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ISSUE THREE AUTUMN 2017

West London

Record makers WHEEL OF INVENTION – ENTERPRISE AND CREATIVITY IN BLOOM


RECORD STORE The Record Store, originally designed by Wallis Gilbert & Partners is a landmark art deco building at The Old Vinyl Factory, Hayes. It was once home to EMI and was a global hotspot for technological innovation. In September 2017, we will be launching this 84,000 sq ft high-end ofďŹ ce space. It has been extensively refurbished and modernised by award winning architects AHMM, offering vibrant, dynamic companies the space they need to work, play and prosper in the heart of The Old Vinyl Factory.

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Editor-in-chief James Wood Production manager Christopher Hazeldine Art direction Kate Harkus Business development director Paul Gussar Project manager Sue Mapara Subscriptions manager Simon Maxwell Managing director Toby Fox Images Andy Stagg Photography, Brasserie Bar Co, Brunel, Hillingdon Council, Morley Von Sternberg, U+I, Skyfly Video/ING Media, Rolfe Judd, SEGRO, ©TfL, GWR, Cloud 9 Photography, Matt Writtle, Oakwood Events, Toby Van de Welde, Oliver Perrott Photography, The Global Academy/Matt Crossick, Jamie Cooper/HiOptic Photography Printed by Tradewinds Published by 3Fox International Sunley House, Bedford Park, Croydon, CR0 2AP 020 7978 6840 3foxinternational.com London Borough of Hillingdon Civic Centre, High Street, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 1UW Subscriptions and feedback hillingdonmagazine.com © 3Fox International Limited 2017. All material is ­strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written ­permission of 3Fox International Limited is strictly ­forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no ­responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this ­magazine are not ­necessarily those of 3Fox International Limited.

CONTENTS 5 NEWS The latest updates on regeneration projects in Hillingdon. 9 WORKSPACES Innovative businesses are finding office space which holds the key to their needs and requirements. 15 HAYES IN FOCUS Planning applications are being approved and Hayes is starting to feel the Crossrail effect. 18 UXBRIDGE IN FOCUS It’s not just office space boosting Uxbridge’s prospects: the town’s retail scene is blossoming too. 23 QUALITY OF LIFE As well as an abundance of parks in Hillingdon, there are also highquality pubs and restaurants with stunning views. 28 PROJECTS Progress reports on Hillingdon’s key development schemes.

35 EDUCATION From primary schools to university and apprenticeships to vocational learning, look no further. 40 MARKETS Key statistics about the borough. 42 LOGISTICS With Heathrow Airport in its south, Hillingdon is London’s major distribution hub. 46 SITEMATCH We look at one of the key office development opportunities.

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Share life, share wellbeing

UK’s Premier business park www.stockleypark.co.uk ISSUE 3 SPRING 2017


News

NEWS

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL BUILDING The design of Northwood Secondary School received recognition when it made the London finals forx a Local Authority Building Control Excellence Award. The council rebuilt and expanded the school at a cost of £35 million as part of its £314 million school building programme. The school was nominated for the strong partnership work between

Hunters South Architects, Farrans Construction, the Education Funding Agency and Hillingdon Council, who delivered the three storey, 9,800sq m school in 15 months and within budget. Tests have shown that the building is highly efficient, sustainable and exceptionally well constructed. Officially opened last year, the school

Sneaky peak Some of the hidden gems in Hillingdon’s heritage chest opened their doors for public viewing during Open House weekend on 16 and 17 September 2017. Several of the council’s historic venues were open to visitors for free and offered a range of activities. Ruislip’s Manor Farm, with its collection of historic buildings and archaeological remains set in 8.9ha grounds, provided guided tours, historical demonstrations and performances, as well as hosting the council’s Autumn Show competition on 16 September. Eastcote House Gardens, which hosted a classic car rally, medieval St. Dunston’s Church in Cranford Park and the Battle of Britain Bunker, Uxbridge, were also open for people to discover.

offers 1,080 school places and has an academic focus on performing arts. A stage area with retractable seating sits at the school’s heart. The facility also features an outdoor amphitheatre and performing arts specialist rooms. Northwood School’s new building was opened in October 2016.

The road ahead Researchers at Brunel University’s Uxbridge campus are working with Jaguar Land Rover and others to develop a new generation of ultra-light car parts that will reduce fuel costs and carbon emissions. The three-year, £7.5 million project aims to perfect ultra-light, thin-walled aluminium die-cast parts, which could be used for shock absorption, chassis parts or door closures in future Jaguar Land Rover vehicles. Liquid metal engineering experts from the university’s Brunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology will help bridge the gap between research and practical application in industry.

GETTING READY FOR ACTIVE SERVICE A new £6 million visitor and education centre at the Battle of Britain Bunker is nearing completion to offer residents and visitors the opportunity to learn more about the site’s history. The 2,000sq m building will be set across two levels. The design embraces the central themes of flight and planes,

with a shell-like form and twisted geometry. There will be a 519sq m main exhibition hall, which will house a variety of exhibits; a 100-seat auditorium and lecture hall; a cafe and gift shop; reception area; and a workspace for schools, corporate events and functions. The centre is due to formally open in spring 2018.

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MAKING HAYES

Planning applications for two significant redevelopments in Hayes have been submitted to Hillingdon Council. SEGRO and Barratt London plan to create new homes, employment and new amenities for residents on the site of the former Nestlé factory, which closed in 2014 when it moved its production facilities to Derbyshire. The project could deliver 1,381 new homes, over 22,000sq m of modern, sustainable industrial workspace and dedicated spaces for community use including a day nursery. It will open up

access to the canal and parks and create up to 530 jobs on site. The developers have been consulting with residents for a year and say they are aiming to retain elements of the site, such as the art deco factory facade, and respect its heritage while delivering urban renewal on an area that has been closed to the public for more than 100 years. The Access Self Storage site at 1 Nestles Avenue is subject to a development plan for 165 homes, offices, a cafe and basement self-storage to the south of Hayes and Harlington station.

Gold disc reflects Hayes’ musical history In the month that saw the 50-year anniversary of the release of The Beatles album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1 June), which was manufactured at The Old Vinyl Factory site in Hayes, the council installed a landmark feature that pays homage to the area’s musical heritage. A modern disc-shaped canopy, which

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will be a recreational area in the town centre for the community, recalls the golden days in the 1960s and 70s when a wealth of iconic albums were mastered, pressed, packed and dispatched from the former EMI factory, including music from Frank Sinatra, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie and Queen. Today, the introduction of Crossrail

in 2019 and an investment of £9 million by Hillingdon Council and Transport for London is reviving the town centre’s potential again. Major improvement works are due to finish this summer and will boost the local economy and create employment opportunities for the community.

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HOMES SURE TO BE HITS

New homes at the Old Vinyl Factory development, Hayes, are offering residents the opportunity to live in one of west London’s fastest developing hotspots. Housing projects are close to completion in the £250 million redevelopment of the 14.5-ha site, where world-famous vinyl records were once produced as well as some of the first computers and TV sets. Build-to-rent developer Be Living is offering 119 award-winning, pet-friendly homes at the Gatefold Building at the eastern end of the site. Gatefold includes a roof terrace, an on-site property manager and secure car parking. At the Boiler House, developer HUB is nearing completion of 54 environmentally conscious homes and has opened a register of interest. Constructed from sustainably sourced timber, the building is named after the heating plant that once serviced the whole site, and includes communal roof gardens and allotments. The Material Store is the second HUB development in the master plan and will provide 189 residential units to let, including a communal roof terrace. Once complete, The Old Vinyl Factory, will be home to a new community of more than 630 apartments with commercial and leisure facilities, including a museum, restaurants, shops and gardens.

Leading lights

No treadmill General Mills UK, a major employer based in Uxbridge, has been recognised as offering outstanding standards of employment in a survey by the Great Place to Work Institute. It is the fifth consecutive year that the food and drink giant has secured a place among the top medium-sized companies in the country. The category is reserved for companies which employ between 50 and 500 staff.

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The rankings are collated from anonymous employee surveys, combined with extensive reviews of the practices and culture at the business. General Mills UK, part of the global US-based food company, manufactures wellknown brands such as HäagenDazs ice cream, Old El Paso Mexican food and Green Giant sweetcorn.

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A £5.2 million programme to improve street lights in Hillingdon will brighten council-owned streets across the borough. Hillingdon Council is upgrading all its street light bulbs with LED lighting. The new energy-efficient LED lighting will improve security and safety and have a positive effect on the local environment, as well as achieving significant reductions in energy consumption and costs. The work will be carried out over an 18-month period by civil and electrical firm, McCann, which will also maintain all 25,000 street lights, subways, illuminated signs, bollards and zebra crossings owned by the council boroughwide over the next five years.

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AT THE HEART

OF HILLINGDON

We are currently working with over 1,700 businesses regionally nationally and internationally.

Last year we put £227m into the local economy and supported 4,305 jobs in the borough.

We advertise part-time, placement, full time and internship opportunities free of charge for organisations.

We help local non-profits and charities to find student volunteers! This year:

690 students

900 students each year are hired on 12 month placements alone!

helped

67 orgs

£

and contributed

21,223 hours

Staff are also given 36 hours a year to volunteer with local organisations!

£100M

In research funding attracted in the last four years helping to contribute to social and business innovation.

Our Students Union selects charities every year to raise money for; last year £104,570.52 was raised!

All our on campus facilities are available to be hired for business, private and community activities.

Hotel

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and spa

rooms

rooms

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START A BUSINESS

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RELATIONSHIP

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Work spaces

PIONEERING OFFICE DEVELOPMENTS ACROSS HILLINGDON ARE CHALLENGING CONVENTIONS ABOUT THE WORKPLACE, SPURRING INGENUITY AND IMAGINATION. JAMES CRACKNELL FINDS OUT MORE

SPACE PROGRAMME

I

nnovative businesses have always found a welcome home in Hillingdon, from major players in the music industry to pharmaceutical giants and tech companies. A great amount of creativity has taken place in this part of west London over the years. In turn, that legacy is now inspiring the creation of a new wave of innovative workspaces. Creators of all kinds are being lured here by a range of bright, attractive new working environments that do not just blur the boundary between business and pleasure, but demolish it completely. At the forefront of this shift is The Charter Building in Uxbridge, the former

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headquarters of Coca Cola Enterprises. When Coca Cola moved across town to a new office building in 2013, it left a blank canvas that was seized upon by a development partnership keen to take a new approach. Landid and Brockton Capital had a vision of a contemporary space that would allow creative occupiers to collaborate, and foster further innovation in the process. That vision has now become reality. “This office space is akin to something in the West End,” says Landid’s director Chris Hiatt, of the £40 million redevelopment. “We stripped it back to the frame and added 60% more floor space, effectively creating a new building.

The Charter Building (top) and Belmont’s office scheme (above) have transformed Uxbridge into a thriving centre for work.

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Work spaces

Sleek, modern interiors (left) at The Charter Building, combined with bright, open surroundings (right, top), space for bikes (right), drone racing competitions (far right) and state-of-the art, modern offices (bottom right) combine to attract the interest of occupiers.

“There are high ceilings and exposed surfaces. We’ve put in roof terraces, break-out areas, and we’ve built an indoor street through the building, connecting to Uxbridge High Street and the tube station. There’s a ‘Caffe Kix’ opening, a concierge service to help arrange anything for you, a monthly bike repair workshop, Friday food pop-ups, powerful Wi-Fi; it’s all there to make people’s lives much easier. “The work-life balance now is just about life, there is a looser and more relaxed environment. People want that flexible space and not just the standard corporate office.”

Space to create

Designed by architect dn-a, the building features an impressive central atrium through which the airy, 100m-long internal street connects to a variety of communal spaces, including a cafe and courtyard. The upper three floors also offer workers decked roof terraces, while photovoltaic solar panels give the building high eco-credentials. Within three months of launching in January this year, The Charter Building

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was nominated for both Best Town Centre Scheme at the Place West London Awards in May and Best Refurbishment at the Office Agents Society Development Awards in June. JLL and Rose Williams are the letting agents for the building, offering flexiblesize lettings from 460sq m and up. Hiatt expects around 15 firms to eventually move in, with two tenants so far confirmed. Telecoms, technology, finance and leisure companies are among those expressing interest. He says: “There’s a real spread of interest, we have adopted an ‘any size’ policy when it comes to lettings. When we acquired the building, interest from larger firms was more commonplace but the market has changed, and that’s why we’ve had this flexible approach. “Uxbridge as a location is improving and changing, the high street has everything an office worker wants, and it’s already got great connectivity. There are 4.5 million people living within a half-hour journey, so the labour pool is massive.” With 22,000sq m of floor space and 4m-high ceilings, The Charter Building

is so vast that in May it was even chosen to host the UK’s first drone race inside an office building. “It is head and shoulders above anything else in this part of west London,” adds Hiatt. “And one of the largest speculative office redevelopments in the south-east.” Hailing the joint venture that made the building’s conversion possible, Tony Edgley, partner at Brockton Capital, says: “The Landid/Brockton partnership is focused on developing fresh contemporary workplaces that can meet the needs of the next generation of savvy occupiers. “Positioned to help businesses both

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Work spaces retain and attract the very best talent, The Charter Building brings together excellence in workplace design with great connectivity, service, sustainability and value, within an amenity rich, urban setting.”

Kept company

FRESH, CONTEMPORARYI WORKPLACES CAN MEET THE NEEDSI OF THE NEXT GENERATION OFI SAVVY OCCUPIERSI

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January’s completion of The Charter Building was followed in March by the Belmont office scheme in Uxbridge – a £30 million redevelopment project set across 12,047sq m (see pages 20 and 46 for more details). The town’s MP and former London mayor (now foreign secretary), Boris Johnson, visited the scheme in June 2016 and said the multimillion pound investment represented a “positive endorsement of Uxbridge”. An altogether different approach to creating innovative workspaces has evolved in Hayes, at a building famous for having mastered and printed albums such as The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side Of The Moon when it was the home of EMI’s production headquarters in the 1960s and 70s. The Old Vinyl Factory is a site also famed for its industrial heritage, having been at the forefront of innovations in radar, computing, broadcasting and medical science in the mid-20th century. But since being bought in 2011 by Purplexed, a joint venture between Cathedral Group and Development Securities, instead of the past, all eyes have been fixed firmly on the future. The Old Vinyl Factory is at the centre of an ongoing £250 million regeneration scheme to create a place “where business, leisure and living can exist in harmony”. Proximity to the new Crossrail station at Hayes, set to open in 2019, is driving the development forward. While the mixed redevelopment scheme features significant amounts of new housing, retail and leisure space, the original EMI factory buildings designed by art deco pioneers Wallis, Gilbert & Partners, will once again be home to makers and innovators. In fact, one of them already is. The recently renovated Shipping Building has lured technology firms Sonos and Host Europe to Hayes, and is now also home to a hub for innovation that could rival and even eclipse the considerable history of its predecessor. EMI’s Central Research Laboratory (CRL) was the research and development hub responsible for the company’s reputation blossoming as a leading technological innovator – and now the CRL name has been revived thanks to

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Work spaces THE PARKLAND SETTING IS A REALI BREATH OF FRESH AIR COMPAREDI TO THE NORMAL CONCRETE JUNGLEI

a partnership with Brunel University, which is also in Hillingdon. Andrew Ward, Brunel’s director of corporate relations and one of the key people responsible for reviving the CRL, explains: “The CRL at The Old Vinyl Factory in Hayes is the result of a unique partnership between Brunel University London, the Higher Educational Funding Council for England and developers U+I. “It contains a business accelerator, an incubator and co-working space. More than 30 new or early stage businesses have benefited from the support and facilities on offer. Focusing on new manufacturing, the CRL provides fabrication workshops with technical support, as well as mentors, a business support programme, professional services from leading local companies and help in accessing finance.”

Inspiring innovations

The relationship between The Old Vinyl Factory’s CRL and Brunel University is already becoming highly productive. Brunel’s design degrees place an emphasis on students developing useable products – culminating in an annual ‘Made in Brunel’ showcase. The CRL is now an additional outlet for these young designers, providing a platform for them to turn their prototypes into marketable products. Among those to benefit have been Dyson Award winner Solveiga Pakstaite, who has designed a fresh food label made from gelatin that can detect when the food inside has gone rotten, potentially negating the need for ‘use by’ dates and saving millions of tonnes of edible food from being thrown away. Other products in the pipeline at the CRL include an evolving walking aid for NHS patients and a digital graphics pen that could eliminate the need for a table-top tablet. Advances in laser and 3D printing are also being developed here and a recent invention of a robotic drawing board that can electronically produce a range of features from notices to works of art is another triumph. “It is a hub for innovative practice across west London and beyond,” adds

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Attractive, landscaped surroundings at Stockley Park (above) draw multinationals. The Old Vinyl Factory’s (top right) Central Research Laboratory has a focus on collaboration (far right) and innovations such as 3D printing (right).

Ward. “U+I and the university have both been successful in winning major funding from the European Regional Development Fund to support the work of the CRL.” The areas immediately north of Heathrow, including Hayes and West Drayton, have long been a hub for industry of various kinds. Thirty years ago it was this area that helped kickstart a revolution in Britain’s service industry, when a rubbish tip was turned into Britain’s first business park. Today, Stockley Park, which recently gained Green Flag status, the national standard for open spaces, provides a UK base for many of the world’s biggest multinational companies, from Apple to

GlaxoSmithKline, Canon, and IBM. However, given the park was built in the mid 80s, how has it managed to stay ahead of the competition and maintain its relevance in a crowded market? Antonio Paradiso, managing director at MSC Cruises, says that as well as excellent transport connections in the area, there are added benefits that help keep office workers at Stockley Park happy. “The parkland setting is a real breath of fresh air compared to the normal concrete jungle,” Paradiso explains. “Lakes, trees and wonderful walks providing a unique and striking environment to work in. There is a great calendar of events open to everyone on the park: a street food market,

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Workspaces

IT IS A HUB FOR INNOVATIVEI PRACTICE ACROSS WESTI LONDON AND BEYONDI

yoga, photography, and table tennis competitions provide relaxing and varied alternatives to the daily routine and an enjoyable break away from the desk. It is a great place to work, rest and play.”

Sharing’s caring

Just along from Stockley Park is another office complex, Hyde Park Hayes. Four recently renovated buildings of up to seven storeys provide 25,000sq m of office

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space and are generating interest from a wide range of firms attracted by their Heathrow and Crossrail connectivity. This business community is now host to Regus, a world-leading company in the provision of flexible, shared workspace. All the facilities and convenience of a conventional office are offered for rent, without the restriction of a long-term financial commitment. It means that self-employed workers and start-up

businesses can easily find the office space they need to grow and compete with larger rivals. Co-working helps business people network, both professionally and personally, and has been proven to have several additional benefits to the traditional office set-up. Regus provides its co-working space at both Hyde Park Hayes and at Stockley Park because, it says, “few locations are as convenient or as well connected”.

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INVESTING IN HILLINGDON

Jigsaw, West London

A2Dominion is seeking new development opportunities in Hillingdon. We are a not-for-profit residential property group, with 36,000 homes across London and the South East, including more than 2,000 in Hillingdon. We’re committed to improving people’s lives through quality homes and services, and we’re looking for further opportunities in Hillingdon. For more information, please contact us: Email: Phone: Website:

newbusiness@a2dominion.co.uk Danny Lynch, Land Director, 020 8825 1597 Sarah Ellis, Assistant Land Manager, 020 8825 1136 www.a2dominion.co.uk/development-and-land

www.a2dominion.co.uk


Hayes in focus

GOLDEN HAYES

The Brickfields scheme in Hayes will feature 124 waterfront properties in its first phase and eventually 500 homes in total.

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DEVELOPMENT WORK AROUND THE DOCKS, AND UPGRADES TO HAYES AND HARLINGTON STATION ON THE CUSP OF CROSSRAIL’S ARRIVAL, MAKE HILLINGDON A MAGNET FOR INVESTMENT. NOELLA PIO KIVLEHAN REPORTS

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Hayes in focus

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purred by an area of Hayes designated as a housing zone – a plan by former London mayor Boris Johnson to identify areas of the capital for stimulating housebuilding through investment – there is a lot of developer interest in the town, many planning applications working their way through the system and a council inundated with enquiries. Jonathan Webb, Hillingdon Council’s housing zone programme manager, says: “We are about to kick off a ‘visioning’ process that will build on the momentum of the significant developer interest we have received for the housing zone. “We anticipate this interest will grow, as we are receiving a number of enquiries, actively engaging with developers and investors, undergoing pre-apps for different sites and working through major planning applications.” Schemes in the pipeline include the recently approved Brickfields development, granted planning consent in March, and based around what is known locally as Shackles Dock. Seen as a catalyst to regeneration in the area, the scheme is being developed by Southern Grove in a joint venture with Hurlington and Bmor and designed by architect Rolfe Judd. The first phase consists of 124 waterfront properties, part of a wider scheme of 500 homes. The regenerated dock will link into the canal and will include a piazza, cafe, community facilities and a new base and training centre for the local canoe club. “Brickfields is a high quality scheme that will hopefully set the tone for the rest of the housing zone,” says Webb. “It is the first step to regenerating the northern side of the canal, and the council is now in discussions with the adjoining landowners to bring forward their plans for redeveloping the rest of the Silverdale (Western View) Industrial Estate. “This also includes the neighbouring council (majority)-owned Hayes Town Centre Estate at Austin Road/Crown Close that is planned for an estate renewal programme in the near future.” Meanwhile, Barratt London and SEGRO are working on the Former Nestlé Factory (fNf) site. A planning application has been submitted and Webb says the council is working through the proposal now. The fNf is one of four sites along Nestles Avenue subject to mixed-use development of residential, commercial and community infrastructure.

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WE ARE ACTIVELY ENGAGING WITH DEVELOPERSI AND INVESTORS, UNDERGOING PRE-APPS FORI DIFFERENT SITES AND WORKING THROUGHI MAJOR PLANNING APPLICATIONSI With 1,400 residential units, 25,000sq m of commercial space and a new community hub proposed, a decision on fNf is expected soon.

One flew over…

It may seem strange that a flyover bypassing Hayes should have such significance for the town’s connectivity, but the £90 million Stockley flyover has done just that. The project is credited for allowing fewer train delays at Hayes and Harlington station. This is particularly important given its location at the junction of the Heathrow Airport branch, served by Great Western Railway (GWR). According to Crossrail, the flyover in Stockley was built to ensure Crossrail and Heathrow express services heading towards central London are able to join the Great Western main line without delaying – or being delayed – by other

trains using the route. Trains to Reading and beyond will pass through the junction unhindered. On top of the station improvements, the bay platform – a dead-end railway platform normally shorter than most – was lengthened and is already benefitting passengers by allowing longer, electric trains with air-conditioning, free wifi and more seats to access the station. In 2016, GWR had three of the top five most crowded trains in the UK running into London’s Paddington station the morning peak, which all stopped at Hayes and Harlington. But the improved bay platform means it can increase the frequency to run a train to the station every 30 minutes. From 3 January 2017, capacity had grown by an extra 6,550 seats daily each way, transforming the journey for customers on this route.

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Hayes in focus

Canal developments (above), stations (below) and improved connections (far below) all boost Hayes’ investment prospects.

Elizabeth line from December 2019. Progress continues to be made on the station redevelopment, which started in 2015. The revamped facility will eventually feature a new glass and steel building, as well as a footbridge, lifts, waiting rooms, platform extensions, replacement canopies, lighting, information screens and CCTV. Outside, the council will make improvements to Station Approach and the public realm, with better pedestrian crossings, cycle lanes and safer junctions. Ben Wheeldon, Crossrail’s programme director, says: “Passengers from Hayes and Harlington are already seeing benefits of Crossrail works ahead of the introduction of the Elizabeth line. “The successful completion of key milestones including the Stockley flyover and new bay platform at Hayes and Harlington has increased the reliability and capacity of this busy part of the rail network and enabled the introduction of new electric GWR rolling stock.” But there is more happening in Hayes to improve residents’ lives than an improved rail station, particularly in the town centre, with plans to transform its appearance and infrastructure for residents and businesses alike. Part of these improvements, which began in 2015, are based on a new traffic management programme, designed to encourage more people into the area by allowing traffic to flow more freely. These include new road layouts, pavement works, separate cycle lanes, parking spaces, free ‘stop-and-shop’ parking, brighter street lights, new furniture and trees. Costing £6 million and funded by the council and Transport for London, these town centre improvements are set to finish this summer. Coupled with a renewed station, the attraction of Hayes is being transformed.

All aboard

Hayes and Harlington station provides a gateway to the world. Trains leaving the transport hub are on a direct line to one of the world’s busiest airports: Heathrow is just five minutes by GWR trains, or an hour and 10-minute walk for the energetic seeking a challenge. Work to the 160-year-old station is being undertaken by Network Rail, in preparation for the £14 billion Crossrail project. Six trains will run through the fiveplatform Hayes and Harlington station towards Heathrow on the re-christened

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Uxbridge in focus

KNOCK-ON EFFECT

T

he consequences of an international fast-fashion chain opening in a town could have two results: to bolster other retailers’ trade or kill them off. In Uxbridge, the ‘Primark effect’ started in March when the chain opened a 4,831sq m anchor store in The Pavilions shopping centre. After three years of rumours about the store’s arrival and delays, the people of Uxbridge got their wish – a long sought-after branch of Primark.

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CAN ONE STORE REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE TO A TOWN? PRIMARK OPENING IN UXBRIDGE TOWN CENTRE HAS HAD A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT. NOELLA PIO KIVLEHAN LOOKS AT THE REACTION FROM SHOPPERS AND OTHER RETAILERS

The 700 shoppers who queued on the morning of the opening, and the thousands who followed through the door afterwards, are testament to the strong desire for the store. And with 2o,000 higher education students in the Uxbridge area, affordable fast-fashion retail is an important asset. “[We have] been exceptionally busy,” says Andrew Kennedy, Primark’s Uxbridge store manager. But, what about the effect on the rest of Uxbridge’s retail trade? “Speaking to retailers in town, it has had a positive knock-on effect for them too.”

Aaron Bayliss, centre manager at The Pavilions shopping centre, agrees: “Primark has proven to be a strong asset for The Pavilions – and for Uxbridge as a whole.” Customer visits to the centre on Primark’s launch day were up 50% from the same Saturday the previous year, according to Bayliss, with 46,791 recorded visits to the centre and a 61% increase in footfall the week following Primark opening. “Since March, the centre’s footfall for the period from launch until the end of May is up over 14%,” he says.

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HIGHEST BID(DER) Plans for making Uxbridge town centre a Business Improvement District were given an 89% approval rating among participating businesses at a ballot in July. The BID will become a legal entity on 2 October, allowing £2.5 million to be invested in Uxbridge in its first five years. A main aim of the BID will be to

Impressive figures then, and Bayliss says as Primark continues to trade well, other retailers benefit from the increased footfall at the centre. He says: “We are committed to ensuring our retail offer reflects the local catchment requirements. Working together with other stakeholders, we will continue to make sure that all retailers within the shopping centre are a component part of Uxbridge’s continuing success and prosperity”. Business development manager for Uxbridge town centre, Mike Crane, echoes the positive comments from Bayliss and Kennedy about the rise in shoppers: “The increase in footfall has seen people spending in other stores. You can see shoppers with different branded bags: from Primark to River Island.” Crane is confident this will encourage new retailers into the town. “There is a knock-on effect with the likes of Primark coming in because asset managers will look at the retail mix differently – there’s

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Uxbridge is a magnet for retailers, with the presence of two shopping centres, including intu’s The Chimes (left), where Toys R Us (above) recently opened a branch. Job figures are likely to soar further as new office space such as Belmont (right) opens.

direct money to town centre improvements. This will be raised through a levy on the BID’s larger businesses: £550,000 is expected to be provided annually. “The BID will let us promote the retail offer we have in Uxbridge and further afield,” says Mike Crane, business development manager for Uxbridge town centre.


Uxbridge in focus

The long-awaited Primark (left) at The Pavilions Shopping Centre. Boris Johnson, MP for Uxbridge, opens a public green space beside Aviva Investors’ £30 million Belmont office scheme, along with Year 4 pupils from nearby Hermitage Primary School (below).

OUR STRATEGY TO ATTRACT MOREI CUSTOMERS FROM FURTHER AFIELDI AND FOR LONGER CONTINUESI a different profile. And they will be driving harder to get more retailers in,” adds Crane. “What we need to do now is sustain footfall.” This, he believes, will come from the expected establishment of the BID, that will be set up partly to promote the town’s retail offer. Further down the high street from The Pavilions is intu’s The Chimes shopping centre. Opened in 2001 and anchored by Debenhams and Boots, retailers include Next, River Island and H&M. Plans are in place to bolster the centre by replacing the current Debenhams frontage, with the retailer committed to spending £1 million, part of which will also go towards general improvements. New additions to The Chimes include Toys ‘R’ Us, which opened a 534sq m unit in February, while Next is growing by

743sq m and Decathlon is due to open in autumn 2017. “These are the first of a number of new brands and exciting changes we’re introducing to the centre this year, as our strategy to attract more customers from further afield and for longer continues,” says Rebecca Ryman, regional director for intu. Hillingdon Council intends to build on Uxbridge’s burgeoning retail scene with £2 million investment, which includes £800,000 from the Mayor of London. The shopfront grants improvement scheme in Windsor Street was launched in November 2016. Primark has dominated discussions about Uxbridge in recent times, but the store is proving to be a catalyst for future investment from the commercial and retail sectors.

AT HOME

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An increasingly popular place for homebuyers, Uxbridge is seeing a number of developments come through the pipeline.

Union Canal, Waterloo Wharf will have studio suites, one, two and three-bedroom apartments and will be completed in 2019.

Two key projects are: * Waterloo Wharf: developed by Howarth Homes and set on the banks of the Grand

* Old Randalls Department: Inland Homes is set to convert the historic store, closed in 2015 after 124 years, into 58 flats.

MULTINATIONAL TIES Uxbridge has always been popular with large corporations: Coca-Cola and Xerox are among two global companies calling the town home. Now Aviva Investors has launched the refurbished Belmont – a £30 million speculatively-developed office scheme two minutes from the tube station in Uxbridge town centre – it is hoped more names will be attracted to the area. Julian Cobourne, senior asset manager at Aviva Investors, says the attraction of the building was both its location and its condition before refurbishment: “Uxbridge is very well located, has great links to London and Heathrow and is a perfect location for a multinational company. We feel there’s great scope for more global companies to locate to Uxbridge.” Cobourne says Belmont “has all the key ingredients to be hugely successful.” Aviva is currently in discussions with potential occupiers to take on the whole building or on a floor-by-floor basis.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


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A VISION

FOR A BETTER UXBRIDGE 89% 93%

of businesses voted in favour for a BID by number. of businesses voted in favour for a BID by rateable value.

Over a five-year period, more than £2.5million of investment will be delivered to the area to improve Uxbridge for businesses, residents and employees.

Uxbridge BID plans to focus on the following areas, to support the local business community. RAISING THE PROFILE, IMPROVING THE EXPERIENCE • Intelligent Marketing • Creating A Buzz – Family Friendly Events • Connecting With Customers • Focusing On Access • Being Street Smart • Putting Safety First

HELPING MAKE UXBRIDGE AN EXCELLENT PL ACE TO WORK • Representing Businesses • Ensuring Access • Supporting Staff • A Voice For Business

ENSURING UXBRIDGE IS THE PL ACE F O R A G R E AT N I G H T O U T • Best Bar None • Street Angels • Increased CCTV Coverage • Purple Flag • New Taxi Rank • Affordable Staff Car Parking • The Clean Team

For more information visit: W W W. U X B R I D G E B I D . C O M

“Harnessing the power and appeal of the united retail offer in Uxbridge” Primark, Marks & Spencer, The Pavilions

“Hillingdon Police support the Uxbridge BID and the proposals to reduce crime and its perception. We look forward to working in partnership with this initiative” Superintendent Gary Taylor Hillingdon, Met Police


Quality of life

CULTURE HUB CUISINE FROM ALL OVER THE GLOBE, OPERA, THRIVING MARKETS, AND AN ABUNDANCE OF PARKS AND OPEN SPACES ALL ADD TO HILLINGDON’S WIDESPREAD APPEAL. MARIA SHAHID FINDS OUT MORE

Seafood dishes are available at The White Bear, Ruislip (above).

HILLINGDON

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T

here are more than 200 parks and open spaces in Hillingdon. The west London borough has a higher number of Green Flags – the benchmark national standard for green spaces awarded by the Department for Communities and Local Government – than anywhere else in England and Wales. But it’s not just for the greenery that visitors flock to the borough: Hillingdon has no shortage of attractions. An ethnically diverse population has seen the local restaurant scene flourish: from pan-Asian food to traditional pub grub to flavours of the Mediterranean. Set in the Colne Valley Regional Park

conservation area, the Old Orchard pub and restaurant in Harefield is based in a 450-year old manor house and provides spectacular panoramic views of lakes and countryside from its terrace. The eatery prides itself on its use of fresh ingredients for traditional British meals such as roasts, steaks and pies, as well as more international fare, spanning from the Mediterranean with pan-fried gnocchi to the Caribbean, with BBQ jerk chicken – as well as a nod to pan-Asian cuisine, with chilli tempura king prawns. Graham Hale, part of the management team at the Old Orchard, says: “We are thoroughly about fresh food. Our menu features six core dishes, as well as others, which change regularly,

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Quality of life

and are created by our head chef. We try out new dishes to add to the core menu at a tasting session every six weeks.” Head chef Roland Short trained at a number of London’s top restaurants, including La Gavroche, run by the celebrity Roux brothers, Michel and Albert. “It’s the busiest pub I’ve ever worked in,” he says of the Old Orchard. “We get a lot of passing trade – visitors who have come for the lake, the views and the walks – but also a loyal local base. We get booked up very quickly. “At the end of May, we opened another outbuilding, with a full gin, draught lager and cider bar, as well as a barbecue area, which is open from Fridays to Sundays and on bank holidays. It’s proved to be very popular, and means that we can now seat passing customers as well as those who have booked.”

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Diners at The Old Orchard (above) in Harefield enjoy stunning lake views (above top) and a varied menu. The White Bear in Ruislip (above right, top) has been subject to a recent refurbishment (above, right), which has further boosted its popularity.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


Quality of life

VISITORS COME FOR THE LAKE, THE VIEWSI AND THE WALKS – BUT WE ALSO HAVE AI LOYAL LOCAL BASE. WE GET BOOKED UPI VERY QUICKLYI

The White Bear in Ruislip is another favourite among locals and visitors. Dating from the mid-19th century, the pub went under refurbishment and a change of ownership a few years ago before reopening in 2015, as a traditional pub and French brasserie with an extensive á la carte menu. Conveniently located for the train to Marylebone and London Underground networks, it provides the ideal pit stop after a busy day at work or after some retail therapy in central London. Elsewhere, in Uxbridge, Asian-fusion restaurant Javitri garners many plaudits on the TripAdvisor website, with a fourand-a-half-point overall rating. It serves Indian and Bangladeshi cuisine, including tandooris, baltis and karahis, as well as signature dish Tetul Bahar – a fusion dish cooked with Bangladeshi hot chilli.

HILLINGDON

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017

In Hayes, to the south of the borough, the family run Grapes Tandoori restaurant was established on the site of a former pub (The Grapes) in 1988. It is a firm favourite with locals, documented by a stream of glowing reviews on its website and ranked in a national poll of the best spice restaurants as one of the top 100 in the UK. The night-time economy in Hayes is also boosted by the Beck Theatre, which celebrates its 40th birthday this year and pulls in sell-out audiences to its shows, the likes of which in summer 2017 will feature Phil Collins and Little Mix tribute acts, latest film releases and dance shows. Celebrity fashion guru Gok Wan will also appear at the theatre in November. For those in search of more unusual fare, a Nepalese restaurant in Uxbridge may provide the answer. Named after

a Buddhist pilgrimage site in Nepal, believed to be the birthplace of Buddha, Lumbini attracts diners who come to sample cuisine which caters to both vegans and vegetarians. Delicacies on offer include momo. This is a Nepalese-style dumpling of steam-cooked minced lamb, in this case served with tomato chutney. Elsewhere, The Pheasant Inn and Restaurant is located near Heathrow Airport. Set on six levels and featuring two car parks, the venue provides the ideal meeting point for travellers and international business meetings.

At the farm

Manor Farm in Ruislip, at the end of the High Street is a 8.9-ha Green Flag site, a pleasant and peaceful open space with a bowling green, orchard and herb garden.

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Quality of life MANOR FARM HOSTSI EVENTS THROUGHOUTI THE YEAR, INCLUDINGI WEDDINGS, CONFERENCESI CONCERTS AND SHOWSI

The farm plays a central part in the area’s culture and heritage, with its Great Barn dating from the 13th century, as well as the nearby Tudor Manor Farm House, and the 16th century Little Barn. It is believed to have been the ancient administrative centre of Ruislip, and holds the remains of what could have been a Norman motte and bailey castle. Refurbishment works using National Lottery funding were completed in 2008, and Manor Farm now hosts a number of events throughout the year, including weddings, conferences, concerts and shows. The Little Barn was converted into a library in 1937. The Great Barn presents an annual exhibition of local artists’ work, while the Cow Byre Gallery on the site is used as an exhibition venue and tearoom. The Stables and Manor Farm Community Hut are both available for hire. Also on the heritage site is the Pram Shed Museum, where a variety of farming tools can be viewed by appointment. All buildings on-site are Grade IIlisted, and the Great Barn itself is Grade II*-listed. Manor Farm opened to the public as part of Open House Weekend on 16 and 17 September, and saw a Norman settlement reenacted, with a living history tent, crafts, archery and combat demonstrations. The weekend was

26

also used to launch an audio guide to the heritage site. The borough’s music service is also housed at the Manor Farm complex and the Winston Churchill Theatre, a 350-seat venue, hosts everything from opera to traditional Indian dance. Highlights in 2016 included Flying! – a new cantata for Hillingdon, which plugged into the borough’s RAF heritage. Presented by Hillingdon Music Hub, it was written by David Perkins and Caroline Dooley, performed by members of the RAF Regiment Band and sung by students from eight local schools to widespread plaudits.

The Manor Farm facilities (above) are used for a wide range of events and activities, boosting Hillingdon’s cultural offer. Fashion aficionado Gok Wan (left) appears at the Beck Theatre in November.

The Winston Churchill Theatre regularly hosts Indian classical music, both Kathak and Bharatanatyam, and more contemporary Indian plays and entertainment. Local community theatre companies also often perform plays and musicals. An outdoor performance of William Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors by Illyria Theatre Company took place at the end of June on the Grass Courtyard outside Manor Farm Library. The Great Barn has seen a number of opera productions since 2014 by Opera Vera, a London-based company. Last year, there were two sell-out shows of Cosi Fan Tutte (The School for Lovers) and this year a performance of The Marriage of Figaro took place in the summer. And on the first Sunday every month, the site hosts The Duck Pond Foodies’ Market, which takes place in the Great Barn, and The Duck Pond Artisan Food and Crafts Market on the third Sunday of every month. Both are popular meeting points for locals, sometimes with around 100 stalls selling ethical crafts and vintage clothes, handcrafted jewellery and organic foods. Part of Hillingdon’s six week-long arts and literature festival, Culture Bite, takes place there too. A highlight last year was Big Goldilocks and The Three Bears at the Winston Churchill Theatre – a comical story retold using a six-foot book, featuring pop-ups and props. From the traditional to the off-beat, people from diverse backgrounds, of different ages and with varying interests, all find something to enjoy in Hillingdon.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


INVESTING IN HILLINGDON www.prologis.co.uk

· New logistics and industrial parks · 40 acres of parkland for public use · Canalside green space and heritage trail “Hillingdon is an ideal location for many of our customers and we have invested in sustainable logistics and industrial parks across the borough, which are regenerating brownfield sites and supporting new jobs. “Our investment includes new green spaces on our parks for the local community, with footpaths, cycleways and a heritage trail. Nearby, we are renovating around 40 acres of additional land within Hillingdon and bringing this into the public realm for everyone to enjoy.” Paul Weston, Senior Vice President, Prologis UK


PROJECTS

Crossrail stations

Work to herald the arrival of the new Crossrail service, the Elizabeth line are well in train. A new Hayes and Harlington station, designed by architect Bennetts Associates, is under construction north of the existing site and will create a bright, spacious ticket hall, a new footbridge with lifts to provide step-free access, new waiting room, platform canopies and extensions. At West Drayton station, a new glass and steel extension will provide an additional entrance with a new canopy, as well as a covered walkway between the existing building and extension, a new footbridge and three lifts for access to platforms. Both stations will have new lighting, customer information screens, signage, and CCTV. They are remaining open throughout the improvement works. From late 2017, Transport for London will run them as part of the capital’s integrated transport network. This modernisation will be accompanied by considerable upgrades to the areas around the stations to improve the access and environment for passengers. Trains between Paddington and Heathrow are expected to run from May 2018 and those serving Hayes will run from December 2019. Figures released last year revealed that Hillingdon, with three stations (including Heathrow) on the Elizabeth line route, had the fastest rising house prices in London. They rose almost three times the national average, with a price increase of 17%. A study released by property consultant CBRE predicts that average prices overall around Elizabeth line stations will increase above local house price growth until the line launches in 2018/19, resulting in an average price hike of £133,000 between now and when the first trains run. The furthest reaches of the route were emerging as its best performers thanks to journey times to central London being slashed. In Hillingdon, trains from West Drayton to Tottenham Court Road will shave almost half an hour off travel times, while commutes will be 27 minutes faster from the new station at Hayes and Harlington.

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Town Centre improvements Significant investment to improve Hillingdon’s town centres is brightening and reviving high streets across the borough. Work is drawing to a close on the £6 million Hayes town centre improvements, funded by the council and Transport for London. The aim is to attract more shoppers and visitors, improve traffic flow and make access to public transport easier. A landmark gold disc-shaped canopy (above) was unveiled in early summer. It forms a recreational and seating area and was built to reflect Hayes’ rich musical heritage. The canopy was created by The Whitewall Company, which works with a range of artists and public art collections, and Hayes-based Coyle Owen Anodising played a part in manufacturing the aluminium disc.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


s

The Old Dairy

The redevelopment of the former Express (Arla) Dairy in South Ruislip is complete and open for business, creating more than 500 new jobs. The leisure and retail scheme of 12,077sq m includes 162 homes, restaurants, an Asda food store, a cinema, petrol station, and central public piazza. New off-road walking and cycling routes give easy access to the tube and bus routes. The 11-screen multiplex Cineworld cinema opened ahead of schedule, joining chain restaurants

Frankie and Benny’s, Nando’s and Chiquito, which are already trading, as is the Asda store. The project won developers Citygrove an RICS London award for regeneration in May. The judges were impressed with the strength of local community collaboration. Sustainability is a key feature of the scheme: 40% of energy comes from renewable or low carbon sources and water-saving devices will be used to minimise waste where possible.

To make getting around smoother, there are changes to road layouts, separate cycle lanes, new parking spaces and and 30-minute free “stop-andshop” parking. A further £3 million is earmarked to create a boardwalk extension to Botwell Bridge, which will form an attractive walkway between the station and town centre, as well as public realm works around the station. These will complement the major town centre improvement works and the new station building, ready for the arrival of full Crossrail services from December 2019. Uxbridge is also benefitting from multimillion pound private sector investment, with improved housing and commercial and retail growth. Hillingdon Council will invest £2 million to improve the town centre and is offering grants to independent businesses to enhance shop fronts.

The local authority is working with shop branding specialists, Designed by Good People and architect DK-CM on proposals, with work due to be completed by March 2018. Two and a half million pounds has been earmarked to improve the streetscape of Hayes Parades, Uxbridge Road, where many shops, cafes, restaurants and businesses trade on the Uxbridge Road corridor. North of the A40, Eastcote town centre will also be revitalised with improved street lighting, paving and landscaping and a bespoke Eastcote Bridge feature. The overall programme builds on previous schemes that have given a vital boost to life in Harefield Village centre, Ruislip Manor and Northwood Hills.

HILLINGDON

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017

A projection of how West Drayton station (far left) will look once refurbishment work is complete. The new gold disc-shaped canopy (left) is a popular addition to Hayes town centre. The former Express (Arla) Dairy site features shops, restaurants and an 11-screen Cineworld.

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Projects

The Old Vinyl Factory The first three buildings in the redevelopment of The Old Vinyl Factory, which is set to transform Hayes, are now complete. The site of almost 6.87ha, first used from 1907 as the headquarters of His Master’s Voice (now HMV) and EMI, is undergoing £250 million regeneration that will combine new business, leisure and living while respecting its significant musical and architectural heritage. Scheduled for completion in 2022, the scheme comprises 14 new or refurbished buildings. Regeneration specialist U+I expects to deliver 642 homes and over 70,000sq m of commercial space featuring a three-screen cinema, shops, restaurants and a University Technical College (Global Academy) set in 16,700sq m of public space. The Shipping Building is 95% let and houses leading technology firms such as air transport technology leaders SITA and wireless hi-fi pioneers Sonos. It is one of three striking art deco buildings designed by Wallis, Gilbert & Partners, which were responsible for the Hoover Building and Victoria Coach Station. It also hosts the Central Research Library, which provides design, manufacturing and business support to inventors and entrepreneurs in a shared hub. Global Academy opened in September 2016 to nurture careers in broadcasting and media. Set up with funding of over £13 million from Global – the media and entertainment company behind some of the UK’s best-loved radio brands – and the Education Funding Agency, it features top recording and filming studios, theatres and a four-storey atrium. Gatefold, located at the east end of the site 300 yards from Hayes & Harlington station, is marketing 133 new one, two and three-bedroom homes for private rent. It features a roof terrace for residents’ events, an on-site property manager and caretaker, secure car parking and petfriendly apartments with plenty of storage. Developed through Willmott Dixon’s private rented sector business be:here, a number of retail units will be available at the front of the scheme from 2019.

The Old Vinyl Factory development in Hayes has many elements, including residential units at the Gatefold Building (below left). Media and broadcasting job opportunities are boosted by Global Academy (above), while energy for all buildings on site will be generated from The Powerhouse building (right). More homes will be provided by developer HUB at the Material Store (far right, building on left) and further office space will be launched in September at The Record Store (bottom right) – where famous records were once produced.

Work in Progress The Record Store is the building where the masters of every EMI album were once pressed. It is being modernised by renowned architect AHMM to provide 7,746sq m of high-spec office space. Launched in September 2017, it features 200 car parking spaces within the Music Box and storage for 87 bicycles. The Boiler House is nearing completion to provide 54 environmentally conscious homes, ranging from studios to two-bedroom flats and two retail/leisure units. Property developers HUB, along with architect Studio Egret West, designed the building as a pavilion, its tapering shape paying homage to the factory chimneys that once stood here. Built by Henry Construction, the Boiler House derives its name from the steam and heating plant that once serviced the entire TOVF site. The Material Store is also a HUB project and will comprise 189 residential units, plus retail and leisure facilities.

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ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


Designed by Newground Architects, the Material Store will provide 189 studio, one, two and three-bedroom apartments for rent, including 26 triplex apartments. Currently under construction, the Material Store will be owned and managed by landlords Fizzy Living upon completion in winter 2017.

PLANNED PROGRAMME FOR TOVF Completing in 2017 Record Store (left) Powerhouse Music Box car parking Completing in 2018 Material Store

The Powerhouse, with its distinctive new chimney, is housing a low carbon energy centre. It will provide heat and hot water for all new buildings on the site and will also feature a music venue, cafe and bar. All buildings share excellent transport links: the site is situated 300 metres from Hayes and Harlington station, with trains to London Paddington taking 20 minutes. When the new Crossrail services begin, journey times will shrink further, with a travel time to Tottenham Court Road of 22 minutes, and Heathrow Airport five minutes away.

HILLINGDON

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Boiler House Future projects Cabinet Building Pressing Plant Complete Shipping Building

Machine Store

Global Academy

Veneer Building

Gatefold

Assembly Buildings

Veneer Store

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Projects

The Charter Place office scheme is transforming Hillingdon into a centre for business, bringing jobs and high-quality employers to the borough.

Charter Place

An internal street complete with trees, coffee shops and restaurants are some of the features which Landid and Brockton Capital believe will attract top corporate firms to move into Charter Place, a stone’s throw from Uxbridge High Street. The centre’s showpiece development is ready for occupation and targeting high-end, corporate tenants. The scheme has refurbished and extended the 1980s office block, which was once home to Coca-Cola and Nexen. Its 100m internal street features break-out areas, coffee shops, a concierge service and co-working space. Designed by architect dn-a, the building has five upper floors with 743sq m of decked terraces on the top three floors, 326 car parking spaces, 212 cycle spaces and 10 showers. At 22,300sq m, Charter Place is the largest office building in Uxbridge. The office space has floor plates of over 0.4ha and ceiling heights of up to 3.4m. Floors can be subdivided up to six ways in various combinations, with suites starting from 560 sq m, and can be designed according to the occupier’s needs.

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Hyatt Place hotel

Hyatt Place London Heathrow/Hayes on Uxbridge Road was the first to be opened in London by the global hospitality company. The £25 million conversion of an office block near Stockley Business Park created a modern business hotel with 170 rooms and suites and 192sq m of indoor meeting and event space, all with natural light and the latest integrated technology. The guest rooms all feature floor-to-ceiling windows, workspaces, free wifi and remote printing. As a conference centre, it offers four different event rooms for meetings, training classes, weddings and local events. The hotel is two miles from the M4 motorway and seven miles from Heathrow Airport. Hyatt Hotels Corporation opened a second hotel at Heathrow Airport at the end of 2016.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


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WELCOME TO LYON SQUARE A DISTINCTIVE NEW COLLECTION OF LUXURY HOMES IN HARROW

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Barking & Dagenham

- 14,000+ new homes

LONDON’S HOTSPOT: EAST LONDON ISSUE FOUR_2014 LONDON’S HOTSPOT: EAST LONDON ISSUE FOUR_2014

ISSUE 4

thecrystal.org

EALING IN LONDON

LON ON

Bu i l d / I n n o v a t e / Gr o w Ha r r o w

EALING BY 2026 HEATHROW CARGO: HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONS

ENTERPRISE HOUNSLOW: BRISTOL BULLET

Great West Investment destination: Hounslow

• L O C A L •

ENJOY LIFE IN STYLE

The regeneration magazine for the London Borough of Ealing/issue 07/spring ‘16

DR A F T FE LTH AM MASTE R PL AN

revdesign i s e d Fe l t h a m M a ste r p l a n i s n ow u n d e r way to Shifting ta ke a c colandscape u nt o f t h e H o u s i n g Zo n e DrawingA on d eharrow s i g n aa p p o r ttou work, n i a e s . T h i s w i l l i nfo r m Inspiring – o n a n d o p e n i n g u p o f o t h e r n ew i nve st m e nt o Building Architecture conserve and create t hfor e the e mfuture e rg i n g We st o f B o ro u g h P l a n .

25 minutes to King’s Cross St. Pancras Fully integrated kitchens All apartments have private outdoor space Residents’ only gym1 and concierge service

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Lyon Square is a distinctive collection of high specification homes located within walking distance from the sought after area of Harrow On The Hill, North London.

LON ON 16

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Havering

Prices from £375,000 Show apartment open 7 days a week Call 020 3538 4982 or email lyonsquare@redrow.co.uk

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2:16

Redbridge

mins

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The Regent’s Park

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Canary Wharf via Crossrail

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E X I ST I N G K E Y B U I L D I N G S P RO P O S E D B U I L D I N G S P U B L I C G R E E N S PAC E

Paris via Eurostar

CO M M U NA L / P R I VAT E G A R D E N S

With a quarter of a million homes to build by 2035, London is moving east

issue 7 2016

HELP TO BUY NOW AVAILABLE ON SELECTED PLOTS WWW.LYONSQUARE.CO.UK

King’s Cross / St Pancras International Station

21473 Lyon Square BM 195x240 wc260916.indd 1

Issue 6 2017

1 Plans are currently in place for residents’ gym. Travel times taken from TfL. Help to Buy is a Government-backed initiative in partnership with housebuilders. Available on selected plots, subject to status, terms and conditions. Help to Buy cannot be used in conjunction with any other scheme. It is highly advised, for a swift, smooth transaction that an IFA/Solicitor advised by Redrow Homes is used. Offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other Redrow offer. CGI image is indicative only. Prices correct at time of going to press. Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on a mortgage or any other debt secured on it. Check that this mortgage will meet your needs if you want to move or sell your home or you want your family to inherit it. If you are in any doubt, seek independent advice.

Great West

INWARD INVESTMENT MAGAZINE ISSUE TWO

1 Siemens Brothers Way, London, E16 1GB

PLUS

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southwark

COVENTRY+ WARWICKSHIRE

Come together Partners in the private and public sectors working to deliver benefits for communities

See Emily play Not just for kids – facilities in parks and open spaces keep adults fit and healthy too

Let’s dance Live music is thriving in Southwark’s established venues, with new kids arriving on the block

Skills to pay the bills Employment rates are rising, as residents take up opportunities to gain the skills for employment

This must be the place Canada Water, Nunhead, Elephant Park and St Mary’s Quarter – new places in development

hi-tech city ◆ rai 175 years ◆ supply

Issue 17 Summer 2017

derbyperspective.com

on the preservation of heritage and the perspective

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ensure its legacy as a world-class city.

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THE HERITAGE OF LONDON TRUST IS D ELIGHTED THAT MOUNT ANVIL IS SUPPORTING THE RESTORATION OF THE THOMAS GUY STATUE. MONUMENTS LIKE THESE ARE PART OF LONDON’S FANTASTIC CULTURAL HERITAGE. MOUNT ANVIL IS A DEVELOPER WITH A REAL COMMITMENT TO MAKING LONDON A WORLD-CLASS CITY.

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CHANGING ROOMS & 10 SHOWERS

Record makers

Derby’s regeneration magazine

UXBRIDGE. ON TRACK TOOF BRING MORE INVESTMENT TO THE REGION

homes and communities across London that THE CHARTER BUILDING UXBRIDGE

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Street wise – urban art Wish you’d built here? Round table – clear thinking at the Crystal

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MOUNT ANVIL ARE PROUD TO BE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE HERITAGE OF LONDON LondonTHE TRUST TOWest RESTORE THOMAS GUY STATUE IN SOUTHWARK

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WILL

COMMITMENT AND TEAMWORK DRIVES PROGRESS

CONS


Education Students plug in at the Global Academy.

FROM INVESTMENT IN SCHOOLS TO A RANGE OF HIGH-ACHIEVING FURTHER EDUCATION FACILITIES AND WORK-BASED OPPORTUNITIES, LEARNING PATHWAYS IN HILLINGDON ARE PLENTIFUL. JESSICA PICKARD REPORTS

TRAINING WHEELS

GLOBAL ACADEMY

Turning the tables

In September 2016, Global Academy at The Old Vinyl Factory development site in Hayes, welcomed its first students. And it is clear they are having an exciting time so far. Built on the premises of EMI’s former vinyl record factory, the academy prepares young people aged between 14 and 19 for media careers. Not surprisingly, applications come in from far and wide, but nonetheless, 60% of those attending live within five miles of the facility. The academy offers a radical curriculum. As well as taking mainstream GCSEs and A-levels, its students develop vocational skills in broadcast and digital

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media that could lead to a career in radio, TV production, app development, web design, events management or marketing. The academy’s name comes from its sponsor, international entertainment company Global, which produces some of the UK’s best-known radio stations, including Heart, Capital, Classic FM, LBC and Gold. The creative industries are one of the fastest growing sectors of the UK economy and employers report a significant skills gap, particularly in digital skills. At Global Academy, students have the chance to acquire these skills in state-

of-the-art facilities with employer-led projects. Recently, for example, Global’s events arm led workshops with small teams of learners. The three top performing students then helped out at Capital’s Summertime Ball in June, working backstage at Wembley Stadium as part of the artist liaison team. Others produced work which won them a summer placement at Sky TV. “This kind of experience – actually getting to see what they’re learning about put into practice – is invaluable,” says Sam Summerson, who is acting head of Global Academy.

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Education

Northwood Secondary now features space with tiered seating (above) and DT rooms (below).

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

Well placed

Across London, local authorities are struggling with the rising demand for school places. In Hillingdon, although the population is growing more rapidly than in many neighbouring areas, the council has announced that, once again, every child will have a school place within borough boundaries. This achievement is considerable given that in some parts of London, this has not been possible. However, the biggest impact of rising numbers in Hillingdon has so far been felt at primary stage. The response from the council has been an ambitious £149 million capital programme to expand existing primary schools and to build new ones. “It has been an exciting challenge,” says Dan Kennedy, deputy director of housing, environment, education, health and wellbeing, referring – with apparent understatement – to the creation of 6,645 new primary places since 2011. Three entirely new primary schools, built by Hillingdon Council, opened between 2014 and 2015.

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OUTSTANDING EDUCATIONI DEPENDS ON GREAT TEACHERSI BUT ALSO ON INSPIRING, GOODI QUALITY FACILITIESI

As these children grow older, the impact will be felt in secondary schools. Again there are significant expansion plans. The new Northwood Secondary School buildings in Pinner Road have now opened and will provide 1,080 places. The school has a focus on performing arts, housing a stage area and a large dance studio. Meanwhile, three other secondary schools either have, or will be, expanded through a building programme costing £144 million, again one of the largest in London. “Outstanding education depends on great teachers,” says Kennedy, “but also on inspiring, good quality facilities.”

Being near a great school is one of the most important factors when parents choose a new home. It can add an average of £18,000 to local house prices. Last year, 98.5% of parents in Hillingdon got a primary school place among their top three choices, while for secondary schools this figure was 94%. At the same time standards, as measured by Ofsted, appear to be rising. Three years ago 80% of children attended a primary school rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ while the same statistic for secondary level was 78%. “We are well on track,” says Kennedy. “At least 90% of our primary schools will soon be rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’.”

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


Education

MAKING STUDENTS WORK-READYI ISN’T JUST GOOD FOR THEM. ITI PROVIDES A PIPELINE OF TALENTI INTO THE LOCAL ECONOMYI UXBRIDGE COLLEGE

Rich mix

Uxbridge College, with campuses in Uxbridge and Hayes, offers a diverse range of courses to more than 6,000 students and produces exam results consistently above the national average. Some students study A-levels and GCSEs but the majority – over 4,000 – take vocational subjects to prepare for a specific jobs sector. “Whatever they study, we want our students to be ready for work,”

Uxbridge College (above top) maintains a focus on vocational subjects, which give students the skills for specific industries.

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explains Lorraine Collins, executive director, enterprise and development, at the college. “This isn’t just a matter of skills, it’s also about behaviour and understanding work cultures.” Local employers have a strong role to play here. The college works with ‘Employer Champions’ – business people who help set assignments for particular career paths, and it is a long term goal that every student should have a work placement. This year, more than 2,000 local placements have been arranged, some by students themselves, but most setup by the college’s team of work experience co-ordinators. Collins says: “Getting a job or work experience is often a question of having the right social networks, but students from different backgrounds don’t have the same opportunities in this respect. Making students work-ready isn’t just good for them, it provides a pipeline of talent into the local economy.” The college also supports employers directly, particularly now with the Apprenticeship Levy. Since April 2017, companies with a payroll of over

£3 million are obliged to set aside 0.5% of their PAYE return to train apprentices. Originally conceived as a way of generating opportunities for young people, this legislation also means existing staff can upskill as apprentices, regardless of age, right up to level 5 – the equivalent of postgraduate work. By turning employers into investors, the legislation gives them more influence over the content of training, but the new rules also produce additional control and reporting responsibilities which many companies find confusing. Uxbridge College offers 29 different apprenticeship pathways and staff have been busy visiting employers with workshops and slideshows to make the new regulations more transparent. Local employers have helped spread the word by assisting with employer open days, including Menzies Aviation based near Heathrow Airport and smaller Uxbridge companies such as One Care IT. “Our job is to support employers with their own agendas,” says Collins. “We help them see the benefits of these reforms and work with them to maximise those benefits to their company.”

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Education

Brunel University is highly respected for its academic output – around 13,000 students attend the institution.

BRUNEL UNIVERSITY LONDON

Better Connections

Brunel University London in Uxbridge has long been known for the quality of its academic work, particularly in engineering. Less well known are the connections it has forged with local businesses and residents. James Shanahan, a member of Brunel’s Employment Strategy and Support Unit, says: “It can be hard for people outside to know all the things they can access here, but we want to break down the feeling that the university is solely for students.” What is on offer for non-students is a surprising range of expertise, support and facilities. For example, many employers consider the chance to engage a skilled student on long-term work placements to be very attractive. This year, more than 300 companies took on in more than 500 students. Among Hillingdon-based companies, this has included the Planesaver Credit Union in Harlington which has taken on two, as has the Hayes-based Disablement Association Hillingdon. “The advantage to the employer,” Shanahan says, “is that they get a young, skilled and keen worker at a low

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cost.” But there is an advantage to the university too, since institutions now have to work harder to attract fee-paying students, applicants consider the weight real-life work experience will give to their CVs. Brunel’s Widening Participation Summer Scheme lets companies take on a student for shorter placements. This is paid for by the university in the form of a bursary. Hillingdon-based companies like MADE TV, Europcar, Hillingdon Council and Intercontinental Hotels are among those working with the university in this way. When a first contact is established,

be it from an employer, a charity or a residents’ group, Shanahan enters their details onto a database which then allows the university’s various departments to follow up with offers of other relevant university services, many of them free. These include expert help from academic specialists via a knowledge transfer scheme; facilities hire – laboratories, studios for media production or spaces for banqueting – help for small businesses; guest speakers; support for charity events; sports facilities and access to university lectures, right down to the donation of abandoned student bicycles.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


L IA NT

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I DE RES COM MERCIAL AND

G R EE N S P AC FOR E

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Connected 4 Business Made 4 Living FAS T

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Hillingdon, already home to the likes of British Airways Coca-Cola, GSK, Apple, Hertz is an ideal west London location for small and large businesses, with a wide choice of commercial properties and excellent amenities, especially national and international transport links. The borough is also a great place to live, with award-winning schools, green spaces and high quality leisure and social facilities.

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For more information visit www.hillingdon.gov.uk/ business

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www.hillingdon.gov.uk


Markets

HILLINGDON FACTS… £9million

of council and Transport for London funding for Hayes town centre improvements

MAJOR PUBLIC REALM FOCUS FOR THE COUNCIL

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GREEN FLAGS

The national standard for wellmaintained open spaces More than in any other local authority in the UK

£2 million including

£800,000

from the Mayor of London for Uxbridge town improvements

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ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


£314 million

642

HOMES WILL BE BUILT BY U+I AT THE OLD VINYL FACTORY IN HAYES

CURRENT SCHOOL BUILDING AND EXPANSION PROGRAMME (PRIMARY AND SECONDARY)

£5.2 million

£35million

invested to rebuild and expand Northwood Secondary School, which opened last year

COUNCIL INVESTMENT IN UPGRADING ALL LIGHT BULBS IN COUNCILOWNED STREETS WITH LED LIGHTING

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Logistics

THIS MUST BE

LOGISTICS COMPANIES ARE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF DISTRIBUTION HUBS ON HILLINGDON’S LARGE SWATHES OF LAND, BRINGING JOBS AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES TO THIS PART OF WEST LONDON. RUTH MCKEE REPORTS

W

ith Heathrow Airport on the doorstep and motorways that can whisk lorries into the heart of central London and beyond, logistics and distribution are big business in the London borough of Hillingdon. Skyline - Segro and Aviva Investors’ new logistics development site beside Heathrow Airport - has already created excitement in the industry. The slick development provides high-end office space as well as a smoothrunning distribution centre with a warehouse unit of just under 7,000sq m, and first and second floor space available.

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The centre’s close proximity to Heathrow Airport’s cargo terminal is luring companies to the sought-after west London location. Even more crucial to some distribution networks than the airport connections is the ease with which fleets of delivery trucks and vans can get onto the transport arteries of the M4 and M25 from the site. These seamless connections caught the eye of Stuart Innes, managing director of international company, Bolloré Logistics. He explains to Hillingdon magazine that the company jumped at the chance of being at the centre of a transport hub that can connect it with clients all over

the world. With Skyline’s easy access to air cargo terminals, major motorway routes, passenger terminals and rail and underground networks, Innes knew it was the right move. “Bolloré Logistics assists its clients globally with solutions to improve supply chain performance,” Innes says. “This offer is supported by the expertise of our people, strength of our systems and a comprehensive range of services in multimodal transport, customs, regulatory compliance and industrial projects. “This move confirms our continuing investment in serving our clients and we are confident that our relationship with our customers will be enhanced and

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


THE BASE

Prologis Park West London (above) has a focus on low emissions and is key to Hillingdon’s thriving distribution and logistics industry.

improved by this upgrade to our facilities at Skyline.” The environmentally friendly and sustainable aspects of the development also appealed, says Innes: “The new air hub is a highly sustainable development, with a total of more than 80,000sq ft [7,432sq m], plus a large outdoor marshalling space, carrying an EPC AEnergy performance certification and a ‘Top 25’ BREEAM environmental rating.”

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Tricks of the trade

The attraction of Hillingdon for distribution development companies does not stop at Heathrow. On the site of an old Victorian brickfield, Prologis Park West London is another example of a scheme specifically catering for the distribution and logistics industry, transforming a previously underutilised area.

Two huge logistics units have transformed the brownfield site. Prologis has finished the first stage of the park on Horton Road in West Drayton with an eye on making its site one of the most environmentally friendly and attractive to work at in the UK. Both new buildings have more than met low emissions targets with their energy consumption below the 35% minimum set by the London Plan.

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Logistics

IN TERMS OF A HIGH-QUALITYI HEADQUARTERS LOCATION, ITITICKS ALL THE BOXESI

Paul Weston, senior vice president and market officer head of London & south-east markets at Prologis Park West London, says company representatives knew the site would prove popular with distribution companies from the outset. Set amid redeveloped waterways and towpaths, the logistics centre is designed along the lines of a business park, and according to Weston, it is rare to find a site where such attention has gone into planning its look and feel. He says: “One of the things is that aspects of the site are structured like a business park environment – and that is not the norm in the logistics sector. So in terms of a high quality headquarters location, it ticks all the boxes, as we provide office space as well.” Although the site is close to the airport, Weston insists that being based in Hillingdon “is not just about Heathrow”. “It’s also the transport connections,” he says. “We are a 10-minute walk from West Drayton station, we are close to the

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motorway – these are things that connect us to all of west London – and these things mean the site is very attractive.” Weston says priority is often given to housing in London when planning applications are being considered, which means industrial sites are sometimes squeezed out of the capital. Therefore, such a well-connected centre stands out for potential clients who want an easily accessible base in the capital. And Prologis is determined to give something back to the borough – with hundreds of jobs expected to be generated by the development. “There is a really good labour pool on our doorstep,” Weston adds. “We estimate that our site will generate 650 jobs for the local workforce. So it’s good for employment and it is good for investment in the borough.” He reveals that as part of the planning agreement to build the vast logistics hubs, the company will be

redeveloping 16.1ha of land and giving it to the council as improved, green space. “We are actually investing £2.5 million into the public realm,” he confirms.

Delivering results

One of the companies clamouring to make use of the connections west London and Hillingdon offer is online grocery shop Ocado, which delivers Waitrose groceries and other goods ordered via the internet. Stockley Close, owned by Aviva Investors, is just south of the wide open green spaces of Stockley Park in Hillingdon and is minutes from the M4 interchange. It is this ideal location that attracted Ocado to the site two years ago. The grocer signed a 15-year deal for the distribution centre in 2015, committing to dispatch its south-west London operations from there until at least 2030.

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


Stockley Close (above) is located within easy reach of Heathrow and the M4 interchange and is home to online grocery shop, Ocado. Skyline (right) is Hillingdon’s latest logistics hub, attracting global businesses such as Bolloré Logistics, which signed for 7,432sq m of space in August 2016.

About 90 of Ocado’s signature brightly coloured delivery vans are based on the 5,290sq m site. And when the company set up its 24/7 operations in Stockley Close, it was an immediate boost for local employment, as 200 drivers were hired to set off from the hub every morning. At the time of the opening, Ian Starling, head of property and network development for Ocado, said: “As the

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world’s largest dedicated online grocery supermarket, having quick and direct access to our customers is absolutely vital for business. “We want to deliver to our customers the best quality product in the shortest time possible.” Starling says that being so wellconnected was ideal for a grocery delivery service, as quick road connections are key to the success of the business.

“That’s why the location of Stockley Close is a perfect fit for our business. It will act as a hub to distribute to our customers in south-west London and helps us remain at the forefront of the e-commerce revolution,” he says. Hillingdon’s status as a global transportation hub will help the logistics industry continue to flourish and grow, creating jobs and boosting the local economy for years to come.

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Sitematch opportunity

(A)VIVA UXBRIDGE THE BELMONT OFFICE SCHEME IS A SIGN OF THINGS TO COME, REPORTS DEBBIE ASHFORD

T

he office scheme of almost 12,000sq m on Belmont Road offers businesses the prospect of moving into modern, stylish offices in a town centre that is itself seeing significant investment in leisure, retail and public spaces. Aviva Investors’ £30 million refurbishment, designed by architects TP Bennett, has created five levels of large, light-filled, flexible floorspace averaging 2,465sq m, as well as roof terraces and a full-height atrium. Two minutes walk to Uxbridge tube station, the bus station and the High Street, Belmont can accommodate up to 1,500 people and will suit either a sole occupier or several companies.

The new £30 million office scheme by Aviva Investors (above) includes nearly 12,000sq m of space (below).

The state-of-the-art scheme offers: Roof terraces on different levels, providing high-quality spaces for occupiers and visitors 171 secure basement parking spaces and 116 cycle bays A BREEAM Excellent certification for sustainability, renewable energy technology, energy-efficient building services that include smart metering, and central building management Improvements to the street landscape, which also benefits from the rejuvenated Friends Garden next door Excellent transport links: six miles from Heathrow, 25 minutes to central London, as well as being within easy reach of the M25 and the M4. Julian Cobourne, senior asset manager at Aviva Investors, says: “Our vision for Belmont has been realised, which was to create an elegantly designed light-filled, grade-A office scheme with large floor plates in Uxbridge town centre, suitable for a sole occupier or to be multi-let. “The high quality of the design and finish, together with its excellent green

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OUR VISION FOR BELMONTI HAS BEEN REALISEDI

credentials, makes it an attractive choice as a corporate headquarters. “It is ideal for organisations who want good transport links to London and the Thames Valley coupled with a desire to occupy a space that combines function with form.”

For more information about this opportunity, contact: Cushman & Wakefield 020 7935 5000 or Colliers International 020 7344 6999

ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2017


Sitematch London 2017 brokered 324 meetings with 55 public sector land owners in attendance, stimulating development and economic growth.

In 2018 we’re back with a new look and the biggest event yet! For private sector attendees contact Josie Brewer, josie@3foxinternational.com For public organisations and councils contact Paul Gussar paul@3foxinternational.com

8 February 2018 155 Bishopsgate, London, EC2M 3YD

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Ollie McLeod THECHARTERBUILDING.COM

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Simon Williams

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Hillingdon #3  

The latest edition of Hillingdon magazine looks at innovative workspaces, quality of of life and the ongoing regeneration of the west London...