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147 IDEAS TO MOTIVATE AT THE GYM, WORK & BEYOND

SOCCER STAR

ALEX MORGAN FROM WORLD CUP TO THE OLYMPICS “USA! USA!”

#2016GOALS

GAME ON! THE TONE IT UP GIRLS: TOTAL-BODY RESET

AMAZING ARMS LEAN LEGS POWER ABS

KALE 2.0 THE NEW SUPERFOODS

“YOU LOOK AMAZING!” GLOWY SKIN, SHINY HAIR IN SECONDS SHAZAM THE COVER TO SEE ALEX IN ACTION.


“MY GOAL IS TO BE THE BEST PLAYER IN THE WORLD.”


COVER STORIES 13 147 Ideas to Motivate at the Gym, Work & Beyond (and throughout issue)

31 Game On! 68 Alex Morgan 16 Kale 2.0 94 “You Look Amazing!”

88 “Working out gives me peace of mind.” —JENEIL WILLIAMS, model

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Photographed by ROBBIE FIMMANO


( JAN/FEB ) C ON T E N T S

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94

FEATURES 68 Alex Brings Her A Game Soccer star Alex Morgan is winning big, on and of the ield.

74 What Women Really Think About Their Bodies SELF’s 2016 bodyimage survey reveals the surprising truth.

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80 Cold Play Go from slope to street in winter styles with a futuristic edge.

88 Power Abs A sculpted core and crop top are a total show of force.

94 Soft & Strong Why a swipe of red lipstick equals instant transformation

74


SELF STARTER

50 Red Cabbage, 3 Ways A trio of recipes using the vibrant veggie

13 Jump Start 2016! A playlist, superfoods and more to kick of your best year yet

SELF IMAGE

52 Eat Happy Smoothie bowls; grocery-shopping tips

54 Indulge Cookies and hot cocoa

19 Bombers Squad Sporty bomber jackets get a sleek update.

20 The Roundup Modern white looks

SELF WORTH 57 Gear Shed Marie Kondo’s latest organizing tips

22 Up & Out

68

Designer Tori Praver’s beachy A.M. routine

58 Learning Curve How running gave writer Allison Ellis a new lease on life

24 Game Plan Look and feel your most gorgeous for 2016.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ROBBIE FIMMANO. JOHNNY MILLER. JACOB SUTTON. GREGORY REID. JAMES RYANG. CHAD PITMAN. SEE GET-IT GUIDE.

28 The Close-up

63 Q/A Up your productivity.

64 Ace Everything Maria Sharapova’s goals for the year ahead

66 Love & Chemistry Easy ways to make any relationship stronger

IN EVERY ISSUE 6 Self.com 10 Editor’s Letter 99 Get-It Guide 100 Why I…

Photographed by Jacob Sutton in Orlando, Florida

29 Beauty Buzz

Styling, Melissa Ventosa Martin; hair, Pasquale Ferrante for Wella Professional; makeup, Sil Bruinsma for Diorshow; manicure, Rachel Craine; set design, Larry Drillick; production, Select Services.

Colorful lip balms; socially conscious skin-care line Laxmi

CLOTHES Bodysuit, Custom Tory Birch Sport. Large earrings, H.Stern. Small earring, Venus by Maria Tash. Page 1: Bikini, Ack. Shirt, Resurrection Vintage. Bracelets, Melet Mercantile. See Get-It Guide.

SELF MOTIVATE 31 SELF X Tone It Up Challenge A genius 28-day workout and meal plan from Tone It Up’s Katrina and Karena

GET THE LOOK Neutrogena

Visibly Even BB Cream SPF 30, $16. Neutrogena Healthy Skin Blush in Rosy, $8

42 SELF Approved

SELF + SHAZAM!

Best races to run Rock climbing essentials

Food entrepreneur Nicole Chaszar’s secrets to success

ON THE COVER

Keep skin pretty and protected this winter.

44 Gym Bag

62 SELF Made

We’ve partnered with Shazam to help you get even more out of each issue. Look for the Shazam icon on our pages to access exclusive videos, extra recipes and much more. JUST FOLLOW THESE STEPS:

13 SELF NOURISH 47 Power Lunch Dishes to help you avoid the 3 P.M. slump

1/ 2/ 3/ 4/ 5/

Download the free Shazam app to your smartphone or tablet. Open the app. Tap the camera icon in the app’s top left-hand corner. Hold your camera over the page. Enjoy the special features!

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JOIN OUR CHALLENGE! Team up with SELF and the Tone It Up duo, Katrina Scott and Karena Dawn, for a 28-day plan to get your best body ever! We’ll all start the program on January 3. Here’s what to expect. FUN WORKOUTS Full-body cardio and strength

routines with lunges, twists and squats to make you leaner and more sculpted all over EASY MEAL PLAN Energy-boosting meals

(tacos! protein pancakes!) that you’ll love MAJOR MOTIVATION Get e-couragement when

you use the hashtag #SelfTIU on social. SIGN UP FOR THE CHALLENGE at Self.com/go/SelfTIU.

WIN A TRIP TO PUNTA CANA Push yourself hard, then relax at the beach! You and a guest could enjoy a four-day stay (spa treatment included) at the All-In Luxury resort Chic Punta Cana. Enter for a chance to win at Self.com/go/prize.

TRY IT!

HEALTHY ON THE GO When you join the SELFXTone It Up Challenge, you’ll get a daily email with everything you need: that day’s workout and meal plan, plus bonus tips and motivation. Sign up at Self.com/go/SelfTIU.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. TO ENTER AND FOR FULL RULES, GO TO SELF.COM. BEGINS AT 10 A.M. ET DECEMBER 15, 2015, AND ENDS 11:59 P.M. ET JANUARY 30, 2016. OPEN TO LEGAL RESIDENTS OF THE 50 UNITED STATES/ D.C. 18 OR OLDER, EXCEPT EMPLOYEES OF SPONSOR, THEIR IMMEDIATE FAMILIES AND THOSE LIVING IN THE SAME HOUSEHOLD. ODDS OF WINNING DEPEND ON THE NUMBER OF ENTRIES RECEIVED. VOID OUTSIDE THE 50 UNITED STATES/D.C. AND WHERE PROHIBITED. A.R.V. OF PRIZE: $2,800. SPONSOR: CONDÉ NAST.

SHAZAM THIS PAGE TO SIGN UP FOR THE CHALLENGE AND GET STARTED!

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ADRIAN MESKO. PHONE: COURTESY OF APPLE. SCREEN IMAGE: ANDREW PURCELL. COURTESY OF CHIC PUNTA CANA.

WIN IT!


Mary Murcko

Joyce Chang

Publisher, Chief Revenue Officer

Editor-in-Chief

Barbara Reyes Creative Director

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TONING IT UP Two SELF editors just SUPing and chilling…

A toast to friends! With Kat, Karena and our fitness director, Liz Plosser (left)

…Liz and I get a little photo booth–crazy.

My resolutions

CHEERS TO 2016! One of my highlights last year was joining the Tone It Up girls, the endlessly sunny and adorable Kat and Karena, at their itness retreat in Newport Beach, California. It was like a wedding: a blur of activity, so many selies, so much Champagne (work hard, play hard!). Four hundred ifty women came from all over the country, some by themselves; many left as close friends. What I took away from the weekend was a deeper understanding of how important community is when it comes to motivation. I’ve never seen a group more supportive of one another. The cheers, the warmth: It was a total you-can-runwith-us zone. This year, I want to bring more of that feeling into my own life—and into yours, through the pages of SELF. So, we asked the TIU girls to lead our best-body Challenge to kick of your new year right (page 31; sign up online at Self .com/go/SelfTIU). You’ll get 28 days of transformative workouts and a simple eating plan, but try adding this twist: Enlist a buddy and see how much fun you can have (and how much you can accomplish) with someone else on your team. We in the SELF community will be there with you every lunge, squat and step of the way. Share your progress and keep one another motivated on Instagram with #SelfTIU. Here’s to a happy new year!

It’s less about a radical do-over, more about affirming the goals I have every year. WORKING OUT I’ll make time for my favorite dance-cardio workouts and challenge myself with something new, too. $125; Net-a-Porter.com

TAKING CARE OF MY SKIN It can say so much about your health. I’m excited to try this natural line. Indie Lee Squalane Facial Oil, $32

EATING HEALTHY Bon App’s latest book is just the right amount of indulgent. Bon Appétit: The Food Lover’s Cleanse, $35; Amazon.com

#2016Goal Joyce Chang Editor-in-chief Email joyce@self.com Twitter @joycemarg Instagram @joycemarg Snapchat @joycemarg

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Be a badass with a good ass.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF TONE IT UP. COURTESY OF JOYCE CHANG (2). COURTESY OF FALKE. COURTESY OF HARPER COLLINS PUBLISHING. SVEND LINDBAEK/CNP DIGITAL STUDIO. COURTESY OF INDIE LEE.

E D I T O R’S L E T T E R


JUMP START

2016! STEVEN BRAHMS

Everyone wants to have an epic new year. And you can: These healthy, fun (totally doable) ideas will get you going.

Here it comes…January 1. It’s a big day— an opportunity to relect with a clean slate and the power of possibility stretching in front of you. Whatever you’re thinking about taking on this year (getting stronger and itter; cleaning up your diet; raising the bar at work), these ideas are sure to inspire you. Including this, from one of our biggest itness crushes, deejay and wellness entrepreneur Hannah Bronfman (pictured here): Do plyometrics to tunes with an infectious beat. “I love explosive moves because you can get an amazing burn in less time,” says Bronfman. “And music puts me in a meditative state, so I’m not focused on how hard an interval is.” Bronfman shares one of her favorite itness playlists on the next page; cue it up to power through a tough workout—or anytime you want to make this new year even more awesome. JUMP START > 14

Deejay and entrepreneur Hannah Bronfman demos the jump squat, one of her favorite plyo moves.

UP SHE GOES

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF BOSE. GREGORY REID; STYLING, ANGELA CAMPOS. COLLIN STARK. JUSTIN STEELE. JAMES MORGAN/GALLERY STOCK. ERICA MCCARTNEY.

HERE’S TO YOUR HEALTH

We’re All Friends Jay Xero

Available as minis or smoothie boosters, juice shots are a tasty, trendy way to try things like tart cherry (said to reduce exercise-induced muscle soreness) or kelp juice (high in B vitamins). You’ll see them at the gym and at juice bars—a perfect postworkout pick-me-up.

Emergency Icona Pop To U (Oliver Remix) Skrillex and Diplo Sorry Justin Bieber Big Rings Drake and Future On My Mind Ellie Goulding I Really Like You (Giraffage Remix) Carly Rae Jepsen In the Night The Weeknd

This Could Be Us Rae Sremmurd

WHAT QUALITIES DO YOU ADMIRE MOST?

SHAZAM THIS PAGE TO LISTEN TO ALL OF THESE SONGS.

The best role models are often your friends and coworkers—look to them for inspiration on being even more awesome this year. We asked you on Self.com to tell us which strengths you look up to in others. Here’s what you told us:

Try a snacksized avocado Avocados naturally differ in size—grocers just tend to favor the biggies. But now that you can buy half-sized avs, called GatorEggs, you won’t have to deal with storing the second half for later. (Find them at Whole Foods and BJ’s clubs.)

27. 9%

WE ASKED YOU...

C O N FI DE N C E

Cake by the Ocean DNCE

TAKE THE VACATION OF A LIFETIME


Give these genius eating tips a go We read these new books about healthy eating to bring you the best try-it-today advice.

1

Celebrate the first bites. Taste buds tire out pretty quickly, says Jean Kristeller, Ph.D., author of The Joy of Half a Cookie, a new guide to mindful eating. Fatigue sets in after just a few bites. So savor those first mouthfuls, then give your mouth a rest.

2 Get un-enriched. “ That ‘extra’ nutrition in ‘enriched’ foods tends to refer to the good stuff that was added back in to replace what was lost in overprocessing,” says Ilyse Schapiro, R.D., coauthor of Should I Scoop Out My Bagel? Nutrition labels will tell you what you’re getting.

3 Play up the positive. Focusing on what you “can’t” have can make you crave it more, says Bee Wilson, author of First Bite: How We Learn to Eat. Instead, reframe your mind-set from denial (“No chips!”) to healthy treat (“I’m going to indulge in these ridiculously fresh veggies”).

Whether you travel solo or with friends, make this the year you achieve a #VacayGoal, like one of these: DO A MULTICITY FITNESS CRAWL Grab your bestie, fuel up the car, and map a route with scenic stops to stretch (and tone) your limbs, like Highway 1, which you can take from San Diego to San Francisco. Stop in Huntington Beach for suring and SUPing, power-walk through Santa Ynez wine country, and hike in stunning Big Sur. VISIT A WELLNESS RETREAT They’re a hot trend in travel—chances are, one of your favorite brands or trainers is planning one this year. Taryn Toomey of New York City’s The Class, for example, hosts a week in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, with itness activities, meditation, massages and farm-to-table dinners (starting at $1,350; TheClassWithTT.com). GO ON A YOLO ADVENTURE A grand-scale excursion—climb Mount Kilimanjaro! Chase Greenland’s glaciers!—can be life-changing. Let Wilderness Travel handle the planning so you can focus on getting psyched (itineraries from $3,200; WildernessTravel.com).

EN

C O M PE TE N C E

5.9 % 5.8 W % IT 4 ST .5 YL % E 3.9 Z %

8.7 %

O TH ER

10. 7%

G EN ER O SI TY

12. 6%

AM BI TI O N

KI N DN ES S

20%

“Non-judgmentalness” “Sweet yet sassy”

LIZ MAKES I T H A P P E N: D O MOR E YO GA

ADD THIS “AHHH” STRETCH TO YOUR ROUTINE Foam rollers are having a moment. (You can buy a schmancy one for $365!) Stretching on one massages connective tissue (fascia) and releases tension, says Lauren Roxburgh, a fascia specialist and author of the new book Taller, Slimmer, Younger. Translation: You’ll feel better, move easier and stand taller. This move (one of Roxburgh’s faves) does all that. ROLLING LUNGE TWIST

Liz Plosser, SELF itness director “I recently shared on Instagram that I want to do yoga once a week in 2016. Now I can’t let down my followers! What’s your goal? Tell your friends— and make it speciic.”

Stand on left foot, top of right foot on roller behind you. Reach arms overhead. Inhale and bend left knee, extending right hip and leg back while pressing into roller as it rolls up shin, until right thigh is almost parallel to floor. Exhale as you twist torso and arms to left for a deep stretch (as shown). Inhale as you return to start. Do 8 reps; repeat on opposite side.

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( SELF ) S TA R T E R

Try the hottest new superfoods BroccoLeaf

Kañiwa

WHAT Foxy Organic produce sells the broccoli plant’s leaves; they’re slightly sweeter than kale. WHY BroccoLeaf has more calcium than other leafy greens— with 30 percent of your daily need in one to two leaves. HOW Sauté with garlic, olive oil and red pepper flakes; use as a sandwich wrap or in a stir-fry.

WHAT A nutty, gluten-free grain like quinoa, kañiwa requires no rinsing (game changer!). WHY It’s a fantastic source of plantbased protein and iron, plus it has fiber and calcium. HOW Boil, then stir it into soups or sides; try it in a breakfast bowl with milk and dried fruit.

Dulse WHAT This red algae from northern seas is salty and chewy. WHY The low-cal ocean vegetable is packed with iodine, potassium, iron and vitamin B6. HOW Toss ribbons in soups and pasta; sprinkle dried flakes on popcorn.

Hemp hearts WHAT Shelled and hulled seeds from the hemp plant have a grassy, nutty flavor. WHY They have the ideal omega-3 and omega-6 fatty-acid ratio; 3 tablespoons pack a whopping 10 grams of protein. HOW Sprinkle on oatmeal; swap for breadcrumbs in gluten-free dishes.

Pitaya WHAT The fruit of a Central American cactus, pitaya has pink or white flesh and black seeds. It’s mildly sweet and very refreshing. WHY It’s an excellent source of vitamin B² and magnesium, with less sugar than many other fruit. HOW Blend it into smoothies. It’s great fresh (and peeled) or frozen.

CHECK OUT A GREAT RECIPE USING PITAYA ON PAGE 52.

WATCH THESE SPORTY STARS The uh-mazing athletes below will tear it up on the slopes and ice this season. Check your local TV listings and watch them compete in the FIS Freestyle World Cup (January 14–16 and February 4–6), Prudential U.S. Figure Skating Championships (January 15–24) and Winter X Games (January 28–31).

JAMIE ANDERSON 25, snowboarding

GRACIE GOLD 20, igure skating

ELENA HIGHT 26, snowboarding

MIRAI NAGASU 22, igure skating

SILJE NORENDAL 22, snowboarding

BRITA SIGOURNEY 26, freeskiing

ASHLEY WAGNER 24, igure skating

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SHOP FOR SNEAKS New year, new shoes! Reebok Hyasu crosstrainers are a solid choice. The sole’s pivot point keeps you grounded, a soft upper locks you in, and the graffiti pattern funs it up. Dance cardio, anyone? $90; Bandier.com

Do good with your dog Help pups around the country by taking yours for a walk—and downloading these free apps. RESQWALK partners with corporate sponsors who pledge donations. By recording your steps, you earn resources for animal welfare organizations. WOOFTRAX allocates donations based on the number of people out actively walking their pets. It’s a great reason to recruit friends to join you on the road.

CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: GREGORY REID; STYLING, ANGELA CAMPOS. GETTY IMAGES. COURTESY OF BANDIER. GALLERY STOCK.

We’re calling it: You’re about to see these nutrient-rich powerhouses everywhere.


BOMBERS

SQUAD The classic bomber jacket gets a fresh revamp this season.

HAIR, DAVID COLVIN FOR R&CO; MAKEUP, ALLIE SMITH FOR CHANEL LES BEIGES; MANICURE, KAYO HIGUCHI FOR DIOR VERNIS; MODEL, AUSTRIA ULLOA AT REQUEST MODELS.

BY SARA GAYNES LEVY

Military-inspired bombers are moving up the style ranks. Designers like Alexander Wang and Rag & Bone have updated the sporty staple with unexpected, statement-making details (think loral embroidery and bold prints). To balance the jacket’s boxy it, pair it with something sleek underneath—a crop top that reveals your abs adds a sexy twist—and a long, slim skirt or tailored jeans. Finish with simple accessories or none at all: The result is a standout.

JACKET Stella McCartney, $2,545; 212-255-1556 TOP $250, and SKIRT $350; Tibi.com CHOKER Jennifer Fisher, $300; JenniferFisherJewelry .com SNEAKERS Christopher Kane, $410; Jeffrey, 212-206-1272

Photographed by COLIN LEAMAN Styled by COQUITO CASSIBBA

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( SELF ) I M AG E

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BLANC SLATE Crisp, clean white gives anything from a crop top to a clutch that ultramodern vibe.

13 1. DRESS $145; KennethCole.com 2. SANDALS Public School, $495; PublicSchoolNYC.com 3. JACKET $120; TheNorthFace.com 4. PANTS Atea Oceanie, $245; Ssence.com 5. SNEAKERS $455; Pollini.com 6. BAG $198; AimeeKestenberg.com 7. TOP Ohne Titel, $275; Saks Fifth Avenue 8. CHOKER $225; FlacaJewelry.com 9. WATCH $205; VoidWatches.com 10. CLUTCH $395; Extraordinary OrdinaryDay.com 11. CUFF Jennifer Fisher, $1,540; Jennifer FisherJewelry.com (available in February) 12. SUNGLASSES Flexon Eyewear, $276; Flexon.com 13. BRA $325; JonathanSimkhai.com

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Photographed by CHELSEA McNAMARA Market and accessories director DANIA ORTIZ

PROP STYLING, ALEX SILVA AT BERNSTEIN & ANDRIULLI. SEE GET-IT GUIDE.

T H E ROU N DU P


Naturally Beautiful Results

Now even sensitive skin can stop and smell the coconut. New AVEENO SKIN RELIEF GENTLE SCENT ™ Lotion and Body Wash are a breakthrough for sensitive skin. Tested with dermatologists, they’re clinically proven to be as gentle as fragrance free, so you can finally indulge in scent that you and your skin will love. ®

gentle scent

© Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc. 2016


( SELF ) I M AG E

5 THINGS THAT GET HER UP AND OUT

1 BOTANICAL SCENTS “I use lavender oil in my diffuser in the morning. The smell is calming but energizing.”

2 FITSPO

Praver on the way to the shore near her Malibu home TANK $12; Topshop .com BIKINI TOP $110, and BOTTOM

$110, Tori Praver; FrankieMiami.com SNEAKERS $680; GoldenGoose DeluxeBrand.com

3 DESIGN IDEAS “The colors in my collections are inspired by my travels— this shade reminds me of the sunset in Mexico.” TOP Tori Praver, $110; Shop IHeartHanalei.com BOTTOM

Tori Praver, $121; Fwrd.com

UP & OUT

4 POSTWORKOUT SMOOTHIES “I whip up kale, coconut butter and frozen bananas. It’s a way to get my greens and nutrients with a sweet taste.”

Swimwear designer and model Tori Praver boosts her mood in the morning by getting in touch with her surfer-girl side. BY SARA GAYNES LEVY “Seeing the ocean when I wake up instantly makes me happy,” says Praver, who grew up catching waves in Maui and now lives near the water in Malibu, California. Praver channels that sporty, beachy vibe into her swimwear line, which mixes athletic silhouettes with lush colors. Mornings at home with her husband, pro surfer Danny Fuller, and their 2-year-old daughter, Ryan, are plenty active. Most days, she gets up at 7:30 A.M., grabs a slice of cinnamon-raisin toast with almond butter, then heads to a workout: either yoga, a circuit training class like Gabrielle Reece’s HIGHX or, if there’s time (and the tide is high), suring. “I like to switch up my itness so I don’t get bored!” Praver says. After a quick shower, she rubs on coconut oil (“It’s the best moisturizer”) and gets dressed. “My go-to look is jeans and a T-shirt, but I’m so indecisive,” Praver admits. “I’m like, I just need to pick something and get out of the house!”

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5 COMFY KICKS “I love the worn-in look of these. On chilly mornings, I’ll wear them to and from yoga.” SNEAKERS $620;

GoldenGoose DeluxeBrand.com

Tag @SELFmagazine on Instagram or Twitter and show us how you get #UpNOut.

CLARKE TOLTON; STYLING, LAUREN GOODMAN; HAIR, CAILE NOBLE FOR KÉRASTASE; MAKEUP, JENNA KRISTINA FOR DIORSKIN NUDE. ANNE MENKE/TRUNK ARCHIVE. STILL LIFES, FROM TOP: GREGORY REID. GETTY IMAGES. DEVON JARVIS (2); STYLING, JESSE LIEBMAN.

“I take Gabrielle Reece’s HIGHX class. She’s such an amazing athlete.”


( SELF ) I M AG E For lips this soft, try a double-duty balm. Nivea Smoothness Hydrating Lip Care ($2) protects with SPF 10 and aloe.

FRESH START Your beauty goal: healthy and gorgeous. Here’s how to make it happen. BY CHERYL WISCHHOVER

The “new year, new you” idea pops up every January, but when it comes to beauty, we’re more into the idea of “new year, even better you.” Think tweak, not overhaul. While a bigpicture resolution takes time and patience, a small change in your beauty routine can produce results right away. Glowing skin, shiny hair, smooth lips, a dazzling smile and strong nails can be yours—without the wait. Because while it’s always admirable to work toward long-term goals, there’s something to be said for instant gratiication.

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Photographed by TAEA THALE

STYLING, COQUITO CASSIBBA; HAIR, DAVID COLVIN FOR R&CO; MAKEUP, TALIA SPARROW FOR LAURA MERCIER; MANICURE, NATALIE PAVLOSKI FOR CHANEL BEAUTE; MODEL, BRITT BERGMEISTER AT NEXT. SEE GET-IT GUIDE.

GAME PL AN


To brighten bare nails, try Zoya Naked Manicure in Nude Perfector, $10.

SMILE

Whiter teeth can be yours in as little as 48 hours. Brilliant!

Your teeth can brighten your entire face, and it no longer takes weeks to get them gleaming. The new Go Smile on the Go Sonic Blue Teeth Whitening System ($89) whitens in just two days. Use it with a combination of the included whitening gel and your favorite toothpaste—the blue light in the brush accelerates the process. Then try cosmetic dentist Michael Apa’s chic (yes, really!) line of maintenance products, which includes the Apa White Duo ive-day home whitening system ($150) and a peppermint-oil-infused Blue Lip Shine ($25). They’ll make your smile look even whiter— and perfectly primed for your close-up.

The holiday season’s dark polishes can notoriously stain nails yellow, but new brightening and conditioning products will get them back in the clear quickly. Take a short sabbatical from colorful lacquers and try Deborah Lippmann Genie in a Bottle Illuminating Nail Tone Perfector ($20), which contains mica and sheer violet pigments to combat dullness, plus biotin to fortify. If you want to make your nails long and strong this year, consider Julep Brighter Is Better Oxygen Brightening Nail Treatment ($18). It delivers oxygen to the nail beds to stimulate growth, lemon extract to whiten over time and optical brighteners to hide discoloration in the meantime.

BeautyCounter Color Pinch Cream Blusher in Hibiscus, $34

MAKEUP To get a dewy look without brushes and powders, try one of the new makeup stick options—and let “wipe and swipe” be your postworkout beauty mantra. (Bonus: They’re very portable.) Create a your-skin-but-better inish with Make Up For Ever Ultra HD Stick Foundation;

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NAILS

Try a polish cleanse for stronger, even-toned and natural-looking nails.

Mally Beauty Shadow Stick Extra Eyeshadow in (from left) Moonlight, Bliss and Mahogany, $25 each

Make Up For Ever Ultra HD Stick Foundation in (from left) Sand and Chestnut, $43 each

Pick-up sticks for eyes, cheeks and lips make your routine simpler (and prettier).

available in 15 shades, the lightweight formula was developed to stand up to new 4K camera technology, so you’ll see the diference in selies. Add a natural rosy hue with BeautyCounter Color Pinch Cream Blusher, which makes the look of snowy-day cheeks last long

after you’ve come in from the cold. Prefer a subtle sunkissed glow? TrèStique Color & Contour Cheek Bronzer Stick ($34) has an attached brush to help buf and blend the gel cream to tawny perfection. Give eyes a hint of shimmer by slicking on Mally Beauty Shadow

Stick Extra Eyeshadow, which builds easily but locks in place in 30 seconds. Pull it all together by swiping Neutrogena MoistureSmooth Color Stick ($9) over lips for lasting hydration and a semisheer—and therefore easy-to-wear—wash of fuchsia, pink or raspberry.


SKIN

( SELF ) I M AG E Reveal a #NoFilter complexion with gentle and effective glow-boosting treatments. increases cell turnover with plant-derived retinol; you’ll see a brighter complexion within minutes. If you prefer to treat while you sleep, Belif First Aid Overnight Brightening Mask ($34) incorporates crushed pearls and gold for wake-up-gorgeous results. For next-level radiance, consider micro-needling, a procedure in which a dermatologist or an aesthetician rolls tiny needles all over your face for a quick dose of luminosity and plumping. It works by causing microscopic damage to the skin, which then stimulates collagen production. To see maximal results, several treatments four to six weeks apart are ideal, but even one can be enough to see a temporary diference.

STILL LIFES: CHELSEA MCNAMARA (EXCEPT R+CO: COURTESY OF COMPANY); STYLING, ALEX SILVA.

HAIR

A dose of retinol or vitamin C will help give you incandescent skin. Used twice weekly, the right sheet mask can produce radiant results; Yes to Grapefruit Pore Perfection Paper Mask ($16 for ive) instantly brightens with orange and lemon peel and calms winter-stressed complexions with aloe. Ideal for sensitive skin, the exfoliating Nude Detox Gentle Brightening Fizzy Powder Wash ($42) uses fruit enzymes, omega-rich açai berry oil and acerola extract to amplify glow and enhance tone. To minimize pores and improve texture without drying, Kate Somerville DermalQuench Liquid Lift+Retinol ($98) refreshes with oxygen and

Grow it, strengthen it, repair it, love it. A made-for-you elixir will help strands shine. In the quest for healthy hair, a customized salon treatment is like a personal trainer for your strands. Kérastase Fusio-Dose Hair Lab (starting at $30) and Shu Uemura Haircare Bar ($28 to $40) ofer madeto-order combinations of concentrates that work in as little as ive minutes. You’ll walk out of the salon with instant shine and added resilience. At home, a weekly session with Obliphica Professional Seaberry Hair Mask hydrates and restores elasticity, while a few drops of R+Co Tinsel Smoothing Oil lend dry hair a gorgeously glossy (not greasy) sheen.

Obliphica Professional Seaberry Hair Mask, $38; R+Co Tinsel Smoothing Oil, $24

Herbal Essences Naked Smooth & Soft Conditioner ($5) infuses strands with moisture.


( SELF ) I M AG E The ideal outdoorsy glow: rosy, not ruddy

TH E C L O SE-U P

COLD FRONT Seeing crimson cheeks and a Rudolph nose? Time to get the red out. BY CHERYL WISCHHOVER

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Last winter, after skiing in subzero temperatures for several hours, I looked in the mirror and was horriied to discover bright red streaks on the slivers of skin where my face mask had slipped down. It wasn’t sunburn or windburn—but it wasn’t the healthy glow of Lindsey Vonn after a successful run, either. This was an unnerving “Do I need to go to the hospital?” scarlet. Once inside, my complexion eventually calmed to a less alarming pink. My problem, it turned out, was run-ofthe-mill seasonal redness (albeit an intense version, thanks to inclement weather). But a flushed face isn’t just about appearance; it can also be a sign of distress. “Redness is the skin’s red flag,” explains Dennis Gross, M.D., a dermatologist in New York City. “It says something’s wrong.” This time of year, redness is almost inescapable, even if you’re not one of the 16 million Americans with rosacea. Dryness and temperature extremes conspire to turn your face into a laky, ruddy mess. Then there’s the holidayparty-season factor: Spicy foods and alcohol can cause increased facial lushing. Another common trigger? Working out. “Exercising, especially in extreme heat or cold, makes redness worse,” says Elizabeth Hale, M.D., a dermatologist in NYC. Any of these factors can trigger a cycle that ultimately afects your skin’s ability to protect itself. “Skin is our barrier to the outside world,” Dr. Hale

GILLES BENSIMON. STILL LIFE: CATHY CRAWFORD; STYLING, SALLY PENN. OPPOSITE: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ERICA MCCARTNEY; STYLING, PAUL PETZY (2). GETTY IMAGES. LOIC LEMEUR.

SkinCeuticals Phyto Corrective Gel, $62; Burt’s Bees Sensitive Night Cream, $15


says. “In the winter, our skin tends to be drier, so it’s also much more sensitive.” That explains why ingredients that normally play well with your skin— retinoids and alpha hydroxy acids, but also acne treatments such as benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid—may cause your complexion to lare up come winter. “You’re more prone to irritation from products that might not otherwise give you a problem,” Dr. Gross says. (A note for those with darker skin: Just because you can’t see redness doesn’t mean the

A FLUSHED FACE ISN’T JUST ABOUT APPEARANCE. IT CAN BE A SIGN OF SKIN DISTRESS. effects aren’t there. Tightness, loss of radiance and discomfort are other signs that your skin is stressed.) Since you’re not going to sit inside all winter long, prevention is the key to halting dryness and redness. Start by switching to a mild facial cleanser such as Olay Foaming Face Wash for Sensitive Skin ($5), and avoid hot water. Look for thicker moisturizers with ingredients like ceramides, which mimic the skin’s natural lipid barrier, and hyaluronic acid, which locks water in. Burt’s Bees Sensitive Night Cream soothes with aloe, while SkinCeuticals Phyto Corrective Gel hydrates and calms inlammation. Protection against the elements, of course, is essential. Ski masks and goggles can prevent windburn as well as sun exposure, and sunscreen is necessary even in the winter. (Try Philosophy Ultimate Miracle Worker SPF 30, $28.) Antioxidants such as vitamin C and ferulic acid help repair skin, and to help them absorb better, exfoliation is a must. Dr. Gross’s new Alpha Beta Ultra Gentle Daily Peel for Sensitive Skin ($88) uses alpha hydroxy acids in levels that won’t exacerbate redness. Now, I’m much better prepared for this winter’s ski trip to Telluride: I’ve got my thick face cream, SPF 30 and a new wrap-around ski mask. After the last run of the day, I plan on having a healthy glow—the kind that doesn’t need any covering up.

BEAUTY BUZZ SELF’s beauty department shares this month’s best inds.

Balms away Talk about sweetening the deal: The newest lip balms protect against chapping, add a shot of pretty color and taste like dessert. Made with grapeseed oil and avocado butter, the citrusy CoverGirl Colorlicious Oh Sugar! balms ($7) come in 10 semisheer shades. Clinique Sweet Pots ($20) contain an exfoliating sugar scrub and a tinted balm in the cutest macaron-inspired packaging. For a transparent finish, the vanilla-scented ChapStick Total Hydration 100% Natural ($3) soothes with argan oil and conditions with shea and mango butters. Go on, treat yourself—and your lips, too. CoverGirl Colorlicious Oh Sugar! balms in (from top) Punch, Gumdrop and Taffy

GLOWY SKIN, ASAP GAME CHANGER

Laxmi WHO Leila Janah, founder of Laxmi, a luxe new skin-care line that sources ingredients from women in low-income communities around the world—and pledges to pay them at least triple the local average rate. “Women are often the breadwinners,” she says. “If you provide them with a livable wage, they invest in their families.” WHY Laxmi’s small-batch organic products feature radiance-boosting ingredients such as Namibian marula oil and Rwandan moringa. The ultra-creamy shea butter in Nilotica Facial Crème ($72) plumps, while the Cold Pressed Cleansing Oil ($56) can remove makeup or prevent dry skin.

An ingenious new treatment for the time-starved: splash masks, which produce softer, smoother skin while you shower. Just pour half a capful of the liquid “mask” into your palm, dilute with water, and dab on your wet face— no rinsing necessary. Thanks to complexion-brightening ingredients like lactic acid and blueberry extract, you’ll see results even before you pat your skin dry. Try it twice a week (on your body, too) for the speediest way to glow from head to toe. Blithe Rejuvenating Purple Berry splash mask, $48; GlowRecipe.com


SELF TONE IT UP

CHALLENGE

LET’S GO!

Reset your body, your psyche… your life (seriously!) with our 28-day program. BY ERIN BRIED Nothing against New Year’s resolutions, but our 2016 Challenge is more like a revolution. Because it’s not about losing a few pounds (again): It’s about actually changing the way you sweat, eat, look and feel. We teamed up with Katrina Scott and Karena Dawn (right), the training duo known as the Tone It Up girls, to create a 28-day plan that will transform your mind and body. And we’ll all do it together— because things are ininitely easier (and more fun) with help from friends. Get everything you need by signing up at Self.com/go/SelfTIU (it’s free!). Then turn the page to get started. ON KAT, LEFT SPORTS BRA Strut-This SHORTS Under Armour SNEAKERS APL ON KARENA SPORTS BRA Vimmia SNEAKERS Nike

Photographed by ADRIAN MESKO Styled by SUE CHOI

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Start here!

HOW IT WORKS

KAT SAYS “The first step to getting the body you want is knowing you deserve it. And you do.”

Our 360-degree program pretty much guarantees major results.

SIGN UP Join the Challenge at Self.com/

go/SelfTIU to get a month’s worth of workouts and recipes, plus connect with other strong, inspired women (like you!). SWEAT Every week you’ll do two cardio workouts and three strength workouts, starting with the one on page 35. (Don’t worry, we’ll tell you exactly what to do in an email every day!) Your goal isn’t to lose weight—though, yes, you probably will. It’s to feel your best ever, inside and out. EAT Enjoy lots of good food, so you feel satisfied and energized. Get five days’ worth of recipes here and access to the full plan at Self.com/go/SelfTIU. MOTIVATE Use the #SelfTIU hashtag and we’ll hit you back with whatever you need: advice, cheers, anything. SPORTS BRA Lululemon Athletica SHORTS Garbe Luxe by Natalia MacLeod OPPOSITE WHITE BRA Alo Yoga BLACK BRA Solow LEGGINGS Vimmia

GET MORE AT

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WE’RE ALL STARTING ON JANUARY 3!

1

2

3

4

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TRAINING SESSIONS

VIRTUAL COACHING

INSTANT INSPIRATION

EXTRA RECIPES

AWESOME PRIZES

Perfect your form (and maximize your results) by watching Kat and Karena demo all the Challenge strength moves.

We’ll send you an email each day, so you’ll know exactly what workout to do and which recipes to prep.

Use the #SelfTIU hashtag to virtually highive the thousands of other women taking the Challenge.

Make healthy eating even easier with a weekend’s worth of recipes for yummy meals. Snacks, too!

Joining online scores you the chance to win a dream trip for two to Punta Cana. Send us a postcard?


Your cardio routines

GET YOUR BEST BODY Twice a week, we’ll ask you to do one of these four workouts. You’ll burn off stress (and calories).

CARDIO 1 Body-weight HIIT WHY TIU LOVES IT

“It blasts calories and builds muscle,” says Karena. TOTAL TIME

20 minutes Warm-up 5 minutes High knees 30 seconds Rest 10 seconds Jump squats 30 seconds Rest 10 seconds Do 3 sets. Wall sit 1 minute

Rest 15 seconds Push-ups 30 seconds Rest 15 seconds Do 2 sets. Jump lunges 30 seconds Rest 10 seconds Mountain climbers 30 seconds Rest 10 seconds Do 3 sets. Cooldown 3 minutes

CARDIO 2 Intervals WHY TIU LOVES IT

“Even after the workout ends, your

metabolism stays stoked,” says Kat. TOTAL TIME

25 minutes Warm-up 5 minutes Sprint 30 seconds Jog 1 minute Do 4 sets. Fast jump rope 30 seconds Slow jump rope 15 seconds Do 4 sets. Step-ups 1 minute Speed skaters 1 minute Do 3 sets. Cooldown 5 minutes

KARENA SAYS

HAIR, DENNIS GOTS FOR MATRIX; MAKEUP, JENNA ANTON AT JED ROOT; MANICURE, MARISA CARMICHAEL FOR FORMULA X FOR SEPHORA. SEE GET-IT GUIDE.

“Every minute you sweat makes you stronger, because you’re not just building muscle—you’re building confidence, too.”

CARDIO 3 Steady-state WHY TIU LOVES IT

Maintaining a slower pace over a longer time boosts endurance. “Longer sessions can be meditative, too,” says Karena.

SHARE IT ON

SOCIAL

TOTAL TIME

30 to 60 minutes Do your favorite cardio Walk, jog, swim—anything!

CARDIO 4 Active rest WHY TIU LOVES IT

“Giving your muscles time to repair is how they get stronger,” says Kat.

UNITED WE SWEAT Every time you slay a workout, ace a recipe, ind new inspiration or see results you never thought possible, share your triumph so we can all celebrate! Chat with us on Instagram and Twitter using #Self TIU or comment on our Facebook. Sign up to join in at Self.com/go/Self TIU.

TOTAL TIME

60 minutes Just move Take a hike, do yoga, etc.

#SELFTIU


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Trainer to Go

YOUR GO-TO STRENGTH ROUTINE

FALLEN TRIANGLE Works arms, core, legs, glutes Start in a Downward Dog. Twist and raise left arm to ceiling as you kick right leg across (as shown). Return to start; repeat on opposite side for 1 rep.

Strength training three times a week will score you stronger, sexier muscles. Once a week, you’ll do this full-body routine that gives your core extra TLC. Get the other two workouts that you’ll do as part of the Challenge at Self.com/go/SelfTIU. YOU’LL NEED two 5- to 10-pound dumbbells.

ADRIAN MESKO; STYLING, SUE CHOI; HAIR, DENNIS GOTS FOR MATRIX; MAKEUP, JENNA ANTON AT JED ROOT; MANICURE, MARISA CARMICHAEL FOR FORMULA X FOR SEPHORA.

DO 3 sets of 10 reps of each exercise in the order shown.

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BETTER-BOOTY SWING

4

FULL-BODY BLASTER

Works shoulders, core, glutes Stand with feet wider than shoulders, a dumbbell in left hand. Squat and lower dumbbell between legs (as shown). Push hips forward to straighten legs as you swing arm to shoulder height in front of you. Grab dumbbell with right hand and lower it between legs as you squat for 1 rep.

Works arms, core, glutes, legs Stand with feet hip-width apart, a dumbbell in each hand at shoulder height. Squat, then press dumbbells overhead as you straighten legs. Lower hands to shoulders, then lift left leg behind you as you lean forward from hips and straighten arms until they’re parallel to back (as shown). Return to start; repeat on opposite side for 1 rep.

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PASS IT ON

5

WIND DOWN

Works shoulders, core, glutes, legs Stand with feet together, a dumbbell in both hands in front of you, arms extended. Step right foot forward and lower until thigh is parallel to floor, transferring dumbbell to right hand. Pass dumbbell under thigh to left hand (as shown). Stand, lifting left knee to hip height and holding dumbbell in hands in front of you. Return to start; repeat on opposite side for 1 rep.

Works shoulders, core Stand with feet wider than shoulders, a dumbbell in left hand, left arm extended overhead. Hinge to right from hips, lowering right hand to floor (as shown). Slowly rise to start for 1 rep. Do all reps; repeat on opposite side.

SHAZAM THIS PAGE FOR DEMOS OF ALL THE MOVES.


Your meal plan

5 DAYS OF DELICIOUS These recipes, developed by the Tone It Up team, will keep your muscles fueled and your taste buds happy—all for less than 1,600 calories a day.

DAY 1 BREAKFAST

Morning Quinoa SERVES 2

In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, simmer ½ cup cooked quinoa; 1 tbsp slivered almonds; 1 tbsp raisins; ½ banana, mashed; ½ tsp cinnamon; and 1 cup unsweetened almond milk. Cook, stirring, 15 minutes. SNACK

Creamy Green Shake SERVES 1

In a blender, puree the juice of 1 lime, 10 mint leaves, ¼ cup parsley, ½ cup spinach, ½ tsp grated ginger, 1 cup mango chunks (fresh or frozen), ½ avocado, 1 cup coconut water, 1 cup ice and a pinch of salt until smooth. LUNCH

Avocado-Turkey Toast SERVES 1

Toast 1 slice whole-wheat (or gluten-free) bread until lightly golden. Top with ½ avocado, 2 slices smoked turkey breast, ½ tsp olive oil and salt to taste.

toss with 1 tbsp olive oil and a pinch of salt. Place on a foil-covered baking sheet, bake 30 to 40 minutes and cool. In a blender, puree 1 tbsp honey, 1 tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 tbsp chopped onion, ½ tbsp apple cider vinegar, ¼ tsp black pepper and a pinch of sea salt on high 30 seconds. Reduce speed to low and slowly add 2 tbsp olive oil. In a bowl, toss 1 sliced apple with 1 tsp lemon juice. Add 1 cup frisée and 1 cup mixed greens; toss with 1 tbsp dressing. Divide between 2 plates and top with roasted beet, sweet potato and ½ cup walnuts.

DAY 2 BREAKFAST

Protein Pancake SERVES 1

In a bowl, whisk together ½ banana, mashed; 1 scoop protein powder; ¼ cup egg whites; 1 tbsp almond milk; and 1 tsp cinnamon. Heat a small nonstick skillet coated with coconut-oil cooking spray over medium heat. Pour batter into skillet and cook until bubbles appear at surface. Flip and cook 1 to 2 minutes more. Top with 2 sliced strawberries.

SNACK

Hummus Lettuce Wraps SERVES 1

In a bowl, combine ¼ cup hummus and 2 tbsp toasted pine nuts. Spread on 3 romaine lettuce leaves.

SNACK

Trail Mix SERVES 1

Mix ¼ cup mixed nuts, 2 tbsp goji berries and 2 tbsp dried pineapple.

DINNER

LUNCH

SERVES 2

SERVES 2

Beet, Apple and Frisée Salad Heat oven to 375˚. Peel 1 beet and 1 small sweet potato, cut into 1-inch chunks, and

sauce), 1 tbsp lime juice and ½ tbsp chopped garlic. Pour over 2 tilapia fillets (4 oz each). Cover and refrigerate 30 to 60 minutes. In another bowl, toss ½ cup chopped daikon, ½ cup chopped jicama, ½ cup chopped cucumber, ½ cup diced tomato, ¼ cup chopped avocado, 2 tbsp chopped mint leaves, 2 tbsp chopped cilantro, 1 seeded and chopped jalapeño and 1½ tbsp lime juice. Season with salt to taste. On a grill or grill pan over high heat, cook tilapia until cooked through, 5 minutes per side. Heat oven to 250˚. Wrap 2 corn tortillas in a damp towel and warm in oven 10 minutes. Top each with 1 fillet and salsa.

Asian-Style Fish Tacos In a bowl, whisk together 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil, 2 tbsp tamari (or soy

SNACK

Yogurt and Fruit SERVES 1

Top 1 cup lowfat Greek yogurt with ½ tsp cinnamon and ½ cup blueberries. DINNER

Turkey-Vegetable Bowl SERVES 2

In a large pot over medium heat, cook ½ lb 95-percent-lean ground turkey and 1 tbsp chicken broth. Stir, breaking turkey into pieces with a spoon. Add 1 tbsp broth, 1 cup of your favorite veggies (such as zucchini, onions, snap peas or broccoli), ¾ cup marinara sauce and 1 tsp oregano. Simmer until turkey is cooked through, 10 to 15 minutes.

DAY 3 BREAKFAST

Breakfast Scramble SERVES 1

BEET, APPLE AND FRISÉE SALAD

In a bowl, whisk together 3 egg whites, 1 egg, ¼ cup chopped spinach, 1 tbsp crumbled feta and 1 tbsp chopped dill. In a nonstick skillet over medium heat, cook 2 minutes. Scramble and cook 2 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with ½ grapefruit. SNACK

“Cheesy” Popcorn SERVES 1

Toss 1 cup air-popped popcorn with 2 tbsp olive oil and 2 tbsp nutritional yeast.

Photographed by ANDREW PURCELL


ASIAN-STYLE FISH TACOS

LUNCH

Sweet & Spicy Kale Salad SERVES 2

In a bowl, combine 1 bunch kale, stemmed and chopped; 1 carrot, chopped or grated; and 2 tbsp raisins. In another bowl, whisk together the juice of 1 orange; 1 tbsp lime juice; 1 tbsp olive oil; 1 tsp honey; ¼ tsp salt; 1 garlic clove, finely chopped; and a dash of cayenne pepper. Toss salad with dressing and divide between 2 plates. Garnish each with 30 almonds. SNACK

Carrots and Hummus SERVES 1

Serve 1 cup baby carrots and ¼ cup hummus sprinkled with a pinch of paprika. DINNER

Grilled Salmon With Cabbage SERVES 2

In a bowl, whisk ¼ cup lime juice, 2 tbsp tamari (or soy sauce), 1 tbsp agave, 1 tbsp olive oil and ½ tbsp powdered ginger. Pour over 2 skin-on salmon fillets (8 oz each); cover and refrigerate 15 to 30 minutes. In another bowl, toss 1 cup shredded napa cabbage; 1 cup shredded purple cabbage; 1 can water chestnuts, drained; ¼ cup sliced green onions; and 1 orange, peeled and segmented. Heat broiler. On a baking sheet covered with parchment paper, season salmon with salt and pepper and broil until flaky, 5 to 7 minutes. In a small saucepan over high heat, boil marinade. Reduce heat to low and simmer until thickened, 5 minutes. Brush marinade on top of fillets. Divide slaw between 2 plates; top each with 1 fillet.

DAY 4 BREAKFAST

Coconut Coffee Shake SERVES 1

In a blender, combine ½ cup almond milk; 1 cup strong coffee or espresso, chilled; 1 small frozen banana, sliced; 1 scoop plant-based protein powder; 1 tbsp coconut shavings; 1 tsp cinnamon; 3 dates; 2 to 3 ice cubes; and a pinch of sea salt. Puree until smooth. SNACK

Spiced Almonds

FOOD STYLING, CARRIE PURCELL.

SERVES 1

Heat oven to 375˚. On a foil-lined baking sheet, drizzle ¼ cup raw almonds with 1 tbsp coconut oil; then sprinkle with ¼ tsp curry powder and a pinch of sea salt. Toast 10 minutes. LUNCH

Baja Burrito Bowl SERVES 1

Steam 1 cup broccoli until tender. In a

medium skillet over medium heat, heat ½ cup canned black beans, drained and rinsed, and ¹∕ ³ cup cooked quinoa. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with broccoli, ¹∕ ³ cup chopped avocado, 2 tbsp chopped cilantro and 2 tbsp prepared salsa. SNACK

Creamy Guac With Celery SERVES 1

In a bowl, mash ½ avocado with 1 tbsp lowfat Greek yogurt and a dash of chili powder. Serve with 4 celery stalks. DINNER

Grilled Hawaiian Chicken SERVES 2

In a bowl, toss ¼ cup chopped pineapple; 1 red bell pepper, chopped; 1 orange bell pepper, chopped; 1 jalapeño, finely chopped; ½ cup chives, chopped; and the juice of 2 limes. In another bowl, combine ½ cup pineapple juice; the juice of 2 additional limes; 2 tsp agave syrup; 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped; and sea salt and pepper to taste. Pour over 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (4 oz each); refrigerate 10 minutes. On a grill or grill pan over medium-high heat, grill chicken until browned, 5 minutes. Flip and continue cooking until opaque in center, about 5 minutes more. Divide chicken and 1 cup steamed brussels sprouts between 2 plates. Serve with salsa.

DAY 5 BREAKFAST

Chia Berry Pudding

SNACK

Grapefruit and Honey SERVES 1

Serve 1 whole grapefruit drizzled with 2 tsp honey. DINNER

Coconut-Crusted Mahimahi SERVES 2

Heat oven to 425˚. In a bowl, combine ½ cup macadamia nuts, roasted and crushed; ½ tbsp chopped parsley; 1 tsp herbes de Provence; ¼ cup coconut flour; 1 tbsp coconut shavings; ¼ cup quinoa crisps; and 1 tbsp coconut oil, melted. On a baking sheet brushed with olive oil, bake 2 mahimahi fillets (6 oz each), seasoned with salt and pepper to taste, 5 minutes. Remove from oven and brush with 1 tbsp coconut milk, dip in flour mixture, and bake 10 minutes more.

MORE RECIPES!

SELF.COM Get your grocery list, two more days of meals and snacks, and nutritional info for every recipe at Self.com/go/SelfTIU.

SERVES 1

In a blender, puree ¼ cup strawberries or raspberries (fresh or frozen), ½ cup coconut water, 1½ tbsp honey and ¹⁄ 8 tsp salt until smooth. In a bowl, combine 3 tbsp white chia seeds, 2 tbsp almond or coconut milk, 1 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut, 1 tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp allspice and ½ tsp sea salt. Top with berry puree and chill 30 minutes.

#SELFTIU BREAKFAST SCRAMBLE

SNACK

Peanut Butter and Apple SERVES 1

Mix 2 tbsp peanut butter with ¼ tsp powdered ginger. Serve with 1 apple, sliced. LUNCH

Greek Salad SERVES 2

In a bowl, whisk together 1 tbsp olive oil, 1 tsp lemon juice, 1 tsp red wine vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss with 1 tomato, sliced; ¼ red onion, chopped; 2 tbsp pitted black olives, halved; and 3 tbsp crumbled feta.

Sign up for the Challenge at Self.com/go/SelfTIU.

JAN/FEB 2016

SELF

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GIVE IT

100%

EVERY MORNING is another chance to get it right.

NO

DOUBTS. HOLDING BACK. EXCUSES.

VISUALIZE YOUR GOALS

YOUR BODY

GET INSPIRED These power mantras—Katrina and Karena’s faves—are feel-good fuel for your psyche. Get them all at Self.com/go/SelfTIU and share on social whenever you need a boost!

DARE TO

BE GREAT

Change can be uncomfortable, but it’s in those moments of discomfort when big things happen.

RISE ABOVE

YOU’LL NEVER, EVER REGRET A WORKOUT.

POSITIVE 40

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JAN/FEB 2016

MIND. VIBES. LIFE.

RESPECT

YOURSELF Every time you talk to yourself, do it with kindness.

HEAD UP, HEART OPEN

GO THE PERFECT MOMENT TO START IS NOW. PRACTICE

GRATITUDE Your body is strong and capable.

ADRIAN MESKO

LOVE

Motivate


( SELF ) M O T I VAT E

SEL F A P P ROV E D

BEST RACES

From 5K to marathon, any race you run is a win—but these are next-level amazing. Add them to your bucket list. BY LAUREL LEICHT AND LIZ PLOSSER

SeaWheeze Lululemon Half Marathon

Golden Gate Bridge views. Ditto for swag: Finishers get a swoosh necklace from Tiffany...awarded by a tuxedo-clad dude.

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

Army Ten-Miler WASHINGTON, D.C.

It’s a USA lovefest: Start at the Pentagon, then run through the National Mall and by the monuments. The most inspiring part of this October race is seeing the hundreds of soldiers who run or volunteer.

Bolder Boulder 10K BOULDER, COLORADO

After tackling grueling (but gorgeous!) inclines at high altitudes in this Memorial Day weekend race, runners bask in cheers from spectators at the finish line on the University of Colorado football field.

Big Sur International Marathon

Falmouth Road Race

BIG SUR, CALIFORNIA

FALMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS

Your quads will feel all 26.2 miles of rolling hills in this April race—but the views of the Pacific Ocean keep you going.

This Cape Cod–area 7-miler, held every August since 1973, has grown from 93 participants to more than 12,000. You wind through 3 hilly, shady miles before hitting a flat seaside stretch.

Nike Women’s Half Marathon SAN FRANCISCO

The girl-power vibes are off the hook in this October race with

NYRR 5th Avenue Mile NEW YORK CITY

You’ll go all out for 20 blocks on the famed avenue to finish at the southern end of Central Park. Stick around afterward to see elite athletes rocket their way to sub-5-minute-mile finishes in this September race.

Run Disney 5K ORLANDO, FLORIDA

In January, Disney superfans enjoy starting-line fireworks at dawn, then photo ops with characters like Elsa as they run through Epcot. Ambitious runners add a 10K, half marathon and marathon each of the next three mornings (for real!), a feat called a Dopey.

TCS New York City Marathon NEW YORK CITY

Some 50,000 runners from around the world travel through the city’s five boroughs on the first Sunday in November. It’s all epic, but the turn off the 59th Street Bridge toward the roar of fans in Manhattan is guaranteed to give goose bumps to your goose bumps.

Visit Self.com/go/races for more of our favorites.

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JAN/FEB 2016

COURTESY OF LULULEMON ATHLETICA

The August event is more about a good time than your finish time—and a beautiful stretch along the Seawall (pictured) makes running feel effortless. Celebrate that evening with a yoga/music festival.


( SELF ) M O T I VAT E

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SHAZAM THIS PAGE TO SHOP EVERY ITEM YOU SEE HERE.

ROCK CLIMBING 1 The wide gate openings on these color-coded carabiners make it easy to clip ropes and anchors as you climb.

3 An open neckline and skinny straps give arms full range of motion; stretchy, thin fabric nixes friction as you twist and turn.

Hotwire RackPack, $35 for six; BlackDiamond Equipment.com

Free to Be, $42; Lululemon.com

2 Feel safe, secure and comfy in this lightweight harness with elastic cushioned leg loops. Chaos, $125; Black DiamondEquipment.com

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4 This mesh tank keeps you cool, no matter how challenging your route. Unisex Muscle Tee, $75; Kor-NYC.com

5 Cinch it closed to tuck away your chalk.

It’s the ultimate workout for sculpting your back, arms and legs. Here’s the gear you need to get to the top of that wall. BY MEG LAPPE

Small Mojo, $17; Black DiamondEquipment.com

Fre Power, $130; Lifeproof.com

6 This nylon tote’s exterior pockets make grabbing essentials a breeze.

8 Medical-grade tape prevents hot spots and knuckle scrapes without causing numbness.

Daily Duffle, $225; RebeccaMinkoff.com for similar styles

7 No matter how long you’re on the wall, this shockproof case will keep your phone powered with double the normal battery life.

Mueller MTape, $5; MuellerSportsMed.com

9 Feel every crevice in Vibram-soled shoes. (Bonus: A padded tongue protects the tops of feet.) Force X, $139; Scarpa.com

10 Lemon and olive-leaf

extracts in these wipes feel refreshing and get you ready for that postclimb selfie. Fearlessly Refreshing Facial Wipes, $22 for 24; GoAdventuress.com

11 These capris’ flat seams mean no chafing on your ascent; the wide waistband gives support. Techfit 3/4 Print, $45; AdidasOutdoor.com for similar styles

Photographed by CHELSEA McNAMARA

PROP STYLING, RACHEL STICKLEY AT BERNSTEIN & ANDRIULLI.

GY M BAG


( SELF )

NOUR I S H POWER

LUNCH Give your brain—and body—a boost with these nutrient-packed midday meals from Silicon Valley’s go-to chef. Breakfast may be the most important meal of the day, but a healthy lunch is also crucial for productivity. We asked Charlie Ayers, the former executive chef at Google who now feeds some of tech’s top minds at his Palo Alto, California, hot spot, Calaia Café, about his food-as-fuel philosophy. “It’s key to eat balanced meals that leave you stimulated and energized for hours,” he says. So whether you need to be on for a big meeting or just plow through your workload, try one of his supersmart desk lunches.

Photographed by JOHNNY MILLER

JAN/FEB 2016

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SERVES 4

1 cup wheat berries

½ cup kamut ¼ cup farro 1 head Tuscan kale, stemmed and coarsely shredded ½ cup sliced almonds, toasted 2 tbsp chopped candied ginger 4 tbsp pomegranate seeds 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 tbsp white balsamic vinegar ½ tsp cinnamon Kosher salt

In a large saucepan over high heat, bring 5 cups water to a boil; add wheat berries, kamut and farro. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until grains are just tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain, rinse with cold water and drain again. In a large pot of boiling water, blanch kale 1 minute. Drain, rinse with cold water and drain again. In a bowl, combine cooked grains, kale, almonds, ginger and pomegranate. In another bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, cinnamon, and salt and black pepper to taste. Pour dressing over salad and toss gently to combine. NUTRITION INFO 510 calories per serving, 22 g fat (3 g saturated), 74 g carbs, 13 g fiber, 16 g protein

Protein-Packed Pasta

Chef Charlie Ayers dishes on what Silicon Valley insiders eat (and avoid) to stay at the top of their game.

SERVES 4

12 2 1 2 12 4 12

½ 4

¹⁄ ³

1

oz lumaconi pasta tbsp olive oil, divided garlic clove, chopped tsp (or to taste) harissa oz baby spinach sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil, drained and chopped cherry tomatoes, halved cup chicken stock boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 4 oz each), cooked and shredded cup sliced black olives tbsp lemon juice Kosher salt cup toasted pine nuts

½ In a large pot of lightly salted boiling water, cook pasta until al dente, about 10 minutes. Drain and toss with 1 tbsp olive oil. In a large skillet over low heat, heat remaining 1 tbsp olive oil. Add garlic and harissa and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add spinach and cook, stirring, about 1 minute. Add sun-dried tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, stock, chicken and olives and continue to cook until cherry tomatoes have softened, about 2 minutes. Add lemon juice and season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add pasta and toss to combine. Garnish with pine nuts. NUTRITION INFO 680 calories per serving, 25 g fat (3 g saturated), 74 g carbs, 6 g fiber, 42 g protein

Healthy, Hearty Soup SERVES 6

2 cups frozen English peas, defrosted and patted dry 4 cups chicken stock 1 can (15 oz) cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 1 tbsp lemon juice ½ cup finely chopped yellow onion ½ cup chopped celery 2–3 small white potatoes, peeled and cubed 1 garlic clove, chopped 2 cups wild arugula, roughly chopped 2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme 2 tbsp chopped fresh oregano 2 tbsp chopped fresh mint 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley 1 tsp grated lemon zest Kosher salt ½ cup grated Parmesan ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Heat oven to 350°. On a baking sheet, roast peas 5 to 10 minutes. In a medium pot over high heat, boil stock. Add beans, lemon juice, onion, celery, potatoes and garlic; cook 3 to 5 minutes. Reduce heat and add peas, arugula, thyme and oregano; simmer until vegetables are just tender, about 15 minutes. Add mint, parsley, lemon zest, and salt and black pepper to taste. Ladle into bowls, sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and drizzle with olive oil. NUTRITION INFO 337 calories per serving, 13 g fat (3 g saturated), 42 g carbs, 8 g fiber, 17 g protein SHAZAM THIS PAGE FOR MORE ENERGIZING SNACK AND MEAL IDEAS.

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Which foods benefit us the most on demanding days?

A ⁄ Nuts and seeds are a great source of both physical energy and brainpower. That’s why I often throw them into a salad. I also like spinach, kale and blueberries, which are rich in protective antioxidants, and ish and seafood for heart-healthy omega-3s. All of these foods play a role in maintaining proper cognitive function. How can I avoid the dreaded postlunch slump?

A⁄

Packing some lean protein into your meal will help you stay alert and energized. But keep the amount in check so you don’t overtax your body. I don’t serve larger than a 5-ounce portion at the restaurant. Also, consume the right fats— from sources like salmon, avocado or walnuts—and carbohydrates such as quinoa and barley, which slowly absorb into your system. A glass of juice can ofer a short-term boost, but don’t overdo it or you’ll end up crashing from the sugar in a few hours. Lunch is often so rushed— how can we enjoy it more?

A ⁄ A lot of people eat so quickly that their brain doesn’t have time to catch up and signal that they’re full. It’s important to pace yourself. I’ve noticed people using chopsticks not just for sushi but on a more frequent basis. It takes longer to eat, and at the end of the meal you often still have something left to take home for later.

FOOD STYLING, MARIANA VELASQUEZ AT BIG LEO; PROP STYLING, CINDY DIPRIMA AT EH MANAGEMENT.

Superfood Salad

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( SELF ) N OU R I S H

START HERE!

APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

Combine these

ORANGE

RAW SUGAR

CILANTRO APPLE CASHEWS GRILLED CHICKEN BREASTS

BROWN RICE

WHOLEWHEAT BUNS

SNOW PEAS

RED CABBAGE, 3 WAYS

RICE WINE VINEGAR

SESAME OIL

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Whether you roast it, pickle it or eat it raw, this vibrant superfood gives any meal a major vitamin C boost.

Toss these

Bake these

BY MARGE PERRY

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

2

OLIVE OIL

ROSEMARY

1 Chicken Burger With

Cabbage-Apple Slaw SERVES 2

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PIZZA DOUGH BALSAMIC VINEGAR

ASIAGO

2 Cabbage Pizza SERVES 2

In a medium saucepan, boil ½ cup apple cider vinegar, 1 tbsp raw sugar and ½ tsp salt for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 1 cup shredded red cabbage and ½ sliced apple; let stand 15 minutes. Season 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (4 oz each) with salt and pepper to taste; cook in a grill pan over high heat, 5 to 6 minutes per side. Divide chicken and slaw between 2 whole-wheat buns and serve.

Heat oven to 450°. In a bowl, toss 2 cups shredded red cabbage, 1 cup sliced brussels sprouts, 2 tsp olive oil and 2 tsp chopped rosemary. Transfer to a baking sheet; bake 8 minutes. Roll out 8 oz store-bought pizza dough into a 10-inch circle. Top with cabbage mixture and ½ cup shredded Asiago; bake 20 minutes. In a small saucepan, simmer ¼ cup balsamic vinegar and 2 tsp raw sugar until syrupy, about 4 minutes. Drizzle over pizza and serve.

NUTRITION INFO 297 calories per serving, 4 g fat (1 g saturated), 36 g carbs, 4 g fiber, 27 g protein

NUTRITION INFO 496 calories per serving, 14 g fat (5 g saturated), 77 g carbs, 6 g fiber, 15 g protein

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3 Cabbage, Orange

and Brown Rice Salad SERVES 2

In a bowl, whisk together 2 tsp sesame oil and 1 tbsp rice wine vinegar. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add 1½ cups shredded red cabbage, 1 cup snow peas, ½ cup cooked brown rice, ½ cup cashews, ½ cup cilantro and 1 orange, segmented. Toss gently to combine. Divide between 2 plates and serve. NUTRITION INFO 381 calories per serving, 23 g fat (4 g saturated), 39 g carbs, 6 g fiber, 9 g protein

Photographed by ANDREW PURCELL

FOOD STYLING, CARRIE PURCELL. ORANGE: ZACH DESART.

RAW SUGAR


( SELF ) NOUR I S H

EAT HAPPY Enjoy a better breakfast, try smarter salts, and upgrade your grocery-store game plan.

Smoothie bowls Skip the cereal in favor of one of these vitamin-packed blended breakfasts. (Bonus: so Instagram-friendly!) RECIPES BY STEPHANIE CLARKE, R.D., AND WILLOW JAROSH, R.D.

Pineapple-Kefir Bowl

In a blender, puree 1¼ cups frozen pineapple, ²⁄³ cup plain lowfat kefir, 1 tbsp hemp seeds, 1 tbsp rolled oats, 1 Medjool date, ¹⁄8 tsp cinnamon and ¹⁄8 tsp nutmeg until smooth, about 30 seconds. Scoop into a bowl and top with ¼ cup blackberries, 1 tbsp toasted pistachios and 2 tsp coconut chips. NUTRITION INFO 418 calories, 13 g fat (3 g saturated), 65 g carbs, 9 g fiber, 17 g protein

Açaí and Yogurt Bowl

Dragon Fruit Bowl

In a blender, puree 1 packet frozen Sambazon açaí puree (found at Whole Foods), ½ banana, ¹⁄ ³ cup lowfat plain Greek yogurt and 2 tbsp orange juice until smooth, about 1 minute. Pour into a bowl and top with another ½ banana, sliced; 2 tbsp chopped Brazil nuts; and 1 tsp ground flaxseed. NUTRITION INFO 358 calories, 14 g fat (4 g saturated), 52 g carbs, 8 g fiber, 10 g protein

In a blender, puree 2 Pitaya Plus dragon fruit smoothie packs (found at Whole Foods), ½ cup chopped mango, 1 cup spinach and ½ cup unsweetened almond milk until smooth, about 2 minutes. Pour into a bowl and top with ½ kiwi, sliced; ¼ cup sliced mango; ¼ cup blueberries; 2 tsp toasted coconut; 1 tbsp chopped walnuts; and 2 tsp bee pollen. NUTRITION INFO 368 calories, 10 g fat (3 g saturated), 66 g carbs, 14 g fiber, 9 g protein

Matcha Bowl

In a blender, puree 1½ cups frozen sliced peaches, ¾ cup unsweetened hemp milk, 2 tbsp hemp seeds, 1 tsp matcha (green tea powder) and 1 tsp honey until smooth, about 1 minute. Pour into a bowl and top with ¼ cup each pomegranate seeds, raspberries and sliced strawberries. NUTRITION INFO 342 calories, 14 g fat (2 g saturated), 46 g carbs, 12 g fiber, 12 g protein

THERE’S MORE! Find additional smoothie recipes at Self.com/go/smoothiebowls.

SWAP IN THIS SALT

Head to the bulk section—where you’ll ind bins of nuts, beans, grains and more—to buy smaller amounts of ingredients you don’t use that often. Your food will be fresher, and you’ll consume less packaging, which is better for the environment.

Salt often gets a bad rap, but the coarse type might actually curb your sodium intake. Less-reined lakes are larger—so you need only a pinch to add a lot of lavor. Keep this palm-sized tin at your desk for lunchtime.

Know your terms

Pure Flake Slide Tins, two for $5; JacobsenSalt.com

SHOP SMARTER NYC health coach Maria Marlowe helps busy women like Ivanka Trump eat well. Here, her grocery-store tips.

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Go organic whenever possible. But also look for pasture-raised chicken, turkey, beef and eggs: They’re typically more nutritious, and the animals have been raised predominantly on grass.

Save the stems Beets and turnips are great for you, and their greens contain tons of nutrients, so don’t throw them away! Cut them up and sauté with a little garlic and olive oil—they taste a bit like spinach.

Photographed by JOHNNY MILLER

FOOD STYLING, REBECCA JURKEVICH; PROP STYLING, SARAH SMART. FROM LEFT: DIANE FIELDS. COURTESY OF MARIA MARLOWE.

Bulk up


( SELF ) NOUR I S H INDULGE

COOKIES & COCOA Get cozy with this healthier take on two winter classics from pastry chef Alina Martell. After a day spent out in the cold (skiing or just running around), there’s nothing better than grabbing a mug of hot cocoa and a delicious cookie. Using coconut oil and almond milk, executive pastry chef Alina Martell of Vaucluse in NYC puts a modern spin on these decadent treats. Curl up with a blanket and enjoy!

Oatmeal and Creamy Coconut Sandwich Cookies MAKES 15

2 tbsp plus 1 tsp honey, divided

2 tbsp grapeseed oil 1 egg 3 tbsp Greek yogurt ¾ cup whole-wheat flour ½ cup almond flour 1 tsp baking soda ¼ tsp salt ¼ tsp cinnamon 3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats Parchment paper 8 oz coconut oil, chilled ¹⁄8 tsp vanilla extract 4 tbsp powdered sugar, sifted

Salted Hot Cocoa SERVES 2

2 cups unsweetened almond milk 2 tbsp cane sugar ½ tsp vanilla extract 3 oz chocolate (60 to 65 percent cacao), chopped Sea salt

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, heat milk, sugar and vanilla. Add chocolate and whisk until completely melted, 1 to 2 minutes. Bring to a boil, add a pinch of salt to taste and remove from heat. Serve warm.

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Heat oven to 375˚. Using an electric or stand mixer, mix together 2 tbsp honey and butter until creamy. Add sugars and grapeseed oil and mix until light and fluffy. Add egg and yogurt and blend until incorporated. Add flours, baking soda, salt and cinnamon and mix until combined. Stir in oats. On a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, drop 30 1-inch balls of dough; press down lightly to flatten. Bake 5 to 6 minutes. Rotate pan 180 degrees and bake 5 to 6 minutes more, until edges are crispy and cookies are browned. Cool. Using an electric or stand mixer, mix coconut oil, vanilla, remaining 1 tsp honey and powdered sugar. Spoon 1 tbsp coconut mixture onto 1 cookie and then sandwich with another cookie. Refrigerate until coconut cream sets. Serve chilled. SHAZAM THIS PAGE TO GET MORE RECIPES FOR SWEET TREATS.

Photographed by JOHNNY MILLER

FOOD STYLING, MARIANA VELASQUEZ AT BIG LEO; PROP STYLING, CINDY DIPRIMA AT EH MANAGEMENT.

½ cup unsalted butter, room temperature ¾ cup coconut palm sugar ¹⁄ ³ cup cane sugar


( SELF )

WORT H

GEAR

SHED PROP STYLING, LAUREN MACHEN AT RED EYE REPS.

Decluttering is like a workout— tough but worth it. Organizing guru Marie Kondo’s new tips will help you power through.

If organizing is your thing, Marie Kondo is the equivalent of a super instructor. Her irst book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, inspired a full-on movement, complete with its own hashtag (#KonMari). Her new book, Spark Joy, includes more genius tips, plus illustrations. Some of our favorite ideas: Divide your desk supplies into compartments by category and store those essentials vertically, so you can ind what you need faster. Put makeup into “teams” (one for everyday basics, another for special occasions) and keep go-to itness items, like sneakers or a tennis racket, in a small corner, not a closet. “The more visible the items, the more motivated you’ll be to use them,” Kondo points out. Neat ideas. —Madeline Buxton SHAZAM THIS PAGE TO SEE HOW PEOPLE #KONMARI THEIR LIVES.

Photographed by BARTHOLOMEW COOKE

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( SELF ) WOR T H

LEARNING CURVE

RUNNING FOR MY LIFE

I run every day. I run up hills and along lat terrain, through ields, boggy meadows, city streets, mud puddles and gravel pathways that wedge tiny pebbles in the tread of my sneakers. I don’t stop to rest until well after I’m fully winded, my heart thumping in my ears like a metronome. Sometimes I last for only a mile or two; other days I’ll jog around the neighborhood for 45 minutes or more. Or so I think—I don’t wear a watch often, preferring instead to time my tempo according to the mood of the day, my energy level or whim. I don’t race, I don’t train, and I stop before any joint pain sets in. Time, distance, calories, music playlists and itness apps hardly ever cross my mind. I haven’t always liked running. In fact, I used to do everything in my power to avoid it. During middle school I purposely wore inappropriate shoes on gym days, and when that didn’t work, I faked side aches and limped dramatically with a hand clutched to my rib cage. When I tried out for my college crew team, the coach informed us that running 5 icy-cold miles before our 6 A.M. practice was part of our “warm-up,” so I quit on the spot. It wasn’t as though I loathed all exercise: I swam competitively, hiked and biked during the summer and skied almost every weekend in winter. But running, I was convinced, would do me in. Running was painful. It required a diferent type of stamina. And I simply had no motivation to do it. Then Gregg burst into my life. We were in our mid-20s, spending long hours at a chaotic online start-up in Seattle. He was the cute project manager who worked on a diferent loor; I was the Web editor who took the back stairwell every day so I could walk casually past his desk. Our relationship was slow to start, though once we paired up, things took of quickly. After our irst kiss, Gregg insisted that I share exactly how I felt about

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him. Four months later, we were engaged. Once, while I was lazily walking on a treadmill in a halhearted attempt at getting in shape for our wedding, Gregg strolled over and punched up the speedometer. “You can go a lot faster,” he said with a mischievous grin. Our relationship was a lot like that. Before I met Gregg, my life plodded along at a slow and predictable pace, and then bam, he put me on the fast track to adventure. Once married, we traveled to far-flung locations, roadtripped through the Southwest with our Siberian husky and camped out in the middle of winter in the snowy foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We fantasized about quitting our jobs and sailing down the coast of California—and then we did it; for three months we got to live that dream aboard a 26-foot boat. We were like teenagers, talking late into the night and musing about the meaning of life. If I ever felt unsteady, Gregg would ground me, filling me with love and confidence. Five years after our wedding, I gave birth to our daughter, and we moved from Los Angeles to Vashon Island, near Seattle and both our families. We wanted to dial down our frenzied pace and put down roots. That’s when Gregg decided to start training for a marathon. And that’s when everything fell apart. It was a bright Sunday morning in early September, about a month before Gregg’s big race. After he’d increased his mileage all summer, this long training run was critical. When he inished, a few hours later, I met him at the ferry landing near our home, making my way down the long dock with our 10-month-old daughter, Lizzie. I remember thinking that Gregg resembled a statue, silently standing there with a vacant look on his face. Why wasn’t he rushing to embrace us? “I feel weird,” he said, his last words before collapsing. I frantically performed CPR until

EMILIANO GRANADO

When a sudden tragedy upended her world, writer Allison Ellis found solace—and hope—in the one activity she used to hate.


( SELF ) WOR T H the paramedics arrived; Gregg showed brief moments of consciousness before being carted of in an ambulance. After an hour, he was pronounced dead at the hospital. An autopsy later revealed that he’d died of a massive heart attack. Though he was in perfect shape on the outside, his major arteries were nearly completely blocked. If there were symptoms, they were either too vague to identify, or Gregg had chosen to ignore them. He was 39 years old. All the hopes we shared—from the big ones (having a second child) to the mundane (putting an addition on our house)—were suddenly shattered, now lying in tiny shards on the hospital loor. In shock and numbness, I went through the motions of talking to doctors and tending to my daughter. But by the time I got to my mom’s house a few miles away, my body and brain were hopelessly out of sync. I kept dropping things. The ground swayed beneath me. I felt nauseous and unmoored. And then a thought occurred to me: Just run away. There was no plan; I knew that I had to move. Immediately. As I dug out an old pair of sweatpants from the back of one of my childhood dressers, the concept of runner’s high or the mood-boosting benefits of cardiovascular activity were definitely not on my mind in that moment. I simply couldn’t sit still with the image of my it husband, cold and unmoving on the hospital gurney, lashing on repeat inside my head. So I handed Lizzie to my mom and took of. The wind illed my lungs and whipped back my hair as I sprinted into the unknown that evening. My body felt surprisingly strong and fast, my limbs full of energy. Just as quickly as that surge had arrived—likely an adrenalinefueled light response—it was over. About a half mile in, I gasped for breath. What had started as a small side stitch was now piercing my gut, forcing me to double over. But I didn’t stop. Stopping meant I’d have to go back to reality—to the lood of pity from friends, the medical forms still waiting to be signed. So I kept shuling forward, slow and hobbled, until exhaustion took over. I limped the remaining distance back to my mom’s house and collapsed on the floor—from physical pain or grief, I couldn’t tell.

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The next morning, awaking in agony to the blunt force of my new life, I promised myself that I could get through the day if I went out for another run. I ixated on this salve until I was outside once again, momentarily escaping the mounting casseroles and funeral planning. On the third day, I did the same, and by the fourth day, the run left me slightly less wiped out. “One step at a time,” I repeated to myself, over and over. Pervasive dark thoughts, such as “My life is over” and “How will I be strong for my daughter?” were replaced with the idea, “If I just make it up that hill without throwing up, I can make it

open wound and more like a chronic, dull ache. As I made strides toward carving out a new identity for myself—no longer a mourning widow but an independent single mom—I began to question the necessity, and practicality, of religiously adhering to my daily routine. I’d evolved into the type of runner who prioritized her life around the ritual (skipping lunch for a jog; joining a gym near the oice for access to their showers post-workout). But I wondered: Did I really need to push myself like this anymore? Was I healed? I started giving myself permission to slack off and devoted time to other

THE GROUND SWAYED BENEATH ME. I FELT NAUSEOUS AND UNMOORED. AND THEN A THOUGHT OCCURRED TO ME: JUST RUN AWAY. through this day.” As the irst week turned into the fourth, and my increasing endurance translated into longer runs, I noticed my mood improving, however mildly. In the weeks and months that followed, friends and family wanted to know how they could help, and my frequent request was for them to watch Lizzie so that I could run. I needed that time to sort through my fears about going back to my job and arranging for child care (Gregg had been a stay-at-home dad, and we didn’t have any life insurance). It was while running that I confronted my anxiety over raising Lizzie alone, over how being so young to lose her dad might ultimately afect her. Runs were also when I felt most connected to Gregg and talked to him during imaginary conversations. (Me: “Hi, are you there? I miss you, I love you. Are you running up in heaven?” Him: “Hi. I love you and miss you, too. Great job with your running. Keep going, you’re looking good!”) Even more than my weekly grieftherapy group, my daily runs helped me grow stronger mentally. They inspired forward movement despite the void in my soul. Running never asked, “How are you coping?” Running never gave me a look of sorrow, avoided my gaze or passed me over for a project because it assumed I was too distraught to handle the workload. Running gave me a sense of control after my world had crumbled around me. And so my grief became less of an

things I enjoyed: I traveled with friends to San Diego, New York City and Portland, Oregon. I bought new clothes for my nowtoned physique. I decluttered the house, unloading dozens of boxes to the donation center, and repainted the walls shades of orange and magenta. Around the eightmonth mark, eager to meet new people, I started dating. I found a yoga class and worked on my Warrior pose, where I need to be centered yet outstretched. Ultimately, though, nothing was as comforting or as motivating as that daily run, so I happily recommitted to the practice. Lizzie often came with me now, in a baby jogger. Running had been an outlet at irst, a way to work through the shock, denial and deep grief. Then it evolved into a companion for the challenging slog of moving toward a new future. Almost exactly one year after losing Gregg, I met Jef, a man who made me feel whole again. An 18-month courtship led to a beautiful wedding on Memorial Day weekend. Lizzie, 3 ½ , walked me down the aisle. I reached a few more milestones after that. I got pregnant again. And I decided to go out on my own as a freelance writer. It’s been 13 years since Gregg died, and sometimes I still imagine us talking. I recognize glimpses of him in Lizzie, especially in her wry smile when the two of us jog together. And so I keep running—no longer from my fears but to see how far I’ve come.


( SELF ) WOR T H

INNER GUIDE “I approach my career as a series of experiments,” Chaszar says. “Test yourself beyond your comfort zone.”

1.5

million pounds of local, seasonal vegetables have gone into Splendid Spoon’s soups.

SECRET SAUCE “The beauty of our team is the tapestry of strengths that we play off of,” says Chaszar. “Rene [right] finds the positive in every situation, and Leah [left] is so passionate about the ‘why’ of the brand. They inspire me and the business.”

SELF MADE

DO WHAT DRIVES YOU Looking for an easy way to eat more veggies, Nicole Chaszar, 32, began making vegan soups in her spare time. An idea was born: She started selling portable, smartly packaged soups, illed with seasonal produce and spices, at lea markets in New York City. They proved so popular that Chaszar quit her job as a digital strategist in 2012 to make Splendid Spoon her full-time gig. Less than a year later, online grocer Fresh Direct picked up her brand, and Chaszar began expanding her e-commerce business. Up next? Publishing a cookbook, due out later this year. “My career philosophy is to pursue whatever interests and

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satisies you,” says Chaszar, who also took turns as a biologist and restaurant cook before discovering her calling as a food entrepreneur. Now that her business has taken of, Chaszar has hired a team, including operations guru Rene Lozzi, 31, and director of communications Leah Kirts, 30, to help build the company, dream up recipes and spread healthy vibes. “We spend long hours together, so it’s a sisterhood of support,” says Chaszar. Here, the Spoon squad talks about how to stay balanced and open to opportunities. IMMERSE YOURSELF “Finding success is about living a certain lifestyle,” says Kirts. “Be engaged with every person

you meet. Ask cool, successful women out for drinks. You’ll attract the type of people who share your interests.” CHANGE FOCUS “In busy times, shifting my perception helps me see the upside of things,” says Lozzi. “Instead of saying, ‘This is hard, I’m stressed out,’ try to look at it as ‘I’m learning new skills, gaining more responsibility and growing thicker skin.’” TRY A 15-MINUTE TRICK “I segment my life into 15-minute chunks,” says Chaszar. “Many of them get pushed together, but the idea is that I’m either fully enjoying myself and my kids or engrossed in my work. This helps me stay wholly present in the moment.”

Photographed by REMI PYRDOL

STYLING, DANIA ORTIZ; HAIR, DANA BOYER FOR ORIBE; MAKEUP, CEDRIC JOLIVET FOR NARS COSMETICS. STILL LIFES, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: GETTY IMAGES. BOOK COVER: COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE. BOOK: GETTY IMAGES. COURTESY OF SPLENDID SPOON. SEE GET-IT GUIDE.

The founder of buzzy new soup company Splendid Spoon talks about turning a passion project into a start-up business, then growing it big. BY JEN SCHWARTZ


Q FIT BODIES, FIT MINDS Chaszar and her team always find ways to move throughout the day, such as taking lunchtime walks and riding bikes to the farmers’ market. “We all believe in the power of boosting our energy through activity, which is especially important since we’re crazy busy,” says Chaszar. “It’s so much easier to make sure we’re moving when we all do it together. That’s why I’m planning a staff rock climbing class!” The crew also takes breaks to meditate as a group and refuel. “Being able to have a bottle of vegetables for lunch is a huge perk of the job,” says Lozzi. “I love that we don’t have to think about it— eating healthy should be easy and accessible.”

Good to the last sip “I make soups for women who want to live full lives unapologetically,” says Chaszar. “They don’t want to compromise on their health but can’t cook every night. Women are prone to putting more and more on their proverbial plates; I want to take something off.” Get more success secrets from SELF Made women at Self.com/go/selfmade.

Five-soup pack, $65; Splendid Spoon.com

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GET IT #DONE LIKE A PRO Author Chris Bailey set out on a yearlong quest to maximize every minute of his day. In his new book, The Productivity Project, he shares the secrets to being ultraefficient. You tried out at hundreds of productivity tricks for your book. What’s the most powerful one you found?

A ⁄ The rule of three ranks high. Every morning, set three goals you’d like to accomplish by the end of the day. Having clear goals gives those tasks greater purpose and meaning, so you won’t let them slide. Then determine when, where and how you’re going to achieve these things—research shows that speciicity helps you inish all of your to-dos. You’re also selecting what you don’t need to tackle in the next 24 hours, which lessens distractions so you can focus when your day gets hectic. Why do so many of us feel less productive than we’d like to be?

A ⁄ Setting intentions is easy—but executing on those intentions is the tricky part. Last-minute meetings and mini-emergencies always get in the way. Productivity isn’t about doing more, faster. It’s about prioritizing what’s important and doing those things deliberately. When you get overwhelmed, step back and check your original plan. And don’t beat yourself up. Taking at least a ive-minute break every hour—to let your mind wander or chat with a coworker—will help you power ahead. If you’re stuck in procrastination mode, what’s a quick motivation tip?

A ⁄ Write a note to your near-future self. It’s surprising, but it totally works. Tell her all of the fun things she could do with her time this weekend once this task is inished. Studies show that when you take your future self into consideration, you realistically account for how things are going to be instead of how you wish they would be. —Alexandra Engler


( SELF ) WOR T H AC E EV E RY T H I N G

EMBRACE IMPERFECTION No one is perfect—we all have of days. Keep this in mind: You don’t have to crush every work project (or win each set 6–0). The key is how we frame our performances. If you can get the job done even when you haven’t maximized your potential, that’s a testament to your skills.

NEW YEAR, NEW GOALS We all want to up our game and find little ways to be healthier and happier. Tennis star and contributing editor Maria Sharapova shares a few simple ideas that can net big results. As an athlete, I constantly set new physical goals for myself: pushing the weight limit at the gym, doing drills faster, running down extra balls. But this year I’m not just thinking about strengthening my skills on the court. I have lots of goals—both big and small—in my work and personal life that I want to go after as well. You too? Let’s do it together. BE CURIOUS I believe you’re a more interesting person when you’re interested in other people. So this year, I’m committed to asking more questions of my friends, family and business contacts. And then I’ll really listen to their answers.

“When I want to feel focused, I listen to power music, like Florence + The Machine.”

WRITE IT DOWN A notebook and pencil are going to continue setting me up for success this year. In meetings, taking notes helps me cement what I’ve heard. It works for itness, too—tracking your workouts in a log is the ultimate reminder of how far you’ve come and how much work you’ve done. Pull it out to remind yourself of all the effort you’ve put in before an important match or race. TAKE A RISK I’m a minimalist when it

comes to my beauty look and style. The truth is that I will always love my standbys: cashmere sweaters and natural makeup. Still, I know it would feel good to try something new.… I’d love to be bold and go for it with a bob haircut. MAKE FITNESS FUN I spend a lot of time

“Every victory— even if I didn’t play my best—is worth celebrating.”

“Writing in a notebook keeps me engaged in meetings.” NOTEBOOK $80; Smythson.com PEN $14; Poppin.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: SPENCER LOWELL/TRUNK ARCHIVE. STILL LIFE: COURTESY OF SMYTHSON. CLIVE BRUNSKILL/GETTY IMAGES.

on conditioning and form drills, and that won’t change—but there’s still room to mix it up! So this year, I want to do more dancecardio classes. It’s such a great workout and it always puts me in the best mood. I’m all about trying new activities while sticking with ones that make me happy.


( SELF ) WOR T H EMBARK ON A 24-HOUR ADVENTURE Life is busy, and vacation days are hard to come by. But you absolutely can set aside one day this month to have fun and do something on a whim—maybe go camping upstate or hole up at a cozy bed-and-breakfast with a fireplace. A mini-break takes almost no planning but pays of in giving you a chance to bond. With or without electricity is up to you. DO PARTNER PLANKS Or acro-yoga. Or just

take turns counting crunches with your signiicant other at the gym. Breaking a sweat together really fuels your motivation to support each other—physically and emotionally. Having washboard abs is just an added bonus. Also: Be open to experimenting with new workouts as a couple (if you’re a runner but your partner loves Spin, maybe you both sign up for a CrossFit class). PUT YOUR PHONE IN A DRAWER Try it

10 LB

at home during dinner tonight: Be an active listener. Ask thoughtful questions. Whether you’ve just started dating or have been together for ages, your conversations become ininitely richer when you’re fully engaged with each other. DO A RANDOM, KIND ACT BEFORE 9 A.M.

L OV E & C H E M I ST RY

EVEN STRONGER TOGETHER

A simple gesture—like bringing a hot cup of cofee to your S.O. in bed—starts the day with loving vibes that carry through bedtime. Super rushed in the morning? Coming home to a glass of wine or a cheese plate works, too. A small surprise is a wonderful thing at any hour. TRY THIS DINNER-PARTY TRICK Say some-

It’s easy to hit a plateau in your love life, whether you’re dating or in a relationship. These moves can change that. BY KARI MOLVAR

thing nice. There’s nothing worse than partners who take jabs at each other (“So-and-so forgot to make reservations— again!”). No relationship is completely stress-free, but pointing out laws in the company of others drags everyone down. Yet when you throw out a compliment, it makes you both feel good.

We all want to improve our bodies, minds, bank balances and career prospects in the new year. What about our relationships? A little tune-up can be a good thing for you and your partner, not that you need to set incredibly high goals for each other. (We’ll run a marathon on every continent! Live on a biodynamic vegetable farm! Never, ever argue again!) Lofty promises might sound amazing in theory, but in reality they rarely stick. What does work: focusing on small but signiicant acts that bring you closer, create momentum and actually lead to meaningful change over time. Here, a few ideas to consider, discuss and (happily) commit to.

POUR YOURSELF A GREEN JUICE Heck, have two. And get a Swedish massage later. Taking care of yourself is important—it’s a chance to recharge your batteries and boost your mood, regardless of whether you’re single or partnered up. After all, when you’re happy and relaxed, that positive energy draws other people to you. Cheers to that!

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Illustrated by ANNA PARINI


BRINGS HER MILLIONS WATCHED AS SOCCER STAR ALEX MORGAN HELPED LEAD TEAM USA TO WORLD CUP VICTORY. NOW SHE’S CHASING EVEN BIGGER GOALS. BY LINDSAY BERRA

GAME

Alex Morgan is one of the fastest players on the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team. But she wants to be even faster. She is a woman with #Goals, big-time. Today she is charging hard inside a warehouselike gym in Orlando, Florida, where she’s training with her of-season performance and speed specialist, Dan Schuck. I watch as Morgan sprints down the ield—her 5-foot-7 frame leaning forward, her arms tucked in and pumping fast—at a pace that seems almost...human. Until I notice that she’s tethered to Schuck with a dual resistance band around both their waists. As Morgan runs forward, Schuck attempts to rein her in, using his own body weight to counter Morgan’s power. Despite the challenge to her natural velocity, she still blazes ahead, ponytail lying like a whip. Eight intervals later, she stops for a break. “Do I think I can get better?” Morgan asks, with a determined grin. “Yes, I think I can.” Morgan, 26, has always been on the fast track. Since becoming the youngest member of Team USA at the age of 22, Morgan has scored 52 goals in 91 international games. At the 2012 Olympics, she netted the game-winning goal in the last 45 seconds of the semiinal. It’s moments like those—when the stadium is packed and tension is high—that Morgan excels. “My favorite goals are the ones when there’s so much pressure,” she says. “I focus more when the game is on the line.” Last July, Morgan and her team found themselves in exactly that situation, as they defeated Japan 5–2 in the World Cup final. That match averaged a record 26.7 million viewers, making it the most-watched soccer game—men’s or women’s—in U.S. television history. And you can bet that many of them tuned in to catch a glimpse of Morgan, the ALEX BRINGS HER A GAME > 73


KICKING IT “My favorite goals are the ones when there’s so much pressure,” Morgan says. “I focus more when the game is on the line.” DRESS and JACKET

(around waist), Lacoste CLEATS (painted silver), Nike EARRINGS H.Stern

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

JACOB SUTTON

STYLED BY MELISSA VENTOSA MARTIN

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TRY HER SPEED ROUTINE To keep Morgan ultrafast on her feet, her offseason performance and speed specialist, Dan Schuck, designed a program that focuses on stabilization, strength and power, all of which are essential for speed. Here, three key moves:

TAPPING PLANK (3 sets, 45 seconds each) In a high plank, lift right hand and touch left shoulder. Then lift left hand and touch right shoulder. Repeat.

SHOULDER LUNGE (3 sets, 12 reps per side) In a lunge with left (rear) foot elevated on a bench and a medicine ball at left shoulder, bend right knee 90 degrees. Make sure left knee grazes floor and chest is up. Return to start for 1 rep.

LATERAL BOUND (3 sets, 6 reps each) With knees and hips slightly bent, balance on right leg and explode laterally, landing softly on left foot. Repeat on opposite side. Gradually increase length and height of jumps while maintaining a stable landing.

STRONG HOLD “I want young girls to dream about being professional soccer players instead of watching the boys go out and play,” Morgan says. VEST Indah Clothing BIKINI TOP Nike SHORTS Southpaw

Vintage


RISING STAR “I always tried to make my family proud,” Morgan says. “My motivation was winning and proving that I belong on a team.” SHIRT John Galliano FLAG BRIEFS Southpaw Vintage SILVER BRIEFS Ack EARRINGS and PINS H.Stern

Hair, Pasquale Ferrante for Wella Professional; makeup, Sil Bruinsma for Diorshow; manicure, Rachel Craine; set design, Larry Drillick; production, Select Services. See Get-It Guide.

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ALEX’S FAVORITE... GOAL SCORED “The 2012 Olympic semifinal goal in double overtime. I scored—with my head!”

SONG “‘Welcome to New York’ by Taylor Swift. It’s a cool song about how moving to NYC changed her.”

TV SHOW “Game of Thrones. No way Jon Snow is dead. Melisandre is going to bring him back to life!”

BEAUTY SECRET “I put on eyeliner, mascara and bronzer when I work out. I’d love to have my own line of sweatproof makeup one day.”

DESSERT “A brownie or cookie. Sometimes I eat three brownies! I eat what I need, when I need to.”

THE LONG RUN “I’ll play for as long as my body can last at this level,” Morgan says. PARKA Public School PANTS Lacoste

SHAZAM THIS PAGE FOR AN INSIDE LOOK AT HOW ALEX TRAINS.


CONTINUED FROM 68 team’s speed-queen forward, number 13. Still, Morgan takes her soccer stardom in stride. “I always tried to make my family proud,” she says. “My motivation was winning and proving that I belong on a team.” Early in her training, Morgan came up with a list of goals: Make the women’s national team, win an Olympic gold medal, win the World Cup. Check, check, check—and she did it all by age 26. “I always felt those things were out of reach,” she says now, taking a minute to absorb what she’s accomplished. But in 2016, Morgan finds herself in a unique position: What do you do when you’ve achieved every seemingly unreachable objective you put out there, and you have yet to reach the peak of your career? “You hit the reset button,” she says. And you set a few more seemingly unreachable goals. The youngest of three sisters, Morgan was raised in Diamond Bar, California, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles. In 1999, when she was 10, the United States won the Women’s World Cup; Morgan began idolizing players like Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly. “They weren’t just cool girls whose concerts you could go to and sing along with,” says Morgan, who grew up with Britney Spears posters on her walls. “Mia and Kristine were badass, and they made me want to play with them and be on their team.” Morgan played multiple sports as a teen but excelled in soccer at Diamond Bar High, where she was an all-American. “I could always score goals. I loved that feeling of having your team look to you, that feeling of leadership,” she says. At one point, Morgan’s father, Mike, created a game for her and her older sisters, Jenny and Jeri. He attached points to specific goals: grades, charity work, sports achievements, anything that would positively afect his daughters’ futures. The points would translate into dollars toward a new car for college (yes, major incentive). Jenny got a lot of As and asked for a Mercury sedan. Jeri got good grades and made the cheerleading squad: She got a Chevy truck. But Alex took the game to another level. She made the honor roll and scored so many goals on the soccer ield that she walked away with a Lexus 350. That kind of drive earned Morgan an

athletic scholarship to the University of California in Berkeley. While there, she racked up all-Pac-10 honors and was a 2010 all-American. After graduating, she turned pro and in 2011 joined the women’s national team, where she bonded with teammates who supported and encouraged one another. Especially Abby Wambach, who recently retired but was Morgan’s wingwoman on the ield. “Having a partnership is so important, and we had chemistry right away,” Morgan says of Wambach. “She was always super positive, telling me, ‘Take that shot. I know you have it in you. You’re going to break all my records and score more goals than I will.’ She instilled that conidence in me from day one.”

“YOU HAVE TO BE AN EXTREMELY CONFIDENT PERSON TO BE WITH A REALLY SUCCESSFUL WOMAN.” ★ And from day one, Morgan has been explosive on the ield. Whether the race is 5 yards or 50, whether she has a ball on her feet or not, Morgan will win. Women are inspired by her; parents everywhere are driving their daughters to Sundaymorning soccer practice because their little girls want to be her. Five years in, Morgan is eager to show that a female athlete’s ingerprints—or, in her case, footprints—can extend far beyond the field. “I want young girls to dream about being professional soccer players instead of just watching the boys go out and play,” she says. She has written a series for young readers, The Kicks, designed to empower this audience. (The next book will be published in March.) “It’s about seeing girls be conident in what

they want to pursue,” Morgan says. With 2.7 million followers on Instagram and a slew of sponsorships—Nike, Coca-Cola, Beats by Dr. Dre—Morgan is redeining what a smart, successful soccer player can do. So what is next? There is an upcoming Olympics to win this summer, in Rio de Janeiro. And a World Cup after that in 2019, in France. But for the moment, Morgan says she has another priority: “working on myself.” And enjoying a little downtime. Last winter, she married her longtime boyfriend, Servando Carrasco, a midielder for the Orlando City team. Their chaotic schedules—Morgan trains up to seven days a week during the season— can present a challenge. “I’m never just on the couch. Being busy is part of who I am,” she says. “But it’s hard juggling my family, my husband, balancing that time.” Their lives are more in sync now that Morgan was traded in October from the Portland Thorns to the Orlando Pride, which lets her and Carrasco live in the same city. “Two pro athletes in one family is crazy, but it’s our normal!” she says. They make it work by motivating each other and not letting fame get in the way. “We don’t publicize our relationship that much. We’re already in the public eye, so we don’t really post pictures of each other on Twitter and Instagram,” Morgan says. Their bond is tight, as they dated for seven years after meeting at Berkeley. “He’s incredibly supportive, and I think that says something about his character,” Morgan says. “You have to be an extremely conident person to be with a really successful woman.” A typical date night might involve a simple dinner out. “My husband is Mexican, and I love Mexican food—guac, sour cream, cheese,” Morgan says. While she focuses on fueling her body, she doesn’t obsess over her diet. “I try to stay healthy, but I have cravings, too,” she says. “Sometimes I want a steak!” Staying strong will be key for the next phase of her career. “I’ll play for as long as my body can last at this level,” says Morgan. “My goal is to become the best player in the world. Or the best player I can bring out in myself.” Her fans—and future soccer stars—will be watching. “When I leave the game, I want to go out on top,” Morgan says. “I want to know that I made women’s soccer better than it was when I came into it.”

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SISTERHOOD IS POWERFUL “I’m strong,” says Alyssa Miller, left (with sister Chelsea). “I think that’s the nicest thing you can say about your body.” ON ALYSSA BODYSUIT

Araks SPORTS BRA A.L.C. ON CHELSEA BODYSUIT Beth Richards SPORTS BRA Athleta SHOES Bloch

MODEL ATTITUDE “I’m naturally blessed with an hourglass shape,” says Chelsea Miller. “It makes me feel sexy, which makes me feel powerful.”


WHAT WOMEN REALLY THINK ABOUT THEIR

BODIES In the social media age, is our body image better than it used to be? As SELF’s new survey shows, the answer is more complicated than you may think. BY MEREDITH BRYAN

After decades of talk about body image, women’s body positivity looks to be at an all-time high. Behold a new crop of female icons like Beyoncé, Mindy Kaling, Lena Dunham, Ronda Rousey, Amy Schumer and Serena Williams, whose bodies are as gloriously diverse as their pop-culture irepower. Notice Kate Winslet inserting a no-Photoshop clause into her cosmetics contract; brands like Aerie trumpeting unretouched women in their advertisements; plus-sized model Ashley Graham declaring, in her widely viewed TED talk, that “there is no one perfect body.” Self-acceptance is trending, as social media churns out encouraging hashtags (#CelebrateMySize, #LoveYourLines, #BodyPositive) and quotes like “My ideal weight is the weight of me holding ive puppies.” As model Gigi Hadid declared on Instagram, “Yes, I have boobs, I have abs, I have a butt, I have thighs.…I’m proud of it.” You may think, with all this good news, that women no longer glare at their bellies in the Zara dressing room. That we’ve moved on to more important things, like earning nearly 60 percent of the college degrees awarded in this country, being the primary breadwinner in 40 percent of families and running Yahoo!, Harvard University and the Federal Reserve.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMES RYANG STYLED BY KATE SEBBAH

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ALYSSA AND CHELSEA MILLER, MODELS

“I’M HAPPY TO BE A PART OF THE SHIFT IN THIS INDUSTRY.” “My sister Alyssa and I look a lot alike, except for one major difference—about five dress sizes,” says Chelsea Miller, who wears a size 14 compared with her sister’s size 4. Throughout their lives, both women have fought to develop and maintain a positive body image. Chelsea, for example, started feeling insecure about her body at age 8. “I tried to convince Alyssa to work out with me because I wanted to be skinny like her,” she remembers. But

94% of women think about their weight “constantly” or “occasionally.”

76% did in 2004.

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Chelsea’s attitude shifted one day years later when her sister asked her if she realized just how often she was calling herself fat. “It’s like a switch went off, and I changed my entire mind-set,” says Chelsea, 28. “When I stopped talking so negatively to, and about, myself, I started actually liking my body. I became happier, more comfortable and more confident.” Alyssa Miller, 26, learned in her teens the importance of staying positive.

But SELF’s new body-image survey—we’ve been conducting surveys on the topic since 1989— reveals a more complicated reality. While today twice as many women report liking the way their bodies look than did in our 1992 survey, the total number is still just a scant 14 percent. And while we are less likely than we were two decades ago to consider ourselves overweight (84 percent then to 53 percent now), a whopping 80 percent of us remain unsatisied with the number on the scale—and 57 percent think about it “constantly.” (“For the full life I have, it’s shocking how much my weight and appearance can afect my day,” wrote one respondent.) Perhaps worse still, 85 percent of women believe they should feel more body-positive than they do. Meaning, not only do we hate on our bodies, but we also hate on ourselves for hating on them. Digest these numbers, and you may ind yourself wondering: Who are the 37 women (of more than 3,100 surveyed) who ranked themselves a perfect 10—and what are their secrets? Unfortunately, the stakes here are higher than not getting warm fuzzies when you look in the mirror. People who are dissatisied with their bodies are more likely to take extreme or unhealthy measures to control their weight; they are also at increased risk for depression and anxiety and may even be more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior. Body image is a public health issue—so why hasn’t all the positive messaging

“I started modeling at 14, and that’s when people started telling me I was overweight,” she says. “They wanted me to be a size 0. I would’ve needed to lose 20 pounds.” Rather than succumb to industry pressure, she stood her ground. “I refused to develop unhealthy habits. I was like, ‘This is who I am.’” Knowing her sister was watching her career only bolstered Alyssa’s courage. “I didn’t want anything I did as a model to make Chelsea feel like she wasn’t good enough,” she says. “The best part is, it hasn’t hurt my career at all.” In fact, after seeing photos of Chelsea on Alyssa’s Instagram, IMG, Alyssa’s agency, signed Chelsea to her own contract. “It’s a beautiful shift in this industry, and I’m happy to be a part of it,” says Alyssa. —Erin Bried

made more of a dent? It’s not as simple as that, says Pamela Rutledge, Ph.D., a media psychologist who examines the efects of technology and social media. “You can’t just tell people to think or feel something and have it happen,” she says. Images still matter, and despite some notable exceptions, the ones most women see every day don’t fully relect the diversity and variety found in real life. It’s hard to look away when, as Rutledge says, we are hardwired by evolution to focus on social relationships—part of which involves comparing ourselves to others. The X factor in all of this may be social media, which has looded our phones and computers with pictures of all kinds of women—which means we’re seeing more body diversity than ever. But it has also created an unprecedented space for us to view and comment on one another’s bodies. Now, it’s not just celebrities and models who are on display; it’s almost everyone. Experts say that visually documenting every moment of our lives can cause us to obsess over our appearance and, ultimately, to feel more negatively about it. “You’re thinking about how your body looks to other people instead of focusing on how it feels and what it can do,” says Deborah Schooler, Ph.D., a psychology professor at Gallaudet University. On Instagram and Facebook, everyone from teenagers to grandmothers can also alter their pictures to look more “ideal”—which may make others wonder why they don’t measure up. “There


IN THE GROOVE “Power comes in owning all parts of ourselves,” says Winhoffer. “I feel that I’m here to bring that out in women.” ON DANCER TOP Laain BRIEFS LNDR SNEAKERS

Adidas by Stella McCartney ON WINHOFFER SWIMSUIT

Lisa Marie Fernandez TOP, SHORTS and SNEAKERS Adidas by Stella McCartney

NICOLE WINHOFFER, TRAINER

“I LOVE ALL OF MY CURVES.” “I don’t have the typical trainer’s body,” says Nicole Winhoffer, 31—and she’s proud of it. But as a classically trained dancer, she didn’t always feel that way. The pressure to be perfect led her down an unhealthy path at 17. “I weighed 95 pounds and was obsessed with what I ate,” she says. Two years later, when she began touring with Broadway’s Wicked, she gained more than 60 pounds. “I wasn’t feeling happy,” Winhoffer says. Only when she stopped touring—and started dancing for herself—did she find balance in body and mind. The world took notice: Madonna hired her as a personal trainer, then Stella McCartney tapped her to represent McCartney’s Adidas line. “How you think about yourself is how others will see you,” says Winhoffer. “I see myself as strong and confident.” Now she runs her own packed studio in NYC, where she not only teaches dance cardio but also preaches positivity. “I feel most beautiful when I’m in love, so I end every class with two words: Love yourself.” —E.B.


82% of women look to social media for fitness advice and inspiration.

39% follow fitness influencers.

POWER UP “A perfect body is when you’re comfortable in your body,” says Younger. BODYSUIT Jill Stuart SPORTS BRA Use Unused EARRINGS Vale Jewelry RING Xr Jewelry

Hair, Seiji for Oribe Hair Care; makeup, Laura Stiassni for Rouge Dior; manicure, Eri Handa for Dior Vernis; set design, Todd Wiggins at Mary Howard Studio. See Get-It Guide.

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JORDAN YOUNGER, AUTHOR OF BREAKING VEGAN

“I FEEL STRONGER THAN I EVER HAVE.” Instagram star Jordan Younger, 25, weighs about 20 pounds more than she did just two years ago, when she was obsessively documenting her life, and meals, as The Blonde Vegan. What her 70,000 Instagram followers didn’t know then was that, behind all the happy hashtags, she was secretly suffering from orthorexia, a dangerous, allconsuming fixation with eating clean. “I felt light and pure—getting thinner was a bonus,” says Younger, who once attempted a 30-day juice cleanse. Eventually, after an eye-opening conversation with a friend, she got help, let go of diet restrictions and ultimately changed her handle to The Balanced Blonde. “This is what my body is meant to look like when I’m healthy,” says Younger, who is training for the Los Angeles Marathon, her first, next month. “Now, when I look in the mirror, I’d never say I’m too big, too small, too this or too that. Instead, I’ll say, ‘I’m strong, fit and capable.’ My body can carry me on a 14-mile run. That’s beautiful.” —E.B.

are all of these apps that cinch parts of your body to make you look skinnier,” says Lindsey Schmitt, a 25-year-old account coordinator at a Chicago start-up. “That gives women a false perception.” Experts say comparing yourself unfavorably to peers is especially insidious. On some level, we know that models and celebrities have resources (personal chefs, trainers on call) that the rest of us don’t. But when your coworker looks lawless in her selie, it’s hard not to think about how you stack up. Unfortunately, 70 percent of women in our survey say they compare themselves to others on social media either constantly or occasionally. One respondent called it “a double-edged sword”: For every woman proudly tagging herself #Curvy, there are plenty of others showing of a thigh gap. “It messes with my head,” says Megan Pollaro, 33, an executive at a sports-hospitality agency in New York City. “You don’t think someone is going to take the time to Photoshop an Instagram picture, but they do. Meanwhile, you’re thinking, This is just a regular girl who looks like that? I should be dieting and not eating bread seven times a week.” At the same time, social media is also facilitating a candid, large-scale conversation about bodies in a way that has never before been possible. It’s a space where we’re hashing out our issues with our own bodies and one another’s in real time—and, in many cases, adding strong voices to the ever-present stream of pictures. Natasha Oakley, a swimsuit designer and cofounder of the blog A Bikini a Day, recently reposted a photo of her backside that had attracted negative comments on a diferent feed. “I am human and will always rock what I’ve got, just like everyone should,” she told her 1.5 million Instagram followers. “The female form is something to be admired and celebrated, not criticized.” Oakley is just one of the social media stars who regularly receive unsolicited feedback on their physiques—and respond to it directly. Others say that what doesn’t kill them makes them stronger. “I see quite the slew of cyberbullies every day,” says Jordan Younger, an author and health blogger (pictured at left). She says negative comments, while occasionally painful, only make her more determined to be who she is. “The haters have strengthened my relationship with my body and myself,” she says. Last year, Cassey Ho, creator of the wildly popular YouTube channel Blogilates, uploaded a video called “The Perfect Body.” In it, she digitally retouched herself based on commenters’ criticism and ended up with a body that was “anatomically wrong,” she says. When she posted a shot of her doctored self on Instagram to advertise the video, some people told her she WHAT WOMEN THINK > 98

#BODYPOSITIVE Learn what makes women proud

of their bodies at Self.com/go/bodyimage.


CO AY

LIFTOFF A sequined top with sleek ski pants takes slope style off the mountain. “I like adding a little bit of dazzle to an otherwise simple outfit,” says Marks. TOP Emilio Pucci, $1,550 PANTS Perfect Moment, $375 GOGGLES Oakley, $180 BRACELET Baja East, $90 BOOTS $180, BINDINGS $140, and SNOWBOARD $600, Burton

ARCTIC AIR, DON’T CARE! TOP MODEL (AND SNOWBOARDER) HEATHER MARKS CARVES OUT A FRESH WINTER LOOK IN SPORTY FABRICS MIXED WITH FUTURISTIC DETAILS.


A VIRTUAL ESCAPE Catch a ride to snowy climes—without the lift lines—via the new Samsung Gear VR headset, powered by Oculus (on Marks, left, $99; BestBuy.com). The virtual reality gadget lets you hang with fellow boarders in a simulated space, look at 360-degree photos and play virtual reality games. All you need to make it work is a 2015 Samsung Galaxy Flagship smartphone (it slides into the goggles)—and a sense of adventure.

FREEZE FRAME A fitted tank and cutout shorts create the perfect base layer—pull on a reflective parka and pants to beat the wind. “I feel like a warrior in this look,” says Marks, who grew up snowboarding in Canada. TOP Chromat, $245 SHORTS Elisabetta

Rogiani, $68 BRACELET Baja East, $90 BACKPACK Bao Bao Issey Miyake, $2,650 JACKET Rebecca Minkoff, $288

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHAD PITMAN STYLED BY MELISSA VENTOSA MARTIN


“I LIKE WEARING COMFORTABLE THINGS SO I CAN GO STRAIGHT FROM SNOWBOARDING TO DRINKS WITH FRIENDS.”

FREESTYLE Strike the right balance between casual and cool with stretch overalls and a silver puffer. “And white sneakers look good with everything!” says Marks. PARKA Ai Riders on the Storm, $569 OVERALLS Chloé, $1,345 BRACELET Baja East, $90 KNEE PADS Sector 9, $48 per pair SNEAKERS Rag & Bone, $495 TAPE TheraBand, $20

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BLUE STREAK In a powder-blue shade, a shiny, water-resistant jumpsuit stands out. “I love a pop of color when your backdrop is white snow,” says Marks. FLIGHT SUIT Nicholas K, $592 SHIRT Lucid FC, $80 EARRINGS

Rag & Bone, $175


CATCHING AIR Balance something oversize (a mesh hoodie) with something slim (biker shorts). “I’d also throw on this hoodie with jeans at night,” says Marks. HOODIE Zoë Jordan, $650 BODYSUIT Koral, $175 SHORTS Isabel Marant, $375 ELBOW PADS Sector 9, $48 per pair BOOTS ThirtyTwo, $180 BINDINGS

Flux Bindings, $235 SNOWBOARD K2 Snowboarding, $400

“SNOWBOARDING ISN’T ABOUT WHO’S BEST. IT’S ABOUT HAVING FUN OUT THERE. WHEN I’M FLYING DOWN A HILL, I LOVE THE ADRENALINE RUSH.”

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BLACK ICE Sexy move: Pair an embellished bodysuit with distressed baggy jeans. “It’s a fun and feminine look,” says Marks. JEANS $1,332, and BODYSUIT Koché BLACK PANTS The

Kooples Sport, $165 GOGGLES Scott Sports, $200 FITNESS TRACKER Garmin, $100 BRACELET

Amigaz Attitude Approved Accessories, $8


FLY IDEA A black satin bandeau, high-waisted pants and a cutaway jacket reveal your toned body. “I mix up snowboarding with pilates to strengthen my core,” says Marks. JACKET $595, BANDEAU $350, and LEGGINGS

$375, 3.1 Phillip Lim HELMET Kask, $580 SILVER NECKLACE (worn as bracelet) Amigaz Attitude Approved Accessories, $9 Hair, Braydon Nelson at Julian Watson Agency; makeup, Maki Hasegawa for Nars; manicure, Maki Sakamoto for Chanel Le Vernis; set design, Bette Adams at Mary Howard Studio. See Get-It Guide.


SHRED IT A frayed velvet tank adds a layer of interest to any look. “Being able to see a little skin through your top is badass,” says Marks. TANK Acne Studios SPORTS BRA Mikoh, $128 GOGGLES Bollé, $60

BEAUTY NOTE “Wearing sunscreen is super important on the mountain, especially on a sunny day,” says Marks. “I love tinted moisturizers with SPF built in.” Try La Mer The Reparative SkinTint SPF 30, $95.

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STRONG START Your core transfers energy throughout your body in every activity, from dancing to dumbbell lifts. “It helps you move more efficiently,” says Amy Opielowski, program manager at CorePower Yoga, a national studio with ab-zinging routines in every class. TOP BCBGMaxAzria BOTTOM AllSisters EARRINGS and RINGS

Jennifer Fisher

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBBIE FIMMANO ST YLED BY VANESSA CHOW


CRUNCH TIME An avid runner, model Jeniel Williams credits “planks and good old-fashioned crunches” for her strong, sculpted abs. TOP and PANTS Off-

White c/o Virgil Abloh EARRINGS Noir Jewelry RINGS Bing Bang (left) and Anfray & Anfray

Rock a cropped top (and every workout) with a stronger core. See how model Jeneil Williams fires hers up, then sculpt your own. BY LAUREL LEICHT 89


THE MOVES Crunches are classic for a reason: They work. Try some (fun!) riffs with these moves from CorePower Yoga’s new CoreCardio Circuit class. Do each for 45 seconds; rest 5 seconds, then go to the next move. Do the circuit 3 times. BELLY-UP CRUNCH Lie faceup, feet on floor, arms extended above head on floor. Raise feet so shins are parallel to floor while bringing hands to knees. Repeat.

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DIAGONAL CRUNCH Lie on right side, balancing on forearm, hip on floor. Keep legs straight as you raise them a few inches and reach left hand toward feet. Repeat for 45 seconds, then switch sides. CRUNCH AND REACH Lie faceup with hands behind head, legs straight, lifted to ceiling. Open legs to a form a V. Close legs, crossing ankles, and crunch up. Lower and repeat, alternating sides. —Meg Lappe


SIDESHOW We all know (and covet) those six-pack muscles, but your core also includes your lower back, glutes and obliques. Front and side planks are great for working your full body, says Opielowski. GREEN TOP Proenza Schouler WHITE BANDEAU American Apparel BOTTOM Mikoh


BOTTOM LINE “The best way to engage the hardto-target lower abs is to do moves that keep your ribs stationary,” says Opielowski. Try hip lifts or vertical scissor kicks. TOP Adam Selman BOTTOM Beach Riot EARRINGS Noir Jewelry CUFF Mateo New York RING Jennifer Fisher

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HOME STRETCH Williams loves hitting pilates and yoga classes. “They stretch me out while they strengthen my core,” she says. SWIMSUIT LeSwim EARRINGS Jennifer Fisher BRACELETS

Mateo New York Hair, Brent Lawler at Streeters; makeup, Asami Taguchi for Chanel Beauté; manicure, Maki Sakamoto at Kate Ryan; set design, Todd Wiggins at Mary Howard Studio; production, Brachfeld; model, Jeneil Williams at IMG. See Get-It Guide. SHAZAM THIS PAGE TO GET MORE AB WORKOUTS.


s RED VELVET Classic crimson looks of-the-moment when worn with little other makeup. Try Dior DioriďŹ c Lipstick in Dolce Vita #014, $36. TOP Misha Nonoo EARRINGS Jennifer Fisher


soft & strong HAIR, DAVID COLVIN FOR R&CO; MAKEUP, TALIA SPARROW FOR LAURA MERCIER; MODEL, SOPHIA REYNAL AT WILHELMINA. SEE GET-IT GUIDE.

The beauty of red lipstick right now: It’s pretty yet powerful—and nearly effortless to wear. Even if you’re a no-makeup girl, you’ll fall for this. BY ALYSSA SHELASKY

Not long ago, I landed a potentially life-changing opportunity: a half-hour meeting with a wellrespected (and, I should add, drop-dead gorgeous) literary agent. Rationally, I knew she’d be paying attention to my ideas, not my appearance. Still, considering this woman was in the business of working with creative souls, I worried that my usual makeup—tinted moisturizer, lip balm, maybe some mascara—wouldn’t cut it. I didn’t want to look generic, but it couldn’t seem like I tried too hard, either. A cat’s-eye and nude gloss? Strong brows and peachy cheeks? I was stumped. The morning of our meeting, somewhere in between brushing my teeth and hopping in the shower, I spotted a red lipstick that my best friend had left at my apartment: L’Oréal Paris Colour Riche Collection Exclusive in Blake’s Red. (I didn’t know it had anything to do with Blake Lively, but apparently, it’s her shade. I expect to

ind a Ryan Reynolds of my own any day now.) I smacked it on quickly, without any precision or expectation. Considering my skin was completely naked and fresh out of bed, I prepared for a good laugh (or cry) as I glanced at myself in the mirror. But instead: Holy crap! I looked pretty great. Vulnerable and venerable. Soft and strong: the way I felt on the inside. Clearly, I’d hit the confidence-boosting mother lode. Before I left my apartment, I washed, moisturized and serumed up my face until it came alive, albeit imperfectly so. Then I glided the lipstick on haphazardly enough to look nonchalant and cool; not so messy that I looked like the Joker. It felt daring (and a little scary!) to walk of the subway and toward the agent’s building without a stitch of makeup, other than my lips with a capital L. Yet in a “One, two, three, let’s

PHOTOGRAPHED BY TAEA THALE STYLED BY COQUITO CASSIBBA 95


do this!” moment, I sailed right into her oice, conident and ready to show her all I could ofer. It would take talent and intelligence to cross the inish line, of course, but I thanked my lips for the ighting chance. She signed me as a new client that afternoon. Little did I know that I was also (inadvertently) channeling Jason Wu’s spring beauty look. The show’s makeup artist, Yadim, gave the models slightly overdrawn red lips on otherwise unadorned faces. (Hey, just like me!) He admits that when Wu initially mentioned the color, he thought, Oh, God, a red lip again. How do you make that fresh or diferent? The answer came when he did a makeup test on two models: one with a naked face and a plush, matte red lip, another with a fully “done” face of foundation, concealer and blush. Both women looked gorgeous, but the makeup—or, rather, the lack of it—made the barefaced model stand out in a novel way. “We kept looking at the girl

to ind their best shade. “It’s great to wear red lips and nothing else,” she says. “If you want to match by skin tone, the old rules still apply, but I think you should play around with it.” A quick color-theory refresher: Reds with blue undertones, like Chanel Rouge Allure in Passion, $36, tend to latter fair-skinned women. Those with medium skin tones can easily wear true reds such as Revlon Super Lustrous Lipstick in Fire & Ice, $8, while dark skin looks beautiful in deeper tones like Urban Decay Matte Revolution Lipstick in Bad Blood, $22. Take texture into account, too—think soft and inviting. “The look is rich and expensive without being a gloss or a matte,” says Talia Sparrow, the New York City–based makeup artist who created the look on page 94. There’s no need to worry, she says, about meticulously keeping the color within the lines of your lips. “You want to make it not quite perfect, so it feels unique,” she explains. To give lips a slightly feathered, modern edge,

who had nothing but that red lip,” Yadim recalls. “You saw her freckles and rawness, and it looked beautiful.” For the show, models wore Maybelline New York Color Sensational Vivid Matte Liquid in Rebel Red plus a touch of the brand’s Berry Boost shade mixed in. No contour, no mascara, not even a lash curl. Somehow my beginner’s luck looked a lot like Yadim’s stroke of genius, although he took it up a notch with a dab of cherry-red powder pigment to create a soft inish. “You press it into the middle of the lip, and it ends up looking like velvet,” he explains. (For a simpler way to achieve the velourlike texture, use your inger to apply powder blush.) Unlike with Yadim’s work, there was no method to my madness, yet I knew my spirit lipstick and I were just getting to know each other. Applying pigment might be a little involved for day-to-day life, but making the power lip more approachable by leaving the rest of my face alone? Now that I could do. So can you, says Brooklyn, New York–based makeup artist Theo Kogan, who encourages redlip novices to experiment with several lipsticks

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she recommends outlining them with a lip liner before blurring the line with a Q-tip. “It’s not so harsh,” she says—and that’s exactly what makes this look so easy to wear. Since that day with the agent, I’ve let my red lips go the extra mile in several situations. I brought my nothing-but-smackers aesthetic to a pretentious party, where, in the face of a tough crowd, I whipped out my Blake’s Red and put on my game face. (By then I’d picked up a tube of my own, though I’m still looking for my version of Ryan Reynolds.) I sailed back into that party, all lips and chutzpah, ready to make some fancy friends. I now call this look “I don’t care…but I do care.” It has a certain ready-for-anything nonchalance, and that’s exactly why I keep at least one red at the ready. A quick streak of cherry or scarlet doesn’t take a lot of efort, but it implies that you tried just hard enough. On paper, that might sound like a contradiction, but in real life, trust me: There are few things that can make you feel as instantly conident as a swipe of red lipstick.

FIND YOUR RED See more shades at Self.com/go/redlips.

OPPOSITE: PROP STYLING, CINDY DIPRIMA AT EH MANAGEMENT.

IT FELT DARING (AND A LITTLE SCARY!) TO WALK OFF THE SUBWAY WITHOUT A STITCH OF MAKEUP, OTHER THAN MY LIPS WITH A CAPITAL L.


MAC

L’ORÉAL PARIS

TATCHA

Mineralize Rich Lipstick in Everyday Diva, $23

Colour Riche Collection Exclusive Lipcolor in Julianne’s Red, $9

Kyoto Red Silk Lipstick, $55

Lip sync

There’s a red to flatter every skin tone. Here, makeup artist Emily Kate Warren suggests some winning combinations.

Kiss Stick High Shine Lip Color in Rose Bud, $7

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOHNNY MILLER

LAURA MERCIER

SMASHBOX COSMETICS

GIVENCHY

Velour Lovers Lip Colour in Temptation, $28

Be Legendary Lipstick in Infrared Matte, $20

Le Rouge in Grenat Initié, $36

FLOWER

SONIA KASHUK Satin Luxe Lip Color SPF 16 in Classic Red, $10


WHAT WOMEN THINK CONTINUED FROM 79

looked amazing, but others commented that she still looked fat. “It was basically how messed up society was, all in the comments section,” Ho says. “Girls on social media now don’t even know what’s real and what’s not anymore. To me, that is the scariest thing.” But these fit-stagram stars are not down on social media—far from it. Ho believes engaging requires a healthy dose of perspective. “You don’t have to compare your everyday life with someone else’s highlight reel,” she says. Remember, also, that apps like Instagram have become necessary tools for women whose careers require a steady stream of inspiring, motivational images. “For me, social media is a job,” explains Younger. She thinks of her posts more as a way to showcase her personality and build her audience. “I know what it takes to get a picture that’s going to get likes,” she says. “It’s about the lighting, what I’m doing, whether I’m in a cool place.” Not, in other words, about her weight or appearance. Of course, social media can be something else, too: a place not just to view pictures, grow businesses and have conversations, but to forge real connections. An increasing number of fitness and wellness stars are making their feeds more interactive and participatory, creating tight communities where women can come together to trade workout routines, share tips and cheer one another on. Ho often reposts and comments on her followers’ pictures; her fans diligently police her comments sections and deal with anyone serving up negative comments that aren’t based on constructive criticism. Positive communities like hers are gaining strength: Rachel Brathen, better known as Yoga Girl, has 1.7 million Instagram followers; Kayla Itsines, the popular Australian itness personality, has nearly 4 million, and Karena Dawn

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and Katrina Scott, the founders of the Tone It Up itness community, have more than half a million. (See page 31 for the SELF X Tone It Up Challenge.) In some cases, these communities have sparked a phenomenon: women proudly sharing their own itness achievements. Lauren Benbassat, 29, a marketing manager in New York City, followed Itsines on Instagram for a while before deciding to post pictures of her progress. “I’m not gonna lie, I was really hesitant,” she says about going public with her irst midrif-baring before-and-after selies. But Benbassat was hooked when, after Itsines reposted her photo, someone she didn’t know sprung up to defend her against negative comments that she’d looked better in the “befores.” It’s not about what anyone else thinks, but how she feels, wrote her defender. “I was blown away that some stranger was backing me up,” says Benbassat, “and saying the right thing!” These days, she pulls up pictures of other women’s progress to motivate herself at the gym. And she’s not bothered by the fact that some of these women— including Itsines herself—have sculpted abs that she doesn’t. “You can’t be everyone and everything,” says Benbassat. When social media encourages a healthy perspective, the ripple efect can be astonishing. Jen Piccolo, 24, a personal trainer in Wolcott, Connecticut, is active in the Tone It Up, FitnessBlender and Whole30 communities on Instagram and YouTube. In 2009 and 2010, she lost 80 pounds; she credits social media for motivating her and giving her tools to exercise in her living room. “I use it for ideas on workouts and recipes,” she says. “It’s weird, but seeing people working out and being positive about it online makes you want to work out, too, and sometimes you need that to get out of bed in the morning.” Piccolo now has more than 17,000 of her own Instagram followers at @jentheitfoodie. “I think I’ve only gotten one negative comment,” she says. “It’s a build-each-other-up vibe in a world that’s constantly trying to pit girls against one another.” Both Ho and Piccolo say they have made oline friends through their social media communities, and that they are careful to post not just when they’ve had an exhilarating workout, but also when

they’re struggling. Their approach has paid of in a moment when we’re all getting better at sniing out fakes. Said one SELF survey respondent, “I appreciate people who share their real thoughts even when they’re not looking or feeling their best.” Experts agree that community building can insulate us against some of social media’s more harmful aspects. Schooler, who has studied body image among Latina adolescents, conirms that strong communities can provide a bufer against the notion of a single beauty ideal. “We can create our own narratives about what’s beautiful,” she says. It remains as important as ever, of course, to cultivate passion and competence oline. Jean Kilbourne, an author and ilmmaker who has tracked changes in body image since the 1960s, says that sports or some other passion can be especially helpful. “You need to see what your body can do, how it can be strong, how it is so much more than simply decorative,” she says. It’s a point echoed by celebrity trainer Nicole Winhofer (see page 77), who says she works out for the mental and spiritual benefits as much as for her health. “In my workouts, I want to rid myself of any negative emotion,” she says. “I want to be free. I am free—being physical makes me that way.” And even if our culture’s still-narrow beauty ideals don’t always relect that same philosophy, social media has empowered us to curate our own visual lives: to see what we want to see, to follow and unfollow at will and to voice (or tweet) our displeasure—and be heard— when we view images that are disrespectful or objectifying. As we choose how to engage with technology, our online lives have the potential to remind us of everything we can do, rather than everything we’ll never be. As Rutledge puts it, “There’s a lot more on Instagram than people drinking green juice.” Ho, for her part, hopes this conversation will soon be less relevant. “I think the whole body-image positivity movement is very strong right now,” she says. “The next step is to just do what you do, and have the body you have, and not even feel the need to mention it. We need to focus on our brains, our character, our knowledge and emotion—on what we’re able to contribute to the world.”


GET-IT GUIDE

Cover Bodysuit, Custom Tory Burch Sport; TorySport.com for similar styles. Large earrings, H.Stern, $7,800; 800-747-8376. Small earring, Venus by Maria Tash, $1,405; MariaTash.com. Page 1 Bikini top, $124, and bottom, $90, Ack; AckWork.com. Vintage shirt; Resurrection Vintage, 212-625-1374 for information. Large earrings, H.Stern, $7,800; 800-747-8376. Small earring, Venus by Maria Tash, $1,405; MariaTash .com. Bracelets, Melet Mercantile, $12 each; 212-925-8353. Page 2 Top, Wow Couture, $51; WowCoutureUSA.com. Bermuda shorts, Rosie Assoulin, $1,195; Hirshleifers, 516-627-3566. Earrings, $75; NoirJewelry.com. Rings, Jennifer Fisher, $160 each; JenniferFisherJewelry.com. Page 4 Socks, Shashi, $16; Amazon.com. Page 20 Helmet, Osbe Helmets; OsbeUSA.com for similar styles. Page 24 Sports bra, Well Kept, $115; WellKeptBra.com. Page 26 Swim top, Well Kept, $138; WellKeptBra.com. Water bottle, S’well, $45; SwellBottle .com. Watch, Freestyle, $70; FreestyleUSA.com. Page 27 Sports bra, $48; Strut-This.com. Page 31 From left: Sports bra, $50; Strut-This.com. Shorts, Under Armour, $25; UA.com. Sneakers, APL, $140; APLRunning.com. Sports bra, Vimmia, $98; Bandier .com. Sneakers; Nike.com for similar styles. Page 32 Sports bra, Lululemon Athletica, $54; Lululemon.com. Shorts, Garbe Luxe by Natalia MacLeod, $112; GarbeLuxe.com. Page 33 White bra, $56; AloYoga.com. Black bra, Solow; SolowStyle.com for similar styles. Leggings, Vimmia, $125; Bandier.com. Page 62 Bottom, from left: Dress,

$125; Us.Topshop.com. Earrings, Seaworthy, $115; SeaworthyPDX .com. Dress, Ronny Kobo Collection, $488; Dash NY, 212226-2646. Top, DKNY, $195; 800-231-0884. Necklace, Sorelle, $60; SorelleNYC.com. Page 63 From left: White top, Ultracor, $140; Bandier.com. Black top, Only Hearts by Helena Stuart, $51; OnlyHearts.com. Pants, $108; AloYoga.com. Sneakers; Nike .com for similar styles. Jacket, Well Kept, $445; WellKeptBra.com. Top, $250; OpeningCeremony.us. Pants, Lululemon Athletica, $148; Lululemon.com. Sneakers, Under Armour, $85; UA.com. Page 69 Dress, $265, and jacket (around waist), $595; Lacoste.com. Cleats (painted silver); Nike.com for other styles. Earrings, H.Stern, $7,800; 800-747-8376. Page 70 Vest, $180; IndahClothing.com. Bikini top; Nike.com for similar styles. Shorts; Southpaw Vintage, 212-244-2768 for similar styles. Page 71 Shirt, $125; JohnGalliano .com. Flag briefs; Southpaw Vintage, 212-244-2768 for similar styles. Silver briefs (worn under), Ack, $90; AckWork.com. Pins, H.Stern, $3,900 each; 800-7478376. Secondary earring, $1,405; VenusByMariaTash.com. Page 72 Jacket, Public School; TheDreslyn .com for similar styles. Pants, $215; Lacoste.com. Page 74 From left: Bodysuit, $350; Araks.com. Sports bra, A.L.C., $225; IntermixOnline.com. Bodysuit, $260; BethRichards .com. Sports bra, $44; Athleta.com. Shoes, Bloch, $60; BlochWorld .com. Page 77 From left: Top, Laain, $170; LaneCrawford.com. Briefs, LNDR, $80; LNDR-LDN .com. Sneakers, Adidas by Stella McCartney, $190; Adidas.com.

Swimsuit, Lisa Marie Fernandez, $370; Shopbop.com. Top, $70, shorts, $65, and sneakers, $190, Adidas by Stella McCartney; Adidas.com. Page 78 Bodysuit, $488; JillStuart.com. Sports bra, Use Unused, $210; 773-772-5000. Earrings, Vale Jewelry, $750; ShopVale.com. Ring, $145; XRJewelry.com. Page 80 Top, $1,550; EmilioPucci .com for stores. Pants, Perfect Moment, $375; Net-A-Porter.com. Goggles, $180; Oakley.com. Bracelet, $90; Baja-East.com. Boots, $180, bindings, $140, and snowboard, $600; Burton.com. Page 81 Top, Chromat, $245; Amazon.com/fashion. Shorts, Elisabetta Rogiani, $68; Rogiani .com. Bracelet, $90; Baja-East .com. Backpack, Bao Bao Issey Miyake, $2,650; 212-226-0100. Jacket, $288; RebeccaMinkoff .com. Page 82 Parka, Ai Riders on the Storm, $569; Ai-Storm.com. Overalls, Chloé, $1,345; Net-A-Porter.com. Bracelet, $90; Baja-East.com. Knee pads, $48 per pair; Sector9.com. Tape (on pads), TheraBand, $20 per roll; DicksSportingGoods.com. Shoes, Rag & Bone, $495; 212-219-2204. Page 83 Flight suit, $592; NicholasK.com. Shirt, Lucid FC, $80; VFiles.com. Earrings, Rag & Bone, $175; 212-219-2204. Page 84 Hoodie, $650; ZoeJordan.com. Jumpsuit, $175; Koral.com. Shorts, Isabel Marant, $375; 323-651-1493. Elbow pads, $48 per pair; Sector9.com. Boots, $180; ThirtyTwo.com. Bindings, Flux Bindings, $235; Backcountry .com. Snowboard, $400; K2Snowboarding.com. Page 85 Bodysuit, price upon request, and jeans, $1,332, Koché; Ikram, 312-587-1000. Black pants, The

Kooples Sport, $165; 424-3350041. Goggles, $200; ScottSports.com. Fitness tracker, $100; Garmin.com. Bracelet, Amigaz Attitude Approved Accessories, $8; Amigaz.com. Page 86 Jacket, $595, bandeau, $350, and pants, $375; 31PhillipLim.com. Helmet, Kask, $580; NorseHouse.com. Silver necklace (worn as bracelet), Amigaz Attitude Approved Accessories, $9; Amigaz.com. Page 87 Tank, price upon request; AcneStudios.com. Sports bra, $128; Mikoh.com. Goggles, $60; Bolle.com. Page 88 Top, BCBGMaxAzria, $158; BCBG.com. Bottom, $38; AllSisters.com. Earrings, $225, and rings, $125 each, Jennifer Fisher; JenniferFisherJewelry.com. Page 89 Top, Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh, $680; Barneys.com. Pants, Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh, $750; Off---White.com. Earrings, Noir Jewelry, $45; Amazon.com. Ring (left), Bing Bang, $65; BingBang NYC.com. Ring (right), $350; Anfray-Anfray.com. Pages 90–91 Green top, Proenza Schouler, $795; 212-420-7300. White bandeau, $15; AmericanApparel .com. Bottom, $112; Mikoh.com. Page 92 Top, Adam Selman, $225; FrenchGarmentCleaners.com. Bottom, $75; BeachRiot.com. Earrings, $75; NoirJewelry.com. Cuff, $695; MateoNewYork.com. Ring, Jennifer Fisher, $160; JenniferFisherJewelry.com. Page 93 Swimsuit, LeSwim, $295; Shop .LeSwim.it. Earrings, Jennifer Fisher, $225; JenniferFisherJewelry .com. Bracelets, $275 each; MateoNewYork.com. Page 94 Top; MishaNonoo.com for similar styles. Earrings, Jennifer Fisher, $210; Jennifer FisherJewelry.com.

SELF IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT ©2015 CONDÉ NAST ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 38, NO. 1. SELF (ISSN 0149-0699) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Charles H. Townsend, Chairman; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., Chief Executive Officer & President; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 874, Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 8L4. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to SELF, P.O. Box 37662, Boone, IA 50037-0662. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS OR BACK-ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to SELF, P.O. Box 37662, Boone, IA 500370662, call 800-274-6111 or email subscriptions@self.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the U.S. Postal Service alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business and production correspondence to SELF Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please email reprints@condenast.com or call Wright’s Media, 877-652-5295. For reuse permissions, please email contentlicensing@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at Self.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines, visit condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37662, Boone, IA 50037-0662 or call 800-274-6111. SELF IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND TRANSPARENCIES) OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY SELF IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.

JAN/FEB 2016

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WHY I...

ICE-CLIMB By EMILY HARRINGTON, 29, professional climber in Olympic Valley, California

The moments where I’ve struggled are most precious to me.”

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JAN/FEB 2016

Ice-climbing is cathartic for me. It’s something that I need to do. I just love being in the mountains, climbing up frozen waterfalls, using my body and my mind— and, yes, getting a little bit scared and uncomfortable. I like to run, but I don’t get that same feeling from running. I’ve tried nearly every style of climbing, starting with indoor walls in a gym back when I was 10 years old. But being on the ice is unlike anything else I’ve done. You have axes and spikes on your shoes, and you just have to ind your own way up. For me, unlocking that route is even more enjoyable than the success of getting to the top. Because ice is always changing. Ice breaks. It requires tons of experience and respect for risks and consequences. You have to understand the weather and how it afects formations. Unseasonably warm

temperatures melt the ice; brutally cold ones make it brittle. And both jeopardize your safety. My climbing partner and I are trusting each other with our lives. For the 20 to 45 minutes that each climb takes, I’m very aware that what I’m doing is risky. If I feel scared, I try to analyze where my fear comes from—Is my gear secure? Will I get hurt if I fall? Am I too exposed to the elements?—and work through it. That sense of adventure, and even sufering a little bit, makes me feel alive. But I also remind myself to enjoy the view before I rappel back down: Frozen water is beautiful. It’s a really cool way to experience winter. When I think back on all of my climbing memories, the moments where I’ve struggled are most precious to me. Those are the climbs where I’ve learned a lesson, grown as a person and become stronger.

FROM TOP: BOONE SPEED/THE SPEEDS. KRIS ERICKSON.

Harrington scales an ice formation in Vail, Colorado.


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