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KLA ART 014 K A M PA L A C O N T E M P O R A RY A RT F E S T I VA L 4 t h- 3 1s t OCTOBER 2014

UNMAPPED WHY KLA ART?

WHY ARTISTS’ STUDIOS?

WHY NOT KLA ART?

WHY NOT ARTISTS’ STUDIOS?

W H Y C U R AT E ?

WHY UNMAPPED?

W H Y NOT C U R AT E ?

THE UNMAPPED

T H E C R E AT I V I T Y O F S U RV I VA L Babirye Leilah Burns: Boda Boda Patrol 001 Reagan Kandole: Go Green Uganda Derrick Komakech: Go Slow! Woman Carrying Paint Jimmy John Ogwang: Boda to Boda Studio Katumba Simon Katumba: Etaffaali Lya Masilo Xenson: Rat Trap Kizito Mbuga: Boda Boda Kibanda Anest Gabriel Shaloom: A Fruit Seller Kino Musoke: I am Boda Boda Joshua Kagimu Rap Poet: Twezuule DAPU: OBULEEMU KIKEMO? Grace Sarah: Carrying Animals on a Boda Boda Stacey Gillian: Funky Glass Ride Adonias Ocom Ekuwe: Save Karamoja, Save Mamai Richard Wasike: The Safety Flapper Ronex: Take Me Home, Your Head Is Not Metal Kalule Enoch & Sandra Suubi King of the Road Petro: Open Obituary Ian Mmesiga & Immy Mali: Pop it! Papa Shabani: Le Studio Boda Boda: Unmapping Camera Men

Tony Cyizanye: Colourful Voice of My People Mulugeta Gebrekidan: The Creativity of Survival Paul Katamiira Bukenya: E'kkomagiro Vivian Mugume: Family Dennis Muraguri: Matatu Taxi Visthois Mwilambwe Bondo: Day by Day, Let Me Dream My Future Helen Nabukenya: Golden Heart Paul Nduguru: My Building Blocks Helen Zeru: Inside out: One Foot in One Foot Out Francis Nnaggenda: Vendor On Scaffold

TWEZUULE

KA M PA L A | A DDI S A BA BA | K I N SHAS A | NA I ROB I | DA R E S S A L A A M | K IG A L I


KLA ART 014 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS KLA ART 014 Unmapped Catalogue is edited by Moses Serubiri Copy Editing: Kampire Bahana & Nicola Elphinstone Catalogue Design: Lucy Swan Photography: Alex Lyons KLA ART 014 team: Chairperson: Margaret Nagawa Curatorial Committee: Violet Nantume Philip Balimunsi Robinah Nansubuga Moses Serubiri Hasifa Mukyala Project Director: Rocca Gutteridge Project Manager: Laura Ratling Curatorial Advisor: Gabi Ngcobo Volunteer Coordinator: Josh O. Agaba Project Assistant: Emmanuel Iwong Marketing and Branding: Nicola Elphinstone Web Design, photography and videography: Alex Lyons Illustration and Design: Lucy Swan Installation: Hasifa Mukyala, Bryony Bodimeade KLA ART 014 would like to thank: Mark Rumanyika, Charles Chapman and Simon Kaheru for enabling us to use Kampala Railway Station as KLA ART 014’s festival exhibition venue. KFW for supporting Francis Nnaggenda in the development of his artwork for the festival. Nicola Elphinstone for her endless support and advice. And the following people for their ongoing energy towards KLA ART 014: Batale Fred, Mary Karooma, Kara Blackmore, Kianga Ford, Miguel Luciano, Katrin Peters Klaphake, Faisal Kiwewa, Carolin Christgau, Andy Roberts, Naume Aweru, Gertrude Flentge, Chantal Verdonk, Kirunda Magoola, Alexander Green, Emma Wolukau-Wanambwa and Jantien Zuurbier. KLA ART 014 has been a conversation between many voices and we would like to thank all those who continue to create new platforms for contemporary Ugandan art.


KLA ART 014 TABLE OF C ONTENT S 1. ESSAYS

1. Margaret Nagawa: ‘Why KLA ART?’ 2. Rocca Gutteridge: ‘Why not KLA ART?’ 3. Moses Serubiri: ‘Why Unmapped?’ 4. The Unmapped: ‘This is not Survival’ 5. Rose Kirumira Namubiru: ‘Why Artists’ Studios?’ 6. Hoods Jjuuko: ‘Why not Artists’ Studios?’ 7. Angelo Kakande: ‘Why Curate?’ Daudi Karungi: ‘Why not Curate?’ 8. Intermission 9. Faisal Kiwewa: ‘Why Festivals?’ 10. Laura Ratling: ‘Why not Festiavls?’

11. FESTIVAL EXHIBITION

13. Tony Cyizanye 15. Mulugeta Gebrekidan 17. Paul Katamiira Bukenya 19. Vivian Mugume 21. Dennis Muraguri 23. Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo 25. Helen Nabukenya 27. Paul Nduguru 29. Helen Zeru 31. Francis Nnaggenda

33. THE BODA BODA PROJECT

35. Stacey Gillian Abe 36. Ronex Ahimbisbiwe 37. Babirye Leilah Burns 38. Disability Art Project Uganda 39. Adonias Ocom Ekuwe 40. Joshua Kagimu Godwin 41. Reagan Kandole 42. Simon Katumba 43. Derrick Komakech 44. Kizito Mbuga 45. Kino Musoke 46. Enock Kagga Kalule & Sandra Suubi 47. Jimmy John Ogwang 48. Petro 49. Grace Sarah 50. Ian Mwesiga & Immaculate Mali 51. Papa Shabani 52. Anest Gabriel Shaloom 53. Richard Wasike 54. Xenson

55. DIRECTORY 58. BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES


WHY KLA ART ? M A R G A R E T N A G AWA Kampala city and the celebration of the contemporary art festival unusual venue – the boda boda motorcycle. This artistic collaboration counteracts a pervasive negative view of boda bodas.3 It is an exchange-driven art production process where willingness to listen is fundamental.

I am certain of the flexibility provided by a city with motorcycle taxis – not because these fast boda bodas transport passengers up and down the hilly city, or because they constitute a major exhibition venue for KLA ART 014, but because it is the city whose transformation I have witnessed since I was a child.1 Kampala was a transit city for me in the mid-1970s with uncongested streets, over-nighting at Antlers Inn on Bombo road, en route from Gulu to boarding school in Mukono district. Today, it is a busy metropolis with people, buildings, vehicles, and animals jostling for space. Kampala city welcomes a diversity of people, stimulating a friendly atmosphere of unity in diversity.

Thirdly artists’ studios, which are a venue for dialogical tours. Jimmy Ogonga captures a recent public perception of artists that, “art, or any form of cultural expression, existed as a trivial and scandalous enterprise.” 4 This urban-centred art festival phenomenon has exposed new audiences to art forms formerly neglected, and those considered out of reach for ordinary citizens, leading to a re-evaluation of perceptions. Art, architecture, urban planning, economics, and politics benefit from the art festival’s symbiotic relationships ensuring sustainability.

Rigid planning by British colonial administration since the early 1900s decentred the significance of the historic ekibuga, the centre of Buganda Kingdom.2 Kampala attracts artists for it contributes, and responds to, modernity in Eastern Africa. While issues of representation are at the heart of public debate today, as are spatial and intellectual areas of friction, on the inverse side Kampala is also the lieu de rencontre in Elly Wamala’s joyous music.

Finally, an art symposium provides a much-needed space for discussion of research and ideas on art, art history, exhibition making, identity, and the politics of space and place. If, in the name of development, we witness wanton destruction in our cities, as highlighted by Xenson’s discarded plastics installation, Nakivubo Channel, in KLA ART 012, then national priorities need reassessing. These exhibition formats and their interconnections mirror the variety of artists’ perspectives while allowing counter readings of art, history, identity, and urbanity.

The contemporary art festival, KLA ART 014, brings together artists from Eastern Africa. It presents artistic positions that connect with critical discourses, and in so doing render visible the history and relationships of the people in this region, and their resonances in Kampala. The artists’ work in this festival acts as a lens through which we can examine issues of identity, enfranchisement, immigration, and belonging. Other festival activities contribute much needed analysis of art, and discourses on identity in our history.

Partnerships developed between artists, curators, arts organisations, foreign missions, Kampala City Council Authority (KCCA), Uganda Railways, the electricity body UMEME, and other organisations, attest to Kampala as a city engaged in dialogue about art and culture at multiple levels. Positive shifts in thought and action are taking place, where art holds a place in public awareness, and participation. Audiences for art comprise theatre and gallery-going literati, traders driving the brisk economy in Kikuubo business district, busuuti-clad women with their extravagant flair, and pedestrians with darkly tinged shoes sinking in muddy back streets. 5 As we exuberantly celebrate these diverse faces of Kampala, let contemporary art form part of our everyday lived experience.

Various exhibition formats are utilised to engage audiences. First is the conventional exhibition of art works in an unconventional space, the historic Uganda Railways station building, bringing together artists from Uganda, DRC, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Ethiopia. Secondly, a mobile exhibition of experimental positions in an

1. Peter Knight, The Eye Magazine, June-July 2010, “The Boda-Boda in Uganda.” Boda bodas are motorcycle taxis. Their name is a simplified term originating in the border-to-border bicycle transportation in Busia, a town between Uganda and Kenya. 2. Nawangwe, B. “The evolution of the Kibuga into Kampala’s City Centre – Analysis of the transformation of an African city.” (paper presented at African Perspectives, 2009; The African Inner City: [Re]sourced) 3. Nakiyimba, G. “Boda-Boda: Uganda’s silent killer.” RFI http://www.english.rfi.fr/africa/20120325-boda-boda-ride-silent-killer-uganda/, May 25, 2012 accessed September 9, 2014

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5. Jimmy, Ogonga. "Roundtable IV--Before We Begin--Jimmy Ogonga." Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art. September 19, 2011. Accessed March 12, 2012. 6. The traditional women’s dress of the Baganda; an ankle-length, large sharp-sleeved, worn by layering of six-yards of fabric with a wide sash. It is sometimes called Gomesi.

W H Y N OT K L A A R T ? ROCCA GUTTERIDGE KLA ART is not a fixed structure, it’s a two-year process of thought, conversation, experimentation and production. It’s about working with artists to find avenues to make and show work and, in return, hearing new artistic voices and alternative ways to view our world.

***** "Why you should not do KLA ART". Grey hairs are starting to form behind my ears. I’m losing friends, I’m losing patience.

Kampala is changing. The city is being mapped,4 exercises of order are taking place in our streets of red dust and rolex.5 This is the right time to take time to pause, look and unpack the ‘Unmapped’. It’s the right time to open up artists’ studios, occupy railway stations and drive on boda bodas 6 through the city, celebrating art.

Are we just replicating a structure that wants to be replicated, for the sake of being replicated? Are we listening enough to ourselves, to each other, to the people that we want to listen to us? In 2012 there were two art biennales in Benin that opened on exactly the same day. “Ultimately the 2012 edition was a public manifestation of the inner disputes and manipulations underlying a bienniale”. 1 The confusions, complications and contradictions of these two biennales I’m sure caused frustrations but also a vital questioning of both the value and challenges of ‘top-down curating’ and the ‘curatorial branding’ of biennales.2

“Those boda bodas, they are political tools, spies, messengers for the government”. 7 Through KLA ART 014 ‘those’ boda bodas become breathing spaces to collaborate with artists; unusual exhibition opportunities for unique minds to engage with and then travel with, to talk with whoever wants to talk, across our city.

In Kampala, we have many festivals;3 in 2014 the word biennale also entered our city.

“I’ve never been inside that building, it’s not allowed”. 8 A closed space opens its doors and invites the public to question the ‘Unmapped’. Kampala’s Railway Station once held a dubious British empirical dream to connect countries and haul cargo for a diverse range of questionable activities. That building now holds questions and interpretations of the ‘Unmapped’ by an international team of artists, curators and organisers. What it all means is for audiences to decide.

Let’s not contribute to an increasingly homogenised, globalised art scene. Let’s rebel. Let’s not do KLA ART. ***** ‘Why not do KLA ART?"

1. Quote taken from “Biennale Regard Benin 2012” by Jelle Bouwhuis. Published in Frieze Magazine Issue 153, March 2013. The reason for referencing this moment in Benin’s recent art history is to represent the parallel situation that occurred in Kampala in 2014. One of the founding organisations of KLA ART and organises of KLA ART 012 created the ‘Kampala Art Biennale’ which now runs two months before KLA ART. 2. For more information on Benin 2012 see ‘Mining the Biennale: A Story About Art and Globalisation in Benin’ by Cédric Vincent. http://www.springerin.at/dyn/heft_text.php?textid=2790&lang=en A second reference to Benin 2012 and Kampala 2014 is the use of motorcycles in the festival, see Meschac Ggaba’s piece, Moving Library http://www.stevenson.info/exhibitions/gaba/index2013.html 3. Bayimba International Festival of the Arts, La Ba!, Kampala International Theatre Festival, Pearl Rhythm, KCCA Festival, The National Youth Festival, Uganda Film Festival are a few of Kampala’s festivals. 4. Uganda’s 2014 National Population Census took place from 28th August – 6th September 2014. 5. A rolex is a popular Ugandan food consisting of an omelette wrapped in a chapatti. Its name is derived by saying "roll of eggs" quickly in a Luganda accent. 6. Boda bodas are Kampala’s motorcycle taxis. The name is derived from the words ‘border border’ as the motorcycles were often used to carry cargo across borders. 7. Artist, Kino Musoke describing the inspiration behind his artwork ‘I am Boda Boda’, on BBC world Africa. 8. On asking a passerby about Kampala Railway Station. Kampala Railway Station closed its doors to passengers in 1992. For a plotted history on Kampala Railway: http://theeye.co.ug/lunatic-express-potted-history-uganda-railway

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WHY UNMAPPED ? MOSES SERUBIRI “So for me the idea of failure began with being an artist”. WANGECHI MUTU

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At the tip of South America, the naturalist Charles Darwin reached a place of failure. He conceded to speculative 2 hypothesis when he saw the red discoluration of the sea, near the Galapagos Islands. In this circumstance, what was 3 artistic survival for Darwin? What does his story tell us about failure, discovery, and survival for the artist? The Afrofuturist declares; if this world doesn't work, then there is another world, somewhere.4 With a philosophical technique of survival they ask: What does it mean to be uprooted; and what are the modes of deracination? But who was ever rooted? Going back to Darwin's explorations on the HMS Beagle, when he was flummoxed by the discoloration of the sea near the Galapagos Islands, was his art ever rooted? In that decisive moment of failure, was Darwin more himself in the coloured sea off the Galapagos Islands than anywhere else in the world? To think about art, what are the journeys of the artist? And what does discovery look like for the artist? 'Unmapped' is, similarly an exploration of failure and discovery in an attempt at survival. As curators, we have allowed ourselves to engage with the notion of the non-artist; with the process of becoming invisible. We have allowed ourselves to go beyond identification, and dared to ask: What does it mean to be unidentified? Like Darwin in the sea near the Galapagos Islands, we have allowed ourselves to become uprooted. Our current failures make us question: Which world is this; and who am I in it? 5

1. “To leave Kenya to study art, while being unable to explain why or to describe what I was going to do, wasn’t considered proper. People in Kenya would ask me, ‘How are you going to support yourself?’ or ‘Where has this thing you’re doing ever taken anyone you know?’ I didn’t have answers to these questions! At the time, I didn’t know of any black female contemporary artists. I didn’t know of any African contemporary artists who had come from Kenya and gone on to do amazing things. I knew there were some painters in Kenya making modest livings, mostly men. As far as anyone was concerned, I was jumping into an abyss of failures. So for me the idea of failure began with being an artist. - Nicole J. Caruth. 'Wangechi Mutu on Failure'. Art 21. Jan. 2014. http://blog.art21.org/2014/01/13/wangechi-mutu-on-failure/#.VCXwALvVm4a [Retrieved 27 Sept. 2014] 2. “I confess, however, there is a very great difficulty in imagining any one spot to be the birthplace of the millions of animalcula and confervae: for whence come the germs at such points?--the parent bodies having been distributed by the winds and waves over the immense ocean. But on no other hypothesis can I understand their linear grouping.” - Charles Darwin. 'The Voyage of the Beagle: A Naturalist's Voyage Round the World'. 1860. 3. “Charles Darwin's theory On the Origin of the Species inspired Herbert Spencer to coin the term 'survival of the fittest'. Spencer used it to articulate his economic theorem: Thus by survival of the fittest, the militant type of society becomes characterized by profound confidence in the governing power, joined with a loyalty causing submission to it in all matters whatever.” - Herbert Spencer; Truxton Beale. 'The Man versus the State: A Collection of Essays.' 1916. 4. “Certainly it comes into collision with another type of existence, and out of that, comes Afrofuturism. I think Afrofuturism as an idea is really important. I think it’s very useful. I think it does help to explain the inexplicable. If anything, it is a form of escape from a type of containment. The escape comes from saying: ‘Well actually, there are other possibilities. If this world doesn’t work, then there’s another one, somewhere. Not the religious sort of other world, but other dimensions where I can function.’ - John Akomfrah; Raimi Gbadamosi. 'Raimi Gbadamosi Talks With John Akomfrah.' Manifesta Journal #17. Future(s) of Cohabitation. 2014. 5. “In terms of the race question as a world problem, the Negro mind has leapt, so to speak, upon the parapets of prejudice and extended its cramped horizons. In so doing it has linked up with the growing group consciousness of the dark-peoples and is gradually learning their common interests. As one of our writers has recently put it: ‘It is imperative that we understand the white world in its relations to the non-white world.’ - Locke, Alain. "Enter the New Negro." Survey Graphic 53, no. 11 (1925): 631-34.

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W H Y A R T I S TS ’ S T U D I O S ? ROSE KIRUMIRA NAMUBIRU An “Artists by Artists” Epoch Ngoma International Artists’ Workshop Uganda, initiated in 1995, was conceived as a space where all artists, whether self-taught or academically trained could experience a short approximately ten days - but intensive professional rejuvenation. This rejuvenation, not guided by formal procedures of art institutions, allowed the artists to reflect on individual expression within contemporary artistic practice, establish a work pattern within a community of artists and confidently develop a patronage. As an innovative concept, it contributed to the development of contemporary art in Uganda, after Trowell’s art school, by breaking new ground in artistic practice, initiating a wave of self-made artists who 1 were versatile, confident and visible. Several scholars have recognised that artists’ workshops have contributed to contemporary African art’s diversity in terms of cultural background, visual images, exchange of knowledge and ideas.2 In addition, there have been strengthened links and interaction between artists and the process has given a fresh input to artistic activity in the region, while raising the different African - in this case Ugandan - artists' profiles on the international scene (Court, 1995; Triangle Arts Trust, 2000-2003; Kasfir, 1999; Kirumira, 2010).3 Through working together with artists from different parts of Uganda and other parts of the world, and as a result of these new links, new opportunities were opened up that several artists embraced by contributing, organising and attending other workshops.4

Nigeria. These artists’ workshops and studios were set up alongside formal art schools and colleges (Kasfir, 1999; Deliss, 1995; KojoFosu, 1993).6 Contemporary artists’ studios by their nature and purpose have yielded an extraordinary African artist, for example artists who have studios and work at the Go-down, Nairobi, Kenya and Greatmore Studios Cape Town, South Africa.7 Funding for art and especially initiatives such as artists’ meetings in Uganda have not been easy to pursue. At the moment, artists’ studios also double as galleries, so among other numerous challenges, both the artists and art scene in Uganda evolve based on the concept of commercialised private studios. Regardless, the Ngoma Artists’ Studio was that space where individual artists were able to give each other support as they conceptualised, expressed and practiced. Since Ngoma was open to any artist, its role as a commercial studio became minimised. It served more as an informal meeting space where ideas got exchanged and new styles learnt. It encouraged interaction between artists, gave them the necessary confidence to not only express themselves with freedom but to also seek exposure. The result has been the growth of numerous artists’ studios and spaces in Kampala and other parts of the country, where artists try to support each other and market their own work. Some of the historical artists of the Ngoma Initiative (1998) are Rose Kirumira (Chair of the Ngoma Working Group), Lillian Nabulime, Francis Nuwagaba (Taga), Venny Nakazibwe, Amanda Tumusiime, Francis Ifee, Fred Mutebi and Maria Naita. Later came Hood Jjuuko, Edison Mugalu, Sheila Nakitende, Ronex Ahimbisibwe, Victoria Namakula and Ismail Musoke Ddamba. The Ngoma Artists have to-date vibrant artistic careers either as academicians, managers or as prominent practicing artists in Uganda and beyond. Since then, new artists’ initiatives such as 32° East, KANN Artists’ Group, Mona Art Studios, Weaver Bird Artists’ Village, and FasFas Art Cafe have emerged being either managed or supported by artists. That is the legacy of Ngoma Artists’ Workshop.

The most important result of the Ngoma Workshop to date was the coming together of several young Ugandan artists initiating and managing their own artists’ studios. Artists’ studios in Africa are not new; they started as early as the 1930s when early missionary activities included art and craft classes 5 to “develop” indigenous culture, (Court, 1985). Examples are Ruth Schaffner who started the Gallery Watatu in Kenya and Polly Street Art Center in Johannesburg where the early professional black artists in South Africa such as Bill Ainslie, David Koloane and Noria Mambaso had studios. Rev. W. Frangeon Jones started the Cyrene Art Center and Frank McEwen started the Salisbury Gallery Center in Zimbabwe; Beier Ulli started the Oshobongo Artist’s Movement in

1. Kyeyune, George “Art in Uganda in the 20th Century” (Unpublished Doctoral Thesis, 2003) 2. Kirumira, Namubiru Rose and Sidney L. Kasfir (2013) “An Artist’s notes on the Triangle Workshops (Zambia and South Africa)” in African Art 3. “Agency in the Workshop”, ed. Sidney Littlefield Kasfir and Till Forster. (Indiana: Bloomington Indiana University Press, 2013) 4. Court, E. “Notes in Seven Stories about Modern Art in Africa” ed. W. A. Gallery. (London: Whitechapel Art Gallery, 1995) 5. Kasfir, S.L. “African Art” (London: Thames and Hudson, 1999).

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6. Triangle Arts Trust Report 2000-2003 (London: Triangle Arts Trust, 2004) 7. My PhD Thesis, Formation of Contemporary Visual Artists in Africa: Re-visiting Residency Programmes, 2010 extensively outlines the objectives, activities and benefits of visual artists’ workshops. The thesis noted that it was imperative that African artists participate in shaping the systems that contribute to their own development even in the face of enormous management challenges. 8. E, Court. "Margaret Trowell and the Development of Art Education in East Africa." Art Education 38, no. 6 (1985): 35-41 9. Deliss, C. “7+7=1: Seven stories, seven stages, one exhibition” in Seven Stories about Modern Art in Africa (London: Whitechapel Art Gallery, 1995) 10. Kojo Fosu “20th Century Art of Africa” (Ghana: Artists Alliance, 1993). 11. The Go-Down Arts Centre is supposedly an independent African-driven initiative (it is supported by the Ford Foundation), established in 2003. It brings various categories of artists (performing, dancers, media, writers and visual) and audiences together in ways that refresh, challenge and inspire its artists’ community. It provides a work space for visual artists both in Kenya, Africa and international such as studios, workshops and residencies. The artists have access to a wide audience and their community is given a chance to interact with them. Greatmore Studios is a visual artists’ space equipped with studio, exhibition and administrative space. Both spaces provide the same services to the artists where they can informally develop their artistic profession.

W H Y N OT A R T I S TS ’ S T U D I O S ? HOODS JJUUKO Karibu Art Studio Karibu Art Studio was started seven years ago by two artists; Anwar Nakibinge and Hoods Jjuuko. Having been in previous art studios that eventually collapsed, they decided to start up an art studio that can serve as a platform and a home for creative artistic people, which at the same time can be self-sustaining. Their aim was to bring artists together and help them have a place to express their artistic creativity.

artwork in order to pay the studio monthly rent, the biggest problem in the previous studios.

Karibu Art Studio has managed to stay in existence for a long time making it the longest-running studio in Uganda currently in existence.

Artists being highly emotional people, the owners tend to be careful in choosing which artists to work with.

Hoods Jjuuko and Anwar Nakibinge hold art classes that help raise some money to defray studio costs. This helps to eliminate the issue of begging artists to contribute to the studio rent.

The studio also has an advisory team which includes Dr William Kalema of BDO East Africa who is an art lover and great business man, and Jennifer Gadebo, a specialist in interior design who enjoys relating with artists in the community.

Why then has Karibu Art Studio survived? In previous studios financing has been a problem between artists and management. Hoods Jjuuko and Anwar Nakibinge decided to deduct thirty five percent off the sales of their

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W H Y C U R AT E ? ANGELO KAKANDE There was a time when art would speak for itself. The curator would select works and put them on a white wall. But how could a urinal validate its presence in an exhibition (museum) space without the intervention of a curator? 1 Today, the curator must intervene by organising an exhibition administratively (select space, time and participants for an exhibition) and historically (explain its meaning and relevance to a particular time and space). Because of these two duties, Curating at the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial

and Fine Art is part of two courses: (i) art history and (ii) exhibition. This curriculum prepares students to present their work to a ‘buying public’. Here then lies a fundamental question, namely; where art and design function in ways which have nothing to do with the capitalist art market, does this curriculum not narrow the curatorial scope of its graduates? I admit that one cannot be a judge in his or her own cause.2 But I must be forgiven for doing exactly that. In my judgment, this

commercialised notion of curating assumes that the strength of an art and design exhibition lies in sales. Though popular among artists in Uganda today, it is wrong. It distorts the role of curators. It limits the meaning of curating. For curating with respect to art and design is to organise an exhibition. The one who curates is called a curator, that is: the one who organises an exhibition. Selling is not primary to these definitions; it is secondary.

1. Here I am speaking of the readymades, the classic example being the urinal Marcel Duchamp presented as an artwork, titled: Fountain (1917)? 2. There is a Latin expression for this: nemo iudex sua causa.

W H Y N OT C U R AT E ? D AU D I K A RU N G I 1

In 2002, I established Afriart Gallery . My mandate at this point was to organise and market art exhibitions to the “rich guys” living in Kampala. A few years later, I realised that the “rich guys” of Kampala do not buy art like “rich guys” of London and New York. Instead, the not-so-rich “art lovers” (locals and expatriates) and tourists ended up consuming the art that was being churned out. After several visits to art exhibitions in Europe and America, I realised that these shows have curators and that explained the red dots on the art works.

This begged the question; what do curators do that art marketers do not? The answer is; curators select art, write about it, market it to the right client, arrange the exhibition and, after the show, follow up. My own experience is that there is a need for specialisation within the creative sector, rather than have these “super African” artists who produce, curate and market their own art. It is simply draining and inefficient. There is also need for variety. New curatorial points of view create a fresh appeal to the artwork on show. For example, different curators bring different looks to exhibitions like

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Documenta, Basel, Africa Remix 4 and such. There is a certain level of organisation, contextualisation, publication and promotion that results in the success of these shows. The bigger the curatorial team, the more effectively the artist and their work are brought to world attention. Art exhibitions in Kampala still face a lack of curatorial training, writing skills, management and financing structures as major drawbacks. These key areas of specialisation should be developed to help bring good art to its intended audience.

1. Afriart Gallery is a focal point of Kampala's artistic community and provides a wonderful space to showcase the exquisite art of Uganda. 2. Documenta is an exhibition of modern and contemporary art which takes place every five years in Kassel, Germany. 3. Art Basel stages the world's premier modern and contemporary art shows, held annually in Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong. Founded by gallerists in 1970. 4. Africa Remix: Contemporary Art of a Continent was the largest exhibition of contemporary African art ever seen in Europe. Featuring more than 60 artists.

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Loodi Loodi (lit. Lord Lord, rich man) - zunga zunga (swahili wandering aimlessly) - omuzungu (lit. wanderer, rich, white person) - suuti (garment, smart, educated) - emmotoka (car, engine, sex) - kalinaabiri (many storied house, rich) - boss mugagga (rich man) - munene munene (lit. big big, fat fat, rich man).

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W H Y F ES T I VA L S ? FA I S A L K I W E WA Organising a successful festival is not different from the usual necessary planning of any activity or event, although the uniqueness of a festival lies within its concept of programming. Around the world, many festivals have different backgrounds and purposes. Whatever the background or purpose, festivals have in common that they are powerful experiences, bringing together audiences and performers in a momentum of excitement and high quality content and excellence and have – even when not originally intended as such – a great impact on local economies.

is increasingly passing laws that defy human rights. At a time when the world has not yet fully overcome recent financial crises, festival organisers are faced with bitter cuts in arts and culture budgets, and diminishing marketing and CSR budgets, while philanthropy and private giving have not yet firmly taken root in Africa.’ Therefore, for a festival to be successful in Uganda today there has to be a long-term added value to its establishment; a clear goal to work towards. Like the establishment of the Bayimba Festivals, aimed at providing a platform for artistic talents and reaching out to a wider audience by adopting a less formal setting, thereby keeping the arts accessible to the average Ugandan. It is now seven years on the road towards this goal and we have begun to register a growing diverse audience and a vibrant creative arts sector, thus becoming a significant festival in the Ugandan social calendar.

However, defining a successful festival really depends on what side you are on. For audiences, it is important that the programme meets their expectations; offers an environment to socialise and maximise fun. For the organiser, measuring success is challenging and can only be long-term. The festival has to be ready at all times to manage any level of crisis, be consistent and keep up the momentum. This can only be achieved if strategies are developed with physical assessment of risks observed from the past and future plans.

This level of success is observed from our regular assessments benchmarked with objectives to deliver a high quality programme and become sustainable. We plan our festivals to ensure improvement in the quality of life, to create jobs, grow audiences, and create demand for the arts, as well as stimulating new creative and artistic ideas to link to the current possible public and private partnerships. We also understand the challenges with the risks we take. For us to be successful, we have to be true and stay relevant to the arts, the artists and the audiences that we serve.

In Uganda today, a festival fever has reached even the most remote areas. One can witness a tremendous proliferation of festivals. In every corner of Kampala, we see festivals of dance, film, human rights, and even food emerge. Every month there is a new festival idea while older events have started adding the word “festival” to their title. The word “festival” has surely become a buzzword. It is difficult to tell how many festivals are being organised in Uganda today, the main reason being that there is little consistency and sustainability; many of them do not survive their first edition. At the same time the old and established festivals are faced with new challenges of justification. Sponsorship requires a direct return on investment and funding bodies want organisers to focus on realising their own resources, to look at historic spaces, creative energies and talents and to utilise cultural assets and resources in an attempt to become more distinctive, create a new urban fabric and generate economic, social and cultural prosperity. These are large demands for festivals, especially in Uganda where they are still struggling to survive, more particularly also now that our government

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W H Y N OT F ES T I VA L S ? L AU R A R AT L I N G A fantastic question and one which has led me to probe why I have spent the last ten years of my life working at them, on them, within them. Why I have dedicated my time to volunteering at, devising and producing festivals at locations worldwide. What are they and why do they matter? Do they matter, even?

imaginations that go into making these complex, dynamic and positive activities happen. Festivals are a time to interact, to collaborate and build relations. Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the largest arts festival in the world, a circus of talents, art forms, visions; one of the most fantastic - and ever developing - places, but also one of the most effective networking opportunities.

The origin of the word points to religious roots and centres upon images of community, feasting and celebration. Today, these foundations have augmented into something fantastic. Vast. A fluorescent spectrum of film festivals, music events, food tastings, that speckle the cultural calendars of many a city: visions of swaying crowds, painstakingly hung frames, glowing lights and enthralled gazes; craft and skill and sweat.

Festivals are a chance to engage; to build relationships and to form artistic bonds. One of their most exciting elements is the myriad communions and communications that inevitably evolve with individuals from diverse cultures, backgrounds and contexts. Festivals are a place to build fresh forward thinking communities.

I have worked at NOW now Festival of Spontaneous and Experimental Music and Film in Sydney's Blue Mountains; a miniature gathering in a remote village focussing on obscure sound and vision; at Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, which startles with its vastness as you peer over the valley edge; I have devised and directed The Big Noise Festival, a multi-discipline arts festival which raises awareness of, and funds for homeless individuals, and I am now project managing KLA ART 014, Kampala Contemporary Art Festival.

They represent a break from the norm; an alternative version of the real world. A time to break free, to hide, to be entertained and lifted from the humdrum and every day, if only for a short while: a live, dynamic, vibrant universe. And why not? In this ever changing, often demanding and challenging little world of ours, doesn't everyone need a place to escape to? Festivals are everything. Fundamental for arts and culture, for the opportunities they offer artists and arts managers; for the chances they afford the public and participants to be removed, if briefly, from the real world into a new and exciting space, to access and to learn.

The difference in these cultural events is immense from multiple angles; their audiences, their marketing, their goals and many of their reasons for being. Their fundamental objectives, however, remain the same and intrinsically entwined with the roots of the word.

And yet, they are nothing. They are not life or death; they are not family or friends, or health or wealth. They are simply something positive and potentially powerful: a chance to celebrate, to interact, to embrace. So sit back, relax and enjoy.

Celebration and community are, for me, also twinned with escapism in contemporary society’s version of ‘festival’. Festivals are a time to rejoice. A time to explore, to unite and experiment: to innovate and learn. They are a time to showcase: a platform for artists to share their ideas, their craft and a learning experience for all. For me, festivals can and should be political on a larger scale exploring, discussing, speaking freely on social issues; but personal politics should be left at the door in exchange for a wristband. Energy is better spent admiring the wealth of skills and crafts, the active

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F ES T I VA L E X H I B I T I O N

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TO N Y CY I Z A N Y E COLOURFUL VOICE OF MY PEOPLE “My People is everyone else besides the privileged. By

popular or visible mediums of expression? In this

this phrase�, the artist Tony Cyizanye also means

case, Cyizanye invests himself in painting the voice of

people who can't speak, but who want to speak. The

his people. He has used bright colours because they

non-privileged struggle to speak out. For example, if

free the spirit, letting his people talk. Colour is a

one wants to talk to the president of the republic

form of communication. It is understood by the

there is protocol to follow. This is only an easy

privileged and non-privileged, and thus can mediate

process for some. Thus, Cyizanye creates a platform

between the two. Wordless communication is

for the voice of his people. Artists express ideas

important in this case. Since most things are

through visual art, musicians through music. But

unspoken, colour says much.

how do the non-privileged speak without such

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M U LU G E TA G E B R E K I DA N T H E C R E AT I V I T Y O F S U RV I VA L For his video and photography works, artist Mulugeta

and negative ways. In Kampala, he observes the

Gebrekidan has worked with the notion of site specificity.

powerlessness of the poor against multinational

This is when an artist takes the location into account

corporations. As an artist Gebrekidan says, 'There is an

while planning and creating the artwork. It often

external force coming and changing situations. So this

incorporates aspects of the environment. In this sense the

change has positive and negative impact. Sometimes,

artist will make work according to the place he is in:

when I look at the negative impact it looks surreal. For

through research, through interactions, and exploring

me, these people who are affected or neglected are left in

the location. Since coming to Kampala, Mulugeta has

a wrong place.' This same element of an imbalance of life

worked intensely along the Uganda Railway (today

is visible through all the works, such as the poor man

known as Rift Valley Railway). He has visited a number of

touching the Coca Cola billboard, and elaborates the

markets along the tracks, such as that in Kireka, to

dichotomies of wealth and poverty and power and

observe the way in which the reconstruction of the

powerlessness. Gebrekidan is also exploring the idea of

railway has affected the people around it. He has also

photographs imagined as paintings. The fast pace of boda

been trying to observe how such urban development

boda motorists becomes his focus, so the artist utilises a

creates a situation of quagmire, of displacement, loss of

slow lens speed to create what appear to be digital brush

identity or history, and urban degeneration. In Addis

strokes. The boda bodas dash off in traffic at light-speed

Ababa, where the artist comes from, he observes the

while everything else remains calm and serene in the

impact of the new railway reconstruction in bothpositive

background.

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PA U L K ATA M I I R A B U K E N YA E’KKOMAGIRO The artist Paul Katamiira's process of making

from the roof draping down at varying lengths. The

barkcloth is brought to the gallery from his own

installation aims at recognising the practice of

space. 'E'kkomagiro' is an installation work that

barkcloth making. It is a platform for both a

engages the audience at different levels. In one way, it

discursive and ephemeral experience surrounding

provides a book and scrolls, where Paul Katamiira

the ancient art form. In the words of the artist Paul

has written about the centuries old tradition of

Katamiira, ‘I want it to be about the making of

barkcloth making. He has also, in words, imagined

barkcloth as our heritage; I want the whole world to

how this tradition could survive in the near future. In

know what has been within my family for over three

another way, with the technical assistance of

hundred years.’

contemporary artist Vitshois Mwilambwe, it provides a scenographic interpretation of the space in which the artist works. Several bark cloth pieces are hung

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VIVIAN MUGUME FA M I LY

The artist Vivian Mugume is a painter of particular

The flexibility of such symbolism allows the artist to

renown within his native Kampala, as well as across

engage meanings beyond space, time and place. In

East Africa. Family engages issues of morality,

his own words, ‘Symbols are open and vast because

religion and nostalgia. The highly personal stories of

they don't limit the message to one element.’ Yet what

his work date back to his childhood upbringing in

is the story behind these symbols? Mugume is

Kampala city, a stone's throw from the railway

influenced by his upbringing by a single mother and

station, the Festival Exhibition venue. Like the Tao's

the struggle to become a man without a father figure.

yin and yang, dualities of positive and negative are

Faith is a barometer for the soul. In the artist's words,

evident in Mugume’s work. He explores both storage

'Faith is guided by your feeling, your attitude, your

technology and barkcloth. He uses the figure of a

intention, your thinking and your heritage.' The

lizard symbolically, which appears both ancient and

symbols in his work are maps tracing Mugume's

contemporary. The symbol functions as both a

personal experiences of religion, family, and social

hieroglyph for the state of African art and a

morality.

cryptograph for the artist's own personal meanings.

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D E N N I S M U R AG U R I M ATAT U TA X I ‘Seeing comes before words... the relation between

light box installation. Matatu Taxi is part of an

what we see and what we know is never settled,’ are

ongoing project that the artist has produced in

the thoughts of John Berger. The artist Dennis

Kenya. Its subject is the matatu or the passenger van.

Muraguri says critically about the people of Kampala,

It is a popular means of public transport in Nairobi,

‘You have what is unique, but you don't see it.’ He

Kampala, and other African metropolises. But are

adds, ‘It is always someone else that sees the

matatus the same all over Africa? The artist observes

uniqueness of what you have.’ Here, the artist

that matatus in Kampala differ in character from

establishes a relationship between the people and

those in Nairobi. Nairobi's matatus are flamboyant,

objects in the city. Muraguri observes the uniqueness

Kampala's matatus subdued. Their blue line indicates

of owning what we see. According to John Berger

modest simplicity. In addition, the actions in and

words are a way of explaining the world around us.

around the matatu are not only physical but mental

But when lost for words, how does one convey the

and spiritual. In fact, for Muraguri these collective

world around him? This is the premise of Muraguri's

actions are the local sport of the near future.

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V I TS H O I S M W I L A M B W E B O N D O D AY B Y D AY, L E T M E D R E A M M Y F U T U R E The artist Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo is concerned

money to survive, according to the artist. The

with the reality of the people of cities in Africa. The

engagement of possibility and dreams is a spiritual

word reality, itself, represents the political and

and existential interpretation of life in urban Africa.

economic situation in which people in urban spaces

The possibility and the dream becomes a spiritual

exist. When the notion of survival emerges,

reaction to the reality of life in these urban spaces.

Mwilambwe engages the dream. In this sense, the

The metaphysical meeting of the dream and the

dream, une reve, is the antithesis of the current

reality is represented by the physical meeting of the

disparities of life for the people. Day by Day is about

video projection and the coloured wooden panels.

the possibilities of how people survive everyday. They

The resulting spectacle is an apparition of layered

create businesses; try to sell small things in the

colour. And it is at this moment that the people in

market

African cities, metaphorically, 'dream their future.'

to

see

how

they

can

have

some

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H E L L E N N A B U K E N YA GOLDEN HEART Golden Heart is a work that unites the narratives of

often point towards the complex experiences and

four women known to the artist Hellen Nabukenya

situations

living within her neighbourhood of Buziga,

neighborhood go through. In Golden Heart, the artist

Kampala. Continuing her series Tuwaaye (loosely

says that the strips of cloth indicate the wavering of

translated as ‘let’s talk’) she engages artistic

love, care, protection, wisdom, and strength of a

interpretations of social issues affecting women.

woman. The strips are silky, flowing, and shiny to

Narrativisation is Nabukenya's methodology to trace

represent the feminine. However, the silky and

the unheard voices of women. The starting point for

flowing fabric material has been shredded and its

any of the artist's large scale woven artworks is an act

significant strips redesigned to bring together the

of togetherness. Her dialogues with the women form

unique stories of Nabukenya's four women. The artist

the basis of her stitching. By stitching parts of fabric

adds that ‘The stitched is the only thing that can last

together, the process of re-narrativising becomes a

and that is still a woman.’

reality. The various colours of Nabukenya's work

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that

women

within

the

artist's


PA U L N D U N G U R U MY BUILDING BLOCKS My Building Blocks is an artwork about building the

made. These totems are visual and textual symbols

nation. The Tanzanian artist Paul Ndunguru reflects

for communities. This places the installation within

on nationalism, patriotism and community in the

the

work. Its participatory nature brings out these ideas.

throughout the region. Yet using wood for the first

The work is both a metaphoric and materialistic

time brought its own set of challenges. In previous

search for unity. During his time in Uganda,

sculptural pieces Ndunguru has worked with stand

Ndunguru recognised the block as a metaphor for

alone figures. Working with bricks raises issues of

unity. Yet the block is also the material for building

assembling them, building a met aphorical national

communal structures. The current popular campaign

togetherness. The audience placed written desires

to rebuild the incinerated royal tombs in Kasubi

and confessions on the wooden blocks. Through this

intrigued him, in particular. He represents the unity

collective act forms a community of desire. The

of the people of East Africa through the metaphor of

installation asks: How does one envision their

the material block, ‘tafaali’ in Swahili, a form of

nation? If one were to relocate, where would it be,

national togetherness. Ndunguru has incorporated

and what would one desire from that community?

animal and human figures on the blocks that he has

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framework

of

local

communal

systems


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HELEN ZERU INSIDE OUT: ONE FOOT IN ONE FOOT OUT In Inside Out: One Foot In, One Foot Out, Ethiopian

home; the uprooting of trees symbolises losing home

artist Helen Zeru continues exploring personal and

and being away from home; the replanting of trees

humanist themes. In previous performance and

represents starting a new life, and so on. Zeru points

video works, she addresses the theme of loss and

out that one tree can be replanted many times. And,

memory. The physical objects that represent loss and

in this way, being replanted many times becomes a

ephemeral experiences become the focus of the

pathway to engage the meaning of survival. This is

work. Here, Zeru focusses on storytelling across

typical of the stories that she has encountered

borders. The protentially tragic experience of being

amongst Ethiopian and Eritrean immigrants in

an immigrant becomes a central theme of the

Kampala. Through interviews, the artist has

artwork,

of

produced a meditation on the human condition

displacement. Further exploring human themes, the

during exile. The resulting performance and video

artist has chosen plants and trees as metaphors for

work shows the superficiality of geographical and

the heavy and chaotic subject matter of immigration.

political borders and explores the triumphant

Trees become a pathway to engage the meaning of

survival of the immigrant.

whose

title

discusses

a

state

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F R A N C I S X . N N AG G E N DA VENDOR ON SCAFFOLD Ugandan artist Francis Nnaggenda has been

century. The sculpted figure, in her precarious

renowned

and

movements, seems to comply with the rules

internationally for his moving artworks. Here, he

governing the urban space. They are subdued by

presents a moving painting titled Vendor on Scaffold.

forces beyond their control. Here, the artist uses

A scaffold is a temporary metal structure for workers

precarious upward movement to engage with the

on a building under construction. The vendor is

complex existence of labourers and low-income

represented by a mother carrying a child on her back

workers in urban Kampala and, indeed, Africa in its

with bananas on her head, as she climbs up the

entirety. These existential concerns are part of

blocks. The moving and stimulating nature of his

Nnaggenda's artistic trajectory. In his words, ‘My art

composition

concrete

is a study of the spiritual infinite and complexity of

architecture of Tropical Modernism, and the

nature's presence. As an artist, I reveal the synthesis

renovation of these buildings with scaffolding, that

of aesthetic toughness based on African thoughts,

has characterized urban Africa in the twenty first

deep values of inspiration and creative spontaneity.’

within

brings

his

to

home

mind

country

the

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T H E B O DA B O DA P R O J ECT

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S TA C E Y G I L L I A N A B E FUNKY GLASS RIDE

Through her artwork, Stacey Gillian has made herself the case study. As an emerging female artist in Uganda, she finds herself at a stage of growth and sees herself as ‘unmapped’. The artwork explores the uncertainties and expectations associated with being a female artist in contemporary Kampala. Furthermore, Funky Glass Ride explores glasswork. Ugandans relate to glass as an everyday material; it is everywhere and extremely accessible. The way in which Stacey Gillian uses stained glass to create tangible works of art defines who she is. And the way in which she uses it remains ‘unmapped’.

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RONEX AHIMBISIBWE TAKE ME HOME, YOUR HEAD IS NOT METAL

In the creation of Take Me Home, Your Head is not Metal, Ronex explored the dangers of riding on a boda boda. The sculpture’s theme is derived from the advantages and disadvantages of using this mode of transport, namely: saving time and gaining inspiration from the city as an artist, as advantages, and the frequency of accidents, as disadvantages. The sculpture shows a human figure seated on a boda boda, constructed from the names of towns that compose Kampala city. The towns are the places that the boda boda can easily access; the helmet signifies safety, which is emphasised by the wording ‘Your Head is not Metal’ on it.

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B A B I RY E L E I L A H B U R N S B O D A B O D A PAT R O L 0 0 1

Babirye Leilah’s artwork Boda Boda Patrol 001 promotes awareness of the attacks which take place on boda boda drivers, whom she perceives to be ‘unmapped’, at night. These are known as ‘ab’obutayiimbwa’. The artwork is a call to protect the boda boda driver through a visualisation of what the Boda Boda Patrol or safety and security measures taken to protect drivers might look like.

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D I S A B I L I T Y A R T P R O J ECT U G A N DA OBLEEMU KIKEMO ?

DAPU’s boda boda has been redesigned to suit disability accessibility standards for all people with physical disabilities. In Uganda, it is the law to have accessible buildings and roads; however, there is nothing which states that public transport such as boda bodas need to be accessible. On this level, for PWDs, the boda boda is ‘unmapped’. DAPU have chosen to ‘map’ the boda boda by showing what a fully accessible motorcycle should look like. The wheelchair displayed can be attached to a boda boda whenever a person with disabilities wants to use it.

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A D O N I A S O C O M E KU W E S AV E K A R A M O J A , S AV E M A M A I

Adonias Ocom Ekuwe’s exploration of the ‘unmapped’ includes an installation matched by a performance. The artist and street beggars, who he has engaged in his project, are dressed in traditional Karamajong attire. They distribute bananas to passersby in exchange for money. The objective behind this is to empower them with alternative survival skills. The ‘knowledge baskets’, in which people can share their views on the causes of and the solutions for the Karamajong beggars, are a further powerful element of the project.

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J O S H UA K AG I M U TWEZUULE

Kagimu Joshua Rap Poet has named his piece Twezuule; a Luganda word denoting discovering someone’s unborn talent. The artwork centres upon the mapping of the talents of street children. Kagimu provides a stage for individuals to perform on, allowing them the opportunity to explore and discover talents within themselves, by using the instruments provided.

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R E AG A N K A N D O L E GO GREEN UGANDA

Kandole Reagan’s map of Uganda is constructed from non-biodegradable plastic bottles and cans from landfill sites. It is designed to promote awareness of the need for an eco-friendly approach to environmental issues, to protect nature in Uganda. The black on the map represents the degradation of the land, pollution and deforestation, which results in drought and the destruction of nature, as well as livelihoods. The green leaf is a call for the Go Green Campaign, and the yellow symbolises the notion that appropriate action can save the environment and protect Uganda, ensuring that it shines.

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K AT U M B A S I M O N P E T E R E ’ TA FA A L I LYA M A S I L O

Katumba’s artwork explores the brick maker as a man who plays a vital role in communities, but who is largely unrecognised and underappreciated. Etaffaali Lya Masilo serves to ‘map’ the brick maker, artistically exploring what he goes through in creating the bricks and encouraging the audience to appreciate his work, so that they may recognise his value in society. Katumba promotes the notion that everything the brick maker produces is art.

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D E R R I C K KO M A K EC H G O SLOW ! WOM A N C A R RY I NG PA I N T

Komakech’s composition celebrates female artists as the unheard voices of our cities. He is working with Kampala’s only female driver. Her costume, a dress, represents her commitment to her job, as a marriage gown represents commitment for the betrothed. As a female painter, she is mixing her own paint: endeavouring to save time for the many tasks she must carry out. Through the title, Komakech cautions that a woman is riding on a boda boda and carrying heavy tools so needs to be excused. The project represents the hard work and daring creativity required to work as a painter for a living.

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K I Z I TO M B U G A BODA BODA KIBANDA

Mbuga has ‘pimped’ his boda boda with a sculpture representing the local Uganda cinema halls. The piece includes a performance of a film translated into Luganda, playing from the sculpture through the speakers. Mbuga explores the notion that local cinema halls are the unsung heroes of the entertainment industry. This is the place in which the majority of the population, for whom modern cinemas are inaccessible because of their price, are entertained. The cinema halls display innovation, through their translations and outdoor advertisements.

44


KINO MUSOKE I AM BODA BODA

Kino Musoke’s artwork is a reflection on the boda boda man himself. Through mirrors placed on ‘fig trees’ constructed from side mirrors mounted on the handle bars of the motorcycle, the image of the rider is reflected back on himself. Musoke celebrates the boda boda driver as a hero: a man who has beaten traffic; the human Google map; and, yet, the person who is most likely to be viewed by society as directionless and lacking ambition. The mirrors offer the world a reflection of the driver, and show the driver as the world views him.

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E N O C K K A LU L E K AG G A & S A N D R A S U U B I KING OF THE ROAD

Siblings, Suubi and Enock are showcasing the boda man as the kabaka; giving him his throne in the form of a boda boda helmet. The driver sits within the helmet, like a king within his kingdom. The helmet as throne allows the drivers to make their majestic way, which is so often denied to them, through the city. The public become the ‘loyal’ subjects who must make way. The helmet also serves to promote safety for the boda boda drivers. It offers them protection, as Suubi and Kalule see drivers as a fundamental element of Kampala-life whose time here needs to be prolonged.

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O G WA N G J I M M Y J O H N BODA TO BODA STUDIO

Jimmy John’s sound sculpture installation celebrates the street musician. Street singers and musicians have long been a central part of city life, moving from one street to another, playing their songs and sharing their sounds. As a business, they charge a small fee to a gathering of people to whom they perform. The street musician is not exposed to a wider audience because the nature of their business attracts a specific class of individual; mainly the street dwellers and vendors. Jimmy John seeks to ‘map’ this element of Kampala life by producing a sound recording studio directly onto the boda boda. A track is played and the audience can sing, rap or chant into the box mapping themselves as Kampala’s very own street musician.

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PETRO OPE N OB I T UA RY

Petro’s artwork Open Obituary explores the artist’s concern that Uganda ranks 19th in fatal road accidents in Africa. Petro sees this as an indication of the speed at which we lose the future heroes of this country. He sees these victims as ‘unmapped’, as they go before their time and do not live to tell their stories. His artwork is therefore, effectively ‘mapping’ them. Open Obituary is designed to raise awareness of road safety and to promote taking care whilst driving, something which Petro believes the government overlooks.

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GRACE SARAH C A R RY I NG A N I M A L S ON A B ODA B ODA

Grace Sarah’s artwork, Carrying Animals on a Boda Boda, promotes the transporting of livestock on the back of motorbikes. The visual artist from Fort Portal explores the potentially controversial practice and celebrates it as an easy way in which to transport animals down narrow roads which may be otherwise inaccessible for ‘unmapped’ agricultural workers.

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I A N M W ES I G A & I M M A C U L AT E M A L I POP IT!

The main objective of Pop It! is to reconstruct society’s perspective on visual art as a product of certain aesthetic values, purposes and functions, and to promote the idea that it can be anything, regardless of place, form, state and time. The artwork also explores and celebrates the mobile popcorn business across Kampala, promoting popcorn as a delicacy which brings people together, these commonly seen, but rarely celebrated business people.

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PA PA S H A B A N I LE STUDIO BODA BODA: UNMAPPING THE CAMERA MAN

“If you have ever posed for a photograph and it was successfully taken, then you joined eternity” Papa Shabani: “The forgotten camera man; their clean yet worn-out shoes, bicycles with tired tyres; the long distances they rode; the many homes they visited. What I remember is that to them everywhere was home and, oh yes, the excitement on their return with photo-prints. There are so many things I can’t forget about these great men, not because I’m a modern ‘camera man’ but because I understand the role they played”.

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A N ES T G A B R I E L S H A LO O M THE FRUIT SELLER

Anest Gabriel Shaloom explores the fruit sellers who make a living selling their wares in busy places. He celebrates the way in which they provide health to the people of Uganda, whilst earning a living. Shaloom believes that fruit sellers have a positive impact on the daily life of Ugandans, as well as the economy of the country, while they remain excluded, unrecognised and ‘unmapped’ by authorities.

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R I C H A R D WA S I K E THE SAFETY FLAPPER

Wasike’s artwork represents contemporary advertising, ‘mapping’ the street seller or ‘hawker’ so common to everyday cities. The Safety Flapper is a performance art piece on a boda boda in the form of a mechanical wind powered robot/doll or a ‘crazy salesman’. The doll waves, flaps and blows its whistle. It was assembled through the imaginative use of locally available materials, including wood, plastic and old clothes, and promotes road safety.

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XENSON R AT T R A P

Xenson’s boda boda carries an installation of rat traps. These are made by burning old car tyres and constructing beautiful basket like traps from the product. The concept behind this is a metaphor for trapping the untapped. The art piece conveys the complex systems of trapping and un-trapping, or mapping and un-mapping that exists within Africa. The wire traps represent the colonial histories of geographical and psychological slavery. Rat Trap also recognises the craftsmanship which goes into the using and reusing of the wire.

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D I R ECTO RY ADDIS ABABA ADDIS FOTO FEST

THE ZOMA CONTEMPORARY ART CENTRE

‘The main objective for the third edition of the Addis Foto Fest is to explore the notion of image through a global framework. At times, one thing that I have found to be limiting to the development of photography in Africa has been the fact that our vision has been set on producing content from and only for audiences within our borders or regions, while our aim should be towards exploring and promoting images from Africa to the global network.’ - Aida Muluneh, Director, Addis Foto Fest

‘The focus of ZCAC’s work is the promotion of multidisciplinary contemporary art, international exchange between artists, and the conception and implementation of sustainable, innovative, and environmentally conscious art projects.’ - C& website Address: P.O.Box 6050, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Tel: +251 91 124 9374 Email: zcac@zcac.net

December 1-7 2014

www.zcac.net

www.addisfotofest.com

NETSA ART VILLAGE ‘Netsa Art Village is a professional organization established in 2008 by 11 graduates from the Addis Ababa University School of Fine Arts and Design (...) It aims to fill the gap between artists and the community by organizing diverse artistic events including concerts, poetry evenings, art talks and workshops as well as exhibitions.’ Netsa Art Village website Address: Netsa Art Village, Near French Embassy Inside Ferensay Park, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Tel : +251911941678, +251916585758 Email: netsaartvillage@gmail.com Website: www.netsaartvillage.org

DAR ES SALAAM NAFASI ART SPACE

TINGA TINGA ARTS CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY

‘Our mission is to be the leading Contemporary Art Centre in Tanzania that provides a platform for artists through development, production and entrepreneurship in the Visual Arts by providing training, exchange and exhibition of contemporary arts locally, regionally and beyond.’ - Nafasi website

‘Tinga Tinga™ is one of the most famous African brands which was established by the Tanzanian artist Edward Tingatinga in 1968. Twenty years later in 1990, the family of Edward Tingatinga registered Tinga Tinga Arts Cooperative Society (TACS) which produces popular art products under the trade name Tinga Tinga™.’ - TACS website

Address: Plot No 41, P.O.Box 31715, Western Block, Light Industrial Road, Mikocheni B, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Tel: +225 716997254 / 78324553 Email: info@nafasiartspace.org

Postal Address: Tinga Tinga Arts Cooperative Society, P.O. Box 23122, Oysterbay, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Facebook: nafasiartspace Website: www.nafasiartspace.org

Visiting Address: Ward: Msasani, Street: Oysterbay, Plot No: 1823 Block, House Na MSN/OBY/585, Dar es Salaam, Daniel@TanzaniaArt.com, Tel : +255 654 57 48 08, +255 715 26 61 56 www.tingatinga.org

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KA M PA L A BAYIMBA CULTURAL FOUNDATION

LABA! ARTS FESTIVAL

‘Its vision is a vibrant arts and culture sector that is professional, creative and viable and contributes to social and economic development in Uganda and East Africa.’ - Bayimba website

‘The LaBa! is one of the oldest art festivals in Kampala, having been organized by the Goethe-Zentrum Kampala/ Ugandan German Cultural Society (GZK/ UGCS) and the Ugandan Artists Association for the first time in 2007, by then called the LaBa! Street Art Festival.’ - LaBa website

Bayimba, Plot 50, Kiira Road, Kenneth Dale Drive, Kamwokya, P.O.Box 34806, Kampala - Uganda Tel: +256 414 591 670, +256 713 548 784, Email: info@bayimba.org

7th - 8th June 2014

www.bayimba.org

www.labaartsfestival.wordpress.com

KAMPALA ART BIENNALE

32° EAST | UGANDAN ARTS TRUST

Kampala Art Biennale is a showcase of contemporary art from Africa with the goal to expose, educate and create debate about the value of art in society.’ - Kampala biennale website

32° East is a centre for the creation and exploration of contemporary Ugandan art.

1st - 30th August 2014

Address: Plot 2239, Ggaba Road, Kansanga, Kampala, Uganda, Email: info@ugandanartstrust.org

www.kampalabiennale.org

www.ugandanartstrust.org

KIGALI IVUKA ARTS KIGALI

YEGO ARTS

‘Ivuka Arts Kigali is an art center that was founded in 2007 with a major objective of discovering, nurturing and exposing young Rwandan artistic talent.’ - Ivuka Facebook page

'The mission of Yego Arts is to create a vibrant, self-sustaining community of established visual artists in Rwanda, and to create new avenues for Rwandans to use the arts as a means of healing and generating sustainable livelihoods for themselves and their children.' - Yego Arts website

Address: KG565 Street, Kacyiru Kigali, Rwanda, Tel: +250 788 620 560

Address: Yego Art Studio, Nyarutarama, 250 Kigali, Rwanda Tel: +250788480835, Email: yegoarts@gmail.com www.yegoarts.com

KINSHASA INSTITUE FRANCAIS DE RDC - Halle de la Gombe

1ST EDITION OF YANGO BIENNALE OF CONTEMPORARY ART, KINSHASA

‘... for the emergence of a Congolese cultural scene, and to promote and disseminate French culture and language.’ - IFK website

One of the objectives of the exhibition, curated by Sithabile Mlotshwa, is to observe the place of female contemporary artists.

Address: 33, avenue de la Gombe, KINSHASA – DRC, Tel : 00 (243) 085 558 15 12, E-mail : secretariat@ifkinshasa.org

22 November - 19 December 2014 www.yangobiennale.org

www.institutfrancais-kinshasa.org

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KIN ART STUDIOS

STUDIOS KABAKO

‘Kin Art Studios founded by former resident Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo wants to stimulate, in a modest way, exchange between local and international artists.’ - R-A-I-N website

‘In 2001, Faustin Linyekula set up the Studios Kabako in Kinshasa, an organisation for dance and visual theatre, ‘a place where people work, where you are always looking and sometimes you find, a place where you doubt but where some evenings certainty prevails.’ - Dance Dialogues Africa website

Address: Kin Art Studio, KAS Project Avenue, Nawejandi 18 A, Kinsuka, Commune de Ngaliema, Kinshasa, Republique, Democratique du Congo. Email: kinartstudio@yahoo.com

Address: Studios Kabako, Chaussée de Benseke 28/B, Commune de Ngaliema Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Email: virginie@kabako.org

Facebook: kas.kinartstudio

www.kabako.org

NAIROBI CIRCLE ART AGENCY

PAWA254

‘Through our consultancy, exhibitions and auctions we aim to give the region’s most talented artists greater visibility and opportunities, ultimately increasing access to the region’s lively and fast-developing art scene.’ - Circle Art Agency website

‘PAWA254 is Nairobi's unique social enterprise through which innovative professionals from diverse artistic fields exploit their creative genius to foster social change.’ - Pawa254 website Address: 2nd Floor, Africa Alliance of YMCAs Building, State House CRE, Nairobi City, Kenya, Tel: +254 721 956552

Address: Circle Art Agency, 910 James Gichuru Road, Lavington, Nairobi, Danda Jaroljmek +254 722 672 938, Rose Jepkorir +254 725 533 507, Email: info@circleartagency.com

www.pawa254.org

www.circleartagency.com

SONDEKA FESTIVAL

KUONA TRUST, CENTRE FOR VISUAL ARTS IN KENYA

‘The word “Sondeka” is a Sheng (Kenyan urban colloquial) word meaning “to make” or “to create”. The Sondeka festival is three days, at the Ngong Racecourse, from 18th non-stop music, workshops, dance, fitness, fashion, creation and auction of collaborative masterpieces.’ - Sondeka website

‘Kuona Trust, Centre for Visual Arts is dedicated to the generation, presentation and promotion of innovative contemporary visual arts practice in Kenya. Its artists’ studios, library, programme of exhibitions, artists’ talks, training & mentoring, education and international exchange, aims to provide opportunities for artists to develop new and experimental contemporary artwork within a context of international current practice.’ - Kuona Trust website

18th - 20th October 2014 www.sondekafestival.com

Address: Likoni Close, Likoni Lane, off Dennis Pritt Road, Hurlingham, P.O. Box 4802-00506 Nairobi, Kenya. Tel: (0)721 262326, (0)733 742752 Email: info@kuonatrust.org

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B I O G R A P H I C A L N OT ES C ATA L O G U E T E X T S

Karungi is also a co-founder of the Kampala Arts Trust. KIRUMIRA ROSE NAMUBIRU is a lecturer and sculptor

MARGARET NAGAWA is a Ugandan artist and independent

whose main engagement over the years was attending artists’

curator based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Nagawa’s interest lies

workshops and residencies in Africa and around the world,

in working collaboratively with artists on practice and public interaction.

Her

experience

and

background

where she gained experience of contemporary visual art and

have

artists’ practices. She has participated in the notable annual

encompassed a broad range of projects including art

exhibitions, 'Women on the Move' and 'Different But One'.

production, gallery work, education, curating, and writing,

Namubiru has worked on several public monuments

with institutions and independently. In 2012, Nagawa was

including 'King Ronald Mutebi' at Bulange, the Buganda

co-curator of Visionary Africa - Art at Work, the Kampala

Parliament, and 'Family' at Mulago Hospital in Kampala.

chapter. Nagawa is a graduate of Margaret Trowell School of Industrial

and

Fine

Art,

Makerere

University;

and

JJUUKO HOODS obtained a first class degree from Kampala

Goldsmiths, University of London.

University. Since graduating he has gained recognition for his unique bark cloth painting technique, which interconnects

ROCCA GUTTERIDGE is Project Director of KLA ART 014

modern and traditional concepts. Hoods previously directed

and Co-Director of 32° East | Ugandan Arts Trust. Based in

Gecko Art Studio and currently directs Karibu Art Gallery.

Kampala, 32° East was co-founded in 2011 with Nicola Elphinstone and is a centre for the creation and exploration of

FAISEL KIWEWA is the Founding Director of Bayimba

contemporary Ugandan art. Gutteridge’s key roles at 32° East

Cultural Foundation and currently chairs the organising

are the delivery of an international exchange programme,

committee of the Uganda Annual Conference on Arts and

participatory and public art projects including KLA ART and

Culture (UACAC). Bayimba Cultural Foundation has set as

the formation of an educational and professional development

one of its explicit objectives raising awareness for the role and

programme. The Co-Directors have won key grants from The

position of arts and culture in Ugandan society and economy

African Arts Trust, Arts Collaboratory and the British

and has, as such, played an instrumental role in the

Council and have formed partnerships with international

organisation of the UACAC. The Foundation also organises,

networking bodies such as the Triangle Network.

amongst other initiatives, seven free annual Bayimba Festivals that bring together artists from Uganda, East Africa and the

ANGELO KAKANDE lectures on Art History at the College

rest of the world to celebrate the power of arts and culture.

of Engineering, Design, Art, and Technology in Makerere University. His research on contemporary Ugandan art and its

LAURA RATLING is a Creative Producer and Festival

connection to politics is the subject of an unpublished Ph.D.

Manager. She has devised and produced a broad range of

thesis, Contemporary Art in Uganda: A Nexus between Art and

cultural events, including arts and music festivals, workshops

Politics.

and interactive events across London. This includes The Big Noise Festival, which she co-founded with Festival Manager

DAUDI KARUNGI has shown his artwork widely, locally and

Kevin Fisher, to promote awareness of homeless issues and

internationally. In 2002, he established AfriArt Gallery, and is

raise funds for UK-based charity, The Big Issue Foundation.

part of a new movement to promote Ugandan art. In 2008, he

Laura worked at arts festivals and events across Australia

co-founded START, a journal of arts and culture. In 2014, he

between 2007 and 2009, and engages in illustration and design

co-directed the 1st edition of the Kampala Art Biennale.

work. She came to Kampala in 2013 to work on the

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production design for Bayimba International Festival of Arts,

documents, and runs an informal readers group called

and was supported by the British Council to take on the role of

Tackling Texts. She is interested in re-looking at archival

Project Manager at KLA ART 014.

materials and formations of linear histories and stories. She attended Asiko Art School. Nantume co-curated the Art Competition exhibition for “The National CSO Fair 2013”,

C U R AT O R S

and ‘Know Go Zone” art project at Bayimba Curatorial Workshop 2013

BALIMUNSI PHILIP is a visual artist and an upcoming

SERUBIRI MOSES is a writer, photographer and curator. His

curator based at an independent art studio, Philbal Art Studio.

research interests include: urbanity, language, politics, and

He is pursuing an interest in Ugandan art history and its

aesthetics. His essays focus on metaphors for postcolonial

relation to contemporary practice. He is a national art judge of

politics in urban spaces. He is a correspondent for C& -

Youth Alive Uganda and was selected for and attended the

Contemporary And Platform for African Perspectives,

Bayimba / 32° East Curators Workshop, co-curating “Know

published critical essays in Chimurenga Chronic, and his new

Go Zone” and “Dance in the City”. His artistic practice has

academic paper on Spoken Word in Kampala is forthcoming

been exhibited in Zandjik, Boxmeer-Netherlands and throughout his hometown, Kampala.

in a book by the Goethe-Institut South Africa. His

MUKYALA HASIFA is the Gallery Administrator at

show 'Dance in the City' curated by “Know Go Zone”. As a

photographic 'Watching Dance Series' was shown in the group curator, Moses sits on the Curatorial Committee for the

Makerere University’s, Institute of Heritage, Conservation and

second Kampala Contemporary Art Festival, KLA ART 014.

Restoration. Her passion lies in the conservation and preservation of Ugandan art and artefacts. Her work at Makerere involves a broad and diverse array of activities,

C U R AT O R I A L A DV I S E R

including: co-curating of exhibitions and conserving and archiving of the Makerere Art Gallery permanent collection.

GABI NGCOBO is an artist, independent curator and

She participated in the curatorial training of the Bayimba / 32°

educator based in Johannesburg. Ngcobo has collaboratively

East workshop and took on an internship exchange at the Harare.

and independently conceptualised projects in South Africa

NANSUBUGA ROBINAH is a curator and a Project Manager

exhibition that coincided with the 17th UN Global Summit on

National

Gallery

of

Zimbabwe,

and internationally. In 2011 she curated “DON'T/PANIC,” an Climate Change (COP17) in Durban. She is the first POOL

(32° East). Her curatorial interests lie in locality, accessibility

Curatorial Fellow, and her exhibition some a little sooner,

and engagement. She took part in the Bayimba / 32° East

some a little later was held at the Zurich POOL/LUMA

Curators Workshop, which resulted in an exhibition: “Know

Westbau space from June-September 2013. As co-founder of

Go Zone”. She went on to co-curate “Dance in the City” at the

the Center for Historical Reenactments (CHR), a project

National Theatre, as part of Dance Transmissions Festival.

based in Johannesburg, Ngcobo curated “PASS-AGES:

Nansubuga has been involved with Fas-Fas Gallery, Kampala

references & footnotes” at the old Pass Office in Johannesburg

and the LaBa! Street Art Festival (Goethe-Zentrum UGCS).

and contributed to a two-year long project “Xenoglossia, a

She travelled to South Africa in 2012 to take part in the

research project,” culminating in two projects; “After-after

Independent Curators International workshop (Bag Factory, Johannesburg).

Tears” in New York and “Xenoglossia, the exhibition” in

NANTUME VIOLET is an artist and Project Manager at 32°

Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York. She is a faculty

Johannesburg, 2013. Ngcobo is a graduate of the Center for member at the Wits School of Arts, Fine Arts Division in

East | Ugandan Arts Trust where she runs the drop in, one on

Johannesburg.

one sessions with artists. She also explores archives and

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Ababa. Reflecting on questions of identity, history and the culture of his city, Gebrekidan aims to capture the internal

F E S T I VA L E X H I B I T I O N A RT I S T S

transformation of the hearts and minds of the people who are affected by the rapid destruction and reconstruction of urban

TONY CYIZANYE is a Rwandese painter and founder of

development. He creates a platform for visual, conceptual, and

Yego Arts studio in Kigali, Rwanda.

public dialogue on social issues through his site-specific works and public art interventions.

Cyizanye has exhibited extensively both within Rwanda and internationally. Key exhibitions venues include: Columbia

Born 1960, PAUL KATAMIIRA has been a farmer since the

University, New York; Charlie Dutton Gallery, London;

age of twenty. He started making backcloth at the age of

Fespad, Jaama Festival, Rwanda; Novotel/Umubano Hotel and

fourteen; the skill has been in his family for the past 150 years

Ishyo Arts Center, Kigali.

and was introduced by his great grandmother, Nakirijja.

Katamiira explains: “the art and trade is a legacy passed on

“I was born in Burundi in 1985, into a family of musicians. My

through my family lineage; making backcloth was passed on

father and three of my uncles were at the centre of the music

to me by my father”.

scene in Bujumbura, the capital city, and our house was their

rehearsal room. Younger musicians came to our home to

Nakirijja taught the craft to her son, Bukenya’s grandfather,

study. The sound of these lessons, and my father’s

Tanansi Nserikomawa, who passed the art of making onto

improvisations on the guitar filled the house since as long as I

Bukenya’s father and uncles. With a home workshop and and

can remember. One of my uncles was also a painter, and so the

over eighty ficus trees, whose barks regenerate and are

house doubled as a painting studio as well. I would sit beside

harvested every year, the family represents one of the biggest

him for hours, watching him work.

backcloth producers in Masaka town.

I am driven by the desire to find a style that is utterly distinct

Bukenya has taught his son the trade and has over thirty

from anything I have ever seen, something that expressed the

apprentices, and, with a resurgence of backcloth for both

worlds I came from in a way that felt completely my own.”

cultural occasions and fashion houses in Uganda, his art seems to be growing.

MULUGETA GEBREKIDAN was born in 1970 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He studied painting at Addis Ababa

For four years he has worked with Bukomansimbi Organic

University’s Alle School of Fine Arts and Design, and has

tree farmers association, under visual artist Fred Mutebi, to

participated in several local and international solo and group

increase productivity and quality and to educate and conserve

exhibitions.

the cultures that are linked to the fabric.

Some noted exhibitions include “Wax and Gold”, a

VIVIAN MUGUME is a contemporary visual artist who

performance art piece in various public spaces in Addis

specialises in painting.

Ababa; “Addis Ababa: the Enigma of the ‘New’ and ‘Modern’”

at the Modern Art Museum, Addis; Gebre Kristos Desta

His work centres upon the subjects of religion and family,

Center and “9th Dakart Biennale 2010”, Dakar, Senegal.

both of which have played significant roles in his life. Mugume

Gebrekidan participated in an art residency program at the

credits both forces as having impacted upon his creativity,

Virginia Creative Center for the Arts (VCCA), USA.

which is reflected in his work.

Gebrekidan works in multiple mediums, such as painting,

performance, video, photography and installation. His current

Mugume’s artistic life altered dramatically in 2006 when he

projects document the changes taking place in Addis

was involved in a near-fatal motor accident, which led to the

60  


loss of his memory. He sees his recent works as efforts to place

Born in Jinja, Uganda, NABUKENYA HELEN graduated

back together the fragments of his memory, to capture what

with a degree in Fine Arts from Kyambogo University.

life was like, so as to be able to move forward, with his family,

Nabukenya’s background is in design and textiles, and her

fiancée, and his three children. Vivian has exhibited in many

recent work has included using mixed media and acrylic

solo exhibitions in Uganda, Kenya and Rwanda.

paints to explore the boundaries of craft and art.

DENNIS MURAGURI, born in 1980 in Naivasha, Kenya, and

Upon graduating, Nabukenya co-founded the artist collective

graduated from Buru Buru Institute of Fine Arts [BIFA] with

Artpunch Studio; a studio and exhibition space for emerging

a diploma in painting and history of art. Muraguri began his

and established contemporary Ugandan artists.

career as a painter, developing techniques and formal skills

through high school and university. Muraguri’s work now

Nabukenya’s work explores a construction of mind sets,

experiments broadly with materials, techniques and ideas.

describing attitudes towards life through the use of mixed

Matatu Games [matatus are Kenyan public transport vehicles]

material and found objects. Her recent work, ‘Tuwaye’

is Muraguri’s current and extensive project. Matatu Games

focussed on using discarded textile materials, stitched

stems from a fascination with the life that surrounds the

together to create large abstract cloths which aim to

matatus and how the matatu and all its factors reflect upon the

communicate and interact directly with the audience.

society of Nariobi.

‘Tuwaye’, which means ‘Let’s Talk’, is a call for communities to

address social, economic and political issues on one table. The

Developing ideas through light boxes, video, installation and

process of creating ‘Tuwaye’ was collective and collaborative,

sculpture, Muraguri represents his fascination with the daily

and involved a group of craftswomen. Nabukenya’s aim was to

transport tool in a myriad of ways. This is the beginning body

empower women by engaging them in productive activities

of work in an exploration of how the everyday shapes and

through art.

reflects our societies. PAUL NDUNGURU

is a visual artist, performer, and

VITSHOIS MWILAMBWE BONDO, born in 1981, lives

educator in Tanzania with extensive experience in new media

and works as a curator and cultural operator, in Kinshasa,

techniques. He has exhibited his work in Asia, Europe and

Democratic of Congo. He is an alumnus of the School of Fine

Africa. Ndunguru also works for the Tanzania Books Project

Arts of Kinshasa, and studied visual art at the School of the

as an illustrator and creates comics, sculptures, puppets and

Decorative Arts of Strasbourg and the Rijksakademie of

paintings. Ndunguru is the a lead singer and a composer for

Amsterdam from 2008 to 2010. In 2010, he created Kin Art

Wahapahapa Band, Tanzania.

Studio, a structure for contemporary visual arts in Kinshasa. Ndunguru is currently experimenting with a wide range of Bondo defines his work as a combination of painting,

new

sculpture, photography and installation. His focus is on the

contemporary methods of drawing. This desire to explore

self and the body, which also represents a reflection of his own

new media comes from Ndunguru’s role as the director of

society and politics.

Alama Art and Media Production Ltd. Ndunguru also creates

media

techniques,

combining

traditional

and

storyboards for TV, as well as promotional material for radio “My body of work is comprised of fractured identities and multiple

geographies;

contradictory

locations

and print.

and

heterochronic calendars. Yet this multiplicity is amalgamated

Ndunguru is a member of Nafasi Art Space, an artist run space

into a significant formal entity that can travel in style across

for visual art in Dar es Salaam. Ndunguru is the Nafasi board

borders and without a passport. My reflection on the body is

member representative for the artists.

at the same time a reflection on society and politics.”

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Born in 1936, FRANCIS NNAGGENDA is a painter and

A graduate in Art and Industrial design from Kyambogo

sculptor. He received his artistic education in Germany and

University, STACEY GILLIAN ABE’s practice focuses on art

France, and balances externally acquired and indigenous

for the community with the objective of inspiring and

sensibilities.

motivating society; creating installations and sculptures

around East Africa from media including stone, glass, cement

Nnaggenda is a former head of the Department of Sculpture at

and metal. Stacey has participated in local and international

the School of Fine Art, Makerere University. He also attended

events, exhibitions, a symposium, a residency and workshops

Freibourg

in sculpture; pursuing her drive to build a link between art

University

in

Switzerland

and

Bayerische

Akademie der Schonen Kunste in Germany.

and community and promoting social change in Africa.

Nnaggenda briefly returned to Uganda in 1969, but left for

RONEX AHIMBISIBWE is a multi-media visual artist who

Kenya where he taught in Nairobi University. Settling back in

graduated from the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and

Kampala, Uganda, he is recognised as one of Uganda’s leading

Fine Arts, Makerere University in 2001. Since 2002, Ronex has

artists, whose expressionistic work, especially in sculpture,

had eleven solo art exhibitions and participated in numerous

has drawn considerable acclaim.

group shows in and outside Uganda. Countries he has exhibited in include: Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Egypt,

His sculpture titled "War Victim” can be found in the atrium

Germany, Denmark, France, Netherlands, Norway, Bulgaria,

of Makerere's main library, whilst his monument of the King

Belgium, England, Slovenia and Australia. As a passionate

of Buganda is located on the outskirts of Bulange. Further

visual artist and a theatre performer, Ronex’s favourite

works can be seen at Kennedy Centre Auditorium and Zurich

disciplines represent a fusion of painting, photography,

Museum of Art. Nnaggenda has been awarded the Meritus

sculpture, fashion, graphic design and guitar music

Certificate by "Who's Who in the World" for his services in the

composition; using these media as a means of self expression

field of art.

to interpret the environment around him.

HELEN ZERU is a visual artist based in Addis Ababa,

BABIRYE LEILAH BURNS is a contemporary visual artist

Ethiopia. Her practice often begins as a healing process,

who specialises in abstract sculpture. She graduated from

dealing with personal incidents in the artist’s life. Starting as a

Makerere University in 2010, having majored in sculpture,

reflection of these private themes the work often ends up

and works with wood, scrap metal and found objects. Babirye

entering a broader social context, touching relevant and

Leilah deals with subjects including human rights in Uganda,

pressing issues in the society in which Zeru lives. The current

exploring political, social and economic issues. She has

and rapid urban gentrification process occurring in Addis

completed residences at the Kuona Trust in Kenya, Nafasi Art

Ababa and how it affects the lives of inhabitants from a broad

Space in Tanzania, Hospital Field in Scotland and 32° East |

spectrum of society within the city is one such issue Zeru is

Ugandan Arts Trust, and received an award from the Royal

currently exploring.

Overseas League in the UK in 2001.

Zeru began her practice exploring the medium of woodcut

DISABILITY ART PROJECT UGANDA (DAPU) is a

printing. She later moved into mixed media techniques and

community of people with disabilities who come together

currently executes work through photography, installation,

with the aim of empowering others with disabilities to develop

video art and performance.

practical skills, confidence and to fulfil their creative potential. DAPU was established in 2013 to offer art and design skills to people with disabilities living on the streets and in slums to

BODA BODA ARTISTS

create unique products, which in turn provide economic stability and lift people with disabilities off the streets, and to

62


lobby for disability rights through art. DAPU’s mission is to

believes that visual art experiences communicated through

positively transform the lives of PWDs in Uganda.

professional artists, workshops and exhibitions can promote cross-cultural understanding and provide new perspectives

ADONIAS OCOM EKUWE is a visual artist and

and insights which can enrich our lives.

photographer. He graduated from the Margaret Trowel School of Industrial And Fine Art in 2013, where he majored in

DERRICK KOMAKECH is a performing artist and visual

Watercolor Painting. Adonias’ work centres upon the realistic

artist. A graduate of the School of Industrial and Fine Art in

representation of the life of the common man; he paints

Makerere, he is currently working as an art tutor for

stories of everyday people he feels need to be told. He has

pre-school students. Derrick enjoys experimenting with art

participated in two group exhibitions; the third CSO

forms, including visual art, film and street theatre; and he

Exhibition in 2013 and the Sadolin Marbarti Challenge

creates artworks ranging from paintings, to sculptures and

exhibition 2014, at which he was awarded the position of third

graphic design work, which he exhibits in local studios.

winner. Contemporary visual artist, IAN MWESIGA has participated KAGIMU JOSHUA GODWIN AKA "Joshua the Rap Poet" is

in The Moving Africa, Dakar Biennale 2014; and has exhibited

a spoken word and visual artist. He has performed at spoken

at AKA Gallery, as well as at the Hotel Serena and Mish Mash,

word events across Kampala, including: Poetry in Session;

amongst other Kampala-based venues. Ian has completed

Open Mic Uganda Musuem; KWIVUGA poetry in session;

residencies at 32° East | Ugandan Arts Trust and Kuona Trust,

Bonfire at Kampala’s National Theatre; and LaBa festival. As a

Nairobi. ANDERU IMMACULATE MALI creates sculptural

visual artist he paints using a range of media, and has

installations out of recycled materials and hair braids. She has

exhibited at Uzina Initiative (NGO), Repainting Uganda

completed a residency at 32° East | Ugandan Arts Trust and

World Music Festival and End of the Weak Hip Hop Summit.

has participated in LaBa festival and the Mabarti Challenge. Both artists graduated from Makerere University.

KANDOLE REAGAN is a 22 year old eco-artist and student of Kyambogo University, majoring in Sculpture and Painting.

KIZITO MBUGA is a visual artist. He graduated from

Kandole founded Waste Manager Education Project

Makerere University with a Bachelors Degree in Industrial

(WAMEP), which engages young people and community

and Fine Art; studying Graphic Design and Fashion Design

members in handling waste creatively, through recycling,

and majoring in Oil Painting. Mbuga also works with chalk

reusing and value addition. Reagan worked with the Garbage

and is currently working on illustrations for Baroque

Collectors and Ruganzu Bruno in the installation of a

publishers. Additionally, he has worked with Artivists 4 Life,

sculpture constructed from polythene bags at Kampala’s

an NGO which works with young people in Kayunga and

National Theatre, and participated in 2014’s LaBa festival, at

Mukono, participating with them at LaBa festival.

which he made an installation of the festival logo from waste. Reagan has exhibited works in AKA Gallery and Flock of

KINO MUSOKE is a Ugandan animator, comic book artist

Birds, Kampala.

and film-maker. He came to prominence with his animated music video ‘Power’ by GNL Zamba, for which he won awards

KATUMBA SIMON PETER is a contemporary visual artist.

for Best Director, Best Cinematographer and Best Male Video.

He has participated in arts events across Kampala, including

Kino has made music videos with further Ugandan artists and

Bayimba International Festival of the Arts; Kampala City

exhibited his flagship cartoon character, BreezyNuts at the

Council Authority (KCCA) Festival; and LaBa festival. Simon

Goethe Zentrum’s Comic Exhibition in 2013; a character

conducts art workshops with groups across Kampala,

which was introduced to the world by Eric Mukalazi at the

including DAPU and is a member of 32° East | Ugandan Arts

inaugural KLA ART festival in 2012. He has gone on to

Trust, at which he has participated in several projects. Simon

produce, direct and edit a number ofdocumentaries under the

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name of Dragonfly Media.

A recent graduate from the Margaret Trowell School, Makerere University, PAPA SHABANI is a documentary

A dynamic duo of Ugandan-born siblings passionate about

photographer who uses film, graffiti, graphics, fashion and

the power of possibility: SANDRA SUUBI is an eco-designer

water colour painting to express his creativity. An

and graduate of the Margaret Trowel School of Industrial and

award-winning photographer (Uganda Press Photo Awards

Fine Art, whilst ENOCK KALULE KAGGA is a student at

2013), Papa is currently an artist-in-residence at 32º East |

Makerere University, passionate about photography and

Ugandan Arts Trust. He has exhibited in several group

design. Both are strong believers in promoting positivity

exhibitions in Kampala and his work has been featured on

through art and music. Sandra was selected to produce the

websites and blogs around the world.

backdrop for Bayimba International Festival of Art’s stage in 2013 using recycled plastic bottles, and her organisation Suubi

ANEST GABRIEL SHALOOM is a 22 year old visual artist

Creations centres upon creating artworks from reused

from Jinja, Uganda. Anest is based at a gallery in Jinja; he

materials.

specialises in painting both abstract and realistic images and exploring elements of society through his work and he ensures

OGWANG JIMMY JOHN is a visual and sound artist.

that a percentage of each of the works that he sells is donated

Having graduated from Kyambogo University, he opened his

to a social cause.

studio O.J. Arts, now Kifaru Art studio, in Kampala, from where he works on designs, paintings, photography, pottery

RICHARD MANYONGE WASIKE is a visual artist from

and conceptual artworks, including sound installations and

Mbale; the foothills of Mount Elgon, Eastern Uganda. His

recordings. Jimmy John completed a residency at 32° East |

artistic talent was recognised by his father at the tender age of

Ugandan Arts Trust in 2013, during which he explored sound

five, as he guided and encouraged him in the drawing of

as an art form and the use of sound in installations. He

African landscapes. Wasike studied Fine Art in Uganda,

collaborated in projects including the "Know Go Zone", which

before moving to Nairobi where he joined BIFA, Institute of

was showcased at Bayimba International Festival of Arts in

Fine Art and settled as a freelance artist for fifteen years,

2013 and "Dance in the City" photography exhibition.

painting the beautiful Savannah landscapes. Wasike has recently moved to Kansanga, Kampala, and is now

PETRO is a 24 year old visual artist from Mbale, Uganda. He

specialising in acrylics.

graduated with a First Class Degree in Art and Industrial Design from Kyambogo University, majoring in Ceramics,

SAMSON SSENKAABA A.K.A XENSON, is a Ugandan

Painting and 2D Graphic Design. Petro has participated in

artist, fashion designer and poet at the vanguard of a youthful

exhibitions including LaBa festival, 2012; Christmas Art

African art renaissance that refuses to be pigeonholed into a

Exhibition, Nommo Gallery, 2012; Internal Annual Art

singular artistic expression. A solitary dreamer greatly

Exhibition, Kyambogo University, 2012 and 2013.

influenced by the grandeur of African cultures, vitality of African dance and performance, and hip-hop as a free

GRACE SARAH is a visual artist, sculptor and a business

expressive art form, Samson traded his engineering studies to

administrator based in Fort Portal, Uganda. She has been

join the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts,

passionate about art since childhood, joining a vocational

Makerere University, Kampala where he graduated with a first

school for art in order to develop her skills and practice. She

class honours, since then, intermittent appearances of his art

has always had an interest in fabric, in particular making toys

works, films and fashions have been shown in numerous

from clothes as a child. Grace Sarah is a member of Fort Portal

exhibitions and shows in Uganda and abroad.

based art group Fort Portal AfroArt, which exhibits artworks by local artists to sell.

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Profile for 32° East | Ugandan Arts Trust

KLA ART 014: Unmapped Catalogue  

KLA ART 014: Unmapped Catalogue  

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