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A Artistic mosaic panels l – Caldera ld A Art Couture Collection ll Lighting h – Siam Floor l Lamp Next N Art Collection ll

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CONTENTS January-February 2016

26 28

EDITOR’S LETTER CONTRIBUTORS

DISCOVER

33

FOCUS Interiors in 2016 should see a rise in a design language that is extremely graphic—using vivid colours to create rooms that are bright, modern and intense.

45

SHOPS AD designs four rooms using products that offer a balance of style and value.

56

AGENDA A round-up of people, ideas, innovations and events in the news.

64

INDULGE Iconic watch designs never fade away. AD’s resident watch editor picks eight timepieces whose designs continue to hold weight—despite, or perhaps because of, multiple reinterpretations. ON THE COVER THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

`150

The large living room in this Cuffe Parade home—designed by Ashiesh Shah—is a treasure trove of eclectic and customdesigned pieces of furniture from around the world. (‘Life At The Top’, pg 154).

TOM PARKER

Photographer: Tom Parker

Pg 154

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|15


contents 70

LIBRARY AD50 architect Martand Khosla writes about architecture and design books that have changed how he lives, works and thinks.

Pg 80

PERSPECTIVE

SHOWCASE With 10 path-breaking projects nearing completion, 2016 promises to be a landmark year for architecture.

90

ICON For those in the industry, Japanese architect Shigeru Ban’s name is synonymous with socially relevant architecture. In an exclusive interview, Ban talks to AD about his disaster-relief work, most recently for the victims of the 2015 Nepal earthquakes.

97

CALENDAR Take special note of AD’s annual art and design planner to ensure you’re kept abreast of the most exciting events in architecture, art and design in 2016.

104

SPOTLIGHT In what promises to be a bold year for colour, and with inputs from colour

SHWETA MALHOTRA

80

authorities like Pantone, AD presents the hues of 2016.

Pg 45

108

PREVIEW Get an inside look at the events taking place at the third edition of the Dhaka Art Summit in February. Additionally, architect Aurélien Lemonier—curator at the Centre Pompidou, Paris—provides details of the first architectural review at the Summit.

118

DESIGN AD lists a few of our favourite concept cars, which are sure to make a mark in the automobile industry in the near future.

126

SPECIAL For the second annual edition of AD Insight, a continuing conversation on design in India, AD and Asian Paints composed a panel of thought leaders to discuss ‘Glocal Design’.

SPACES

Pg 45

137

CONCRETE VISION With a unique blend of concrete and colour, the interior designers at Untitled Design created a striking personality for this four-storey home in New Delhi.

146

LADY OF THE MANOR In Kathiwada, on the ‘central’ side of the Gujarat-Madhya Pradesh border, Sangita Sinh Kathiwada and her son undertook a monumental task—transforming a royal hunting lodge into a 21st-century palace.


contents 154

LIFE AT THE TOP This behemoth of a duplex in Mumbai’s posh Cuffe Parade neighbourhood has been designed to be absolutely spacious, luxurious and bespoke.

164

EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE Known for her successful creation of iconic structures, architect Amanda Levete has found equal success in designing her London home to reflect her “punk” aesthetic—at least, in an architectural sense.

172

THE HIGH LIFE New York-based architect Shamir Shah transformed this 3,000-squarefoot apartment—which its previous owners hadn’t renovated for over two decades—with modern design and iconic furniture.

180

TALKING HOUSE For entrepreneur and globetrotter Suhel Seth, hotel rooms can sometimes feel like home—which explains the choice of decor in his posh, art-filled Gurgaon residence.

186

WORKBOOK Samir Wadekar adapts the international styles in our pages for your homes.

Pg 186

Pg 172

191

STYLE To kick off AD’s annual bathroom report, we showcase five unique bathrooms, designed by some of the world’s best interior designers.

202

POINT OF VIEW Comedian Radhika Vaz offers an incisive rant about why she values the bathroom—especially her own.

206

SCOUTS A low-down on the hottest products and newest launches to hit the market this season.

214 216

STOCKISTS An A to Z of the stores in our pages.

MANOLO YLLERA

INSIDE

AD 10 The president of the Oberoi Group of Hotels in India, Kapil Chopra lists 10 places and things with which he identifies. Pg 191

Pg 191

20|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016


ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST EDITOR greg Foster EDITOR-AT-LARGE Manju Sara Rajan MANAGING EDITOR Sanhita Sinha Chowdhury ART DIRECTOR Ashish Sahi PHOTO EDITOR Kim Sidhu STyLE EDITOR Sonali Thakur COPy EDITOR Tyrel Rodricks WATCH EDITOR Rishna Shah ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Almas Jani JUNIOR STyLIST Samir Wadekar PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Shreya Basu MANAGER SyNDICATION Michelle Pereira SyNDICATION COORDINATOR Giselle D’Mello SyNDICATION COORDINATOR Persis Shroff CONTRIBUTOR Gauri Kelkar PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Amit Navarange PRODUCTION MANAGER Sunil Nayak COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION MANAGER Sudeep Pawar PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Vijay Salunkhe, Mangesh Pawar CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Pete Bermejo Sunil Sethi Nonie Niesewand Divia Patel Neha Prasada Namita A Shrivastav Michael Snyder Divya Mishra Leena Desai CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ricardo Labougle Antonio Martinelli Tom Parker

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(Clockwise from this picture) The Mumbai penthouse designed by AD50 architect Ashiesh Shah (pg 154). This lobby in a New Delhi home by Untitled Design features a blue-lacquered glass wall and a slatted screen in teak wood (pg 137). A section of the National Assembly Building within the parliament complex that Louis Kahn built in Bangladesh (pg 108).

all me jaded, but it’s rare that a home really impresses me. not that you’d know, as i diligently sing praise when being paraded around yet another project apparently worthy of AD’s coverage. those who work with me can translate what i’m really thinking. “oh, how lovely.” = this looks like a hotel lobby. “so extraordinary!” = i’ve seen this before. “i love the Bauhaus reference.” = i can’t believe you had the audacity to copy that. i’m so transparent that my new year’s resolution is to learn to keep my mouth shut. when a house does excite me, there are fewer words. instead, it’s an almost physical reaction. i remember distinctly, my heart racing the first time i visited le Corbusier’s Villa savoye, just outside paris; the goosebumps, when i had a snoop around tom ford’s art-filled london townhouse; the breathtaking sophistication at studio ko’s Villa k in the foothills of morocco’s atlas mountains; and the tingling sensation when entering the extraordinary (yes, really!) living area of adolf loos’s Villa müller in prague. i’ve been lucky to have experienced that feeling a few times since moving to india. most recently, it was upon entering an oh-so-sophisticated mumbai penthouse designed by ad50 architect ashiesh shah. there’s a lot that excites me about this duplex, including the dramatic double-height copper wall with a Juliet balcony, which i knew immediately should grace our cover. But that hair-standing-on-the-back-of-my-neck moment came just upon arriving. through heavy, custom-made double doors, guests immediately enter the main living area. taking in the skyline of south mumbai through the glass walls in front of you, it would be easy to miss the tiny treasure on your right. sculpted within another copper wall is a small square window that—when you’re standing in just the right place—perfectly frames the iconic dome of the taj mahal palace hotel like a painting. it reminds me of ludwig mies van der rohe’s maxim—“God is in the details.” no wonder this apartment has a prayer room. i’m looking forward to more goosebumpinducing moments in the year to come. the direction of design in 2016 is the theme of this issue: where to go (see our exhaustive ‘art & design planner’ on page 97), what to see (the architectural icons, which are about to be completed, illustrated on page 80), and the trends (colour forecasts for the year on page 104) and innovations (avant-garde concept cars give a glimpse of the future on page 118) you need to know about. there’s also an exclusive interview with pritzker prize-winning architect shigeru Ban, about his emergency relief housing project in nepal (page 90). ‘Bright ideas’ is what we’ve called this round-up of the best of 2016, and we introduce the section with a specially created light bulb by ad50 architect rooshad shroff. made from a single piece of creamy makrana marble and hand-carved with the AD logo, this made-in-Jaipur piece turns the spotlight on the idea of fusing contemporary design with traditional craftsmanship. let’s hope the next 12 months spark similarly brilliant designs. happy new year!

GreG Foster

adeditorial@condenast.in Follow us on Instagram @ArchDigestIndia. You can purchase and download the digital edition of the magazine from architecturaldigest.in/DigitalEdition.

photos (CloCkwise from top): prasad naik. © raymond meier. tom parker. ashish sahi

editor’s letter


Collection COLISEUM

www.giorgiocollection.it Seregno (MB) Italy

design Giorgio Soressi

MADE IN ITALY


contributors

RADHIKA VAZ

DOLLY D'SOUZA

WRITER Radhika Vaz is one of India’s most wellrecognized stand-up comedians. Her book Unladylike, A Memoir, is available in stores and online and her web series, Shugs & Fats, was nominated for the 2015 IFP Gotham Awards in New York. In This Issue: In ‘Potty Mouth’ (pg 202), Vaz reveals her bathroom-related idiosyncrasies. “Being asked to write for AD has definitely been a highlight. I know my architect friends will treat me with more respect. Now all I need to do is write for a medical journal and maybe some sort of engineering rag, and I can die happy.”

MARTAND KHOSLA

WRITER Artist and AD50 architect Martand Khosla, graduated from London’s acclaimed school, The Architectural Association in 2001. Consequently, he returned to India and became a founding partner of the award-winning New Delhi-based architectural studio, Romi Khosla Design Studio. In This Issue: Khosla introduces readers to his favourite books in ‘Building a Library’ (pg 70). “Some of these books are really old editions and belong to my father, and while I had to be really careful because of that, it was very interesting revisiting them for this piece.” 28|

KOMAL SHARMA

WRITER Komal Sharma is a New York-based writer. In This Issue: Sharma talks to New York-based architect and interior designer Shamir Shah about his design for a Park Avenue loft in ‘The High Life’ (pg 172). “As a writer, you ideally check against projecting your own opinions on to the interviewee. But once in a while, you talk to someone and their work strikes you as simply evident and natural. Talking to Shamir about his nuanced and very considered views on design and life made it one of those lovely experiences.”

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

TOM PARKER

PHOTOGRAPHER A lifestyle and travel photographer, this former photo editor of the Indian edition of Condé Nast Traveller shifted his base to London after three years in the country. He returns regularly for work. In This Issue: In ‘Life at the Top’ (pg 154) Parker photographed a two-storey home designed by architect Ashiesh Shah in Mumbai’s posh Cuffe Parade. An assignment that took two entire days, a weekend no less, Parker found the apartment to be “massive”. The space that really made an impression, though, was the one where he shot Shah’s portrait; his “favourite spot in the house”.


contributors

SHWETA MALHOTRA

ILLUSTRaToR Shweta Malhotra is a graphic artist and designer based in New Delhi. Her overall design aesthetic is minimal, bold and graphic, a response to the maximalist visual language prevalent in India. In This Issue: In ‘The Shape of Things to Come’ (pg 80), Malhotra illustrated some of the most awaited buildings set for completion in 2016. “It was an absolute pleasure illustrating the works of some of my favourite architects from the world over— especially Tadao Ando!”

ANJALI PURI

wRITER Anjali Puri is a freelance journalist based in New Delhi. In This Issue: In ‘An Evolving Cityscape’ (pg 108), Puri interviews Aurélien Lemonier of the Centre Pompidou in Paris, who has curated the architecture section of the Dhaka Art Summit 2016. She says, “It was a fascinating conversation, about buildings, yes, but also about the interplay of architecture and politics and history and culture. While retaining the outsider’s ability to connect the local and regional with the global and universal, he had also made a great effort to understand Bangladesh from the inside.” 30|

FABIEN CHARUAU

PhoTogRaPhER For the last 15 years, Fabien Charuau has been based in India, working as an interiors, fashion and advertising photographer. He is also a visual artist, represented in Mumbai by art gallery, Chatterjee & Lal. In This Issue: Charuau says of his shoot for ‘In Graphic Detail’ (pg 33), “Shooting for this issue of AD was a very engaging experience—wonderful styling and logistic planning from the team and the possibility to push the photography towards a minimal abstraction, which echoes my artistic sensibilities.”

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2016

LATIKA KHOSLA

wRITER Latika Khosla is the founder and design director of Freedom Tree, a Mumbai-based colour and trend studio, and the creative force behind Freedom Tree Home, a home decor brand with stores in Goa and Mumbai. An alumna of NID and chair holder at the Color Marketing Group, she has worked with brands in technology and transportation, paint and cosmetics, office systems and more. In This Issue: Khosla’s role as a colour forecaster and contributor to trend forums gives her the domain expertise to comment on the forecast for 2016 in ‘Swatch This Space’ (pg 104).


OUR ROUND-UP FROM THE FRONT LINES OF DESIGN: TRENDS, PRODUCTS, STYLES, BOOKS AND EVENTS

A MEMPHIS TOUCH ‘Circus’ (93/6020) wallpaper from the Geometric collection by Cole & Son; F&F. Red ‘Wire’ lounge chair; rubberbandproducts.com. Rug from the Ankara collection; imperialknots.com. ‘Westin’ console by Giorgio Cattelan for Cattelan Italia; And More Stories. ‘Random Art’ sculpture; Design Artifacts Haven. Ceramic vase; Poltrona Frau Group Design Center. ‘Mesh’ lamp; And More Stories. Book; CMYK Bookstore.

IN

FOCUS

DETAIL

One trend that will gain an edge in 2016 is the use of solid bold shades paired with striking patterns and accessories to create the new cool STYLIST SONALI THAKUR . PHOTOGRAPHER FABIEN CHARUAU


discover

A striking pAttern ‘Circus’ (93/6020) wallpaper from the Geometric collection by Cole & son; F&F. ‘The Stag’ trophy; Design Artifacts Haven. Floor lamp; sarita Handa. ‘Istanbul’ sofa by parrot; CAC. (On the sofa) ‘Green Bird’ cushion; CAC. ‘Santaria Saphir’ and ‘Butterfly Parade Opalin’ cushions by Christian Lacroix; My tailor Home. ‘Fold’ occasional tables by Philippe Nigro for Ligne roset; And More stories. ‘Lily’ vase in apple green; Abaca. ‘Zola’ canister (black); inV Home. Books; CMYk Bookstore. ‘Staple’ bamboo silk carpet (solid blue); shyam Ahuja. ‘Mercury’ armchair by parrot; CAC. ‘Hexagonal Montage’ cushion; idamstore.com. ‘Doris’ mirror-top side table; natuzzi. ‘Tiko’ vase; Villeroy & Boch.


Home at last.

AGENT FOR INDIA VITA MODERNA Pritesh Modi Mob. +91 9920780590 Tel. +91 22 61270011 info@vitamoderna.in

SOFT DREAM SECTIONAL SOFA design by Antonio Citterio

FLEXFORM www.flexform.it


discover

COLOUR BLOCKING ‘Suswagatam Gendaa’ (purple), ‘Suswagatam Gulaab’ (yellow) and ‘Suswagatam Kamal’ (blue) framed prints by Mira Malhotra; kultureshop.in. ‘Retro’ sideboard; Freedom Tree. Books; CMYK Bookstore. ‘Naturo’ vase from the NaturoFantastic collection; Lladró. Striped mixing bowl; CAC. ‘Anmut Colour’ dinner plates; Villeroy & Boch. ‘Copper Globe’ lamp; And More Stories. ‘Frilly’ chairs by Patricia Urquiola for Kartell; Santorini. ‘Simon’ dining table by BlueLoft; Khazana Stores. ‘Anmut Colour’ dinner plates; Villeroy & Boch. ‘Butterfly Parade’ quarter plates by Christain Lacroix; InV Home. Purple and green glasses; The Pinakin Store. ‘The No Evil Monkeys’ candelabra by Selab for Seletti; bycollage.com. ‘Basis’ rug (dark purple); jaipurrugsco.com.


AHMEDABAD BY DESIGN ITALIANO OPP. SINDHUBHAVAN, SINDHUBHAVAN ROAD, BODAKDEV AHMEDABAD - 380015 GUJARAT (INDIA) T. +91 98 79026328 - INFO@DESIGNITALIANO.IN CUSTOMISED INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICE

POWELL SEATING SYSTEM RODOLFO DORDONI DESIGN

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neon sign ‘Drop’ bookcase by Nendo for Cappellini; Poltrona Frau group Design Centre. Books, CMYK Bookstore. ‘Angie Anakis 25-29’ vase; And More stories. ‘Bong’ side table (blue) by Giulio Cappellini for Cappellini; Poltrona Frau group Design Centre. ‘Lanterna’ tealight holder by seletti; bycollage.com. ‘Rainbow’ cotton rug; shyam Ahuja. ‘Flash’ table, ‘Lean’ bookend (blue), ‘Cylinder’ pen stand, ‘Big Block’ sketchpad, ‘Globe Series’ hardbound book (beige), ‘Memo Block’ multi-coloured notepad, ‘Three x One’ trays (blue and white); rubberbandproducts.com. ‘Elle T1’ white table lamp; natuzzi. Copper alarm clock; Red Blue & Yellow. ‘Diva’ chair by Valdichienti; sources Unlimited. ‘Fork’ floor lamp by Diesel Living for Foscarini; Firefly. ‘Head Study’ graphic art on aluminium composite plates; Design Temple. ‘Ruché’ sofa by Inga Sempé for Ligne Roset; And More stories. ‘Circular Tangents’ cushion; idamstore.com.


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SOLID CHARM ‘Mon Beau’ mirrors by Michael Koenig for Ligne Roset; And More Stories. ‘Toy’ chair; rubberbandproducts.com. Books; CMYK Bookstore. ‘Bluff City’ pendant lamp by Jonah Takagi for Roll & Hill; Firefly. ‘Piero’ bench in polymer gold (next to the bed); Abaca. Ceramic vase (blue); Poltrona Frau Group Design Center. Black alarm clock; Red Blue & Yellow. Moss balls (set of six); The Pinakin Store. ‘Honeycomb’ duvet and pillow shams (grey); Sarita Handa. ‘Green Chowkad’ (60x60 cm) and ‘Green Patta’ (50x70 cm) cushions; no-mad.in. ‘Jardin Exo’Chic’ printed cushion by Christian Lacroix; My Tailor Home. ‘Seascape Mist’ lime and turquoise quilt; Shades Of India. Assistant Stylist: Samir Wadekar Production Assistant: Shreya Basu Production: Imran Khatri Productions Set Designer: Shruti Gupte

For details, see Stockists


ALL ROADS LEAD TO

MuMbaI PRESENTING

WEEK 13th-18th February 2016

An insight into the pioneering initiative and what Make In India aims to accomplish

Across Mumbai, a melting pot which represents a unique combination of culture, commerce, technology, industry and urbanity

The best and brightest: Global, government and industry leaders, policy makers, regulators, business associations, entrepreneurs, research institutions and international media

13th-18th February, 2016. To stay updated with key events or to know more, visit www. makeinindia.com/ mumbai-week

WaTCH OuT FOR?

WHEN?

WHO?

WHERE?

WHaT?

The much-awaited, landmark event Make In India Week is just around the corner. Here’s everything you need to know about it.

Gain vital information across key manufacturing sectors through the Make In India Centre, business forums, design conferences, seminars and more


SHOWCASE + CONNECT + COLLABORATE

TH E

CI TY

O F

Th de er e m an is th in ogr no c a a r co t r e ph oth Th mm ep dib ics er of e c e res le s , d nat m Ind ity rce ent cal iver ion us ia w , te s a e. si in eu n a ill s ch u M ty t m rt ho no niq um an he w s, , c w lo u b d d o ga ra ca g e c ai e r lle ft, se y, i om is o mo ld t rie te th nd n c ha s a ch e us bin e b rac t c m n o a i t nd ol a ry ti g y o m pa ogy ker an on o me n s bin lt s d u e rt ne and th ur f cu ing ch s r b l p ri o t ns fas ug ani ure ot tit hio h d ty. , ut n is io ac pl ns ro ay . ss s

D RE AM S

Make In India, a major national initiative, is designed to propel sustainable growth and make India the preferred global manufacturing destination. The theme of the week-long event is to: Showcase design, innovation and sustainability potential to highlight India’s top manufacturing sectors in the coming decade. Connect with global industry leaders and administrators through their involvement. Collaborate to take corporate and public participation to the next level. From being a global platform for networking and business opportunities to having access to stakeholders, global investors, tech firms and think tanks—it’s going to be big.


SE M IN AR S

Th no er i an se e’s th d s , an ple be ose oc d nty co en w ial f exp to lla pl ith ut lor loo bo an th ure e n k ra ne e m . A ew for te d, w w to in ost ar ide ard co clu in ds as to m din no th , te a v t a e up g a ati t w chn the w we ve a ill a olo M ith e n c g a id k-lo d g kno ies ke I ea n am w a n s t g h e le nd Ind ha ac -c dg le ia t s ka ha e c ad W ol th ng om er ee sh k ve on in ur , w g i pan ip : Fo d ba h e ie sk ru n ere as s, ills ms de fi . t sig cod In a rst- hat tha d n er d ge wi t w pr s, iti ne ll i ob en on ra sh ll cu le gi , a tio ap t t m ne h n e h s. er os en As rou s a t o tr ia’ g nd f in ep s e h th de itia ren con e sig tiv eu om ne es rs a ic rs ha nd w ve ill

H AC K AT H O N

FO RU M S,

The Make In India Centre will feature an exhibition of the most innovative products and manufacturing processes that have been developed in India. The space itself will be an avant-garde statement in design, merging the aesthetics of traditional craft with a futuristic vision. Opportunities across key sectors that will boost Indian manufacturing activity will be highlighted.

&

THE MAKE IN INDIA CENTRE

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

The calendar includes seminars, performances and workshops that will feature experts from finance, industry, art and design. Highlights include the Make In India Centre, CNN Asia Business Forum, Time India Awards, Make In Mumbai, The Global Design & Innovation Session, Empowering Through Design, 18 State Seminars and much more. Investor or citizen, bureaucrat or businessman, this is one week that should be in everyone’s diaries!


13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th Feb Feb Feb Feb Feb Feb SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Inauguration of Make In India Week by the Prime Minister of India, Shri Narendra Modi

CNN Asia business Forum: CNN anchors Fareed Zakaria, Richard Quest and Andrew Stevens will lead a series of interviews and debates

Make In Mumbai: World’s best urban planners and architects to present ideas on successful urban planning. Exhibition of the best practices at the Make In India Centre

Driving Innovationhackathon: Coders, engineers and designers will collaborate to come up with ideas that solve urban design problems. Winners will present their ideas in front of venture capitalists, government representatives and the media

Conference on empowering through Design: A forum on rethinking contemporary design practices against the backdrop of manufacturing

Closing session

time India Awards: Recognizing excellence in the world of manufacturing

Maharashtra Night: An evening dedicated to the best in media, entertainment, popular culture and technology from the state of Maharashtra

the Global Design & Innovation Session: A daylong session on global design & innovation with founders of leading brands, key decision makers and experts from the fields of fashion, cinema, architecture and management

Launch of the Make In India Magazine: This one-time edition will showcase some of India’s most creative and dynamic innovators and entrepreneurs across various industries

For registration and queries visit makeinindia.com/mumbai-week Follow the lion: Facebook facebook.com/makeinindiaofficial Twitter @makeinindia Instagram @makeinindia


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‘PLAKSH’ PENDANT LAMP, `980, FREEDOM TREE

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‘CODY’ BIRD SCULPTURE, `3,450, BOCONCEPT

‘MORBEUS’ SIDEBOARD, `22,600, FREEDOM TREE

‘FLOWER’ BOWL, `3,450, BOCONCEPT

‘LAVO’ DINING TABLE, `48,000, ‘LAVO’ DINING CHAIRS, `18,000 EACH, RED, BLUE & YELLOW

‘ETHNO CHIC’ RUG, `34,450, BOCONCEPT

‘LACE’ THREE-TIER COOKIE JAR, `2,095, ELVY


discover ‘LUXOR’ (105/1003) WALLPAPER FROM THE GEOMETRIC II COLLECTION BY COLE & SON, `12,650 PER ROLL, F&F

‘ROCK ON BLACK GLAM’ PENDANT LAMP, `8,500, MOTHER GONE MAD DESIGN STUDIO

‘COMO’ LACQUERED BOOKCASE (MATTE CHARCOAL GREY), `44,950, BOCONCEPT

‘BEATON’ TABLE LAMP, `3,790, IKKADUKKA.COM

‘HOWARD’ CHAIR, `15,990, AKFD STUDIO

‘CRANE’ DHURRIE (4x6 FEET), `11,500, SAFOMASI.COM

‘BLOCK’ ALARM CLOCK BY LEFF, `5,700, BYCOLLAGE.COM

‘BIGADE’ DESK, `43,500, INV HOME

‘PATTERN’ STORAGE BOX, `950 EACH, BOCONCEPT

PHOTOGRAPHERS: ANSHUMAN SEN, INDRAJIT SATHE. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: NITYA DHINGRA, KRITI VIJ.

‘NIGHTMARE’ A2SIZED FRAMED PRINT BY JASJYOT SINGH HANS, `7,000, KULTURESHOP.COM


discover ‘CALLIGRAPHIE’ (FP305) WALLPAPER FROM THE JACARANDA COLLECTION BY PIERRE FREY, `22,800 PER METRE, LE MILL

‘A SACRED COW’ AND ‘A WEDDING HORSE’ A2-SIZED FRAMED PRINTS BY KASHMIRA SARODE, `7,000 EACH, KULTURESHOP.COM

‘CASA MADERA’ DRESSING TABLE BY WOODSWORTH, `24,500, PEPPERFRY.COM

‘CORBIN’ TABLE LAMP, `1,599, URBANLADDER.COM

CIGAR TABLE, `12,000, THE UPPER GALLERY

‘COLOR POP’ WATER JUG, `820, FREEDOM TREE

‘HAMPTONS’ BED (QUEEN SIZE), `72,975, IQRUP+RITZ

‘CASA BONITO’ TABLE BY WOODSWORTH, `14,693, PEPPERFRY.COM

HANDLOOM WINE-RED RUG (5x8 FEET), `25,000, IMPERIALKNOTS.COM

‘DORIS SLIPPER’ CHAIR, `35,000, LIMÓN


MARINE DRIVE TABLES www.viyahome.com MUMBAI 01/31 Kamal Mansion 2F Arthur Bunder Road Colaba M.9987879694


discover ‘DANZON’ (W680202) WALLPAPER BY OSBORNE&LITTLE, `12,970 PER ROLL, F&F

‘CBWU002’ BOOKCASE, `48,000, CANE BOUTIQUE ‘SPACE LINE PENDANT’, `24,450, BOCONCEPT ‘AMBY’ A2-SIZED FRAMED PRINT BY KUNAL ANAND, `7,000, KULTURESHOP.COM

‘FADING WOOD’ CANDLESTICKS, (PINK, GREY AND CITRUS YELLOW), `950, `950 AND `1,450, BOCONCEPT

STONEWARE VASE, `4,500, MOONRIVER ‘CALASCIO’ ARMCHAIR (GREY) BY CASACRAFT, `7,929, PEPPERFRY.COM

‘DART’ TABLE, `9,880, AKFD STUDIO

‘FELCIANO’ THREESEATER SOFA (PALE AND DARK EARL GREY) BY CASACRAFT, `50,509, PEPPERFRY.COM

‘AT HOME’ COFFEE TABLE, `6,900, FABFURNISH.COM

‘NOSTALGIA’ RUG (5x8 FEET), `48,000, JAIPUR RUGS

For details, see Stockists

PHOTOGRAPHERS: THIRU S/WHITE LIGHT DESIGN, SHAMANTH PATIL. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: NITYA DHINGRA, KRISHNA KALRO.

‘DREAM CLOUD’ CUSHION, `880, FREEDOM TREE


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NAGPUR - Ajni Square Wardha Road: 9168652091

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D'Decor Blinds Galleries : Mumbai - Bharat Furnishing, S.J. Enterprise, S Shades, Pravin Kumar & Sons, Red Skin, The Window Seat, JC Furnishing, Furniture Zone; Pune - Themes Furnishing, Kejals, Alankar Mangal Decor; Anand - Fabric Ville; Kolhapur - Riddhi Curtains; Ahmedabad - Dynamic House, Selections, Raiff, Comfy; Aurangabad - Palette; Baroda - Aavaran; Bhavnagar - Amsons Furnishing; Nagpur - Malik Deco House, Jayshree Traders, Furnishing World; Rajkot - Worlds House; Surat - The Decora Incorporation, Saheb Krupa Home Decor; Gurgaon - M.O.; Lucknow - Monarch; Kanpur - High Street; Bhopal - Gharana; Amritsar - Ganpati Exclusive; New Delhi – Nirmals Furnishing, DWINDO, Panipat Handloom, HomeSaaz, Leela Furnishing,


Kapas Furnishings, Surprise Furnishing, Rajwada Decor; Noida - Studio Home; Jammu - Bansal Trading; Mohali - Home Square; Ludhiana - Naveen Bharat Furnishing Pvt Ltd; Jalandhar - Mansaram Mahajan Furnishing Pvt Ltd; Panipat - Prince The Designer Studio; Panchkula – High Street Gagan Handloom; Indore - Tana Bana, Grah Shobha; Dehradun - Virendra & Co. Interiors; Agra - Modi Enterprises, Meerut - G S Furnishing; Sharanpur - Janata Home Furnishing; Hissar - Madras Handloom Pvt Ltd; Haldwani - Internationals The Furnishing Mall; Bareli - Ashoka Foam; Bengaluru - Petals, Skipper Furnishings, Drapes Avenue, London Line, Vistar, Symphony; Hyderabad - Jay Durga Furnishings, Drapes & More; Calicut & Kochi - Kenz Furnishing; Coimbatore - Peacock Decor; Kolkatta - Times Furnishing; Raipur - Lifestyle Furnishing; Siliguri - Kuber Furnishing


discover AGENDA

NEWSFLASH es to know right now A round-up of events, ideas, innovations and nam WRITER LEENA DESAI

PHOTO: NEVILLE SUKHIA

nation. So you get different forms of architecture and habitations that coexist in very close proximity. The second is that we don’t have a unified architectural style any longer, like we had in the decades of the 1950s and 1960s when modernism was accepted as the national style. Today, the question of national identity has been supplemented with that of regional identity. So, essentially, Ranjit, Kaiwan and I have addressed this condition or “state of architecture” and tried to make sense of this productively.

VISIONS OF

BUILDING

Eminent architect and founding principal of RMA Architects, Rahul Mehrotra talks to AD ahead of the exhibition he is co-curating with Kaiwan Mehta and Ranjit Hoskote, titled ‘The State of Architecture: Practices and Processes in India’—at the NGMA, Mumbai, from 6 January to 27 March 2016.

AD: How would you describe the state of architecture in India right now? Rahul Mehrotra: Confused, highly pluralistic, and varied. This spectrum of variation and thus visual chaos is established on account of two reasons: the first, the severe inequities that exist in our society and

AD: Much of Mumbai’s built heritage is giving way to skyscraping residential towers. Is the exhibition a response to this? RM: The exhibition’s aim is much wider in looking at the entire spectrum of attitudes to architecture nationally. We’re trying to understand how the built environment across the country is transforming and why. And what role does architecture have to play in this massive transformation? Actually, change is most noticeable in India’s small towns and not necessarily in the mega cities as we imagine it. AD: What is your take on the morphing Mumbai skyline? RM: Mumbai’s skyline is changing because we have completely unregulated land markets; and that, combined with the arrival of global capital, is transforming it. What’s totally lacking in Indian cities is urban design; that’s how different forms of architecture come together in the broader urban landscape. AD: Your father-in-law Charles Correa had a grand vision for Navi Mumbai. As an urban planning expert yourself, how do you think we can manage the urban sprawl? RM: We have no choice but to simultaneously address both scales of the problem—at the metropolitan as well as the neighbourhood levels. We have to find ways to use infrastructure to orchestrate and lead

growth, not the other way around. What Mumbai desperately needs is the empowerment of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) because we need visioning for the entire region. The MMRDA has not come close to fulfilling this mission. As Charles Correa himself put this—today, they don’t produce visions but hallucinations! AD: What do you think of the ideas behind the smart cities being developed in India? RM: The biggest contribution of the smart cities idea is that it has brought attention to our urban centres. What we have to watch out for is that the way smart cities are being perceived is not human and, instead, too centred on these being cities for investments. We need to humanize these approaches if this has to work for India. Otherwise, we will perpetuate enclaves of gated communities with no place for ordinary people and, more importantly, the poor. AD: Are boutique apartment buildings, which house several branches of the same family, the future of Indian family living? RM: Not really; but I think for cities like Chennai, Bengaluru and New Delhi, as they grow denser, this will be a model that will naturally emerge. I am interested in exploring this as a typology, as I think it has interesting possibilities in making the densification process gentler. AD: What is the intent behind inviting firms to submit projects for the ‘Projections and Speculations’ section of the exhibition? RM: It is to try and widen the pool of firms. We curated the first round and then opened it up to submissions from architects. This has been productive and makes the reading of the state of architecture more inclusive. We hope this is a start and will open up the debate on architecture more broadly.


PHOTOS COURTESY YALE WAGNER PHOTOGRAPHY

discover

2

A VENERABLE TRIBUTE

Building a gallery or a museum in memoriam happens, perhaps, quite regularly. regularly. But few can boast of interiors by a world-famous designer. The Gyan Gyan Gallery, in Jaipur, is dedicated to the late Gyan Chand Dhaddha, who founded the acclaimed jewellery house Gem Plaza in 1988. In his lifetime, Dhaddha travelled extensively and amassed a vast collection of artefacts from around the world. It is inside Gyan Gallery—whose interior design bears the trademark sophistication of its designer, Paul Mathieu—that artefacts such as textiles, Mughal rugs, silver hookahs, gemstones, vintage spectacles, paintings and rare inscriptions are beautifully displayed. Mathieu designed a Zen-like museum space that is not only ideal for appreciating the treasures on display, but also the man who lovingly collected them.

One would rarely associate the element of fun that pop-ups usually lend to a subject as serious as conservation architecture. But that’s exactly what Shivaram Ananthanarayanan has done in his book In the Fold: Heritage Structures of India produced in collaboration with architect Dean D’Cruz of Mozaic. In the Fold presents 10 heritage structures as pop-ups using origamic architecture, which fuses origami and kirigami (Japanese paper cutting) to produce three-dimensional architectural forms. In the Fold is priced at `4,000, available at 9twentycreative.com and foldnation.com. A pop-up version of the Harmandir Sahib, Amritsar’s Golden Temple.

A pop-up version of the Mahabodhi Vihar temple in Bodh Gaya, Bihar.

PHOTOS: SHRINIVAS ANANTHANARAYANAN

3

UNFOLDING HERITAGE


argine

masierogroup.com


5

Untitled from ‘Drawing from the Present’ (2014) by Chitra Ganesh

FOR THE LOVE OF ART

Angelus Novus (2008) by Praneet Soi

PHOTOS: VIVEK SAHNI

Goa is once again hosting the who’s who of the Indian art world at Sensorium, the annual festival of art, literature, music and theatre—started by Sunaparanta, Goa Centre for the Arts—in Panjim. Titled ‘Love’, the 2015 edition opened on 14 December 2015 and will run until 29 February 2016. The current edition features discussions, installations, sculptures, paintings, videos, and mixed media work by prominent artists. sgcfa.org

4

ARTISTRY IN STORE

For the discerning traveller who seeks the handcrafted collectibles of Rajasthan, but lacks the time to make a trip there, Vayu: Design for Living is entirely dedicated to the most refined crafts from the state. Located inside Bikaner House, a recently restored colonial mansion near India Gate, in New Delhi, Vayu has been designed and curated by Dave Chang and Vivek Sahni. The store’s serene hand-painted walls serve as the perfect backdrop for a custom-made collection of furniture, jewellery, accessories and apparel sourced from the master craftsmen of Rajasthan who continue to practise ancient design techniques.

LOUNGING IN

7

STYLE

6

HEARS

TALKING DESIGN

The third edition of the India Design Forum (IDF)—founded by art connoisseurs and patrons Rajshree and Aishwarya Pathy—will be held on 17 February, in Mumbai, as part of the Make in India Week, a showcase of the Indian manufacturing sector’s prowess in design, innovation and sustainability. This edition of IDF will include panel discussions and talks by key international and Indian speakers, as well as the forum’s signature ‘Happy Hours’, where young designers present their work in a fast-paced, TEDx-style forum. indiadesignforum.com Since 2012, Louis Vuitton, the French luxury fashion house, has been collaborating with some of the most acclaimed designers for Objets Nomades, a limited edition collection of foldable furniture and travel accessories. After collaborating with the likes of Patricia Urquiola, Nendo, Maarten Baas, Barber and Osgerby and more, they teamed up with Dutch designer Marcel Wanders to launch the ‘Lounge Chair’, which debuted at the Louis Vuitton Miami Design District store as part of the Objets Nomades exhibition from 3 December 2015 to 10 February 2016. The portable chair is made up of three different pieces, which when attached to each other, can be used as a chaise longue, armchair or pouffe.

PHOTO COURTESY VADEHRA ART GALLERY

PHOTO COURTESY LAKEEREN ART GALLERY

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POWER

These cult-status watches are as relevant today as they were back in the day when they first made their debut WATCH EDITOR RISHNA SHAH

CHOPARD ICONIC DESIGN: HAPPY SPORT DEBUT: 1993

ROLEX

ICONIC DESIGN: OYSTER

PERPETUAL DATEJUST DEBUT: 1945 IDENTIFIERS: The date window at 3 o’clock, a fluted bezel, and a supple five-piece link metal bracelet dubbed Jubilee. MODIFICATIONS: In 2003, the first ladies’ version was created; and in 2009, the ‘DateJust II’ was introduced with a larger diameter of 41mm. MODERN-DAY VERSION: With a focus on coloured gemstones, the ‘Oyster Perpetual DateJust Pearlmaster’ incorporates 48 baguette-cut sapphires set in 18-carat gold. The 39mm dial can withstand depths up to 100 metres.

IDENTIFIERS: Mobile diamonds on the round dial below a sapphire crystal case. MODIFICATIONS: There have been several special editions over the years, such as the ‘Happy Sport Snowflakes’ in 2003, ‘Happy Sport Cannes’ in 2005, ‘Happy Sport Zebra-Striped’ in 2008, as well as transformations of the dial into square and oval shapes. In 2013, to celebrate two decades of the Happy Sport collection, Chopard offered a unique bespoke service for clients to personalize their Happy Sport watches. MODERN-DAY VERSION:

A 30mm automatic version of the ‘Happy Sport’, launched recently, features steel, diamonds and a red alligator strap.

HUBLOT

ICONIC DESIGN: BIG BANG DEBUT: 2005 IDENTIFIERS: A porthole-style dial with six H-shaped screws on the bezel, best recognized for its rubber-strap editions and contrast dials. MODIFICATIONS: Juicy hues were chosen for the Big Bang Tutti Frutti collection in 2008, and a more saturated colour scheme for the Big Bang Pop Art series in 2014. The Unico movement—a column-wheel chronograph with a double clutch—was added to the dial in 2013. There have been several collaborations with Ferrari, too. MODERN-DAY VERSION: To mark a decade of the bestseller, the ‘Big Bang Unico 10 Years Haute Joaillerie’—limited to 10 gem-studded watches—was unveiled in 2015, with a 45mm dial and a whopping price tag of $1 million each. 64|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

OMEGA

ICONIC DESIGN:

CONSTELLATION DEBUT: 1952 IDENTIFIERS: A constellation star at 6 o’clock, griffes on the bezel at 3 and 9 o’clock and a horizontal link bracelet. Roman numerals are often seen engraved on the bezel. MODIFICATIONS: Over the decades, several variations have been added to the line, such as a date function in 1958, day-date in 1967 and a ladies’ edition, ‘Pluma’, in 2014. MODERN-DAY VERSION: At Baselworld 2015, the ‘Constellation Pluma’ was in the spotlight with a feather-engraved, mother-of-pearl dial in steel, gold and diamonds.


discover BVLGARI ICONIC DESIGN: SERPENTI DEBUT: Circa 1949 IDENTIFIERS: Coiled snake bracelet in gold mesh with a watch face in the serpent head. MODIFICATIONS: In 1962, Elizabeth Taylor wore the ‘Serpenti’ on the sets of Cleopatra, which boasted pavé-set diamonds and emerald eyes. Another coveted model from the same decade came in turquoise enamel and sapphires, and wrapped thrice around the wrist. MODERN-DAY VERSION: A head-overtail snake produced in red lacquer, pink gold and diamonds was released at Baselworld 2015, as an ode to eternal renewal.

JAEGER-LECOULTRE ICONIC DESIGN: REVERSO DEBUT: 1931

AUDEMARS PIGUET

IDENTIFIERS: A rectangular art-decostyle case that turns completely on its axis with a swivelling mechanism. MODIFICATIONS: From the first blue-lacquered dial version in 1933, to an enamel miniature painting of a maharani in 1936, the second face of the ‘Reverso’ has seen many different avatars. A 1993 model had a tourbillon; a 1998 model, a second time zone; and a 2000 model featured a perpetual calendar. MODERN-DAY VERSION: A limited edition of the ‘Reverso à Eclipse’ was created as a tribute to Vincent van Gogh on the 125th anniversary of his death. Sunflowers are intricately enamelled on the pink gold dial—a reproduction of Van Gogh’s masterpiece.

ICONIC DESIGN: ROYAL OAK DEBUT: 1972 IDENTIFIERS: An octagonal bezel with eight hexagonal screws and a lattice-embossed dial. MODIFICATIONS: There have been many add-ons to this core line, like the ‘Royal Oak Offshore’—a sportier edition released in 1993, and which is now a collection—and a tourbillon chronograph in 2010. MODERN-DAY VERSION: A chiming ‘Royal Oak Concept’ watch featuring a minute repeater, tourbillon and column-wheel chronograph was released in 2015. 66|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

CARTIER

ICONIC DESIGN: TANK DEBUT: 1919 IDENTIFIERS: A seamless blend of the lugs and case, originally inspired by the horizontal section of a Renault tank. The angular dial has a railway-style minute track in the interior, Roman numerals and blue steel baton hands. MODIFICATIONS: The case was elongated for the ‘Tank Americaine’ in 1989 and the chain-link bracelet was tweaked for the ‘Tank Française’ in 1996. The ‘Tank Anglais’ was launched in 2012 with a more curvilinear shape and enclosed crown design. MODERN-DAY VERSION: The ‘Tank Louis Cartier Skeleton Sapphire’ watch is fitted with a brown alligator strap, a calibre 9622-MC movement, a power reserve of three days and a pink gold manual-wound skeletonized movement, visible through the sapphire crystal.


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RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP (VOLUME ONE) Peter Buchanan (Phaidon, 1993)

LIBRARY

BUILDING A

LIBRARY AD50 architect MARTAND KHOSLA takes us on a tour of his library, talking about the books—and the architects and concepts within their pages—that have guided his work PHOTOGRAPHER THIRU S LUBETKIN AND TECTON: ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIAL COMMITMENT

Peter Coe (University of Bristol, 1981)

Georgia-born, British architect Berthold Lubetkin is someone whose work I had always been familiar with, but did not engage with in any detail until about 10 years ago. We, at Romi Khosla Design Studio, were in the process of designing buildings for the urban poor in New Delhi, when I had an opportunity to revisit Lubetkin (and his firm Tecton) while researching their Finsbury Health Centre in London. This book is not a critical assessment of Lubetkin’s work, nor is it a detailed documentation of his built works. It is, however, an important introduction to the social impact of architecture in society, and the impact architectural interventions have made in the past. Unlike Le Corbusier’s work, where often the scale of conceptualization and implementation was extremely large, with Lubetkin’s work, one is able to truly assess the impact of architecture at a community level. As we look at decentralization and empowerment of local bodies as a viable planning alternative in the mega cities of the world, there is much to be learned from how the local councils and architects worked together—successfully—in the past. 70|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

Renzo Piano has long been an architect whose practice I have respected. Unfortunately, I have not enjoyed some of his more recent projects like The Shard in London and the extension to Le Corbusier’s Notre Dame du Haut—a chapel in Ronchamp, France. However, works from his early- and mid-career have been a real inspiration to me and many other architects. His approach to architecture has been one where he successfully managed to craft a building from the micro to the macro scale without allowing overarching stylistic criteria to define his built form. In an age where the signature forms of architects—ranging from Zaha Hadid to Daniel Libeskind— have dominated the architectural imagination, Piano has managed to give importance to the smallest part of a building and allowed the form to emerge from the craft and programme of a space.


discover TRICKSTER CITY: WRITINGS FROM THE BELLY OF THE METROPOLIS (Penguin Viking, 2010)

LOCAL CODE: THE CONSTITUTION OF A CITY AT 42 DEGREES NORTH LATITUDE Michael Sorkin (Princeton Architectural Press, 1993)

Local Code was introduced to me in my final year of architecture training. I was looking at ways in which micro societies can benefit from an integration of formal architecture and locally agreed and conceptualized legislation. Architect and architectural critic Michael Sorkin prescribes a series of laws for an imagined community, laid out as a series of rules that prescribe the limits and possibilities of a neighbourhood. Imagine if gram sabhas, mohalla committees and panchayats (local and rural governmental organizations) were to be given the power to formulate their own laws for their own geographical and cultural realities. From an urban planning and governance point of view, Lubetkin’s work and Local Code, for me, are great examples of empowering and transforming the urban fabric through local legislation and its resultant development through built form and infrastructure. What this book has proposed is a much more viable way of conceptualizing and planning for our cities. Rather than to think of our cities as static mega systems, it is much better to plan towards a decentralized approach where the city is in fact an amalgamation of constantly evolving smaller organisms. 72|

Trickster City emerged as a result of a series of writing workshops held over a period of two years in New Delhi. It is one of the most exciting pieces of writing about New Delhi, but, in fact, could be about any large city within South Asia. If you consider the fact that nearly 60 per cent of the population of the city of New Delhi live and find work in areas that are not recognized by the master plan of the city— semi-legal, illegal, jhuggie jhopdi clusters (a term that refers to huts and makeshift dwellings), pavement dwellers—our city, in fact, is primarily ‘illegal’! There is a lot that is written on it by academics, journalists and planners, but scarcely any writing from it. This book is just that: it is part autobiographical, part fiction and part analysis—and always incredible in its reading of the city. The concerns surrounding my own art practice are almost entirely to do with labour, migration and their relation to the coded systems of the urban mega city. This book added greatly to my immersion and understanding of the organisms, mechanisms and life within New Delhi. I recommend it to every citizen of the capital, to start.

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

BEFORE OBJECT, AFTER IMAGE: KOSHIRAKURA LANDSCAPE 1996-2006 Shin Egashira (AA Publications, 2006)

This book is particularly close to my heart, as it is the result of 10 years of workshops that have taken place under the guidance of Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) tutor, Diploma 11 unit master and architect Shin Egashira. The workshops are held in the remote Japanese village Koshirakura, in the Niigata prefecture. In 1999, I had attended the fourth such workshop, and we had to make a series of shelters for the elderly inhabitants of the village. Till 1996, the inhabitants of Koshirakura had not laid eyes upon people from outside Japan, but since then, every year, they have hosted a batch of 20-30 people from all over the world who descend on the village to teach, learn and engage with them. The built object has been the culmination of the workshops, but the build-up to the final object has been much more about cultural understanding, integration and documentation of the interaction between the inhabitants and the visitors. This book has beautifully recorded the learning, the documentation and the evolution in the nature of the relationship between people, material and culture. The workshops still continue and I look forward to seeing the next edition. This book is a must for anyone interested in Japan, architectural integration and its culture of aesthetics.


discover THE POETICS OF SPACE Gaston Bachelard (Beacon Press, 1958)

As the series of books that I had been asked to choose were to be primarily concerned with architecture, there was no way that I could have left this seminal book out. This book took me a while to get into, but in time, emerged as critical to thinking through my approach to design and architecture. Written by the French philosopher Gaston Bachelard, it treads the space between emotion and intellect, while experiencing and evaluating the built environment. It helped me think about spatial experiences that I took for granted. And it continues to help me decide on how to design, and often helps me take irrational but personally driven decisions. It allowed me to articulate my own relationship with space.

INVISIBLE CITIES

Italo Calvino (Harcourt Brace, 1972)

THE CITY OF TOMORROW Le Corbusier (The Architectural Press, 1947)

I can’t recall when I first came across this book—I imagine that it must have been during my late architectural education—but I continue to return to Le Corbusier’s socialist vision and philosophy very frequently, and often with a lot of criticism. I have, like most architecture students, read Towards a New Architecture and while studying Chandigarh, The Modulor, but it is in the present political context that I have chosen to revisit The City of Tomorrow. In this book, Corbusier lays out a number of solutions for cities from Rio de Janeiro to Paris. Over 60 years since it was written, with a considerable realization of his modernist projects following the Second World War, the emergence of America as a dominant power, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union and the subsequent rise of China, it is perhaps a great time to evaluate Corbusier and his imagination of the future—which has probably been the single most important influence on the Modern architecture of the 20th century. Perhaps I chose this book because I keep returning to the principles set out for a socialist society, yet recognize that its architectural propositions must be different from those imagined by Corbusier. This is necessary if we are to present a future different than that realized by the actualization of his model over the past century. 74|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

It was my first year at the Architectural Association School of Architecture. We were going off for a unit trip to Turkey, and my tutor Mark Prizeman had put this book on a reading list. What has always remained with me is the idea of multiple truths, imagined narratives, and the overlay of unexpected parallels. The idea that a single city is described with each rendering as a completely different city, with its multiple realities, is incredibly poetic. There are parallels between the tale of the blind men describing an elephant and Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon, but the poetically ambiguous space within which Invisible Cities situates itself goes beyond just the idea of multiple truths. For me, early mappings of the city followed the possibilities that emerged from my reading of this book: to follow a series of randomly chosen people as they go about their business within a city, or to explore a city through sensory journeys, finding representational methods that create narratives that can be interpreted by the reader differently. Each mapping leads to a new and unexpected reading of a place.


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newsmakers, opinions that matter, plus the latest in art, architecture and design

JIGNESH JHAVERI

set in stone when ad50 architect rooshad shroff presented his marble bulbs to us, it sparked a collaboration that resulted in this unique piece—hand-carved with the AD logo. shroff’s idea to use traditional crystalware patterns was somewhat slow burning; it took nine months to train artisans from Jaipur to hollow out a single block of white makrana marble. we’re not the only ones with glowing praise for shroff’s latest work; lodha’s luxury collection commissioned an entire installation of the bulbs that glimmers outside its debut residential development at altamount road, mumbai.

Bright Ideas! The people, places, events and innovations that will shape the design world in 2016


There are several reasons why the World Towers deserve attention over the multiple high-rises coming up in Mumbai. It is a development by real-estate moguls Lodha Group. It has acclaimed New York-based architectural firm Pei Cobb Freed & Partners designing it. The interiors are slated to be designed by Armani/Casa. And most significantly, one of its residential towers, World One, is set to be Mumbai’s–and the world’s–tallest. Along with the 120-storey World One, World View and World Crest make up this high-end complex, one of the most talkedabout real-estate projects in Mumbai. Of the three, World One is scheduled for completion at the end of 2016. A glass-and-steel structure, World One’s clover-leaf plan and three-tier elevation will enable it to rise that high in that dense a neighbourhood, and ensure each apartment receives maximum natural light. Once complete, the World One will redefine the Mumbai skyline.

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perspective apple Campus 2, Cupertino

Foster + PArtners After the first Apple Campus at One Infinite Loop in Cupertino, California, it’s almost a given that the second headquarters—a place where the future will be born—should look futuristic. Also located in Cupertino, Apple’s Campus 2 looks like the mother ship (though it is nicknamed the ‘Doughnut’). This $5-billion project is planned as a 280-million-square-foot building by Norman Foster. “The first point of reference, I think, for Steve [Jobs] was the campus at Stanford, his home territory,” says Foster. Interestingly, according to the Pritzker Prize-winning architect, the initial plans weren’t for a circular structure. It eventually “grew into that”. The campus is a four-storey building with tall glass walls that look out at the circular park that it will surround. Set to have one of the world’s largest photovoltaic solar arrays, and an underground car park with over 100 charging stations, the campus is going to lay emphasis on sustainability. With Apple, you expect nothing less.

reforma towers, mexiCo City riChArd meier & PArtners A 40-storey mixed-use development and a 27-storey hotel that combine history, locality and nature—wrapped in Richard Meier’s signature white concrete—reinterpret the concept of a post-millennial high-rise. The towers have been planned in collaboration with local firm Diámetro Arquitectos on Paseo de la Reforma, the city’s major thoroughfare. The master plan evolved by accounting for current constraints, future developments and architectural legacy. As Meier says, “Every component has been carefully designed taking into consideration the public areas, the city and natural light.” A central void through the 40-storey tower creates an urban courtyard, leading to reconfigured internal spaces. The volumetric cut-outs in the exterior enable interaction with the outdoors, further facilitated by the use of glass, an aluminium curtain wall and pre-cast concrete panels. The result will be interiors that receive optimal natural light, ventilation, and a view of the historic surroundings. The goal is to create modern towers that wear the local aesthetic effortlessly.

Casarts, CasablanCa

Atelier ChristiAn de PortzAmPArC In 2009, Pritzker Prize-winner Christian de Portzamparc’s master plan won over the likes of those by Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry and Aziz Lazrak to build the biggest theatre in Africa, on Casablanca’s massive town square, Place Mohammed V. The architect conceived of a contemporary design for Casarts, which would fit into the square’s classic rectangular 1920s’ composition, and chose fluidity over monolithic symmetry. The impossible-tomiss stark white structures have been planned to seem like detached houses. Several narrow gaps in the facade create seamless outdoorindoor spaces, which comprise a grand public gallery composed of curved shell-like red staffs, retail outlets, a cafe and other visitor areas. One of the ‘houses’, at the core of this ever-mutable architecture, is a wide entrance that opens into an area conceived as the larger of two theatres for concerts and plays—which passers-by in the square can also enjoy once the doors open. Overlooking this construction will be a floating moucharaby terracotta and resin wall, a touchstone for a new cultural world, in Casablanca. 82|

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2016


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Validated


perspective StavroS NiarchoS FouNdatioN cultural ceNter, atheNS

Renzo Piano Building WoRkshoP Kallithea, four kilometres from Athens, has been chosen as the site for the colossal Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center. Planned to become an important cultural site close to Athens, the centre has Pritzker Prize-winner Renzo Piano helming the design. Known for a staggering list of iconic works (The New York Times Building and the ongoing Academy Museum of Motion Pictures), Piano’s master plan involved rebuilding the lost connection between site and sea: the once-popular seaport currently offers no sea views. Piano overcame that shortcoming by creating an artificial hill at the site’s south end. The site will also feature a building that houses an opera wing and a national library—with the glass-walled library room just beneath the roof, offering a 360-degree view of Athens. A public space, the Agora, will provide access between the two main facilities. From the land of the Parthenon and the Acropolis, this promises to be a modern-day icon.

NatioNal MuSeuM oF aFricaN-aMericaN hiStory aNd culture, WaShiNgtoN, dc

Shiga MuSeuM oF ModerN art exteNSioN, otSu

sanaa In the Shiga Prefecture, the steel-reinforced concrete structure of the Shiga Museum of Modern Art (Shiga Kenritsu Kindai Bijutsukan) is spectacularly located, offering views of Lake Biwa, Japan’s largest freshwater lake, and the Hira and Hiei mountains. The current building offered architectural firm SANAA—co-founded by Pritzker Prize-winners Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa—context and perspective when they were commissioned to design the museum extension, a 70,000-square-foot space. The work also involved renovating the existing buildings and maintaining the surrounding parkland. The master plan centred on a space that would seamlessly integrate with the current structures and surrounding topography, an objective achieved through a curved pavilion with floor-to-ceiling glass walls. This museum will offer visitors the opportunity to view nature’s mastery juxtaposed against the Warhols, the George Segals and the Gyoshu Hayamis on display inside. 84|

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2016

david adjaye associates Creating what is probably the final addition to be made on Washington, DC’s National Mall—home to the Washington Monument and the National Museum of American History—is not an enviable job. But if anyone can accomplish that, it’s David Adjaye, whose sensitivity to local context and history has ensured his buildings have a distinctive architectural idiom. Collaborating with American firm Freelon Group to design the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, Adjaye has conceived of a building with part of the structure below ground. The corona-shaped building that rises upward uses the stones of the Washington Monument as a point of reference. A porch creates a bridge between built and natural landscapes. A bronze mesh—made of a specially created bronze-coated alloy—is a respectful nod to traditional African craftsmanship. The vast, pillar-less interiors use materials like pre-cast concrete, timber and a glazed skin to offset the bronze mesh. And it all facilitates an emotional journey through 400 years of culture and history.


perspective The TaTe MoDeRn exTension, lonDon

herzog & de meuron The firm that transformed London’s Bankside Power Station into the Tate Modern in 2000, has been given the charge of creating its extension as well. Herzog & de Meuron–debuting in India with the ambitious Kolkata Museum of Modern Art, set for completion in 2019–created a contemporary structure that complements the original building. While the Pritzker Prize-winning firm has used the same material—brick—here as well, it’s in an entirely different and completely futuristic way. The concrete, pre-cast structure of this extension has a perforated brick lattice, facilitating a fantastic play of light and shadow that will make the building glow in the evenings. The windows and terraces are planned to look as if they have been carved out of the surface. The industrial underpinnings also contribute to the overall aesthetic, with the vast oil tanks at the building’s base set to serve as a performance venue. The gallery spaces here are set to be more varied in size and shape. Another London icon in the making? Probably.

Rolex ToweR, Dallas

Kengo Kuma and associates It was the catastrophic 2011 tsunami in Japan that made architect Kengo Kuma re-examine the idea of the permanence of built spaces—and the imbalance of nature and architecture. Fitting then that his first project in America is the Rolex Tower, which organically incorporates nature into built spaces. Designed by Kuma along with project developer Harwood International, the new tower, according to Kuma, “fuses nature and architecture”, and has been planned as a series of staggered floor plates that give it a twisted appearance, to accommodate landscaped terraces at each level. Gabriel Barbier-Mueller, founder and CEO of Harwood International said that they “intend on creating an office that will feature a unique blend of innovative architecture and gardens that Dallas has never seen before”. Also on the cards is a Japanese tiered rooftop garden, created in collaboration with landscape architect Sadafumi Uchiyama. Dallas can look forward to a greener 2016.

152 elizabeTh sTReeT, ManhaTTan

tadao ando architect & associates “I like to make architecture that has a subtle sensitivity [...] treats water as a living thing. Treats light as a living thing,” says Tadao Ando, about 152 Elizabeth Street, his first American project. Developed by New York-based firm Sumaida + Khurana—founded by Saif Sumaida and Amit Khurana—this seven-storey condominium serves as a tranquil, light-filled counterpoint to energy-infused Manhattan where it’s set to come up. Ando makes use of “20th-century materials” like iron, concrete and glass, which work in harmony with his trademarks—nature, and more importantly, light. The massive glass openings within the poured concrete make it look like a crystal box perched on a Lower Manhattan street. Collaborating with the Pritzker Prize-winner on the interiors is American architect and interior designer Michael Gabellini, co-founder of Gabellini Sheppard Associates. The open-configuration apartments are set to feature floor-to-ceiling water walls. The highlight, however, is the 55-foottall and 99-foot-wide ‘living’ green wall on the southern facade, to be created along with landscaping firm M Paul Friedberg & Partners. 86|

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2016


perspective project

Rising From the Dust Writer NoNie NiesewaNd

photos: shigeru ban architects

Architect Shigeru Ban’s understanding of vernacular architecture led him to design wooden framed shelters, their walls filled with rubble left in the wake of the devastating earthquakes last year in Nepal

(Clockwise from this picture) recycle, rebuild, restore Architect Shigeru Ban. His Nepal project delivers modular timber frames and walls with rubble beneath plastic sheeting roofing that is eventually thatched. They can be terraced (above) or standalone (right).

W

hen the devastating earthquake reduced parts of Nepal to rubble, killing 9,000 people in April last year, 2.8 million survivors were left homeless. Temporary shelter beneath corrugated iron sheets and tarpaulins assumed as great an importance as food and medical supplies, according to a report by The Asia Foundation. After cremating their dead, the Nepalese people then faced the double logistical nightmare of removing the rubble to begin the process of rebuilding their communities. Not long after the second earthquake struck in May 2015, Pritzker-prizewinning architect Shigeru Ban visited the worst-hit areas and found an ingenious solution to both problems—rubble and rebuilding—by recycling the debris into wood-framed houses. He was inspired when he saw workers building windows and door frames for traditional Nepalese homes that had carved wooden frames embedded within the brick walls. >

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perspective

KartiKeya Shodhan

(Clockwise from this picture) built from scratch In Gujarat, India, those left homeless after the earthquake in 2001 were rehoused in Ban’s Paper Log houses. Built from waterproof and flameresistant cardboard tubes that the architect calls “evolved wood”, these Paper Log Houses are adaptable. In Kobe, Japan, after the earthquake of 1995, Ban’s Paper Log House was built on foundations of donated beer crates filled with sandbags. Inside the Paper Log schoolhouse in Gujarat.

SUPPORT STRUCTURE Shigeru Ban has housed the homeless in Haiti, Rwanda, Turkey and India. He was in Onagawa, Japan after the 2011 tsunami and earthquake that destroyed the town centre and killed more than 1000 people. In Christchurch, New Zealand, his Cardboard Cathedral gave the community a new symbol of strength, 92|

ArchitecturAl Digest|jAnuAry-FebruAry 2016

>

KartiKeya Shodhan

method inspired by those traditional window frames and the abandoned piles of rubble,” Ban says of his eureka moment. “My wall system can be assembled by connecting modular wooden frames measuring three feet by seven feet, filled in with brick rubble.” He has chosen to show his prototype online in a rural setting beneath blue skies, its irregular stone-and-brick self-build walls supported within regular wooden panels. The roof is a plastic sheet over trusses of cardboard tubes lashed with rushes. Window flaps are propped open on a stick. Such is the skill of Ban’s research into vernacular architecture that the house sits perfectly within its setting, as if it has always been there. The great advantage of this technique is that the house can be built over time. Thatched roofs require special skills, but as Ban observes, “The prototype isn’t made with a thatched roof, but rather plastic sheets laid over the roof trusses with a thin thatch of straw on the sheet to shade the interior.” Resourcefulness is the key to Ban’s practice. He finds structural uses for many materials, including paper and cardboard—which he calls “evolved wood”— and even beer crates and shipping containers.

taKanobu SaKuma

< “That is where I came up with the idea for a construction


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JAIPUR TRIVANDRUM COIMBATORE CHENNAI DELHI LUDHIANA AHMEDABAD MUMBAI HYDERABAD BENGALURU KOCHI INDORE 9313134488 9815048222 9414058718 9879538977 9322987229 9700058285 9740999350 9895058285 9895058285 9500210555 9442081111 9425803599 E-mail: info@hacker-kitchens.com Website: www.haecker-india.com / www.haecker-kuechen.com


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©Stephen GoodenouGh

road to recovery Ban designed the Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand as a temporary structure following the original church’s destruction after the 2011 earthquake.

< following the 2011 earthquake that destroyed the city’s 19th-century Anglican church. The Paper Log relief projects, designed for Japan, Turkey and India following earthquakes there in 1995, 1999 and 2001 respectively, made use of water-resistant paper tubes. In Japan, the house is shaped like a pagoda, while in India the semi-circular facade atop pillars is reminiscent of a Hindu temple. Twenty years ago, he launched VAN, the Voluntary Architects’ Network. “Because I’ve been continuously involved in disaster-relief projects all over the world, we receive emails asking for support as soon as an earthquake happens. We fund-raise it ourselves,” he says. “When Nepal was hit by an earthquake, we were contacted by an investor who loves Nepal, a photographer, an alpinist, and people all over the world connected with NGOs. This time, the number of messages was particularly large.” Getting his designs off the ground, however, is not without its own set of difficulties. “It’s always the hardest challenge to form a new team at each disaster site. It’s not possible to hire people just for disaster-relief work, so for each project we must always form a team of volunteers,” he says. In the first phase of the Nepal project, Shigeru Ban Architects carried out a workshop with students to create a plan for a temporary shelter. “But we found it wasn’t needed. The second phase is to create a prototype of Nepal House, where the information can be gathered from our website.” ENDURING VISION Tents and tarpaulins are quick-fix solutions that can quickly become permanent. Good design early on is essential to stop shanty townships developing. In Kobe, people lived in Ban’s Paper 94|

ArchitecturAl Digest|jAnuAry-FebruAry 2016

Log House for four years. In Onagawa, people are still living in his shelters that transformed shipping containers into homes. Rehousing the homeless in Rwanda in 1994 with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) proved to be a learning curve for Shigeru Ban. “At first, following the policy of the UNHCR, I designed comfortable shelters,” he says. “Then I changed the design to a simpler one, to solve the deforestation problem and to prevent refugees staying there for prolonged periods. Their stay becomes too long if the shelter is too comfortable. I learned the policy of the UN through this project.” Now the UNHCR is working with the IKEA Foundation to produce prefabricated houses for people fleeing conflict zones and to rehouse the homeless after natural disasters. Their Better Shelter prefabricated accommodation packs flat for easy delivery and can be assembled on-site in four hours. It includes solar panels to power a light or charge a mobile phone. Destined to provide shelter for up to three years, the shed-like structure is made of polymer panels which clip into a steel frame. It has housed refugees in Ethiopia and Iraq, and 10,000 Better Shelters are destined for Nepal. Is this shelter, as IKEA claims, “a major milestone in humanitarian design, offering a more dignified home for displaced people and a more cost-effective solution for humanitarian organisations”? Ban declines to answer, “since I am not familiar enough with Better Shelter”. He also sidesteps my next question—Europe’s handling of the migration crisis, which has overwhelmed countries and communities in 2015. “I do not intend to be involved in political matters such as the migration crisis,” he says tactfully. “I am an architect, not a politician.”


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ART & DESIG

SHOW

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO 2016᾿S ESSENTIAL

JANUARY

Jaipur in January. jaipurliteraturefestival.org

BRUSSELS ANTIQUES & FINE ARTS FAIR (BRAFA)

THE STATE OF

ART STAGE SINGAPORE

6 JANUARY – 27 MARCH, MUMBAI

Founded by former Art Basel director Lorenzo Rudolf, this is one of the world’s leading art fairs and has a strong South East Asia focus. artstagesingapore.com

The 61st edition of BRAFA will take place inside the historic, large halls of Tour & Taxis, which was once a mail-sorting station. Over 130 exhibitors from 17 countries will showcase and sell works of art from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. brafa.be

ARCHITECTURE The Urban Design Research Institute in Mumbai presents an exhibition on contemporary architecture at the NGMA. ‘The State of Architecture: Practices and Processes in India’ will be curated by Rahul Mehrotra, Ranjit Hoskote and Kaiwan Mehta. ngmaindia.gov.in

SIHH

18 - 22 JANUARY, GENEVA

The Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie annual watch trade fair is where cutting-edge innovations in watchmaking meet traditional knowledge of the craft. The fair is generally regarded as a reliable barometer for gauging changing trends in the watch world. sihh.org

JAIPUR LITERATURE FESTIVAL 21 – 25 JANUARY, JAIPUR

Considered ‘the largest free literature festival in the world’, the Jaipur Literature Festival, under the leadership of festival directors William Dalrymple and Namita Gokhale, will welcome some of the world’s most important writers to

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21 – 24 JANUARY, SINGAPORE

MAISON&OBJET

22 - 26 JANUARY, PARIS

For those in the interior design industry, the year begins with one of the world’s most important trade fairs—Maison&Objet. This biannual fair is dedicated to interior decoration, accessories, textiles, tableware and more. An eclectic programme of events, which includes installations and exhibitions, showcase the latest innovations in design. maison-objet.com

WINTER ANTIQUES SHOW 22 – 31 JANUARY, NYC

The cognoscenti of fine arts and antiques converge in New York City every January for the renowned Winter Antiques Show. Curated by knowledgeable antique experts, this is where you can view and purchase exceptional pieces by specialists in American, English, European, and Asian fine and decorative arts. winterantiquesshow.com

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

23 – 31 JANUARY, BRUSSELS

SOLO EXHIBITION BY JITISH KALLAT

23 JANUARY – 20 FEBRUARY, CHEMOULD PRESCOTT ROAD, MUMBAI Versatile contemporary artist Jitish Kallat works in a variety of mediums—from painting, photography and video to sculpture and installation. gallerychemould.com

INDIA ART FAIR

28 – 31 JANUARY, NEW DELHI India Art Fair is India’s, and one of the world’s, largest art fairs. Attracting over 170,000 visitors in its first three years, and exhibiting and facilitating the sale of worldrenowned artists such as MF Husain, SH Raza and FN Souza, the fair has become a leading platform for contemporary art. indiaartfair.in

FEBRUARY

ZONA MACO

3 – 7 FEBRUARY, MEXICO CITY

The 15th edition of Zona Maco, Latin America’s most important contemporary art fair, will take place in Mexico City. Since its inception in 2002, the fair has been promoting contemporary art and design in the region. zonamaco.com

DHAKA ART SUMMIT

5 – 8 FEBRUARY, DHAKA

The Samdani Art Foundation will host the third edition of the Dhaka Art Summit with noted curator Diana Campbell Betancourt as the artistic director. The summit will also include talks, a film programme, educational workshops, and exhibitions on Bangladeshi architecture and art. dhakaartsummit.org

MAKE IN INDIA WEEK 13 – 18 FEBRUARY, MUMBAI

The Indian government’s initiative to promote India as a manufacturing base will receive a major impetus with the Make in India Week. The exposition aims to promote the potential of design, innovation and sustainability across India’s manufacturing


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sectors. Besides exhibitions and pavilions, special awards will also be handed out by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. makeinindia.com

INDIA DESIGN FORUM

and cultural development and unite artists from Africa, the Middle East, the Mediterranean region and beyond. marrakechbiennale.org

MARCH

17 FEBRUARY, MUMBAI

THE ARMORY SHOW

India Design Forum is the country’s premier design festival, which brings together some of the leading practitioners and game-changers in this sphere, from India and abroad. The one-day conference approaches design from a holistic point of view and includes fashion, textile, furniture, industrial and product design. indiadesignforum.com

Every March, some of the leading art galleries, collectors and curators in the world assemble in New York City for the Armory Show. The four-day show includes exclusive museum tours, discussion panels, gallery openings, special shows, and performances. thearmoryshow.com

ARCOMADRID

24 – 28 FEBRUARY, MADRID

Attracting over 150,000 visitors each year, this art fair turns the Spanish capital into a melting pot of artists, gallerists, curators and collectors. ifema.es/arcomadrid_06

MARRAKECH BIENNALE

24 FEBRUARY – 8 MAY, MARRAKECH

Noted curator Reem Fadda will helm the sixth edition of the highly acclaimed Marrakech Biennale. With ‘Not New Now’ as the theme, the Biennale aims to examine key issues of artistic

3 – 6 MARCH, NYC

DESIGN SHANGHAI

9 – 12 MARCH, SHANGHAI

Asia’s prime international design trade event has grown into a great platform for the continent’s top architects, interior designers, property developers, and private buyers to network. The event showcases never-before-seen designs from some of the world’s top galleries. designshowshanghai.com

TEFAF MAASTRICHT

11 – 20 MARCH, MAASTRICHT, THE NETHERLANDS

A gathering of 275 of the world’s most significant galleries from 20 countries makes TEFAF Maastricht one of the world’s leading art and antique fairs. Here, you not only

see the works of old masters, but also contemporary art and design, jewellery, photographs and much more. tefaf.com

ART DUBAI

16 – 19 MARCH, DUBAI

With 90 participating galleries from UAE and around the world, Art Dubai is a platform that is committed to promoting artists from the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. The art fair will also include artist residencies, commissioned projects and educational initiatives. artdubai.ae

BASELWORLD

17 – 24 MARCH, BASEL

through special programmes. artparis.com

APRIL

FIGURES IN TIME, BOURNE & SHEPHERD 1 – 29 APRIL, TASVEER, BENGALURU

Tasveer presents an exhibition of vintage photographs by 19thcentury photographers Samuel Bourne and Charles Shepherd. The photos are fragments of India’s past—frozen in time. tasveerarts.com

SP-ARTE

The watch and jewellery industries’ most important show will once again invite industry insiders to Basel for eight days, where the latest designs and innovations will be unveiled. baselworld.com

7 – 10 APRIL, BRAZIL

ART PARIS

SALONE DEL MOBILE

In 2015, Art Paris showcased 145 exhibitors from 20 countries. ‘Cosmopolitan regionalism’ is the fair’s main idea as it explores the lesser known art scenes of Europe. This year’s guest of honour is South Korea, whose rich artistic heritage will be highlighted

Since Salone’s launch in 1961, it has become the world’s biggest furniture fair. Over 1,000 Italian and 300 foreign companies participate in Salone. Besides the best in furniture design, 2016’s Salone will also include the International Kitchen Furniture Exhibition and International Bathroom Exhibition. salonemilano.it

31 MARCH – 3 APRIL, GRAND PALAIS, PARIS

The distinguished São Paulo International Art Fair always attracts the top galleries from Brazil. The fair transforms the city with special programmes in museums, cultural centres and galleries. sp-arte.com

12 - 17 APRIL, MILAN


perspective Gallery Weekend Berlin

29 april - 1 may, Berlin

Art galleries in Berlin, one of the world’s most artistically rich cities, invite national and international collectors, curators and connoisseurs into their spaces for one art-soaked weekend. gallery-weekend-berlin.de

MAY

NYCxDESIGN 3 – 17 May, NYC

New York City’s two-week celebration of design brings various cultural and artistic institutions and individuals together for one mega design event that includes exhibitions, openings, installations, specially curated shows, talks and tours. nycxdesign.com

Dak’Art Biennale

3 May – 2 June, Dakar, Senegal

Under the leadership of curator and art critic Simon Njami, the Dak’Art Biennale will once again unite the best artistic minds from Africa and beyond for a month of exhibitions, tributes, special shows, talks and other events. dakart.org

Frieze New York 5 – 8 May, NYC

The New York edition of one of the world’s best contemporary art fairs takes place inside a bespoke structure in Randall’s Island Park, Manhattan. Besides exhibiting works by leading contemporary artists, Frieze New York also organizes Frieze Projects, a programme of talks and artist commissions. friezenewyork.com

Photo London

19 – 22 May, London

Photo London was founded in 2015 to harness the world-class photographic talent in England’s

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capital, and to showcase the work of great photojournalists like Sebastião Salgado and Kaveh Golestan. The work on display is curated from major museums, art galleries, auction houses and art districts. photolondon.org

Art16

90,000 art lovers from across the globe. The 2015 edition saw more than 280 galleries and 4,000 artists participating. Now in its fifth decade, Art Basel continues to unite the world’s biggest art patrons and artists under one roof. artbasel.com

20 – 22 May, London

Masterpiece London

VENICE Architecture Biennale

If it’s a masterpiece you want, whether a work of art or design, Masterpiece London should figure in your events calendar. This high-profile fair attracts the who’s who of the London art scene and exhibits works of art, antiques and design whose authenticity is vouched for by over 150 of the best galleries in the business. masterpiecefair.com

Art13 was the first edition of this fair that has successfully captured the artistic zeitgeist of our times. Art16 will welcome artists, galleries, collectors and curators from all corners of the world to promote new talent and nurture a global network of artists and art patrons. artfairslondon.com

28 May – 27 November, Venice

The 15th International Architecture Exhibition organized by the Venice Biennale will span nearly six months this year, and under the guidance of its curator, Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena, will explore various architectural ideas within the purview of its theme, ‘Reporting from the Front’. labiennale.org/en/architecture

JUNE Beirut Design Week 1 – 7 June, Beirut

Since 2012, the most creative minds from the Middle East and North Africa have been converging in Beirut every June to showcase their work, participate in workshops, organize talks and encourage innovation using art and design. beirutdesignweek.org

Art Basel

16 – 19 June, Basel

The Big Daddy of all art fairs, Art Basel attracts close to

Architectural Digest|january-february 2016

30 June – 6 July, London

JULY Volcano extravaganza

18 – 30 July, Stromboli, Italy

Against the pristine, volcanic landscape of Stromboli, the Fiorucci Art Trust presents the Volcano Extravaganza. Camille Henrot will be the artistic leader and, along with Milovan Farronato, director of the Trust, will lead the 2016 edition, involving 10 participating artists. fiorucciartrust.co

Experimenter Curators’ Hub

THE ROYAL ACADEMY Annual Architecture Lecture Date to be announced, London

Every year, the Royal Academy organizes the Annual Architecture Lecture by a leading architect. Past speakers have included starchitects such as Norman Foster, Rem Koolhaas, Renzo Piano, Rafael Moneo and Bjarke Ingels. The name of the architect leading the 2016 lecture will be announced in May. royalacademy.org.uk

AUGUST

Ruhrtriennale

12 August – 25 September, Ruhr, Germany

Ruhrtriennale is held once every three years in the Ruhr region o north-west Germany. This music theatre, dance and installation art festival turns former industrial buildings into venues where visitors can enjoy great cultural events.   ruhrtriennale.de

Melbourne Art Fair

18 – 21 AUGUST, melbourne

Since its inception in 1988, the Melbourne Art Fair, presented by the Melbourne Art Foundation, has brought together the best artists working in Australasia. The fair has successfully represented the region’s vibrant visual arts scene and promoted the work of some very talented artists. melbourneartfoundation.com

28 – 30 July, Kolkata St Moritz Art Masters The sixth edition of the Curators’ Hub will take place in Kolkata in July. In the past, the Hub has attracted noted artists and curators such as Jitish Kallat, Tasneem Zakaria Mehta, Shuddhabrata Sengupta, Abhay Maskara, Matt Packer, and Riyas Komu. experimenter.in

Last week of August, St Moritz, Switzerland

Since 2008, the alpine resort town of St Moritz has hosted this 10-day international arts and culture festival that promotes and honours contemporary artists from the world over. The


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fair includes exhibitions, exclusive shows, workshops and more.  stmoritzartmasters.com

SEPTEMBER

Maison&Objet

2 - 6 September, Paris

The autumn edition of the distinguished interior design trade fair showcases the major, buzz-worthy creative trends in design and also determines the overall direction the industry will head towards in the coming year. maison-objet.com

Bienal de São Paulo

10 September – 11 December, Brazil

The São Paulo biennale—the second oldest art biennial in the world after the Venice Biennale—takes place inside a pavilion designed by PritzkerPrize-winning architect Oscar Niemeyer. German art historian Jochen Volz will curate the 32nd biennale, whose theme is ‘Measures of Uncertainty’. bienal.org.br

Biennale des Antiquaires

10 - 18 September, paris

Fine arts, antiques and collectibles of museum quality attract thousands to the Grand Palais for this antiques biennale, which has a very strict process for selecting exhibitors and ensuring the authenticity of the pieces on display. sna-france.com

London Design Festival

17 – 25 September, London

Art lovers and design connoisseurs unite for the London Design Festival, which includes exhibitions, installations, special shows, exclusive projects and much more—all in an effort to celebrate design and

promote London as the world’s design capital.   londondesignfestival.com

ArtRio

21 – 25 September, Rio de Janeiro

ArtRio is one of the most important fairs in South America, and attracts close to 52,000 visitors to view works shown by 106 galleries. Besides showcasing the works of great masters, ArtRio exhibits the work of up-and-coming artists, thus giving them international exposure and recognition. artrio.art.br

OCTOBER Frieze london

5 – 8 october, london

With the participation of leading contemporary art galleries and a curated programme of projects and events, Frieze London is one of the world’s leading contemporary art fairs where you can view and buy art by over 1,000 artists. friezelondon.com

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 6 – 9 October, London

1:54 aims to showcase the diversity of contemporary African art and cultural production on an international stage. This will be the fourth edition of the fair. 1-54.com

FIAC

20 – 23 October, Paris

The Foire Internationale d’Art Contemporain is one of the biggest contemporary art fairs in the world, attracting over 180 galleries from 25 countries. Custom-designed, gigantic installations can be seen all over Paris during the fair. fiac.com

Moscow Design Week

Dates to be announced, Moscow

The Moscow Design Week is a celebration of art and design, specifically in the Russian context. The event also includes lectures and talks on design as well as specially curated films and documentaries. moscowdesignweek.ru

NOVEMBER

Paris Photo

10 – 13 November, Paris

The Grand Palais will host the 20th edition of Paris Photo, the annual celebration of photography, drawing over 147 galleries from 34 countries. parisphoto.com

Contemporary Istanbul

Dates to be announced, Istanbul

The biggest contemporary art fair in Turkey hosts galleries, artists, collectors, museum directors, curators and art critics—from all over the world. contemporaryistanbul.com

Angkor Photo

Dates to be announced, Siem Reap, Cambodia

The Angkor Photo Festival is South East Asia’s longest-running photography event, and includes workshops by internationally renowned photographers and promotes the work of talented lensmen. angkor-photo.com

Artissima

Dates to be announced, turin, italy

Artissima—a company connected to the Turin Museum Foundation—organizes this contemporary art fair. It attracts over 50,000 visitors, and includes the participation of over 200 galleries from 35

countries, and 50 curators and museum directors. artissima.it

Abu Dhabi Art

Dates to be announced, Abu Dhabi

This multi-disciplinary art fair showcases artwork from new and established galleries and includes exhibitions, talks and specially curated events. abudhabiart.ae

Art021 Shanghai

Dates to be announced, Shanghai

This art fair focuses on 21stcentury contemporary art and aims to give China’s artists global recognition and visibility. art021.org

DECEMBER

Art Basel Miami Beach

1 – 4 December, Miami

The art world’s movers and shakers congregate every December for Art Basel Miami Beach, which brings together around 267 leading galleries from North and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. artbasel.com/miami-beach

KochiMuziris Biennale

December 2016 – March 2017, Kochi, Kerala The third edition of the KochiMuziris Biennale will continue to attract and nurture artistic talent from India and abroad. The previous editions have included the participation of artists like Anish Kapoor, Gigi Scaria, Bharti Kher, Akbar Padamsee, Sarnath Banerjee, and more. The curator of the upcoming biennale is noted artist Sudarshan Shetty. kochimuzirisbiennale.org


perspective SPOTLIGHT

THIS SPACE

For the uninitiated, picking the ‘colour of the year’ conjures an image of a blindfolded individual tapping one colour on a rapidly spinning colour wheel. Those in the know, however, know it’s a science

(From the top) THE NEW COLOURS OF INDIA Pantone’s ‘Rose Quartz’ and ‘Serenity’. Asian Paints’ ‘Parrot Green’ and ‘Pure Red’. Akzonobel’s ‘Monarch Gold’.

nspiration is everywhere. It may be found in the fluidity of fashion, or in the discovery of a new design. When innovation and technology meet, new industries are born, which can change the face of design and culture. In the late 1990s, trend-forecasting powerhouse WGSN did just that. The firm pioneered the idea of turning potential trends into highly valuable commodities and revolutionized the market. The word ‘trend’ is of Germanic origin and its verb—meaning, to turn in a specific direction—dates back to the 16th century. In its modern avatar, a trend may be described as a new expression of an idea that captures the changing needs of people—a sort of visual marker for the zeitgeist. This year promises a duality—whether in choice, theme or inspiration. Pantone is the obvious starting point when looking for a colour trend; and for the first time ever, the Big Daddy of colour forecasting has chosen two shades for the year. A dusty pink ‘Rose Quartz’ and a powder blue ‘Serenity’ flow into each other on their website—perhaps representing the meeting of two worlds; a nod to balance and equality; or, simply, dissolving boundaries. At AkzoNobel, of Dulux Paints fame, the international experts and trend watchers from their Global Aesthetic Center draw on many sources to predict global developments, based on various trends. Their forecast for 2016 references a duality of its own: “looking both ways”. Succinctly presented, it stands for an idea that has many layers: that of the past shaping the future, of heritage giving nuance to modernity. This idea is manifested in their choice for 2016, ‘Monarch Gold’—a colour with historical prevalence modernized for a new day and age. And if we are, in fact, at this fascinating crossroads, we must acknowledge India’s largest paint company: Asian Paints. For a company rooted in our ever-changing, multicultural population, Asian Paints recognizes how the Indian consumer evolves each year. While a rising exposure to the world—through travel and the Internet—has impacted our cultural evolution, we’ve always held on to our roots, tending to reference the original. The conclusion from this duality is that the idea of ‘heritage’ is making a strong comeback in a globally influenced India. The colour trends drawn from this result imply that rich, Indian colours—vibrant red, parrot green or haldi (turmeric) yellow—and even some traditional pastel shades will have an important role in the coming seasons. For 2016, Asian Paints predicts that a vibrant red will be our go-to colour. Bright, bold and unapologetic? Sounds undeniably Indian.

PHOTO (PAINT ROLLER): CORBIS

WRITER LATIKA KHOSLA


PROMOTION


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PHOTO COURTESY NOOR PHOTOFACE

(From this picture) CLASS ACTS Yasmin Jahan Nupur and other participating artists in scenes from past shows organized by performance artist Nikhil Chopra and visual artists Madhavi Gore and Jana Prepeluh.

T R A A K A DH IEW PREV

2016

gives you an exclusive preview of the most exciting exhibitions of the Dhaka Art Summit, which is on from 5–8 February 2016, in the Bangladeshi capital

WRITER PHALGUNI DESAI

T

he third edition of the Dhaka Art Summit (DAS) is all set to bring a confluence of art practices and theory from the subcontinent to Dhaka yet again. The three-day summit, initiated by the Samdani Foundation, features an eclectic programme that includes new commissions, performance art, public art projects, lectures and an art writing workshop, put together by artistic director Diana Campbell Betancourt and a team of guest curators including artist Nikhil Chopra, independent curator Shanay Jhaveri, Tate Modern’s Nada Raza, Aurélien Lemonier of the Centre Pompidou and director of the Kunsthalle Zurich, Daniel Baumann. We went through the line-up and spoke to their curators to bring you some of this year’s highlights.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

WHAT IT IS: The Performance Pavilion will explore performance art in the subcontinent under the curation of performance artist Nikhil Chopra, along with visual artists Madhavi Gore and Jana Prepeluh. The performances explore duration, the body and aesthetics as aspects of performance. Gore and Chopra run the Heritage Hotel in Goa, which offers artist residencies for visual artists looking to explore performance. Chopra himself is known for his long-duration performances where he lives a character out for as long as 72 hours. WHY WE’RE EXCITED: The Pavilion features five Dhakabased young performance art exponents, along with two Indians and a Sri Lankan performer in the mix. We’re looking forward to performances by Kabir Ahmed Masum Chisty and Yasmin Jahan Nupur from Dhaka, who were recently featured in the 54th Venice Biennale, and New Delhi-based Manmeet Devgun’s performative evaluation of her life as an artist and a mother. >

PHOTO COURTESY SAMDANI ART FOUNDATION

SUMM I T

PERFORMANCE PAVILION


PHOTO COURTESY SHUMON AHMED AND PROJECT 88

PHOTO COURTESY DAYANITA SINGH

PHOTO COURTESY PO PO AND SAMDANI ART FOUNDATION

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SOLO PROJECTS

PICTURE WINDOWS (Left to right) Nalini Malani's ‘Photograms’ (1970) and ‘Utopia’ (1969-76).

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

PHOTO COURTESY NALINI MALANI AND KIRAN NADAR MUSEUM OF ART

PHOTO COURTESY SHUMON AHMED

WHAT IT IS: Curated by Betancourt, ‘Seventeen Solo Projects’ will feature artists such as Tino Sehgal, Lydia Benglis, Dayanita Singh, Shakuntala Kulkarni, Prabhavathi Meppayil and Myanmar-based artist Po Po, whose work was unveiled at the 8th Asia Pacific Triennial of contemporary art in Brisbane before travelling to Dhaka. WHY WE’RE EXCITED: There are 13 newly commissioned pieces including Bangladeshi artist Shumon Ahmed’s ‘Land of the Free’, an experiential exploration of torture techniques used on Mubarak Hussain Bin Abul Hashem, a Bangladeshi national held for five years at Guantanamo Bay, to give the audience a window into the strength and frailty of the human mind.

(Clockwise from top left) BEYOND BORDERS Scenes from Indian artist Dayanita Singh’s book Museum of Chance. An image from the ‘VIP Project’ by Burmese artist Po Po. Two scenes from Bangladeshi artist Shumon Ahmed’s exhibition titled ‘Land of the Free’.

REWIND WHAT IT IS: Curated by Betancourt with advisors, Rubin Museum’s Beth Citron, Sabih Ahmed from the Asia Art Archive and Amara Antilla of the Guggenheim Museum, this part of DAS 2016 seeks to revise the historical framework for understanding modern art in South Asia. Functioning as a research platform, the exhibition attempts to chart out influences and impulses behind the art, and showcase groundbreaking artists unknown outside the country of their origin. WHY WE’RE EXCITED: The exhibition features historically significant work not accessible to public view, loaned from government and private collections including the Pakistani High Commission, the Bangladesh National Museum, various artists’ estates, and from the artists themselves or their families. Some artists featured are Bangladeshi print-maker Safiuddin Ahmed, Rashid Choudhury and SM Sultan, artists neglected due to their interest in more decorative arts, Krishna Reddy’s prints and Akbar Padamsee’s long-lost film, Events in a Cloud Chamber.


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G N I V L O V E N A

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The third edition of the Dhaka Art Summit will introduce a new section dedicated to the region’s architecture and the architects behind the evolution of the strong modern idiom

(This picture and left) MASTER STROKE The National Assembly Building—within the parliament complex that Louis Kahn built in Bangladesh—is a great ode to modernist architecture. Eight structures wrap around the central parliamentary chamber and the entire complex is surrounded by an artificial lake.

M

idway through my interview with the urbane and soft-spoken Aurélien Lemonier, I hear a surprising fact: He visited Bangladesh for the first time last year. And when he touched down in Dhaka, the only Bangladeshi building he knew of was the parliament complex built by Louis Kahn, which many regard as the American architect’s greatest work. These revelations are unexpected because they come after Lemonier, architect and curator at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, has spoken with zest, and what seems like a fine grasp of political and cultural nuance, on the very topic to which he came quite late—Bangladeshi architecture. Clearly, Lemonier, who will present the work of leading Bangladeshi architects over seven decades—from 1947 to the present—at the architecture section of the third Dhaka Art Summit (DAS) in February 2016, has immersed himself in his subject. It no doubt helped that the Indian subcontinent was familiar ground for this curator of Centre Pompidou’s exhibition on Indian architect Raj Rewal.

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Invited to join a panel discussion at last year’s summit, Lemonier found himself meeting architects, touring buildings and, finally, making a suggestion to summit organizer Rajeeb Samdani, an industrialist and art connoisseur associated with London’s Tate Museum: Why not a separate section on architecture at the summit’s next edition? When it was readily accepted, Lemonier had a job on his hands—transforming a medley of impressions about a country, its architects and their work, into an exhibition. A WORLD OF CONTRASTS The word “paradox” pops up often as Lemonier explains those impressions. “We know Bangladesh as a poor country,” he says, “and yet it has extraordinary energy and richness, culturally and in terms of economic activity.” “The liberal economy,” he adds, “has destroyed a lot, but equally, you see a very strong will among architects to rise to these challenges, to produce, to invent, really, an architecture that is modern yet contextual at the same time, and responsible.” >

PHOTOS: © RAYMOND MEIER

WRITER ANJALI PURI


perspective

< Not least among Bangladesh’s intriguing paradoxes, for

Lemonier, is that it embraced Kahn’s parliament. After all, he points out, the project had been commissioned (as the federal legislature of Pakistan) by the West Pakistani leadership in the early 1960s, well before the war of liberation that saw Bangladesh seceding from Pakistan. “It should have been the most hated building in Bangladesh,” says Lemonier, “yet it became a national symbol. One man played a key role, which is forgotten in the general story of architecture.” He means Muzharul Islam, widely regarded as the father of Bangladeshi modernism. The parliament commission was Islam’s for the taking, but he brought Kahn to Dhaka instead. Lemonier compares this to Jawaharlal Nehru getting Le Corbusier to build Chandigarh. “The impulses,” he argues, “were similar—to create a new kind of east-west encounter, to bring in the language of modernity in architecture as a symbol of a new democracy.” Fascinated by the Kahn-Islam narrative, impressed by Islam’s own work and struck by his influence on younger architects, Lemonier quickly decided that Islam’s “humanist modernity” and his legacy should be the overarching theme for the exhibition. DRAWING UP A PLAN Kahn’s parliament will only be a backdrop. The focus, Lemonier explains, is on “three layers” of modern Bangladeshi architecture: Islam himself, and two generations of “post-liberation” architects influenced by him. The first threw itself into rediscovering Bangladesh’s indigenous architectural roots, and crafting a new “regionalist” vocabulary. The second consists of architects now in their 40s whose work, in Lemonier’s words, is “rooted in a Bangladeshi social context but is also very well connected to the West.” These stories will be told through original drawings, models and photographs. When I ask further questions, Lemonier disappears briefly

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PHOTOS: AURÉLIEN LEMONIER

(Clockwise from this picture) BUILDING AN IDENTITY Architect Muzharul Islam designed the lecturer’s quarters at the University of Chittagong. Louis Kahn’s affinity for bricks can be seen in his design of the staff quarters for the National Assembly Building. Ninakabbo commercial building designed by avant-garde architect Enamul Karim Nirjhar, who is famous for integrating narratives into building facades.

You see a very strong will among architects to rise to... challenges, to produce, to invent, really, an architecture that is modern yet contextual at the same time, and responsible.

—AURÉLIEN LEMONIER

and returns with a laptop. As he brings up Islam’s public buildings of the 1950s and 1960s on his screen, he seems less struck by their air of neglect than their finely drawn lines and the relationship between architecture and landscape. “This is a pure modern architect of the 1950s,” he exclaims. A few clicks later, he calls up the ruins of an 8th-century Buddhist monastery, and traces its influence on the work of leading “regionalist” Saif ul Haque. As many brick-clad structures appear on his screen, Lemonier mentions a curious fact—that Bangladesh relies heavily on “the art of bricks” because there is no stone. Lemonier’s commentary grows enthusiastic as he displays the strikingly modern mosques of Kashef Mahboob Chowdhury and the sustainable “architecture for green living” of Rafiq Azam— both AD50 architects. He speaks of Chowdhury’s marriage of modernity and tradition, and Azam’s effort to “create architecture of quality, display responsibility through private commissions”, mentioning his use of courtyards, gardens and terraces in high-rise buildings. But when an inventive pair of red brick towers by AD50 architect Marina Tabassum comes up on his screen, Lemonier offers only one word: “Fantastic.” Then, finding the right English sentences, he explains why they speak to him: “These are modern, global buildings, I completely understand them as a Frenchman. But they are also local and rooted, in their brickwork, for example. Someone once said that bricks are like fabric. That’s what these buildings are, woven like fabric.”


perspective DESIGN

FUTURAMA From self-driving saloons to eco-friendly electrics and even road-legal racers, ASHOK GEORGE lists some of the most exciting concept cars of 2015 that offer a glimpse of the production cars of 2016

he year was 1938. Harley J Earl—head of design at General Motors—was working on a project for Buick that would change the way automotive design functioned. He was working on the Buick ‘Y-Job’. With power-operated headlamps, electric windows and a design that was thought to be path-breaking, the ‘Y-Job’ would go on to inspire the automobiles that came out from the Buick production line for decades. There’s a reason the ‘Y-Job’ is so important to the automotive industry. It was the first concept car ever made— kick-starting a trend that has resulted in some of the most striking automotive designs in the world. So what are concept cars? In simple terms, they are statements that automobile manufacturers make to show that they are on the cutting edge of design and technology. Not usually meant for production, these concepts hint at the direction in which manufacturers are heading. The Chevrolet ‘Corvette Mako Shark II’ (1965) showed what the 1968 ‘Corvette’ would look like; and the Porsche ‘989’ (1988) was a preview of the ‘Panamera’ (2009). The Mercedes-Benz ‘F700’ (2008) was the first to introduce Magic Body Control, available in the 2015 ‘S-Class’. On the other hand, you have the Rolls-Royce ‘102EX’ (2011), which was the company saying that it could make an electric car if it wanted. Unfortunately, charging times and ranges (on single charges) aren’t where the company wants it to be. So we’re still waiting on the ‘102EX’ features to enter Rolls-Royce’s production cars. Here are some of the latest concepts—ones that warrant special mention. Ashok George is the Assistant Features Editor at OVERDRIVE. 118|

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MERCEDES-BENZ F 015 The future of the car seems to be headed in a direction that will soon take the driver out of the equation. The self-driving ‘F 015’, though, is different. Larger than an ‘S-Class’, it takes luxury to an entirely new level. With Mercedes-Benz’s idea of a “mobile living space”, a touchscreen-equipped “digital arena”, and a futuristic design, this is the quintessential science-fiction automobile.


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perspective ITALDESIGN GIUGIARO GEA

BENTLEY EXP 10 SPEED 6

The studio that has designed some of the most iconic vehicles in the world—the DeLorean, of Back To The Future fame; and James Bond’s Lotus Esprit in The Spy Who Loved Me (yes, the amphibious car)—has just created the ‘Gea’. And their interpretation of autonomous transport isn’t just pretty. With an electric motor in each wheel, the ‘Gea’ has a combined horsepower of 764hp— well into supercar territory.

Here’s the thing with Bentleys. Even when they make stupidly fast cars that can go dangerously close to 300 km/h, they still look too elegant for their own good. They’ve always been too prim and proper. Sort of like a younger—while still very well behaved—brother to Rolls-Royce. Not anymore though. With the EXP ‘10 Speed 6’, Bentley has thrown all that out of the window and made a concept that looks just as fast standing still as Wile E Coyote strapped to an Acme rocket. And in that shade of British racing green that it was shown in at Geneva, it looks ready to go set some lap records at Silverstone.

LEXUS ORIGAMI CAR Okay this car isn’t all new. Based on the Lexus ‘IS’—which has been on roads the world over for a while—the ‘Origami Car’ requires special mention because it’s, wait for it, made from cardboard. If you’re saying that isn’t too hard, I agree. But it’s near impossible to make a drivable car out of cardboard. That’s right; this cardboard car—made from 1,700 individually shaped cardboard sheets—is powered by an electric motor mounted on a steel and aluminium frame.

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PORSCHE MISSION E

Few cars hold the kind of respect that the Bugatti ‘Veyron’ does—as the name that singlehandedly ruled the hypercar game for the longest time. With the ‘Veyron’ retired, all eyes are on Bugatti for their next hypercar. But if you’re familiar with the PlayStation 4 game Gran Turismo 6, Bugatti’s virtual-turned-real hypercar ‘Vision Gran Turismo’ holds the designs for the ‘Veyron’ successor. One thing is for sure: nothing so far has embodied sheer violence like the Vision GT.

Have you ever noticed how all Porsches are unmistakably, well, Porsches? So it shouldn’t be a surprise that the ‘Mission E’ is 100 per cent Porsche. And it’s a Porsche in terms of performance too. It can hit 100 km/h in under 3.5 seconds—similar to the German automaker’s ‘919 Hybrid LMP1’ racecar—and can go 500 kilometres on a single charge, which means Teslas should watch out. If electric cars are going to look like the ‘Mission E’, nobody would complain about the internal combustion engine dying.

2015 bugatti automobiles sas

BUGATTI VISION GRAN TURISMO

MAZDA RX-VISION When Mazda retired the ‘RX-8’, many a tear was shed because it was thought to be the end of the rotary engine. But then, along came the Tokyo Motor Show—automakers’ go-to annual event for introducing their concepts—that began at the end of October 2015. This little number was standing at the Mazda pavilion. The ‘RX-Vision’ is what the ‘RX-9’ could look like, and, in that sense, enthusiasts are already applauding. The same formula that made legends of previous RX cars applies here—front-engine, rearwheel-drive and compact. But most crucially, the car is powered by the (very futuristic sounding) “next-generation SKYACTIV-R rotary engine”.

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photos courtesy porsche 2015

perspective


in association with

SPECIAL

AD INSIGHT

design

In the second edition of our annual panel discussion on design, partnered with Asian Paints to explore how global and local elements influence architecture and interiors in India WRITER TYREL RODRICKS . PHOTOGRAPHER THIRU S

L

ast year, AD and Asian Paints conducted the first in a series of conversations on the past, present and future of design—and, more importantly, to understand how it’s evolving. The 2014 edition of AD Insight looked to the future, specifically to the ‘Homes of the Future’. The idea that, while globally aware, people are paying more and more attention to local design was born from this first edition of this conversation on design. In 2015, for the second edition of AD Insight—also in association with

LITTLE BOXES Artists Jiten Thukral and Sumir Tagra were specially commissioned to create this installation for AD Insight.

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perspective

Bijoy Jain

We’re at a point in time that is going through an exponential change. Civilization as we know it is going to be redrawn—I believe—in the next 20 years. I think not only locally, but also globally. We continuously imagine that we’re moving away, that our traditions are being lost. I say tradition is being obscured.

Asian Paints—this idea was developed into a new theme: ‘Glocal Design’. The event was held at 1AQ, a space that promotes conversations about creative and visual arts in New Delhi. Based on this year’s theme, artists Jiten Thukral and Sumir Tagra created a large installation for the space. AD and Asian Paints composed a panel of thought leaders and experts—in the fields of architecture, fashion and Indian handicrafts—to “discuss the global/local influence on contemporary Indian interiors and architecture”. The panel consisted of Bijoy Jain, principal architect of Studio Mumbai; Sabyasachi Mukherjee, fashion designer and founder of his eponymous label; and Maximiliano Modesti, a French-born textile and embroidery entrepreneur and founder of Jaipur Modern and Les Ateliers 2M. This was followed by a panel discussion moderated by Sunil Sethi, contributing editor at AD. EVOLVING INFLUENCES Amit Syngle—president of sales, marketing and technology at Asian Paints—set the event in motion with a short presentation on the ‘glocal’ concept and how it applies to Asian Paints in India. Syngle said, “In a true sense, Asian Paints aims to be a local company that understands the local nuances in terms of what’s happening globally, and how we can marry both global and local, in terms of what makes sense for the people of India.” Following Syngle’s presentation, the three panellists each took to the stage to make presentations of their own. Jain, known for his use of local materials, presented his vision of how global influences are guiding his architectural vision. “We’re at a point in time that is going through an exponential change. Civilization as we know it is going to be redrawn—I believe—in the next 20 years. I think not only locally, but also globally. Both, in some way, influence each other. And my interest really lies in the meeting of the two. We continuously imagine that we’re moving away, that our traditions are being lost. I say tradition is being obscured.” He went on to outline his attempts to bring back tradition, by >

Sabyasachi Mukherjee

At one point of time, ‘Made in Italy’ was a very prestigious phrase. But today, if you look at the label, it says ‘Valentino, Roma’, it says, ‘Dolce Gabbana, Sicily’. And we do not say ‘Sabyasachi, India’, we say ‘Sabyasachi, Kolkata’, very proudly, because that’s where I come from.

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perspective < employing craftsmen who are trained in traditional techniques— passed on through the generations.

Maximiliano Modesti

You need to educate the artisan, teach him to understand what he’s making— not just to be a production machine. We are there not just to continue the tradition, but also, within the tradition, to bring new design to nurture the future of these crafts. 128|

CHANGING LABELS Mukherjee recently began his foray in interior design with a range of Indiainspired wallpapers for Asian Paints. He shared Jain’s thought—of keeping tradition alive through the work of local craftsmen—though he expressed his disdain for the label allotted to the idea. “For me, ‘glocal’ is a pet peeve. In fashion, there’s a term that describes ‘glocal’; and I absolutely hate it with a passion. That term is Indo-western. If you take a dress from Valentino and wear a salwar with it, that’s what Indowestern is.” The Kolkata-born designer went on to point out how, while the reach of his brand is expanding, there’s an intent to localize influences, and to call out origins: “At one point of time, ‘Made in Italy’ was a very prestigious phrase. But today, if you look at the label, it says ‘Valentino, Roma’, it says, ‘Dolce Gabbana, Sicily’. And we do not say ‘Sabyasachi, India’, we say ‘Sabyasachi, Kolkata’, very proudly, because that’s where I come from. Ten years ago, there used to be a concept called ‘global’. Then ‘global’ became ‘glocal’—which I still don’t understand. But I think the future is going to be ‘local’.” Modesti—who’s worked with some of the world’s leading interior designers and brands through his firm Les Ateliers 2M—was perhaps the most vociferous advocate of preserving traditions by bringing them into the 21st century. He said, “How do you make relevant this craft, this traditional craft in the modern age? Of course, education is important. You need to educate the artisan, teach him to understand what he’s making. Not just to be a production machine.” He summed up, eloquently, what each of the three thought leaders expressed through their varied views on ‘Glocal Design’. That there’s no substitute for the techniques honed over years and “We are there not just to continue the tradition, but also, within the tradition, to bring new design to nurture the future of these crafts.”

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

Sumir Tagra & Jiten Thukral

Exploring emotions in a globalized world, yet trying not to let local values slip through one’s fingers. [Each of the boxes in our specially commissioned installation for AD Insight] signifies a global object, however, its contents are localized personally.


THE MOST INFLUENTIAL NAMES IN RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN IN 2016 BACK IN ITS THIRD EDITION For 2016, the AD50 list once again looks beyond just India to include the entire subcontinent, revealing the best designers across the region. And, for the first time, the list is selected by a highly regarded panel of judges. To be announced in our March-April anniversary issue.

THE JUDGES

Greg Foster

Editor, AD India

@archdigestindia

India Mahdavi

Interior Designer

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Balkrishna Doshi Architect

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in association with

AD editor Greg Foster, Bijoy Jain, Sunil Sethi, Sabyasachi Mukherjee, Maximiliano Modesti

Sunita Kohli

Kohelika Kohli Sonali Rastogi

s kling wine wa Chandon spar

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Ajay Bhatia

Sumir Tagra, Greg Foster, Jiten Thukral

AD publisher Deepa Bhatia, Amit Syngle

event. served at the

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

Maximiliano Modesti, Sabyasachi Mukherjee

Iram Sultan

Ek Bar created a special fusion menu for the event.

Gunjan Gupta


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Enda Noone

Nilisha Kohli

Bijoy Jain, Sunil Sethi

Radhika Gupta, Gautam Sinha

Sumant and Iqrup Dhamija

Varrun Motihar, Kanu Agarwal

Puru Das Sarah Fotheringham and Maninder Singh

Amrita Guha and Joya Nandurdikar

Brian DeMuro

Pavitra Rajaram

Jivi Sethi

Sharika Nath Radhu

PHOTOGRAPHER: GULSHAN SACHDEVA

Ankit Puri, Satish Kulkarni

SK Srikanth

Peter Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ascoli


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spaces

take a journey through some of the most beautiful homes in the world

The owners of this concrete-meets-colour-themed New Delhi home are constantly surprised by the nuanced layers set in place by the interior design duo at Untitled Design Writer AAshmitA NAyAr PhotograPher Ashish sAhi StyliSt soNAli thAkur

Forms oF arT at the bottom of the stairs in the basement foyer, this sculpture by local artist umesh kumarâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;of a mother and childâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;has been decorated in gond art.


grey room The walls of the formal lounge in the basement are covered in a polymer-based micro-concrete. The coffee table is made of extra-clear mirrored glass; the brass legs are handcrafted. The base of the console is from a sheesham (Indian rosewood) trunk, topped with toughened glass. The artwork on the right is part of a polyptych called Mindspace by Abhijit Saikia.


(This page and facing page) the set-up The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Autumn Leafâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; coffee table is a sectioned walnut trunk finished in clear and black polyester coats; the triptych is by Ankur Singla, an artist with a physical disability. The entrance to the ground-floor family lounge is framed by a traditional Malayali chowkat (door frame) sourced from Sharma Farms, a home furnishings store in Chattarpur; the chaise longue is by Untitled Design.


getting geometric ‘Puffee’, a fur-and-mirror bench by Untitled Design, makes for a funky addition to this cosy television lounge. ‘Twiggy’—a lamp from Lightbox—hangs over a veneered chair with leather trimming. The rug is from Hands Carpets.


(Clockwise from top left) PAINTING A CONNECTION A small lobby on the second floor features a blue-lacquered glass wall and a slatted screen in teak; the white high-gloss chair is by Untitled Design. The master bedroom features a workstation, above which are antique tribal spears; the table and chair are by Untitled Design. The Perspective by artist Ankita Aryaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;depicting souls rising out of a fuchsia-pink cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;extends from the first floor lobby to the second floor, connecting the two levels. The basement foyer features a ceiling installation in mirrored glass, and a teak chair by Untitled Design.


(From this picture) ethnic touch Aryaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artwork is complemented by a contemporary take on a traditional jhoola (swing)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;manufactured by Untitled Design. Looking out on to a vertical garden, the dining area features a wall with panels in an aqua-blue fabric from Good Earth; the brass hanging lights are by Untitled Design.


room was transformed into a small gym, attached to a bathroom and massage area. Pulling all the different, diverse spaces together are little brass elements that create a sense of harmony throughout the house— especially in the four bedrooms and lounge areas. Beaten brass doorknobs dot doors. A bar made of brass strips glints heavily in a corner of the basement, complementing a beautiful scarlet polyptych by Abhijit Saikia titled Mindspace. In the foyer, a contemporary owl (“an auspicious omen for us,” grins Guha) perches neatly under a copper pendant light. To further eliminate excessive accessories, the designers have seamlessly merged geometric patterns with natural shapes. On entering the basement, one is greeted by a rough-hewed horizontal slab of stone that cuts a windowpane into two. In other parts of the house, tapered tree trunks form washbasins or bathroom shelves. A giant red lamp—‘Twiggy’ from Lightbox— curves across the length of the TV room, lending it an informal air. On the first floor, the master bedroom features a bay window that has been transformed into a unique seating area framed in veneer. “It gives you utilizable space with visual appeal,” says Guha. It is accompanied by a four-poster bed in lime-washed wood and champagne-coloured gold leaf with leather trimmings. LOCAL IS BEAUTIFUL Guha and Nandurdikar love to comb the country for local artefacts. “Every state features a multitude of severely underrated arts and crafts,” says Nandurdikar as we admire an ancient Malayali

temple chowkhat (door frame) around a glass door in the lounge. “Many clients here try to go more European, but we do our best to educate them on local sourcing; the findings are so vibrant.” Like the biryani handis that have been used to light up the pool. Or an old kadhai (wok) from Chandni Chowk that embraces its new avatar as a washbasin in a second-floor bathroom, which extends into a small space that hosts a traditional Malayali massage table curated from medicinal wood. In the basement lounge, a coffee table and the sides of the sofas feature hand-etched mirror work by Kolkata-based karigars (artisans), reminiscent of famous Venetian mirrors. Sharp spears in plush red fibre—a gift given by the wife’s Naga tribe to the husband—are mounted on the wall in the master bedroom. A few local artists were commissioned to add eclectic touches. A sculpture depicting the face of a child cradled by his mother’s hand has been embroidered with Gond art. A marquetry coffee table—featuring five different types of wood knotted together— stands next to a comfortable daybed outside the master bedroom. And an eye-catching wall painting—The Perspective by Ankita Arya—ascends from the first floor to the second. Minimalist as it may seem, the layering of the architecture has a peculiar effect: as soon as you leave a room, or a floor, you almost forget the finer elements. The homeowners share this belief. “Even after a year of living here, there are times we are left awestruck all over again. It’s as if there is always a new element, like a tiny jewel waiting to be discovered on each floor,” they conclude, admitting that this home has, indeed, become their most prized accessory. (From left) INNER SANCTUM The master bedroom on the first floor features a four-poster bed in a distressed finish; the headboard and bedside tables have been finished in gold leaf and faux leather. A large kadhai (wok) sourced from Chawri Bazaar, Chandni Chowk is used as a washbasin, mounted on a trunk of solid sheesham wood.


Lady Of The Manor After a five-year-long restoration process, this erstwhile royal hunting lodge in Kathiwada, Madhya Pradesh was elevated to a status befitting its regal past: a palatial residence and high-end retreat WRITER MANJU SARA RAJAN . PHOTOGRAPHER MONTSE GARRIGA

WILD MOTIFS The Kathiwada Raaj Mahal was originally a hunting lodge, and is still filled with hunting trophies. All the animals were from the forests in the Kathiwada valley.


framed The library, with over 2,000 noteworthy books, is dedicated to Sangita Sinh Kathiwadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late husband Yuvraj Bharat Sinh. To represent his passion for riding, she had English tweed handwoven in riding-gear colours.


LONG SHOT The tea lounge was once used by Rana Sahib Onkar Sinh—who commissioned the lodge—to rest after riding.


science behind the design This is the Wedgwood-blue room used by Sangita. Pictured here is a portion of the 27-piece bedroom set recently purchased from the public auction of Mehrangir, physicist Homi Bhabhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private home in Mumbai.


white wash The bathroom features hand-carved marble jaali screens, which were independently erected on an old terrace.


“A

nightmare dressed like a daydream...”— Taylor Swift’s pop-wisdom flits into my head as Sangita Sinh Kathiwada and I discuss the difficulties of house construction. She snatches the idea right out of my thought bubble, saying, “When you dream of creating a home, no one tells you that you have to go through many nightmares to get to the dream.” Actually, refashioning an over-80-year-old heritage structure located in the middle of a forest in Madhya Pradesh is more nightmarish than building a new home. But Sangita did just that, spending five years on a Cinderella-style makeover project that reimagined a tumbledown building as a 21st-century palace.

ANCESTRAL PROPERTY Sangita’s late husband Yuvraj Bharat Sinh Kathiwada’s family are recognized as the direct descendants of the erstwhile rulers of the princely state of Kathiwada. It is a lush area in western Madhya Pradesh, nurtured by forests and crowned by the ancient Aravalis, altogether justifying a comment by the late Francis Wacziarg, co-founder of Neemrana Hotels, that this place “was dropped into the womb of the earth”. And yet, its primeval beauty is an easily accessible two-hour drive from Vadodara. Sangita says she can finish breakfast in Mumbai—where she runs Mélange, a fashion boutique— and make it to Kathiwada in time for lunch. The building at the heart of this story used to be the royal family’s hunting lodge, commissioned by Sangita’s grandfather-in-law, Rana

Sahib Onkar Sinh, in the 1920s. Some 20 years ago, the last bit of the family’s official palace on the 120-acre property was demolished; one of the buildings handed over to Sangita was this six-suite lodge and guesthouse that was filled with riding paraphernalia and scores of hunting trophies: panthers, bears and tigers from the jungles of Kathiwada. Like a reward for its survival, the building became the official palace, rechristened Kathiwada Raaj Mahal. In its new and glamorous avatar, Raaj Mahal is also a luxurious wellness retreat. PRACTICAL DECISIONS A renovation project is problematic because it throws up many, many questions, and answers must be found within the limitations and idiosyncrasies of an existing building. It is like dealing with an obstinate, lovable grandparent. Some are philosophical queries, like how much contemporary intervention is appropriate on a heritage structure. Some are make-up related: should colours be changed? “There are always pangs of doubt,” she admits. “I always remember the romance of the way it was. We never had air conditioning; the house was lit with lanterns; there were no water heaters.” The 29,000-square-foot area contained 11 terraces, but just six bedrooms, too few for a building that was meant to house discerning wellnesstourists with the family. The structure was painted an old-worldly light-pink and grey which now just seemed dolled-up. Sangita and her son Digvijay Sinh hoped every change they prescribed was “wise and practical”. The decision to also turn the property into a high-end retreat served with regal hospitality—a solution applied by many former royal families to support their high-maintenance real-estate

(From left) of all she surveys Sangita oversaw the restoration of Raaj Mahal; the palace is at the heart of a luxury wellness retreat. The view overlooking a meditation temple and paddy fields.


heritage house Raaj Mahal was built in the 1920s as a royal hunting lodge by Rana Sahib Onkar Sinh. Kathiwada means kathi ka wada, the wooded forest.

heirlooms—was the duo’s first move of practical wisdom. Then, Sangita sought out Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH) member and conservation expert, Professor Rabindra Jayendralal Vasavada. He laid the ground rules, and guided them towards craftsmen sensitive enough to work on a heritage structure. It was his instruction to import West Bengal craftsmen expert at dealing with lime plaster—both the removal and application of it. She admits he disapproved of doubling the number of bedrooms in the building, because it meant enclosing some terraces. Architect Pronit Nath of Mumbai-based Urban Studio created a layout that would fix the building’s inconveniences, and create new bedrooms and service areas. But after that, Sangita says she was “left holding the baby”. Getting paper plans implemented in a place that is distant from both labour and material can be a serious hurdle. They travelled to the site every month, and supervised the project living in a 3,000-squarefoot makeshift house erected in place of what used to be the cooks’ cottage. “We discovered the foundation of this building by chance. We made a bathroom, put a roof on it, and within three months, I had a place to live,” remembers Sangita. It is now the pool house. Among the significant changes made to Raaj Mahal, the entrance was moved from what was the mardana (male) entryway to the zenana (female) one, a breakfast room was created on what used to be the driveway, and with Nath’s help Sangita realized what she calls “a palace of bathrooms”—the most theatrical rooms in the building. Using five different kinds of Indian marble, each bathroom is distinct, and makes an excellent exhibit of the best of Indian material and workmanship.

A CHANCE ENCOUNTER The first time I spoke to Sangita was more than two years ago. We were both at an exhibition at Mumbai’s Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya. Just as I was leaving, I heard a voice: “Are you the mother?” She was referring to my restless twin offspring. “Yes,” I mumbled, hoping she wasn’t going to ask me to pay for damages somewhere. “Hi, I’m Sangita,” she said. “Your kids are so welldressed, and I wanted to see who their mother might be. It’s so nice to meet you! Well done,” she told a startled-but-inwardly-delighted me. I mention it here to give a sense of this vibrant, energetic woman who’s excellent at engaging people. For a project like this, you need all that, plus a heavy dose of perseverance. For 24 years, Sangita has channelled her interest in textiles and fashion into running Mélange, and working with crafts. The Raaj Mahal renovation was an opportunity to tell personal stories through her favourite handicraft. “I spent a lot of time and effort on the textiles,” she says. “Twelve bedrooms have 12 different fabrics; everything was custom-woven. For instance, in the library, I’ve used seven different kinds of tweed from Bhagalpur. It is a reminder of my husband, who was an excellent rider; there’s a little velvet on the sides of the armchairs just like he had on his breeches.” There are such reminders in everything from the lampshades to the photo frames. Sangita’s bedroom is a soft, “merawala” Wedgwood blue. I asked her how she felt that first night in her new room in a house that took five years to create—the dream that had come true. “I was uneasy,” she says, laughing. “After all that work, there it is, beautiful, but you remember how it was and wonder if it was right to change it.”


EARTH TONES The living room on the first floor of the penthouse features ‘Fiorita’ chairs by designer Giuseppe Rivadossi, with the sculptural backrests rising against the copper-clad wall. The tan ‘Chieftains’ chair in the foreground is a Finn Juhl design for Onecollection; the sofa to the right is from Ceccotti Collezioni. The wooden ‘Kieran’ stump is from BDDW; the red side table is from Gervasoni; the rug is from Golran and the centre table and armchairs are by Thierry Betancourt. The artwork on the centre table is from Kelly Wearstler; the ‘AMT 61c’ clock installation (left) is by Humans since 1982; and the artwork in the passage is by Aakash Nihalani.


Architect and interior designer Ashiesh Shah creates a sophisticated aesthetic for a duplex penthouse in Mumbaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cuffe Parade neighbourhood Writer Gauri KelKar PhotograPher Tom ParKer


ART AND SOUL The pair of red and black chairs are from Desalto; the tall ‘Punta Krisa’ conical shelf in Scandinavian wood— designed by Giuseppe Rivadossi and assembled here— takes advantage of the double-height ceiling. The column made of coloured soap blocks is by Hemali Bhuta; the specially commissioned circular artwork mounted on the wall is by Thukral & Tagra; the hanging light is from the David Weeks Studio. A Rana Begum artwork hangs on the wall in the background.


LIGHT AND SPACE This first-floor terrace—which serves as a lounging area—features ‘Bell’ tables from ClassiCon, with ‘Fiction Sculpture’ marble books from Kelly Wearstler placed on the tabletop. The Giuseppe Rivadossi chairs stand in front of a wall with artwork by Asim Waqif; the rug is from Chevalier Edition. Overlooking this seating area are hanging lights from Klove. The bar seen in the background is by Thierry Betancourt.


(Clockwise from above) IN GOOD TASTE The ‘Sitar’ chairs on the right are from Saba; the ‘Pebble’ sofa is by Ashiesh Shah. The light above the dining table is from Michael Anastassiades; the flooring is by Le Mill for Bharat Floorings; the wall art is by Astha Butail. The first-floor passageway serves as an “accidental seating area”; the rug is from Golran; the metal chair against the wall on the right is from Gervasoni, and the bench is by Thierry Betancourt; the corner table is from Desalto and the red sculpture on it is by Navjot Altaf.


feast for the eyes The table in the dining room is from Gervasoni, and the chairs are from BDDW. The artwork is 18 Allegories of the Self by Ranbir Kaleka.


(Clockwise from above left) INSIDE INFORMATION In one of the sonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bedrooms, the bed from Ivano Redaelli has linen from Merci in Paris; the artwork is by Shilpa Gupta; next to the bed is a Casamania chair. In the guest bathroom is a cloud-shaped mirror, lighting from Flos and flooring by Le Mill for Bharat Floorings. An Ivano Redaelli bed and a Golran carpet are some of the furnishings in the master bedroom. The powder room, which has tiles custom designed by Shah, features an Eileen Gray mirror and a Gervasoni metal chair.


(Clockwise from this picture) POINT OF VIEW In the balcony attached to the guest room, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Paraggiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sofa is from Exteta; the wooden log tables are from Gervasoni, and the flooring is by Le Mill for Bharat Floorings. Shah on the first-floor terrace. The rooftop terrace has a Golran rug, concrete lights from Luciferos, another Exteta sofa and a Royal Botania floor light.


he assignment seemed pretty straightforward: write about a house in Cuffe Parade, and interview the architect who designed it. Essentially, a regular day at work. What it was, was falling down a rabbit-hole—well, riding up a silent, efficient elevator to the 17th floor—and emerging into a precisely curated, artistically conceived parallel world. The penthouse occupies the top two storeys of a hard-to-miss building in one of Mumbai’s most exclusive neighbourhoods. Designed by Ashiesh Shah for a family of four, it was one of those rare projects where architect and client were so completely in sync, that no sooner would one of them have an idea than the other would voice it. “That ‘Aha!’ moment always came for the same thing at the same time,” says the client. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN “They had such positive energy and their enthusiasm about the house was infectious,” says Shah. “The fact that they are very spiritual dictated a lot of spaces.” As did the vastu requirement, which led to a few layout changes, including moving the staircase and breaking down one wall. “Now you can walk the entire circumference of the house. The spaces flow beautifully,” he adds. That is evident from the front door itself, which opens out into a sprawling space, topped with that almost-extinct-inMumbai feature—a double-height ceiling, and balconies all around, furnished with foliage. “The client’s aesthetic was key— Indian materials with contemporary lines, nothing ready-towear, something out of the box,” says Shah. But what they wanted more than anything was “no Italian marble”. They were open to almost anything else. “We used a lot of different materials, from epoxy in different colours, to different tile patterns, stones and veneers,” says the client. The ground-floor media room is clad in epoxy; the master bedroom features Kota stone; the living room has prefabricated concrete panels, veneer—and metal. “A lot of trial and error went into those aspects where we experimented with our own aesthetic,” says Shah. The final design is a stunning testament to this spirit of experimentation—as evidenced by the copper-clad living-room wall. It was that desire to do something novel that determined the strength of the aesthetic—so much so, that the furniture almost became a “by-product”. This is hard to believe, though, given the eclectic collection of pieces, which have been hand-picked after diligent sourcing from local and international fairs. Highlights include an almost artistic pair of chairs with sculptured backrests, which rise along the copper-clad wall they are set against; and a fantastic ceiling-grazing conical shelf made of Scandinavian wood—both by designer Giuseppe Rivadossi. “The idea was to be

a vagabond design hunter, to explore,” explains Shah, who has also contributed some of his own pieces—the floating marble shelf in the library (his first-ever piece of furniture), and a light installation in the additional sitting area beyond the living room. Everything else has been custom designed for this house, including the sculptural lights dotting the spaces. CONTENT AND CONTEXT The idea of customization also extends to the art, with New Delhi-based artists Jiten Thukral and Sumir Tagra’s dome-shaped artwork, which uses a shade that mimics the veneer on the living-room wall. Adding art served as an education in Indian art for the homeowners—both self-confessed novices in the subject. So along with a Seher Shah piece in the guest room, and an Ayesha Sultana graphite piece in the master bedroom, there’s a Hemali Bhuta pillar of soap-blocks in the living room. And the art at every level in the ascent up the stairs includes works by Aakash Nihalani, Rathin Barman, and Rohini Devasher. Not to mention the stairs themselves. “They are in this sort of box. I had the idea for a skylight on top, which led to a play of light and shadow, almost like walking through a [Richard] Serra-esque work,” says Shah. The way it ends—in a balcony-like projection on the first-floor landing—adds a touch of drama; it is a tribute to the lady of the house, who owns a theatre-production company. The home’s seemingly disparate elements—the carefully thought-out lounging areas, the diverse materials, the pops of colour—are all textured with the personality of its occupants. The design for the kitchen, for instance, has been derived from the client’s wife’s love for cooking, which prompted Shah to create a fluid, wall-less space between the cooking counter and the dining table. While the overall design was a consequence of a lot of experimentation, three spaces were non-negotiable—the kitchen, the library and the meditation room, attesting to the homeowners’ spiritual bent. Even the children had a say. Shah “redid the flooring of the [younger] son’s room because he thought the wooden flooring we had given him was too adult”. He ensured that he created two very differently designed kids’ rooms, which were connected by a playroom, and a separate study. Then there’s the terrace with its huge play area—as well as a pool, a sunken bar and plenty of lounging room to take in the 360-degree bird’s-eye view of Mumbai. Shah’s ability to adapt his aesthetic to suit client and context is unmistakeable. “The form of circles, whether as a cone, a dome or an arch, is not in my vocabulary, but somehow, this house connected with the idea of a circle. Maybe because the space was so boxy...” he says. Then there are the clever fenestrations, little pockets peeping out into the world. One is strategically positioned to frame the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel’s iconic dome. “This house could be anywhere in the world. The context is what makes it real.” And that, in a copper-clad nutshell, perfectly sums up Shah’s design approach.


COLOURED IN A corner of the living room features an orange ‘Drift’ bench by homeowner Amanda Levete for Established & Sons, a Serge Mouille standing lamp, a ‘Font’ clock by Sebastian Wrong for Established & Sons, and a sofa by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani. (Facing page) SHELF LIFE The living space is part of an addition to Levete’s home. It features a sweeping play of ceiling planes suggestive of the profiles in a church designed by Jørn Utzon. Floating stainless steel shelves display art and curios.

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EVERYTHING As the brains behind the 2015–16 MPavilion in Melbourne and an upcoming refresh at the V&A, it’s no surprise architect Amanda Levete’s London home offers an array of aesthetic wonders WRITER ANNEMARIE KIELY PHOTOGRAPHER PAUL MASSEY


HUNG UP The master bedroom features an original print by Guy Bourdin, a ‘Model No 31’ cantilevered armchair by Alvar Aalto and a hanger rack from Nendo’s Thin Black Lines exhibition. (Facing page) THINKING SPACE The library is situated in the front of the old Victorian house. The ‘Anfibio’ sofa bed by Alessandro Becchi for Giovannetti is sandwiched between two Bestlite ‘BL3’ floor lamps and banks of slender steel-section bookshelves.

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n architect Amanda Levete’s north London home, the facts arrange on floating shelves—three misaligned planes of stainless steel that comment on traditional kitsch. “We wanted somewhere to display the things that mean something to us,” says Levete of the broad-ranging curios collected by her and husband Ben Evans, director of the London Design Festival. “But we didn’t want to hang pictures on the wall because the space is so complete. The shelves play with the kitschy idea of the three flying ducks… just sliding past each other.” These slender blades manifest two distinct relationships with design, and map the trajectory of human creativity from antiquity to anarchy—Cycladic vessel 2700 BC to Sid Vicious AD 1978. “Oh, that is very much Ben’s youth,” says Levete of the Dennis Morris snap of the sneering Sex Pistol that sits top shelf. “Punk wasn’t a movement I hugely identified with, but I like the chance correspondence between things; you can see connections that are entirely retrospective.” She is referring to the photo’s pairing with a caricature of herself commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects when the now-defunct Future Systems (co-directed by Levete and the late Jan Kaplický) won the 1999 Stirling Prize for Lord’s Media Centre. The ‘correspondence’ is clear in the symmetry of their stances—a muscleflexing Vicious mirrors the counter-pose of an arm-cranking Levete. But the real connection lies in their repute: both are agents provocateurs who have unsettled orthodoxies and instigated change. No, Levete does not subscribe to the nihilism of Vicious’s subculture. But, as a former director of Future Systems (the test-bed practice that space-aged Selfridges’ Birmingham store into a

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(From the top) GOING WITH THE FLOW The kitchen runs the length of a living room wall and echoes the angled lines of a fibreglass dining table, designed by AL_A, set with 12 ‘Revolt’ chairs by Friso Kramer. The space-age fluidity in Levete’s home is representative of her daring public works. (Facing page) RUNNING THEME The living room fireplace is a black slit in the wall that is reminiscent of the gill-like detailing on AL_A’s schemes for the EDP Cultural Centre in Lisbon and the 10 Hills Place office building in London.

magnificent silver blob) and as principal of Amanda Levete Architects, known as AL_A (innovator of the Tincan pop-up restaurant that last year dished up fish from a can), she is every bit the punk. Think Sid Vicious flipping the Frank Sinatra standard My Way, and you’ve got a grasp on Levete’s development of a new entrance, gallery and courtyard for the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. She is rearranging a classic for new audiences and breaking down the separation between institution and street. Central to her scheme is a courtyard ‘room’ that will be wrapped in tiles—a wild colour-field of porcelain that will pull people off the street. “Porcelain has never been used outside a public building,” says Levete, elaborating on two years of research to develop the buildingcode-compliant tiles. “We did not know where it would lead.” But pushing the limits of what is possible with one of the world’s oldest materials, without concern for polite convention, is what drives Levete’s office. “The nature of a museum is to disrupt,” she adds. “It’s where you get the telling adjacencies—the very old next to new, the original next to the reproduction, the huge value next to the not-sovaluable; they make you look at things in different ways.” And thus the play with perception on her home shelves; a simple Regency salt cellar is put in corrupting proximity of David Shrigley’s ‘Heroin and Cocaine’ condiment set—too much taste will kill you. So what did these adjacencies augur for her MPavilion scheme— the second in a four-year programme of annual temporary architecture commissioned for Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Gardens by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation? “We wanted to create a structure that is man-made, completely artificial, but one that creates the natural sensation of standing under a tree,” she says of the >


< contradictory pursuit. “So we came up with this idea of a series of large interlocking petals—translucent, wafer-thin leaves, three and five metres in diameter that sway on impossibly slender columns in the breeze.” It was a dreamy proposition that seeded from the success of London’s Serpentine Pavilion—the annual architectural ‘experimentation’ commissioned by the Serpentine Gallery. But where no surface material existed to substantiate Levete’s concept for a cluster structure, how did she proceed? How did she convince a client to commit to a fiction as fanciful as Enid Blyton’s Faraway Tree? “Naomi is a rare client—an extraordinary force of nature,” says Levete of the foundation’s commissioning chair, Sussan Group CEO Naomi Milgrom. “When we proposed a canopy, relying on a boundary-pushing technology that would take us we knew not where, she just adapted the programme to our approach.” Milgrom’s leap of faith led to Levete’s collaboration with Arup and MouldCAM—manufacturers of composite materials for aeronautical industries. “They were absolutely committed to exploring this idea of a large-span, wafer-thin surface,” she says of ensuing research into carbon fibres and composites embedded with sound and light systems. “They found a way of making it work and the reality is more beautiful than we could have imagined.” Materialized in Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Gardens from 5 October 2015, this weather-reactive architecture is the platform for a programme of talks, workshops and performances.

For more about Amanda Levete, visit ala.uk.com. MPavilion will be at Queen Victoria Gardens till 7 February 2016; mpavilion.org.

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WATER WORKS The master bathroom is a double-height, top-lit room wrapped in pale-blue Corian. (Facing page, clockwise from bottom left) SELF-MADE The monochromes of the master bedroom are matched to a Daido Moriyama photograph of fishnet stockings. The downstairs kitchen continues the monochrome theme of the master bedroom. “The bath, basin, towel rail and shower have been specially designed for us—by me,” Levete says of the master bathroom.


Touch sensiTive In the living room, the custom-made sofa by New York-based Shamir Shah Design (SSD) is flanked by the curvy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Serpentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sofa by Vladimir Kagan on one side, and vintage chairs by Milo Baughman on the other. The framed picture is by American photographer Todd Hido.


The

HIGH LIFE In the city that never sleeps, a loft apartment designed by Kenya-born, New York-based architect and interior designer Shamir Shah captures both the functional and artistic needs of its Indian inhabitants Writer Komal Sharma . PhotograPher manolo Yllera 173


brick by brick The nesting tables in the centre are by Caste Design; the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Contourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; low-back lounge chair is by Vladimir Kagan.


watching you In this informal lounge space, next to the main living area, chairs and a table by Eero Saarinenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the iconic mid-century modern designerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; (produced by Knoll) are paired with a custom settee by SSD. The artwork is by Max Neumann.

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light and dark The picture is by large-format Canadian photographer Edward Burtynski from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ship Breakingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; series in Bangladesh. It overlooks a 10-seater custom steel table by Holly Hunt, a custom buffet server by SSD against the wall and a sculptural light fixture by David Weeks Studio.


fifty shades The master bedroom in the rear end of the loft gets a diffused northern light in the evenings. It has a custom bed by SSD, a ceiling fixture by Alexandre Loge, table lamps by Christian Liagre and a sketch by Jogen Chowdhury.

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(Clockwise from top left) Foyer pleasure Above the custom steel-and-glass cabinet by Christophe Côme is Brazilian artist Vik Muniz’s Leda and the Swan, after Leonardo da Vinci; the sculptural bronze lamp is by Alexandre Loge, from Donzella. The out-turned legs of the Paris metro chairs (from the Paula Cooper Gallery) offset the vintage table base from Flessas, all of it enveloped by custom cabinetry from SSD. A bathroom in Bisazza tiles, with plumbing trim by Dornbracht and a custom Corian vanity by SSD. This cube office for the homeowner has custom cabinetry in Corian by SSD and a vintage Paris metro chair.


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ale, wide oak-wood planks line the floors of this loft. Beginning at the expansive living room, along the bookshelf-lined passage, bleeding into the dining area on one side and the kitchen on the other, rising up to wrap the walls of a small office cube along the way, they run right till the bedrooms in the back of the 3,000-square-foot space. There’s a continuity to this home that feels almost effortless and natural, belying all the thought that has gone into orchestrating this flow. A minimal modernism made humane with crafted details, it has the warmth and quietude that a home should ideally provide. New York-based architect and designer, Shamir Shah, with his 16-year-old practice, exudes a similar warmth and self-assuredness as he talks about his design for this Park Avenue apartment for his clients—a surgeon and a photographer. It was originally a commercial manufacturing building, which gave it rare pliability as a space, but also certain restrictions. For instance, all the plumbing that’s concentrated into one corner called for some ingenuity on the part of the architect to accommodate all the wet areas in one niche without hampering its functionality. However, that being its origin, it had been converted into a residential building before Shah and the homeowners arrived at it about two years ago. It had been lived in for over two decades by a couple who hadn’t ever renovated, and had a frightening kind of datedness. “But that’s the kind of project we like to do, to be able to take a place that’s raw and challenging and put our own imprint on it,” says Shah.

A wAlk in the woods A full-floor loft building that an elevator opens directly into is already a luxury in New York. With windows on the front and the back and minimal fenestration on the sides, light not only floods the apartment, but adds an extended notion of space—yet another luxury in New York—which Shah further enhanced by manipulating the ceiling heights. There is the quality of a walk or an exploration in how this apartment unfolds. Right from the foyer, you begin to pause and observe, where, from above a stunning steel-and-glass accent cabinet by Christophe Côme, the intriguing artwork Leda and the Swan, after Leonardo da Vinci, by Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, peers back at you. The living room, with its silk rug, velvet upholstery on a Vladimir Kagan sofa, and chairs with a hint of art nouveau in their legs, appeals at a very tactile level. In an informal lounge space, classic Eero Saarinen chairs surround a table, while the reds of a striking Max Neumann portrait contrasts with the charcoal grey wall it is mounted on. The kitchen is lined with the same oak planks, but also by a ribbon of steel custom cabinetry that runs around the perimeter, tucking away all the appliances and a painstakingly curated spice cabinet. Shah may have given away his bias for the kitchen, as “the most amazing meals come out of there”. ConneCting the dots While talking about his vision for this home, Shah dwells on the broad strokes of his design language. “A contemporary home that has an approachable quality, that gives you a sense of comfort and pleasure, a shelter in a true primordial sense. It’s a home, not a museum or a nightclub,” he sums it up. While that is evident—there is no place for gimmicks in this home—it doesn’t mean the space is devoid of subtle idiosyncrasies and character, those quintessential New York touches.

reading room The vintage chair and ottoman are by Hans J Wegner (from New York furniture store Wyeth). The artworks are by Malcolm Scott Hill. The lamp is by Moooi.

Hidden in the back, for instance, is a guest bedroom and reading spot. Buildings in New York almost always have a vestigial space in the rear with a window or a fire exit, where overgrown foliage tends to create a particular kind of dappled-light effect. Shah retained the wire mesh of the original fire-rated [a fire-resistance rating indicating the product’s ability to withstand a fire resistance test] windows, but stripped all the steel to bare it and let the light in. “This is a beautiful spot to sit in. In the day you get an evocative, moody light. And it’s quiet back there, which is again unusual in New York. So you put your feet up and read. It’s probably the homeowners’ favourite spot in the home,” says Shah. Not to mention, that what you sit in and rest your feet on, is a Hans J Wegner chair and ottoman—perhaps the most comfortable ever created. Then there is the exposed masonry wall in the living room— another New York staple—that, with some preservation work and thoughtful lighting, forms a striking backdrop for the piano in the foreground; the homeowners’ daughter is an acclaimed musician, and some evenings, their gatherings are graced by her recitation. Shah’s nuanced notion of luxury manifests in such choices. In the continuous singularity that the oak flooring creates, or the soft, triple-skin coated finish of the wall paints, or discernment over what needs preserving and what needs to go. Which brings us to the subtle, underlying approach to Shah’s work. To curate and put things together is one way of doing it, but there is an interplay of spatial relations here. It is not merely object-meets-object, and instead, about how a void resonates with the elements surrounding it. It is about the kinship between objects, spaces and people, which in turn creates the flow that is so special about this home. In a stream of thought, Shah elucidates this concept. “What I love most is how the space really connects, that when you’re in one place you never really feel isolated. If I’m sitting here in the front living room, I can still appreciate something there in the lobby.” In a city that often tends to be overwhelming, over-exposed and certainly isolating, it’s a luxury to be able to retreat to a home that has a quiet, warm rootedness. 179


TALKING HOME THE CONVENIENCE of a hotel, the comfort OF A HOME—inside SUHEL SETH’S Gurgaon residence WRITER SUPRIYA DRAVID . PHOTOGRAPHER RICARDO LABOUGLE STYLIST GUSTAVO PERUYERA 180


WALL PAINTING In the living room, a Siraj Saxena canvas hangs above a sofa by Puru Das of Urbanist. The trunk in the corner is from Ralph Lauren. (Facing page) DETAILED STUDY Homeowner Suhel Seth in his study, which has Austrian teak wood flooring. The mahogany desk, with a tooled leather inset, is by Ralph Lauren. The wooden shelves and the chesterfield chairs have also been designed by Das.


meeting ground The living room extends into the dining area, which is separated by a round centre table from Milan.


(Clockwise from above) art around The foyer has a 140-year-old Afghan kilim, and Greek Thassos marble flooring, used through most areas of the house; a series of muted canvases by Siraj Saxena is placed over a lacquered table from Milan; the red canvas is also by Saxena. The master bedroom has a bed from Armani/Casa; portraits by Umrao Singh Sher-Gil, artist Amrita Sher-Gil’s father, line the wall above. The dining table—which is made out of a single block of teak wood—is from Lava East, a bespoke contemporary furniture store in Singapore.

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(Clockwise from this picture) behind closed doors The master bathroom has Greek Thassos marble flooring. Seth first came across the idea for a steel base for the basin from a boutique off Sloane Square in London, and had it recreated for his Gurgaon home. Seth converted a bedroom into this walk-in closet.


T

he winter sunlight filters into the study—the polished Austrian teak wood parquet flooring a perfect canvas for the play of shadows. It is the kind of made-to-order lighting that every homeowner probably wishes for, but seldom achieves. However, that’s not the only thing that captures your attention in this study. There are also immaculately maintained floor-to-ceiling bookshelves on both sides of the room, punctuated with photographs, awards, Ganesha idols, limited-edition Coca-Cola bottles too. And plenty of books. It makes for one hell of a good universe to lose yourself in. “More and more books, which is what I’d like my world to be,” says Suhel Seth, the peripatetic and proud owner of this intriguing 6,000-square-foot apartment in a residential complex in the heart of Gurgaon. A caricature of Seth—made by his old friend, the late famed cartoonist and humorist, RK Laxman— smiles benignly at us. Sitting behind his mahogany Ralph Lauren desk with a tooled leather inset, the managing partner of branding and marketing firm Counselage and the founder of advertising agency Equus says, “I live most of the month in hotels, so I wanted to replicate a similar situation when it came to the conveniences here. At the same time, I also wanted to make it feel like a home.” Which was reinforced by the fact that his mother, who lives in the flat next door, ensures he still enjoys a hot, home-cooked meal. “No food is cooked in my house; it comes from my mother’s. But a lot of drinks are served here,” he laughs. The tech-wired, iPadcontrolled apartment was designed by AD50 architects Sonali and Manit Rastogi of Morphogenesis. “They don’t usually design apartments, but I wanted them to do mine,” says Seth. “I felt that they would appreciate the sense of minimalism I believe in.” Under Seth’s watchful—and rather creative—eye, the apartment took a year and a half to complete. The result: a modern space that is an example of smart contrasts, a deceptively sprawling home unravelling itself methodically, somewhat nesting like the matryoshka dolls—each tucked inside the other—placed in his study.

While the bling may be restricted to just the bathroom, an artistic aesthetic permeates the entire space, with a collection that can best be described as eclectic. An avid art connoisseur, Seth uses this space to showcase the enviable works that he has collected over the years, including those by FN Souza, Anjolie Ela Menon, Henri Matisse, Marc Chagall, Jamini Roy and Siraj Saxena. At the entrance of the home is a life-size fibreglass tiger, which was a part of the Artiger fundraising project that raises awareness about the conservation of India’s national animal. The most stunning piece of art, though, is opposite the dining table—an oil on canvas depicting Amritsar’s Golden Temple by Hungarian artist Gyula Tornai, when he visited India in the late 19th or early 20th century. “I picked it up at Christie’s,” says Seth. The master bedroom has walls lined with portraits photographed by Umrao Singh Sher-Gil, father of artist Amrita Sher-Gil. The regal foyer that we pass through on the way to the main living room, on the other hand, has a series of Siraj Saxena canvases pitted against the explosion of colours seen in the work by Puducherry-based French artist, Pierre Legrand. An easel by Seth’s friend, Natasha Singh Kohli, holds a dog-eared copy of an old Chinese book of symbols. “Instead of a painting, I thought, ‘why not put a book?’” explains Seth. A 140-year-old Afghani kilim brightens up the Greek Thassos marble flooring, which is used through most areas of the house.

“More and More books, which is what I’d lIke my world to be.”

SHOW FLAT From a bare shell provided by property developers DLF, Seth decided on just two bedrooms, one for himself (with a walk-in closet the size of another bedroom) and a guest bedroom. He also has a rather indulgent leather-floored man cave. But that’s not the pièce de résistance. It’s the en suite bathroom, which features a mirror framed by a stingray-leather border, an intricately carved marble jaali covering the basin, and a mother-of-pearl wall (perfectly suited for the Shah of Iran, maybe?). “It’s the only bling in the house,” says Seth.

AN ORIGINAL MAKE Seth’s home isn’t just a showcase for blue-chip contemporary art, but also for 21st-century design and the best in artisanal craftsmanship. “All the pieces of furniture have been made from scratch,” he says. Like the Puru Das-designed bar in the living room, evidence of the fact that entertaining guests at home was part of the agenda when the design was under way. Co-founder of New Delhi-based interior design firm Urbanist, Das is also the man behind a lot of the furniture in the house, like the leather-upholstered chest of drawers in Seth’s bedroom, the chesterfield chairs in the study and the couches in the living room. “Puru has done a beautiful job with every piece of furniture I asked him to create,” says Seth. Another piece, though not by Das, is no less unique—a stunning dining table from Lava East, a bespoke contemporary furniture store in Singapore, made out of a single block of teak wood. The visual drama within is easily matched by the scenic display outside; given that Seth’s home is on the fifth floor, your vision is in perfect symmetry with the top of the manicured treeline. Beyond that is the vast expanse of a golf course. Ever a stickler for perfection, Seth has ensured that everything sits in its allotted space. He knew the sort of house he wanted to live in and succeeded in creating a haven that shows off his life and times over the years—a curated space with the state-of-the-art sophistication of a hotel and yet very much a home at its heart.

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workbook

DECONSTRUCT ’s SAMIR WADEKAR helps you adapt the look of the international homes in our pages with products that are available in local Indian stores

THE HIGH LIFE

‘SCRIBBLE’ BEIGE RUG, `34,650, HANDS CARPETS

WOODEN BIRD, `3,750, CINNAMON;

ARMCHAIR, PRICE ON REQUEST, OMA

POLISHED-BRASS CANDLESTAND, `4,000, ESSAJEES

‘LACE’ VASE, `6,500, MOONRIVER ‘MONO’ SEARED-OAK SIDEBOARD, `99,000, KHAZANA STORES

‘MAIN’ FLOOR LAMP, `36,950, BOCONCEPT

‘CBST001’ TABLE, `8,000, CANE BOUTIQUE

‘LULU’ SOFA, `1,10,000, URBANIST

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PHOTOGRAPHERS: INDRAJIT SATHE, ANSHUMAN SEN, THIRU S/WHITE LIGHT DESIGN. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: NITYA DHINGRA, KRITI VIJ.

MANOLO YLLERA

PG 172-179


EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE

PG 164-171

‘K7’ KITCHEN FAUCET, PRICE ON REQUEST, GROHE

PAUL MASSEY

‘NO 5’ FLOOR PANELS FROM THE MANUFAKTUR COLLECTION, `495 PER SQUARE FOOT, HKS 1835

‘ORIO’ TABLE IN TUSCANA CARAMEL LEATHER, `1,16,902, STANLEY

‘OB60SL11DEPX1FP’ SELF-CLEANING OVEN, `1,70,000, FISHER & PAYKEL

FLOOR LAMP, `16,500, IRONWORKS

‘MC ESCHER GRAPHIC WORK’ BOOK BY TASCHEN, PRICE ON REQUEST, CMYK BOOKSTORE

‘ZIG ZAG’ CABINET, `64,900, SQUARE BARREL ‘ASAN’ CHAIR, `19,750, AKFD STUDIO

For details, see Stockists

PHOTOGRAPHERS: INDRAJIT SATHE, SHAMANTH PATIL. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: KRISHNA KALRO.

‘OPTIMAL’ VASE BY MOSER, `12,000, THEHOUSEOF THINGS.COM

SET OF TWO VASES, `2,500, SALVA TERRA HOME


The St. Regis’ Anuraag Bhatnagar

CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER CELEBRATES ITS 5TH YEAR IN INDIA

The Singleton bar

Spirits soared at the magazine’s stellar anniversary bash The venue: The St. Regis Mumbai Dilip and Shobhaa De

M

errymaking went into the wee hours at the Condé Nast Traveller 5th Anniversary party in October, hosted by The St. Regis Mumbai in association with The Singleton Selections. The evening saw contributing writers, photographers, film-makers, artists, advertisers, partners and several others who have been a part of the magazine’s journey. The evening came alive at the Zenith Party Suite, on the 38th floor of the hotel with popular music spun by Nina Shah and Malika Haydon—the glamorous DJ duo who call themselves The Elektrovertz. Fun, glamorous and memorable, the evening was the highlight of Condé Nast Traveller ’s landmark moment.

Rajan Anandan, Radhika Chopra and CNT’s Divia Thani Daswani

CNI’s Alex Kuruvilla and Wasim Akram

Anaita Shroff Adajania and Farrokh Chothia Starwood’s Dilip Puri

The lovely spread

Sabyasachi Mukherjee

Jaipur Trunks Company created installations at the venue

The Elektrovertz


Biren and Sheetal Vaidya

Romil Ratra

Laila and Ricky Lamba

Vishal Bakshi with CNTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunaina Talwar Khiani Shunali and Shravan Shroff

Ram Sampath and Sona Mohapatra

Mittu and Inga Chandilya

Homi Adajania and Vicky Ratnani

Surabhi and Nachiket Barve, Malini Agarwal and Nowshad Rizwanullah

Wasim Akram with Devendra and Swapan Bharma

PHOTOGRAPHS: PANKAJ ANAND; KEDAR NENE

Chinmai Sharma

Anupama Chopra

Rajiv Kaul

Gazi Rouhallah

Sheetal Mallar

Atul Ruia

Lisa Ray Rahul Akerkar

Narendra Nedungadi, B Hariharan and Madhavan Menon

Anil and Sabina Chopra


inside

STYLE

THE

BATHROOM REPORT helps you create the perfect bathroom with an array of accessories and products inspired by the distinct styles of five renowned designers and firms STYLIST SAMIR WADEKAR

EXPERT ADVICE, DECOR TIPS, ND STYLE ESSENTIALS FOR THE AND CONTEMPORARY INDIAN HOME

SHOWER PLAY The ‘Closer’ shower is a creative reimagining of the traditional shower column. Designed by Diego Grandi for Zucchetti, its flexible form cleverly recalls the aesthetics of a lamp. A simple system designed with three joints ensures a multi-directional movement to control and direct the jet of water.


KENGO KUMA

PHOTO: DAICI ANO

Kengo Kuma and Associates were enlisted by the owners of the Ginzan Onsen Fujiya Hotel in Japan to renovate the 350-year-old building housing the hotel. This private bath pays homage to the surrounding areaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; known for its hot springsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a traditional wooden ofuru (bathtub). The structured cypress-wood walls and ceiling panelling reference traditional Japanese building techniques. The minimal aesthetic and use of handmade wooden surfaces lend this space a Zen-like tranquillity. kkaa.co.jp


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7 1. Wall unit from the Metropole collection; VitrA. 2. Washbasin and console from the Cape Cod collection by Philippe Starck; Duravit. 3. ‘Offset Curve’ wooden tile from the Network collection by Ann Sacks; C Bhogilal West-End. 4. Water closet and bidet set from the Bagno di Colore collection by Globo; Etre Luxe. 5. ‘NE01’ bathtub by Nendo; Bisazza Bagno. 6. ‘5mm’ faucet by Treemme; Etre Luxe. 7. ‘F Acqua Built in Waterfall’ shower; Queo. 8. Three-hole basin mixer from the Axor Citterio collection; Hansgrohe. 9. ‘Wazebo’ outdoor shower cabin by Ludovica+Roberto Palomba; Kos.

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JEAN-LOUIS DENIOT

By pairing a monochrome colour palette with an aesthetic style evocative of the 1930s, architect and interior designer Jean-Louis Deniot created this timeless bathroom in a Parisian apartment. The grandeur of the Carrara marble surfaces pairs well with the chrome fixtures and fittings. Deniot wanted to create a refined space that appears to be carved from a single block of marble. deniot.com


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6 11. Door handle by Bronces Mestre; e; Etre Luxe. e 2.. ‘Troy’ sculpture by Artisan House; e; thehouseofthings.com. f m 3.. ‘Coyal’ tabletop basin; Cera. 4. Mirrored wash cabinet with two doors by Arte Veneziana; a Defa f Lighting Solutions. s 5.. ‘Somerset’ basin mixer; Grohe. e 6. ‘President’ ident’ bathtub by Devon&Devon; FCML Bathrooms. 7. Towel rack (980.62.122); Häfele. 8. Lotion dispenser (83430360); Dornbracht. 9. ‘Cascade Grey’ light and dark ceramic tiles; Nitco. 10. Water closet from the Istanbul collection; VitrA.

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PATRICIA URQUIOLA

PHOTOGRAPHER: MANOLO YLLERA

Spanish-born, Milan-based designer Patricia Urquiola created this bathroom for her friend Patrizia Moroso of Italian furniture brand Moroso. Urquiola infused a burst of personality into the space with bright tiles, textured surfaces and sleek bathroom sanitaryware. Using bold art and modern furniture (‘Klara’ chair and ‘Shanghai Tip’ side table, both by Urquiola for Moroso; ‘The Fool on the Hill’ ceramic stool by Luca Nichetto for Moroso), she managed to turn a mundane bathroom into a striking living space. patriciaurquiola.com


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PHOTO: INDRAJIT SATHE

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1. ‘F Acqua Chromo’ shower with LED lighting; Queo. 2. Crown mirror by Maviya Sabri; L’Mya Decor. 3. Washbasin from the Water Jewel collection; VitrA. 4. ‘45909’ washbasin and ‘45001’ basin mixer from the Cono collection by Gessi; FCML Bathrooms. 5. Bathtub from the Hermitage collection; The.Artceram. 6. Studded stool; R House. 7. ‘Veulo’ faucet by Brizo; Delta Faucet. 8. ‘Automate’ intelligent toilet; Hindware Italian Collection. 9. ‘Kristall’ 3D quartz tiles (rich green, sweet brown and berry); Sternhagen. 10. Thermostatic bath mixer from the Axor Citterio collection; Hansgrohe.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|197


GILLES & BOISSIER

PHOTOGRAPHER & PRODUCER: MICHAEL PAUL

Patrick Gilles and Dorothée Boissier—of the self-named Parisian firm—designed a Lake Como residence for Remo Rufni, chairman and creative director of FrenchItalian apparel brand, Moncler. This Italian Carrara marble bathtub acts as an imposing central element. Polished marble floors and walls heighten the sense of luxury in this monochrome master bathroom, while the vintage taps and shower head (Drummonds, London) infuse an organic aesthetic to this otherwise modernist space. A photograph of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum (New York) by Swiss photographer Irene Kung hangs above the bathtub. gillesetboissier.com


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7 8 1. ‘Adair’ water closet by Kohler; C Bhogilal West-End. 2. ‘Solitaire’ (black) shower panel; Amore. 3. Stone tile from the t Calacatta Borghini g SP collection by Ann Sacks; C Bhogilal West-End. 4. ‘AC-001C’ basin mixer from the Classic Creations collection; Bravat. 5. ‘Gask’ suspension light by Diesel Living with Foscarini; Lightbox. 6. ‘Costal Grey’ quartz surface by Caesarstone; Häfele. 7. Standing bath-shower mixer from the Agorà Classic collection by Ludovica+Roberto Palomba; Zucchetti. 8. Custom alabaster bathtub by Atelier Alain Ellouz; My Tailor Home. 9. Towel bar (580.34.320); Häfele. 10. ‘Faces’ washbasin by Ramón Esteve; Porcelanosa. 11. ‘Music’ mirror by Devon&Devon; FCML Bathrooms.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|199


RAJIV SAINI

Mumbai-based designer Rajiv Saini wanted this bathroom to reflect a laid-back and relaxed aesthetic, which was maintained throughout a Goan holiday home. The neutral grey limestone works as a contrast to the mustard stone mosaic. The custom ironand-bronze basin stand creates a visually light vanity area, while the purple pendant light infuses colour to this modernist space. rajivsaini.com


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For details, see Stockists

1. ‘Edition Edition 400’ 400 glass and soap holder; Keuco Keuco. 2. ‘Unfold’ Unfold lamp by Muuto Muuto; Le Mill. 3. EMO shower system by Edelbad; Häfele. 4. Mosaic panel from the Neocolibrì collection by Sicis; C Bhogilal West-End. 5. Single-lever mixer from the Axor Uno2 collection; Hansgrohe. 6. ‘Cypris’ mirror by Nina Mair; Classicon. 7. ‘Milla’ basket; BoConcept. 8. ‘Cirocco’ water closet; Cera. 9. ‘84120970’ towel rack and soap stand; Dornbracht. 10. Washbasin from the SaphirKeramik collection by Konstantin Grcic for Laufen; FCML Bathrooms.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016|

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inside POINT OF VIEW

POTTY

In an unfiltered, unfettered rant, comedian and author RADHIKA VAZ explains the many inferences one makes based on the state of people’s bathrooms—and why a clean bathroom is so damn important

incorporates every hue in the rainbow and then some, but I will s a comedian, I have been not tolerate a bathroom that looks like I need to wear shower shoes accused of what some people call at all times. I am usually a pretty accommodating person, but all I “bathroom humour”. I have no need to see are water spots on a mirror and I will call housekeeping beef with that (wait, am I banned immediately. It goes without saying that I extend this fanatic need from using that expression now?), for clean to my own bathroom, thus driving myself, and any but I have always thought the cleaning person who has ever worked for me, completely mad. phrase made no sense. You see, I And while this may sound excessive, as a woman I feel I have no believe the bog should actually be other choice. the cleanest room in the house. Let me explain. All my life, I have believed that the state of a Having lived my whole life in person’s bathroom tells you at least a little bit about them, and a hostels and rentals, when it comes clean toilet tells me that—despite all of your other fault lines—you to bathrooms, I am used to taking are probably not harbouring a communicable disease. I agree; this what I get. I make the most of it, of course, by installing (a more system isn’t foolproof. But it’s the closest thing I can get to a snap architectural sounding word than ‘hanging’) a few quirky pictures judgement, and for this reason I am expecting to be judged right on the wall and stacking the place with reading material. Old issues back. In the good old days, we women didn’t of Hello! and People, from my trips to phoren, and a have careers and so validation came in three picture book titled Images You Should Not Masturbate It goes without forms: our ability to look good, cook well and To is what will greet you should you pay me, saying that keep a good home—and by good, I mean clean. or rather my lavatory, a visit. So, as much as I I extend my Over the years, I have done what I can with hate to say this to a bunch of designers, for me a fanatic need for MAC foundation and a regimen of squats and bathroom has always been functional. clean to my own bench press. I am also convinced that cooking Don’t get me wrong; I love a carefully and bathroom, thus is not a skill one can develop, but a talent that aesthetically planned crapper, and in my mind driving myself, I wasn’t blessed with. Cleaning, however, is the bathroom is the new living room. In this and any cleaning different. Anyone can do it; it’s literally the competitive world we live in, a killer commode person who has pinnacle of unskilled labour. So if there is one palace is now where one can gain a little ground ever worked for nod to femininity I can at least pretend to on the Joneses. Let’s face it; a posh loo is better me, completely make, this would be it. For this reason, dirt has than the most souped-up BMW, and a more mad...as a woman, always been my bête noire, and the bathroom is understated way of telling everyone you are I feel I have no where I wage my war against it. better than they are. From Jacuzzis to rain other choice. The female of the species has always been showers to toilets that will wash your bottom expected to be cleaner than men, both in mind and body and unasked, if you can think of a way to waste water, trust me, the most definitely at home. And despite the loud feminist voice sanitaryware industry got there before you did. Only the wealthy inside my head, I can’t seem to shake this last one entirely. Forget can afford to squander away our limited H2O, and so today the bathroom humour, most of us don’t want to be caught dead using number of bathrooms rather than bedrooms is what tells me how the bathroom. For this reason, we will never spend a night with money you are. Plus, as a socialite, your bathroom better be on a new boyfriend, and if we do, we disappear well before that call point, because when you entertain, that is precisely where the of nature. It is also the reason why so many couples eventually real fun goes down. Oh c’mon Prudey, they don’t call it a powder insist on separate toilets. I don’t blame them; a shared shithouse is room for nothing. where romance goes to die. I mean, how is a decade-long marriage But back to me and my low-budget lifestyle. Having never supposed to survive skid marks? Or long curlie-wurlies stuck to a had the opportunity to build from scratch or even just renovate nice white bar of L’Occitane en Provence soap? my own place, when it comes to bathrooms, hygiene rather than For me, as a member of the female species, cleanliness is not style has been my calling card. Even when I check into a hotel, next to godliness; it is, in fact, right next to femininity. So the next I care less about the view and more about the loo. I can forgive time you call a lady a potty mouth, think again. tacky furniture, hideous light fittings and a colour scheme that 202|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016


PHOTOGRAPH: ERRIKOS ANDREOU


PRESENTS

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO

Destination Weddings DREAMY DESTINATIONS • ICONIC HOTELS • ROMANTIC WEDDING STORIES • EXPERTS’ INSIDER SECRETS • FASHION & ACCESSORIES FOR THE BRIDE AND GROOM • CELEBRATED WEDDING PLANNERS All this and much more...

AVAILABLE ALONG WITH OUR FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 ISSUE

For advertising queries, please email priya.singh@condenast.in


scouts

Newsreel From the hottest products to the coolest launches, here’s a low-down on the latest in the market this season

freNch coNNectioN A global leader in high-end furniture, Roche Bobois made its long-awaited entry into the Bengaluru design market with a 7,500square-foot showroom at No 7/1 Ulsoor Road. This iconic 50-year-old French brand is famous for creating luxurious collections that bear their unique design aesthetic and ingenuity. The new store in Bengaluru reflects the spirit of the brand through its interior architecture, collections by Missoni, Jean Paul Gaultier, Sonia Rykiel, and the quality of the proposed services. (roche-bobois.com)

office of the future

Panchshil Realty, headquartered in Pune, has developed a new property called Business Bay. Strategically located across the Poona Club Golf Course on Airport Road, this business park is designed to offer the complete package—work, shop, live and play—to its corporate occupants. High-end retail stores and the luxurious Ritz-Carlton hotel are only the tip of the iceberg at this property by the recipient of the Asia-Pacific Property Awards 2014-2015 for ‘Highly Commended Mixed-Use Development’. The key assets of Business Bay are its modern workspaces—as seen in the aesthetic environs of BMC Software (pictured), an American digital enterprise management firm. (panchshil.com)

the healthy choice

The Olive Tree Trading Company was formed 14 years ago to import fine Mediterranean food ingredients and premium products from around the world while promoting a healthier lifestyle. Their gourmet online store hosts a variety of vegan alternatives and healthy organic ingredients. You will be spoilt for choice with Silk almond and soy milk, Mori-Nu tofu, and even single-origin coffee capsules. Rediscover wellness with Olea Europaea’s range of pure, raw and natural honey all produced in Italy. Their ‘Wildflower’, ‘Chestnut’, ‘Eucalyptus’ and ‘Orange Blossom’ honey can be purchased through the website. (olivetreetrading.com) 206|

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2016


WALL ART

Nitco, one of India’s leading tile manufacturers, presents the Wall Digital collection. These tiles offer ways to mix and match multiple tiles from the collection to create your own style. Dark and light variations help create contrast, as seen in the ‘Aqua Green Decor’ and ‘Aqua Green’ tiles. Made specifically for use on walls, and coated in an antibacterial treatment, these tiles are easy to clean and maintain. Nitco also offers a range of floor tiles in varying finishes that are slip-resistant. (nitcotiles.in)

IN TIME

Launched in 1972, the ‘Royal Oak’ was the first luxury watch to treat stainless steel like a precious metal. However, in 2016, Swiss watchmaker Audemars Piguet brings gold back to the forefront. Housed in a yellow gold case, the self-winding ‘Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar’ has a new movement, the calibre 5134, which is visible through the glare-proof sapphire crystal back. Calibre 5134 is based on its predecessor, calibre 2120, however it has been enlarged to perfectly fit the updated 41mm case. On the Grande Tapisseriepatterned dials—with subtle three-dimensional squares—the three day, month displays of a perpetual calendar are given pride of place: day and date are displayed at 9, 12 and 3 o’clock. ((audemarspiguet.com g m))

FABRICATE

Bengaluru-based RUMORS Fine Furnishings is one of the largest exporters and manufacturers of rich upholstery fabrics. This one-stop furnishing destination recently introduced their latest fabric, ‘Verona’ from the Quartz collection. The collection is classically inspired, and replete with damask motifs, intricate floral embroideries, velvets and delicate sheers. These luxurious designs come in soft and soothing shades of lilac, ivory, gold and blue, which are reminiscent of the French baroque period. This classic range starts at `1,600 per metre, making these pieces affordable. (rumorsindia.in)


scouts

BATHROOM ESSENTIALS

Roca, one of the leaders in elegant sanitaryware solutions, offers the Escuadra collection of bathroom faucets, showers and mixers. The Escuadra high-neck basin mixer (pictured) is defined by its minimal form—a sequence of angles, straight lines and planes—which makes the faucet the perfect choice for an urban setting. Committed to combining the perfect finish with the latest technology, the deck-mounted faucet also features the CLICK ® water and energy saving system. (roca.in)

CLEAN ACT

The Neorest collection of water closets (pictured) by TOTO will do an outstanding job of meeting your needs with their hygienic functions and comfortable use. The sensoractivated lids rise and lower automatically, while the seats can be heated to desired temperatures. The adjustable wand jet allows for warm water cleansing. The temperature and position of the sprays can be customized for two individuals as well. Its modern design and outstanding comfort makes this water closet the perfect complement to any modern interior. (asia.toto.com)

BASIC INSTINCTS

With an in-house design team and testing lab, Jaquar creates high-quality products with superior performance for their wide range of bathroom fixtures and sanitaryware. The single-lever basin mixer (pictured) from the new range of Ornamix Prime bath fittings is defined by its minimalistic form. The collection also consists of a family of coordinated faucets, overhead and hand showers. Jaquar’s passion for perfection reflects in the 10-year warranty available for its faucets. (jaquar.com)

WRITTEN IN STONE

To commemorate the launch of Little India in Malaysia, inaugurated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Malaysian peer Najib Razak, Indian stone brand Odyssey built the Torana Gate. The $1.1 million gate—inspired by the Great Stupa at Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh—was built in Indian Dholpur sandstone. Apart from felicitations, the gate has garnered the brand multiple requests to replicate the carving and elements of design—all of which were undertaken by Odyssey over a four-and-a-half month period. (odysseystone.com) 208|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016


CREATIVE SPACE

Decowood, from the house of Greenlam Industries, offers over 200 exotic timbers such as walnut, rosewood, mahogany, ebony and many more. These woods have been specially sourced from across the world, and are backed by fine craftsmanship, artistic skills, and years of expertise. This unique and exotic collection of high-grade veneers is processed at a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Rajasthan. Decowood has many variants you can opt for, like veneered MDF panels, and laminated and flexible veneers. Apart from the standard sheet size of 4 by 8 feet, Decowood offers specialized dimensions of 4 by 10 feet—as well as 3 by 7 feet for doors and panels. (decowoodveneers.com)

HANG IN THERE

Available exclusively through Grandeur showrooms across India, the Vitrum collection by Pianca comprises wardrobes with a minimalist design and clean lines. Created with the finest materials in Italy, the glass-fronted wardrobe is replete with storage sections, and divided into shelves and hanging closet spaces. These wardrobes can be customized with respect to size, finish, colour and internal accessories. After the design and specifications are finalized with a Grandeur design representative, they are individually crafted using cutting-edge production methodologies in Italy and shipped to India. (grandeurinteriors.com)

LAID BACK

Since 1959, iconic Italian brand Natuzzi has symbolized innovation and style, focusing its attention on achieving the best stylistic solutions, as well as providing comfortable furniture. Design and function are key elements in their wide range of sofas, armchairs, beds, dining tables and accessories. The ‘Long Beach’ sofa (pictured) designed by Italian architect Claudio Bellini is a modular sofa with crisp, clean lines and meticulous attention to detail. The sofa’s height-adjustable feet can be easily set up to provide comfortable seating. (natuzzi.in)


Che Kurrien & Akshay Kumar

Vece & Leander Paes

Rajkumar Hirani Lisa Ray & Vijendra Bhardwaj

Sabyasachi Mukherjee

Lara Dutta

Y C Deveshwar & Alex Kuruvilla

Rahul Bose & Vikrum Baidyanath Shahid Kapoor & Ayushmann Khurrana

Deepika Padukone


Vivek Ranadivé

Gaggan Anand

Aditi Rao Hydari

Delicious desserts by Grand Hyatt Mumbai

WIRED FOR THE FUTURE

A glamorous affair at Grand Hyatt, Mumbai, GQ Men of the Year Awards 2015, in association with Chivas, was the most talked about and wellattended event this year. While GQ India celebrated its 7th Anniversary, the awards commemorated 16 outstanding achievers who were carefully selected from diverse fields – ranging from sports, film and literature to fashion, art and business. Eminent personalities and A-listers from across the country flooded the red carpet as the evening came alive with the futuristic “Wired” theme. While Cyrus Sahukar played host, the charming Aditi Rao Hydari presented a segment on philanthropy, which had three special awards – Philanthropist of the Year, Social Entrepreneur and Agent of Social Change. The entertainment was spectacular as the band, A Bit of Both – featuring Boombay Djembe Folas – played customized tracks specially created for the occassion. As spirits began to rise, guests joined the musicians to create new sounds on the ground, making it an event that will long be remembered.

Madhav Chavan

The Chivas Bar

The Chivas range

Waluscha De Sousa at the Amex booth

Nikhil Mehra & Almona Bhatia The Woolmark display

Riyas Komu & Bose Krishnamachari


Cyrus Sahukar

Pernia Qureshi

Dino Morea

Evelyn Sharma

Arjun Mehra

Bikram Saluja & Schauna Chauhan

Lisa Griplas & Arti Gudal

Nimisha Tiwari, Piyush Tewari & Oona Dhabhar

Ranveer Brar

Amy Jackson

Elli Avram

Prateik Babbar

Sunil Chhetri

AD & Sabina Singh

Manoj Adlakha & Rohit Sharma

Sumeet Lamba

Neil Nitin Mukesh Vikram Raizada


WINNERS OF GQ MEN OF THE YEAR 2015

LEANDER PAES SPORTING LEGEND

Y C DEVESHWAR BUSINESS LEGEND

RAJKUMAR HIRANI

SABYASACHI MUKHERJEE

SHAHID KAPOOR

DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR

DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

ACTOR OF THE YEAR

ROHIT SHARMA

DEEPIKA PADUKONE

SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

BOSE KRISHNAMACHARI & RIYAS KOMU INSPIRATION AWARD

GAGGAN ANAND

AKSHAY KUMAR

VIVEK RANADIVÉ

SUSHANT SINGH RAJPUT

CHEF OF THE YEAR

ULTIMATE GQ MAN

GLOBAL INDIAN OF THE YEAR

BREAKTHROUGH TALENT AWARD

RAHUL BOSE

PIYUSH TEWARI

MADHAV CHAVAN

PHILANTHROPIST OF THE YEAR

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR

AGENT OF SOCIAL CHANGE


stockists

The merchandise featured in the magazine has been sourced from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. ABACA: Mumbai 022-24933522 (abacaindia.com) AKFD STUDIO: Jaipur 1414068400; Bengaluru 08042106797 (akfdstudio.com) AMORE: Gurgaon 124-4779200 (hindwarehomes.com) AND MORE STORIES: Mumbai 022-24931016 (andmorestories.com) ANN SACKS: (annsacks.com); see C BHOGILAL WEST-END ARTE VENEZIANA: (arteveneziana.com); at DEFA LIGHTING SOLUTIONS, New Delhi 09811112028 AUDEMARS PIGUET: Time Avenue, Mumbai 02226515757; Kapoor Watch, New Delhi 011-46536667 BISAZZA BAGNO: (bisazza.com) BOCONCEPT: Ahmedabad 09409631000 (boconcept.com) BRAVAT: Gurgaon 124-

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4945050 (bravatindia.com) BVLGARI: Rose - The Watch Bar, Mumbai 02223620277; Johnson Watch Co, New Delhi 01141513121; Zimson Watch World, Bengaluru 08040913800; Meena Jewellers, Hyderabad, 040-44767758 BYCOLLAGE.COM: India 09890245900 C BHOGILAL WEST-END: Mumbai 022-61523100 (cbwestend.com) CAC: Mumbai 022-22013379 (cac.co.in) CANE BOUTIQUE: Bengaluru 080-41152093 (caneboutique.com) CAPPELLINI: (cappellini.it); see POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER CARTIER: Rose - The Watch Bar, Mumbai 02223620277; DLF Emporio, New Delhi 011-46788888; Ethos Summit, Bengaluru 080-41130611; London 0044-20-73126930; Paris 0033-1-58182300 CASSINA: (cassina.com); see POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER CERA: India 02764242329 (cera-india.com) CHOPARD: New Delhi 01146662834; Mumbai 02222884757; London 004420-74093140 CINNAMON: Bengaluru 080-41634220 (cinnamonthestore.com) CMYK BOOKSTORE: (cmykbookstore.com)

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

COLE & SON: London 0044-20-84428844 (cole-and-son.com); see F&F DELTA FAUCET: Gurgaon 124-4066109 (deltafaucet.co.in) DESIGN ARTIFACTS HAVEN: Mumbai 09820951828 (designartifactshaven.com) DESIGN TEMPLE: 022-22821001 (designtemple.com) DEVON&DEVON: (devon-devon.com); see FCML BATHROOMS DIESEL LIVING WITH FOSCARINI: (foscarini.com/diesel); see FIREFLY DORNBRACHT: Mumbai 022-26853900 (dornbracht.com); see C BHOGILAL WEST-END DURAVIT: India 07966112300 (duravit.in) ELVY: Gurgaon 124-4578888 (elvy.in) ESSAJEES: Mumbai 022-22021071 (essajees.com) ETRE LUXE: New Delhi 011-26809771 (etreluxeindia.com) F&F: Gurgaon 124-4307000 (fandf.in) FABFURNISH.COM: Gurgaon 124-6733300 FCML BATHROOMS: Bengaluru 080-41169343; Chennai 044-42176167;

Mumbai 022-49261200; New Delhi 011-26800482 (fcmlindia.com) FIREFLY: Mumbai 022-66608959 (fireflyindia.in) FISHER & PAYKEL: (fisherpaykel.com) FREEDOM TREE: Mumbai 022-24914231 (freedomtree.in) GROHE: Gurgaon 1244933000 (grohe.com) HĂ&#x201E;FELE: Bengaluru 080-22226116; Kolkata 03340086814; Mumbai 02261426100; New Delhi 01166574999; (hafeleindia.com) HANDS CARPETS: Ahmedabad 079-40191757; Simply Sofas, Bengaluru 080-22232223; Mumbai 022-26320609; New Delhi 011-26503239 (hands-carpets.com) HANSGROHE: Pune 02066259500 (hansgrohe.in) HINDWARE ITALIAN COLLECTION: Gurgaon 124-4779200 (hindwarehomes.com) HKS 1835: Mumbai 022-22702075 (hks1835.com) HUBLOT: Rose - The Watch Bar, Mumbai 022-23620277; Kapoor Watch, New Delhi 011-41345678; Zimson Watch World, Bengaluru 080-40913800; The Helvetica, Chennai 04428490013


IDAMSTORE.COM: India 09999372636 IKKADUKKA.COM: Gurgaon 124-4363187 IMPERIALKNOTS.COM: Gurgaon 09650427850 INV HOME: Mumbai 022-40020402; New Delhi 011-29233122 (invhome.in) IQRUP+RITZ: Gurgaon 09599110672 (iqrupandritz.com) IRONWORKS: Mumbai 022-26059838 (tejalmathurdesign.in)

PHOTOS: ASHISH SAHI, ANSHUMAN SEN, TOM PARKER

JAEGER-LECOULTRE: Rose - The Watch Bar, Mumbai 022-23620277; Kapoor Watch, New Delhi 011-41345678; Zimson Watch World, Bengaluru 080-40913800; The Helvetica, Chennai 044-28490013 JAIPURRUGSCO.COM: Jaipur 141-3987400 KHAZANA STORES: Ahmedabad 07926840378; Mumbai 022-40055264 (khazanastores.com) KOHLER: Gurgaon 1244319601 (kohler.co.in); see C BHOGILAL WEST-END KOS: Italy 003903-22954700 (zucchettikos.it) KULTURE SHOP: Mumbai 02226550982 (kultureshop.in)

L’MYA DECOR: India 09927040657 (lmyadecor.com) LIMÓN: (limon-design.com) LLADRÓ: Bengaluru 080-40985215; Mumbai 022-22823436; New Delhi 011-41864400 (lladro.com) MOONRIVER: New Delhi 011-41617103 (moonriverstore.com) MOTHER GONE MAD DESIGN STUDIO: India 09810119504 (mothergonemad.wix.com) MY TAILOR HOME: Mumbai 022-40043458 (mytailorhome.com) NATUZZI: Bengaluru 09844639887; New Delhi 09910086595; Mumbai 022-24999099 (natuzzi.in) NITCO: Ahmedabad 07926937719; Bengaluru 080-22861866; Chennai 044-28152963; Kolkata 033–40012873; Mumbai 022-67302500; New Delhi 011-24633685 (nitco.in) NO-MAD.IN: India 09820361687 OMA: New Delhi 011-43597191; Mumbai 02224983133 (omaliving.com) OMEGA: Bengaluru 08040982106; Chennai 04428464092; New Delhi 011-41513255; Hyderabad 040-23331144; Mumbai

022-30602002 OSBORNE&LITTLE: (osborneandlittle.com) PEPPERFRY.COM: Mumbai 022-61576157 PIERRE FREY: (pierrefrey.com); at LE MILL 022-23684463 (lemillindia.com) POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER: Mumbai 022-22614848; New Delhi 011-40817357 (poltronafrauindia.in) PORCELANOSA: Spain 0034-96-4507140 (porcelanosa.com) QUEO: Gurgaon 124-4779200 (queobathrooms.co.uk) R HOUSE: Mumbai 02224916901 (rhouse.in) RED BLUE & YELLOW: Mumbai 022-66260400 (redblueyellow.in) ROLEX: DiA, Mumbai 02222042299; Kapoor Watch, New Delhi 011-46536667; The Helvetica, Chennai 044-28490013; Luxury Time, Ahmedabad 07926469797; Meena Jewellers, Hyderabad 040-44767758 RUBBERBANDPRODUCTS. COM: Mumbai 022-64512487 SAFOMASI.COM: New Delhi 011-41600863 SALVA TERRA HOME: Mumbai 09920907435 (salvaterrahome.com)

SANTORINI: Mumbai 02224956666 (santorini.net.in) SARITA HANDA: Mumbai 022-40052686; New Delhi 011-43521824 (saritahanda.com) SHYAM AHUJA: Mumbai 022-24926017 (shyamahuja.com) SOURCES UNLIMITED: Mumbai 022-26201700 (sourcesunlimited.co.in) SQUARE BARREL: Mumbai 09820848615 (squarebarrel.in) STANLEY: Bengaluru 08861307777; Mumbai 022-24940300; New Delhi 09313840882 (lovestanley.com) STERNHAGEN: (sternhagen.com) THE.ARTCERAM: Italy 0039-07-61599499 (artceram.it) THEHOUSEOFTHINGS. COM: India 08003011110 THE PINAKIN STORE: Mumbai 022-65002400 (pinakin.in) THE UPPER GALLERY: Mumbai 09820100494 URBANIST: Gurgaon 0124-4384071 (urbanist.in) URBANLADDER.COM: India 080-67400200 VILLEROY & BOCH: Mumbai 022-40040014 (villeroy-boch.com) VITRA: (vitra-india.com) ZUCCHETTI: Italy 0039-0322954700 (zucchettikos.it)


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The president of The Oberoi Group, an art collector and a gallery owner, Kapil Chopra tells about 10 of his favourite things 10

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2016

1. MUSEUM When I’m in Spain, I love visiting the Museu Picasso in Barcelona. 2. ARTIST My favourites are Thukral & Tagra for the eclectic works that they bring to the table. 3. FASHION ACCESSORY I cannot do without my collection of Hermès ties. 4. MOVIE One of the most iconic movies of all time, and my personal favourite, The Godfather. 5. ARTWORK A memorable purchase is a painting called Game Theory by Mumbai-based artist TV Santhosh. It was the first expensive artwork that I bought. 6. GADGET The Jawbone fitness tracker is my go-to gadget. 7. COCKTAIL My favourite is the ‘Old Fashioned’. 8. BOOK Right now, I’m reading Zero to One by Peter Thiel. 9. WATCH The watch that I am currently wearing is the Cartier ‘Santos’. 10. PERFUME ‘Bleu de Chanel’ is one of my favourites. —SHREYA BASU

PHOTOS: 1. CATERINA BARJAU. 2. THIBAULT MONTAMAT. 3. 7CM TIES IN SILK TWILL BY HERMÈS. 6. JAWBONE. 7. COURTESY OF ERICH WAGNER. 8. PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE. 9. CARTIER. 10. CHANEL.

KAPIL CHOPRA


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