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down . . . this old cinder block. We wanted to keep the name and the building as it is. “It’s perfect for us,” he continued. “And we want it to be a place where, like the barbershop, people come together to talk, tell stories and be a community.”

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TO LEARN MORE The Barbershop Theater is in the process of planning their schedule for the summer and fall. Check www.thebarbershoptheater. com for upcoming shows, classes and workshops and for parking information! 2W

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rehearsal for a play that was using the informal space. “It still looked like an empty barbershop then,” Dies said. “But I was like, ‘Wow! This is amazing! What are you going to do with it?’” Nettie responded, “We’re going to make it into a theater.” Today, the name and the building’s purpose may have changed, but the barbershop spirit remains the same. A hand-painted “The Barbershop Theater” sign graces the wall where the big plate-glass window was, welcoming neighbors to enjoy the space once again. Some might have wanted to raze it to build a more modern structure, but Mote countered, almost lovingly, “We’re not going to tear it

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Along with offering great entertainment, the theater also opens its doors for other services like Small World Yoga classes and as community meeting space. “Nettie and Graham are passionate about their community, the art happening in it, and empowering local theatre artists,” Frame said. That same passion inspired her and other members of the collective to join. “We wanted to be a part of that passion and help amplify it,” she continued, describing Garden Theatre’s interest in joining the Collective. “Being a Collective member not only provides us with an affordable venue for our shows and educational programming, but more opportunities to collaborate with fellow theatre professionals and develop stronger connections with our community. ”They [Mote and Kraft] are incredibly enthusiastic about expanding accessible, inclusive theatre experiences,” Frame said. “So, naturally, we jumped at the chance to work with them and the rest of the Collective members.” Dies remembers her first chance meeting with Kraft at the theater before it had been renovated to a theater. She and Kraft were at a

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Brigid Murphy Stewart is a fifth-generaLLE

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tion Nashvillian, writer and editor who always considers West Nashville her stomping grounds, regardless of where life takes her.

June–July 2019 | 372WN.com

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Profile for 372WN

372WN Vol III, Issue IV  

June–July 2019

372WN Vol III, Issue IV  

June–July 2019

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