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Contemporary Architecture in Korea and Uruguay

International Invitational Exhibition 100 ARCHITECTS OF THE YEAR


Contemporary Architecture in Korea and Uruguay

International Invitational Exhibition 100 ARCHITECTS OF THE YEAR


33North 34South is the catalog-book that covers the exhibition of Contemporary Architecture in Korea and Uruguay that is presented at the Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales (MNAV, National Museum of Visual Arts) between March 12 and 31, 2019 in Montevideo - Uruguay. The exhibition arose from an invitation extended by the Korean Institute of Architects (KIA) to the Sociedad de Arquitectos del Uruguay (SAU, Uruguayan Architects Society) to participate in the international exhibition 100 Architects of the Year 2018 as Guest of Honor Country, with the support of the Union Internationale des Architectes (UIA, International Union of Architects). It is part of an academic-cultural exchange between both countries, which started with an exhibition at the Jeju Museum of Art, Jeju Do - Korea, in October, 2018. The exhibition at the MNAV includes 67 works of contemporary architecture: 33 located in South Korea and 34 in Uruguay.


International Invitational Exhibition 100 ARCHITECTS OF THE YEAR

President KIA Kang Chul Hee

President UIA Thomas Vonier

Vice President KIA Han Young Keun

Vice President UIA for the Americas Roberto Simon

President SAU Fernando Pereira Vice President SAU Marcel Perchman

P. 3


Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores Declarado de interés ministerial

Embajada de la República Oriental del Uruguay en Corea Embajada de la República de Corea en Uruguay

Declarado de interés cultural


33NORTH 34SOUTH General coordinator Gustavo Vera Ocampo Curators Gustavo Vera Ocampo, Luis Zino Scientific committee Laura Alemán, Diego Capandeguy, Conrado Pintos Graphic edition Marcelo Gualano, Gustavo Vera Ocampo Production Carla Ribas ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Kang Chul Hee Han Young Keun Sungyoun Hwang Luis Iribarne Mariella Crosta Omar Mesa Joaquín Gastambide Enrique Aguerre Marcelo Danza Álvaro López

Marcelo Bednarik Carina Strata Juan Pedro Urruzola Andrés Richero Marcos Guiponi Duilio Amándola Martín Boga Julia Pereda César Reisch Felipe Saizar Ignacio Sambarino

Documentation Laura Cesio, Carla Ribas Editorial design Valentina Juanicó, Manuel Machado Translation Adriana Butureira Impresión y encuadernación en Gráfica Mosca Marzo 2019


INDEX


P. 08

Unequal contexts / Converging imagery contemporary architecture in Uruguay Gustavo Vera Ocampo, Luis Zino

P. 10

Place and places ways of inhabiting time Laura Alemรกn

P. 12

The lyric discretion recent architecture in a distant country Diego Capandeguy

P. 18

33 North Selection of works

P. 56

34 South Selection of works

P. 7


Victor Lorieto

contemporary architecture in Uruguay


And if by chance the sun did not shine… Luis Alberto Spinetta

Uruguayan contemporary architecture is the guest of honor of the Korean Institute of Architects on the opposite side of the world. It is an manifestation of intercultural exchange between the various architectural realities in the world, precisely at a time when discrimination and intolerance for diversity are on the rise. Uruguay is a small country in South America. Like South Korea, Uruguay is surrounded by giant countries, in its case Argentina and Brazil. This has conditioned their historical logics, their legitimating stories and their mixes. Uruguay has a territory almost doubles in size that of South Korea, but a population fifteen times smaller (a little over three million inhabitants and demographically stable), and almost the same latitude, to the South (34º) as South Korea to the North (33º). Antipodes from each other, but in the case of Uruguay, lacking snow or mountains. Instead, there are large extensions of fertile soil, and good indicators in the context of Latin America. Its economy is based on the production of agricultural and forestry commodities, and the provision of services, especially tourism.

The exhibition in South Korea includes thirty-four examples of recent Uruguayan architecture, all from the 21st century. How could we limit the selection? Which should be the limits? Three main restrictions were defined: a spatial one, by which the works should have been built in our national territory; a temporary one, by including only the last decade; and a disciplinary one, related to a synergistic relationship with the environment in which the works are implanted and the formal consistency of the constructed object. A second operational plane established the following requirements: one piece by author; representation of different generations; a geographical distribution encompassing different realities; a diversity of programs and constituents (public, cooperative, private); smaller and larger scale; limited and more generous budgets; both recycled and new buildings. An extensive universe of works was explored to select those that, in our opinion, reflect the evolution of contemporary architecture in Uruguay.

The chosen works attempt to convey a story that evidences the adaptability to different contexts over time: historical, social, economic, cultural and material. A diachronic accumulation of knowledge and diverse footprints stimulated by a slow permeability and a certain resistance to change. In the analysis, it may seem that our architectural imagery converged. It can be seen in the concern for insertion, both into the landscape and into the urban fabric. Also, in the respect for the public space and the existing textures. In the programmatic connotations and the use of materials. In the demands some architects prioritize over the economic revenue that may otherwise be deemed the sole purpose. The final selection exhibits a set of clear answers to very unequal contextual realities, where the dedication to the project process, simplicity, detail and the capacity of adaptation to different constraints appear as possible virtues. These are imageries, dreams and illusions that seem —even unknowingly— to be convergent.

Gustavo Vera Ocampo, Luis Zino Curators of the 33North / 34South Exhibition

P. 9


ways of inhabiting time Ildefonso de o so Aroztegui o tegu


Place: a charged, determined space. A unique crossing between space and time. A unique cut. An alien emptiness that is filled or overfilled. A high sky that becomes earth. Place, locus, Aristotelian τόπος.1 A corporeal attribute that does not entirely belong to the body; something that is not its own but that is not completely alien to it either, like the scent or the shadow. A way of being. An ineffable air that tinges or affects the object. Architecture is a place. It creates a place in the place. Even if it does not intend or is not forced to do so. Because it does not escape the fabric of history, because it cannot escape time. But this doing admits different modes and degrees, and maybe that is where the differences lie. What is exhibited here is a small sample of this. A series of very recent works that show varied ways of being on earth, and which — even unwittingly— dialogue with previous voices. They appear in relief against a broad background. They take up inherited threads, but they break with others; they continue, refute or ignore the echo of other times. Some pieces are inscribed in the open air: they appeal to the horizon and to the flight of the wind. They attempt to lean out onto the rough or turbid sea, to look into the stream, to lose themselves in the green or stony ground of the ballena2 or the hills. Sometimes they create an illusion of eternity, the pretense that they have always existed under that sky. They do not emulate the feat of Julio Vilamajó, his revered venture3: they appeal to other weapons, they define another game. They belong in a different time. But often they invoke the same desire to join the blue without dissolving in it.

Other works pulse with the city’s heartbeat and maintain with it a close and direct link. They are integrated into the urban fabric and accept its challenge. They follow its tight pulse and assume its powerful rules. But they do it with new criteria: they impose another form of expression, they write a text at odds with the context. Here resonates barely the dazzling audacity of the fifties4, which pulses epidermally. And one also hears its early condemnation: the ethics of Eladio Dieste, his objections against any gesture that he deems futile or impertinent.5 The sequence also incorporates another type of projects: the ones based on anotherr work, and which grow within a previously existing sphere. Architecture that is born within architecture, the graft of the new among the old walls. These operations impose a hiatus between the worlds they bind together: they affirm the happiness of the distinct, they conjure out all mimetic awkwardness. They depart from some local ways imposed in the eighties. And they usually do it with extreme gracefulness: the guest place exalts the host, it uplifts or praises it. In this choral piece there are different notes. Dissimilar or irreconcilable questions, and their possible answers. Varied scales, points of focus or magnifiers that come closer or move away. There is a common history and a tremulous photograph: a provisional cut in the course. Parricide, respect, veneration, indolence: a common legacy that is killed, ignored, obeyed or accepted. But above all, the atavistic eulogy of matter and form, and of what happens when they turn space into a place.

1. It alludes to the notion of topos that Aristotle addresses in Physics book IV and in other works he authored. 2. It alludes to the notion of topos that Aristotle addresses in Physics book IV and in other works he authored. 3. Julio Vilamajó (1894-1948), a Uruguayan architect who designed the Villa Serrana development (1945-1947), where he located the famous Ventorrillo de la Buena Vista (1946) and the Mesón de las Cañas (1947). 4. It refers to the trend that local architecture adopted in those years, embodied in the work of Luis García Pardo, Raúl Sichero and Ildefonso Aroztegui, among many others. 5. Eladio Dieste (1917-2000), a Uruguayan engineer who developed a construction system based on the use of reinforced ceramics. His work is based on principles of rationality and economy that decry, for example, the use of the glazed walls in high-rise structures.

Laura Alemán Architect, writer. Master in Territorial Planning and Urban Development (fadu-udelar). Associate Professor at the Institute of the History of Architecture (fadu-Udelar). Ph.D. in Architecture candidate (fadu-udelar) undergoing a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy (fhce-udelar).

P. 11


Jua Apolo Juan po o

recent architecture in a distant country


# 01 Euclidean geometries and material fundamentalism

Taxonomic Fields, Fields of Meaning How to map and interpret recent Uruguayan architecture? One possibility is to research the diachronic associations of works about project strategies, their concepts, their poetics and their construction technologies. This transcends the genealogies that generate frequently illusory concatenations. Such genealogies are understood as not very relevant in the universe of open and permeable architectural practices in which operate most of the creators included in the exhibition. For this mapping, an attempt was made to ascribe the thirty-four works in this exhibition to the architecture compass proposed by Zaera Polo in his text «Well into the 21st century: the architectures of post-capitalism?»1 This author, supported by Jencks’ insightful schemes in his book Architecture 2000, opens seven fields or categories in which he positions creators and emerging architecture practices at the global level.

In his text, this analyst invites us to apply and build other specific compasses, which is what we present here. Some Uruguayan works seem to fit well into such taxonomic fields, others seem juxtaposed between categories, and some distance themselves from these registers. This view aims to illuminate the understanding of these architectures and their fields of meaning. It is a relational analysis that transcends other critical exercises and the diversity of architecture targets. Uruguayan architecture thus portrayed, relying on the quoted compass, operates fundamentally in five major fields:

It is the field that is most often explored by the works and architects included in this exhibition. This is seen in the sensitivity for the architectures of Euclidean geometries, volumes or articulated boxes, and the achievement of some materialities that oscillate between a soft expressiveness and more intense ones. In Uruguay there was neither a resistance to a parametric architecture —which was practically not researched— nor a vernacular fiction. Here a simple re-materialization occurs, associated with various construction technologies, some more conventional, others more advanced.

# 01 Euclidean geometries and material fundamentalism # 02 Contingency inquiry and new existentialism # 03 Cosmopolitical and austerity chic # 04 Practices and intersecting poetics # 05 Concomitant registers

These works have been implanted in cities and the countryside, moving between normative and customer constraints, but always imposing themselves as discrete entities, with simple geometries and powerful externalities. In Uruguay this attitude captivates architects of several generations, especially those in their forties, fifties and sixties. An early reference project is a small tourist shelter in the middle of the countryside by the Gualano brothers. It is the Pabellón Salto del Penitente (Salto del Penitente Pavilion). It is an abstract concrete shell, containing an inn and a public viewpoint on its roof, that qualifies and intensifies the landscape. Their subsequent works of increasing scale show a continuous virtuosity in their volumetric restraints and material expressivities.

1. Zaera Polo, Alejandro (2016), «Ya bien entrado el siglo XXI: ¿las arquitecturas del post-capitalismo?)», El Croquis magazine, Nº187, pp. 252/287.

The work of Comerci, the Training Center of the Spanish Cooperation in the historic center of Montevideo, leverages an old construction that has been refurbished and in which a suspended rear glass box was infiltrated. P. 13


This was resolved with great clarity and lightness, a work at the same time artisanal, elaborate and contemporary, with a somewhat magical result. The Teatro Politeama de Pintos, by Lorieto and Santellán, a town theater of the early twentieth century, was refurbished with limited resources and expanded in its frontal space. To this end, a small and very lightweight abstract volume was attached, a contemporary origamii in contrast to the heaviness of the original building, as its authors point out. It is an example of expressive intensification. The Casa Fausta de Apolo is embedded in a sloping urban terrain, with openings and underground sections. The project is resolved with a filleting in which a small continuous window contrasts with a bestial exposed concrete top plate, resulting in a building that offers great power and shelter Another underground building is included in this field, the Computer Institute of the School of Engineering of the Universidad de la Republica, by Scheps. It is organized according to a careful geometry attached to a modern building of heritage value, with inert and green materialities and which meets several standards as a Green Building. This is resolved thanks to the great skill and sensitivity that are pervasive in the work of this creator. In another prominent position is MAPA, a Uruguayan-Brazilian collective formed by Andrades, Carballal, Gobba, Lagranha and López. Their Sacromonte Crafted Wines Landscape in Pueblo Edén in Maldonado includes the implantation of several small shelters among the hills, vineyards and freshwater lenses. Each prefabricated shelter,

with its volumetric perfection, opacities, shine, and veiled luminescence, is implanted in a stony, mediating sculpted base. A fragile and delicate abstract chapel enquires about the mysteries of creation. MAPA reconciles a delicate and very controlled design, hedonistic tectonics, workshop production, in situ assembly, and an active and global communication strategy. The Casa Marindia of MASA Arquitectos, by Pronczuk and Saettone, is presented as a hollow prism that perches in a garden suburb, with a rustic materiality of exposed concrete and light structural window frames, complemented by a fireplace and technological and home automation equipment: a Banham and Dallegret bubble disciplined in its envelope. The uniquely Uruguayan experience of real houses projected and built by students takes part of this field. It is the Arquitectura Rifa G.20112 house, by García and García. In a small corner plot, stacks of pure volumes and courtyards are used to organize a medium habitat. The result is an introverted, somewhat enigmatic building, wrapped in concrete and weathering steel. The Casa Frente al Mar (House facing the sea), by Argentinian creator Arraigada, in Punta del Este, essays on the tectonics of wood and the contemporary logics of prefabrication and assembly. It starts from a corner plot of land where a building is implanted on pilotis, following a layout with two L-shaped wings and a gallery of elegant proportions and monochromatic contrasts, resolved as an ecology. 2. Translator’s note: the graduating generation of the Architecture School of the Universidad de la República organizes a fundraiser based on a raffle, whose main prize is a house.

Also in Punta del Este, this laboratory of regional architecture, is located the Casa Punta of the great Brazilian creator Kogan, from MK27. This large sub-rural dwelling, in only one level and an open floor layout, is made up of an exposed concrete slab on regular pillars and external stone walls. Under it, a partly glazed and partly wooden box is implanted, along with a thatched roof structure, with an adjoining deck. It is a somewhat sublime work, of great horizontality and a large scale typical of the so-called São Paulo School. Other undertakings could be classified in this field. This is the case of Casa Antonio Serratosa by Graetz and Nuñez, created by recycling a small palace in the Old City of Montevideo. This became a coworking space, where a skylight was replaced, and two floors added in a mansard, while some areas were restored incorporating very good quality materials. Included in this classification are also several public and social buildings, generally low-cost, such as the following: The Visitor Center of the Artigas Plateau, made for the MINTUR by Artecona, Dutiné and Falkenstein, which reinterprets a warehouse-shed of careful proportions in an open field. Ferrer and Preve’s Muelle Negro in Salto, made for the Departmental Government. The project consisted in transforming an old railway pier into an equipped public promenade that projects into the Uruguay River. The so-called Operational Zone Buildings of the Police Department, projected by Elizalde and located in various areas of the city of Montevideo. They are large prisms with specific


programmatic requirements, which are adapted to the different locations and needs, their main façade s covered with a frame of colored plates that are visually composed with different variations. The project of the Technological University in Fray Bentos, in a heritage industrial site, by Ruiz, Dibarboure, Grauert and Llorente, is also included in this register. The proposition appeals to simple geometries and materialities in tune with the surroundings. An important volume attached to a preserved basement (an old wall and a pump room) is resolved with an envelope of perforated sheet metal, and a clear programmatic organization of the entire group. High School Nº 7 in Rivera, part of the MEMFOD Program, and designed by Cuadro, Dauría, Gnesetti and Musto, stands out for its concept as a contemporary educational building and its quality. With its three floors, it has careful geometry and proportions, a very good layout, spatial fluidity, low maintenance rustic materials such as exposed concrete or Venetian mosaic, other material nods, and several complementary amenities. Another case is that of the Cooperativa de Viviendas de Ayuda Mutua COVIOFRIT in Tacuarembó, developed for the Centro Cooperativista Uruguayo and designed by Moreno. This type of social housing has been influenced and sedated by the strong innovative tradition of the 60s and 70s. In this scenario, this project operates with many starting constraints, leveraging them to set up a new block marked by strips of duplex houses. They are conceived as a support or adaptive platform for future growth by internal or external expansion.

# 02 Inquiry of contingencies and new existentialism

# 03 Cosmopolitical and austerity chic

In this category, priority is given to the investigation of contingencies, certain randomness, a frequent existential background, an application of fresh modes of representation and cartography, and sometimes conceptual, ecological, and even hedonistic approaches. Zaera Polo, in his taxonomy, associates this field with frequently distorted geometries, a limited attribute in the case of Uruguay. Here, this category could be more closely associated with an incipient phenomenological sensitivity. In our country this approach is researched by several creators who are around forty years of age.

In this field, Zaera Polo includes diverse practices that emphasize processes and ecologies, cosmopolitan preoccupations, and not the architectural object, whose fetish would be the iconic author artifact of highly controlled design. This does not mean that poetics are renounced, but they are less perceptible and individualized. Perhaps one could speak of a chic austerity, a term taken from Aureli but used in another sense in the referenced text. In Uruguay, we could speak about an open architecture with a scented sobriety.

This is the classification of the so-called Parque Lineal Portuario Rambla 25 de Agosto de 1825, by Torrado, Bednarik, Bruzzone and Mirabal. It is a small public space between the edge of the Old City of Montevideo and the modern port, loaded with contingencies and limitations that activate the project. The result is a nice inert and continuous plate of light colors that revitalize gray adjacencies. The plate is punctured by archaeological infiltrations and greenery and urban furniture implants, using a phenomenological approach. Included in this field, but in a different register, is the expansion of the Full Time School No. 40 of Artigas in the north of the country, carried out by Cecilio. An old public school-farm is transformed and ionized. For this purpose, the existing buildings are expanded and pairs of terrace-classrooms, slightly rotated on each other almost randomly, create inbetween spaces. This controlled distortion contrasts with the crosscutting walls of oxidizing sandstones and aileron-roofs, a reflection of the power of material sensitivity in Uruguay.

Bodega Viña Edén (Viña Edén winery) is positioned in this operative category, created by the collective Fábrica de Paisaje of Ayerra, Castaings, Cobas, Lanza and Pérez. In this and other works, their expertise, freshness and a search for meaning are articulated by the creation of a story and a fiction that sustains and triggers its architecture. In particular, this building is conceptualized as a rock of ambiguous and attractive geometry, a stroke of scale, embedded in a hill and mediated by terraces. Here, a tourism-oriented agroindustry is located, conceived with boutique, complex and processual architecture. This large artificial rock, with its weathering steel, its stony walls, and its large glass surface, enables interior colonizations and external changes by other actors and by nature itself, all of which transcends the notion of object design. In the complex architectures of Sprechmann - Danza, their weighting is achieved by their own recognition as potentially changing infrastructures, with communicative strategies in emblematic parts. Such is the case of the Central Laboratory of Conaprole, the main dairy company in the country. It is resolved as a large container with a thick, spatially unfolding façade containing facilities and support equipment, with an external treatment as a decorated shell that recreates the institutional logo.


# 04 Practices and intersecting poetics In this register is included Sinergia Design by Estudio Ramm, established by Berger and Leymonie, a deliberately unfinished, flexible work with minute gourmett infiltrations . It is a partial intervention in an old industrial building that has been transformed into a commercial and co-working program. The large building morphology and some old elements are maintained; others have been demolished or transformed to implant infrastructure, capsular shop premises and floating and mobile objects for various temporary colonizations. The activation of the Mercado Agrícola de Montevideo (MAM, Montevideo Agricultural Market) Project, carried out by the Municipality of Montevideo with an architectural project by Pascual, is positioned in this field. An old market located in a very degraded area of the city was reconverted as a retail center, with selective actions of remodeling and installation of shops and infrastructure. This is framed in the generation of a procedural neighborhood development associated with the creation and improvement of public space and new housing supports.

They are intersecting or mixed situations. In this exhibition several qualified works pulse simultaneously between intersecting fields. This is the case of the convergences between clear and material volumetric strategies, and the cosmopolitical field, as well as of a certain austerity chic. Various works are found at the intersections of different groups and fields of practice. In particular, the following works can be interpreted in the field of both Euclidean geometries and material fundamentalism, and in the cosmopolitan as well as austerity chicc fields. This is the case of the Corporate Offices / Soca of BVO ARQ, by Boga and Vera Ocampo. The work is implanted in a corner property in a once elegant residential neighborhood of Montevideo, with low morphology and gardens. The design strategy is that of a friendly estrangement. It appeals to a detached prism, with a concrete open structure, fluid interiors, and a seductive and complex glazed façade dominated by an abstract composition of warm color thermo panels and a band of horizontal parasols. Here object and material endurances are articulated with ecological, economic and cultural preoccupations in aesthetics of ad hoc assembly, with a cosmopolitical character, in the words of Zaera Polo. At this intersection, but in a different register, could be construed the work of the ZIP practice by Zino-Probst, partly self-developers of their own mostly residential works. In La Mansarde, in the Old City of Montevideo, an old construction is reconverted and a corten steel mansard is added, a retro o nod of urban figuration, with spatial and interior materials handling that seduces for its bohemian atmosphere. Oficinas Prinzi, by Cotignola, Staricco and Tobler, in a deep lot with a limited front, take advantage

of an old building infrastructure, connecting warehouses and sheds. For this purpose, two courtyards help organize a series of offices and spaces resolved with great rigor, with delicate, dominantly white materialities both in the façade and in its interior, achieving a diaphanous, very empathetic atmosphere. Within both intersecting fields could also be located Sierra Ballena 1 in Punta del Este, of the Argentinean AFRA practice, set up by Ferreiro, Armendares, Leunda and Gómez. This venture required a regulatory change at the initiative of this team, to mitigate the impacts on a rocky foothill that jets into the sea. The resulting project is placed on the slope without affecting the summit, unfolding into three harmonic geometric bands that merge into a new illusory landscape, appealing to stony and plant tectonics. The Casa Palmar in Montevideo by Urrutia is a very small action on a preexisting one, generating a boxed house, harmonious in its exterior geometry, fluid and continuous interior, increasing the value of the m3. This is achieved with great delicacy in proportions, spatial management and materialities. The three previous fields converge in the Isla de Flores St. Offices by Livni. An old structure is intervened to locate a main clothing firm, with offices and collections. Some key points are its rigorous geometry; a system of new interior patios and transparencies; the great height of deep floor plans; the inclusion of an elevator in a transparent box and stairs encased in black as objects trouve; the contrast between pre-existing and new materialities; the compositional elegance of the front façade; and the careful cost of the whole, achieving an atmosphere typical of a normcore studio and not of a canonical corporation.


# 05 Concomitant registers

Epilog. Lyrical Discretion

Some very high-quality Uruguayan works cannot be adequately interpreted based on the previous categories. These are the cases, among others, of the designers who have delved into the so-called partii architecture, with a very clear and powerful organizing layout. It is a tradition of a Beaux Arts and modern matrix still strong in Uruguay and Argentina. This is usually expressed in poetics of a certain sobriety. It also includes some singular work that rebels against the previous categories.

A unique portrait is the Vitacura Building of the studio directed by Martín Gómez Platero, one of the main architecture practices in Uruguay, specializing in large projects and high-end products. This project is located in a circular corner facing the sea in an elegant garden district of Montevideo with heritage protection. The building formulates a clear parti, with an arched ground floor and three terraced levels, ruled by diverse complementary elements, with a sober expressiveness.

In this register we interpret the Alister Golf Building of Estudio Cinco, led by Iván Arcos. Here a light building, with a mix of residential and tertiary purposes, infiltrates a deep property, articulating with the neighboring building according to the regulatory restrictions, resolved with a clean and clear floor plan and section, with great quality in the resulting whole, the distinctive mark of this creator.

The O’ 33 olive oil plant by Daglio in José Ignacio also refuses to be categorized. It is conceived as a ritual emblem of a pastoral eco-landscape experience near Punta del Este, and as a manufacturing boutique with high environmental standards. The project is marked by two containing sculpted volumes, a tall one in precast concrete for the mill with large shiny tanks, and a low one for the remaining productive operations.

The Maritime Terminal of the Port of Colonia, of LGD Arquitectos, by García Dovat, Gastambide and Laurito, had to be resolved as the portal of a World Heritage Site in a reduced area. It is a complex infrastructure that organizes flows, conceived according to a categorical layout and a compact volumetry, built with low cost and with some material nods. This practice is positioned in the other fields mentioned with other projects.

A very particular proposition is the Casa de Hierro (Iron House) by Farina in the Punta del Este peninsula. It is a of two-floor, slightly vaulted building with an interior that evokes a curious ship-like atmosphere. This and other works by this creator show an interest in architecture conceived as craftsmanship, with multiple individual poetics in each work that distance themselves from taxonomic purisms.

The selection of thirty-four examples of recent Uruguayan architecture proposed by the curators of this exhibition portrays an incipient new cycle of architecture in this small country in South America. They are works with diverse characters, budget and architectural quality. All of them converge in actions and objects showing a certain discretion, without extravagances, and with frequent lyricism. It is a lyrical discretion. It transcends local anchors and shows harmony with other cultures and collectives. The contemporary world is marked by information technologies, by artificial intelligence, by factual openings and closures, by socio-territorial crises and other instabilities. Such instabilities challenge contemporary societies, their values and practices. In this scenario, the practices of architecture face the frequent mutations, shadows and ghosts of contemporaneity. Such local practices and objects from Uruguay, with their lyrical discretion and a greater opening to the world: will they expire, be adapted procedurally or will they reinvent themselves? In this respect, paths and niches seem to be opening with a dose of hope and optimism, generating enthusiasm and even inspiration.

Diego Capandeguy Architect. Professor of History of Contemporary Architecture (fadu-udelar) P. 17


SELECTION OF WORKS

P. 19


P. 22

Amorepacific Archive

P. 23

PLACE 1

P. 24

Triangle Gallery

P. 25

Long House

P. 26

Light Gallery House

P. 27

National Library of Korea, Sejong

P. 28

ID Hospital

P. 29

Woorokri House

P. 30

Patriot Son Yang Won Memorial Museum

P. 31

Wrapping a Round Void

P. 32

Studio Atelier11

P. 33

Sound Scape

P. 34

Chiselling a Glass Cube

P. 35

Startup Hub Annex

P. 36

Twist Layers

P. 37

Songdo House


P. 38

Gimchen Kinderhaba

P. 39

Suwon Hanok Children Day Care Center

P. 40

Hotel 28 Myeong Dong

P. 41

Jeju AeroSpace Museum

P. 42

JASENG Hospital of Korean Medicine

P. 43

Chuncheon City Library

P. 44

Culture Platform : DGB Second Head Office

P. 45

Oil Tank Culture Park

P. 46

K-Resort Hotel Food and Beverage Space Remodeling a Plan

P. 47

SEDEC Jeju

P. 88

Yeoju Museum

P. 49

Junggok Community Center

P. 50

Hotel Shilla Stay Gwanghwamoon

P. 51

Space in hands

P. 52

Coconut House

P. 53

Hana Tour Remodeling Project

P. 54

Korean Medicine Industry Promotion Center & Public Parking Lot

P. 21


Osan, Korea

Amorepacific Archive Byungchul Shin SNP Architects & Partners


P. 23

Seoul, Korea

PLACE 1

Chanjoong Kim The System Lab


Seoul, Korea

Triangle Gallery Chezinn Lim Hongik University


P. 25

Daegu, Korea

Long House

Chungkee Lee University of Seoul


Sungnam, Korea

Light Gallery House Daniel Keunwoo Cheon + Wonmo Yang YCH Architects International Ltd.


P. 27

Sejong, Korea

National Library of Korea, Sejong

Dokwon Park Samoo Architects & Engineers


Seoul, Korea

ID Hospital Dongjin Kim L’EAU design Co.,Ltd.


P. 29

Daegu, Korea

Woorokri House

Dongwon Kim Studiozt Architects


Haman, Korea

Patriot Son Yang Won Memorial Museum Eunseok Lee + Jongsang Oh Kyunghee University + Atelier Koma


P. 31

Seoul, Korea

Wrapping a Round Void

Hun Yang ONEAN Architects & Associates


Jeju, Korea

Studio Atelier11 Hyunmo Park Atelier11


P. 33

Jeju, Korea

Sound Scape

Jaemin Yoon JMY Architects


Seoul, Korea

Chiselling a Glass Cube Jaeyong Chung Hongik University


P. 35

Seoul, Korea

Startup Hub Annex

Jeyu Park + Jinwook Lee JU Architects & Planners + Lee & Hwang Architects


Hanam, Korea

Twist Layers Jiyeon Nam Kunin E&C Architectural Firm


P. 37

Busan, Korea

Songdo House

Kichul Lee Architect-K


Gimchen Kinderhaba Kindergarten Children’s House Kiseok Kim + Keukrae Joe, KIDAN Architecture Designers Group + Catholic University of Daegu


P. 39

Suwon, Korea

Suwon Hanok Children Day Care Center

Kwanjick Lee BSD ARCHITECTS


Seoul, Korea

Hotel 28 Myeong Dong Kyuman Song Hongik University


P. 41

Jeju, Korea

Jeju AeroSpace Museum

Manchul Jung Haeahn Architecture, Inc


Seoul, Korea

JASENG Hospital of Korean Medicine Minjin Park Haeahn Architecture, Inc


P. 43

Chuncheon, Korea

Chuncheon City Library

Myunghyup Park MOOYOUNG Architects & Engineers


Daegu, Korea

Culture Platform : DGB Second Head Office Myungjin Lee Junglim Architecture


P. 45

Seoul, Korea

Oil Tank Culture Park

Seogoo Heo + ROA Architects Seogoo Heo Architects & Engineers + ROA Architects


K-Resort Hotel Food and Beverage Space Remodeling a Plan, Kangwon, Korea Seonghyeok Bae Hongik University


P. 47

Jeju, Korea

SEDEC Jeju

Sungin Kang + Yongseung Kim KKPartners Architects + Hanyang Univ. ERICA


Yeoju, Korea

Yeoju Museum Sungwook Song + Sungkwan Lee Sunchon National University + Hanul Architects & Engineers, Inc


P. 49

Seoul, Korea

Junggok Community Center

Sunyoung Rieh + AOC University of Seoul


Seoul, Korea

Hotel Shilla Stay Gwanghwamoon Taehyun Park Haeahn Architecture, Inc


P. 51

Ulsan, Korea

Space in hands

Woongsik Jung ON Architecture, Inc


Sungnam, Korea

Coconut House Yeonghwan Lim Hongik University


P. 53

Seoul, Korea

Hana Tour Remodeling Project

Youngkeun Han Archipoly Architects Co.,Ltd


Seoul, korea

Korean Medicine Industry Promotion Center & Public Parking Lot Youngmo Ryu + Seisuk Oh UNP Architecture Co.,Ltd


P. 55


SELECTION OF WORKS

P. 57


P. 60

Salto del Penitente Pavilion

P. 61

Viña Edén Winery

P. 62

Sacromonte Landscape Hotel

P. 63

Sierra Ballena 1

P. 64

Almazara O´33

P. 65

Fluvial Station & Visitor Center – MINTUR

P. 66

Muelle Negro

P. 67

Parque Portuario Rambla 25 de Agosto

P. 68

Jefatura de Policía Montevideo – Zonas Operacionales II, III, IV

P. 69

Terminal Marítima de Pasajeros Puerto de Colonia

P. 70

Laboratorio Central Conaprole

P. 71

Instituto Tecnológico UTEC – Fray Bentos

P. 72

Liceo Nº 7 Rivera

P. 73

Full Time School Nº 40 Artigas

P. 74

Computing Institute

P. 75

Corporate Offices / Soca

P. 76

Oficinas Isla de Flores


P. 77

Prinzi

P. 78

Casa frente al mar

P. 79

Punta House

P. 80

Iron House

P. 81

Marindia House

P. 82

Arquitectura Rifa – Gen. 2011 House

P. 83

Palmar House

P. 84

Fausta House

P. 85

Vitacura

P. 86

Coviofrit

P. 87

Alister Golf

P. 88

La Mansarde

P. 89

Mercado Agrícola de Montevideo

P. 90

Antonio Serratosa House

P. 91

Training Center for Cooperación Española

P. 92

Sinergia Design

P. 93

Politeama Cultural Center

P. 59


Lavalleja

Salto del Penitente Pavilion Marcelo Gualano, MartĂ­n Gualano Gualano + Gualano arquitectos


P. 61

Pueblo Edén, Maldonado

Viña Edén Winery

Fabio Ayerra, Marcos Castaings, Martín Cobas, Javier Lanza, Diego Pérez | Fábrica de Paisaje


Sierras del Carapé, Maldonado

Sacromonte Landscape Hotel Luciano Andrades, Matías Carballal, Andrés Gobba, Mauricio López, Silvio Machado | MAPA


P. 63

Punta Ballena, Maldonado

Sierra Ballena 1

Saturnino Armendares, Pablo Ferreiro, Joaquín Leunda, Andrés Gómez | Estudio AFRA


JosĂŠ Ignacio, Maldonado

Almazara O´33 Marcelo Daglio Marcelo Daglio arquitectos


P. 65

Paysandú, Rio Negro, Salto

Fluvial Station & Visitor Center – MINTUR

Inés Artecona, Hugo Dutiné, Gabriel Falkenstein ADAA + F


Ciudad de Salto, Salto

Muelle Negro Juan Ferrer, Lucía Preve Área de Proyectos – Intendencia de Salto


P. 67

Ciudad Vieja, Montevideo

Parque Portuario Rambla 25 de Agosto

Ulises Torrado, Marcelo Bednarik, Alejandra Bruzzone, Federico Mirabal


Jefatura de Policía Montevideo Zonas Operacionales II, III, IV Leonardo Elizalde | Dpto. de Proyectos Arquitectónicos, Área de Infraestructura – Ministerio del Interior


P. 69

Terminal MarĂ­tima de Pasajeros Puerto de Colonia

Leonardo GarcĂ­a Dovat, Federico Gastambide, Eduardo Laurito (asociado) | LGD arquitectos


Nuevo ParĂ­s, Montevideo

Laboratorio Central Conaprole Thomas Sprechmann, Marcelo Danza Sprechmann Danza arquitectos


P. 71

Instituto Tecnológico UTEC – Fray Bentos

Alejandro Dibarboure, Ingrid Grauert, Inés Llorente, Virginia Ruiz


Ciudad de Rivera, Rivera

Liceo Nº 7 Rivera Cecilia Cuadro, Alicia Dauría, Andrea Gnesetti, Verónica Musto | ANEP – PAEMFE


P. 73

Artigas, Uruguay

Full Time School Nº 40 Artigas

Mariana Cecilio | PAEPU – ANEP BIRF | Colaboradores: F. Deferrari, C. Sityá, M. Vázquez, W. Gurruchaga, D. Boada


Parque Rodรณ, Montevideo

Computing Institute Gustavo Scheps Direcciรณn de Arquitectura UdelaR


P. 75

Parque Batlle, Montevideo

Corporate Offices / Soca

MartĂ­n Boga, Gustavo Vera Ocampo BVO ARQ


Palermo, Montevideo

Oficinas Isla de Flores Pedro Livni


P. 77

La Comercial, Montevideo

Prinzi

AndrĂŠs Cotignola, Marcelo Staricco, Carolina Tobler CST arquitectos


Balneario Buenos Aires, Maldonado

Casa frente al mar Diego Arraigada Diego Arraigada arquitectos


P. 79

Punta del Este, Maldonado

Punta House

Marcio Kogan, Suzana Glogowski, Diana Radomysler STUDIO MK27


Punta del Este, Maldonado

Iron House Ă lvaro Farina


P. 81

Marindia, Canelones

Marindia House

MartĂ­n Pronczuk, Santiago Saettone MASA


La Blanqueada, Montevideo

Arquitectura Rifa – Gen. 2011 House María Inés García, Maximiliano García


P. 83

Parque Batlle, Montevideo

Palmar House

Daniella Urrutia UZ:AA


MalvĂ­n, Montevideo

Fausta House Juan Apolo Apoloarqs estudio de arquitectura


P. 85

Carrasco, Montevideo

Vitacura

Martín Gómez Platero Gómez Platero arquitectos


Ciudad de Tacuarembรณ, Tacuarembรณ

Coviofrit Centro Cooperativista Uruguayo CCU


P. 87

Punta Carretas, Montevideo

Alister Golf

Ivรกn Arcos estudiocinco arquitectos


Ciudad Vieja, Montevideo

La Mansarde Luis Zino, Guillermo Probst Estudio ZIP


P. 89

Villa Muñoz, Montevideo

Mercado Agrícola de Montevideo

Carlos Pascual Oficina de Arquitectura – Intendencia de Montevideo


Ciudad Vieja, Montevideo

Antonio Serratosa House Alberto Graetz, Armando Núñez Graetz Nuñez Arquitectos


P. 91

Ciudad Vieja, Montevideo

Training Center for CooperaciĂłn EspaĂąola

Francesco Comerci Francesco Comerci arquitectos


CordĂłn, Montevideo

Sinergia Design Pedro Berger, RaĂşl Leymonie RAMM


P. 93

Ciudad de Canelones, Canelones

Politeama Cultural Center

VĂ­ctor Lorieto, Conrado Pintos, Luis SantellĂĄn Estudio LPS


P. 95


Profile for 33N34S

33NORTH 34SOUTH / Contemporary Architecture in Korea and Uruguay  

33NORTH 34SOUTH / Contemporary Architecture in Korea and Uruguay  

Profile for 33n34s
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