but many wanted us to do more. We have now developed our plans so that we will be able to reduce the smell from the sewage works even further. The additional measures we are proposing will mean we will deal with the odour from the parts of the sewage works that create the majority of the odour. This will involve covering tanks and other parts of the works, and installing equipment to catch and clean the air under the covers. This will mean that the number of properties in the area most affected by the smell will be reduced by 99 per cent and all properties will experience a significant reduction in odour.

Getting planning permission

We submitted our planning application for permission to build the upgrade to the London Borough of Enfield in June 2014. The Council’s Planning Committee are responsible for deciding our application, and will take into account the views of local people before making its decision.

Once the upgrade is complete, we will also provide an education resource at the site and guided tours around the works for local school groups.

We hope to receive planning permission from London Borough of Enfield before the end of 2014, so that we can start construction in 2015.

Significantly reducing odour

To find out more about our proposals to upgrade Deephams Sewage Works, visit our website

We know that reducing odour is the most important issue for local residents and businesses.

thameswater.co.uk/deephams


Regenerating Enfield: delivering £2 billion worth of opportunities for investment Key to projects Planned and in the future Current and in progress Completed School expansions New schools Industrial sites South-west (SW) 1 New Southgate and Ladderswood Commercial space, a community centre, 517 new homes, and a hotel. 2 Southgate Town Hall and Palmers Green Library The former town hall is being turned into housing while the adjoining library is being extensively refurbished. 3 North Circular Enfield Council is now in the process of adopting the North Circular Area Action Plan. South-East (SE) 4 Meridian Water Some 8,500 new homes, 3,000 jobs and three new schools will be created. 5 Advent Way Premier Inn hotel and restaurant recently opened. 6 Highmead New retail, 118 homes, commercial space and a health centre now being marketed. 7 Edmonton Green Ongoing investment and improvements to the Edmonton Green area, including the installation of lifts at the train station. 8 The Crescent Improvements to Grade II-listed Georgian terrace.

22 Projects Opportunity Enfield

The vision for the future has been set out and now change is in evidence throughout Enfield, as projects come out of the ground in the delivery phase

9 Edmonton EcoPark Set to provide the next generation of waste services.

21 Dujardin Mews 38 new council homes next to the Oasis Academy Hadley.

10 Central Leeside A major regeneration project with space for 15,900 homes, creating a potential 15,000 jobs.

22 Enfield Warehouse and Distribution Centre A flagship mixed-use development capable of accommodating a range of options.

11 Angel Gardens New public park near Meridian Water with adventure area.

West (W)

12 Unity Hub Custom-built youth hub.

23 Cat Hill Residential development at the former university campus.

13 Upper Lee Valley rail A four trains per hour service by 2018.

24 New Avenue estate Full redevelopment of the estate in Southgate.

Central (C)

Borough-wide

14 New River House The conversion and extension of a vacant office building.

25 Lee Valley Heat Network Residents will see local waste processed into energy to heat Enfield homes.

15 Lumina Park A major development at the old General Electric site. North-east (NE) 16 Electric Quarter A flagship regeneration project on Ponders End High Street. 17 Ponders End A transformed gateway to the Lee Valley Park. 18 Alma estate Complete redevelopment of the estate, providing a minimum of 800 homes, doctors centre, retail space and gym. 19 Tesco Distribution Centre A major mixed-use scheme, built-to-suit Tesco stores. 20 Ordnance Unity Centre New library, community space, doctors surgery and dental practice.

small sites 26 Parsonage Lane 29 new homes comprising a mix of two, three and four bedrooms. 27 Forty Hill Nine new family homes of three and four bedrooms. 28 Lavender Hill 12 new homes of one and two bedrooms. 29 St Georges Road Three new four-bedroom family homes. 30 Tudor Crescent 15 new homes of a mix of flats and houses. 31 Jasper Close 18 new homes comprising a mix of flats and houses. 32 Holtwhites Hill Eight new homes, of a mix of flats and semidetached houses.

To Heathrow Airport

school expansions A St Michael’s B Merryhills C Capel Manor D Houndsfield E Firs Farm F Eversley G St John & St James School H Suffolks School I Garfield J Highfield K Grange Park L Worcesters M Prince of Wales N George Spicer O Edmonton County P Cuckoo Hall Academy

Hadley Hadley Wood Wood

New schools A Woodpecker Hall B Kingfisher Hall C Enfield Heights D Heron Hall E Oasis Hadley F ARK John Keats Available industrial sites G View 406, Advent Way H Imperial, Innova Park I Navigation Park, 7 Morson Road J Enfield Warehouse and Distribution Centre, Kier Park, Mollison Avenue K Expansion Enfield L G Park M Unit B5, Angel Road Works, Crispin House N Gibbs Road, Montagu Road Industrial Estate Key regeneration sites in Enfield – more detailed profiles of some are on the following pages. For further information email invest@enfield.gov.uk, or call 020 8379 3800


To London Stansted Airport

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Brimsdown Brimsdown

Bush Bush Hill Hill Park Park

Winchmore Winchmore Hill Hill

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23 Projects Issue 5 Winter 2014


1

New Southgate and Ladderswood

1 New Southgate and Ladderswood The redevelopment of the strategically important Ladderswood Way estate and the adjoining New Southgate Industrial Estate started on-site in March. The development, designed by Pollard Thomas Edwards and developed in a joint venture between Mulalley and housing association One Housing Group, will create 517 homes, 1,400sq m of commercial space, a community centre and an 80-bedroom hotel, bringing employment and training opportunities. The new homes will range from one-bedroom flats to four-bedroom houses, in a mix of private and affordable tenures. 24 Projects Opportunity Enfield

The first phase will provide 40 new homes (of which 23 will be affordable and 17 for private sale) and is expected to complete by autumn 2015. The second phase, at the corner of the site, will comprise 190 apartments in seven blocks, an underground car park, hotel and open space, and is anticipated to complete in mid-2016. Ladderswood will be the first development in Enfield to use the decentralised energy network, being developed by the Lee Valley Heat Network. A centralised boiler system will be installed deep underneath the new homes to provide all heating and hot water for the development.


Above An artist’s impression of the redeveloped Ladderswood Way estate and adjoining New Southgate Industrial Estate.

Powerday Powerday has started construction on a new materials recycling facility at its waste transfer station in Enfield. The plant will produce high-quality recycled materials and renewable fuels for supply to the energy market, recycling and processing 330,000 tonnes of construction and commercial waste from the London area each year. The plant – to be completed in April 2015 – will create up to 60 new jobs, as well as supporting the construction and waste industries’ commitments to reducing waste to landfill. 25 Projects Issue 5 Winter 2014


4

6

Edmonton

26 Projects Opportunity Enfield


4 Meridian Water Development of the £1.5 billion regeneration scheme, Meridian Water, moved one step nearer to delivery as Enfield Council became the first authority to submit a bid to the Greater London Authority (GLA) for the area to be identified as a housing zone. The initiative was launched by the mayor of London and the chancellor of the exchequer in June to accelerate the number of houses being built in the capital, by lifting planning restrictions and providing additional funding. Construction on such a vast development site could help to alleviate the capital’s housing shortage. Meridian Water was one of five zones initially shortlisted by the GLA and the site was chosen by the mayor of London to publicise the launch of the initiative. Inclusion of the scheme among the zones would help to speed the delivery of up to 8,500 new homes, as well as encouraging developers to build more homes nearby. Councillor Doug Taylor, leader of Enfield Council, said: “A housing zone would help to stimulate the construction of additional homes in areas adjoining Meridian Water, potentially increasing total supply in both areas from around 5,000 homes to approximately 8,500 homes. If we receive funding support from the GLA to make Meridian Water a housing zone, we could start work on key infrastructure later this year.” While the deadline for local authorities to submit their bids for designation of the 20 housing zones was 30 September 2014, Enfield Council had filed its application in early July. Housing zone measures would see local authorities identify sites for residential development and able to bid for a portion of £400 million of funding. Loans will be made available to the local authority for all necessary remedial work at the site. Meridian Water will be an 85-ha, mixed-use, waterfront community, which in addition to housing, will also provide three new schools and community facilities, a new high street causeway, diverse parklands and up to 3,000 jobs. Another initiative which could help to facilitate development at Meridian Water is the Lee Valley Heat Network, which has been set up to convey waste heat from the Edmonton EcoPark and other sources to homes and businesses over a wide area in Enfield and potentially, in neighbouring boroughs. The network has the capacity to provide sustainable, low carbon energy to thousands of homes and businesses.

Left It is hoped the £1.5 billion Meridian Water regeneration scheme will be identified as a housing zone, to alleviate the capital’s housing shortage.

Left Highmead will provide 118 new homes in Edmonton, and has been shortlisted for a housing design award.

6 Highmead Edmonton’s new Highmead scheme started on-site in July 2013, and is on track to provide a total of 118 new homes (22 houses, two with wheelchair access and 96 apartments). Forty per cent of these homes will be affordable and managed by Newlon Housing Trust, available from February 2015. The development is due to be completed in spring 2015. As homes went on the open market, approximately 20% were reserved within the first few weeks. The scheme is by developer Countryside Properties and will also include 1,037sq m of new retail space, as well as a bespoke health centre and a community facility. Designed by Hawkins\Brown architects, the development has been shortlisted for a housing design award. It will kick-start wider investment and regeneration in Edmonton. 27 Projects Issue 5 Winter 2014


16

18

24

Ponders End

Left A new mixed-tenure neighbourhood in Ponders End, the Alma estate redevelopment will include at least 800 homes, retail space, a gym, GP centre and improved public realm.

18 Alma estate Progress has been made on the £150 million redevelopment of the Alma estate in Ponders End, with the appointment of Countryside Properties as the developer, and Newlon Housing Trust as owner. The new mixed-tenure neighbourhood will include around 1,000 homes, with a mixture of private sale and shared ownership, and a minimum of 200 council-owned homes for secure tenants. It will also provide new retail space, a GP centre, an affordable gym, and greatly improved open space and public realm. It will replace 717 properties, including four 23-storey tower blocks. The new estate will be able to connect to a decentralised energy network, owned and managed by the Lee Valley Heat Network, using water from the nearby reservoirs to provide heat to the homes. 28 Projects Opportunity Enfield

Local residents and stakeholders have been attending design panel workshops – along with Countryside and the architect Thomas Pollard Edwards – to prepare both the outline planning application for the masterplan and a detailed planning application for phase one. This is due to be submitted in March 2015, about the same time as demolition of the first phase. As part of the Alma’s regeneration programme, Enfield Council is also constructing its first new council homes in decades. Dujardin Mews – named after the Enfield-born Olympic equestrian double gold medallist – will provide 38 new homes, 19 for council rent and 19 for shared equity. The appointed contractor, Durkan, is due to start construction in January 2015 and will complete in spring 2016.


16 Electric Quarter The transformation of the Ponders End High Street area, now known as the Electric Quarter – named after former local resident Joseph Swan, who pioneered the invention of the electric light bulb – continues to progress. Behind the high street a new secondary school, the Heron Hall Academy, is taking shape with a planning application expected imminently. Meanwhile, new plans are advancing after the revised development boundary for the residential mixed-use development was agreed by the council in June. A new planning application is anticipated in early 2015, with start on-site expected as soon as summer 2015.

24 New Avenue estate This flagship project in Cockfosters, part of Enfield’s estates renewal programme, will increase the number of homes on the estate from 163 to more than 400. The next stage of the comprehensive redevelopment of New Avenue estate, formerly Coverack Close, will see Enfield Council appoint a development partner and hold a series of design workshops with the selected company and residents from January 2015. The developer will submit applications for planning

Small housing sites

Left Revised plans are progressing for a mixeduse development at the Electric Quarter.

permission later that year and subject to approvals, commence on-site in 2016. Existing council tenants will be offered a secure tenancy, whether they choose to remain on the estate or bid to move away permanently. Leaseholders may choose to sell their property back to the council or take the offer of a new, shared equity home. Once a developer is appointed, a phasing plan will target the earliest block(s) for vacant possession.

To meet the challenge of an increase in demand for both affordable housing and private rented homes, Enfield Council has launched the first phase of its small housing sites programme, creating residential mixed tenure developments that integrate into the existing street scene and help to improve the profile of the area. The project will provide 94 exemplar homes on seven sites across the borough. Of these new homes, 37 will be affordable (20 for social rent and 17 for shared ownership) and 57 will be available for private rent. The homes will range in size from one to four bedrooms. Creative thinking about how to package the development has meant 37 affordable council-owned homes could be created, seven more than if a standard approach had been adopted. The scheme is paid for via a special-purpose vehicle, allowing the council to intervene in the market as well as deliver a cost-neutral scheme with a net cash flow. A council subsidiary will use the income generated from the remaining 57 homes, available for private rent, to fund the whole development. To support the scheme, the council has secured a £690,000 Greater London Authority grant from the mayor’s Care and Support Fund and the Homes for Working Londoners pot. Subject to planning conditions being discharged, construction will begin in January 2015.


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Shop front Left The Stephen James Enfield BMW showroom is a landmark on the Great Cambridge Road. Below Palace Exchange, bought by Standard Life Investments, which also owns Palace Gardens.

Enfield is seeing a retail revival post-recession, with renewed interest from big brands and institutional investors, complemented by a strong independent sector. Estates Gazette’s markets editor, Noella Pio Kivlehan, finds big deals bringing fresh changes too

32 Retail Opportunity Enfield


“Enfield’s success has been in its ability to accommodate a varied mix of retail uses”

When Enfield’s Palace Exchange shopping centre was bought by Standard Life Investments in the last week of August, it heralded change for the area’s retail scene. The 20,440sq m mall essentially makes up almost half of Enfield Town’s retail market. But, what is significant, is that Standard Life Investments also owns the adjacent 20,000sq m Palace Gardens shopping centre, which takes up the other main chunk of the town’s retail offer. For the first time in recent history, the majority of its retail estate is under single ownership. Having a dominant landlord could cause trepidation but this deal has been warmly welcomed. “I am very pleased Standard Life Investments has continued to invest in Enfield by buying Palace Exchange shopping centre,” says Mark Rudling, town centre manager, Enfield Business and Retailers Association (EBRA). “I would consider it to be a great advantage to have both Palace Gardens and Palace Exchange under one ownership.” Huw Jones, chief executive of the North London Chamber of Commerce agrees. “This deal shows investors are viewing Enfield as a positive destination in terms of long-term commitment and we’re delighted that Standard Life Investments sees a value in increasing its holdings in the borough.” Jones believes that having a sole landlord will help improve operations: “Everyone will be on the same page. There will be a single message.” Neil Isaac, assistant director for economic development at Enfield Council, adds: “It’s really great to see another organisation that is now well established in Enfield seeing the value in increasing its investment in local businesses and the town centre over the longer term.” Emma Rigby, a passionate campaigner for independent retailers in the area, who runs the local website loveyourdoorstep.com, says: “It’s positive for Enfield. Having a joined-up approach, with both centres merging, they can’t go wrong.” And Rigby hopes that for the independents, it will bring more footfall to the town.

Standard Life Investments wouldn’t comment on the deal. But it is believed that for now the two centre teams will run as separate entities, meaning it is too early to say what the overall impact will be. The sale of Palace Exchange – for around £74 million, according to Mat Oakley of Savills – is part of a retail evolution over the last three decades not only in Enfield Town, the largest conurbation, but elsewhere in the districts of Edmonton Green, Palmers Green and Southgate. And a lot of the changes to the retail scene are down to Enfield’s residents. With a population of almost 325,000 people, the fourth largest in London, Enfield is a cultural melting pot. This diversity dictates the type of retailer attracted to the area – of 6,000 businesses, the majority are small independents. Enfield Council’s chief executive, Rob Leak, spent a large part of his career in fashion retail before moving to the public sector. He says: “The change in profile of Enfield’s population over the past 30 years has seen a thriving Turkish, Cypriot, Greek, African and eastern European market open up and diversify Enfield’s centres.” Leak adds: “Enfield’s success has been in its ability to accommodate a varied mix of retail uses within an area and being able to combine this with community, leisure and cultural uses such as Enfield Town and Edmonton Green.” When the recession hit in 2008, rents were at a high of £130 per sq ft – now £85 per sq ft according to Colliers International – and independents were caught in the crossfire leaving empty shops in local high streets. But, as the UK comes out of the economic downturn, those shops are beginning to be occupied. “We have seen a significant change in the number of new businesses coming back to the high street, so to me it’s saying that economic form is definitely on the way back up,” says Rigby. “Different independent stores are coming in, which you would not have seen five years ago. A new music arts cafe has just opened on the (Enfield Town) high street, something you would have previously seen in Crouch End or Muswell Hill.”

Left Palace Exchange, the busy retail centre in Enfield Town.

33 Retail Issue 5 Winter 2014


Left Palmers Green district centre.

Left Southgate Green is one of several flourishing shopping areas in Enfield.

Pearson’s, Enfield Town’s original anchor store, has also invested heavily in modernising its Church Street base, while increasing its range of goods and opening a new restaurant and coffee shop. While Rigby champions independents, she is not against large shopping centres and out-of-town locations such as Enfield Retail Park. “There’s a need for both. No one is ever going to offer the same service as a small 34 Retail Opportunity Enfield

independent retailer but, if they are shopping locally in Enfield, it’s still bringing money into the area.” Rigby is keen to see more national and international retail names open in Enfield to add to the high street multiples, which include Marks and Spencer, Morrisons, Waitrose and Nike. When jeweller Pandora took a unit in Palace Exchange, Rigby says it was a turning point for Enfield in attracting more well-known retailers. Drawing these types of shops out into the boroughs can be challenging. One senior retail analyst says the large, international companies have “an unhealthy obsession” with the prime locations in central London such as Oxford Street, Regent Street, Bond Street and the Westfield centres. “They should be looking at cascade outwards. It’s happened in upmarket places like Wimbledon Village and Hampstead – the high-end operators [are in or are] looking at those. [But, the likes of Enfield] – these are markets that often get overlooked,” says the analyst. In Edmonton Green, St Modwen has invested in excess of £100 million to deliver a regeneration scheme in partnership with Enfield Council. St Modwen acquired the retail centre from the council in 1999 and it currently comprises 120 retail and restaurant outlets, 40 market stalls, 750 residential units, a 73-bedroom Travelodge, community uses and offices. Other elements of the scheme include a new bus station, primary care centre and leisure centre. An additional £4.5 million of investment by St Modwen


Left Well established on the Great Cambridge Road, where the retail offer continues to diversify, Stephen James Enfield has all the latest BMW and Mini models.

“It’s extremely important to us to employ local people and to become part of the local community – we want to give something back”

delivered improvements to the South Mall (community facilities, Post Office, library and banks). The North Mall was reconfigured in 2013 to accommodate a 2045sq m Wilkinsons store, along with improvements to the elevations of all buildings, landscaping, street furniture and lighting. Whether in famous names or independents, the retail market is an important source of employment. The sector accounts for 11% (approximately 12,100 people) of all employees in the borough, with many jobs created during the last five years. One company keen to sing the praises of local workers is Warren Evans. In 2011, the bed and mattress manufacturer opened a showroom at Clock Parade,

Enfield, as part of a vigorous expansion programme. Speaking about the launch of the company’s Ealing branch in June, founder, Warren Evans, who started his business in 1992 during the depths of an earlier recession, said: “It’s extremely important to us to employ local people and to become part of the local community – we want to give something back and support the needs of others.” And there is more to come. Leak says Winchmore Hill retail is expected to continue to grow, while Edmonton Green and Angel Edmonton have low vacancy rates and have seen increasing demand for new retail and leisure floorspace. Enfield Retail Park has also signed a number of new operators, and prestigious BMW and Mini retailer 35 Retail Issue 5 Winter 2014


Stephen James Enfield has long been an impressive glass landmark on the Great Cambridge Road, displaying the latest sleek models on the roof as well as in the showroom. Leak adds that there will be significant new opportunities both in Enfield Town and Meridian Water – the high-quality regeneration scheme which will comprise up to 5,000 homes and 3,000 new jobs. Meridian Water was launched by the mayor of London, Boris Johnson, in June 2014 and in July, Enfield Council submitted a bid to the Greater London Authority to secure housing zone status for the £1.5 billion regeneration scheme. Increased development and investment in attracting different retailers shows serious interest in Enfield’s potential. With Standard Life Investments’ purchase of Palace Exchange shopping centre, all eyes will be on the landlord to see how it will be part of this changing market – and what difference it will create for the future of Enfield as a town centre and a retail destination.

The newcomers New signings have occupied a wide variety of trading premises ranging from big box retail to small high street units: Enfield Town + Two Morrisons Local stores and other independent grocery outlets + Music Shop & Art Cafe + Foxtons estate agent + Hotter Shoes Palmers Green + Three hairdressers (JOJO & FLO, My Hair & Beauty, La Coupe Hair Studio) + Strictly Silver & Gold (Jewellers) + Service uses: Tipico Betting Shop; City & Urban Estates (letting agent); Gate House (interior design) + Food and drink: Lime Leaf Bangladeshi and Valentino’s restaurant Edmonton Green + Wilkinsons, plus a number of independent cafes and grocery businesses   Southgate + There are new estate agents, hair salons, bookmakers, a new butcher, baker, an interior design studio as well as three new food and drink outlets Enfield Retail Park + M&S Simply Food, Boots, Nike + Carphone Warehouse, Subway, Nando’s (all three are due to open shortly) Source: Enfield Council

36 Retail Opportunity Enfield


Opportunity Enfield partners group Joining together to support Enfield

Abellio Greater Anglia Jonathan Denby jonathan.denby@abelliogreateranglia.co.uk Derrick Wade Waters Mark Joslin mj@dww.co.uk Newlon Housing Trust Joe Molloson joe.molloson@newlon.org.uk Macmillan macmillan.org.uk The National Autistic Society autism.org.uk

For more information about these companies, visit opportunityenfield.com/partners


Trading up

Right Gentleman’s Row, one of Enfield’s conservation areas and a prime location.

38 Housing Opportunity Enfield

With demand continuing to outstrip supply in the hot and heavy London residential market, some outer boroughs are proving a competitive bet with unexpected advantages, such as family housing with garages and extensive gardens. Colin Marrs finds Enfield is attractive to buyers in search of a larger property to make their “forever home”


Publisher Findlay Peterson and his young family have just put down roots in Enfield – and they are far from alone. The borough is currently experiencing huge demand for its housing – much of which is being generated from inner London boroughs, where prices are rising at eye-watering rates – up to 38% a year in some areas. The maths meant the Petersons were able to sell their two-bedroom flat in Stoke Newington and use the proceeds to buy a four-bedroom town house with a garage and 31-metre garden in Forty Hill, north Enfield. Peterson says: “When we started looking for a family home in Hackney we quickly realised we weren’t going to find anywhere within our budget that we thought was suitable, so we decided to cast the net wider. A lot of people we know with young families were moving to Walthamstow at the time so we had a look there but had heard Enfield was nice so went to see some properties there too. The difference in what you can get for your money, having sold up in Hackney, was startling.” Daniel Puddick, sales manager at the Enfield office of estate agent Foxtons, says that the story is a familiar one: “About 10 years ago, people would only want to live on or very near to a tube station. But you run out of tube before it becomes affordable now.”

Right Gareth Drive is just one of the many schemes that adds to the afffordable housing offer in Edmonton.

Enfield actually hosts four tube stations, all on the Piccadilly line – Arnos Grove, Southgate, Oakwood and Cockfosters, albeit all on the western border with Barnet. Two north-south overground lines form the spine of the borough, providing links to King’s Cross St Pancras, Moorgate and Liverpool Street, with journey times of less than 40 minutes. Keith Barnfield, co-founder of estate agent, Barnfields says: “Enfield is ideally placed for commuters looking to move further out of the centre.” Access to public transport is not the only benefit of being based in Enfield. The borough offers good schools, with exam results improving in 2014 on the previous year, as well as strong community ties in its towns and easy connectivity to both the city and nearby countryside. Within Enfield, there has traditionally been a divide between areas either side of the A10 – the Great Cambridge Road. Homes to the west of the road have reached higher prices, with those to the east bordering Waltham Forest being seen as less desirable. But, says Barnfield, some of the biggest recent rises have been seen in this neighbourhood. “The areas traditionally regarded as the lower value districts have witnessed some of the biggest percentage rises, due to buyers seeking a bargain.” Partially, these strong rises are due to the fact that prices in these areas – particularly in EN3 and N9 postcode areas – fell further than others during the recession. But since then price rises across the whole borough also mean that some areas are now out of reach for some buyers. Barnfield says: “If people can pay £200,000 for a home then they won’t get much for that money in the west of the borough now, so they have to look to the east.” Puddick agrees, pointing out that demand in the east is also being fuelled from buyers closer to home – those who are priced out of the property hotspot of Walthamstow, parts of which are becoming viewed as trendy. He believes that the new money is beginning to bring further improvements to the quality of life in the borough. “There are new cafes and shops springing up and that is likely to continue as new residents move in. I spoke to a property owner looking to let three commercial units in Enfield Town who had an approach from Carluccio’s. He didn’t want a restaurant but it shows that demand from business follows demand from housebuyers.” Puddick is hard-pushed to identify particular hotspots within the borough, saying that the picture is more complex and granular. “It’s about the type of housing rather than an area. There are certain types of property – two or three-bedroom houses with garages and a garden, which don’t exist in great numbers in central London. If all we were selling were those types of home, we would be very happy.” Alex Ward of Lanes estate agents in Enfield Town says that outside the large regeneration schemes at places like Meridian Water, the supply of new housing is being constrained by the fact that so much development land has already been built on: “There is not a lot of new housing coming on at the moment, and when it does, it tends to be in smaller developments and so sells quickly.” 39 Housing Issue 5 Winter 2014


“There are new cafes and shops springing up and that is likely to continue as new residents move in”

Left New homes at the Velocity Way scheme near Enfield Lock.

Right The development at Burnt Farm Ride in Forty Hill is being marketed by Atkinsons Residential.

40 Housing Opportunity Enfield

All the estate agents Opportunity Enfield talked to noted a slowdown during summer in the house price frenzy of the preceding two years. The summer market is traditionally slow, with holidays booked, barbecues to enjoy, and the distraction of sporting tournaments. However, there is a perception that measures by the Bank of England to tighten mortgage requirements, along with looming interest rate rises, are also beginning to bite. Whatever lies in the future, those who have already made the move are happy they have made the right choice. Peterson has no regrets. “We really like Hackney but you feel that prices have just got a little bit out of hand there now,” he says. “Enfield, I think, is one of the remaining pockets of London where you still get some space and value for your money.”


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Route cause Above, right and opposite With extension of the London Overground, Enfield’s connections will soon improve – if Crossrail 2 comes, from 2030, rail travel would be transformed.

42 Connectivity Opportunity Enfield

Intensive lobbying for rail transport improvements is paying off. Enfield Council is now winning commitments from central government and city-wide authorities to deliver what is needed to transform the borough’s connectivity and build the infrastructure for new developments such as Meridian Water. And Crossrail 2 is the latest major project under consideration, as Kirsty MacAulay reports


“The whole passenger experience will be significantly improved”

Right A section of the proposed Crossrail 2 line, now referred to government for safeguarding of the route. Enfield stations are highlighted in blue.

Seven Sisters Euston St Pancras Victoria Clapham Junction

Wimbledon Tooting Broadway

Angel Road station, which will be renamed Meridian Water, is being redesigned by Atkins. The international design and engineering consultancy is currently focusing on options for enabling better and step-free access to the station, mindful of the need to accommodate new track and in the long term, possibly looking at designing a new station. Improvements to this station will be implemented over a number of phases (and years), as funding becomes available. Angel Road will also benefit from the additional track that is being put in place on the line between here and south of Tottenham Hale to enable four trains an hour to run into Stratford from 2018. This station could link to Crossrail 2 if the regional option favoured by the council and TfL is taken forward. Crossrail 2 could see up to 10 trains an hour running into

In an international city like London, the skyline, population, neighbourhood character and architectural styles are continually changing. Enfield, London’s most northerly borough, is on the brink of some major changes that will transform the area and significantly improve its transportation links. The borough is well located with links into central London and outside the capital as well, and already benefits from four stations on the Piccadilly line into central London, as well as rail services into London Liverpool Street, Moorgate and Stratford, and out to Hertfordshire, Stansted Airport and Cambridge. Additionally the North Circular Road runs along its southern border while the M25 skirts Enfield’s northern boundary. Further improvements to the borough’s connectivity are coming sooner rather than later – and with even more lined up for the future. Consultation in summer 2014 showed significant support for the extension of Crossrail 2 from Alexandra Palace up to New Southgate, enabling a journey time of only 21 minutes from this part of Enfield to Victoria. Transport for London (TfL) has decided to include New Southgate on the safeguarded route. The Meridian Water development in the south-east of the borough will bring a whole new population to the area, as people move into the 5,000 new homes that will be created in the new neighbourhood. Angel Road train station, situated close to the North Circular Road, will have the task of delivering new residents and workers in and out of the borough. Plans to relocate the station closer to the heart of Meridian Water are well under way, with works due to complete in time for the new train service in 2018.

Kings’s Road Chelsea

Tottenham Court Road

Key Overground New tunnel

Angel Dalston Junction Hackney

Alexandra Palace

Turnpike Lane

Meridian Water (Angel Road)

Tottenham Hale

New Southgate

Northumberland Park

Waltham Cross Brimsdown

Ponders End

Cheshunt Enfield Lock

43 Connectivity Issue 5 Winter 2014


Above The Overground will make the City an easy commute to and from Enfield. Right The London Overground service is on track for Enfield.

Cheshunt Theobalds Grove Enfield Town

Turkey Street

Bush Hill Park

Southbury

Edmonton Green

Chingford

Highams Park

Silver Street Wood Street

White Hart Lane Bruce Grove

Walthamstow Central

Seven Sisters Stamford Hill St. James Street

Stoke Newington

Rectory Road

Clapton

Hackney Downs

London Fields Cambridge Heath Bethnal Green

Liverpool Street

44 Connectivity Opportunity Enfield

central London through Meridian Water and other Enfield stations by 2030. Although this project is in the developmental stages, key decisions on funding are expected soon. A consultation on a single preferred route option is expected to start in autumn 2015. It is, however, a crucial development for the borough as David B Taylor, head of traffic and transportation at Enfield Council, explains: “It would be a transformation in terms of the frequency of service and access to central London, as well as a vital catalyst for confidence and investment in Meridian Water. “Transport is such an important factor in the success of Meridian Water. It is essential these things happen if we’re to provide the homes and jobs on the site,” he says. “These changes will be a catalyst for future development as well as being of huge benefit to existing businesses and residents in the borough. Improving connectivity, with shorter more frequent journeys in the future, is really important.” The service currently run by Abellio Greater Anglia into Liverpool Street (via Seven Sisters) is also about to be improved, when it is incorporated into the London Overground network next year. The change will affect six Enfield stations: Edmonton Green, Silver Street, Bush Hill Park, Enfield Town, Southbury and Turkey Street. The takeover starts in May 2015 but will be a gradual process with improvements implemented over a period of time. New rolling stock with eight-car trains will be brought in, stations will be improved and rebranded as the line is integrated into London Overground. Taylor says: “The whole passenger experience will be significantly improved. There will be better information and facilities, stations will be deep cleaned, rebranded and information boards put up – all the things you expect at London Overground stations. “The key thing is the opportunity to improve offpeak services. The mayor is committed to a minimum four-train per hour service and London Overground will have direct responsibility for supplying this. Not immediately, but in the not too distant future, people will see an improvement in the quality and regularity of the service – that’s the ultimate aim.” Once all the changes have been made the smart, frequent, state-of-the-art trains with their distinctive livery will transport residents in style from clean, modern stations into central London. Crucially, the new line will appear on the London tube map, giving some of Enfield’s stations a name-check on the world famous city transport plan. The upgrade to the service is the perfect illustration of how Enfield is changing; utilising good technology and design to offer residents and businesses a better, more connected future. Major plans by the Greater London Authority, Network Rail and Transport for London (TfL) for a third rail track in Enfield will provide much-needed extra trains into Stratford on the Lea Valley line. Services are currently


Enfield Connectivity

Angel Road station will be renamed Meridian Water, with a minimum of four trains an hour State-of-the-art trains will come into operation from 2018

very infrequent due to limited capacity on the existing track, with just an hourly service at Angel Road – an additional track will enable a regular, reliable, four trains an hour service to run between Stratford and Angel Road. It is hoped that the infrastructure for this will be in place by 2017 with trains up and running by 2018. And this is just the first phase of a bigger project to extend additional track all the way up the Lea Valley line to Broxbourne allowing more, higher frequency services. In the west of Enfield, rail services on the Great Northern Line between Moorgate and Kings Cross, and Hertford North and Welwyn, have recently been taken over by Govia Thameslink Railway. New stateof-the-art trains will come into operation on the line in 2018, resulting in more seats and better journeys for passengers, another vital improvement to Enfield’s transport infrastructure.

Cycle Enfield (Mini Holland) Many people on returning from a trip to Holland will consider, for a moment, digging out their bike and rediscovering the joy of cycling. Enfield Council is hoping residents will actually dig out their bikes and hop on them, as the borough’s successful bid for Mini Holland status will soon provide an environment that ‘is safe and feels safe for people who want to cycle’, as part of the mayor of London’s Vision for Cycling. Enfield’s £27 million plans will help develop better town centres, as well as links between them and to the adjacent boroughs while increasing fitness levels among those who start cycling and, hopefully, the project will contribute to reducing air pollution. Gold standard infrastructure is the key; innovative ideas that are being explored include Dutch-style roundabouts and segregated cycle routes improving connections between town centres and to central London. It is hoped that any improvements to infrastructure resulting from this programme will mean local residents, workers and school children can more easily commute on bikes, boosting both health and employment opportunities. Cycle hubs will also be set up in Enfield Town and Edmonton Green offering training and apprenticeship schemes. Great success has already been achieved with Enfield’s first Greenway route at Albany Park, which has seen an increase of a whopping 395% in use by cyclists in just two years. If this achievement can be replicated through the Cycle Enfield programme, Enfield will be well on the way to realising its aim to be among the best places in the world for cycling.

45 Connectivity Issue 5 Winter 2014


Navigation Park Segro and Roxhill Developments are bringing to the market the Navigation Park site in Enfield. Sitematch research manager Huub Nieuwstadt reports Navigation Park is a 3.3-ha site with outline planning permission for up to 19,000sq m for industrial and warehouse uses. The outline consent allows for a single standalone unit or up to three individual buildings. Situated east of the Meridian Way site, Navigation Park is a little over three miles away from the North Circular Road (A406), just over four miles from Junction 25 on the M25 and within 13 miles of central London. Ponders End rail station nearby provides a 20 minute service to central London via Liverpool Street station. Segro, developer of industrial property, and Roxhill

Developments, a specialist logistics developer, are jointly promoting the scheme. A range of building sizes can be developed on-site with a typical scheme of three units providing accommodation of 3,892sq m, 4,653sq m and 5,658sq m. Alternatively, the site can take a single logistics building of 18,379sq m. For more information contact Ken Butcher, asset manager of logistics at Segro on 01753 213402 or Simon Williams, development director at Roxhill Developments on 01788 538454.

Left The second phase of Navigation Park totals 18,379sq m, and is available in two options depending on the occupier’s requirements.

46 Sitematch Opportunity Enfield


FAIRVIEW INVESTING IN ENFIELD Building a greater London.

For over fifty years, Fairview New Homes has been building high quality housing on urban brownfield sites and has become a recognised leader in this highly competitive field.

Renaissance,

at Drapers Road, Enfield, is a stunning development of 45 three and four bedroom houses and one, two and three bedroom apartments. This now completed development of family homes and smaller apartments has also proved to be extremely popular with purchasers, with marketing commencing in April 2013 and the last unit being reserved just 6 months later in September 2013.

Meridian Water Gateway to the future “Meridian Water provides a clear framework to enable public and private sector investment to deliver significant economic growth as well as much needed housing. We have the plan, but more than this, we have the capacity to deliver and delivery is what we are all about.� Rob Leak - Chief Executive, Enfield Council

Based in Enfield, Fairview New Homes continue to deliver new homes within Greater London and The South East.

Be part of this premiere project; contact Peter George, Programme Director Neighbourhood Regeneration peter.george@enfield.gov.uk or 020 8379 3318

Planning permission is anticipated imminently with construction starting before the end of 2014, and apartments being available mid 2015.

Vogue,

at Eaton Road, Enfield, provides 36 quality one, two and three bedroom apartments. The site was purchased by Fairview New Homes in January 2012, was granted planning permission by the London Borough of Enfield in February 2013 and was first marketed in October 2013. This now completed scheme has proved extremely popular, with purchasers, with all units reserved by early February 2014. The success of this development highlights the attractiveness of Enfield Town as a place to reside.

Cecil Road, Enfield. Fairview New Homes acquired this site from the London Borough of Enfield in March 2013 and submitted a planning application in October 2013. The scheme will deliver much needed accommodation in the town centre area and will provide welcoming entrance to the adjacent Town Park.

To register an interest please call 0208 366 1271 or register online at www.fairview.co.uk

www.meridianwater.co.uk/oe

Fairview New Homes recognises the desirability of Enfield as a place to live, work, and relax and is delighted to be working with Enfield Council to deliver much needed new homes. Our record of delivery in Enfield is plain to see.

We are actively seeking new opportunities and both brownfield and greenfield sites will be considered, with or without Planning Permission. We are committed to working with vendors to shape a deal that is right for each site. Please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard Paterson at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk or call 0208 366 1271.


...consideration and care built in

OPPORTUNITY ENFIELD / The regeneration of Enfield

urban regeneration with excellence...

Mulalley - building and regenerating communities throughout London Winter 2014 Issue Five

Transforming the Ladderswood Estate into a vibrant community where people want to live. Providing new energy efficient homes, a community centre and commercial space creating jobs for local people

The regeneration of Enfield Well placed locational advantage / Smarter future knowledge economy / House proud North Circular Road / Up to the challenge Meridian Water Winter 2014 Issue Five

Opportunity Enfield #5  

Opportunity Enfield is a business publication publicising the work of regeneration organisations in the borough.

Opportunity Enfield #5  

Opportunity Enfield is a business publication publicising the work of regeneration organisations in the borough.