Page 1

SUMMER TRAINING SPECIAL

Stronger. Leaner. Faster! Set a New Fitness Goal— Then Nail It

16-Week

Marathon PLAN ! p83 Start Now

Your Pace Or Mine?

Men & Women, Running Together By Peter Sagal

Beginners

Tap Into the Runner’s High Emma Coburn, America’s top female steeplechaser. Our U.S. Olympic Trials coverage starts on page 66.

200 Miles, 12 Teammates, 2 Vans, 0 Showers. AreYou In?

Fuel Smarter S marter

5

HYDRATING SUPERFOODS

How to Break Bad Eating Habits Plus

JULY 2016 RUNNERSWORLD.COM


LIFE IS A SPORT. WE ARE THE UTILITY. BE UNSTOPPABLE.


BETTER

TOGETHER

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WARMUP CONTENTS

JULY 2016

EDITOR’S LETTER

RAVE RUN

THE LOOP

50TH ANNIVERSARY

8

10

12

14 2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

66

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

MAKING A SPLASH The U.S. steeplechase field has never been deeper, thanks in large part to Evan Jager (left) and Emma Coburn (cover). They’re favorites to make the Olympic team, but first, they’ve got 35 significant hurdles (and some significant water pits) to overcome in Eugene.

COV E R P H OTO G R A P H B Y M AT T T R A P P E ; H A I R & M A K E U P B Y S T E P H A N I E K L A S S E ; N E W BA L A N C E C LOT H I N G & S H O E S

BY NICK WELDON

ON THE COVER

76 U.S. OLYMPIC TRIALS

83 MARATHON TRAINING SPECIAL

90

Stronger. Leaner. Faster! .............. 36 Your Pace or Mine?...................... 20 Beginners.................................... 40 Fuel Smarter................................ 58 Break Bad Eating Habits............... 50 Are You In?.................................. 90

CHANGING OF THE GUARD

26.2 FOR YOU

ARE WE HAVING FUN YET?

The upcoming Track & Field Trials in Eugene, Oregon, features a crop of fast upstarts ready to disrupt the status quo and get to Rio.

A lot has changed about marathons in the past five decades. Experts who’ve been with us over the long haul explain what’s still as important as ever.

If you’re having trouble remembering what it’s like to have a really, really good time, pick up a 30hour relay-race baton.

BY PETER GAMBACCINI

BY CINDY KUZMA

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS HORNBECKER

BY MARC PARENT

JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 3


CONTENTS

WE’RE ALWAYS RUNNING AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM

21

CATCH IT ALL

HUMAN RACE 17

Quick Study The Casmanian Devil’s Olympic dream.

18

Running for Good Embedding community service into workouts.

PERSONAL BEST 35

Prerun Cooldown Cool yourself from the inside out with a slushy.

TRAINING 36

Stay Fit and Kick Back A seasonal goal can help keep you shining bright all summer.

40

The Starting Line Set yourself up for a feel-good run.

42

The Fast Lane Racing tactics to defeat your rivals head-to-head.

44

Race Prep The cooldown can be a potent tool—if you do it right.

46

Next Level The top men’s master at Boston almost wasn’t.

48

Ask the Experts What’s a good stadium workout?

20

Road Scholar Running to impress.

21

Runner by the Numbers A twotime cancer survivor goes ultra.

24

Action Star An elite makes a movie about Tracktown U.S.A.

26

Funny Feet A former Full House actress likes to sock it to ya.

26

Go You! Doctors said he’d never run again. He ran a 1:11 half to prove them wrong.

28

These Running Times The pain and pleasures of racing hard.

30

Ask Miles I see London, I see France…

50

Messy Eater? Bad habits that hurt your waistline.

32

Intersection Anti-Zika track suits.

54

Fridge Wisdom Add a few petals to your plate for a nutrient boost.

56

The Runner’s Pantry Refresh with all things strawberry.

58

Quick Bites Cold soups stocked with fruits and veggies.

BY PETER SAGAL Alexi Pappas ate a lot of eggs for the breakfast scenes in Tracktown. “I consumed about 12 of them—raw,” she says. “We made sure to find some local Eugenie ones so I wouldn’t get sick!”

BY JONATHAN BEVERLY

Across the Bay 12K A golden opportunity.

102

Trending Patriotic races.

I’M A RUNNER 112

Kat Graham She wears her muscles with pride.

4 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Slowing your movements adds stress to muscles that helps them grow stronger. Read about how on page 62, then watch it demonstrated at runners world.com/eccentric.

FUEL

RACES+PLACES 99

TRAINING VIDEO

MIND+BODY Andrea Barber’s collection is dominated by PRO Compression. The company’s Multicolor Stripe pair, which has been nicknamed #thegibblers by her fans, has sold out three times.

60

Is Brain Drain Tiring You Out? Six strategies to counter fatigue.

62

The Body Shop Slow your moves to maximize your gains.

GEAR 64

Take a Good Look The best sunglasses for runners.

I’M A RUNNER Check out scenes from our shoot with actor and singer Kat Graham at runnersworld.com/ imarunner.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H I R O YA M A M OTO ( R U N N E R B Y T H E N U M B E R S ); M I TC H M A N D E L ( S T R AW B E R R I E S ) ; M AT T R A I N E Y ( E G G S ); C O U R T E S Y O F P R O C O M P R E S S I O N ( S O C K )

56

We’ll have complete coverage of the Olympic Track & Field Trials July 1 to 10, including news, interviews, profiles, and behind-the-scenes footage. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and runners world.com/olympictrials.


Paper and paper-based packaging play a key role throughout our education. And that’s just one way they’re important to us. Discover how paper and packaging are instrumental to how we learn and how we live. HowLifeUnfolds.com © 2016 Paper and Packaging Board. All Rights Reserved.


David Willey

Molly O’Keefe Corcoran

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VP/PUBLISHER

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• “I finished a run and jumped in my car to go measure how far it was. In the mid-70s, we didn’t have fancy GPS devices.”

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Maria Rodale


EDITOR’S LETTER

A RACE TO REMEMBER

8 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Betsy Luce (left) and Jan Bastian, the unlikely organizers of Onward Shay! Our third-annual Cover Search is up and running, and we want to hear about your breakthrough running moment. Two winners (one male, one female) will appear on the cover of our December issue. Enter at runnersworld.com/ coversearch.

If you’re looking for a mobile-friendly training plan (and you want to track and log your runs on your phone), check out our newly upgraded RW GO app, which also syncs our What to Wear tool with local weather forecasts. Download on the App Store.

Shay Hirsch (above) was a big fan of The Wizard of Oz, so the race’s logo features Dorothy and Toto, and all volunteers will wear red shoes.

St. Alphonsus Hospital signed on as a major sponsor, and six shoe companies—Adidas, Asics, Brooks, Mizuno, New Balance, and Saucony—are joining forces to support the race in Shay’s memory. That’s unheard of. “The most rewarding thing is seeing how the spirit of the race resonates with people,” says Betsy. “Shay’s attitude of ‘Onward!’ moves everyone.” So many people reciprocated with inspiring stories of their own that Jan and Betsy decided to dedicate every mile marker to a single “Onward story.” Shay’s will be last. When we spoke in early May, registrations were up to 600 (you can sign up at onwardshay .com). The race course is f lat and fast and has been certified as a Boston qualifier. The field will range from first-time runwalkers to an elite group targeting 2:20. Finishers will get a free, specially brewed beer after crossing the line at the Payette Brewery. The event is affiliated with multiple charities, and there will be kids’ races on the Boise High track on Saturday morning, which Shay would’ve loved most of all. The Wizard of Oz theme— that’s for Shay, too. No, Betsy and Jan, both longtime runners, will not be in the race they started from scratch. “We’ll be running around putting out fires,” Jan says. Both look forward to resuming their running lives when the weekend is over. Soon, though, it will be time to look to next year. The foundation is in place, but the race won’t go on without heroic doses of effort. Onward! DAVID WILLEY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

@DWilleyRW

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

CO U R T E SY O F JA N BA S T I A N ( TO P R I G H T )

AND JUST LIKE THAT, it’s marathon season again. Or rather, marathontraining season, when hundreds of thousands of runners begin preparing in earnest for big fall races. It’s a months-long commitment to early-morning miles, agonizing speedwork, weekend long runs, and a surge in Google searches for “nipple chafing.” (We’re here to help; see page 83.) But training for a marathon is child’s play compared to organizing one. Just ask Betsy Luce and Jan Bastian. Neither one had ever organized a race before, but after their friend Shay Hirsch died in 2014 after an 11-year battle with cancer, they decided, along with Shay’s husband, George, to create a lasting tribute to her that would also be a gift to the city where she grew up. Throughout her illness, Shay wrote with steadfast optimism to friends and family about her treatments and prognoses, always ending with “Onward, Shay.” And thus the inaugural Onward Shay! Boise Marathon (plus half and relays) will be run in Idaho’s capital on October 30. I first wrote about Shay and George in our June 2014 issue. “A Running Love Story” (also on our website) was about how running brings people together in ways big and small, sometimes coincidentally, other times after

heroic doses of effort. This next chapter of the story is about how the running community has rallied to create something that looks improbable on paper but will end up being memorable. To be clear, this is not about setting up cones and water tables in a park. Boise (pop. 214,000) is a major city, and this will be the first big marathon there in years. If Jan and Betsy hit their target of 2,500 participants, it’ll be Idaho’s biggest marathon ever. To bring it to life, the duo is working six to eight hours a day, six days a week. “When we first started, I was too ignorant to understand what we were embarking on,” Jan says, “But there’s no turning back. It’s scary and exhilarating, much like running a marathon!” Phase I began in early 2015. They wrote a business plan and set up Onward Shay! as a 501c(3) nonprofit—“all the boring stuff.” That was followed by negotiations with City Hall, the police, and municipal entities that own Boise’s streets, more than eight miles of which will be closed for the marathon as it winds through residential North End neighborhoods to a greenbelt that traces the Boise River. Then came fundraising and outreach to sponsors and the media. “The hardest thing is rejection by potential sponsors,” Jan says. “When you’re intensely invested in something, it can feel draining at times.” Yet so many good things have happened. Assisted by George, a former publisher of Runner’s World, they assembled a board of advisors that includes Frank Shorter, Joan Benoit Samuelson, and Bill Rodgers. (I’m on it, too, along with RW’s Bart Yasso and Amby Burfoot.) They hired an ace race director, Keith Hughes, for a near pro-bono fee, and got a big grant from the Albertson’s Foundation (as in the chain of grocery stores). Boise’s


POWERED BY JEEP®

“It was slow going over rock-strewn switchbacks and narrow trails.” No one tried running from Badwater to Mount Whitney until 1974. Even then it took the first man three attempts before he finally did it in 1977. By the time I came along in 1989, Badwater had been an official race for two years, and only nine people had completed it. I had good reason to be anxious. I’d never run more than 26.2 miles—and Badwater was more than five times that distance. There was the heat—hot enough that sweat can literally evaporate from your body before it beads. And there was the terrain. To summit Mount Whitney, you must climb a total of 19,000 feet and drop 4,700 feet in a toe-smashing descent.


RAVE RUN

PORTLAND, OREGON RUNNER Bethany Efaw THE EXPERIENCE The Willamette River Greenway Trail is an intermittent 40-mile multiuse loop along the riverfront in downtown Portland. It starts northwest of the Fremont Bridge and ends on the southeast side of the river near Peace Memorial Park. The trail is marked by bridge crossings like the Broadway (foreground) and Fremont Bridges. “Portland is perfect for any level of runner,” says Efaw. “There are trails, challenging stairs, and beautiful parks.” FAST FACT Take a breather and soak in scenic river views from Portland’s newest bridge, Tilikum Crossing. At 1,720 feet, it’s the longest car-free transit bridge in the country. LOCAL FARE Portland is a foodie’s paradise, says Efaw, who regularly hits up the Brix Tavern in the Pearl District for brickoven pizza. “It never disappoints,” she says. RACE NEARBY Sunset on the Springwater July 23, 2016 PHOTOGRAPHER Erik Isakson

FOR DIRECTIONS, RESOURCE INFORMATION, AND DOWNLOADABLE WALLPAPER IMAGES, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/ RAVERUN.


JULY 2016 RUNNERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WORLD 11


THE LOOP

THE INBOX

NEWBIE FAN I thought no one could top Marc Parent’s stories until I started reading Kathryn Arnold’s Newbie Chronicles. Wildly entertaining and so spot-on. It’s my favorite part of the magazine.

THE REMINDER

Check out our weekly podcast The Runner’s World Show and our (just launched!) storytelling show, Human Race. The former features news, stories, and interviews with the likes of Bojan and Brogan, founders of November Project (above, with show host and EIC David Willey, and producer Sylvia Ryerson); the latter tells stories of runners like Randy Shepherd, who raced with a mechanical heart.

BRUCE MARTIN, BLOOMINGTON, IN

DEEP GRATITUDE “The Power of Pace” (These Running Times, May) brought tears to my eyes. I’m a back-of-thepack ultrarunner struggling with being unemployed after leaving a job that required an incessant sprint. While my patience is now tested with applications and résumés, there is great solace in running long steady miles. When Jonathan Beverly writes “I will end up where I want to be in the end,” I believe him. MELISSA M C CUTCHEON, TOWACO, NJ

LEFT OUT I am very disappointed in the article “Is It Okay to Have Sex the Night Before a Big Race?” (Zelle.com). It was strictly heteronormative, excluding anyone within the LGBTQ+ community. That was a careless and close-minded move on your part, and I hope you understand the severity of such a flub. KATHLEEN LAMANNA, VIA EMAIL

Coburn incorporates several variations into her routine.

Steeplechaser Emma Coburn credits planks for her killer abs. “In 2013, I had a back injury that caused a stress fracture in my sacrum, so a strong core is a priority,” she says. Cover shot by Matt Trappe in Boulder.

THE COLOR WHEEL

Pairs in Kimmy Gibbler’s Race Sock Stash

In our June Editor’s Letter, we referred to Steve Prefontaine’s win in the 1500 meters at the 1972 U.S. Olympic Trials. He won the 5,000 meters.

Gibbler adores holiday socks.

Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2

Send comments to letters@runnersworld .com. If your letter is published, you’ll receive an RW T-shirt.

Q3 Q3

RUNNER’S WORLD reserves the right to

edit readers’ submissions. All readers’ submissions become the sole property of RUNNER’S WORLD and may be published in any medium and for any use worldwide.

Q3 Q5 Read about her collection on pg. 26.

Q6

P H OTO G R A P H B Y LO R I M A R F I L M E N T E R TA I N M E N T/ E V E R E T T CO L L E C T I O N (G I B B L E R )

CORRECTIONS On the 50th Anniversary page of our May issue, we misstated Grete Waitz’s 1983 London Marathon time. She ran 2:25:29.

THE COVER


THE BREAKDOWN

THE QUESTION

Cheating is a very big deal, and so is reporting on it. We compiled a few of the digits that went into publishing one of our most popular online stories of late, “Dozens Suspected of Cheating to Enter Boston Marathon.”

WHAT’S THE MOST MEMORABLE 26.2 TRAINING ADVICE YOU’VE RECEIVED?

STORY BY THE NUMBERS

3 Writers assigned

15 Weeks they spent reporting

THE GALLERY

#RWRELAYRUN

Nothing says “insane fun” like a 24-hour relay race, right?

47 Runners they investigated

“Train your legs for the first 20 miles. Prepare your mind for the last 10K.” —Ryan Lydon

“The stuff on the tongue depressors is Vaseline, not energy gel.” —Lawrence Beck

“Wake up early to have time to get the nervous poops out.” —Wendi Collier

“Don’t start out like an idiot, but don’t finish like a wimp.” —Brittany Greenslit

19 Runners they attempted to reach

8 People who responded

3 Admitted to cheating

THE RECOVERY

292 Reader comments on the story

“The Ragnar Snowmass relay in COLORado was a blast! (get it?)” —@sweetcandymandy

Writer Marc Parent “relaxed” after his Ragnar Relay (“Are We Having Fun Yet?” page 90) with wife Susan and son Owen on a 12-mile round trip to the 5,760-foot summit of Mt. Dickerman in Washington’s North Cascades. “It was the most strenuous climb I’ve done at the worst time I could have done it,” he says.

“This is how you celebrate finishing your first round of the HTC Relay!” —@runner_blogger_az

TM

“Seen at Ragnar Cape Cod: I like big butts (and I cannot lie)!” —@fireflygirls


50TH ANNIVERSARY

before the open field so fans could watch their icons and then test their own mettle on the same course.

MIDNIGHT FUN

● In 1987, RW absorbed another magazine, The Runner, and took over its sponsored events. One of those was the New York Road Runners’ famous Midnight Run in Central Park. For 10 years, we helped ring in the New Year with a five-mile race in the Big Apple.

TRAIN WITH US!

TO THE RACES! BY THE EARLY 1970s, people had caught the running

24-HOUR KILLER

● The original Runner’s World event, the 24-Hour Relay, was for the truly masochistic, er, dedicated. Runners all over North America made teams with as few as two and as many as 10 teammates, who raced a mile at a time, on a track, for 24 hours straight. Total mileage was then mailed to us to be compared with other entrants’. In

14 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

1974, the Edinburgh AC crew ran 297 miles, which is the longest distance we can find in our archives.

B-DAY BASH

● To recognize our 10th birthday, we launched a weeklong celebration from December 28, 1975, to January 3, 1976. Ads in issues before the event invited readers to our offices (then in Mountain View, California) to run

● In the April 1977 issue, we were mystified by the success of the 24-hour relay: “The exact appeal of the relay remains a little less than clear. But it is that enigma, the paradox of victory maimed by the exhaustion of the struggle, that interests runners and keeps it going.”

GOING PRO

● In 1979, RW introduced a 5-Mile Invitational, held in Los Altos, California. The pros were no joke: Grete Waitz, Mary Decker, and Alberto Salazar all made appearances. Elites raced an hour

LIFETIME SUBSCRIBER

To register for our next event, go to: rw.runnersworld .com/classic.

UP NEXT

● Our five-year-old October festival in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, is booming, and this year we’ll launch a new event in North Andover, Massachusetts. The RW Classic will be July 15 to 17. Run the 5K, 10K, half marathon, or any combination. See you there!

Raymond “Coach” Willis, Charlemont, Mass., 87 “I ran the New York Marathon in 1978, and while I was running, my wife attended this fair-like event that Runner’s World put on. You had a lottery where you had to pick the winner and their time. My wife chose Bill Rodgers to win the race in 2:12:12. He came in at 2:12:11—she was just a second off! She won the prize, which was a lifetime subscription. We’ve been getting that magazine ever since then. Right now, I run three miles a day, so roughly 20 miles a week. It keeps me going. I’m 87 and I’m still running.”

R W A R C H I V E S ; RYA N H U LVAT ( R W H A L F & F E S T I VA L ); C O U R T E S Y O F R AY M O N D W I L L I S ( W I L L I S & R O D G E R S )

bug, and this magazine, which started as a biannual newsletter, became a monthly fixture in runners’ homes. But even back then, we wanted to bring RW to life beyond our pages. The best way to do that was to host our own races. Here, we look at RW events of the past, present, and near future. —ALI NOLAN

a 100-mile relay in which they would carry a torch from Stinson Beach to RW HQ. The party turned into National Running Week the next year, an annual tradition held through the mid-1980s.

● The RW Challenge began as a July 2009 article. The idea was to have readers train with staffers who faced the same challenges en route to a marathon. That year, 189 participants followed plans and ran with us at the Richmond Marathon. In 2016, the Challenge was renamed RW VIP, now at Big Sur, Chicago, Disney, and Marine Corps.


Just because you don’t see it, doesn’t mean it isn’t there. Introducing the newly redesigned Volkswagen Passat with Blind Spot Monitor, one of seven available Driver Assistance features.* Passat. Where family happens.

vw.com

Simulated image. *Driver Assistance features are not substitutes for attentive driving. See Owner’s Manual for further details and important limitations. ©2015 Volkswagen of America, Inc.


TRACKTOWN’S LEADING LADY p24

ISO SASSY SOCKS p26

HUMAN( )RACE 2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

NEWS, TRENDS, and REGULAR RUNNERS doing AMAZING THINGS

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

QUICK STUDY

CASIMIR LOXSOM 25, SEATTLE

Olympic hopefuls need fast feet. And Loxsom’s got those: He’s the American Record holder in the 600 meters. A cool head helps, too. In 2015, Loxsom lost his racing shoes en route to a meet in Italy. He rented a bike to get to a shoe store. Then the bike chain snapped, and he had to walk back—in the rain. Loxsom, who unwinds with Netflix and tortilla chips, is counting on a smoother leadup to the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials in July, where he’ll compete in the 800 meters. —NICK WELDON

1. HE’S A MAN OF MANY NAMES. “I’m named after my Lithuanian great-grandfather. Hardly anyone calls me Casimir. Even my mom calls me Cas. High school friends called me Foxy Loxy. ‘Casmanian Devil’ just popped up.” 2. HE’S A NEW ENGLANDER AT HEART. “I grew up in Connecticut. I love Pepe’s pizza. I dress preppy. I love boating. I have a big nautical compass tattooed on my shoulder.” 3. HE’S A WANNABE WIZARD. “My aunt was a librarian and used to get me advance copies of the Harry Potter books. I’d like to think I’d be in Gryffindor House. That’s the dream, right?”

PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHEN MATERA

4. HIS REMOTE IS A RECOVERY TOOL. “My Brooks teammates and I will knock out a season of a show on Netflix in a day. We’re a very recoveryoriented program.” 5. HE SEEKS WORLD DOMINATION. “I played Settlers of Catan, a settlement and acquisitions game, in high school. It’s one of the games we play as a team to bond, especially at training camps.”

6. HE COOKS WELL. “Shrimp scampi used to be my go-to meal, but I’ve expanded my repertoire. I make a baked salmon with a crust of Greek yogurt, lemon, dill, and pepper.” 7. BUT EATS JUNK, TOO. “I’ve been known to go through a bag of Cool Ranch Doritos. They should think about sponsoring me.” 8. HE WANTS A BRAZIL PASSPORT STAMP. “I’m planning to be in the top three in at the Trials. I’m not a ‘happy to be there’ person, but if I make it to Rio, I’ll be happy to be there.”

CAZZY’S TWEETS What you get following @cazzylox You never expect the coffee filters to run out because they come in packs of 6,500...but when they do, it’s a devastating way to start the AM. The Sleepless in Seattle writers either pitched a false premise, or Tom Hanks is the only man ever that could be sad living in a houseboat. There’s a time and a place for “good luck,” but hearing “Go show everyone how hard you’ve worked” means a lot more. Today’s bucket list: 1) Run slowly and not very far. 2) Watch Season 7 of Parks and Rec...again. #aimhigh

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COMMUNITY ACTION A British group combines running with social service

18 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

has 20,000 registered runners in 24 locations across England. Participants can choose to be paired up with a specific person for ongoing weekly visits or opt for a more flexible arrangement in which they perform a onetime mission, such as weeding a garden, for a person who needs assistance. GoodGym also hosts group runs, which feature service projects embedded into workouts. When GoodGym launches in a new area, members reach out

GoodGym members visit neighbors (above, left) and perform service projects in their communities (above, right). They also meet for traditional training runs (below, left).

PAY IT FORWARD GoodGym is currently run only in England, but founder Ivo Gormley is interested in expanding in the U.S. If you have interest in bringing GoodGym to your community, visit goodgym .org/us.

workouts, and the GoodGym website helps runners track their progress and connect with others training for races. The program is a win-win-win, Gormley says: It’s good for the runners, good for the communities, and good for the individuals impacted. “The introduction of a young, healthy person into my life has been beneficial,” says Barry Dryer, 65, who receives a weekly visit. “I enjoy the exchange of views and hearing about my runner’s progress.” Gormley believes the service GoodGym offers is going to become ever more vital. “The population is living longer,” he says. “It’s such a sad thing when older people end up isolated and lonely. The great thing about what we do is it gives you purpose. It allows you to explore and connect with your community. It feels really good to be making a difference in someone else’s life as well as your own.” —SAM MURPHY

CO U R T E SY O F G O O D GY M ( N E I G H B O R S H AV I N G T E A , CA R RY I N G BAG ); R U N N E R ’ S WO R L D U K ( S H OV E L I N G , M A N R U N N I N G ); N E W BA L A N C E U K (G R O U P R U N N I N G )

In 2007, Ivo Gormley decided to run a newspaper to an elderly, housebound acquaintance in London. His paper-delivery route became a weekly routine. “I knew if I didn’t do it, he wouldn’t see anyone, so it motivated me to run,” says the documentary film maker, now 34. Gormley wanted to encourage others to build good deeds into their workouts, so in 2009, he created GoodGym, a club with the motto “Get fit, do good.” Today, GoodGym

to local organizations to let them know they are available to pitch in. GoodGym’ers recently moved books at a library, painted the changing rooms at a sports pavilion, and renovated a classroom. Member Katie Welford participates in both the group runs and one-on-one visits. Every week, she runs a mile to a 78-year-old woman’s flat, where she visits for 30 minutes before continuing on her six-miler. “I love hearing Mona’s stories of London back in the day,” says the 32-yearold communications manager. “It grounds me, and gives a sense of place. Mona doesn’t often leave the house, so having someone in for a regular chat is great.” The focus on community service makes GoodGym attractive to newbies. “We offer a distraction from running and the satisfaction of volunteering,” Gormley says. That doesn’t mean GoodGym doesn’t take its running seriously. Trainers plan and oversee the group


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Road Scholar BY PETER SAGAL

YOUR PACE OR MINE? The male ego goes for a run.

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was practically sprinting up the Central Park roadway, over on the East Side, north of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I was running along with Dorothy, a lawyer/mother/biochem Ph.D. of about my age whom I had met the night before at a gala reception, and with whom, fueled by one too many martinis, I had cheerfully agreed to meet early the next morning for a run. (That last martini, the one that triggers terrible ideas, is known colloquially as the Beverage of Foolishness.) ¶ “Dorothy,” I said to her, “we’ve known each other only a short while, but I have to admit I find you extremely impressive. You’re sophisticated, learned, professionally accomplished in a variety of fields, and obviously a dedicated and successful runner.” ¶ She glanced over at me with a slight look of alarm. I imagine that she was mentally checking to make sure she had mentioned her husband. She had. I went on. ¶ “And I’m going to go out on a limb here and suggest that you’re rather impressed with me as well,” I said. “Given my fame, my professional success, my charm and wit, and of course my own celebrated career as a runner.” ¶ I allowed a pause, partially for dramatic effect, partially because I desperately needed a gulp of oxygen in order to finish my point. ¶ “So since I’m very impressed with you already, and, as I said, I’m sure you’re already impressed with me, do you think we can slow down?” ¶ “Oh, thank you!” she said. “I was dying here, trying to keep up with you!” ¶ “The same,” I said, and we slowed down, to mutual satisfaction, and enjoyed the rest of our run around the park. ¶ I have run many times with people I’ve just met—one of the great pleasures of our sport is the opportunity to do it alongside all kinds of people, everywhere in the world—and while there is almost always a difference in ability and state of training, it’s always been

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simple to negotiate. You say how fast you want to go—eight-minute miles, or 12, or six—and if the difference isn’t too great, the faster runner slows down for the other. Or we smile and agree to meet back at the park entrance, and he leaves me in a cloud of dust. Easy. This was different. I couldn’t remember a time, outside of a race, when I was pushing so hard to look like a better runner than I was. And Dorothy told me she was doing the same, and it was just as unusual for her. So what gives? I decided to turn to science. In recent years social scientists and psychologists have substantiated a persistent phenomenon, which one author calls “risk-taking as a situationally sensitive male mating strategy,” or what laymen might call “guys acting stupid to impress girls.” In one experiment, scientists told a group of young male skateboarders that they wanted to record them doing their best tricks to see how performing them affected their testosterone levels. But some of the skaters were watched by male “scientists,” and some by attractive female “scientists.” (By the way, there are established ways of objectively measuring how attractive you are. Let us all hope never to find out our score.) Not only did being watched by attractive women raise the testosterone levels of the skateboarders more than being watched by men, but the skateboarders also crashed more when women were watching. They were attempting riskier and riskier behavior—the difference between a skater saying to himself, in midair, “This isn’t going to work, I’d better bail,” and “BANZAI!!!!” was entirely due to who was watching. And then, after the test, the skateboarders asked the female observers for their phone numbers. Because boys. Another study used gambling games to establish that men engage in “future discounting” when in the presence of available females. That is, they stop thinking about the future costs of an activity, and instead pursue immediate, if uncertain, gain. So when watched by an (objectively, scientifically) ILLUSTRATION BY ZOHAR LAZAR


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RUNNER BY THE NUMBERS

JUNKO KAZUKAWA

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y O F H I R O YA M A M OTO ( K A Z U K AWA , TO P ); C O U R T E SY O F AT H L I N K S ( K A Z U K AWA O N B I K E ); CO U R T E SY O F K E I S U K E N I S H I M OTO ( KA Z U KAWA R U N N I N G )

532.4

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In 2015, Kazukawa completed the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning—four 100-milers in four months—and the Leadwoman Series, which entails a marathon, a 50-mile mountain-bike race, a 100-mile mountain-bike race, a 10K trail run, and a 100-mile run. This summer, the cancer survivor/ personal trainer is focusing on one event. She’ll compete in the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc, a 106-mile trail race in France in August. —MEGAN DITROLIO

STABILYX TIGHTS GREY ROSE PRINT

52, DENVER, COLORADO

MILES RUN IN THE GRAND SLAM OF ULTRARUNNING AND THE LEADWOMAN SERIES

150 Miles biked in the Leadwoman Series

KAZUKAWA’S PHYS-ED GRADE, THE LOWEST GRADE (ON A SCALE OF 5) YOU CAN RECEIVE IN JAPANESE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. “I DECIDED, ‘I’M GOING TO SHOW MY TEACHER WHAT I CAN DO.’”

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2009 NYC Marathon time, completed 5 weeks after finishing chemotherapy for breast cancer. “I had no hair, but I just wanted closure from my illness.”

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WEEKLY MILES RUN. SHE USUALLY CROSSTRAINS DURING THE WEEK AND DOES TWO 20-MILERS EVERY WEEKEND.

Number of marathons finished

NUMBER OF 100-MILE RACES COMPLETED

400 Amount she saved while working as a waitress and teaching English so she could move to the U.S. from Japan to study exercise science when she was 24

CALORIES IN A BOWL OF PHO, A NOODLE SOUP, HER FAVORITE POSTRACE MEAL

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Tell us about your breakthrough running moment and you might land on the December cover of Runner’s World! Enter now at RUNNERSWORLD.COM/COVERSEARCH With support from

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. Contest entry period runs 5/2/2016–7/20/2016. Must be 18 or older and a legal resident of 49 U.S. states or DC (excludes AZ, PR & CAN). For Official Rules, go to http://coversearch.runnersworld. com/rules. Winners selected based on entries that best depict and describe “Best Running Breakthrough Moment,” community votes, and interview. Sponsor: Rodale 202910301 Inc., 400 S. 10th St., Emmaus, PA 18049.


One more problem for my notion: I knew Dorothy was happily married, and I’m not single either. The experiments on subconscious behavior suggest that if a man isn’t looking for romance and knows the woman in question isn’t either, he won’t display the same risky, future-discounting behavior. So I’m still not sure exactly what happened, but I can offer some speculation, and it has to do with a detail I left out. It’s true that Dorothy and I had met at a gala, but it wasn’t a random encounter. It had been a formal affair with thousands of attendees at a luxury hotel, raising money for a nonprofit, and I was there to entertain the crowd. And Dorothy didn’t merely attend the gala: She organized it. She is the head of the nonprofit that hired me. So: I am usually desperate to please anyone, but this woman was, for the moment, my boss. I wanted to let her know that not only had I been the right choice to amuse and entertain her colleagues and esteemed guests, but I was also a stalwart and reliable fellow—one who will, in fact, show up at 8 in the morning after one too many martinis—as well as a badass runner.

Because, as noted above, boys. As for Dorothy, I don’t need to have my attractiveness scientifically scored to know with certainty that any kind of mating ritual was as far from her mind as the Great Rift Valley of Africa, where our ancestors had evolved, and where, I suppose, some primitive man really wanted to impress a primitive woman, so he invented fire, and then probably set his hair on it. But I didn’t flatter her just to get her to slow down. She is an extremely accomplished person, with a Ph.D. and a law degree and a demanding, prestigious job and a leadership position at an important nonprofit, not to mention raising a happy family in her spare time. So we speculate that Dorothy got to where she is, in part, by being smarter, working harder, and being more disciplined than everyone around her. Who would have been, during her formative years, given her age, mostly men. And thus, her attitude, when confronted with yet another idiot guy who seemed to want to challenge her, might have been, out of long habit: “Bring it, brother.” I got back in touch with Dorothy to test this thesis, and she confirmed it, sort of. “I am an alpha,” she said. “I compete with everyone. I can’t help it.” My being a male may have had little to do with it. I’m trying to work out if that’s a comfort to me or not. So it may have been no more than two amateur jocks of a certain age trying to show each other, and ourselves, that we still had it. It’s a ritual that happens in weight rooms and basketball courts and soccer fields all over the world, and results in countless strained muscles and torn ACLs and guys—and, with a nod to Dorothy, gals—cursing themselves for being stupid. All I know is if I ever get a chance to run with Dorothy again— and I hope I do; she’s a fine runner and excellent company—I’m going to remind her that I already know both those things, before we start. Peter Sagal is a 3:09 marathoner and the host of NPR’s Wait, Wait...Don’t Tell Me! For more, go to runnersworld.com/scholar.

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attractive woman, who they have been told is single, men were more likely to make riskier bets in a game of blackjack. Or, perhaps, run a lot harder in the first two miles of an eight-mile run than if they were on their own. Interestingly—and devastating to my hypothesis that Dorothy and I were acting out a strange, unconscious mating display—in these same experiments, women demonstrate none of this behavior. Many of the simulations were done using both male and female test subjects, and the women made the same decisions no matter who was watching. Whatever strange drive evolution has grafted onto men, forcing us to act recklessly to impress members of the opposite sex, women were spared, because either risky behavior isn’t a successful mating strategy for them, or they don’t need to perform dominance displays to defeat other suitors. Or maybe women are just smarter.

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To impress a primitive woman, a primitive man probably invented fire, then set his hair on it.

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Pappas had to get in the right mindset before filming certain scenes. She used “sense memory,” which involves visualizing a feeling associated with a specific emotion. When her character needed to be nervous, Pappas imagined holding the metal railing that circles indoor tracks. “I know that feeling of grabbing that railing when I’m so nervous,” she says. “I would close my eyes and give myself that time to warm up before a scene.”

A FAST CAST Olympian filmmaker Alexi Pappas brings the track life to the big screen.

24 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

cowrote and stars in the featurelength film Tracktown, which will premier at the LA Film Festival in June. The movie was shot in the real TrackTown, USA—Eugene, Oregon, where Pappas trains and lives with her boyfriend, Jeremy Teicher, an independent filmmaker who cowrote and codirected Tracktown. John Legere, the CEO of T-Mobile and an avid runner and track fan, is the primary financial backer. Though it’s fictional, the movie’s storyline mirrors

ON LOCATION From Hayward Field (shown here at the 2012 Olympic Trials) to 99-acre Amazon Park, all of the settings are haunts frequented by elite runners in Eugene.

M CC L A N A H A N / P H OTO R U N ( SY M M O N D S , R OW B U RY, H AY WA R D F I E L D)

Alexi Pappas logs 90 to 100 miles a week, mixes protein powder into her oatmeal, and naps in an oxygen-depriving tent. It’s all part of her preparation for the Summer Olympics, where she will represent Greece (where she has family roots) in the 10,000 meters. Despite her regimented lifestyle, the 26-year-old former University of Oregon grad student finds time to dabble in improv comedy, compose poetry, and write screenplays. In her latest venture, Pappas

the clash that sometimes occurs between track stars’ running and nonrunning lives. Pappas plays Plumb Marigold, whose laser focus on qualifying for the Olympics is interrupted by a romantic relationship and a visit from her quirky, estranged mother. “The story is about running, but it’s also about growing up, feeling a little bit different, and pursuing something you are so invested in that you can’t imagine doing anything else,” says Pappas, who plans to screen the movie during the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials in July. Here, Pappas provides a behindthe-scenes viewers’ guide. —KIT FOX

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H R I S C O L L I N S ; C O U R T E S Y O F J E R E M Y T E I C H E R ; L AU R A WAG N E R ; D E B B Y WO N G / Z U M A W I R E / Z U M A P R E S S .CO M ; A N D R E W

WARMING UP


VOICE OVER In the film, a distinctive, raspy timbre emanates from Hayward Field’s loudspeakers. It belongs to ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman, who is known for calling football, baseball, and hockey. “He was so excited when we reached out to him,” Pappas says. “He told me he had announced one track meet in college, so, he said, ‘I have some experience.’”

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Pappas and Teicher (far left) wanted experienced actors to play the nonrunner roles. They cast Andy Buckley (The Office, Jurassic World) and Rachel Dratch (Saturday Night Live, 30 Rock) as Marigold Plumb’s parents.

STABILYX CALF SLEEVES

HIRED HELP

STAR SEARCH “We shot on days the athletes had downtime from running,” Pappas says. “One of the most important things was making sure the dressing room was stocked with a ton of really great snacks.” Look for Shannon Rowbury (American Record holder in the women’s 1500), Jerry Schumacher (coach of the Bowerman Track Club), and Nick Symmonds (world championships silver medalist in the 800). “Nick plays a hunky, mostly shirtless romantic interest,” Pappas says. “We told Nick to just be himself.”

THIS SUMMER, PAPPAS WILL CREATE FIVE SHORT FILMS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RUNNER’S WORLD. SEE THEM AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/PAPPAS.

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After Barber showed these off on social media, her fan following nicknamed them “The Gibblers” in honor of her alter ego. On February 26, the day Netflix launched Fuller House, a revival of the original show, people who bought the socks posted their own pics using #nationalwearyourgibblersday.

G O YO U ! Runners who inspire us LINDA “SUNNY” FOX

CHRISTMAS SWEATER

FUNNY FEET

PINK ARGYLE

Andrea Barber, best known for playing Kimmy Gibbler on the sitcom Full House and its update, Fuller House, has a thing for funky running socks. When she took up the sport four years ago, Barber wore black compression socks to reduce inflammation in her legs. But the utilitarian look didn’t mesh with her otherwise vibrant vibe. Barber, 39, met her match when she discovered PRO Compression, a company that makes bright, colorful athletic socks. “A fun sock can turn your whole run around,” says the four-time marathoner. “When I get a new pair, I’m more motivated to get out the door.” In her Orange County, California, home, Barber’s dresser drawer holds more than 20 compression socks, arranged by color and pattern. Here, a few faves. —KIT FOX

Barber has long considered these to be her favorite pair (“pink goes with everything”). But she hasn’t worn them since the fall. “I wore them in a race that didn’t go well,” she says. “I have a bit of superstition. I will wear them again. I need to wear them for an easy run so I can have a positive association with them again.”

SHAMROCKS March 17 was supposed to be a rest day for Barber. “The Shamrocks were begging to be worn,” she says. “So I did a quick three-miler, which proves socks are motivators!”

WHITE AND BLACK The newest addition to Barber’s collection is also known as the “Jailbird.” “I wore them for the Hollywood Half Marathon,” she says. “On the course I looked up, and waddaya know, there was a Fuller House billboard with my face on it. Truly a surreal moment.”

PARTY WEAR Barber is currently contemplating what socks to wear for her next big event. She’s hosting The Andrea Barber 4.0 Birthday Run, a virtual event to celebrate her 40th birthday on July 3. The 450 runners who registered will receive a T-shirt and medal (see left). Barber is donating all proceeds to Girls on the Run.

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Racing for two

Fox, 59, has run 830 races, ranging from 5Ks to marathons, as part of a goal of participating in 1,000 events. But her mission isn’t just about herself. The retired Navy Master Chief Petty Officer and substitute teacher from Virginia Beach raised $6,000 to purchase a racing wheelchair so she can push kids who otherwise couldn’t race. “I told myself if I’m going to run 1,000 races, I’d like to help others along the way,” she says. Fox has pushed dozens of children; she’s often paired with riders through the charity Team Hoyt VB. —MEGAN DITROLIO

COLLIN JARVIS No colon, no problem

In 2013, Jarvis was a steeplechase champion at the University of California, Berkeley. But he began suffering from severe abdominal pain and fatigue. Ultimately, he was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and had surgery to remove his colon. Jarvis resumed running in 2014, with an ileostomy bag taped to his abdomen. Doctors said he wouldn’t be a competitive athlete again. But last fall, Jarvis ran a 14:45 5K and a 1:11 half marathon. The 24-year-old, who is a partner in a company called Hurdle Barriers, plans to compete in the Olympic Track & Field Trials in either the steeplechase or the 5,000. “It’s a dream come true to be able to regain confidence and lead a healthy lifestyle.” —LISA JHUNG

C O U R T E S Y O F A N D R E A BA R B E R ( BA R B E R R U N N I N G , M E DA L ); S A E E D A DYA N I / © N E T F L I X / E V E R E T T CO L L E C T I O N ( BA R B E R O N F U L L E R H O U S E ) ; CO U R T E S Y O F P R O C O M P R E S S I O N ( S O C K S )

A Fuller House actor takes socks seriously.

Barber wore these for a December half marathon after wrapping up Fuller House (above, left). “I had taken a long break from running while filming and was feeling a little bit down,” she says. “But then the socks came in the mail. Other runners yelled, ‘Nice socks!’ during the race, and that was really motivating.”


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These Running Times BY JONATHAN BEVERLY

there were those among the 800 or so participants of this race whose day matched that image, full of hugs and high-fives, smiles and cheerful conversation. In another context—even during much of my running—I would be happy to be part of that scene. But that isn’t why I race. Interestingly, this question of having fun isn’t generally asked of young runners after a track meet or cross-country race (I checked with a few to make sure this is still true). In the context of youth sports, you are supposed to compete, to dig deep, to do your best—ideally, to win.

PLEASURE AND PAIN Many activities are enjoyable. A race is a shot at knowledge and joy.

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t’s a Monday morning and I’m talking with colleagues about what we did over the weekend. After hearing about street fairs and botanical gardens, I mention I ran a 10K. ¶ “Was it fun?” one woman asks. ¶ The question, innocent enough, surprises me. I’m not sure how to answer. ¶ By most measures of fun, my race fell considerably short. “Fun” brings to mind beer-commercial images of beautiful, smiling people, laughing and bantering in a relaxed, comfortable environment. Any athletic pursuits in this scene are low-key and convivial, with mock victory poses and flirtatious body contact. ¶ My race had none of that. A video collage would feature a tense, inward-focused gaze as I warmed up in the already-disturbing heat, grimaces of effort and pain during the two-loop road course, a shuffling, sweat-drenched and salt-encrusted cooldown, and a hamstring cramp on the ride home. Interaction between me and other racers was mostly short and cursory: assessing glances and nods before the race; a respectful brushing of fingers reached out from exhausted, hands-on-knees poses in the chute; and some affirmations of shared suffering while making our way through the finish area. ¶ The answer to my colleague seems simple enough: “No. It was not fun.” ¶ But to say that would sound like I made a mistake, that I had been disappointed and wasted the weekend. And, fun or not, I’m glad I did it. ¶ It’s not like she doesn’t have reason to think that I would have fun at a race. The sport, by and large, presents races as parties. And

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One reason for this disparity is that youth are often seen to be competing for an athletic job: to get a college scholarship. As an adult, were I talented enough to make money at my running, my seriousness would be expected and understood. But I’m not. My racing, no matter how important it is in my life, is now, and always has been, almost entirely recreational. Besides the promise of a lucrative future, youth are encouraged to take sport seriously in order to build character. Competition and struggle reveal something about how they will deal with life’s difficulties. Later in life, we’re no longer supposed to require this affirmation. Yet some of us seem to never outgrow the need to prove ourselves. In his poetic memoir, Poverty Creek Journal, Thomas Gardner describes the time a man, out walking his dog, stopped to talk with Gardner during a hill workout. “I’m flushed, self-conscious, as if I’d been caught wanting something too much,” Gardner writes. What is it we want from this embarrassing effort? Philosophy professor and runner Mark Rowlands suggests that it is knowledge. “This was a game of enduring, of finding out how much would break me,” Rowlands says about running up his favorite hill in Running With the Pack. “I always ran that hill just to see if I could—to see if I could still make ILLUSTRATION BY THOMAS FUCHS


Created with REI Co-op members, the experts who work in our stores, and a wilderness spirit born in 1938.

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EXCLUS IVE TEN SI O N -T RU SS ARC H I T E C T U RE

2016 REI HALF DOME 2 PLUS TE NT

E XT E N DE D FLO O R PL AN


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R

ASK MILES He’s been around the block a few times— and he’s got answers.

I ran a marathon behind a woman whose shorts were see-through. Should I have told her as a courtesy?

The fact that I will push myself beyond my body’s distress signals for no good reason but ego is the whole point.

—Emily P., Austin, TX

Ask yourself, “Would I want to know, if the roles were reversed?” Would I want to know if my fly were open? If I had spinach in my teeth? Usually the answer is “Yes.” You’d want to resolve the situation. However, if you’d told this woman midrace that everyone could see her bum, well...what could she have done? Telling her would have probably left her self-conscious and distracted for the rest of the race. So in this case, I’d ask myself, “Would I want to know at this time and place?” If the answer is “No,” keep your mouth zipped. Perhaps you’ll see her at the finish where you could tell her (discreetly!). Those silver thermal blankets make great cover-ups.

MILE S AS

KS

My coworker bandits races so she doesn’t have to pay to enter. Should I tell her this is wrong? —Bre W., Macomb, MI I will never understand why some runners believe it’s okay to run a race without paying for it. It’s stealing, and no number of excuses or rationalizations can change that. Folks who bandit races cannot see this. If they could, they wouldn’t bandit in the first place. Therefore, I would

advise against chastising your coworker. Telling her straight up that banditing is wrong might make you feel better, but she won’t suddenly get it. All you can do is continue to set a good example by paying for your races—or sitting them out, if you can’t afford them. And hope that your coworker sees the light. Or gets caught. Have a question for Miles? Email him at askmiles@ runnersworld.com and follow @askmiles on Twitter.

How do you cool off after a blazing-hot summer run? A tall, cold, frosty one. I mean beer, of course, but a Slurpee will do in a pinch. @CameronVW I check and see if neighbors are gone, and a quick dip in their pool. #dontsnitch @Whofartlekd Standing in the sprinklers. And a blue freeze pop. @Really wings_and_fur

30 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

myself do it today just as I had done it yesterday. Finding out if the hill would beat me—knowing one way or the other—that was the point.” John L. Parker Jr. echoes this idea in his novel Once a Runner. “Racing was a rite of death; from it came knowledge,” he writes. What knowledge comes from a rite of death? I don’t believe it is mystical or masochistic. The best explanation I’ve found is that we’re seeking the knowledge that we are fully human. One characteristic that makes mankind unique, at least according to German philosopher Georg Hegel, is our ability to overcome

our desire for self-preservation and fight to the death over nothing more than a symbolic idea. The fact that I will push myself beyond my body’s distress signals for no good reason but ego is the whole point. In a race, I get to prove that I am more than a bundle of instinctual reactions, salivating on cue at the promise of reward. I am not drifting through life, taking the path of least resistance to survive and be comfortable. I am in control, I can choose and act—even when it gets scary or painful. That knowledge brings great satisfaction. A lot of activities are pleasurable, and I enjoy them in their place, but I’m looking for something else when I line up for a race. In a world where skipping Starbucks is, for some, considered hardship, running is one of the best ways I know to get it. Through this lens I reconILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDY REMENTER


Paula Radcliffe Marathon World Record Holder Olympian •

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H

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MOMENTOUS

Tim Peake sets a record for fastest marathon in space, running a 3:35 on an ISS treadmill.

My effort in the race didn’t result in a record or an award. It didn’t feel good. But it gave me the chance to feel good about myself.

40% of proceeds from Athleta sales on Schoola.com go to the Malala Fund to support girlseducation projects.

Game of Thrones actor Natalie Dormer runs a 3:51 London Marathon.

GO!

STOP!

Supermodel Christy Turlington-Burns runs Boston in 4:09 for her foundation, Every Mother Counts.

Atlanta Falcons running back Devonta Freeman stops midrun to help an 82-year-old woman mow her lawn. Stella McCartney unveils her designs for Great Britain’s Olympic kits.

Nick Symmonds auctions ad space on his arm again (he also did it in 2012, above). This time, T-Mobile CEO John Legere places the winning bid of $21,800. But Symmonds will need to cover the temporary tat at the Olympic Trials and Games.

Michelle Obama attends a 100-days-from-the-Rio-Olympics street party with Olympians in Times Square. Brooks creates a running shoe for parent company Berkshire Hathaway’s annual meeting. It features a golden caricature of BH’s CEO, Warren Buffett.

Can’t qualify for Boston? NASA and MIT engineers help Puma create BeatBot, a speedy robot you chase to get faster.

FRIVOLOUS

32 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Phil Knight gives Stephen Colbert his own pair of Nike Presto iDs decorated with the host’s catch phrase, “Truthiness.”

powerfully through the finish line to the blessed relief beyond. A photo of me crossing the line revealed a mask of distress (a photo I would look at in wonder and awe but never show to anyone else). That moment, however, was one of joy. The effort didn’t result in a record or an award. It didn’t feel good. But it gave me the chance to feel good about myself. My colleague’s question remains unanswered. She doesn’t need to know about Hegel and my existential angst, about the connections between suffering and joy. She just wants to know if I had a good weekend. “Yes,” I say. “It was fun.” Jonathan Beverly has been a competitive runner since 1977. The former editor-in-chief of Running Times , he writes and runs on the high plains of the Nebraska/Colorado border.

CO U R T E SY O F M A R AT H O N F OTO ( T U R L I N G TO N - B U R N S ); C H U N G S U N G-J U N /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( S O U T H KO R E A N U N I F O R M S ); J I M R O G A S H /G E T T Y I M AG E S (O R T I Z )

South Korea outfits its Olympians with anti-Zika uniforms infused with insect repellent.

David Ortiz will appear in Mark Wahlberg’s Patriot’s Day to reenact his Fenway speech following the 2013 marathon bombings.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y E S A / N AS A V I A G E T T Y I M AG E S ( P E A K E ); CO U R T E SY O F S C H O O L A ( AT H L E TA C LOT H I N G ); S T UA R T C. W I L S O N /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( D O R M E R ); S C OT T C U N N I N G H A M /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( F R E E M A N ); C O U R T E S Y O F C B S ( K N I G H T

Where running and culture collide

& C O L B E R T ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F B R O O K S ( S H O E ) ; E D M U L H O L L A N D/G E T T Y I M AG E S (O BA M A ); CO U R T E SY O F P U M A ( B E AT B OT ); B E N D U F F Y/A D I DAS V I A G E T T Y I M AG E S ( M CCA R T N E Y ) ; CO U R T E SY O F H A N S O N D O D G E C R E AT I V E ( S Y M M O N D S );

THE INTERSECTION

sider yesterday’s race. As the early pace sorted the field, I fell in behind a tall, tan, highly toned runner moving with the grace of a natural athlete. I decided my goal would be to stay with this Adonis as long as I could. As the miles passed and the heat grew, I clung to his shoulder, digging deep into debt and desperation, yet hanging on. And then a quarter mile out, as the buildings grew taller with the center-city finish approaching, I discovered a spark inside that still cared, that wanted to do more than maintain. To my surprise, I felt my stride lifting and quickening. I watched myself fly past the tall runner and drive


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PERSONAL BEST GET FIT, EAT SMART, RUN STRONG With almost no protein or fat, slushies aren’t as filling as smoothies and are perfect for prerun energy.

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CHILL OUT When the day is hot, you’ll run better by starting cool. Lowering your body temperature can improve performance by 3.7 percent, according to a German study, worth a whopping 55 seconds in a 25:00 5K. That’s why Olympians like Deena Kastor and Meb Keflezighi take prerace measures to chill out, literally— sitting in air-conditioned rooms wearing ice vests. You can cool yourself from the inside out with this slushy, suggested by Chris Fischer, a chef who runs 5Ks in the heat of Martha’s Vineyard summers. Blend together a handful fresh stemmed strawberries, lemon slices (minus the rind), watermelon cubes, ice, and honey to taste, topped with a sprig of mint. Then quick, go for a run! For more of Fischer’s favorite ways to eat strawberries, see page 56. PHOTOGRAPH BY TED CAVANAUGH

JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 35


TRAINING STAY FIT AND KICK BACK Shine bright all summer with the right seasonal goal. By A.C. Shilton

SUMMER CAN BE A TRICKY TIME for runners. Sure, you’ve got long days full of daylight, but that sunshine can be sweltering. Vacations, cookouts, and other seasonal fun can tempt you to skip workouts, especially if you aren’t actively training for something. “There are a lot of distractions for athletes during the warm-weather months,” says Ryan Bolton, who coaches 2015 Boston

36 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

There’s a reason why 5Ks and 10Ks are so popular in the summer—they’re short! Runners who aim to race one of these distances should run three or four days per week, working up to a long run of at least three miles (for the 5K) or six miles (for the 10K) a week or two before the event. Runners with time goals should build their 5K or 10K training around speedwork. If you’re new to faster running, start by adding five to ten 30- to 60-second pickups, with a minute or two of jogging between each, in the middle of one run per week. For more experienced runners, Bolton suggests short, hard efforts

once or twice a week to build power and turnover. “Focus on 200- to 600meter repeats,” he says. Do some workouts with short, jogging recovery intervals (to build endurance and mental toughness) and other workouts with plenty of walking or jogging rest (so you can do every rep close to all-out). For peak performance, race no more than once per month, says Joan Scrivanich, a coach based in Colorado. In addition to speedwork, advanced runners who want to notch a 5K or 10K PR ought to work in weekly tempo and long runs to build and maintain aerobic fitness. For tempo efforts, Bolton has his athletes work up to maintaining 85 to 90 percent of 10K pace for

P H OTO G R A P H B Y CO B E R S C H N E I D E R /G E T T Y I M AG E S

You’ll love to run on vacation if you find a beautiful place to do it (like this trail in Corsica, France).

Marathon champion Caroline Rotich. “Because of this, you have to create time every day—in advance—for your workouts.” Choosing a goal to carry you through the coming months will keep you from getting stuck in a slothful rut. Put down that piña colada, grab your sunscreen and sunglasses, and set your sights on one of these four targets.

NAIL A SHORTER RACE


TRAINING

your metabolism works at an accelerated pace for several hours postexercise. To further harness this effect, you could split up a moderate to long easy run into two shorter runs—one in the morning and one in the afternoon or evening— to spend more time in that increased metabolic state.

outweighs the satisfaction you would derive from completing them, set the goal of coming back refreshed and ready to recommit. You will lose some fitness if you do nothing for a week or two, but your priority should be to enjoy your time away, says Scrivanich. ENDURE THE HEAT

STAY COMMITTED

On longer runs on hot days, circle back home to grab ice to put in your hat or sports top.

three to four miles. Long runs can be (relatively) short—the average runner doesn’t need to run more than eight to 10 miles to ace a 5K or 10K. LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD

Summer may be the best time to drop a few pounds: Fresh produce is in season, outdoor activities are abundant, and heat often suppresses appetite. Additionally, a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that working out in warm temps burned more fat than exercising in cold conditions.

HIIT IT High-intensity interval training burns calories and builds speed. Jog for 15 minutes before and after each session.

38 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

While eating nutrientdense, whole foods is crucial for weight loss, strategic workouts can help, too. “Recent research shows that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is very effective for weight loss,” says Pamela Nisevich Bede, a registered dietitian and coauthor of Run to Lose. For maximum results, keep both the work and the rest intervals short—neither should be longer than a minute—and do each rep as hard as you can. (See “HIIT It,” below, for workout ideas.) Bede also recommends running first thing in the morning when possible, because

REPEAT 200S On a track, run 200 meters at the fastest pace you can hold without feeling out of control— mile race pace or slightly faster. Jog 100 meters to recover. Do eight to 12 reps.

It can be especially tough to work out when you’re traveling with friends or family. However, you can stay in shape with a minimal amount of miles. Bolton says two weeks of running only 40 percent of your usual mileage is enough to allow you to pick up where you left off. The most expedient way to work training into your schedule is to get it done first thing. If you must go later, you might feel more motivated (less guilty) if you can involve your companions in some way—say, by challenging your kids to ride bikes alongside you as you run. When you travel, shift your focus to fitting in whatever you can. If you’ve only got a few minutes to work out, don’t get sucked into the “it’s not worth it” trap, Bolton says. Do a plank, some burpees, some squats—anything to activate your muscles and/or get your heart pumping. However, if the stress of squeezing in workouts

TIME PYRAMIDS

LANDMARK FARTLEK

Run 30 seconds hard, then jog for 30 seconds. Repeat with 45and 60-second hard/jog intervals, then work back down to 30. That’s one set; do two to five.

Choose a landmark up ahead and surge hard until you pass it. To recover, choose another landmark and jog until you pass it. Repeat for 10 to 20 minutes.

Toughing out warm conditions pays off in the fall: As you acclimate to the heat, your body produces more blood to help cool you while you exercise, and that surplus helps fuel muscles even after temperatures drop. However, there’s a point at which it’s better to take workouts indoors. “If I know my athlete will sacrifice the quality of the run because of the heat, I’ll have them do the run on the treadmill,” Bolton says—his threshold is whenever the heat index (a measure that factors in temperature and humidity) hits 95 degrees. Even conditions that aren’t quite that stifling will affect your performance, so lower your expectations for warm outdoor workouts. How much you’ll slow down depends on a variety of factors, including the humidity, your fitness level, your body type, how acclimated you are to the heat, and how hydrated you are. Cut yourself slack if your watch and your perceived effort don’t match up. For best results on any run, “try to run early in the morning or in the evening if you can,” says Scrivanich, and wear lightweight and light-colored clothing. Ensure you stay hydrated by caching frozen bottles along your route or wearing a hydration pack or belt. Bolton recommends circling home during longer runs to grab ice, which you can stuff beneath your hat or down your sports bra. PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL


TRAINING

A comfortable pace is key for a feel-good run. Beautiful scenery helps, too.

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. Where am I most likely to experience runner’s high? Research shows that being in nature can boost your mood, so choose scenic routes when possible. However, if you’re fretting about rocks or roots in your path, it will be harder to relax, so stick to smooth trails. How often can I expect a great run?

A NATURAL HIGH Tap into the good feelings running can elicit. Most of us have heard tales of “runner’s high,” a feeling of euphoria that crops up midrun. Beginners might find its existence far-fetched—it’s common for new runners to push too hard, which stresses the body in a bad way. But it’s true that exercise stimulates the production of endorphins, powerful attitude-boosting brain chemicals. A few tweaks to your routine can help you feel the good vibes.

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your most peaceful time to run, and stick to it. RUN EASY It’s hard to feel good when you’re huffing and puffing. Ease into each run by walking, to allow body and mind to warm up, and take walk breaks to keep your effort level steady and prevent aches and fatigue.

JOIN OUR ONLINE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR BEGINNERS AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/THESTARTINGLINE.

TUNE IN, OR OUT Some runners have a better experience when they focus on their breathing and their surroundings. Others prefer to daydream or listen to music midrun. Do whatever helps you maintain a positive attitude. (But if you do wear headphones, keep the volume low to stay alert.)

Fact or Fiction I need a running buddy in order to enjoy my run. FICTION Meeting others can help the miles go by faster, but many runners tell me that their most transcendental and restorative runs happen without company. If you rarely go solo, try adding a weekly alone-time run.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M I K E S C H I R F/G E T T Y I M AG E S

SCHEDULE WISELY Allow your run to be an escape from stress instead of a stressor. Many runners find the morning to be the least stressful time to fit in miles, before other obligations demand your attention. If, however, you find yourself fretting about the day to come during early runs, try going later. Find

CHECK IN Every mile or so, assess your form: Try to keep your posture upright and your footfalls light, and shake out any tension in your neck and shoulders. It’s also wise to repeat a positive mantra like “I feel good,” whether or not you actually do. The body follows the mind, so negative thinking will dampen your enjoyment.

Not every run will be great (or even good), but the longer you follow a consistent running schedule, the more often you can expect to enjoy yourself. Each year I have about a dozen great runs. Effort, terrain, weather, and my state of mind all have to come together just right to produce this sense of joy.


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TRAINING

Mo Farah may not have the fastest PR among the competitors in this summer’s Olympics, but the British speedster has won seven straight global championships over 5,000 and 10,000 meters, dating back to 2011. He has mastered the art of racing for place, not time. If you have an upcoming race and your top priority is beating your opponents, it’s worth knowing what makes Farah so good, and how you, too, can race tactically. First, assess your strengths and weaknesses. Farah’s kick is his greatest strength, so he relies on that instead of trying to run away early. Try various approaches in low-key races, figure out which works best for you, and train to develop the skills and confidence to execute your strategy. If you’re trying to beat specific rivals, it’s your strengths relative to theirs that matter. You may have a great finishing sprint, but if Farah’s is better, you need to try something else to win. Consider these head-to-head tactics:

SURGE HARD Ethiopian star Genzebe Dibaba was considered almost unbeatable heading into last summer’s world championships, with world records for indoor 5,000 and outdoor 1500 meters under her belt. But after 2,000 meters in the 5,000 final, her compatriot Almaz Ayana surged into the lead at faster than world-record pace. As Dibaba hesitated, Ayana continued to accelerate, and the race was effectively over long before

The British star’s finishing kick has earned him seven gold medals on the track.

HOW TO BEAT MO FARAH

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FOR MORE FROM ALEX, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/SWEATSCIENCE.

Dibaba had a chance to deploy her superior sprint speed. The moral? Some surges are feints and others are knockout blows. By being the aggressor, you get to choose which is which. TRAIN IT To be effective, surges have to be done at a faster pace than you (and your rivals) can maintain to the finish, to force others into a difficult decision. The key skill is being able to recover and settle back into a quick pace, rather than blowing up. Include “surge” reps in some of your workouts; for example, run 6–8 × 1,000 meters at 10K pace with 2:00 recovery, but make one or two of the middle reps 10 seconds faster than the rest. GO WIRE-TO-WIRE It’s the loneliest road to glory, but sometimes pushing hard from the start is the right choice. Sammy Wanjiru’s gold medal in the 2008 Olympic marathon, Shalane Flanagan’s gutsy 2:22:02 for seventh at the 2014 Boston Marathon—both started with aggressive early frontrunning. Consider this approach if you know your strengths lie in endurance rather than finishing speed. TRAIN IT Get used to running fast while tired. Instead of easing into workouts, do the first few reps faster than normal before settling into a sustainable pace. You also need to get comfortable running solo, since you’ll be setting the pace and any lapses will allow your rivals to regroup and catch up. Make sure to rack up a few long, race-pace workouts on your own.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y A N DY LYO N S /G E T T Y I M AG E S

Strategic moves when you’re racing for place

SIT AND KICK This is the current strategy of choice for most competitors in championship racing, for a simple reason: It works. You can shelter from the wind and turn off your mind early in the race, saving all your mental and physical energy for the moment where you blow past your rivals and high-step to victory. It gets tricky, though, when everyone is trying to do the same thing. Farah’s approach is a long, drawn-out acceleration over the final 500 to 800 meters of the race, giving him time to sap the speed of others who may be quicker over the final 100 meters. TRAIN IT The kick isn’t about raw sprint speed; it’s about having the endurance to shift gears and maintain a hard pace when you’re tired. Practice with workouts like 4–6 × 800 meters with 3:00 rest. For each rep, run the first 400 at 10K pace, the next 300 at 5K pace, and the last 100 at mile pace or faster.


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TRAINING FINISH UP WITH A FEW MORE MILES

RACE PREP

OUT OF GAS? DON’T STOP!

After a race-pace workout, or a tuneup 5K or 10K on the way to a half or full marathon, run an additional 30 to 40 minutes. Don’t worry about pace, but make sure to run tall and softly: Poor biomechanics will boost injury

risk. Running slowly on low fuel teaches your body to burn more fat and utilize glycogen more efficiently, says McMillan. RACE-DAY PAYOFF You can run longer before needing to take in midrun calories, and you’ll avoid bonking in longer races.

The right cooldown plan can build strength and speed. By Lisa Marshall IMAGINE A TRAINING TOOL that helps you race faster, build endurance, and develop the mental grit needed to push beyond your comfort zone—all without adding another workout to your week. That secret weapon is the cooldown. And if you’ve been blowing it off, you’re making a mistake. Coaches consider the cooldown an indispensable part of a workout that can provide potent training adaptations. “It’s time to change the way we think of the cooldown,” says exercise physiologist Steve Magness, author of The Science of Running. “If people realized it can actually increase fitness, they’d be more likely to push through it.” Conventional wisdom has long held that postrun jogging brings down heart rate and body temperature and helps flush metabolic by-products like lactic acid. However, three recent studies found that cooling down does little to prevent soreness, and Magness says heart rate and body temperature would return to normal within 30 to 60 minutes regardless. Continuing to exercise while fatigued and nutritionally depleted, though, forces the body to recruit muscle fibers it wouldn’t tap when fresh and can boost its fuel efficiency, says Magness. Plus, says running coach Greg McMillan, “it toughens you up mentally by providing another opportunity to run tired.”

44 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

FINISH UP AT TEMPO PACE

After a high-intensity track workout (short repeats like 200s or 400s), start your cooldown with one or two laps at tempo pace. Then ease into one or two laps of jogging. Running at a fairly brisk pace, with loads of lactic acid on board,

FINISH UP WITH STRENGTH MOVES

After slower, longer repeats (like mile repeats at halfmarathon pace), cool down with a five- to 10-minute circuit of squats, lunges, jumping jacks, or burpees. (Try sets of 10 to 15 with 30-second rests in between.) Asking

FINISH UP WITH 5K-PACE STRIDES

After a half-marathon- or marathonpace run, finish with five 20- to 30-second strides at 5K pace with 60 to 90 seconds of jogging in between. Strides force you to run with higher knees and pumping arms, working

trains your body to recycle that lactic acid into glucose for fuel, says Magness. That’s important because lactic acid buildup kicks off a chain of events that impede muscle contraction. RACE-DAY PAYOFF

You can run faster for longer before fatiguing.

your muscles to perform while tired prompts recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers, allowing you to strengthen them without adding more speedwork. RACE-DAY PAYOFF Fasttwitch fibers can serve as backup late in a long race, when slow-twitch muscles are kaput.

different muscle groups after miles of slower running, says Denver-based coach Jay Johnson. They’re also another way to utilize fasttwitch muscles in a fatigued state. RACE-DAY PAYOFF You’ll be used to kicking (and activating untapped muscle groups) while tired.

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TRAINING Key workout

WHAT A fartlek session of one to two hours with faster segments at marathon pace

NEXT LEVEL

OLDER, WISER, FASTER For Clint Wells, the road to masters excellence began with a three-year break. By Peter Gambaccini

CLINT WELLS, 41, is having

TIPS FROM THE TOP

event at the 2000 U.S. Track & Field Trials by less than two seconds. In his late 20s, he set personal bests in the 5,000 (13:27) and 10,000 (27:56) meters. Soon after, he heard from 1964 Olympic 10,000-meter gold medalist Billy Mills, whom Wells had met years earlier. Mills, who is half Sioux, called to congratulate Wells, who is part Apache and Yaqui, for becoming “the fastest Native American distance runner of all time.” Today, Wells runs and coaches with the Boulder Track Club. He mentors Olympian Jenny Simpson’s husband, Jason, a 2:23 marathoner. Wells’s best 26.2 was 2:23:11 in 2012, but he’ll chase a PR this fall at Minnesota’s Twin Cities Marathon. “I’ve gotten faster over the last few years,” he says, “and I have a few more good years left in me.”

LOVE THE JOURNEY Running is about more than results, Wells says. “Enjoy the buildup to a marathon. Join a group and make it social. We’re lucky to be able to do this.”

46 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

SEEK HELP You need to trust your training, Wells says, and outside guidance can boost your confidence. Consult with a coach or bounce ideas off a local training group.

WHEN Two to three times in a marathon buildup, including once three to five weeks before race day HOW Wells does a flat eight-mile loop twice because the terrain doesn’t interrupt the pace. He begins with a jogging interval, then runs an equal amount of time at goal marathon pace (for him, about 5:20 pace). He starts with five minutes and adds five to 10 minutes at a time to each segment, working up to 30 minutes.

DON’T PANIC “Sometimes you go out after a weak, puzzling day, and you feel great again,” Wells says. “A breakthrough may be right around the corner.”

P H OTO G R A P H B Y PAU L P H I L L I P S /CO M P E T I T I V E I M AG E

a good year. The Coloradan was top master at April’s Boston Marathon, clocking 2:24:55 on a warm day, a little less than a month after a decisive masters win—by more than 6 minutes, in 1:06:47—at the NYC Half. This after nearly abandoning the sport before he aged up. In his early 30s, Wells noticed his race times slowing, prompting a crisis of confidence. He quit competitive running for three years. “The time off made me realize why I was running,” Wells says. “I missed the process of training, and the social camaraderie.” Wells began running in high school, where he was a Colorado state champion. He took up the 3,000meter steeplechase as a freshman at the University of Colorado in 1994, and missed an Olympic berth in that

WHY When you extend the faster portions to 20 to 30 minutes, you find your comfortable marathon pace.


TRAINING ASK THE EXPERTS

What’s a good stadium workout?

When climbing, run tall, step lightly, and swing your arms to drive yourself upward.

48 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Who is better—a faster or a slower running buddy?

What are some simple core exercises?

It depends. On easy or recovery days, it’s best to run with someone whose company you enjoy, who runs at your comfortable pace or a bit slower. Trying to keep up with a faster runner during these runs would defeat their purpose and leave you fatigued and possibly injured. However, when you’re doing speed workouts or other hard runs, your faster pal will keep you on pace to hit your targets. —Jamie Adcock has coached 600 runners since 2011 in Madison, Wisconsin, and online at running divamom.com.

Planks and Supermans work your abdomen, lower back, and pelvic floor and require no equipment. To do a plank, lie facedown with your forearms and toes supporting your body; maintain a straight line from shoulders to heels. Hold for 30 seconds; do three. For a Superman, lie facedown and extend your arms above your head. Lift your arms, head, chest, and legs as high as you can. Hold for five seconds, relax, and do up to 20. —Crystal Hadnott is a coach and owner of Synergy Total Holistic Health & Wellness (crystalhadnott.com).

The standard estimate is that for each pound you lose, you’ll run about two seconds faster per mile in distance races. Theoretically that means after losing 10 pounds, you could improve by more than a minute in a 5K—or by more than eight minutes in a marathon. But this assumes that you have the pounds to lose and that you maintain a weight above your ideal, a number that’s not easily determined. Get too light and you’ll lose energy and muscle strength. Shoe weight also matters, because you’re swinging that heft with every step. For every ounce you lighten by choosing a more minimal racing shoe, you’ll run an estimated one second faster per mile. However, lighter shoes have less support and cushioning, which could lead to fatigue and an elevated risk of injury in some runners, especially over longer distances.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y P E T E R G R I F F I T H /G E T T Y I M AG E S

The Explainer How much does extra weight slow you down?

After a warmup, run up the stairs five to 10 times at 80 percent effort. Walk down between reps, and rest at the bottom if you’re still out of breath. This workout will boost your speed, especially on hills, and strengthen your lower body. —Paul Romeo oversees stadium-step workouts as a coach for Koko FitClub (kokofitclub.com).


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Health-Watch ExposĂŠ: How to Break Through Your Weight Loss Plateau By Amber Rios

B

eing a health and nutrition correspondent means that companies frequently send me their products, and ask for my stamp of approval. Most of the time I dive into research, give the product a try, and send the company honest feedback about what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to change before Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll recommend it. Plus, my hectic job and my determination to stay fit means Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m always hunting for a quick and nutritious way to fill up on nutrients my body needs. So I can confidently say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried it allâ&#x20AC;?. Like many people out there, one of my biggest frustrations when I am trying to lose weight is when my progress halts despite the fact that I continue to follow a strict plan. On my last workout, I expressed my frustration to my elite personal trainer, Tony, a triathlon winning, organic-to-thebone fitness guy with a ten mile long track record of whipping the â&#x20AC;&#x153;whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whoâ&#x20AC;? into shape in record time. Tony handed me a meal replacement drink and told me to include it in my regular diet. He simply said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You will be astounded by the taste and the results you will see!â&#x20AC;? With more than a healthy dose of scepticism, I decided to investigate the shake Tony handed me to try called INVIGOR8. Turns out, he was right about the taste. After one sip I thought there is no way this can be healthy because the creamy chocolate flavor is just too delicious. I was stunned because virtually every other meal replacement shake Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried has tasted chalky, clumpy and are packed with hidden â&#x20AC;&#x153;no-noâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;? like cheap protein, tons of artificial ingredients, not to mention harmful synthetic dyes, additives, sugars, preservatives, and hormones. And even though INVIGOR8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full meal replacement shake costs more than many of the shakes Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried, it was about half the price of my favorite salad, and the nutrition profile looked second to none. Still sceptical, I looked up the reviews

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FUEL

MESSY EATER? Clean up bad diet habits to slim down. By Matthew Kadey, M.S., R.D.

DIET DISASTER

Cluttered Kitchen Jeans feeling snug? Take a look at your counter. A Cornell Food and Brand Lab study found that people who spent time in a kitchen that had a sink filled with dishes ate twice as many cookies from an easily accessible bowl as those in a clean kitchen. Another Cornell study showed

50 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

that people who left unhealthy snacks on their countertops were up to 26 pounds heavier than those who stashed these items out of sight or didn’t have them in the house at all. “If your kitchen is messy, it can lead to feelings of being out of control, which may lead to mindlessly snacking on items you have easy access to,” says Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., spokesperson for the

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “A handful of pretzels or a few cookies each time you go into the kitchen adds up.” THE FIX Store treats out of sight—and out of mind. Research in the journal Appetite found that women who had to walk six feet for candy ate about half as much as those who had it within arm’s reach. Instead of treats, leave out healthier snacks like fruits and veggies, says Rumsey. Subjects in the Cornell study who kept a bowl of fruit out in the open weighed an average of 13 pounds less than those who didn’t.

DIET DISASTER

“Healthy” Food Labels The words on a package may have you eating more. In a Pennsylvania State University study, subjects consumed more trail mix whose label included “fitness” and an image of running shoes versus trail mix with no claims. And researchers at the University of Texas at Austin found that people ate more popcorn when they were told it was “healthy” than when eating popcorn deemed “unhealthy,” despite both foods being nutritionally identical. And it’s not just fitness

ILLUSTRATIONS BY RAMI NIEMI


FUEL packaging. Research has also found that shoppers think foods labeled “organic” are lower in calories and higher in fiber, and that’s often not the case. Additionally, candy bars in green packages—a color associated with power foods like kale and spinach—were viewed as healthier options. “Package claims and health halos often cause people to eat too much, thinking that since the food is healthy, it’s okay to eat a larger portion,” says Rumsey. “Unfortunately a lot of these foods, like protein bars, all-natural or gluten-free snacks, and trail mixes, are high in calories. Eating extra portions can sabotage your training or weight-loss goals.” THE FIX Don’t get drawn in

by packaging claims. Read the nutrition label to determine what products have better ingredients, like whole grains, no added sugar, and fiber. People who read labels tend to weigh less than those who don’t. Practice portion control by measuring items onto a plate based on serving size. Using a smaller

dish will also prevent you from overeating—it can cut your calories by 30 percent, according to the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. DIET DISASTER

Paying with Credit Cards Using plastic can derail your plan to get to your racing weight. A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that shoppers tend to make at-the-register impulse purchases of less-nutritious foods like candy when they pay by card compared with those who hand over cash. THE FIX Make a shopping

list and stick to it. Bring cash, don’t even look at the goodies by the register, and have a healthy snack before filling your cart. Shoppers who ate an apple before their grocery run bought 25 percent more fruits and veggies than those who did not, according to research from Cornell University. DIET DISASTER

Distracted Dining Healthy eating isn’t just about what you eat; it’s also about how. Research from

Drop the cupcake! Desktop dining can cause you to eat 10 percent more calories. Northwestern University in Chicago found that exposure to blue-enriched light (think smartphone or laptop screens) before and during meals can increase hunger and could lead to overeating. Looking at a screen instead of your plate may stimulate the regions of the brain that regulate appetite. And British researchers determined that people who ate lunch while playing a computer

game ate more cookies 30 minutes later than those who ditched the electronics. But don’t rush your meal to get back to work. Studies show that people who eat their meals quickly consume more calories, feel hungrier, and are more likely to carry extra weight. “When you eat while distracted or shovel in your food, you’re less likely to notice satiety signals,” says Molly Kimball, R.D., C.S.S.D., a sports dietitian at Ochsner Fitness Center in New Orleans. THE FIX Treat your gadgets like your elbows and keep them off the table, take lunch breaks away from your desk, and don’t multitask during meals. Also, save your speed for the track: A study in Appetite found that people who chewed each bite for at least 30 seconds consumed fewer calories two hours later than those who’d eaten quickly. You can trick your brain into thinking you have more on your plate by cutting your food into small pieces, according to an Arizona State University study.


FUEL

FLOWER POWERS Pick these petals for health-boosting benefits. RECOVER POSTRUN Edible flowers can be powerful antiinflammatories, according to a Food Science and Nutrition review. Flower petals contain phenols, also abundant in many Choose varieties dark-colored grown without fruits, which pesticides. Be mindful help reduce where you pick your own, and thoroughly inflammation rinse away dirt after an injury and dust. or a hard workout. Phenols have been shown to be even more powerful than aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs. Look for chrysanthemum, nasturtium, rose, pansy, and peony.

STAY YOUNG Flower colors like

DIG IN! 6 Ways to Add Flowers to Your Meals

1

Toss petals or small flowers into salads, sandwiches, and wraps.

54 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

2

Top fruit with whipped cream or yogurt and a flower garnish.

3

Add flowers to partially frozen ice cubes and freeze until solid.

4

PICK, PURCHASE, GROW You can find edible flowers at nurseries or farmers’ markets, or grow them yourself. For longer shelf life, wrap them in a paper towel and store in the fridge. Some flowers are NOT edible, such as hydrangea, daffodil, oleander, sweet pea, and wisteria.

Mix flowers into stir-fry at the last minute, so they stay colorful.

5

ZINNIA TACOS 1 steamed corn tortilla 2 oz. cooked chicken, shredded 2 Tbsp. green salsa 1 Tbsp. queso fresco Rinsed zinnia petals • Assemble taco and sprinkle with petals.

GARDEN PARTY PIZZA 1 12-inch wholewheat prebaked pizza crust or flatbread 3 Tbsp. pesto 1 ½ cups shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese ¾ cup halved multicolored cherry tomatoes ½ cup edible flowers • Spread pesto on pizza crust; top with cheese and tomatoes. Bake at 425°F for 14 to 16 minutes. Let cool, and top with flowers.

Stuff squash blossoms with soft cheese and herbs, and bake.

6

Season your dishes with chive, rosemary, and lavender.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S ; I L LU S T R AT I O N S B Y LU CY E N G E L M A N

FIGHT CANCER Chrysanthemum petals have quercetin, a potential anticancer compound, which is also found in onions and sage. A study from World Journal of Gastroenterology found that the flower’s petal extract stopped the proliferation of human cancer cells.

red, orange, yellow, and purple come from antioxidants that help repair damage from aging, everyday wear and tear, and exposure to pollutants. Studies, including a review from Food Science and Nutrition, have found that these antioxidants may help ward off age-related decline in brain function. And the levels of antioxidants in some flowers are comparable to those in certain superfoods like blueberries and pomegranates. Try rose, zinnia, violet, marigold, gardenia, and honeysuckle.


A REFUND T ’ N O D U O Y IF . S T L U S E FEEL R RESULTS IF YOU DO.

Take the CocoaVia® Results or Refund three week challenge. The cocoa flavanols in CocoaVia® supplement maintain a healthy flow of oxygen and nutrients to your blood vessels, important for your overall exercise performance†. 100% money-back guarantee if you don’t feel a difference in three weeks. Learn more at CocoaVia.com/results

† This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

®/™ Trademarks © Mars, Incorporated. 2016.


FUEL A cup of strawberries has 49 calories and 3 grams of fiber. The fruit also helps ward off the ill effects of high-fat, high-sugar diets.

THE RUNNER’S PANTRY

BERRY, BERRY GOOD Chef and runner Chris Fischer shares his favorite ways to enjoy this in-season fruit. SURE, STRAWBERRIES are available year-round, but their juicy

sweetness peaks in the summer—bonus points if you can pick your own. “Eating strawberries still hot from the sun is one of the greatest things on earth,” says Chris Fischer, author of The Beetlebung Farm Cookbook, about his family-owned farm on Martha’s Vineyard. For more, see beetlebungfarm.com. —YISHANE LEE

MASHED STRAWBERRIES AND GRANOLA Mash a handful of trimmed strawberries with a fork, add maple syrup to taste, and top with your favorite granola and milk.

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FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA, BONUS RECIPES, AND PREP VIDEOS, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/STRAWBERRIES.

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Chop ½ pound trimmed strawberries, and add to saucepan with 1 Tbsp. sugar and 1 Tbsp. water. Cook over medium-high heat until berries soften, about 7 minutes. Set berry compote aside to cool. Halve 4 biscuits and fill with compote and whipped cream.

STRAWBERRY, WATERMELON, AND FETA SALAD Blend ½ cup trimmed, quartered strawberries and ½ cup cubed watermelon. Garnish with feta cheese, chopped parsley, black pepper, and a touch of red-wine vinegar.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

Thanks to strawberries, this dessert is rich in bone-healthy manganese. For Fischer’s biscuit recipe, visit runnersworld .com/biscuits.

STRAWBERRYCHEESE TOAST Butter a slice of toasted bread and top with trimmed, thinly sliced strawberries and thickly sliced cheddar cheese. Eat as is, or briefly melt cheese in oven.


© 2016 Kraft Foods


FUEL QUICK BITES

THAI CARROT SOUP

Carrots are packed with vitamin A for a healthy immune system. TOSS 1 lb. peeled and chopped carrots, 1 seeded and quartered orange bell pepper, 2 peeled shallots, and 4 peeled loves garlic with 1 Tbsp. olive oil. ROAST at 400°F for 30 minutes. Let cool, then blend with 1 cup low-sodium vegetable broth, 1 can light coconut milk, 1-inch piece peeled fresh ginger, 1 Tbsp. honey, juice of 1 lime, 2 tsp. curry powder, and a couple pinches salt until smooth. CHILL for at least 2 hours; serve with 1 tsp. chopped unsalted, roasted peanuts and 1 tsp. cilantro. Makes 4 servings.

COOL SOUP! Rehydrate with a fruit- or veggie-packed bowl of chilly goodness. By Matthew Kadey, M.S., R.D. Vitamins and minerals in fruits and vegetables help speed postrun recovery.

Thai Carrot

RASPBERRY GAZPACHO

Avocado Basil

LEMON-BLUEBERRY SOUP

Blueberries supply key antioxidants for body AND brain health. SIMMER 4 cups fresh or frozen blueberries, 1 cup water, 2 Tbsp. honey, ½ tsp. cinnamon, ½ tsp. ground ginger, and pinch of salt until berries burst, about 5 minutes. PUREE soup with zest of 1 lemon and juice of ½ lemon in a blender, then strain through a fine sieve back into pan. WHISK together 1 cup almond milk with 1 ½ Tbsp. cornstarch; stir into blueberry mixture and simmer until slightly thickened, stirring often. CHILL for at least 2 hours and serve topped with 1 Tbsp. toasted coconut flakes. Makes 4 servings.

LemonBlueberry

Traditional gazpacho can decrease blood pressure, and the raspberry twist adds sweetness and fiber. PLACE ½ cup water, 4 chopped medium tomatoes, 1 ½ cups raspberries, 1 cup Peppadew (sweet piquanté) peppers, ½ peeled and chopped English cucumber, 1 ½ tsp. fresh thyme, 2 chopped scallions, 1 chopped clove garlic, 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar, and ¼ tsp. each salt and pepper in a blender. BLEND until slightly chunky. With machine running on low speed, slowly drizzle in 2 Tbsp. olive oil. CHILL at least 2 hours and serve with 2 tsp. crumbled feta. Makes 6 servings. CORN YOGURT SOUP

Corn Yogurt

Help your heart with avocado’s healthy fats and your gut with kefir, which is rich in probiotics. BLEND together 1 ½ cups water, 1 ½ cups plain FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA AND PREP VIDEOS, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/SOUP.

Boost protein by serving soup with a grilled cheese or tuna fish sandwich on whole grain bread.

The lutein found in corn can protect and improve eye health. SLICE off kernels from 3 corn cobs (or use 3 cups frozen corn). BLEND kernels with 1 chopped medium yellow summer squash, 1 chopped yellow bell pepper, 1 cup plain Greek yogurt, ¾ cup low-sodium vegetable broth, juice of ½ lemon, 1 chopped shallot, 2 chopped cloves garlic, ½ tsp. cumin, ¼ tsp. chipotle chili powder, and ¼ tsp. salt until smooth. CHILL at least 2 hours, and serve with 1 ½ tsp. pesto. Makes 6 servings. PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

Raspberry Gazpacho

AVOCADO BASIL SOUP

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kefir, 2 small avocados, 1 chopped green bell pepper, ½ chopped English cucumber, 1 cup basil, 2 chopped scallions, 1 chopped clove garlic, 1 seeded and chopped jalapeño, juice of ½ lime, and ½ tsp. kosher salt until smooth. With machine running on low speed, slowly drizzle in 2 Tbsp. olive oil. CHILL at least 2 hours, and serve each with 1 ½ tsp. roasted pumpkin seeds (pepitas) and ½ tsp. chopped chives. Makes 6 servings.


With 8 GRAMS of P LANT- P OWERED P ROTEIN

per serving, delicious Silk® Original Soymilk gives you P LENTY T O L OVE. Silk.com / LoveSoymilk ©2016 WhiteWave Services, Inc.


MIND+BODY IS BRAIN DRAIN TIRING YOU OUT? Decisions and distractions can zap your resolve to run. Here’s how to preserve mental energy. By A.C. Shilton

BETWEEN YOUR DEMANDING

boss, a balky computer, and text messages from your child or partner (or both!), by the time 5:30 rolls around you think, Ugh, I am way too tired to run. Fatigue may seem odd, considering you’ve mostly been parked in

60 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

a chair for eight hours. But while you may not have physically exerted yourself, you are low on mental energy, and that can make you feel tired, says Daniel Evans, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Brown Clinical Psychology Training Program and

employed by Butler Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. When your brain is engaged in making microdecisions all day, it can experience what’s called decision fatigue. The more choices you make, the more drained your brain becomes, which can cause you to abandon good judgment as the hours click by. For almost three decades, psychologists have been researching decision fatigue. The theory is that people’s willpower becomes increasingly depleted. It’s why you’ll find yourself surfing Facebook after a run instead of foam rolling. Or why you’re fully committed to your race plan at mile 1, but ready to ditch it at mile 22. These strategies may be enough to keep good training habits on track—even on mentally exhausting days.

START YOUR DAY RIGHT It’s true that one good decision can lead to another. Healthy habits like exercising in the morning and eating a balanced breakfast can have a domino effect, causing you to make better choices throughout the day. Evans says willpower is similar to a muscle—the more it’s worked, the stronger it becomes. Even if you can’t run in the morning, start your day with a positive behavior, like doing yoga or eating a healthy breakfast. Front-loading your day with actions that support your training will make it less likely you’ll bail on a run later. STREAMLINE DECISIONS You can’t control what you’ll face at work, and life emergencies can always pop up. But you can remove some decisions by planning your workouts and prepping meals in advance.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAY WRIGHT


J U LY

“When I was training for a half Ironman, I sat down and planned out all my workouts so I never had to think about them when I was tired,” says Stephen Graef, Ph.D., a sports psychologist at Ohio State University. “Try to eliminate figuring out which workout, which time, which route. Every single one of those decisions burns brain fuel.” Be aware that hard workouts take mental fortitude. When you come back from a long run, your resolve may not be at its highest. Have a healthy postrun snack prepped and ready to go. RACE IN A GROUP It takes mental energy to properly pace yourself in a race. Letting someone else set the pace for you—be it a pace group or a friend you regularly run with—could help you conserve mental energy so you’ll feel less physically drained as the race progresses. “In principle, running with a group

is beneficial because the decision-making process becomes much simpler: Follow the runner ahead of me,” says Andrew Renfree, a doctoral candidate and researcher at the Institute of Sport and Exercise Science at the University of Worcester. Just be sure that your pacer is a good match for your speed and race goals. HAVE SUGAR ON STANDBY When your body begs for a break, recognize that it’s your brain trying to slow you down. Research shows that “hitting the wall” is a psychological phenomenon. The mental fatigue of running hard can make you feel like you can’t go on, even though you still have physical energy (glycogen in your muscles). However, a hit of sugar can fool your brain. Evans says that just tasting something sweet can reset the brain’s ability to make good decisions. One study found that simply

swishing a glucose solution, like Gatorade, around your mouth can help you feel more energized. “There are sensors in our mouths that sense glucose, which is tricking the brain into thinking it’s getting more fuel,” Evans says. Of course, if you’re racing a long distance, you’ll need to replenish your glycogen sources anyway, so feel free to sip, not just swish. (And you still have to train.)

MAKE A POWER PLAYLIST Good decision making declines as you lose mental energy, which is why grabbing a beer from a spectator at mile three doesn’t present the same temptation that it does at mile 23. Graef says that one great way to stave off a lategame mistake is to use music. Even if you don’t want to run with it for your entire race, having music available for the last few miles when your willpower is likely to dip can boost your mood, help you tune out sideline distractions, and help you refocus on your performance. TAKE FIVE Evans says taking time to mentally reboot can help you find motivation to run after a draining day. Research supports the benefits of a quick meditation session or power nap. Just as effective is spending a few minutes doing something that elicits a positive emotion. Cat videos, anyone?

JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 61


MIND+BODY THE BODY SHOP

MAKE THE TIME Slow down in the gym to get strong and stay healthy. WANT TO AVOID INJURY ? Take your time when lifting. A new study found that runners became stronger after doing six weeks of eccentric strength training. This tactic, which entails slowing down the lengthening phase of a movement, puts greater stress on muscles to help them grow more powerful and resilient, says study author Fernando Sanz López, Ph.D., of San Jorge University in Spain. Do the following five exercises from López as one circuit. Rest, then repeat. Aim for three rounds total, trying to take minimal rest between reps and circuits. —CAITLIN CARLSON

Do this 20-minute routine two days a week on nonrunning or easy-run days.

SINGLE-LEG SQUATS Stand with your left foot on a box, right leg hanging off to the side. Bend your left knee to slowly squat down. Pause, then rise back up to the starting position. Do six to 12 reps on each leg.

WOODCHOP Squat down and bring a medicine ball toward your right knee. Contract your abs as you stand up and bring the ball diagonally across your body. Do both phases of the movement slowly so you move with control in both directions. Do six to 12 reps on each side.

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SEE THESE EXERCISES IN MOTION AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/ECCENTRIC.

DEADLIFT Stand with dumbbells. Hinge forward at your hips, keeping your back flat, to lower the dumbbells just below your knees. Rise up slowly to stand straight. Pause, then lower back down and repeat six to 12 times.

CALF RAISES

SINGLE-LEG BRIDGE

Stand with your heels off a box edge. Lift up on your toes (use a wall for support). Take your left foot off. Lower your right heel slowly. Pause; return to start. Do six to 12 reps on each leg.

Lie on your back with knees bent and arms at your sides. Extend your right leg out. Lift your hips slowly into the air. Pause, then return to start. Do six to 12 reps on each leg.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT RAINEY


GEAR

1

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TAKE A GOOD LOOK The best shades for running (and for the rest of your day) By Bob Parks AS IF OUTRUNNING PAPARAZZI,

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5

MOSTLY FOR RUNNING

2 / NIKE VAPORWING ELITE $395 BEST FOR Speedsters

1 / UNDER ARMOUR UA RIVAL $140 BEST FOR Durability

• The Rival is built like football pads for the eyes, thanks to a layer of titanium under the thick white frame. The fit is large and the build hefty (1.3 ounces), and they were among the most rugged we tried. Adjustable nose pads and spring-loaded arms held firmly to our mugs.

• With incredibly clear Zeiss lenses, they made testers feel like they were running in a bubble. The amber tint bumps up detail of objects in the distance, like an orange race cone. Some testers, however, wanted a darker filter to beat back a bright sun. Created just for runners, these have temples that get sticky when wet and cutaways in the arms and nose pads to lighten the frame and increase airflow.

64 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

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G R O O M I N G B Y M E L I S S A C O N N E R F O R W I L H E L M I N A ; P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I TC H M A N D E L ( S U N G L A S S E S S T I L L S ) ; C O U R T E SY O F I N T E L ( R E C O N J E T )

our testers went incognito in more than 30 pairs of sunglasses to find ones most worthy of love. Looks mattered, but not at the cost of fit. “Try them out in the store first,” says Tim Don, an Olympic triathlete from Boulder, Colorado. “Don’t go for a pair just because your buddies have the same kind. They might end up sitting on your nose awkwardly.” To pick our favorites, we considered performance features like ventilation, field of view, and comfort, but also gave points for après-run style.

Looking sharp: Members of the South Beach Track Club try out this season’s top picks.


3

3 / JULBO ZEPHYR $180

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BEST FOR Heavy Sweaters • Designed for mountain and ultrarunners, the Zephyr increases airflow along the nose to reduce eye-stinging and slippage, not to mention fog. Bendable earpieces with metal cores deliver a custom fit, making these 1-ounce frames among the most versatile. “They were stylish and super comfortable, like they were a part of me,” said one tester who ran with them in Boston. They also automatically adjust to light, though it took over two minutes to switch on a run from a sunny meadow to dense forest trails, making it hard to see during the transition.

4 / TIFOSI WISP $69 BEST FOR Tiny Faces

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• The diminutive Wisp ended the long hunt for shades that actually fit one slight runner in our group, a 2:51 marathoner. “These

are snug and never bounce,” she said of the .7-ounce model. Other testers liked the three interchangeable lenses—clear, amber, and dark gray—which can be quickly swapped to suit the conditions or a change in seasons. Plus, the temple arms adjust for a better fit. Though they come in blue and pink, smaller guys will appreciate the brown and black options.

5 / RUDY PROJECT SYNFORM $299 BEST FOR Travelers • The Synform is a rare foldable set of Italian-made frames for sports that doesn’t eat up room in your carry-on. Their sturdy magnesium and titanium build makes them a little heavy (1.2 ounces), but adjustable nose pads and soft, rubbery arms help them sit just right. Testers found them so comfortable they forgot they were on. A vent along the top increases airflow, and the lenses can be swapped for a dark filter, photochromic lenses, or prescription options (all sold separately).

TO WEAR ALL DAY

8 / DISTRICT VISION NAGATA $298 6 / REVO DESCEND E $179 BEST FOR Comfort

• At a mere .6 ounce, these are the lightest in our lineup. Testers liked the steady fit, but the smallish profile didn’t block wind, and light crept in at the edges. The polarized lenses showed us great clarity and dimension. Since they seem delicate, we always stored them in the included hard case.

BEST FOR Fastinistas

• New York City– based startup District Vision prototyped these frames for two years to get the features dialed-in for runners. Indeed, the shape provides great coverage without an unnecessary aerodynamic look. We found the yellow lenses best for low-light running to enhance obstacles (potholes, sticks, roots) against a dark background. They are lightweight at just .8 ounce, yet clung to testers securely.

7 / NATIVE EYEWEAR KHANNA From $109 BEST FOR Easy Days

• Female testers loved wearing the Khanna around town as much as on a social sevenmiler. The full plastic frame isn’t vented, so they fogged up on one tester during an interval workout, but low-key runs were never a problem. The grippy temples banished bounce, and the frames felt comfortable even when navigating rough trails.

SMART SHADES ON THE HORIZON

9 / SMITH DRAKE $209 BEST FOR Stealth Runners • This classic style is loaded with tech: Springy steel hinges protect the frame when you yank it off one-handed, yet these hold tight to a variety of head sizes. The lenses feature Smith’s ChromaPop technology, which boosts colors and adds dimension to uneven surfaces.

We get it: No runner wants to look like a cyborg. But what if eyewear with a built-in heads-up display looked (almost) like a regular pair of shades? One such pair, the Recon Jet, from Intel’s Recon Instruments, shows run data in the corner of your field of vision. “The value to runners is great,” says Dan Eisenhardt, GM of head-worn devices within the New Devices Group at Intel. “But bottom line: If they feel uncomfortable about looking geeky, they won’t wear it.” Also ahead: audio. This fall, Oakley will release the Radar Pace, sunglasses built with Intel that has an earpiece to announce splits and coaching advice.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JEFFERY SALTER


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

Rising track stars Emma Coburn (right) and Evan Jager (left) bound over 12-foot-long water pits on their way, they hope, to Olympic glory.

EVAN JAGER and EMMA COBURN are America’s top Olympic hopefuls in the steeplechase, a race so chaotic that anything can happen—and often does. BY NICK WELDON


Making A


Long before the Kenyans owned the steeplechase, IT BELONGED TO THE CRAZIES. though about half of his 24 competitors dropped out after a few hundred yards. As cinder-track racing emerged in the late 19th century, the steeplechase fell out of favor except as a sideshow. Meet organizers designed impossibly long water jumps, Shearman wrote, “to please spectators…for the British public, in the true style of those who rejoice in gladiatorial shows, like to see somebody... coming to grief or rendered ridiculous.” The steeplechase made its Olympic debut in Paris in 1900, with one 2500-meter race and a 4,000-meter gauntlet; Sidney Robinson of England, a real masochist, medaled in both. It wasn’t until the 1920 Games that organizers settled on the single 3,000-meter race that is still run today. Over time, other standards were established: There are a total of 35 jumps in a steeplechase, each 36 inches high for men and 30 inches high for wom-

68 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

P R E V I O U S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H R I S H O R N B E C K E R ( JAG E R ) ; B E N JA M I N R A S M U S S E N (C O B U R N );

At the 1839 Aintree Grand National race at Liverpool, the field was mainly equine (below). Later, in 1922, humans raced at Stamford Bridge, London (top) .

T H I S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H U LTO N A R C H I V E /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( H O R S E S ) ; TO P I CA L P R E S S AG E N CY/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( R U N N E R S )

Men (alas, it was always men, until recently) who craved a brutish challenge and had little regard for their own well-being, the story goes, would race from one town’s church steeple to the next, hurdling all manner of wet and dry obstacles along the way. Those early steeplechases, in Ireland, tended to involve horses, at least to start. In one of the earliest documented human steeplechases, held in 1838 in Birmingham, England, the competitors had the good sense to spare their families the shame of association, and adopted pseudonyms: The Spouter edged Neversweat over a mile-long course, with Sprightly, Rustic, and Chit-Chat trailing behind. A dozen years later, at Oxford’s Exeter College, a chagrined jockey named Halifax Wyatt, fresh from being tossed off his mount in an equestrian steeplechase, invited his peers to race on foot. They established parameters that roughly resembled the modern event—two miles, with 24 jumps—but staggered across a course of marshy farmland that decidedly did not. Sport historian Montague Shearman later wrote: “…the ground was deep, the fences big, and all the competitors were heavily handicapped by wet flannels bedraggling their legs.” Wyatt won the slog,

en—roughly the height of a Great Dane. Most of the jumps are meant to be leapt over, but seven require jumping onto a fixed hurdle then pushing off of it over a 12-foot-long water pit, which begins at a depth of a little over two feet and slopes upward. The total number of laps can vary slightly depending on the placement of the water jumps, but in the Olympics today it’s seven-and-a-half. With all those impediments, the Olympic steeplechase has always been a haven for carnage. The great “Flying Finn” Paavo Nurmi claimed silver in the 1928 contest only after recovering from a back-first splash into the pit during his heat, in an incident that has been described as “almost fatal.” Dry hurdle crashes cost East German Frank Baumgartl possible gold in 1976 (he’d settle for bronze) and Kenyan Brimin Kipruto a shot at his second steeplechase gold in 2012. Matthew Birir, of Kenya, fell after being spiked on the third lap in 1992, but managed to rally to victory despite a ripped shoe. The last time an American won gold was in 1952, when Horace Ashenfelter, an FBI agent who trained by hurdling a park bench in New Jersey, defeated Vladimir Kazantsev after the Soviet favorite stumbled out of the last water pit. (The same fate befell Tanzanian Filbert Bayi in 1980.) And where the barriers fail to destroy, crippling fatigue takes over: In his bid to reassert American supremacy in 1984, top-ranked Henry Marsh fell behind early and surged late to be the fourth man across the line, where he collapsed and was carried away on a gurney. To even whiff glory in the steeple is to become familiar with unique, intimate agony. It’s a gorilla that jumps on your back in the last lap, after you’ve survived the first 24 hurdles and six water jumps, dragging you down into the track so that the maw of the final pit can consume you. You must become the beast in order to defeat it; Kip Keino won gold in 1972 by hurdling, he said, “like an animal.” The event’s dirtiest trick is that it feels fine until, suddenly, it doesn’t. A PR pace


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y PAT R I C K S M I T H /G E T T Y I M AG E S (C O B U R N ); A N DY LYO N S /G E T T Y I M AG E S (JAG E R )

Coburn was fifth at the 2015 Worlds in Beijing (left), but both she and Jager won last year’s USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships (right).

in the 3K steeple roughly equates to that of a 10K—if you start any faster, you’re doomed. Evan Jager and Emma Coburn, America’s best steeplechasers and legitimate gold-medal threats in Rio, know this all too well. “When you go out at PR pace, you feel good because you aren’t running that fast, and then it’s like a slow death,” says Jager. “You’re just trying to keep your sh*t together.” Says Coburn, wincing: “The pain creeps up on you in such a nasty way.” Jager, 27, and Coburn, 25, are already all-time national greats. The seven fastest races ever run by an American man all belong to Jager, and nine of the top 10 for women are Coburn’s. Combined, they are the rising tide lifting our domestic steeple stock: The United States has never been deeper in the event, and at Worlds in Beijing last August all six men and women advanced to the final for the first time ever in a global championship. The U.S. has not had an Olympic medalist in women’s steeple since it debuted

in 2008, and Ashenfelter, six decades ago, was the last to win one on the men’s side. Jager and Coburn have a chance to end both droughts. If you believe in things like destiny, it would seem fortuitous that they first met at the Olympics four years ago. Each has been among the other’s biggest fans ever since. Neither faces an easy path. Kenya has dominated the men’s event, winning gold (and most of the silvers and bronzes) at every Olympics they’ve participated in since 1968. The women’s global championships have been scandalized by doping. Before Coburn and Jager can even consider their international prospects, though, they must first survive the U.S. Olympic Trials this month in Eugene, Oregon. The requisite top-three finish for each should be a virtual guarantee, but this is the steeplechase. Failing to clear a hurdle by even a fraction of an inch can be the difference between history and, well, something else entirely.

Ronaldo Field, still damp from the previous night’s rain, sparkles in the morning light. Geese honk in the distance on this Saturday in early March. Around the pitch, situated in the middle of Nike’s sprawling Beaverton campus in Oregon, six runners jog in a loose V-formation, shedding layers as the sun warms them. Jager leads the way, loping along with leggy, effortless strides. A sports watch turned in on his left wrist keeps the group on a roughly six-minute-per-mile pace for the 75-minute workout; on his right wrist, always, is a hair tie. His lustrous mane bobs lightly beneath a backward Nike SB cap, and his Bowerman Track Club teammates fan out in its wake, like the high school girls do when they’re in town for Nike Cross Nationals. He is a heartthrob, no doubt, but all comers should know that he got engaged over the Christmas holiday to his longtime Swedish belle, Sofia HellbergJULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 69


Jonsen. Getting her to agree to marry him, on a snow-globe Stockholm night, is his proudest accomplishment. Not crushing the American steeplechase record months after taking up the event, or running in the Olympics weeks after that, or even flirting with the vaunted eight-minute barrier in Paris last July. That’s where the track world fell in love with Jager, in Paris, though his memories of it are far from romantic. It is the last lap of the Paris Diamond League and Jager is toasting one of his primary Kenyan rivals, Jairus Birech. Jager is in the best shape of his life. Three weeks earlier, in what should have been a tuneup 1500-meter race in Portland, he scorched all expecta-

tions by running a 3:32.97, the fastest time ever for an American-born athlete on U.S. soil. Now in Paris he is laying waste to the notion that Americans can’t hang with Kenyans at full throttle. It is Jager who has had his foot on the gas for five laps before passing Birech, who is fading, fading. Jager looks at the clock for the first time heading into the bell lap. Sh*t, I might be able to break eight minutes, he realizes. It’s one of running’s magic numbers, albeit a little under the radar. Only 11 men have done it, whereas 29 have gone sub-2:05 in the marathon. With 300 meters to go, Jager sees on the big screen that his foe remains a good five-plus meters behind him. Jager clears the last water jump, lands

Coburn sits

at the wheel of her dirt-flecked Audi SUV, texting her training partners about a backup plan. It’s late February, and the Anvil of God Coburn leads the pack in the 2015 USA Outdoors (left). As a high school junior, she ran the anchor leg in the 4x800 at the Colorado State Championships (right).

F R O M L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A N D R E W M C C L A N A H A N / P H OTO R U N ; C O U R T E S Y O F E M M A CO B U R N

cleanly—and feels all of his energy drain into the pit, down into the void. Still, he retains a healthy lead. Fumes can still get him there. Focus, just make sure you get over this last barrier… The trigger is almost imperceptible. Replay the clip on YouTube a few times over and you notice his trail foot barely clips the last barrier, by a toenail. That’s all it takes. Right foot clean, left foot askew. Down in a heap. There goes Birech, already a sub-eight man, on his way to the fastest steeplechase anyone will run in 2015. And then an incredible thing happens: Jager scrambles to his feet, sprints his ass off, and leans valiantly into an 8:00.45 finish, an American Record. A time bettered only by Birech’s for the year, and an effort that would earn Jager universal admiration from the track world. The Diamond League declared it the “Moment of 2015.” “I probably gained more attention for falling and running that time than if I’d run cleanly and gotten 7:57,” he’ll tell me later, a tad sheepishly, while curled up like a cat in an oversize beanbag chair in his Portland apartment. In the ’80s there was Marsh, who set the U.S. steeplechase record four times, was number one in the world three times, and competed at two Olympics. In the ’90s there was Mark Croghan, who made three Olympic teams and was the second-fastest American ever, until Daniel Lincoln came along in the aughts. Lincoln broke Marsh’s 21-year-old record in 2006 and went to one Olympics. Jager broke Lincoln’s record in 2012 mere months after picking up the event, but not until Paris did it become clear that he not only could but should accomplish something none of that talented trio had: win a global medal.


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

CO U R T E S Y O F J O E L JAG E R ( L E F T )

Jager as a high school freshman at a crosscountry meet in Peoria, Illinois (left), and earlier this year at Nike’s Ronaldo Field (right).

trail, where they’d planned to run, had been shut down by snow. Poking into the front of the vehicle from its gutted backseat is a shovel that she uses on speed days to clear off the University of Colorado’s practice track. Boulder’s capricious weather won’t get in the way today, either: We’re off to the flatter, drier Bobolink Trail, which links up with the school’s cross-country course. Coburn graduated from Colorado in 2013 and never left. This is home. Her parents met at the school, and she and two of her three siblings were born in Boulder. The Coburns moved away to the tiny mountain hamlet of Crested Butte, 8,885 feet up, when Emma was 7, but she eventually came back down to Boulder to run for Mark Wetmore’s and Heather Burroughs’s powerhouse program. She signed her first pro contract with New Balance but stayed with her coaches, and now lives in a new mixeduse complex developed by her father, built on land that was once a steel fabrication yard owned by her grandfather. Yes, her roots run deep here. Coburn pulls off onto a Highway 93 service road where Sara Sutherland, who runs for Saucony, and Blake Theroux and Aric Van Halen, ex-Colorado runners who train with Wetmore’s group, all stretch out under a dazzling blue sky. Snow clings to the Flatirons in the distance and to the shadows down here, but the temp will push 70 today. Coburn, wearing a black tank top, red racing shorts, and black New Balance Zantes, pulls her hair into a ponytail and jogs to a dirt path just off the road. Even for an easy day, Coburn’s gait seems unusually effortless. From her hips up you’d barely know she’s running, if not for her swaying hair. It’s something that she’s known for: an über-efficient, rotary stride that hardly perturbs her upper body, even in a steeplechase. A week later in Portland, Jager will jealously imitate it with two gangly fingers, deftly curling one back to demonstrate her low-key hurdling form. Coburn’s New Balance teammate and frequent PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS HORNBECKER

training partner Jenny Simpson says it takes some getting used to. “It always looks easy,” she says. “She’ll be out on American Record pace and you’re like, ‘Why aren’t you trying any harder!?’” It’s how Coburn looked, and felt, in Glasgow, Scotland, two years ago, when she broke Simpson’s steeplechase record and emerged as a legitimate Olympic medal threat, if not a favorite. Ponytail swish, whip the left leg back, swish, right leg back, swish—(hurdle) gliiiiide— swish, whip, swish, whip. Record. Arms in the air, smile for the crowd. Coburn’s march toward Simpson’s 9:12.50 mark, set in 2009, was methodical and ruthless. In her 2014 season debut in Shanghai, she demolished

a field that included all three reigning world championship medalists with a four-second PR of 9:19.80. Thirteen days later at the Prefontaine Classic she ran a 9:17.84 and followed that up a few weeks later with her third national title. Eight days after that, she slashed her PR to 9:14.12 in Paris. There, with the record in play heading into the bell lap, she finally cracked and slowed down. “I couldn’t hear anything anymore except my breath,” she says. “From head to toe, I was tingling. I was at my max.” Coburn, ever composed, viewed the huge PR despite losing steam as another sign of the inevitable. Exactly a week later she ran a 9:11.42 in Glasgow. History. Or so she thought. JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 71


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

“I love going fast,” Jager says. “I’ve noticed that.”

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M U S TA FA YA LC I N /A N A D O L U AG E N CY/G E T T Y I M AG E S

So did Joel and Cathy Jager, his parents, years ago while watching little Evan exhaust the rest of the kids on the soccer pitch. “It’s one of those things, you’re watching him, you’re going, All right, he’s better at running than the other kids,” Joel says. “I wouldn’t say he was the better soccer player, but he was better at running. He was always able to catch up to the ball.” Every Friday and Saturday night in middle school, Evan would take his obsession with speed to the local roller rink; he’d strap on an aggressive pair of skates and get a rush, he says, from “just blowing past people.” Then he discovered that the biggest adrenaline surge came from just plain running. The summer before seventh grade, the Jagers were visiting Joel’s parents out in rural Michigan. “He was really antsy one night,” Joel says, so he and his son went for a walk. The next street was a half mile away, and Joel challenged Evan to run out and back; he’d time him on his watch. Evan returned 6 minutes and 12 seconds later. Not bad for a 12-year-old, over hills and gravel. Joel asked his son how fast he thought he could do it with a little more training, and Evan replied with his trademark confidence: “Five minutes.” “When you run that I’ll buy you a 5liter Mustang,” Joel said. “Five-point-oh for a five-point-oh.” Evan did it during the next track season and Joel held up his end of the bargain—though the car would sit in the garage for three years until Evan could drive. At Jacobs High School in the Chicago suburb of Algonquin, Evan exhibited an almost insatiable desire to run—and win—at any event he could. He claimed state titles in cross country, the 1600, and the 3200, and he anchored a record-setting 4x800 relay team. He ran the 4x400 once and even gave the high jump a try: 5 feet 10 inches at practice for fun. He attended Jerry Schumacher’s summer running camp at the University of Wisconsin the summer before his sophomore year, but it wasn’t until a year later, after he’d had a growth spurt of four inches, that he caught the esteemed coach’s attention. Jager wound up earning a scholarship to run for Schumacher at Wisconsin, but at the end of his freshman year, just as he was settling in, he faced a dilem-

TRACK & FIELD ma: Schumacher was leaving to TRIALS launch a pro group with Nike in Portland. “I knew after college I wanted to run professionally with Jerry,” Jager says, “so it was either ‘I’m going to continue running for you and move out to Portland’ or ‘I’m going to stay in college for three or After passing Kenyan four more years and then Jairus Birech in the 2015 Paris Diamond run for you.’” League race, Jager’s toe In Jager’s mind, it grazed the last barrier. wasn’t about whether He fell but got up to run 8:00.45, the American he was good enough to Record. turn pro at 19; he demonstrated as much that summer by placing eighth in the 1500 at Junior Worlds. It was about weighing the opportunity it presented against the forfeiture of his NCAA eligibility and the safety net of the Midwest. He knew his destiny was as a pro runner. “Oh, I have no clue,” he says when asked what other career path he could have taken, shaking his head. “Seriously.” Jager made up his mind to follow his coach and hired Tom Ratcliffe, his agent to this day. Schumacher worked with Jager’s parents to ensure that he would continue his education at Portland State (where he finished a degree in health studies last year) and that he had the proper support system around him. Joel Jager didn’t mince words with the coach and agent: “You guys have to be his parents.” Jager’s bet on himself paid off. In the Jager had been curious about adding spring of 2009 he placed third at USA to his repertoire and that his coaches Outdoors in the 5,000 meters, earning thought might be the perfect outlet him a spot on the national team for the for his springy athleticism: the steeworld championships at 20 years old. “It plechase. The seed had actually been was a validation point for him,” Schumplanted years before, in high school, acher says. “He believed in himself and after Jager toyed with the high jump what he could do and made it happen.” and an assistant coach suggested that he Everything was falling into place unshould one day give steeple a try. til June 2010, when Jager fractured the “Even when I was younger I was a navicular bone in his right foot during very bouncy runner,” Jager says. “It the 1500-meter prelims at the 2010 U.S. was always in the back of my mind as championships. Surgery and six months something I thought I might be good downtime followed—the longest layoff at. It looked fun, looked challenging.” of his career. He was miserable, rehabOf all the events to try after coming bing on the bike while having to watch back from a serious foot injury, though, his teammates train without him. “All I was the one designed to slowly grind wanted to do was go for a run,” he says. your lower body into bonemeal really As he healed, he and Schumacher the best choice? Jager called his surand Pascal Dobert, a former Olympic geon, Dr. Robert Anderson. “Is this stusteepler who joined Schumacher’s staff pid?” he asked. “Are we being foolish?” in 2009, discussed a new event, one “Those two screws are in there hold-


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2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

Coburn refuses

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TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

in school from 7:30 to 7:30,” she says. She regretfully gave up hockey, her first love, in her freshman year because the boys—she always played with the boys—had gotten so big that a hard check might jeopardize her other pursuits. Her childhood heroes had not been Steve Prefontaine or Joan Benoit Samuelson, but the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey team. “I loved the story, their heart and their fight and their spirit,” she says. “I think that competitive side, never thinking you’re out of it, that just seeped into my athletic career.” It was her sophomore year, with Emma beginning to come into her own as a runner, when it was all nearly snatched away. Bill had taken Emma and a few of her friends out to the family cabin in the ghost town of Tin Cup, when the chimney caught fire in the middle of the night. Bill woke up to a strange crackling sound and realized the cabin was burning. He saw that Emma’s friends had already run out the front door and he sprinted to her room upstairs. Choking on smoke, he ran back outside to catch a breath and heard one of the girls yell, “She’s out back!” Disoriented by carbon monoxide poisoning, Emma had stumbled out the back door. Everyone was safe, but the generations-old cabin would have to be rebuilt from the ground up. Bill thinks the incident contributed to Emma’s unflinchingly positive outlook. “Until you’ve been on that edge you maybe don’t appreciate things the same,” he says. Emma finished fourth at state in cross country her junior year and discovered the steeplechase by accident during track season. Traveling to Albuquerque to run an 800, Emma and Bill decided to make the most of the trip and sign her up for a steeple. After asking race officials how many laps there were, she won in a nationals-qualifying time. She’d place fourth in the steeplechase at Nike Outdoor Nationals, where she introduced herself to Wetmore in the parking lot. “She had to be a pretty self-confident 16-year-old to do that,” he says. It helped that from that very first race in Albuquerque, Coburn felt natural competing in (Continued on page 108)

P H OTO G R A P H B Y J O R DA N M A N S F I E L D/ B R I T I S H AT H L E T I C S /G E T T Y I M AG E S

ing everything together,” Dr. Anderson told him. “That should be no problem.” Empowered by his doctor and with a clean bill of Coburn leads health, Jager competed Ethiopia’s Hiwot well in the 1500 in 2011 Ayalew at the 2014 while beginning to coDiamond League in Glasgow. She ran a WR vertly work with Dobert. time of 9:11.42, but due “He took to it like a fish to a rules violation, to water,” Dobert says. it is unofficial. The coach says this in earnest, though to hear Jager tell it, he had to do his fair bit of flopping around. The water jump, he says, was “by far” the hardest adjustment. “It took me a long time to has just pushed herself to the aerobic trust my foot and trust my body to really brink ought to be the one responsible take the impact of the water jump.” for shuttling said athlete to drug testing. Jager made his steeplechase debut You would think it’s in everyone’s best at Mt. SAC in April 2012 and wowed interest to make sure this necessary step onlookers by running an 8:26.14, good isn’t fumbled; who doesn’t want to be enough for the Olympic B standard and, able to promote a record-breaker? even better, he avoided a splashdown. “It was my responsibility to know, That dry streak ended at one. A couple since I chose not to have an agent,” weeks later at the Oxy High PerforCoburn says, sitting at a table on her mance meet, he took a strong lead well sister Gracie’s back patio, a red jacket into the last lap, only to blow it by crashtugged over her workout clothes. Growing in the final pit. “My foot just went ing up in the mountains can endow a kid straight into the deep end,” he says, “and with an independent streak, especially I went shoulders-down into the water.” when she’s operating in the shadow of Jager nonetheless wobbled to his talented siblings. feet—unhurt—and auspiciously sprinted “I was this scraggly black swan,” she to the finish, earning a time of 8:20.9 and says. “Not coordinated, not good at anythe Olympic A standard. Properly hazed, thing”—at least not compared to Willy, Jager spent the following weeks workfour years older than her, and Gracie, ing on running cleanly out of the pit her elder by 18 months. (She also has a “without babying the landing,” he says, younger brother, Joe, now 15.) and a month later he won the Olympic “She definitely was a late bloomer,” Trials in 8:17.40. “It just clicked for me,” says her father, Bill. But why try to be he says. “I made a huge step in trusting good at one thing when you can have myself and taking the jump efficiently. fun in everything? Emma’s childhood I felt totally comfortable.” was defined by being outside: SumA few weeks later, in Monaco, he mers involved hiking 14ers, kayaking, shocked the world by running 8:06.81, swimming in rivers, shooting guns, and a new American Record. It was his fifth mountain biking, and winters were all steeplechase. “More than anything,” about skiing and snowboarding. Jager says, “it proved to people what She attended tiny K-12 Crested Butte I already thought about myself.” The Community School, where she would steeplechase favors the bold, after all. eventually graduate with the same 19 Jager rode that wave out of Monaco and students who were in her third-grade into London, where, at 23, he was the top class. Bill and his wife, Annie, expectAmerican in the Olympic final, finishing ed Emma and her siblings to maintain sixth. He was just getting started. all As and Bs and participate in three sports. By high school she was doing it to blame all: In addition to being in the National the IAAF officials in Glasgow or even Honor Society and student council, she USA Track & Field for her record not competed in cross country, volleyball, being ratified, so allow me to do so on basketball, and track. In the fall she her behalf: They all failed her. would go straight from volleyball pracSomebody other than the runner who tice to the cross-country course. “I’d be


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

This July, America’s fastest athletes will race with a single, shared dream: the Olympic Games. By Peter Gambaccini

IN

100 Meters

WOMEN The United States has a fresh crew ready to challenge Jamaica in the 100. Tori Bowie, 25, won bronze at the 2015 IAAF World Championships and boasts a flashy set of sprint times. English Gardner, 24, the University of Oregon alumna with the pastoral moniker, could provide fans in Eugene with reason to cheer. Quick-starting Barbara Pierre, 30, a former Haitian Olympian who switched her affiliation to the United States, won the 2016 world indoor 60-meter title and should burst out of the blocks to take the lead. Expect a tight race.

PICKS

200 Meters

MEN Justin Gatlin, 34, ran a personal best last May but lost to Jamaica’s invincible Usain Bolt at the world championships by 1/100th of a second. Trayvon Bromell, 20, took the bronze medal in those championships. His youth and rapid improvement could put him ahead of Gatlin at the trials and onto the cusp of track superstardom. We expect a photo finish for third between veterans Tyson Gay, 33, Mike Rodgers, 31, and other upcoming contenders. Rodgers is a clutch performer, racing like he’s closer to his prime than Gay, and should be the man to make the team.

PICKS

1 Tori Bowie

1 Trayvon Bromell

(PR: 10.80)*

(9.84)

2 English Gardner (10.79)

2 Justin Gatlin (9.74)

3 Barbara Pierre (10.85)

3 Mike Rodgers (9.85)

WR: Florence Griffith-Joyner (10.49)

WR: Usain Bolt (9.58)

WOMEN Allyson Felix,

30, is the defending Olympic gold medalist and a three-time world champion in the 200. Count on her to hold off an improving roster of youthful rivals at the trials. Candyce McGrone, 27, fourth at last year’s world championships and a winner at last year’s Monaco Diamond League meet, has the best chance of upsetting Felix. Jeneba Tarmoh, 26, 2014 NCAA indoor champ Dezerea Bryant, 23, and University of Oregon grad Jenna Prandini, 23, all have a crack at an Olympic berth. Prandini’s home field advantage should help her take third. PICKS 1 Allyson Felix (21.69)

2 Candyce

McGrone (22.01) 3 Jenna Prandini (22.20)

WR: Florence Griffith-Joyner (21.34 )

MEN Justin Gatlin was second to Bolt at last summer’s world championships in Beijing at this distance as well. But here in the U.S., he reigns supreme in the 200; he was the only American to make it to the semifinals in Beijing. Isiah Young, 26, faltered at those races after a swift second place at the USATF meet but is a sub20.00 performer and a possible trials winner if age finally catches up with Gatlin. Ameer Webb, 26, won 2016’s Diamond League opener in Doha in May and if he holds up through the trials rounds, he’ll be heading to Rio.

PICKS 1 Justin Gatlin (19.57)

2 Isiah Young (19.86)

3 Ameer Webb (19.85)

WR: Usain Bolt (19.19)

*Our press date came before the spring track season, when many PRs and ARs were likely to improve.

T H I S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P H OTO R U N

professional running, careers are made and broken at the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials. This year, a new class of young elites steps to the line, ready to take the place of reigning vets. Will youth or experience prevail? From July 1 to July 10, the nation’s best will race at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon. The top three finishers in each event will punch a ticket to the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro this August.

Changing


of the Guard 400 Meters

WOMEN After a long tenure dominating the 200, Allyson Felix said she needed patience to run the longer 400. She’s apparently found it, and the trials schedule was changed specifically to allow her to attempt the 200/400 double. Francena McCorory, 27, the 2014 world champion indoors, is too talented to miss making her second Olympic team. Natasha Hastings, 29, was runner-up to Felix at the 2015 USATF Championships and is still improving. But the emerging phenom is Courtney Okolo, 22, an NCAA champion and collegiate recordholder after a 49.71 in April.

PICKS 1 Allyson Felix (49.26)

2 Courtney Okolo (49.71)

3 Francena

McCorory (49.48)

800 Meters

MEN LaShawn

Merritt will turn 30 four days before the trials. His career, which includes 2008 Olympic gold and a 2015 world championships silver, is a lengthy one for a 400-meter runner. A tweaked hamstring kept him out of the 2012 Olympic final, but if healthy he should triumph at the trials. David Verburg, 25, is one of the most consistent Americans behind Merritt, and Tony McQuay, 26, seems to have recovered the form that put him on the 2012 Olympic team. But we wouldn’t be shocked if a fresh face cracked the top three. PICKS 1 LaShawn Merritt (43.65)

2 David Verburg (44.41)

3 Tony McQuay (44.40)

WR: Marita Koch

WR: Michael Johnson

(47.60)

(43.18)

WOMEN This is one of the Olympic track events most altered by the Russian drug suspensions. Let’s see how Alysia Montano, 30, races now that she’s not trying to make an early move away from a rival she suspected was fueled by banned substances. Montano, with her signature flower in her hair, is up against the quiet and demure Ajeé Wilson, 22, who had the world’s fastest women’s 800 time in 2014. Their battle will be one to watch, but Brenda Martinez, 28, who won bronze at the 2013 world championships, won’t let them escape without a fight.

PICKS 1 Ajeé Wilson (1:57.67)

2 Alysia Montano (1:57.34)

3 Brenda Martinez (1:57.91)

WR: Jarmila Kratochvílová (1:53.28)

1500 Meters

MEN In 2014, Boris

WOMEN Shannon

MEN Matthew

Berian, 23, was serving fries at McDonald’s, but last July he recorded the fastest American 800 time of 2015 and became the 2016 world indoor champion. Nick Symmonds, 32, made a lot of news outside of running in 2015, but his focus is back on the track now. He builds momentum through the rounds at the trials and should make his third Olympic team. Erik Sowinski, 26, and Casimir Loxsom, 25, have each held the U.S. indoor record for 600 meters but can hang on for an extra 200. Clayton Murphy, 21, is another rising star.

Rowbury, 31, and Jenny Simpson, 29, were both closing in on a nearly 32-yearold American 1500-meter record; ultimately Rowbury got it with a 3:56.29 in Monaco in July. Both women are two-time Olympians and world championships medalists; Simpson took gold in 2011. The archrivals are in their own league in the trials field, with Rowbury possessing the finishing speed to place first. Kerri Gallagher, 27, emerged in 2015 to make it to the world championships and made further progress on the indoor track this winter.

Centrowitz, 26, is a two-time world championships medalist and 2016 world indoor champ and is getting faster almost every year. Former 800-meter teen prodigy Robby Andrews, 25, has found a home in the 1500. His come-frombehind finishes might be his best weapon. Leo Manzano, 31, the 2012 Olympic silver medalist, has an erratic race résumé but rises to the occasion for crucial meets. But if Andrew Wheating, 28, picks this over the 800, or Garrett Heath, 30, runs this instead of the 5,000, the third spot could be up for grabs.

PICKS 1 Boris Berian (1:43.34)

2 Nick Symmonds (1:42.95)

3 Erik Sowinski (1:44.58)

PICKS

PICKS

1 Shannon

1 Matthew

Rowbury (AR: 3:56.29) 2 Jenny Simpson

2 Robby Andrews

(3:57.22)

Centrowitz (3:30.40) (3:34.78)

3 Kerri Gallagher (4:03.56)

3 Leo Manzano (3:30.98)

WR: David Rudisha

WR: Genzebe Dibaba

(1:40.91)

(3:50.07)

WR: Hicham El Guerrouj (3:26.00)

JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 77


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

TV TIMES FOR ALL THE FINALS Get live updates at runnersworld.com/ olympictrials

5,000 Meters

WOMEN If Molly

PICKS 1 Marielle Hall (15:06.45)

2 Abbey D’Agostino (15:03.85)

3 Nicole Tully (15:04.08)

SATURDAY 7/2

SUNDAY 7/3

MONDAY 7/4

Men’s 10,000m NBC 9 p.m.

Women’s 10,000m NBC 2 p.m. Decathlon NBCSN 5 p.m.

Men’s and Women’s 100m and 400m NBCSN 7 p.m.

Men’s and Women’s 800m NBC 7 p.m.

ALL TIMES ET Semifinals where indicated

10,000 Meters

MEN Ryan Hill (not to be confused with retired marathoner Ryan Hall), 26, is now reliable in the final 400 meters of outdoor 5,000s at any pace against his American competition. Eric Jenkins, 24, an ex–University of Oregon star in his first full year as a pro, could be the Hayward Field crowd’s most popular Rio-bound male. Former Nordic skier Ben True, 30, made the world championships in the 5,000 and 10,000 in 2015 but prefers this shorter event. And despite being 41, U.S. record-holder Bernard Lagat could make one more team.

PICKS 1 Ryan Hill (13:05.69)

2 Eric Jenkins (13:07.33)

3 Ben True (13:02.74)

WOMEN At the

2015 IAAF World Championships Molly Huddle, 31, eased up before the finish and lost a bronze to her teammate, Emily Infeld, 26. Huddle dealt with the heartbreak by winning five U.S. road titles from September to November. She is not likely to get ambushed again, but Infeld proved that she was no fluke and is someone to watch out for. Kim Conley, 30, the 2014 USATF champion, has great closing speed but should be wary of Emily Sisson, 24, as well as Laura Thweatt, 27, who skipped the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials to focus on this 10,000. PICKS 1 Molly Huddle (30:47.59)

2 Emily Infeld (31:38.71)

3 Kim Conley (31:48.71)

3,000-Meter Steeplechase

MEN In February, he won the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials, but before going 26.2 in Rio, Galen Rupp, 30, wants to run the 10,000, the race in which he won silver in 2012. Against Americans, he’s been nearly untouchable in the 10K for seven years. The other spots could go to Sam Chelanga, 31, and Diego Estrada, 26, who ran half marathons to qualify for the marathon trials but didn’t make the top three there. We’ll wager that Chelanga, who owns the NCAA record in the 10,000, makes it. But world championships veteran Hassan Mead, 26, will likely take third.

PICKS 1 Galen Rupp (AR: 26:44.36)

2 Sam Chelanga (27:08.39)

3 Hassan Mead (27:33.04)

WOMEN Emma Coburn, 25, is the fastest American woman ever in this event and ranked No. 2 in the world in 2014 (see page 66). A slight slump and new international faces pushed her a bit below that level in 2015. She still maintains an edge over Stephanie Garcia, 28, who has improved her PR by more than 20 seconds over the past two seasons, and former model Colleen Quigley, 23, the 2015 NCAA champion for Florida State University. Shalaya Kipp, 25, a 2012 Olympian and Coburn’s training partner, is near top form and could make the team again.

PICKS 1 Emma Coburn (9:11.42)

2 Stephanie Garcia (9:23.48)

3 Colleen Quigley (9:24.92)

WR: Tirunesh Dibaba

WR: Kenenisa Bekele

WR: Junxia Wang

WR: Kenenisa Bekele

WR: Gulnara Galkina

(14:11.15)

(12:37.35)

(29:31.78)

(26:17.53)

(8:58.81)

78 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

MEN Five years ago, this was one of America’s weakest track events, but Evan Jager, 27, has transformed the steeplechase picture (see page 66). He is a natural in this event, capable of challenging the preeminent Kenyans for medals— and he may do so while sporting a “man bun.” In the last year, he’s been tested by Dan Huling, 32, a Bowerman Track Club teammate in Oregon who will present a challenge in the trials final. Donn Cabral, 26, who placed eighth in the London Olympics, has regained his form after some subpar results in the intervening years.

PICKS 1 Evan Jager (AR: 8:00.45)

2 Dan Huling (8:13.29)

3 Donn Cabral (8:13.37)

WR: Saif Saaeed Shaheen (7:53.63)

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P H OTO R U N (5 ) ; J O R DA N M A N S F I E L D/ B R I T I S H AT H L E T I C S /G E T T Y I M AG E S (C O B U R N )

Huddle or Emily Infeld decide to double back in the 5,000 after running the 10,000, they could upset the form chart here. If not, former University of Texas star Marielle Hall, 24, who missed a national title by 1/100th of a second in 2015, had an outstanding indoor season and looms as the favorite. Her tight rivalry with Abbey D’Agostino, 24, who ran against her while at Dartmouth, continues in the pros. Nicole Tully, 29, the 2015 USATF 5,000 champion, had some rough moments indoor this past winter but regained her form as the outdoor season began.

FRIDAY 7/1


2016 U.S. OLYMPIC

TRACK & FIELD TRIALS

THURSDAY 7/7

FRIDAY 7/8

SATURDAY 7/9

SUNDAY 7/10

Women’s Steeplechase NBCSN 8 p.m.

Men’s 1500m, Women’s 100m Hurdles, Men’s and Women’s 400m Hurdles (Semifinals) NBCSN 6 p.m. Women’s 100m Hurdles, Men’s Steeplechase NBC 8 p.m.

Men’s 110m Hurdles, 200m, 5,000m NBC 8 p.m.

Men’s and Women’s 1500m Women’s 200m Men’s and Women’s 400m Hurdles NBC 7 p.m.

100-/110-Meter Hurdles

400-Meter Hurdles

Heptathlon/ Decathlon

MEN Expect an

WOMEN Shamier

MEN Track’s most

WOMEN The seven-

er Nelson, 32, the 2008 Olympic gold medalist and national champion in 2015, could make her third Olympic team. But it’s U.S. record-holder and 2013 world champion Brianna Rollins, 24, who may set the bar in this field. Kendra Harrison, 23, the 2015 NCAA champ, is the new pro on the block and made an emphatic statement with a 12.36 in April. Nia Ali, 27, who gave birth in 2015, returned and won a world indoor 60-meter hurdles gold this winter. It’s a deep field and anyone who makes the finals has the talent to be an Olympian.

unpredictable and exhilarating trials final. Towering and muscular David Oliver, 34, is America’s best if he doesn’t clobber a hurdle. Reigning Olympic champion Aries Merritt, 30, was a 2015 world championships bronze medalist just four days before receiving a kidney transplant. He has since recovered and is ready to race. Devon Allen, 21, another Oregonian who’ll be at home at Hayward Field, won NCAA and USATF hurdles titles in 2014 before a knee injury. He doubles as a wide receiver, but before he chases NFL dreams, a trip to Rio beckons.

Little, 21, a Texas A&M student with retro spectacles, earned world championships silver and Pan American Games gold in 2015 and is only getting better. Cassandra Tate, 25, wasn’t far behind her with a bronze in Beijing. Dalilah Muhammad, 26, a silver medalist at the worlds in 2013, has had difficulty adjusting to postcollegiate athletics, but 2016 could be her year. Kendra Harrison will attempt to pull the rare feat of qualifying in both hurdles events. Veterans Lashinda Demus, 33, and Tiffany Williams, 33, might be locked out of the top three.

difficult event used to be dominated by the U.S., but the world has caught up. Expect good things from Michael Tinsley, 32, who won silver in the 2012 Olympics. Bershawn Jackson, 33, was the fastest American in the 400 hurdles in 2015, but does he have one more year in him? Johnny Dutch, 27, who doubles as a filmmaker, might find a spot. But if there’s a men’s race crying out for new talent, the 400-hurdles is it. Based on his strong times this spring, 2011 national champion Jeshua Anderson, 26, could be the man to fill the bill.

event heptathlon is the American women’s Achilles’ heel. Sharon Day-Monroe, 31, was the top U.S. finisher, in 16th, at the 2012 Olympics and placed 14th at the 2015 IAAF World Championships. With little competition, she can be an Olympian again. Barbara Nwaba, 27, had the highest American point total in 2015 but didn’t finish the first event, the high hurdles, at the world championships last year. Kendell Williams, 20, of the University of Georgia, is a three-time NCAA indoor pentathlon champion, and could be the special dose this event needs.

PICKS 1 Brianna Rollins (AR: 12.26)

2 Kendra Harrison (12.36)

3 Nia Ali (12.48)

WR: Yordanka Donkova (12.21)

PICKS 1 David Oliver (12.89)

2 Aries Merritt (AR: 12.80)

3 Devon Allen (13.48)

PICKS 1 Shamier Little (53.74)

2 Cassandra Tate (54.01)

3 Dalilah

Muhammad (53.83)

PICKS 1 Michael Tinsley (47.70)

2 Jeshua Anderson (47.93)

3 Bershawn

Jackson (47.30)

WR: Aries Merritt

WR: Yuliya Pechenkina

WR: Kevin Young

(12.80)

(52.34)

(46.78)

80 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

PICKS 1 Barbara Nwaba (6,500)

2 Sharon Day-

Monroe (6,550) 3 Kendell Williams (6,223)

WR: Jackie JoynerKersee (7,291 points)

MEN Ashton Eaton, 28, is the defending Olympic champion and world record holder in this 10-event contest of runs, throws, and jumps. Eaton is the closest thing track and field has to a superhero, and unless he literally stumbles, he’ll be unbeatable at the trials. Two-time world champion Trey Hardee, 32, is the second-best American decathlete, but if back trouble flares up, he’s vulnerable. The prowess that Curtis Beach, 25, has shown in the 10th race, the 1500, could help him in a battle for third against Jeremy Taiwo, 26, or Zach Ziemek, 23.

PICKS 1 Ashton Eaton (AR: 9,045)

2 Trey Hardee (8,790)

3 Curtis Beach (8,081)

WR: Ashton Eaton (9,045 points)

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P H OTO R U N (4 ) ; G R E G BA K E R /A F P/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( R O L L I N S ) ; L I N TAO Z H A N G /G E T T Y I M AG E S (O L I V E R )

WOMEN Dawn Harp-


O T D U O PR T R O P P U S MEB EST ON HIS QU FOR GOLD

Meb Keflezighi 3-time Olympian, Silver Medalist & KT Tape Champion

TRAIN LONGER. FINISH STRONGER. Go to

kttape.com for instructional

videos for over 50 injuries.

*Not clinically proven for all applications. ©2016 KT Health, LLC


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Marathon Training Special

26.2 FOR YOU

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M A R V I N N E W M A N / T I P S / Z U M A P R E S S .C O M

If you run 20 miles per week, you can train for New York (or any other marathon).

F I V E D E C A D E S O F E X P E R IE N C E A ND E X P E R T I S E T H AT W IL L help you reach the start of your FALL M AR ATHON healthy, happy, and ready to race. By Cindy Kuzma


I 84 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

AMBY BURFOOT Runner’s World writer-atlarge and winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon

JEFF GALLOWAY Runner’s World columnist, Olympian in the 10,000 meters, and Atlanta-based coach

JENNY HADFIELD Runner’s World columnist, coach, and coauthor of Running for Mortals and Marathoning for Mortals

JANET HAMILTON, M.S. exercise physiologist and coach at Running Strong in Atlanta

GREG McMILLAN, M.S. exercise physiologist, coach, and author of You (Only Faster)

BART YASSO chief running officer at Runner’s World

I L LU S T R AT I O N S B Y C H A R L I E L AY TO N

IN SOME WAYS, 1980 looked a lot like 2016—there was a contentious election (Ronald Reagan vs. Jimmy Carter), climate change (Mount St. Helens erupted), even a new Star Wars movie (The Empire Strikes Back). ¶ But in the world of marathons, the finish-line photos look very different—and now there are official photo services snapping them, one of many new race-day developments (see “It’s Still 26.2 Miles,” page 88). Back at the end of the first running boom, marathons were largely reserved for the speedy, mostly male elite. In 1980, when Running USA started tracking such stats, only about 143,000 runners crossed the finish line of a 26.2-mile race, and they did it swiftly, in median finishing times of 3:32:17 for men and 4:03:39 for women. ¶ Today, more than half a million runners complete a marathon each year. Many are older, far more are women, and the finishing times reflect the broader appeal (and the more inclusive nature) of the event. By 2014, median times had increased to 4:19:27 for men and 4:44:19 for women. ¶ Nearly one-third of Runner’s World readers plan to tackle the distance in the year ahead, according to a recent survey. But you probably have no plans to log 70- to 100-mile weeks, as many marathoners of the past did; in fact, if you’re like the typical Runner’s World reader, your four weekly runs total about 20 miles. Fortunately for you, a decade and a half into the second running boom, coaches have learned to adapt the training methods of elites into programs that fit average athletes’ schedules. We asked the top experts and advisers who’ve appeared in these pages over the years to spell out the best strategies for runners with busy, full lives. Here’s their advice.

THE EXPERTS


Chatting on long runs helps the miles pass quicker—and proves you’re not going too fast.

ABOVE ALL, STAY HEALTHY Follow these best practices to ensure you reach the starting line. Since he began coaching marathoners in the 1970s, Jeff Galloway has maintained ongoing contact with runners; through the years, he’s talked with more than 400,000, he says. His surveys show that only about 5 percent (!) of first-time marathoners who begin training to go 26.2 actually cross the finish line that season. Some get too busy, others burn out—and many fall victim to injuries. ¶ “If you talk to seasoned runners and ask what they’d do differently, they almost always say, ‘I should have put more effort into taking care of my body,’” Greg McMillan says. Fortunately, experienced coaches and exercise scientists have identified key behaviors that keep athletes strong and healthy as they prep for the marathon. Build the following habits into your routine from the beginning.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y S I M O N P OT T E R /G E T T Y I M AG E S

RUN EASY ● Speedwork has a place in marathon training, but it’s a small piece of a bigger puzzle. On most runs— especially the long ones— resist the urge to push and instead travel at a slow, steady pace, Janet Hamilton says. You should be able to have deep conversations with your running buddies (another perk of marathon training—lifelong friendships forged over the miles). Easy running reduces the impact on your body and staves off fatigue, enabling you to log more miles with less risk of injury. What’s more, it actually prepares you better for the distance. PHOTOGRAPH BY NAME HERE

When you run a marathon, most of your body’s fuel comes from your aerobic system—your hardworking muscles need oxygen-rich blood to power each contraction. Your body adapts to easy miles by strengthening your heart, sprouting more capillaries to infuse oxygen into muscles, and building more mitochondria, the factories within cells that produce energy. “You’re getting the foundation, all of the horsepower,” McMillan says. “Then later, when you want to go fast, you’ve got a bigger engine.”

STRENGTH-TRAIN ● Runners of the past may

On long runs, travel at a slow, steady pace to reduce injury risk and fatigue. have scoffed at the idea of using valuable training time for anything other than more mileage, but modern marathoners know better—and are healthier, more well-rounded athletes because of it. A good strength-training program counteracts the effects of

our sedentary lifestyles as well as the repetitive motion and impact stresses of running, strengthening weak links and ensuring that joints move through their full range of motion. Many runners have weak hip and glute muscles, which can drive your knees out of alignment and cause muscle imbalance, tightness, and pain from your hips to your knees, Jenny Hadfield says. And if you don’t have the core strength to make it through 15 seconds of planks on each side, you’re not durable enough to maintain your form throughout a 20-mile run. Counteract these deficiencies and build a solid strength-training habit by doing three or four targeted exercises after your runs at least three times per week. Smart options include planks and side planks, squats (working up to single-leg versions), lunges, clamshells, and glute bridges.

FUEL PROPERLY ● “If the furnace was hot enough, anything would burn, even Big Macs.” This quote from John L. Parker Jr.’s famous 1978 novel Once a Runner serves as clever prose but terrible nutritional advice. Cleaning up your diet early in a marathon-training program helps you shed extra weight and ease stress on your joints without depriving yourself of calories you need during the heaviest weeks of training, McMillan says. To do it, trade refined sugars and carbs, as well as fried and overly processed options, for whole foods like vegetables, whole grains, fruits, and lean proteins. These healthy-eating habits support your training throughout the cycle, providing the energy and nutrients your body needs to cope with the demands


A PLAN FOR THE MODERN MARATHONER This 16-week training plan is designed for the average RW reader, who runs 20 weekly miles over four days of running. It features two easy runs, one quality run, and one long, slow distance run each week. The goal? For you to arrive at the starting line feeling ready to go!

WEEK

O N YA S S O S “Working up to 10 is the key; that’s where a lot of people go wrong. They do a couple of them and think, ‘Oh, I can expect to run this time,’ and that’s not really true.”

—AMBY BURFOOT

KEY HILLS Run easy on a hillier route. HILL REPEATS Run up a moderate hill at 5K effort, then walk down. Add a two-mile warmup and cooldown. SPEED Run the repeats at 5K pace

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

TOTAL

4 hills

4

8

20

2

5

4 hills

4

10

23

3

4

5 hills

4

12

25

6

4×60s hill reps

4

5

5

6×60s hill reps

5

12

27

6

6

8×60s hill reps

4

14

30

5

Speed: 10×400

5

16

32

6

Yassos: 6×800

4

12

29

6

Mile Repeats: 3×1mi

5

16

34

7 8

CUT BACK

9

8

23

“Hills are great early in the plan because they’re building strength in the legs, plus you’re building your aerobic capacity.” —GREG McMILLAN

ON SPEEDWORK “Anything that makes you breathe heavy is good— you have to challenge yourself to keep going.”

O N C U T- B A C K WEEKS “Cut-back weeks in marathon training are mini breaks—for recovery, restoration—just like the sleep cycle in our day.” —JENNY HADFIELD

ON KEEPING INTENSITY IN T HE TA PER “If you’re doing speedwork during the season, then leave it in—just do less of it.” —JENNY HADFIELD

—GREG McMILLAN

10

6

Speed: 12×400

5

18

36

11

5

Yassos: 8×800

5

20

38

12

6

Mile Repeats: 4×1mi

6

16 or Tuneup Race

ON A L ATE TUNEUP RACE

36

13

6

Yassos: 10×800

5

20

40

14

6

Mile Repeats: 3×1mi

5

14

32

15

5

Speed: 10×400

4

10

25

16

“Never underestimate the value of well-rested legs on race day. They are a wonderful gift.” —JANET

5

Speed: 6×400

“You can practice your fueling, you can wear what you’re going to wear, you can get used to all of the stuff that happens when you go to a race.” —GREG

3

RACE

McMILLAN

HAMILTON

CUT BACK

TAPER TAPER RACE WEEK

with 200-meter jogging recovery. Add a one-mile warmup and cooldown. YASSOS Run the repeats at about 10K pace with 400-meter jogging recovery. Add a one-mile warmup and

86 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

WED

4

CUT BACK

“If you’re going to run a marathon, you’ve got to do training runs that last several hours.”

TUE

1

4

—BART YASSO

ON THE LONG RUN

MON

O N E A R LY HILL TRAINING

cooldown. The time you hit for 10 roughly predicts your marathon time. (If you run 10 800s in 4 minutes, 30 seconds, you’ll likely go 26.2 miles in about 4 hours, 30 minutes.) MILE REPEATS Run the repeats

at a comfortably hard pace with 800-meter jogging recovery. Add a one-mile warmup and cooldown. TUNEUP RACE Race at your expected marathon pace. Jog pre- and postrace to log 16.

YOUR FIRST DAY TWIN CITIES RACE DAY 10/9 START TRAINING 6/20 CHICAGO RACE DAY 10/9 START TRAINING 6/20

ON T HE TA PER

MARINE CORPS RACE DAY 10/30 START TRAINING 7/11 NEW YORK CITY RACE DAY 11/6 START TRAINING 7/18 PHILADELPHIA RACE DAY 11/20 START TRAINING 8/1


PLAN(S) B Run more—or less—than the average RW reader? Check out some of these marathon training alternatives that have stood the test of time.

Run/Walk RW DEBUT

April 1998 BEST FOR

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y W E S T E N D 6 1 /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( S TA N D I N G D E S K ) ; R W A R C H I V E S ( M AG A Z I N E S P R E A D S )

True beginners, older or injury-prone runners, or anyone who’s “hit the wall” and wants to feel better in the last six miles of the marathon

Run Less, Run Faster RW DEBUT

August 2005 BEST FOR

Triathletes and time-crunched or injury-prone runners

Hansons Marathon Method RW DEBUT

January 2011 BEST FOR

Experienced runners willing to work hard

Jeff Galloway pioneered this method, in which you take predetermined walk breaks at regular intervals throughout your run. The ratio depends on your pace (a 10-minute miler would run for 90 seconds and then walk 30 seconds). You’ll not only reduce your injury risk but can also actually improve your marathon time, he says. LEARN MORE The RunWalk-Run Method by Jeff Galloway; jeffgallo way.com

The scientists at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina, pared marathon training down to three runs per week: an interval workout, a tempo run, and a long run. Their plans also require two days of challenging cross-training per week to boost fitness. LEARN MORE Run Less, Run Faster by Bill Pierce, Scott Murr, and Ray Moss; furman.edu/ sites/first

Brothers Keith and Kevin Hanson (who coach Olympic marathoner Desi Linden) build tough plans designed to elicit “cumulative fatigue,” weariness that trains you to run well on tired legs. LEARN MORE Hansons Marathon Method: Run Your Fastest Marathon the Hansons Way, by Luke Humphrey with Keith Hanson and Kevin Hanson; hansonscoach ingservices.com

of higher mileage. When it comes to fueling each run, you can power through short efforts on water alone. For runs lasting 90 minutes or longer, supplement with 30 to 60 grams of carbs per hour from sports drinks, gels, or everyday foods like pretzels or jellybeans, Hadfield says. Afterward, refuel with a healthy snack or meal containing protein and carbs—for instance, a turkey, veggie, and avocado wrap or chocolate milk—to jump-start muscle repair and tamp down the “runger” that might otherwise strike with a vengeance (and make you “hangry”). And whatever you do, practice your night-before, morning-of, and midrace fueling plans on every long run. Make notes in your training log about what works and what leaves you feeling bloated, nauseated, or energy-depleted so you’ll know exactly how to make your body happy on race day, Hadfield says.

Standing at work beats sitting— even better if you walk around and stretch regularly.

SIT LESS ● Time and again, we’ve heard that “sitting is the new smoking,” raising the risk for obesity, heart disease, and an early death. And if that’s not enough to scare you into standing, runners face additional consequences to muscles and joints from staying seated. “Sitting puts your hip in the absolute worst position for what you want to do in running,” McMillan says. Your hip flexors tighten and your hamstrings shorten, clipping the backward extension of your leg that makes for a healthy stride. Plus, your shoulders tend to hunch over, triggering back pain and constricting your breathing, Hadfield says. Standing desks can help, but a recent research review in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise suggests working upright alone can’t counteract all the damage sitting causes to physically active people. Take at least one break an hour to get up and walk around your


IT’S STILL 26.2 MILES But most everything else about the modern marathon has evolved since 1980.

FINISHERS

SWAG

THEN

NOW

143,000

550,637

TIMING

MEDIAN AG E

THEN

NOW

Gun time only

Chip time

THEN

NOW

34 40

31 36

THEN

NOW

High-tech shirt (plus numerous other goodies)

TR AINING

NUTRITION

NOW

57%

10%

43%

THEN

NOW

THEN

NOW

Training plans and information available only in print magazines and books

Training plans on apps (like RW GO) and sites (like runners world.com)

Water and E.R.G., an early sports drink

Several runningstore aisles dedicated to pre-, mid-, and post-run fuel

MASTERS*

R ACE START S

THEN

NOW

48%

26% * Age 40-plus PHOTOS

AWARDS?

THEN

NOW

Few race-day photos

Official oncourse photographers—and midrace selfies

SOURCES Running USA, Amby Burfoot, Jenny Hadfield, Tish Hamilton, Greg McMillan, Bart Yasso 88 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

THEN

NOW

Trophies for the winners (maybe)

Medals for every finisher

THEN

NOW

Runners seeded themselves (and tended to be honest about their speed)

Race organizers break runners up into corrals and waves by verified paces

MEDIAN FINISH TIME THEN

NOW

3:32:17 4:19:27

4:03:39 4:44:19

T H O M AS M AC D O N A L D ( N U U N ); E S T H E R H O R VAT H / F I L M M AG I C/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( S TA R T L I N G L I N E ) ; M A R AT H O N F OTO ( R AC E P H OTO S , 3 )

90%

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S T E P H E N F R E N C H /A L A M Y (G U N ) ; P G P I C T U R E S /A L A M Y ( P H O N E ); G E T T Y I M AG E S ( WAT E R ) ; M I TC H M A N D E L (G ATO R A D E ) ; M AT T R A I N E Y (G U ) ;

G ENDER

THEN

Cotton race T-shirt


building or even head outside. And if you have the space and the privacy, do a few office-friendly moves to bring your body back to equilibrium. Hadfield suggests, for instance, walk or lunge backward to open your hips, or drop down to all fours and do cat-andcow stretches to ease strain on your back.

SLEEP WELL ● So many good things happen when runners turn out the lights: Your muscles repair, your hunger hormones reset, your brain makes new motor connections. You awake restored, refreshed, and ready to run again. In one study, the number of hours of sleep per night stood as the number one predictor of sports

needs a specialized glossary to understand the types of footwear available, let alone select the perfect pair. Experienced friends, a trusted coach, or trained running-store employees can help decode the lingo and point you in the right direction. But the best way to find the right shoe for you is to try, and try again, Bart Yasso says. Head to a running-specific shoe store late in the day, when your feet tend to swell, and test several different brands and models. Put them on side by side to compare, looking for a pair that allows adequate room for your toes, hits your arch in the right place, doesn’t slide off your heel, and seems to move with your foot rather than pushing

Know that it’s okay to miss a few runs—especially if you’re sick, tired, or stressed. injuries in teen athletes, and experts suspect similar findings apply to grown-ups. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine advises healthy adults to log at least seven hours per night, and while every athlete differs, most runners need even more sleep as their mileage adds up, McMillan says. “I always tell athletes in training—as soon as you can go to bed, you should to go to bed,” McMillan says—no ifs, ands, or extra episodes of House of Cards about it. To make sure you fall asleep quickly and stay asleep soundly, avoid all screens for at least an hour before you hit the hay.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT SHOES ● Minimalist, maximalist, zero-drop, stability—today’s runner practically

it in a different direction, Hamilton says. Consider rotating several different pairs, and replace them every 300 to 500 miles— sooner if you start to feel new aches and pains.

BE FLEXIBLE ● A sensible plan like the one on page 86 (or those found at runnersworld .com/training-plans) serves as a solid guide for your preparation. But don’t stress if you miss a few days. “If you do 85 percent of the training, you achieve 95 percent of the results,” Amby Burfoot says. “Everybody misses runs; just try to get most of them.” In fact, sometimes extra rest days will actually increase your chances of getting to the starting line strong and healthy. Whether it’s due to a crazy

day at work, illness, or pain that gets worse as you run, the smart runner over the course of 16 weeks is going to take a few days off, if they’re really training intelligently, Burfoot says. On the flip side, those who stay slaves to the schedule and push through miles when they’re short on sleep, frazzled, or injured put their race in peril.

RW’S FIRST TRAINING PLAN 1979’s “sensible” schedule would probably sideline today’s runners.

SET SMART GOALS ● If you’ve run races of other distances, you can plug your times into an online calculator (we’ve got one at runnersworld.com/tools) to get an idea of where you might finish. But Galloway says runners hung up on the numbers are prone to train harder than their bodies can handle—even if they somehow avoid injury, they tend to have a lot less fun. “I tell people, this experience is going to be one you’ll remember for the rest of your life,” he says. “If you want it to be one of those really great experiences, then don’t have a time goal.” In fact, the wide range of motivations and goals just might be the biggest difference between marathoners of today and those of yore. “Forty years ago we all ran because we wanted to break three hours and set a personal record; it was pretty much a selfish endeavor. Now, there are manifold reasons for running a marathon,” Burfoot says. You can aim to raise money for a charity, collect medals, check off an item on your bucket list, or live a long, healthy life. Setting nontime goals can provoke psychological changes that are as profound as—if not more so than—the physiological responses to running. The new definition of winning? “Find your reason for running or your many reasons, and embrace them,” Burfoot says.

In honor of our 50th anniversary, we looked back through the archives to find the first marathon-training plan RW ever published. We found it in the March 1979 issue: “A Sensible Schedule for Running Marathons.” The 12-week plan involved running for time at least six days per week. It began by alternating 25- and 50-minute runs, and a 1:10 long run, in week 1, and peaked two weeks before the race with three 40-minute runs, two 1:30 runs, and a 2:30 long run. The kicker? We said, “Training pace should be similar to your marathon—but easier, naturally, because you aren’t running as far.” That’s fine if you’re aiming to complete a marathon by maintaining a comfortable pace, but “just finish” was an uncommon goal in that competitive era. We now know that always running the same, challenging pace is a recipe for boredom and stagnation at best, and exhaustion and injury at worst. Oops.


ARE

If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enjoy yourself on a 200-

WE

mile, 12-person, two-van, 30-hour

HAVING


The Reebok Ragnar Relay Northwest Passage starts near the Canadian border and heads south along the Puget Sound.

RAGNAR RELAY team, well, you probably

FUN

hate peppermint ice cream, too.

YET?

BY MARC PARENT PHOTOGR APHS BY IL JA HERB


You can judge a person’s character by

THE COMPANY HE KEEP S, but to judge the character of an entire group, you have to look at pizza toppings. When you walk into a room with people sitting around a table of veggie pies, go with the first word that comes to mind: safe. This is an early-to-bed group of underwear-folders who will argue fresh carrots over cheese and Flying Mustachios crackers, without a shred of (from top): son Owen, sarcasm. They use the canbrother Brodie, vas totes from public-radio writer Marc, friends Kris Volpenhein and fund drives, go the speed Faith Berry. Wife limit in sensible all-wheelSusan in stripes. drive cars, and have large bank accounts. Pizzas topped with onions, green peppers, and sausage suggest a wild side. These people know when to let it out and when to pull it back in—the veggie group in recovery. Meat-laden pizzas shout reckless—hard liquor, dark suntans, full ashtrays, good times, no apologies. Mushroom As I walked into La Fiamma Wood pizzas are for Hobbit lovers who wear Fire Pizza in Bellingham, Washington, shirts with laces and discuss whether just north of Seattle, I came upon a large or not space and time are figments of table surrounded by a dozen noisy, atthe imagination. Plain-cheese lovers tractive people wearing dark, stick-on suffer from a lack of intellectual curimustaches, who were about to dive into osity and are the most likely group to pizza topped with peaches and bacon. At have had chicken fingers for dinner the the far end of the table were more musnight before. 92 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

taches and another pizza covered with watermelon and coleslaw. What I didn’t know but would soon find out was that the group was every bit as ambitious and outrageous as the pizzas in front of them. They were all runners, but that might have been obvious—a runner is hungry above everything else and might put peaches and bacon on almost anything and call it supper. But these were no ordinary weekend warriors. These were the Flying Mustachios, a relay team that would soon begin a race taking over 27 straight hours to complete and covering almost 200 miles over mountain passes and rocky coasts that make up the Reebok Ragnar Relay Northwest Passage. If that wasn’t ambitious and outrageous enough, what really put the cabbage on the pizza was that they would do this in red capes and fake mustaches, and not because they had to—not for money or medals or even bragging rights. They would endure the miles, the hunger, the aches and pains, the sleep deprivation, the BO, and the fuzzy upper lip for one primary reason: fun. What an interesting concept—fun. I think I remember fun, but it was a long time ago. Fun was the oxygen of childhood, and I remember fun in college; reg-


ular doses of fun after school; excessive amounts after I married Susan. But at some point, a low creeping fog of seriousness had settled in. As kids and careers took over, we convinced ourselves we were still having fun essentially by lowering the bar. Instead of a night on the beach with friends, guitars, and a full moon, it was laser tag with third-graders under black light. I remember driving back exhausted from a particularly long session with a belly full of cheese pizza, our kids passed out in the backseats, and Susan and me A day-plus of relay staring at the road through racing includes t he windshield say ing, (from top) van exchange, baton “Well…that was fun.” It handoff, optional was the same kind of fun tattoos, burritos, as a clean house or a mown and many miles. lawn—same as at the company party when you look at the shrimp hooked through your fingers and think, just before bursting into tears: Look at the size of this thing—I must be having a tremendous time. Susan and I recently admitted to each other that life had made us too serious and that we needed to find fun more regularly and more authentically. Every electric guitar eventually gathers dust, but that didn’t mean it had to grow moss as well. The trouble is, most every attempt at real fun requires you to be either a good sport or a maniac. One feels artificial, the other desperate. Going out to get drunk under spinning lights was not tempting. We passed on adult costume parties, pool parties, camping trips. I didn’t care for grown-up rock concerts and wouldn’t be seen at the ones kids go to. I didn’t want to sign up for the medieval sword-making class at the adult-learning center. Never too late to educate! I’d cheer on the way out the door and then panic. I left my family and went to Memphis last summer for a friend’s birthday, made a pact with myself to drink tequila and howl at the moon, but then finished the night early and went to bed sober. “There’s this race,” I said to Susan one evening after we’d had a blast doing the dishes. She asked me what race. “Near Seattle. Three months from now. Something called Ragnar. It’s a 200mile relay. I’d have to ask my brother to put together a team. It takes something like 30 hours to finish. You run through the night. You need headlamps. And sleeping bags. You sleep outside. You get stinky. Eat when you can. Run like crazy.” “And we’d do this why?” she asked. “Well, you know…for fun.”

THE RAGNAR RELAY, named after the legendary

ninth-century Scandinavian king, was created in 2004 by Steve Hill, his son Dan, and Dan’s college roommate Tanner Bell. With Oregon’s famous Hood to Coast Relay as inspiration, they mapped out a 188-mile course along the Wasatch Range of the Rocky Mountains in their home state of Utah and ran that first race with just 22 teams of 12 runners each. The Reebok Ragnar Relay Series has since grown to include 18 road and 12 trail races with over 100,000 participants each year. Unlike Hood to Coast, which is in one location and typically sells out in hours, Ragnar holds its signature “200-ish”-mile relays throughout the country, from Hawaii to Cape Cod and numerous points in between. Though races in some locations sell out quickly— the Napa Valley event, in wine country, for example—many remain open up to just weeks before their start. The logistics of running a 200-mile relay are daunting. Ragnar makes the most essential elements somewhat less so by mapping out portions of each course into three specific legs that are divided between the 12 members of a team. Each person runs three times. “Runner one” for example, takes legs 1, 13 and 25; “runner 12” takes legs 12, 24, and the last leg, 36. Each leg is rated in increments from “easy” to “very hard” as determined by both distance (between 3 and 13 miles) and elevation change, meaning that some members of a team will run something akin to a hilly marathon while others, by comparison, will have it much easier. Each team typically splits into two rented vans—Van One covering the first six legs, while Van Two waits at the first “major exchange point” to take over the next six legs. This is repeated, without stopping, through the night until the entire team meets at the finish, between 25 and 32 hours later and roughly 200 miles from where they started. Our team began with a call to my brother Brodie, a 31-year-old two-time marathoner and a surgery resident at the University of Washington in Seattle. I asked him two things: Would he run the race with us, and would he captain our team? He agreed to both immediately. His fiancée, Faith, also signed on and promptly gave the team its name—The Flying Mustachios. I said I would bring Susan and our middle son, Owen, to celebrate his final month at home before heading off to college. All good, Brodie said, but he had a serious question before we went any further: Would we agree to JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 93


run in red capes and mustaches, real or otherwise? At the risk of feeling like a good sport, I said we would. In a group email later that week to the rest of the assembled team—many being UW surgical residents—Faith sent a link to a Facebook page she called Flying Mustachios Attack Ragnar Northwest Passage and a Google Doc with a relay timeline, team contact information, and results tracker that she and others would update in real time as the race unfolded. Brodie congratulated everyone on acceptance into The Flying Mustachios, and outlined the team’s main objectives: “1) Speed…and if not speed, then dazzling good looks. 2) Mettle…and if not mettle, then barely audible whimpers. 3) Hirsute upper lip… for those able.” For the next three months, we exchanged training schedules, gear recommendations, hygiene essentials, nutrition tips, boasts, taunts, and pictures of the mustaches we all hoped to emulate. Susan tapped my friend and training guru Pete Rea, head running coach at ZAP Fitness near Blowing Rock, North Carolina, who devised a plan to bring her from her 4-mile walk/1-mile run base up to what would have to be her 3.1-, 3.8-, and 3-mile legs in the relay. Owen, just off a sports season, was in sufficient shape for his 5.7-, 4.5-, and 3.1-mile legs, and I felt ready to take on my 6.5-, 5.6-, and 3.2-mile distances. That is until I was cc’d on an email between two of our teammates, from Ironman competitor and sub-seven pacer Cordelie Witt to Boston qualifier Jenny Riggle: “Finished a 15-mile run and not feeling ready, but I’ll get there! Need to start doing double run days!” Not ready after a 15-mile run. Double run days. Susan and Owen were already dubious about the fun potential of a nearly sleepless 200mile race. I didn’t want to cement their skepticism by allowing them to discover that many in the team were hoping not only to complete but also to go fast. I deleted the email so they wouldn’t see it. THE DAY OF THE RACE began with a quick 7:00

a.m. breakfast at a hotel just miles from the start at Peace Arch International Park in the Canadian border town of Blaine, Washington. Susan and Owen had assumed the look of people strapped into a roller coaster car—a sort of willful gladness born from the helplessness of being fully committed to a potentially awful experience. We’d stuffed our vehicle the night before with food, drinks, pillows, sleeping bags, running 94 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

outfits individually sealed in freezer bags, and containers of antibacterial wipes—our shower for the next two days. We stopped at the house of our last rider, Kris Volpenhein, a 34-yearold engineer, where his wife, Britt, was making breakfast for the other half of the team, who had spent the night on floors and couches. While both Kris and Brodie touched up their mustaches and mutton chops, the rest of us went to graffiti the windows of our transport vehicles. With a giant white grease pen, Faith wrote our team name across the tailgate window in thick, ornate cursive. She bedazzled the lettering Runners are and then with Susan drew required to wear a fat, blue mustache across headlamps and the entire length of the top reflective gear after dark. Road kills (i.e., windshield. Owen gamely passed runners) are drew a block-lettered sign tallied on the van. on the side window that read “Increase Your ’Stache,” with a segmented “’stache-ometer” mustache beneath it. To the left of that was a rocket lifting from its launch pad trailing an outsized flaming mustache next to the words “Beware the Power of the ’Stache.” I drew an indignant Frenchman with a jutting cleft chin and large curling mustache, who kissed his fingertips and said what became the battle cry we shouted with guttural French accents to nearly every passing competitor van—“We are more handsome than you!”

Relay teams of 12 are divided between two vans. While one crew is on the road running, the other finds a place to camp and rest.


There’s No “I” in “Team” Gather like-minded friends for more fun and fitness.

CO U R T E S Y O F TO U G H M U D D E R ; O L I V E R CO L E /CO U R T E S Y O F C H A L L E N G E N AT I O N

HOOD TO COAST RELAY Portland, OR August 25–26, 2017 The inspiration for Ragnar and other relays, this overnight, 200-mile relay race starts at the highest peak in Oregon and leads runners through metropolitan Portland to end on the beaches of the Oregon coast. Register in early October—the race maxes out at 1,050 teams of 12, and sells out quickly.

BADWATER SALTON SEA Salton City, CA April 30-May 1, 2017 If your friends are all ultrarunners (you guys must be fun at parties), sign up for Badwater Salton Sea, an 81mile road and trail race that takes you over 9,000 feet of elevation gain, including Palomar Mountain. Teams can consist of two or three runners,

who do the entire course together.

TOUGH MUDDER Multiple Dates and Locations Leave your watch at home—these dirty 10- to 12mile courses are filled with over 20 different obstacle challenges, so a PR may not be in your future (top left). Make sure you tackle the mud with friends you trust—the Pyramid Scheme obstacle literally requires you to put the team on your back.

CHALLENGE NATION Multiple Dates and U.S. Locations Have a friend who is fast on his feet and can solve riddles quickly? Time to call him up for Challenge Nation, a race series that hosts 3- to 4-mile scavenger-huntstyle races in 34

cities. Though the brain-teasing challenges may slow your team down (top right), you’ll want to be speedy while running from clue to clue—the top finishing teams will qualify for the National Championships in New Orleans.

NOVEMBER PROJECT Weekly (or more) Workouts in 30 Cities The self-described “free fitness movement” that was started by a couple of friends in Boston in 2011 now gathers people who want to exercise en masse early on weekday mornings across the U.S. Find a local group (or start one!) to do stair workouts, hill climbs, and sweaty hugs punctuated by, um, colorful language. —MEGAN DITROLIO

At the start village, under a hail of music and costumed runners awash in authentic gladness, we underwent a mandatory gear-check for reflective vests and lights, watched a short safety video that played on a large outdoor screen, and picked up race packets containing shirts, energ y bars and gels, a slap bracelet, traffic flags, race bibs, and large Ragnar and Reebok-logo tattoos. One of the volunteers asked if we’d ever run the race. I said we hadn’t. “You know about kills, right?” he said. I shook my head. “Kills, man!” he said, slapping my shoulder. “It’s all about racking the kills. When you pass someone on the course, it’s a kill. Keep track of the number on the windows of your van—get some!” Back at the vehicle, we broke out the markers and devoted an entire window to “road kills.” Similarly deckedout vans throughout the parking area had dedicated windows for their own tallies. “You get to kill people, Owen! So fun, right? To kill?” I said—words of encouragement I never thought I’d say to anyone, much less to my own kid. Brodie produced a plastic baggie full of stick-on mustaches. We pressed them above our lips and were immediately transformed into aspiring Inspector Clouseaus—quietly snickering with frowns on our faces as we applied the Ragnar tattoos to each other’s necks. We ate bananas and avocados and bagels and drank half-watered Gatorade, which made the stick-on mustaches fall off, so we drew them back on with eyebrow pencils. Owen wore a bushy western style; Susan, a simple upturned line; me, a fleur-de-lis that scrolled into my cheeks (mais, oui!); and Faith, a shaded brush so realistic it made people’s heads turn. We gave the bright-orange slap bracelet and red cape that would serve as the batons we passed between us to Owen, our first runner, who waited for the sound of the horn to start his 5.7-mile “hard” first leg. Ragnar has a staggered start based on aggregate 10K pace times of individual team members in order to keep the 300 to 700 groups within relative proximity to each other along the course. Teams with the slowest times may begin at 5 a.m., with faster groups starting every hour until the very quickest are released at 3 in the afternoon. The faster teams catch up with the slower ones over the following 25 or so hours so that the majority of runners are together by the finish. Our start time was high noon. Owen leaned into the line with his hand at JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 95


his running watch and when the horn sounded, took off with red cape flapping. Members of the dozen other teams lined either side of the start along with us, cheering their first runners on. We shouted and hooted until they all disappeared in the distance, then Brodie called our Van Two runners. “This is Mustachio One, come in, Mustachio Two,” he said with the French Inspector’s accent. “Confirmed: Mustachio One was go at 012 hundred hours. Will report progress on Google Doc and rendezvous in 33 miles. Regarding the large Ragnar tattoos: As Captain, I am requiring all men to apply to the left side of the neck. Mustachio One out.” We piled back into our vehicle, dropped the windows, and cranked the first track of a CD Brodie had made for the journey—The Who’s “Eminence Front,” which at the right volume makes everything several magnitudes cooler than it could ever be without it. With the sizzle and bump of the speakers, we passed around water bottles and Clif Shot Bloks, handfuls of granola, and dabs of sunscreen as the cool Pacific Northwest air swirled around us. This was fun—not done-dishes fun, not drunk-on-the-party-boat fun, but actual, authentic fun. I told as much to Susan. “Right?!” I said, rubbing her shoulders, still selling it. I turned from her and shouted over the music to the others, “Let’s quit our jobs and do this for the rest of the year!” They raised their waters in agreement. OWEN CAME BLASTING into the first exchange

with an unmistakable look of accomplishment on his face. He had started us off right, finishing far sooner than any of us had expected. We ran to meet him as he slapped the team bracelet onto Susan’s wrist and handed off the cape while a volunteer logged the time. Susan, who was running 3.1 “easy” miles, disappeared around a corner with her fists raised overhead. We slapped Owen around and poured water over his head. “Four kills,” he said with a dripping grin. Faith gave him a marker and he registered four hash marks on our road kill window. I draped a towel over his shoulder and handed him antibacterial wipes, and we all rolled into the van while Kris tapped the next exchange point into his phone, brought up a map, and directed us onto the road. When we approached Susan a mile later, we screamed at her from the windows. As we waited for her at the next exchange, Kris tied a stars-and-stripes 96 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Where there’s sun there’s hope: Teams smile as they near the finish (left), and the author runs under his team’s human arch.

bandanna tight over his head and assumed a game face for his 8.2-mile run— the longest first leg of our group. When Susan came through, smiling, cheering, looking very much like a person who was having fun, Kris was ready, and the pattern repeated—slap bracelet exchange, towel and wipes, Google Maps update, kill tally, next exchange into Maps, and head out. The routes of each leg were well marked with large blue signs indicating left and right turns as well as the critical “One Mile to Go!” Even so, we thought Kris had veered off course after we drove two miles without seeing him. By two and a half miles, we were certain he’d lost his way. We searched every group of runners we passed, before finally spotting him after the threemile marker—a distance he had burned down in the time it took us to register Susan’s kills and hit the porta-potties at the last stop. “Could you try and go a little faster?” Faith shouted from the window as we flew by. At the next exchange, Faith readied a white baseball cap with attached wedding veil and touched up her mustache before Kris wheeled in. He slapped the orange bracelet onto her wrist and she was gone. Brodie picked up the next leg and then at four o’clock, it was my turn. He came screaming into the handoff and slammed the bracelet onto my wrist with such gusto it bounced off and sent us scrambling for it—wasting a few precious seconds, I thought, storming off and logging three kills before I’d even left the parking lot.

But of course there are no precious seconds in a 200-mile race. I glanced at my watch at the half mile and saw I was ripping up a 6:30 pace—also known as a hideous way to begin a six and a half mile run when you usually run a 9-minute pace, especially when you have to complete two more runs within hours. I slowed down but soon spotted a guy ahead who was struggling and just begging to be killed. I started chipping away at the space between us, and by the time I got within striking distance was only at a slightly less hideous pace than the one I’d started at. And as I approached, I could see the guy was probably a high-schooler. He glanced back, tore ahead effortlessly, and quickly disappeared in the distance. By the middle of the run I was dried out and baking under the late afternoon sun. I rounded a corner to see our vehicle pulled to the side of the course with the whole squad cheering and holding out waters and packets of GU Energy Gel. I poured a water over my head and chest and drank another. Despite the help, I was killed repeatedly through the last mile and was fully gassed by the time I rounded into the exchange. A final kick came when I saw the entire

A team of Runner’s World staffers took on the Reebok Ragnar Relay in Cape Cod in May. Read about their adventures at runnersworld.com/ragnar. Learn how to fuel up for an overnight relay at runnersworld.com/relayfoods.


team from both vehicles screaming at me. They’d formed a human covered bridge of clasped hands that I ran under before passing off to Max Seaton, the first runner of Mustachio Two. “How do you feel?” Brodie asked as I walked through the exhaustion. Since the team was made up mainly of new surgeons, they had equipped both vehicles with IV bags and suture kits (though they forgot Band-Aids). “You’re pale as a ghost.” “Probably just need a burrito,” I said. “Sorry—I know you’ve always wanted to stick a needle in me.” With the orange bracelet safely in the hands of Mustachio Two for the next 30 miles, we had time to eat, clean, and rest up for our next round. Though most of Ragnar’s major exchanges have amenities like indoor bathrooms, hot showers, and food, we chose to explore on our own and found a burrito shack like the one I’d fantasized about in a one-road town just off the beaten path. We had grown tired of the high-tech, quick-energy packaged carbs we’d been eating all day and hoped a little lowtech, slow energy in the form of heavy burritos with a few fish tacos and black coffees on the side would get us through the rest of this thing. We ordered a pile of food, inhaled it all, made a mess, traded war stories, planned ahead, then stepped out under a burning-red evening sky and drove the remaining distance to the exchange where we would take over again. “You know,” Kris said in a quiet moment in the van, “This whole thing is a lot more fun than I thought it was

gonna be.” We all laughed. “I said yes to this,” Brodie said, driving, “But I thought, you know, it might really be terrible.” “I thought it would be terrible,” Owen said. “I also thought: Possible terrible,” said Faith. “I’m really surprised, this is an incredible thing,” Kris said. “I think most people hear about it and have no idea how cool it is.” “Where the hell are we even going?” I said. “Who cares, right?” Brodie said. “Absolutely—I love you all. It’s the burrito talking, I know, but—” “Was that the greatest burrito ever?” Susan said. “I’d fly across the country and run 200 miles for that burrito,” I said. “Definitely,” she said. Owen said, “Guess we already did.” I turned to him. “Yeah, but was it worth it?” I said. He thought for a moment, smirked, and said, “Definitely.” WE PULLED INTO a large parking lot and sat on a grassy hill to watch the red sky dim. Then at 8:40 p.m. our 12th runner, Cody Gillenwater, passed the orange bracelet to Owen, who raced off down a desolate road with the brightest stars just beginning to shine above him. By this time the race had grown more crowded, more tribal, and more strange. The large parking lot in front of a high school was mobbed with runners wearing reflective vests, blinking taillights and headlamps, and flashing shoes, shorts, and even bras. Music thumped loudly from every direction. White vans wrapped with string lights and decorated with team names were everywhere—Don’t Mean to Bragnars, whose runners hung out of open doors in metallic morph suits; a van called Cirque Du Sore Legs, covered with iridescent scarves and detached legs wearing animal-print leotards; a team in matching rainbow tie-dye called The Sexalicious Bus, with writing on their windows that read “Not tonight babe, I’m on the Rag” and “My third leg is longer than yours”; Team Tutu Legit 2 Quit decked out in pink and yellow tutus, of course. There was Twisted Blister, Scrambled Legs, Van Heelin’, For Those About to Bonk, Chafing the Dream LLC, Mo Miles Mo Problems, The Northwest Passage Aggressives, The Sparkle Bits, The Glitter Bombers, The Run Burgundies, Gin and Beer It,

I’ve Got Friends With Slow Paces, and my favorite—Narwal! “You realize,” Faith said, with the multicolored lights reflecting in her glasses, “we’ve discovered an alternate universe.” It was here in the fading light that we learned another Ragnar tradition— tagging. Without our knowledge, other teams had been writing their names on our vehicle, or simply sticking magnets with their team logos onto our side panels. Before long, we were roaming the parking lot with markers in hand, drawing mustaches on every vehicle we could sneak them onto. It was just past 12:30 a.m. when it was my turn to run again—5.6 miles of “hard” terrain. The time leading up to then was a blur of catnaps and howling in the dark. Still groggy, I took the bracelet from Brodie and trotted into the darkness wearing a reflective vest, taillight, and headlamp. The road was empty and pitch-black, with cornfields on either side stretching to the horizon. Far ahead, I could see the bouncing red taillights of a small group of runners that I reached and passed by mile two. Unlike the ruthless daylight kills, the darkness and desolation drew us into one team of runners, so that when I passed or was passed, words of encouragement were always exchanged. I was alone with the stars for the last two and a half miles. I turned my headlamp to full brightness and scanned the flat fields to either side. Then I turned it off completely and ran in starlight. The air was cool and silky and the only sound was breathing and footfalls. It was nearly two in the morning and I had no idea where I was—a pretty fantastic thing to experience in a modern world. I was filled with thoughts and ideas that would only make sense in the run—but what brief, tremendous sense they made. I indulged them all. By mile five, there was a bumping glow at the horizon that slowly brightened and grew colorful as I ran to it. A heavy beat of music thumped across the fields in time with the light. I came cruising into the exchange, slapped the bracelet onto Max’s wrist at 1:30, and found myself transported into a full-on party in the middle of nowhere—a good place to hold a few thousand wacked-out, sleepdelirious, sugar-buzzed runners. The energy was frenetic—runners careened in and rocketed off while teammates on either side of them cheered and spun and danced under the flash of disco lights. As great as the party was, we headed straight (Continued on page 107) JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 97


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RACES+PLACES ACROSS THE BAY 12K The Across the Bay 12K began 32 years ago as a run (originally called Houlihan’s to Houlihan’s) between bars in Sausalito and San Francisco. It was an instant hit for its pointto-point crossing of the Golden Gate Bridge and remained popular even after the two bars closed. Running across the iconic span gives participants a view of the Pacific Ocean, San Francisco Bay, and the city’s skyline, and the area’s chilly July temps make for nearly perfect running weather. Turn the page to see what past finishers love about this race.

TIPS, TRENDS, and MUST-RUN EVENTS

REFUEL After devouring postrace snacks, walk back over that final hill to the Fort Mason Center Farmers’ Market for fresh Chinese dumplings, Vietnamese sandwiches, or Indian plates (all with vegetarian options). cafarmersmkts.com

July 10, San Francisco, race415.com

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E SY O F R E P R E S E N T R U N N I N G

The Golden Gate Bridge is the focal point of this race (and appears on its swag).

JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 99


RUNNERS REVIEW

A C R O S S T H E B AY 1 2 K

Ask Coach Jenny How to navigate a crowded field and ensure a strong finish What’s the biggest mistake runners make in packed races?

REWARDING CLIMB

FAST FINALE

“Cardiac Hill, as I call it, always tests my mettle in the first 1.5 miles. Climbing it, you hardly leave the shadow of the bridge. At the top, the Golden Gate opens up in front of you. What a majestic and inviting sight, helping you forget about the hard pull to get there. And it does appear golden in the early sunlight—unless it’s cloaked in fog.”

“It takes every bit of energy to conquer the final climb through Fort Mason (a former U.S. Army post), where you’re inspired by glimpses of the bay through the eucalyptus trees. But once you crest it (with about 300 yards to go), gravity takes over on the steep, final descent. ” —BRIAN BURGESS, 36, OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

“I’ve run across the Brooklyn Bridge many times, so I didn’t expect to be so impressed by the Golden Gate. But running across it, surrounded by runners all absorbing the view of the bay and the city, was such a memorable way to experience San Francisco.”

“It was nice that the finish-line announcer boomed out our names, giving my girlfriend and me extra motivation to finish strong together. The Under Armour T-shirt (which runners receive postrace) and finisher’s medal that shows the bridge were icing on the cake. We easily found friends and my dad—who flew out from Ohio—after the race.”

—BROOKE BURDGE, 27, NEW YORK CITY

—MICHAEL SMITH, 39, SAN FRANCISCO

AWE-INSPIRING VIEWS

WATERFRONT CHARM “Once you reach the south shore of San Francisco Bay, you can look across to where you started as you follow a flat path past beaches and parks. By then, they’re filling up with people picnicking, flying kites, tossing Frisbees to their dogs, and windsurfing toward Alcatraz.” —LEIA FAZIO, 36, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA

CELEBRATE Irish coffee arrived in America in 1952 at the Buena Vista Café— 100 yards from the shirt pickup tables. Stroll over postrace to try this coffee/whiskey concoction. thebuenavista.com

How should I line up at the start to avoid getting boxed in? Most large races have corrals, so line up near the front of yours and toward the center of the road to give yourself room to navigate in either direction. Mass starts are trickier to navigate—it can be hard to know how close to the front you should be—but again, avoid nearing the sides of the road, where you might get boxed in. What should I do if I get stuck behind runners going slower than I’d like? Exercise patience and, when possible, wait for a natural opening on the course. If one doesn’t appear, tap one of the runners on the shoulder and let him or her know you’ll be passing. This allows you to get around without having to do as much weaving, and minimizes the risk that you’ll get tripped up and wipe out.

Jenny Hadfield is a running coach in Chicago. Visit her blog at runnersworld.com/coachjenny.

Crossover Hits These races traverse other major bridges. TACOMA NARROWS HALF MARATHON Enjoy panoramic views of Puget Sound and the snowcapped peaks of the Cascade Range surrounding it as you cross the mile-long Tacoma Narrows Bridge shortly after the start of this point-to-point event. August 27, Tacoma, Washington tacomanarrowshalf.com

100 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

RIM TO RIM ROYAL GORGE 10K Don’t look down during this race’s last quarter mile, which takes place on the Royal Gorge Bridge. At 956 feet above the Arkansas River, the steel structure is the tallest bridge in the United States. October 1, Cañon City, Colorado rimtorimroyalgorge.com

ACROSS THE BAY 10K The 4.2-mile Chesapeake Bay Bridge opens to pedestrians (25,000 of them) just once a year, during the sixth-largest 10K in the country. The point-to-point race begins and ends at two different bayside parks. November 6, Stevensville, Maryland bridgerace.com

RUNNER INTERVIEWS CONDENSED AND EDITED BY BOB COOPER

CO U R T E S Y O F R E P R E S E N T R U N N I N G ( AC R O S S T H E BAY 1 2 K ); N I KO L AY L I TOV/A L A M Y ( I R I S H CO F F E E ); G A M E FAC E M E D I A ( AC R O S S T H E BAY 1 0 K )

SWEET SWAG

—STEVE HALL, 70, OGDEN, UTAH

Trying to get ahead early by surging and weaving around runners—it zaps a ton of energy, causes physical and mental stress, and drives up your heart rate. The more energy you burn early on, the worse you’ll fare in the final miles.


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FROM THE MAKERS OF


TRENDING

Bad Bass Half Marathon A fierce-looking fish wearing a kilt (right) is the official mascot for this event. Organizers claim that the Bad Bass rises from the depths of Lake Chabot Reservoir, where runners start and finish, to scope out the field as it passes on the waterfront path. If you don’t see him surface, fear not—the Bad Bass appears on the finisher’s medal and race shirt.

Fast Fourths Make Independence Day great by running a patriotic race. STATUE OF LIBERTY 5K Runners take a ferry from Jersey City to Liberty Island, where the field runs loops around the looming, iconic national greeter.

July 23, Castro Valley, California, brazenracing.com

Liberty Island, New Jersey liberty5k.org

AERIAL SUPPORT

MATTAPOISETT ROAD RACE

Balloon Chase Run Spectators don’t just line this flat, looped, two- or four-mile course—they watch from the sky. The route circles the launching area for the Mississippi Championship Hot Air Balloon Fest.

Colonial homes draped in American regalia line this five-mile coastal course through small, picturesque Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. At the halfway mark, runners circle Ned’s Point Lighthouse before heading back to finish at the center of town.

July 2, Canton, Mississippi, ballooncanton.com

ARTSY EFFORT PRERACE PUMP-UP

Mattapoisett, Massachusetts mattapoisettroadrace.com

REVOLUTIONARY RUN

Twilight Half Marathon At dusk on a strip of land between the Columbia River and Vancouver Lake, runners start this event to the sound of a 21-member drum line. The flat, out-andback race ends with a full dinner—a free burrito, plus two complimentary beers to help wash it down. July 9, Vancouver, Washington, twilighthalf.com

Spearfish Canyon Half Marathon At mile four of this race along a scenic byway, local artists set up a canvas plus supplies. Runners add streaks of color to create an abstract painting for the race’s headquarters. July 9, Spearfish, South Dakota Spearfishcanyonhalfmarathon.com

In 1776, General George Washington crossed the Delaware River to attack the British-held town of Trenton. To mark the occasion 240 years later, runners complete a 5K through Washington Crossing Historic Park. Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania revrunpa.com

UNCLE SAM 4K

Three feats to cheer

Ida Keeling (left), 100, raced 100 meters in 1:17.33, a world record for centenarians. Malcolm Richards (2:21:56) and Allie Kieffer (2:44:44) set world records in the indoor marathon, which requires 211 laps around a 200-meter track. Twins Jean Schmidt and Jennifer Black, 64, finished their 100th marathon together in 5:01:28. THE PODIUM

102 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Race registration gets you a T-shirt, top hat, and fake beard to wear during this 2.5mile jaunt through downtown St. George. St. George, Utah sgcity.org/running

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O N AT H A N F O N G /C O U R T E S Y O F BA D BAS S H A L F M A R AT H O N ; M A R CO CAT I N I /CO U R T E S Y O F S TAT U E O F L I B E R T Y 5 K; CO U R T E S Y O F T H E G O O D S A M A R I TA N C E N T E R ( BA L LO O N ); K AC I E J O M A R TA N I C K L E S ( S P E A R F I S H CA N YO N H A L F M A R AT H O N ) ; DAV E L A R S E N /CO U R T E S Y O F U N C L E S A M 4 K

MARVELOUS MASCOT


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RACING AHEAD

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NOV 12 - Anthem Richmond Marathon, Half Marathon & 8K Richmond, VA Contact: Race Director, 100 Avenue of Champions, Richmond, VA 23230. (804) 285-9495 marathon@sportsbackers.org www.richmondmarathon.org

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FEB 5, 2017 - Publix Florida Marathon, Half Marathon & Half Relay Melbourne, FL Contact: Mitch Varnes, P.O. Box 33100, Indialantic, FL 32903. (321) 759-7200 info@thefloridamarathon.com

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OCT 9 - Prairie Fire Marathon Race Series, Marathon, Half, 5K, Youth Marathon & Fun Run/Walk Wichita, KS Contact: Bob Hanson, 515 S. Main, Suite 115, Wichita, KS 67202. (316) 265-6236 bob@wichitasports.com www.prairiefiremarathon.com

OCT 15 - Waddell & Reed Kansas City Marathon with Ivy Funds, Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K & Team Relay Kansas City, MO Contact: Kansas City Sports Commission, 114 W. 11th Street, Suite 300, Kansas City, MO 64105. (816) 474-4652 register@kcmarathon.org

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NORTH CENTRAL

AUG 20 - Go Far Woman Half Marathon, 10K, 5K & Girls One Mile Fargo, ND Contact: Sue Knutson, 405 W Main Ave., #1-D, West Fargo, ND 58078. 701-371-5158 sue@gofarevents.com

OCT 22 - Fargo Mini Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K & 5K Fargo, ND Contact: Mark Knutson, 405 W Main Ave., #1-D, West Fargo, ND 58078. (701) 238-1900 mark@gofarevents.com

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INTERNATIONAL

NOV 13 - Athens Marathon, 10K & 5K, Original Historical Course Athens, Greece Contact: Apostolos Greek Tours Inc., 2685 S. Dayton Way #14, Denver, CO 80231. (303) 755-2888 www.athensmarathon.com

Various Support Packages.

NOV 13 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in Puerto Rico San Juan, Puerto Rico Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 561154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

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4th Annual All Women Race - Awesome Swag & Fun!

Half Marathon, 5K & Kids Run Madison, WI Contact: Joe Trinosky, 16851 Southpark Dr., Suite 100, Westfield, IN 46074. (317) 801-0688 joe@visioneventmanagement.com

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AUG 20 - Madison Mini-Marathon,

JAN 15, 2017 - Louisiana Marathon Running Festival, Marathon, Half Marathon, Quarter Marathon, 5K & Kids Races Baton Rouge, LA Contact: Danny Bourgeois, 721 Government Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70802. (888) 786-2001 danny@thelouisianamarathon.com

SEP 17 - 6th Annual Indy Women’s

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Rosemary Beach, FL Contact: Karen Meadows, PO Box 613651, WaterSound, FL 32461. (850) 325-0561 info@30a10k.com

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• CONTINUED FROM PAGE 97

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for our vehicle. While the second half of the team handled the next 40 miles, we would drive ahead, find a place to park, and try to pinch out as much sleep as possible. Ragnar had arranged a large “tent city,” complete with indoor bathrooms and showers, food, and a large field for hundreds of tents and sleeping bags, but we chose instead to turn off into a quiet vacant campsite in Deception Pass State Park. We rolled our bags out under the pines, gazed up through the branches at the Milky Way, laughed at the absurdity of it all, passed out for two hours, and got back up in time to watch the sunrise from the towering bridge that spanned the jaw-dropping awesomeness of Deception Pass. “Can you believe we have to run again?” I said to Brodie as we squinted against the yellow sunrise shimmering off the water far below. He shook his head and started laughing. “I mean, this is beautiful—I can hardly believe my eyes and all that. But, you know, I can barely walk.” “Can you believe you wanted to do this for the rest of the year?” Susan said. “Oh, go fix your mustache,” I said. It was a smear across her upper lip. We sent Owen off with the orange bracelet just after 6:45 a.m. and would tackle a hilly 25 miles before handing it back to Mustachio Two for the 33mile finish. Our water was low. Our food was gone. Our legs were trashed. Our vehicle was trashed. Many in the team were beginning to show wear— Lucas Thornblade pulled a hamstring and Brodie suggested he switch out for somebody fresh. “Shut up, Brodie,” Lucas said, and then hammered out 5.7 miles at an 8:24 pace. Thanks in large part to him and the other fast runners of Van Two (specifically, Kevin Riggle and Max, who averaged 7:57 and 7:52 paces, and Cordelie, who averaged 6:48), we’d caught up to the main body of the race and were surrounded for the rest of the day by thousands of other trashed runners—a rolling carnival of happy lunatics.

the finish for our last runner, Cody, to burn down the final leg. Brodie produced a fresh baggie of mustaches that were applied by those still willing. Then we joined Cody on the course and crossed the finish line as a rowdy, ragged team at 3:03 p.m. We received our medals under the Ragnar banner, turned them to their back sides, and joined their edges to spell out: “Together We Ran 200ish Miles.” Or more precisely (due to a last-minute road closure and course change), 192.2 miles, in 27:03:09 for a 61st-place finish out of 543 teams overall, and 26th out of 355 in the mixed open division. Sitting around a large table eating free pizza and drinking beer, we tallied our kills (329) and roughly estimated we’d tagged over 200 team vans with mustaches. Cody removed the slap bracelet from his wrist and held it out for inspection. It was tattered, soaking wet, and thoroughly disgusting. He turned to Owen and raised his eyebrows. Owen grimaced and held out his wrist. Cody slapped it with the bracelet, and a cold splatter of old sweat flew into the air. The whole table erupted with moaning. Owen peeled the bracelet off and slapped it onto Kris, who then passed it down the line until it made it all the way around the table, splashing on every slap. “Who needs a shower?” I said, and all hands went up. We chose another round of beer and pizza instead—cheese pizza—the 192-mile run having sapped us of all intellectual curiosity. Cheese pizza was perfect. Later on, after goodbyes and promises to share photos, Susan and I paused under a giant orange Ragnar arch with Owen for one final shot. Then we slowly limped back to the van with Faith and Brodie, and I thought, probably the nicest thing about running a relay is that once you’ve finished, you’re not the only idiot lifting your elbows and grimacing while stepping off the curb. I put an arm around Susan for structural support as much as anything else, and we watched Owen jog ahead to draw mustaches on a few more vans. We laughed and I looked over to my dishwashing partner of all these years— my bill-paying, taxes-figuring, parent/ teacher-conferencing, house-painting, oil-changing, good-time gal, and gave her shoulder a bump. “Well,” I said. “That was fun.” JULY 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 107


• CONTINUED FROM PAGE 74 what is for many runners a most unnatural event. Standing 5'8", Coburn has never been intimidated by the 30-inch barriers—in fact, she found analogs to volleyball and basketball. “When you’re taking the steps before a jump, it’s like going up for a layup or spike,” she told me between pistol squat reps at her local gym. “It’s my favorite part.” Coburn placed second at nationals her senior year to go with eight state titles, and in the spring of 2008 she secured a scholarship to run for Wetmore at Colorado. That summer she watched the track and field events at the Olympics. In the debut of the women’s steeplechase, she saw rising Colorado senior Jenny Simpson (then Barringer) break the American Record. “I was like, Oh my gosh, she’s gonna be my teammate!” Coburn says. What was even better: On Coburn’s first cross-country trip that fall, they were roommates. “Mark encouraged the older veterans on the team to shepherd along the freshmen,” Simpson says. The Olympian saw a little of herself in the teenager. “The patience it takes to develop your speed, keep with the barrier work, we were very similar in that way,” Simpson says. Coburn’s biggest learning curve was adjusting to the pack dynamics of elite-level steeplechases, something she rarely contended with in high school, where talent disparity would often string out races by the end of the first lap. “I remember my first big college race at Mt. SAC feeling a little chaotic,” she says. “It’s hard to have good form when you’re stuck in a big pack or don’t have a clear view of a water jump. You may never have a clear view of a barrier in a race.” It’s a discomfort she says that only experience can help ease, and something that even now takes a few laps to shake off at the beginning of every race season. Coburn would take up Simpson’s steeplechase mantle, but only after her elder claimed another NCAA title and lowered the American Record by an unthinkable 10 seconds, to 9:12.50 at the Berlin World Championships, where she placed fifth. Simpson, though, would be destined for greatness in another event, the 1500. 108 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

Coburn won the NCAA and U.S. steeplechase titles her junior year, and redshirted her senior season of track to focus on the Olympic trials—which she also won. In London, she placed ninth in the final, running a 9:23.54 PR that left only Simpson ahead of her in the record books. Just as everything appeared to be lining up, same as with Jager, injury struck: During the 2013 NCAA championships she suffered a sacral stress fracture. Somehow, adrenaline helped her push past the pain she felt on every jump in order to win the race, but she was devastated. “I was trying to sign a contract,” she says. “I was trying to break the NCAA record. I had all of these hopes and realistic expectations.” Coburn’s 2013 season was shot, but New Balance signed her anyway—a show of support that won the young runner’s intense loyalty. (She makes a point of taking me to New Balance’s splashy new Run Hub in Boulder during my visit.) She wouldn’t race again for eight months but would return in 2014 healthier—and hungrier—than ever. JAGER’S TEAMMATES like to tease him for his celebrity status. After their morning long run, he and Lopez Lomong and Ryan Hill jog over to Nike’s brick-red practice track, hidden amid a thicket of pines, for some stride work. Jager sheds a blaze-orange tech tee, revealing a bold tattoo of the Olympic rings running vertically along his right torso from his hip to his armpit. Hill leans over to me as I jot down notes from the morning session and dictates, “Jager, the only one working out shirtless…” Dan Huling, one of the top-notch steeplers Schumacher has assembled around Jager, says they refer to him simply as “the American.” Over the phone a few weeks later, Huling explains by affecting broadcaster Tim Hutchings’s British accent: “Then the American”—the implication being that Jager is so often the only American near the front of international steeplechases that he can be identified solely by his nationality. That may not be the case for long. Jager preaches the value of being able to train alongside the likes of Huling, a veteran of three U.S. world teams, Canadian steeplechase record holder Matt Hughes, and the raw-but-gifted Andy Bayer—and the benefits cut both ways. Huling and Bayer rode Jager’s aggressive pace at USAs last year to third- and fourth-place finishes; that single race had four men crack 8:22 (the other being Donn Cabral). “Anytime someone really, really good comes into an event, someone like Evan,” Huling says, “it’s gonna up what’s going on behind you.” Which brings us to the Worlds in Beijing last August, where Jager placed sixth—a

bigger disappointment, he says, than the fall in Paris. “That stuck with me longer.” Jager is a wild stallion—a mustang—who yearns to run free. The claustrophobic pack dynamics and slow burn of championship races have tested this instinct, as they have with Coburn. “It’s like driving on a highway with a lot of traffic but no lanes, and trying to move in unison with all these other cars,” he says. “It’s very uncomfortable.” It’s what sets the steeplechase apart from the sprint hurdles (other than it being a distance race)—there are no lane designations to harness the inherent danger of a group of athletes sprinting and jumping over things as fast as they can. Guys in the 400-meter hurdles, for instance, “know what 17 steps or 15 steps feels like…it’s just an ingrained rhythm in their brains,” Jager says. “In the steeple, I don’t think anyone counts steps. It’s just way too much.” Coburn occasionally commiserates with elite hurdlers at international meets (usually to gush over their precise form), and an exchange she once had with Olympic champion Dawn Harper-Nelson sums up how the dissimilar specialists in these two events view each other: “I’m so glad I’m not a 100-meter hurdler,” Coburn said. “I’m so glad I’m not a steeplechaser!” HarperNelson replied. Amid the pack in Beijing, Jager ran with agitation. He tucked in near the front for two kilometers until he couldn’t take it anymore and moved abreast of the leader, Conseslus Kipruto, with whom he was neck-and-neck going into the bell lap. Then, around the last curve, the four Kenyans in the race surged past him and he had no chase left. The exuberant Ezekiel Kemboi pranced across the line for his sixth global title in 8:11.28, which Jager had already bested seven times in his career. A flash of red also passed him in the last 100 meters—his training partner Huling, who at 32 had just run the race of his life. “I was obviously elated,” Huling says, “but I had to temper my own emotions to help out Evan.” As they traveled to Zurich for a meet the following week, the elder steepler gave his younger, faster teammate some advice: Be patient. Huling learned it the hard way after falling short of his Olympic dream in 2008 (fifth at the Trials) and 2012 (seventh); now, partly because of Jager, his best shot awaits him in Eugene. “It doesn’t happen all right away,” Huling told him. “This hurts, but wouldn’t you rather go through it now, learn from it, and then medal next year?” It’s another learning experience for Jager; he’s proven his worth but knows that in order to be considered truly great, he has to solve tactical championship brawls. (Continued on page 110) It’s a challenge he


A WICKED GOOD BOSTON

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The RUNNER’S WORLD team continued to celebrate the brand’s 50th Anniversary with their annual trek to Boston for a variety of special events and activities to commemorate the 120th running of the Boston Marathon. Beginning on Friday, April 15, the RUNNER’S WORLD booth at the John Hancock Health and Fitness Expo was buzzing with activity. Runners lined up to get their photo on a cover of the magazine at the #RWCoverSearch Photo Booth to kick off the third annual contest. Those who stopped by the booth could also share their running stories at The RUNNER’S WORLD Show pop-up podcast studio, sample JellyBelly Sport Beans, try out Spenco recovery sandals, and enter to win a pair of Jaybird X2 earbuds. There were also special appearances by Olympian Shalane Flanagan, November Project’s Brogan Graham and Bojan Mandaric, and RUNNER’S WORLD Editor-at-Large (and 1968 Boston Champion) Amby Burfoot, who signed copies of his new book, First Ladies of Running. Down the hall, the RUNNER’S WORLD Seminar Series presented by Spenco was attended by hundreds of runners who received advice from experts, legends, and past champions. Highlights included a standing-room-only panel moderated by RUNNER’S WORLD Editor-in-Chief David Willey with Burfoot and Roberta "Bobbi" Gibb, the first woman to ever run the Boston Marathon (in 1966), who was celebrating the 50th anniversary of her famous run. Saturday morning kicked off with a scenic three-mile shakeout run along the Charles River, presented by Spenco and Jaybird and led by RUNNER’S WORLD Chief Running Officer Bart Yasso. Hours later, more than 400 runners gathered at the Marathon Finish Line for RUNNER’S WORLD’s 50th Anniversary Run led by the Graham and Mandaric along with running legends Dean Karnazes, Rory Bosio, and Rob Krar. In lieu of the annual RUNNER’S WORLD party, more than 400 runners took to the streets for a 2.7-mile run and workout that ended at the Cyclorama, where Willey and RUNNER’S WORLD Publisher Molly O’Keefe were joined by The North Face to celebrate RW’s 50th Anniversary and launch of November Project: The Book with the Boston running community. Then on Sunday morning, Flanagan and chef-nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky, joined by Willey and Yasso, led 200+ runners on a sold-out 2.5-mile shakeout run to celebrate the upcoming launch of their cookbook, Run Fast. Eat Slow. The weekend culminated on Patriots’ Day, also known as Marathon Monday, with runners taking their places at the starting line in Hopkinton while their families, friends, and colleagues found their places along the course to cheer on the runners as they made their journey down Boylston Street to the finish line. 1) The RUNNER'S WORLD team before the 50th Anniversary Run including (from left to right) Alison Brown, Lauren Brewer, Amy Bauer, Traci Hafner, Molly O'Keefe, Jeff Dengate, Bart Yasso, David Willey, Paul Collins, Nicole Ragucci, and Amy Tota. 2) November Project participants and 50th Anniversary runners pose in front of the Cyclorama. 3) Saturday morning shakeout runners along the Charles River trail. 4) From left to right: Two members of the November Project; running legends Rob Krar, Rory Bosio, and Dean Karnazes; and RUNNER'S WORLD's Willey at The North Face Speaker Series. 5) Dave McGillivray, Boston Marathon Race Director, answers runners' questions during one of the RUNNER'S WORLD Seminars presented by Spenco. 6) Olympian Shalane Flanagan (left) and chef-nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky with the Run Fast. Eat Slow. shakeout run participants on Sunday morning. PHOTOS BY BRENT DOSCHER, GAMEFACE MEDIA, AND BRITA OUTZEN

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• CONTINUED FROM PAGE 108 embraces: “You should have to win the race on that day to be crowned champion.” Jager legs out his last stride on the Nike track, pulls his shirt over his mop of hair, and waves for me to follow him. As he jogs into the trees, he passes Alberto Salazar and his star pupil, Olympic 10,000-meter silver medalist Galen Rupp, who are getting ready for their own track session. Salazar’s Nike Oregon Project and the Bowerman Track Club share many facilities, and exchanges between members of the frenemy groups, at least during my visit, ranged from genuinely warm to “workplace-polite.” Salazar and Rupp both reciprocate Jager’s smile and head nod. Game recognize game. In Rio, after all, they’ll be on the same team. “THERE HAVE BEEN TIMES that I’ve told someone I do the steeplechase,” Coburn says, “and people assume it’s equestrian.” She sits up on her kitchen counter in her apartment on a Sunday morning, post–long run, spooning sliced mango, Greek yogurt, and maple syrup out of a bowl. Her corner unit faces to the southwest, and behind her looms a spectacular view of the mountains. Her bare feet dangle, showing off an Olympic rings tattoo on her right foot. To be sure, steeplechase has historically been an outsider’s event. Both Coburn and Jager bristle, however, at the old stigma that it’s where coaches stick runners who aren’t very good at the 1500 or 5,000. “I think that mentality needs to disappear,” Jager told me, irritated at the suggestion. “Evan was briefly ranked No. 1 in the world in the 1500 last year,” Coburn points out. And there’s the example of her friend and mentor, Simpson, who is one of the best 1500-meter runners in the world. The event’s appeal to top athletes is growing, especially on the women’s side. Whereas Simpson had to contend with one or two other U.S. women nipping at her heels, a stable of at least a half dozen strong, young steeplers chase Coburn. “You aren’t motivated to run an event that you can’t run in college or the Olympics,” Simpson says. Women’s 3,000 steeple was first held at U.S. nationals in 1999, but its inclusion at the 2008 Games, she says, “was really necessary for it to attract the best talent.” What didn’t help were the two doping bombshells that dropped last year: 2009 world champion Marta Dominguez of Spain and 2011 Worlds and reigning Olympic champ Yuliya Zaripova of Russia were both sanctioned for failed tests and stand to be stripped of their medals. “In my head,

110 RUNNER’S WORLD JULY 2016

there are athletes who when they do a crazy performance I’m like, eye roll, that’s not real,” Coburn says. “I blur those times out and I scroll down to the first clean athlete I believe in. That’s how my brain works.” The steeplechase is hard enough without having to incorporate such mental gymnastics, but Coburn is resigned to the reality that beyond being a vocal advocate for clean sport, there’s not much she can do about it. In the meantime Coburn is focusing on lessons learned in 2015. She fell short of her goal to PR—and “officially” claim the record—though her season best of 9:15.59, which won her her fourth USA title in June, made her the sixth-fastest woman in the world. Nothing to sneeze at. A nagging Achilles injury slowed her at times last year, but at the World Championships in Beijing she expected to medal. Coburn, well known for front-running from the gun, opted for a sit-and-kick strategy. She took the lead with two laps to go but could never gain separation, and faded to fifth place. Coburn has no regrets. “In 2014 I didn’t care as much about the win—it was about time, and pushing hard,” she says. “Last year was more about place and trying different racing strategies.” She didn’t race indoors this year; she’s just been piling on the miles and upping her fitness. “I’m hoping to be perfect in August—at times I’ve been a little too perfect in June,” she says. If she makes it to Rio, she’s not yet sure how she’ll run it, but she knows exactly how she’ll be measuring success. “People say records are broken all the time, and running fast times is exciting,” she says, “but medals you get to keep forever.” ASIDE FROM GETTING to train and race in exotic locales, professional runners lead boring lives. Most happily admit this. We hoi polloi are supposed to treat our bodies like temples; it stands to reason, then, that those whose livelihoods depend on physical fitness must operate like ascetics. Which is what makes this last story so refreshing. It’s August 6, 2012, night falling over the Olympic Village. Spots of rain have washed away the sweat of competition, giving the mild London evening an air of rejuvenation. Coburn and Jager have been texting. After exceeding all expectations in their Olympic debuts, it was time the two steeplechase prodigies finally got to know each other. The night involved an entourage that included, at various points, Jager and Coburn; Coburn’s boyfriend, Joe Bosshard; her brother and sister; and a couple of Australian comrades. The night started at the casino bar next door, which had become a popular athlete escape from the cloister of the Olympic Village.

It had been a long week—no, a long year. The pressure of the Summer Olympics builds and builds until erupting like a whistling kettle in the penultimate month. After allowing her 21-year-old self to enjoy the spectacle of the Opening Ceremonies, Coburn had soberly wrestled that wonderment into submission long enough to advance out of her heat and run a PR in the final. Jager, only 23, had finished sixth in his final yesterday. Yes, it was time for a drink. A few drinks. Eventually the group leaves the casino bar to peruse the adjacent mega-mall. Questionable purchases are made: Justin Bieber and Prince Harry masks; a can of energy drink Coburn is convinced is labeled “Emma-rgy.” (She’ll look at it tomorrow and mutter, “That just says Emerge.”) Later they find themselves in the Tube station beneath the mall and encounter underground roller-bladers, where Jager will fight the temptation to relive his heyday as an Algonquin rink god. At some point— memories are foggy—they emerge from the subterranean playplace and return to their rooms to sleep off the buzz of their first Olympics. When they wake up, Coburn and Jager will go on respective training runs, taking the first proverbial steps toward Rio. Back to work, as if the bar and the masks and the skaters never existed. In four years, they know, there will be no sneaking up on anyone. Making the finals will not be a pleasant surprise. In four years there will be Expectations. Yes, Coburn and Jager aspire to medal in Rio, and it isn’t fantasy for the rest of us to picture them both in gold. They have proven time and again that they can contend with the world’s top steeplechasers. They both embrace the pressure of being heavy favorites in this year’s Trials, but know better than to take any race lightly. “Everyone’s days are numbered,” Jager says. “No one is safe,” says Coburn. That they understand the risks and proceed anyway makes them all the more dangerous. The kids are all grown up, yet they remain fearless. Giddy-up. RUNNER’S WORLD (ISSN 0897-1706) IS PUBLISHED 11 TIMES A YEAR, MONTHLY EXCEPT BI-MONTHLY IN JANUARY/FEBRUARY, BY RODALE INC. VOLUME 51 NUMBER 6, EDITORIAL OFFICES 400 SOUTH 10TH ST, EMMAUS, PA 18098 (610-967-5171). ©2016 RODALE INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, P.O. BOX 26299, LEHIGH VALLEY, PA 18022-6299. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT EMMAUS, PA, AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. IN CANADA POSTAGE PAID AT GATEWAY MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO. CANADA POST PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 40063752. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADA ADDRESSES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, 2930 14TH AVE, MARKHAM, ONTARIO L3R 5Z8. GST #R122988611. SUBSCRIBERS: IF THE POSTAL AUTHORITIES ALERT US THAT YOUR MAGAZINE IS UNDELIVERABLE, WE HAVE NO FURTHER OBLIGATION UNLESS PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. WE RECEIVE A CORRECTED ADDRESS WITHIN 18 MONTHS.


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I’M A RUNNER Interview by Dana Meltzer Zepeda

KAT GRAHAM

ACTOR/SINGER, 26, ATLANTA & LOS ANGELES

“When I run, I feel like I’m running toward the best version of myself.”

BUT EVEN IF my schedule is erratic, I know if I stop working out, it will affect me mentally. I will become slow and sluggish, and I won’t have the energy to take on the day like I need to. I’M SOMEBODY who prides myself on not being some skinny, frail actress. I like the fact that my fans look at me and think, “She’s got muscular legs and she likes to work out.” I’ll never be this tiny thing, and I love the fact that when I run I embrace that. I HOPE ONE DAY I can run 10 miles without stopping. I can do five, but not more than that. I’m working tirelessly toward it every day. AND IF ANYBODY has tips for me to reach that goal, I would happily welcome them. WHEN I SEE women running, fighting toward a goal, those are the people who inspire me. If they can do it, if they can get off their ass, I can do it, too. WE HAVE THE gorgeous, massive Piedmont Park in Atlanta. It’s nice to get that fresh air. IF YOU’RE on a treadmill, you’re aware of how much time is going by. When you’re outside, you just run and think about it later.

I’VE BEEN a dancer since I was three years old, so I assumed I didn’t need to do any other exercise. But once I got busy shooting the show, I wasn’t going to dance class as often.

I RUN NOTHING less than about two miles a day. I have to do it in the morning. If I don’t start my day with running, I let the day beat me up a little bit; if I get it done, I have a really clear head.

SO TWO YEARS ago, I bought three treadmills—one for my room on set, one for my house in Atlanta, and another for my house in L.A.

I’M A WORKING runner. Sometimes, after days of filming for 15 hours, I’m exhausted, and it’s a struggle [to get up for a run].

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GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/IMARUNNER FOR A VIDEO INTERVIEW.

Kat Graham stars as Bonnie on the CW show The Vampire Diaries. She will play Jada Pinkett Smith in the Tupac biopic set to be released this November.

THE MUSIC I listen to when I’m running—Kanye, The Prodigy, Eminem, 50 Cent, and Britney— has the message to win and persevere. It’s really empowering. I THINK YOU should always push yourself. The hardest you can push might be a half mile. The hardest you can push might be around the block. Regardless of the time, regardless of the miles, keep going!

PHOTOGRAPH BY HAROLD DANIELS


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