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MAY

DO YOUR OWN THING! OUT-OF-THIS WORLD STYLE

From sci-fi streetwear to fresh festival fashion

CULTURAL APPRECIATION REAL GIRLS, REAL BEAUTY, REAL TALK

Earth Angels 8 ECO ACTIVISTS SAVING THE PLANET

I S SUE eGlobal STARRING STARRING THE THE COOLEST COOLEST GIRL GIRL IN IN THE THE GALAXY GALAXY

WILLOW SMITH

“I “I realized realized it it isn’t isn’t about about finding finding yourself—it’s yourself—it’s about about creating creating yourself” yourself”


MAY 2016 longtime advocate for refugees from as far away as Syria and Burundi.

32

Playlist: Surround Sounds They may be from opposite ends of the planet, but these six burgeoning artists prove that music is a universal language.

36

My World: Selena Gomez The global beauty icon dishes on her go-to products, travel tips, and Revival summer tour.

PEOPLE WATCHING

40

FASHION 12 Masthead 10

teenvogue.com Forget the gown— this prom season, all the cool kids are inspired by the runway’s obsession with menswear; Ophélie Rondeau is this month’s pick for #GirlGaze.

14

ON THE COVER

Cover Look: Sound Cloud Get the inside scoop on Teen Vogue’s cover shoot and a status update on Willow Smith, the 15-year-old prodigy who is rewriting the rules.

18

Letter From the Editor Girls of the world.

20

Contributors Get to know Kyemah McEntyre, Daunnette Reyome, Leaf McLean, Sashamoni Burnett, Natasha Ramachandran,

Brandi Kinard, and Eiko Hara.

26

Trending Your feedback on our March 2016 issue.

28

Social Studies: Local Hero Eighteen-year-old Avery McCall is a

46

Big in Japan Tokyo street style is not all rainbow hues and Harajuku girls.

48

Ice Princesses Unfrozen! To outsiders, Iceland might be a bit of a mystery. Get to know the country’s hidden culture through its coolest gatekeepers.

continued ➤ 6 4

MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

EMMA SUMMERTON. Details, see teenvogue.com.

p. 72 Vibing With Willow

Sweet Melody With their distinct U.K. vibes and rock ’n’ roll prowess, model-musicians Ben Gregory and Misha Hart strike a chord with Burberry.


MAY 2016 FEATURES

continued ➤ 4

VIEW

53

The New Order These young designers from across the globe prove that New York and London aren’t the only cities churning out major talent.

56

BEAUTY & HEALTH

61

Beyond the Veil Makeup artist Sir John traveled to the Middle East to teach a lesson in beauty— but he returned with newfound inspiration.

66

The Pat Pack How four girls on the ’gram got crowned by the queen of makeup— Pat McGrath.

p. 88 Eco Warriors 68

Stockholm Syndrome Sweden makes its mark on beauty.

70

10 Most Wanted: Bag of Tricks Going global? Lighten your load with these pintsize products.

FASHION & FEATURES

72

ON THE COVER

Vibing With Willow The coolest girl in the

galaxy travels down to Earth, expanding paradigms, exploring womanhood, and proving she’s lightyears ahead.

80

ON THE COVER

Festival Days Master the music circuit in a modern mix of grunge, glam, and metallic pieces.

88

ON THE COVER

Eco Warriors Meet eight inspiring environmentalists— from brilliant

inventors to wildlife conservation advocates—who are out to save the world.

94

Beyond Borders Immigration has already become the most heated topic of the presidential election. Meet two young women who are on the front lines.

98

ON THE COVER

Cultural Appreciation Borrowing from

other cultures has never been trendier—or more taboo. From henna and headdresses to Afros and cornrows, real girls reclaim their beauty.

LAST LOOK

106

Miranda Banana French fashion norms don’t prevent blogger Miranda Starcevic from testing out the wilder side of style.

TEEN VOGUE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2016 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 16, NO. 4. Teen Vogue (ISSN 1540-2215) is published monthly (except for combined issues in December/January and June/July) by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S.I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Charles H. Townsend, Chairman; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 874, Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 8L4. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to Teen Vogue, P.O. Box 37730, Boone, IA 50037-0730. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK-ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to Teen Vogue, P.O. Box 37730, Boone, IA 50037-0730, call (800) 274-0084, or e-mail subscriptions@teenvogue.com. Please give both new address and old address as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to Teen Vogue, 1 World Trade Center, 29th Floor, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please e-mail reprints@condenast.com or call Wright’s Media at (877) 652-5295. For reuse permissions, please e-mail contentlicensing@condenast.com or call (800) 897-8666. Visit us online at teenvogue .com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit condenastdigital.com. Occasionally we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at Teen Vogue, P.O. Box 37730, Boone, IA 50037-0730, or call (800) 274-0084. TEEN VOGUE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY TEEN VOGUE IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, ARTWORK, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.

6 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

THOMAS GIDDINGS

Selfie Made Individualism has never looked cooler. Meet Sita Abellán, the sartorial darling who approaches chic in her own way.


Teenvogue.com

NO WATCH IT! DRESS ZONE

Forget the gown—this prom season, all the cool kids are inspired by the runway’s obsession with menswear.

EDITOR: PHILLIP PICARDI

#GIRLGAZE “THERE ARE ENDLESS WAYS TO PHOTOGRAPH WOMEN. YOU CAN’T GET BORED OF IT,” OPHÉLIE RONDEAU (@OPHELIE ANDTHEGIRLS) SAYS. SHE’S THIS MONTH’S PICK FOR #GIRLGAZE— OUR SOCIAL MEDIA HUNT FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHERS. SUBMIT YOUR WORK ON INSTAGRAM USING THE HASHTAG! 10 MAY 2016

MEET OUR 9 FAVORITE NEW STARS ON THE CATWALK

7 THINGS YOU SHOULD NEVER SAY TO A TRANS OR GENDERNONCONFORMING PERSON TEENVOGUE.COM

Clockwise from top left: STEVIE & MADA; STEVEN BRAHMS; DIANE RUSSO (2); OPHÉLIE RONDEAU. Details, see teenvogue.com.

THE STRUGGLES THAT ONLY FASHION GIRLS WOULD UNDERSTAND


Editor in Chief

AMY ASTLEY Creative Director Marie Suter

FASHION Fashion/Accessories Director Marina Larroudé Bookings Director Lara Bonomo Fashion Market Editor Sarah Brody Associate Accessories Editor Kirby Marzec Fashion Assistant Katie Sapp Accessories Market Assistant Kyle McCabe Stiansen

FASHION FEATURES Style Director Andrew Bevan Fashion News Assistant Ariana Marsh BEAUTY AND HEALTH Beauty and Health Director Elaine Welteroth Beauty/Style Writer Sue Williamson Beauty Assistant Tina Ferraro ART Associate Art Director Erin Hover Art Assistant Esther Shechtman

PHOTO Photo Director Rhianna Rule Photo Editor James Clarizio Associate Photo Editor Noelle Lacombe Assistant Photo Editor Nicolas Bloise PRODUCTION Production Director Nicole Stuart Research Chief Marni Okun Copy Chief Joanna Citrinbaum Zerlin Assistant to the Editor in Chief Noor Brara TEENVOGUE.COM Digital Editorial Director Phillip Picardi Social Media Director Terron Moore Digital Deputy Editor Amanda Chan Digital Features Editor Sade Strehlke Digital Beauty Editor Emily Gaynor Digital Entertainment Editor Ella Ceron Digital Entertainment Writer Isis Briones Digital Research and Copy Editor Hanna Howard Digital Associate Photo Editor Nicole Pizaro Digital Associate Designer Wesley Johnson Social Media Associate Hannah Weintraub Digital Producer Andrea Navarro Senior Manager, Digital Analytics Clara Chen Associate Director, Audience Development Lindsay Sansone Senior Public Relations Director Erin Kaplan West Coast Editor Lisa Love Paris Editor Fiona DaRin

CONTRIBUTORS

Camila Hennessy, Havana Laffitte, Bee Shaffer Executive Talent Consultant Greg Krelenstein for Starworks Group Artistic Director

ANNA WINTOUR For subscription inquiries, please write to Teen Vogue, P.O. Box 37730, Boone, IA 50037-0730, or subscriptions@teenvogue.com, visit teenvogue.com, or call (800) 274-0084. For reprints, please e-mail reprints@condenast.com or call Wright’s Media at (877) 652-5295. For reuse permissions, please e-mail contentlicensing@condenast.com or call (800) 897-8666. Address all correspondence to Teen Vogue, 1 World Trade Center, 29th Floor, New York, NY 10007, or call (212) 286-2860.

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Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. www.condenast.com | www.condenastinternational.com Published at 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007

12 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM


Cover Look EDITOR: ELAINE WELTEROTH FEMALE ENERGY Willow’s T-shirt says it all. On the cover: She wears a Chanel jacket and dress. Anita K. Jewelry earring, $45 per pair. Trash and Vaudeville cuff (worn as choker), $17. Nina Ricci necklace. Details, see teenvogue.com.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY EMMA SUMMERTON.

SOUND CLOUD

Get the inside scoop on Teen Vogue’s cover shoot and a status update on Willow Smith, the 15-yearold Hollywood prodigy who is rewriting all the rules. 14 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

Fashion Editor: Ondine Azoulay; hair, Lacy Redway using Carol’s Daughter; makeup, Lottie using Chanel Ligne Graphique de Chanel; nails, Tracey Sutter for Cloutier Remix; set design, Peter Klein at Frank Reps; production, Kiori Georgiadis at Hinoki Group.

T

ake a trip to Willow Smith’s universe. Through the lens of this wunderkind’s limitless imagination, colors appear brighter than they do here on Earth. The songstress is a mystical vision when she materializes on Teen Vogue’s sunny Los Angeles set earlier than expected wearing a white tee emblazoned with girl-power prose. Willow’s message is clear and quite fitting considering the shoot’s female-led crew: Ladies can run the world. “Willow commands the room the second she steps in,” hairstylist Lacy Redway notes. “She has such a strong voice for someone so young. We’re in good hands if she’s part of the group of women who will be leading us in the future.” Unlike many of her hit-hungry peers, Willow is one of only a handful of artists who seem focused on furthering conversations about gender equity and identity rather than just climbing the charts—though, to be fair, she’s done that too. But gone are the days of whipping her hair back and forth. Now the short, springy dreadlocks that Willow started growing more than a year ago frame her face like a halo. “Her locs are so funky and cool that they didn’t need much to look amazing,” Lacy says. She twisted the roots tight to keep them fresh, then secured the style with Carol’s Daughter Mimosa Hair Honey Shine Pomade. Makeup artist Lottie traced the shape of Willow’s stunning hazel eyes with a black felt-tip liner on the lids, turning a classic cat eye into a graphic work of art. The end result? Beauty vibes fit for a bona fide teen superhero.  ➤


Cover Look WALK THIS WAY On location at the Sepulveda Dam. Acne Studios jacket. Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh shirt, $300, and turtleneck (worn underneath), $225. Paco Rabanne shorts. American Apparel socks, $9. Jeremy Scott boots. Details, see teenvogue.com.

At Chanel’s fall 2016 runway show

Favorite Film: Avatar Most Overused Words: “Sus” and “bro” Favorite Foods: “Light…oh, and kale.” Nickname: “My dad calls me Bean.” Life-Changing Reads: The Ancient Secret of the Flower of Life by Drunvalo Melchizedek and Intuition by Osho “Any book you read by Osho is going to flip the script on your entire existence.”

BOW DOWN In Teen Vogue, March 2011

GET THE LOOK

Chanel Les Beiges Healthy Glow Sheer Colour Stick in Blush No. 21, $45, and Écriture de Chanel Eyeliner Pen in Noir, $35. chanel.com. Performing in New York City

16 MAY 2016

Fascinating facts about the world’s most fascinating teen

HER PLAYLIST Here’s what the musichead blasted from her iPhone on set

Kid Cudi: “Going to the Ceremony” Jabs: “SunDown” Willow Smith: “dRuGz” Kid Cudi: “Angered Kids” St. Vincent: “Now, Now” Kid Cudi: “Satellite Flight” Jabs: “Always Do” Kid Cudi: “Handle With Care” Allen Stone: “Fake Future” Cocteau Twins and Harold Budd: “Sea, Swallow Me” (the best song ever, according to Willow) “Music is my favorite thing. If it didn’t exist, I would die!” TEENVOGUE.COM

Clockwise from top left: JACQUELINE DI MILIA; RINDOFF/LE SEGRETAIN/Getty Images; TOM GORMAN (3); DAVE KOTINSKY/Getty Images; DANIEL JACKSON.

FRONT AND CENTER

WILLOW’S WORLD


Letter from the Editor KILLER COMBO

GLOBAL CITIZENS

Supermodel looks and a STEM-kid brain blend in “Vibing With Willow,” page 72 Below: Artist @nicolacardone cannily sums up the essential @gweelos: superstylish science geek!

Meet girls owning their individuality and taking great pride in their beauty in “Cultural Appreciation,” page 98. “Indian heritage is so culturally rich,” Natasha Ramachandran says. “I wouldn’t want to be anything other than Indian.” Sheena wears a Jil Sander Navy jacket. Details, see teenvogue.com.

GIRLS OF THE WORLD

18 MAY 2016

Clockwise from top left: EMMA SUMMERTON; courtesy of Nicola Cardone; NICOLAS KANTOR; no credit.

T

he third time is the charm: Fifteen-year-old Willow Smith finally graces our cover after two previous Teen Vogue shoots—the first one at the tender age of 10 (!) in 2011, aka the “Whip My Hair” moment. Willow has massively moved on into a whole other moment, one that includes feminism, philosophy, quantum mechanics, and Chanel. (She is a new ambassador for the brand, an honor she calls mindblowing.) Emma Summerton’s photos capture the power of this latest stage, reflecting the fiercely intelligent and unconventional Willow in all her gorgeous glory. She is an ideal Teen Vogue female! Speaking of outspoken females, our feature “Cultural Appreciation” evolved from ongoing lively staff discussions about appropriation as it relates to appearance. We eventually agreed that perhaps sensitivity and respect for the roots of a look make all the difference, as it is nearly impossible (and certainly unpleasant) to police all the potentially offensive beauty and style statements out there in this era of “anything goes.” The real girls and models we shot are as compelling as the resulting images—but it is their words that really resonate with me. “When I see people in headdresses or Native American accessories, I feel disrespected. They don’t know the meaning behind it, how we wore it, or what we did to earn it,” Daunnette Reyome says. “I wish the world knew that we do still exist, and we don’t all still live in tepees.” From Daunnette’s head feather to braids, locs, Afros, and baby hair, listen and learn right here.

AT NEW YORK FASHION WEEK WITH @KIERNANSHIPKA

TEENVOGUE.COM


BORN BEAUTY

The stars of ‘Cultural Appreciation,’ page 98, share their stories.

KYEMAH MCENTYRE

DAUNNETTE REYOME

LEAF MCLEAN

“I am African-American. The reason I wear my hair in an Afro is because I think it expresses exactly who I am, where I come from, and the people who have paved the way for me. I used to have a perm but I asked my mom to cut it off when I was in seventh grade. I’m superhuge on expression and individuality. I found it very difficult to be myself because I was comparing myself to others who had straight hair. There are a lot of stereotypes and misconceptions about black people and black hair. We shouldn’t have to question wearing our natural hair to a job interview; I wish people just understood how strong and beautiful it is. I think cultural appreciation is about understanding that you can’t just take aesthetic properties from a culture. Our hair is not an accessory. It’s literally who we are.”

“I am Native American from the Omaha tribe in Nebraska. My Indian name means ‘shooting star.’ I wish the world knew that we do still exist. And, no, we don’t all live in tepees. When I see people in headdresses or Native American accessories, I feel disrespected. They don’t know the meaning behind it, how we wear it, or what we do to earn it. This is a real eagle feather. It doesn’t just fall off an eagle and someone says, ‘Oh, here— it’s yours.’ You have to earn it in my culture. I feel powerful when I wear it, more confident, and more connected to my ethnicity. I’ve never been embarrassed about being Native American. I take pride in it. I love how spiritual we are—it’s like we’re in tune with the Earth and the universe. I know there’s no other culture out there like mine.”

“I am Puerto Rican and black. Baby hairs are a big part of both of my cultures—they are a sign of pride. I’ve had so many toothbrushes that I’ve had to throw away because I used them to gel down these baby hairs! [Laughs] Being Afro-Latina, you have a lot of hair. When I was younger, I was constantly mocked for having crazy-thick sideburns. But everything I got made fun of for back then is trendy now. FKA Twigs wearing her baby hairs has inspired people from all over the world to rock them. It’s cool as long as you respect where it comes from. Cultural appreciation is about giving credit to a long line of people who have done this for years. Embracing my heritage was about accepting the hair on my body from my head to my toes. Making a conscious decision to love yourself for who you are is the coolest trend ever.” ➤

on her Afro

20 MAY 2016

on her feather

on her baby hairs

TEENVOGUE.COM

NICOLAS KANTOR; Fashion Editor: Catherine Newell-Hanson; hair, Edward Lampley using John Masters Organics; makeup, Fulvia Farolfi using Chanel; nails, Maki Sakamoto using Dior Dior Vernis; casting, Sisi Chonco at Zan Casting.

Contributors


Contributors

NATASHA RAMACHANDRAN

BRANDI KINARD

on her locs

on her traditions

“I am Jamaican and Haitian, and I live in Brooklyn. I am Rastafarian. When I was 3 or 4, my mom and dad decided to dread my hair, and I haven’t cut it since. I really like my hairstyle. Wearing locs makes me feel totally unique. And I don’t want to be like everyone else—I am my own person. People are always asking me, ‘How do you wash your hair?’ It’s like, come on—the same way you wash your hair! [Laughs] If I see someone on the street with dreads and they aren’t Rasta, I’m completely cool with that. They just want to be a part of the culture. I think the coolest thing about my culture is the food. The spices are the best! I love the combinations of flavors. Jerk chicken and white rice with beans and sweet plantains—that’s like life, literally.”

“I am 100 percent Indian, and I wouldn’t want to be anything else. I love that my jewelry reminds me of home, because I live so far away. It’s also nice to feel like you are representing your country, your culture, your people. Especially because I travel a lot, I get asked questions about my language, my food, and my ethnicity. I’m really proud of and thankful for the importance we place on family. Everyone is so close-knit. And we are taught to respect everybody: elders, family, friends. We treat guests like gods! Hindus have a million rituals. To me, the popularity of Yoga shows how rich our culture is. It’s being practiced all over the world.”

“I am black, Irish, Chinese, and Creek Indian. I call this my crown of glory. What better way to explain it? This look all started at Afropunk Fest, when I was trying to find a hairstyle to represent my blackness. I got the idea from Pinterest! Now it’s my identity. It comes from a tribe in West Africa called the Fulani. I see my braid designs as a way to attach myself to my roots. Going back to my engineering classes at a predominantly white college, I was nervous that my classmates would think, Is she some type of witch doctor? [Laughs] I had to explain to them why I had this hairstyle. It was a weird, wild experience. Not too long ago, people were telling me how weaves, hair extensions, and braids are considered hood or ghetto, but I’m not that at all, and I don’t see it that way.

24 MAY 2016

on her braids

EIKO HARA

on Japanese beauty “I feel like many people in Japan are obsessed with how they look—people care a lot about their hair and makeup, the shape of their bodies. That’s why we have so many different versions of beauty. Like, this look I am wearing today; it’s known as byojaku. Japanese culture is so creative—it plays in extremes. But I think that’s how we built street style. When I tell people I’m Japanese, they seem really interested in my culture. It makes me happy.” —ELAINE WELTEROTH

TEENVOGUE.COM

NICOLAS KANTOR. Details, see teenvogue.com.

SASHAMONI BURNETT


Trending EDITOR: NOOR BRARA

YOUR FEEDBACK ON OUR

Ask an

MARCH 2016 ISSUE EDITOR All your questions, answered by us!

“THANK YOU FOR THE DIVERSITY AND FOR HIGHLIGHTING VERY TALENTED (NOT JUST PRETTYFACED) YOUNG WOMEN!” @kelcadet,VIA INSTAGRAM Susannah Liguori, photographed by Evaan Kheraj

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“GROWING UP, I NEVER SAW ANYONE IN THE MODELING INDUSTRY WHO LOOKED LIKE ME. I’M SO HAPPY BHUMIKA AND POOJA [‘GLOBAL CITIZENS’] ARE BREAKING BOUNDARIES.” becca VIA YOUTUBE

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON SOCIAL 26 MAY 2016

@PadillsTheGreat: What does being a features editor involve? Sade Strehlke: I typically handle the newsier stories. Think protests, gun violence, and theupcoming election. @sc0ttymccreery: How did you get to where you are today? SS: Hard work and a little swag! I studied theater for undergrad and got my master’s in journalism. @ImaniMcg: How do you and your team work to bring diverse voices to Teen Vogue’s newsroom? SS: We always look for writers who best represent the content SADE’S FAVE Herbivore Lapis we’re Facial Oil, $72. sephora.com. sharing. 

In addition to submitting on social media, submissions may also be placed by commenting on teenvogue.com, e-mailing trending@teenvogue.com, or sending mail to Trending, Teen Vogue, 1 World Trade Center, 29th Floor, New York, NY 10007. Submissions should include the writer’s name, address, and daytime phone number, and may be edited for length and clarity as well as published or used in any medium. All submissions become the property of Teen Vogue and will not be returned.

TEENVOGUE.COM

Clockwise from top right: no credit; courtesy of Herbivore; DANIEL JACKSON; EVAAN KHERAJ; JOSH OLINS.

SADE STREHLKE, DIGITAL FEATURES EDITOR


Social Studies

MODEL CITIZEN “I love having the opportunity to discuss my work with people I never would have crossed paths with,” Avery says.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALYSSA SCHUKAR.

LOCAL HERO

W

hat is the one item you would grab if your house went up in flames? Would it be your dog? A sentimental photograph? Your favorite T-shirt? Or would you fear so greatly for your life that you would just run? These may seem like hypothetical questions, but if you’re one of the more than 60 million people who have fled their homes due to war, natural disasters, or persecution, you may have already answered them. Refugees and internally displaced persons are among the most vulnerable in the world. Whether they have crossed international borders (and are considered refugees) or have been forced to relocate within their homeland (and are considered displaced), they may have witnessed or experienced torture, rape, mass murder, and the destruction of their homes. The Syrian refugee crisis that has dominated headlines and political discourse is one example of how millions of individuals can be forced to flee for their lives due to an ongoing armed struggle. But ordinary citizens in places like the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan have been ravaged as well in the wake of varying conflicts verging on genocide. It was a book that changed the trajectory of my life. I was 12

28 MAY 2016

when I read Half the Sky by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn and first became aware of the global oppression of women. Because refugees embody so many human rights issues—trafficking (modern-day slavery), gender-based violence (sexual assault), scarcity of clean water, lack of shelter, and more—they became the focus of my work. I even transferred from my Chicago school to Stanford University Online High School in order to have greater flexibility in my schedule to be an advocate for those affected by these issues. It also allowed me to pursue modeling, an unconventional path for a human rights activist but one that has afforded me a farreaching and global platform. As I meet with many influential designers, casting agents, and photographers, I try to bring up my advocacy whenever circumstances allow. Whether it’s mentoring and tutoring resettled refugees through RefugeeOne, serving as a teen advisor for the United Nations Foundation Girl Up campaign, or galvanizing young people to take action, I have learned that any person, regardless of age, can become an agent of change. Unquestionably, though, it has been my personal engagement with refugees that has been the most meaningful. A small ➤ TEENVOGUE.COM

Hair and makeup, Kyrsten Bryant for M.A.C.

Eighteen-year-old Avery McCall is a longtime advocate for refugees from as far away as Syria and Burundi. Along with her family, she has opened her home to those who have lost theirs—and wants you to get involved too.


Social Studies OPEN HEARTS

From top: ALYSSA SCHUKAR; MARCUS TONDO/vogue.com.

Emmanuel and Avery play with the now 7-month-old daughter of another refugee (not pictured) who also lives in her Chicago home.

number are ever granted permanent citizenship in another country, and they face tremendous challenges when they are. These can range from navigating an unknown culture to repaying travel debt. Currently, several young resettled refugees are living in my home. Each day presents opportunities to teach them about life in America, like how to pay bills and why my hometown has the best deepdish pizza. We are their friends, new family, and support system. And we learn equally from them, as their stories are a constant reminder of the tenacity of the human spirit. One man who lives with us, Emmanuel, fled his home in the Democratic Republic of Congo at 17 when his family was massacred. After years in a camp, he arrived in the United States self-taught in eight languages. He is one of the most optimistic and grateful people I know and is now pursuing his GED.

It is our responsibility as global citizens to ensure that the fear experienced by millions of refugees is met with compassion and action, not hatred and indifference. The rhetoric that Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, and other politicians spew threatens to close the few avenues of hope for these individuals and stokes the hatred espoused by those REEM ACRA who are responsible for these conflicts. And you can help, too, by contacting any of the many organizations serving refugees in the United States and abroad. Whether you volunteer, raise money or awareness, lend your skills, give a speech at your school, or simply donate clothes, even the smallest gesture can have a huge impact. 

I HAVE LEARNED THAT ANY PERSON, REGARDLESS OF AGE, CAN BECOME AN AGENT OF CHANGE

30 MAY 2016


Playlist EDITOR: ARIANA MARSH

MABEL MCVEY, 20

SURROUND SOUNDS They may be from opposite ends of the planet, but these six burgeoning artists prove that music is a universal language. ➤

32 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

JAMIE MORGAN

LONDON She may be ’80s and ’90s pop star Neneh Cherry’s daughter, but this Spanish-born, Swedishraised R&B-soul-pop singer’s success is all her own. “I want to make people feel like they’re not alone through my music,” reveals the songwriter, who is working on her debut album. “If people connect and relate to it, I’ll be very, very happy!”


Playlist STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN Fearlessly bold in both style and lyrics, rapper Jonatan Aron Leandoer Håstad, aka Yung Lean, is a true creative through and through. And with two albums under his belt and an international tour in progress, the world is starting to notice. “My music is dreamy, dark, and honest,” he says. “I’m happy with it if I like it—it’s personal.”

IBEYI, 20

PARIS AND HAVANA Twin sisters make up this soulful R&B-meets-pop-meets-electronic duo. While they each contribute chilling vocals in English and Yoruba (a Nigerian language their ancestors spoke), Lisa-Kaindé Díaz (left) also plays the piano and Naomi Díaz is a skilled percussionist. “We are a mix of two cultures and so is our music,” Lisa-Kaindé explains. “Our sound does not belong to one country— we’ve performed all over the world. It’s really incredible.”

LEE HI,19

DAVIDO, 23

EDE, NIGERIA With a sophomore record in the works and a newly inked deal with Sony Music Entertainment, David Adedeji Adeleke, or Davido, is bringing upbeat Afropop tunes to the forefront of the popular music scene. “I am breaking boundaries with my sound,” the American-born, Nigerian-reared artist points out. “I want to make the entire African continent proud.” 34 MAY 2016

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA Having dropped her debut album in 2013, this K-pop sensation is back in the spotlight with her recently released follow-up, Seoulite. Boasting collaborations with Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music crew, and Tablo and DJ Tukutz of the Korean hip-hop group Epik High, it offers everything from beat-heavy jams to a piercingly emotional ballad. “It’s really a reflection of myself,” Lee declares. “It shows a lot of complex feelings.”



TEENVOGUE.COM

Clockwise from top left: SØREN JEPSEN; JON GORRIGAN; courtesy of YG Entertainment; Twenty20 Media.

YUNG LEAN, 19


My World EDITOR: ELAINE WELTEROTH

TUNE IN “I’m most excited to sing ‘Kill Em With Kindness’ on tour,” Selena says. “It’s my favorite song lyrically on the entire record. It’s such a powerful message.”

SELENA GOMEZ

The global beauty icon dishes on her go-to products, travel tips, and Revival summer tour.

“I appreciate what Pantene stands for in celebrating women. Its motto is ‘Strong is beautiful.’”

“SOUTH AMERICA IS AMAZING— THERE’S SO MUCH PASSION BEHIND THE MUSIC. BRAZIL IS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES.”

“My style is pretty classic. I want to feel like myself; it’s all about being authentic.”

“I LOVE WATCHING FRIENDS WHILE ON THE ROAD— IT’S KIND OF MY HOME AWAY FROM HOME.” 36 MAY 2016

Rebecca Taylor top, $250. Rebecca Taylor.

“I usually pick a candle that will be the scent of the tour. I keep it with me so I’m in a consistent place. I love Le Labo.” Le Labo Santal 26 Scented Candle, $75. barneys.com.

TEENVOGUE.COM

Clockwise from top right: GIAMPAOLO SGURA; THIAGO VERAS/Getty Images; courtesy of Le Labo; NBC/Getty Images; courtesy of Pantene; PAOLA KUDACKI; CHRIS GORMAN.

Pantene Pro-V Airspray, $7. Target.


People Watching EDITOR: ANDREW BEVAN

SWEET MELODY

With their distinct U.K. vibes and rock ’n’ roll prowess, model–musicians Ben Gregory and Misha Hart strike a chord with Burberry. ➤ 40

MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

Fashion Editor: Andrew Bevan; hair, Yumi Nakada-Dingle for Jed Root; makeup, Amy Conley for Stella Creative Artists.

PERFECT DUET Ben wears a Burberry jacket, shirt, T-shirt, $350, and pants. Misha wears a Burberry dress and backpack. Details, see teenvogue.com. PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHARLOTTE HADDEN.


People Watching WINDOW SEAT Misha wears Burberry sandals. Details, see teenvogue.com.

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BUDDY SYSTEM From left: Their spring 2016 Burberry campaign; Ben performing in Manchester, England.

Clockwise from top: CHARLOTTE HADDEN; courtesy of ImaxTree; JONATHAN NICHOLSON/NurPhoto/Corbis; courtesy of Burberry.

n a rare sunny day in London, rising Scottish model Misha Hart reunites with her Burberry campaign costar Blaenavon front man Ben Gregory, and is immediately drawn to a rack of clothes with his name on it. “I’ll take a suit any day! I don’t like to limit myself with rules or genres. I’m much more drawn to the styles of Nick Cave and John Cooper Clarke over someone wearing a dress,” the 21-year-old notes. The two friends haven’t seen each other since their campaign shoot, but you wouldn’t know it by their familiar rapport. It’s Ben and Misha’s relatable yet sexy swagger that sets them apart from their London cool kid counterparts and ultimately caught the eye of the British heritage brand. “I’ve only done a few magazine shoots before. It’s been a really interesting process to be a part of,” says Ben, 20, who—besides the campaign—has also appeared in a Burberry Acoustic video. “People sending me photos of my face on billboards in Johannesburg and Dubai is very surreal.” Their mugs may appear together around the globe, but the pair’s shared love for music is what they connect on most. “I grew up in a house full of music— I’ve been songwriting since I was 8 years old,” explains the selftaught Misha, who recently joined a new band. Ben’s passion also traces to childhood. “We only started Blaenavon for a contest at school when we were MISHA BACKSTAGE AT about 14 or 15 and BURBERRY’S FALL 2014 managed to win,” states Ben, SHOW whose band just finished up its first album. “Maybe if we hadn’t, everything would have been so different.” —A.B. TEENVOGUE.COM


People Watching

Asali wears a Kinsella sweater and Bubbles pants.

BIGIN JAPAN

Tokyo street style is not all rainbow hues and Harajuku girls. The latest trendsetters have a more easygoing method to getting dressed.

Kaori wears a G.V.G.V. jacket, Acne Studios sweater, and Pearl glasses.

Miho Miyakawa wears a Canari sweater and a vintage blouse from the thrift store Chicago.

Mei Nagasawa wears a LilLilly top.

KAZUMA IWANO/droptokyo.com

Asali and Erika wear Bubbles pants.

EVA CHEUNG IN OVERALLS BY MINI CREAM Towa wears a vintage dress and Converse sneakers.

TEENVOGUE.COM


People Watching

Briet Olina At right: Briet poses for Ravelin magazine. Anna Jia At right: Anna cycles through the fields of China.

Clockwise from top left: KATRIN BRAGA; ELISABET DAVIDS; BOO GEORGE/Trunk Archive; courtesy of Brynja Jónbjarnardóttir; courtesy of Apple/courtesy of Chris Burkard; courtesy of Anna Jia (2).

Kolfinna Kristófersdóttir

ICE PRINCESSES Unfrozen! To outsiders, Iceland might be a bit of a mystery. Get to know the country’s hidden culture through the eyes of its coolest gatekeepers.

Brynja Jónbjarnardóttir At left: Brynja stars in an Apple campaign.

48 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM


People Watching DREAM WIFE BANDMATES

A

s natives of the first European country to elect a female president (in 1980), it’s not so surprising to learn that Iceland’s women quite literally run their world. From annual music festivals energized by the island nation’s ethereal landscapes to nature-inflected unisex fashion (before it was de rigueur), here’s the lowdown on what’s in from four It girls currently killing the game.

BRIET OLINA, 20

MUSIC DUO KIASMOS

Globe-trotter Briet Olina grew up in Reykjavík, California, and London before moving at 19 to New York, where she now works as a stylist and a model, most recently posing for Issey Miyake, Spotify, and i-D magazine. “I assist several stylists and recently got to work on a Vogue Italia shoot,” she enthuses. When it comes to mastering the Reykjavík look, Briet says the city’s chicest keep it low-key, but with a twist. “Icelandic girls love white sneakers, jeans, and a big fur in winter. And fanny packs! Wearing them across your shoulder is probably the best year-round trend.”

FORMER PRESIDENT VIGDÍS FINNBOGADÓTTIR

ICELAND’S INFLUENCERS Who, what, and where Reykjavík’s elite are listening to, wearing, and hanging out.

Following her breakout in 2013—walking in shows like Chanel and Marc Jacobs—former model Kolfinna Kristófersdóttir caught the fashion world’s attention for her resemblance to The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’s edgy Lisbeth Salander. These days she’s an aspiring artist in Reykjavík. “For me, making art has always felt as necessary as brushing my teeth,” she notes. The creative calls out Guðmundur Jörundsson as the designer everyone needs to know about: “He has a way of bringing out femininity in whatever form it comes in.”

BRYNJA JÓNBJARNARDÓTTIR, 22 Brynja Jónbjarnardóttir, most recognized for her campaigns for Apple and Carven, was signed by Next when she was just 15. “After modeling internationally, I moved back to Iceland where I both model and study economics,” she reveals. “I especially enjoy shooting outside in the summertime—the waterfalls and glaciers are amazing.” Reykjavík residents, who are also known for their coffee culture, spend a significant amount of the season hanging out in the city’s outdoor cafés, which double as stunning shoot locations.

HILDUR YEOMAN DESIGN

ANNA JIA, 22

JÖR DESIGN

STOFAN CAFÉ 50 MAY 2016

“I’m intrigued by the idea of bioengineering—how cool would it be to make robotic arms and legs?” raves girl-abouttown Anna Jia, who splits her time between modeling in Reykjavík and working in China during her year off school. Her fave event? “Iceland Airwaves,” she says, citing the massive music festival held in Reykjavík each November. “Check out Icelandic-influenced bands Dream Wife and Kiasmos!” —NOOR BRARA TEENVOGUE.COM

From top: KATRIN BRAGA; Hipix/Alamy Stock Photo; HEDINN EIRIKSSON; EREZ SABAG; BIRTA RÁN; courtesy of Stofan Café.

KOLFINNA KRISTÓFERSDÓTTIR, 23


ARM’S LENGTH Lauren wears an Ed Marler crop top, top (worn underneath), and pants. Trash and Vaudeville socks, $8. Eytys sneakers, $235. Details, see teenvogue.com.

View EDITOR: ANDREW BEVAN

Fashion Stylist: John Colver; hair, Edward Lampley using Philip Kingsley; makeup, Jen Myles using Nars.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF HENRIKSON.

THE NEW ORDER These young designers from across the globe prove that New York and London aren’t the only cities churning out major talent.

Ed Marler, 26, High Wycombe, England “Being British and having that heritage is a big part of my work,” declares Ed, whose garments walk a fine line between couture and costume, always offering up a healthy dose of creativity. “I’ll mix historical cuts with sportswear and denim elements, and top off the look with a crown.” Aisha Ayensu, 30, Accra, Ghana “I find interesting ways to reinterpret African traditions and culture into my creations to make them relevant,” explains Aisha, the brains behind the vibrant and pattern-heavy label Christie Brown. “We specialize in hand embroidery and waxprint buttons.”

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MAY 2016 53


View SPACE CADET

Clockwise from top left: JEFF HENRIKSON (2); courtesy of Christina Economou; ILYA S. SAVENOK/Getty Images; EDWARD JAMES/Getty Images; JEFF HENRIKSON.

Miuniku coat

ROSY DISPOSITION From left: Lauren wears a Christie Brown crisscross cover, $195, and top (worn underneath), $125. Latifah wears a Christina Economou jacket, $333, and pants, $386. Julia wears an Anna K dress. Details, see teenvogue.com.

Christina Economou, 26, Athens, Greece Although she studied fashion design in Paris, Christina is largely inspired by the white, picturesque villages of Greece. “Prints and textures are its signature characteristics,” she says of her breezy, eponymous line. “It provides a sophisticated twist on day-to-night dressing.” Anna Karenina, 20, Kiev, Ukraine This model turned designer founded her label, Anna K, when she was just 16 years old. “I would describe it as innocently sexy,” notes the burgeoning creative. “My trademark is the trapezoidal dress—I’m transforming it every season.” Nikita Sutradhar, 25, & Tina Sutradhar, 27, Mumbai, India “Our aesthetic is a mix of minimal and maximal elements,” states Tina, one half of the sister duo behind the LVMH prizewinning label Miuniku. “Our focus is in the details,” Nikita adds. “And we love to make statement outerwear.” Hayley Elsaesser, 27, Vancouver, British Columbia “My pieces are quite easy to recognize because of their outrageous prints,” observes Hayley, whose colorful textiles feature everything from flying saucers to eight balls wearing cowboy hats. “My main focus is fun—far too many labels out there are stark, serious, and boring!” —ARIANA MARSH 54 MAY 2016

FULL BLAST Clockwise from above left: Hayley Elsaesser top, $150, and skirt, $170. Hayley Elsaesser spring 2016. Christina Economou jumpsuit. Anna K pre-fall 2016.


View POWER GRID Clockwise from top left: Sita wears a Joseph sweater. ASOS bra (worn underneath), $24. Moschino pants. MM6 Maison Margiela shoes. Laruicci earring, $140 per pair. Dilara Findikoglu jacket. Ganni pants, $230. Coach 1941 skirt. Walter Steiger boots. Details, see teenvogue.com.

SELFIE MADE

Individualism has never looked cooler. Meet Sita Abellán, the sartorial darling who approaches chic in her own way. ➤ 56 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

Fashion Stylist: Jaime Kay Waxman; hair, Romina Manenti using René Furterer; makeup, Sam Addington using Dior Diorskin Nude.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY NADYA WASYLKO.


View HEART OF GOLD Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh jacket, and shorts, $350. Discount Universe leotard, $345. Sarah Chloe necklace, $79. Details, see teenvogue.com.

ON SET FOR RIHANNA’S BBHMM

WILD THINGS Clockwise from above: Eugenia Kim beret. Martine Ali necklace, $125. Crap Eyewear sunglasses, $60. O-Mighty jacket, $59. Discount Universe top, $125.

Clockwise from top left: NADYA WASYLKO; @sitabellan; TOM GORMAN (4).

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o one tells me what to do, how to act, or what to wear,” says Sita Abellán, the badass Spanish It girl we’ve been crushing on since seeing her in Rihanna’s “Bitch Better Have My Money” music video. At 23, the model, DJ, and stylist has led a glamorous life most of us could only dream of, walking in fashion shows for the likes of Jeremy Scott and VFiles, and curating beats for exclusive parties. “I started DJing three years ago in Murcia, my hometown, and was scouted by Wilhelmina Models on Instagram a year and a half later,” she explains. “Now I get to travel around the world, attending fashion weeks and playing gigs.” While we have no doubt that she rules the turntables, we can’t help but think that Sita’s unapologetically in-your-face sense of style has also contributed to her meteoric rise. “I just wear what I like and what I feel like when I wake up,” the Moschino muse declares. “I see fashion as a way to express myself, and think it’s art in one of its best manifestations.” It’s true that Sita’s outfits are often masterpieces. She makes sequins work for day, accessorizes like a chic kleptomaniac, and is a femme fatale, punky raver princess, and streetwear savant all wrapped into one. “I have always expressed myself without boundaries in all aspects of my life, including my style,” she says, adding that the sartorially traditional town where she grew up had a dichotomous effect on her aesthetic. “On one hand, it was a good setting to explore my creativity in, but on the other, people often tried to bring me down for it. But I am what I am, I do what I do, and I wear what I wear.” When it comes to rocking eccentric looks, confidence really is key. —ARIANA MARSH


Beauty & Health GLOBAL EXCHANGE “America is all about nomakeup makeup. But the women I met in Dubai are obsessed with beauty and glamour—it’s refreshing!” Sir John notes. “I brought back some of that with me.” Saufeeya wears an Echo scarf, $45. Details, see teenvogue.com.

EDITOR: ELAINE WELTEROTH

Fashion Stylist: Akari Endo-Gaut; makeup, Sir John for L’Oréal Paris USA; nails, Maki Sakamoto.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAUL MAFFI.

BEYOND THE VEIL Makeup artist Sir John traveled to the Middle East to teach a lesson in beauty— but he returned with newfound inspiration. ➤

TEENVOGUE.COM

MAY 2016 61


Beauty & Health

BEAUTY

BROW BEAT “Women who wear hijabs have a few inches on the face, which becomes a window to express their individuality, personalities, or moods—and one vehicle is makeup,” Sir John says. Zeena scarf, $20. Details, see teenvogue.com.

TRADE SECRETS

Tips an A-list beauty pro learned from everyday Muslim women.

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“Play with textural contrasts. A wet effect on the eye with matte skin is really provoking visually”

Sephora Collection Colorful Eyeshadow in Surfin USA, $10. sephora.com. Right: CoverGirl Ink It! By Perfect Point Plus eyeliner in Violet Ink, $8. ulta.com.

Nars Dual-Intensity Eyeshadow in Deep End, $29. narscosmetics.com.

From top: Rimmel London Magnif’Eyes Double Ended Shadow and Liner in Kissed by a Rose Gold, $7. Walgreens. Sonia Kashuk Dramatically Intensifying Kajal, $9. Target. L’Oréal Paris Infallible Silkissime Eyeliner in Cobalt Blue, $9. ulta.com.

“You can make a brow a complete moment” “Perfect your wing. Practice on your girls”

Chosungah 22 Dong Gong Minn Brow Maker in Black Brown, $22. sephora.com.

FASHION

UNDER WRAPS

Modest fashion is having a moment. These brands offer cool ways to cover up. DOLCE & GABBANA 62 MAY 2016

H&M

UNIQLO TEENVOGUE.COM

Clockwise from top left: PAUL MAFFI; TOM GORMAN (7); courtesy of Uniqlo; courtesy of H&M; courtesy of Dolce & Gabbana.

he Middle Eastern women I met in Dubai reminded me of American women of the ’30s and ’40s. They make sure their brows are meticulously drawn on, their liner is perfect—and they still have vanities!” says Beyoncé’s go-to Sir John. “When you wear a hijab, it’s about making a beauty statement with minimal real estate. I came back with an understanding of how to make looks more impactful and how to take some of that unapologetic glamour back to my clients’ daily lives.” ➤


Beauty & Health COLOR POP Preen Line dress, Tees by Tina turtleneck, $58. Zeena wrap, $20. Details, see teenvogue.com.

@THATGIRLYUSRA

@SHAZAIRA

@MARIAHIDRISSI

@AUTOMATIQHIGH

Point of View

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER Muslimgirl.net’s Amani AlKhatahtbeh sheds light on the meaning of cosmetics in her culture.

T

hey say eyes are the windows to the soul. I think back to when I was 13 years old, gazing at my reflection and defiantly adorning my eyes with my grandmother’s black kohl during visits to her native Jordan. I saw it as an act of rebellion—resistance to my dad telling me to “wipe that stuff off” and to cover the strand of hair sticking out of my scarf. My Arab tastes always did clash with my Muslim customs. Today, my spirited makeup has become a proud celebration of generations of Arab women with kohl-rimmed, almondshaped eyes. It is still a bold adornment of my appearance in a world that seems hell-bent on devaluing it. Growing up in New

64 MAY 2016

@ALIATAHA_

Jersey, I used to get bullied for wearing a hijab to school and rocking my thick Arab brows long before they became #onfleek. Even though we still encounter discrimination and adversity around the world, Muslim women are gaining influence in beauty and fashion. Social media has given rise to hijabi style gurus, like blogger Saufeeya Goodson, pictured above, who co-runs @hijabfashion, which has nearly 2 million followers. This shift offers a glimpse of glamour from behind a veil of obscurity, misconception, and misguided judgment. “Does modesty allow for makeup?” It’s a question I deal with often. Modesty is an individualistic concept. For some, it’s donning a scarf—for others it’s making our grandmothers’ liner our own. Both symbolize pride in who we are as we look the world in the eye and put our best face forward.  AMANI AL-KHATAHTBE

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Clockwise from top center: PAUL MAFFI; TAAHA SIDDIQUI; courtesy of Haute Elan; courtesy of Alia Taha; COCO CAPITÁN; courtesy of Tik Zulkifli; courtesy of Noor Elkhaldi; courtesy of Saira Arshad.

@NOORE


Beauty & Health

From left: Carlotta wears a Hilfiger Collection jacket. Sahara wears a Topshop dress, $70. Paloma and Kate wear their own clothing. Details, see teenvogue.com.

THE PAT PACK How four girls on the ’gram got crowned by the queen of makeup.

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egendary makeup guru Pat McGrath has worked with iconic powerhouses from Kate Moss to Gisele—but when choosing faces for her very first line, she went straight to social media. After scouting on Instagram and gathering recs from friends, Pat selected part-time models and full-time downtown girls Carlotta Kohl, Sahara Lin, Paloma Elsesser, and Kate Bowman, among others, to represent. “I handpicked each one of them because I loved their style and confidence,” Pat explains. “They are their own women—determined, inspiring, and fiercely independent.” The admiration is mutual. “Pat is incredibly positive and kind to everyone, which is a cool thing to look up to,” Carlotta says. “The first day we shot with her, I just felt so beautiful.” Pat’s products also have that effect on people: The first two launches sold out within an hour of being released. Luckily her new luminizers are available this month in select Sephora stores and online, so even more fans can get in on the Insta-girl glow. They may not look alike or come from comparable backgrounds, but the members of this diverse group have more in common than meets the metallic-capped eye. “We’re all young people who don’t fit a certain mold in the fashion industry,” Kate says. With Pat’s blessing and the rise of individualism on their side, these stunners are well on their way to leading a beauty revolution. —SUE WILLIAMSON

66 MAY 2016

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEROME CORPUZ.

#McGrath Muses Testing, testing! The benefits of being one of Pat’s chosen few? First dibs on sampling her sublime pigments. Pat McGrath Labs Skin Fetish 003, Version: Nude, $72. patmcgrath.com.

Fashion Stylist: Coquito Cassibba; hair, Jordan M for Bumble and Bumble; makeup, Tatyana Makarova for Pat McGrath Labs. Clockwise from middle right: REBEKAH CAMPBELL; SOFIA MALAMUTE; JOSH TREADAWAY; PATRICK DEMARCHELIER.

THE PAT’S MEOW


Beauty & Health

packaging and formulas that work, stylish Sweden makes its mark on beauty. Sachajuan Ocean Mist, $31. barneys.com. Face Stockholm Purifying Seaweed Cleanser, $24. facestockholm.com.

& Other Stories Nail Colour in Paschmina Bay, $9. & Other Stories, NYC.

Byredo Blanche Eau de Parfum, $150. byredo.com.

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tockholm stays on the forefront of cutting-edge innovations in design—it also happens to be the perennial birthplace of tall, cool blonde model types. Now the idyllic capital city is bottling its effortless sense of style and sending it straight to your top shelf. The latest wave of Nordic-chic essentials to hit Stateside boast minimalist charm and mass appeal—think muted polishes, fresh scents, and homegrown botanicals with performance as impressive as the packaging is sleek. —TINA FERRARO

WONDERS DOWN UNDER There’s more to the Land of Aus than beach waves and bronzed bods. It is an undercover mecca for brilliant finds like natural exfoliators and all-purpose elixirs.

68 MAY 2016

Model Tilda Lindstam’s style is pared down and pretty—not unlike these Swedish staples.

Shine by Three’s Margaret Zhang rules the Aussie beauty and fashion scene.

Clockwise from above: Grown Alchemist Polishing Facial Exfoliant, $67. grownalchemist.com. Frank Body Original Coffee Scrub, $15. frankbody.com. Lano The Original 101 Ointment, $19. net-a-porter.com. Kevin Murphy Powder Puff, $28. kevinmurphy.com.au.

Born on Instagram, Frank Body’s beautifying brew of coffee scrubs inspire a whole new kind of caffeine craze.

Clockwise from top right: Stockholm Streetstyle/blaublut-edition.com; TOM GORMAN (4); courtesy of Margaret Zhang; TOM GORMAN.

STOCKHOLM SYNDROME With simple


Beauty & Health PHOTOGRAPHED BY HANNAH WHITAKER.

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BAG OF TRICKS

Going global? Lighten your load with these pint-size products. 1. Marc Jacobs Beauty Cover(t) Stick Color Corrector in Getting Warmer, $42. sephora.com. 2. Chosungah 22 So Tiny Lip & Cheek in Peach, $14. sephora.com. 3. Sephora Collection Brow Aid Kit Set of 3 Mini Brow Tools, $10. sephora.com. 4. Milk Makeup Oh Snap Wallet, $18 for set of three mini lip colors and wallet. milkmakeup.com. 5. Dior Hydra Life Intense Rehydrating Mask Shots, $48 for set of seven. dior.com. 6. Real Techniques Mini Face Brush, $10 for three-piece set. realtechniques.com. 7. Hourglass Opaque Rouge Liquid Lipstick, Travel Size, $10. hourglasscosmetics.com. 8. Beautyblender Micro Mini Correct Four, $30. Sephora. 9. Formula X The Match Clix! in Fair/Light, $16. sephora.com. 10. Benefit The Porefessional: License to Blot, Mini Size, $34 for five-piece set. sephora.com.

70 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM

Prop styling, Heather Greene

10 Most WANTED


G N I B I V W O L L I W H T I W The coolest girl in the galaxy travels down to Earth, expanding paradigms, exploring womanhood, and proving she’s light-years ahead. Photographed by Emma Summerton.

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hoa. This place is amazing! How dope would it be to do a concert here?” Willow Smith shoots out of a large black SUV like a rocket at takeoff. It is 8:55 on a brutally sunny morning at Los Angeles’s Sepulveda Dam, and our cover star’s hazel eyes are transfixed by the shoot’s location, a sprawling concrete basin, which reads part abandoned skate park, part UFO landing pit. She is rocking an infectious smile and a cropped tee that serendipitously spells out the spirit of our female-led shoot: “Never underestimate the power of a woman.” Within seconds of her deployment, Willow’s slim fingers find their way into photographer Emma Summerton’s waist-length waves. “This is so cool. I’ve never been shot by a woman before—not for anything this major!” she gushes, stroking Summerton’s soft strands. Then, as if a 72 MAY 2016

lightbulb goes off in Willow’s brain, she lunges right into an impassioned soliloquy about the disturbing lack of female representation in male-dominated fields. “There is such a need for more female photographers, physicists, astronauts, doctors.…” The crew nods in agreement, eyeing each other at the exciting and rather unusual start to the day. Norms tend to fall by the wayside in the midst of this truly willowy enigma, whose mind seems to move at the speed of light itself. At 15, she is already the sum of many things, none of which are saddled with conformity: As the youngest child of box-office legends Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith, she’s Hollywood progeny, not to mention a musical wunderkind, a science whiz kid. And with her recent appointment as Chanel’s new ➤ TEENVOGUE.COM


Touch the Sky

Willow wears a Martine Rose jacket. Nina Ricci top and skirt. ASOS earring. Zana Bayne choker, $165. Adidas socks, $16. Gucci shoes. Details, see teenvogue.com. FASHION EDITOR: ONDINE AZOULAY.


Dream Catcher Zana Bayne harness, $160. Nicopanda dress. Silver Spoon Attire beret (with veil), $135. Cornelia James gloves, $90. Nina Ricci necklace. Trash and Vaudeville cuff (worn as choker), $17. Details, see teenvogue.com.


Electric Feel

Kye faux-fur top, $389. Iceberg dress. Annelise Michelson earring, $250. Adidas socks, $12. Jeremy Scott boots.

BEAUTY NOTE:

We love Chanel Ligne Graphique de Chanel Liquid Eyeliner for its masterful precision— even if you aren’t a makeup pro.


ambassador, she is an official style icon-in-the-making. She also makes up one half of possibly the world’s most wonderfully weird brother/sister duo. Willow and her older brother Jaden’s collective persona famously fascinates, perplexes, and stirs up heated debate among adults who simply cannot get on their level. It is a wavelength few can. Willow speaks of their connection as kismet— “We’re like binary stars, like two parts of one thing,” she explains. “I know what he’s thinking at all times. And he knows what I’m thinking. We’re not identical twins, but it feels like that in a lot of ways.” Labels such as “bizarre” and “self-adoring” have been hurled at these two, only to seemingly roll off their backs. Jaden infamously continues to don his skirts—and not just in the latest Louis Vuitton womenswear campaign (a feat that still sends his little sister into proud squeals). On set Willow gives eye contact, big hugs, lots of thank-yous. Forget whatever tabloid fodder you read; she is a supremely likable, well-mannered kid. She also seems utterly unencumbered by the teenage plight of fitting in—there is a bigger picture to focus on. In front of the camera, Willow is peerless. She has the self-possession of a supermodel and the baby face of a Disney fairy. This kid’s got it all, I think, studying how she moves every inch of her unwieldy limbs with a dancer’s grace. She’s also calling the shots on the tunes. Kid Cudi’s Satellite Flight blasts from a nearby Jambox, and she gets completely lost in the music, singing along: “Have you ever seen the Earth from this view?” I am convinced that the answer for anybody but Willow is no. She may very well be from a distant planet, a foreign place where women are homegrown superheroes, nurtured to become goddesses; a land where girls are taught to own their power from birth so that by 15 they possess the kind of delightfully off-kilter creativity that marked Warhol-era greats. But it isn’t all art for art’s sake with Willow. During our New York City breakfast date a few weeks after the shoot, she shows off her radically intellectual side. The teen supernova perks up on topics like nanoscience, civil engineering, and microbiology. She is a self-proclaimed STEM freak, with her sights set squarely on deepening connections in the science community and maybe even attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) one day. It’s why she hopped on a flight to tour the campus in Cambridge directly after Paris Fashion Week (where she excited a flashing mob of paparazzi with karate kicks at

Chanel’s #frontrowonly show—NBD!). “It was nice to be able to talk to female students and professors about science and logic because that’s just such a man’s world,” she notes. It should come as no surprise that one of Willow’s favorite topics is changing perceptions about women and girls of color in spaces where they are underrepresented. But don’t call her an activist. Why? Because when you’re Willow Smith, categories can feel restrictive. “I see myself as a—hold on, let me ask Siri.” The teenager whips out her iPhone and speaks into it, drawing stares from tables nearby. “Siri, define artisan.” Everybody’s favorite robotic voice serves up a satisfying definition: Artisan is a worker in a skilled trade, especially one that involves making things by hand. “Ah, OK, yes!” Willow allows. “I call myself an artisan.” Willow sews clothing, hosts underground teachings in quantum mechanics, and is studying how to produce songs from mathematical equations, yet I wonder if there was ever a time when she felt less empowered. “Yes. One hundred percent,” she responds without missing a beat. “After ‘Whip My Hair’ and all the publicity, after going on tour in the U.K., after saying no to the Annie film, all of this crap was going on in my life, and I had to sit down and say, ‘Who are you? On a real note. Are you this or this?’” She grasps the table’s salt and pepper shakers, one in each hand, for comparison’s sake. “During that time of figuring it out, I was lost and super insecure. But then I stopped trying to find myself in these other inanimate objects, people, and ideas. I realized it isn’t about finding yourself—it’s about creating yourself.” Her sartorial expressions seem to be an inextricable extension of that creation—and they are anything but superficial. “I have some cool shoes on [that day, she is in Chloé Susanna studded booties] and I wear crazy eyeliner, but it’s really all about emulating the colors you feel inside,” she reveals. “A lot of clothes are cute, but after you buy the Yeezy shoes, after you get your hair done with a weave, you’re still the same person. I feel like more and more kids are starting to realize this.” Shifting gears slightly, she ruminates on the meaning of her new role. “Being a young African-American woman with dreads, it blows my mind that I’m a Chanel ambassador. Like, how am I a Chanel ambassador?” she marvels. “It is so beautiful. I’m coming into a new part of my life that is completely unknown, and I’m jumping right in. All I can do from here is continue to shift paradigms and continue to push the envelope further and further. But I am doing it every day just by being myself.” —ELAINE WELTEROTH

AFTER ALL OF THIS CRAP WAS GOING ON IN MY LIFE, AND I HAD TO SIT DOWN AND SAY, ‘WHO ARE YOU?’ ON A REAL NOTE


Space Cadet Coach 1941 sweater. 3.1 Phillip Lim jacket (worn underneath). Karen Walker jeans, $230. Gentle Monster x Kye sunglasses, $320. The Tie Bar suspenders, $25. Ashley Williams shoes. We Love Colors thighhighs, $10. Details, see teenvogue.com.


I’M COMING INTO A NEW PART OF MY LIFE THAT IS COMPLETELY UNKNOWN, AND I’M JUMPING RIGHT IN


Think Tank Acne Studios jacket. OffWhite c/o Virgil Abloh shirt, $300, and turtleneck (worn underneath), $225. Paco Rabanne shorts. American Apparel socks, $9. Jeremy Scott boots. Opposite page: Nicopanda dress. Max Mara top, $435. Fleet Ilya belt. Details, see teenvogue .com. In this story: hair, Lacy Redway using Carol’s Daughter; makeup, Lottie using Chanel Ligne Graphique de Chanel; nails, Tracey Sutter for Cloutier Remix; set design, Peter Klein at Frank Reps; production, Kiori Georgiadis at Hinoki Group.


Sweet Escape

Jay wears an Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh jacket. Acne Studios dress. Vex turtleneck (worn underneath), $110. Details, see teenvogue.com. FASHION EDITOR: HAVANA LAFFITTE.

KEITH TSUJI/Getty Images

FESTIVAL


DAYS

Master the music circuit in a modern mix of GRUNGE, GLAM, and METALLIC PIECES that pop. PHOTOGRAPHED by YELENA YEMCHUK. TEENVOGUE.COM

MAY 2016 81


Morning Glory

Jay wears a Lacoste coat. Rothco top, $11. Unif top (worn underneath), $75. Daang Goodman for Tripp NYC skirt, $56. Denim x Alexander Wang skirt (worn underneath), $295. Huf socks, $14. Nike sneakers, $150. Details, see teenvogue.com.


Air Supply

MENAHEM KAHANA/Getty Images

Miu Miu coat and turtleneck (worn underneath). Search & Destroy vintage T-shirt, $25. Denim x Alexander Wang jeans, $320. Unif boots, $178. Below: Louis Vuitton dress and shirt. Unif bodysuit (worn underneath), $72. LeSportsac belt bag, $65.


Camp Out

Sacai coat. Unif socks, $25. Chanel sandals. Details, see teenvogue.com.


Hippie Chic Jay wears a McQ sweater and skirt. Mishka shirt (worn underneath), $39. The Kooples belt, $190. Huf socks, $14. McQ shoes. Adrian wears a Just Cavalli scarf.

BEAUTY NOTE:

GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/Getty Images

Stamp out shine while dancing in the dessert with Dior Diorskin Forever & Ever Control Loose Powder.


Creature of the Wind Gucci sweater. Details, see teenvogue.com.

BEAUTY NOTE:

When on the road to Bonnaroo, let a volumizing mousse like John Frieda Frizz Ease Dream Curls Air-Dry Waves Styling Foam do the heavy lifting for your hair.


SEEN BY HOTSHOT/Getty Images

New-Age Nomads

Jay wears an MM6 Maison Margiela dress. Mishka shirt (worn underneath), $36. Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh belt, $120. Miu Miu tights, $230. In this story: hair, Tina Outen for Wella Professionals; makeup, Romy Soleimani for beauty.com; set design, Gille Mills; production, Abby Vo at Deltree.


Our generation has the greatest opportunity to lead the way in protecting Earth and changing our relationship with it —Xiuhtezcatl Martinez

Xiuhtezcatl wears an Acne Studios coat. Coach 1941 jacket (worn underneath), and pants, $195. Rothco boots, $64. Jendayi wears a No. 21 coat, dress, and sandals, $211. Robert Lee Morris Soho earrings, $30. Opposite page: Lily wears an Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh top. Palmer Harding collared shirt (worn underneath), $333. Michael Michael Kors top (worn underneath), $150. Paco Rabanne skirt. Janis Savitt for Jill Stuart necklace. Brave Leather belt, $132. Details, see teenvogue.com. FASHION EDITOR: CLARE BYRNE.


Meet eight inspiring environmentalists— from brilliant inventors to wildlife conservation advocates—who are out to save the world. Photographed by Thomas Giddings.

ECO WARRIORS

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MAY 2016 89


Ann wears a 3.1 Phillip Lim jacket, and shorts, $350. MSGM vest (worn underneath), $320. Paco Rabanne shoes. Deepika wears a JNCO jacket, $50. T by Alexander Wang sweater, $310. Area sleeve, $425. Coach 1941 pants, $195, and collar. Eytys sneakers, $160. Details, see teenvogue.com.

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hances are, at times you’ve taken small steps to be a little bit greener, like carrying a reusable water bottle or turning off the lights when you leave a room. But for these young Earth-conscious individuals, being eco-friendly isn’t a part-time thing—it’s a full-on lifestyle (sometimes even a job!). Get motivated by the work they’re doing for our oceans, around our neighborhoods, and even on our city rooftops to ensure that the planet’s future is a bright one. As the Boulder, Colorado–based youth director of Earth Guardians, 15-year-old Xiuhtezcatl Martinez is influencing hundreds of thousands of young people around the globe to ignite a revolution. “We are taking to the streets and courts, flooding media and demanding that the world do something about the biggest issue of our time—climate change,” he says. “It isn’t about being an activist; it’s about being human and realizing our responsibility to protect the only home we have.” “During my freshman year of college, I began organizing with the University of Chicago Climate Action

Network (UCAN) and have since realized that the fight against climate change must be political,” declares Jendayi Jones, 20, who grew up in a household where energysaving and waste-reducing measures were stressed. Now a sophomore, she and her group are urging the school to divest any holdings in fossil fuels that are currently in its endowment. “We believe that our government and institutions must no longer support companies that pollute and take advantage of people living in lowincome areas,” she states. Lily Kwong is the designer of a New York City art installation called Garlands, which was inspired by the idea of having to transform the moon into an Earth-like planet as a desperate solution to climate change. “It is an artistic response to what I believe is the greatest threat to our generation,” explains the 27-year-old about the 10,000-square-foot wall-to-wall field of artificial grass and poppies. Previously, the Columbia University graduate created sustainable design solutions for cities and brands, including serving as project director for LVMH’s design district landscape master plan in Miami and ➤


I hope to allow those most vulnerable to environmental change to have their voices heard —Shauna Mahajan

Michelle wears a 3.1 Phillip Lim coat. Sportmax dress. Shauna wears a Carven sweater, $450. 3.1 Phillip Lim tunic, $395. Tory Burch shorts, $165. Noir Jewelry earrings, $64. Longxustudio scarf, $150. Michael Kors bracelet, $125. Jil Sander shoes.


Xiuhtezcatl performing at the 2015 Be The Change music festival in Minnesota

Deepika at the White House Science Fair in 2013 Michelle working on the farm at Brooklyn Grange Tylar photographing a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service event

Ann presenting one of her inventions on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Jendayi enjoying the outdoors on a hike in New Jersey

planting 100,000 trees across the United States with eco-fashion company Amour Vert and nonprofit American Forests. Ann Makosinski of British Columbia, Canada, has created two inventions that run off surplus energy: the Hollow Flashlight, which is powered by body heat, and the eDrink, an iPhone-charging mug that converts excess heat from its contents into electricity. “My passion for inventing has provided me with incredible opportunities to travel,” notes the 18-year-old, who can boast being a global brand ambassador for Uniqlo fleece; she has given five TEDx Talks, and was named one of Time’s 30 Under 30 World Changers. Seeing children drinking dirty water during summer trips to India inspired Deepika Kurup, 17, to take on the worldwide water crises in the eighth grade. “I developed an awardwinning solar-powered method to remove bacteria and other contaminants from water,” reveals the current Harvard student. “I recently cofounded Aquidas, which is a nonprofit aimed at deploying the technology I have developed to use in everyday settings.” Learning about the importance of a sustainable food system in college prompted Michelle Cashen, 25, to get a job as farm manager at the New York rooftop-farming company Brooklyn Grange, where she oversees production of everything from kale to less-common ground cherries. “The benefits of urban agriculture go beyond fresh and tasty vegetables,” she advises. “It provides precious green space, increases wildlife habitats, reduces the urban-heat-island effect, and helps combat combined sewer overflow caused by snowmelt or snow-water runoff.” “Through studying our interactions with nature all over the world, I’ve learned that the only way to protect our natural resources is to find better harmony between people and their habitat,” points out Shauna Mahajan, 27, who works as a conservation research associate at the World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C. In her role, she develops with and tests research methods that help us understand the impact of conservation efforts. The work of 26-year-old Tylar Greene with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service centers on Shauna exploring connecting people with nature. “As a public affairs Mexico’s Yucatán officer, I support our urban conservation program, Peninsula by which strives to address how we can better unite sea underserved groups and communities in large cities with nature,” explains the Philadelphia resident. “ I’m also working to create a groundswell to save monarch butterflies from extinction by creating suitable habitats for them in urban areas.” —ARIANA MARSH

From top: courtesy of Xiuhtezcatl Martinez; RENÉE RODENKIRCHEN/The Coveteur; courtesy of the Davidson Institute for Talent Development; courtesy of Greg Thompson/USFWS; courtesy of Edible Schoolyard NYC; NBC/Getty Images; courtesy of Jendayi Jones; courtesy of Shauna Mahajan.

Lily giving an herb garden tutorial in New York for aspiring urban farmers


I want every person living in a city, regardless of their background, to have equal access to outdoor green spaces —Tylar Greene

Tylar wears an Alpha Industries jacket, $135. Fear of God hoodie. Tuza Jewelry earrings, $115. Details, see teenvogue .com. In this story: hair, Shingo Shibata at The Wall Group; makeup, Kanako Takase using Dior Diorskin; nails, Rica Romain at LMC Worldwide; set design by Josephine Shokrian Studio; Kueng Caputo chair, courtesy of Salon 94.


Immigration has already become the most heated topic of the presidential election. Meet two young women who are on the front lines, fighting to finally make America a true home to millions more. ARTWORK by ALLAN BJORNAA. 94 MAY 2016

TEENVOGUE.COM


B

y now, we’ve all heard the infamous speech. “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Donald Trump spewed from the podium. “They’re bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists.” He concluded those remarks by promising to build a “great, great wall on our southern border,” to the sound of cheers. Later, on his campaign trail, he proposed a “shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.” It’s with this dangerous rhetoric that Trump has unexpectedly constructed his success as the GOP presidential front-runner and made immigration the election’s hottest—and most urgent—topic. On the Left, the Democratic candidates responded by making campaign promises that would take a softer stance on immigration reform than their Republican rivals’. To help, Hillary Clinton’s camp turned to 27-year-old Lorella Praeli, while Bernie Sanders’s campaign selected the 28-year-old Erika Andiola. These young women, among the country’s most influential Latino activists, were tasked with assisting presidential hopefuls win an election that was quickly becoming a high-stakes battle for their rights. It’s estimated there are more than 11 million undocumented immigrants

keeper Stateside.) Just 10 years old when they moved, Lorella didn’t know about her undocumented status until her mother was unable to provide her with a Social Security number for her college applications. “I felt ashamed and embarrassed to be undocumented. The idea that somehow I could get deported made me very anxious,” she says. Luckily, the burgeoning movement of young immigration activists gave her hope. She was invited to a field planning meeting for the advocacy organization United We Dream and decided to attend. “When I arrived, there were 200 young people wearing T-shirts that read ‘undocumented and unafraid.’ I knew I was exactly where I needed to be,” she recalls. Lorella’s motivation was close to her heart: When her grandmother in Peru was suffering from advanced Alzheimer’s disease, there was tremendous anxiety that she would pass away without her daughter and granddaughter by her side. “I promised my mom we’d get immigration reform done and that she’d be able to go home and take care of my grandma,” Lorella remembers. Unfortunately, there was no such luck. “She passed away, and my mom couldn’t go,” Lorella explains. “We watched

I FELT ASHAMED AND EMBARRASSED TO BE UNDOCUMENTED. THE IDEA THAT SOMEHOW I COULD GET DEPORTED MADE ME VERY ANXIOUS in the United States—and for Erika and Lorella this was a lived experience. Erika’s mother fled to the United States from Mexico with five of her children, escaping poverty and domestic abuse; the family settled in Arizona. An 11-year-old Erika quickly picked up English and became a star pupil, which eventually led to her receiving seven college scholarships despite her “unauthorized” status. But in 2006 Arizona passed a proposition prohibiting in-state tuition for undocumented students, seriously jeopardizing Erika’s chances at a degree. “I met about 300 kids just like me at my university, and together we decided to come out of the shadows,” she explains. Lorella first came to the United States from Peru with her family when she was a small child. They were seeking medical attention for her after she had lost her right leg in a car accident. In order to get the best treatment for Lorella, the family had been making multiple trips to Florida to see her doctors, and they eventually decided to permanently relocate. (Her mother sacrificed her career as a psychologist, becoming a house-

her funeral on an iPad.” Erika also found her family at risk over the status of their papers. “The same year that I lost my college scholarship, my house got raided by immigration officials,” she reveals. “They went to my mom’s job, and she’s stopped working since then…. I ended up becoming the head of the house.” In early 2013, in another raid, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) took away her mother and brother in handcuffs. “It was a really traumatizing experience I don’t think I’m ever going to forget,” she recounts. That evening she uploaded an emotional video to YouTube, pleading to stop the deportation of her family. “This is not just happening to me; this is happening to families everywhere,” she said to the camera, crying. The video received national media coverage, and her family ended up returning safely. It was events like these—many of which are commonplace for undocumented immigrants in our country—that motivated the young women, ultimately making them two of our most prominent DREAMers, a network of young undocumented


immigrants who would qualify for citizenship under the DREAM Act. (For more information, see sidebar.) Without its passage, legal ways to become a citizen are extremely limited. In 2012, after criticism of the United States for deporting a record number of undocumented immigrants, President Barack Obama announced a program that would allow a large subset of qualified undocumented young adults to avoid deportation. Thanks to dedicated activism (aided in part by Lorella and Erika), the framework of the DREAM Act helped pave the way for President Obama’s executive action, which is known as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA; see sidebar). About 800,000 have benefited from the action. Erika is one of them. The same year DACA went into effect, Lorella got married and became a permanent resi-

dent. In December of last year, she officially got U.S. citizenship. Her mother, however, still needs papers. Both women also have boots-on-the-ground experience in D.C. Lorella led United We Dream’s executive branch–focused advocacy efforts. She worked with the White House, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and members of Congress. Ultimately those efforts paid off: President Obama announced the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program (see sidebar). Erika cofounded the Arizona Dream Act Coalition, a prominent immigrants’ rights group, and served as a congressional staffer for U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema. As the national director of the Latino vote, Lorella is now working to fortify the Clinton campaign’s stance on immigration. In response to the 2014 child migrant crisis, Clinton argued

YOU WANT TO BUILD SOMETHING THAT WILL SEE ITSELF PAST THE ELECTION


From top: ALEX BRANDON/AP Images; JACQUELYN MARTIN/AP Images (2); PARKER HAEG/Demotix/Corbis. Opposite page: ALLAN BJORNAA.

that undocumented children fleeing violence in El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala shouldn’t stay in the United States. “Just because your child gets across the border, that doesn’t mean the child gets to stay,” she stated at the time. Clinton has since supported measures that would provide legal counsel to unaccompanied child migrants seeking asylum in this country. As the primary cycle winds down, her reputation among Latino voters is seen as being crucial to her success. “It’s a challenge and opportunity to be smart about how we engage the Latino community and make sure they turn out and flex their muscle at the booth,” Lorella says. “But beyond that, you want to build something that will see itself past the election. You care about electing Hillary Clinton, and you also care about making sure the Latino voice is ever more powerful.” Bernie Sanders, the son of a Polish immigrant, also has a complicated history with immigration. While he’s perceived as having a more progressive track record than Clinton on social issues, Sanders hasn’t exactly been consistent with regard to his votes on reform. For example, he voted against an immigration bill in 2007 because he said it would have a negative impact on American workers. That didn’t stop Erika from joining the campaign as his national press secretary for Latino outreach. For her, a DACA beneficiary, Sanders’s immigration platform is more than just a job responsibility. “I’m a DREAMer, and my whole family is undocumented,” she says. “Sanders’s immigration policy would give us an opportunity to contribute and have a better life. It would give me certainty that we won’t be separated.” Although they’re on different campaign trails, both Erika and Lorella also have to help their candidates change Americans’ ideas surrounding immigration. This is ironic, considering we are quite literally a country founded by European migrants. The rhetoric that immigrants are wasting our financial resources has proved to hold little weight. As Meg Wiehe, the state tax policy director of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP) says on the group’s website, “...the data show undocumented immigrants greatly contribute to our nation’s economy, not just in labor but also with tax dollars.” To quantify, the 11 million– plus undocumented immigrants pay an estimated $11.64 billion a year in state and local taxes. If Congress passed comprehensive immigration reform, the number would increase by an additional estimated $2.1 billion, according to ITEP’s analysis. But in our current era of no-compromise, filibusteror-die politics, Lorella and Erika have their work cut out for them. Given that they both started out as grassroots activists and landed on the national political stage, it seems as though the future of our country is in good hands. In the midst of so much vitriol, the women have emerged as very visible proof that immigrants contribute much to the fabric of our country’s culture. They went from the shadows to the spotlight of presidential campaigns. They’re not just pursuing the American Dream, but living it—citizenship or not. —ANA DEFILLO

SPEAKING OUT Above: “You can’t forget what is happening every single day,” Erika notes. “The stories, they really push you.” Middle left: Lorella reacts to the DACA announcement in 2012.

DREAM ON

Immigration reform still has a long way to go. Here, a brief time line. 2001: The Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act The DREAM Act was first introduced to help facilitate citizenship for millions of qualified undocumented high school graduates and G.E.D. recipients who entered the country as children. It has come up for a vote many times, yet failed to become law. 2012: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) After major advocacy work, President Obama resorted to executive action to offer temporary deportation relief and work authorization to young adults who came to the United States as children. 2014: Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) DAPA is similar to DACA, but instead of young adults, DAPA provides undocumented parents of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents with temporary deportation relief and work authorization. DAPA is currently on hold as 26 states challenge the action in court. The future of comprehensive immigration reform With a divided Congress as the new normal, any policy revamp appears unlikely soon. To get involved with the DREAMers, visit unitedwedream.org.


My Indian name means ‘shooting star’ Daunnette wears a Louis Vuitton dress. On right ear: Claire’s hoops, $10–$13 per pair. Noir Jewelry turquoise earrings, $72. Roxanne Assoulin choker, $120. Details, see teenvogue.com. FASHION EDITOR: CATHERINE NEWELL-HANSON.


cultural appreciation Borrowing from other cultures has never been trendier— or more taboo. From henna and headdresses to Afros and cornrows, real girls reclaim their beauty. Photographed by Nicolas Kantor.

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MAY 2016 99


I am Rastafarian. To me, locs mean unity Sashamoni wears a Lyz Olko jacket, $225. Missoni dress. On left ear: Sorelle wood-bead earring, $80. Details, see teenvogue.com.


I WEAR MY HAIR IN AN AFRO BECAUSE I THINK IT EXPRESSES EXACTLY WHO I AM AND EXACTLY WHERE I COME FROM

Kyemah wears a Sportmax dress. Tory Burch sweater, $250. Selima Optique glasses, $360. Sorelle ball hoop, $160 per pair. Guess hoop, $22 per pair.


EVERYTHING I GOT MADE FUN OF FOR BACK THEN IS TRENDY NOW. IT’S IN TO BE YOU

Leaf wears a Dior sweater. Eve’s Addiction name hoop, $120 per pair. Claire’s hoop, $13 per pair. Details, see teenvogue.com.


Natasha wears a Lyz Olko jacket, $345. Missoni top. Child of Wild head ornament and nose ring, $38 each.

INDIAN HERITAGE IS SO CULTURALLY RICH. WE ARE TAUGHT TO RESPECT EVERYONE: ELDERS, FAMILY, FRIENDS


Eiko wears a Marc Jacobs jacket, and brooches, $200 for set of three. Claire’s hoop, $10 per pair. ASOS choker. Details, see teenvogue.com. In this story: hair, Edward Lampley using John Masters Organics; makeup, Fulvia Farolfi using Chanel; nails, Maki Sakamoto using Dior Dior Vernis; casting, Sisi Chonco at Zan Casting.

JAPANESE CULTURE IS SO CREATIVE. IT PLAYS IN EXTREMES


When I wear these braids, it’s not only reflective of my African side—it also reflects all of my other ethnicities. Braids are an international thing Brandi wears Matthew Adams Dolan overalls. Hilfiger Collection top, $90. DoubleDisco earrings, $120–$230 per pair.


Last Look LIFE IN COLOR Miranda wears an Opening Ceremony tunic, $275, and shirt, $115. Gemma Redux earrings, $188. Topshop boots, $150. Details, see teenvogue.com.

MIRANDA BANANA

French fashion norms didn’t prevent this blogger from testing out the wilder side of style.

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Fashion Stylist: Jaime Kay Waxman; hair, Romina Manenti using René Furterer; makeup, Sam Addington for Dior Diorskin Nude. Inset, SCOTT FURKAY/bfa.com.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY NADYA WASYLKO.

arisian It-girl chic isn’t usually associated with colorful fuzzy coats and printed bucket hats. But for Miranda Starcevic, aka Miranda Banana, the Gallic writer behind Let’s Get Flashy, loud playful pieces are what wardrobe dreams—and self-expression—are made of. “I went to a very wealthy, academically focused high school in France where everyone wore the same trends,” explains the 22-year-old, who moved to New York City to study fashion design at Pratt Institute. “I would dress in ridiculous outfits to rebel against that. I got called out by my principal a lot.” Now she’s found sartorial solace in the Big Apple, where eccentric style icons like Iris Apfel and Lynn Yaeger reign supreme. While Miranda’s wonderfully offbeat blog is one of her main points of AT NEW YORK FASHION focus, becoming a designer is also on her WEEK FALL 2016 mind. “I’d love to have my own brand someday—I really enjoy hand knitting and weaving,” says the creative, who interned at Jeremy Scott while in college and recently was a fashion week assistant for quirky label Manish Arora in Paris. “Being a brand influencer would also be cool. I’ve worked with ASOS and Kenzo before, which was really fun.” —ARIANA MARSH

106 MAY 2016



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