Page 1

FIVE WAYS to

Centennial Boulevard: Positioned to Reclaim the Core of The Nations

GIVE BACK to WEST NASHVILLE (Right Now and Beyond) page 6

page 12

SIDE HUSTLING: A Creative Spin on a New Year’s Resolution page 16

December 2017–January 2018 VOL. II, ISSUE 1


DONATE FUNDS A financial gift of any amount helps us empower thousands of individuals who walk through our doors each year:

• Visit stlch.org/donate to make a gift

NASHVILLE’S 50% POVERTY RATE IS

HIGHER THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE U.S. Census Bureau 2016; persons in poverty, National Average 12.7%, Nashville-Davidson County 18.6%

St. Luke’s wants to change this heartbreaking statistic by addressing the root causes of poverty with education, food security, supportive services and a caring community.

HELP EASE THE PAIN OF POVERTY

Donating money, time or goods will help families, children and seniors when they need it most.

• Mail donations to 5601 New York Ave, Nashville, TN 37209 • Make St. Luke’s Community House your AmazonSmile charity of choice

DONATE TIME Volunteers are the most valuable resource at St. Luke’s so we invite you and your family, co-workers, church group or friends to sign up to:

• Pack emergency food boxes • Deliver nutritious meals to seniors • Help children become better prepared for Kindergarten • Lend administrative support • Help with community programs like Family Christmas, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, and Trunk or Treat

DONATE GOODS Running our programs is a community effort. If you prefer to donate goods or services, some of our greatest needs include:

• Landscape Design • Facility planning • Hygiene products • Household supplies • Baby formula • Prizes for senior bingo • School supplies

5601 New York Avenue, Nashville, TN 37209 www.stlch.org • (615)350-7893

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Editor and Publisher MIRIAM DRENNAN

Creative Consultant EVELYN MARIE PARRISH

Historian YVONNE EAVES

Copy Editor JENNIFER GOODE STEVENS

Contributors: CARLY BROWNING

ELLEN CALDWELL

HOLLY DARNELL

YVONNE EAVES

CLARE FERNANDEZ

NAOMI GOLDSTONE

HANNAH HERNER

ABBY LEE HOOD

JENNIFER MASLEY

Art Direction and Design ELLEN PARKER-BIBB

Photographers JASON HOFFMAN STEPHANIE MULLOWNEY

Social Media ABBY LEE HOOD

Promotion and Publicity SUZANNE ISRAEL

Distribution DON GAYLORD

Advertising Account Manager LANE ABERNATHY

COVER ABE GOOLSBY

Advertising Inquiries: 615.491.8909 or 372WestNashville@gmail.com. @372WN

@372Wn

@372wn

372WN is a print and digital magazine published every other month by Next Chapter Publishing, LLC. All content presented herein, unless otherwise noted, is the exclusive property of Next Chapter Publishing and cannot be used, reprinted, or posted without permission. 372WN is free for readers; excessive removal of the product or tampering with any of our distribution racks will be considered theft and/or vandalism and subject to prosecution.


CONTENTS VOL. II, ISSUE 1 | December 2017–January 2018

MAIN FEATURE 6

Five Ways to Give Back to West Nashville

CURRENT HAPPENINGS 12 Centennial Boulevard Positioned to Reclaim the “Core of The Nations” 16 Side Hustling: A Creative Spin on a New Year’s Resolution 44 Get Out and Celebrate, West Nashville-Style!

FEATURES 22 Holiday Travel: Seven Items to Check Before You Hit the Road 26 Make Your Season Bright: Advice from a Personal Concierge 30 What’s in a Name? West Nashville Streets 34 St. Luke’s Preschool: Now Enrolling! 38 A Merry Revival 48 Foolproof Food for Your Celebrations 52 Holiday Directory 63 EiO & the Hive Gets Us into the Holiday Spirits!

IN EVERY ISSUE 58

372WestNosh

64

372WhokNew?

CORRECTION AND CLARIFICATION: In our October issue, it was erroneously reported that Wayne Garland played professional football; he played for the MLB. On a different article, Mark Moody (whose family has been in West Nashville since the early 1900s), wrote in to clarify a few dates and details: “Our house on River Rouge was finished in January 1962. I went to elementary school and high school with a boy who moved into his in 1959. The main builders in Charlotte Park at that time [were] Todd & Sheets, Harry Graham and Alvin Terrell & Sons. Annex ended at Capri Drive until 1965. Bush Builders put in the utilities. We rode bikes on the trails that the dozers and track hoes made. The dozer operator’s family moved to America Road in 1958; they moved to Sunliner in 1961. The house mentioned at the end of River Rouge Court [standing in the middle, looking straight] was where Mark Kelly lived.” Thank you, Mr. Moody!

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

3


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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


FEEL GOOD ABOUT GIVING GOOD.

SH OP HOLIDAY G IF TS HAN DC RAF TED BY WOMEN SURVIVORS thistlefarms.org


FIVE WAYS TO

GIVE BACK to WEST NASHVILLE

(Right Now and Beyond) by Naomi GOLDSTONE photos provided by the respective organizations and used with permission

’Tis the season for giving, and there are many needs in our own community. The needs won’t go away with the holiday season, and now is a great time get involved. Here are five ways you can help, knowing that your generosity will go directly back into West Nashville.

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


Preston Taylor Ministries

F

ounded in 1998, Preston Taylor Ministries (PTM) was organized to help the residents of the Preston Taylor public housing area confront the problems many of them face —drug use, gang involvement, teenage pregnancy, illiteracy, poor school performance and crime. PTM is a faith-based organization with a message for each student who enters its program: God has a plan and a purpose for your life. “Students need to be connected to a purpose,” explains Executive Director Chan Sheppard. “And to be connected to a caring adult, academic confidence and eventually, to workforce confidence.” Many of the children in PTM have limited family support and live below the poverty line; they also are behind academically. PTM believes that the best way to overcome these challenges is for children to have supportive relationships with concerned adults. It therefore provides the avenue for these relationships to form in different ways: mentoring, after-school tutoring, and health and wellness programs. During the holiday season, PTM hosts two major events for its students: a wrapping party on December 15 and the Nativity Store on December 16. At the nativity store, parents shop for Christmas gifts for their children, so PTM is looking for new toys and new clothes, as well as for volunteers to help parents shop and wrap presents when the store is open. At the wrapping party, elementary students will wrap the Christmas gifts they have selected for their parents/guardians. RIGHT NOW: PTM could use gift donations that are appropriate for adults, volunteers to help the children select their gifts and then to wrap them, and snacks for all to share during the activity. If you would prefer to give money, they will gladly accept your financial contributions. BEYOND THE HOLIDAY SEASON: Each program offered at Preston Taylor Ministries could use volunteers throughout the school year and in the summer. Email them (Brittany@PrestonTaylorMinistries.org) or go online (prestontaylorministries.org) for additional information about their programs and to sign up to volunteer.

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ebuilding Together Nashville began in 1995 under the name “Christmas in April.” According to Executive Director Kaitlin Dastugue, “The idea was that volunteers would get together one time in April to provide critical repairs for neighbors in need.” This mission, however, changed in May 2010, after the devastating Nashville floods. “We grew in capacity to respond to the huge needs in the city,” Kaitlin says. Today, Rebuilding Together Nashville works tirelessly to “provide critical repairs for low-income homeowners who are seniors, disabled or veterans.” They help their clients stay in their homes by removing hazards in order to make the house “safe and healthy.” According to Kaitlin, volunteers will tackle anything “from electrical to plumbing to HVAC, and then smaller things like installing smoke detectors.” Rebuilding Together Nashville has recently partnered with Nashville’s Home Energy Savings Program to help make houses more energy-efficient.

Rebuilding Together Nashville

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

7


One family Rebuilding Together Nashville was able to help was a Vietnam veteran and his brother, who was also his caretaker. The home the two men lived in had a leaky water heater, so Rebuilding Together Nashville replaced the water heater and then worked with them to clean up the mold that resulted from the leak. “We wanted the brothers to be able to live together so that they could take care of each other,” says Becky Carter, regional director of Rebuilding Together’s national organization and West Nashville resident. The two men were thrilled with the repairs because they were able to stay in their house and continue caring for one another. RIGHT NOW: Kaitlin said that during the holiday season, people can help Rebuilding Nashville Together by giving money. “It’s probably our number one need,” she says. “We have a long wait list, and a lack of resources is what stops us from serving the great need that’s out there in Nashville.” She added that during the holiday season, there’s often a greater need for emergency repairs—like fixing heating and drafty windows. BEYOND THE HOLIDAY SEASON: During the winter months, volunteers are mostly needed in the office to help with sending annual giving letters or processing donations. In spring, summer and fall, Rebuilding Nashville needs volunteers to help with critical home repairs, and they especially need skilled carpenters and handymen to donate their time and labor. If you would like to volunteer or donate money, please call the office at 615.297.3955. You can also visit their website at rebuildingtogethernashville.org.

West Nashville Dream Center

W

hen it opened in 2013, the West Nashville Dream Center was an umbrella organization of Cross Point Community Church. They decided to stay when Cross Point relocated to downtown. “We started building relationships with our neighbors first by just knocking on doors to make sure they were okay,” says Miranda Telford, the Marketing and Sunday Programming Director for the West Nashville Dream Center. “And we didn’t want to leave our friends behind.” The West Nashville Dream Center first began with an 11 a.m. church service on Sundays, and after seeing the needs of so many single mothers in the community, they knew they needed to become even more involved. Though the West Nashville Dream Center is a religious organization, their goal is not to convert people to a particular faith. “We wanted to be a church that served the needs of our local community,” explains Ryan Bult, CEO of the West Nashville Dream Center. “Not just on Sundays, but during the week, too.”

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


The mission of the West Nashville Dream Center is to provide “Safe Community, Supplemental Resources, and Family Strengthening Tools.” On “Fresh Wednesdays” and “Fresh Fridays,” the West Nashville Dream Center runs a food bank where they give away fruits, vegetables, prepared salads, prepared meals, yogurt and other groceries they have rescued from Whole Foods and Sprouts. “We try to give families healthy foods so that they can incorporate them into their daily menu,” Miranda says. Last month, the center also hosted a Thanksgiving dinner for those in the neighborhood. RIGHT NOW: For Christmas, they will have an angel tree program for the children who regularly come to the center. If you would like to donate, you can go to the West Nashville Dream Center or online at nashvilledreamcenter.org to find a list of clothing sizes and each child’s wish list. And there's still time to donate or sign up to volunteer at their Christmas Store on Saturday, December 2nd, which helps give families a chance to shop with dignity.

The West Nashville Dream Center will also have a Christmas party for the children, so they need food and people to help with that. Miranda says that they will also do something special for the moms who consistently come to the Dream Center, and they would like to give them a Kroger gift card as a Christmas present. So, they gladly welcome Kroger or other gift cards to pass along to the mothers. BEYOND THE HOLIDAY SEASON: According to Ryan, volunteers are the lifeblood of the West Nashville Dream Center. “We want people to come help us build relationships with our kids and our mothers while we work to create a safe, happy and healthy community,” he says. If you need the resources at the West Nashville Dream Center or want to volunteer during the holiday season or beyond, please call the West Nashville Dream Center at 615.469.5190; email them at info@nashvilledreamcenter. com; or visit them online at nashvilledreamcenter.org. December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Nashville Adult Literacy Council

F

ounded in 1982, the Nashville Adult Literacy Council (NALC) teaches adult Americans how to read and write and teaches adult immigrants the English language. In addition, adults can take classes through NALC to improve their writing skills and to prepare for their high school equivalency or citizenship tests. The NALC primarily serves two communities. “We work with people who were born in the U.S. and who speak English and for one reason or another never learned how to read and write well,” Executive Director Kim Karesh says. “Or we work with people who have immigrated to the U.S. and for whom English is a second language.” Though there is often a lot of shame and stigma surrounding being illiterate, Kim says the word that applies to so many of the learners at NALC is resilience. “If you meet the students here and you hear their stories, you would forgive them for giving up,” she explains. “Yet, this is a group who, in their adulthood, has found the motivation. There is so much joy of seeing people make progress.”

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018

RIGHT NOW: Because the Nashville Adult Literacy Council has faced some financial challenges this year, they could use monetary donations during the holiday season and beyond. “We were not able to receive as much funding as in years past, though the needs for our serves are increasing,” Kim says. BEYOND THE HOLIDAY SEASON: The NALC could also use more tutors, and Kim wants to dispel any myths that one needs to be a teacher to tutor there. “You just need patience and to have an encouraging attitude,” she insists. She also noted that during the Christmas season and immediately following, “people often set resolutions that they are going to give back to the community, so we hope people will think about working with an adult learner to help him or her improve their literacy.” If someone you know needs the services of the Nashville Adult Literacy Council or if you want to volunteer, please call the NALC at 615.298.8060 (the Cohn Learning Center) or at 615.891.4247 (Antioch); fill out a form online at nashvilleliteracy. org; or stop by the NALC office at the Cohn Learning Center in Room 305.

Senior Renaissance Center

L

ocated in the basement of the Cohn Learning Center, the Senior Renaissance Center (SRC) celebrated its 29th year of helping and entertaining seniors this year. According to Executive Director and Activities Coordinator Judith Redmond, the nonprofit SRC is a “great place for seniors who live alone or who have had a loved one pass away and want some socialization with others.” The Senior Renaissance Center is open 8:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. When someone asks Judith how much it costs to attend, she always replies with: “It doesn’t cost anything but your time. All I ask is you leave with a smile on your face, tell all your friends where you have been and invite them to attend, too.” A free lunch is served daily, but visitors who can afford it are asked to pay a little bit based on their income. Judith says that there are activities to keep folks of all ages at the center entertained. Bingo is a very popular activity, and the fourth


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BEYOND THE HOLIDAY SEASON: Because fundraising and donations are what keep the programs at the Senior Renaissance Center going, the SRC welcomes your monetary contributions. There is also an ongoing Flea Market & “Oldies but Goodies” clothing rack at the center,

and they would love to have your donations so that they can either sell or give away the items to seniors. And, if you just want to come and hang out with the seniors, they will gladly welcome you. E

RIGHT NOW: In December, the SRC will have a Christmas Party, and Judith always tries to give the regular attendees a Christmas gift. She would love small items to put in each person’s gift bag or food items for the Christmas party.

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Tuesday of every month is Bingo Bash. There are also group exercise classes several days a week, and the Adult Coloring Book Craze is available daily. The second Tuesday of every month is karaoke, and Judith says that the seniors love to dance and sing along to songs from many different eras. Ms. Jean is a senior who regularly comes to the SRC. At 90 years old, she loves to play trivia at the center, and for the past three years she has competed on the SRC’s Trivia Team, which has competed in the District/Regional Senior Brain Games. “The trivia helps you remember, and I don’t want my brain to go stale,” Ms. Jean says. “You don’t even have to know all the answers; the fun part is talking with the others.”

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When she’s not being dragged around The Nations by Mr. Ernie Banks and her other three dogs, Naomi Goldstone is a professor of English and coordinator of the African American Studies program at Austin Peay State University. She is also the author of “Integrating the Forty Acres” and blogs at dwonnaknowwhatithink.com.

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11


Centennial Boulevard Positioned to Reclaim THE

CORE THE NATIONS of

by Hannah HERNER photos by Jason Hoffman/Music City Aerial, unless otherwise noted

Out with the old, in with the new. It’s the way development typically goes, but that’s not the case with Centennial Boulevard in The Nations. Developers are deftly renovating and incorporating existing structures to pay respect to the area’s industrial roots while attracting new and innovative businesses. With new restaurants, retail and residential developments, Centennial Boulevard is quickly becoming the hub of The Nations. “A thriving community starts with a healthy core—and that’s what we’re building with 51st Avenue and Centennial Boulevard,” explains Mary Carolyn Roberts, Metro Council representative for District 20, which includes The Nations neighborhood. “And that little mecca right there is the epicenter. I never would have dreamed that it was the epicenter, but I think the corner of 51st and Centennial is just that.”

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


“We’re bringing back a really cool residential neighborhood with some neat amenities.” –WOOD CALDWELL, SOUTHEAST VENTURE

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

13


Big Changes at Silo Bend

condominiums that will be available “The interesting thing about our for individual sale, and approximately property at Silo Bend is that it’s all A big piece of that epicenter will be 120 single-family homes. Caldwell basically nonfunctional industrial Southeast Venture’s development of explains that the company proceeded property,” says Wood Caldwell, real 37 acres in what’s being called the with the contracted plans after seekestate principal at Southeast Venture. Silo Bend area, marked by the large ing support from the neighborhood. “We’re not tearing down anything. All silo with a giant mural that was paint“The neighborhood did not want we’re doing is bringing back a really ed by world-renowned artist Guido it to go back to industrial,” he says. cool residential neighborhood with van Helten this past summer. Accord“They wanted more housing, they some neat amenities.” ing to Councilmember Roberts, this wanted more shops. As Nashville The area was rezoned to allow for has been the most notable zoning re-urbanizes, this industrial property 193 apartment units. The apartments change in the area. has become so expensive that it’s not will be known as The Flats at Silo Bend, really economically feasible to keep and Caldwell estimates it will cost putting industrial-type uses there, so about $1.80 per square foot, per month. that’s why this is all happening.” The second phase of the Silo Bend The Nations Neighborhood Assodevelopment is at an old warehouse ciation President Travis Moore says building on the site, now owned by PARCEL CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WEST PARCEL CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WEST PARCEL September 03, 2015 neighborhood input is important Flyway Companies in Charleston, before developers finalize their plans. South Carolina. It will house a mix of He said the neighborhood associacreative uses, according to company CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WEST PARCEL Nevin. The site, 03, 2015 tion suggested adding moreSeptember areas for President Lindsay ĊēęĊēēĎĆđĔĚđĊěĆėĉ September 04, 2015 CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WEST PARCEL September 03, 2015 CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WESTbe PARCEL September 03, 2015 community gatherings in Southeast which will known as Silo Studios, CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WEST PARCEL September 03, 2015 Venture’s plans. will include a restaurant and bar, “We actually sat down with [Southsmall outdoor music venue, event east Venture] and talked through space and creative office space. CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD: WESTof PARCEL eptember 03, 2015 their plan and looked at what September they’re03, 2015 Phase three the Southeast Venbuilding and gave some suggestions,” ture project is designed to include 95 MAXIMUM

HEIGHT:

153

 

1.0

60 10 35 15

MAXIMUM

3 STORIES AT 45'

LEVEL 1 STUDIO 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM

41 8 23 10

LEVEL 2-3 STUDIO 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM

56 12 30 14

(46 PARKING REQ.)

PARKING PARKING



PROVIDED TOTALTOTAL PROVIDED 240 240

REQ. RESIDENTIAL REQ. RESIDENTIAL 204 *SURFACE PARKED *SURFACE PARKED

204 PARKING

240

TOTAL PROVIDED

REQ. RESIDENTIAL September 09, 2015 REQ. RETAIL TOTAL REQ. *SURFACE PARKED

1

138,075 GSF 113,225 RSF 12,600 GSF N 10,500 RSF 1,950 SF

BUILDING TOTAL:

150,675 GSF

FAR:

0.60

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RESIDENTIAL UNITS TOTAL UNITS

56 12 30 14

(63 PARKING REQ./LV)

PARKING TOTAL PROVIDED REQ. RESIDENTIAL REQ. RETAIL TOTAL REQ. *SURFACE PARKED

172 50 222

*RESIDENTIAL + RETAIL, 3-STORY WALK UP.

BUILDING TOTAL:

232,800 GSF

RETAIL RESIDENTIAL UNITS +33'

+45'

+33'

SITE SECTION 1" = 60'

TOTAL UNITS 64 15 33 16

LEVEL 2-3 STUDIO 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM

83 18 44 21

SITE SECTION 1" = 60' SITE SECTION SITE SECTION SITE 1" = 60' SECTION

(72 PARKING REQ.)

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(94 PARKING REQ./LV)

PARKING

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50

360

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100

50

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150

50

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100

100

100

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240

  

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SITE SECTION

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RESIDENTIAL UNITS

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N

0

100

200

300

AREA

B

AREA

B

AREA

C

Silo Bend Master Plan used with permission from Southeast Venture

14

AREA TABULATION LEVEL 1-3 GROSS:

50,225 GSF/LV

AREA TABULATION LEVEL 1-3 GROSS:

COMBINED AREAS TOTAL: 3 FLOORS RESIDENTIAL GSF: RESIDENTIAL RSF: RETAIL GSF: RETAIL RSF: RES. AMENITY POOL:

166,275 GSF 136,345 RSF 12,600 GSF 10,500 RSF 1,950 SF

FAR:

0.60

77,600 GSF/LV

AREA TABULATION WEST PARCEL GSF: EAST PARCEL GSF:

COMBINED AREAS TOTAL: 3 FLOORS RESIDENTIAL GSF: RESIDENTIAL RSF: RETAIL GSF: RETAIL RSF: RES. AMENITY POOL:

215,200 GSF 176,000 RSF 17,600 GSF 14,400 RSF 1,800 SF

COMBINED AREAS TOTAL: 2 THREE STORY, MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENTS RESIDENTIAL GSF: 318,475 GSF RESIDENTIAL RSF: 312,345 RSF RETAIL GSF: 30,200 GSF RETAIL RSF: 25,000 RSF

FAR:

1.40

372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018 RESIDENTIAL UNITS

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

FAR: RESIDENTIAL UNITS

178,875 GSF 232,800 GSF

0.94

CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD TRACT B AREA: ZONING: UZO:

~

410,00 GSF (9.4 ACRES) MUL-A YES

BUILD-TO ZONES FRONT SET BACK SIDE SET BACK REAR SET BACK

20' NONE REQUIRED 20'

*Shall be measured from the standard R.O.W. lines found in the Major & Collector Street Plan

COMBINED

COMBINED

R. MĆēĚĊđǦĊēęĊēēĎĆđ | ĆĘęĊėđĆē ZONING

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LANDSCAPING PARKING AREAS

+45'

+45' +33'

+33'

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LEVEL 2-3 STUDIO 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM

COMBINED AREAS RESIDENTIAL GSF: RESIDENTIAL RSF: RETAIL GSF: RETAIL RSF: RES. AMENITY POOL:

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20'

AREA TABULATION NONE REQUIRED LEVEL 1-3 20' GROSS: AREA

*Shall be measured fromAREA the standard R.O.W. lines found in AREA TABULATIONA AREA TABULATIONB COMBINED AREAS COMBINED AREAS the Major & Collector Street Plan AREA 1-3 AREA 1-3 LEVEL LEVEL 3 FLOORS 3 FLOORS AREA TOTAL: TABULATION AREA TOTAL: TABULATION GROSS: 55,425 GSF/LV GROSS: 50,225 GSF/LV GSF: 166,275 GSF GSF: 166,275 GSF LEVELRESIDENTIAL 1-3 AREA TABULATION LEVELRESIDENTIAL 1-3 AREA TABULATION FAR: RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RSF: 136,345 RSF GROSS: 55,425136,345 GSF/LV RSF GROSS: LEVEL 1-3RSF: MAXIMUM 1.0LEVEL 1-3 50,225 GSF/LV RES.COMBINED AMENITY POOL: SF GSF/LV RETAIL GSF: GSFGSF/LV AREAS 1,95055,425 COMBINED AREAS 12,600 GROSS: GROSS: 50,225 RETAIL RSF:3 FLOORS 10,500 RSF TOTAL: 3HEIGHT: FLOORS TOTAL: COMBINED AREAS COMBINED AREAS POOL: 1,950 SF FAR:RESIDENTIAL 0.65 RES.RESIDENTIAL AMENITY GSF: 166,275 GSF GSF: 166,275 GSF TOTAL: 3 FLOORS TOTAL: 3 FLOORS MAXIMUM 3 STORIES AT 45' COMBINED AREAS COMBINED AREAS RESIDENTIAL RSF: 136,345 RSF RESIDENTIAL RSF: 136,345 RSF RESIDENTIAL GSF:3 FLOORS 166,275 GSF RESIDENTIAL GSF:3 FLOORS 166,2750.60 GSF FAR:RETAIL TOTAL: TOTAL: RES. AMENITY POOL: 1,950 SF GSF: 12,600 GSF RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RSF: UNITS 136,345 RESIDENTIAL RSF: 136,345 RSF RESIDENTIAL GSF: RSF 166,275 GSF RESIDENTIAL 166,275RSF GSF RETAIL RSF: GSF: 10,500 RES. AMENITY POOL: 1,950 RETAIL GSF: 12,600 GSF136,345 RSF RESIDENTIAL RSF:SF 136,345 RSF RESIDENTIAL RSF: FAR: 0.65 RES. AMENITY POOL: 1,950 SF RESIDENTIAL UNITS TOTAL UNITS RETAIL RSF: 180RES. AMENITY POOL: 1,950 SF RETAIL GSF: 10,500 RSF12,600 GSF FAR: 0.65 RES. AMENITY POOL: RETAIL RSF: 1,950 SF 0.60 10,500 RSF TOTAL UNITS LEVELUNITS 1-3 60 RESIDENTIAL 153FAR: FAR: 0.65 RES. AMENITY POOL: 1,950 SF STUDIO 10 FAR: 0.60 RESIDENTIAL UNITS LEVELUNITS 1 41 1 BEDROOM 35 RESIDENTIAL TOTAL UNITS FAR: 0.60 180 STUDIO 8 RESIDENTIAL 2 UNITS BEDROOM 15 RESIDENTIAL UNITS (68 PARKING REQ./LV) 1 BEDROOM 23 180 TOTAL UNITS LEVEL 1-3 TOTAL UNITS 60 153 RESIDENTIAL 2 UNITS BEDROOM2 10 TOTAL UNITS 1 60 STUDIO 10 180 AREA (46 PARKING REQ.) TOTAL UNITS AREA LEVEL 1-3 PARKING LEVEL 1 41 1 BEDROOM 35 153 STUDIO 10 TOTAL UNITS LEVEL21-3 60 LEVEL 2-3STUDIO 56 8 153 BEDROOM 15 AREA TABULATION LEVEL 1 41 AREA TABULATION 1 BEDROOM 35 STUDIO 10 STUDIO (68 PARKING REQ./LV) 1 BEDROOM 12 23 LEVEL 1-3 1 STUDIO 8 1-3 TOTAL PROVIDED 2 BEDROOM 15 240LEVEL LEVEL 41 1 BEDROOM 35 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 30 10 GROSS: (68 PARKING 55,425 REQ./LV)GSF/LV 1 BEDROOM 23 50,225 GROSS: REQ. RESIDENTIAL STUDIO 8 GSF/LV (46 PARKING 2 BEDROOM204 15 2 BEDROOM 14 REQ.) PARKING 2 BEDROOM 10 *SURFACE PARKED (68 PARKING REQ./LV) 1 BEDROOM 23 (63 PARKING REQ./LV) LEVEL 2-3 REQ.) 56 (46 PARKING PARKING 2 BEDROOM 10 COMBINEDSTUDIO AREAS 12 COMBINED AREAS PARKING (46 PARKING REQ.) LEVEL 2-3 TOTAL PROVIDED 240 *100% RESIDENTIAL, 3-STORY WALK UP. PARKING RESIDENTIAL GSF:56 138,075 1 BEDROOM 30 GSF TOTAL: 3 FLOORS STUDIO REQ. RESIDENTIAL 204 LEVEL22-3 56 RSF RESIDENTIAL RSF:12 113,225 BEDROOM 14 RESIDENTIAL 166,275 GSF PROVIDED GSF: 240 TOTAL 1 BEDROOM 30 *SURFACE PARKED PROVIDED STUDIO 12GSF 240 TOTAL (63 PARKING REQ./LV) RETAIL GSF: 12,600 RESIDENTIAL RSF: 136,345 RSF REQ. RESIDENTIAL 204 N TOTAL PROVIDED 240 2 BEDROOM 14 172 REQ. RESIDENTIAL 1 BEDROOM RETAIL RSF: 10,50030 RSF RES. AMENITY POOL: 1,950 SF *SURFACE PARKED (63 PARKING REQ./LV) REQ. RESIDENTIAL 204 PARKING REQ. RETAIL 2 BEDROOM 0 RESIDENTIAL, 50 100 RES.150 AMENITY POOL: 50 1,950 14 SF *100% *SURFACE 3-STORY PARKED WALK UP. (63 PARKING TOTAL REQ. 222 REQ./LV) PARKING BUILDING TOTAL: 166,275 *100% RESIDENTIAL, 3-STORY WALK UP. *SURFACE PARKED BUILDING TOTAL: 150,675 GSF TOTAL PROVIDED 240 PARKING *100% RESIDENTIAL, 3-STORY WALK UP. FAR: 0.65 172 REQ. RESIDENTIAL TOTAL PROVIDED 240 *RESIDENTIAL FAR:REQ. 0.60 RETAIL 50 UP. + RETAIL, 3-STORY WALK RESIDENTIAL UNITS 172 REQ. RESIDENTIAL TOTAL PROVIDED 240 TOTAL REQ. 222 RESIDENTIAL UNITS REQ. RETAIL 50 172 REQ. RESIDENTIAL *SURFACE PARKED PARKING AREAS TOTAL REQ. 180 TOTAL UNITS REQ. RETAIL222 50 TOTAL UNITS *SURFACE PARKED 153TOTAL REQ. 222 *RESIDENTIAL + RETAIL, 3-STORY WALK UP. LEVEL 1-3 60 RETAIL *SURFACE PARKED LEVEL 1 41 STUDIO 10 *RESIDENTIAL + RETAIL, 3-STORY WALK UP. STUDIO 8 1 BEDROOM 35 PARKING AREAS RESIDENTIAL UNITS + RETAIL, 3-STORY WALK UP. *RESIDENTIAL 1 BEDROOM 23 2 BEDROOM 15 PARKING AREAS 2 BEDROOM 10 (68 PARKING REQ./LV) RETAIL (46 PARKING REQ.) PARKING AREAS RETAIL PARKING LEVEL 2-3 56 RESIDENTIAL UNITS STUDIO 12 RETAIL 1 BEDROOM 30 RESIDENTIAL UNITS 240 TOTAL PROVIDED 2 BEDROOM 14 RESIDENTIAL UNITS REQ. RESIDENTIAL 204 (63 PARKING REQ./LV) *SURFACE PARKED PARKING AREA

+45'

+33'

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AREA

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41 8 23 10

(46 PARKING REQ.)

77,600 GSF/LV

172 50 222

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BUILD-TO ZONES FRONT SET BACK

AREA TABULATION SIDE SET BACK LEVEL 1-3 REAR SETGSF/LV BACK A GROSS: 55,425 AREA

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LEVEL 1 STUDIO 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM

AREA TABULATION LEVEL 1-3 GROSS:

230

8,650 SF

153

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COMBINED AREAS RESIDENTIAL GSF: RESIDENTIAL RSF: RETAIL GSF: RETAIL RSF: RES.150 AMENITY POOL:

EAST PARCEL

50,225 GSF/LV

(615) 833-8716

AREA TABULATION LEVEL 1-3 GROSS:

4011 ARMORY OAKS DRIVE NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204

AREA

LEGEND

2

AREA

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(63 PARKING REQ./LV)

RESIDENTIAL, 3-STORY *100% *100% RESIDENTIAL, 3-STORY WALK WALK UP. UP.

+33'

ZONING ZONING ZONING ZONING

TOTAL UNITS

(68 PARKING (68 PARKING REQ./LV)REQ./LV)

͟ĘęĔėĎĊĘ ĒĚđęĎǦċĆĒĎđĞ ͣ͜ĚēĎęĘ

ORIES AT 45'

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

1-3 LEVELLEVEL 1-3 60 STUDIO STUDIO 10 1 BEDROOM35 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 15

+33'

ZONING

RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL UNITS UNITS

TOTALTOTAL UNITS UNITS 180 180

+45'

+33'

+33'

CENT

SV PROJECT NO 00000

FAR:

138,075 GSF 113,225 GSF RSF 166,275 12,600 GSF 136,345 RSF 10,500 GSF RSF 12,600 1,950 SF 10,500 RSF 1,950 SF 150,675 GSF 0.60 0.60

FAR: 0.65 FAR: 0.65

20' NONE REQUIRED 20'

*Shall be measured from the standard R.O.W. lines found in the Major & Collector Street Plan

d R.O.W. lines found in

COMBINED AREAS RESIDENTIAL GSF: TOTAL: 3 FLOORS RSF: RESIDENTIAL GSF: RETAIL GSF: RSF: RESIDENTIAL RSF: RETAIL GSF: RES. AMENITY RETAIL RSF: POOL: RES. AMENITY POOL: BUILDING TOTAL: FAR: FAR:

(615) 833-8716

BUILD-TO ZONES FRONT SET BACK SIDE SET BACK REAR SET BACK

50,225 GSF/LV

COMBINED COMBINED AREASAREAS

3 FLOORS TOTAL:TOTAL: 3 FLOORS RESIDENTIAL 166,275 RESIDENTIAL GSF: GSF: 166,275 GSF GSF RESIDENTIAL 136,345 RESIDENTIAL RSF: RSF: 136,345 RSF RSF RES. AMENITY 1,950 SF RES. AMENITY POOL:POOL: 1,950 SF

4011 ARMORY OAKS DRIVE NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204

+45'

156,800 GSF (3.6 ACRES) MUL-A YES

(615) 833-8716

~

AREA TABULATION LEVEL 1-3 GROSS:

COMBINED COMBINED COMBINED COMBINED ZONING

E REQUIRED

AREA: ZONING: UZO:

2 B

AREA

TABULATION AREA AREA TABULATION 1-3 LEVELLEVEL 1-3 GROSS: GSF/LV GROSS: 55,42555,425 GSF/LV

AREA: ~ 252,600 GSF (5.8 ACRES) CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD ZONING: MUL-A WEST PARCELYES UZO: CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD WEST PARCEL CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD AREA: ZONES ~ 252,600 GSF (5.8 ACRES) BUILD-TO WEST PARCEL MUL-A FRONT SET BACK 20' AREA: ZONING: ~ 252,600 GSF (5.8 ACRES) YES SIDE SET NONE REQUIRED ZONING: UZO: MUL-A AREA: ~BACK252,600 GSF (5.8 ACRES) REAR YES SET BACK 20' UZO: ZONING: MUL-A BUILD-TO ZONES UZO: YES FRONT SET BACK 20'R.O.W. lines found in *Shall be measured from the standard BUILD-TO ZONES SIDE SET Street BACK Plan20' NONE REQUIRED the Major & Collector FRONT SET BACK BUILD-TO ZONES BACK 20' SIDE SETREAR BACKSET FRONT SET BACK NONE REQUIRED 20' FAR: REAR SET BACK 20' SIDE SET BACK NONE REQUIRED *Shall be measured from the1.0 standard R.O.W. lines found in MAXIMUM REAR SET BACK 20' thebe Major & Collector Plan R.O.W. lines found in *Shall measured from Street the standard HEIGHT: the Major & Collector Plan *ShallStreet be measured from the standard R.O.W. lines found in FAR: MAXIMUM 3 STORIES AT 45' the Major & Collector Street Plan CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD MAXIMUM 1.0 FAR: WEST PARCEL MAXIMUM 1.0 FAR: HEIGHT: MAXIMUM 1.0 AREA:MAXIMUM ~ 252,600 GSF3 (5.8 ACRES) STORIES AT 45' HEIGHT: ZONING: MUL-A MAXIMUM 3 STORIES AT 45' HEIGHT: UZO: YES MAXIMUM 3 STORIES AT 45'

LEGEND LEGEND LEGEND WEST PARCEL LEGEND

WEST PARCEL COMBINED

S)

ZONING

SV PROJECT NO 00000

+45'

+33'

3 STORIES AT 45'

A

1

AREA AREA

CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD EAST PARCEL

CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD WEST PARCEL

1.0 3 STORIES AT 45'

MAXIMUM

4011 ARMORY OAKS DRIVE NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204

HEIGHT:

(615) 833-8716

FAR: *Shall be measured from the standard R.O.W. lines found in the Major & Collector Street Plan MAXIMUM 1.0

FAR: HEIGHT: MAXIMUM MAXIMUM

4011 ARMORY OAKS DRIVE NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204

YES 252,600 GSF (5.8 ACRES)

~

4011 ARMORY OAKS DRIVE NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204 (615) 833-8716 ARMORY NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204 833-8716 4011 4011 ARMORY OAKSOAKS DRIVEDRIVE NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37204 (615) (615) 833-8716

UZO: AREA:

ZONING: BUILD-TO ZONESMUL-A UZO: FRONT SETYES BACK 20' SIDE SET BACK NONE REQUIRED BUILD-TO ZONES REAR SET BACK 20' FRONT SET BACK 20' SIDE BACK from the standard NONE R.O.W. REQUIRED *Shall SET be measured lines found in REAR SET BACK 20' the Major & Collector Street Plan

SV PROJECT NO 00000 SV PROJECT NO 00000 SV PROJECT NO 00000

SV PROJECT NO 00000

ZONING ZONING

CENTENNIAL BOULEVARD WEST PARCEL

CENTENNIAL AREA: ~ BOULEVARD 252,600 GSF (5.8 ACRES) WEST PARCEL ZONING: MUL-A

AREA

AREA TABU LEVEL 1-3 GROSS:

COMBINED TOTAL: 3 FL RESIDENTIA RESIDENTIA RETAIL GSF RETAIL RSF RES. AMENI FAR:

RESIDENTIA


Moore says. “They were a lot of fun to work with because they’re invested and they want to be part of the neighborhood.”

Taking Stock of Stocking 51 People are already taking advantage of the work-in-progress known as Stocking 51 at the corner of Centennial Boulevard and 51st Avenue. The building was originally a hosiery mill that opened in 1925. The old mill caught Above and below: renderings of The Flats at Silo Bend the eye of Nathan courtesy of Southeast Venture Lyons, founder of real estate investment firm Vintage South, the residential side,” he explains. “But a few years ago. Up to that point, Lythere was really no commercial develons made his name restoring historic opment at the time.” homes in the Green Hills area. He The Vintage South Development approached the owner of the discount will take four phases. The first buildcabinet shop that had been located ing—which houses Frothy Monkey, there for 38 years and expressed Nicky’s Coal Fired pizza and Fashioninterest in buying the building. able boutique—is already finished. “We bought it without a clear plan Southern Grist taproom and brewery in place, other than we felt that The will take up parts of buildings two and Nations was growing, especially on

continued on page 55

Visit our *new* location in The Nations! 1400 51st Ave N Nashville, TN

FROTHYMONKEY.COM @frothymonkey

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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A Creative Spin on a New Year’s Resolution As a new year approaches, many people start brainstorming ways to make a little extra money or to turn a hobby into a profitable venture. In recent years, millions of Americans have embraced the “side hustle”—anything done outside a typical day job to make extra money. Walking dogs, consulting, blogging . . . the possibilities are nearly limitless. Almost any area of interest or expertise can be turned into a side hustle, as the following West Nashvillians can attest. Whether they’re making extra money, paying off debt, pursuing a hobby or following their dreams, their side-hustle stories might offer the extra nudge you've been looking for to do the same in 2018.

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Rachel Mullens, Music City Suds musiccitysuds.com Rachel grew up in Tennessee and has lived in West Nashville since 2011. Music City Suds began as a way for Rachel to combat her skin allergies and eczema. It was a hobby that Rachel never imagined would grow into such a viable business. “When I began selling my soap, people loved the names (I Walk the Lime, Stand By Your Mandarin, Friends in Aloe Places), and stores began approaching me to sell it,” Rachel says. “The more I experimented and researched and developed new products, the more I fell in love with the chemistry of soapmaking and the creativity it offered.” Rachel successfully juggles her business with a full-time job. This can be a tough balance, and time management is key. Rachel shares: “I love where I work, and it deserves my undivided attention while I’m on the clock. However, once I leave the office, I don’t check work email, I don’t take work calls.” Setting such boundaries allows Rachel to devote time and energy to her day job, her business and her family, without suffering burnout. According to Rachel, anyone who wants to turn a hobby or passion into something more has to believe in themselves as a business owner. Taking it slow, starting small, making smart decisions, and having a strong vision are the keys to turning a goal into reality. “Music City Suds took a very long time to get off the ground, but because our growth was gradual, it has a very strong foundation,” Rachel adds. Owning a business involves a lot of hard work and requires a lot of patience. The time commitment is demanding, but the tradeoff? Being your own boss and getting to do something you truly enjoy and value.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Jay Smith, Juicebox Designs www.juiceboxdesigns.com Jay Smith has lived in West Nashville with his wife, Kristi, for 17 years. His graphic design firm, Juicebox Designs, began in 2003 as a part-time freelance business and continues to provide unique, high-level branding solutions for clients in a variety of industries. Nine years later, his business begat another side hustle: The Juice Bar, an online store selling custom-designed prints, posters, greeting card sets and coloring books. In Juicebox Designs’ infancy, Jay completed design projects for clients on an old, used computer. He saved enough capital to buy the equipment and software needed to launch his business full-time. “When I knew it was time to start my company, it was motivated by passion from day one,” he said. “Over fourteen years later, we are still going strong.” For someone struggling to get a side hustle off the ground, Jay encourages getting clarity on that struggle. “Once you have defined it, start implementing a strategy for dealing with and overcoming the struggle(s),” he says. His advice for someone wanting to turn a hobby or passion into a side hustle is that it should bring joy, above all else. “There will always be peaks of great joy,” Jay admits, “but the valleys are just as deep. If you have passion and joy in what you do, that will help carry you through tough financial seasons or other career hardships.” Once you have clarity about your goals and solid ways to conquer any potential struggles, Smith explains, then it’s all about motivation, determination and hard work. “Know that the worst thing that can happen to you is not failure in your side hustle or potential career,” Jay says. “The worst thing that can happen to you is never trying it at all.”

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


Sara Hutchison, Get Your Best Resume Getyourbestresume.com With a master’s degree in career counseling and a knack for professional writing, Sara started out offering her services—writing resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles—to friends in exchange for lattes. She developed a large network of clients who gave her positive reviews, allowing her to organically grow her client base. Upon moving to Bellevue in the summer of 2015, she wanted to spend time with her then-18-month-old daughter and figure out her next career move. “I set up an Etsy shop and found a real niche market for other moms who needed resumes to return to work or people applying for promotions that needed resume help at an affordable cost,” she says. For Sara, this has been a source of extra income and a passion. “I truly get high levels of satisfaction out of knowing I directly helped someone in their career and helped them land a dream job. Or helped give them confidence to apply to a job and interview.” Sara recently returned to work full-time for a national nonprofit in another area in which she is passionate— Parkinson’s disease research. Most of her current clients are repeat customers, and she receives a headhunting fee for referring customers to trusted partners and contractors. This affords her the opportunity to keep her side hustle going as residual income. She adds, “I’ve grown my business to the point where I can source contractors to do parts of the technical stuff like formatting, design, proofing, etc.” While the income may not always be consistent, consistency in brand imagery and language is critical to success. “It’s been hard to find a balance because I love this hat I wear, the Resume Writer/Career Coach hat,” she admits, “but I have an employer and am no longer completely my own boss.” For mothers out there considering a side hustle, she shares: “You can’t work all night when they sleep and then think you’ll deliver quality work. You have to take your ‘work time’ seriously and commit to distraction-free space.” Her general advice is tried and true: It’s a marathon, not a sprint.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Kristin Larsen, Believe in a Budget believeinabudget.com

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Kristin has been side hustling since college. She was a mystery shopper and a dog walker. She participated in medical studies and sold items on eBay. Before starting her website in January 2015, Kristin worked as a residential and commercial designer. While she enjoyed that career and still takes on consulting projects occasionally, she longed for the freedom of being her own boss. She started her website while she was still at her day job. “I went into the process knowing that I wasn’t going to get rich overnight and would have to put in the time and dedication to succeed,” Kristin shares. After four months, she made her first profit from her blog. During the recession, Kristin was laid off. She was unemployed for more than a year and had to take a job that paid less than half her previous salary. As her blog grew, so did her possibilities for work, and she transitioned into the field of Pinterest marketing. “I started offering Pinterest marketing services to fellow business owners and bloggers,” Kristin shares. Now, she teaches an online course on how to become a Pinterest Virtual Assistant. Less than a year after launching her website, she quit her job and became her own boss. She now blogs full time, highlighting resources and personal experiences in blogging, side hustles and tips for saving money and eliminating debt. Her online course Side Hustle to Success “teaches entrepreneurs how to start a side hustle in great detail,” she shares. The course also includes direct links to companies to begin working with immediately. While Kristin now has a thriving business, she hasn’t lost her side hustle mentality. “I think that for many people that have experienced the recession, we have the same mentality when it comes to earning a living and side hustling.” Kristin said. “We are willing to work hard if that means we can also have job flexibility.” Kristin has lived in West Nashville for two years, and her favorite place to work during the week is Three Corners Coffee. West Nashville has emerged as a prime spot for work meetings and coworking sessions within the entrepreneur community, and Kristin has enjoyed being a part of the growth. VI

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Make Your Move For additional ideas and inspiration to help turn your passion into

TIP S

profit, check out the tips and resources below. Happy side hustling! Reach out to 20/20 Research: Get paid to

SCORE: Attend no- to lowcost educational workshops and mentoring services for entrepreneurs and business owners in Middle Tennessee. nashville.score.org

seasoned professionals

to access resources for creating, launching and growing your business. www.ec.co

Takl: Earn money providing on-

loans, and don’t quit

Roadie: Sign up as a driver

Thumbtack: Get paid to provide service-based skills in event services, health and wellness, home improvement, and more. www.thumbtack.com

give your opinion and a review of a brand’s product. www.2020research.com

Nashville Entrepreneur Center: Join as a member

and earn money by transporting packages (and pets!) on your own terms. www.roadie.com

Rover: Offer your pet-sitting and dog-walking services for some extra cash. www.rover.com

demand home services, such as yard work and housekeeping. www.takl.com

Upwork: Gain experience and extra money doing virtual freelance projects in a variety of fields. www.upwork.com

A native Nashvillian, Clare Fernandez is an arts integration advocate, lifelong actress, obsessive proofreader and lover of coffee, wine and laughter. She works as a data analyst by day and enjoys spending her free time serving on the board of Poverty & the Arts, reading, hiking in various local parks, belting out showtunes off key, writing and exploring the growing arts and culture scene in Nashville.

HOMES FOR SALE

in your area of interest for advice. Don’t take out your day job without a plan. Allow for flexibility if you also have a full-time job. Be prepared to make sacrifices to get what you want. Love what you do.

Two decades of Quality Renovations and New Construction in 37209 Visit westnashvilleliving.com for listings.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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HOLIDAY TRAVEL photos by Stephanie

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018

MULLOWNEY


Seven Items to Check Before You Hit the Road It’s probably the most overlooked holiday tradition that, if unobserved, can ruin all the others: Getting your vehicle inspected before you hit the road. Since the hol-

iday season is busy, make an appointment with your mechanic as early in the season as possible. This gives automotive professionals time to order parts if they need to, and it helps ensure you can hit the road on time and without worry. We asked the experts at Midas Tire and Auto Service (6008 Charlotte Avenue) for their recommendations about what items need to be checked by professionals before drivers head over the river and through the woods. In business since 1986, Midas Tire and Auto boasts seven dedicated employees—and at press time, they’re looking for more—each specializing in various areas of expertise. With 38 years of experience, General Manager Keith Boldus knows what it takes to be successful. “We take care of the customers, fix what they come in for and tell them what they need,” he explains. “It’s a proven strategy, and it works. Don’t push the customer, don’t use scare tactics. I’ve always said that it works. And I’ll be danged if just three months ago Midas didn’t come up with the poster that hangs now behind our counter that reads, ‘We tell you what needs to be fixed and what can wait.’ I don’t just make the sale; I make the customer happy.”

So in the spirit of Keith’s customer-care philosophy—and Midas Tire and Auto’s—here are seven items to get checked out on your vehicle before traveling:

1

TIRES. “If you have a lot of outside or inside tire wear, that’s due to alignment issues. Tires need to be balanced every other oil change, that’s the key to them lasting longer,” Keith explains. “Once tires get old, they start to crack. You have to look really close to see them— you’re not going to see cracks just walking past a car.” He estimates the average lifespan for a tire is four years. “You buy an inexpensive tires, you’re only going to get about a year and a half out of it. The key is rotation and balance, and you’ll get the mileage recommended for that tire. If it’s a 60,000-mile tire and you keep up with rotation and balance, you’ll get 60,000 miles out of it.” He also advises to make sure your spare is properly inflated.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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2

FLUIDS. Transmission, brake, oil and coolant. “If your coolant’s low, your car will run hot. If the oil is low, your engine could lock up. Transmission? You want to make sure it’s full. If it’s not it, will start to slip on you and you won’t get very far. If any of those are low and you’re stuck in traffic, it’s likely you’ll be stranded.”

3

LIGHTS. Always make sure all your lights work: hazard lights, brake lights . . . if you are towing anything, check those connections every time you pull over. “Hypothetically, you think your blinkers are working,” Keith explains. “And if you haven’t double-checked, you could do a lane change and cause an accident. When it’s snowing or raining hard, you want those flashers working and visible.”

4

BATTERY. “A battery is one of those things that can cause everything on a vehicle to die, all at once,” Keith says. “Cold weather will affect batteries. “ He strongly advises that vehicles get taken to a reliable auto-repair shop and not to try and check the battery at home. “There’s no way to fully vet that without sophisticated equipment like you’d find in a shop. Ours is all digital, so we can check the battery, the starter, the alternator, etc.”

5

FRONT END. “That little clunk could be something serious,” Keith says, “Tie rod ends, ball joints. Shocks will not leave you stranded, but they will cause tire wear. The rest need to be in good repair, or you will be on the side of the road without question.”

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372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


6

BRAKES. While brakes are fairly obvious, many people think they can check them at home. Keith explains that brake checks are only effective if you “take the tire off, jack up the car and take a look at it.”

7

Travel DO’S and DON’TS SO NOW WE KNOW THERE ARE SEVERAL THINGS ON OUR CARS BEST LEFT TO THE PROFESSIONALS. IN THE SPIRIT OF “THE MIDAS TOUCH,” KEITH BOLDUS AND HIS

WIPER BLADES. “A lot of people can check their blades on their own,” Keith says. “In the wintertime, remember that they really need to be checked. “

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Keith reiterates: “I have to repeat: The key is tires. I’m from Wisconsin originally, and I really have never seen so many people driving on bald tires. It’s all, in short, about the rubber on the road.” He concludes, “We sell tires; many repair shops may have 100 tires in stock, and most will order them for you. But we have over 600 tires in stock at any given time. In fact, expanding our tire business is our main goal for the 21st century.” VI

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TEAM ALSO PROVIDED SOME “UNIVERSAL TRUTHS” THAT ANYONE CAN IMPLEMENT AS THEY PREPARE FOR HOLIDAY TRAVEL.

BLANKETS. Always make sure you have a blanket in the car for each person, and flashlights. If you get stranded someplace, a battery’s only going to last so long. With at least two flashlights, someone can go get help while the other person remains with the car. DE-ICER. Make sure you have access to that in the trunk or glove box in case your doors ice and freeze. In a pinch, Keith says to use a lighter and heat up your key. A FIRST-AID KIT IS A MUST. The ready-made kits are a good starting point, but there may be special additions based on your family’s individual needs. DO NOT CHARGE YOUR CELL PHONE OR OTHER DEVICES IF YOU ARE STOPPED IN TRAFFIC. According to Keith, your alternator is only going to put out so much juice, and if your car is older than three or four years, charging your laptop or devices at a standstill will suck the life out of the battery. So try not to use any devices when you are at a standstill. ICE SCRAPER. Enough said.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Make Your Season Bright: Advice from a Personal Concierge by Ellen CALDWELL

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et’s just put it out there: the holidays are stressful. You’re probably entertaining at home, and you might be planning an office celebration. Then there’s decorating the house and shopping for gifts, whether you frequent local stores, the malls or your favorite online outlets.

A Personal Concierge’s Guide to Taking Stress Out of the Holidays

And then there are the parties: Casual get-togethers with friends, church services and more formal parties mean getting your wardrobe in tip-top shape. Holiday cards need to be ordered and mailed on time, to the right list of people and to their current addresses. And don’t forget looking your personal best: hair appointments, manicures, facials, etc., and all the massage, stress-relieving exercise, yoga, Pilates and acupuncture you can squeeze into your days. Because you’re going to need all that, just to, well, deal. As a personal concierge, my job is to handle many of these tasks for my clients, plus anything else during the year that they require, so they can claw back more of that precious commodity of free time. I make it possible for them to grab a round of golf, a meal out or a movie at the Belcourt instead of strolling the grocery aisles late at night or running errands on the weekends. It’s a simple, straightforward job, which is what I like about it. No office politics, no endless meetings in conference rooms, no memos to write. I did those sorts of things for the first 20 years of my career in public relations, mostly in Washington, D.C. Who hires a personal concierge? In my experience, they’re usually busy professionals with demanding jobs: attorneys, physicians, CEOs, business owners. They can also be elderly people who need assistance, someone laid up at home after surgery or perhaps even a socialite who is active with volunteer and philanthropic work. I’ve worked for large families and for globe-hopping empty-nesters. Sometimes I manage their second homes, keeping them stocked with groceries and supplies, making sure they’re houseguest-ready in advance of their arrival. The equation is simple: I charge an hourly fee, and they decide if the tasks at hand are worth that expense. Trust is a huge part of it, too, and concierge and client have to genuinely like and respect each other. So as someone whose job is giving the gift of time to others, I can speak to a few ways to alleviate a bit of stress during this most wonderful time of the year. Some you can implement right now in 2017, others you’ll have to implement later, in small increments, to make the 2018 holiday season the best ever!

Make a comprehensive list and keep track of it, year to year. Transfer it to your phone in case you come across an amazing sale, like your favorite store moving or going out of business. If you often give cash or gift cards, stock up on unique small boxes. Everyone can use a well-curated gift closet for those times you’re invited to a party at the last minute. Keep an assortment of quality hostess gifts at the ready: soaps, candles, wine, gourmet food, cocktail napkins, fun novelty items—you get the picture.

1. Shopping for Gifts.

2. Holiday Baking.

Some people are known for that one holiday food item that their friends and family look forward to receiving. My sister-in-law Barbara makes amazing crescent cookies, and I can’t wait to get my hands on a bag of those at her house on Christmas Day. If baking is something you enjoy and you have the time, then go for it. If not, pay someone to do it for you, or place an order at your favorite bakery or chocolate shop. Don’t forget your supply of festive tins and containers, including ribbon, tags and cellophane bags. Target is a good source, along with Nashville Wraps, The Container Store and T.J. Maxx.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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THE PROFESSION OF PERSONAL CONCIERGE IS NAMED TO AVOID CONFUSION WITH ITS OTHER, MORE RECOGNIZABLE COUSIN: THAT OF HOTEL CONCIERGE. In French, it means “keeper of the keys.” It dates from the Middle Ages, when castles designated someone to welcome visiting nobility. In the 1800s, buildings throughout Europe had them. Fast-forward to the 20th century, with the advent of steam ships and train travel, and travelers from distant lands started to ask hotel staff for guidance during their stay. To fill the demand, the better European hotels made this a permanent position. The practice made it to the U.S. much later in the 1970s. My favorite iteration of the term “concierge” has to do with apartment buildings in France, specifically Paris. Many of those quintessential French buildings, with their mansard roofs and wrought-iron balconies, feature a heavy locked door that residents use to enter into an internal courtyard. That’s where you find the concierge’s small apartment. That person keeps the building tidy, often taking out the trash, and watches out for trespassers. Perhaps their most important role is keeping elderly neighbors engaged with a bit of friendly company.

3. Decorate the House.

This is a biggie. Several years ago, a client needed everything, and my solution was Costco. There you can buy the gamut: a tree, wreaths, garland, poinsettias, candles, strings of lights, ornaments, tins of chocolate and cookies for guests—even those huge inflatable snowmen for the yard. You’ll need a good handyman to help with the installation, and also to take things down. And don’t forget to decorate the mailbox! Buy plastic storage containers, label them well, and stash everything in the basement or attic.

4. What’s in Your Closet?

Buying and maintaining a suitable wardrobe is a year-round endeavor, but the holidays are when you bust out the best of what you have. You’ll want to have your winter items dry-cleaned well in advance, and make sure any alterations are made. Take advantage of the best sales at places like Nordstrom, and of course your favorite local boutiques. I rep a product line by India Hicks (www. indiahicks.com/rep/ellencaldwell) and do a huge amount of business at home shows during the holidays. Shoppers buy gifts as well as wardrobe choices: jewelry, scarves, handbags, clothing, etc. For serious closet purging and shopping, I bring in a professional wardrobe consultant. They’re expensive, but worth every penny in the end.

5. Travel Plans.

Is anything more stressful than traveling during the holidays? Booking flights, finding rental cars, monitoring impending weather conditions, ferreting out affordable hotel or Airbnb rates—it can be exasperating. Get in front of the curve and do this ASAP. Or hire an experienced travel agent and fill in the gaps with someone like me. If visiting family, ship those gifts via FedEx or UPS; there’s no need to lug that stuff onto the plane.

6. Entertaining at Home and/or the Workplace.

Again, book those caterers and bartenders as quickly as you can, and you’ll need to design the invites even earlier. If you do this on a large scale, hopefully you have a party planner and florist you can trust. Think outside the box for special flourishes: custom cookies, party favors, or a signature cocktail. There are so many interesting venues you can hire, which is always fun, especially for work events.

7. Think About Others Who Are Less Fortunate.

This will bring you and the recipients a lot of joy while putting the holiday stress in perspective. Give money, volunteer your time at a shelter, adopt a family and shower the kids with gifts, declutter your house and give items that are truly useful/intact/in good condition to a non-profit, like a church charity shop. Make time to give during this season.

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8. Schedule Anything You Can Earlier in the Year.

This includes routine dentist and doctor visits, car maintenance, HVAC check-up, exterminator, window cleaners and computer upgrades. All these tasks are important, but there’s no need to do them in December. Get your tax records in order, so you can knock those out with your CPA in January.

9. Hire an Excellent Housekeeper.

Have your house deep-cleaned every six months. After a long day at work, there’s nothing better than coming home to a clean house. The laundry is done, the sheets are ironed, it smells nice and all the surfaces sparkle. And when your neighbors stop by with a holiday gift, you can invite them in for a cocktail with no worries about the state of your house.

10. Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff.

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Seriously, take some time for yourself. Walk Percy Warner Park or Radnor Lake, invite a friend for an impromptu Starbucks visit, go see the lights at Cheekwood at night, put some new music on your phone, and remember the spirit of the holidays. If it gets to be overwhelming, just dial it back. (Or call someone like me for help.) VI

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A native of Nashville, Ellen Caldwell worked in P.R. in Washington, D.C., for many years before returning home 20 years ago. She and her sister Cissy Akers opened Caldwell Collection in 1999, an Italian imports gift store in Green Hills. When the store moved to Gas Lamp Too Antique Mall (T-161) in 100 Oaks, Ellen began her career as a personal concierge. Her side hustles include: sales ambassador for India Hicks’ luxury product line (www.indiahicks.com/rep/ellencaldwell) and managing her short-term rental property, Sylvan Park Guest Quarters.

Diocesan Catholic School

AdvAncEd/SAIS AccrEdItEd

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call for a personal tour: 615-352-1328 6401 Harding Pike | Nashville, TN 37205 www.sthenryschool.org December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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What’s in a Name?

WEST NASHVILLE

STREETS by Yvonne EAVES photos courtesy of Metro Nashville Archives

In the West Nashville community, there are many streets that have a story to share. If only the streets could talk— their conceptions, their compositions, the travelers they carried, even their names. 30

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ne neighborhood’s streets are named after an automobile company. Two West Nashville neighborhoods include streets named for American states. Others contain streets named for families or developers from the West Nashville community. Street names like River Road or Brook Hollow are named for their locations. Perhaps the largest change to West Nashville’s streetscape was the interstate coming through the community. Beginning in the late 1950s, houses were condemned to make way for the freeway. In Charlotte Park and West Meade, building plans were altered. During the 1960s, the interstate going toward Nashville ended at 46th Avenue and Alabama. Heavy traffic had to go through Sylvan Park by way of 46th Avenue and Murphy Road to get downtown. (Can you imagine that happening now? If you dared that route during rush hour, you’d have to pack a suitcase and spend the night in your vehicle!) But the names of West Nashville’s streets are a link to the history of their neighborhoods, a glimpse of different eras in the community’s history that gave rise to the eclectic streetscapes of today.

to Nashville, its street names were changed to conform with the city’s numbering system. Nashville Land Improvement Co. decided to name the streets after U.S. states, in hopes of attracting people from across the nation to make their homes in West Nashville. The exceptions were Centennial Boulevard and Morrow Road. Centennial Boulevard was originally named Esplanade Boulevard (meaning “opened space”). West Nashville developers thought perhaps Esplanade was too fancy of a name for a road leading to the state prison, so Capt. Mark Sterling Cockrill suggested the name Centennial to honor Tennessee’s 100th birthday that year. The area known as Morrow Road was once known as Campground Road, and the land was used as training grounds for troops by James Robertson during the War of 1812.

“THE NATIONS”

Morrow Road

The neighborhood known “The Nations,” north of Charlotte Pike to Centennial Boulevard, was once upon a time West Nashville. Developers’ intentions were to create West Nashville as a metropolis of manufacturing. In the planning stages, West Nashville was going to be a town in and of itself, named “New Town.” The streets running north to south were to be numbered, beginning with what today is known as 42nd Avenue. It was First Avenue. After West Nashville was annexed

Hite Street at Rome Avenue, 1960s.

SYLVAN HEIGHTS Northeast of Sylvan Heights, on a large hill close to where Charlotte and I-440 “meet,” stood the Barrow Mansion. During the Civil War, the house was used as a Yellow Fever Hospital. The owner of the mansion was Mathew Barrow, whose son-in-law was Merritt S. Pilcher. Pilcher Avenue was named for Barrow’s son-in-law. Elkins Avenue was named for OverDecember 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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ton Elkins, whose home was at 3801 Elkins Ave. Located between Elkins Avenue to Sentinel Drive, was once part of Thirty-Eighth Avenue North. Chamberlin was named for James N. Chamberlin. Chamberlin worked as railroad mail clerk, and he owned several houses the street. Mayor Hillary House renamed the street to honor Chamberlin’s generosity.

SYLVAN PARK When Sylvan Park was created, the street names were different. Running east to west, Park Avenue was First Street, Elkins was Second Street, and so on. Since numbered avenues already existed in New Town (north of Charlotte), the names were changed, with the exceptions of Park and Elkins Avenues. Murphy Road was named for Samuel Murphy, a property owner who lived close to Murphy Road. At one point, there was a proposal to rename Murphy Road to Minnesota Avenue, and at another point, there was consideration to rename it West End Boulevard. And 41st had been known as Sylvan Street.

CHARLOTTE PARK In the mid-1950s, Ford Motor Co. decided to build Ford Glass Plant just off of Centennial Boulevard. The decision was made to name the streets in Charlotte Park after Ford-inspired products and people: Henry Ford Drive, Edsel, Thunderbird, Capri, Comet, Continental, Galaxie and so on. Henry Ford was the mastermind behind Ford products, and his son was named Edsel. The street Wilclay is named for one of Edsel Ford’s sons, William Clay. Henry Ford’s estate was known as Fairlane. And Bagleyshop Drive? Ford’s first workshop was on a road named Bagley.

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HORTON HEIGHTS A September 1952 newspaper article from The Tennessean mentions plans for a West Nashville subdivision on the property that had once belonged to Josiah Horton, a justice of the Davidson County courts. The Horton home stood on Fleetwood between Hillwood and Summerly. The area covered 82 acres, and plans were being made to create 800 lots. Streets like Summerly, Fleetwood, Hillwood, Lansing, Russelo, Darden and Greeley were named at the inception of this Horton Heights subdivision. Upon the completion of Horton Heights, the subdivisions of Hillwood and Brook Hollow connected Charlotte and Harding Roads.

HILLWOOD The Hillwood subdivision was developed by H.G. Hill Jr., and many of the street names are connected to the Hill family. Elizabethan Drive is named for Hill’s sister Elizabeth Hill Penick. Fransworth Drive is a combination of Caldwell, Frances and Wentworth. Hickory Valley is named after the location in Smith County where H.G. Hill was born. The name Huckleberry Drive originated from Hucklebuckle, a game the Hill family played as children.

Northeast Corner of Robertson and Charlotte, 1964.

WHITE BRIDGE ROAD In the early days, the portion of White Bridge Road closest to Charlotte was known as Knox Road. Knox Road was a short road that ran out at Burgess. Until the early 1900s, the road beyond that was known as Whitworth Lane. After 1912, the Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway decided to replace the bridge going over the railroad tracks and Richland Creek with an updated bridge. The new bridge was 512 feet long and 48 feet above the creek. A white cement coating was applied to the bridge, and upon completion of the bridge, the street name was changed to White Bridge Road.

WEST MEADE

63rd Avenue at New York Avenue, 1950

West Meade was once part of the Belle Meade plantation. West Meade sits between Belle Meade and Bellevue. Some of streets on West Meade are Sedberry, Davidson, Vosswood and Caryle. Sedberry begins at Davidson and was most likely named for Eleanor Cargile, as her maiden name was Eleanor Sedberry Allen. Vossland and Vosswood were named for Ronald L. Voss, a partner in the group that purchased 1,750 acres. In 1944, Voss acquired the West Meade mansion and 51 acres from the heirs of Supreme Justice Howell E. Jackson and Elizabeth Harding Jackson.


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in the vicinity from 38th Avenue and Charlotte and Murphy. Phillip’s Gut was on a fisherman’s site on the Cumberland River. Mount Nebo was close to 40th and Delaware Avenues. Clifton was a village between Centennial and Charlotte, close to 40th Avenue. The Midway neighborhood was north of Clifton were Hadley Park is today. The next time you drive on them, stroll on them or cycle on them, consider the paths you’re taking and the stories they hold. Not just a means to get from Point A to Point B, roads hold many of West Nashville’s secrets, from its industrial roots to the dreams of the visionaries who came before us. Street by street, their names weave a tapestry of time and nuance into our community’s larger story. A

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Brownlee O. Currey was one of the developers in West Meade. In 1944, Currey was a founder and chairman of the board of Equitable Securities, a Nashville-based investment bank. Brownlee Drive is named for him. Cargile Lane and Road are named for Neil Cargile, who lived in a house built by his father-in-law after the purchase of 1,750 acres of West Meade Farm in 1944 by Nashville businessmen E.W. Wortham, Currey and Ronald L. Voss. Other names have faded into the West Nashville landscape, remaining only in old books. Thirty-fifth and Nevada was once known as Pumlee’s Hill. The deed referred to this area as Childress Knob, named for residents John and Nancy Hickman Childress. Texas Hill was located close to today’s 40th and Charlotte, while Davis Hill or Pavilion Hill was located at 48th and Kentucky. Coon Ridge was close to Park Avenue and the railway crossing. Cat Town was

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Southeast corner of Hillwood and Charlotte, 1955. author of Nashville’s Sylvan Park (along with co-author Doug Eckert, Arcadia Publishing). Sources used for this story include: Website History.com/topics/world-war-ii/us/home/ front, during-world-war-11; Nashville Since the 1920s by Don Doyle; Thayer Fare newspapers Tennessee State Library & Archives and Metro Archives; and Vertical Files at the Nashville City Room, Nashville Public Library.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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ST. LUKE’S

PRESCHOOL: Now Enrolling! by

Carly BROWNING

St. Luke’s Community House has always excelled at blending the old and the new. Built in 1920, the original cornerstone of the building still stands, denoting how long this organization has been serving the West Nashville community. The house still boasts its original stonework and comfortable living-room atmosphere, something St. Luke’s is wonderfully proud of. “We actually don’t want St. Luke’s to feel institutional,” says Penny Anderson, director of development, as she stands on the edge of the old house and new house. “For anyone who walks in this door, we need to serve them with dignity, with quality and with respect.”

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enny beams while she continues talking about the stonework and their mission. St. Luke’s began as the West Nashville Clinic in 1913, offering myriad services to the community. Today, they partner with organizations like Nashville Food Project and Second Harvest Food Bank, to name a couple. They remain in perpetual adjustment mode to meet the changing needs of the West Nashville community, as the landscape morphs at a rapid-fire pace. This is evident as the old house gives way to the new house, which gives way to a winding hall of offices, a food bank and eventually, the preschool. “We’ve been educating the neighborhood’s young people for 87 years,” Penny says. “That’s always been a strength of St. Luke’s, so why aren’t we looking at one of the ways we can help marry old and new?” “Gentrification has such a bad stigma,” she continues. “But it doesn’t have to. This neighborhood is actually learning a lot from other neighborhoods like East Nashville and 12South; we’re learning the lessons they had to learn the hard way. A lot of our new neighbors

actually want the diversity, they want the inclusion, they want to raise incredible families in a super-authentic neighborhood, and there’s no better place to have that proving ground than St. Luke’s.” As the city changes, St. Luke’s believes it’s important to evaluate programs to ensure their mission is still serving the community first.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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There are many opportunities to give and receive help from St. Luke’s. MOBILE MEALS: Deliver meals to house-

bound seniors and disabled adults right here in our community who would otherwise have an incredibly difficult time getting home-cooked meals. It’s an easy, flexible schedule where you control how much you drive, and how long you drive. The shortest route runs only about 30 minutes.

SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK:

Each week, Second Harvest operates out of St. Luke’s, and they need your help. The bank is open 9 a.m.–1:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. This service ensures that families receiving packages have enough to feed every person in the household for three days. Have a blast working in the house with the St. Luke’s team and putting together packages to truly impact others’ lives.

KITCHEN AT ST. LUKE’S: The kitchen at St. Luke’s makes fresh food daily for their preschool students alongside their partnering organization, Nashville Food Project. Their mission aims to bring people together to grow, cook and share food. They specialize in alleviating hunger and creating a community within everything they do. To secure your spot in the kitchen, visit www.thenashvillefoodproject.org FINANCIAL DONATIONS: Of course,

monetary donations are always accepted and encouraged. With the holiday season coming, there’s no better way to show you appreciate your community than by donating on behalf of a friend, a neighbor or simply in the spirit of the season. While monetary donations are the lifeblood of St. Luke’s, they are also always accepting goods donations. Specifically, they’re looking for household cleaning products and toiletries. Any donation, large or small, contributes to the irreplaceable legacy that is St. Luke’s Community House.

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With so many changes happening all over West Nashville, it’s an admirable testament to the nature of St. Luke’s that it remains committed to being an active and important part of the landscape. St. Luke’s is excited to announce they are expanding admission to their preschool; now, any child of preschool age is eligible to attend! Since the early 1930s, the child development program at St. Luke’s has been dedicated to bringing high-quality and thoughtful childcare to low-income families of West Nashville. However, as West Nashville continues to evolve, St. Luke’s has “really taken a step back and a look at the changes in the neighborhood, the changes in Nashville and at what the mission means for [them] now,” Penny says. “[To] educate, enrich and empower are the three things we are focusing on that just nail everything that we do. I can’t think of anything else on our campus more educational, enriching and empowering than our preschool.” Aside from its status as a well-respected community institution, St. Luke’s Preschool has the highest-possible rating of childcare programs—a three-star DHS rating, which denotes schools that go above and beyond requirements set by the state. They implement a “Read to Succeed” program throughout all age levels, including early literacy in their infant classrooms. This dedication to literacy has resulted in students at the Pre-K level graduating

having attained a second-grade reading level. In addition, they are in the process of piloting a new assessment tool measuring social and emotional skills of students. In the classroom, teachers adhere to a “Conscious Discipline” program. This allows teachers to discipline with respect. Instead of chastising: “No, don’t do that,” teachers can model correct behavior with statements such as, “I like it when you . . . ” They treat each child with respect, a mindset that permeates the entire organization, while caring for them holistically and intentionally. Teachers note they’ve not only seen results in the classroom, but parents who use the system at home have also noticed results. The goal is for students to recognize how to calm themselves and to act with intent. Conscious discipline is just one of the many reasons St. Luke’s preschool is so much more than just school—and that’s by design. The preschool operates 50 weeks a year, allowing for individual or group-grade transitions to happen at any time. Programs follow the student, not the other way around, allowing students to move when they are ready and stay if they aren’t. Each day begins with a healthy, nutritious breakfast cooked on site by the Nashville Food Project. “It’s healthy, organic when possible and local when possible,” Penny notes. “Our kids are eating fresh fruits and vegetables every day, and it’s all prepared through volunteers.”


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open. Just like the building itself, the preschool embraces old and welcomes the new—and they can’t wait to meet new faces! ST

gram. Some students can even trace back their grandparents’ kindergarten diplomas from the very same program! There is a waiting list for some class levels, but slots open up as students progress. Online registration is available, and tours may be conducted any time the preschool is

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The volunteers take great care to provide a lot of the meals from scratch. “If they’re having breakfast, and it’s a pastry item, it wasn’t a purchased honey bun,” Penny explains. “It was made from cinnamon dough measured and mixed by a volunteer.” Throughout the day, the children also receive lunch, a snack, at least 60 minutes of outdoor play time and a rousing curriculum to nurture them throughout each development stage. The program begins at six weeks old and follows students as they make their way through jaguars, roos, tigers, cubs, lions and finally, owls: the oldest, kindergarten-bound students. With these classrooms, students can thrive at their own level. There are additional benefits, like the Google-provided computer lab. Located in the library, this donation of an additional 15 computers will add on to the existing computer education program, allowing students to learn to use technology hands-on in a safe and small environment. Another benefit comes from the Greenman Gift from Bright Horizons, a company contracted to do on-site child care for many larger companies. This gift is dedicated solely to the improvement of learning spaces and provides up to $35,000 in funding. St. Luke’s will use this gift to create a multi-sensory, interactive, outdoor learning center. The landscaping will focus on natural play pieces that incorporate organic materials; “think river rocks instead of bricks, think tree stumps that are stair steps, things like that,” Penny says. “There’s going to be an art wall, a sense wall and a music wall with xylophones, bongos and things for the children to really play with.” This exciting renovation, to be completed by the end of 2017, will provide a unique outdoor area for all students at St. Luke’s. The preschool at St. Luke’s has served generations of community members and offers diversity throughout all aspects of the pro-

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Carly Browning is a Nashville transplant ’S MAG

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with a B.A. from Ithaca College in upstate New York. www.carlybrowning.com

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December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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REVIVAL: Beauty Through the Eyes of Keith Merry

by Miriam DRENNAN photos courtesy of

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Garden Park Antiques / Herndon & Merry


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f you’re headed west down Centennial Boulevard, Herndon & Merry and Keith Merry Garden Park Antiques stand as an oasis amid nondescript industrial buildings in various states of repair. If you go inside, you’ll discover one of the most unusual architectural antique showrooms in the United States. The treasures have turned the heads of many of the country’s top interior designers and celebrities, including a few whom Nashvillians refer to on a first-name basis: Faith. Tim. Dolly. Nicole. Keith. Marty. Garth. Trisha. Reba. And once upon a time, even Tammy.

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Last month, Keith Merry's Garden Park Antiques celebrated 30 years of re-purposing, reviving and re-discovering beauty. The showroom likely was not the vision of the original Herndon & Merry partnership, which began in 1959 as an iron and decorative metalwork business. According to Vice President Keith Merry, his father Bill Merry, Sr. “really came to Nashville to be a commercial artist and began doing work for an awning company. Before he knew it, boom! They became the premier ironwork company that every builder used.”

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All of the Merry sons worked for their father at some point. Keith started sweeping floors at age 16, learning the business from the ground up. He attended college with the intention of becoming an architect but decided it wasn’t the right fit for him. “So I went back to work for Dad,” he explains. “One day he said, ‘Hey, I want to take you up to this design school in Franklin.’” The school, of course, was O’More College of Design. “Miss O’More served us tea and pastries in her parlor,” Merry recalls. “And then we toured the school. There were only 60 students, all women, so when Dad asked if I wanted to go to school there, I said, ‘Absolutely.’” Keith finished his interior design degree in three years. He was hired immediately and worked for several interior designers. By then he was a newlywed hoping to start a family, so he returned to work for his father, this time in sales. “After working in interior design—now I’m selling patios, carpet and security doors. It was just killing me,” he explains. “And a lot of things were happening. Carpet sales were crashing [due to design trends], so I rebranded the company to be more higher-end.” He also purchased print advertising. “We started advertising in Southern Accent and Veranda magazines,” he says. “All of a sudden, I start getting calls from someone building a multimillion-dollar home in North Carolina needing decora-


tive ironwork, and my father would get in his car to visit these clients in person. Then we’d build it, put it on a trailer and install it. We did this for clients in New York, Florida, Texas . . . anywhere and everywhere. Clients were building $20-, $30-. $50-million-dollar homes, and they couldn’t just go to their local ironwork shop and expect them to produce the amount they needed, at their specifications.” They ran the same ad for 20 years, and Merry estimates that this is why 30 percent of their work is outof-state. Then in 1987, Keith saw his chance to get out of the ironwork manufacturing business. The building next door had been vacated, so he suggested they purchase it to refinish and repurpose antique ironwork. “I’d seen people in Atlanta doing this,” he says. “They’d recondition these old gates and ironwork, so I thought, ‘Why couldn’t we do that, too?’ Plus I developed a love for historical things while in design school.” The elder Merry agreed to let Keith launch the business venture, buying and selling architectural antiques, and Keith Merry’s Garden Park Antiques was born. “I had limited experience in this field,” Keith admits. “But I had loads of Are you a Doll? enthusiasm and a keen desire to search the country for decorative antique ironwork—gates, railings, fencing, urns, fountains, et cetera. Having finished design school in 1984, it was an exciting time to combine my recently acquired design knowledge with my desire to travel into historic parts of the country in search of these architectural treasures.” In those days, there were no Google searches or cell phone apps to source his pieces, and he began almost three decades before the popularity of the “picking” reality shows. Keith went to the public library, sought out the Yellow Pages of every historical city in the United States—New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, etc.—and photocopied antique dealer listings. He started calling them, asking where he could find old iron. “I knew it wasn’t very prevalent in the South,” he explains. “But up in the Northeast and Midwest, those old cities were full of it.” Thirty years later, Keith has built a solid network JOIN THE COLLECTIONS! of sources (and he fully appreciates and embraces Now accepting new clients at www.paperdollsphotography.com the technological advances that make communicaEM: thedollcollections@gmail.com PH: 931.215.2937 tion easier). Look with your eyes. See with your heart.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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In the interim, however, he traveled extensively throughout the country. “I wished I’d kept a diary of the places I’ve traveled,” he says. “Some of the places I would have never been otherwise. A lot of them are really funny, and a lot of them I can’t tell because they’d get me into trouble,” he laughs. He does mention that he has spent a lot of time in New England, the cornfields in Illinois, Amish country in Pennsylvania and alleyways in Chicago (where he was chased by street gangs). Three years after launching his business, an interior designer was admiring an iron panel and requested Keith turn it into a coffee table. When Keith finished the job and assessed his work, he knew he’d

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found the next step for his company. “Initially, I had been a purist,” he admits. “I wanted only antique ironwork and garden antiques. Then in my travels, I would see all these beautiful pieces that didn’t fit those molds, but I knew if I saw the beauty in them, someone else might, too. I really cultivated my eye and was constantly looking at design magazines, building . . . in the back of my mind, however, we had this huge metal shop, 20 employees, a master blacksmith—and furniture was the way I could make this work. [That table] really was the catalyst that got us into repurposing.” One trip to Chicago stuck in his mind for several

years. “I visited a showroom, and they had a house built inside of it,” he recalls. “I knew I wanted something similar for my own showroom when I had the chance. Having the facilities to do it all onsite was priceless.” In 1999, Keith finally got his chance. Herndon & Merry and Keith Merry Garden Park Antiques continued on page 56


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by Abby

Lee HOOD

Get Out and Celebrate, WEST NASHVILLE-STYLE!

There are any number of ways families in Nashville can celebrate the holidays, and West Nashville is home to a considerable number of them. If you’re in the market for creative Christmas and New Year’s events, shopping and more, the only list you need this year is right here. We’ve also included some of the best shows and events outside the neighborhood, so whatever you’re in the mood for, we’ve got you covered.

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GREAT GIFTS, BETTER PRICES Looking for the perfect, thoughtful or unique gift? West Nashville has some of the best shopping you can imagine for everyone on your list. Some shops are quirky, some support great causes, but all are guaranteed to provide great gifts for reasonable prices. Rhino Booksellers Make the bookworm or vinyl lover on your list swoon when you take a trip to Rhino, located in Sylvan Park, and bring home their favorite title or record. Find rare, used and interesting books and other curiosities at this local favorite committed to a community of creativity and talent. 615.279.0310 | 4918 Charlotte Avenue


The Shop at Thistle Farms

Bang Candy Company

After recently reopening their cafe on the Charlotte Pike corridor with Nashville’s only daily tea service, guests can also purchase natural home and body products handmade by women survivors of trafficking and other traumas at the Thistle Farms shop. Support a great cause located in the neighborhood and accomplish your holiday gift shopping, all in one. Gift cards available.

The self-described “sugar-peddler specializing in whimsical confections” allows sophisticated palates to fulfill childhood fantasies: handmade gourmet marshmallows, delightful caramels in assorted boozy or purely sweet flavors, baked goods, and those lovely syrups that are often the secret ingredient to many of our favorite recipes and cocktails. Order gift baskets for your lovelies or yourself!

615.690.4767 | 5122 Charlotte Pike

615.953.1065 | 1300 Clinton Street

Cool Stuff Weird Things

Vintage Market Days - Under the Mistletoe

For the ultimate eclectic shopping experience, Cool Stuff Weird Things has a whimsical collection of metal signage, furniture, knick-knacks and collectibles. Impress anyone on your holiday list with a quirky piece from this local gem.

December 2–3

615.460.1112 | 4900 Charlotte Pike

If you still need to find your vintage Christmas fix, this quirky and eclectic market might the best place to shop. Find upscale, vintage-inspired art, antiques, handmade items and more. General admission tickets are only $5, and early buying tickets are available. Nashville Fairgrounds, 500 Wedgewood Avenue Vintagemarketdays.com

Used with permission by Cool Stuff Weird Things.

Used with permission by Rhino Booksellers. December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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BLINDED BY THE LIGHTS

FAMILY-FRIENDLY SHOWS

Hopefully that won’t actually happen, but Nashville is famous for going all-out when it comes to decorations. Enjoy these beautiful displays while you can, whether they’re located in the neighborhood or a little farther out.

The holiday season rings in some of the best shows and musical compositions. Celebrate the Christmas spirit in classical style with one of these performances. Handel’s Messiah December 14–17

The Dancing Lights of Christmas at Jellystone Park November 5–December 31

Whew! This fall, we were sweating this one a bit when it was abruptly cancelled. But have no fear, the show will go on! A true family tradition, this drive-through light show will now take place in Wilson County at the James E. Ward Agricultural Center (home of the Wilson County Fair.) Open rain or shine until New Year’s, tickets can be purchased for $25 per car or church van, or $50 per commercial vehicle. 945 East Baddour Parkway (Lebanon, Tenn.)

Cheekwood Estates Light Display November 24–December 31

One of the biggest and the baddest (in a good way!) Cheekwood’s light display boasts over one million lights each year. Tickets are $19 for non-members and $14 for members. Tickets on “peak nights,” which are Thursday to Sunday, are $22 for non-members and $17 for members. You can save money for this walking tour by purchasing online ahead of time. 615.356.8000 | 1200 Forrest Park Drive

If you’d like to see a holiday show that’s both profound and thought-provoking, this timeless classic is a great choice. The symphony performance will feature 140 choristers, 30 musicians and 4 soloists, with Gary Thor Wedow conducting. Celebrate the season with “one of the most inspiring works of music ever written.” Tickets start at $34. 615.687.6400 | 1 Symphony Place

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker December 24

You can never go wrong with a Nutcracker performance during Christmas. This beautiful, whimsical and timeless show is a great choice, and you can take in the spectacle at the Ryman Auditorium on Christmas Eve. Tickets start at $30. 615.889.3060 | 116 5th Avenue

Amy Grant & Vince Gill, Christmas at the Ryman November 29–December 21

It wouldn’t be Christmas in Nashville without a little country flair, so this show is a wonderful chance to celebrate a new tradition in Music City. Amy Grant and Vince Gill will return to the Mother Church this year for a ten-night performance run. Tickets start at $35. 615.889.3060 | 116 5th Avenue

Music City Winterfest December 9–December 10

While this isn’t technically a show, Winterfest in Centennial Park is a great option for families. This is a FREE day of activities and entertainment, as well as a holiday market, snowball fights, food trucks and beer garden. Supposedly, Santa himself is coming to town. Centennial Park, 2500 West End Avenue

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HOLIDAY SPORTS

Reserva Cigars

Not every holiday event has to be Christmasrelated. For the sports fanatics in Nashville, there are some exciting games this time of year. Predators vs. Anaheim Ducks

We have all your holiday needs covered:

December 2

The Preds face off against the Ducks the first weekend in December in the Western Conference Finals for the first time at home at the Bridgestone Arena. Tickets start at around $70. 615.770.7800 | 501 Broadway Avenue

Titans vs. Los Angeles Rams December 24

Not in the mood for a holiday show? Celebrate Christmas Eve at Nissan Stadium while cheering on the Titans as they play the Rams on home turf. The Titans play the Jacksonville Jaguars again on New Year’s Eve, as well. Tickets start at $34. 615.565.4200 | 1 Titans Way

Or just stop by for a great smoke and a beer! 73 White Bridge Rd, Ste. 1G www.reservacigars.com 615-730-8567

OUT OF THE BOX Looking for something a little less traditional? Try these kookier, fun or just plain creative Christmas events. 12 Bars of Xmas Crawl December 9

The dress code for this event is probably the best all year; think onesies, ugly Christmas sweaters and elf costumes. You’ll get a 16oz. cup for all your drinks, a “commemorative Santa hat,” food and drink specials and no covers to the locations on the crawl. Tickets start at $12. Downtown Nashville bars | xmastn.evenbrite.com

Nashville SANTA Rampage December 9

While you don’t have to dress up as Santa proper, according to this event’s description, you do have to come up with a variation of “Santa-ness” to participate. This event is basically a flash mob of Santas taking over bars and restaurants everywhere in Nashville. Expect gifts, shenanigans and fun, and be ready to hand out your own presents, even if it’s just candy canes. Photo shoot gathering, 8:00 p.m., Christmas tree on 2nd Avenue. www.facebook.com/groups/nashvillesantarampage December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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FOOLPROOF FOOD For Your Celebrations

At some point this holiday season, you’ll be asked to bring something somewhere, even if you’re a disaster in the kitchen. We asked Holly Darnell, owner of West Nashville’s Golden Roots, a meal-delivery service that specializes in gluten-free and vegetarian dishes, to give us a few simple, healthy sides that are guilt-free and foolproof!

Balsamic-Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Crispy Bacon Servings: 4 Prep + Cook Time: 45 minutes INGREDIENTS: 1 pound Brussels sprouts 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. black pepper 2 slices bacon*, cut into small pieces 2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 425°. 2. Trim off ends of Brussels sprouts and pull off any yellow outer leaves. Cut in half. 3. Place Brussels in a medium-sized mixing bowl and toss with olive oil, salt and pepper. 4. Cut bacon into small pieces and place in the bowl with Brussels sprouts. 5. Place on a lined baking sheet and roast for 35 minutes, or until crispy on the outside. 6. Turn the Brussels every 15 minutes to make sure they crisp evenly. 7. Toss with balsamic vinegar and enjoy! *If vegetarian, omit the bacon.

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Kale, Butternut Squash and Cranberry Quinoa Salad

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Sweet Potato Hash Servings: 4 Total Prep + Cook Time: 45 minutes INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed into 1-inch pieces

1. Preheat oven to 425°.

2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 yellow onion, diced 1 red bell pepper, chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped

2. Peel and cube sweet potatoes and place in a medium mixing bowl. Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper. 3. Place on a lined baking sheet and roast for 25-30 minutes, or until sweet potatoes are fork tender. 4. While the potatoes are cooking, heat olive oil in a medium-sized skillet over medium-high heat. Add in onion, peppers and garlic and saute until translucent and tender, about 6-7 minutes. Remove the skillet from the heat after cooked. 5. Once the potatoes are roasted, add them to the onions and peppers. Stir, serve and enjoy!

*This dish makes a great side dish but can also transition into a breakfast dish. Simply add scrambled eggs to the potatoes and peppers, or place in tortillas for easy breakfast tacos.

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Kale, Butternut Squash and Cranberry Quinoa Salad Servings: 4 Cook + Prep Time: 45 minutes INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

1 butternut squash, peeled and cubed

1. Preheat oven to 425°.

1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1 cup quinoa 2 cups vegetable broth 1 large bunch kale, de-stemmed 1/2 cup preferred nut (pecan, walnut, hazelnut)

2. Wash, drain and dry de-stemmed kale leaves (use a salad spinner, if you have one). Set aside. 3. Soak quinoa for five minutes in cold water and then rinse using a sieve. Set aside. 4. Peel and dice butternut squash. Toss in a medium bowl with olive oil and salt. 5. Place on a lined baking sheet and roast for 35–40 minutes, or until fork tender.

2 tsp. Dijon mustard

6. While the butternut squash roasts, cook the quinoa by placing 1 cup of quinoa and 2 cups of vegetable broth in a medium-sized sauce pan. Bring the mixture to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to a low and simmer until quinoa is tender, about 15 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat, still covered, and let the quinoa sit for 5 minutes. Then fluff the quinoa with a fork and let cool.

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

7. Reduce oven to 350°.

1 tsp. salt

8. Toss the kale in enough olive oil to make leaves shiny, along with ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper.

1/4 cup dried cranberries DRESSING: 3 Tbsp. olive oil

1/2 tsp. pepper

9. Divide the kale or roast the leaves in batches. If you put too much kale on one pan, it will steam rather than roast and will never become crisp. Roast for 15 minutes, until crisp. 10. While kale is cooking, whisk dressing ingredients together in a bowl. 11. Toss squash, quinoa, kale, nuts and cranberries with the dressing. Enjoy!

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Holiday Directory HOLIDAY GIFT:

FREE TIRE ROTATION (Good Through Dec 31st)

TUNE UP • ELECTRICAL • BRAKES • OIL EUROPEAN • ASIAN • DOMESTIC VEHICLES Midas Tire and Auto Service • 6008 Charlotte Pike • 615-356-6367

615.491.3787

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Holiday Directory

Happy Holidays from

1400 51st Ave N • Nashville, TN FROTHYMONKEY.COM

615-298-3663 343 53RD AVE NORTH 53RD & CHARLOTTE MIELRESTAURANT.COM

Happy Holidays DANA BATTAGLIA REALTOR

Christianson Patterson Courtney & Associates Danasemail@aol.com | 615-504-9792 | DanaBattaglia.com

5028 Charlotte Pike (Corner of Charlotte and 51st) 615.200.7055

www.nationsautoplex.com

ALL CREDIT LEVELS ACCEPTED

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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DISCOVER NASHVILLE’S BEST RADIO STATION.

WXNA is Nashville’s all-volunteer, non-profit, freeform community radio station with over 90 different shows featuring everything from funk to metal and all points in between. And while our signal doesn’t reach all the way to Bellevue quite yet, you can stream us on WXNAfm.org, the TuneIn app or just ask Alexa to play WXNA. 54

372WN.com | December 2017–January 2018


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When discussing the developments on Centennial Boulevard in community meetings, Moore said comparisons to the 12South neighborhood come up frequently. He said he’s personally hoping to get the “feel” of 12South while avoiding congestion and focusing on about safe street crossing, especially with the truck traffic in the area. (In fact, Southeast Venture also owns the mixed-use retail building at 12South, which houses Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams and Josephine restaurant.) Roberts says she sees the area becoming not only a walkable neighborhood, but also a go-to place for visitors and natives alike, especially with her hope of adding more public art in the future. However, she pointed out a big difference in the blueprint of the two areas. While 12South is primarily residential and commercial with some multi-use sites, the Centennial Boulevard area has a juxtaposition of residential and industrial sites, and those repurposed industrial buildings give it an edge. “We have the extreme—residential right next to industrial—which is almost unheard of,” Roberts explains. “So a lot of people considered this a less desirable area because of that. When you do it right, that mix can be amazing.” LLE

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One such tenant is Frothy Monkey, a beloved, locally owned chain that opened its fifth location in Stocking 51 on August 14. Frothy Monkey was approached by Vintage South about occupying the space. Lyons says the restaurant did a good job of balancing the historic industrial materials with modern touches in its design, something that Partner and Creative Director at Frothy Monkey, Jennifer Sheets, echoes.

The Next 12South?

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The New Tenants in Town

“Construction is not exact science,” he admits. “We push it as hard as we can, but, especially with these buildings, they can be more difficult at times. When you open things up, you find problems that you have to fix that cause delays. But you also can’t recreate a historic building, and we feel those older buildings are a draw. They do require more work normally, but in the end you get something a little different.”

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four. Building two is also home to City Construction and Office Evolution, a coworking office space for small businesses. Building four includes Project 615, a specialty T-shirt shop and social enterprise venture. Building three will include The Cardinal restaurant, another concept from Tony and Caroline Galzin, who also own Nicky’s Coal Fired pizza. Lyons has prioritized more parking and sidewalks in proximity to the buildings. “Our goal is to make this a walkable community,” he says. “It should be a place where people can come and eat and shop and spend a few hours here, so that’s what we’re moving toward.” Lyons said chain restaurants tend to steer clear of places like Stocking 51, so residents can expect more small businesses in the area in the future. “The type of tenant that is drawn to these types of spaces are generally more creative, small businesses, in general,” he explains. “You won’t see a Subway out here. We’ve been very fortunate to get what I feel is the perfect tenant mix of office, retail and restaurant.”

“We’ve chosen the locations that we’re in based on being in a neighborhood, and so that’s the common thread,” Sheets says. “They’re all places where people live and work, they’re walkable neighborhoods.” Sheets added that The Nations is a good balance of residents and businesses, so customer traffic is consistent at all times of the day. “We’re glad we’re here, and we’re excited to see how it changes,” she said. And it’s not all restaurants and retail—Centennial Boulevard has already caught the eye of one of Nashville’s most respected architectural firms. The company formerly known as Street Dixon Rick (now real estate firm Orcutt Winslow) moved into Stocking 51 in October. The firm has been in the West Nashville area for many years, but had outgrown its former location. Amy Jacobs, marketing director for Orcutt Winslow, said architects were drawn to the industrial look and feel of the Stocking 51 space. “We have enjoyed being on the west side of town, and the development in The Nations definitely caught our eye,” she explains. “It’s an interesting place to be. As employees, we are certainly excited about the restaurant opportunities, the livelihood that’s happening there with some of the development.” While Lyons said he hopes to have all of the phases of construction on Stocking 51 finished by the end of the year, there are no guarantees.

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resident of Bellevue and recent graduate of The Ohio State University. She is also an alternative music fan, tap dancer and a Jeni’s ice cream enthusiast.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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A MERRY REVIVAL, continued from page 42

had outgrown their small location just south of downtown Nashville, and there was a 25,000-square-foot space available in West Nashville. “Perception is everything, so when we had the opportunity to move to a 4,000-square-foot space in West Nash-

ville and create a gallery showroom, I pushed really hard for it,” Keith recalls. “A lot of time and expense went into creating a special place for these unique pieces of history. Merchandising display and everything that goes with it—music, lighting, all of it. A lot of people travel to see what we do—we’ve been featured in

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www.nationsautoplex.com 5028 Charlotte Pike (Corner of Charlotte and 51st) Monday through Friday: 9:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m., Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m. 615.200.7055

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almost every major magazine over the last 30 years. Half of the people who walk in my door are from outside Nashville. Additionally, our family’s 15,000-square-foot metal fabrication shop gives visitors a unique opportunity to see our artisans at work, restoring antique metalwork and crafting functional works of art from salvaged architectural pieces. We’ve done work for Little Big Town, Kings of Leon, Adam Levine—I never know who’s going to walk in, and a lot of times I don’t recognize them. It does make the day fly, it’s a lot of fun.” Keith’s passion for historical preservation and the nuts-and-bolts knowledge gained from the metal fabrication business has led his company to design and fabricate more than 2,000 one-of-a-kind pieces, like an antique terra cotta plaque into a glass-top coffee table and a European gate into a dining table. “The antique business is tough,” he says. “We call it one and done: You buy something, you sell something, then you’ve got to turn around and find something else to buy. You can’t just open a catalog and order 10 more. “But it’s so much fun hunting for them,” he sighs. “And what’s on the sign outside conjures up a totally different image in people’s minds than what’s taking place when they walk in here. Yes, these are old things and they are classified as antique or vintage; but people are expecting Grandma’s furniture, and that’s really not what’s in here. Other architectural antique dealers—which is probably the best category to put me in—are renovating bathtubs, sinks, light fixtures . . . I’ve got a little bit of that, but I’m on the decorative end and cater more to interior designers. When I realized I could make furniture out of these beautiful things, it was a game-changer.” His father passed away 10 years ago, and at 83, his mother Moneta Merry Schumaker no longer works in the showroom but serves as chairman of the board. Keith and his older brother (Bill Merry, Jr.) bought their


Registration is ongoing Join us for affordable classes in languages, cooking, business, art + much more. Gift certificates available for the holidays! Most classes are located at the Cohn School in Sylvan Park!

Register now at nashville.gov/ce

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that can change the course of a life. “There’s no telling what’s next,” he concludes. “It’s been the most fun in the world.” 2W

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So whatever happened to that first table that changed the course of Garden Park Antiques? Years later, that client walked into Keith’s showroom, and Keith offered to trade any table he had in exchange for his first table. Today, it sits in his office as a reminder to embrace the happy accidents

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younger brother Kevin's share of the business, and they continue to seek skilled employees. “We find out if we hire people much smarter than we are, we’ll be successful,” he laughs. “They teach us things we would never know otherwise, so we have great people who work for us. Some have been here nearly as long as I have. Our biggest challenge is finding workers. People aren’t going to trade schools any more, they’re going to college, so finding a fabricator in the back that fits our requirements is a challenge.” Though Keith himself still draws with pencil and paper, the companies have fully embraced technology where it makes the most sense in their business. “We’re into technology and do everything in-house,” he explains. “CAD, full-size prints of everything that’s built in the back, everything inventoried and tagged.” The brothers have recently launched a third business called Iron Rods, a custom drapery rod business. “Three years ago, we decided to take this very seriously,” Keith explains. “We had to have something sustainable. We spent three years in product development, testing and research.” In June, they launched in 14 cities nationwide, to 1,000 interior designers wholesale. At press time, an e-commerce site is in the works. Beyond that, what’s next? “I’d like a break, travel some, maybe do some consulting work on the side,” Keith says. “Our company only exists because of my family. My mother, my father . . . God really watched over us. We’ve been through some very difficult times. During [the late 1970s] when the interest rates soared, we almost lost the entire business. And when 9/11 happened, we’d only been in this building about six months. It almost crushed our business. We got back on our feet again, then the 2008 crash just about killed us. One man—a billionaire—saved our company. He gave us a big project in Arkansas. He had cash so this didn’t affect him, and everyone kept their jobs—and we kept our business—as a result.”

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Miriam Drennan is a freelance writer who lives in The Nations.

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372WestNosh

by Constant

EATER

What’s so special about this edition of WestNosh? We’ve included establishments that are not only great places to dine-in, they also offer a variety of catering services that will help you celebrate in style. Happy eating!

Breakfast THE LOVELESS CAFÉ 8400 Highway 100 lovelesscafe.com

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he Loveless Café is synonymous with Nashville, and it is the epitome of Southern food and Southern hospitality. Located along Highway 100 and open since 1951, the iconic neon “Loveless Café” sign beckons patrons into the restaurant, where the mouthwatering smell of fresh biscuits and bacon wafts through the room. “It’s a total experience when it comes to Loveless,” manager Alex Jeffreys says. “It’s almost like stepping back in time—from the service to the hospitality.” Since breakfast is served all day, Loveless makes for

an excellent stop during the holiday season, whether it’s your first or last meal of the day. Famous for their biscuits, country ham and sides, Loveless makes everything in-house and from scratch daily. “We try to not change a whole lot,” Alex explains. “We try not to take shortcuts, and we do things the old-fashioned way. That way, the results are consistent. We want to keep locals coming back to enjoy the cafe and bring their friends, so consistency is key.” In February 2017, Loveless launched their “Heat n’ Eat” program, a series of homemade sides that can be purchased in their cafe and enjoyed at home with a simple reheating method. They started with

photos provided by respective establishments and used with permission.

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their famous hashbrown casserole, which took some time to perfect for this endeavor. Their macaroni and cheese, another customer favorite, followed close behind. “Now you can have a from-scratch holiday meal made without any of the stress or cleanup,” Alex says. Due to the popularity of Loveless, it is not uncommon to wait two or more hours for a table. However, they now take reservations through OpenTable, and their mobile app and online ordering significantly reduce wait time. “Our ‘To Go’ site is a convenient thing for locals who


mixers and more. “Each food product features a recipe card and shows customers how to use it,” Alex says. “Our biscuit mix is the next best thing to the real thing. It’s Southern and Sunday goodness to family.” The shop also features locally curated items from other Nashville vendors. And did you know they offer a “shop and ship” feature? Anything you purchase at the café or shop can be shipped anywhere in the Unites States! So on that note, here’s a final “have your biscuits and gravy, too” thought: Have a relaxing meal and get your holiday shopping done in one trip! HOURS: 7:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m. daily CREDIT CARDS: All don’t have time to wait,” Alex says. “Go online and order anything on the menu, and then pay online. All you need to do is walk up to the door at Loveless, and it’s ready for you. There are even dedicated parking spots for to-go orders. The best thing about the app is that you can place the order the day before and schedule your pick-up for the following day. You can also save your favorite order and reorder again.” The Loveless Café is also known for its capacity to hold private functions and events on the grounds. Known as Loveless Events, they have several spaces that can accommodate whatever party size and holiday needs. The cafe seats up to 50, while the barn seats 50 to 400. The Harpeth Room seats up to 75 and is usually used for family parties, business luncheons and corporate parties. Food is served on-site, with full-service catering. Loveless Events also offers off-site catering. Loveless Events is best known for their biscuits and breakfast options, but whether you want biscuits, fried chicken, smoked sirloin, seafood, or something completely different, they’ll ensure your guests are treated to an elevated, sophisticated Southern experience.

Their annual “Family Friday” event is a great way to kick off the holiday season, and last month’s was no exception. Instead of participating in Black Friday chaos, families enjoyed a relaxing, fun day at the Loveless Café that included Christmas decorations, free photos with Santa, music, recipe demos, face painting and treats from other local vendors. If you missed this year’s, mark your calendars for 2018. Whether you’re waiting on your table or have wrapped up your meal, be sure you wander over to the gift shop, a rustic-chic array of relishes, chow-chows, homemade moonshine

RESERVATIONS: Via Open Table, on a limited basis

Lunch KITCHEN WEST SIDE 95 White Bridge Road 615.573.7740 info@kitchenwestside kitchenwestside.com

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itchen West Side is familiar and familial, even though it’s only been open for a couple of months. You’re greeted like an old friend—not just by owner and chef Nick Govrik, but also by the flavorful aromas, carefully curated music and warm vibe. “I always wanted my own spot,” explains Nick, who has worked as a chef for 15 years. “My goal is to expand and have two to three more places—Kitchen East Side, South, North—just like this, but in other neighborhoods.” A small oasis on the first floor of a corporate office building, every part of Kitchen West Side feels like a direct representation of Nick’s soul. He restored and revived the space himself, from painting December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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and laying floors to installing and painting the hood of the stove. (“This was the opportunity to make it cool and funky,” Nick says.) The space is small, yet the restaurant feels open, with small tables and counter seating available. Since Nick also is a musician, music plays an integral role in the restaurant’s ambience. In fact, he has plans to host a musicians’ night coupled with a family-style dinner in the future. “I’ve been a chef a long time,” Nick says. “I wanted to get back to having fun and doing what I like to do. This is more personal and intimate.” According to Nick, the food at the Kitchen West Side is “a play on familiar food, prepared in a different way. For example, we have a Latin dip [sandwich] instead of a traditional French dip. Instead of your basic chicken, we have a Parmesan-herbed chicken. There aren’t too many components to the dish, but it’s tasty.” Daily specials are offered (at the reasonable price of $5), and the menu includes a variety of soups, sandwiches and entrees. The current Thursday special featured Chef Nick’s brisket chili and homemade chocolate bread pudding. Pastries, desserts and muffins are mostly made in-house, with a few delicacies sourced from a local baker. Wine and beer are also available.

Kitchen West Side has a breakfast menu that features basics like bacon and eggs, plus trendy items like avocado toast, breakfast burritos and huevos rancheros. Currently, the restaurant is open only for breakfast and lunch, but Nick plans to extend their hours on Thursday and Friday evenings and offer a happy hour. On Thursday evenings, however, Nashvillians have the opportunity to experience Kitchen West Side in the comfort of their own homes. Nick offers a set carry-out menu for $11 that includes salad, meat, a few sides and a roll. Orders need to be placed before noon on Thursday, with same-day pickup from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. With the holiday season’s stresses, this is a handy item to keep in your back pocket when you want someone else to do the cooking. Affordable prices, central location and great food—and yes, lots of free parking—Kitchen West Side has all the ingredients to make it a go-to favorite among locals. “I want people to think of it as their neighborhood place,” Nick says. “I want them to eat here two to three times a week, come in for a quick bite or escape from the hustle and bustle.” Kitchen West Side offers catering for holiday parties, corporate functions, events, weddings, showers, or family dinners. Their catering menu extends beyond their breakfast and lunch fare. “We offer beyond what is on our menu,” Nick says. “If you want a huge cascading charcuterie board, we can do that. We can really do whatever you want.” HOURS: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.; Thursday night pre-order pick-up from 5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m. CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: No

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Dinner HOPSMITH TAVERN 1903 Division Street hopsmithnashville.com

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n the heart of Midtown sits Hopsmith Tavern, a new three-story neighborhood restaurant and sports bar that’s quickly being embraced by locals. Hopsmith Tavern features two outdoor decks, ample seating and several televisions located throughout its Division Street location—but the repurposed 1979 Jeep Grand Wagoneer that’s now a bar is the definitive conversation piece. “Hopsmith Tavern in Chicago has been open for two and a half years,” chef Jim Heflin explains. “We’re well-known for our craft beer program, awesome food and fun late-night events. When looking at other markets, our owner had been to Nashville and fell in love with the city. People down in the South are so great. He knew if he came across a location, it would be the type of place where they could bring something new to the city.” The idea for the restaurant began years ago in Chicago with the desire to host a great party and atmosphere but also provide affordable, high-caliber food in a bar setting.


Cocktails FROTHY MONKEY 1400 51st Avenue North frothymonkey.com

I “Our culture is centered around our mission statement,” Jim says. “We treat guests like they are walking into a personal home. We treat employees like family and strive to make every person who comes through the door feel as comfortable as if they were at their own home. We enjoy being in Nashville because of the city and vibe of the place.” “We are super-excited to be an addition to an already amazing Midtown scene,” adds owner Erik Baylis. “We couldn’t be luckier to have been welcomed by our neighbors the way we have and are looking to build long term relationships with all of our neighbors for years and years to come!” There is always, always something going on—great specials, fun events and contests—that keeps customers wondering what they’ll dream up next. This doesn’t distract from the main event, however, which is their Food (with a capital F!). Hopsmith Tavern offers extensive lunch and dinner menus to accommodate just about anyone’s preferences, plus a substantial late-night menu. “We’re known for our tacos and meat,” Jim says. “We have a professional smoker for the meat and smoke all of it in-house.” Hopsmith offers eight varieties of tacos, five kinds of sliders and any number of starters, salads, sandwiches, sides . . . and dessert, if

you save room. Weekend brunch is available, with a crazy assortment of skillets, omelets and other delights. And here are three magic words you’ll want to remember when ordering: Flintstone French Toast (Challah bread battered with Fruity Pebbles, grilled to perfection and topped with rumchata cream). Designed with events in mind, Hopsmith Tavern is a great spot to host holiday parties, corporate events and friend/family gatherings. They have a catering menu, and the space can be rented either by the floor or the entire restaurant. They also offer a “Back-Door Chicken” program. At the back door of the restaurant, patrons knock between 5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., pay $25 dollars and leave with a bag of a whole brined and smoked chicken with tortillas and salsa, as well as a few sides. This option provides a quick take-home meal or family picnic-style dinner to be enjoyed during the holidays. Hopsmith Tavern will close early on Christmas Eve and remain closed for Christmas Day.

nside Frothy Monkey on 51st Avenue, the original beams, floors and exposed brick are gleaming reminders of the former Belle Meade Hosiery Mill, and chandeliers hang from the high ceilings. With coffee, food and a full-service bar in the center of the restaurant, it’s hard not to call this place a second home. In 2004, Miranda Whitcomb opened the first Frothy Monkey location on 12th Avenue South, with Ryan Pruitt as the general manager. In 2011, Ryan approached Miranda about purchasing the brand and began a partnership with Jennifer Sheets, who now serves as Frothy Monkey’s creative and marketing director. “[Ryan] had the vision of adding food and eggs to the menu,” Jennifer says, “adding to what was already a great coffee and pastry shop.” With the Franklin shop on the radar to open, the owners continued to cultivate the neighborhood concept with the Frothy Monkey brand. “It’s unique to find a brand that you believe so much in,” Jennifer continues. “People have emotions for Frothy. They don’t think of it as a coffee shop, but really as part of the

HOURS: Monday through Friday: 11:00 a.m.–3:00 a.m.; Saturday: 9:00 a.m.–3: a.m.; Sunday: 10:00 a.m.– 3:00 a.m. CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: Yes, except for weekend brunch December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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person. It really makes it easy for us to be so passionate.” Frothy’s continued popularity and demand led to three more stores and by then, the Frothy Monkey brand was well-known, and owners were constantly approached by developers. While they had no intention to open a fifth location, The Nations neighborhood soon seemed like an organic fit. Both owners were familiar with the neighborhood, fell in love with the location and recognized the need for an all-day coffee shop and full-service eatery. “The building feels like a standalone building, and we had no idea what would be surrounding us,” Jennifer explains. “The fact that The Nations is a walkable neighborhood with lots of families and close to a university . . . for the most part, we have local people coming in.” Frothy Monkey established their fifth location in The Nations on August 14, 2017. Due to the larger restaurant space, the owners were able to include a fully stocked bar featuring high-quality cocktails, the only Frothy Monkey location to do so. They have a rotating, seasonal cocktail menu and offer traditional cocktails with a full beer and

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wine list. If dining on the weekend, brunch cocktails are offered all day. “We try to integrate brands that we believe in,” Jennifer explains. “Our Bloody Mary uses Hoff Sauce, a sauce company based out of Chattanooga. We also use our own Cold Brew in our Bloody Marys and house-pickle whatever is seasonal for the Bloody Mary. We offer good alcohol and quality ingredients, infusing a lot of things in-house.” The Irish coffee is another highlight on the cocktail menu, made with Frothy Monkey’s iced coffee. “We are pretty picky about what we drink,” Jennifer continues. “We say that Frothy is selfishly designed. It started as a coffeehouse. Then we all started having kids, so we wanted an easy place to go and have dinner. Our kids can still get eggs and chocolate milk and be happy while we’re having dinner and wine.” For those needing an early dinner with friends or family or drinks after work, Frothy Monkey happy hour is 4:00–6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, with two-for-one select beer and wines. On Wednesday evenings, join Frothy for “Wine Down Wednesday” featuring a cheese plate and wine or beer flights (3 pours) for $15. Frothy Monkey offers full-service (food and bartending) catering on and off site for holiday parties, corporate events, rehearsal dinners, or other events. An enclosed room is available for private events, and examples of catering menus are available online. Holiday shopping can also take place while sipping on a cocktail. Frothy Monkey sells bundled merchandise and

cookie tins from their bakery, along with coffee bags in campfire mugs, bundled merchandise and housemade syrups. Electronic gift cards are also available. While the holiday season can occasionally be hectic, Frothy Monkey offers a relaxing and inviting space to enjoy quality time over a cocktail. HOURS: Monday through Thursday: 6:30 a.m.–9:00 p.m.; Friday through Saturday: 6:30 a.m.– 10:00 p.m.; Sunday: 8:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m. CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: No Constant Eater is dedicated to discovering the West Side’s best breakfasts, lunches, dinners and cocktails . . . in the name of fair reporting and satisfied tummies, of course.


Gets Us into the Holiday Spirits! Trying to stay healthy through the holiday season? Wanna get the most out of your holiday toasts? We asked Jen Masley, owner of EiO & The Hive, for her best cocktail recipes and we can attest, these hit the spot. Cheers!

Vegan Eggnog (serves 2-4)

The Holly Jolly

• 2 cups cashew milk

• 1 oz unsweetened cranberry juice

• 1/2 cup full fat coconut milk

• 2 oz ginger beer

• 1/3 cup raw cashews, soaked for at least

• 2oz gin

30 minutes (optional)**

• 4-6 Medjool dates • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract • 1 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg • pinch ground cinnamon  • pinch ground cloves • pinch sea salt • spiced rum, bourbon, or whiskey

• fresh mint • 1 rosemary sprig for garnish • orange slice for garnish Grab a shaker and muddle mint, then add cranberry juice, gin and ginger beer with ice. Shake thoroughly and pour over glass filled with ice. Add a sprig of rosemary + orange slice for garnish on top.

Add all ingredients minus the alcohol to your highly speed blender and process until smooth and creamy. Pour into glasses, top with alcohol of choice (if desired). ** the raw cashews provide the thick, creaminess to the egg nog. If you want it thinner, leave out or add less.

December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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372Who kNew? Name: What’s your relationship to West Nashville? How long have you been here? Favorite thing about West Nashville? Favorite food? color? drink? dessert? hobby? Where will you be on Friday night? Dog or cat? Mustard or mayonaise? Mountains or beach? Dream occupation when you were five? What’s your hidden talent? What’s your superpower? What excites you about West Nashville?

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Kristi Smith


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