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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

Trump signals a U.S. security shift

BEHIND THE FIREWALL | HOW CHINA TAMED THE INTERNET

POLICIES ON NUCLEAR ARSENAL, ISRAEL President-elect hints at major change in day of tweets BY

MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST

For U.S. firms, something’s not clicking BY E MILY R AUHALA AND E LIZABETH D WOSKIN

beijing — Netflix has a nifty new China strategy: Skip it. In January 2016, the video-streaming service announced an ambitious global expansion. The goal was to beam American hits such as “House of Cards” around the world including, eventually, in China. “Today you are witnessing the birth of a new global Internet TV network,” said chief executive Reed Hastings at a large tech conference. Sending racy American content into a country that censors almost everything may have

Internet start-up employees work on their computers at 3W Coffee in Beijing. For some U.S. businesses, plans for China have either fallen by the wayside or required new strategies.

seemed like a leap, but Netflix was confident. The China plan, Hastings said, was on a “slow and steady path.” Less than a year later, having launched just about everywhere else, Netflix shelved the streaming project. It opted instead to license some content to Chinese providers for “modest” revenue, according to a quarterly letter. (Representatives of the company declined to comment.) For some highflying U.S. Internet businesses, the China dream is fading; for others, it looks radically different from what they had hoped. California’s Internet companies once

BY

CHINA CONTINUED ON A11

Do drug firms hobble DEA by hiring its experts? Pharmaceutical companies that manufacture or distribute highly addictive pain pills have hired dozens of officials from the top levels of the Drug Enforcement Administration during the past decade, according to a Washington Post investigation.

The hires came after the DEA launched an aggressive campaign to curb a rising opioid epidemic that has resulted in thousands of overdose deaths each year. In 2005, the DEA began to crack down on companies that were distributing inordinate numbers of pills such as oxycodone to pain-management clinics and pharmacies around the country. Since then, the pharmaceutical

companies and law firms that represent them have hired at least 42 officials from the DEA — 31 of them directly from the division responsible for regulating the industry, according to work histories compiled by The Post and interviews with current and former agency officials. The number of hires has prompted some current and former government officials to ask whether the companies raided

Before lunchtime Thursday, President-elect Donald Trump said he would expand the U.S. nuclear arsenal, upending a reduction course set by presidents of both parties over the past four decades, and called for the United States to veto a pending U.N. resolution that criticized Israel’s settlements policy. The policy prescriptions, communicated in morning tweets, followed calls since last month’s election to reconsider the armslength U.S. relationship with Taiwan and to let China keep an underwater U.S. vessel seized by its navy. Trump declared within hours of this week’s Berlin terrorist attack that it was part of a global Islamic State campaign to “slaughter Christians” and later said it reaffirmed the wisdom of his plans to bar Muslim immigrants. Late Thursday, Trump suggested in another tweet that the U.S. military’s years-in-the-making plans for a new stealth fighter, Lockheed Martin’s F-35, might

the division to hire away DEA officials who were architects of the agency’s enforcement campaign or were most responsible for enforcing the laws the firms were accused of violating. “The number of employees recruited from that division points to a deliberate strategy by the pharmaceutical industry to hire people who are the biggest headaches for them,” said John CarDEA CONTINUED ON A10

S ARI H ORWITZ

Twelve days before the presidential election, FBI Director James B. Comey dispatched a senior aide to deliver a startling message to the Justice Department. Comey wanted to send a letter to Congress alerting it that his agents had discovered more emails potentially relevant to the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server. The official in Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates’s office who received the FBI call immediately understood the explosive potential of Comey’s message, coming so close to the presidential election. Federal attorneys scrambled into offices on the fourth and fifth floors of Justice Department headquarters, where they huddled to figure out how to stop what they viewed as a ticking time bomb.

M ONICA H ESSE

Several months ago, before the presidential election, San Francisco poet and author Dean Rader found himself engaged in a philosophical debate with some of his fellow poets: If Donald Trump won the presidency, and if he asked one of them to compose a poem to be read at the inauguration, would they agree? On the one hand, none of them had voted for Trump. Rader didn’t know many politically conservative poets in general, and his friends found Trump’s election in

TRUMP CONTINUED ON A4

Trump urges nuclear expansion His tweet on arms capability is a radical break from U.S. policy. A5 Clashing voices on Muslim ban Donald Trump and his aides still issue conflicting statements. A4

“It was DEFCON 1,” said an official familiar with the deliberations. “We were incredibly concerned this could have an impact on the election.” Aides at Justice and the FBI — located in offices directly across the street from each other on Pennsylvania Avenue — began exchanging increasingly tense and heated phone calls, nearly a half-dozen throughout the afternoon and evening of Oct. 27 and into the next morning. Justice officials laid out a number of arguments against releasing the letter. It violated two long-standing policies. Never publicly discuss an ongoing investigation. And never take an action affecting a candidate for office close to Election Day. Besides, they said, the FBI did not know yet what was in the emails or if they had anything to do with COMEY CONTINUED ON A8

Market reopens as Berlin weeps

Artists at the inauguration: Big stage makes big dilemma BY

be reconsidered, saying he had “asked Boeing to price-out a comparable F-18 Super Hornet!” With weeks to go before he becomes president, Trump has not hesitated to voice his opinions on national security issues of the day and to publicly advise the current president on what to do about them. Ultimately, the nuclear statement was tempered by a Trump spokesman. And the likely fallout from a tentative decision by the Obama administration to break years of precedent and abstain on the Israel resolution was avoided when Egypt, its sponsor, abruptly postponed it just hours before a scheduled Security Council vote. But the president-elect’s pronouncements have privately riled

Why Lynch didn’t stop Comey bombshell letter on Clinton

UNNATURAL CAUSES

This article was written by SCOTT HIGHAM and reported by LENNY BERNSTEIN, STEVEN RICH and ALICE CRITES.

K AREN D E Y OUNG

A concrete barricade stands near the Brandenburg Gate on Thursday in Berlin. The Christmas market struck this week by a truck rampage that killed 12 and wounded dozens reopened as the grieving city sought a return to normal life and as police hunted for Anis Amri, the prime suspect. Law enforcement authorities say Amri had been on the radar of anti-terrorism officials after a rapid radicalization. Story, A7

particular to be “terrifying” and offensive. At the same time, poetry was rarely given a national platform in the United States. So if a poet was presented with the opportunity to share her or his art form with the entire listening country, perhaps there would be an artistic responsibility to participate — a sense of duty. Many of Rader’s friends responded with an unequivocal no; they wouldn’t perform. Others wrestled with the question: “How could I work for a man and administration without becoming ARTISTS CONTINUED ON A2 CLEMENS BILAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

IN THE NEWS

YOUSSEF KARWASHAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Rebels leave Aleppo Syria’s government said it has full control of the city in the wake of a deal brokered by Turkey and Russia. A10 Population slide In 2015, the United States had the lowest rate of growth of any year since the Great Depression. A3

THE NATION

THE ECONOMY

A major trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine shows it is effective against the virus. A3 Citing secret evidence, a House panel says Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency contractor who leaked classified material to journalists, continues to have contact with Russian intelligence services. A14

Mortgage rates have climbed to levels not seen in more than two years, with the 30-year loan jumping to 4.3 percent, from 4.16 percent a week ago. A12 President-elect Donald Trump suggested in a tweet that he might abandon the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter in favor of a cheaper plane because of cost overruns at Lockheed Martin. A13 Kane, owner of the District’s Office Movers, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. A13 After California forced Uber to take its self-

THE WORLD

Pope Francis denounced the resistance he is encountering in reforming the Vatican bureaucracy, calling some of it the devil’s work. A6

driving cars off the road, the company packed up the vehicles and moved them to Arizona to begin road tests. A13 THE REGION

An effort to bring services to thousands more disabled people in Virginia could jeopardize funding for caregivers already in the state’s system. B1 A Prince George’s police officer fatally shot a 19-year-old man who had pointed a gun at another county officer during an investigation of a suspicious car, authorities said. B1 The Federal Transit Administration, citing “significant progress” in

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Metro’s bookkeeping, released the agency from restrictions imposed two years ago for the spending of federal grant funds. B1 With help from the National Park Service, supporters of the Netherlands Carillon launched a fundraising effort to restore the bell tower, which is in serious disrepair. B2 By car, bus, train or boat, almost 2.6 million of the D.C. region’s residents are projected to travel over the holiday week, AAA says. B2 A man with disabilities has sued Fairfax police over an incident in which he was hit in the back with a Taser. B2

Inside WEEKEND

New favorites Suggestions for activities to add to your holiday must-do list. ST YLE

Merry and bright Ashland, Va., has a gift for train travelers: a holiday light show. C1 BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A12 COMICS........................................C5 OPINION PAGES ......................... A15 LOTTERIES ................................... B3 OBITUARIES ................................. B4 TELEVISION..................................C4 WORLD NEWS .............................. A6

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CO R R ECTI O N S A Community Calendar item in the Prince George’s edition of the Dec. 22 Local Living section incorrectly said that Hospice of the Chesapeake’s Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day event would be held this month. The correct date is March 30. A Dec. 21 Metro article about businessman Rodney P. Hunt losing his mansion misstated the year he founded his government contracting firm, RS Information Systems. He established the company in 1992, not 2003.

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Eric Trump suspends operations of the charitable foundation he started BY

D AVID A . F AHRENTHOLD

Eric Trump said Thursday he is suspending the operations of his charitable foundation and ceasing all fundraising. That decision appeared to go beyond a pledge Trump had made a day earlier to the New York Times. In that interview, Trump said he would cease personally raising money for the foundation but left the broader fate of the foundation uncertain. The Eric Trump Foundation, founded in 2007, raises more than $1.5 million a year through a golf tournament, online auctions and other events. The foundation does no direct charitable work, but rather passes on the bulk of the money it raises to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, a pediatriccancer center in Memphis. Last year, the Eric Trump Foundation made a pledge to donate $20 million over 10 years to the hospital. Trump says he has raised about $15 million for St. Jude. That figure includes $7.9 million

in donations from the Eric Trump Foundation and $7 million from other fundraisers he has organized, often held at Trump Organization properties. At Trump hotels, for instance, guests can make small donations through room bills. Earlier this month, the Times reported that the foundation was auctioning off a coffee with Ivanka Trump — the presidentelect’s daughter and an influential adviser to Donald Trump. The report said bids had risen to more than $72,000, and that the top bidders were seeking to influence Trump’s policymaking. The auction was later canceled. So far, Donald Trump has not set any explicit limits on his involvement with his global business empire. His two eldest sons — who are supposed to run the business empire while Trump is president — have also been deeply involved in the presidential transition process. david.fahrenthold@washpost.com  More at washingtonpost.com/ blogs/post-politics

THE WASHINGTON POST

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DECEMBER 23 , 2016

Trump taps loyalists for media posts BY P HILIP AND E LISE

R UCKER V IEBECK

President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday appointed a handful of campaign loyalists to senior positions in his White House with responsibility for overseeing the administration’s outreach to the public and managing Trump’s sometimes hostile relationship with the news media. Kellyanne Conway, Trump’s campaign manager who was an unyielding promoter and defender of his on television, will serve as counselor to the president with direct access to advise him on his message strategy and political tactics across a broad range of issues. Conway will serve as a public face of the administration along with Sean Spicer, the Republican National Committee’s chief strategist and communications director, who was named White House press secretary. A veteran operative with deep relationships among Republican officials and political journalists, Spicer will ascend to one of Washington’s most coveted jobs, representing the president in briefings with the press corps. Also leading the communica-

tions operation will be Jason Miller, the Trump campaign’s senior communications adviser, who will serve as director of communications; Hope Hicks, Trump’s longtime spokeswoman who was at the candidate’s side nearly every day of his 16-month campaign, who will be director of strategic communications; and Dan Scavino, a onetime golf caddy who managed Trump’s presence on Twitter and Facebook during the campaign, who has been named director of social media. Spicer, Miller, Hicks and Scavino each will hold the title of assistant to the president, the highest designation in the West Wing and one befitting their close relationships with Trump. “Sean, Hope, Jason and Dan have been key members of my team during the campaign and transition,” Trump said in a statement. “I am excited they will be leading the team that will communicate my agenda that will Make America Great Again.” Reince Priebus, the RNC chairman and Trump’s incoming White House chief of staff, has indicated that the new administration may change how it engages with the media. For decades, the White House press secretary has led dai-

ly briefings with journalists. Neither Priebus nor other Trump aides have specified what changes they may make. Spicer, a close Priebus ally who was a visible presence on Trump’s behalf during the general election, has along with Miller led daily news briefing calls during the transition. He also has given several notably combative television interviews in recent weeks. A commissioned officer in the U.S. Navy Reserve, Spicer traveled the world during the George W. Bush administration as an assistant U.S. trade representative and also has led communications for the House Republican Conference. Conway, a veteran pollster and political strategist, had publicly grappled with whether to join the administration. The first woman in history to manage a winning presidential campaign, Conway spoke about the toll a move to Washington from New Jersey and a high-pressure White House job could take on her four children. But Trump tapped her to join Priebus and senior counselor and chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon in the senior leadership in the West Wing. Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law, also is expect-

ed to take on a senior advisory role. “Kellyanne Conway has been a trusted adviser and strategist who played a crucial role in my victory,” Trump said in a statement. “She is a tireless and tenacious advocate of my agenda and has amazing insights on how to effectively communicate our message. I am pleased that she will be part of my senior team in the West Wing.” Conway joined Trump’s campaign during the general election and helped shape Trump’s message and devise his strategy to capture an electoral college majority. Her frequent appearances on television made her a household name in politics — and a regular character portrayed on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.” In a statement about her appointment, Conway said: “I want to thank the president-elect for this amazing opportunity. A Trump presidency will bring real change to Washington and to Americans across this great nation. I am humbled and honored to play a role in helping transform the movement he has led into a real agenda of action and results.” philip.rucker@washpost.com elise.viebeck@washpost.com

Are artists performing for Trump or the country? ARTISTS FROM A1

one of the ‘fawning half-men?’ ” responded Dana Levin, a lauded Santa Fe poet, in an email to Rader that he later published online. “Would I politely decline such an invite, or use it as a vehicle of public protest, or slink into the wilderness without answer, in hopes I can wait out the regime?” The hypothetical question from August has now become a literal one for artists. Trump has been elected. His inaugural committee is planning an inauguration — an event that, in President Obama’s terms, included performers ranging from Kelly Clarkson to Yo-Yo Ma. Now, less than a month before that inauguration, Trump’s program is filled with question marks. Currently, just two performers have been publicly confirmed: the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, which was announced Thursday, and Jackie Evancho, a 16-year-old classically trained singer who rose to national fame on “America’s Got Talent.” Beyond that there has been silence from official channels on which artists will take part in the Jan. 20 festivities, leading many to speculate that the planning committee is struggling to secure A-list names. A recent “Saturday Night Live” sketch included a dig at the president’s celebrity dearth: a campaign staffer tells Alec Baldwin’s Trump that she’s compiled a list of artists who are willing to perform on Jan. 20. She then hands him a minuscule Post-it. Many artists have been contacted. Trump adviser Anthony Scaramucci said that Elton John would be performing; John’s publicist quickly denied that. “I’m not a Republican in a million years,” John had told the Guardian newspaper, months earlier, when asked about Trump using his music to campaign. “Why not ask Ted f------ Nugent? Or one of those f------ country stars. They’d do it for you.” Country star Garth Brooks implied he might consider it — “It’s always about serving, it’s what you do,” he told TMZ when he was in the District this month for the National Christmas Tree Lighting

ceremony — but his publicist politely said he had “not been able to commit yet.” Andrea Bocelli, a best-selling Italian tenor, had offered to perform, according to a television interview given by Thomas Barrack, the chair of Trump’s transition team. Barrack said the singer was told it wasn’t necessary. And meanwhile, some of Bocelli’s 226,000 Twitter followers turned on him, launching a #BoycottBocelli movement. “I love you Andrea,” wrote one such fan. “But I will never listen to you again if you sing for Trump.” The tweet lays out the tension at hand. Would Bocelli be singing “for Trump?” Or would he be singing for the country? And if there’s a difference, does it matter? ‘A lot of responsibility’ The history of performers at inaugurations is not as far-reaching as one might suspect. The concept of an inaugural poet, for example, wasn’t introduced until John F. Kennedy’s inauguration in 1961. Robert Frost was an admirer of Kennedy, and it was thought that the presence of the stately octogenarian poet would lend gravitas to the inauguration of the baby-faced senator. “If you can bear at your age the honor of being made president,” Frost wrote in a telegram to Kennedy, “I ought to be able at my age to bear the honor of taking some part in your inauguration. I may not be equal to it but I can accept it for my cause — the arts, poetry, now for the first time taken into the affairs of statesmen.” Subsequently, poets made sporadic appearances at inaugurations — after Robert Frost, the next was Maya Angelou at Bill Clinton’s ceremony — while opera stars or pop singers became staples. On a few occasions, the same performer has performed at multiple inaugurations: The contralto Marian Anderson performed at both the inauguration of Dwight Eisenhower, a Republican, and Kennedy, a Democrat. Soprano Jessye Norman sang “Simple Gifts” at Ronald Reagan’s inauguration, followed 12 years later by

“America the Beautiful” at Bill Clinton’s. “It’s a uniquely American event,” Norman said on the subject of presidential inaugurations in 1997. “There’s a lot of good to be said for it.” One could argue that being an artist has become a more political act than it was in 1997. In this election, Hollywood and Broadway, with rare exception, heaved their public and full-throated support behind Hillary Clinton. Republican politicians generally are not known for bringing in highwattage star power: At the Republican National Convention in July, Trump promised “showbiz,” and then delivered only Scott Baio and Antonio Sabato Jr. But even while the country becomes more divided, there is still a historic sense that the arts should unite us — that the transformative power of words and music should transcend politics and be able to speak to something deeper and more universal in every human soul. The question of whether an artist should agree to perform is not as simple as asking whether one agrees with the administration. It’s a matter of asking, Richard Blanco says, “What role does the poem or the art serve?” Blanco, a Cuban American poet, was asked to compose and write a poem for Obama’s second inauguration — a work called “One Today” that was an ode to the country’s diversity and unity. “One of the important things that I learned in the whole process of writing the poem and delivering the poem was that America is still very much a work in progress,” Blanco said. “It’s pretty young for a country. Sometimes we take five steps forward and three steps back. And I see the rhetoric being proposed by the Trump narrative as a step back. It’s not inclusive. So there’s a lot of responsibility for all of us to add to that narrative — a sentence or a paragraph — what we think was right.” Perhaps an artist would decide that her best sentence would be the one she wrote declining to participate in an inauguration she didn’t support. Perhaps she would always worry she was being used as a puppet to lend civility to an uncivil regime. Or, perhaps she could find a way to make the performance into a subversive act — imagine if Katy Perry agreed to perform, and then sang “Roar,” the song that she made into a Hillary Clinton anthem during the primaries? Or perhaps a performer could decide that the fractures in the nation could be healed by art. Or that it was just her civic duty. “The reason I’m doing this is for

my country,” Evancho said. At 16, she is too young to vote or participate in politics. But she has also performed at the White House under Obama, which she saw as an honor. “I think it’s sad that we don’t hear poets anymore or that we don’t hear classical voices. Pop is a form of art, too, of course, but I think it’s important to hear a variety of artists.” “My first, knee-jerk reaction is that I couldn’t do it,” said Blanco. “Because, to write a poem, you have to be so honest,” he says, and he’s not sure that a poem with that level of honesty would be approved by the inaugural committee. “I would wonder, can I do this? Can I have one’s poem and eat it, too?” ‘A crisis point’ In the months since Rader polled his friends, he has been considering his responsibility as an artist. He’s recalled a poem by Pablo Neruda called “The Poet’s Obligation,” which includes the line, “I must feel the crash of the hard water / and gather it up in a perpetual cup.” “I think we have an obligation as artists to insert our voice into the larger conversation about our country and our culture,” Rader says. “At some level, the inauguration of a president is an affirmation of democracy. On a larger scale, it’s not even about a particular person, but about an ideal — a philosophical project.” For that reason, Rader has been thinking that he might, hypothetically, try to find a way to say yes. To write a poem that could honor democracy without necessarily honoring a man, that could provide an “alternate vision” of what America could or should look like. “A poet who is given the opportunity to align poetry with that larger democratic project,” Rader said, “should probably think about participating in it.” It would be, he acknowledged, a difficult decision for any poet to consider. A philosophical “crisis point” that got to the heart of what poetry was, and what it was meant to do. Elizabeth Alexander, the poet at Obama’s inauguration in 2009, offers the idea that participation in democracy can occur in many different venues — not just a podium in front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 20. “What I hope to see on Inauguration Day, and all around it,” she said, “is for poets with varied backgrounds and aesthetics as Americans to raise their voices and offer us hope and vision and love — in spaces all across the country.” monica.hesse@washpost.com

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Ebola vaccine shown to be ‘highly protective’ in big trial New study in Guinea involving a single shot showed 100% efficacy BY

A RIANA E UNJUNG C HA

Scientists on Thursday announced a milestone in the fight against Ebola, reporting that a major trial of an experimental vaccine shows that it may be “highly protective” against the virus, which has infected nearly 30,000 people and killed 11,000 worldwide since 2013. Although the current outbreak has been contained, health officials fear that the deadly pathogen could return and have been racing to develop ways to stop it should that scenario unfold. The new study, led by the World Health Organization, was

based in a coastal region of Guinea known as Basse-Guinée. The vaccine showed 100 percent efficacy in protecting those who got it. More than 11,800 people participated in the trial. “While these compelling results come too late for those who lost their lives during West Africa’s Ebola epidemic, they show that when the next Ebola outbreak hits, we will not be defenseless,” Marie-Paule Kieny, the study’s lead author and WHO assistant director general for health systems, said in announcing the results. When preliminary findings were unveiled in July 2015, WHO Director General Margaret Chan called the vaccine a potential “game-changer.” Guinea was one of three West African nations hit hardest by Ebola beginning in 2014. Researchers are running two parallel studies of the same vaccine in

Sierra Leone and Liberia, the other epicenter countries. The vaccine used in the study, known as rVSV-ZEBOV and licensed by Merck, involves just a single shot. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have designated it for streamlined regulatory approval. A number of other vaccines — developed by GlaxoSmithKline and the Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, among other groups — also have shown promise and are advancing in human trials. The Guinea trial, described in the Lancet, used an approach known as “ring vaccination,” which the researchers described as the same approach used to eradicate smallpox. It involves tracing all individuals who may have been in contact with every new person diagnosed with the virus, from relatives who live in the same household to visitors

and those who may have been in close contact with the infected person’s clothes or linens. In some cases, contacts of contacts also were considered to be at risk. Ultimately, researchers identified 117 “rings,” or clusters of people, for the study. Each was made up of an average of 80 people. At the beginning of the trial, which took place in 2015, when the virus was actively spreading in the region, the rings were randomly divided into two groups. One was to get the vaccine immediately and the other after a three-week delay. When the first results showed that the vaccine was working, everyone was offered it immediately. Those 18 and older got it initially, then children older than 6. The results were striking: In the group of 5,837 people who received the vaccine immediately, there were zero Ebola cas-

es. In the other group, which included those who got a delayed vaccination as well as those who were never vaccinated, there were 23 cases. Kieny and research team members from Guinea’s Health Ministry and other international partners also noted that vaccination appeared to create a type of “herd immunity” that indirectly protected people who had not been vaccinated. But more research will be needed to confirm this theory, they said. Two serious adverse events were reported after vaccination, with one participant spiking a fever and another suffering an allergic reaction. Everyone else either reported no side effects or very mild ones such as headache, fatigue and muscle pain. No effects were long term. Despite researchers’ caution that more studies are needed to confirm the vaccine’s safety for

children and other vulnerable groups, such as individuals with HIV, they are making plans to accelerate its rollout should future trials further confirm safety and effectiveness. Merck has committed to having 300,000 emergency doses available soon and to submit the licensing application to regulatory authorities by the end of 2017. In a commentary piece — optimistically titled “First Ebola virus vaccine to protect human beings?” — virologist Thomas Geisbert of the University of Texas wrote that the study data was so strong that it seemed that the vaccine “probably contributed to controlling the 2013–16 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea.” ariana.cha@washpost.com  More at washingtonpost.com/ news/health-environmentscience

U.S. population growth is lower than at any time since the Great Depression BY

T ARA B AHRAMPOUR

Last year the United States had the lowest rate of population growth of any year since the Great Depression, according to census figures released Tuesday. The milestone is largely the result of the aging of the population, with more deaths last year than at any time since 2000, according to William Frey, a demographer and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. The nation grew by 0.695 percent between 2015 and 2016 to 323.1 million, down from 0.732 percent the previous year — the lowest increase since 19371938, when it was 0.6 percent. Immigration also declined, though for the past three years it has been higher than it had been since before the recession of 20072009. But the fall in the natural increase, from 4.07 to 3.84 per 1,000, reflecting fewer births and more deaths, is the lead cause of

the slowdown — and the trend is expected to continue, Frey said. “The aging of the population is the main thing,” he said. “We still have a positive natural increase, and there are other countries that don’t have that” — such as Germany and Japan. But in coming years the increase will continue to decline, with serious policy implications, he said. “We need to pay attention to the dependent older population who’s going to have to be taken care of, through Social Security and Medicare and general support for them.” At the same time, he cautioned that the United States will need to invest in immigrants who are helping to shore up the younger segment of the labor force. The latest numbers show some states being hit harder by population loss while others are on an upswing — shifts that could affect future statewide and national elections.

Western and Southern states such as Nevada, Arizona and Florida, which took big hits during and after the recession, have been growing recently, while states with higher costs of living, including New York and California, and Midwestern states such as Ohio and Illinois, have experienced a decline in growth as people have moved away. Migration out of California had stagnated during the recession and post-recession period, but now the Golden State appears to be losing more migrants to neighboring states, in a phenomenon known as domestic outmigration, Frey said. A similar pattern is occurring between New York and Southeastern states. Utah is now the fastest-growing state — its population increased 2 percent to 3.1 million — while North Dakota, the growth leader in 2014-2015, fell to become the 15th-slowest-growing state as its oil extraction economy withered.

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Illinois leads the nation in population losses for the third year in a row, with its largest domestic outmigration since 1990. Texas had the highest numeric gains, with growth in immigration, domestic migration and natural increase. Florida, which bled population during and after the recession, also ranks high because of immigration and domestic migration. California and New York, on the other hand, rank high on immigration and natural increase but are among the nation’s biggest losers in terms of domestic migration, ranking 49th and 51st, respectively. The District of Columbia registered its highest population count since the 1970s, at 681,170 — an upward trend that is expected to continue. The changes have important implications for future elections. Projecting current trends onto the 2020 Census, Frey calculated that Texas would gain three electoral

college votes, Florida would gain two, and Arizona, Colorado, North Carolina and Oregon would gain one each. Alabama, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and West Virginia would lose one apiece. Given this November’s voting, the shifts would result in Donald Trump netting two additional electoral college votes from Hillary Clinton. The changes imply that a lot more states could be competitive in national elections. Typically the Midwest and the Northeast have voted for Democrats while Southern and Southwestern states have voted for Republicans. But Barack Obama won some traditionally Republican states, and Trump picked up some traditionally Democratic ones. As domestic migration continues, Republicans will no longer be able to rely on wins in Southern states, and Democrats will have to play stronger defense in Northern industrial areas that they once

took for granted, Frey said, adding, “It’s kind of up for grabs right now.” Outmigration from areas with declining economies can create a vicious cycle, said Philip Cohen, a sociology professor at the University of Maryland. “When the good prospects are elsewhere, people with good prospects leave,” he said, adding, “The middle of the country is still hollowing out overall in the long term.” And as states such as California experience more outmigration, immigrants from Mexico and Central America could increasingly head directly to states such as North Carolina and Iowa, where there are jobs. Once they and their children become citizens, this could have electoral implications. “In the small towns where immigrants are going, they can have a big effect,” Cohen said. tara.bahrampour@washpost.com Scott Clement contributed to this report.

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A4

EZ

THE WASHINGTON POST

SU

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

More confusion over plan for Muslims entering country Trump, aides issue conflicting statements about his position

AND

BY A BBY P HILLIP A BIGAIL H AUSLOHNER

Weeks before he is sworn in as president, Donald Trump and his advisers are issuing conflicting statements about the status of a signature tenet of his candidacy: restrictions on Muslims entering the United States. This week, Trump once again declined an opportunity to clarify his position on the Muslim ban, which he first proposed a year ago, suggesting that it has been consistent. A day later, this left his aides insisting once again that the proposal for a “total and complete shutdown” of Muslim immigration had evolved into something more nuanced. The public back-and-forth reflects the degree to which Trump’s aides have struggled to reshape his initial pronouncement into something more palatable to the public than an all-out ban on a religion. And it highlights Trump’s propensity to double down on his original statements even as his advisers seek to shift the focus to other issues. “As he’s walked through and learned about this stuff, he has evolved,” said Newt Gingrich, the former U.S. House speaker and a vice chairman of Trump’s transition committee. The policy has become “more targeted, more narrowly defined and more implementable,” he added. In the past 12 months, Trump has veered widely on the issue. He has suggested that wealthy Muslims might be exempt from a ban and that country-specific enhanced vetting was an expansion, rather than a refinement, of his original proposal. At one point,

CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES

Outside the White House on Dec. 21, Imam Ali Siddiqui, second from right, speaks to protesters about President-elect Donald Trump’s policy proposals on Muslims. Protesters heard messages of tolerance.

Trump suggested that the ban might affect only Muslims from “terror states.” But according to Trump, his policy on the ban and views on registering Muslims already in the United States have been known “all along.” He added that a terrorist attack on a Christmas market in Berlin this week vindicates him. “I’ve been proven to be right. One-hundred-percent correct,” Trump told reporters Wednesday outside his Mar-a-Lago estate, his national security adviser, retired Gen. Michael Flynn, peering over his shoulder. “What’s happening is disgraceful.” Less than 24 hours later, Trump’s former campaign manager and newly named White House counselor Kellyanne Conway denied that the president-elect still

supports a ban on Muslims. She described Trump’s plans as focusing on country-specific vetting rather than solely on religious affiliation. “What he says is that it’s very clear that we need better vetting policies,” Conway said on CNN on Thursday morning. “You’re going back to over a year ago and what he said about the ban versus what he said later about it when he made it much more specific and talked about countries where we know they have a higher propensity of training and exporting and in some cases harboring terrorists.” Asked whether religion would be a criterion for screening entrants, Conway added: “That in and of itself, no.” Trump’s national security aides, led by Flynn, are working out the details of his plan, at-

tempting to take a groundbreaking approach to finding terrorists before they strike, Gingrich said. He declined to say what that approach would look like, but he suggested that Islam would be used as a criterion for the “extreme vetting.” “Were any of them Baha’i? Were any of them Buddhist? Were any of them Christian?” Gingrich asked, referring to the individuals who carried out the attacks in Berlin and Turkey this week. “All the people involved, they yell, ‘Allahu akbar’ when they kill people.” German authorities have presented no evidence that the attacker who plowed his truck into a crowd at the Christmas market shouted “Allahu akbar,” but they said he appeared to have been inspired by the Islamic State. Trump has also expressed an

openness to establishing a registry of Muslims entering the United States. And he has taken counsel from Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, who helped develop the National Security EntryExit Registration System (NSEERS), which was used to register and monitor visitors from “high-risk” countries from 2002 to 2011. Gingrich did not say whether Trump envisions a revival of NSEERS. But some of his other advisers have suggested as much, and when Trump refers to banning people from “terror states,” national security and immigration experts guess that he is referring to NSEERS. That program, which the Department of Homeland Security ultimately determined to be “redundant” with existing monitoring procedures and relatively useless in providing added security benefits, mandated that men older than 16 from one of 25 countries on a list register with the U.S. government if they are living in the United States or have arrived to visit. Twenty-four of those countries were Muslim-majority countries. Registration, which involved fingerprinting, interrogations and sometimes parole-like checkins, was required, regardless of whether the individuals had broken the law. Men who overstayed their visas or failed to comply with annual registration requirements or more frequent check-ins were deported. Nearly 180,000 people registered with the program when it was in place; more than 83,500 of them were already residing in the United States when the program was enacted. On Thursday, the Obama administration moved to make it more difficult for Trump to use NSEERS — issuing final regulations that seek to dismantle the program.

Civil rights advocates say that NSEERS already amounted to a registry for Muslims, through discriminatory targeting. Obama shelved the program in 2011, but the regulations that allow it to function have not been dismantled. Virtually all of the proposals floated by Trump and his aides would invite a legal challenge or strain international partnerships needed in the fight against terrorism, experts say. Enacting immigration restrictions, even from countries “compromised” by terrorism rather than simply based on religious affiliation, would be “almost inherently ridiculous,” said Anthony H. Cordesman, a foreign policy expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies who also served as an adviser to Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) on the Armed Services Committee. “You’re talking about countries like Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, with the possible exception of Syria — virtually every country in the region now has a government cooperating with us on counterterrorism,” he said. “Does anybody who has actually suggested this even bothered to look at who our major partners are?” Some experts also expect the Trump administration to take actions to monitor Muslims without going through Congress. “I think there are a lot of agency level things that could happen, because it’s much more hidden,” said a national security expert who requested anonymity in order to speak frankly. “If you want to put pressure on Muslim communities, you could work through the FBI,” which could be accomplished with little public oversight. abby.phillip@washpost.com abigail.hauslohner@washpost.com Ellen Nakashima contributed to this report.

Trump’s call to expand U.S. nuclear arsenal would reverse decades-old policy TRUMP FROM A1

a White House that has repeatedly insisted in public that the transition has been smooth sailing. Asked last week whether he was trying to help Trump, a professed admirer of Russian President Vladimir Putin, understand Russia’s responsibility for the civil-war carnage in Aleppo, Syria, President Obama said he would “help President-elect Trump with any advice, counsel, information that we can provide so that he, once he’s sworn in, can make a decision.” “Between now and then,” Obama said firmly, it was up to him to decide what to do. “These are decisions that I have to make based on the consultations that I have with our military and the people who have been working this every day.” Even as the White House has held its tongue, however, others have not.

Trump provided no details in his tweet calling for the United States to “greatly strengthen and expand its nuclear capability.” But “if he means what he says,” said Joe Cirincione, president of the Ploughshares Fund, a Washington-based security foundation, “this could be the end of the arms-control process that reduced 80 percent of our Cold War arsenal.” Former congressman John Tierney (D-Mass.), executive director of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, said in a statement, “It is dangerous for the President-elect to use just 140 characters and announce a major change in U.S. nuclear weapons policy, which is nuanced, complex, and affects every single person on this planet.” Under New START, the treaty negotiated by Obama with Russia and ratified by the Senate in 2010, the United States and Rus-

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sia by February 2018 must have no more than 1,550 strategic weapons deployed. While there is widespread agreement that the U.S. deterrent must be modernized, little enthusiasm has been expressed elsewhere for increasing the number of nuclear warheads. Trump spokesman Jason Miller later said that was not precisely what Trump meant. Rather than calling for more nuclear weapons, Miller told Yahoo News, he was referring to “the threat of nuclear proliferation” and “the need to improve and modernize our deterrent capability.” The president-elect’s U.N. tweet was more explicit and more immediate. “The resolution being considered . . . should be vetoed,” he said in a pre-dawn tweet referring to the Egyptian measure. The resolution condemned “the construction and expansion of settlements” in the West Bank and mostly Palestinian East Jerusalem, along with “the transfer of Israeli settlers, confiscation of land, demolition of homes and displacement of Palestinian civilians.” Saying the settlements have “no legal validity,” it demanded that Israel “immediately cease all settlement activities.” Although consideration of such a measure has been circulated at the United Nations for weeks — and similar measures have for years brought a consistent U.S. veto — it was not until Wednesday night that word began to circulate that the United States might abstain and allow it to pass. While successive administrations have considered the settlements an impediment to an Israeli-Palestinian peace process, the Obama administration has grown increasingly irate over what it feels is Israel’s flouting of its concerns. Over the past six months, Israel has announced plans to add hundreds of units to existing settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. A July announcement that 770 new homes were to be built in the East Jerusalem settlement of Gilo drew particularly sharp U.S. criticism. At the same time, right-wing voices in the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu are pushing for legislation that would legalize settlements built on privately owned Palestinian land. The “legalization bill” stems from a court-ordered demolition of the Amona settlement, which sits on land owned by a Palestinian farmer. Amona was meant to be demolished next week, but on Thursday it received an addition-

JACK GUEZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

A pro-Donald Trump sign hangs last month in Tel Aviv. Early Thursday, the U.S. president-elect said in a tweet that a U.N. Security Council resolution condemning Israeli settlement policy should be vetoed.

al month of reprieve from the court. Residents brokered a deal with the government to move their homes to a nearby location, essentially creating a new settlement. During the campaign, Trump frequently criticized what he described as the administration’s failure to fully support Israel. Last week, he named David Friedman — a New York bankruptcy lawyer who has given strong financial support and other backing to the Israeli settlement movement and has said Trump supports Israeli annexation of Palestinian territory — as his ambassador to Israel. During the campaign, Trump also charged that Obama had helped promote terrorism by supporting “the ouster of a friendly regime in Egypt” — that of long-standing autocrat Hosni Mubarak — and more recently by failing to fully back the military government that overthrew Mubarak’s elected replacement. In an interview last weekend with a Portuguese news agency, Egyptian President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi said that Trump “has shown deep and great understanding of what is taking place in the region as a whole and Egypt in particular. I am looking forward and expecting more support and reinforcement of our bilateral relations.” Once it became clear late Wednesday that the settlements vote was scheduled for Thursday afternoon, Trump officials said the transition gave the administration a “heads-up” that the

president-elect was going to publicly call for a U.S. veto. At the end of the day Thursday, it was not entirely clear what led Egypt to withdraw the resolution. At the State Department, spokesman John Kirby said that Egypt had pulled it back in order to have “discussions with its Arab League partners” over the wording of the text.

“If he means what he says, this could be the end of the arms-control process that reduced 80 percent of our Cold War arsenal.” Joe Cirincione, president of the Ploughshares Fund, on Trump’s nuclear statement

Secretary of State John F. Kerry, who supported an abstention and was clearly expecting to deliver a pre-vote speech announcing it, along with an outline of future prospects for Middle East peace, canceled his plans. Elsewhere within the administration, officials said Israel had twisted Egypt’s arm and threatened to work against its interests in Congress. Several Arab officials said they were convinced that the United States had pressured Egypt to postpone the vote. In Israel, where a late-night

cabinet meeting was convened Wednesday to consider the possibility of a U.S. abstention, Netanyahu sent out a dead-of-night tweet calling for a U.S. veto. It was quickly followed by Trump’s own, near-identical tweet. Deriding “the imposition of terms set by the United Nations,” Trump said in a later statement that passage of the resolution would put Israel “in a very poor negotiating position and is extremely unfair to all Israelis.” After initial hesitation on whether Trump should weigh in, the statement was written late Wednesday by Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and an influential adviser to the presidentelect, and Stephen K. Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist, according to two people briefed on the deliberation who were not authorized to speak publicly. They said that Kushner and Bannon consulted with several allies in Israel and the United States but declined to name them. The effort represented perhaps Kushner’s most significant foray to date into foreign policy and the Middle East, where Trump has said he would welcome his son-in-law’s involvement. After the statement was issued Thursday, a transition official told the Reuters news agency, Trump spoke by telephone with Sissi. karen.deyoung@washpost.com Carol Morello and Robert Costa in Washington and Ruth Eglash in Jerusalem contributed to this report.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

.

THE WASHINGTON POST

EZ

A5

RE

Trump says the U.S. must ‘strengthen and expand its nuclear capability’ BY

C AROL M ORELLO

President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday called for the United States to expand its nuclear arsenal, after Russian President Vladimir Putin said his country’s nuclear potential needs fortifying, raising the specter of a new arms race that would reverse decades of efforts to reduce the number and size of the two countries’ nuclear weapons. In a tweet that offered no details, Trump said, “The United States must greatly strengthen and expand its nuclear capability until such time as the world comes to its senses regarding nukes.” Trump’s position represents a radical shift in thinking. Russia and the United States have worked for decades at first limiting, and then reducing, the number and strength of nuclear arms they produced and maintained under a Cold War strategy of deterrence known as “mutually assured destruction.” Republican and Democratic presidents have pursued a policy of nuclear arms reduction. Trump’s tweet came shortly after Putin, during a defense ministry meeting, talked tough on Russia’s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Putin said that Russia is the strongest nation in the world but that it cannot rest. “We need to strengthen the military potential of strategic nuclear forces, especially with missile complexes that can reliably penetrate any existing and prospective missile defense systems,” Putin said in an apparent reference to a planned NATO troop buildup in Eastern Europe. The Trump camp offered only slightly more explanation of the president-elect’s comment later in the day, when communications director Jason Miller said in a statement that Trump “was referring to the threat of nuclear proliferation and the critical need to prevent it — particularly to and among terrorist organizations and unstable and rogue regimes.”

“We need to strengthen the military potential of strategic nuclear forces, especially with missile complexes that can reliably penetrate any . . . missile defense systems.”

nal shelf lives. But independent experts have estimated that the cost of modernizing the aging nuclear arsenal could reach $1 trillion over 30 years, according to the Arms Control Association. “If Donald Trump is concerned about the rising costs of the F-35, he will be shocked by the skyrocketing costs of the current plan to modernize the U.S. nuclear arsenal,” Kimball said. “Trump and his people need to explain the

basis of his cryptic tweet. What does he mean by expand, and at what cost?” But others say that nuclear weapons and the principle of deterrence are essential components of national security and that the Obama administration’s efforts to further reduce its nuclear weapons have been wishful thinking. Michaela Dodge, a Heritage Foundation policy analyst specializing in nuclear weapons and

missile defense policy, said the White House in its 2010 Nuclear Posture Review made the erroneous assessment that there was little likelihood of conflict with Russia. Yet Moscow is in the midst of a large-scale nuclear weapons modernization program and has violated many arms control treaties that it signed, she said. “There is already an ongoing nuclear arms race, except now the United States isn’t racing,”

States,” she said. “So to continue to have strong deterrence is a national priority.” Robert Jervis, a national security policy professor at Columbia University, said the remarks by Putin and Trump do not necessarily mean a new arms race is on the horizon. “Not yet, but we’re seeing the sorts of dynamics that could lead to one,” he said. “But we’re umpteen steps away from that.” carol.morello@washpost.com

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Miller added that Trump believes in “the need to improve and modernize our deterrent capability as a vital way to pursue peace through strength.” Trump’s tweet was in keeping with earlier comments he has made. During an October debate, he criticized this country for lagging behind Russia in its nuclear program. “We are old, we’re tired, we’re exhausted in terms of nuclear,” he said. “A very bad thing.” He also suggested that South Korea and Japan develop nuclear weapons to protect themselves from the threat posed by North Korea. The United States has just under 5,000 warheads in its active arsenal and more than 1,550 deployed strategic warheads, a number that fluctuates, according to Daryl G. Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association. In an October assessment by the State Department Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, Russia has about 400 more nuclear warheads than the United States does. But the United States has about 170 more delivery systems than Russia. Under the New START Treaty, the main strategic arms treaty in place, the United States and Russia must deploy no more than 1,550 strategic weapons by February 2018. Kimball said both countries appear to be on track to meet that limit, which will remain in force until 2021, when they could decide to extend the agreement for another five years. Since President George H.W. Bush’s administration, it has been U.S. policy not to build new nuclear warheads. Under President Obama, the policy has been not to pursue warheads with new military capabilities. The U.S. military is in the beginning stages of updating its nuclear triad, which covers the delivery systems — bombers, submarines and intercontinental ballistic missiles. Last year, the Pentagon estimated that it must spend an average of $18 billion a year over 15 years, starting in 2021, to replace weapons that already have been refurbished and upgraded beyond their origi-

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A6

EZ

THE WASHINGTON POST

RE

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

The World Pope in Christmas speech blasts Vatican resistance to bureaucratic reform A SSOCIATED P RESS

vatican city — Pope Francis on Thursday denounced the resistance he is encountering in reforming the Vatican bureaucracy, saying that some of it is inspired by the devil and that the prelates who work for him must undergo “permanent purification” to serve the Catholic Church better. For the third year in a row, Francis took the Vatican bureau-

cracy to task in his annual Christmas greeting. He said the reform process he was elected to push through in 2013 is not aimed at a superficial facelift for the Holy See but rather a profound change in mentality among his collaborators. “Dear brothers, it’s not the wrinkles in the church that you should fear, but the stains!” he said. In 2014, Francis stunned the Vatican Curia, the administra-

tion of the Holy See, when he listed the 15 “spiritual ailments” afflicting its members. He accused them of using their careers to grab power and wealth, of living “hypocritical” double lives and of forgetting — because of “spiritual Alzheimer’s” — that they are supposed to be joyful men of God. Last year, Francis listed a “catalogue of virtues” they were supposed to show instead, including honesty, sobriety, respect and

humility. This year, he gave the priests, bishops and cardinals who work for him 12 guidelines that are inspiring his reform process, which has involved consolidating Vatican departments and creating new ones. He called for a “definitive end” to the Vatican’s face-saving way of getting rid of unqualified or problematic staff by promoting them to a higher office. “This is a cancer!” Francis

said. The pontiff said it is entirely natural that there should be resistance during such a profound process of reform — but he said there is good resistance and bad. Positive resistance is an open willingness for dialogue, he said, but “hidden” resistance comes from the “fearful or hardened hearts” of people who say they want change but really don’t. And then there’s “malevolent

resistance . . . when the devil inspires nasty intentions often dressed as lambs.” He urged his collaborators to undergo an ongoing process of spiritual purification guided by the Gospel. Later, he told staff who work for the Vatican City State that the Gospel also should dictate the Vatican’s labor practices to ensure people have proper contracts. “No employment off the books. No subterfuge,” he said.

PHOTOS BY SERGEI KARPUKHIN/REUTERS

The prancing and pawing of millions of hoofs BY

ABOVE: A herd of reindeer in an enclosure in Krasnoye, a village in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, in Siberia. LEFT: A herder sorts the reindeer. There are an estimated 730,000 of the animals in the region, but they have been reduced this year by disease and a lightning strike.

K ARLY D OMB S ADOF

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hildren around the world will be staring at the sky in hopes of catching a glimpse of Rudolph or one of his reindeer friends. But for the people snuggled in Russia’s remote Arctic regions, there are usually so many reindeer — an estimated 730,000 — that for centuries, people have had to herd these creatures to keep the population manageable. That said, 2016 has not been a good year for reindeer in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, a subdivision of Siberia made up mostly of flat, lake-

pocked tundra the size of California, Texas, Montana and both Dakotas combined. In August, a lightning strike killed a few hundred; a few thousand more were killed by anthrax — a result of the region’s soaring temperatures; and in October, Russia proposed killing a quarter-million to prevent the anthrax outbreak from spreading. But for the village of Krasnoye, the only settlement in the Nenets region connected by road to the region’s capital, the herding tradition lives on. foreign@washpost.com

DIGEST RUSSIA

Turkish cleric in U.S. denies role in killing A U.S.-based Muslim cleric on Thursday condemned the killing of Russia’s envoy to Turkey and rejected accusations that his movement was behind the attack. Ambassador Andrei Karlov was shot by an off-duty police officer at a photo exhibition Monday in the Turkish capital, Ankara. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has implicated Fethullah Gulen, a former ally, in the killing, accusing his movement of links to the gunman. In a video address, Gulen accused Erdogan of defaming his movement and suggested that the Turkish government would facilitate other killings and blame them on Gulen’s followers. Gulen has been living in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1999.

Russia has flown a team of 18 investigators and Foreign Ministry officials to Turkey to help investigate Karlov’s killing. In Moscow, officials and lawmakers gathered at the Foreign Ministry’s headquarters for a ceremony to honor Karlov. Diplomats and officials laid flowers at the open casket alongside an honorary guard. President Vladimir Putin arrived at the end of the ceremony, laid flowers at the casket, offered condolences to the ambassador’s widow and left. — Associated Press

ROMANIA

Nomination delayed of female Muslim premier Romania’s president said Thursday that he needs more time to nominate a new prime minister, delaying the

confirmation in office of the country’s first female Muslim premier amid signs of unease. The Social Democrats, who won elections on Dec. 11, on Wednesday proposed economist Sevil Shhaideh, a little-known former minister, as prime minister. President Klaus Iohannis had been expected to give official support to that nomination on Thursday. But he said he will delay any announcement until after Christmas. He did not say why. Shhaideh, 52, served as Romania’s regional development minister last year. Critics of her nomination say that she lacks sufficient political experience. She is married to Akram Shhaideh, a Syrian, who obtained Romanian citizenship in 2015. The Rise Project, a member of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, said Thursday that Shhaideh’s

husband had postings in support of Syrian President Bashar alAssad on his Arabic-language Facebook page. Meanwhile, the Romanian Orthodox bishop of Cluj, Andrei Andreicut, said he personally wanted a “Romanian and Orthodox prime minister.” More than 85 percent of Romanians belong to the influential church. — Associated Press Death toll in alcohol poisoning in Russia climbs to 72: Local

health officials in Russia’s Siberia said the number of people who have died this week from drinking a bath lotion that contained methanol has climbed to 72. The Health Ministry in the Irkutsk region said 33 people were still in the hospital. Bottles with the lotion carried warnings that it was not for internal use, but the labels said the product contained ethyl alcohol, not

methanol. Household products containing alcohol are popular in Russia as a cheap alternative to standard spirits. Bombings in Mosul kill 23:

Three car bombs ripped through an outdoor market in Mosul, killing at least 15 civilians and eight police officers, the Iraqi Defense Ministry said. The attack occurred in the eastern district of Gogjali, which Iraqi forces retook from Islamic State militants weeks ago as part of an ongoing operation to drive them from Mosul. The Islamic State captured the northern city in summer 2014. Senegalese man found guilty in U.S. woman’s killing: An Italian

court has convicted a Senegalese man of killing an American woman he met at a nightclub and sentenced him to 30 years in prison. Ashley Olsen, 35, was found dead in her apartment on

Jan. 9, 2016. She had been strangled and had suffered skull fractures. Police arrested Cheik Tidiane Diaw after street surveillance cameras showed him walking with Olsen toward her home that night and DNA traces were found on a cigarette butt and condom in her apartment. Cambodia seizes animal parts smuggled from Africa: Cambodia

has made one of its biggest seizures of smuggled animal parts, including more than a ton of ivory, a wildlife protection group said. The Wildlife Alliance said about 3,000 pounds of ivory, 10 cheetah skulls and 180 pounds of cheetah bones, and 301 pounds of pangolin scales were found concealed in three containers shipped from Mozambique. Cambodia has made 19 seizures of ivory and rhino horn from six African nations since 2014, the Wildlife Alliance said. — From news services


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

.

THE WASHINGTON POST

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Berlin Christmas market suspect was on terrorism radar after radicalization A NTHONY F AIOLA, N AVEENA K OTTOOR AND S TEFANO P ITRELLI BY

berlin — He was the man nobody wanted. When Anis Amri washed up on European shores in a migrant boat in April 2011, he landed on the windswept Italian island of Lampedusa already a fugitive. Sought in his native Tunisia for hijacking a van with a gang of thieves, the frustrated Italians would jail him for arson and violent assault at his migrant reception center for minors on the isle of Sicily. There, his family noted, the boy who once drank alcohol — and never went to mosque — suddenly got religion. He began to pray, asking his family to send him religious books. The Italian Bureau of Prisons submitted a report to a government anti-terrorism commission on Amri’s rapid radicalization, warning that he was embracing dangerous ideas of Islamist extremism and had threatened Christian inmates, according to an Italian government official with knowledge of the situation. The dossier was first reported by ANSA, the Italian news service. The Italians tried to deport Amri but couldn’t. They sent his fingerprints and photo to the Tunisian consulate, but the authorities there refused to recognize Amri as a citizen. The Italians, officials there say, could not even establish his true identity. Italy’s solution: After four years in jail, they released him anyway — giving him seven days to leave the country. On Monday, German authorities believe, Amri, now 24 and with previously known links to Islamist extremists, drove the truck that slammed into a Christmas market in Berlin, killing 12 and wounding dozens. They had tried to deport him, too, though Tunisia long refused to take him back. The night before the attack, Amri called his family in Tunisia, as he would nearly every weekend. His birthday — on Thursday — was fast approaching, and he seemed animated. “What’s the weather like? Is it raining? What are you having for dinner?” his sister, Sayida Amri, 36, in his bleak home town of Oueslatia, Tunisia, recalled him asking Sunday. He asked her, she said, to pass the phone to his youngest niece, Zeinab — 4 years old. “Do you even know who I am?” he asked her. His case suggests two critical realities of modern terrorism that present major new challenges, especially in Europe. The cumbersome, sometimes flawed system of deportation and asylum — mixed with open borders — has made it exceedingly easy for radicalized Islamists to operate on the continent. Yet Amri is also the latest suspect to have emerged from a disconcerting counterterrorism gap in both Europe and the United States. In case after case — including that of the German Christmas market attack — authorities have come forward after the fact to say that they had enough cause to place the suspect under surveillance well before the violence. But never enough to move in for an arrest. This has been true of the majority of lone-wolf terrorism plots over the past several years. The Orlando shooter, Omar Mateen, had been under FBI investigation for 10 months. The bureau had also tracked but had been unable to build a case against the Boston Marathon bombers or the plotters who targeted a contest to draw cartoons of the prophet Muhammad. The same was true with Amri. Several months ago, during a surveillance operation monitoring radical Islamic preachers, German authorities intercepted a communication, which, in retrospect, appeared to forecast Amri’s violent intent. They would not disclose the precise wording, but two German officials with knowledge of the investigation said the intercept was not straightforward enough to directly indicate an imminent threat. “He never made such a clear statement during this interaction, which could have led to the conclusion that he would become a martyr,” one of the officials said. Amri fell into a dangerous gray zone — he was on the U.S. no-fly list a month ago, and Germans had linked him to a radical network led by Abu Walaa, a 32-year-old of Iraqi descent arrested in November on charges of recruiting and sending fighters from Germany to the Islamic State. Amri had also been under

police surveillance for several months until September of this year, because he was suspected of planning a burglary in Berlin to finance the purchase of weapons. The suspicion wasn’t confirmed, however, and authorities found him guilty only of being a smalltime drug dealer. “This kind of super-low-tech, improvised thing is hard,” said Rafael Bossong, research associate at the German Institute for International and Security Af-

fairs. “The guy didn’t buy any weapons. He didn’t give off absolutely clear signals. The question is, how do you definitely prevent that?” The way the system is designed, even had Amri fully cooperated, however, the Germans would not have had access to his criminal record in Italy. The computer databases used in Europe to vet migrants in the first instance does not include such data.

European law enforcement officials say that sharing information across borders has sharply increased in the 13 months since the Bataclan attack in Paris. But just because information is in a database does not always mean that it gets used, they say. “I’m not sure it’s that we don’t have enough information,” said Brian Donald, the chief of staff of Europol, the pan-European police agency. “I think it’s more

PPP

about ensuring that law enforcement has access to the information we have.” Back in Oueslatia, Amri’s family remains incredulous. His brothers and sisters rushed back to their mother’s home, a simple house on a dirt street, when they heard the news. “My son was planning to come back next year and start a small business here, said his mother, Nour el Huda, 60, her voice trembling. “He was home-

g uid a magical

sick.” “We hope he didn’t do it; we really hope he wasn’t involved,” she repeated as a German camera crew pulled up outside. anthony.faiola@washpost.com Kottoor reported from Oueslatia, Tunisia; Pitrelli, from Rome. Souad Mekhennet and Stephanie Kirchner in Berlin, Michael Birnbaum in Brussels and Greg Miller in Washington contributed to this report.

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A8

EZ

THE WASHINGTON POST

RE

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

Lynch, Comey failed to navigate the ugly politics of 2016 COMEY FROM A1

the Clinton case. Remarkably, the country’s two top law enforcement officials never spoke. As Comey’s boss, Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch could have given the FBI director an order to not send the letter. But Lynch and her advisers feared that Comey would not listen. He seemed to feel strongly about updating Congress on his sworn testimony about the Clinton investigation. Instead, they tried to relay their concerns through the Justice official whom the FBI had called. Their efforts failed. Within 24 hours of the first FBI call, Comey’s letter was out. Nearly two months later, the effect of that letter on the 2016 race is still being debated. Clinton told donors recently that she blamed a pair of “unprecedented” events for her loss. One was the Russian hacking of Democratic Party officials. The other was Comey’s letter. Corey Lewandowski, President-elect Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, said in a speech at Oxford University shortly after the election that what Comey did was “amazing” and gave Trump the “spring in his step” he needed to win the election. An examination of how a single letter from the FBI became a political bombshell reveals that it was the result of two law enforcement leaders failing over months to navigate the unusually ugly politics of 2016. Having a presidential candidate under active criminal investigation was extraordinary. But Comey and Lynch repeatedly underestimated how much their actions would reverberate in a closely contested presidential race. Lynch’s meeting in June with Bill Clinton on a tarmac in Phoenix led to a crisis in leadership at the department over how to handle the Clinton email investigation. Rather than formally recuse herself, Lynch left ambiguous who would be making final decisions on issues regarding Hillary Clinton. Into that vacuum stepped Comey, an FBI director who prides himself on having a finely tuned moral compass that allows him to rise above politics. Weeks before the letter, Comey had advised against the Obama administration public statement admonishing Russia for the Democratic Party hacks, arguing it would make the administration appear partisan too close to the election. But to him, the Clinton email investigation was different. Battered by Republican lawmakers during a hearing that summer, Comey feared he would come under further attack if word leaked about the Clinton case picking up again. He was surprised by the intensity of the reaction to his letter, according to people familiar with Comey’s thinking. His reputation fell further after the FBI acknowledged three days before the election that the emails amounted to

CLIFF OWEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

FBI Director James B. Comey filled the leadership vacuum created by Loretta E. Lynch, analysts say.

nothing. Comey has taken the harsher beating in public for his decision, but some political observers and former Justice officials say that Lynch deserves at least as much scrutiny. Jack Goldsmith, a Harvard Law School professor and senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, said that the controversy shines a light on Lynch’s compromised position and failed leadership as attorney general. “If she thought [the letter] violated department policy or was otherwise a bad idea, she could have ordered him not to send the letter,” said Goldsmith, who noted that soon after the letter was released, Justice officials proceeded to criticize Comey when Lynch had the power all along to stop him. “It was an astonishing failure of leadership and eschewal of responsibility, especially if Lynch really thought what Comey did was wrong.” A former senior FBI official who worked closely with Comey for several years said that Comey’s sense of obligation to Congress was the key factor driving his decision. He had testified under oath months earlier that the Clinton investigation was closed. But another factor that day was that Lynch’s credibility had been compromised months earlier in Phoenix. “Anybody who’s ever worked with Jim Comey knows that he has an independent spirit,” the official said. “But he still very much believes in the chain of command. If he has a boss who’s asking him to do something that’s in the scope of the law and reason, he’s going to follow it. He would have followed protocol. Had the issue with Loretta Lynch on the tarmac not happened, things would be different. People forget that.” The tarmac It was a sweltering June day in Phoenix, and Lynch’s plane had just landed at the airport. She and four staffers had flown west for a series of meetings with local police officers.

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The staffers walked down the plane stairs first and stepped into a van on the tarmac. The plan was for Lynch — and her husband, who was also on the trip — to follow quickly afterward and step into another vehicle. As the staffers waited for about five minutes in the van, checking their smartphones, they suddenly saw a man with silvery white hair approaching the plane. At first, the staffers could not tell who it was. But then, as the man got close to the airplane steps, one of the staffers said with surprise, “Is that Bill Clinton?” It was. Clinton had just wrapped up a fundraiser for his wife and arrived at the tarmac to fly out of Phoenix. His Secret Service detail tipped him off that Lynch was there, too, and he sent word that he wanted to say hello. Lynch felt she could not say no to the former president, who 17 years ago promoted her to U.S. attorney. Once inside the plane, Lynch said that she, Clinton and her husband discussed their travels, Clinton’s grandchildren, golfing and Brexit. But as the visit dragged on, Lynch became anxious. The Justice Department was still conducting an investigation into Hillary Clinton’s email practices during her tenure as secretary of state. Lynch had just wanted to say a quick hello to Bill Clinton, and now they had been talking for close to half an hour. Her aides outside were also concerned. One of them got out of the van and walked back onto the plane to tell Lynch that they needed to get moving. Lynch would later insist that she and Clinton did not discuss the investigation into his wife. But the optics were immediately damaging. Republican legislators raised questions about whether Lynch and the Justice Department’s investigation had been compromised. Four days later on July 1, Lynch acknowledged in an interview with Washington Post editorial writer Jonathan Capehart that her meeting with the former president “cast a shadow over how [the Clinton] case may be per-

ceived” and she “certainly would not do it again.” Then, in an effort to allay any concerns, Lynch said she would “fully accept” the recommendations of career prosecutors and the FBI on how to proceed with the Clinton case. Capehart pressed her to explain. Did that mean she would review their recommendation and make her own judgment? No, she said. He asked further. Did that mean she was recusing herself from the case? Lynch did not give a clear answer. Those close to Lynch said that she planned all along — before the tarmac incident even — to accept the recommendations of the FBI and career prosecutors. To this day, aides say she does not see any connection between her meeting with Bill Clinton and what Comey would do next. ‘Extremely careless’ Four days after Lynch’s remarks, Comey, known for his independent streak, called reporters to FBI headquarters on Pennsylvania Avenue to announce the conclusion of the year-long Clinton investigation. It was a stunning event both because of what he said and how he said it. Usually, in a high-profile case, the FBI makes a recommendation to the Justice Department, and then the attorney general — not the FBI director — announces in a news conference the final decision on any charges. It is rare for officials to hold a briefing when prosecutors decline to pursue a case. In this case, Lynch and other Justice officials did not even find out that Comey was holding a briefing until shortly before he began speaking. At the news conference, Comey stood wedged between two FBI flags as he read a prepared speech to reporters. “I have not coordinated this statement or reviewed it in any way with the Department of Justice or any other part of the government,” Comey said. “They do not know what I’m about to say.” He proceeded to sharply criticize Hillary Clinton for her use of

a private email server while she was secretary of state, calling her behavior “extremely careless.” But he said that the bureau would not recommend criminal charges against her. “Although there is evidence of potential violations of the statutes regarding the handling of classified information, our judgment is that no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case,” Comey said. Justice officials were shocked. They had never seen an FBI director deliver such remarks. “He was out there on his own,” said a former high-ranking Justice Department official. “That was unheard of, unprecedented. Lynch did not recuse herself but also was not fully participating, which left a vacuum that the FBI director decided to fill.” Comey, though, felt that given the highly politicized nature of the case, the FBI needed to practice radical transparency for the public to trust the government’s findings on the case. “I think the confidence of the American people in the FBI is a precious thing, and I want them to understand that we did this investigation in a competent, honest and independent way,” Comey said in a three-paragraph internal memo sent to all FBI employees shortly before he spoke. “Folks outside the FBI may disagree about the result, but I don’t want there to be any doubt that this was done in an apolitical and professional way and that our conclusion is honestly held, carefully considered, and ours alone.” Two weeks before the Republican National Convention, Comey’s announcement ignited a blast of criticism from Republicans and Trump supporters who said the investigation’s outcome had been influenced by politics. “The system is rigged,” Trump tweeted. Two days later, Republicans on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee grilled Comey for five hours. In September, he was brought before the House Judiciary Committee. “My first question is this, would you reopen the Clinton investigation if you discovered new information that was both relevant and substantial?” Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Tex.) asked Comey during the hearing. “It’s hard for me to answer in the abstract,” Comey replied. “We would certainly look at any new and substantial information.” ‘Case reopened’ On Oct. 3, FBI agents seized a computer and other electronic devices from Anthony Weiner, the disgraced former congressman who was now being accused of having a sexual relationship online with a 15-year-old girl. In their search for evidence, the agents stumbled upon something else: 650,000 emails stretching over several years with thousands possibly tied to Clinton’s private server and associated with Clinton and Weiner’s estranged wife, Huma Abedin, a senior aide to the Democratic presidential nominee. Within days, Comey was notified of the discovery. At that point, the agents and their supervisors did not know how many of the emails could be relevant, if they contained classified information or were duplicates of evi-

dence that had already been investigated. They also could not peer into the contents of any Abedin or Clinton emails because they only had a search warrant for Weiner-related evidence. The agents were directed by FBI officials to do more work and report back to Washington when they had a better idea of the scope of the material on the computer and how much might be linked to Clinton. Two more weeks went by as the bureau brought in their computer forensic experts to further examine what appeared to be on the computer, but not look at the contents of the emails. Finally on Oct. 27, three weeks after the emails had first been discovered, agents made a presentation to Comey in his office. They still had no idea what was in the emails, only that there were thousands associated with Abedin, including some correspondence with Clinton. To learn if there was classified information on the emails, they would need a search warrant. Comey agreed it was time. He also began wrestling with whether to notify lawmakers. He worried that getting a warrant would alert more people to the probe, increasing the chances of a leak to the media. He feared a huge outcry if anyone learned the FBI was again investigating Clinton’s emails without informing Congress. Comey would later privately tell lawmakers that he was “stuck in a really bad place.” FBI officials contacted career prosecutors who had worked the Clinton email case to ask what they thought about sending the letter. Don’t do it, they advised. Meanwhile, Justice officials decided that neither Lynch nor her deputy, Yates, should order Comey to not send the letter. They were not sure how Comey would respond to such a command. And they too feared leaks. Lynch and her advisers were nervous about how it would look if people found out that she, a Democratic presidential appointee, told Comey to keep secret from Congress a new development in the Clinton investigation. Instead, they tried to convince Comey that he had never promised to update Congress at every turn. He had merely said he would “look at” any new information in the case. When that did not work, they made one last effort to contain the damage. Justice officials wanted Comey to simply say that he had new information that might be related to the Clinton probe, and to make clear the FBI did not know whether the new material was significant. The FBI did not take their advice, as Justice officials would learn after they saw Comey’s final letter when he sent it to Capitol Hill. The FBI director said the emails “appear to be pertinent to the investigation.” Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) tweeted, “Case reopened.” This was exactly the impression from the letter that Justice officials feared most. Half an hour later, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway tweeted, “A great day in our campaign just got even better. FBI reviewing new emails in Clinton probe.” sari.horwitz@washpost.com Matt Zapotosky and Adam Entous contributed to this report.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

THE WASHINGTON POST

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A9

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Drugmakers’ DEA hires raise questions DEA FROM A1

nevale, who was director of planning for the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy and now runs a consulting firm. “These people understand how DEA operates, the culture around diversion and DEA’s goals, and they can advise their clients how to stay within the guidelines.” The DEA’s Diversion Control Division, tasked with preventing prescription drugs from reaching the black market, wields enormous power within the pharmaceutical world. The small division, with about 300 employees at its Arlington, Va., headquarters, can suspend or revoke the licenses of doctors, pharmacies and pharmaceutical companies that fail to comply with federal law. From 2000 to 2015, nearly 180,000 people died of overdoses from prescription painkillers in what public health authorities have called an epidemic. States including Massachusetts, and most recently Virginia, have declared public health emergencies as the number of deaths has escalated. It is not unusual for corporations to hire federal employees directly away from the government. Their expertise and inside knowledge can be invaluable, but there are laws and regulations to slow the “revolving door” in Washington and prevent potential conflicts of interest. The restrictions include a lifetime ban on participating “personally and substantially” on a “particular matter” that the official had handled while working for the federal government. There also is a two-year ban on switching sides on a wider array of matters that were in the employee’s official purview. State bar associations impose additional post-employment restrictions for government lawyers. An industry spokesman said former DEA diversion officials are hired for their expertise. “Our industry is highly specialized, and the function of drug diversion experts even more so,” said John M. Gray, president and chief executive of the Healthcare Distribution Alliance, which represents drug distributors. “As such, for these individuals who want to continue to grow in their areas of expertise, it is logical for them to pursue government and industry roles that are closely aligned with their professional experience.” While The Post did not find evidence that the officials violated conflict-of-interest regulations, the number of hires from one key division shows how an industry can potentially blunt a government agency’s aggressive attempts at enforcement. The DEA diversion officials who have gone to the industry since 2005 include two executive assistants who managed day-today operations; the deputy director of the division; the deputy chief of operations; two chiefs of policy; a deputy chief of policy; the chief of investigations; and two associate chief counsels in charge of legal affairs and enforcement actions against pharmaceutical companies. “It’s obvious that they targeted the office,” said Joseph T. Rannazzisi, who ran the diversion division for a decade before he was removed from his position and retired in 2015. “If you want to understand how we were doing our investigations, the best way to do it is to take our people who are doing the investigations and put them in place in your compa-

ny. It’s not difficult to understand why you would take these guys. They know the law.”

M

ost of the DEA officials went to work for the pharmaceutical industry and law firms within weeks of leaving the agency. Among the 31 DEA diversion employees, 22 began their new jobs within weeks of leaving the DEA, according to work histories the officials posted on LinkedIn, as well as news releases and biographies published by the companies and law firms that hired them. The Post found that several high-ranking DEA supervisors from outside the diversion division also took top jobs with industry: four special agents in charge and three assistant special agents in charge of field operations in some of the nation’s largest cities, including New York, Washington and Atlanta. In responses to questions from The Post, the DEA said in a statement that former employees must follow the law and ethics regulations in taking jobs in the private sector. “Many who serve in government possess expert knowledge in a wide variety of fields. It is not uncommon for former government officials to use or rely on such expertise when they transfer to the private sector following their public sector service,” DEA spokesman Rusty Payne said in the statement. “Employees who leave DEA and other government agencies for private sector work are expected to abide by the applicable laws and ethics rules that govern their private sector activities.” At least five of the 31 DEA employees were hired by McKesson — the nation’s largest drug distributor and fifth-largest corporation. McKesson has been the subject of two publicly disclosed DEA enforcement actions, which resulted in $163 million in fines after allegations that the firm failed to report hundreds of suspicious orders for millions of pain pills from Internet pharmacies and others. “McKesson has put significant resources towards building a best-in-class controlled substance monitoring program to help identify suspicious orders and prevent prescription drug diversion in the supply chain,” the company said in a statement. “It is only natural that this team is comprised of a broad range of experts, including individuals who have spent time at DEA, as they bring deep knowledge of effective strategies to prevent diversion. Our team is deeply passionate about curbing the opioid epidemic in our country.” The Post contacted a dozen former DEA officials who went to work for the drug industry, but few agreed to be interviewed. Those who did said they followed federal ethics guidelines designed to prevent potential conflicts of interest for officials who switch from government to the industries they once regulated. “I don’t feel like I took off the white hat and put the black hat on,” said Larry P. Cote, who left as the associate chief counsel for the DEA’s diversion division in May 2012 to become a partner at the law firm Quarles & Brady. “That’s really not what’s going on. It’s trying to get the best people in place to make sure that companies are staying compliant. And frankly, that benefits the DEA as much as it benefits the companies.” At Quarles & Brady, Cote serves

KRISTOFFER TRIPPLAAR/SIPA USA

ABOVE: Drug giant McKesson’s headquarters in San Francisco. RIGHT: A Drug Enforcement Administration officer at a Little Rock clinic in May 2015, when a multistate crackdown on prescription drug abuse in the South was underway, with raids at pain clinics, pharmacies and other locations.

as co-director of the firm’s DEA Compliance and Litigation Practice Group and provides legal advice to some of the nation’s largest pharmaceutical companies. Cote said he obtained an ethics opinion from the DEA that advised him on which cases he could and could not handle in the private sector. Ethics experts said revolvingdoor issues have been a longstanding concern across the government, with some of the most notable cases coming from the Defense Department. Presidentelect Donald Trump recently criticized the revolving door at the Pentagon, saying high-ranking officials “should never be allowed to go work” for companies in the defense industry. The ethics experts said the number of officials switching sides at the DEA raises serious questions about whether the ability of the diversion division to carry out its mission has been compromised by the pharmaceutical industry. “The findings that so many DEA officials have switched from their roles preventing, detecting and investigating illegal drug use to working for those involved in the supply chain is disturbing,” said Scott H. Amey, general counsel for the Project on Government Oversight, a watchdog group in Washington. “It’s also another reminder of how well the revolving door is greased and how the revolving door can negatively impact government operations. It’s not a surprise that DEA isn’t as vigilant as it once was when so many ex-feds are working for the companies that they once investigated.”

DANNY JOHNSTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

I

n 2004, DEA officials became alarmed by the increasing number of overdose deaths. The following year, the agency’s diversion division launched an initiative designed to hold distributors of narcotics accountable for the hundreds of millions of pills that were being diverted to the black market. The DEA pursued cases against some of the largest opioid distributors in the country, including McKesson, Cardinal Health and AmerisourceBergen, as well as CVS and Walgreens, which distribute opioids to their own pharmacies. In general, the companies did not admit wrongdoing and said they were taking steps to address illegal diversion. In 2008, McKesson settled one of those cases, paying a $13 million fine without admitting liability. That same the year, the DEA filed a case against Cardinal. That company also settled, paying a $34 million fine. Cardinal promised to improve monitoring of its drug shipments. The DEA’s initiative was sharply curtailed in the face of pressure from the pharmaceutical industry beginning in 2013, according to a Post investigation published in October. In fiscal 2011, civil case filings against distributors, manufacturers, pharmacies and doctors had reached 131. By 2014, they had fallen to 40. The slowdown came after DEA lawyers began to require a higher standard of proof before cases could move forward. Supervisors in the field said they were frustrated that their cases were being stalled at DEA headquarters. Top DEA and Justice Department officials have declined to discuss the reasons behind the slowdown.

Unnatural causes: Sick and dying in small-town America Since the turn of this century, death rates have risen for whites in midlife, particularly women. In this series, The Washington Post is exploring this trend and the forces driving it. Read more at wapo.st/dea.

Syria regains control of Aleppo, in severe blow to opponents of Assad BY

H UGH N AYLOR

beirut — Syria’s government declared Thursday that it had regained full control of Aleppo after the last rebel fighters and civilians evacuated the key city as part of an agreement brokered by Russia and Turkey. The Syrian military announced on state media that “security and stability” had been returned to eastern Aleppo, once the largest rebel stronghold. The “terrorists” — a term used by the Syrian government to describe nearly all of its opponents — had exited the city, the military said. President Bashar al-Assad’s consolidation of Aleppo marks the end of the opposition presence in the city for the first time in more than four years and deals a

major blow to the rebellion to unseat him. Assad now appears to have the upper hand in the conflict, which began with protests against him in 2011. The Syrian leader and his allies are poised to consolidate their hold on areas of the country under their control and further squeeze the beleaguered rebellion elsewhere. His critics in the United States, Turkey and Saudi Arabia must increasingly grapple with a Syria, or at least a major portion of it, that is now firmly under his control. The foreign ministers of Russia, Iran and Turkey met in the Russian capital Tuesday to discuss ways to end the Syrian war, which has killed more than 400,000 people and displaced

AMMAR ABDULLAH/REUTERS

Evacuees from the Shiite villages of Foua and Kefraya. Pro-Assad militias had demanded their evacuation as part of the Aleppo deal.

millions. On Thursday, Russia’s deputy foreign minister, Sergei Ryabkov, said in an interview with the RIA Novosti news agency that Assad’s future is “absolutely not a topic for discussion right now.” Last week, pro-rebel residents of Aleppo began boarding buses

to flee the city’s war-ravaged eastern districts as part of the RussiaTurkey deal that effectively surrendered their areas to Assad’s forces. In frigid winter weather, desperate men, women and children waited in the thousands to be shuttled westward to rebel-held

Government ethics experts said regulators often join the industries they oversee, lured by substantially higher salaries. “That high rate of turnover makes you really wonder whether those officials were acting in the interests of the DEA rather than the companies they were regulating,” said Craig Holman, an expert on revolving-door issues for Public Citizen, a government watchdog group in Washington. “Just by seeing your colleagues going that way, that tells you that you can shape your future employment prospects if you behave accordingly.” Once senior employees leave for jobs in the industry, they are in positions to help pharmaceutical companies comply with the complex laws and regulations that govern controlled substances. But ethics experts said they also can exploit weaknesses they are aware of within the DEA. One of the key players in the DEA’s diversion initiative went to work for a law firm that represents the companies he used to regulate. D. Linden Barber, who served as associate chief counsel from 2006 to 2010, guided cases against some of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the country. In 2008, Barber’s office filed its first diversion case against Cardinal, accusing it of failing to properly monitor shipments of painkillers. Barber conducted extensive meetings with DEA attorneys assigned to the case and was deeply involved in crafting a “memorandum of agreement” to settle the allegations against Cardinal, according to a DEA document. The case resulted in the $34 million settlement with Cardinal. In September 2011, Barber, who had been serving as the DEA’s regional diversion counsel in the Midwest, left for the law

Idlib province. The deal broke down multiple times as government-allied militias from Lebanon and Iran demanded similar evacuations from nearby Shiite villages besieged by rebel fighters. “We left Aleppo with broken hearts,” said Abu Jaafar, a 60year-old father of five who was evacuated from eastern Aleppo. U.N. officials said earlier Thursday that more than 40,000 people had been evacuated , but the total number is unclear. Before the agreement, the United Nations estimated that 250,000 people lived in eastern Aleppo. For Syria’s armed opposition, Thursday’s events are a severe setback, if not an outright catastrophe. As the final buses departed the snow-glazed ruins of eastern Aleppo late Thursday, rebel fighters expressed sadness. Some lashed out at the international community for what they said was insufficient support — especially weapons — to battle Assad and his powerful allies, including Iranian-controlled Shiite militias from Lebanon, Iraq and Afghanistan.

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

firm Quarles & Brady. His colleague, Larry Cote, had taken over as associate chief counsel at DEA headquarters. The next month, the DEA served warrants seeking records from Cardinal as part of a second case against the company. Quarles & Brady’s clients include Cardinal. Seven months later, in May 2012, Cote, who helped to coordinate the second Cardinal case while at the DEA, joined Barber at Quarles & Brady, becoming co-director of compliance and litigation. Cote had appeared in court on behalf of the DEA in the case against Cardinal three months earlier, records show. Barber said he sought advice from Roberto D. DiBella, the DEA’s ethics lawyer, before and after leaving the agency. Barber declined to say whether he asked DiBella for advice about representing Cardinal, but he said his representation of his clients complied with ethics laws. “The rules governing my work as an attorney make it inappropriate for me to discuss work I did for DEA and any other clients,” he said in a statement to The Post. “However, the records of DEA will show that I followed the rules. I never worked on a matter for DEA and then worked on the same matter for the other party. I am proud of the work I did for DEA and of the work I do in private practice for clients who want to work with DEA to stop the abuse of prescription drugs.” The DEA provided The Post with a copy of DiBella’s ethics opinion. It shows that Barber asked for guidance on his representation of Cardinal. DiBella told him that he was banned for life from representing Cardinal on any issues connected to the 2008 memorandum of agreement (MOA). “Your representation of Cardinal to address an alleged violation of the MOA would on its face appear that you switched sides on a matter that you participated in as a DEA employee,” DiBella wrote. DiBella did not respond to interview requests. The DEA said the ethics opinion was reviewed by DiBella’s supervisor to doublecheck the advice Barber was given. Cote said he, too, asked DiBella for an ethics opinion before leaving the agency in 2012. “I provided him with a fairly comprehensive list of the cases that I worked on,” he said in a recent interview. The DEA provided a copy of the opinion to The Post. It noted that Cote had participated “personally and substantially” in specific matters relating to at least 10 companies while he was at the DEA. It said he was banned for life from communicating with or appearing before the DEA or any other federal agency on behalf of those companies on the specific matters he handled. The companies include some of the largest drug distributors and retailers in the nation, including McKesson, AmerisourceBergen, CVS, Walgreens, Rite Aid and Walmart. Cote said he has followed the opinion, which also singled out his work for the DEA on the Cardinal case. “I did not and really have not represented Cardinal since I left DEA,” Cote said. “Our firm does do work for Cardinal, but I’ve been really walled off from it because some of these matters are still pending and I just didn’t want to go there.” scott.higham@washpost.com leonard.bernstein@washpost.com steven.rich@washpost.com alice.crites@washpost.com Josephine Peterson contributed to this report. She is attached to The Post’s investigative unit through a program at American University.

“All the world remained silent toward the crimes committed by the Russians, Iranians and 60 Shiite sectarian groups by not enabling rebels to obtain the means for defending themselves and their lands,” said Lt. Col. Abu Bakr, a commander of the Jaish al-Mujahideen group that is part of the rebel umbrella Free Syrian Army. “This victory of Russia and Iran’s sectarian militias is over the ruins of a destroyed city.” In 2012, rebel forces had triumphantly stormed the eastern districts of Aleppo and hoped to use the city as a staging ground for their eventual assault on the capital, Damascus, where they hoped to unseat Assad. Instead, the war dragged on. Government allies, notably Iran and Russia, helped Assad gain momentum, and residents of eastern Aleppo endured years of horrific bombardment from government and Russian warplanes that decimated hospitals, homes and entire families. hugh.naylor@washpost.com Zakaria Zakaria in Istanbul contributed to this report.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

.

THE WASHINGTON POST

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China plays, and wins, by own rules CHINA FROM A1

dreamed of liberating China with technology, thinking that the system of censorship known as the Great Firewall would inevitably crumble like the Berlin Wall, paving the way for their advance in the world’s most populous nation. But President Xi Jinping has tightened, rather than loosened, control of the Internet and increased restrictions on foreign companies. Six years after Google retreated from China’s search-engine business over censorship and hacking concerns, U.S. firms seem more willing than ever to play the Communist Party’s game — they just can’t win it. Even if they can gain a foothold, which is hard enough, there is practically no way they will be able to overtake the Chinese companies that have comfortably established themselves. Facebook’s China charm offensive, which included Mark Zuckerberg studying Mandarin, has yielded little. Google’s search business and Twitter remain blocked. LinkedIn and Microsoft censor — and still, neither is a major player in China’s online space. Amazon.com is sputtering along against the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba. After great initial success, Apple is being overtaken by local upstarts. [Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.] Still, tech companies are pushing, and they are looking to the incoming Trump administration for help breaking in. When executives from the major U.S. technology companies met with President-elect Donald Trump on Dec. 14 at Trump Tower, they complained about a Chinese proposal that would require foreign technology companies to deposit the source code for their software with the government, according to a person who was familiar with the discussions.

MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST

Workers load a sign bearing the image of Chinese pop star Wu Yifan, spokesman for Dell, into a truck in Beijing. Mobile devices and e-commerce are in wide use despite serious Internet access restrictions.

BEHIND THE FIREWALL | HOW CHINA TAMED THE INTERNET This is part of a series examining the impact of China’s Great Firewall, a mechanism of Internet censorship and surveillance that affects nearly 700 million users.

Bill Bishop, a tech consultant who writes Sinocism, an influential China newsletter, said he has seen waves of confident California firms humbled by efforts to crack the China market. “Each generation believes they can find a way, but the Chinese Communist Party has upped their game in terms of censorship, and these companies that nobody has heard about 10 years ago — now they are the biggest companies in the world,” he said, referring to corporate behemoths such as Alibaba, Tencent, Xiaomi and Baidu, sometimes called the Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google of China. “U.S. companies are going to make a Chinese play, but not the way they imagined.” Thinking small If you were looking for a symbol of downsized China dreams, it would be hard to do better than Wuzhen, the luxe but isolated resort that plays host to China’s “World Internet Conference” each fall. The summit, in its third year, brings together an oddball cast

which this year included Chinese Internet regulators, pro-censorship academics, the prime minister of Cambodia and emissaries from U.S. companies such as Amazon and Facebook. One of the most high-profile speakers was Reid Hoffman, the executive chairman of LinkedIn, who praised Xi’s signature infrastructure plan, a spending bonanza known as “One Belt, One Road.” U.S. companies considering a China move often talk about the “LinkedIn model” — a model that means close local ties and full cooperation with the government. Acting local — or, indeed, operating at all — means playing by local rules, even when those rules run counter to the idea of free expression and association. LinkedIn’s Chinese site censors content and puts limits on forming groups. LinkedIn chief executive Jeff Weiner has described the company’s introduction of a Chinese-language version as involving “compromises that are far from ideal and can be very painful.” LinkedIn did not agree to an

interview for this article. Unlike when Google and Yahoo were hauled in to testify before Congress for censoring content a decade ago, LinkedIn’s censorship has earned the company a small amount of bad press but has not been treated as a major story. LinkedIn’s bigger challenge is competing in the Chinese market. Its Chinese site has more than 20 million users — fair by U.S. standards but diminutive for a Chinese social network, analysts said. To better connect with young workers, it launched an app called Chitu which promises to be “real and fun.” The app sounds millennial-friendly — it hosts livestreams with celebrities, for instance — but faces fierce competition from homegrown challengers with a head start. Staying relatively small, saying the right things and complying with authorities seems to be the only option. Evernote, an organizational app, launched a China-specific version in 2012. In 2014, the app shelved a feature that Hong Kong protesters had used to share infor-

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mation in China. Like many U.S. companies doing business in China, Evernote has agreed to store Chinese citizens’ data on Chinese servers, where authorities can access it. It runs its China operation in a bright, foosball-equipped office in Beijing’s tech district. The business is chugging along but remains small, employing a couple of dozen people. That fact that both firms are cited as China success stories shows just how tough it is for U.S. businesses. Jeremy Goldkorn, director of the media and consulting firm Danwei, summed up the best-case scenario for U.S. Internet startups as “not getting kicked out, but not making a lot of money.” Many large U.S. tech giants, from semiconductor companies to Apple, have made impressive profits in China, but it’s getting harder now, said Scott Kennedy, who directs a project on Chinese business at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “This is a market that makes or breaks companies.” Locked out The titans of U.S. technology are facing some of the toughest challenges yet. Google and Facebook remain at the periphery, reduced to selling ads while they angle for a Communist Party-brokered compromise that could get them in. Over the past few years, Facebook has made a high-profile push to win over China’s leaders. When China’s former Web czar, Lu Wei, toured Facebook’s office in 2014, a copy of Xi’s book, “The Governance of China,” was visible on Zuckerberg’s desk. Last March, Zuckerberg braved Beijing’s toxic air to take a notorious “smog jog” through Tiananmen Square. Despite recent reports that Facebook is building a “censorship tool” to help secure access to the Chinese market, the social network remains blocked, with little chance of that changing anytime soon, according to a person familiar with the matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of its sensitivity. To comply with Chinese law and regulations, Facebook would need to drastically change its product, experts said. If the company were to secure the requisite permits to operate — and that’s a big if — it’s not clear that it would succeed. In the years that Zuckerberg has been studying Mandarin, China’s government has ramped up

its focus on innovation and helped build an alternate universe where local technology rules. Facebook would need to compete, for instance, with Tencent’s WeChat, a chat service with more than 800 million active users that has morphed into one-stop shopping for socializing, news and ecommerce. “When I think about Facebook in China, I think, ‘What’s their advantage?’ ” said William Bao Bean, a Shanghai-based partner at SOSV Ventures and the managing director of Chinaccelerator, which invests in start-ups. “Their product is so outpaced by the local companies.” That does not mean Facebook won’t try. Tim Sparapani, who was Facebook’s first director of public policy and is now principal at SPQR strategies, said entering China was part of Zuckerberg’s vision and he “wouldn’t bet against Mark.” “If Mark says he is going to connect the world, he is going to connect the world. It’s about fulfilling that vision of ubiquitous worldwide connectivity.” Facebook declined a request for comment. Carmen Chang, a partner at the Silicon Valley firm New Enterprise Associates and a longtime China dealmaker, said that ambitious companies such as Facebook will take the long view in China — strengthening their ties and waiting for new opportunities. “China is too important a market for these companies to settle for a Plan B,” she said. “They will take what they can get and keep probing. Some companies will never give up.” Others wonder why Silicon Valley stays optimistic. “The people at the top are used to moving forward at cyber-speed, not to being pushed aside, blocked, for reasons that are not based on the technology or based on somebody having a better idea — it’s just foreign to their way of thinking,” said Lester Ross, a managing partner at Wilmer Hale in Beijing, who advises U.S. and Chinese companies. “If you can afford it, it’s patience and hope that things change. I don’t see signs of that in front of us in the near term,” he said. “It is very hard to be optimistic.” emily.rauhala@washpost.com elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com Dwoskin reported from San Francisco. Congcong Zhang in Wuzhen and Luna Lin in Beijing contributed to this report.


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. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

Economy & Business 



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Mortgage rates reach highs not seen in more than 2 years Homebuyers face challenges as housing prices climb, supply falls BY

K ATHY O RTON

House hunters might need to start adjusting their expectations as the days of ultra-low mortgage rates could finally be winding down. With homeownership hovering around a 50-year low, the American dream of owning a home seems like an unattainable goal to some, as prices are rising, supply is dwindling and mortgage rates have climbed to heights not seen in more than two years. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year, fixed-rate average jumped to 4.3 percent with an average 0.5 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent

of the loan amount.) It was 4.16 percent a week ago and 3.96 percent a year ago. The 30-year fixed rate, the most popular mortgage product, hasn’t been this high since April 2014. It has risen 83 basis points since Oct. 27 and 14 basis points in the past week. (A basis point is 0.01 percentage point.) A homebuyer who held off purchasing a $500,000 home in July when rates sank to 3.41 percent now will pay $255 more a month on a 30-year loan. The spike in mortgage rates also hurts the refinance market, although many homeowners already had taken advantage of the prolonged period of low rates. “The world is an uncertain place, and there is always a chance that rates could drop again in response to global turmoil,” said Mike Fratantoni, Mortgage Bankers Association’s chief economist. “But we expect that refinance volume will most likely be much lower over the next few years as homeowners have

repeatedly had the opportunity to lower their rates, and there will be fewer households with an incentive to refinance if rates follow the path we are projecting.” The bigger concern is how rising rates will affect affordability, particularly with rising prices. Home prices nationally reached a new high in September, according to the Standard & Poor’s/ Case-Shiller index released last month. The average home price surpassed the previous best set during the housing boom. However, adjusted for inflation, the index remains about 16 percent below peak. Home prices have been pushed higher in part by low inventory. Supply of homes for sale varies across the country. In the Washington area, the number of homes on the market in November was at its lowest level in three years. The combination of higher rates and higher prices may present obstacles for potential homebuyers, as U.S. economic growth has been steady but slow. The

Weekly averages for popular mortgage types 5%

30-YEAR FIXED

4.30% 4

15-YEAR FIXED 5-YEAR ARM

3.52%

3

3.32% 2

1

0 ’15

’16

Source: Freddie Mac The Washington Post

housing market is very dependent on the jobs market. People are reluctant to make large purchases such as buying a home unless they have a steady income. Although unemployment is down, wage growth has been stubbornly lackluster. Average hourly earn-

ings declined by 3 cents to $25.89 last month, offsetting the large gains in October. The rise in the 30-year fixed rate is also tempting borrowers to consider adjustable-rate mortgages again. ARMs got a bad rap during the housing bust when some borrowers took out interest-only mortgages or ones that reset to catastrophically high rates. But under the new, stricter regulations, ARMs have regained favor among borrowers. For those borrowers who don’t plan to remain in a home longer than 10 years, they offer a less expensive alternative to the 30-year fixed rate. “First of all, the number-one reason people are afraid of ARMs is because they don’t fully understand them,” said Craig Strent, chief executive officer of Apex Home Loans. “They were incorrectly used, and in my opinion, abused” during the housing boom. Despite the rapid increase in mortgage rates, they remain be-

low historic norms. It wasn’t that long ago that they were at 5 percent (February 2011) or 6 percent (November 2008). But since the housing bust, homeowners and buyers have become accustomed to rates as low as 3 percent and 4 percent. “It’s not about where rates are,” Strent said. “It’s about how does it affect your affordability.” Mortgage rates’ steady upward march reflects the surge in longterm bond yields. The yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury peaked at 2.6 percent last week before retreating slightly. The movement of the 10-year bond is one of the best indicators of whether mortgage rates will rise or fall. When yields go up, home loan rates tend to also go up. The bond market has been on a tear because investors believe President-elect Donald Trump will stimulate the economy through infrastructure spending, which would boost growth and potentially spur inflation. kathy.orton@washpost.com

As Ford is targeted, GM avoids the ire of president-elect Trump, who once had a Cadillac named after him, has mostly held off on criticizing that car’s maker BY M AX E HRENFREUND AND J IM T ANKERSLEY

The love affair between Donald Trump and Cadillac peaked in the late 1980s, when they teamed up on a line of limousines called “the Trump Series.” The most luxurious model came with black, Italian-leather seats, aircraft sound insulation, a television and VCR, a cellular telephone, 24-karatgold plating, a hidden safe and a paper shredder. The car stretched nearly 231/2 feet long. “I’m very honored that they built me the first one,” Trump said, unveiling the Golden Edition in 1988, “and, frankly, I deserve it.” Trump has had a long and sometimes lucrative relationship with Cadillac, the brand his father drove when Trump was a child. General Motors, which makes Cadillacs, was a regular advertiser on Trump’s television show, “The Apprentice,” where its products were sometimes featured in challenges for contestants. Cadillac was a longtime sponsor of a golf tournament at a Trump-owned course in Florida. Trump, in turn, has appeared at launch events to promote GM vehicles on several occasions, including one for the 2015 Cadillac Escalade. Trump is now president-elect, and he has styled himself as a critic in chief of American companies that move factory jobs to foreign countries. On the campaign trail, he made a few mentions of GM, which is in the middle of a $5 billion plan to expand production in Mexico. But the automaker has largely escaped the worst of Trump’s wrath. In a statement sent to reporters in June, Trump criticized GM’s

Mexico expansion: “Many companies — like Ford, General Motors, Nabisco, Carrier — are moving production to Mexico,” the statement read. But in the version of the statement posted to the campaign’s website, the reference to GM has been removed. A GM spokesman said Trump has no business relationship with Cadillac. There is no evidence that his past relationships with GM have influenced his conduct as a candidate and presidentelect. But the difference in how he has treated GM and, say, Ford — both iconic Detroit automakers — highlights a challenge Trump will face as president: how to avoid the appearance of playing favorites with companies he has done business with. Trump frequently criticized Ford on the campaign trail for its plans to move small-car production to Mexico. Last month, he announced that he had persuaded Ford not to move an SUV production line from Kentucky to Mexico, a decision that the company and union officials said did not affect any American jobs. In a statement, Hope Hicks, a spokeswoman for Trump, said GM, “along with many other companies he is speaking to, will be encouraged to keep jobs here in the United States.” But Trump has not criticized GM for its decision to import an SUV built in China, or for large investments in production facilities in South Korea. He did not speak out when GM announced last month that it will lay off 2,000 workers at factories in Ohio and Michigan, nor when the company said this week that it would lay off 1,300 workers in Detroit. (GM

DUANE BURLESON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A gas-powered Chevrolet Sonic, followed by an electric Chevrolet Bolt, moves off the assembly line in November at a General Motors plant in Orion Township, Mich. During the campaign, Donald Trump blamed layoffs at the plant in 2013 on policies backed by Hillary Clinton.

blamed both moves on softening U.S. demand for smaller cars and sedans.) GM produces about 19 percent of the cars it sells in North America in Mexico, similar to the figure for Fiat-Chrysler, according to data from the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich.; Ford produces about 12 percent there. There are GM plants at four locations in Mexico, and the company announced two years ago that new investments would create about 5,600 positions for Mexican workers. GM also imports the Buick Envision from China, a decision that has drawn the ire of organized labor. Workers have nicknamed the Envision the “Invasion.” On the campaign trail, Trump largely stayed mum on those decisions, even as he criticized Ford. For instance, in the opening minutes of his first debate with Demo-

cratic nominee Hillary Clinton, Trump falsely claimed Ford had plans to lay off employees. “Ford is leaving — you see that,” Trump said. “Their small-car division — thousands of jobs, leaving Michigan, leaving Ohio.” While Ford does plan to relocate its small-car production to Mexico, the company said its employees in the United States will continue working, building larger vehicles. One of the few moments when Trump mentioned GM on the trail came in Grand Rapids, Mich., a week before the election. There, he used layoffs at one of the company’s plants to attack not the company but his Democratic opponent. “GM laid off 314 workers at the Lake Orion assembly plant in 2013 because of imports from the South Korean trade deal pushed by Hillary,” Trump said.

After winning the election, Trump appointed GM’s chairman and chief executive, Mary Barra, to an economic advisory panel. Last year, Trump’s campaign told The Washington Post that a Cadillac Escalade was one of two American cars that Trump owned at the time, along with a Tesla. In 2006, contestants on “The Apprentice” were tasked with planning a three-hour training session for Chevrolet dealers, focused on the Tahoe. (GM also makes Chevrolets.) Luigi Zingales, an economist at the University of Chicago, said Trump’s divergent treatment of GM and Ford on the stump raises the specter of government favoritism to specific companies, a practice economists generally believe can hurt the economy. “It looks more and more [like] the behavior of a crony capitalist,” Zingales said. “The issue is you

don’t want to be in a country where the president picks and chooses who to blast and who to promote in completely arbitrary fashion.” Not every past partnership with Trump has worked out for GM. The Trump line of limos, for example, never really made it to the road. At the unveiling, Trump called the car “the ultimate limousine to be found anywhere in the world.” In his book “The Art of the Deal,” Trump wrote that he received a “beautiful gold Cadillac Allanté” as a gift from the company on completing the deal. GM says that only three of the Trump-edition cars were ever produced. max.ehrenfreund@washpost.com jim.tankersley@washpost.com  More at washingtonpost.com/ wonkblog

DIGEST BANKING

ECONOMY

U.S. sues Barclays in mortgage fraud case

GDP revision shows faster growth

The Justice Department is suing Barclays for fraud in the sale of mortgage securities in the run-up to the financial crisis. The British bank deceived investors about the quality of loans underlying tens of billions of dollars of mortgage securities between 2005 and 2007, according to the lawsuit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn. Loans based on inflated home appraisals had been made to borrowers with no ability to repay, the suit said. Barclays said in a statement that the claims in the lawsuit are “disconnected from the facts” and that it has an obligation to defend against “unreasonable allegations and demands.” The bank was apparently referring to negotiations to settle the claims without a case being filed.

The U.S. economy grew at a 3.5 percent annual rate in the July-to-September quarter, the fastest pace in two years and more than the government had previously estimated. But the growth spurt isn’t expected to last. The gain in the gross domestic product — the economy’s total output of goods and services — came from added strength in consumer spending, business investment and the government sector, the Commerce Department said Thursday. Commerce had previously estimated last quarter’s annual growth rate at 3.2 percent. The GDP report “paints a picture of a healthy consumer, likely fueled by ongoing gains in employment, modest increases in wages, and solid balance sheets,” Michael Gapen of

— Reuters

Barclays said. Last quarter marked a sharp pickup from the tepid annual growth of 0.8 percent in the first quarter and 1.4 percent in the second. Still, growth is expected to slow to a roughly 1.5 percent annual rate in the October-toDecember quarter, reflecting in part less consumer spending and less business stockpiling. — Associated Press

ALSO IN BUSINESS  Ikea has agreed to pay $50 million to the families of three toddlers who died when the company’s dressers tipped over on them, the families’ lawyers said. The Swedish furnishings retailer has recalled millions of chests and dressers over concerns that they can tip over when the drawers are opened. The lawyers said Ikea also will make donations to children’s hospitals. The settlement, which is awaiting U.S. court approval, involves the deaths of 2-year-olds in

FAROOQ KHAN/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

A Kashmiri man adjusts threads he dyed as he leaves them to dry in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian Kashmir. Kashmiris have been dyeing fabric and threads manually for about 200 years. The practice, however, is declining as the manual labor involved in creating dyes is exhausting and often takes its toll on workers.

Pennsylvania, Washington and Minnesota.  Nokia, the Finnish telecom

equipment maker, said Thursday it has filed a new set of patent lawsuits against Apple in Asia,

Europe and the United States. Nokia had said Wednesday it was suing Apple, accusing the iPhone maker of violating 32 technology patents. Nokia said Thursday it has filed 40 patent suits in 11 countries. Teva Pharmaceutical  Industries agreed to pay more than $519 million to settle U.S. criminal and civil allegations that the company bribed overseas officials to gain business for its medications, the Justice Department said Thursday. The company paid millions of dollars in bribes to officials in Mexico, Russia and Ukraine to promote its products such as its blockbuster multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone, the Justice Department said. — From news services

COMING TODAY  10 a.m.: Commerce Department releases new-home sales for November.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

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Trump suggests he might abandon F-35 plans for a less-expensive plane BY AND

M ISSY R YAN A ARON G REGG

President-elect Donald Trump piled on fresh criticism of the Pentagon’s most sophisticated aircraft on Thursday, suggesting that he might abandon the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter in favor of a cheaper plane because of high costs. In a message on Twitter, Trump said that cost overruns in Lockheed Martin’s $400 billion program to develop the stealth jet

had prompted him to ask Boeing, another major aircraft manufacturer, to “price-out a comparable F-18 Super Hornet.” The Super Hornet is a fighter jet that began flying in the 1990s. While the F-35 has been declared combat-capable, the United States has yet to fly it in combat missions. Trump has blasted the F-35 before, saying the cost is “out of control” and promising that his administration would find savings in military hardware pur-

chases. His criticism of Lockheed, based in Bethesda, and Boeing has roiled the defense industry and laid a marker for a hard line from the White House in dealings with major players doing business with the government. Even before Trump launched his public assault, the F-35, the Pentagon’s most expensive weapons program, had come in for widespread criticism for design flaws and spiraling costs. While the current price for the various F-35 variants is at least $100 mil-

lion per plane, the company has said that it will fall to $85 million each in four or five years. This fall, the Pentagon and officials from Lockheed failed to agree on a mutually acceptable price for the latest batch of planes. And last month, Canada said it might buy Super Hornets until it decides whether to go ahead with planned F-35 purchases. A number of U.S. allies, including Israel, are buying F-35s. While some lawmakers have

criticized the program, the jet’s supply chain touches virtually every state in the country, giving it many defenders in Congress. Lockheed Martin estimates that the program accounts for 38,900 jobs in Texas alone, and close to 10,000 in Connecticut. In an email, Lockheed spokesman Bill Phelps declined to comment. Lockheed shares fell 2 percent in after-hours trading, wiping out about $1.5 billion in shareholder value, while Boeing rose 0.67

immediately after the presidentelect’s tweet. Trump has also assailed Boeing over the high cost of a new Air Force One plane in the works. Its chief executive later met with the president-elect and promised to give the U.S. government a break on the aircraft. missy.ryan@washpost.com aaron.gregg@washpost.com Carol Morello, Dan Lamothe and Steven Mufson contributed to this report.

Uber shifts self-driving cars to Ariz. from Calif. Vehicle registrations were revoked, ending tests in San Francisco BY

S TEVEN O VERLY

On Wednesday afternoon, California regulators forced Uber to take its self-driving cars off the state’s roads for failing to obtain required permits. On Thursday morning, Uber packed up the cars and shipped them to Arizona, where it expects to begin road tests in the coming weeks. Uber’s move to a neighboring state highlights the patchwork of regulations emerging as states determine how self-driving cars should be tested for safety. In particular, states looking to

adopt the technology early are making their roadways more welcoming to self-driving cars and those who make them. Twelve state governments have passed legislation or issued executive orders related to autonomous vehicles, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, though not all pertain to testing on public roadways. More could be coming in the new year. “Right now there are only a handful of states that have statutes like this. Four or five years ago, it looked like there would be a lot more,” said James Anderson, a senior behavioral scientist at Rand, a nonprofit research institution. Now that these tests are taking shape, “states are more trying to think about how does this actually work in practice.” California was among the ear-

liest to pass laws governing autonomous vehicles. In 2012, it required companies testing the vehicles on its roads to obtain special permits and disclose certain information about how the vehicles perform. Some of the state’s more recent policy proposals have been criticized as onerous and stifling to innovation. The California Department of Motor Vehicles rebuked Uber last week when the company began testing self-driving cars on public roads in San Francisco without obtaining the required permits. On Wednesday, the DMV revoked the automobile registrations for Uber’s fleet to halt the program. “California’s testing regulations for autonomous vehicles strikes a balance between protecting public safety and embracing innovation,” the agency said

in a statement. “These regulations were adopted two years ago, and they are working for the 20 manufacturers now testing more than 130 autonomous vehicles on California’s streets and roads.” For its part, Uber acknowledged from the start that the decision to launch without a permit may rankle regulators. The company maintains that its vehicles do not meet the state’s definition for autonomous vehicles because they need an engineer and a safety driver, who can take control of the vehicle, to operate on roads. Uber is no stranger to public policy conflicts. The company rapidly expanded its popular ride-hailing service often by circumventing regulators and launching without the required approvals. This time is different. Whereas

ERIC RISBERG/ASSOCIATED PRESS

An Uber self-driving car waits in traffic during a test drive in San Francisco, where regulators cried foul over unobtained permits.

before it relied on a network of contractors to use their personal vehicles, Uber owns its fleet of self-driving cars and employs those who operate them. That

gives regulators new recourse, such as California’s decision to revoke registrations, that they didn’t have before. steven.overly@washpost.com

Kane Co., owner of D.C.’s Office Movers, files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy BY AND

A ARON G REGG T HOMAS H EATH

Kane Co., a family-owned firm that became one of the nation’s largest commercial movers, filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Baltimore on Thursday morning. The filing in federal bankruptcy court comes two weeks after President John Kane said the firm would close most of its operations and lay off 950 people. “The Kane Company and its subsidiary-related businesses are filing Chapter 7 today,” Kane said in a statement. “We look forward to cooperating with the bankruptcy trustee to unwind the business and get as much money to creditors as we can.”

In a Chapter 7 liquidation, a court trustee sells assets to pay creditors’ claims, and the company then ceases operations. Kane Co.’s shredding and storage business is to be sold as part of the bankruptcy proceedings. A local competitor, Suddath Workplace Solutions, said last week it is interviewing 100 dismissed Kane Co. employees and is in talks with the company’s bank about purchasing some of its assets. Kane says he has not filed personal bankruptcy. Kane and his wife are well known in the Washington business scene and are active in local politics. John Kane formerly chaired the Maryland Republican Party, and his wife, Mary, ran unsuccessfully for the state’s

lieutenant governor post. And yet, they maintained good relationships across the political spectrum. “You could always count on the guy to participate in charitable and philanthropic events, and they’re just very, very good as leaders in the community,” said Montgomery County Executive Isiah Leggett (D), who had collaborated with Kane during his time in politics even though the two pulled for opposing parties. The bankruptcy filing is the end of a long journey for Kane Co., a family-owned moving firm that rose to local prominence through its Office Movers business, which plotted and implemented moves for some of the

region’s biggest employers. The firm was founded by Kane’s father, Eugene, who bought a defunct Baltimore trucking company and built it into a profitable business focusing on the Baltimore-Washington region. The company eventually expanded to more than a dozen facilities across five states and built a fleet of trucks that once numbered more than 250. The business later split into three distinct companies, each owned by one of Eugene Kane’s sons. The other two Kane-owned businesses are not a part of the bankruptcy. Kane Construction, a $30 million-per-year contracting firm run by Dennis Kane, and International Limousine Service, an $18 million-per-year business

run by Richard Kane, are still in operation. Dennis Kane said his company shares numerous customers with his brother John’s business but has no corporate or financial ties to the firm. He said his company is in good standing with its creditors and is hiring to facilitate an expansion. In recent years, John Kane’s moving company has expanded into novel lines of business that stepped beyond the traditional responsibilities of a moving firm. The company hired securitycleared movers to safely dispose of classified information, opening up business relationships with classified government contractors. The firm also played interior designer for some of the world’s best-known hotel brands,

outfitting hotel rooms with accessories. The moves helped John Kane shepherd the company through the recession while keeping layoffs to a minimum. Kane Co. reported annual revenue of about $48 million but found itself short on cash as it prepared to move to a new office. The company came up short for $2 million in lease costs and couldn’t cover the difference. Bankruptcy filings submitted Thursday indicate the company had total property assets of $15.77 million and total liabilities of $8.83 million. “I made a couple of stupid mistakes. Our bank lost patience with us,” Kane said at the time. aaron.gregg@washpost.com thomas.heath@washpost.com

THE MARKETS 6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets

Data and graphics by

Daily Stock Market Performance Index Dow Jones Industrial Average 20,000

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YTD % Chg

19,918.88

–0.1

+14.3

18,500 17,000 15,500 Nasdaq Composite Index 5500

5447.42

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Industry Group Diversified Telecomm Biotechnology Personal Products Oil, Gas, Consumable Fuel Road & Rail Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr Automobiles Auto Components Distributors Multiline Retail

0

–5.0%

+5.0%

1.02 0.59 0.51 0.48 0.45 –1.75 –2.06 –2.44 –2.56 –4.58

4750 4500 4250 S&P 500 Index

2260.96

–0.2

+10.6

2325 2200 2075 1950 D

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Americas Brazil (Bovespa) Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.) Mexico (Bolsa) Europe Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600) France (CAC 40) Germany (DAX) U.K. (FTSE 100) Asia Pacific Australia (ASX 200) China (CSI 300) Hong Kong (Hang Seng) Japan (Nikkei)

Close

Daily % Chg

57,255.22 15,335.23 45,008.08

–0.7 0.2 0.1

359.82 4834.63 11,456.10 7063.68

–0.2 0.0 –0.1 0.3

5643.94 3335.67 21,636.20 19,427.67

0.5 –0.1 –0.8 –0.1

YTD % Chg –40%

0%

+40%

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Daily % Chg

YTD % Chg

3M Co AmExp Apple Inc Boeing Caterpillar Chevron Corp Cisco Systems Coca-Cola DuPont Exxon Mobil GE GoldmnSchs Home Depot IBM Intel Corp

179.20 74.58 116.22 157.46 94.12 118.77 30.46 41.55 75.07 90.87 31.82 240.12 135.43 167.06 36.93

0.4 –1.0 –0.7 0.0 0.3 0.7 0.1 0.0 –0.5 0.7 –1.0 –0.5 –1.0 –0.2 –0.1

19.0 7.2 10.4 8.9 38.5 32.0 12.2 –3.3 12.7 16.6 2.2 33.2 2.4 21.4 7.2

Company

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YTD % Chg

J&J JPMorg Ch McDonald's Merck Microsoft Nike P&G Co Pfizer Inc Travelers United Tech UnitedHealth Verizon Visa Inc Wal-Mart Walt Disney

115.44 86.89 123.72 59.58 63.55 52.14 84.47 32.34 122.12 110.46 161.58 53.65 77.90 69.59 105.42

0.1 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.0 –0.3 0.2 –0.2 –0.4 0.0 0.2 1.3 –0.3 –2.3 –0.1

12.4 31.6 4.7 12.8 14.5 –16.6 6.4 0.2 8.2 15.0 37.4 16.1 0.5 13.5 0.3

Cross Currency Rates US $ US $ per EU € per

0.9581

EU €

Japan ¥

Britain £

Brazil R$

Canada $

1.0437

0.0085

1.2289

0.3042

0.7413

0.0482

0.0081

1.1774

0.2911

0.7102

0.0462

144.4680

35.7179

87.1480

5.6679

0.2475

0.6031

0.0392

Japan ¥ per

117.5700

122.7100

Britain £ per

0.8137

0.8493

0.0069

Brazil R$ per

3.2916

3.4356

0.0279

4.0399

Canada $ per

1.3490

1.4080

0.0114

1.6578

0.4104

Mexico $ per

20.7420

21.6494

0.1760

25.4948

6.3020

Mexico $

2.4373

0.1585 0.0650

15.3778

Index Close DJ Total Stock Market Index 23,486.05 Russell 2000 1362.66 Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 450.51 CBOE Volatility (VIX) 11.45

Consumer Rates

Daily % Chg –0.3 –0.9 –0.4 1.6

YTD % Chg 11.3 20.0 22.4 –37.1

Daily % Chg

$2.4995 $3.4725 $52.95 $1,130.70 $3.54

+0.1 0.0 +0.9 –0.2 –0.1

Orange Juice Silver Soybeans Sugar Wheat

Exchange-Traded (Ticker) Coffee (COFF.L) Copper (COPA.L) Corn (CORN.L) Cotton (COTN.L) Crude Oil (CRUD.L) Gasoline (UGAS.L) Gold (BULL.L) Natural Gas (NGAS.L) Silver (SLVR.L)

Daily % Chg

Close

Daily % Chg

$1.9195 $15.87 $10.0400 $0.1816 $3.9700

–1.5 –0.7 –1.3 –0.2 –0.6

day $800

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Gainers Micron Technology Alexion Pharma LSC Communications Pioneer Energy Svcs Era Group Inc CF Industries Brooks Automation Carrizo Oil & Gas Bill Barrett Corp Lamb Weston ConAgra Inogen Inc MEDNAX Inc Tetra Technologies Marathon Petroleum CentralGarden & Pet CentralGarden & Pet CDI Corp GulfIslandFabricatn HollyFrontier Corp

Daily Close % Chg

$23.19 $125.85 $27.00 $6.55 $16.56 $30.11 $17.44 $39.41 $7.40 $36.33 $39.29 $67.66 $67.82 $5.13 $50.34 $34.25 $31.97 $7.95 $12.60 $32.63

12.7 5.8 5.2 4.8 4.5 4.2 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.4 3.2 2.9 2.8 2.8 2.7 2.7 2.6 2.4 2.4

Losers Red Hat Inc Tidewater Inc Bed Bath & Beyond CalAmp Corp AAR Corp Lannett Co Inc Kirkland's Inc Winnebago Indst Tailored Brands Inc Zumiez Inc Dick's Sprtg Goods Williams-Sonoma G-III Apparel Big Lots Inc Dress Barn Inc Stage Stores Inc Hibbett Sports Inc Vitamin Shoppe Inc American Eagle Abercrombie & Fitch

Daily Close % Chg

$68.71 $3.70 $41.38 $14.31 $34.19 $22.70 $15.23 $32.65 $26.13 $21.00 $52.85 $49.77 $29.91 $50.92 $6.42 $4.95 $37.00 $24.45 $15.09 $12.03

–13.9 –12.9 –9.2 –9.0 –9.0 –8.8 –8.4 –8.2 –8.0 –7.9 –7.8 –7.5 –7.4 –7.4 –7.0 –6.8 –6.6 –6.5 –6.3 –6.3

Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months Interest Rates

Other Measures

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Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index

Dow Jones 30 Industrials Company

Futures Copper Corn Crude Oil Gold Natural Gas

Value of $1000 invested for the past:

International Stock Markets

5250 5000

1825

Commodities

S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot Daily % Chg

Money market funds 6-Month CDs 1-Year CDs 5-Year CDs New car loan Home-equity loan

0.26 0.32 0.56 1.19 2.85 5.11

3.75% Bank Prime 0.75% Federal Funds

4.17% 30-Year fixed mortgage

3.32%

10-year note Yield: 2.55

2-year note Yield: 1.19

5-year note Yield: 2.03

6-month bill Yield: 0.65

15-Year fixed mortgage

3.04% 1.00% www.ebook3000.com LIBOR 3-Month 1-Year ARM

Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of 4:30 p.m. New York time.


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PowerPost INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS  WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST

Trump’s conflicts of interest could yield conflict

JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST

President-elect Donald Trump after a meeting Wednesday at the Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Fla.

Is ‘unpredictable’ Trump adopting Richard Nixon’s ‘madman theory’? Donald Trump appears to have embraced, with gusto, Richard JAMES Nixon’s “madman HOHMANN theory” of foreign policy. Trump thinks he can use his reputation for unpredictability and lack of respect for long-standing international norms to unnerve and then intimidate U.S. adversaries into making concessions that they would not otherwise make. The Chinese government’s decision Tuesday to return the naval drone that it had seized in the South China Sea, despite howls of protest about Trump’s braggadocio, might be the first vindication of this approach. A generation ago, Nixon wanted to convince the Soviets and their North Vietnamese clients that he was a hot-head willing to use nuclear weapons. The goal then was to scare the communists into negotiating. In some ways, this was the nub of the secret plan he talked so much about during the 1968 campaign — just as Trump insisted that he had a secret plan to get rid of the Islamic State during the 2016 race. “I call it the Madman Theory,” the then-president explained to H.R. Haldeman, his chief of staff, as they walked along a foggy beach one day. “I want the North Vietnamese to believe I’ve reached the point where I might do anything to stop the war. We’ll just slip the word to them that, ‘For God’s sake, you know Nixon is obsessed about Communism. We can’t restrain him when he’s angry — and he has his hand on the nuclear button!’ And Ho Chi Minh himself will be in Paris in two days begging for peace.” Elites in Washington and across the world say Trump is crazy, but the president-elect has demonstrated repeatedly that he can be crazy like a fox. He knew exactly what he was doing when he called for a Muslim ban, for instance, or picked fights with people on Twitter to distract the media from much bigger problems. We’ve already learned

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that Trump’s phone call with the leader of Taiwan was not some spontaneous faux pas but a carefully planned recalibration of U.S. policy. For Trump’s stratagem to work, foreign leaders must continue to believe that he’s erratic and prone to irrational overreaction. “We must as a nation be more unpredictable,” Trump often said on the campaign trail. “We have to be unpredictable!” This is a dangerous gambit in the current geopolitical risk environment. Nixon played the game in a bipolar world, with two superpowers and nothing like the Islamic State to worry about. The world that Trump must lead is multi-polar. Asymmetric warfare is now a top-tier concern. Several events Monday — including the assassination of

“We must as a nation be more unpredictable. . . . We have to be unpredictable!” Donald Trump on campaign trail

the Russian ambassador in Turkey, the truck attack at a Christmas market in Berlin, the mosque shooting in Zurich, the on-again, off-again evacuation in Aleppo, Syria, and riots in Venezuela — offered timely reminders of the degree to which our interconnected world is a tinderbox, perennially on the verge of bursting into flames. In Europe, they’re already calling it Black Monday. What alarms so many foreignpolicy gray beards is that Trump is a flamethrower, not a firefighter, by his very nature. Since Theodore Roosevelt was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in ending the RussoJapanese war, every U.S. president has prided himself on at least trying to defuse global tensions, not heighten them. As

Billy Joel sang: “We didn’t start the fire. No, we didn’t light it, but we tried to fight it.” The international order, which the United States sits atop, depends to some degree on stability, certainty and predictability. Allies need to know they can count on us, and the United States’ enemies need to know that the security guarantee for countries from Estonia to South Korea is real. Trump seems either unable or unwilling to pivot into using diplomatic speak. That should not come as a big surprise, and it’s not necessarily always a bad thing. A big part of his appeal during the campaign was his refusal to be “politically correct.” Why would he change now? Trump’s decision to adopt the “madman theory” highlights his longtime fixation with Nixon and underscores his pre-existing Nixonian tendencies. Henry A. Kissinger, Nixon’s national security adviser and secretary of state, has spoken to Trump several times before and since the election. They’ve had long meetings to talk about the world. Even as a nonagenarian, the German-born Kissinger has an uncanny ability to cast a spell on powerful Republican men — just as he did with Nelson Rockefeller a half century ago, then Nixon and finally Gerald Ford. On Monday, Kissinger sat with Vice President-elect Mike Pence, who studiously took notes and then tweeted a picture of their meeting. Pence, 57, may not be old enough to remember when Kissinger, 93, was one of the biggest bogeymen there was on the right. Ronald Reagan’s 1976 primary challenge against Ford was fueled by conservative antipathy toward Kissinger, who was perceived as having Rasputin-like influence over the accidental president. Ford literally stopped using the word “detente” because Reagan was hammering him for being too soft on Russia during that campaign. How times change. . . . james.hohmann@washpost.com

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potential conflicts for Trump and his family. Yet, his businesses could present conflicts for federal employees, too. For example, if Trump doesn’t completely divest his business operations and one of them violated federal regulations, would agency staffers hesitate to impose enforcement actions that could harm the boss’s financial interests? If the regulations were not enforced, would workers fear being retaliated against for disclosing that dereliction of duty? In the BIA’s case, the “failure to defend its employee and, instead, to cave to a retaliatory demand is a PPP (prohibited personnel practice),” OSC’s 17-page report said. “The chilling effect is clear: BIA employees are silenced from disclosing violations of law if they anticipate that such disclosures will be unpalatable to a Tribe and that BIA will simply bend to the Tribe’s will.” Lerner told The Washington Post that “federal managers need to abide by merit system principles, even when there is outside pressure to retaliate. It’s important for the federal workforce to know about this case to help deter future acts of retaliation. It’s vital that federal managers protect employees who anger outside interests when they uncover potential wrongdoing as a part of their job.” Whatever implications stem from this case will be played out in the context of the disturbing news that the Trump transition team asked the Energy Department for the names of individual employees and contractors who attended conferences on climate change, a global phenomenon that Trump called a hoax. That inquiry worried workers concerned that there could be reprisals from incoming Trump officials for work done on policies he opposes. The OSC enforcement action in the Southern Ute case “sends a strong signal that agencies must

not retaliate against whistleblowers to mollify key stakeholders,” said Jason Zuckerman, a Washington lawyer specializing in whistleblower retaliation. “The troubling questionnaire that the Trump transition team sent to DOE to identify scientists performing research on global warming suggests that regulated industries might view the new administration as an opportunity to punish federal workers for enforcing regulations or force federal workers to abandon investigations or enforcement actions for political reasons.” In a letter to its members, the Southern Ute Tribal Council said the OSC misrepresented it “as actively trying to skirt environmental regulations, then seeking retaliation for a BIA employee ‘whistleblower’ who had refused to let environmental mandates slide. This is simply not the case.” The Tribal Council said it wanted the employee replaced because of incompetence, disrespect and “disregard for the Tribe’s sovereignty.” The BIA ignored most of my questions, saying only that it appreciated OSC’s review and intends to comply with its requests for the worker’s reinstatement and compensation. Federal employees who enforce regulations “may be understandably reluctant to put objections, stipulations and cautions in writing for fear that it may cause them to be put on White House hit lists,” said Jeff Ruch, executive director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility. Enforcing rules that conflict with Trump administration policies, under “a chief executive who is so thinskinned that he regularly gets into Twitter-spats with actors about comedy skits,” he added, “may require a profile in courage.” joe.davidson@washpost.com  Excerpted from washingtonpost. com/powerpost

House panel alleges that Snowden is in contact with Russian intelligence BY

E LLEN N AKASHIMA

A newly declassified House Intelligence Committee report states that Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency contractor who passed secrets to journalists, “has had, and continues to have, contact with Russian intelligence services” — but says the evidence is classified. Snowden, 33, has been in Moscow since June 2013, when he left the country to avoid prosecution for sharing classified information about NSA and other intelligenceagency programs. His material, provided to outlets including The Washington Post, led to some significant changes to intelligence gathering, such as a ban on the government’s mass collection of Americans’ phone metadata. It also sparked controversy over whether some of the revelations damaged national security. The 37-page report, completed in September and issued in declassified form Thursday with sub-

stantial redactions, does not provide any evidence for the assertion. Instead it says the “cited material [is] classified.” Snowden has said he never gave information to Russian intelligence. He told Yahoo anchor Katie Couric in an interview this month that Russians did try to get him to talk: “And I said, ‘Look, guys, I don’t have any information. I don’t have any documents. I’m not going to cooperate.’” He said that “the government has left me alone, for the most part.” Ben Wizner, Snowden’s attorney and a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, said that if the committee “had any evidence to support that false accusation, they would show it.” The report also cites a NPR report that quotes a Russian parliament member who, the intelligence committee said, asserted that “Snowden did share intelligence” with the government. Snowden told Couric that the NPR report involved a “mistranslation” in which the individual

was “speculating” that Russia’s spy services would approach him. “It didn’t happen,” he said. “I’ve never shared information with Russia’s intelligence services.” In a June YouTube interview, former NSA deputy director Chris Inglis said he doubted that Snowden was “in the employ of the Chinese or the Russians.” Said Inglis, “I don’t see any evidence that would indicate that, and even if they were careful in terms of practicing denial and deception, I think there would be certain telltales” that would show that Snowden was giving up intelligence. The committee chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), said the report gives the public “a fuller account of Edward Snowden’s crimes and the reckless disregard he has shown for U.S. national security. . . . It will take a long time to mitigate the damage he caused, and I look forward to the day when he returns to the United States to face justice.” ellen.nakashima@washpost.com

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Will a barely noticed report from a little federal agency about whistleblower Federal retaliation have Insider larger implications after JOE the Trump era DAVIDSON begins next month? That question can’t be answered now, but there is concern among whistleblower advocates who find both comfort and warning signals in an Office of Special Counsel (OSC) case. The OSC investigates reprisals against federal whistleblowers. There are far too many acts of revenge, but “the unique aspect of this case is the third-party element,” said Special Counsel Carolyn Lerner. Agency retributions against employees generally don’t involve retaliation on behalf of an outside party. That’s behind what the OSC says the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) did to a staffer after he complained that leases between energy firms and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe in Colorado appeared to violate BIA regulations and environmental laws. “The employee’s disclosures angered a Native American tribe, and the tribe put pressure on the highest levels of BIA and the Interior Department to reassign the employee from the BIA’s office on the tribe’s reservation,” an OSC statement released last week said. The BIA fired the employee in 2013. He was reinstated with back wages and compensatory payments in an agreement that the OSC negotiated. In normal times, this case might not make this column. But Donald Trump’s electoral college victory makes these times abnormal. With the presidentelect’s extensive business and financial holdings, this case could have larger implications. There has been much attention to

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Why a civilian should lead the Pentagon

BY ERWIN CHEMERINSKY, ANNIE LAI AND SETH DAVIS

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ities and public universities are exercising their constitutional authority when they declare themselves “sanctuaries” in response to Donald Trump’s vow to deport 2 million to 3 million immigrants upon taking office next month. Trump has threatened to force state and local governments to implement his deportation policies, including by taking away federal funds, but such actions would be unconstitutional and likely halted by the courts. The term “sanctuary,” as used in this context, does not mean that a city or institution will conceal or shelter undocumented immigrants from detection. Rather, sanctuary policies might, among other things, commit a city to serving all individuals without regard to immigration status, protect the privacy of community members by keeping their immigration status confidential, or direct law enforcement officers not to investigate, arrest or hold people solely on the basis of immigration status. Sanctuary policies are an exercise of basic state and local powers to regulate for the health, safety and welfare of their residents. Some entities have acted out of a moral objection to mass deportations, but that is rarely the only motivation. Many local leaders recognize that sanctuary policies are vital to preserving policecommunity relations and ensuring that residents feel safe reporting crimes and accessing basic government services. Still others are responding to the risk that collaboration with federal immigration officials could lead to racial profiling and civil liberties violations. Public schools and universities have voiced concern that more aggressive immigration enforcement will jeopardize student safety and interfere with their schools’ educational missions. Trump insists that he can force states and cities to participate in his plan to deport undocumented immigrants. But this ignores the 10th Amendment, which the Supreme Court has repeatedly interpreted to prevent the federal government from “commandeering” state and local governments by requiring them to enforce federal mandates. For example, in Printz v. United States, in 1997, the Supreme Court struck down a provision of the federal Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act that sought to require local officers to help enforce federal gun-control laws, including by conducting background checks. In an opinion by Justice Antonin Scalia, the court held that the act violated principles of federalism and the 10th Amendment for Congress by compelling state and local governments to comply with a federal mandate. Under the anticommandeering principle, the federal government can no more require state and local governments to help it carry out mass deportations than it can require local officers to investigate and enforce federal gun laws. Some have suggested that there is an exception to the anti-commandeering principle that allows the federal government to demand that states and cities turn over confidential information about undocumented immigrants. But this assertion misreads Supreme Court precedents. The court has held that Congress can require states and cities to disclose information where a statute also requires private parties to turn over the same kind of information. The court has never held that Congress can single out states and cities to share information with the federal government. That is the type of commandeering that the court repeatedly has found violates the 10th Amendment. Nor can the federal government do indirectly — by threatening to withdraw federal funding from states — what it cannot do directly. In National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, in 2012, the Supreme Court struck down a provision of the Affordable Care Act that required states to expand their Medicaid programs or lose the state’s federal Medicaid money. The court found the condition that Congress placed on states’ Medicaid funding unduly coercive and thus a violation of the 10th Amendment. There are other limits on Congress’s ability to impose funding conditions on states and localities. Congress must give clear, advanced notice to states of the terms of federal grants, and any conditions imposed on a grant must be reasonably related to the federal interest animating the grant program. Congress likely could not, for example, condition the receipt of a grant for economic development on cooperation with immigration enforcement. Also, funding conditions cannot themselves be used to induce states to violate the Constitution, for example by unlawfully detaining people on immigration detainers without a judicial determination of probable cause. California Senate President Kevin de León (D) on Dec. 7 unveiled a bill in the state legislature that, if passed, would further remove state and local governments from the business of immigration enforcement. For decades, conservatives have championed states’ rights. The principles they have created mean that states and cities can decline to participate in Trump’s deportation plan, no matter how much his plan’s success may depend on their cooperation.

The writers are professors at the University of California at Irvine School of Law.

R UBEN G ALLEGO

AMANDA VOISARD FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Holiday lights adorn a fence at a home in Washington.

The suffering behind the lights BY CHEN GUANGCHENG

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t’s just a few days before Christmas, and all across the United States, the holiday spirit is growing, with decorations lighting up homes and main streets. Unfortunately, this warm atmosphere is aided in no small part by forced prison labor from China. As unpleasant as it sounds, the truth is that many of the trappings of the holiday — strings of lights, tchotchkes, gift bags — are often made by inmates at prisons or other detention centers in China, who face severe punishment for not achieving daily work quotas. Indeed, many prisons and detention facilities are factories unto themselves, with a variety of products being manufactured throughout vast compounds. These are islands of lawlessness, outside the reach of human rights attorneys, journalists, the United Nations and nongovernmental organizations, not to mention the family members of those who are incarcerated. Having spent more than four years in prisons and detention centers, and having spoken with many friends, colleagues and fellow human rights activists who have suffered similar fates, I am unfortunately all too familiar with what happens in these so-called correctional facilities in China. In the case of holiday lights, prisoners are required to put together 200 to 300 strings of lights per day. In some places, the requirement is not for strings of lights but for the number of light bulbs attached. Inmates are forced to work 10 to 15 hours a day, sometimes staying up through the night. By design, the workload is far greater than can be reasonably accomplished; the pressure to keep up with quotas is so great that people often forgo a chance to go to the bathroom. Those who are brave enough to refuse orders to do illegal labor are subjected to “hugging chains”

(arms and legs chained and locked together, the body curving forward in a crawling position), or “hanging cuffs” (both hands are raised up high and put through the iron bars of a window or a fence and locked with handcuffs from the outside), or “squatting on the john” (both hands are locked to an iron ring on the floor), or “food stoppage,” “sitting beating” and other punishments. The range and variety are vast. Punishments such as these might last a day or so, or extend for weeks on end. Once torture begins, it does not end easily. What’s more, prison guards can order a few trusted “work numbers,” as prisoners are called, to take a disobedient inmate out to the prison yard, pull down the person’s pants, and pin the person’s head and limbs down on the ground. Then, in front of everyone gathered, a work number will beat the person’s naked backside with a leather belt, rubber club or other implement. With each blow, the victim squirms and writhes on the ground. These events usually end in one of two ways. One is that the misbehaving offender is unable to withstand the pain and, while crying and screaming, begs for mercy and agrees to cooperate with whatever is asked. The other is that the torturer himself has enough, since beatings of this kind require physical exertion. That’s when the perpetrators start looking for even more efficient ways to inflict pain. For the most part, those who are put in detention centers in China have not undergone a trial — they’re just suspects. Chinese and international law are extremely clear that such detainees are not criminals and cannot be forced to do labor. Laws regulating prisons are also clear that any labor must adhere to strict guidelines for time worked, breaks, conditions, etc. However, in mainland China today, inmates in most detention centers nationwide are forced to work,

and conditions in prisons would by any measure be considered unlawful. This fuels a shadow economy in which goods made from forced labor are pushed out into the “real” economy and abroad, enriching and motivating prison system officials all along the chain of authority to maintain the status quo of violence, secrecy and denial. Some people have said to me, “Well, that’s China, right?” as though to suggest we should simply accept this, that what goes on in China has no bearing on our more comfortable, free lives here in the United States. The America I know is better than that. When our joy is unwittingly fueled by the suffering of others, we have a problem in our system that must be addressed. When our costsaving holiday purchases are the end product of a network of corrupt prison guards, prison officials and party officials who are selling to foreign corporations that don’t ask the tough questions for fear of losing a good deal, we must take action. We must demand more from our representatives in government and from the businesses whose products we buy. Thankfully, in the United States, where we can speak out openly, we have the power to make the world a better place for everyone. None of us wants our joy of the holiday season tainted with the sweat and pain of those enslaved in prisons a world away. I implore all readers with a conscience to refuse to purchase goods such as these manufactured in countries ruled by dictatorships. The writer is the author of “The Barefoot Lawyer: A Blind Man’s Fight for Justice and Freedom in China.” He is a visiting fellow at the Catholic University of America, distinguished senior fellow in human rights at the Witherspoon Institute and senior distinguished adviser to the Lantos Foundation for Human Rights and Justice.

Slow readers at the CIA BY N ADA B AKOS AND J OHN N IXON

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e are former senior CIA analysts who, in our combined 23 years of service, have been privy to secrets that would amaze you. You will never hear them from us. We also have learned other critical, but unclassified, information about dealing with terrorists and dictators that we want to share — but the government has thrown needless roadblocks in our path. CIA employees pledge that for the rest of their lives they will submit their writings to the agency in advance of publication to ensure that nothing appropriately classified is inadvertently revealed. We fully support this. But we are both paying a price well beyond the spirit of our agreement. Each of us has written a nonfiction book that has been ensnared in red tape by the CIA — for 11 months (for John Nixon) and 14 months and counting (for Nada Bakos). The courts have held that this signed agreement is a lifetime enforceable contract, provided that the review is limited to the deletion of classified information and that a response is given to the author within 30 days of submission. (The 30-day time constraint was set forth by the 1972 circuit court decision in U.S. v Marchetti.) Books such as ours can help foster a climate of accountability that is an essential element in any democracy. But the system of review is broken. Our experience is sadly typical. Even agency alumni who write novels and short stories are told to expect a year or more to pass before they hear back. It is not just the little guy, either. In 2014, former CIA director and defense secretary Leon Panetta became so frustrated with the over-

zealous review process that he sent his memoir to his publisher before receiving clearance. Robert Baer, a former CIA case officer and CNN contributor, was mulling running for Congress and was told pointblank by the agency Publications Review Board that it would have to review all of his campaign statements, making it nearly impossible for him to run. Michael Hayden, a retired four-star general who served as director of the CIA and the National Security Agency, told us: “It’s important for the American intelligence community to get the accurate word out on what it is they do. And there is no better way to do that than to allow professionals to speak in their own words. In short, if the agency needs to commit more resources to the Publications Review Board process, it should do so. It owes that to the American people and to the officers who want a fair chance to tell their story.” When authors do hear back, too often ridiculous edits are demanded. After a lengthy wait, one CIA veteran was forced to make major alterations to his novel about vampires. Vampires! Another was directed not to reveal the gender of an unidentified officer who led a successful operation. Correctly calling him “he” would have narrowed a search for the officer to half the people on the planet. Those submitting material for clearance are generally neither whistleblowers nor agency cheerleaders. They are simply offering their experience to contribute to the historical record and to help the public understand important national security issues. Without their voices, readers must rely on accounts from authors who lack the insights provided by a tenure in intelligence — or who have a political ax to grind. (Also, as a woman, Nada felt the need to write a

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national security book from a woman’s perspective.) Why is the review process broken? We believe it’s because the handling of this material is given such a low priority and the resources devoted to it are so small. But we also suspect there has been an overreaction to incidents such as the Edward Snowden debacle. The solutions aren’t rocket science. They include leveraging new technology to help review short articles or provide a cursory analysis of longer documents, as well as funding for more review board employees. Also needed are all-inclusive but flexible standards from the director of national intelligence, simple interagency agreements that restrict the time each has to respond to the submitting agency and realistic standards over what is considered classified or detrimental. “We are a democracy,” former national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski once said. “We can only have as good a foreign policy as the public’s understanding of world affairs.” By needlessly delaying books such as ours, the CIA loses an opportunity to educate the public and policymakers alike about what intelligence can and cannot achieve. And U.S. taxpayers who fund the intelligence community lose the opportunity to know what their government is doing (and not doing) to protect them from threats abroad. Nada Bakos is a former CIA analyst whose book “The Targeter: My Life in the CIA on the Hunt for the Godfather of ISIS” is scheduled for publication in June. John Nixon is a former CIA analyst whose book “Debriefing the President: The Interrogation of Saddam Hussein” is scheduled for publication this month. This op-ed was reviewed by the CIA’s Publications Review Board.

s a combat veteran of the Marine Corps and a longtime admirer of Gen. James N. Mattis, I was sad to annouce this month that I could not in good conscience support granting him a waiver to serve as our 26th secretary of defense. I explained that my decision was motivated not by political considerations but by concern for the enduring American principle of civilian control of the military. I lauded Mattis’s eminent qualifications and leadership skills while affirming that this central tenent of our democracy should matter more than any single individual. What happened next was revealing. Despite my considered words, I got an earful from Marines across the country, including men I served alongside in Iraq. They called and wrote letters. They tweeted and texted. In some colorful language that I can’t repeat in this space, they questioned my loyalty to the Marine Corps and to our country. Paradoxically, their passionate defense of Mattis and their anger toward me confirmed my reservations about his appointment. For me, the reaction immediately verified the wisdom of Congress in establishing a cooling-off period for former military leaders. The anger that my stance elicited among many of my fellow Marines demonstrated, albeit on a small scale, the danger to our democracy of a defense secretary coming to power with the ardent loyalty of the men and women he recently commanded.

Waivers should be granted for extraordinary circumstances — not extraordinary people. The members of Congress who, in 1947, enshrined in law this period of separation had fresh memories of World War II. Like our Founding Fathers, they recognized that political leaders should derive their authority from the will of the people — not the personal fealty of members of the armed forces. As a result, they were wary of a decorated general slipping off his uniform and immediately stepping into an ostensibly civilian role. In addition, they were justifiably apprehensive about installing a secretary of defense who could be perceived as partial to one service over the others. More than a half-century later, these concerns are still highly relevant. We should ask ourselves whether the reputation of our military as a highly professional, nonpartisan institution would be tainted if its most respected leaders were allowed to seamlessly segue into political positions. That’s why, instead of simply rubber-stamping Presidentelect Donald Trump’s choice, it is critical that we engage in a meaningful debate before discarding this well-established precedent. The last time a recently retired military man, the great George Marshall, was permitted to lead the Pentagon, the United States was facing the prospect of ignominious defeat in the Korean War. Even then, congressional leaders specified that his waiver was a one-time exception to the rule. While our country must confront an array of threats today, none of our national security challenges remotely compares to a massive war in the Far East. This history should inform Congress’s decision about Mattis. When it comes to something as basic as civilian control of the military, I strongly believe waivers should be granted for extraordinary circumstances — not extraordinary people. Many of my fellow Democrats disagree. Recognizing Mattis’s exceptional judgment and ability, they believe he could serve as a counterweight to Trump — a partial antidote to our new commander in chief’s profound lack of expertise, experience and discipline on matters of national security. I certainly sympathize with this view. However, I am equally concerned about the kinds of decisions that will emanate from the White House if, as appears likely, the national security adviser, the homeland security secretary and the defense secretary are all former generals. The American people should demand a diversity of views and experiences — both military and civilian — in the Situation Room. When debate on Mattis’s waiver resumes in January, a long-standing precedent will be at stake. Future generations of American leaders — perhaps facing circumstances far more perilous than our own — will look at how we dealt with this test of our commitment to civilian control of the military. Congress would be wise to uphold this time-honored principle by denying Mattis a waiver to serve as secretary of defense. The writer, a Democrat, represents Arizona’s 7th District in the U.S. House of Representatives.


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Collaboration won’t stop Mr. Trump

EDITORIALS

The college debt debate Ms. Yellen provides an optimistic reality check on the costs and benefits of higher education.

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majority of student borrowers who complete their degree programs find work that allows them to keep up with interest payments and eventually pay off the principal. According to studentloanhero.com, about 40 percent of student debt was incurred to finance graduate and professional degrees — that is, MBAs, MDs and law degrees, which enhance future earnings even more than a four-year bachelor’s. Ms. Yellen’s words were a useful corrective to the view, expressed at great but tendentious length by presidential candidates this year, that student loans are “crushing” America’s young people — and that a major federal initiative is needed to correct that. In fact, debt distress is disproportionately concentrated in certain segments of the market, including professional schools and for-profit four-year colleges. Solutions, if any, should be targeted and limited so as not to waste resources that could go toward other purposes, such as enhancing the prospects of those who do not attend college. In that respect, we had reservations about Hillary Clinton’s plan for “debt-free college” — but that’s academic now, and

Clinging to power in Africa

President-elect Donald Trump’s ideas are the ones that matter. They are still rather murky at this point. During the campaign, a Trump adviser spoke of returning the student-loan business to private banks, as opposed to having the government originate them, and profit directly, as at present. The candidate advocated incentives for colleges to reduce tuition costs, as well as capped payments and long-term loan forgiveness — all of which already have been suggested or attempted, in some form, by the Obama administration. This would be a good subject on which to probe education secretary-designate Betsy DeVos at her confirmation hearing next month. Whatever the next Congress and president do about student loans, policy must reflect the fact that the benefits of investment in higher education accrue not only to society but also to the individuals who receive the education. It is therefore perfectly reasonable both to subsidize that investment — and to expect individual beneficiaries to pay for some of it themselves.

TOM TOLES

The leaders of Congo and Gambia resist the forces of democracy.

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HIS YEAR saw another steady rollback of democracy around the globe. The lights go out when no one is looking: An editor is jailed, an election is postponed, a bookseller or lawyer disappears. Right now, two leaders in Africa are clinging to power, hoping to resist the forces of democracy. They must not be allowed to succeed. In Congo, Dec. 19 was supposed to be the last day in office for President Joseph Kabila, who is prohibited by the constitution from a third term. He failed to organize a new election, did not step down and reportedly is increasingly isolated in the capital, Kinshasha, staying up late with his Sony PlayStation 4 and pondering how to protect the wealth he and his family have accumulated. A Bloomberg News investigation published Dec. 15 shows the Kabilas have built a business network reaching into every nook of Congo’s economy, reaping hundreds of millions of dollars. The New York Times reports that Mr. Kabila likes to sport an expensive Rolex and Patek Philippe watch on each wrist and sometimes races fancy motorcyles around the city at night to blow off steam. Not since independence from Belgium in 1960 has the country had a peaceful, democratic transition of power, and Mr. Kabila does not look to be changing that. At the same time, Congo is drifting toward an explosion. The nation is vast and only loosely controlled by security forces and armed militias. Opposition forces have been growing ever more restive under Mr. Kabila’s boot. According to Human Rights Watch, over the past two years, the authorities in Congo have arbitrarily arrested scores of activists and opposition leaders, holding some incommunicado and mistreating or torturing them, while trying others on trumped-up charges. Mr. Kabila named a new cabinet this week, but opposition street protests are intensifying, and security forces killed at least 26 demonstrators on Tuesday. Separately, in Gambia, the smallest nation on the

continent, President Yahya Jammeh, who has been in power for 22 years, clings to office. He was defeated in Dec. 1 elections by opposition leader Adama Barrow, and his initial decision to step down and accede to the will of the voters offered a rare glimmer of hope. But it didn’t last. On Dec. 9, Mr. Jammeh changed his mind and called for a new vote, refusing to budge. There is only one nation that has overwhelming influence as a beacon for democracy, the United

States. But it has not always spoken out as strongly as it should against strongmen in Africa. Clearly, Mr. Kabila and Mr. Jammeh are calculating that they can hang on, even if they destroy democracy in their countries. Perhaps they know President-elect Donald Trump has shown little interest in the topic. “Sad,” as Mr. Trump likes to say, because if the flame of freedom doesn’t burn brightly from the United States, then next year the path for democracy will be darker for millions of people elsewhere.

The D.C. Council approved a poorly conceived and expensive paid-leave program.

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the city. What makes the move even more mindboggling is that most of the benefits of the program will go not to D.C. taxpayers, but to Maryland and Virginia residents who work but pay no taxes in the District. It is telling that even some council members voting for the bill expressed misgivings. “Ill considered” was the judgment of Mary M. Cheh (DWard 3), who meekly went along with the majority after a measure she co-sponsored with Mr. Evans failed. “A serious bill with serious consequences to our business community,” said Kenyan R. McDuffie (D-Ward 5), noting there are a lot of issues that still need to be worked out. No kidding — such as, for starters, finding the money to design and build a system for which no model exists. Or figuring out how a city government that sometimes struggles to provide basic services is going to administer the complexities of this program. The D.C. smallbusiness owner who said he gets “chills and

nightmares” just thinking of the city administering his employees’ benefits had it exactly right. The alternate proposal fashioned by Mr. Evans would have required businesses to provide the same amount of leave, with smaller businesses getting tax credits and hardship exemptions. It would present fewer risks to the city and could be implemented quickly. That, though, did not serve the interests of union advocates who wanted a bill they hoped would serve as a national model, and so the more sensible alternative was given short shrift. Ms. Bowser has been too timid in her approach to this issue. While she made no secret of her reservations about the council’s approach, she failed to mount an effective defense against it. It is not enough, as she has announced, that she won’t attach her name to the bill. She must let the city know through her veto just how unacceptable it is and challenge the council to act in defense of the interests of D.C. taxpayers.

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FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer

Put the Purple Line on ice The Dec. 21 Metro article “FTA: No need for Metro-related Purple Line study” accurately reflected what the Federal Transit Administration said in its report to U.S. District Judge Richard Leon last week. What was sad, but not unexpected, was what the FTA omitted from its report. Omitted was what will happen if Metro ridership, which is based on service, safety, maintenance, proper funding levels and trained employees, fails to generate sufficient revenue for the Purple Line. Purple Line revenue shortfalls, almost guaranteed in this current environment, will be made up by transfers of Maryland funds from MARC. Who then pays to replenish MARC’s coffers? All Maryland taxpayers, not just those in Montgomery and Prince George’s coun-

In his Dec. 17 Economy & Business column, “The Democrats’ dilemma: Resist Trump at every turn or break ranks and compromise,” Steven Pearlstein asserted that rather than fully resist, Democrats should collaborate with President-elect Donald Trump to avoid the risks of pushing him to the far right and making him angry and thus more authoritarian. If your basement is flooded, there’s not much risk in pouring on a glass of water. Mr. Trump will dance with the ones who brought him. And bullies are encouraged by compliance; you have to punch their noses. To be sure, resistance may not work, but collaboration stands no chance to abate the reputational, social or material destruction our country is facing. Bernard Klein, Bethesda

Mr. Friedman’s extreme positions Regarding the Dec. 20 editorial “The big question about Mr. Friedman”: The rejection of the two-state solution by President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for ambassador to Israel, David M. Friedman, is an even more extreme position than Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s stated support for it. Advocacy of West Bank settlements will strengthen the far right’s opposition to any agreement with the Palestinians to the point at which it would be impossible for Mr. Trump to make the “ultimate deal” between Israelis and Palestinians he claims he wants. The resulting elimination of any prospect for an agreement could lead to a binational state and could escalate violence between Jews and Arabs, deepen Israel’s international isolation, nip in the bud Israel’s efforts to forge alliances with Arab states in the Persian Gulf, reduce the United States’ standing in the Middle East and lessen Washington’s ability to project U.S. interests in the region. Moreover, Mr. Friedman’s unapologetic disdain for a broad swath of American Jewry that supports a two-state solution — he called some “far worse than kapos” (Jews who were forced to cooperate with the Nazis) — will intensify the divide among American Jews and diminish their support for Israel. Seymour D. Reich, New York The writer is a former chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations.

Small businesses still need the SBA

A mind-bogglingly bad decision T ONE point during Tuesday’s debate over paid family leave legislation, D.C. Council member David Grosso (I-At Large) said he had some questions about a substitute proposal. Council member Jack Evans (D-Ward 2) gamely tried to answer but was cut off and talked over by an increasingly agitated Mr. Grosso. It was clear the council had already decided, and so never mind the facts showing there might be a better, faster and more responsible way to provide benefits. Given the council’s 9-to-4 vote to approve the Universal Paid Leave Amendment Act of 2016, it may be difficult for Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) to find a fifth vote to sustain a veto, but she should try. The legislation passed by council members — imposing a new tax on employers to fund an expensive paid-leave program while creating a sprawling new government bureaucracy — is a bad bill that, as was elucidated by the city’s independent chief financial officer, carries enormous risks for

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

ANET YELLEN, chair of the Federal Reserve, spoke at the University of Baltimore’s midyear commencement on Monday, and her message was about as upbeat as any the students will ever hear from a practitioner of the dismal science. The economy is nearly at full employment, with prospects especially strong for college graduates, for whom the unemployment rate is an infinitesimal 2.3 percent. What’s more, grads can expect a “large” advantage in lifetime earnings over contemporaries with only a high school education. Last year, college graduates’ earnings averaged 70 percent more than high school graduates’ pay; that is up from 20 percent in 1980, she said. And the advantage kicks in quickly: Only a few years after graduation, it’s almost $18,000 a year, Ms. Yellen reported. Moral of the story: Higher education is a good long-term investment. That notion is being questioned as never before, though, due to concern about student debt, which now totals $1.3 trillion, spread out over 44.2 million borrowers. Yet as Ms. Yellen pointed out, government data shows that the vast

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ties. Taxpayers elsewhere in the state won’t be happy about this. Metro’s numerous and tragic failures lead to the doorstep of the FTA. Now is the time to remove the FTA and transfer these functions to another federal agency with more experience and knowledge and no vested interest in the outcomes. Indeed, we need an independent, nonpartisan board to examine Metro and the Purple Line to determine how this debacle could happen. The only option for taxpayers is to put the Purple Line on ice — an apt metaphor since, similar to Metro and its third rail, the Purple Line probably won’t be able to function with ice on its overhead wires. Frederick H. Graefe, Bethesda

News pages: MARTIN BARON Executive Editor CAMERON BARR Managing Editor EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ Managing Editor TRACY GRANT Deputy Managing Editor SCOTT VANCE Deputy Managing Editor

Editorial and opinion pages: FRED HIATT Editorial Page Editor JACKSON DIEHL Deputy Editorial Page Editor RUTH MARCUS Deputy Editorial Page Editor JO-ANN ARMAO Associate Editorial Page Editor

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The Dec. 19 editorial “The SBA needs reforming” seemed to support the idea of consolidating the Small Business Administration (and five other agencies) into one gargantuan department. The idea seems to be that hiding the SBA within the web of a much larger bureaucracy would “enable small businesses to navigate the dizzying array of programs supposedly designed to help them.” The logic of that conclusion continues to elude us. But beyond the agency’s place on the federal organizational chart, the editorial also questioned whether the SBA’s loan programs have a substantive reason for being, even though the editorial acknowledged the argument that traditional small-business lending has suffered from “a market failure that argues for government intervention.” Credit scoring has not miraculously solved the difficulties small businesses encounter in the credit markets. In fact, the fixed costs of bank oversight and regulatory burden for smaller community banks have made smaller loans less and less profitable, further exacerbating the historic problems in the small-business credit markets. Finally, the main SBA-guaranteed loan program doesn’t cost the taxpayers a penny; it is funded entirely by fees paid by lenders and borrowers. As such, its elimination would represent an odd starting point for a streamlining of federal excess or corporate welfare. Todd O. McCracken, Washington The writer is president of the National Small Business Association.

Don’t blame public relations In his Dec. 18 Outlook essay, “Big business taught politicians a better way to lie,” Ari Rabin-Havt contended that corporate public relations campaigns sowed the seeds for the scourge of political lies and referenced the campaign to defend tobacco products to make his point. But misinformation campaigns have been used in the United States since the revolution. Samuel Adams’s report of the Boston Massacre and other British actions were purposely exaggerated to inflame colonial opinion. Government or political use of communications campaigns have often served as incubators for the private sector. Just look at President Woodrow Wilson’s Committee on Public Information, tasked with building popular support for U.S. participation in World War I. By picking only negative examples and ignoring the vast majority of fact-based and ethical PR campaigns, Mr. Rabin-Havt created a false narrative not unlike the biased and misleading “facts” he lamented. Lies in the public realm are a real problem for which real solutions are needed. These should include focusing on educating people so that they can better discern truth from lies and supporting professional news organizations that take their role as guardians of the truth seriously. Pointing an accusing finger at the public relations industry will not solve the problem and is just another example of misdirection that cloaks the real issues. Jeremy E. Plotnick, Centreville

The real world isn’t middle school Regarding Hugh Hewitt’s Dec. 20 op-ed, “The unifying of the GOP’s foreign policy establishment”: Mr. Hewitt seemed almost giddy over the GOP’s unified command facing the world under the incoming commander in chief. Not disputing our need for a strong military, I remind Mr. Hewitt and others that I can’t recall a lot of saber-rattling military initiatives that had long-term success. I would also tell Mr. Hewitt that proactive statesmanship not only is a requirement, but also sends a strong message to our neighbors, be they friends or adversaries. President-elect Donald Trump should realize that our real world is not middle school. Yes, these tough guys with whom he has surrounded himself might protect him somewhat, but understanding our diverse world and its competing needs and cultures so that we can advance our national interests is ultimately our best long-term security strategy. Tom Martella, Washington


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Why the white working class votes against itself

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hy did all those Economically Anxious™ Trump voters reject policies that would have helped relieve their economic anxiety? Maybe they believed any Big Government expansions would disproportionately go to the “wrong” kinds of people — that is, people unlike themselves. Hillary Clinton’s unexpected loss, particularly in traditionally blue strongholds, has led to lots of rumination about what the Democrats must do to reclaim their political territory. Smarter marketing, smoother organization, greater outreach and fresher faces are among the most commonly cited remedies. But there seems to be universal agreement, at least among the Democratic politicians and strategists I’ve interviewed, that the party’s actual ideas are the right ones. Democrats, they note, pushed for expansion of health-insurance subsidies for lowand middle-income Americans; investments in education and retraining; middle-class tax cuts; and a higher minimum wage. These are core, standardof-living improving policies. They would do far more to help the economically precarious — including and especially white working-class voters — than Donald Trump’s top-heavy tax cuts and trade wars ever could. Here’s the problem. These Democratic policies probably would help the white working class. But the white working class doesn’t seem to buy that they’re the ones who’d really benefit. Across rural America, the Rust Belt, Coal Country and other hotbeds of Trumpism, voters have repeatedly expressed frustration that the lazy and less deserving are getting a bigger chunk of government cheese. In Kentucky, consumers receiving federal subsidies through the Obamacare exchanges complain that neighbors who are less responsible are receiving nearly free insurance through Medicaid. “They can go to the emergency room for a headache,” one woman told Vox’s Sarah Kliff. In Ohio, white working-class focus group participants decried that women who “pop out babies like Pez dispensers with different baby daddies” get “welfare every month” and “their housing paid for, their food.” These women seem to live large, one participant said, while people like herself are “struggling to put food on the table.” Participants in this focus group, held by the Institute for Family Studies, were also skeptical of efforts to raise the minimum wage. Opponents argued either that higher pay wasn’t justified for lower-skilled, less intense work or that raising the minimum wage would unfairly narrow the pay gap between diligent folks such as themselves

and people who’d made worse life choices. “That son of a b---- is making $10 an hour! I’m making $13.13. I feel like s--because he’s making almost as much as I am, and I have never been in trouble with the law and I have a clean record, I can pass a drug test,” said one participant. In Wisconsin, rural whites are similarly eager to “stop the flow of resources to people who are undeserving,” says Katherine J. Cramer, a political scientist at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and author of “The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker.” The people Cramer interviewed for her book often named a (white) welfarereceiving neighbor or relative as someone who belonged in that basket of undeservings — but also immigrants, minorities and inner-city elites who were allegedly siphoning off more government funds than they contributed. More broadly, a recent YouGov/Huffington Post survey found that Trump voters are five times more likely to believe that “average Americans” have gotten less than they deserve in recent years than to believe that “blacks” have gotten less than they deserve. (African Americans don’t count as “average Americans,” apparently.) None of this should be particularly surprising. We’ve known for a long time, through the work of Martin Gilens, Suzanne Mettler and other social scientists, that Americans (A) generally associate government spending with undeserving, nonworking, nonwhite people; and (B) are really bad at recognizing when they personally benefit from government programs. Hence those oblivious demands to “keep your government hands off my Medicare,” and the tea partyers who get farm subsidies, and the widespread opposition to expanded transfer payments in word if not in deed. Rhetoric this election cycle caricaturing our government as “rigged,” and anyone who pays into it as a chump, has only reinforced these misperceptions about who benefits from government programs and how much. It’s no wonder then that Democrats’ emphasis on downwardly redistributive economic policies has been met with suspicion, even from those who would be on the receiving end of such redistribution. And likewise, it’s no wonder that Trump’s promises — to re-create millions of (technologically displaced) jobs and to punish all those non-self-sufficient moochers — seem much more enticing. No American likes the idea of getting a “handout” — especially if they believe that handout is secretly being rerouted to their layabout neighbor anyway. crampell@washpost.com

DAVID IGNATIUS

‘Value in a disruptive approach’

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ob Gates has worked in senior national security positions for the past five presidents, Republican and Democratic. So it’s noteworthy — and to me, encouraging — that he is advising President-elect Donald Trump, too. Gates, a former defense secretary, CIA director and deputy national security adviser, spoke with me by telephone Wednesday about the advice he’s giving Trump and his team — and the opportunities and pitfalls ahead. At the top of Gates’s to-do list is striking the right balance between improving relations with Russia and appearing too cooperative with a belligerent President Vladimir Putin. “I think the challenge for any new administration would have been how to thread the needle — between stopping the downward spiral in U.S.-Russian relations, which had real dangers, and pushing back on Putin’s aggressiveness and general thuggery,” Gates said. “If you only want to stop the downward spiral, you empower Putin to feel that he can do whatever he wants. I worry that if you don’t have pushback — let him know there are limits, and that the U.S. will react, militarily, if necessary — then the chance of being taken advantage of is larger.” Gates said that if he had been defense secretary when Russian jets made “dangerously close passes” over U.S. warships in the Baltic Sea in April, “I’d have recommended that we send a message to Moscow that the next time you do it, I’ll ‘paint’ you [with targeting radar], and I may shoot.” If Trump is seen as too eager to cooperate with Russia, Gates cautioned, it will create perceptions in Europe, China, North Korea and Iran that “this guy isn’t prepared to back up his words with the tough action that’s necessary.” Trump made a surprising, and somewhat ominous, pushback against Moscow on Thursday. After Putin said he planned to “strengthen the military potential of strategic nuclear forces,” Trump tweeted: “The United States must greatly strengthen and expand its nuclear capability until such time as the world comes to its senses regarding nukes.” Gates told me Thursday that he wished Trump had used the word “modernize,” rather than “expand,” but that “what he said is okay, given Putin’s recent comments.” Gates has shared the role of informal counselor to the Trump transition team with two other veterans of the Bush administration, former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, who talks regularly with Vice

President-elect Mike Pence, and former national security adviser Stephen Hadley. The three have a consulting firm, RiceHadleyGates, which has proposed candidates for Cabinet and sub-Cabinet jobs, including Rex Tillerson and retired Marine Gen. James N. Mattis, the choices for State and Defense, respectively. Gates, Hadley and Rice have also talked with foreign governments that are puzzled about how to approach Trump. In an interview this week, Hadley summarized his basic advice: “We’ve never had a populist movement or political insurgency quite like this — that actually captured the White House. That means there will be more discontinuities in our foreign policy. I’m telling people: ‘Give us some space here and have some strategic patience. And don’t overreact — even to Trump’s tweets.’ ” One issue that worries Gates is the multiplicity of people surrounding Trump in the White House, seeking to influence an undisciplined chief executive. “What happens when someone tries to get in to see the president with a proposal or initiative and is rebuffed by one gatekeeper — and simply goes through another door? It’s a formula for a disjointed process.” “There will be a rough break-in period,” Gates predicted. Part of the challenge is that Trump believes his success stems from his freewheeling, undisciplined style, and personal messaging through Twitter — which makes him resist limits. Gates credits Trump for choosing strong personalities for the key national security posts: Tillerson, Mattis and retired Gen. John F. Kelly at Homeland Security. “He’s willing to surround himself with very strong figures who . . . will tell the president what he needs to hear.” Trump’s insurgent, populist style has worried many foreign governments. But Gates argues that “there is some value in a disruptive approach — in the U.S. not being so reliably passive” in responding to events as it seemed during the Obama administration. Trump, by accident or design, has created a hint of the triangular dynamic among the United States, Russia and China that was a hallmark of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger’s diplomacy. Ideally, said Gates, the United States could play off Russia and China so that “they’re both uncertain about where we’re headed.” But this subtle play requires a strategic vision and disciplined follow-through — two qualities that Trump has yet to demonstrate. davidignatius@washpost.com

GEORGE OURFALIAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Syrians evacuate the Bab al-Hadid district of Aleppo this month after it was seized by government forces.

Our empty ‘witness’ in Syria BY

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he words “never again” ring hollow as the city of Aleppo, Syria, has fallen to regime forces of Bashar al-Assad. A brutal siege that has ground on for years was finally brought to a bloody end by a surge of Russian airpower, Iranian shock troops and assorted regional militia fighters. As we eulogize the dead of Aleppo, we must acknowledge the United States’ complicity in this tragedy. President Obama speaks of the need to “bear witness” to injustice. He did little else for Aleppo. To what have we borne witness? To the use of smart bombs to target women and children, hospitals and bakeries, aid warehouses and humanitarian convoys. To the development and popularization of barrel bombs — oil drums packed with shrapnel and explosives, dropped indiscriminately from aircraft to kill and maim as many civilians as possible. To the tactic of follow-on airstrikes designed to kill rescue workers, such as the intrepid White Helmets, who rush to the scene of an attack to save the innocent. And now to the busloads of refugees pouring out of Aleppo and the tens of thousands left behind to the tender mercies of the Assad regime and its Russian and Iranian allies. Obama has borne witness to all of this, and more, and done nothing to stop it. As with past atrocities, Aleppo’s destruction inspired much high-minded talk and the illusion of action. Endless meetings in the gilded palaces of Geneva and Vienna and elsewhere. Red lines drawn and transgressed with no consequences. Statements like this: “Should we really accept the notion that the world is powerless in

the face of a Rwanda, or Srebrenica?” the president asked the U.N. General Assembly in 2013. “If that’s the world that people want to live in, they should say so, and reckon with the cold logic of mass graves.” That reckoning is now upon us. The mass graves are before us, and the name Aleppo will echo through history, like Srebrenica and Rwanda, as a testament to our moral failure and everlasting shame. Even in a conflict that has killed nearly 500,000 people, driven half of Syria’s population from their homes, created the worst refugee crisis in Europe since World War II and spawned the terrorist army of the Islamic State — even amid all this horror and depravity, Aleppo stands out. Aleppo may be lost, but the war in Syria is far from over. It will likely get worse as the Assad regime, Iran, Russia, Turkey, the Kurds, the Gulf states and others intensify their fighting over what is left of Syria’s carcass. The United States still has a choice to make. The longer we wait to help end the war, the worse our options will become. But no one should believe that we have no choice. We must acknowledge that we have a stake in what happens in Syria. It is not just about the suffering of others, as moving as that is. It is about the national security of the United States: The resurgence of al-Qaeda in Syria affects us. The rise of the world’s most advanced terrorist organization affects us, as we saw in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif. A refugee crisis that destabilizes allies such as Israel and Jordan and threatens the foundation of Western democracies affects us. We must also acknowledge that Assad, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Qasem Soleimani, commander

of Iran’s Quds Force, will never be viable counterterrorism partners. In fact, the opposite is true. The Syrian regime, Russia and Iran are not fighting the Islamic State. Their indiscriminate slaughter of Syrian civilians is what created the conditions for the Islamic State’s emergence. The bloody siege of Aleppo will be a windfall for terrorist radicalization and recruitment. To think that we can destroy the Islamic State by throwing in our lot with those who are strengthening it every day is a dangerous fantasy. Finally, we must acknowledge that ending the conflict in Syria will not be possible until Assad and his foreign backers realize they cannot succeed militarily. And make no mistake: Succeeding militarily is what they are trying to do. The fall of Aleppo will only encourage them to turn their guns on their next targets in Syria. We must recall the wisdom of former secretary of state George Shultz: “Diplomacy not backed by strength will always be ineffectual at best, dangerous at worst.” Just because America cannot stop every horror in the world does not absolve us of the responsibility of using our great power to end the worst injustices where we can, especially when doing so would benefit our own interests and make the United States and our partners more secure. We do not need to become the world’s policeman to defend our interests. But we cannot wall ourselves off from the chaos of our dangerous world. And if we try, the instability, terror and destruction at the heart of that chaos will eventually make their way to our shores. The writer, a Republican, represents Arizona in the U.S. Senate.

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER

Aleppo and American decline

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he fall of Aleppo just weeks before Barack Obama leaves office is a fitting stamp on his Middle East policy of retreat and withdrawal. The pitiable pictures from the devastated city showed the true cost of Obama’s abdication. For which he seems to have few regrets, however. In his end-of-year news conference, Obama defended U.S. inaction with his familiar false choice: It was either stand aside or order a massive Iraq-style ground invasion. This is a transparent fiction designed to stifle debate. At the beginning of the civil war, the popular uprising was ascendant. What kept a rough equilibrium was regime control of the skies. At that point, the United States, at little risk and cost, could have declared Syria a no-fly zone, much as it did Iraqi Kurdistan for a dozen years after the Gulf War of 1991. The U.S. could easily have destroyed the regime’s planes and helicopters on the ground and so cratered its airfields as to make them unusable. That would have altered the strategic equation for the rest of the war. And would have deterred the Russians from injecting their own air force — they would have had to challenge ours for air superiority. Facing no U.S. deterrent, Russia stepped in and decisively altered the balance, pounding the rebels in Aleppo to oblivion. The Russians were particularly adept at hitting hospitals and other civilian targets, leaving the rebels with the choice between annihilation and surrender. They surrendered. Obama has never appreciated that

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the role of a superpower in a local conflict is not necessarily to intervene on the ground, but to deter a rival global power from stepping in and altering the course of the war. That’s what we did during the 1973 Yom Kippur War, when Moscow threatened to send troops to support Egypt and President Nixon countered by raising America’s nuclear alert status to Defcon 3. Russia stood down. Less dramatically but just as effectively, American threats of retaliation are what kept West Germany, South Korea and Taiwan free and independent through half a century of Cold War. It’s called deterrence. Yet Obama never had the credibility to deter anything or anyone. In the end, the world’s greatest power was reduced to bitter speeches at the United Nations. “Are you truly incapable of shame?” thundered U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power at the butchers of Aleppo. As if we don’t know the answer. Indeed the shame is on us for terminal naivete, sending our secretary of state chasing the Russians to negotiate one humiliating pretend cease-fire after another. Even now, however, the Syria debate is not encouraging. The tone is anguished and emotional, portrayed exclusively in moral terms. Much less appreciated is the cold strategic cost. Assad was never a friend. But today he’s not even a free agent. He’s been effectively restored to his throne, but as the puppet of Iran and Russia. Syria is now a platform, a forward base, from which both these revisionist regimes can project power in the region. Iran will use Syria to advance its drive

to dominate the Arab Middle East. Russia will use its naval and air bases to bully the Sunni Arab states, and to shut out American influence. It’s already happening. The foreign and defense ministers of Russia, Iran and Turkey convened in Moscow this week to begin settling the fate of Syria. Notice who wasn’t there. For the first time in four decades, the United States, the once dominant power in the region, is an irrelevance. With Aleppo gone and the rebels scattered, we have a long road ahead to rebuild the influence squandered over the past eight years. President-elect Donald Trump is talking about creating safe zones. He should tread carefully. It does no good to try to do now what we should have done five years ago. Conditions are much worse. Russia and Iran rule. Maintaining the safety of safe zones will be expensive and dangerous. It will require extensive ground deployments, and it risks military confrontation with Russia. And why? Guilty conscience is not a good reason. Interventions that are purely humanitarian — from Somalia to Libya — tend to end badly. We may proclaim a “responsibility to protect,” but when no American interests are at stake, the engagement becomes impossible to sustain. At the first losses, we go home. In Aleppo, the damage is done, the city destroyed, the inhabitants ethnically cleansed. For us, there is no post-facto option. If we are to regain the honor lost in Aleppo, it will have to be on a very different battlefield. letters@charleskrauthammer.com


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DECEMBER 23 , 2016

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AAA predicts that almost 2.6 million of the area’s 6 million people will travel this holiday season. B2

A Fairfax County police officer is being sued by a disabled man who was Tasered last year. B2

Cardinal Paulo Evaristo Arns spoke for democracy and against dictatorship in Latin America. B4

Metro freed from ‘penalty box’ after bookkeeping improves Md. man BY

M ARTINE P OWERS

After more than two years of what some called onerous restrictions, Metro is finally out of the financial “penalty box” with federal regulators, the Federal Transit Administration said Thursday. In a letter sent to Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld, FTA Regional Administrator Terry Garcia Crews said the transit system had made “significant progress in improving its financial controls” and would be allowed to spend

FTA lifts spending restraints imposed two years ago federal money without waiting months for reimbursements to tap more than $400 million in federal grants. “It is imperative that [Metro] continue to monitor and build on the internal controls and procedures that have improved through this process,” Crews

wrote. The restrictions, put in place in 2014, were an attempt to tighten the reins on Metro’s financial staff after outside consultants found that the staff had practiced poor bookkeeping and awarded millions of dollars in no-bid contracts. After those issues came to light, the FTA mandated that Metro switch to a practice known as “restricted drawdown” for spending federal grant funds: Rather than automatically receiving electronic reimbursements from the fed-

eral government that would be subject to later audits, Metro would need to spend its own money first and then file paper requests for reimbursements, which would be scrutinized by FTA staff before Metro was repaid — often months later. The practice often meant that Metro would need to borrow money from outside lenders, at extra cost, to cover short-term spending needs. The requirements were lauded by federal lawmakers who said Metro was METRO CONTINUED ON B3

Push to bring services to thousands more in Va. could jeopardize funding for those in system

EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

killed in encounter with police Prince George’s officials say he was shot after pointing a gun at officer BY M ICHAEL E . M ILLER AND P ETER H ERMANN

A 19-year-old man was fatally shot Thursday morning by a Prince George’s County police officer after he allegedly pointed a gun at another officer as they investigated a suspicious car. The incident unfolded about 8 a.m. on a residential street in Capitol Heights, Md., just over the District line. Police recovered two guns from the scene, including a 9mm carbine rifle, and they said the vehicle matched descriptions of one used in recent robberies and shootings in the vicinity. The slain man was identified as Terrance Toshay Thomas Jr., who lived four blocks from where he was killed in the 4100 block of Byers Street. A passenger who was in the vehicle and tried to run away was arrested, police said. Officers performed CPR on Thomas, who died at a hospital, authorities said. As police continued the investigation, a young woman dressed in black broke down in the street a few doors from where Thomas lived and had grown up, weeping and stamping her feet on the ground. She was carried to a car by two young women. “No comment,” an older family member said. “We are not speaking.” Another woman said, “We are still grieving.” Thomas has a criminal history in the District and Maryland. Two weeks ago, a D.C. Superior Court jury convicted him of two counts of misdemeanor assault and one count of destruction of property after an incident in July in which authorities say he rammed a police car following a police pursuit that began in Prince George’s and ended in the District. County officers suffered minor injuries. Police said the 2003 Buick Regal that Thomas was driving had been taken in a carjackSHOOTING CONTINUED ON B2

Disability caregivers may face cuts BY

A

A NTONIO O LIVO

Virginia effort to bring state-funded services to thousands more disabled people could jeopardize funding for those who are already receiving support, advocates for the disabled say. State health officials have been trying to cut into an 11,000-person wait list for services paid for with Medicaid vouchers, part of a broader effort to comply with the terms of a 2012 federal court settlement that, under the Americans With Disabilities Act, requires the state to find a way to allow more people with disabilities to live and work in community environments rather than institutional settings. Faced with an increasing demand for services, the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmen-

tal Services has started to use an assessment of the individual patient’s needs known as the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) to help determine funding levels. The assessments have led to a reduction in state reimbursement rates by as much as half in some cases, prompting concern from family members and advocates about the quality of care people with disabilities will receive when the new rates take effect in January. “This has pretty big implications,” said Lucy Beadnell, director of advocacy for the Arc of Northern Virginia, a nonprofit group that advocates for the disabled. “There have been lots of complaints from families.’” State health officials say the assessments — to be conducted every three years for adults and every two

Matt Kidder, 41, who has cerebral palsy and has limited speech, returns a shopping cart with life-skills counselor Faith Rojas after collecting donated food that will find its way to a food bank this week.

He called the situation “a classic conflict of interest.” If Trump won’t divest himself of his businesses, he should make sure that none of his office’s appointees have anything to say about these decisions, said Richard Painter, a professor at the University of Minnesota Law School who was chief White House ethics lawyer during 2005-2007 in the George W. Bush administration. “It’s critically important that these [types of requests] be handled by career employees in federal agencies who have civil service protections,” Painter said. “Anyone appointed by him should be required to recuse themselves. It’s not required by law, but he should do it anyway.” Trump Vineyard Estates filed a request Dec. 2 with the Labor Department for six H2 visas, which permit U.S. employers to hire foreigners for seasonal jobs such as pruning grapevines,

“Lighting a candle in the darkness — that is something that stands on its own,” Rabbi Jack Moline told me just as that early winter night Petula was closing in and the Dvorak Christmas lights around us began twinkling. It’s a powerful image, a strong metaphor for both Christians and Jews. The start of Hanukkah and Christmas fall on the same day this weekend, a rarity that comes only every few decades. It means millions of people of both faiths will be lighting candles together, across the land. Hello? Haters? Are you seeing this celestial bat signal? It’s a sign. Interfaith wonderpowers: Time to activate. Because the darkness has been deep this year. For ages, anti-Semitism felt dead or maybe just dormant in the ugliest, dark corners of America, where moonlanding and illuminati conspiracy theories writhed. But since the start of this justcompleted presidential campaign, there has been a resurgence of swastikas and hate speech. Trolls are trying to ignite the Internet with pictures of ovens or subversive signals sent to people with Jewish-sounding names. “It’s no surprise to me that there are people who hate Jews for being Jews,” said Moline, who is president of the national Interfaith Alliance. History will never allow American Jews to completely exhale, not even in the country where George Washington, Founding Father Numero Uno, sent that lovely letter to the Hebrew

WINERY CONTINUED ON B3

DVORAK CONTINUED ON B3

DISABILITIES CONTINUED ON B6

Ethics experts see conflict in Trump winery’s visa request BY

P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN

Federal ethics experts for former Democratic and Republican administrations warned Thursday that Presidentelect Donald Trump is creating a major conflict of interest by allowing his Virginia vineyard to seek special temporary visas for foreign workers. Trump, who is president of the Charlottesville vineyard that applied this month for H2 visas for six foreign workers, will soon run the U.S. government, which determines whether to grant those visas. “This is a powerful example of why Donald Trump needs to make a definitive break, not just with his operational interests but his ownership interests, by appointing an independent trustee to liquidate all that,” said Norm Eisen, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution who was chief White House ethics lawyer for President Obama from 2009 to 2011.

ANDREW SHURTLEFF/THE DAILY PROGRESS VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Trump Winery website says President-elect Donald Trump is not affiliated with the company, though filings say he owns the land the vineyards are on.

www.ebook3000.com

Candles lit by two faiths could be a sign of hopefulness


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THE WASHINGTON POST

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. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

THE REGION

Record number likely to travel for holidays BY

A SHLEY H ALSEY III

That season that entails a frenzy of last-minute shopping and then a trek someplace to see somebody — maybe even grandma herself — is here. Wherever travelers go, they’ll be party to setting a record during the extended Christmas week. That’s according to the annual AAA survey, which says 103 million Americans — close to a third of the population — plan to drive, fly or go by bus, train or boat for a visit. It’s not clear just how many people will flock to visit the nation’s capital this season, but the region long has been one from which a lot of people flee. Judging from the relative respite from normal commuter-hour traffic this week, many people seem to be taking the week off for 11thhour shopping or to make an early getaway. AAA says that 43 percent of those in the region plan to take a trip over the protracted holiday period. The automobile club projects that almost 2.6 million of the metro area’s 6 million people will depart. “On an epic scale, four out of ten residents in the Washington metro area will embark on longdistance trips during the Christmas/New Year’s holiday,” said AAA spokesman John B. Townsend II. By the numbers: Almost 2.4 million say they will travel by car, up 2.2 percent from last year; 143,200 plan to fly, a 3.2 percent increase; and about the same number as last year — 96,000 — say they’ll go by train, bus or other modes of transportation. “It is a decampment from the Washington metro area so massive that it may feel like everyone else in the world is traveling this Christmas,” Townsend said. “With more than 93 million people across the nation traveling by car this holiday season, the roadways will be crowded and patience will be in high demand at Christmastime.”

The Post’s Capital Weather Gang says there won’t be snow during the pre-Christmas getaway on much of the Interstate 95 corridor from Boston south. Cities likely to witness a white Christmas include Burlington, Vt.; Buffalo; Detroit; Chicago; Milwaukee; Des Moines; Minneapolis; Bismarck, N.D.; Casper, Wyo.; Billings, Mont.; and Boise, Idaho. The big snowmaker will be a storm coming into the West on Friday and Saturday, which will dump a lot of snow in the Sierra Nevada and Rockies regions. Nationwide, the number who plan to travel is 1.5 percent greater than last year and the highest number of expected travelers that the AAA survey has recorded. “This year, more Americans will travel to celebrate the holidays and ring in the New Year than ever before,” said AAA President Marshall Doney. “Rising incomes and continued low gas prices should make for a joyous holiday travel season.” Most people — almost 94 million — tell AAA that they plan to drive 50 or more miles from home in the run-up to Christmas and the week that follows through New Year’s Day. About 6 million people say they plan to fly, while 3.5 million say they’re opting for other modes of travel. A big reason for the bump in car travel, AAA says, is that U.S. drivers have saved more than $27 billion on gas this year, compared with the same time frame in 2015. The average price per gallon nationwide is $2.22, AAA says, the second-lowest price since 2009, when the national average was $1.62. While grandmother and other relatives and friends can expect plenty of visitors, a lot of people are fleeing this week’s cold front in search of warmer climes. Las Vegas, Orlando, San Diego and Anaheim, Calif., meet that criteria, although New York City slips in among them in the top five. ashley.halsey@washpost.com

VIRGINIA

Netherlands Carillon backers seek funding National Park Service donates $4 million to tower-restoration effort BY

P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN

Supporters of the Netherlands Carillon, which for more than 50 years has rung out melodies of international friendship from a point overlooking Washington’s monumental landscape, launched a $5.8 million restoration fundraising effort Thursday with a $4 million commitment from the National Park Service. The 127-foot tower between the Iwo Jima Memorial and Arlington National Cemetery has been closed to visitors for five years and needs serious structural and safety repairs to make it safe to climb. Under the planned restoration, three new bells will join the 50 existing bells, to make the site a “grand carillon,” one of only about two dozen in the world. All the bells are cast in the Netherlands, and kept in tune with annual visits by Dutch carillonneurs. “Repairs are urgently needed, but the operation also gives us the opportunity to upgrade the memorial,” Dutch Ambassador Henne Schuwer said in a statement. In addition to the money from the U.S. government, the Royal Netherlands Embassy is raising $1.2 million through the Netherland-America Foundation for the chimes, its operating system and surroundings. It will also pay for the new bells, create an educational curriculum for visitors and for future repairs. Those who wish to donate can do so at www.nlintheusa.com/carillon. The embassy is also support-

THE DAILY QUIZ

JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST

A bell in the Netherlands Carillon in Arlington. The 127foot carillon tower needs funding to repair serious structural and safety problems.

ing the Singing Bronze Foundation in the Netherlands, which is trying to raise $600,000 there. The carillon was donated by the Dutch people in 1952 to thank the United States for its role in liberating the Netherlands during World War II and for the Marshall Plan, which helped rebuild its economy after the war. Most visitors who happen upon the summer concerts on the lawn beneath the tower do not know its significance, nor do they realize that each bell — ranging from 42 pounds to 61/2 tons — is unique, carrying an emblem that represents different groups within Dutch society and inscribed with sentiments of gratitude. “Every time I pass by, I realize that this monument is a symbol for Dutch gratitude to the U.S. It represents the good relationship we have,” Schuwer said. “The fact that this building will be restored strengthens my optimism about the future of Dutch-American ties.” patricia.sullivan@washpost.com

JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST

“I don’t think that someone should be targeted in the back,” said Elton Cansler, who was struck with a Taser in 2015. “It’s just a violation.” Fairfax County police investigated the incident and concluded that the officer involved acted appropriately.

VIRGINIA

Man sues police after Taser incident Altercation with officer in Fairfax was caught on bystander’s video BY

R ACHEL W EINER

Elton Cansler remembers being scared and confused. He remembers turning to a police officer for help. Instead, the officer fired a Taser into his back. Police in Fairfax County investigated the 2015 incident, which was caught on video, and they present a different picture of events. They said Cansler carried a knife and resisted arrest and concluded that Officer Alan Hanks acted appropriately. Cansler disagrees; he is suing Hanks and Fairfax Police Chief Edwin Roessler in federal court in Alexandria. “The man knows his actions were wrong,” Cansler said of the officer in an interview Thursday after the suit was filed. “I don’t think that someone should be targeted in the back. It’s just a violation.” Cansler, 37, has cerebral palsy and associated cognitive and physical issues. He walks with a slight limp and his speech is occasionally slurred. But he said he has never before or since had an anxiety attack like the one that came over him as he walked through Rose Hill Shopping Center on Sept. 24, 2015.

“It started to feel like people were coming toward me, or after me,” he recalled. He walked into a SunTrust bank and into an employee break room; he left and took a pair of sunglasses off a counter on his way out. “What was going on in my mind was, ‘Get the pair of shades, and a person will come to me for help,’ ” he said. Cansler walked outside and did not know where he was, although he has lived in nearby Mount Vernon his whole life. He saw a sign for the Fairfax Connector bus and headed toward it. Cansler’s actions, attorneys Victor Glasberg and Maxwelle Sokol say in the lawsuit, “were manifestations of mental aberrations, unwarranted and irrational.” Meanwhile, bank security contractors called police and said that a large black man had gone into an employee break room and closed the door behind him. He then came out and put on the bank manager’s sunglasses. Ignoring a call to put the glasses back, he walked out and began wandering the parking lot. When Hanks approached him, Cansler said, he thought it was the help he had been seeking. He asked for some water. Hanks asked about the sunglasses. Cansler said he handed them over immediately. Then, Cansler said, the officer pulled out his Taser. Cansler said he raised his arms and stepped back. He said Hanks asked him to turn around and put his hands on a police car. When he

did, Cansler said, Hanks fired the Taser into his back. Police said the use of the Taser — a device that sends an immobilizing electric current into a person’s body and can be lethal — was provoked. According to the police account, while talking to Hanks, Cansler repeatedly put his hands in his front pants pockets, one of which had a knife clipped to it. When Hanks tried to arrest Cansler, according to police, Cansler put his hands on the cruiser but refused to move his arms behind his back. He allegedly pushed Hanks back with his body when the officer tried to tug on his arms. Police said Hanks stepped back, and that when Cansler responded to another command to put his hands behind his back by moving his arms forward, fired the Taser. The video, shot by a bystander, begins a few seconds before Cansler falls to the ground. Cansler is standing and facing the officer with his arms in the air, leaning his back on the police car. Hanks is pointing the Taser at him. He then brings his arm down, turns around and puts his hands on the hood of the car, briefly moving out of the frame as he does so. A couple of seconds later, Cansler is hit with the Taser and crumples to the ground. A second video released by police shows that when he was on the ground after being struck with the Taser, Cansler put his hands behind his back but moved them to his sides when Hanks attempt-

be determined whether Thomas fired his gun; he said investigators are awaiting forensic tests.

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ing in Maryland. A judge sentenced Thomas to 180 days in jail but suspended the sentence and imposed a year of probation. . Meanwhile, Thomas had been awaiting a February trial in Prince George’s after he was arrested in October and charged with numerous felony firearms offenses. He was out on bail when he was killed. Police said that on Thursday morning, officers twice went to Byers Street, both times to investigate a suspicious vehicle. The first time, police did not find anything. On the second call, police said officers found two men sleeping in a car. The officers were in uniform. Prince George’s Police Chief Henry P. Stawinski III said a female officer approached the passenger side and a male officer walked up to the driver’s side. He said the passenger immediately began to get out of the car. The chief said the driver then pointed a handgun in the direction of the female officer and the passenger. Stawinski said the male officer fired his weapon twice, striking Thomas. The chief said it could not

2016 PostPoints Treasure Hunt

As police continued their investigation, a young woman dressed in black broke down in the street a few doors from where Terrance Thomas Jr. lived. Charges were pending against the passenger, who is in his late 30s or early 40s. Authorities on Thursday posted on Twitter photos of the two guns from the scene. One photo shows the carbine that police said was found on the passenger’s side of the car; another shows a handgun on the driver’s-side floorboard. PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY POLICE

A rifle lies on the ground at the scene of the officer-involved shooting of Terrance Toshay Thomas Jr., 19, of Capitol Heights.

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Man, 19, killed in police-involved shooting in Md.

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Last chance to see A Christmas Carol. Poor “Tiny Tim” Cratchit’s life is in peril. Will Scrooge repent and help him out? Kindness is what this play’s all about.

ed to handcuff him. Another officer arrives and appears to quickly handcuff Cansler. Cansler’s attorneys say Hanks lied when he claimed he felt threatened by Cansler. “Mr. Cansler’s impaired speech, movements, and gait suggested that he was disabled, if not in need of assistance, as he himself told Officer Hanks,” the complaint argues. In a recording made by police, according to the complaint, several officers are heard saying that although the bank manager did not want to press charges, Cansler would have to be charged with something because Hanks had used the Taser. One suggests assault on a law enforcement officer. Cansler was charged with assault and petty larceny. The former charge was dropped; he pleaded guilty to the latter. “It’s on camera — the only person who was assaulted was I,” Cansler said. He is suing Hanks for using unreasonable force and Roessler for failing to train officers properly or investigate officer misconduct. Fairfax police did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Cansler said the altercation had a profound impact, giving him nightmares and making his world feel smaller. “It’s like all my four corners were cut off,” he said. “I’m in my own bubble now. I’m in my own circle.”

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THE WASHINGTON POST

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For Metro, federal spigot is unblocked

An 18-year-old man has been arrested in connection with robberies of two cabdrivers who had each picked up a passenger at Union Station, D.C. police said Thursday. Johnathan Waddell of Northwest Washington has been charged with armed robbery and robbery. Police said that in each case, the suspect robbed the driver in the 300 block of Evarts Street NE, near a playground in the Edgewood neighborhood, two miles north of Union Station. — Peter Hermann

Three poisoned by carbon monoxide

MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST

A train arrives at the King Street-Old Town station. Under restraints imposed on Metro two years ago, the agency often had to borrow money from lenders, at extra cost, to cover short-term needs.

state, and Federal stakeholders that WMATA is getting its fiscal house in order,” Beyer said in a statement. “This will assure those stakeholders that financial controls are in place and that investments in the system will be properly managed going forward.” “Numerous challenges still confront WMATA,” Beyer added, “but this is a big step in the right direction.” Michael Goldman, chairman of the finance committee on Metro’s board of directors, said he was also pleased at the announcement — for what it says about Metro’s improved financial standing at the FTA and also because of concerns about what would happen if the reimbursement restrictions continued through January. Under a new presidential ad-

“Today’s action by FTA . . . demonstrates the significant progress we have made toward getting our financial house in order and ensuring full compliance with federal requirements.” Paul J. Wiedefeld, Metro general manager

ministration, Goldman said, it would probably have taken many more months before newly minted agency officials would have gotten around to addressing the issue. “If this were to carry over into the new administration, there’s no telling what kind of timeline there would’ve been,” Goldman said. “It’s nice to have that uncertainty lifted.” Even so, the FTA warned in its letter that the agency will continue to scrutinize Metro and watch for backsliding into old practices. Goldman said he is hopeful that a relapse won’t occur. “I think this has been a wakeup call over the last two years,” Goldman said. “I think that, going forward, we have a good deal of confidence in these individuals and in these systems.” martine.powers@washpost.com

PETULA DVORAK

Holidays of hope at a time of ugliness, intolerance DVORAK FROM B1

Congregation in Rhode Island back in 1790: “May the children of the stock of Abraham who dwell in this land continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitants — while every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree and there shall be none to make him afraid,” he wrote. Rabbi Gerry Serotta, the executive director of the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, said America has been wonderfully hospitable to Jews. More than 40 percent of the world’s Jews live here. Both Serotta and Moline grew up when Jewish kids were bullied in school, slurs and jokes were common and there were quotas on the number of Jews admitted to American universities. But their kids? They’ve experienced none of that. And the stuff they’re seeing today is scary. Not just scary because there

are swastikas on a school restroom wall in tolerant and enlightened Bethesda. Not just frightening because a guy who hosted a showcase of bigotry and hate — Stephen K. Bannon — will work in the high reaches of the Trump White House. Today’s atmosphere is also terrifying because of what other minorities are facing. “What Jews are experiencing now ain’t nothing,” Moline said. A people who saw their communities destroyed and their families slaughtered by the millions during the Holocaust are understandably appalled by how Muslims are now being targeted in this country. While Merry Christmassing across the country this week, Trump underscored his commitment to a nationwide Muslim registry and a ban on Muslim immigrants. “You know my plans all along,” Trump declared. This — far more than a swastika scrawled on a building — is terrifying. “If they’re asking Muslims to register, of course we’ll get every

Winery’s visa request seen as a conflict WINERY FROM B1

which is the work cited in the request. The request was posted online by the Labor Department on Wednesday and first reported by BuzzFeed News. The workers are needed to prune the vines on the estate, the visa application said, and they would be paid $10.72 per hour for a 40-hour, six-day week. The jobs are anticipated to last from January to June. Trump, whose transition team and press office did not respond to requests for comment on the matter, consistently argued during the presidential campaign that the federal government should limit immigration to pro-

Wednesday.

THE DISTRICT

Man charged in robberies of cabbies

METRO FROM B1

wasting taxpayer dollars. But the new process was also highly time-consuming for Metro’s budget staff, and it was costly to pay interest on millions of dollars in short-term loans. At times, there were concerns within the agency about coming up against maximum borrowing caps and incurring a cash-flow problem. Now, the FTA says Metro has improved enough that the agency’s financial staff will be allowed to discontinue the practice for all federal grants awarded after June 2015. The decision can be seen as a vote of confidence in Wiedefeld, who came into Metro’s top job a little over one year ago and promised financial accountability. “Today’s action by FTA to remove financial restrictions on Metro demonstrates the significant progress we have made toward getting our financial house in order and ensuring full compliance with federal requirements,” Wiedefeld said in a statement. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.), the District’s nonvoting member of Congress, said Thursday that she was relieved to see that the “burdensome restrictions” are now being lifted — a move she has requested for months. “FTA’s diligent financial monitoring of [the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority] was essential to get the agency into acceptable financial standing with sound budget and financial controls. This exercise has been a costly lesson for WMATA,” Norton said. Of late, she said, the practice has been doing more harm than good. “Because the resulting costs will ultimately fall to the public,” Norton added, “the last thing financially ailing WMATA needs is the long time it has taken FTA to do its review.” Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.) called the announcement a “milestone” for Metro. “It demonstrates to regional,

LOC AL D I GE S T

NORM SHAFER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

The vineyard in 2011, the year Donald Trump bought it.

tect American jobs. The visas his business seeks do not allow workers to reside permanently in the United States. About 8,800 temporary agricultural worker visas were requested nationwide in federal fiscal 2016, Labor Department reports show, and about 8,300 were granted. The Trump vineyard applied for 19 temporary visas for foreign workers in 2014, 2015 and this year, before the most recent request, according to federal rec-

Jew in America to register,” Rabbi Daniel Zemel vowed at a Friday night Shabbat service at Temple Micah in the District last month. “If they’re going to start deporting people, we’ll make Temple Micah into a sanctuary.” Moline agreed, joining Christians, Jews, Buddhists and Muslims outside Masjid Muhammad, which calls itself “The Nation’s Mosque,” in Northwest Washington last month and saying, “I will be the first in line to say, ‘Ana Muslim!’ ‘I am a Muslim!’ ” It’s because Jews remember not just the Nazis, butpeople like Marion Pritchard. Pritchard, once a Dutch social work student, was 96 when she died in Washington last week. She was credited with feeding, clothing and hiding more than 150 Jews during the Holocaust, many of them children. She even killed a Nazi collaborator who discovered one of the hideouts she used under floorboards. She shot him and slipped his corpse into a coffin with another cadaver to escape

ords. In addition, he has sought to hire 513 foreign workers since 2013 for some of his other businesses, including his Palm Beach home, Mar-a-Lago Club. Kerry Woolard, the Trump Winery’s senior manager who signed the visa request, did not respond to a request for comment. Although Trump, during a campaign event in May said of the winery, “I own it 100 percent, no mortgage, no debt,” the winery’s website says it is a registered trade name of Eric Trump Wine Manufacturing LLC and is “not owned, managed or affiliated with Donald J. Trump, The Trump Organization or any of their affiliates.” Eric Trump, the son of the president-elect, is part of his father’s transition team and has been sitting in on meetings that his father has held with high-level technology leaders and others. The winery, however, is on land owned by Trump Vineyard Estates LLC. Trump reported in his campaign’s federally required financial disclosure statement in May 2016 that he was president of that entity.

detection. Pritchard always insisted that none of it would have been possible without the assistance of others. Serotta pays tribute to Christians like her every Christmas. His family goes out for Chinese food, as many Jewish families do, and then volunteer at a local church’s soup kitchen so Christians can have the night off to celebrate with their families. He’ll do it again this year and light his Hanukkah candle when he gets home. The rabbi’s America is the one we must embrace — a place of love, religious freedom and tolerance. George Washington was very clear in his letter to the Jews he visited in Rhode Island, explaining that the United States “gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance.” And now is a good time to live up to that promise, to light a candle in the darkness. petula.dvorak@washpost.com Twitter: @petulad

— Peter Hermann

MARYLAND

Hypothermia death reported in Baltimore A woman died of hypothermia in Baltimore last week in what authorities said was the state’s first recorded cold-weather death of the winter months. Maryland’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene did not identify the woman, citing health privacy in a statement. Public records indicated that she was older than 65. There were 20 hypothermiarelated deaths in Maryland last winter, according to the health department statement released

State seeks to undo lease agreement The state of Maryland, facing threats of a $70 million lawsuit over its decision to cancel plans for renting space in a longstalled Baltimore redevelopment project, has asked a court to declare the leasing contracts invalid. Assistant Attorney General John J. Kuchno filed the request with the Baltimore City Circuit Court on Wednesday, saying that “vast changes” occurred with the proposed $1.5 billion project since the state approved the leases in 2010 and that “nothing in the applicable agreements or under Maryland law compels the state to move forward” with them. The action came hours after Maryland’s Board of Public Works voted to cancel the lease agreements and Gov. Larry Hogan (R) announced that he would order the state’s stadium authority to explore the possibility of building a professional sports arena at the 28-acre site. Michael J. Edney, an attorney for the developer, said his client plans to sue the state if it does not follow through with the lease agreements. — Josh Hicks

VIRGINIA

Man allegedly sought to support ISIS A Virginia man was charged Thursday with attempting to provide support to the Islamic State, prosecutors said. In October and November, Lionel Nelson Williams of Suffolk sent money to a person he believed was collecting money to purchase weapons and ammunition for Islamic State fighters, the U.S. attorney’s office for the Eastern District of Virginia said in a statement. The recipient was an FBI informant, according to court records. Williams, 26, also pledged his support for the Islamic State on social media in March, court records showed, writing, “It’s time for me to take a stand” and “I love the Mujahideen” on Facebook in March. In addition, he bought an AK-47 assault rifle the day after the terrorist attack in San Bernardino, Calif., in 2015, prosecutors said, and fired the gun during target practice in a field near his home. — Justin Wm. Moyer

LOTTE R I E S Results from Dec. 22

VIRGINIA

DISTRICT Mid-Day Lucky Numbers: Mid-Day DC-4: Mid-Day DC-5: Lucky Numbers (Wed.): Lucky Numbers (Thu.): DC-4 (Wed.): DC-4 (Thu.): DC-5 (Wed.): DC-5 (Thu.):

1-2-8 2-8-1-6 5-6-8-8-8 6-2-0 1-8-3 0-6-2-0 8-4-6-6 3-0-7-7-6 2-8-6-7-4

Day/Pick-3: 4-9-0 Pick-4: 0-2-1-7 Cash-5: 7-10-17-20-23 Night/Pick-3 (Wed.): 4-2-6 Pick-3 (Thu.): 8-1-2 Pick-4 (Wed.): 1-5-1-1 Pick-4 (Thu.): 7-4-7-9 Cash-5 (Wed.): 7-18-22-23-29 Cash-5 (Thu.): 7-10-12-32-34 Bank a Million: 1-14-27-30-35-39 *21

MARYLAND Mid-Day Pick 3: 6-5-1 Mid-Day Pick 4: 2-2-4-8 Night/Pick 3 (Wed.): 7-6-1 Pick 3 (Thu.): 7-6-4 Pick 4 (Wed.): 5-0-6-8 Pick 4 (Thu.): 2-1-7-2 Multi-Match: 1-8-13-15-21-30 Match 5 (Wed.): 11-12-19-30-34 *36 Match 5 (Thu.): 2-3-31-32-35 *10 5 Card Cash: JS-QS-3C-3H-9D

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MULTI-STATE GAMES Cash 4 Life: 14-19-32-38-43 ¶3 Lucky for Life: 10-15-21-23-34 ‡1 Powerball: 25-33-40-54-68 **3 Power Play: 5x Hot Lotto: 19-26-30-40-43 †9 *Bonus Ball **Powerball ¶Cash Ball †Hot Ball ‡Lucky Ball For late drawings and out-of-area results, check washingtonpost.com/lottery

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A man, his wife and his teenage daughter were rushed to a District hospital Thursday morning after suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning in their home in Northeast Washington, according to the D.C. fire department. The man was in critical condition, a fire spokesman said. His wife and daughter were transported in serious condition. All were taken to George Washington University Hospital. Doug Buchanan, a spokesman for the D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department, said firefighters were called about 6:40 a.m. to a singlefamily house in the 3300 block of 20th Street NE. The incident remains under investigation, but the spokesman said the family had the furnace repaired Wednesday, and investigators think a faulty or unsecured valve could be to blame.

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B4

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THE WASHINGTON POST

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. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

obituaries CARDINAL PAULO EVARISTO ARNS, 95

Brazilian church leader defied military dictators BY

MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST

Don’t even think about it Window washer Guillermo Solano pauses as a bird flies past the Maryland Institute College of Art. Solano works for a contractor that handles window-washing duties at the fine arts and graphic design school in Baltimore.

THE REGION

Man uses pellet gun in robbery attempt on Metro BY

P ETER H ERMANN

After spending Wednesday night dining with friends in the District, Denise Sudell hopped on the Metro’s Orange Line toward New Carrollton, headed to her home in Prince George’s County. She took a seat in the front end of one of the last cars in the line. It was past 11 p.m. Shortly after the train pulled out of the station at Minnesota Avenue in Northeast Washington, Sudell, 59, heard yelling from the other end of the car. A dozen panicked people rushed in her direction, forced open the emergency door and piled into the next car.

One man was still standing in the back. Sudell, an attorney who is chief of external enforcement with the Civil Rights Center at the Labor Department, joined the frightened crowd, although she still was not quite sure what was happening. All she could think to ask someone was: “Does he have a gun?” Passengers shut the emergency door behind them, leaving a man with a gun inside the car, along with a few people who stayed. One passenger hit the emergency button. Another called 911 on a cellphone. Metro Transit Police said later that the man had tried to rob a passenger. A spokesman

later said the weapon was a pellet gun. Still, the attack unnerved more than a dozen passengers during the two-minute ride between the stations at Minnesota Avenue and Deanwood, where police met the train and arrested the man. Sudell said the man stayed in the car, at one point sprawling on the floor. Sudell, who runs a division that processes discrimination complaints in the job-training system, said she did not see the attempted robbery or the weapon. She said it wasn’t until she was in the next car that another passenger answered her question about the gun. That passenger

told her the man had tried to shoot somebody but nothing came out of the gun. Sudell said that after people got into the other car, “it felt safe and people were more relaxed. They were chatting about what happened, saying, ‘Oh, this is wild.’ ” She said the train doors opened at Deanwood and passengers watched as police arrested the man. She said officers wrestled him to the ground on the platform and that he was shouting at them. Metro identified him as Dontirius Dywayne Bullock, 23, of Northeast Washington. He is charged with assault with a dangerous weapon. peter.hermann@washpost.com

THE REGION

M AURICIO S AVARESE

Cardinal Paulo Evaristo Arns, one of the Catholic Church’s most prominent pro-democracy voices in Latin America, died Dec. 14 in São Paulo, Brazil. He was 95. He had lung and kidney problems, according to the archdiocese of São Paulo, where he served from 1970 to 1998. The cardinal became famous for challenging leaders of the brutal military dictatorship of 1964-1985 and for his opposition to torture in Latin America. Cardinal Arns often talked about democratic values during Mass, protected activists in his churches and led a national antitorture initiative. Arns also threatened to excommunicate police investigators who refused to provide information on political prisoners. In 1975, he organized one of the most open acts of defiance of Brazil’s dictatorship, praying in São Paulo’s central cathedral with other religious leaders and blaming the regime for the assassination of journalist Vladimir Herzog, who had been taken as a political prisoner shortly before. Officials said Herzog had committed suicide in jail, but Cardinal Arns rejected that account during Mass, despite the presence of tanks and soldiers outside his church. Conservative members of the church and the military leaders regarded him as a troublemaker. He recalled a conversation with Gen. Emilio Medici, who told

him, “You take care of your church, and I will take care of the country.” Cardinal Arns also helped victims of political persecution and torture in the rest of South America. One of his friends was Argentine human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize-winner Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, who said Cardinal Arns saved him twice from the Brazilian dictatorship. A commission created by Cardinal Arns at his archdiocese documented many cases of torture and helped later governments pay damages to victims and shame perpetrators of violence. Cardinal Arns was sympathetic to the left-leaning liberation theology, a stream of Catholic thought that irritated critics by often merging socialist theory with church doctrine. The cardinal’s political links led Pope John Paul II to intervene in his archdiocese, the second biggest in the world after Mexico City, to split his powers. Paulo Evaristo Arns was born in Forquilhinha, Brazil, on Sept. 14, 1921, to German immigrants. He entered the Franciscan order and was ordained a priest in 1945. He earned a doctorate at the Sorbonne in Paris before returning to Brazil to begin his teaching career. He was named auxiliary bishop of São Paulo in 1966 and was appointed archbishop four years later. He lived his last years in silence on the outskirts of São Paulo. —Associated Press

DARIO LOPEZ-MILLS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinal Paulo Evaristo Arns, shown in São Paulo, Brazil, in 1998, often talked about democratic values during Mass, protected activists in his churches and led a national anti-torture initiative.

DICK LATESSA, 87

Trump supporters to party at National Press Club Actor won Tony Award for role in ‘Hairspray’ Va. nightclub says it was harassed after declining to host the ‘DeploraBall’ BY

J OHN W OODROW C OX

One week after a Virginia nightclub received harassing phone calls for declining to host an inauguration party dubbed the “DeploraBall,” the Donald Trump supporters behind the event have found a new venue to celebrate the election of their media-bashing candidate: the National Press Club. “Doing it at the press club asserts that we’re a new force in town,” said Jeff Giesea, one of the organizers. “And we’re not just doing it as a troll.” The Jan. 19 party had garnered

attention on Twitter earlier this month in part because several of its slated guests are best known for being online provocateurs, contributing to conspiracy-theory websites and sharing views with the alt-right, an extremist movement of mostly young men seeking a whites-only nation. But the organizers say they are simply fans of the president-elect and in no way connected to the alt-right, which has come under intense scrutiny since a number of its members flashed Nazi salutes at a Washington conference last month. “This is an event for Trump supporters from across the country, from all backgrounds, ethnicities and walks of life,” the event’s site says, adding: “We will not tolerate any incendiary actions, remarks or gestures that go against the ‘open basket’ spirit of the event.”

Giesea reiterated that point in an interview Thursday. “Moms from the Midwest are flying out for this,” he said. “They’re not part of the alt-right. They don’t even know what that is.” In a statement, press club President Thomas Burr said that its downtown D.C. location would host “a private, client-paid inaugural ball for supporters of President-elect Donald Trump — as we have for incoming presidents of both parties for decades. “This is not an event,” he added, “sponsored or endorsed by the National Press Club.” The leaders of the DeploraBall — a name inspired by Hillary Clinton’s description of some Trump supporters as “deplorables” — had been in talks with the Clarendon Ballroom in Arlington, but, according to a statement, the venue backed out because of “the suspi-

cious actions of the organizers” — not because of political pressure. Party promoters had sold hundreds of tickets and claimed online that the ballroom was booked before any contracts had been signed. The venue’s staff later told police that they had received harassing phone calls. “I think there was a perception that they did it partly for political reasons,” Giesea said. “We certainly didn’t encourage anyone to troll them.” The controversy has not curtailed interest in the party, which quickly sold out of its 1,000 tickets. “Tickets get you in the door,” the site says, “with open bar, light hors d’oeuvres, fun people, cool music, and endless memes.” john.cox@washpost.com Rachel Weiner contributed to this report.

MARYLAND

Police recover 42 packages stolen outside homes Four teens held in connection with thefts, all in Montgomery County BY

D AN M ORSE

Scrooge alert: Montgomery County police on Thursday said they have arrested four teenagers who swiped dozens of delivery packages left in front of homes. Authorities described two pairs of suspects, all ages 17 or 18. Starting several days ago, police received reports from residents in Germantown about a man, driving a silver Audi station wagon, who was stealing packages, said Sgt. Rebecca Innocenti, a

police spokeswoman. Police also heard from a delivery truck driver that a silver Audi wagon was following him, Innocenti said. Officers learned enough about the car to determine that it was registered to Marcell Bennett, 18, of Boyds. Just past noon on Tuesday, a police officer spotted the Audi. It sped off. Twenty minutes later, according to court records, a plainclothes officer saw the car. The officer watched it pull to a stop at the dead end of Stags Leap Court. The driver got out, looked around, reached into the back of the Audi, took out three empty boxes and dumped them among trees, according to charging documents. After the driver got back into

the car, police followed it — at speeds over 75 mph — before pulling it over. The driver, later confirmed to be Bennett, would not get out of the car, police said, and he had to be forced to do so. Bennett and a passenger, a 17year-old girl, were taken into custody. “The entire rear seat and compartment area were filled with merchandise,” police wrote in charging documents. “One such item, seen in plain view, was a gift box decorated as a snowman.” Police found about 30 packages. Inside the passenger’s purse, they also found five $100 bills, court papers say. Police think the bills were taken out of five picture frames that had been inside a package left at one of the houses. At a district police station, offi-

cials said, Bennett and the passenger admitted to stealing about 12 packages Monday and Tuesday. Bennett, charged with theft and resisting arrest, could not be reached Friday, and court records do not indicate whether he has an attorney. On Dec. 13 in the Clarksburg, Md., area, a resident called police to say he had just seen two young males steal packages along Fair Garden Lane and get into a car. Police later spotted that car, believed to be stolen, and took two 17-year-old males into custody. In the two cases combined, officers recovered a total of 42 packages and have been working to get them — all the way, this time — to their intended recipients. dan.morse@washpost.com

BY

M ARK K ENNEDY

Dick Latessa, a veteran Broadway actor who was in the original productions of “Follies,” “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “The Will Rogers Follies” and who won a Tony Award playing Harvey Fierstein’s onstage husband in the original cast of “Hairspray,” died Dec. 19, Fierstein said. He was 87. “This was a man who defined pro, with the timing of a Swiss watch and a voice, a smile and sweet soul that made you feel special just to know him,” Fierstein wrote of his former co-star on Facebook. No other details of the death were immediately available. Mr. Latessa was born in Cleveland, where he worked as a machinist and newspaper carrier before pursuing a career in acting. He played Herr Schultz in the 1999 revival of “Cabaret” and Dr. Dreyfuss in the 2010 revival of “Promises, Promises.” Other credits on Broadway included “Broadway Bound,” “Awake and Sing!”

and the 1994 revival of “Damn Yankees.” He was last on Broadway in “The Lyons” in 2012. He won his Tony in 2003, for best actor in a featured role in a musical, as the good-hearted dad in “Hairspray,” singing “You’re Timeless to Me” with Fierstein. When he won the Tony, he said, “Being up here is wonderful, but the trip here was the best of all.” His film roles included parts in “The Substance of Fire” (1996), “Stigmata” (1999) and “Alfie” (2004) with Jude Law. On TV, he made appearances on “Six Degrees,” “The Black Donnellys,” “The Good Wife” and “Brotherhood.” Mr. Latessa’s old role opposite the cross-dressing Fierstein in NBC’s “Hairspray: Live!” was taken by Martin Short in the recent telecast, but creators honored him with a store sign — “Crazy Dickie’s.” “Oh, Dick, there was only one you and I’ll be forever grateful that I got you all to myself for nearly a thousand performances,” wrote Fierstein. —Associated Press

RICHARD DREW/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dick Latessa accepts the Tony for best featured actor in a musical for “Hairspray” in 2003. Other credits included “Follies.”


O F NO T E

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THE WASHINGTON POST

Curtis Farrar, food policy official Curtis Farrar, 89, who retired about 15 years ago as director of finance and administration at the International Food Policy Research Institute, died Nov. 22 at his home in Washington. The cause was congestive heart failure, said a son, Douglas Farrar. Dr. Farrar was born in New York City and had lived in the Washington area since 1963. He joined the institute in the mid1990s after having been a World Bank agricultural research officer, a member of the State Department planning staff, a technical assistance specialist at the U.S. Agency for International Development and an official of the Asia Foundation. John Poff, library officer John Poff, 53, a team leader in the literary division of the Library of Congress’s copyright office, died Nov. 8 at a hospice in Arlington, Va. The cause was lung cancer, said a friend and colleague, Gareth James. Mr. Poff, an Arlington resident, was born in Baltimore. He worked 27 years at the Library of Congress, retiring this year. During this period he also taught English as a second language in a night division of the Alexandria, Va., school system. Betty Ellen Brown, public information officer Betty Ellen Brown, 98, former public information officer in the 1970s for Montgomery County’s division of elder affairs, died Nov. 4 at her home in Rockville, Md. The cause was complications following abdominal surgery, said a son, Scott Brown. Mrs. Brown was born Betty Ellen Boylan in Enid, Okla., and did public information work in Illinois and Colorado before moving to the Washington area in 1965. She was a volunteer writing instructor with the Montgomery County Public Schools and was a volunteer softball coach, Cub Scout den mother and Girl Scout Brownie leader. Janis Pitts, biotech industry advocate Janis Pitts, 64, an advocate for the growth of the biotech industry in Montgomery County as the director of life science strategy for the Montgomery County Department of Economic Development from 2000 to 2014, died Nov. 14 at her home in Kensington, Md. The cause was complications from a progressive neurological disease, said a daughter, Samantha Kupferman. Mrs. Pitts was born Janis Gralnick in Washington and grew up in Silver Spring, Md. In the early 1990s, she owned and managed a gourmet grocery and catering operation, Western Market, in Bethesda, Md. After leaving the county position, she briefly was director of business development at Amarex Clinical Research in Germantown, Md., assisting the company get Food and Drug Administration approval for medical products. Her avocations included tending rose bushes and collecting antique rolling pins. Yvonne Rodler, NIH tour guide Yvonne Rodler, 85, who during the 1970s gave tours of the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Md., to visiting doctors from foreign countries and helped plan events for other health-related organizations, died Nov. 4 at a medical center in Oakland, Calif. The cause was a stroke, said a daughter-in-law, Jenny Rodler. Mrs. Rodler was born Yvonne Mermel in Washington. In the 1950s, she worked for the CIA, where she helped test telephone eavesdropping equipment. She later edited publications of the National Register of Large Dams. In 2009, she moved to Oakland from Washington. — From staff reports

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IN MEMORIAM

DEATH NOTICE

DEATH NOTICE

DEATH NOTICE

JONES

CLARK

LOONEY

GRANT

EVA VIRGINIA FRYE CLARK (Age 94)

HARVEY LOONEY #151

Obituaries of residents from the District, Maryland and Northern Virginia. John Jeffrey, physician John Jeffrey, 86, a Washingtonarea obstetrician gynecologist who had private practices and was affiliated with many hospitals, died Nov. 1 at an assisted-living center in Potomac, Md. The cause was lung cancer, said a daughter, Clare Sullivan. Dr. Jeffrey, a Potomac resident, was born in Scranton, Pa., and had lived in the Washington area since 1960. He retired in 1994. He was a former secretary of the Washington Gynecological Society and a member of Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church in Potomac.

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Of Fairfax County, VA passed away December 18, 2016. She is preceded in death by her husband, Disco “Junior” Clark, and granddaughter, Marci Hubbard. Mrs. Clark is survived by her children, Regina Taft of Mandeville, LA, and Brenda Clark of Christiansburg, VA, four grandchildren, and eleven great-grandchildren. Graveside services will be held on Monday, January 9, 2017, at 11 a.m. at Quantico National Cemetery, 18424 Joplin Rd, Triangle, VA 22172. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123, or to Quantico National Cemetery, P.O. Box 10, Triangle, VA 22172. www.adventfuneral.com

DAMIAN A. JONES There are tears of fond remembrance, dearest Damian for you still, for you held a place within our hearts, that none can ever fill. The Jones Family

DOMZALSKI JOSEPH MATTHEW DOMZALSKI Passed away on December 15, 2016, at the too-young age of 46. Missing him immensely are his devoted wife, Pamela, of Richmond, VA; his parents, Joseph D. and Pearl W. Domzalski, of Fairfax, VA; his sisters, Marsha Hope of McKinney, TX, and Alicia Truitt of Manassas, VA; nephews, Tyler Hope and Evan Truitt; and nieces, Sydney Hope and Elena Truitt, as well as a multitude of other relatives, friends and associates. Surfing on the Outer Banks and bicycling (including working on maintenance of bike trails in Richmond) were his heartfelt passions along with an abiding love of music, dogs, healthful food and pleasant camaraderie which leaves a lasting impact on all who knew him. One of his friends described him as a “beautiful gift” and that is how he will be remembered. A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date.

DEATH NOTICE

BAKER

HARRIS COOLIDGE MARIE HARRIS ELLEN SARA BAKER On Tuesday, December 20, 2016 of Potomac, MD. Beloved wife of Arden Baker; devoted mother of Roger Baker and Beth Baker; loving grandmother of Samuel Baker, Luna Cristales and Carlos Cristales. She received a BA, MA and her PHD in Psychology and was in private practice in Montgomery County, MD for 22 years. She was also a wonderful artist working in oils. Funeral Services will be held Friday, December 23, 2016, 10:30 a.m. at Congregation Har Shalom, 11510 Falls Rd., Potomac, MD with interment to follow at King David Memorial Gardens, Falls Church, VA. The family will be observing Shiva at the home of Arden Baker following the interment Friday until 4:30 p.m.; resuming on Saturday and Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m. with Minyan services at 7:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the American Lung Association or the charity of your choice. www.sagelbloomfield.com

BROWN-SILVERMAN

On Saturday, December 17, 2016. Survived by daughter, Patricia; four sisters; four grandchildren; great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces; nephews; other relatives and friends. Preceded in death by beloved husband Isaac and daughter Lovie. Services privately held.

PAID DEATH NOTICES

Members of the Prince Georges County Police Retired Association are notified of the passing of Brother Looney on December 19, 2016. Our heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends.

HOLIDAY HOURS Sunday, December 25, 2016 & Monday, December 26, 2016

MATTHEWS LOIS MARR MATTHEWS (Age 88) On December 15, 2016, at ManorCare York South in York, PA. She had Alzheimer’s disease. Born Lois Barbara Marr on July 10, 1928, in Washington, DC, she grew up in NW, Washington. She graduated from Coolidge High School in 1946, and Wilson Teachers College in Washington in 1950 (B.S. degree in Elementary Education). She earned an M.A. in Music Education from Columbia University Teachers College in New York in 1953. She began musical training on the piano at the Washington Musical Institute. She served as organist at several area churches early in her career, then played for Memorial Baptist Church in Arlington for about 33 years. Gave recitals at several churches in the D.C. area and played for many weddings and funerals. She was a long-time piano and organ teacher. She was a member of the DC. and Northern, VA. Chapters of the American Guild of Organists for many years, and a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Lois taught at two elementary schools in DC. in the 1950s, and music classes in the Fairfax County Schools briefly in the 1960s. She held clerical jobs with the federal government during the 1970s-80s, and the Alumni Office of George Mason University in Fairfax (1987-1992) After marriage to Richard Andrew Matthews in 1956, Lois spent most of her years living in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs of DC while raising her family. She was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Richard A. Matthews, who passed away in 2010. She is survived by three daughters, Julia M. Pagio and husband, Dominic; Christine D. Trout and husband, Monroe; and Melanie M. Doss and husband, Gene; five grandchildren; a sister, Ruth M. Wood; four nieces and a nephew. A service will be held at 12 p.m. on Friday, December 30, at the Cedar Hill Funeral Home in Suitland, MD. Burial will be at Cedar Hill Cemetery on December 30. There will be no viewing. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation, www.alzdiscovery.org.

CLARENCE GRANT, JR. “Butch” On Sunday, December 18, 2016, Clarence “Butch” Grant of Landover, MD. Beloved husband of Noriko Grant; loving son of Hester Grant. Also survived by his loving children; grandchildren; family and friends. Family will receive friends Tuesday, December 27, 2016 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Beall Funeral Home, 6512 NW Crain Hwy, Bowie, MD; followed by a funeral service at 11 a.m. Please view and sign the family’s guestbook at: www.beallfuneral.com

VIRGINIA HERRINGTON “Ginny” Virginia “Ginny” Herrington of Arlington, VA passed away on December 19, 2016. She is survived by her longtime companion, Scott Haugland; her daughter Alyson F. Damron; her brother, Joseph N. Patz and grandchildren, Don Allen and Stephen Allen Damron and greatgrandson, Kendell Damron. Ginny retired from the Government in 2002 with over 38 years of Federal Civil Service, 35 of which was with the Office of The Air Force Civil Engineer. She was subsequently employed part-time by Northrop Grumman. Family will receive friends on Friday, December 30, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Everly Community Funeral Care, 6161 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22044. Funeral Services will follow at 1 p.m. at the funeral home with interment in Columbia Gardens Cemetery. www.everlycommunity.com

RICHARDS JILES EMMITT RICHARDS "Prazman" (Age 70) On Monday, December 19, 2016 of Bladensburg, MD, formerly of Richmond, VA. Beloved father of Jiles (Paula) Richards, Jr. Cherished grandfather of Samuel Richards. Brother of Paul Richards, Eloise Damron, Alton Richards, and the late Roberta Bevins, Mary Lou Daughterly, Peggy, and Sue. Son of the late Jiles and Thelma Richards. Friends may call at Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A., 4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on Friday, December 30 from 1 p.m. until service time at 3 p.m. Interment private. Memorial contributions may be made in his name to the Extraordinary Life Church, Building Fund, 715 East Ordnance Road, Glen Burnie, MD 21226. www.gaschs.com

Photo Deadline: 1 p.m. NO EXCEPTIONS To place a notice, call: 202-334-4122 800-627-1150 Ext. 4-4122

LUCK

deathnotices@washpost.com

PAID DEATH NOTICES MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. To place a notice, call: 202-334-4122 800-627-1150 ext 4-4122 FAX: 202-334-7188 EMAIL: deathnotices@washpost.com

MILTON M. LUCK, III

HERRINGTON

11 a.m. ~ 3 p.m.

Born and raised in Washington DC, died on Saturday, December 17, 2016 after a long battle with cancer. He is survived by his loving wife, Belvia Luck of 39 years; their only son, Milton M. Luck, IV (Doris Luck); mother, Rose Luck; two brothers, Theodore Luck (Alyce Luck) and Thomas Luck; nieces and nephews, Tracy, Tyler and Samantha Luck. A gathering of family and friends will be held on Thursday, December 29, 2016 at 11 a.m. at Kingdom Hall, 1206 Doewood Lane, Capitol Heights, MD. Interment, Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Crownsville, MD. Please view and sign the family’s guestbook at: www.beallfuneral.com

Email and faxes MUST include name, home address & home phone # of the responsible billing party. Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily Phone-In deadline 4 p.m. M-F 3 p.m. Sa-Su CURRENT 2016 RATES: ( PER DAY) MONDAY-SATURDAY Black & White 1" - $135 2" - $306 3" - $441 4" - $482 5" - $611 -----SUNDAY Black & White 1"- $161 (text only) 2" - $339 (text only) 3" - $489 4" - $515 5" - $665 6"+ for ALL Black & White notices $135 each additional inch wkday $161 each additional inch Sunday -------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY Color 3" - $502 4" - $545 5" - $680 -----SUNDAY Color 3" - $535 4" - $621 5" - $770

STEPHENS

HOWARD ADA PAULINE HOWARD

JUDITH BROWN-SILVERMAN Beloved wife, fabulous mom, devoted sister and aunt, and friend to all, passed away suddenly and unexpectedly after a tragic accident on Tuesday, December 6, 2016. Born on January 19, 1952 in Syracuse NY, she is survived by her husband, Dr. Harold Silverman; son, Joshua Silverman; sister, Linda Levy; and brothers, Dave Brown and Dr. Paul Brown; their spouses and many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. Judi was predeceased by her parents, Dr. Oliver and Elaine Brown of Quaker Hill, Connecticut. Dr. Brown was a distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Connecticut College and the owner of many patents. Judi was a resident of Silver Spring, MD but spent a great deal of time in Ventnor, NJ, where was able to spend many hours each day watching the beach and ocean she loved. A graduate of the George Washington University, she was a vivacious, funny and high energy person, whose first concern was to help people who could not, for various reasons, help themselves. These qualities were reflected throughout her career. She worked at the now defunct Chestnut Lodge Psychiatric facility in Rockville, MD. As an AARP employee, she became a principal spokesperson and face of AARP’s advocacy on generic pharmaceutical and Direct-to Consumer prescription drug issues on Capitol Hill during the debate over Public Law 98-417 (the landmark Hatch-Waxman Act) which was enacted in 1984. She was AARP’s representative on generic drug issues to the media, public health groups and the brand name pharmaceutical industry. When her son Joshua was born in 1989, he became her total focus and the light of her life. Later, she was a Red Cross volunteer at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center where she helped comfort and support wounded warriors and their families after surgery and other medical procedures. During her years at Walter Reed, Judi was very involved with the Wounded Warrior Project. Judi was also an accomplished singer and was blessed with a beautiful voice, which she shared with family, friends and choirs. A gathering of family and friends to honor her and share memories was held in Ventnor, NJ on December 11, 2016. Contributions in memory of Judi BrownSilverman may be made to the Metropolitan DC Chapter of the American Diabetes Association at 1400 16th Street NW – Suite 410, Washington DC 20036 or The Wounded Warrior Project (woundedwarriorproject.org). May her memory be a blessing.

Ada Pauline Howard, 100, of Germantown, MD passed away at her home on December 20, 2016. Ada was greatly loved by all her family and friends. She was the devoted wife of the late James M. Howard; loving mother of H. Pauline Johnson (dec.) and her husband Kenneth A. Johnson (dec.); cherished grandmother of Kenneth N. Johnson (Herlinda), Judith A. Johnson, and James A. Johnson (dec.); great-grandmother of Adriana Johnson and Alexandra Watkins (Justin); great-great-grandmother of Logan James Monseur, Justin Bruce (Lil J) Watkins II, and Alexis Marie Watkins. Friends are welcome to call on Tuesday, December 27, at 10:30 a.m. for a viewing, followed by a service at 11 a.m. at Fairhaven United Methodist Church, 12801 Darnestown Rd, Gaithersburg, MD 20878. Interment to follow at Forest Oak Cemetery. Online condolences at devolfuneralhome.com.

SPENCER

6"+ for ALL color notices $160 each additional inch wkday $186 each additional inch Sunday Notices with photos begin at 3" (All photos add 2" to your notice.) ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID

LOUIS BREEZE SPENCER, JR. “Lou” (Age 86)

LAWRENCE KENNETH A. LAWRENCE Kenneth “Ken” A. Lawrence, 84, of Fairfax, Virginia, passed away, Saturday, December 17, 2016 at Inova Fairfax Hospital. A commemorative service for friends and family will be held at 1 p.m., Tuesday, December 27 at the Tower Club, Tysons Corner, Virginia. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Salvation Army and/or the American Lung Association would be appreciated. Ken was born May 4,1932 in Niagara Falls, New York. He graduated from Cornell University in 1954 and served as a Captain in the Army Corps of Engineers at Ft, Belvoir, VA. On June 14, 1958 he married the former Mary Joyce Davis. Ken was employed as a research scientist/project manager for such companies as Psychological Research Associates, Raytheon and Logos, Subsequently, he joined the Public Sector and worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Veterans Administration and the IRS. He finalized his career by serving as the Planning Commissioner for Providence District in Fairfax County, where he significantly shaped the development of Tysons and the Mosaic District. He viewed this work as his service to the community. Ken was an avid MG enthusiast, a fan of Grand Prix racing, a globe-trotter and a loving father and husband.

passed away peacefully Saturday, December 17, 2016 at his home in Boyds, MD in the embrace of his beloved wife of 62 years, Janet Atkinson Spencer. A devoted father, he is survived by four children and their spouses, Keith A. Spencer, William L. Spencer, Mary-Eileen Hahn, and James S. Spencer; 11 grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. Born in Washington, DC, he was raised in Silver Spring, MD with two older sisters, one older brother and two younger brothers, attending and serving at Grace Episcopal Church. Lou is a veteran of the United States Coast Guard. His career with PEPCO spanned over thirty years. Visitation for family and friends will be held on Tuesday, December 27 beginning at 11 a.m. with a Memorial Service and Reception immediately following at 12 noon. Location: Redeemer Lutheran Church, 27015 Ridge Road Damascus, MD 20872 www.redeemer.us. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Montgomery Hospice http://www.montgomeryhospice.org/. Online condolences may be shared with his family at: molesworthwilliams.com

Additional plaques start at $26 each and may be ordered. All Paid Death Notices appear on our website through www.legacy.com LEGACY.COM Included in all death notices Optional for In Memoriams PLEASE NOTE: Notices must be placed via phone, fax or email. Photos must be emailed. You can no longer place notices, drop off photos and make payment in person. Payment must be made via phone with debit/credit card.

DEATH NOTICE

BROWN preceded in death by her mother Maxine Hooter and stepfather Frank Hooter of Dallas, Texas, father Stanley Aulsbrook and stepmother Wilma Aulsbrook of Gadsden, Alabama, brother Benjamin Hooter of Dallas, Texas and her sister Stephanie Kraus of Plano, Texas.

PHYLLIS K. BROWN A memorial mass will be held at 10 a.m. on January 21, 2017 at St. Joseph's Church in Herndon, VA, for Phyllis K. Brown, beloved wife, mother and grandmother, who worked for IBM for more than 40 years, most of them in the Washington D.C. area. She died of cancer on November 22, 2016.

DEATH NOTICE

two-year squadron tour, VF-11 also deployed on USS Wasp (CV-18) and aboard USS Oriskany (CV-34) for a South America tour. He flew over 1,100 hours in the Lockheed TV-2 “Shooting Star” jet as an instructor in the Advanced Training command at NAS Kingsville, TX and NAS Memphis, TN where he met and married Ann Ray and was promoted to lieutenant commander. After a tour of 27.5 months on USS Forrestal (CVA-59) he was assigned to NAS Oceana,VA and promoted to commander. He was eventually assigned to NAS Glenview, IL where he served as personnel, maintenance officer and air station XO during a 2.5 year tour, and attained the rank of captain. While on the staff of the chief of Naval Material he completed a Master of Science from George Washington University before retiring in 1970 after 28 years. He had logged 4,089 total flight hours in 43 aircraft types and models, with 2,200 jet hours and 253 carrier JOHN A. O’DONNELL “Jack”, landings. He received the DFC, seven awards Capt. USNR (Ret.) (Age 95) of the AM, NCM w/Combat V and the PUC Of Potomac, MD, passed away on Tuesday, while serving in WWII and Korea. Following December 20, 2016, at his home. Navy retirement, he spent 21 years in the data processing industry. John was born in Philadelphia, PA on May 30, 1921. After graduating from West Catholic John was preceded in death by his father John High School, John entered the V-5 Aviation mother, Bridget; sisters, Mary and Kathleen Cadet Program in November 1942, after which and brother, Joseph. he was commissioned ENS USNR and received his Wings of Gold September 8, John is survived by Ann, his wife of 59 1943. He was then assigned to Composite years; two children, Blythe Ratcliffe (Mark) of Squadron 81, flying the FM-2 “Wildcat”. He Wyomissing, PA, and Caroline Colbert (Craig) flew 59 combat missions. He was released of Germantown, MD and his grandchildren, from active duty in June 1946 and flew the Ellen, Bradley, Noelle and John “Jack”. Funeral F6F “Hellcat” in reserve training. He received services will be private. In lieu of flowers your a BA from the University of Pennsylvania tax-deductible contributions may be given to under the GI Bill and volunteered for active support the Tailhook Educational Foundation duty in June 1951. Promoted to lieutenant and @ www.tailhook.net or the NJROTC program assigned to VF-11, the “Red Rippers”, he flew in Montgomery County Public Schools. Check the McDonnell F2H-2 “Banshee” jetfighter donations should be made payable to “Seneca in combat over North Korea in the winter Valley High School NJROTC” and mailed to: campaign 1952-53, flying 66 combat missions Seneca Valley High School 19401 Crystal Rock from the USS Kearsarge (CV-33). During his Dr., Germantown, MD 20874.

On Monday, December 19, 2016, Dorothy Cheek Stephens. Born and raised in Henderson, NC, she lived the majority of her adult life in Washington, DC and later resided in Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife of the late Robert T. Stephens; mother of Mildrilyn (Emerson) Davis and Clifford K. (Tanya) Stephens; grandmother of Emerson S. Davis, Jr., Robert S. Davis and Tiffany Dorothea Stephens; aunt of Michael Lucas of Chicago, IL and Doris Roach of Indianapolis, IN; also survived by her first cousins Marjorie H. Burke of Washington, DC, Ethel M. Lewis of Silver Spring, MD, and a host of family and friends. The family will receive friends on Monday, December 26, 2016 at Takoma Park Baptist Church, 635 Aspen Street, NW, Washington, DC from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m., where her funeral service will immediately follow at 11 a.m. Interment on Tuesday, December 27, 2016 at Fort Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD at 11 a.m. Please view and sign the family guestbook at: www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com

She is also survived by her brothers Howard Aulsbrook Jr. and Buddy Aulsbrook of Gadsden, Alabama and her sisters Laura White of Gadsden, Alabama, and Cheryl Porter of Huntsville, Alabama.

Ken is survived by his wife, (Mary) Joyce of Fairfax, VA; his daughter, Lesley Law-rence of Berryville, VA; two sons, Alan Lawrence of Oakton, VA and Richard Lawrence and his wife, Angeline of San Diego, CA; three grandchildren, Taylor, Jessica and Erik Lawrence; his sister, Sandy Tomalty of Potsdam, New York and several nieces and nephews.

O'DONNELL

MEMORIAL PLAQUES: All notices over 2" include complimentary memorial plaque.

DOROTHY CHEEK STEPHENS (Age 89)

AULETTA

Phyllis is survived by her husband of 45 years, Donald C. Brown Jr., of Herndon, VA, sons Donald C Brown III, (Shalini) of Roswell, GA, Robert Brown of Washington DC; granddaughter Kara Hart of Herndon, VA, grandson Taylor Brown of Roswell GA, and granddaughter Leina Brown of Roswell, GA.She is also survived by her sisters, Nina Morton (Ronnie) of Garland, Texas, Virginia De Silva and partner Christopher Carter of Plano, Texas, Jill Bishop of Granbury, Texas and Lisa Boyd of Garland, Texas and brother Brian (Andy) of San Francisco, CA. She was

Phyllis was born in Dallas, Texas on January 20, 1951. She graduated from Richardson High School in 1969, Tyler Junior College in 1971 and attended North Texas State University. Phyllis joined IBM in Baton Rouge, LA, in 1974. She also worked at IBM locations in Dallas, Texas, White Plains and Armonk, New York and Connecticut before transferring to the Washington, DC area in 1989, where she worked at IBM facilities in Maryland, the District of Columbia and Virginia She held a number positions at IBM including resource manager, project manager, technical hiring manner and facilities manager. She is remembered by her fellow workers as a consummate professional who mentored and guided the career development of dozens of IBMers. Phyllis was devoted to her family. Phyllis enjoyed watching her granddaughter Kara play soccer and basketball and also enjoyed their vacations to Yellowstone National Park and the Grand Tetons as well as Assateague Island in Maryland and Ocracoke Island in North Carolina. She also particularly enjoyed spending time with her younger grandchildren Taylor and Leina at Deep Creek Lake in Maryland.

ANTHONY J. AULETTA, SR. "Tony" (Age 95) Lt. Col. U.S. Army (Ret.) A long-time Fairfax County resident passed away peacefully November 21, 2016 after a brief illness. Devoted and loving husband, father, and grandfather survived by his wife Anna of 63 years; sons, Anthony, Vincent, and Richard; and two grandchildren. World War II Veteran with 100th and 44th Infantry Divisions. Korean War Veteran with 401st Civil Affairs Company. Bronze Star recipient. Civilian service with DOD Civil Affairs. 1975 recipient Eli E. Nobleman Award for Outstanding Contributions in Civil Affairs. Service at Ft. Myer Chapel and burial at Arlington National Cemetery, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 12 Noon. In lieu of flowers the family requests donation to USO or other veteran and active duty service member organizations. Arrangements by Cunningham Turch Funeral Home, Alexandria, VA.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016


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. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

The Weather WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER

Mostly cloudy and cool

Today Partly sunny

Cloud cover should start to increase by late morning, and skies are expected to be mostly cloudy by afternoon. That should keep temperatures a few degrees cooler than might be expected with a light southwest wind blowing at 5 to 10 mph. Look for afternoon highs in the mid-40s. Rain is expected to move into the area after midnight, with overnight low temperatures in the upper 30s and low 40s.

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TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER

Saturday Morning rain

Sunday Mostly sunny

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FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER

Monday Cloudy

Tuesday Mostly sunny

Wednesday Partly sunny

48° 36

50° 35

48° 38

54° 51

62° 34

45° 38

FEELS*: 46°

FEELS: 46°

FEELS: 50°

FEELS: 48°

FEELS: 61°

FEELS: 45°

CHNCE PRECIP: 0%

P: 75%

P: 0%

P: 15%

P: 10%

P: 5%

WIND: SW 4–8 mph

W: SW 7–14 mph

W: N 4–8 mph

W: S 7–14 mph

W: W 7–14 mph

W: NNE 4–8 mph

°

°

°

°

°

OFFICIAL RECORD Temperatures

NATION

Hagerstown 46/38

High Low Normal Record high Record low

Baltimore 47/36 Dover 47/35

Washington 48/41

ACTUAL

FORECAST

W

Th

F

Sa

Su

M

Tu

W

Th

F

Sa

Su

through 5 p.m. yesterday

Reagan

Dulles

BWI

60° 1:37 p.m. 35° 12:03 a.m. 45°/31° 72° 2013 3° 1872

57° 2:00 p.m. 29° 7:34 a.m. 44°/26° 71° 2013 2° 1989

57° 1:00 p.m. 26° 12:44 a.m. 43°/27° 71° 2013 4° 1989

Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +0.4° yr. to date: +2.1° PREVIOUS YEAR

NORMAL

LATEST

OCEAN: 48°

Ocean City 46/36 OCEAN: 40°

Lexington 48/35 Richmond 49/37 Norfolk 48/38

Virginia Beach 48/38 OCEAN: 44°

Past 24 hours Total this month

Kitty Hawk 50/42

Normal Total this year

OCEAN: 44°

Normal

Pollen: Low

Air Quality: Moderate

Grass Trees Weeds Mold

Dominant cause: Particulates

Low Low Low Low

Snow, past 24 hours

Reagan

Dulles

BWI

0.00" 1.83" 2.25" 30.92" 39.03" 0.0"

0.00" 1.68" 2.21" 34.65" 40.88" 0.0"

0.00" 2.00" 2.47" 39.75" 41.08" 0.0"

Moon Phases

UV: Low

Solar system

2 out of 11+

Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny. High 40–44. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Tonight, cloudy, rain late, snow late. Low 31–35. Wind south–southwest 8–16 mph. Saturday, morning rain. High 44–48. Wind west 7–14 mph. Sunday, partly sunny. High 42–46.

T-storms <–10

Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, sunny. Wind west– southwest 5–10 knots. Waves around 1 foot. Visibility generally clear. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, sunny. Wind west–southwest 5–10 knots. Waves 1 foot on lower Potomac, 1–3 feet on the bay. Tonight, late rain.• River Stages: Today, the Potomac River stage at Little Falls will be at 3.5 feet, holding steady at 3.5 feet Saturday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet. (High tides in Bold)

3:29 a.m.

10:10 a.m.

3:55 p.m.

10:55 p.m.

Annapolis

12:16 a.m.

6:40 a.m.

1:23 p.m.

7:19 p.m.

Ocean City

2:58 a.m.

9:13 a.m.

3:08 p.m.

9:22 p.m.

Norfolk

5:04 a.m.

11:17 a.m.

5:19 p.m.

11:23 p.m.

Point Lookout

2:46 a.m.

9:20 a.m.

3:52 p.m.

9:01 p.m.

Rain –0s

Showers 0s

10s

Snow 20s

Flurries 30s

Ice

40s

50s

Cold Front

Warm Front

60s

80s

70s

Stationary Front

90s

100s

110+

Yesterday's National High: McAllen, TX 85° Low: West Yellowstone, MT –22°

World High: Big Bend, Swaziland 115° Low: Kugluktuk, Canada –38°

Dec 29 New

Jan 5 First Quarter

Jan 12 Full

Jan 19 Last Quarter

Sun Moon Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn

Rise 7:24 a.m. 2:04 a.m. 10:17 a.m. 10:53 a.m. 1:33 a.m. 6:29 a.m.

Set 4:51 p.m. 1:35 p.m. 8:29 p.m. 9:46 p.m. 12:56 p.m. 4:05 p.m.

for the 48 contiguous states

Atlantic beaches: Today, increasingly cloudy. High 44–48. Wind west 4–8 mph. Tonight, cloudy. Low 34–48. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Saturday, rain. High 49–58. Wind southwest 7–14 mph. Sunday, mostly sunny. High 43–49. Wind north–northeast 6–12 mph.

Washington

Tu

Precipitation

Cape May 45/36

Annapolis 46/39

Charlottesville 51/39

Today’s tides

M

Weather map features for noon today.

Philadelphia 45/37

Harrisburg 45/35

RECORD

°

Su

REGION

AVERAGE

NATIONAL

Today

Tomorrow

Albany, NY Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Billings, MT Birmingham Bismarck, ND Boise Boston Buffalo Burlington, VT Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte Cheyenne, WY Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver

40/28/pc 51/32/pc 10/6/pc 55/44/s 71/63/r 47/36/s 30/16/pc 60/51/pc 26/9/pc 32/28/sn 43/34/s 37/33/pc 40/31/pc 62/49/s 51/40/pc 52/40/s 46/24/pc 35/31/sn 43/39/c 41/36/c 55/51/sh 48/31/pc

40/32/i 53/28/pc 25/21/sn 67/49/c 74/65/c 49/32/r 22/10/sn 69/53/c 21/18/sn 34/18/sn 45/32/r 40/29/c 38/29/sf 72/51/pc 51/43/r 59/46/c 47/24/s 35/29/c 46/41/r 41/32/r 72/62/c 48/30/s

Des Moines Detroit El Paso Fairbanks, AK Fargo, ND Hartford, CT Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS Jacksonville, FL Kansas City, MO Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk

36/24/sn 35/30/pc 61/39/pc –8/–20/sn 36/17/pc 43/27/s 81/71/pc 75/64/c 38/35/c 66/58/pc 70/54/s 40/28/i 55/47/s 50/48/r 61/50/r 46/42/c 57/54/c 82/72/pc 36/30/sn 35/25/sn 56/50/pc 70/59/pc 46/39/s 48/38/s

38/33/c 37/25/c 67/43/s 0/–9/c 27/26/sf 40/27/r 81/70/pc 76/65/c 43/36/c 72/58/c 78/56/pc 45/40/c 49/36/sh 59/53/r 57/40/pc 51/46/r 64/58/r 84/74/pc 35/29/c 33/28/c 56/54/r 74/61/pc 47/36/r 58/41/r

Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Providence, RI Raleigh, NC Reno, NV Richmond Sacramento St. Louis St. Thomas, VI Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco San Juan, PR Seattle Spokane, WA Syracuse Tampa Wichita

48/37/sh 39/18/sn 80/63/s 45/37/s 65/52/pc 43/35/pc 39/25/s 42/33/r 45/33/s 55/38/s 50/28/r 49/37/s 51/35/r 42/37/r 85/75/sh 44/37/sn 64/53/pc 54/43/r 83/76/sh 41/35/sh 33/27/sn 37/30/s 80/65/s 47/25/c

62/52/c 41/34/c 83/65/pc 48/33/r 59/40/r 45/33/r 40/26/sn 41/32/c 47/31/r 55/43/c 36/14/sf 51/37/r 50/31/pc 48/41/c 85/74/sh 41/25/r 59/46/r 52/39/pc 86/75/pc 40/31/c 33/18/sn 39/27/sn 83/67/pc 51/44/c

WORLD

Today

Tomorrow

Addis Ababa Amsterdam Athens Auckland Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Bogota Brussels Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Copenhagen Dakar Dublin Edinburgh Frankfurt Geneva Ham., Bermuda Helsinki Ho Chi Minh City

73/44/s 48/42/pc 50/45/sh 66/58/sh 64/49/pc 93/76/s 38/20/s 41/33/pc 64/46/t 46/42/pc 83/64/pc 64/47/pc 77/68/pc 44/40/pc 77/67/pc 54/38/r 51/37/r 41/38/pc 43/33/pc 70/63/pc 37/29/pc 90/73/s

75/45/s 50/46/c 54/41/pc 68/60/pc 56/47/sh 93/76/s 38/24/pc 44/39/c 65/45/pc 49/45/c 86/67/s 63/50/pc 76/69/pc 44/38/c 77/70/c 49/46/sh 48/44/sh 48/41/c 41/34/sh 69/66/pc 38/32/sh 90/75/pc

Hong Kong Islamabad Istanbul Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul Kingston, Jam. Kolkata Lagos Lima Lisbon London Madrid Manila Mexico City Montreal Moscow Mumbai Nairobi New Delhi Oslo Ottawa Paris Prague

72/65/c 75/41/pc 49/39/sh 56/40/c 88/62/t 59/25/s 85/77/pc 81/62/c 92/78/s 79/65/pc 61/46/pc 53/40/c 56/35/pc 88/74/s 72/46/s 34/26/c 28/25/sn 90/70/pc 76/54/pc 76/50/c 38/34/pc 32/24/c 47/42/c 38/30/pc

70/67/c 73/38/pc 46/37/c 53/40/s 82/57/pc 50/20/s 87/77/s 81/61/pc 90/78/pc 79/66/pc 61/45/pc 50/48/pc 57/35/pc 86/75/pc 74/47/s 34/25/sn 32/26/c 89/70/pc 78/57/pc 76/51/c 38/29/c 34/22/sn 50/42/c 39/37/sh

Rio de Janeiro Riyadh Rome San Salvador Santiago Sarajevo Seoul Shanghai Singapore Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tehran Tokyo Toronto Vienna Warsaw

91/79/pc 75/52/s 58/37/s 87/63/s 85/54/s 38/19/s 33/21/sf 50/38/pc 86/77/c 39/34/pc 79/68/pc 67/61/pc 50/31/s 66/45/pc 34/30/pc 36/25/pc 35/30/pc

91/78/s 79/54/s 58/39/pc 87/66/s 82/52/s 42/22/pc 37/23/s 51/48/c 87/77/c 41/32/sh 82/69/t 71/66/pc 50/40/pc 53/40/s 38/26/c 41/35/pc 37/35/sh

Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air quality data); National Weather Service * AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature® combines over a dozen factors for an accurate measure of how the conditions really “feel.”

Funding for Va. disability caregivers could see cuts DISABILITIES FROM B1

years for children — are part of Virginia’s overall revamping of its system of Medicaid waivers, which covers about 12,000 people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. State officials aim to increase the number of people served by waivers to about 16,000 by 2021, using money that is being appropriated to comply with the court settlement — currently $112 million. The SIS assessments — used by 22 states — are supposed to determine more accurately who is in need of additional services and

who can function more independently. “It puts the state in a position where it can create more slots for less cost in the future than it has in the past,” said Connie Cochran, the assistant commissioner for developmental services for the state behavioral health agency. Previously, funding levels for patients with disabilities were largely determined by a local case manager, who generally advocated as much services as possible, officials said. The SIS approach, promoted by the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, is more for-

mulaic. State-contracted interviewers meet with the patient, family members and service providers and ask as many as 100 questions about medical needs and the person’s ability to function independently at home, at work and out in the community. The answers, plus any other documentation detailing previous services, are supposed to determine which of four funding tiers is appropriate, with the lowest level indicating minimal care and the highest reserved for people with severe behavioral problems.

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Eighty-one percent of the people in Virginia receiving disability services under Medicaid waivers are classified under Tier 2 or Tier 3 funding, meaning they have moderate or slightly high care needs. Six percent are Tier 1 patients, the lowest level, and 13 percent are in Tier 4. State officials say those ratios will probably change as more SIS assessments are completed. The assessments directly impact how much the state will reimburse a care provider for working with a given patient, which advocates say could affect the number and caliber of workers willing to do the job. Because the state does not allow SIS scores to be appealed unless there is evidence that standard procedures were not followed, it is hard to determine how many assessments may be flawed, advocates say. Out of more than 10,000 assessments conducted so far, 22 patients have sought new assessments. Two of those were successful in arguing that the manner in which their assessments were done was flawed, according to state officials. Leila McDowell, of Upper Marlboro, Md., tried to appeal her daughter’s assessment after the new evaluation system concluded that she has moderate support needs — Tier 2 — despite a severe form of autism that causes frequent seizures. Among other things, the new assessment determined that McDowell’s daughter, Layla Head, who lives with her caretaker in Sterling, required just six hours of care a year for her seizures instead of the 21 hours for which her full-time caregiver is reimbursed. Reimbursement rates for other services, such as helping the 33year-old eat, dress herself and bathe also dropped. As a result, the annual reimbursement for Sharon Adams, her full-time caregiver, will go from $96,000 to $60,000 once the new rates go into effect in January. “She’s never independent, and she requires constant support,” McDowell said of her daughter, whose living arrangement was the topic of a 2008 article in The Washington Post. “It makes no sense.” State officials, however, argue that the level of care some families have received in the past may not match their actual need.

EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Life-skills counselor Faith Rojas works on a puzzle with Matt Kidder, 41, who has cerebral palsy, at Chimes Virginia in Fairfax.

Purcellville resident Linda Kidder said the assessment meeting for her 41-year-old son was confrontational. The interviewer, she said, frequently dismissed the fact that Matt Kidder, who was born with cerebral palsy and has limited speech, needs help from caregivers at his group home and his day-support program for nearly everything he does. “She’d ask: ‘Can he dress himself?’ and we’d say: ‘Yes, but he needs assistance. He needs someone to pick out his clothes, someone standing next to him,’ ” Kidder said. “All she heard was ‘Yes.’ ” Matt Kidder was ultimately assessed as a Tier 1 patient, or someone who is mostly independent — a designation his mother has also appealed without success. “This person met Matt,” Kidder said of the interviewer conducting the assessment. “How these scores could have come out the way they did is just unbelievable.” Service providers say the cuts to reimbursements based on the lower assessments could lead to some hard choices about patient care. For example, the reimbursement rate for day-support services for someone classified as a Tier 1 patient under SIS is $10.01 an hour. The rate for a Tier 4 patient is $20.29. Nancy Eisele, chief operating officer at Chimes Inc., the day-support facility in Fairfax that cares for Matt Kidder, said several patients’ families have been notified of SIS assessments that call for lower reimbursement rates than what they receive. “If you had a lot of these and you’re a small facility, you’d really be hit hard,” Eisele said. “Providers aren’t in the habit of discharg-

ing patients for money. But at some point, if you can’t figure out how to maneuver around it, you can’t help but do it.” Jennifer Fidura, executive director of the Virginia Network of Private Providers Inc., said the organization is lobbying the General Assembly to fund a study that would re-examine the reliability of SIS assessments in Virginia. That effort is partly motivated by a 2015 federal court settlement in New Mexico that allowed patients whose funding was reduced after a SIS assessment to return to their previous levels of service. Virginia’s assessment system is slightly different from New Mexico’s, in that it determines the level of need and reimbursement rates, rather than what kinds of services someone can receive. But Fidura said there have been enough questions raised about the Virginia process to merit another look into whether it is a legitimate way to determine funding. “Every provider seems to have an example of ‘Hmm. That doesn’t look right. The score is either too high or too low,’ ” Fidura said. “We’d like to see if we can determine that the SIS is a good tool to use for the purpose it’s being used for.” Fidura said the assessments could help streamline funding so some group homes resist accepting patients who need lower levels of care, opening up slots to others on the wait list whose needs are more severe. “That’s kind of the hope of where this is going to go,” she said. “That we will be better able to match services to needs because we have more options.” antonio.olivo@washpost.com


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MOVIE REVIEWS IN WEEKEND

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Weekend

 Hidden Figures Women who break down barriers to open the heavens to astronauts. 23  Fences Denzel Washington makes a powerful impression in front of and behind the camera. 24

Holiday Favorites

 Sing Hey, it’s the season when reindeer fly, so just let go and listen to the koala sing. 26

How a giant TV company helped Donald Trump’s campaign Sinclair says no deal with candidate existed, yet a review indicates coverage tilted toward him.

BY

P AUL F ARHI

Over four days in early August, Donald Trump gave interviews to four TV stations in Ohio, Florida and Maine, and to the Washington bureau of a national TV chain. The interviews were a coup for the stations, which eagerly promoted their “one-on-one” encounters with the GOP nominee. They were also an effective way for Trump to target voting blocs

in key states, particularly since he had begun limiting his national media exposure largely to friendly interviewers on Fox News. The most striking thing about the interviews, however, may be that one company was behind all of them: Sinclair Broadcast Group. The Maryland-based company is the nation’s largest owner of TV stations, with 173 in 81 cities nationwide, including those that interviewed Trump in August.

The Washington bureau was Sinclair’s, too; it provided its interview with Trump to Sinclair’s many stations for their newscasts. Sinclair, which has drawn criticism for favoring conservative candidates before, says it had no special arrangement with Trump’s campaign and that it didn’t favor him at the expense of his main rival, Democrat Hillary Clinton. It also said it offered equal time to Clinton and solicit-

ed interviews with her throughout the campaign, but her managers responded less enthusiastically than Trump. Those statements appear to be at odds with comments made last week by Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and a key adviser. In a speech to business executives in New York, Kushner said Trump’s campaign struck a deal with Sinclair to provide access and coverSINCLAIR CONTINUED ON C3

Ashland, Va., offers a little holiday wonder for passing trains

Seasonal delights, from light displays and stocking stuffers to festive meals and cocktails PAGE 16

‘Humble and Kind,’ a home remedy for a world of hurt BY

E MILY Y AHR

Music is usually a reliable escape from reality, but between global tragedies and an acrimonious presidential election and deaths of iconic figures, it was extraordinarily difficult to escape the fever dream that was 2016. Still, there was one song, quieter than almost anything else, that became a huge hit this year — and it was one we sorely needed. Tim McGraw’s “Humble and Kind,” written by top Nashville songwriter Lori McKenna, stands out from the ballads you usually hear on country radio, which often center on relationships. Yet “Humble and Kind” struck a deep chord when it was released in January, as it hit No. 1 on the charts and went on to sell more than a million copies. Nominated for best country song at the upcoming Grammy Awards, it also won song of the year honors at the Country Music Association Awards and from the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. The song is exactly what it sounds like: a simple, thoughtful,

“I just hope in every song that I write, there’s a line that makes someone stop for a second and think.” Lori McKenna

PHOTOS BY TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Five-year-old Mary Hayden Stehle and her 7-year-old brother, Will, marvel at the lights that Ashland, Va., residents put out to provide a bright spot in the holiday journeys of train passengers and crews. BELOW: An Amtrak train pauses at the town’s rain-soaked but warmly lit station.

The bright side of the tracks BY

A NDREA S ACHS

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ive nights before Christmas, Mary Hayden Stehle is so deep into her Kindle jigsaw-puzzle game, she barely registers the racket of the train as it hurtles southward from Washington. Across the aisle, her brother, Will, sits on his grandfather’s lap, playing Minecraft. Neither child notices the dark forest outside, one seemingly filled with Wild Things. But then, just beyond the woods, lights start to appear like fallen constellations. The youngsters set down their gadgets and drift over to the window. “See the candy canes?” asks their mother, Michele Stehle. The Northeast Regional pulls into the Ashland, Va., station, in the bull’s-eye center of town, and the Amtrak train becomes an insurmountable median on Railroad Avenue. Boarding passengers are privy to only one half of town (the section with the depot draped in white lights). Travelers already on board, however, can delight in the holiday display illuminating both sides of the iron rails. ASHLAND CONTINUED ON C4

acoustic-driven tune that gently suggests ways to make the world a little nicer. “Hold the door, say ‘please,’ say ‘thank you’/Don’t steal, don’t cheat and don’t lie/I know you got mountains to climb, but always stay humble and kind,” the chorus advises, before zooming out to the bigger picture. “When those dreams you’re dreaming come to you/When the work you put in is realized/Let yourself feel the pride, but always stay humble and kind.” The verses dig deeper: “Don’t expect a free ride from no one, don’t hold a grudge or a chip and here’s why/Bitterness keeps you from flying.” Then, “Know the difference between sleeping with someone, and sleeping with someone you love/‘I love you’ ain’t no pickup line.” Other lines urge listeners to visit grandpa, go to church, and open the windows on a hot summer day instead of cranking up the air conditioner. McKenna admits the idea is fairly basic, and that’s exactly what she envisioned. She wrote it in May 2014 at her house in suburban Massachusetts, sitting at the dining room table with her morning coffee after taking her kids to school. With her five children on her mind (ages 12 to 27), she thought about life lessons she wanted to pass on. She scribbled down a list; strummed a melody on her guitar; worked out the rhyming and phrasing; and by HUMBLE CONTINUED ON C3

BOOK WORLD

Nabokov’s and Wilson’s cross words are never really puzzled out THE FEUD Vladimir Nabokov, Edmund Wilson, and the End of a Beautiful Friendship By Alex Beam Pantheon. 224 pp. $26.95

BY

E LAINE M ARGOLIN

What holds a long-term friendship together is as mysterious as what sustains a lengthy marriage. The underpinnings are invisible to outsiders, who aren’t privy to the jealousy and passion and dependency and repressed desire that often hold sway. Boston Globe writer Alex Beam tries valiantly to examine such a relationship in his new book, “The Feud,” about critic Edmund Wilson and novelist Vladimir Nabokov, but he seems thwarted by his own congenial evenhandedness that avoids the dark clouds and hidden spaces

that can fuel intense friendships. Wilson and Nabokov became close friends after Wilson found him work writing for the New Yorker and the New Republic, where Wilson was already embedded. Nabokov had spent years in exile after escaping Russia when the Bolsheviks destroyed his idyllic childhood, which he wrote about in “Speak, Memory.” The two men seemed to enjoy each other’s company, even while needling each other over petty disagreements. Nabokov was exasperated by Wilson’s fondness for Lenin and Russia, which Nabokov detested. For Nabokov, the “Lenin-

ist reality” would always be “a pail of milk of human kindness with a dead rat at the bottom.” Wilson found Nabokov’s proclivity for punning intolerable and told him so repeatedly. Their childhood experiences and subsequent world views differed wildly. Nabokov hated Freud and was suspicious of anyone who claimed to decode the tragedy of human existence by espousing theories about sexuality and early development. He revered his mother, and he had great love for his father, who was assassinated when he was 22. Edmund Wilson, on the other hand, was the only

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child of a critical and neglectful mother, who berated him for his inability to make enough money. Wilson became a chronic drinker and womanizer and married four times while producing an enormous output of books and criticism. Nabokov remained married to the same woman throughout his life but was also unfaithful. Both men revered the creative life and loved magic tricks and puzzles. Neither learned to drive. Unfortunately, Beam struggles to integrate these details into an engaging narrative about their BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3

BECKY FLUKE

Songwriter Lori McKenna wrote the song we really need.


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The Reliable Source Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil

Passenger confronts Ivanka Trump on JetBlue This has been an interesting College in New York, posted about week for air travel — and not just the incident. because of the holiday rush. In since-deleted tweets, Lasner, On Thursday morning, Ivanka who specializes in urban housing policy, wrote that he and his Trump, President-elect Donald husband were “kicked off the Trump’s daughter, was the target plane” after his of a fellow JetBlue husband “expressed traveler’s ire. According displeasure in a calm to TMZ, “an out-oftone.” In a previous control passenger” on tweet, Lasner had Trump’s flight out of written that the couple John F. Kennedy had spotted Ivanka and International Airport her husband, Jared “began verbally berating her and Kushner, and that ‘jeering’ at her 3 kids.” his husband “was The passenger, chasing them down to MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS holding his own child, harass them.” reportedly told Trump, Ivanka Trump So far, there has been who was flying coach no official word from with her family, “Your father is the Trump team regarding the ruining the country.” He went on incident, but JetBlue did release a to express surprise that Trump, statement. whose father owns his own “The decision to remove a Boeing 757 jet, was traveling with customer from a flight is not the masses. “Why is she on our taken lightly,” the statement read. flight?” he asked. “She should be “If the crew determines that a flying private.” Eventually, airline customer is causing conflict on personnel escorted the passenger the aircraft, the customer will be off the plane. asked to deplane, especially if the Ivanka Trump was traveling crew feels the situation runs the with Secret Service protection, risk of escalation during flight. In according to a Secret Service this instance, our team worked to official who spoke on the re-accommodate the party on the condition of anonymity. next available flight.” Although the disgruntled passenger has yet to be identified, a Twitter user named Matt Sarah Larimer contributed to this Lasner, a professor at Hunter report.

“If there’s one good thing to come out of the Trump administration, let it be that there will be no more White House Correspondents’ dinners. It brings honor to no one to have Kim Kardashian or Tara Reid sitting there next to a news anchor.”

’Tis the season for champagne and charity: What’s on Washington VIPs’ holiday wish lists Maybe the Christmas spirit can’t be bought at a big-box store, but a present (or eight) never hurt anyone. For the third year, the Reliable Source asked a few of Washington’s big names what they hope to receive this holiday season. We gave each VIP one pick from their altruistic list and one from their Dear Santa letter. Chris Baker, defensive end for the Washington Redskins

Julie Kent, artistic director of the Washington Ballet

 Philanthropic wish: For all the sick kids to get out of the hospital.  Material item: A Bentley truck.

 Philanthropic wish: I am an advocate for a rare and serious skin disease called epidermolysis bullosa (EB). My family and I have actively raised money for this disease since 2011.  Material item: A roundtrip train ticket for my children and [me] to visit our friends in N.Y.C.!

Amanda McClements, owner of the Salt & Sundry home goods stores

JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST

 Philanthropic wish: That a renewed wave of inclusivity, empathy and kindness will protect human rights in this country and beyond.  Material item: I love a good food gift. A country ham and a great bottle of Champagne are usually tops on my list.

REBECCA D'ANGELO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

JESSE DITTMAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Jackie Greenbaum, restaurant co-owner (El Chucho, Bar Charley, Quarry House Tavern and Little Coco’s)  Philanthropic wish: I’d like to see a profound increase in charity, in our personal temperaments, from our pocketbooks, and in time spent on good deeds.  Material item: A KitchenAid stand mixer!

Kwame Onwuachi, chef at the Shaw Bijou and former “Top Chef ” contestant  Philanthropic wish: That whatever differences political parties have right now, we just come together as a country to just better it.  Material item: The new centrifuge Spinzall, a unique, handy kitchen tool.

DAN GROSS/THE GAZETTE

Margaret Brennan, CBS News foreign affairs correspondent

DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

 Philanthropic wish: Safe haven and peace to the refugees left homeless by the conflicts in Syria, Sudan and other conflict zones.  Material item: SLEEP and a cozy new bathrobe to crash in.

Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.)  Philanthropic wish: I am passionate about seeing life-changing treatments and cures for chronic diseases like cancer, Alzheimer’s, cystic fibrosis, diabetes and more getting to patients faster.  Material item: More grandchildren to spoil!

JOHN PAUL FILO/CBS NEWS

ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

— Celebrity chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain, in an interview with Eater.

GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE

CROSSYNERGY CROSSWORD

ACROSS 1. Wild guess 5. “Roger that” 10. Morning radio host Don 14. 20 stamps, often 15. Summa cum laude, for one 16. Camping cover 17. Quaker Oats trademark 19. “Smooth Operator” singer 20. Georgia or Virginia, but not Carolina 21. Cheese with a red coat 22. Molecule component 23. Drop the ball 25. Peace of mind 27. Wrestling victory 30. Orca 36. Poster subject in many a teen’s room 38. Kind of hammer 39. “I’m outta here!” 40. Defense agcy. headquartered in Brussels 41. Sahara rest stop 43. Huge opening? 44. Selected 46. Laptop list 47. Greek god of love 48. Ratel 51. Lubbock-toLaredo dir. 52. Fencing World Cup category 53. Snug retreat 55. Charlie’s Angels, for one 57. Italian wine region 61. Hospital helpers 65. “That smarts!” 66. Legendary swimmer 68. Canapé spread 69. Electric sports car manufacturer 70. Alan of “Tower Heist” 71. Poet Khayyám 72. Scornful look 73. Thesis defense, e.g.

@helena_andrews @emilyaheil

“WELL, I’LL BEE!”

MAURICE MOLYNEAUX

The self-styled “dragapella beautyshop quartet” Kinsey Sicks star in “Oy Vey in a Manger” at Theater J.

THEATER REVIEW

© 2016 RANDALL J. HARTMAN/CROSSYNERGY SYNDICATE LLC

DOWN 1. Luxurious resorts 2. Tightly drawn 3. One of the sisters in “Frozen” 4. Midler of “Gypsy” 5. Revolutionary figure 6. Computer key 7. “National Velvet” author Bagnold 8. Unconscious condition 9. Wacky neighbor on “Seinfeld” 10. “Too bad” 11. Lions and tigers and bears 12. Reverse 13. Flower stalk 18. Schlemiel 24. Puerto ___ 26. Sharp punch 27. Squeeze tight 28. Location of part of the Oregon Trail 29. Zilch 31. Andes pack animal 32. Zapped surgically

33. NBA Hall of Famer Patrick 34. Toys featured at a theme park in Carlsbad, California 35. Clear, as a whiteboard 37. Go dead, perhaps 42. Made a case against

45. CBS logo 49. Wild things 50. ___ naked choke (hold that might elicit a tapout) 54. Try to bite 55. “Cincinnatti” feature 56. Office Depot purchase

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58. Spotted 59. Subdue with a stun gun 60. Part of Vanuatu 62. Take-out order? 63. Breaks off 64. Baseball card datum 67. Musical ability

THURSDAY’S CROSSYNERGY SOLUTION “I HERD THAT!”

No sheepishness around this ‘Manger’ BY

C ELIA W REN

The Kinsey Sicks are still trying to offload their manger, before the bank forecloses on it. But the urgency of that task hasn’t kept them from following the news. In the updated edition of the giddily impious “Oy Vey in a Manger” — at Theater J through Dec. 28 — the four members of the wellknown “dragapella beautyshop quartet” once again sing outrageous, raunchy remakes of holiday songs and indulge in campy patter. But this time, a portion of the talk and music reflects the age of Trump. For instance, the current show includes several arch references to Stephen K. Bannon, incoming White House chief strategist and senior counselor. (On one occasion, if memory serves, the name “Bannon” rhymes with “let the Klan in.”) With a nod to the next administration, a musical number — performed soft-shoe style, with silver canes in hand — celebrates the ascendancy of “All the White Faces.” And a spoken toast salutes “The next leader of the free world: Vladimir Putin!” The topicality sits comfortably within the relaxed framework of “Oy Vey in a Manger,” which

Theater J previously showcased in the 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons. “Oy Vey in a Manger” captures the four glamour queens Trampolina (Spencer Brown), Trixie (Jeff Manabat), Winnie (Nathan Marken) and Rachel (Ben Schatz) as they prepare to host an open house. The women have some tidying to do: Red strings of tinsel (or are they spindly feather boas?) straggle across the space, which is jampacked with Christmas and Hanukkah ornaments, including reindeer sculptures sporting pink sunglasses. In between cleaning and gossiping about their love lives, the gals (who are decked out in party dresses, with gloves) share a cappella versions of seasonal favorites such as “God Bless Ye Femmy Lesbians,” “I Had a Little Facial” and the ribald “Lusty the Snowman.” No sacred cow is too delicate for this foursome to rope into a rodeo of spoofery. Most major religions come in for at least one dig — in some cases, in connection with the fact that Rachel and Winnie are Jewish, and Trampolina and Trixie, Christian. Even the history of the Donner Party becomes fodder for song (“Soylent Night”).

Each member of the quartet displays a distinctive, if equally glittery, personality. It will be hard to forget the elegant Trixie’s paean to the diet brand Jenny Craig (crooned to the tune of “O mio babbino caro”), or the bubbleheaded Trampolina’s recollections of working in the porn industry. The organized Winnie sounds her pitch-pipe at just the right moment before each song, and the wanton Rachel throws caution to the winds when she bounces lasciviously on an audience member’s lap. The characters’ personalities dovetail artfully with the show’s topicality. For example, in one of her many unguarded moments, Rachel confesses to seeing the bright side of any anti-Semitic rhetoric that may be mainstreaming at the present moment. “All that fleeing for my life is so slimming!” she exclaims. style@washpost.com The Kinsey Sicks in Oy Vey in a Manger. Through Dec. 28 in the D.C. Jewish Community Center’s Goldman Theater, 1529 16th St. NW. Co-scenic designers, Audrey Bodek and Tom Howley; lighting, Garth Dolan. About 1 hour 50 minutes. Tickets $47. Call 202-777-3210 or visit theaterj.org.


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What is ‘inspiring’? A dying ‘Jeopardy!’ champ gamely played on. Fighting words from Nabokov and Wilson BY

E LAHE I ZADI

“Jeopardy!” contestant Cindy Stowell completed her remarkable run during Wednesday night’s episode, winning six games and $103,801 in prize money. The 41-year-old Austin science content developer, who competed while battling Stage 4 cancer, died shortly before the first of her seven episodes aired. “For the past six ‘Jeopardy!’ programs, you folks have been getting to know the talented champion Cindy Stowell. Appearing on the show was the fulfillment of a lifelong ambition for that lady,” host Alex Trebek said at the conclusion of Wednesday’s episode. “What you did not know is that when we taped these programs with her a few weeks ago, she was suffering from Stage 4 cancer, and sadly, on December 5, Cindy Stowell passed away. So from all of us here at ‘Jeopardy!,’ our sincere condolences to her family and her friends.” Staffers sent advance copies of the first three episodes to Stowell while she was in the hospital and

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cindy Stowell, right, on the “Jeopardy!” set with Alex Trebek, had a fever while taping her episodes. It was a blood infection.

expedited her prize money, according to a release from the show. Stowell said she planned to donate her winnings to fund cancer research, a pledge that has inspired TV viewers around the country to contribute as well. “It was kind of just a line in the sand that I drew,” she explained in a video posted by the show. “I wanted to donate a lot of the money to cancer research, partly

because — this is hard and I’m sorry . . . I’m dying of cancer, and I really would like the money that I win to be used to help others, so this seems like a good opportunity.” On Wednesday, fellow “Jeopardy!” contestant Sam Scovill won; he encouraged viewers to donate to cancer research. Over the course of six episodes, Stowell triumphed, including

coming back from deficits. “Even when you think the odds are completely against you, somehow, be it luck or something, things kind of work out,” she said. Stowell began watching “Jeopardy!” in the 1980s and, as a ninth-grader, unsuccessfully tried out for the teen tournament. A trivia buff, she successfully passed the online test for the show in early 2016 and was invited to an in-person audition. But Stowell was concerned about the timeline, writing to contestant producer Maggie Speak, “Do you have any idea how long it typically takes between an in-person interview, and the taping date? I ask because I just found out that I don’t have too much longer to live.” Stowell continued: “The doctor’s best guess is about six months. If there is the chance that I’d be able to still tape episodes of ‘Jeopardy!’ if I were selected, I’d like to do that and donate any winnings to . . . charities involved in cancer research,” she wrote. “If it is unlikely that the turnaround time would be that quick, then I’d like to give up

my tryout spot to someone else.” Producers told Stowell to come to the in-person audition, and if she passed, she would be booked as soon as the schedule would allow. Stowell made it through and arrived Aug. 31 to tape the first of four games that day, which began with her unseating seven-game champion Tim Aten. She returned Sept. 13 to win two more games. She had a high-grade fever during the taping, according to her longtime boyfriend, Jason Hess. It turned out to be a blood infection. Her opponents didn’t know she was sick, according to the show. In fact, just a few staffers and Trebek were aware of her condition. After her death, Hess and Stowell’s family released a statement: “Cindy came on Jeopardy! to play the game she loved and in doing so, she was able to make a contribution to cancer research in the hopes that no one else would have to go through what she did.” elahe.izadi@washpost.com

‘Humble and Kind’ offers simple rules for complicated times HUMBLE FROM C1

the end of the day, she had a song. “Music in general . . . wakes us up from things we didn’t know we were feeling, or shuts down things we don’t want to feel anymore,” McKenna said in a phone interview. “I just hope in every song that I write, there’s a line that makes someone stop for a second and think.” In the madness of this year’s news cycle, the straightforward, positive lyrics were a welcome respite. They connected with many, including McGraw, the country superstar who has been friends with McKenna for years. (McKenna’s career took off

around 2005 when Faith Hill, McGraw’s wife, recorded several of her songs.) McKenna sent McGraw an audio file of her singing the track; when she ran into him a few weeks later, he assured her, “Oh, yeah, we’re recording that song.” “Humble and Kind” not only wound up as a cut on McGraw’s 14th studio album, “Damn Country Music,” but the label released it as the second single. The tune was bolstered further when Oprah Winfrey let McGraw use footage from her inspirational “Belief ” series for the song’s award-winning music video, which featured scenes of different cultures around the world to cap-

ture the “universality” of the message. “I think, in the times that we live in, it’s an important song, by itself, just by what it says,” McGraw said in February at a radio conference in Nashville. The country star said the lyrics hit him hard when he thought about his three daughters, one of whom had recently left for college. “I just thought it was a song that needed to be heard.” Indeed, the track took off, and has been used for sentimental purposes (including weddings and high school graduations) as well as healing. After the horrific Orlando nightclub shooting in June, syndicated country radio

personality Bobby Bones hosted a #MusicIsTherapy day on his show and invited artists to play covers; rising star Kelsea Ballerini chose “Humble and Kind.” “I think that’s the song that encapsulates everything that people love about country music. It’s a guitar vocal, it’s stripped down, it’s the truth. It’s the kind of truth that almost makes you uncomfortable,” Ballerini said in an interview with The Post. “I just love that [Lori] was bold enough to write that song and that Tim McGraw was bold enough to cut it.” Plus, the song (which McKenna also recorded for her own album, “The Bird & the Rifle”) was also a

milestone for country music: “Humble and Kind” is the first solo-written song in four years to go No. 1, an increasingly rare feat when tracks with multiple cowriters rule the charts. Now, the song continues to have an impact. Over the course of the year, McKenna said, people offered her suggestions of other instances where the song might be played. “Especially with the election and everything, I had several people tell me I should send it to Donald Trump,” McKenna said. She heard that joke more than once, however, “I don’t actually know how to do that.” emily.yahr@washpost.com

Did broadcaster Sinclair put its thumb on the scale for Trump? SINCLAIR FROM C1

age, according to an account of the address by Politico. Kushner reportedly said that Sinclair’s stations, particularly in swing states such as Ohio and Florida, reached a far greater audience in their local area than a national network like CNN could. “It’s math,” he said. Sinclair’s vice president of news, Scott Livingston, said no such deal existed. In an interview Wednesday, he said Sinclair’s reporting merely reflected the candidates’ differing approaches to the news media. “President-elect Trump did substantially more television interviews than Secretary Clinton during every period of the campaign,” he said. “If you were to count the number of appearances, I’d wager that Mr. Trump or a Trump campaign official or surrogate appeared on nearly every network and broadcast company more than a Clinton counterpart.” While Trump dominated TV airtime during the primaries, the coverage was somewhat more balanced during the last months of the campaign. Between Labor Day and Election Day, Trump attracted 308 minutes of reporting on the evening news broadcasts of ABC, CBS and NBC, compared with 194 for Clinton, according to the Tyndall Report, which has tracked the nightly newscasts since 1987. Not all of this attention was favorable: According to the conservative Media Research Center, the broadcast networks devoted 103 minutes to coverage and discussion of a 2005 recording of Trump bragging about assaulting women in the three days after the tape surfaced. A review of Sinclair’s reporting and internal documents shows a strong tilt toward Trump. Sinclair gave a disproportionate amount of neutral or favorable coverage to Trump during the campaign while often casting Clinton in an unfavorable light. For example:  Sinclair-owned stations and its Washington bureau scored 15 “exclusive” interviews with Trump over the past year, including 11 during the final three months of the campaign in critical states such as Pennsylvania and Ohio. They did 10 more with Trump’s running mate, Mike Pence, from August through October, as well as 10 with Trump surrogates, primarily Ben Carson. Sinclair stations aired five such interviews with Clinton running mate Tim Kaine and two with Chelsea Clinton but none with Clinton or another top surrogate.  During one of the Carson interviews, Sinclair managers

WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN/GETTY IMAGES

Sinclair, headquartered in Hunt Valley, Md., sent its stations “must-run” stories favorable to Trump.

provided questions for localstation reporters to ask, such as “Dr. Carson, you toured Detroit, your home town, with Donald Trump Saturday. What will Donald Trump offer the African American community better than Hillary Clinton can?” And: “He has talked a lot about job creation. What will he do specifically to help employment among African Americans?” Livingston said the company often suggests questions of “national importance” to its local reporters so that the responses can be shared with other Sinclair stations. “Suggesting national angles is not coaching,” he said. “Nothing is off-limits for our reporters.”  Three of Trump’s 15 interviews over the past year were with a new Sinclair-owned publicaffairs program called “Full Measure,” including one on its debut last year. The program, hosted by reporter Sharyl Attkisson, is carried on Sinclair-owned stations across the country.  Sinclair managers asked Sinclair-affiliated stations in Green Bay and Madison, Wis., to air extended portions of “Full Measure’s” interview with Trump on their local newscasts on April 3, two days before the Wisconsin Republican primary. WLUK-TV in Green Bay, for example, aired 181/2 minutes of the interview over its two-hour evening newscast, according to the station’s logs. During the same broadcast, it also included segments on Republican rivals Ted Cruz (which ran 5 minutes 45 seconds) and John Kasich (7 minutes 38 seconds), and Democrat Bernie Sanders (41/2 minutes). The station, and Sinclair, asked Clinton to appear but were turned down, Livingston said.  Mark Hyman — a Sinclair

executive and conservative commentator who appears on Sinclair stations — regularly criticized Clinton or highlighted positions favorable to Trump in his on-air commentaries. “Most Americans know very little about the leaked Clinton emails,” he said in one, which aired on Oct. 27. “Major news organizations buried the most damaging. So we’re sharing some with you.”  In January, Sinclair began producing a public-affairs talk show called “The Right Side Forum” hosted by Armstrong Williams, Ben Carson’s business manager and the de facto head of Carson’s unsuccessful presidential campaign. Williams is a longtime business partner of Sinclair; in 2013, he acquired TV stations from Sinclair when the company reached federal limits on station ownership.  News stories and features favorable to Trump or that challenged Clinton were distributed to Sinclair stations on a “mustrun” basis — that is, the stations were required by managers in Washington to make room in their evening newscasts or morning programs for them. A “must-run” email from Washington managers to stations on Sept. 13 read this way: “DESCRIPTION: Why did Hillary Clinton struggle with disclosing her medical diagnosis? She has been repeatedly faced with previous questions of trust. Can a president lead with so many questions of transparency and trust?” Another, from Sept. 8: “DESCRIPTION: Hillary Clinton showed up to talk about the responsibilities of being a leader at the commander-in-chief forum and the first question she took from the audience was about the email/server debacle. Clinton has repeatedly admitted it was a mis-

take, but 18 months since the first story broke and she’s still in the mode of damage control.” An October “must-run” story was a report about conservative activist James O’Keefe’s “sting” video in which two Democraticaffiliated contractors who were surreptitiously recorded discussed disrupting Republican events and mused about a voterfraud scheme. Another, on Sept. 9, was titled “Donald Trump Reflections of 9/11,” which also included a package in which Ivanka Trump discussed what she would do in a Trump administration. In early September, it pushed “Women for Trump,” a feature about Trump’s daughterin-law Lara and another woman who was campaigning for him. There were no equivalent “must-run” stories examining Trump’s refusal to release his medical or tax records or about questions surrounding his charitable foundation. In addition, Sinclair offered no stories about Clinton’s views about 9/11, about what role Chelsea Clinton might play in her mother’s administration or about Bill Clinton’s campaign role. However, Livingston countered that Sinclair produced “must-run” stories on the historic nature of Clinton’s candidacy, and one focusing on how the Trump campaign was off course in early August. “We are proud of the unbiased, thorough and essential coverage we provided our viewers,” he said. A Clinton spokesman did not respond to requests for comment. Sinclair, which is based in the Baltimore suburb of Hunt Valley, was founded by Julian Sinclair Smith in 1971. His four sons are now the company’s majority shareholders.

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From a base of three TV stations, the company began a rapid expansion following passage of the deregulatory Communications Act of 1996. Among its many deals since then was the acquisition in 2013 of stations owned by Allbritton Communications of Arlington for $985 million (The Washington Post’s publisher, Frederick Ryan, was president of Allbritton at the time). The Allbritton stations included ABC affiliate WJLA, Channel 7, of Arlington and local cable network NewsChannel 8. The company drew criticism from Democrats on the eve of the 2012 election when Sinclair stations in several battleground states aired a corporate-produced half-hour news “special” that faulted President Obama for his handling of the economy, his signature health-care law and the administration’s management of the terrorist attack on a U.S. installation in Benghazi, Libya. During the 2004 presidential campaign, Sinclair planned to air a controversial documentary that highlighted Democratic nominee John Kerry’s antiwar activism during the Vietnam War. Under intense criticism, it aired only short excerpts of the film. The company’s managers have been particularly close to Carson, who practiced medicine in Baltimore for many years. Sinclair featured him repeatedly as an expert source in televised “town hall” meetings before he declared his candidacy in early 2015. Its stations also aired his hourlong autobiographical promotional film, called “A Breath of Fresh Air, A New Prescription for America,” just before Carson’s official announcement. The Carson infomercial was produced by a company run by Armstrong Williams, which paid Sinclair an undisclosed fee for the airtime. paul.farhi@washpost.com

BOOK WORLD FROM C1

friendship and its demise. He seems averse to the psychological inquiry required to penetrate the turbulence that engulfed both men, and he relies too heavily on reasoning that ignores the mysterious stirrings of the heart. He seems at times exasperated by his own flailing efforts, asking at one point, “So how does a friendship pass from genuine intimacy to loathing? From the borrowing of socks to the rewriting of personal histories?” The reader feels left in the dark as to the essential zeitgeist that ignited their friendship and destroyed it years later. Beam speculates that the trigger for their contention was Wilson’s savage review of Nabokov’s translation of Pushkin’s “Eugene Onegin” in the New York Review of Books. Nabokov had spent a decade on it, but Wilson found it unreadable and said so in his critique. Nabokov never forgave him. But one senses it was never as simple as that; there were other forces at play. Beam hints that perhaps Wilson tired of Nabokov, who was known to have a mean streak. Wilson had grown disappointed in Nabokov’s recent works, particularly “Lolita,” which catapulted Nabokov to immense wealth and international fame. Beam wonders if perhaps Wilson was jealous of Nabokov’s enormous success, which Wilson never achieved. He considers the possibility that Nabokov may have grown uncomfortable with Wilson, who knew him at the start of his literary life when he was needy of Wilson’s assistance. Beam believes Wilson’s most egregious transgression was assuming he understood the forces that shaped Nabokov, a presumption Nabokov found repellent. Wilson had concluded that his friend possessed a “chilly soullessness” from the aftereffects of his father’s assassination and his own lengthy exile in Europe after being ousted by the Bolsheviks. Nabokov dismissed Wilson’s analysis as “figments of his warped fancy.” Their differences as they aged seem to grow more pronounced. Wilson was proud of the fact that he took literature seriously and had a sense of social justice, while Nabokov boasted, “My books are blessed by a total lack of social significance.” Beam’s assessments are intellectually plausible, but the reader can’t help but feel that the keenest insights have been left unexplored. His narrative style has an ingrained distance that makes it difficult to imagine what an afternoon spent with Nabokov and Wilson might have sounded like — or even to care about their relationship. In contrast, Brian Boyd, who wrote a highly praised biography of Nabokov, seems intuitively to have grasped the terrain he needed to travel to reach more complex truths. Boyd explained his biographical technique in chasing down the essential Nabokov in a revealing interview: “I try to tease out Nabokov’s consistency while also highlighting his variety. I sometimes show the hard lone toil of the artist and the scholar (in this case, me too), and how it relies on or resists the work of others. I show how obsessions, Nabokov’s and mine, need not preclude multiplicity and surprise.” Boyd explains that his pursuit of Nabokov involved “wielding a variety of nets, in different seasons and terrains, panting with effort while he flutters free.” Boyd’s emotional openness to the hidden complexities and contradictions buried within all of us, including himself, set the template for his probing analysis of Nabokov. Beam doesn’t quite get there. bookworld@washpost.com Elaine Margolin is a writer and critic in New York.


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Television TV HIGHLIGHTS 12/23/16

7:00

7:30

8:00

◆ News ◆ Hollywood 4.1 WRC (NBC) ◆ TMZ Mod Fam 5.1 WTTG (Fox) ◆ Wheel ◆ J’pardy! 7.1 WJLA (ABC) ◆ ET 9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script 14.1 WFDC (UNI) Sal y Pimienta 20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud State Circle 22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business 26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour 30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming Inside Poldark 32.1 WHUT (PBS) Geerges 50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Mike & Molly 66.1 WPXW (ION) ◆ Criminal Minds

BROADCAST CHANNELS 8:30 9:00 9:30

10:00

10:30

The Grinch ◆ Murray-Xmas ◆ Dolly Parton’s Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love ◆ Taraji’s White Hot Holidays ◆ Sleepy Hollow Fox 5 News at Ten ◆ Last-Standing (8:31) ◆ Dr. Ken ◆ Shark Tank (10:01) ◆ 20/20 ◆ Home-Holiday ◆ Hawaii Five-0 ◆ Blue Bloods ◆ Despertar Contigo ◆ Vino el Amor ◆ El color de la pasión ◆ American Ninja Warrior American Ninja Warrior Big Bang Big Bang ◆ Shakespeare Live! From the RSC Vera Wash New Orleans Shakespeare Live! From the RSC France 24 Programming Cain Maigret Carol Burnett’s Favorite Sketches ARTICO ◆ Terry-Saves Christmas ◆ Terry-Saves Christmas ◆ Seinfeld News ◆ Criminal Minds ◆ Criminal Minds ◆ Criminal Minds ◆

11:00

11:30

News News News News Noticias Simpsons

J. Fallon TMZ ◆ J. Kimmel ◆ Colbert ◆ Noticiero ◆ Anger Science ◆

Charlie Rose Democracy Now! Two Men Two Men ◆ Saving Hope

CABLE CHANNELS NETFLIX

Sense8: A Christmas Special (Netflix streaming) The Sensates — including Kala (Tina Desai) and Wolfgang (Max Riemelt) — form deeper connections in this two-hour holiday episode. (All times Eastern.) Great Performances: Shakespeare Live! From the RSC (WETA at 9; MPT at 9:30) David Tennant and Catherine Tate host the Royal Shakespeare Company’s two-hour tribute to the Bard, featuring appearances by Benedict Cumberbatch, Judi Dench, Joseph Fiennes, John Lithgow, Ian McKellen, Helen Mirren and more. 20/20 (ABC at 10) The weekly program explores the lives and careers of notable figures who died this year, including Prince, Muhammad Ali, David Bowie, Gene Wilder, Elie Wisel, Gwen Ifill, Leonard Cohen and Janet Reno. PREMIERES

Travelers (Netflix streaming) Eric McCormack (“Will & Grace”) stars in this Canadian time-traveling drama. Trollhunters (Netflix streaming) Guillermo del Toro (the writerdirector “Pan’s Labyrinth” and “Hellboy”) created this familyfriendly animated series about Jim Lake Jr., a teenager who finds a mystical amulet on his way to school and becomes entrusted to defend trolls from evil forces. The late Anton Yelchin voices Jim. Kelsey Grammer, Steven Yeun, Charlie Saxton and Ron Perlman

also lend their voices to the 26episode series. Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas (NBC at 8) Boris Karloff narrates this 1966 holiday classic, based on the beloved book. SPECIAL

A Home for the Holidays (CBS at 8) Country music star Miranda Lambert headlines this year’s broadcast of the annual special featuring uplifting adoption stories. Alessia Cara and Rachel Platten also perform. FINALE

Terry Crews Saves Christmas (CW at 8) The four-night special concludes with two episodes. In the first, the actor helps a family rescue their party from dated decor and terrible food. The second hour features a pair of newlyweds, who find themselves unable to plan a party without arguing. LATE NIGHT

Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Adam Driver, Rhett & Link, R. Kelly. Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Chris Pratt, Jason Bateman, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog, Stevie Wonder. — Bethonie Butler More at washingtonpost.com/tv

Leah Remini: Scientology The Killing of JonBenet: Her Father Speaks (10:01) JonBenét’s Mother: Victim or Killer? A&E (6:00) Movie: Deck the Halls Movie: Home Alone 2: Lost in New York ★★ (1992) Movie: Four Christmases ★★ (2008) AMC Treehouse Masters: Branched Out Treehouse Masters (11:01) Treehouse Masters Animal Planet Movie: Madea’s Family Reunion ★★ (2006) Movie: Jumping the Broom ★★ (2011) BET Housewives/Atl. Married to Medicine Married to Medicine Housewives/Atl. Married to Medicine Bravo We Bare King of Hill King of Hill Cleveland Burgers Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy Family Guy Cartoon Network We Bare Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 This Is Life With Lisa Ling This Is Life With Lisa Ling This Is Life With Lisa Ling CNN Caps SportsTalk SportsNet Redskins Ravens Uns Comcast SportsNet NHL Hockey: Tampa Bay Lightning at Washington Capitals (Live) Movie: We’re the Millers ★★ (2013) We Millers Comedy Central (6:50) Movie: Super Troopers ★★ (2001) Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush: Legends Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Discovery Mickey Toy Story Lego Frozen Movie: Frozen ★★★ (2013) Cali Style Girl Meets Stuck/Middle K.C. Under. Disney (5:30) Friends With Benefits Movie: Legally Blonde ★★ (2001) Movie: Legally Blonde ★★ (2001) E! College Football College Football: Dollar General Bowl -- Ohio vs Troy (Live) SportCtr ESPN (6:30) SportsCenter College Basketball: Harvard at Houston (Live) College Basketball ESPN2 Spotless Spotless Spotless Spotless Spotless ESQTV Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Food Network Tucker Carlson Tonight The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity The O’Reilly Factor Fox News (6:45) Movie: Disney’s A Christmas Carol ★★ (2009) (8:50) Movie: The Santa Clause ★★★ (1994) The 700 Club Freeform Mr. Peabody & Sherman Movie: Christmas With the Kranks ★★ (2004) Movie: Christmas With the Kranks ★★ (2004) FX (6:00) A Dream of Christmas Movie: Sleigh Bells Ring (2016) Movie: Christmas in Homestead (2016) Hallmark Balls of Fury VICE Movie: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix ★★★ (2007) Movie: In the Heart of the Sea ★★ (2015) HBO Tiny House Tiny House Dream Home Dream Home Dream Home Dream Home Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Hunters Int’l HGTV Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens History All About Christmas Eve Movie: Last Chance for Christmas (2015) (10:02) Movie: 12 Men of Christmas (2009) Lifetime Nationals Classics Touchdown Pro Ftbl Plus ESPNWS OPACY MASN Hardball Matthews Lockup: N.M. Lockup: N.M. Lockup: Colorado Lockup: Colorado MSNBC 2 Fast 2 Fur. Movie: The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift ★★ (2006) Movie: Stomp the Yard ★★ (2007) MTV Mars Mars Mars Explorer Nat’l Geographic Mars Loud House SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Full House Full House Full House Full House Friends Friends Nickelodeon Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Spike (6:00) Movie: Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) (8:34) Movie: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom ★★★ (1984) (11:10) Incorporated Syfy Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Full Frontal Search Party TBS (6:15) Movie: Love Crazy Movie: The Thin Man ★★★★ (1934) (9:45) Movie: After the Thin Man ★★★ (1936) Another Thin TCM (6:00) Paranormal Lockdown Paranormal Lockdown Paranormal Lockdown Alaska Haunting Paranormal Lockdown TLC Bones The Librarians The Librarians The Librarians The Librarians TNT Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Travel Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Snack TruTV Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King TV Land Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times Good Times TV One Law & Order: SVU Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam USA Network Love & Hip Hop Movie: Friday ★★★ (1995) Movie: Friday After Next ★ (2002) VH1 Afternoon Report Govt. Matters NewsTalk Sports ABC News News at 10pm Govt. Matters Sports Final WNC8 Cops Cops Movie: Troy ★★★ (2004) How I Met How I Met WGN LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs

High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated

A Virginia town gets all aboard with its holiday lights ASHLAND FROM C1

“Oh, look! There’s a train made out of trash cans,” says Michele, pointing at a metal sculpture decorated with fir trimmings and ornaments designed by schoolchildren. The locomotive bell rings. Onward to Richmond. The sights flicker past. Reindeer prancing on lawns. Christmas trees playing peekaboo between half-drawn curtains. Diamond-bright bulbs trimming eaves and picket fences. Gem-colored lights dangling like Chanel necklaces on bare branches. “Do you like the colored lights or the white lights?” Michele asks her children. “The colored lights,” answers Mary Hayden, 5, after several minutes of speechless wonder. “I like how the lights on the trees looked like they were flying,” adds Will, 7. Oh, Christmas lights. They’re just plastic bulbs — yet they possess near-magical powers. They can transport you to the North Pole, or to a time predating Black Friday, or to a calm state guided by Zen Santa. We look at them and feel gooey and good, like a marshmallow floating in a cup of hot cocoa. The good townspeople of Ash-

land, a Bedford Falls-like town about 18 miles north of Richmond, know this. And so they’ve bedecked their village streets with more than 100,000 sparkling lights for train travelers and freight crews to ooh and aah over. “What we’ve done with the lights is to dial up what has always been here,” says writer Phyllis Theroux, who relocated from Washington more than 25 years ago. “Ashland really is a Christmas town.” It’s even more of a railroad town. The first train arrived 180 years ago. Each day, more than 60 trains — 22 run by Amtrak, 40 by CSX — clatter up and down Ashland’s main drag. There’s no “wrong side of the tracks” here. Two tracks run through the main thoroughfare like a dry, rocky tributary. If a train pulls up just as you were planning to cross the road, you’d better take a seat — this could take a few minutes. “The train is such an integral part of our daily life,” says Dan Bartges, an artist and Ashland Main Street Association board member. “We wanted to make the entire town twinkle for the train crews and passengers.” Through Jan. 3, railway passengers heading home for the holidays — or simply slogging through their daily commute — will coast through the mile-long Light Up

TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Some of the lights on display in Ashland, Va., part of the show for train riders passing through.

the Track event. As for the blurring special effects, you can thank the train engineers. When you’re moving at up to 35 mph, the lights do appear to sprout wings. The dazzling illumination beams from shops, houses and yards paralleling the track. Most of the decor is traditional: white lights, red velvet bows, wreaths, electric candlesticks, a jigging snowman. “It is so welcoming and nostalgic,” says Ashland resident Stephanie Werner, the maternal grandmother of the Stehle children. Some locals, however, have apparently drunk from the whimsy punch. Yes, that is a carved-wood tiki head wearing a sweatband of

red bulbs. The lights surprise most travelers, who are typically staring into phones, computers or closed eyelids. Unless otherwise informed, they’re not prepared for the diversion created on their behalf. “If I knew ahead of time, I would go ‘Ooh’ and ‘Aah,’ ” says Desiree Sisitka of Hampton, Va., “like I always do when I see lights.” On the trip up to Washington that Monday morning, Sisitka had mentioned to her husband that she hoped the train would pass through towns decked out for Christmas. Unfortunately, the couple were traveling during daylight hours. Also working against them: The scenery along the

northbound route is mainly forest, farmland and the backsides of towns. But they were returning in the dark and stopping in Ashland — so maybe, just maybe. On occasion, the conductor announces the upcoming show. The staff might also share wisdom from its repeat rides through the display. “They’re on both sides,” an employee informs us at Washington’s Union Station about the lights, “but I think this side has nicer ones.” To clarify, “this side” means left (if you’re heading south). A staff member at the Richmond Staples Mill Road station advises us, now headed north, to sit in the cafe car. He demon-

strates how you can easily swivel your head to see out both picture windows framing the festive scenery. Suddenly, a cellphone rings, releasing “Jingle Bells” into the air. The mood is set. For passengers on the southbound train, the display starts with Randolph-Macon College, which demonstrates its merriment by wrapping white lights around lamp posts. Downtown follows. Then a row of Victorian houses. A few dark patches intervene before a stunning residence with a wide lawn bursts onto the scene like the Noel version of a Fourth of July fireworks finale. “I want to see it by foot,” Sam Westrick, a PhD student in Pittsburgh going to visit his parents in Mechanicsville, says after the show. The Sisitkas spend the final leg of the journey tossing out Santasanctioned ideas. Perhaps Amtrak could serve spiked eggnog, hand out candy canes and play Christmas carols over the P.A. Maybe the staff could don holiday gear. And how delightful if the train could park in Ashland for 15 minutes, so passengers could disembark and experience the lights up close. On this evening, however, the train has other plans and plunges back into the darkness. But Ashland’s lights continue to burn bright, ready to greet the next load of passengers. Because without the decorations, it’s just another night on the tracks. andrea.sachs@washpost.com

After a breakup, feel the pain but trust that it will fade (and that you won’t) Dear Carolyn: I’m

25, and my boyfriend of five years just broke up with me. I was completely Carolyn blindsided — I had Hax been going through a difficult time at a new job and for a few weeks was admittedly absorbed with my own problems. I was leaning on him too heavily for support. I would have tried my best to make the relationship work if he’d said he was unhappy. He said this isn’t something that can be fixed — though he misses and loves me. I know heartbreak is part of being human. I know that I’m young, that I shouldn’t expect to spend my entire life with my first boyfriend, that I’m lucky he didn’t wait until we lived together and that I’m lucky to still have supportive friends. But we did everything together, we talked about everything (except, apparently, his doubts),

and everything reminds me of him. I’m exhausted from feeling sad and scared all the time. I know this is not a unique experience, but how do I start to accept this? I’m amazed to realize I don’t have any single friends — I don’t know where I fit now. I’m tired of feeling pathetic all the time. Help Help: You’ve already started to accept this, you just don’t see it yet. Your weariness with feeling pathetic is a dead giveaway. It’s not feeling bad that motivates us to reach for something different, it’s getting annoyed with feeling bad — annoyed enough to face the different kind of struggle that comes with moving on. In that sense, you’re also further along than you realize. You don’t have to agonize about whether your relationship is working, whether you’d regret leaving or regret staying, etc. Your ex handed you big changes as a fait accompli. All you need to sort

out now are the particulars of your new circumstances. I don’t mean to sound like a complete lizard here; I understand the intense pain you’re in. But when surging emotions seize control of all your executive functions, a little lizardry can help. It can remind you that relationships of five years don’t end over five weeks of selfabsorption. General reflection is important and useful, but this breakup was coming regardless, so don’t second-guess what you said two weeks ago Thursday. It can remind you that new breakups are like new jobs, handing you an unfamiliar routine requiring intense presence of mind where your old circumstances were comfortably reflexive. It’s normal to feel overwhelmed by a learning curve — and progressively less so as familiarity starts to kick in. It can remind you that being with someone requires a specific kind of effort: of accommodating

someone’s habits, emotions, preferences, autonomy, etc., while remaining fully yourself. Now no such effort is required — home is all you! — which is convenient because that energy can go toward an effort you’ve neglected, building “d[o] everything together” friendships. You didn’t lose everything; you just traded one emotional challenge for another. Have your sad and scared jags, of course; they’re a normal and cathartic part of a lousy process. In between, though, try to listen for what the lizard has to say: This was unavoidable, it hurts intensely, intensity fades. Trust time and trust your own resourcefulness — if you do, then together they’ve got this, I swear. Write to Carolyn Hax at tellme@washpost.com. Get her column delivered to your inbox each morning at bit.ly/haxmail.  Join the discussion live at noon Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com

NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

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THE WASHINGTON POST

CLASSIC DOONESBURY

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GARRY TRUDEAU

RED AND ROVER

BRIDGE

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PICKLES

C5 BRIAN CRANE

BRIAN BASSET

AGNES

TONY COCHRAN

TOM THAVES

WUMO

MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER

N-S VULNERABLE

NORTH  KJ62  K73  K632  Q7 EAST  10 8 3  Q J 10  J 10 7 5  J42

WEST  954  654  98  A9653

FRANK AND ERNEST

SOUTH (D)  AQ7  A982  AQ4  K 10 8

The bidding: SOUTH

WEST

NORTH

2 NT(!) Pass 3 3 Pass 6 NT Opening lead —  6

EAST

Pass All Pass

I

think most would agree (except maybe the retailers) that Christmas is too commercial. Cy the Cynic says it’s become like a baby shower gone totally overboard. Today’s North-South displayed some of the same self-indulgence by overbidding their cards. South opened 2NT, supposedly showing 20 or 21 points. North drove to slam when he might have invited. (When both hands have balanced pattern, 33 points are often too few to make 6NT.) South won the first heart in his hand, led a club to dummy’s queen and returned a club: four, 10, ace. He won the next heart and cashed four spades and his ace of diamonds. At Trick 10, he took the king of clubs, pitching dummy’s last heart. East, with room for three cards, was squeezed. Whether he threw his last heart or a diamond, South would get a 12th trick. It’s too bad that South’s overbidding wasn’t punished. If West ducks the second round of clubs, he stops South from “rectifying the count” for the “simple” squeeze, but South can still succeed by squeezing East “without the count.”

CLASSIC PEANUTS

RHYMES WITH ORANGE

LIO

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

CHARLES SCHULZ

HILARY PRICE

MARK TATULLI

CHRIS BROWNE

MIKE DU JOUR

MIKE LESTER

MARK TRAIL

JAMES ALLEN

MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM

MIKE PETERS

BALDO

HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS

DAILY QUESTION

You hold: KJ62K73 K632Q7 Your partner opens one club, you bid one spade and he raises to two spades. What do you say? ANSWER: Much depends on partner’s style. If he avoids opening lightish hands and always has fourcard support to raise your major-suit response, you can bid four spades. Otherwise, you may do well to settle for an invitational sequence. Bid 2NT. Partner will have options, and you may reach your best contract.

BLONDIE

DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL

SALLY FORTH

FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE

— Frank Stewart © 2016, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

SUDOKU

SHERMAN’S LAGOON

CURTIS

BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!

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JIM TOOMEY

RAY BILLINGSLEY

TIM RICKARD


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PATRICK McDONNELL

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DECEMBER 23 , 2016

JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN

HOROSCOPE BIRTHDAY | DECEMBER 23

DILBERT

SCOTT ADAMS

JUDGE PARKER

WOODY WILSON & MIKE MANLEY

This year you interact well with friends, in groups, at work or in the community. You seem to bask in the attention of many people. If you are single, you might note that you start attracting a different type of person. Be open, but make no commitments for a while. If you are attached, the two of you often go out together with friends and have a great time. Make sure you sprinkle in some romantic dinners and weekends away. Scorpio offers an intense friendship. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19). One-on-one relating elicits strong results. Your words will awaken a key person in your life. You probably will see a strong reaction and might have to do a lot of explaining. Hopefully, others will listen.

FRAZZ

JEF MALLETT

GARFIELD

JIM DAVIS

CANDORVILLE

DARRIN BELL

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20). Defer to a loved one. Be as clear as possible when dealing with a demanding friend. You might discover that you know a lot of people at a last-minute party. Your upbeat attitude marks the beginning of your celebration.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20). Mellow out and know that you can do only so much. Be concerned about how a loved one feels. An older friend or relative is likely to let you know how much you are WEINGARTENS & CLARK appreciated.

BARNEY AND CLYDE

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22). Your creativity and dynamic energy merge, allowing you to come up with a solution even in the worst of circumstances. Remain sensitive, first to your immediate priorities and then to your inner circle.

DUSTIN

STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN

STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22). Stay anchored. You seem to be able to tap into others’ energy quickly and effectively. A loved one could be difficult at first, but eventually he or she will relax. Somehow you will experience fewer problems today than you thought possible. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22). You seem unusually demonstrative right now. Others are clearly thrilled to see you. Catch up on several different people’s news. You could be surprised by what you hear. A child or loved one happily catches your attention.

PRICKLY CITY

SCOTT STANTIS

NON SEQUITUR

WILEY

LOOSE PARTS

DAVE BLAZEK

BABY BLUES

RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22). Follow through on a lastminute decision, and you will be delighted with the outcome. You have too much energy for your own good. Make a point of getting to the gym today, or take a long walk at some point. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21). Your energy draws many people toward you. You are unusually magnetic, as you clearly can see. Your sense of humor touches others in many different ways. Allow your ingenuity to come up with a solution should a problem appear. Your idea will work. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21). Take your time getting going. Many of you can step back and have some personal time. A roommate or loved one could be moving quickly in an attempt to complete what he or she must. Let this person do what he or she feels is necessary.

BIG NATE

LINCOLN PEIRCE

BEETLE BAILEY

MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER

ON THE FASTRACK

BILL HOLBROOK

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

STEPHAN PASTIS

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19). You could have some lastminute errands to run. A group of pals might opt to get together at the end of the day. Go with the flow. Don’t be concerned about not having enough gifts. Everything will balance out. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18). Pressure builds, especially if you work. As you look around, you will notice that quite a few people took today off. The issue is that you likely will have to pick up the slack. Accept an invitation that comes forward at the end of the day. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20). Your mind could be drifting to some people you have not visited in a while. Get going with your holiday calls. The sooner you place them, the more likely it is that you will be able to avoid a voicemail buildup.

— Jacqueline Bigar © 2016, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.

PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION

SPEED BUMP

DAVE COVERLY

DENNIS THE MENACE

H. KETCHAM

FAMILY CIRCUS

BIL KEANE

REPLY ALL LITE

DONNA A. LEWIS

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SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

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Don’t look now, but the suddenly surging Wizards have won seven of 10 and are on the verge of getting back into playoff contention. D3

The Eagles hold off the Giants, 24-19. The result clinches the NFC East for Dallas and could impact the Giants-Redskins season finale. D5

Jessie Govan scores a game-high 20 points and Marcus Derrickson adds 15 as Georgetown rolls past UNC Greensboro at home, 78-56. D4

What McCloughan envisioned isn’t what everyone is seeing The type of football team Scot McCloughan promised to build was on full display Monday Dan night. When it Steinberg needed to gain a few yards on the ground late in the fourth quarter, this team instead gained 30 or 40. Its defensive front had fewer gaps than an upscale shopping mall. It controlled the clock, left its opponent battered and bruised, and seemed better equipped for December than October. Problem is, that team was

wearing a ghastly shade of blue. McCloughan’s Redskins very well might make a second straight playoff appearance; online simulators give them about a one-in-three chance. But if they get there, it probably won’t be from following the GM’s blueprint. McCloughan talks about his teams being big and nasty, but these Redskins win with an elite passing game. He talks about dominating the line of scrimmage, but these Redskins have been outrushed in nine of their 14 games. He talks about winning coldweather slugfests, but in STEINBERG CONTINUED ON D5

Redskins’ faith unshaken despite Cousins’s setback BY

JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST

Quarterback Kirk Cousins did not throw a touchdown pass in the loss to Carolina, the first time he had failed to do so since Week 1.

L IZ C LARKE

In his second season as an NFL starter, quarterback Kirk Cousins has mastered the art of not getting too high amid success and not getting too low amid failure. So if he was rattled by his shaky performance in Monday’s loss to the Carolina Panthers — it was the first game since the season-opening loss to Pittsburgh in which he didn’t throw a touchdown pass, and he twice turned the ball over — there was no evidence when the Washington Redskins regrouped for their

lone practice of the week in advance of Saturday’s game at the Chicago Bears. “Not my first time coming away from a tough loss,” said Cousins, who threw for 315 yards in the 26-15 defeat while missing open receivers, throwing one interception and fumbling after getting blindsided on a sack on the opening play of the second half. Two plays later, a four-point deficit became an 11-point deficit. “I’ve learned through all my years REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D5

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Navy looks to end 2016 with a bit of redemption BY

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fort worth — When Navy foot-

Capitals are hoping their star can find the scoring touch that mostly has gone missing

PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES

An all-points bulletin for Ovechkin BY

I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN

With three seconds left in regulation Wednesday night, Alex Ovechkin finally flashed the quick release and lethal shot he’s known for, firing a shot at Philadelphia goaltender Steve Mason during a power play. The shot on goal was Ovechkin’s first of the game, barely preserving a streak of games with at least one that dates from March 12, 2013. Ovechkin is averaging 3.94 shots per game, compared with 5.04 a season ago, and while he leads the Washington Capitals with 14 goals, that’s three fewer than he had through 31 games

Falling short of his goals Washington captain Alex Ovechkin has 14 goals in 31 games, putting him on pace to approach the career-worst numbers he posted in 2010-11. 0.8

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last season. If he maintains his current pace, he would finish with one of the least productive seasons of his high-scoring career. Ovechkin’s chances of winning a fifth straight Maurice Richard Trophy for the most goals in the league seem bleak; Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby has 22 goals through 27 games played. More than a third of the way into the season, Crosby is one of nine players with more goals than Ovechkin. So is there reason to be concerned CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D3

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ball Coach Ken Niumatalolo addressed the team following practice this week regarding what’s at stake in their final game of the season, his message was unlike any other since he took over on a permanent basis eight years ago. That’s because, for the first time under his watch, the Midshipmen enter a bowl game on the heels of a loss to Army. Navy had won a series-record 14 in a row in one of college football’s most storied rivalries until the Black Knights ended the streak, 21-17, on Dec. 10. Despite that stinging disappointment, as well as a 34-10 loss to Temple the previous week in the American Athletic Conference championship game, these Navy players have an opportunity to leave a unique imprint on the program, Niumatalolo reminded them. “People want to talk about the negative, but we have one more chance to win 10 games” in consecutive seasons, he said. “Never happened before in school history.” To do so, 25th-ranked Navy (9-4) must defeat high-scoring Louisiana Tech (8-5) on Friday in the Armed Forces Bowl at Amon G. Carter Stadium. The considerably shorthanded Midshipmen, in their second appearance in the Armed Forces Bowl in four years, also are seeking a fourth consecutive bowl victory. In what has become an ongoing and perplexing saga, 11 players are listed as out on Navy’s injury report. Six of those are starters, including both senior co-captains: linebacker Daniel Gonzales and slotback Toneo Gulley. Navy starters and significant contributors have missed a combined 92 games. “Until we got everybody hurt, we were fine,” said Niumatalolo, the two-time AAC coach of the year who is Navy’s all-time wins NAVY CONTINUED ON D6

Armed Forces Bowl Navy vs. Louisiana Tech Today, 4:30 p.m., ESPN

Blue Devils suspend Allen — 10 months after they should have The first thing that comes to mind regarding serial tripper Grayson Allen: What makes a Barry person keep doing Svrluga this? The second, after Coach Mike Krzyzewski announced that Duke had suspended Allen indefinitely following his egregious trip of an Elon (Elon?) player Wednesday night: Would a team-imposed suspension 10 months ago have stopped Allen’s reckless on-court behavior? And in what might seem

ancillary but is far from it for those who care about college basketball: Does anyone remember that Louisville beat Kentucky on Wednesday night? That tense and taut in-state affair — which should have put a focus on college basketball that the sport yearns for in every month not named March — was kicked to the side by Allen’s right foot, which intentionally and inexplicably found the back side of the left leg of Elon guard Steven Santa Ana in what became a 72-61 victory for the heavily favored Blue Devils. Few situations offer Krzyzewski, his sport’s career

leader in coaching victories, no choice. Suspending Allen was one of them. “What Grayson did was unacceptable,” he told reporters afterward, which is akin to pointing out that the sun rises in the east. So before we trip over ourselves (sorry) in lauding Krzyzewski for taking this step, it’s worth pointing out that he should have taken it Feb. 26. That’s the day after Allen tripped Florida State’s Xavier RathanMayes, which came all of 17 days after he had tripped Louisville’s Ray Spalding. Wednesday’s cheap shot, which came after Santa Ana had

beaten Allen with a spin move along the baseline, had the entire sport focused not just on Allen, who’s moving his way up the seeding of the “Most Hated Duke Player Ever” bracket, but on how Krzyzewski would handle him. “No more gifts,” Jay Williams said on ESPN. “We’re done with that. He deserves to sit.” That there is Duke-on-Duke crime because Williams played for Krzyzewski’s 2001 national champs. And it’s a measure of how obvious Krzyzewski’s choice was Wednesday. “As a program, we needed to take further steps regarding his

www.ebook3000.com SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D4

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Duke’s Grayson Allen, right, reacts with seeming disbelief after he was called for tripping an Elon player Wednesday, a repeat offense.


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DECEMBER 23 , 2016

washingtonpost.com/sports D.C. SPORTS BOG

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Shanahan: Cousins will win Super Bowl BY

Upstarts that could get at-large NCAA bids

REDSKINS

S COTT A LLEN

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins still has his doubters, but former coach Mike Shanahan might be his most vocal public believer. And Shanahan was proselytizing about the quarterback he drafted three rounds after Robert Griffin III in 2012 again Wednesday. “There’s no question he is a franchise guy,” Shanahan told Fox Sports 1’s Colin Cowherd. “You give him a good system, and Kirk Cousins will win you a Super Bowl. There’s no question. He’s got all of the intangibles that you look for. In fact, one of the reasons I’m not at Washington is, you know, we had a conversation relative to Robert or Kirk, but what Kirk did away from the football field . . . I’ve never been around a person that worked that hard, studied that hard. He’s got a great feel, and I think people see [it]. He’s very similar to Drew Brees, to me. When [Brees] was at San Diego, then all of a sudden he went to Miami, he went to New Orleans. [People asked,] ‘Can Drew Brees play?’ And all of a sudden the rest is history. I think Kirk Cousins is that type of guy.” This isn’t the first time that someone has compared Cousins to Brees, a late bloomer who has developed into one of the NFL’s best quarterbacks. It’s also not the first time that Shanahan has attempted to distance himself from the Redskins’ decision to trade for Griffin or mentioned Cousins and Super Bowl in the same sentence. “I think he’s a guy that can take your team and win a Super Bowl,” Shanahan told ESPN 980 four games into last season, when Cousins had thrown as many interceptions (four) as touchdown passes. “And that’s the biggest compliment I can give somebody. Does this person have the ability, the ingredients, that if he has the right supporting cast on offense, defense and special teams, can he win you a Super Bowl? And I believe that Kirk Cousins has that ability.” scott.allen@washpost.com  Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog

BY THE NUMBERS

25-24 All-time record for the Washington Redskins on Saturdays, including the postseason. Washington, which is 28-40 in its history on Monday nights but has won its past two Saturday contests, travels to Chicago to face the Bears on Christmas Eve. (Via D.C. Sports Bog)

BY

The end of nonconference play is (almost) here. All six of the top conferences will fire up the league schedule next week, and all of the Big East and most of the Big Ten will wedge in two conference games by New Year’s Day. One of the many upshots of this is that it is easier to size up which teams have a nonconference scheduling problem that could doom them on Selection Sunday. Virginia Tech, Utah and Rutgers are among those who do. These three teams, from traditionally one-bid leagues, are at the opposite end of the spectrum. Middle Tennessee (No. 12 CBS, No. 75 KenPom)

MASTER TESFATSION/THE WASHINGTON POST

Ty Nsekhe shops at Tysons Corner for Dae’Anna Reynolds, whose mother, Diamond, was the girlfriend of Philando Castile.

Nsekhe continues to give back Redskins lineman sends Christmas presents to 5-year-old who witnessed shooting BY

M ASTER T ESFATSION

Washington Redskins offensive tackle Ty Nsekhe is attempting to bring joy to the victims of a tragedy that occurred this year. On the team’s day off Tuesday, Nsekhe went Christmas shopping for Dae’Anna Reynolds, the daughter of the late Philando Castile’s girlfriend, hoping to spread the holiday cheer on Christmas week. Reynolds, now 5, was in a car seat on the passenger side of the back seat when police shot and killed Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn., a suburb in the Twin Cities area, during a traffic stop July 6 while her mother, Diamond Reynolds, recorded the event on Facebook Live. Nsekhe said he reached out to Redskins public relations to come up with a way to give back during the holiday season to someone who was affected by tragedy this year. He didn’t watch the video, but he was moved by the details of the situation and wanted to give back to Dae’Anna Reynolds during the family’s first Christmas without Castile. “I just decided why not give back to a little girl that’s gone through such a traumatic event in such a short period of time,” Nsekhe said. “Losing a loved one and actually seeing something like that, that can be traumatizing to her — especially to a 5-year-old. It impacted me, and I felt like maybe I could do something to brighten her day. Hopefully, she can get a smile out of this.” While many shoppers at Tysons Corner Center spent their afternoon looking to purchase last-minute

Christmas items, the 31-year-old Nsekhe went to the American Girl store to buy Reynolds a doll, a stuffed dog and various accessories that will arrive in Minnesota later this week. Nsekhe, who has an 8-month-old son, had never stepped foot inside an American Girl but paid a visit once he heard it was one of Dae’Anna Reynolds’s favorite stores. “She’s a little princess, so it matches the theme of her life,” Nsekhe said. In a statement from the family’s lawyer, Diamond Reynolds said, “The holidays are a tough time for Dae’Anna and I without Philando. He was a loving and caring person who loved us, and we loved him. Knowing that people like Ty and the Redskins are thinking of us and care means a lot and we thank them from the bottom of our hearts. Dae’Anna loves the gift, and we appreciate it.” Nsekhe said there are plans to help provide financial support to the family. The police officer involved in the shooting, Jeronimo Yanez, faces three felony charges — second-degree manslaughter and two counts of dangerous discharge of a firearm — and deferred entering a plea Monday until a trial judge has been assigned to the case. The gifts mark the second time Nsekhe has attempted to console victims of a national incident that highlighted America’s ongoing racial tension in 2016. Previously, when the Redskins faced the Dallas Cowboys on Thanksgiving Day at AT&T Stadium, the Arlington, Tex., native donated 10 tickets to Dallas police officers and families affected by July’s shooting. Nsekhe said at the time that it was

just the start of his charitable acts, and he remained true to his word by giving back to Castile’s family. “I’ve been through different things in my past that have put me in position to understand where people are coming from,” Nsekhe said. “I’ve been on both sides. I’ve been on the wrong side of the law, so I know what it’s like for police officers to do their jobs and how dangerous that can be. So I understand that completely. Just the fact that I’ve been there and now able to come full circle, I’m in a different light and on a different platform and just trying to use my platform for good.” Nsekhe, who is a free agent at the end of the year, said that he is not finished with his acts of kindness. He wouldn’t go into details, but he has vowed to continue making a positive impact after the many blessings he has received this year, both on and off the field. “I’m just a human being trying to be a genuine person and trying to show that I have great character on and off the field,” Nsekhe said. “Hopefully somebody can learn from the values that I’m displaying, feel moved and want to do the same thing. Pay it forward. “Hopefully I can do my part and somebody can take heed to what I’ve done, and they can do their part. So on and so forth. Slowly but surely, we can move this country forward — in a positive direction.” master.tesfatsion@washpost.com  Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/ insider

Indians, Encarnacion agree to a $60M deal The Cleveland Indians swung for the free agent fences and connected: Edwin Encarnacion is joining the American League champions. Capping a year in which they came within one victory of winning the World Series for the first time since 1948, the Indians agreed to terms with the veteran slugger on a three-year, $60 million contract Thursday night. The deal includes a club option for 2020 that, if exercised, would make it worth $80 million over four years. The agreement is contingent upon Encarnacion passing a physical after the holidays, two people familiar with the negotiations told the Associated Press. . . . Pitcher Ivan Nova and the Pittsburgh Pirates agreed to a three-year, $26 million contract, according to a person with knowledge of the deal. COLLEGES Matt Linehan threw for 381 yards and four touchdowns

The Blue Raiders (10-3) would have been helped a lot more if they had defeated Virginia Commonwealth and Georgia State in the past week. Had they gone 12-1 outside of Conference USA and scattered a couple losses in league play, they might have withstood an upset in the conference tournament. Now? Well, the defeats of Mississippi and especially Vanderbilt might not hold up as all that valuable. But Middle Tennessee clearly understood how to finagle its RPI, going 6-1 in road/neutral games and loading up on contests against teams that should win plenty of games (such as Belmont and North Carolina Wilmington). Texas Arlington (No. 45 CBS, No. 27 KenPom)

Here’s a team that brought back five starters, does one thing especially well (defending threes) and has won at Saint Mary’s and Texas. Remember the Mavericks because if they get into the field of 68, they’re as good a bet as anyone to pull a 12/5 or 13/4 upset. The trick is getting there. UT Arlington (7-3) dropped early games to Minnesota, Florida Gulf Coast and Arkansas, so it won’t be sitting in the at-large pool with just a loss or two. It should be the best team in the Sun Belt, and KenPom gives it at least a slight edge in all 19 of its remaining games. The Mavericks probably have the best shot at an at-large right now of any of these teams. UNC Wilmington (No. 68 CBS, No. 146 KenPom)

The Seahawks (11-1) play their first and only power-conference foe of the regular season next week at Clemson. Win that and then dominate the Colonial Athletic Association, and there will be a worthwhile conversation to have about their at-large hopes in March. A defending league champ with much of its roster returning. Wilmington has faced its share of mid-major-conference contenders (a loss to Middle Tennessee, victories over East Tennessee State and Toledo) and bagged a victory at St. Bonaventure. sports@washpost.com Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/sports/ colleges

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P ATRICK S TEVENS

and ran for a another score, helping Idaho beat Colorado State, 61-50, in the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl in the third-highest scoring game in bowl history. Idaho (9-4) matched its highest victory total since it moved to Football Bowl Subdivision in 1996, but its victory in Boise will do nothing to quell the debate over the school’s decision to move back down to Football Championship Subdivision play. In April, the Sun Belt conference informed the school it was dropping Idaho after the 2017 season. . . . The NCAA again has revamped its charges against North Carolina in the school’s multiyear academic case, leading university officials to question the fairness of the process. The school released a third notice of allegations from the NCAA that included charging it with providing improper extra benefits after withdrawing a similar charge last spring. The Dec. 13 notice reworded the charge that had been removed from the first version filed in May 2015 centering on athletes’ access to irregular courses on the Chapel Hill campus. First tied to conduct by academic counselors, the charge

now focuses on two former staffers in that department while also citing them for violating “principles of ethical conduct.” . . . The 128 FBS athletic directors and the programs they represent have formed a political action committee to financially support candidates for office. LEAD1 Association, the group that was once known as the D1A Athletic Directors’ Association, announced the creation of the PAC that will support candidates who align philosophically with its vision for the future of college sports. The goal of the PAC is to influence how the rules of college sports are enacted and implemented when amateurism is facing legal challenges. . . . Michigan football suspended sophomore wide receiver Grant Perry after he was charged with assaulting a police officer and improperly touching a woman outside a bar in October. . . . Georgia fined assistant coach Shane Beamer $25,000 for accepting leaked game-plan information two years ago while at Virginia Tech from Tommy Elrod, the former Wake Forest assistant coach who has been fired as a radio analyst.

SOCCER Forward Jozy Altidore was named the U.S. player of the year for the second time. Altidore, who plays for Toronto in Major League Soccer, received 52 first-place votes and 223 points in voting by 136 media conducted by Futbol de Primera. . . . Second-division side Alcorcon eliminated top-tier club Espanyol from the Copa del Rey with a 4-3 victory in a penalty shootout in Madrid. . . . In Italy’s Serie A, Roma rallied from a goal down to beat Chievo Verona, 3-1, and remain perfect at home, with nine wins in nine matches this season at Stadio Olimpico. MISC. Days after the UFC created a new women’s featherweight division that seemed ripe for domination by Cris “Cyborg” Justino, the organization announced that a sample she submitted Dec. 5 was flagged as a potential doping violation. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency notified Justino of the development from the out-ofcompetition test and ultimately will handle the “results management and adjudication

7:30 p.m. 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m.

Oklahoma City at Boston » NBA TV Washington at Milwaukee » CSN Plus, WFED (1500 AM) Dallas at Los Angeles Clippers » NBA TV

NHL 7 p.m.

Tampa Bay at Washington » CSN

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 8 p.m.

Bahamas Bowl: Eastern Michigan vs. Old Dominion » ESPN Armed Forces Bowl: Louisiana Tech vs. Navy » ESPN, WFED (1500 AM), WBAL (1090 AM), WNAV (1430 AM) Dollar General Bowl: Ohio vs. Troy » ESPN

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m. 8:30 p.m. 9 p.m. 10 p.m. 11 p.m. 12:30 a.m. (Saturday)

Auburn at Connecticut » ESPN2 Providence at Boston College » ESPNU Diamond Head Classic, semifinal » ESPN2 Rutgers at Seton Hall » Fox Sports 1 Arkansas State at Minnesota » Big Ten Network Harvard at Houston » ESPN2 Las Vegas Classic, third-place game » Fox Sports 1 Florida A&M at Wisconsin » Big Ten Network Diamond Head Classic, semifinal » ESPN2 Las Vegas Classic, championship game » Fox Sports 1 Diamond Head Classic, consolation game » Fox Sports 1

RUGBY 2:30 p.m.

English Premiership: Northampton vs. Sale » NBC Sports Network

of this case,” according to a UFC statement emailed to reporters. . . . Russia has lost biathlon and speedskating events it was due to host this winter following allegations it ran a vast statesponsored doping scheme. . . . The WNBA’s San Antonio Stars promoted assistant Vickie

Johnson to be the team’s new head coach. Princeton University canceled the rest of the men’s swimming and diving team’s season after administrators discovered that members had posted “vulgar and offensive” material on the team’s electronic mailing list. — From news services


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

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NHL ROUNDUP

Jagr passes Messier as No. 2 on career scoring list BRUINS 3, PANTHERS 1 A SSOCIATED P RESS Jaromir Jagr moved into the outright No. 2 spot on the NHL career scoring list Thursday night, getting an assist in the Florida Panthers’ 3-1 loss to the Boston Bruins in Sunrise, Fla. Jagr got point No. 1,888 to break a tie with Mark Messier. The historic point came with 6:40 left. “I appreciate everything . . . over my hockey career, and I thank the fans,” Jagr said in a brief ceremony during which he was given a golden stick. Only Wayne Gretzky, with 2,857 points, has more than Jagr. Aleksander Barkov was credited with the goal that deflected off the 44-year-old Czech star. In a video, Gretzky offered congratulations. “You play the game the right way,” he told Jagr.

 BLUE JACKETS 7, PENGUINS 1: Scott Hartnell had his

ninth career hat trick, and host Columbus scored four times in a head-spinning third-period flurry to blow out Pittsburgh. Cam Atkinson, William Karlsson, Brandon Saad and Boone Jenner also scored to help the Blue Jackets win their 11th straight game and take over first place in the Metropolitan Division. Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 25 shots for Columbus (22-5-4) amid a rollicking playoff atmosphere and a sellout crowd at Nationwide Arena.  HURRICANES 3, SABRES 1: Jeff Skinner and Justin

Faulk scored to power Carolina to victory in Buffalo. Cam Ward made 22 saves and Sebastian Aho scored an emptynet goal in the final minute as the Hurricanes beat the Sabres for the second time in six days. Carolina has earned a point in four straight games. Brian Gionta scored for Buffalo,

and Robin Lehner made 31 saves. The Sabres have lost three in a row.  LIGHTNING

5, BLUES 2:

Alex Killorn scored a go-ahead goal early in the third period, and Jonathan Drouin added two late goals as Tampa Bay rallied from a two-goal deficit to win in Tampa. Killorn put Tampa Bay up 3-2 from the high slot 5:25 into the third period to help the Lightning go 2-0 to start a stretch in which it plays seven of eight games at home.  DEVILS 4, FLYERS 0: Cory Schneider made 16 saves in his first shutout of the season as New Jersey snapped a seven-game losing streak with a win in Newark. P.A. Parenteau, Miles Wood, Adam Henrique and Kyle Palmieri scored for New Jersey, which won for the first time since defeating Vancouver on Dec. 6.

er and Devin Setoguchi scored for Los Angeles. Playing the sixth of their season-high nine-game road swing, the Kings improved their record to 3-2-1 on the trip.  SENATORS 2, DUCKS 1 (OT): Mike Hoffman scored a

power-play goal at 4:03 of overtime to vault host Ottawa. Hoffman’s one-timer on a pass from Dion Phaneuf beat John Gibson in the Anaheim goal. Ryan Dzingel scored in regulation for the Senators (20-11-3).  WILD

4, CANADIENS 2:

Eric Staal’s shorthanded goal in the third period in Montreal broke a tie and helped Minnesota earn its ninth straight win. The Wild (20-8-4) last won nine in a row March 8-24, 2007, and can break the team record Friday in New York against the Rangers.

4, PREDATORS 0:

 MAPLE LEAFS 6, AVALANCHE 0: Nazem Kadri scored

Peter Budaj made 28 saves to lead Los Angeles to victory in Nashville. Nick Shore, Nic Dowd, Jeff Cart-

twice, Frederik Andersen stopped 38 shots for his first shutout this season, and Toronto cruised to victory in Denver.

 KINGS

KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST

Washington left winger Alex Ovechkin celebrated his 200th power-play goal Dec. 11 against Vancouver. He has 14 goals this season.

Caps confident that Ovechkin will return to old ways CAPITALS FROM D1

about Washington’s captain? “Yeah, I have concern his production’s down because we need his production to win,” Capitals Coach Barry Trotz said. “I know that the history will state that he will get on some hot streak here and he’ll score some goals, but if we’re going to be successful, we’ve got to have Ovi being productive.” Ovechkin is averaging his fewest shots per game since the 2011-12 season, when he finished with 38 goals, just the second time in his career he had fewer than 40 goals in a non-lockout year. Ovechkin has scored at least 50 goals in three straight seasons, but with 14 goals and nine assists, he is averaging the fewest points of his career at 0.74 per game, and he’s on pace for roughly 37 goals. He hasn’t started a season like this since 2011, when he had 10 goals and 12 assists through 31 games and finished with a career-low 65 points. Ovechkin

notched 50 goals and 21 assists in 79 games last season. “Ovi carries high expectations by the fans, us, everybody to put up offensive numbers,” Trotz said. “The best way he can do that is with his line working together and finding ways how he can get open. . . . “Right now, he’s had a dry spell where he hasn’t had a lot of shots. Is that a little bit of him, a little bit of his linemates, a little bit of how we’re going or whatever? But he’s capable of going through a week where he’ll get 10 goals, and we’ll go, ‘Everything’s fine.’ He’s dynamic, and we need him to win, plain and simple.” In the past two-plus seasons under Trotz and General Manager Brian MacLellan, the Capitals have striven to surround Ovechkin with talent to share the burden of offensive production. Evidence of the Capitals’ decreased dependence on him can be found in their past 12 games, during which he has scored just two goals while they have gone

C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E vs. Tampa Bay Lightning Today

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at New York Islanders Tuesday

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vs. New Jersey Devils Thursday

7 CSN, NBCSN

Radio: WFED 1500

7-3-2. Part of the decline could be related to decreased minutes. He is averaging 18:46 of ice time, down from 20:19 a year ago, as the Capitals try to keep the 31-year-old fresh for later in the season. For the first time since 2011-12, Ovechkin is averaging fewer than two unblocked shot attempts per game on the power play. Trotz said he has spoken to Ovechkin about playing detailed when he’s without the puck, something that could help regain possession more efficiently, as

opposed to getting exhausted defending for an entire shift. After several practices, Ovechkin stayed on the ice late to get repetitions tipping defensemen’s point shots in front of the net, seemingly searching for a new way to score. Hours before Wednesday night’s game in Philadelphia, Ovechkin went on the ice in shorts and shoes, stickhandling a puck and then shooting it into the boards for several minutes before returning to the locker room. “I think with Ovi he goes sometimes in little bits of spurts,” Trotz said. “It wouldn’t surprise me if he got 10 goals the next five games. That’s the way he sometimes goes. “You know he’s going to score. As long as he’s shooting, he’s going to score. When he’s not getting those shots, then he’s not going to score a whole heck of a lot. He’s going to continue to pound that puck at the net, and they’re going to find ways to get to the back of it.” isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com

Battlefield brings Cox back as its football coach F ROM

STAFF REPORTS

When Mark Cox decided to end his 11-year coaching tenure at Battlefield in January 2015, his son Kevin offered some advice: If you really want to move on, leave the school. Cox brushed his son’s words aside. The only head football coach Battlefield had known since its 2004 inception could focus on his roles as a physical education teacher and assistant activities director without worrying about the daily grind on the gridiron. On Monday, Cox changed his mind. His son had been right. “There is some truth to that,” Cox said. “It’s hard to be around the kids and the coaches and not miss it.” Battlefield ended its two-week search for a new coach Wednesday by welcoming back the man who had nurtured the Bobcats into Prince William County’s

TRACY A. WOODWARD/THE WASHINGTON POST

Mark Cox previously coached the Bobcats from 2004 to 2014.

most consistent football power. Battlefield made the postseason a county-record 10 straight seasons, but earlier this month, the school cut ties with coach Jared Van Acker after a seven-win season fizzled with a 21-0 loss at Patriot and a 34-12 defeat at South County in the opening round of the 6A North region playoffs.

Van Acker had led Battlefield to a 16-7 mark and one playoff victory in his two seasons at the helm. Cox, who turns 54 on Dec. 26, was hired as Battlefield’s first football coach when the school opened. His teams went 85-34 during his tenure, including an 11-2 finish and a Conference 8 title to cap his last season in 2014. Cox was named All-Met Football Coach of the Year in 2010 for leading the Bobcats to their lone Virginia 6A state title. Cox insisted on following through with the traditional interviewing process this week. It didn’t take long for Battlefield Student Activities Director Jason Koch to make his decision. “He loves Battlefield,” Koch said of Cox. “. . . When you have somebody with that much passion, it’s kind of a no-brainer.” Cox will remain in his faculty positions.

Goganious, McNamara part McNamara has dismissed football coach Keith Goganious, he confirmed Thursday. “It was more small things that they saw that we needed some improvement on. I didn’t think so. We agreed to disagree,” Goganious said. “They just wanted to go in a different direction.” He said the move was “unexpected.” Goganious, 48, compiled an 19-22 record in four years with the Forestville school. The Mustangs went to the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference playoffs in 2014 and posted one season with a winning record — 2015, when they went 6-4 with the help of a win over St. John’s. This fall, they finished 4-6, 2-4 in conference play. McNamara Athletic Director Tony Johnson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

www.ebook3000.com — Nick Eilerson

— Jacob Bogage

KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST

“We want to utilize the speed of one of the fastest point guards in the league,” Wizards Coach Scott Brooks said of John Wall, above.

Behind their stars, Wizards find a spark BY

C ANDACE B UCKNER

milwaukee — The low point for the Washington Wizards came Nov. 19. They couldn’t handle an undermanned Miami Heat team at home and surrendered at least 105 points for the fifth consecutive game. The offense depended too heavily on John Wall and Bradley Beal; the duo combined for 68 points, but no other Wizard scored more than 10. The team fell to 3-9 and tumbled to 14th place in the Eastern Conference, just one step higher than the Philadelphia 76ers. Only a dozen games into the schedule and 2016-17 already appeared to be a hopeless excursion to the NBA draft lottery. Since that 114-111 loss to the Heat, the Wizards have resurrected their season, going 10-6 to improve to 13-15. Their run has included a win at home over the Western Conference power Los Angeles Clippers (21-8) and a 10797 victory Wednesday at Chicago. The Wizards remain out of playoff position but are within 1 / 3 2 games of the third-place Boston Celtics (16-12) in the wide-open Eastern Conference, which appears to have Cleveland and Toronto as front-runners and a bunch of teams scrambling to pick up crumbs. The Wizards’ rise has placed them among those jockeying. After that home loss to the Heat, Beal gauged the atmosphere of the locker room by saying, “It’s tough in here.” Now that the team has won seven of 10, Beal has a different take. “It’s been evident when we want to lock down and really lock into guarding our guys,” Beal said following the Wizards’ third road win of the season, “we’re a really tough team.” It starts with their two stars. Beal has scored at least 20 points in eight consecutive games, the longest stretch of his career. Meanwhile, Wall has floated between the roles of floor general and No. 1 scoring option. He has averaged 9.6 assists during the past 10 games while also ranking among the top 10 in scoring at 26.0 points — only MVP candidates Russell Westbrook and James Harden have better numbers over the same stretch. The Wall-Beal dynamic has

WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE at Milwaukee Bucks Today

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transformed the Wizards’ offense. Since a Dec. 5 road win over Brooklyn that sparked this hot stretch, Washington has averaged 109.7 points (sixth highest in the NBA) on 48.9 percent shooting (third highest). The Wizards are creating more scoring opportunities by pushing the tempo. On Wednesday, Washington scored 32 fast-break points. The team is averaging 16.5 transition points in December, ranking fifth in the NBA. “We made a conscious effort 14 games ago to play faster,” Coach Scott Brooks said. “We want to utilize the speed of one of the fastest point guards in the league. It puts great pressure on their defense. John’s speed is something special, and we need to take advantage of it.” Besides the steady play from the two best players and the refined offense, the Wizards are winning more because the bench has settled down. While others have bounced in and out of the rotation, the Wizards have steadied themselves with a core group of Trey Burke, Marcus Thornton, Kelly Oubre Jr. and Jason Smith. The definition of roles and assurance of a bit longer leash have helped Washington’s second unit gain confidence — especially Burke, who once struggled in his role of running the offense but has since been freed to be who he is: a smaller combo guard who can score. “I’m just feeling the game out,” Burke said. “I get to see the game, I get to see an all-star point guard every night and see how the rhythm of the game is going. I’m learning from it as well. I’d be dumb to not pick up some of the things from that guy over there. I’m learning every day.” candace.buckner@washpost.com

NBA ROUNDUP

After Miami honors O’Neal, its late-game rally halts L.A. HEAT 115, LAKERS 107 A SSOCIATED P RESS Justise Winslow and Hassan Whiteside each finished with 23 points and 13 rebounds, and the Miami Heat rallied from 19 points down to beat the Los Angeles Lakers, 115-107, on Thursday night in Miami. Winslow set a career high for points and tied a career best in rebounds for the Heat, which raised Shaquille O’Neal’s No. 32 jersey to the rafters in a halftime ceremony. Goran Dragic scored 21 and James Johnson added 19 for Miami, which snapped a three-game slide and went 3-3 on its six-game homestand. Lou Williams scored 27 points for the Lakers, who fell to 5-14 on the road. Nick Young scored 20, and D’Angelo Russell had 17.  WARRIORS 117, NETS 101: Kevin Durant had 26 points, nine rebounds and seven assists, and visiting Golden State turned an ugly start into an easy finish against Brooklyn. Klay Thompson added 23 points for the Warriors, who opened a three-game road trip that leads into their NBA Finals rematch in Cleveland on Christ-

mas. They didn’t look ready while falling behind by 16 at halftime but were back to their sometimes unstoppable selves while outscoring the Nets by 32 points over the final 24 minutes. Stephen Curry and Zaza Pachulia each finished with 15 points for the Warriors, who played without Draymond Green. The 26-year-old returned to the Bay Area early Thursday after the birth of his son, Draymond Jamal Green Jr. Brook Lopez scored 28 points but just five in the second half as the Nets dropped their fourth straight.  CELTICS 109, PACERS 102: Isaiah Thomas had 28 points and nine assists, helping Boston win in Indianapolis. Avery Bradley and Jae Crowder each scored 15 points for the Celtics, who have won four in a row. Marcus Smart had 12 points, and Amir Johnson and Kelly Olynyk finished with 11 apiece. Jeff Teague led Indiana with 31 points and eight assists.  KNICKS 106, MAGIC 95: Derrick Rose scored 19 points, Kyle O’Quinn had 14 points and a career-high 16 rebounds, and New York topped visiting Orlando. Carmelo Anthony and Willy Hernangomez each had 15 points for the Knicks, who have won their past two after a three-game skid. Serge Ibaka led the Magic with 23 points and 10 rebounds.


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college basketball AREA ROUNDUP

Patriots dominate, win ninth straight GEORGE MASON 75, PRAIRIE VIEW 59 F ROM NEWS SERVICES Otis Livingston had a careerhigh 23 points and Marquise Moore had 20 points and a careerhigh 17 rebounds to lead George Mason to its ninth straight win, 75-59, over Prairie View A&M on Thursday at EagleBank Arena. Livingston went 10 for 16 from the floor with two three-pointers and had six assists. Moore made 7 of 13 shots and 6 of 10 from the line on his birthday. The Patriots (10-3) head into conference play with 10 wins for only the second time since 1983-84. Zachery Hamilton had 21 points for the Panthers (2-11), who lost their eighth straight since their only home game. George Mason used a 12-0 run to take a 27-15 lead 4:08 before the break. Justin Kier had four points during the spurt, and Ian Boyd knocked down a three-pointer. It was 37-21 at the half. Livingston made both of his threes, hit 6 of 7 shots and scored 14 points in the second half, when the Patriots pushed the lead to 24.  MIAMI 72, GEORGE WASHINGTON 64: Davon Reed

scored 17 points to lead the Hurricanes past the Colonials in Coral Gables, Fla. Miami (9-2) secured the victory with eight free throws in the final 41 seconds. Reed’s two free throws with 5.9 seconds left gave the Hurricanes their final margin. Yuta Watanabe scored 15 points to lead the Colonials (8-5). Miami has won five straight, and GW’s three-game winning streak was snapped.  HARTFORD 63, NAVY 54: In West Hartford, Conn., Jason Dunne hit four three-pointers on his way to 18 points and also had five steals to lead the Hawks past the Midshipmen. Hartford (5-8), winner of three straight, knocked down 11 of 30 three-pointers and held the Midshipmen to 3 for 23 from long range (13 percent). Tom Lacey had 12 points and 11 rebounds for Navy (5-7), and George Kiernan had 10 points.  OLD DOMINION 65, HOWARD 46: Zoran Talley, returning

from a five-game suspension, scored a career-high 18 points and Brandan Stith posted a doubledouble to pace the Monarchs (7-4) past the Bison (3-9) in Norfolk.  VCU 78, LOUISIANA MONROE 65: Doug Brooks made 5 of 6

three-pointers and ignited a 17-2 run midway through the second half to lift the Rams (9-3) in Richmond. The Warhawks are 5-7. Bryant leads Bison women Imani Bryant scored a gamehigh 19 points and added nine rebounds and six blocked shots to lead Howard to a 71-68 victory over Fairleigh Dickinson in Teaneck, N.J. The Bison and improved to 3-8. Brianna Thomas and Kiana Brown each scored 12 points to lead the Knights (2-9).  MICHIGAN

82, AMERI-

CAN 33: The Eagles shot just

29 percent in a nonconference loss in Ann Arbor, Mich. American is 3-8, while the Wolverines improved to 11-3.

Govan, Derrickson give Hoyas an outside shot GEORGETOWN 78, UNC GREENSBORO 56 BY

P ATRICK S TEVENS

Jessie Govan got going both inside and from the perimeter. Marcus Derrickson got going, period. Together, the sophomore big men demonstrated an element of Georgetown’s offense Thursday that bodes well as it ventures into its Big East schedule. Govan had 20 points, 10 rebounds, six assists and four blocks, and Derrickson scored a season-high 15 points off the bench as the Hoyas cruised to a 78-56 victory over North Carolina Greensboro at Verizon Center. “Both of them were a presence today,” Georgetown Coach John Thompson III said. “We need them to continue to do that because it gets real now.” Junior L.J. Peak added 16 points for the Hoyas (8-4), who have won six in a row and have not lost since dropping their final two games at the Maui Invitational last month. They open conference play Wednesday at Marquette. R.J. White had 14 points and 12 rebounds for the Spartans (9-4), who had won eight of their previous nine. The 6-foot-7 Derrickson and the 6-10 Govan were particularly efficient from beyond the arc, where they combined to shoot 5 for 7. The pair had totaled seven three-pointers on the season before Thursday. “It opens up a lot for our offense,” Govan said. “Our guards feel comfortable throwing it to us on the perimeter, and they’re confident in us to knock it down. We’re going to try to keep on doing that. Coach has put a lot of

JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST

Jessie Govan had 20 points and 10 rebounds — his second double-double of the season — in Thursday’s win.

confidence in us to take the open shot if we had it. We feel good about taking the shot, and it’s been going in lately.” It’s hardly a foreign skill set for either player. Govan made half of his 28 attempts from three-point range last year and was 3 for 5 from the outside before Thursday. Derrickson made 38 threes last

season, second most on the team, but was slowed early this season with a knee injury. Derrickson, a two-time All-Met from Paul VI who started 27 games as a freshman, was shooting 27.6 percent from the field entering the night. “I wasn’t letting the game come to me,” said Derrickson, who grew

up in Bowie. “I was trying to force and hunt and force shots in. It just wasn’t falling. This game, I just relaxed, calmed down and knew I was going to get open shots.” The pair logged the bulk of the Hoyas’ frontcourt minutes against UNC Greensboro, and it was the first time both played at least 25 minutes in the same game

this season. Their presence on the floor together could create spacing headaches for opponents during Big East play. “They do a good job setting flare screens that turn into back screens at the top of the floor in their Princeton offense,” UNC Greensboro Coach Wes Miller said. “You try to help on their cutters, and when those guys can step out and make them, it makes them a really tough team to guard.” Derrickson scored all but two of his points in the second half, while Govan was efficient throughout, scoring 11 points in the first half. It was Govan’s second 20-point game of the season and the third with at least that many points in his career. Georgetown delivered stellar defense for stretches, particularly when it held the Spartans without a field goal for a stretch of 9:22 in the first half. The Hoyas turned a 12-12 tie into a 31-14 lead in that span and would not see their advantage trimmed to fewer than eight the rest of the game. The Spartans closed within 42-33 early in the second half, but the Georgetown frontcourt’s perimeter prowess took over from there. Derrickson made the first of his three-pointers with 17:08 left, and Govan soon followed with another to push the margin back to 15. “These two guys are basketball players,” Thompson said. “A lot of people will say, ‘Oh, they’re post players.’ They’re basketball players. Sometimes they need to remember to do the things a post player does, but they’ve been doing that. Them popping out and hitting shots is something they both do. That’s the norm, for the most part.” sports@washpost.com

BARRY SVRLUGA

Allen’s suspension came Thursday. It should have come in February. SVRLUGA FROM D1

actions that do not meet the standards of Duke Basketball,” Krzyzewski said in a statement. Have the standards of Duke [b]asketball changed since February? Because that’s when Allen tumbled to the floor after a drive, then — while prone — swung out his right leg to trip Spalding, who was trying to push Louisville into a fast break at Duke’s Cameron Indoor Stadium. That’s also when Allen slyly stuck his left leg out behind him to trip Rathan-Mayes, who was innocently headed upcourt in the waning seconds of a Duke win at Cameron. The day after the FSU incident, when Allen officially became a repeat offender, Duke was all but silent on the matter, saying the incident had been “handled internally.” That turned the ball over to the ACC, which decided that Allen deserved a “reprimand” — whatever that is — but no suspension. “The first time, you call the kid in and say, ‘What the hell’s wrong with you?’ ” said former Maryland coach Gary Williams who, like Krzyzewski, is a Hall of Famer. “If you take the temperature around the game, the second time, you suspend him.” Krzyzewski didn’t. And now? Another season and a new version of the same cheap shot from Allen. Yes, Allen was assessed a

CHUCK BURTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Grayson Allen trips Elon’s Steven Santa Ana in Wednesday’s first half. Allen has done the same to Louisville and Florida State players.

technical foul after he kicked Santa Ana. Yes, he was despondent on the bench and contrite in the locker room. Yes, Krzyzewski arranged for a meeting — and an apology — with Allen, Santa Ana and Elon

Coach Matt Matheny afterward. And now comes the suspension. But it leaves people wondering: What in the world makes a player as good as Allen continue to do that? “Here’s the thing: Part of

growing up when I grew up is you had to prove yourselves on the playgrounds,” Williams said. “If you ever tried to trip somebody like that, you’d have to fight your way off the court. Kids today, they don’t play outside. Everything’s controlled. You kind of miss disciplining yourself as you grow up as a player. “Allen’s a great competitor. He really competes on the court. Every coach would like to coach players that have the competitive spirit that a guy like Allen has. But at the same time, you can’t do that. Where does that come from?” This matter isn’t over, for two reasons. One, we don’t know how long Allen will sit out from competition. Duke’s next game is its conference opener Dec. 31 at Virginia Tech. The subsequent two are both at home against beatable ACC opponents, Georgia Tech and Boston College. The test will be after that: Will Krzyzewski hold Allen out of the Blue Devils’ Jan. 10 matchup with dangerous Florida State (12-1) in Tallahassee? What about the next game — at Louisville, which showed its own potential by beating Kentucky? That’s what Williams, Krzyzewski’s former guard, called for on ESPN: five games, which would include the one against the Cardinals. But secondly, whenever the suspension ends, the matter won’t be over because Allen will be publicly monitored like few

players in his sport have been. This entire incident is seen through the prism of Duke’s public persona, which is a generation in the making and predates Allen’s birth. The villains are a long line of Duke players — starting probably with Christian Laettner in the early 1990s but extending to Steve Wojciechowski, J.J. Redick, Greg Paulus and so many others. For so many college basketball fans, Krzyzewski provides the connective tissue, so they notice when he blows off most of the handshake line (as he did last season following a loss to Syracuse) or when he lectures an opponent on sportsmanship (as he did with Oregon’s Dillon Brooks following the Blue Devils’ exit from the NCAA tournament in March). So before conference play starts, we have the themes of the season clearly defined: How long will Krzyzewski punish Allen? How will Allen conduct himself when he returns — and absorbs the unbridled scorn of every opposing crowd? And will villainous Duke become healthy and whole enough for a run at what would be Krzyzewski’s sixth national title? It’s too bad. Because in the days before Christmas, the theme should be: Wasn’t that Louisville-Kentucky game great? barry.svrluga@washpost.com For more by Barry Svrluga, visit washingtonpost.com/svrluga.

NATIONAL ROUNDUP

No. 24 Bearcats need overtime to get past sharpshooting Thundering Herd CINCINNATI 93, MARSHALL 91 (OT) A SSOCIATED P RESS Troy Caupain rebounded his missed shot and made a short jumper with 0.7 seconds left in overtime Thursday night, rallying No. 24 Cincinnati to a 93-91 victory over visiting Marshall. The Bearcats (10-2) trailed by 15 points in regulation and held the lead only briefly with 2:49 left. Gary Clark led Cincinnati with 26 points and 10 rebounds. Stevie Browning scored 28 points for Marshall (7-5) and made a career-high six threes. The Thundering Herd made a season-high 14 three-pointers in the first half alone. Browning had 21 points in the half.

 KANSAS 71, UNLV 53: Josh Jackson scored 21 points, Svi Mykhailiuk had 20 and Frank Mason III added 13 as the No. 3 Jayhawks beat the Rebels in Las Vegas, extending their winning streak to 11 games. Kansas got 12 rebounds and four points from Landen Lucas. The Jayhawks (11-1) haven’t lost since a season-opening 103-99 overtime setback to Indiana in Honolulu.  INDIANA

97,

AUSTIN

PEAY 62: James Blackmon Jr.

scored 24 points and Robert Johnson added 20 as the No. 16 Hoosiers blew out the Governors in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana (10-2) extended its homecourt winning streak to 26 games — the fifth longest in school history. Josh Robinson had 21 points for Austin Peay (4-9).

 SAINT MARY’S 74, SOUTH CAROLINA STATE 47: Jock

Landale had 20 points and 11 rebounds, and the 19th-ranked Gaels pulled away in the second half to beat the Bulldogs in Moraga, Calif. Calvin Hermanson added 10 points as Saint Mary’s (10-1) overcame cold shooting early to win its fourth straight. Huskies women beat Cougars Kelsey Plum scored 29 points, and the No. 9 Washington women rolled to an 82-70 win over Brigham Young in Provo, Utah. Plum, the nation’s leading scorer, had 13 points in the second quarter and didn’t miss her first shot until after halftime. The Huskies picked up the defensive intensity in that second period, and BYU was held to just seven points and shot 3 for 19 from the field.

JOE ROBBINS/GETTY IMAGES

Troy Caupain’s jumper with less than a second remaining in overtime keeps Cincinnati unbeaten at home.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2016

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Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/insider

Kerrigan, Baker are limited in practice Outside linebacker Ryan Kerrigan, inside linebacker Will Compton, defensive Chris Baker and cornerback Bashaud Breeland were limited in Washington’s practice Thursday. Meanwhile, tight end Jordan Reed, cornerback Quinton Dunbar and inside linebacker Su’a Cravens did not participate. Kerrigan is nursing an elbow injury, Baker an ankle injury and Compton a knee injury, while Breeland had an illness, Coach Jay Gruden said. Reed remains hampered by the shoulder injury that limited him each of the past two games. Dunbar remains in the NFL’s concussion protocol and seems unlikely to play Saturday.

Cravens continues to nurse the strained elbow that kept him out of Monday night’s game against the Panthers. He, too, seems unlikely to play Saturday against the Bears. Cravens spent all of the individual drills watching the safety group. All season, he has worked with the inside linebackers, although Gruden has said that a move to safety has been considered. Linebacker Martrell Spaight, who started in place of Compton on Monday, has a shoulder injury and also was limited Thursday. Gruden said Dunbar likely will not play Saturday, but he didn’t commit to Reed being unavailable. “He didn’t do much today, obviously. Did not participate today,” Gruden said of Reed. “So I really don’t have anything to compare it to. Obviously, it’s still bothering him a little bit, and we’ll have to gauge it tomorrow before we leave.”

Phillips promoted Washington brought cornerback Dashaun Phillips back to the 53man roster, with Dunbar in the concussion protocol and seemingly unlikely to play Saturday. This is the third time this season that Phillips has been added to the roster. He opened the season as the top nickelback but lost his job to rookie Kendall Fuller after suffering a hamstring injury in the third game of the season. Phillips was released in November to make room for tight end Derek Carrier on the 53-man roster and re-signed to the practice squad. He was then briefly called back up from the practice squad in the first week of December but didn’t play in that game. Phillips returned to the practice squad for two weeks and now gets another chance to vie for

playing time. Dunbar has served as the third cornerback in the past two games, playing on the outside and enabling Bashaud Breeland to cover slot receivers. When Dunbar left Monday’s game, Greg Toler replaced him on the outside, but he left the game with an injury as well. Fuller returned to nickelback, and Breeland moved back outside. Phillips has the ability to play both inside and outside, and he also plays on special teams, as did Dunbar. To make room for Phillips, the Redskins waived backup wide receiver Rashad Ross, who had appeared in only five games this season, recording one catch for eight yards. The Redskins also signed linebacker Lynden Trail to the practice squad Thursday. Trail spent the offseason and preseason with Washington but didn’t survive final roster cuts. — Mike Jones

NFL ROUNDUP

Giants’ playoff hopes put on hold after Eagles’ win

DAN STEINBERG

Washington not running according to plan

EAGLES 24, GIANTS 19 ASSOCIATED PRESS

STEINBERG FROM D1

Monday night’s debacle, the Redskins were getting slugged. “We got whupped,” injured linebacker Will Compton said. “They took it to us.” The Redskins gained 29 yards on the ground Monday night, with poor Rob Kelley embarking on Sisyphean attempts just to reach the line of scrimmage. The Panthers were more like the boulder, gaining 148 rushing yards, often through holes that could have accommodated a second rock. It was the Redskins’ first game since 1997 in which they rushed for fewer than 30 yards while giving up more than 145 yards on the ground. Over their past four games — a season-changing 1-3 stretch — the Redskins have the secondfewest rushing yards in the NFL on the second-fewest attempts. Only one Redskins team in the past half-century has averaged fewer rushing attempts per game than this outfit, whose offensive coordinator has publicly criticized himself for straying from the run. Now remember what McCloughan said when he arrived in Washington. “When you get done playing the Washington Redskins, you know you’re playing them,” he promised. “You’re going to feel it. . . . We get late in the year [with] playoff runs and cold weather and nasty games and field conditions, you need to be able to run the football. So I think it’s vital.” The GM later talked about “bad-weather games where you have to run the ball 30 to 35 times.” Twenty-four NFL teams have rushed the ball at least 35 times in a game this season. The Redskins aren’t on that list. This isn’t one of those annual sports-radio pleas for the Redskins to bring back the Riggo Drill. The sport has changed. You can go to the playoffs with the sort of pass-happy offense Washington employs; the Redskins did that very thing last year. And when the running

RICH SCHULTZ/GETTY IMAGES

Safety Malcolm Jenkins returns one of his two interceptions for a touchdown as Philadelphia snapped a five-game skid Thursday.

JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST

GM Scot McCloughan wanted to build an identity around a bruising rushing attack. So far, he hasn’t.

game is as anemic as it was Monday, there’s no sense in asking Kelley to run into a concrete wall, pick himself up and run into that wall again. But Washington’s executives spent the offseason pledging to field a more physical team and explaining how central that notion was to their rebuild. They have been dominated in time of possession three weeks in a row, culminating in Monday night’s disappointment. Their opponents have had the ball a combined 30 minutes longer in those three games; that’s watching a bad sitcom without fast-forwarding through the commercials. “We were not the more physical team Monday night. Carolina was. There’s no doubt about it,” Coach Jay Gruden said this week. “That’s our intent is to be a physical football team, and I like our physicality up front . . . but it just didn’t show Monday night.” McCloughan’s vision has been limited by some of his own choices. Two of his biggest misses have come on the defensive line, where the team signed and then released veterans Stephen Paea and Kendall Reyes. He used a thirdround pick on Matt Jones — who looked like a big, bruising, NFC

East back — but Jones has been inactive for seven games in a row. No one promised an instant transformation, and we’re still less than two years into this regime change. Still, for a second straight December, the biggest — or possibly only — strength of this Washington team is its passing attack. When Kirk Cousins and his receivers struggle, as they did Monday night, the team has no real alternative. This isn’t about fact-checking a GM’s promises. The Redskins could throw the ball 73 times a game using a roster made up entirely of emaciated garageband rock stars and no one would care whether they were winning. McCloughan’s first draft pick, guard Brandon Scherff, got named this week to his first Pro Bowl, where he will join linemate Trent Williams. That’s a fine start. It’s just striking to see a team that remains so different from its general manager’s oft-stated vision, a vision that players still claim to see. “Redskins football is line up, run the ball, don’t be so quick to bail out on the run, and on defense, we’ve got to stop the run and make the offense onedimensional,” lineman Ricky Jean Francois said. “We didn’t do

anything we were supposed to do [Monday night], so anything Scot was trying to build, it damn sure wasn’t going to look like it that night.” The most alarming part of Monday’s loss was Carolina’s final drive. This was a onepossession game, late in the fourth quarter, an obvious running situation. And yet on the Panthers’ first snap, Jonathan Stewart strolled through the defense for 34 yards. After another run for a first down, the Panthers clinched the game with a field goal. “You can’t let that stuff happen,” linebacker Mason Foster said. “We’ve just got to be better than that.” Saturday offers a chance for a redo. The Bears have the worst rushing defense the Redskins will have faced in two months. It will be cold again, late December in Chicago. This is the kind of game McCloughan loves to talk about. Maybe his team will win this game through brute force, on both sides of the ball. More likely, that’s a vision to chase in 2017. dan.steinberg@washpost.com For more by Dan Steinberg, visit washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.

The New York Giants will have to wait a while to make the playoffs. Malcolm Jenkins had the second two-interception game of his eight-year career, returning one for a touchdown, and the Philadelphia Eagles snapped a five-game slide by beating the visiting Giants, 24-19, on Thursday night. The loss handed Dallas the NFC East title — and home-field advantage throughout the conference playoffs. It also put the Giants (10-5) in a more difficult spot for ending their four-season playoff drought. They still own the top wild-card position heading into their finale at Washington. New York still can get in this weekend if Detroit, Green Bay, Tampa Bay or Atlanta loses. Carson Wentz threw a touchdown pass to Nelson Agholor, then returned from being examined for a concussion in the fourth quarter to guide a drive to Caleb Sturgis’s 41-yard field goal. After New York’s Robbie Gould made his fourth field goal, Philadelphia (5-9) held on downs with just under two minutes remaining. The Giants got the ball back with 1:31 left, and Terrence Brooks intercepted to clinch it with five seconds to go. Meanwhile, Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. was fined $18,000 by the NFL for wearing unapproved cleats against Detroit, two people familiar with the fine told the Associated Press. Beckham wore cleats honoring the late broadcaster Craig Sager, who lost his lengthy battle with cancer last week. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the fine has not been announced publicly. Beckham planned to auction off the cleats for charity. Falcons’ Jones to return Atlanta Falcons Coach Dan Quinn said star wide receiver Julio Jones will play Saturday at Carolina after missing two games with a toe sprain. Quinn said cornerback Jalen Collins and defensive end Adrian Clayborn will return from knee injuries. Tight end Austin Hooper (knee) and linebacker De’Vondre Campbell (concussion) will not

play. Jones’s return was expected after he ran full speed during Wednesday’s practice. Despite missing two games, Jones leads the NFL with 1,253 receiving yards. The Falcons (9-5) can clinch the NFC South by beating the Panthers if Tampa Bay loses or ties at New Orleans.  PANTHERS: Cam Newton said it makes no sense for Carolina to play three-time all-pro middle linebacker Luke Kuechly the remainder of the season following a second concussion in two years. “Luke is a person that could potentially to be the greatest linebacker that has ever played — straight up,” Newton said. “I don’t think, for me, I would want to jeopardize that for a long, longterm issue just to bring him back.” The 25-year-old Kuechly, the NFL’s defensive player of the year in 2013 and four-time Pro Bowl selection, has missed Carolina’s past four games because of the concussion he suffered Nov. 17.  PATRIOTS: New England wide receiver Michael Floyd said he’s trying to learn from his mistakes following an arrest on charges of driving under the influence earlier this month that led to him being waived by the Cardinals. In his first comments since he was claimed off waivers by New England, Floyd said he’s trying not to think about the Dec. 12 incident in Scottsdale, Ariz., in which he was found asleep behind the wheel of his SUV with a blood alcohol level nearly three times the legal limit. “I think in life, everyone makes mistakes. And I think right now it’s about learning from that mistake,” Floyd said. “I think I couldn’t be in a better position right now with this team. The guys that they have around here, just keeping me focused and working hard.”  RAMS: Rookie quarterback Jared Goff is expected to start for Los Angeles on Saturday after clearing the NFL’s concussion protocol. Interim coach John Fassel said Goff will start for the Rams (4-10) against the San Francisco 49ers (1-13). Sean Mannion will replace Case Keenum as Goff’s backup, the coach also announced. Goff participated fully in the Rams’ past two practices. The No. 1 pick in last spring’s draft claims he felt no ill effects from a hard hit from Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman last week.

Despite setback, Redskins players have ‘all the faith in the world’ in Cousins REDSKINS FROM D1

of playing football to just keep going and not ride the roller coaster. Get back to work and do what you know to do.” This time last year, it was Cousins who led the slow-starting Redskins to the NFC East championship, playing his best football of the season to win the final four games for a 9-7 finish. With two games remaining, the Redskins, 7-6-1 and a halfgame out of the final wild-card spot, are leaning on Cousins to conjure the same heroics. The defense, 24th in the NFL in points allowed per game (24.5), hasn’t shown the ability to carry the team. And the running game has been far from a reliable contributor. So can Cousins get the job done? And what bearing, if any, will his performance in Decem-

ber have on negotiations for a long-term contract in the offseason? Cousins is the NFL’s sixth-rated quarterback behind Matt Ryan, Dak Prescott, Tom Brady, Drew Brees and Aaron Rodgers. During the loss to Carolina, he set a Redskins record for passing yards in a season — breaking his own record of 4,166, set a year ago. He has 4,360 yards with two games remaining. Still, some want more proof of his mettle after arguably his roughest outing of the season. Cousins’s teammates, for their part, have seen enough. “All the faith in the world” is how running back Chris Thompson described his confidence in Cousins’s quarterbacking ability Thursday. Said left tackle Trent Williams, a co-captain of the offense: “It wasn’t Kirk’s fault we lost [to

Carolina]. We didn’t play well as a team. When our defense was playing well, our offense wasn’t playing well. Offensively, we had penalties, we had missed assignments, we had drops. You can’t pin everything on the quarterback. We didn’t play well as a whole. So there’s no confidence that’s lost in here.” Nearly every Redskins player was implicated in the loss to Carolina (6-8) at FedEx Field, where the home team was favored by a touchdown. Pass protection wasn’t as stout as Cousins had grown accustomed to, yet Cousins hurried his throws at times, as if giving the Panthers’ defensive front too much respect. The running game was “atrocious,” to use Coach Jay Gruden’s word, contributing 29 yards (2.2 per carry) before it was largely abandoned, resulting yet again in a lopsided offensive

script that consisted of 47 pass plays and 13 rushing plays. Otherwise reliable receivers dropped catchable balls — Thompson among them. Tight end Jordan Reed wasn’t a factor, ailing from a shoulder separation and ultimately ejected. With the offense converting just 2 of 12 third downs (16.7 percent), the Redskins’ defense was left on the field for nearly 35 minutes, and the safeties were easily exploited. Most disconcerting, the Panthers took the Redskins’ home field with more fire than the host team. Despite having virtually no chance at making the playoffs, the Panthers competed as if the postseason hung in the balance. On some teams, that fighting ethic is steeped in the culture. On others, the head coach supplies it. Or a defensive captain. Or the

www.ebook3000.com

quarterback. Gruden, in his third year on the job, is finding his moments to sound the code-red alarm or dress down his players for a subpar effort, as he did following the Week 13 loss at Arizona. Firing up the troops isn’t necessarily Cousins’s forte. He leads in a different manner, Thompson says. “There are guys that are ‘rahrah’ guys, that get loud and pump people up and slap people on the head. That’s Trent Williams; that’s his job, patting hands, hitting helmets — all of that,” Thompson said. “Then Kirk comes in with his calm message before the game, at the end of practices. We can just feel how calm he is. It gives us that confidence because we know Kirk is ready to go. He’s wired up, and he’s prepared. That’s who he is; that’s how he plays. He’ll say,

‘Guys, we need to do this. We know what we can do. Let’s go out there and get it done.’ And that’s it.” But is it enough to push a team with obvious deficiencies to the playoffs? In Cousins’s view, it goes both ways. “As a quarterback, it will always be a major role of mine to elevate the play of the other players in the huddle. If I step in the huddle and the 10 guys there are not going to play better as a result of me being in the huddle, then what am I doing? . . . You need to elevate the play of the guys around you,” Cousins said Thursday. “That being said, we’re all professionals. We’re all grown men. And if it takes a ‘rah-rah’ speech to get you to the right place, then you’re probably not going to last very long.” liz.clarke@washpost.com


D6

EZ

THE WASHINGTON POST

M2

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23 , 2016

Entering bowl vs. Louisiana Tech, Navy is broken, but its records could be, too NAVY FROM D1

leader. “We’ve just got to overcome the injuries.” Unavailable as well because of injury is quarterback Will Worth, who ascended to first string after Tago Smith tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee in the season opener. Major college football’s leader in rushing touchdowns with 25, Worth broke a bone in his right foot early in the

second quarter against Temple. So the Midshipmen are down to their third-string quarterback, Zach Abey. The sophomore, who played high school football at Archbishop Spalding, is set to make his second start at Navy after becoming the only quarterback in program history to make his first career start against Army. “We just want to win for the sake of winning because it’s the last game I’ll ever play,” said guard

Adam West, who is part of an offensive line that had the secondfewest career starts combined (four) in the country entering the season. “You’re not going to see me at the [NFL] combine, I promise. We’re trying to win because we’re seniors and it’ll be the last time we play.” The class of 2017 has won more games (37) than any other over a four-year period at Navy. That distinction previously belonged to

the classes of 1909 and 2016. Last year’s class was led by quarterback Keenan Reynolds, who claimed virtually every significant scoring and rushing record in school history as well as a handful of notable national career marks. Even in Reynolds’s best years, though, the Midshipmen did not flirt with the offensive milestones they amassed this season. Navy’s 67 touchdowns, for instance, are a single-season school record; its

56 rushing touchdowns are another. Another 26 points would give Navy the program single-season record (currently 512) in that category. Ninety-seven yards against Louisiana Tech would set the Navy record for total offense (5,774). The Midshipmen are averaging 436.7 yards of total offense, ranking 50th nationally among 128 schools in the Football Bowl

Subdivision. They are fourth in the country in rushing (310.9 yards per game) and 20th in scoring (37.4). “We go by next man up,” Abey said. “All throughout the offseason, it doesn’t matter who you are — everyone has to put in the effort as if they’re the starter. I think that really showed this season, just having guys step up when they’re least expecting it.” gene.wang@washpost.com

SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL W EEK EN D O N TH E A I R

TOMORROW NFL

1 p.m. 1 p.m. 4:05 p.m. 4:25 p.m. 8:25 p.m.

Washington at Chicago » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45), WTEM (980 AM) New York Jets at New England » WJZ (Ch. 13) Indianapolis at Oakland » WUSA (Ch. 9), WSPZ (570 AM) Tampa Bay at New Orleans » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45) Cincinnati at Houston » NFL Network, WJFK (106.7 FM)

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m.

Hawaii Bowl: Hawaii vs. Middle Tennessee » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)

RUGBY 9 a.m.

Premiership: Wasps vs. Bath » NBC Sports Network

SUNDAY NFL

4:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

Baltimore at Pittsburgh » NFL Network Denver at Kansas City » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11), WJFK (106.7 FM)

NBA Noon 2:30 p.m. 5 p.m. 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m.

Boston at New York Knicks » ESPN Golden State at Cleveland » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2), WTEM (980 AM) Chicago at San Antonio » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2), WTEM (980 AM) Minnesota at Oklahoma City » ESPN Los Angeles Clippers at Los Angeles Lakers » ESPN

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 8 p.m.

Diamond Head Classic, seventh-place game » ESPNU Diamond Head Classic, fifth-place game » ESPNU Diamond Head Classic, third-place game » ESPN2 Diamond Head Classic, championship game » ESPN2

SOCCER 7:30 p.m.

Mexican Liga MX finals, second leg: Tigres vs. America » Univision

B A S K ETB A L L NBA

Celtics 109, Pacers 102

EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTIC W Toronto ......................................20 Boston........................................17 New York ...................................16 Philadelphia .................................7 Brooklyn.......................................7

L 8 12 13 21 21

Pct .714 .586 .552 .250 .250

GB — 31/2 41/2 13 13

SOUTHEAST W Charlotte....................................16 Atlanta.......................................14 Washington ...............................13 Orlando ......................................13 Miami.........................................10

L 13 15 15 18 20

Pct .552 .483 .464 .419 .333

GB — 2 21/2 4 1/ 6 2

CENTRAL W Cleveland ...................................21 Chicago ......................................14 Indiana .......................................15 Milwaukee .................................13 Detroit .......................................14

L 6 14 16 14 17

Pct .778 .500 .484 .481 .452

GB — 71/2 8 8 9

WESTERN CONFERENCE SOUTHWEST W x-San Antonio............................23 Houston .....................................22 Memphis ....................................19 New Orleans ..............................10 Dallas ...........................................8

L 5 8 12 21 21

Pct .821 .733 .613 .323 .276

GB — 2 51/2 141/2 1/ 15 2

NORTHWEST W Utah ...........................................18 Oklahoma City ...........................17 Portland .....................................13 Denver........................................12 Minnesota....................................9

L 12 12 18 17 19

Pct .600 .586 .419 .414 .321

GB — 51/2 51/2 8

PACIFIC W Golden State..............................26 x-L.A. Clippers ...........................21 Sacramento ...............................12 L.A. Lakers .................................11 Phoenix ........................................8

L 4 8 17 21 21

Pct .867 .724 .414 .344 .276

GB — 41/2 131/2 16 171/2

1/ 2

x-late game

TUESDAY’S RESULTS at Charlotte 117, L.A. Lakers 113 New Orleans 108, at Philadelphia 93 at New York 118, Indiana 111 Orlando 136, at Miami 130, 2OT at Toronto 116, Brooklyn 104 Boston 112, at Memphis 109, OT Cleveland 114, at Milwaukee 108, OT San Antonio 102, at Houston 100 at Golden State 104, Utah 74 at L.A. Clippers 119, Denver 102 at Sacramento 126, Portland 121

29 9

26 27

32 — 109 35 — 102

BOSTON: Crowder 5-9 2-2 15, Johnson 5-7 0-2 11, Horford 3-12 2-2 8, Thomas 9-21 8-9 28, Bradley 6-13 3-3 15, Brown 2-7 0-0 4, Jerebko 2-4 0-0 5, Olynyk 4-8 1-1 11, Smart 2-8 7-8 12, Rozier 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 38-92 23-27 109. INDIANA: George 5-16 9-10 19, Robinson 1-9 0-0 2, T.Young 6-11 0-2 15, Turner 5-11 0-0 10, Teague 9-15 11-11 31, Miles 7-13 3-4 19, Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Seraphin 0-0 0-0 0, Jefferson 2-4 0-0 4, Brooks 0-3 2-2 2. Totals 35-82 25-29 102. Three-point Goals: Boston 10-39 (Crowder 3-5, Olynyk 2-5, Thomas 2-11, Johnson 1-2, Jerebko 1-3, Smart 1-4, Horford 0-3, Bradley 0-3, Rozier 0-3), Indiana 7-23 (T.Young 3-6, Teague 2-4, Miles 2-6, Turner 0-1, Brooks 0-1, Robinson 0-2, George 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Boston 44 (Horford 11), Indiana 52 (T.Young 12). Assists: Boston 19 (Thomas 9), Indiana 20 (Teague 8). Total Fouls: Boston 27, Indiana 21. Technicals: Bradley, Indiana defensive three second, Indiana team, George. A: 17,577 (18,165).

Knicks 106, Magic 95 ORLANDO ........................... 19 NEW YORK ......................... 27

28 30

25 24

23 — 95 25 — 106

ORLANDO: Fournier 9-17 2-2 21, Ibaka 10-18 0-0 23, Gordon 3-8 0-0 6, Biyombo 3-6 3-4 9, Augustin 1-4 0-0 2, Green 3-8 4-4 10, Rudez 0-0 0-0 0, Vucevic 4-11 2-4 10, Zimmerman 0-1 0-0 0, Payton 4-11 1-2 10, Watson 2-5 0-0 4, Hezonja 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-90 12-16 95. NEW YORK: Anthony 5-17 5-5 15, Porzingis 5-11 0-0 12, Noah 2-5 2-2 6, Rose 7-16 4-4 19, Lee 4-7 0-0 10, Kuzminskas 2-3 1-2 6, O’Quinn 6-12 2-2 14, Hernangomez 7-11 0-0 15, Jennings 1-5 1-2 4, Holiday 2-8 0-0 5, Baker 0-1 0-0 0, Vujacic 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-96 15-17 106. Three-point Goals: Orlando 5-27 (Ibaka 3-7, Payton 1-4, Fournier 1-5, Vucevic 0-1, Green 0-2, Augustin 0-2, Gordon 0-3, Watson 0-3), New York 9-20 (Porzingis 2-2, Lee 2-3, Jennings 1-2, Kuzminskas 1-2, Holiday 1-2, Rose 1-2, Hernangomez 1-3, O’Quinn 0-1, Anthony 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 41 (Ibaka 10), New York 52 (O’Quinn 16). Assists: Orlando 21 (Vucevic 6), New York 26 (Jennings 12). Total Fouls: Orlando 14, New York 18. A: 19,812 (19,812).

Heat 115, Lakers 107 L.A. LAKERS ....................... 25 MIAMI ................................ 17

35 36

20 29

27 — 107 33 — 115

L.A. LAKERS: Deng 5-10 0-0 13, Young 7-14 1-1 20, Ingram 2-7 0-2 4, Mozgov 6-11 2-2 14, Russell 7-16 0-0 17, World Peace 0-1 0-0 0, Robinson 3-4 2-2 8, L.Williams 8-17 8-8 27, Clarkson 2-10 0-0 4. Totals 40-90 13-15 107.

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS Washington 107, at Chicago 97 at Cleveland 113, Milwaukee 102 Memphis 98, at Detroit 86 Minnesota 92, at Atlanta 84 Oklahoma City 121, at New Orleans 110 Houston 125, at Phoenix 111 Sacramento 94, at Utah 93 Dallas 96, at Portland 95

MIAMI: Winslow 10-16 3-6 23, McRoberts 2-2 0-0 4, Whiteside 9-12 5-6 23, Dragic 6-15 6-7 21, Richardson 4-11 0-0 9, Babbitt 0-1 0-0 0, Reed 1-2 0-0 2, J.Johnson 8-11 0-2 19, T.Johnson 5-14 0-0 14. Totals 45-84 14-21 115. Three-point Goals: L.A. Lakers 14-38 (Young 5-11, Deng 3-6, L.Williams 3-7, Russell 3-8, World Peace 0-1, Ingram 0-2, Clarkson 0-3), Miami 11-22 (T.Johnson 4-6, J.Johnson 3-5, Dragic 3-6, Richardson 1-3, Winslow 0-1, Babbitt 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 40 (Robinson 12), Miami 47 (Winslow, Whiteside 13). Assists: L.A. Lakers 18 (Russell 7), Miami 25 (Dragic 7). Total Fouls: L.A. Lakers 14, Miami 15. Technicals: Robinson, Whiteside. A: 19,712 (19,600).

THURSDAY’S RESULTS Boston 109, at Indiana 102 Golden State 117, at Brooklyn 101 at New York 106, Orlando 95 at Miami 115, L.A. Lakers 107 San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, late

FRIDAY’S GAMES

Mavericks 96, Blazers 95

Chicago at Charlotte, 7 L.A. Lakers at Orlando, 7 Brooklyn at Cleveland, 7:30 Golden State at Detroit, 7:30 Oklahoma City at Boston, 7:30 Houston at Memphis, 8 Miami at New Orleans, 8 Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 Washington at Milwaukee, 8 Atlanta at Denver, 9 Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9 Toronto at Utah, 9 San Antonio at Portland, 10 Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 10:30

Late Wednesday DALLAS .............................. 30 PORTLAND ......................... 20

32 18

19 33

15 — 96 24 — 95

DALLAS: Finney-Smith 1-3 0-0 2, Barnes 10-22 8-8 28, Mejri 1-1 0-0 2, Williams 10-17 1-1 23, Matthews 6-16 3-5 16, Powell 1-2 7-9 9, Barea 1-7 0-0 2, Harris 1-5 0-0 2, Curry 4-10 0-0 12. Totals 35-83 19-23 96. PORTLAND: Harkless 3-9 2-2 8, Aminu 1-4 2-2 5, Plumlee 4-4 2-7 10, Lillard 10-23 6-6 29, McCollum 5-16 3-3 13, Davis 1-1 4-6 6, Napier 3-6 2-2 10, Crabbe 5-9 0-0 14. Totals 32-72 21-28 95. Three-point Goals: Dallas 7-31 (Curry 4-8, Williams 2-7, Matthews 1-7, Barea 0-2, Finney-Smith 0-2, Barnes 0-2, Harris 0-3), Portland 10-27 (Crabbe 4-6, Lillard 3-9, Napier 2-2, Aminu 1-2, McCollum 0-4, Harkless 0-4). Fouled Out: Harkless. Rebounds: Dallas 38 (Powell 8), Portland 43 (Davis 10). Assists: Dallas 14 (Williams 5), Portland 15 (Lillard, Plumlee 4). Total Fouls: Dallas 20, Portland 20. Technicals: Matthews, Portland defensive three second, Portland team. A: 19,393 (19,980).

SUNDAY’S GAMES Boston at New York, 12 Golden State at Cleveland, 2:30 Chicago at San Antonio, 5 Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30

NBA Leaders

Warriors 117, Nets 101 GOLDEN STATE .................. 33 BROOKLYN ......................... 34

BOSTON ............................. 22 INDIANA ............................. 31

16 31

Entering Thursday’s games 39 19

29 — 117 17 — 101

GOLDEN STATE: Durant 10-23 5-6 26, Looney 2-5 0-0 4, Pachulia 6-9 3-4 15, Curry 6-19 0-0 15, Thompson 9-24 0-0 23, West 4-5 2-2 10, McAdoo 0-1 0-0 0, McGee 0-0 1-2 1, Varejao 0-0 0-0 0, Livingston 2-4 0-0 4, Iguodala 3-6 0-0 8, McCaw 1-2 0-0 3, Clark 4-6 0-0 8. Totals 47-104 11-14 117. BROOKLYN: Booker 2-5 0-0 4, Lopez 9-16 6-6 28, Lin 4-12 0-0 10, Bogdanovic 5-10 0-0 12, Kilpatrick 4-11 5-7 14, Scola 1-1 0-0 2, Bennett 0-0 0-0 0, McCullough 0-0 0-0 0, Hamilton 1-3 0-0 2, Dinwiddie 1-3 0-0 2, Foye 0-0 0-0 0, Harris 3-4 0-0 9, LeVert 2-6 1-2 5, Hollis-Jefferson 6-15 0-1 13. Totals 38-86 12-16 101. Three-point Goals: Golden State 12-37 (Thompson 5-10, Curry 3-13, Iguodala 2-5, McCaw 1-1, Durant 1-7, Clark 0-1), Brooklyn 13-35 (Lopez 4-9, Harris 3-3, Bogdanovic 2-5, Lin 2-7, Hollis-Jefferson 1-3, Kilpatrick 1-5, LeVert 0-1, Hamilton 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Golden State 51 (Pachulia 14), Brooklyn 46 (Lin, Lopez 8). Assists: Golden State 29 (Curry, Durant 7), Brooklyn 22 (Lin 11). Total Fouls: Golden State 19, Brooklyn 15. Technicals: Durant.

POINTS Westbrook, OKC ............... Davis, NOR ........................ Cousins, SAC ..................... DeRozan, TOR ................... Harden, HOU ..................... Lillard, POR ....................... Thomas, BOS .................... Durant, GOL ...................... James, CLE ........................ Curry, GOL ......................... Butler, CHI ........................

G 29 29 28 28 30 31 24 29 25 29 28

FG 300 308 275 280 243 273 196 261 236 233 209

FT PTS. AVG. 255 908 31.3 230 863 29.8 212 811 29.0 208 781 27.9 256 833 27.8 222 849 27.4 189 639 26.6 168 744 25.7 120 638 25.5 141 717 24.7 234 683 24.4

REBOUNDS Whiteside, MIA ................ Drummond, DET ............... Howard, ATL ..................... Jordan, L.A.C. .................... Gobert, UTA ...................... Gortat, WAS ..................... Chandler, PHX ................... Towns, MIN ....................... Davis, NOR ........................ Vucevic, ORL .....................

G OFF. DEF. TOT. AVG. 29 121 309 430 14.8 30 117 290 407 13.6 26 121 218 339 13.0 29 100 277 377 13.0 30 92 263 355 11.8 28 93 237 330 11.8 21 65 177 242 11.5 28 95 223 318 11.4 29 57 268 325 11.2 27 70 224 294 10.9

HOCKEY

F OOTBALL

NCAA Men

NHL

THURSDAY’S RESULTS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

EAST Brown 82, Maine 77 Canisius 106, St. Bonaventure 101 Dartmouth 75, Bryant 69 Duquesne 70, Colgate 57 Georgetown 78, UNC-Greensboro 56 Hartford 63, Navy 54 Hofstra 84, Siena 64 Lehigh 93, Cabrini 72 Manhattan 81, E. Kentucky 54 Mount St. Mary’s 87, Coppin St. 49 NJIT 92, Dean College 50 Princeton 72, Bucknell 70 Rhode Island 73, William & Mary 62 Saint Joseph’s 92, Lafayette 63 Temple 83, Yale 77 Towson 76, Iona 69 Troy 92, Cornell 84 UMass 78, Rider 67 Wagner 94, College of Staten Island 42 SOUTH Alcorn St. 83, Rust College 68 Belmont 88, Cleveland St. 61 Campbell 81, Stetson 72 Coll. of Charleston 77, W. Carolina 59 East Carolina 76, Presbyterian 56 Florida Gulf Coast 107, Florida National 50 George Mason 75, Prairie View 59 Georgia Southern 106, Fisk 58 Georgia Tech 76, Wofford 72 Kennesaw St. 68, NC A&T 60 La Salle 98, Mercer 96 Louisiana Tech 95, LSU-Shreveport 53 Miami 72, George Washington 64 Mississippi St. 85, Morehead St. 76 NC State 89, McNeese St. 57 Old Dominion 65, Howard 46 Samford 83, Florida A&M 63 San Diego St. 66, Southern Miss. 51 South Florida 81, Delaware 53 Tennessee 72, ETSU 68 VCU 78, Louisiana-Monroe 65 Wright St. 77, Murray St. 62 MIDWEST Ball St. 73, Alabama St. 48 Bowling Green 74, Alabama A&M 61 Chicago St. 74, SE Missouri 65 Cincinnati 93, Marshall 91 Drake 101, MVSU 69 E. Michigan 101, Marygrove 48 Evansville 68, Mount St. Joseph 55 Green Bay 108, St. Mary’s (MN) 59 IPFW 93, Detroit 86 Ill.-Chicago 91, Roosevelt 53 Indiana 97, Austin Peay 62 Miami (Ohio) 66, Tennessee Tech 58 Michigan 68, Furman 62 Northwestern 72, Houston Baptist 63 S. Illinois 78, UT Martin 70 Santa Clara 87, Valparaiso 80 Wichita St. 89, S. Dakota St. 67 Winthrop 66, Saint Louis 55 Wyoming 72, DePaul 58 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 90, Sam Houston St. 56 Oklahoma St. 92, Texas A&M-CC 70 San Diego 69, North Texas 68 Tulsa 74, Stephen F. Austin 51 UC Irvine 62, UTEP 57 FAR WEST Air Force 77, UC Davis 67 Arizona St. 98, Cent. Arkansas 62 Colorado 76, E. Washington 68 Denver 73, UC Riverside 55 Grand Canyon 89, Ark.-Pine Bluff 49 Montana 71, Pepperdine 70 Nevada 67, UC Santa Barbara 66 Portland St. 118, Walla Walla 59

METROPOLITAN Columbus ...................... Pittsburgh ..................... N.Y. Rangers ................. Philadelphia .................. Washington .................. Carolina ......................... New Jersey ................... N.Y. Islanders ...............

W 22 21 23 20 19 14 13 12

L 5 8 11 12 8 11 13 14

OL PTS. GF GA 4 48 108 64 5 47 117 99 1 47 115 82 4 44 110 108 4 42 83 69 7 35 85 88 7 33 79 98 6 30 85 101

ATLANTIC Montreal ....................... Ottawa .......................... Boston ........................... Tampa Bay .................... Florida ........................... Buffalo .......................... Detroit .......................... Toronto .........................

W 21 20 18 17 15 12 14 13

L 8 11 14 14 14 12 15 12

OL PTS. GF 4 46 103 3 43 88 3 39 83 3 37 100 5 35 82 8 32 70 4 32 79 7 33 93

H I GH S C HOOLS

NFL

BOYS' BASKETBALL

AFC T 0 0 0 0

PCT. .857 .643 .500 .286

PF 365 315 358 242

PA 233 314 314 358

SOUTH W L Houston ................... 8 6 Tennessee ............... 8 6 Indianapolis ............. 7 7 Jacksonville ............ 2 12

T 0 0 0 0

PCT. .571 .571 .500 .143

PF 250 340 362 260

PA 294 323 339 359

NORTH W L Pittsburgh ................ 9 5 Baltimore ................. 8 6 Cincinnati ............... 5 8 Cleveland ................ 0 14

T 0 0 1 0

PCT. .643 .571 .393 .000

PF 341 306 288 220

PA 276 263 293 408

WEST W yOakland ................ 11 Kansas City ............ 10 Denver ..................... 8 San Diego ............... 5

L 3 4 6 9

T 0 0 0 0

PCT. .786 .714 .571 .357

PF 377 319 299 366

PA 336 274 258 366

EAST W yDallas ................... 12 xN.Y. Giants ........... 10 Washington ............. 7 xPhiladelphia .......... 5

L 2 4 6 9

T 0 0 1 0

PCT. .857 .714 .536 .357

PF 366 272 345 316

PA 258 250 343 299

SOUTH W Atlanta ..................... 9 Tampa Bay ............... 8 New Orleans ............ 6 Carolina ................... 6

L 5 6 8 8

T 0 0 0 0

PCT. .643 .571 .429 .429

PF 469 313 406 337

PA 358 322 392 352

NORTH W L Detroit ...................... 9 5 Green Bay ................ 8 6 Minnesota ............... 7 7 Chicago ................... 3 11

T 0 0 0 0

PCT. .643 .571 .500 .214

PF 301 363 264 248

PA 285 339 259 320

at Columbus 7, Pittsburgh 1 Carolina 3, at Buffalo 1 at New Jersey 4,Philadelphia 0 at Ottawa 2, Anaheim 0 (OT) Boston 3, at Florida 1 Minnesota 4, at Montreal 2 at Tampa Bay 5, St. Louis 2 Los Angeles 4, at Nashville 0 Toronto 6, at Colorado 0 Winnipeg at Vancouver, late

WEST W L zSeattle .................... 9 4 Arizona .................... 5 8 Los Angeles ............ 4 10 San Francisco .......... 1 13

T 1 1 0 0

PCT. .679 .393 .286 .071

PF 298 340 197 264

PA 235 325 328 434

FRIDAY’S GAMES

SATURDAY’S GAMES

TOP 20

Minnesota at N.Y. Rangers, 7 New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7 Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 Montreal at Columbus, 7 Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 Detroit at Florida, 7:30 Boston at Carolina, 7:30 Los Angeles at Dallas, 8:30 Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 Toronto at Arizona, 9 Vancouver at Calgary, 9 Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30

Washington (-3) at Chicago, 1 Atlanta (-3) at Carolina, 1 N.Y. Jets at New England (-161/2), 1 San Diego (-51/2) at Cleveland, 1 Miami at Buffalo (-41/2), 1 Tennessee (-41/2) at Jacksonville, 1 Minnesota at Green Bay (-61/2), 1 Indianapolis at Oakland (-31/2), 4:05 Arizona at Seattle (-71/2), 4:25 Tampa Bay at New Orleans (-3), 4:25 San Francisco at Los Angeles (-4), 4:25 Cincinnati (PK) at Houston, 8:25

NO. 12 RYKEN 68, GOOD COUNSEL 54

SUNDAY’S GAMES

Y (7-3) Van Kirk 20, Patterson 18, Kaniut 10, Andersen 6, Coulom 5, McCoskrie 5 Totals 16 11-13 64. G (3-4)Totals 0 0-0 50. Halftime: Yorktown, (32-20). Three-point goals: Y 7 (Kaniut 2, Coulom, Van Kirk 4); G 0 ().

GA 74 89 84 94 93 86 93 94

WESTERN CONFERENCE CENTRAL Chicago ......................... Minnesota ..................... St. Louis ........................ Nashville ....................... Dallas ............................ x-Winnipeg ................... Colorado ........................

W 22 20 18 15 13 15 11

L 9 8 12 13 14 17 20

OL PTS. GF GA 4 48 101 84 4 44 95 62 5 41 98 103 5 35 94 94 7 33 86 104 3 33 91 104 1 23 65 105

PACIFIC San Jose ........................ Edmonton ..................... Anaheim ....................... Calgary .......................... Los Angeles .................. x-Vancouver .................. Arizona ......................... x-late game

W 20 18 17 17 17 14 11

L 12 12 12 16 13 16 17

OL PTS. GF GA 1 41 84 73 5 41 103 94 6 40 96 99 2 36 90 102 3 37 85 81 3 31 84 101 5 27 74 104

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS at Philadelphia 3, Washington 2 (SO) Edmonton 3, at Arizona 2

THURSDAY’S RESULTS

NFC

x-late game z-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division

THURSDAY’S RESULT

Bruins 3, Panthers 1 BOSTON ................................... 0 FLORIDA .................................. 0

2 0

1 — 1 —

3 1

MONDAY’S GAME Detroit at Dallas (-71/2), 8:30

Eagles 24, Giants 19

Scoring: 3, Florida, Barkov 9 (Matheson, Jagr), 13:20. 4, Boston, Backes 8 (Marchand), 18:37.

GIANTS .................................... 3 EAGLES .................................. 14

SHOTS ON GOAL

FIRST QUARTER

BOSTON ................................... 8 16 9 — 33 FLORIDA ................................ 12 5 13 — 30 Power-play opportunities: Boston 1 of 3; Florida 0 of 3. Goalies: Boston, Rask 17-6-3 (30 shots-29 saves). Florida, Reimer 4-5-2 (32-30). A: 14,462 (17,040). T: 2:37.

Philadelphia: Sproles 25 run (Sturgis kick), 9:48. Philadelphia: M.Jenkins 34 interception return (Sturgis kick), 8:20. N.Y. Giants: FG Gould 35, :10.

Blue Jackets 7, Penguins 1 PITTSBURGH ........................... 1 COLUMBUS .............................. 1

0 2

0 — 4 —

1 7

FIRST PERIOD Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Crosby 23 (Sheary, Cole), 2:39. 2, Columbus, Atkinson 15 (Foligno, Wennberg), 13:01 (pp).

SECOND PERIOD Scoring: 3, Columbus, Karlsson 5 (Anderson, Gagner), 10:15. 4, Columbus, Hartnell 6, 12:20.

Hartford 63, Navy 54

THIRD PERIOD

Navy (5-7) Lacey 4-10 4-7 12, Wieck 1-1 0-0 2, Abdullah 2-13 0-0 4, Anderson 4-13 0-0 8, Dulin 2-3 0-0 4, Hemphill 0-1 0-0 0, Kiernan 3-7 3-3 10, Alade 2-2 0-0 4, Abruzzo 2-7 0-0 5, Fox 2-4 0-0 5, Fong 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 22-63 7-10 54.

Scoring: 5, Columbus, Hartnell 7 (Johnson, Gagner), 2:44. 6, Columbus, Saad 12 (Wennberg), 3:01. 7, Columbus, Jenner 6 (Jones, Dubinsky), 3:35. 8, Columbus, Hartnell 8 (Dubinsky, Saad), 6:24.

George Washington (8-5) Toro 2-8 2-2 7, Cavanaugh 4-13 5-6 13, Smith 4-9 0-0 8, Sina 4-10 2-4 11, Roland 3-6 2-3 10, Marfo 0-0 0-0 0, Bolden 0-1 0-0 0, Hart 0-0 0-0 0, Watanabe 6-9 0-0 15. Totals 23-56 11-15 64. Miami (9-2) Murphy 2-5 1-2 5, Huell 1-5 0-0 2, Newton 7-12 0-2 14, Reed 5-12 4-4 17, Brown 3-9 6-6 14, Izundu 4-6 4-5 12, Lawrence 1-3 0-0 2, Vasiljevic 2-5 0-0 6. Totals 25-57 15-19 72. Halftime: Miami 38-30. Three-point goals: George Washington 7-22 (Watanabe 3-5, Roland 2-3, Toro 1-4, Sina 1-5, Bolden 0-1, Smith 0-1, Cavanaugh 0-3), Miami 7-14 (Reed 3-7, Brown 2-2, Vasiljevic 2-4, Newton 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: George Washington 33 (Toro 10), Miami 31 (Brown 12). Assists: George Washington 11 (Sina, Roland, Watanabe 3), Miami 10 (Newton 5). Total fouls: George Washington 14, Miami 14. A: 6,871 (7,972).

SHOTS ON GOAL PITTSBURGH ......................... 10 6 10 — 26 COLUMBUS .............................. 6 12 10 — 28 Power-play opportunities: Pittsburgh 0 of 3; Columbus 1 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 13-3-1 (23 shots-17 saves), Fleury 8-5-4 (5-4). Columbus, Bobrovsky 20-5-2 (26-25). A: 19,115 (18,144). T: 2:35.

THURSDAY’S RESULTS EAST Brown 80, St. Peter’s 71 Cornell 60, Canisius 43 Fordham 92, Niagara 69 Hofstra 75, Saint Joseph’s 64 Howard 71, Fairleigh Dickinson 68 Temple 73, Fairfield 59 SOUTH Belmont 83, Presbyterian 58 Coll. of Charleston 79, Charleston Southern 76 Elon 84, Georgia St. 67 Georgia Southern 74, SC State 58 Georgia Tech 61, Middle Tennessee 60 Louisiana-Lafayette 80, Louisiana Tech 72 Samford 65, Georgia 59 Tulane 61, Auburn 59 MIDWEST Bradley 65, Ill.-Chicago 56 Michigan 82, American U. 33 Minnesota 92, Kent St. 62 N. Iowa 67, Kansas St. 59 Northwestern 82, UT Martin 59 Ohio 80, Illinois 68 SOUTHWEST Lamar 94, Louisiana College 55 Texas State 59, North Texas 58 Texas Tech 79, Texas-Arlington 60 FAR WEST California 80, Arkansas St. 55 Drake 93, E. Washington 78 Gonzaga 72, Colgate 42 San Diego St. 71, Cal St.-Fullerton 61 Washington 82, BYU 70

Oakton senior linebacker Chris Walton (Conference 5) Gonzaga senior linebacker Mitchell Johns (WCAC) Rockville senior defensive lineman Cameron Hoppman was mistakenly listed as playing for Poolesville in the Maryland 3A all-league team roster.

CONFERENCE 7 ANNANDALE 91, EDISON 79 10 7

3 0

3 — 19 3 — 24

SECOND QUARTER

E (6-3) Washington 22, Green 21, Hughes 10, Clawson 7, Hussein 5, Hester 5, Clawson 3, Moore 2, Layton 2, Williams 1, Vereen 1 Totals 21 25-39 79. A (8-2) Johnson 32, Adams 14, McKiver 14, Murphy 11, Lotongo 6, Anderson 5, Figley 4, Abdalla 4, Ours 1 Totals 25 26-32 91. Halftime: Annandale, (39-27). Three-point goals: E 4 (Green 2, Clawson, Washington); A 5 (Adams 3, Murphy 2).

N.Y. Giants: FG Gould 35, 7:28. Philadelphia: Agholor 40 pass from Wentz (Sturgis kick), 4:59. N.Y. Giants: Shepard 13 pass from Manning (Gould kick), :33.

PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

THIRD QUARTER

IDEA 64, BATTERY CREEK 56

N.Y. Giants: FG Gould 29, 9:09.

BC (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 56. I (2-7) Ojulari 20, Coleman 18, Joyner 17, Banks 6, Leach 3 Totals 16 11-17 64. Halftime: IDEA, (30-30). Three-point goals: BC 0 (); I 7 (Ojulari 3, Leach, Coleman, Banks, Joyner).

FOURTH QUARTER Philadelphia: FG Sturgis 41, 8:47. N.Y. Giants: FG Gould 41, 5:17. Attendance: 69,596. GIANTS First Downs .......................................... 24 Total Net Yards ................................... 470 Rushes-Yards ............................... 25-114 Passing ................................................ 356 Punt Returns ............................... 3-(minu Kickoff Returns ................................. 4-82 Interceptions Ret. ............................... 1-0 Comp-Att-Int ............................... 38-63-3 Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 0-0 Punts .............................................. 3-48.3 Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 2-0 Penalties-Yards ................................ 5-50 Time Of Possession ......................... 34:04

EAGLES 15 286 30-118 168 0-0 2-38 3-40 14-25-1 0-0 5-47.4 0-0 1-5 25:56

RUSHING

Devils 4, Flyers 0 PHILADELPHIA ........................ 0 NEW JERSEY ........................... 2

0 1

0 — 1 —

0 4

New York: Perkins 15-68, Jennings 9-44, Shepard 1-2. Philadelphia: Mathews 18-46, Sproles 7-40, Wentz 4-27, Agholor 1-5.

PASSING

FIRST PERIOD Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Parenteau 8 (Cammalleri, Severson), 7:40 (pp). 2, New Jersey, Wood 4 (Henrique), 13:26.

SECOND PERIOD Scoring: 3, New Jersey, Henrique 8 (Parenteau, Hall), 13:49.

THIRD PERIOD Scoring: 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 5 (Moore, Greene), 18:38 (pp).

New York: Manning 38-63-3-356. Philadelphia: Wentz 13-24-1-152, Daniel 1-1-0-16.

RECEIVING New York: Beckham 11-150, Cruz 8-84, Shepard 7-61, Tye 5-23, Jennings 4-7, Rainey 1-13, Perkins 1-9, J.Adams 1-9. Philadelphia: Celek 3-27, Agholor 2-47, Ertz 2-33, Sproles 2-23, Matthews 2-12, Mathews 1-16, Green-Beckham 1-7, Burton 1-3.

MISSED FIELD GOALS None.

PHILADELPHIA ........................ 6 7 3 — 16 NEW JERSEY ........................... 8 9 5 — 22 Power-play opportunities: Philadelphia 0 of 2; New Jersey 2 of 6. Goalies: Philadelphia, Stolarz 2-0-0 (14 shots-12 saves), Mason 14-10-4 (8-6). New Jersey, Schneider 10-10-5 (16-16). A: 16,514 (17,625). T: 2:43.

NCAA Idaho 61, Colorado St. 50 IDAHO ...................................... 0 COLORADO ST. ........................ 0

NONLEAGUE LANDON 82, HIGHLAND 74 L (3-3) Frayer 17, Reynolds 17, Cockrell 13, Boyd 12, Patterson 8, Ford 6, Harley 3, Camphausen 3, Collins 3 Totals 22 11-21 82. H (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 74. Halftime: Landon, (43-32). Three-point goals: L 9 (Frayer 2, Cockrell 2, Boyd 2, Camphausen, Reynolds, Collins); H 0 ().

BULLIS 71, ST. MARIA GORETTI 51 B (6-3) Morse 22, Yeutter 22, Walker 8, Smith 7, Baumgardner 4, Baltimore 4, Amsellem 2, Mountari 2 Totals 21 11-16 71. SMG (9-1)Totals 0 0-0 51. Halftime: Bullis, (36-27). Three-point goals: B 6 (Morse 2, Yeutter 3, Smith); SMG 0 ().

MEADE 60, CHOPTICON 45 C (1-6) Snyder 18, Estep 9, Lowe 6, White 5, Hunt 4, Hoffert 3 Totals 11 5-6 45. M (3-2) Sturdivant 12, Washington 12, Moses 8, Cunningham 7, Williams 7, El 6, Thames 4, Evbuomwan 2, George 2 Totals 14 8-13 60. Halftime: Meade, (26-21). Three-point goals: C 6 (Estep 3, Hoffert, Lowe 2); M 8 (Cunningham, Moses, Sturdivant 4, Washington 2).

HERITAGE 47, STONE BRIDGE 44

SHOTS ON GOAL

20 7

21 7

H (6-2)Totals 0 0-0 47. SB (3-6) Buckley 19, Kling 6, Williams 6, DiLuigi 6, O'Day 3, Palmer 2, Warden 2 Totals 12 2-9 44. Halftime: Heritage, (26-25). Three-point goals: H 0 (); SB 6 (Kling, Buckley 2, O'Day, DiLuigi 2). 20 — 61 36 — 50

Wild 4, Canadiens 2

GI R LS ’ BAS K E TBALL TOP 20

THIRD PERIOD

IDAHO COLORADO ST. First Downs ..................................... 31 24 Rushes-Yards ........................... 51-225 30-155 Passing .......................................... 381 445 Comp-Att-Int .......................... 21-31-0 21-36-2 Return Yards .................................... 94 159 Punts-Avg. ............................... 7-35.28 6-38.5 Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards ............................ 7-69 10-92 Time Of Possession .................... 36:16 23:44

Scoring: 5, Minnesota, Staal 11 (Granlund, Suter), 3:08 (sh). 6, Minnesota, Zucker 7, 19:37.

RUSHING

NO. 15 MCNAMARA 65, BISHOP IRETON 49

Idaho: Saunders 33-147, Duckworth 6-57, Petrino 1-12, C.Hightower 1-4, Ma.Linehan 7-4, Lupeamanu 1-3, Brantley 1-0, Ungerer 1-(minus 2). Colorado St.: Dawkins 16-118, Matthews 10-29, Stevens 2-5, De.Clark 2-3.

BI (6-3) Fairfax, Shacklford 14, Peters, Konkwo 21 Totals 13 8-19 49. BM (5-1) Brown-Turner 17, Evans 14, Apesemaka-Vital 10, Frames 8, King 7, Matharu 7, Greer 2 Totals 13 1219 65. Halftime: McNamara, (23-22). Three-point goals: BI 5 (Fairfax, Shacklford, Peters 3); BM 9 (Frames 2, Brown-Turner 3, Matharu, Evans 3).

MINNESOTA ............................ 0 MONTREAL .............................. 0

2 2

2 — 0 —

4 2

SECOND PERIOD

NCAA Women

The following high school football players were accidentally omitted from the all-league teams — as selected and submitted by coaches — in the All-Met section on Sunday, Dec. 18:

YORKTOWN 64, GAR-FIELD 50

Baltimore at Pittsburgh (-5), 4:30 Denver at Kansas City (-3), 8:30

THIRD PERIOD

Miami 72, George Washington 64

All-league football team omissions

CONFERENCE 4

Prairie View (2-11) Hamilton 8-18 0-0 21, Wallace 0-1 0-0 0, Blakely 0-2 0-0 0, Cook 1-10 2-2 4, Thompson 3-6 3-4 11, N.Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 0-0 0-0 0, Jett 0-3 1-2 1, Bellinger 5-10 0-0 11, Lomax 0-5 0-0 0, Westbrook 1-5 1-3 3, Giddings 2-6 4-5 8. Totals 20-66 11-16 59.

Halftime: Hartford 22-21. Three-point goals: Navy 3-23 (Fox 1-2, Kiernan 1-5, Abruzzo 1-6, Dulin 0-1, Fong 0-2, Anderson 0-3, Abdullah 0-4), Hartford 11-30 (Hobbs 4-8, Dunne 4-10, Ross 3-6, Twyman 0-1, Ramirez 0-1, Lynch 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Navy 33 (Lacey 11), Hartford 33 (Attia 9). Assists: Navy 12 (Anderson 5), Hartford 13 (Lynch, Carroll 4). Total fouls: Navy 17, Hartford 16. A: 2,453 (4,017).

C OR R E C TI ON

GC (1-7) Baylor 15, Margarites 14, Donnelly 11, Keller 4, Flood 4, Carter 3, Vazzana 3 Totals 11 11-14 54. SMR (7-1) Long 18, Eackles 11, Tabbs 11, De Pree 9, Greene 9, Young 8, Syrjämäki 2 Totals 18 20-27 68. Halftime: St. Mary's Ryken, (33-23). Three-point goals: GC 7 (Donnelly 3, Vazzana, Margarites 2, Keller); SMR 4 (Long, Greene 3).

Scoring: 1, Boston, Vatrano 1 (Krug), 2:09. 2, Boston, Bergeron 5 (Spooner, Krug), 5:13 (pp).

Hartford (5-8) Carroll 2-4 1-3 5, Attia 2-2 0-0 4, Ross 4-11 3-5 14, Lynch 3-9 4-4 10, Dunne 7-13 0-0 18, Wilkerson 0-0 0-0 0, Hobbs 4-8 0-0 12, Twyman 0-1 0-0 0, Ramirez 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 22-49 8-12 63.

MARYLAND Chesapeake 58, Mercy (Balt.) 30 Howard 71, Centennial 28 Indian Creek 56, Broadneck 43 Potomac (Md.) 54, High Point 11 VIRGINIA Heritage 75, Stone Bridge 55 PRIVATE McNamara 65, Bishop Ireton 49 NIKE TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS Archbishop Wood 48, Good Counsel 39 Cardinal O'Hara 55, Elizabeth Seton 51

BOY S ’ BAS K E TBALL

George Mason 75, Prairie View 59

Halftime: George Mason 37-21. Three-point goals: Prairie View 8-26 (Hamilton 5-11, Thompson 2-4, Bellinger 1-2, Lomax 0-1, Jett 0-1, Westbrook 0-1, Giddings 0-1, Cook 0-5), George Mason 4-14 (Livingston 2-3, Newman 1-3, Boyd 1-4, Murrell 0-1, Grayer 0-3). Fouled out: Bellinger. Rebounds: Prairie View 24 (Hamilton 6), George Mason 52 (Moore 17). Assists: Prairie View 11 (Blakely 3), George Mason 13 (Livingston 6). Total fouls: Prairie View 23, George Mason 14. A: 5,584 (10,000).

GIRLS' BASKETBALL

N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, late

SECOND PERIOD

George Mason (10-3) Jenkins 1-2 0-0 2, Grayer 3-6 0-1 6, Moore 7-13 6-10 20, Kier 1-2 3-4 5, Livingston 10-16 1-1 23, Relvao 0-1 0-0 0, Dixon 1-3 2-3 4, Tate 0-0 1-3 1, Abram 1-1 0-0 2, Murrell 0-4 2-2 2, Newman 1-5 2-2 5, Boyd 2-8 0-0 5. Totals 27-61 17-26 75.

DISTRICT Friendship Collegiate 59, Freire Charter (Pa.) 40 IDEA 64, Battery Creek 56 MARYLAND Hammond 62, Carver-Vo Tech 51 Laurel 52, Chapelgate Christian 44 Liberty (Md.) 59, Marriotts Ridge 49 Meade 60, Chopticon 45 Mount Hebron 65, South River 58 VIRGINIA Heritage 47, Stone Bridge 44 Annandale 91, Edison 79 I.C. Norcom 74, H.D. Woodson 62 St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 69, Herndon 52 Yorktown 64, Gar-Field 50 PRIVATE Bullis 71, St. Maria Goretti 51 Landon 82, Highland 74 St. Mary's Ryken 68, Good Counsel 54

EAST W L zNew England ........ 12 2 Miami ....................... 9 5 Buffalo ..................... 7 7 N.Y. Jets .................. 4 10

Scoring: 1, Montreal, Pacioretty 14 (Weber, Danault), 2:01 (sh). 2, Minnesota, Schroeder 1, 7:09. 3, Montreal, Lehkonen 7 (Flynn, Plekanec), 10:35. 4, Minnesota, Spurgeon 2 (Granlund, Zucker), 15:43.

SHOTS ON GOAL MINNESOTA .......................... 13 8 6 — 27 MONTREAL ............................ 11 15 8 — 34 Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 0 of 4; Montreal 0 of 4. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 17-6-3 (34 shots-32 saves). Montreal, Price 18-5-2 (26-23). A: 21,288 (21,273). T: 2:33.

PASSING Idaho: Ma.Linehan 21-31-0-381. Colorado St.: Stevens 21-36-2-445.

RECEIVING

Senators 2, Ducks 1 (OT) ANAHEIM .......................... 0 OTTAWA ............................ 0

1 1

0 0

0 — 1 1 — 2

SECOND PERIOD

Idaho: D.Watson 5-140, Sannon 4-58, Frysinger 3-69, C.Hightower 3-33, Onunwor 2-41, Cowan 2-15, Mwehla 1-20, Saunders 1-5. Colorado St.: O.Johnson 7-265, Gallup 6-108, Ruiz 3-35, Matthews 2-16, Fackrell 1-14, Dawkins 1-5, De.Clark 1-2.

Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Dzingel 8 (Turris), 1:02. 2, Anaheim, Silfverberg 9 (Perry, Vermette), 19:50 (pp).

BOXI NG

OVERTIME Scoring: 3, Ottawa, Hoffman 10 (Phaneuf), 4:03 (pp).

SHOTS ON GOAL ANAHEIM .......................... 6 9 9 1 — 25 OTTAWA ............................ 5 7 5 1 — 18 Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 1 of 4; Ottawa 1 of 2. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 11-9-5 (18 shots-16 saves). Ottawa, Condon 8-3-2 (25-24). A: 17,125 (19,153). T: 2:38.

NO. 10 HOWARD 71, CENTENNIAL 28 H (6-0) Addison 24, Lewis 16, Jones 8, Furr 7, Scott 5, Sanchez-Henry 5, Kinsey 4, Sagi 2, Malagar 1 Totals 23 8-10 71. C (2-3) Welsh 10, Simmons 7, Hamshey 4, Anderson 3, Molz 2 Totals 7 6-8 28. Halftime: Howard, (35-14). Three-point goals: H 6 (Furr, Sanchez-Henry, Lewis 4); C 2 (Simmons, Anderson).

NONLEAGUE CHESAPEAKE 58, MERCY (BALT.) 30 C (6-0) Worrell 14, Persell 14, Gray 9, Downin 7, Smith 4, Dailey 3, Snyder 2, Phares 2, Castle 2, Stewart 1 Totals 21 13-17 58. M (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 30. Halftime: Chesapeake, (31-10). Three-point goals: C 1 (Downin); M 0 ().

HERITAGE 75, STONE BRIDGE 55

Fight Schedule DEC. 30 At Tokyo, Naoya Inoue vs. Kohei Kono, 12, for Inoue’s WBO junior bantamweight title; Akira Yaegashi vs. Wittawas Basapean, 12, for Yaegashi’s IBF junior flyweight title; Ryota Murata vs. Bruno Sandoval, 10, middleweights.

SB (4-6) Madgwick 25, Harwood 16, LeMaster 11, Lenderman 2, Hines 1 Totals 7 11-17 55. H (3-4) Zjajo 19, Calloway 14, Sibley 13, Phelps 8, Gray 8, Edmond 5, Campion 4, Gaither 3, Kaiser 1 Totals 25 10-17 75. Halftime: Heritage, (44-33). Three-point goals: SB 10 (LeMaster 2, Harwood 4, Madgwick 4); H 5 (Sibley 3, Phelps, Zjajo).


EFGHI

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BRICKS—$249 640 New Red 10-Hole Bld Size more or less if need (appx 4000) .39ech 301-345-1693 Firewood For Sale—$220/Cord Oak, $200/Cord Mixed Local Delivery Inc. 301-676-0388

PUBLIC NOTICE The services and facilities of Suburban Hospital, a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine are operated on a non-discriminatory basis. They are subject to the provisions of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Hill Burton Act. These acts prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, and disability. This facility’s non-discriminatory position applies to admissions, provisions of services, assignment of services, granting of privileges, accommodations, and opportunity to participate in programs and activities.

Suburban Hospital Charity Care Policy Suburban Hospital, a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine maintains accessibility to all services regardless of an individual’s ability to pay. The hospital policy on charity care is that the hospital will provide necessary emergency medical care to all persons regardless of their ability to pay and will consider for charity care those patients who cannot pay the total cost of hospitalization due to lack of insurance coverage and/or inability to pay.

Pfaltzgraff Filigree 6 place settings, new in box—$75.00 Falls Church, VA, 703-401-7861 825

Solid Hardwood Brazilian Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F., $2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190 275

Merchandise Wanted

ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS— WANTED LARGE SPEAKERS RADIO & HI-FI PARTS MOST CASH 410-740-5222 GOVT SURPLUS TUBES WANTED— JOINT ARMY NAVY TUBES JAN PREMIUM PAID CASH 410-740-5222 I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I drive to you, pay CASH, and haul them away. Call 571-830-5871 Radio Tubes—249 WANTED ham radios huge speakers tube hifi amps202-527-9501VCVDC@MSN.COM SENCORE LC103 CAPCITOR ANALYZER— WANTED PLEASE CALL FOR BEST PRICE 410-740-5222 THANKS

SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS. Call Al, 301-807-3266 Will Come to you!

280

284

Office & Business Equipment

Giant Inflatable Advertising Blimp YR logo 16ft—$221, 509 205 8709, shelia1421@hotmail.com.

Lateral File Cabinets—$25 4 & 5 drawer cabinets for sale $25 each, Manassas, VA, 703-345-1674

610

Montgomery County

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY MARYLAND JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs v. ALFRED R. MARIANELLI LOUISE B. MARIANELLI Defendant(s) Civil Action No. 424050V NOTICE

Musical Instruments

ACCORDION TITANO: Hand made reeds, amp, microphone. Sacrifice $2,000. Call 540-972-0881

Dogs for Sale

AKC Huskies, Tiny Yorkies, Shih-Poo & more—304-904-6289, AKC Standard (Giant Poodles), Tiny Yorkies, cc, cash, easy financing: wvpuppy.com AUSSIE DOODLE PUPS Parents under 25 lbs. Choc. F, $460, Blk M's $395 cash. S/W 4 mons. Cute pups! Call 301-797-5645

AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD MIXED PUPS8 wks, all M's, blue merle & red merle, shots/wormed, gorg., int. babies. $375. 703-577-9469 Belg. Malinois— AKC reg. European World Champ. Lines, V-rated conformation,vacc, de-wormed 8 weeks old, $1500,571-643-1213 BOXER—PUPPIES CKC Reg. Dark brindle M / F's tails/d.claws done. $600.00. CASH, 240-405-3161

Chihuahua—ACA reg. M/F, short hair, many colors, health warr, vacc, info pkt, food, treat pkg. more 8 wks - 1yr old, $300-1200,540-845-9068

DOUBLE DOODLES - Chocolate, Christmas special, ready to go! Good w/ children. $950. 8 wks, shots/wormed. Call 304-671-1031

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS AKC. $685. Vet checked and shots. Great watch & family dogs. Ready Jan. 7 Call 301-481-4943, 301-884-4891

Notice is hereby given this 12th day of DECEMBER, 2016, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 2976 Gracefield Road, Silver Spring, MD 20904 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 11th day of JANUARY, 2017, provided a copy of this NOTICE be published at least once a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the 11th day of JANUARY, 2017.

Barbara H. Meiklejohn Clerk of the Circuit Court For Montgomery County, Maryland Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071636

Ask me about home delivery! 1-800-753-POST SF 815

GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN / LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS 8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543 W www.VictoriasPups.com W

Great Dane—$600, Male/Female, 8 weeks old, 2 year health/genetic warranty and Lifetime breeder support. 240-765-4335 Lab Puppies—8 weeks old, AKC registered, Black males and females, raised with kids, can hold for Christmas, call or text 240-462-4967 LHASAPOO AND YORKIE PUPPIES, M's & F's, tiny babies,10 wks, shots and wormed,non-shed, hypoallergenic. $550 up. Call 703-577-9469 MASTIFF CANE CORSO XMAS PUPS - AKC cert, 9 wks. $600, 2 F's. Shots & wormed. Must sell. Call 202-957-7458 Miniature American Shepherds, (Mini Aussies), Toy and Mini, all colors, All ages, beautiful companions, agility. $800-1500. 540-364-3099 sharonstoyandminiaussies.com

840

Montgomery County

Martin R. Gruber 930 Wayne Avenue, Unit 1303 Silver Spring, MD 20910 Defendant(s) Case No. 421845V NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 7th day of December 2016, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 930 Wayne Avenue, Unit 1303, Silver Spring, MD 20910, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 6th day of January 2017, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a daily newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 6th day of January 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $247,000.00. Barbara H. Meiklejohn Clerk of the Circuit Court Montgomery County, MD Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12070785

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY MARYLAND JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs v. BONGAM B. OCTAVIE Defendant(s) Civil Action No. 422584V NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 16th day of DECEMBER, 2016, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9415 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, MD 20901 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 17th day of JANUARY, 2017, provided a copy of this NOTICE be published at least once a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the 17th day of JANUARY, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale to be $423,000.00 Barbara H. Meiklejohn Clerk of the Circuit Court For Montgomery County, Maryland Dec 23, 30, 2016 Jan 6, 2017 12073843 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs. SOU DONG JUNG KYUNG SOOK LEE Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) CIVIL NO. 393552-V NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS 13th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 10 BLACKBURN COURT, Burtonsville, MD 20866, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 12th day of January, 2017, next; provided a copy of this order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD published in said COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY once a week for three successive weeks before the 12th day of January, 2017. The report states the amount of the sale to be $571,863.08. Barbara H. Meiklejohn Clerk of the Circuit Court For Montgomery County, Maryland Dec 16, 23, 30,2016 12071854

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Legal Notices

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY MARYLAND DIANE S. ROSENBERG MARK D. MEYER JOHN A. ANSELL, III KENNETH SAVITZ JENNIFER ROCHINO Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v.

The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale to be $347,634.74

Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, United States of America v. AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc., et al., Civil Action No. 1:16-cv-2475. On December 20, 2016, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that the proposed acquisition by AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc. of Carmike Cinemas, Inc. would violate Section 7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. § 18. The proposed Final Judgment, filed at the same time as the Complaint, requires AMC to divest certain theatre assets, reduce its equity holdings and relinquish its governance rights in National CineMedia, LLC, and complete screen transfers to the cinema advertising network of SV Holdco, LLC and Screenvision Exhibition, Inc. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United States describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the industry, and the remedies available to private litigants who may have been injured by the alleged violation. Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office of the Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. Interested persons may address comments to Owen M. Kendler, Acting Chief, Litigation III, Antitrust Division, Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 4000, Washington, DC 20530 (telephone: 202-305-8376), within 60 days of the date of this notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website, filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in the Federal Register.

Bids & Proposals

825

Bids & Proposals

J. Fletcher Creamer & Son, Inc. is seeking Disadvantaged and Minority Business firms to subcontract opportunities for a proposal to the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority for Small Diameter Water Main Cleaning and Lining 11C. Areas of opportunity are: curb, sidewalk, asphalt milling and paving, excavation, trucking, labor to supplement JFC crews, installation of water services, material supply and traffic control. Bids are due to the owner 1/25/17. JFC will provide plans and specifications if needed and assistance with bonds and procurement. Your quote is requested by 1/18/17. Award will be based on your safety record, references, pricing and work history/work load. Contact dkoger@jfcson.com or by calling (908)986-5695 Dave Koger. Request for Proposal REF: AU/WDC/CC/238/16 The Africa Union Mission to the United States of America, located at 1640 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington DC, 20007, hereby notifies, to whom it may concern, that the Mission is conducting a RFP for the services of comprehensive health insurance coverage. The contract, running for 12 months shall cover medical, dental and vision. The deadline to submit bids is January 6th, 2017 with the winner being notified by January 15th, 2017. REQUIREMENTS • Please be informed that only the census data will be disclosed. The renewal (past or present), rates or information about the current carrier will not be made public and efforts to solicit for this information is grounds for disqualification. • The medical cover should have no co-pays or deductibles. • The dental cover should have at least a $2,000 benefit with no deductibles. Coverage for all types of care should be at 100%. • The vision plan should have annual exams and hardware benefit of at least $400 per year. • The quoted plan should have a minimum of $25,000 for the repatriation of remains.

If interested and require census data, please send request to: rfphealth@gmail.com SUBMISSION

1372

Complete Locksmith Shop for sale, asking $168,000. Largest key selection in MVA & DC Area. Inside of shopping mall. Serious inquiries only. Call 240-475-2398 Pizza store, delivery and carry out, monthly sales over $60,000. Baltimore, MD. Rent $2600. Selling $210,000 Call 443-255-2050

840

Trustees Sale - DC

Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, I will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1334 Walllach Place NW, Washington, DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Josephine Mays dated July 20, 2005, in the original principal amount of $469,342.50 recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, as Instrument No. 2005100326, and the Assignment recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia in favor of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development recorded on December 12, 2012 as Instrument Number 2012134351, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned Foreclosure Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the building housing the Superior Court for the District of Columbia located at 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 on January 9, 2017 at 9:10 A.M., the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above address, with improvements thereon and more particularly described as follows: 1334 Wallach Place NW, Washington, DC 20009, for which further legal description is attached to the Deed of trust. This property is also presently known for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot numbered One Hundred Thirty-One in Square numbered Two Hundred Thirty-Seven. This is an adjourned sale from the previous sale date of 12/7/16. TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%) of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind. The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale. HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law, Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach, VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. December 9, 16, 23, 2016 12070013

Alex Cooper Auctioneers 5301 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 750 Washington, DC 20015 (202) 364-0871 www.alexcooper.com 401 A ST., NE UNIT #2 WASHINGTON, DC 20002, CONGRESSIONAL CORNER CONDOMINIUM Pursuant to the District of Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, § 313, and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 and DC Code §42-1903.13, as amended by Declaration of the Condominium dated September 17, 1981 and recorded on September 21, 1981 as Instrument No. 30066 and instrument no. 30067, among the Land Records of the District of Columbia, in Condominium Book 29 at page 19, Notice of Foreclosure Sale of Condominium Unit of Assessments Due dated November 21, 2016, and at the request of the Attorney for the Congressional Corner Condominium Association (the “Association”), we shall sell at public auction on the 29th day of December, 2016, at 10:00 A.M., within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc. at 5301 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, D.C., the following described premises situated in the District of Columbia and designated as and being: Unit 2 in the Condominium known as “Congressional Corner Condominium”, according to the declaration of condominium dated September 17, 1981 and recorded on September 21, 1981 as instrument No. 30066 and the by-laws of condominium dated September 17, 1981 and recorded on September 21, 1981 as instrument no. 30067 among the land records of the District of Columbia in Condominium Book 29 at page 19. Together with a .12910 undivided percentage share interest in the common elements of said “Congressional Corner Condominium”, as set forth in said declaration of condominium and the exhibits thereto. Said condominium project is situate on lot numbered 14 in the subdivision made by Charles A. Zanner as per plat recorded in liber 51 at folio 131 in the Office of the Surveyor for the District of Columbia. Said property being known for assessment and taxation purposes as lot numbered 2006 in square numbered 816. At the date hereof the above-described land is designated on the Records of the Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot numbered 2006 in Square numbered 816. Parcel ID: Square 816, Lot 2006. TOGETHER WITH all the appurtenances incident to said Unit, as contained in said Declaration of Condominium. SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to all the provisions, restrictions, easements liens, and conditions of record, including but not limited to those contained in prior deeds, said Declaration of Condominium and the Bylaws relating thereto, or in law or equity. TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to the first Deed of Trust and real estate taxes, if any; the purchase price above said trust to be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens, encumbrances and municipal assessments if any, further particulars of which will be announced at time of sale. Property is sold “as-is, where-is”, without warranty. A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form as Congressional Corner Condominium Association in its sole discretion may determine. All conveyances, recordings, recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. shall be at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold at the discretion of the Association and at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. In the event of failure on the part of Congressional Corner Condominium Association to convey such deed purchaser’s sole remedy shall be a return of the deposit. Contact Attorney for Congressional Corner Condominium Association: Contact Attorney for Congressional Corner Condominium: Aaron Sokolow 202-269-3333/ Aaron@SokolowLaw.com Dec. 19, 23, 28, 2016 12073133 851 851

Prince Georges County

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 3008 Metronome Turn, Clinton, MD 20735 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 3008 Metronome Turn, Clinton, MD 20735. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from HORACE SETTLES JR., dated January 22, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27148 at Page 26 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $502,500.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Six (6) in Block lettered "F" in the subdivision known as "PARTS OF BLOCKS, D, F & G MARY CATHERINE ESTATES", as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book WWW 69 at Plat 58, among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-259024. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

• Please be advised that bidding process will close at 12:00 PM Eastern Standard Time on January 6th, 2017. Submission is by FedEx, UPS or USPS only.

Prince Georges County

12069473

Home delivery is convenient.

some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the 6th day of January, 2017.

1-800-753-POST

Sydney J. Harrison #619 Clerk of the Circuit Court For Prince George's County, Maryland Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12070775

The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale to be $678,688.82.

Delivery Address:

www.ebook3000.com 12069485

www.hwestauctions.com

Prince Georges County

SF

851

Prince Georges County

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY MARYLAND JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs v. RICHARD JONES MARY JONES Defendant(s) Civil Action No. CAEF16-10354 NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 9th day of December 2016, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 5904 Surratts Village Drive, Clinton, MD 20735 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017, provided a copy of this NOTICE be published at least once a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale to be $160,000.00. Sydney J. Harrison #619 Clerk of the Circuit Court For Prince George's County, Maryland Dec. 16, 23, 30, 2016

12071824

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND PAUL J. COHEN Substitute Trustee V. STEPHANIE D. JOHNSON Defendant. CASE NO. CAEF16-25247 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given this 12th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 6213 Alpine Street, District Heights, MD 20747 be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 12th day of January, 2017, next, provided a copy of this Notice be published at least one week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in Prince George's County, Maryland, before the 12th day of January, 2017, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $140,000.00. Sydney J. Harrison(#619) Clerk, Circuit Court of Maryland for Prince Georges County Cipriani & Werner, P.C. Executive Plaza III, Suite 302 11350 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, MD 21031 Dec 23, 30, 2016 Jan 6, 2017 12073801

TRUSTEE'S SALE 5603 Devon Ct, Temple Hills, MD 20748 www.hwestauctions.com 12066499 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 premises known as 5603 Devon Ct, Temple Hills, MD 20748. 851 Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR of Trust from JOAN BENNETT, dated May 13, 2010, and FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND MARYLAND recorded in Liber 31720 at Page 109 among the land records KEITH M. YACKO, et al. of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Substitute Trustees (s) Plaintiffs, amount of $215,650.00. Upon default and request for sale, the Trustee Plaintiff(s) V. undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the vs. MONTRECE L. LIGHT-EL, et al. Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front Defendant(s). ESTATE OF BARBARA JEAN of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 HARDIE-WELCH CASE NO. CAEF15-00928 NOTICE Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, C/O KATRINA HARDIE PER REP Notice is hereby issued this 12th 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of (SUCCESSOR) Defendant(s) day of December, 2016, that the Mortgagor(s) Trust including but not limited to: sale of the property in this case, 1115 Iago Avenue, Capitol Heights, Civil No. CAEF16-25655 All that certain lot or parcel of land situate in the County of Maryland 20743, reported by Keith NOTICE Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Gene Prince George's, State of Maryland, and being more particularly NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this M. Jung, Jason L. Hamlin, Thomas J. described as follows: Gartner, Substitute Trustees, be 6th day of December, 2016 by ratified and confirmed, unless the Circuit Court for the County All that lot piece or parcel of land with improvements of Prince George's, Maryland and cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 12th day of January, the authority thereof, that the designated as Tax I.D no. 09-0910083 being described in by 2017, provided a copy of this sale made by Kristine D. Brown, deed book 30130 page 151 and known as lot 13 and 711 William M. Savage, Gregory N. Notice be inserted in The Washington Post, a newspaper pubBritto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of sq ft of part of lot 12 Westchester Estates lished in Prince George's County, the Real Property designated as Maryland, once in each of three (3) Mary Carroll Court, Upper Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and 10608 successive weeks on or before the Marlboro, MD 20772, and reported is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, in the above entitled cause, will 12th day of January, 2017. finally ratified and confirmed, The report states the amount of conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may be unless cause to the contrary sale to be $150,000.00. thereof be shown on or before affect same, if any. Sydney J. Harrison(#619) the 6th day of January, 2017 next; Clerk of the Circuit Court TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash provided a copy of this Order for Prince Georges County, MD inserted in The Washington or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The be Post, in said County of Prince BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC once a week for three balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum George's 474 Viking Drive successive weeks before the 6th Suite 203 from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within day of January, 2017. Beach, VA 23452 TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments The Report states the amount of Virginia (757) 213-2959 the sale to be $234,000.00. on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Dec 23, 30, 2016 Jan 6, 2017 BY THE COURT: 12073695 will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed Sydney J. Harrison (619) by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners Clerk of the Circuit Court IN THE CIRCUIT COURT association dues and assessments that may become due after Shapiro & Brown, LLP FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Virginia 20109 ROBERT E. FRAZIER, et al. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Manassas, 703 449-5800 Substitute Trustees taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071366 Plaintiffs, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for V. MICHELLE D. RHETT, et al. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the Defendant(s). PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting MARYLAND CASE NO. CAEF16-01512 purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees James E. Clarke NOTICE Renee Dyson are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Brian Thomas Notice is hereby issued this 12th day of December, 2016, that the of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Erin M. August sale of the property in this case, Hugh J. Green Trustee's File No. 14-245353. LOAN TYPE= FHA 15621 Jamies Way, Accokeek, Patrick M. A. Decker Maryland 20607, reported by Substitute Trustees Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura Plaintiffs D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, V. Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. OlivLinwood M. Longus, II and eri, David M. Williamson and Keith Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 Maureen E. Longus M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be

TRUSTEE'S SALE www.hwestauctions.com 10661 Campus Way South, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12067803 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by 850 premises known as 10661 Campus Way South, Upper Marlboro, 850 Montgomery County Montgomery County IN THE CIRCUIT COURT MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF FOR THE COUNTY OF in a Deed of Trust from SEAN L. BEST AND KIMBERLY Y. MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND BEST, dated June 21, 2010, and recorded in Liber 31827 at KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Trustee(s) Page 154 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE Plaintiff(s) Plaintiff(s) GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $271,782.00. vs. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees vs. will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the MICHAEL J PETRILLO NICHOLAS J GOMES MARGARET K PETRILLO Defendant(s) COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Mortgagor(s) CIVIL NO. 423385V CIVIL NO. 379988V Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, NOTICE NOTICE all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS 13th day of December, 2016 by the not limited to: 13th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF Court for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED 89-7 Circuit MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by the authority thereof, that the sale IN BLOCK NUMBERED 11 IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, Wilby Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, "KETTERING" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT made liam M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real BOOK NLP 116 AT PLAT 19 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF Trustees, of the Real Property des- Property designated as 1200 ignated as 12404 BEALL SPRING Clagett Dr, Rockville, MD 20851, PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. RD, Potomac, MD 20854, and and reported in the above entitled in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and BEING THE SAME LOT OF GROUND CONVEYED BY DEED reported cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the DATED JUNE 10, 2008 FROM LORI A. JACKSON AND CYNTHIA confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or thereof be shown on or before the 12th day of January, R. JACKSON UNTO SEAN L. BEST AND KIMBERLY Y. BEST contrary before the 12th day of January, 2017, next; provided a copy of this AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE 2017, next; provided a copy of this order be inserted in THE WASHbe inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street, GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND ON JUNE 16, 2008 IN LIBER order INGTON POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD published in Washington DC, MD published in said COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY 29763 AT FOLIO 425. said COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY once a week for three successive a week for three successive weeks before the 12th day of Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and once weeks before the 12th day of January, 2017. is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, January, 2017. The report states the amount of conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may The report states the amount of the sale to be $238,677.88. the sale to be $920,010.00. Barbara H. Meiklejohn affect same, if any. Barbara H. Meiklejohn Clerk of the Circuit Court For Clerk of the Circuit Court For Montgomery County, Maryland TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash Montgomery County, Maryland Dec 16, 23, 30,2016 12071855 or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The Dec 16, 23, 30,2016 12071858 851 balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum Prince Georges County from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within IN THE CIRCUIT COURT TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments Home delivery starts FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments MARYLAND your day off right. will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners Substitute Trustees 1-800-753-POST Plaintiffs association dues and assessments that may become due after SF v. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. JERMAINE C. COLLIER Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Defendant(s) taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Civil Action No. CAEF15-36859 are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for NOTICE Wake up the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the Notice is hereby given this 6th day December 2016, by the Circuit property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting to home delivery. of Court for Prince George's Counpurchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees ty, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proare unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms ceedings and described as 12809 of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Odens Bequest Drive, Bowie, MD 1-800-753-POST 20720 will be ratified and conTrustee's File No. 16-257292. LOAN TYPE= FHA firmed unless cause to the conSF trary thereof be shown on or Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. before the 6th day of January 2017, provided a copy of this NOTICE be SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, published at least once a week in Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 each of three successive weeks in

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

851

TRUSTEE'S SALE 7007 Antock Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 7007 Antock Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from DANIEL J WILLIAMS AND THELMA A WILLIAMS, dated June 28, 2010, and recorded in Liber 31832 at Page 513 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $414,419.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT THREE (3), BLOCK B, IN A SUBDIVISION PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT TWO, LOTS 1 THRU 5 AND 35 THRU 39 - BLOCK ;A' AND LOTS 1 THRU 11 - BLOCK 'B', (BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF PART OF PARCEL 1), VILLAGE OF MELWOOD" AS RECORDED THEREOF AMONG THE PLAT RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK REP 213, AT PLAT 14. BEING IN THE FIFTEENTH ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-249275. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF15-40269 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)

• Bids not received at the Mission by the said date and time will be disqualified.

Finance Office, Healthcare RFP Africa Union Mission, 1640 Wisconsin Ave, NW, Washington DC 20007

851

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www.hwestauctions.com

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

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D7

ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 14102 Clements Way, Brandywine, Maryland 20613 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $325,729.25. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG566521 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071385 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs. BERNADETTE JONES Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF13-36269 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 9th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Lila Z. Stitely, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 2025 COLEBROOKE DRIVE, Temple Hills, MD 20748, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017.

ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 12th day of January, 2017, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in The Washington Post, a newspaper published in Prince George's County, Maryland, once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 12th day of January, 2017. The report states the amount of sale to be $395,000.00. Sydney J. Harrison(#619) Clerk of the Circuit Court for Prince Georges County, MD BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC 474 Viking Drive Suite 203 Virginia Beach, VA 23452 (757) 213-2959 Dec 23, 30, 2016 Jan 6, 2017 12073698

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071826

ESTATE OF GUS TUMINELLO C/O RIKKI S DRYKERMAN (SUCCESSOR) PER REP Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25652 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 312 Carroll Avenue, Laurel, MD 20707, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $210,000.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071833

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TAMMY L. WILLIAMS Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25209 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 7331 SPLIT RAIL LANE, LAUREL, MD 20707, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $133,346.78. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071831 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs. ESTATE OF JOSEPH W. PROCTOR C/O CHERYL A GARNER (SUCCESSOR) PER REP Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25499 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 9020 Darcy Road, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $127,695.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071832

KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs. HARRY NESTOR KATIA NESTOR COLLIN NESTOR Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF15-04111 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 1116 Beatrice Court, Fort Washington, MD 20744, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $170,000.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

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KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs.

The Report states the amount of the sale to be $180,600.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

12071834

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D8 851

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 6108 Seat Pleasant Drive, Capitol Heights, MD 20743 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 6108 Seat Pleasant Drive, Capitol Heights, MD 20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from JOHN W. GREGORY, dated August 23, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28541 at Page 245 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $397,500.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: BEGINNING for the same at an iron pipe set in the northerly right of way line of "F" Street and thence running North 32 degrees 00' 00" West 356.70 feet to an iron pipe set in the southerly right of way line of Grenton Street said point being also the Northeast corner of Millman property which is more fully described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, in Liber 1833 at Folio 311, and thence with the Southerly right of way line of the aforesaid Grenton Street North 56 degrees 39' 00" East 193.28 feet to an iron pipe set in the Westerly line of a 15 foot alley and 18 degrees 00' 00" East 397.30 feet to a point on the northerly right of way line of "F" Street and passing over an iron pipe set at 396.30 feet and thence with northerly right of way line of "F" Street South 72 degrees 00' 00" West 100.00 feet to point of beginning and contained 54,333 square feet more or less, as surveyed by Parkway Surveys, dated the 17th day of September, 1957, and being that same property conveyed to John W. Gregory, and Virginia M. Gregory, his wife, by Deed recorded in the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland at Book 2197, Page 547 correcting the Deed dated the 24th day of April 1984, recorded at Liber 6112, Folio 119, by and between Virginia M. Gregory Burgess, John W. Gregory and Richard M. Gregory as Joint Tenants with a right of survivorship Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-256215. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

www.hwestauctions.com

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 851

Prince Georges County

V. Antonio Franklin Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25219 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 1st day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 6714 Halleck Street, District Heights, Maryland 20747 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 3rd day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 3rd day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $160,950.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG570101 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 12071384

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Lenora Bailey, Janice Blair and Bertram Blair Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25313 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 7915 Legation Road, New Carrollton, Maryland 20784 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $332,015.42. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG531112 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071392

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. The Estate of Karen Holt-Williams Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF16-24834 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 1st day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 6711 Birch Lane, Temple Hills, Maryland 20748 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 3rd day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 3rd day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $144,500.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG569942 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071383 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Allison A. Jones and Jacqueline D. Jones Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF15-37448 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 6404 Killarney Street, Clinton, Maryland 20735 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $204,450.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG566336 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071389

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Prince Georges County IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs

Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

12063566 851

SF

James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Tawada Atkins Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF16-10765 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 8019 Sport View Road, Landover, Maryland 20785 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $269,700.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG553203 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071391 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee (s) Plaintiff(s) vs. MARCUS L CUTTS KENYA L CUTTS Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25367 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 8807 CHARM COURT, BRANDYWINE, MD 20613, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $193,000.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071364

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851

Prince Georges County IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

Prince Georges County IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee (s) Plaintiff(s) vs.

KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee (s) Plaintiff(s) vs.

CHARLES CARPENTER Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25177 NOTICE

ANDREW H FOWLER Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF15-25488 NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 8806 HARDESTY DRIVE, CLINTON, MD 20735, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 5704 LYNGATE CT, LANHAM, MD 20706, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017.

The Report states the amount of the sale to be $201,720.00.

The Report states the amount of the sale to be $375,000.00.

BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court

BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court

Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800

Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800

Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

12071368

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs. HELEN L DEOCAMPO ALBERTO C DEOCAMPO Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) Civil No. CAEF16-10963 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th day of December, 2016 by the Circuit Court for the County of Prince George's, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 99 Swan Creek Rd, Fort Washington, MD 20744, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD in said County of Prince George's once a week for three successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $241,046.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court Shapiro & Brown, LLP 10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200 Manassas, Virginia 20109 703 449-5800 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071829 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Chiffon S. Smith Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF15-32647 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 13226 St. James Sanctuary Drive, Bowie, Maryland 20720 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $336,690.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG554634 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071397 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Jimmy McCrawford and Arnita R. McCrawford, AKA: Arnita R. Powell Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF14-29359 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 8610 Pamper Lane, Fort Washington, Maryland 20744 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $211,600.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG564570 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

12071393

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Erin M. August Hugh J. Green Patrick M. A. Decker Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Carlton King Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF16-25123 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 3313 Swann Road, Suitland, Maryland 20746 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $241,293.66. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG505278 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

12071367

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND ROBERT E. FRAZIER, et al. Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs, V. HOLLY S. BLACKETT, et al. Defendant(s). CASE NO. CAEF16-24962 NOTICE Notice is hereby issued this 12th day of December, 2016, that the sale of the property in this case, 10416 Vista Gardens Drive, Bowie, Maryland 20720, reported by Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson and Keith M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 12th day of January, 2017, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in The Washington Post, a newspaper published in Prince George's County, Maryland, once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 12th day of January, 2017. The report states the amount of sale to be $243,710.00. Sydney J. Harrison(#619) Clerk of the Circuit Court for Prince Georges County, MD BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC 474 Viking Drive Suite 203 Virginia Beach, VA 23452 (757) 213-2959 Dec 23, 30, 2016 Jan 6, 2017 12073697

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James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Shannon Menapace Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Anthony Hudson Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF13-37499 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 8th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 13303 Alyssa Court, Brandywine, Maryland 20613 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson and Shannon Menapace, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 9th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $545,000.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison #619 Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG543223 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

12071840

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Brian Thomas Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Ramon Elubio Escobar and Rosa I. Escobar Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF15-08337 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 5005 70th Avenue, Hyattsville, Maryland 20784 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson and Brian Thomas Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $138,000.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG549603 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071398

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND James E. Clarke Renee Dyson Shannon Menapace Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs V. Cecelia King Defendant(s) Civil No. CAEF14-02242 NOTICE PURSUANT TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, this 6th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust docketed herein and located at 4343 Swindon Terrace, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 207726927 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson and Shannon Menapace, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 6th day of January, 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 6th day of January, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale at $166,520.00. BY THE COURT: Sydney J. Harrison (619) Clerk of the Circuit Court ALG544741 Atlantic Law Group, LLC PO Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071396

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TRUSTEE'S SALE 6708 Hillcroft Pl, Fort Washington, MD 20744 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 6708 Hillcroft Pl, Fort Washington, MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from PAULA CROWELL, dated September 28, 2001, and recorded in Liber 15084 at Page 442 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $154,574.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Part of Lots numbered Thirteen (13) and Fourteen (14) in Block Lettered "F" in the subdivision known as "ROSECROFT PARK", as per plat recorded in Plat Book WWW 24, Plat 16, of the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, described as follows: BEGINNING for the same at a point in the North line of Border Drive, said beginning point being the common corner of Lots 12 and 13 North 38 degrees 29 minutes West 68 feet to a point, and running thence to establish a dividing line across Lots 13 and 14 South 58 degrees 30 minutes West 129.1 feet to a point on the West side of Lot 14, and running thence along the West side along said Lot 14 in a Southerly direction South 20 degrees 52 minutes East 62.87 feet to a curve to the left, having an arc distance of 34.35 feet with the radius of 18.29 feet to the North side of Border Drive, and running along the South side of 13 and 14 North 51 degrees 31 minutes East 129.33 feet to the place of beginning, containing 10,783 square feet, more or less. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-258534. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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Prince Georges County

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Prince Georges County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 1865 DUTCH VILLAGE DRIVE, Hyattsville, MD 20785 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 1865 DUTCH VILLAGE DRIVE, Hyattsville, MD 20785. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from ALGENON ASHFORD, dated August 29, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28598 at Page 688 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $137,600.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS UNIT NUMBERED J290 IN PHASE SIX (6), WINDMILL SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ESTABLISHED BY DECLARATION RECORDED IN LIBER 5958 AT FOLIO 263, AS AMENDED BY FIFTH AMENDMENT TO DECLARATION WINDMILL SQUARE CONDOMINIUM IN LIBER 6398, FOLIO 347 OF THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND BY THE PLAT OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NLP 128, PLATS NOS. 28 THRU 33, INCLUSIVE, AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS. TOGETHER WITH AND UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST AND OWNERSHIP IN AND TO THE COMMON ELEMENTS OF SAID CONDOMINIUM AS SET FORTH IN SAID EXHIBIT C OF THE SIXTH AMENDMENT TO DECLARATION. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.75% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 14-241293. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

851

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016

Prince Georges County

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Prince Georges County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 2212 BRETON DRIVE, District Heights, MD 20747 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 2212 BRETON DRIVE, District Heights, MD 20747. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from NINO JEREZ, dated December 12, 2006, and recorded in Liber 27410 at Page 046 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $213,750.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at in front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: All that lot of ground situate in the County of Prince George's County, State of Maryland and described as follows, that is to say: Being known and designated as Lot numbered Twelve (12) in Block numbered Fifty-Five (55) in a subdivision known as "SECTION THREE, DISTRICT HEIGHTS" as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book BB 9 at plat 27 among the Land Records of Prince George's County , Maryland. The lot and improvements thereon being known as: 2212 Breton Drive. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 10-208631. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

www.hwestauctions.com

A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12070323 www.hwestauctions.com

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND

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www.hwestauctions.com

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12066973

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12069904 TRUSTEE'S SALE 9818 Green Apple Turn, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 9818 Green Apple Turn, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from JUSTIN W. SWEITZER AND JENNIFER L. SWEITZER, dated August 30, 2010, and recorded in Liber 31997 at Page 428 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $232,391.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Being known and designated as Lot 19 in Block F in Section 3 in a subdivision known as "Williamsburg Estates", as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book WWW 74 at plat 6 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-258617. LOAN TYPE= VA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

TRUSTEE'S SALE 5101 Abbott Drive, Temple Hills, MD 20748 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 5101 Abbott Drive, Temple Hills, MD 20748. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from THELMA T. JOHNSON, dated September 25, 2010, and recorded in Liber 32389 at Page 505 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGES, in the original principal amount of $231,494.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGES, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS COMMITMENT IS DESCRIBED AS ALL THAT CERTAIN PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGES, AND STATE OF MARYLAND AND BEING DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED 12/29/2006 AND RECORDED 04/24/2007 IN BOOK 27766 PAGE 22 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY AND STATE SET FORTH ABOVE, AND REFERENCED AS FOLLOWS: THE EASTERLY ONE-HALF (1/2) OF LOT NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "BARNABY MANOR WOODS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK BB 7, AT PLAT 40, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A PIPE ON THE NORTH SIDE OF ABBOT DRIVE, SAID PIPE BEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 AND THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 17; THENCE WITH THE LINE BETWEEN LOTS 2 AND 17, (1) N. 27 DEG. 55 MIN, W. 301.70 FEET TO A PIPE, THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 17 AND WITH THE NORTH SIDE OF SAME, (2) S. 61 DEG. 59 MIN. W. 72.55 FEET TO A PIPE; THENCE WITH THE DIVISION LINE, (3) S. 27 DEG. 52 MIN. E. 301.85 FEET TO A PIPE ON THE NORTH SIDE OF ABBOT DRIVE AND WITH THE SAME, (4) N. 62 DEC. 05 MIN. E 72.39 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 0.501 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may www.hwestauctions.com affect same, if any. DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12069477 TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash TRUSTEE'S SALE or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum 1868 DUTCH VILLAGE DR, #R-277, Hyattsville, MD 20785 from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments premises known as 1868 DUTCH VILLAGE DR, #R-277, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Hyattsville, MD 20785. By virtue of the power and authority will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners contained in a Deed of Trust from ALGENON ASHFORD, dated association dues and assessments that may become due after January 31, 2008, and recorded in Liber 29299 at Page 747 the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer in the original principal amount of $107,100.00. Upon default taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. not limited to: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS UNIT NUMBERED RTrustee's File No. 15-254869. LOAN TYPE= FHA 277 IN BUILDING R IN PHASE SIX (6) WINDMILL SQUARE Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. CONDOMINIUM ESTABLISHED BY DECLARATION RECORDED SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, IN LIBER 5958 AT FOLIO 263, AS AMENDED BY FIFTH Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 AMENDMENT TO DECLARATION, WINDMILL SQUARE CONDOMINIUM IN LIBER 6398, FOLIO 347, OF THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND A BY THE PLAT OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK NLP 128, AT PLATS NOS. 28 THRU 33, INCLUSIVE, AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS; TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST AND OWNERSHIP IN www.hwestauctions.com DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12066935 AND TO THE COMMON ELEMENTS OF SAID CONDOMINIUM AS SET FORTH IN SAID EXHIBIT C OF THE SIXTH AMENDMENT 851 Prince Georges County TO DECLARATION. BEING IN THE 13TH ELECTION DISTRICT. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, James E. Clarke conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may Renee Dyson affect same, if any. Brian Thomas Substitute Trustees TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash Plaintiffs or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The V. Jorge A. Arcay balance of the purchase price with interest at 8.45% per annum Defendant(s) from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within Civil No. CAEF14-32394 TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments NOTICE PURSUANT on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments TO MD RULE 14-215 (A) ORDERED, by the Circuit Court will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed for Prince George's County, Maryby purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners land, this 8th day of December, 2016, that the foreclosure sale association dues and assessments that may become due after of the property described in the the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. deed of trust docketed herein and located at 524 Jurgensen Place, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Landover, Maryland 20785 made taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson and Brian Thomas, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting before the 9th day of January, purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees 2017; provided a copy of this Order be inserted in The Washare unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms ington Post, once in each of three of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. (3) successive weeks before the 9th day of January, 2017. Trustee's File No. 15-247910. LOAN TYPE= Conventional The Report of Sale states the Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. amount of the sale at $307,000.00. BY THE COURT: SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Sydney J. Harrison #619 Clerk of the Circuit Court Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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TRUSTEE'S SALE 3003 TRINITY DRIVE, Bowie, MD 20715 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 3003 TRINITY DRIVE, Bowie, MD 20715. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from MARIA GLADIS RODRIGUEZ AND FRANCISCO A. FRANCO, dated November 1, 2005, and recorded in Liber 23418 at Page 678 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $334,800.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Seven (7) in Block numbered One Hundred Thirty-One (131), in the subdivision known s "SECTION 39, TULIP GROVE AT BELAIR", as per plat duly recorded in Plat Book 44, plat no. 50, among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland. And Being acquired by Deed dated April 23, 2004 recorded June 16, 2004 in Deed Book 19711 at Page 253. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 8.375% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 14-243416. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12069901

TRUSTEE'S SALE 7804 Regal Ct, Clinton, MD 20735 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 7804 Regal Ct, Clinton, MD 20735. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from RASHAD TERRY, dated March 14, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27966 at Page 359 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $352,500.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot Numbered 2 in Block Lettered "A" in a subdivision known as "Plat Seventeen, Summit Creek", as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 167 at plat No. 96 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, and having a property address of 7804 Regal Court, Clinton, MD 20735. BEING the fee simple property which, by Deed dated July 18, 2005, and recorded in the Land Records of the County of Prince George's, Maryland, in Liber 23120, Folio 660, was granted and conveyed by Odell Kennedy and Carmen Kennedy unto Rashad Terry. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-248775. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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12067802 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12066904


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016 851

Prince Georges County

851

OPQRS

EZ

Prince Georges County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 2710 EDFELDT DRIVE, District Heights, MD 20747 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 2710 EDFELDT DRIVE, District Heights, MD 20747. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from SILAS HARRISON TUCKER AND ELLEN R. TUCKER, dated February 24, 2006, and recorded in Liber 27341 at Page 004 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $222,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED as Lot Numbered six (6) in Block Lettered "B" in the subdivision known as "CALVARY HEIGHTS", as per plat thereof recorded among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland in Plat Book WWW 19 at Plat 80. Being in the 6th Election District. The improvements thereon being known as 2710 Edfelt Drive, District Heights, MD 20747 Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 13-238779. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

851

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 5703 66th Avenue, Riverdale, MD 20737 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 5703 66th Avenue, Riverdale, MD 20737. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from ISIDRO R. AGUILAR AND ALFREDO AGUILAR, dated March 17, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30571 at Page 317 among the land records of the County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount of $125,681.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (21) IN BLOCK LETTERED "L", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION FOUR, EASTPINES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. B. B. 10, PLAT 72, ONE OF THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-257776. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12067697

www.hwestauctions.com

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12069903

TRUSTEE'S SALE 2108 Lakewood Street, Suitland, MD 20746 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 2108 Lakewood Street, Suitland, MD 20746. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from DELIA GAMBLE, dated June 29, 2011, and recorded in Liber 33033 at Page 8 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $79,108.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Fourteen (14) in Block lettered "L"' in the subdivision known as "The Hillsboro Subdivision" as per plat recorded in Plat Book WWW #37, Plat #8 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland. ALSO, Outlot numbered Fourteen (14) in Block lettered "L" in the subdivision known as "The Hillsboro Subdivision" as per plat recorded in Plat Book WWW #45, Plat #4 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-258057. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

TRUSTEE'S SALE 720 Gleneagles Dr, Fort Washington, MD 20744 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 720 Gleneagles Dr, Fort Washington, MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from TONIA LITTLE, dated July 5, 2005, and recorded in Liber 23202 at Page 233 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $360,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LOT NUMBERED EIGHT (8) IN BLOCK LETTERED "E" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION 8, TANTALLON ON THE POTOMAC, AS PER THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK WWW 64 AT PLAT 81. BEING IN THE 5TH ELECTION DISTRICT Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.125% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-259133. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12066948

www.hwestauctions.com

DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

12069480

TRUSTEE'S SALE 4500 Apex Lane, Beltsville, MD 20705 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 4500 Apex Lane, Beltsville, MD 20705. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from WINIFRED ROBINSON AND LAWRENCE ROBINSON, dated January 2, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27413 at Page 435 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $448,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Eight (8) in Block numbered Three (3) in the subdivision known as "Plat 1, BELTSVILLE HEIGHTS", as per plat thereof recorded among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland in Plat Book VJ 164 at Plat 56, and being in the 1st Election District of said County Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-255190. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

TRUSTEE'S SALE 8111 Pats Pl, Fort Washington, MD 20744 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 8111 Pats Pl, Fort Washington, MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from VICTOR LEE MASON AND ALLICIA H. MCCUTHEONMASON, dated May 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25324 at Page 366 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $387,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot Twenty-five (25), in Block lettered F, in a certain subdivision knoWn as "RADFORD", as per plat thereof recorded among the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, in Plat Book NLP 128 at Plat 16. The improvements thereon being known as No. 8111 Pats Place. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-253261. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

12067699

851

Prince Georges County

852

Anne Arundel County

852

Anne Arundel County

852

Anne Arundel County

852

D9 Anne Arundel County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 4815 John St, Suitland, MD 20746 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 4815 John St, Suitland, MD 20746. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from LOIS M SWANN, dated October 6, 2008, and recorded in Liber 37331 at Page 484 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE, in the original principal amount of $351,084.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE, at the front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LOT NUMBERED ONE (1) IN BLOCK LETTERED "C" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PLAT SIX. SKYLINE HILLS AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NLP 118 AT PLAT 38 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-254495. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

TRUSTEE'S SALE ATLANTIC LAW GROUP, LLC. 1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310 566 WEST COURT UNIT 9B, Glen Burnie, MD 21061 LEESBURG, VA 20175 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by 703-777-7101 premises known as 566 WEST COURT UNIT 9B, Glen Burnie, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE MD 21061. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY Deed of Trust from STEPHEN WINEBRENNER, dated November 13, 2006, and recorded in Liber 18653 at Page 154 among the 101 Shelly Road land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original Glen Burnie, MD 21061 Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from CRAIG principal amount of $171,475.00. Upon default and request A. NAYLOR AND CRYSTAL LYNN MCDONALD FKA CRYSTAL for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public NAYLOR, dated October 6, 2010 and recorded in Liber 22848, auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, folio 248 among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-15-001718; Tax ID No.05-110- including but not limited to: 03959215 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED as Condominium Unit the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 9-B, in Building 9, Woodside Square Condominium as set forth in a Condominium Regime Declaration and CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Anne JANUARY 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM Arundel County, Maryland in Book 2687, page 160 et ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements seq. and any all amendments thereto , specifically, thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more the Second Amendment thereto recorded among the fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust. aforesaid Land Records in Book 2708, page 560 and The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to as shown on condominium Plats entitled "BUILDING conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the 9, WOODSIDE SQUARE CONDOMINIUM" which Plats are same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Plat Book Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,100.00 by cash or certified check. 56, pages 33 through 38, as Plats 3008 through 3013. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten The improvements thereon being known as 566 West days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE Court, Glen Burnie, MD 21061. ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by affect same, if any. first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the association dues and assessments that may become due after Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit Trustee's File No. 16-257711. LOAN TYPE= Conventional without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. www.hwestauctions.com DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12067700 transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date www.hwestauctions.com of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey TRUSTEE'S SALE insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 13300 LILLY POND CT, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 12070318 law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified ATLANTIC LAW GROUP, LLC. premises known as 13300 LILLY POND CT, Upper Marlboro, MD for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, 1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 558025) LEESBURG, VA 20175 of Trust from RONNIE THAXTON, dated October 24, 2006, and 703-777-7101 JAMES E. CLARKE, recorded in Liber 26504 at Page 530 among the land records RENEE DYSON, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal BRIAN THOMAS, OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY amount of $418,400.00. Upon default and request for sale, the ERIN M. COHEN, 1741 Mayfair Place undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the HUGH J. GREEN, Crofton, MD 21114 Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front PATRICK M. A. DECKER, of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, JAMES P. BATTLE JR AND GAIL M. BATTLE, dated February 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of 18, 2010 and recorded in Liber 22061, folio 489 among Trust including but not limited to: the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as LOT FORTY-THREE (43) IN BLOCK "F" AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF Case No.C-02-CV-16-002497; Tax ID No.02-205-09569307) SUBDIVISION ENTITLED, "PLAT TWO-MARLTON SOUTH", AS the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the ANNE PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS www.hwestauctions.com ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 151 AT PLAT NO. 75 DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 12073733 ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on JANUARY 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and TRUSTEE'S SALE is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements 225 PEGASUS CT, Gambrills, MD 21054 conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more affect same, if any. Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash premises known as 225 PEGASUS CT, Gambrills, MD 21054. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum Trust from GEORGE A. BOOTH AND SHERAN T. BOOTH, dated same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within November 9, 2004, and recorded in Liber 15613 at Page 0434 Terms of Sale: A deposit $39,900.00 by cash or certified check. TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments the original principal amount of $536,250.00. Upon default days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the association dues and assessments that may become due after ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Trust including but not limited to: first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Lot 22, block A, as shown on plat 4, section III, BRETTON provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for WOODS, which plat is recorded among the land records of of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the Anne Arundel county in plat book 87, folio 9. Which has sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting an address of 225 Pegasus court, Gambrills, MD. 21054 the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid Trustee's File No. 14-242964. LOAN TYPE= Conventional affect same, if any. purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 of the purchase price with interest at 7.122% per annum from the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, association dues and assessments that may become due after prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior www.hwestauctions.com knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12066978 the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee's File No. 08-131214. LOAN TYPE= Conventional assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date 8519 Paragon Court, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in premises known as 8519 Paragon Court, Upper Marlboro, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified a Deed of Trust from PAUL HERMANN GUSTIN AND KAREN for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, SUE GUSTIN, dated December 30, 1991, and recorded in is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 571676) Liber 8173 at Page 738 among the land records of the JAMES E. CLARKE, COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal RENEE DYSON, amount of $121,150.00. Upon default and request for sale, the BRIAN THOMAS, www.hwestauctions.com undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the ERIN M. AUGUST, Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 12066970 HUGH J. GREEN, of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016, PATRICK M. A. DECKER, 852 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on January 3, 852 Anne Arundel County Anne Arundel County SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, Trust including but not limited to: MARYLAND MARYLAND LOT 189, AS SHOWN ON A PLATE ENTITLED "A PORTION Keith M. Yacko, et al. Keith M. Yacko, et al. Substitute Trustees OF THE MARLTON PLANNED COMMUNITY, SECTION 10-D, Substitute Trustees Versus BRANDYWINE COUNTRY", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORD- Versus Patricia Y Loyd, et al. Cindy Lindamood, et al. ED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S Defendants Defendants www.hwestauctions.com COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 85, AT PLAT NO. 9 No . C-02-CV-15-002183 No . C-02-CV-15-004082 A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 NOTICE NOTICE Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 12073562 is hereby issued this ThursNotice is hereby issued this Thursis sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, Notice day, December 15, 2016 that the day, December 1, 2016 that the 852 Anne Arundel County 852 Anne Arundel County conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may sale of the property in the pro- sale of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and ceedings mentioned, made and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT affect same, if any. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR reported by Robert E. Frazier, Subreported by Robert E. Frazier, SubFOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, stitute Trustee MARYLAND TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash stitute Trustee Diane S. Rosenberg, et al. BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, Robert E. Frazier, et al. or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The unless cause to the contrary be unless cause to the contrary be Substitute Trustees Substitute Trustees balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum shown on or before the 17th day shown on or before the 3rd day Versus Versus of January 2017 next, provided a January 2017 next, provided a from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within copy of this Notice be inserted of copy of this Notice be inserted Glenn N. Brown, Sr., et al. Stephen Coon The Washington Post, a newsin The Washington Post, a newsTEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments in Defendants Defendant paper published in Anne Arundel published in Anne Arundel on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments County, Maryland, once in each paper No . C-02-CV-16-001640 County, Maryland, once in each of No. C-02-CV-16-002683 of three (3) successive weeks on (3) successive weeks on or NOTICE will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed or before the 17th day of January three before the 3rd day of January 2017 Notice is hereby issued this ThursNOTICE by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners 2017 next. The report states the next. The report states the amount day, December 1, 2016 that the of sale of the property at of sale of the property at 6417 Notice is hereby issued this Thursassociation dues and assessments that may become due after amount sale of the property in the pro203 HARFORD ROAD, GLEN BURNIE, JEFFERSON PLACE, GLEN BURNIE, day December 1, 2016 that the sale ceedings mentioned, made and the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. MD 21060 to be $120,967.00. MD 21061 to be $83,000.00. of the property in the proceedings reported by Robert E. Frazier, Submentioned, made and reported by Robert P Duckworth Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Robert P Duckworth stitute Trustee Kenneth Savitz, Substitute Trustee. Clerk of the Circuit Court Clerk of the Circuit Court taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, for Anne Arundel County, MD for Anne Arundel County, MD BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for unless cause to the contrary thereshown on or before the 3rd day BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC of be shown on or before the 3rd of January 2017 next, provided a the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the 484 Viking Drive 484 Viking Drive day of January, 2017 next; provided, copy of this Notice be inserted Suite 203 a copy of this Notice be inserted property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting Suite 203 in The Washington Post, a newsVirginia Beach, VA 23452 Virginia Beach, VA 23452 in some newspaper published in paper published in Anne Arundel purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees (757) 213-2959 Anne Arundel County, once in each (757) 213-2959 County, Maryland, once in each of three successive weeks before are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Dec 23, 30, 2016, Jan 6, 2017 Dec 9, 16, 23, 2016 12069253 of three (3) successive weeks on the 3rd day of January, 2017 next. or before the 3rd day of January 12072947 of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. The report states that the amount 2017 next. The report states the of sale of the property at 5201 Trustee's File No. 15-249332. LOAN TYPE= FHA amount of sale of the property Home delivery PATRICK HENRY DRIVE, BROOKLYN, at 34 PAROLE STREET, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21225 to be $29,500.00. Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. is convenient. MD 21401 to be $85,000.00. Home delivery starts /S/Robert P Duckworth Robert P Duckworth SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Circuit Court for 1-800-753-POST Clerk of the Circuit Court your day off right. SF Anne Arundel County, MD Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 for Anne Arundel County, MD Dec 9, 16, 23, 2016

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ATLANTIC LAW GROUP, LLC. 1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310 LEESBURG, VA 20175 703-777-7101 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 20 Riverview Avenue Annapolis, MD 21401 Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from MARY GOULD WEIDNER, dated November 30, 2005 and recorded in Liber 17330, folio 343 among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-16-002748; Tax ID No.02-000-10708600 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on JANUARY 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit $30,100.00 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 571245) JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON, BRIAN THOMAS, ERIN M. AUGUST, HUGH J. GREEN, PATRICK M. A. DECKER, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES

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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 12073736

ATLANTIC LAW GROUP, LLC. 1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310 LEESBURG, VA 20175 703-777-7101 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 1337 Howard Road Glen Burnie, MD 21060 Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from EDGAR F. ALVAREZ AND JOANNE ALVAREZ, dated September 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18300, folio 518 among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-16-000527; Tax ID No.03-418-22041600 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on JANUARY 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit $19,600.00 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 556025) JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON, BRIAN THOMAS, ERIN M. COHEN, HUGH J. GREEN, PATRICK M. A. DECKER, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES

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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 12073558

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TRUSTEE'S SALE TRUSTEE'S SALE 2209 CONQUEST WAY, Odenton, MD 21113 5705 NORTH SHORE PARKWAY, Churchton, MD 20733. Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 5705 NORTH SHORE PARKWAY, Churchton, premises known as 2209 CONQUEST WAY, Odenton, MD MD 20733. By virtue of the power and authority contained in 21113. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a a Deed of Trust from TODD OMAR COOLEY AND BELEN SILVA Deed of Trust from MICHAEL A. DOTSON AND PRISCILLA L. COOLEY, dated October 27, 2008, and recorded in Liber 20510 DOTSON, dated August 22, 2006, and recorded in Liber 18225 at Page 0552 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE at Page 522 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $238,950.00. ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $268,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 54 AS SHOWN ON ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, DESCRIBED THE PLAT ENTITLE, "P.U.D., PLAT ELEVEN, PARCEL ONE, TOWNHOUSES, SEVEN OAKS", AS RECORDED IN PLAT W.E.H. AS: BOOK 116, FOLIO 28 AND AS PLAT NO. 6102 AMONG THE PARCEL ONE: LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND ON BEGINNING FOR THE SAME AT A POINT ON THE NORTHEAST FEBRUARY 12,1989. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING SIDE OF NORTH SHORE PARKWAY AT THE CORNER OF LOTS KNOWN AS NO. 2209 CONQUEST WAY. 13 AND 14, BLOCK 1, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF CAPE ANNE RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 6, FOLIO 35; THENCE RUNNING is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, FROM SAID BEGINNING POINT SO FIXED AND WITH THE conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may NORTHEAST SIDE OF SAID PARKWAY, NORTH 47 DEGREES affect same, if any. 22 MINUTES WEST, 26.16 FEET TO A POINT AT THE END OF TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash THE SOUTH 51 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The 101.70 FOOT LINE OF THE CONVEYANCE FROM GERTRUDE C. balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum LAW TO STANLEY R. JOHNSON, JR., BY DEED DATED OCTOBER from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within 16, 1958, AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN LIBER G.T.C. 1244, FOLIO 299; on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments THENCE LEAVING NORTH SHORE PARKWAY AND WITH THE will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed ABOVE MENTIONED LINE REVERSELY AND RUNNING ACROSS by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners LOT 14, NORTH 51 DECREES 58 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST, association dues and assessments that may become due after 101.70 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT IN THE REAR the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. LINE OF SAID LOT 14; THENCE WITH PART OF THE REAR Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer LINE OF LOT 14, SOUTH 47 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST, taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement 25.76 FEET TO A POINT AT THE REAR CORNER OF LOTS 13 are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for AND 14; THENCE WITH THE DIVISION LINE OF SAID LOTS the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the 13 AND 14, SOUTH 51 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST, 101.27 property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 2593 purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees SQUARE FEET, MORE OR LESS. BEING THE REMAINING PART are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms OF LOT 14, BLOCK I, OF CAPE ANNE AND AS DESCRIBED of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. BY J.R. MCCRONE, JR.. INC., REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL Trustee's File No. 14-243150. LOAN TYPE= Conventional ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS IN JANUARY, 1963. Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. PARCEL TWO: SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOTS NOS. 12 AND 13, BLOCK I, CAPE ANNE, FORMERLY CAPE BATTEE, AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF CAPE ANNE RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 6, FOLIO 35.THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 5705 NORTH SHORE PARKWAY, CHURCHTON, MARYLAND -20733. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and www.hwestauctions.com is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12067317 affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments TRUSTEE'S SALE on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments 314 Church Cir, Linthicum Heights, MD 21090. will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners Trustee's Sale of valuable leasehold property improved by association dues and assessments that may become due after premises known as 314 Church Cir, Linthicum Heights, MD the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. 21090. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Deed of Trust from BEATRICE E. MYERS, dated December 20, taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement 2006, and recorded in Liber 18689 at Page 437 among the land are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for records of the County of Anne Arundel, in the original principal the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the amount of $504,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but Trustee's File No. 13-236434. LOAN TYPE= FHA not limited to: Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. FRONTING 65 feet on the North side of Church Lane SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, and extending back with even width for depth North 03 degrees 07 minutes East 150 feet, known and designated Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 as Lot No. 42 as shown on Plat of Church Gardena recorded among the Plat Records of Anne Arundel County in Plat Liber 25, folio 12. Said property is subject to an annual ground rent in the amount of $120.00 and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, www.hwestauctions.com liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016, 12066979 if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after TRUSTEE'S SALE the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. 7803 Bodkin View Drive, Pasadena, MD 21122 Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement premises known as 7803 Bodkin View Drive, Pasadena, MD are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for 21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the Deed of Trust from GREGORY E. MEYD AND VALERIE MEYD, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting dated January 16, 2013, and recorded in Liber 25708 at Page purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees 187 among the land records of the County of Anne Arundel, are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms in the original principal amount of $241,707.00. Upon default of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale Trustee's File No. 16-257202. LOAN TYPE= FHA at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 Trust including but not limited to: PARCEL ONE: DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 10 AND 11, IN SECTION C ON PLAT NO. I OF BAY SIDE BEACH, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. I, PAGE 46 IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND. www.hwestauctions.com PARCEL TWO: A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 BEING ALL THOSE LOT OF GROUND DESIGNATED AS LOTS DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12069487 NO. 12 AND 13 IN BLOCK C, ON A PLAT OF BAYSIDE BEASCH NOW OF RECORD AMONG THE PLAT RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IN LIBER W.M.B. 1, FOLIO 46. AND BEING A PART OF THE PROPERTY THAT WAS CONVEYED TO THE SAID CHARLES C. RITTENHOUSE AND EMORY A. KELBAUGH BY JOSHUA S. LINTHICUM AND WIFE BY DEED BEARING DATED TRUSTEE'S SALE FEBRUARY 9, 1926 AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN LIBER W.M.B. NO. 8123 Turn Loop Road, Glen Burnie, MD 21061 15, FOLIO 418, ETC. SAID LOTS FRONTING 82.72 FEET ON Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by THE NORTHEAST SIDE OF BAYSIDE ROAD AND EXTENDING premises known as 8123 Turn Loop Road, Glen Burnie, MD EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHERNMOST SIDE OF LAKE DRIVE 21061. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a A DISTANCE OF 135 FEET. Deed of Trust from RONNIE T. DAY, JR., dated May 7, 2010, and Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and recorded in Liber 22252 at Page 367 among the land records is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may amount of $195,236.00. Upon default and request for sale, the affect same, if any. undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within not limited to: TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 48, BUILDING on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments NO. 18, ON A PLAT ENTITLED, "REVISED SECTION TWO, will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed CLOVERLEAF TOWNHOUSES" WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, association dues and assessments that may become due after MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 101, FOLIO 27. THE IMPROVEthe time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. MENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS NO. 8123 TURNLOOP Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer ROAD. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting affect same, if any. purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum Trustee's File No. 16-259515. LOAN TYPE= FHA from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for www.hwestauctions.com the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016, 12066182 property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-247606. LOAN TYPE= FHA To place your Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, legal notice in the Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

LEGAL NOTICES

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EZ 852

Anne Arundel County

852

Anne Arundel County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 117 Haile Ave, Brooklyn, MD 21225 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 117 Haile Ave, Brooklyn, MD 21225. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from SHAWN DENISE HYSON, dated October 22, 2010, and recorded in Liber 22820 at Page 349 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $214,068.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Being known and designated as Lots Thirty-five (35) and Thirty-six (36) of Block H, Arundel Gardens, as shown on a Plat of Arundel Gardens, which Plat is recorded among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County in Plat Book W.N.W. No. 1, Section 4, folio 348 and also as recorded in Plat Book 15, Folio 5. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-259845. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12070320

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852

Anne Arundel County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 405 IDLEOAK CT, Severna Park, MD 21146 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 405 IDLEOAK CT, Severna Park, MD 21146. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from WAHEED AKBARI AND MASTOORA AKBARI, dated March 15, 2006, and recorded in Liber 17630 at Page 053 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $432,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED as Lot 3, as shown on the Plat entitled, "SABRINA PARK, PHASE II", which Plat is recorded among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, Maryland in Plat Book 134, folio 43. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 9.66% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 14-242781. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12069406

A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12069426

TRUSTEE'S SALE 588 PINEDALE DR., Annapolis, MD 21401 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 588 PINEDALE DR., Annapolis, MD 21401. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from PHILIP BLANKFELD AND HARRIET F BLANKFELD, dated March 18, 2008, and recorded in Liber 20000 at Page 438 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $645,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LOT NUMBERED THIRTY NINE (39) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "REVISED PLAT OF NORTH RIVER FOREST, SECTION 3, PLAT 1", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 96 AT PLAT NO. 16 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.8% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 14-243038. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

TRUSTEE'S SALE 731 Baylor Rd, Glen Burnie, MD 21061 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 731 Baylor Rd, Glen Burnie, MD 21061. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from WAYNE A. REDDINGTON, dated August 25, 2014, and recorded in Liber 27618 at Page 54 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $291,114.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Being known and designated as Lot No. 61, Block W, as shown on the Plat of Glen Burnie Park, Section 5, which Plat is recorded among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County in Plat Book No. 28, folio 29. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-257760. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12062729 www.hwestauctions.com

A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12070321

TRUSTEE'S SALE 1191 Bay View Avenue, Shady Side, MD 20764 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 1191 Bay View Avenue, Shady Side, MD 20764. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from STEPHEN M. NICHOLSON, dated September 12, 2011, and recorded in Liber 23820 at Page 65 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $155,846.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LOT TWENTY (20) IN BLOCK TEN (10) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS CEDARHURST ON THE BAY, AS PER PLAT RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, IN PLAT BOOK 15 AT FOLIO 11. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-258179. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

TRUSTEE'S SALE 305 Christy Road, Pasadena, MD 21122 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 305 Christy Road, Pasadena, MD 21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from SAMUEL T. BOWERS, JR. AND MARY K. BOWERS, dated February 22, 1999, and recorded in Liber 9058 at Page 651 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $142,514.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 35, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED, "PLAT 2, SECTION 2 OF SELBY GROVE", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 31, FOLIO 98. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS NO. 305 CHRISTY ROAD, PASADENA, MARYLAND 21122. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. www.hwestauctions.com Trustee's File No. 15-251386. LOAN TYPE= FHA A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12064449 SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016

Anne Arundel County

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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016, 12066495

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853

853

Calvert County

OPQRS

EZ 855

Calvert County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 8856 Saint Andrews Dr, Chesapeake Beach, MD 20732 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 8856 Saint Andrews Dr, Chesapeake Beach, MD 20732. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from JASON T. KNICK, dated February 7, 2013, and recorded in Liber 4128 at Page 0473 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CALVERT, in the original principal amount of $299,579.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CALVERT, at 175 Main Street, Prince Frederick, Maryland, on January 3, 2017 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Being known and designated as Lot Numbered 102, Section 'D', Plat 1 of the Subdivision known as "The Highlands" as recorded among the land records of Calvert County, Maryland in Plat Book ABE 2 at Folio 184. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-254952. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

Charles County

855

Charles County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 12307 BURNING OAK COURT, Waldorf, MD 20601 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 12307 BURNING OAK COURT, Waldorf, MD 20601. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from JASON A. BIVENS, dated September 17, 2008, and recorded in Liber 06700 at Page 0330 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $318,274.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Forty-three (43) in the subdivision known as "SECTION SIX, WHITE OAK VILLAGE", in Charles County, Maryland, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book DGB 37 at Plat 55, one of the Land Records for said Charles County, Maryland. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.5% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-260225. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 855

12069496 855

Charles County

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

Charles County

12069422

TRUSTEE'S SALE 870 Copley Avenue, Waldorf, MD 20602 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 870 Copley Avenue, Waldorf, MD 20602. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from TERRI L. GREEN, dated December 13, 2010, and recorded in Liber 07362 at Page 0162 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $264,130.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Five (5) in Block numbered Thirty-six (36), in the subdivision known as "St. Charles, Section II-B, Sheet 1 of 3" as per plat thereof duly recorded in Plat Book PCM 10 at plat no. 128, among the Land Records of Charles County, Maryland. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-254204. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 856

856

Frederick County

CIRCUIT COURT FOR FREDERICK COUNTY Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court 100 West Patrick Street Courthouse Frederick, MD 21701 (301) 600-1976 Mark H Wittstadt vs. John Waters Case Number:10-C-14-002993FC Lender License Number: N/A NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby issued by the Circuit Court for Frederick County this 2nd day of December, 2016, that the sale made and recorded by Terrance Shanahan for the sale of the property described in these proceedings 11812 Pine Tree Ct Monrovia, MD 21770 be ratified and confirmed thirty (30) days from the date of this Notice, unless cause to the contrary be shown, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County, once in each of three (3) successive weeks. The report states the amount of the sale to be $258,000.00. Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court of Frederick County Terrance J. Shanahan MSO Legal Partners, LLC P.O. Box 86996 Montgomery Village, MD 20886 Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016

12071848

CIRCUIT COURT FOR FREDERICK COUNTY Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court 100 West Patrick Street Courthouse Frederick, MD 21701 (301) 600-1976 Case Number: 10-C-16-001217 FC Lender License Number: N/A James E Clarke VS. Elizabeth M Collings Robert Collings NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby issued by the Circuit Court for Frederick County this 2nd day of December 2016, that the sale made and recorded by James E Clarke for the sale of the property described in these proceedings 2020 Weitzel Court Frederick, MD 21702 be ratified and confirmed thiry (30) days from the date of this Notice, unless cause to the contrary be shown, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County, once in each of three (3) successive weeks. The report states the amount of the sale to be $217,764.08. Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court of Frederick County Hugh J Green P.O. Box 2548 Leesburg, Virginia 20177 (703) 777-7101 12/16,12/23,12/30 2016 12071601

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TRUSTEE'S SALE 2783 Pinewood Dr, Waldorf, MD 20601 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 2783 Pinewood Dr, Waldorf, MD 20601. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from ROBERT H. JOHNSON AND VALERIE P. JOHNSON, dated November 25, 2005, and recorded in Liber 5584 at Page 363 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $292,237.17. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: LOT NUMBERED AND LETTERED TWENTY-TWO-A (22-A) IN BLOCK LETTERED 'B", LOTS 13A — 37A, BLOCK 'I", PINEFIELD 111-B, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 22 — 24, BLOCK "B" AND LOTS 13 — 37, BLOCK "I", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 33 FOLIO 99. BEING IN THE 8th ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.36% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-246339. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, 12067801 Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

Frederick County

CIRCUIT COURT FOR FREDERICK COUNTY Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court 100 West Patrick Street Courthouse Frederick, MD 21701 (301) 600-1976 DIANE S ROSENBERG vs. EDWARD E FOLAND KATHY A FOLAND Case Number: 10-C-16-001705 FC Lender License Number: N/A NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby issued by the Circuit Court for Frederick County this 14th day of OCTOBER, 2016, that the sale made and recorded by Diane S. Rosenberg for the sale of the property described in these proceedings 10239 Allview Drive, Frederick, MD 21701 be ratified and confirmed thirty (30) days from the date of this Notice, unless cause to the contrary be shown, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County, once in each of three (3) successive weeks. The report states the amount of the sale to be $286,000.00. Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court of Frederick County Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071633 CIRCUIT COURT FOR FREDERICK COUNTY Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court 100 West Patrick Street Courthouse Frederick, MD 21701 (301) 600-1976 DIANE S ROSENBERG vs. FRANCES M GIBSON TINA D GIBSON Case Number: 10-C-16-002159 FC Lender License Number: MD3452 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby issued by the Circuit Court for Frederick County this 27th day of OCTOBER, 2016, that the sale made and recorded by Diane S. Rosenberg for the sale of the property described in these proceedings 13529 John Kline Road, Smithsburg, MD 21783 be ratified and confirmed thirty (30) days from the date of this Notice, unless cause to the contrary be shown, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County, once in each of three (3) successive weeks. The report states the amount of the sale to be $170,000.00. Sandra K. Dalton Clerk of the Circuit Court of Frederick County Dec 16, 23, 30, 2016 12071627

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12066939

TRUSTEE'S SALE 4282 Drake Court, Waldorf, MD 20603 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 4282 Drake Court, Waldorf, MD 20603. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from RICHARD M. FRANKLIN, dated August 13, 2014, and recorded in Liber 8932 at Page 87 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $188,528.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: All that lot of ground situate in Charles, County, Maryland and described as follows, that is to say: Lot Numbered Eighty Nine (89) in the Subdivision know as "Phase 2, part of Parcel E-2, Lakeside Mews, Lancaster Neighborhood, St. Charles Communities" as per Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book DGB 34 at Plat No. 171, among the Land Records of Charles County, Maryland Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-258520. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

Charles County

855

Charles County

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

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856

856

Frederick County

Frederick County

856

D11 Frederick County

LEGAL NOTICES

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Frederick County

SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. 611 ROCKVILLE PIKE 611 ROCKVILLE PIKE SUITE 100 SUITE 100 ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY KNOWN AS KNOWN AS 417 CARROLLTON DRIVE 1310 PEACHTREE COURT FREDERICK, MD 21701 FREDERICK, MD 21703 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated October 3, Deed of Trust to ROBERT A. ALTIERI, Trustee(s), dated June 26, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 9173, folio 0205, the holder COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 7049, folio 690, the holder of the of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON, MD 21701 ON, JANUARY 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM JANUARY 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as follows: follows: LOT NUMBERED SIX (6) IN BLOCK LETTERED "E" IN THE LOT #9 IN BLOCK A, AS INDICATED ON A PLAT OF SECTION I, SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION FIVE, HILLCREST MAPLEWOOD SUBDIVISION, AS PREPARED BY JAMES W.O. ORCHARDS" AS DRAWN ON A PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BAKER, REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER, DATED THE BOOK 13, PAGE 14 14TH DAY OF MAY, 1956, AND RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK #3, The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition FOLIO #130 without either express or implied warranty or representation, The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition including but not limited to the description, fitness for a without either express or implied warranty or representation, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiincluding but not limited to the description, fitness for a tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateparticular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110. record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110. funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified the purchase price with interest at 5.5% per annum from the funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN the purchase price with interest at 4.25% per annum from the DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed association dues and assessments that may become due after by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. www.hwestauctions.com association dues and assessments that may become due after Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12067698 the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any TRUSTEE'S SALE mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a 4530 Christopher Place, La Plata, MD 20646 said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to premises known as 4530 Christopher Place, La Plata, MD Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the 20646. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit. Deed of Trust from PRISCILLA M. SWANN, dated November 23, convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the Trustee's File No. (35629) 2004, and recorded in Liber 5010 at Page 595 among the land purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit. JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the original principal Trustee's File No. (44564) SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES amount of $153,245.00. Upon default and request for sale, the JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: www.hwestauctions.com LOT NUMBERED ONE (1) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 12071340 "LOTS 1 AND 2 PALMER ACRES" AS PER PLAT THEROF www.hwestauctions.com DULY RECORDED AMONG TUE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES 12071341 COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK 44 AT FOLIO 16; LYING DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 AND BEING IN THE 7TH ELECTION DISTRICT OF CHARLES SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. COUNTY, MARYLAND SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. 611 ROCKVILLE PIKE Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and 611 ROCKVILLE PIKE SUITE 100 is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, SUITE 100 ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF affect same, if any. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY KNOWN AS or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The KNOWN AS 10295 PLACID PLACE balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum 9698 ROYAL CREST CIRCLE NEW MARKET, MD 21774 from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within FREDERICK, MD 21704 TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated July 23, Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK Deed of Trust to ROBERT J. ANGELUCCI, Trustee(s), dated by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 10155, folio 168, the holder December 16, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records association dues and assessments that may become due after of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 7681, folio the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument 0349, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees MD 21701 ON, COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON, JANUARY 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. JANUARY 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements Trustee's File No. 16-258212. LOAN TYPE= FHA thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as follows: SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, LOT NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE (223) IN follows: Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797 BLOCK LETTERED "F" AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED LOT NO. 25127, AS SHOWN ON PLAT ENTITLED "FINAL "SECTION I, COLDSTREAM, PLAT 3, EAGLEHEAD" AS PLAT, SECTION P3, URBANA HIGHLANDS", WHICH PLAT WAS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF FREDERICK RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF FREDERICK COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK NO. 71, FOLIO 179. COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15. The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or representation, without either express or implied warranty or representation, www.hwestauctions.com including but not limited to the description, fitness for a DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016 12067696 including but not limited to the description, fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiparticular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA TRUSTEE'S SALE assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110. assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110. 819 KENYON AVE, Waldorf, MD 20602 TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of premises known as 819 KENYON AVE, Waldorf, MD 20602. the purchase price with interest at 3.99% per annum from the the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN Trust from KATRINA J. DANDIE, dated July 8, 2005, and DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on recorded in Liber 05372 at Page 0033 among the land records all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments of the COUTNY OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed of $224,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after Courthouse for the COUTNY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-EIGHT (28), IN BLOCK NUMBERED the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the THIRTY-THREE (33) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ST. property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting CHARLES", SECTION II-B, SHEET 2 OF 3, AS PER PLAT purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK PCM 20, said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any AT PLAT 96 AND RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK PCM 10 AT PLAT Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a 129. Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit. conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. (10430) affect same, if any. Trustee's File No. (38965) JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.35% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners www.hwestauctions.com www.hwestauctions.com association dues and assessments that may become due after DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, 12071347 JANUARY 6, 2017 12071342 DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 15-249834. LOAN TYPE= Conventional Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

SF

SF

856

TRUSTEE'S SALE 6 Ravenglass Road, Waldorf, MD 20602 Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by premises known as 6 Ravenglass Road, Waldorf, MD 20602. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust from ERIC BERNARD MARTIN AND DENISE RICHARDSON MARTIN, dated December 21, 2007, and recorded in Liber 6541 at Page 411 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $248,675.00. Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on January 3, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to: Lot numbered Two (2) in Block numbered Sixty-six (66) in the subdivision known as "St. Charles, Section 1V-B, Sheet 4 or 4", as per plat thereof recorded among the Land Records of Charles County, Maryland in Plat Book PCM 18 at plat 111. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may affect same, if any. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. 16-257646. LOAN TYPE= FHA Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

855

e-mail: S2843C 2x3

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016

legalnotices@washpost.com WP 2x3


OPQRS 856

857

Frederick County

SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. 611 ROCKVILLE PIKE SUITE 100 ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY KNOWN AS 9721 Woodsboro Pike Walkersville, MD 21793 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust to JUDITH L. BARNETT, WILLIAM J. ZIEGLER AND DAVID T. AX, Trustee(s), dated April 10, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 9507, folio 199, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON, JANUARY 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as follows: ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED DATED APRIL 24, 2013 AND RECORDED IN LIBER 9507, FOLIO 199. The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or representation, including but not limited to the description, fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 4.99% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit. Trustee's File No. (46943) JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES

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DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017 872

872

Fairfax County

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $444,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 2.000000% from CARLOS MAURICIO DORADO AND MARIA JOSE DORADO dated September 16, 2005, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17762, Page 1892, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 18, 2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with improvements to wit: Lot Five Hundred Forty-one (541), of the subdivision known as Section Eight (8), KINGS PARK WEST, as the same appears duly, platted, dedicated and recorded among the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia.

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $609,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 4.625000% from REZA A. HAMED AND JAMILEH NAIMI dated March 12, 2007, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19198, Page 1117, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 18, 2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with improvements to wit: LOT 5, WHISPERING HILLS, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 2889 AT PAGE 437, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF FAIRFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA

TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of 10% of the sale price, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Reference Number 16-259564. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800. Dec 23, 30, 2016 12069402

ATLANTIC LAW GROUP, LLC. 1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310 LEESBURG, VA 20175 703-777-7101 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 6422 CHELL ROAD Columbia, MD 21044 Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from YUPAYONG VONGPUKDEE AND MALAIVAN HOLLINGSWORTH AND NARAPORN SIRIWONGTHAWAN, dated October 26, 2012 and recorded in Liber 14471, folio 241 among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.13C16108501; Tax ID No.05-376254 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction located at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on JANUARY 3, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit $49,600.00 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 570200) JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON, BRIAN THOMAS, ERIN M. AUGUST, HUGH J. GREEN, PATRICK M. A. DECKER, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES

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AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 095-4-03-/0005) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of 10% of the sale price, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Reference Number 16-262170. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800. Dec. 23, 30, 2016 12073421

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876

Loudoun County

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF 10744 ROBERT E. LEE DRIVE, SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22551.

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $288,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 3.000000% from PATRICK MICHAEL O'MARA AND ROSE MICHELLE O'MARA dated May 11, 2005, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument Number 20050517-0049128, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on the courthouse steps in front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on January 18, 2017 at 9:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit: LOT 96, PHASE II, MAIN STREET VILLAGE, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 1253 AT PAGE 1151, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF LOUDOUN COUNTY, VIRGINIA. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 36-D-2-96)

In execution of a certain deed of trust dated July 13, 2004, in the original principal amount of $125,000.00 recorded in the Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR 200400027798 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the Circuit Court building for Spotsylvania County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on January 19, 2017 , at 4:00 PM, the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE, OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LIVINGSTON MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND DESCRIBED AS LOT 10, SECTION TWO, SHADY GROVE, AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF SURVEY MADE BY E. W. KNISELEY SURVEYS, DATED JULY, 1973, OF RECORD IN DEED BOOK 32, PAGES 33 - 34, IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%) of the sale price or ten percent (10%) of the original principal balance of the subject deed of trust, whichever is lower, in the form of cash or certified funds payable to the Substitute Trustee must be present at the time of the sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Purchaser's deposit may be forfeited to Trustee. Time is of the essence. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50 cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms to be announced at the sale. A form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This is a communication from a debt collector and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 402, Arlington, VA 22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville, MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website: www.bwwsales.com. BWW# VA207843-1 December 23, 30, 2016 12073743

THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of 10% of the sale price, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Reference Number 16-262201. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800. 12073441

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Spotsylvania County

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 124 OLIVER COURT, PURCELLVILLE, VA 20132

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12071365 877

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877

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DECEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2016

1-800-753-POST

SF

Home delivery is convenient.

ATLANTIC LAW GROUP, LLC. 1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310 LEESBURG, VA 20175 703-777-7101 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 6408 WIND RIDER WAY COLUMBIA, MD 21045 Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from PAUL LEVY, dated December 16, 2005 and recorded in Liber 09741, folio 171 among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.13C16108701; Tax ID No.16-209708 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on JANUARY 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit $41,600.00 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 555351) JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON, BRIAN THOMAS, ERIN M. AUGUST, HUGH J. GREEN, PATRICK M. A. DECKER, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES

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Dec. 23, 30, 2016 SF

EZ 873

Howard County

DECEMBER 23, 30, 2016, JANUARY 6, 2017

Wake up to home delivery. 1-800-753-POST

857

Howard County

12071344

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 11209 SEPTEMBER LANE, FAIRFAX STATION, VA 22039

THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.

857

Howard County

Fairfax County

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 5240 RICHARDSON DRIVE, FAIRFAX, VA 22032

AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 069 3 05 0541)

857

Howard County

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FROM "NO

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In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $174,217.99, dated March 3, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 200500009785, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on January 10, 2017 at 12:00 Noon the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 34, Pine Ridge, with improvements thereon. Subject to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the aforesaid property.

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $284,700.00, dated May 25, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 200500020205, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on January 24, 2017 at 12:00 noon the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 120, Section 2, Cambridge, with improvements thereon. Subject to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the aforesaid property.

TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check will be required at the time of sale, but no more than $10,000.00 of cash will be accepted, with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (48384) 5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 757-457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or visit our website at www.siwpc.net Dec 19,20 21,22, 23,2016 12072903

TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check will be required at the time of sale, but no more than $10,000.00 of cash will be accepted, with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (29428) 5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 757-457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or visit our website at www.siwpc.net Dec 23, 30, 2016 12073530

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TRUSTEE SALE 5933 Cambridge Drive, Fredericksburg, VA 22407 Spotsylvania County

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Spotsylvania County

TRUSTEE SALE 9305 Pine Ridge Drive, Spotsylvania, VA 22551 Spotsylvania County

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873

Prince William County

882

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE 13993 Flagtree Place, Manassas, VA 20112 By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated July 18, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200607270110415 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $551,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on: January 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that certain lot or parcel of land lying and being situate in Prince William County, Virginia, more particularly described as follows: Lot 24, Section 2, Deer Valley, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 2907, at page 1408, among the Land Records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the settlement documents. Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. Rosenberg & Associates, LLC (Attorney for the Secured Party) 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com December 23, 30, 2016

12066943

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE 9641 Manassas Forge Drive Manassas, VA 20111 By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated December 11, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200612150174432 and re-recorded at Instrument Number 200701080003244, in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $392,500.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on: January 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of ALL that certain piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Prince William County, Virginia, to wit: Lot 102, Section 2, Arrowood, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 2006, at Page 916, among the Land Records of Prince William County, Virginia., and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the settlement documents. Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. Rosenberg & Associates, LLC (Attorney for the Secured Party) 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com December 23, 30, 2016

878

12066926

879

Stafford County

Culpeper County

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF 139 SHADY CREEK LANE, FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406.

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF 13250 WINDMILL WAY, CULPEPER, VA 22701-5136.

In execution of a certain deed of trust dated April 24, 2007, in the original principal amount of $495,000.00 recorded in the Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR070010584 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the Circuit Court building for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on January 19, 2017 , at 2:00 PM, the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND WITH IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND APPURTENANCES THERETO LYING, BEING AND SITUATE IN HARTWOOD DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, KNOWN AS LOT FORTY-ONE (41), SECTION ONE (1), STONEHOUSE WOODED ESTATES, AS SHOWN ON SURVEY OF JOHN B. VANCE, JR., DATED NOVEMBER 1, 1974, AND RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGES 102 AND 103.

In execution of a certain deed of trust dated October 30, 2009, in the original principal amount of $352,907.00 recorded in the Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 090006610 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the Circuit Court building for Culpeper County, at the corner of West Davis Street and North West Street in the Town of Culpeper on January 11, 2017 , at 5:30 PM, the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above address, and more particularly described as follows: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF CULPEPER, STATE OF VIRGINIA. LOT 65, CONTAINING 1.3260 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, ACCORDING TO THAT CERTAIN PLAT AND SURVEY PREPARED BY BASHAM & ASSOCIATES, L.S., ENTITLED "PLAT OF SUBDIVISION OF DUTCH HOLLOW", DATED OCTOBER 10, 1991, REVISED NOVEMBER 23, 1991 AND RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT CABINET 3, SLIDES 149-154.

TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%) of the sale price or ten percent (10%) of the original principal balance of the subject deed of trust, whichever is lower, in the form of cash or certified funds payable to the Substitute Trustee must be present at the time of the sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Purchaser's deposit may be forfeited to Trustee. Time is of the essence. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50 cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms to be announced at the sale. A form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This is a communication from a debt collector and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 402, Arlington, VA 22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville, MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website: www.bwwsales.com. BWW# VA310419-1 December 23, 30, 2016 12073764

TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%) of the sale price or ten percent (10%) of the original principal balance of the subject deed of trust, whichever is lower, in the form of cash or certified funds payable to the Substitute Trustee must be present at the time of the sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Purchaser's deposit may be forfeited to Trustee. Time is of the essence. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50 cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms to be announced at the sale. A form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This is a communication from a debt collector and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 402, Arlington, VA 22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555, website: www.bwwsales.com. BWW# VA309304-1 December 16, 23, 2016 12071996

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TRUSTEE SALE 854 Butler Avenue, Winchester, VA 22601-5406 Frederick County In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $178,000.00, dated October 21, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the Frederick County, Virginia, in Document No. 050025036, at Page 0444 and modified in Document No. 120003347, at Page 0017, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court of Frederick County, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, on January 17, 2017 at 2:15 PM the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 26, Section 2, Hampton Chase, with improvements thereon. Subject to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the aforesaid property. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check will be required at the time of sale, but no more than $10,000.00 of cash will be accepted, with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (41061) 5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 757-457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or visit our website at www.siwpc.net Dec. 16, 23, 2016 12071875

883

JOBS

Rappahannock County

needed to deliver The Washington Post for routes in Purcellville, Lovettsville, Middleburg and Leesburg, VA areas. To apply, go to deliverthepost.com or Call Rene Reyes at 703-798-5567 Great part-time income opportunity! Transportation required.

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Landscaping-Greensweep, LLC: Temporary, full-time landscape laborers for various addresses in MD (Counties: Montgomery, Howard, Anne Arundel, Baltimore & PG), DC, & VA (Counties: Fairfax, PW, Loudon & Arlington). Transport to & from pick up/drop off location in Burtonsville, MD. Up to 28 openings. On-the-job training available. Landscape & maintain grounds using hand or power tools/equip. Install trees/shrubs/ flowers/ sod, mow, maintain grounds, mulch, leaf removal. Physically demanding outdoor work. Psbl. insect bites, sun exposure, scratches, cuts. Employer will provide all tools & equip. Employer will provide transportation (incl. meals & lodging) to the place of employment if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early. Seasonal work: 2/12/17 through 11/12/17. F/T 6:30am – 3:30pm, M-F & some wkends. No O/T. No educ. or exp. required. $14.21/hr. Email resume to nick@greensweepllc.com. Applicants may also inquire about Job #575931 at local SWA (MD: dllr.state.md.us/county/, VA: vawc.virginia.gov, DC: does.dc.gov)

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TRUSTEE SALE 19 Hickerson Mountain Lane, Flint Hill, VA 22627 Rappahannock County In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $50,000.00, dated August 26, 2006 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the Rappahannock County, Virginia, in Document No. 060002120, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court of Rappahannock County, 238 Gay Street, Washington, on January 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Containing 10.30 acres, more fully described in Deed recorded in Document # 1582, dated November 17, 2000, with improvements thereon.

To apply, go to deliverthepost.com or call 202-334-6100 (Please press “0” once connected)

Seeking --Domestic Positions I WILL CARE FOR YOUR LOVED ONES - Night or day (Live-in). Cert for CPR, exp in personal care, vital exps, exp w/dementia & Alzheimer's disease, provide companionship, light cooking & cleaning, etc. Exc refs avail. Call 571-505-2324

Subject to Deed of Trust dated April 24, 2006 and recorded April 25, 2006 as Instrument Number 060000812. Subject to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the aforesaid property. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check will be required at the time of sale, but no more than $10,000.00 of cash will be accepted, with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (49854) 5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 757-457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or visit our website at www.siwpc.net Dec 22,23,24, 2016 12073518

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THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Weekend

Holiday Favorites

Seasonal delights, from light displays and stocking stuffers to festive meals and cocktails PAGE 16

ISTOCKPHOTO

$20 DINER At Caphe Banh Mi in Old Town Alexandria, the pho and vermicelli bowls — not the namesake sandwiches — are the draw. 8 MOVIES There’s something for everyone, including inspirational true stories (“Hidden Figures,” “Lion”) and crooning animals (“Sing”). 23

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THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

EZ

2

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1/7/17

1.888.377.0563

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IN SID E Dining Seven desserts worth indulging in. 10

3

Best Bets

EZ

Noteworthy events this week

Exhibits A forest of data at the National Building Museum. 14

Movies Denzel Washington directs a timely adaptation of “Fences.” 24 NICK ECKERT

Water skiing Santa

Music Everyone Orchestra creates songs on the fly. 5 Nightlife Another Christmas bar opens in D.C. 6

When: Saturday at 1 p.m. Where: Alexandria waterfront between King and Oronco streets (Metro: King Street). waterskiingsanta.com. Admission: Free.

Hanukkah cocktails

The Roots

Born in Baltimore and celebrated in New York, veteran jazz pianist Cyrus Chestnut is a D.C. guy now, having joined the full-time faculty at Howard University in 2015 while also taking over the traditional New Year’s Eve shows at Blues Alley. The versatile musician and improviser will perform with his trio, featuring Eric Wheeler on bass and Chris Beck on drums, all week leading into 2016’s grand finale, when they’ll perform at 6:30 and 10 p.m. When: Monday through Dec. 30 at 8 and 10 p.m.; New Year’s Eve at 6:30 and 10 p.m. Where: Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW. bluesalley.com. Tickets: $30-$40, $110-$150 New Year’s Eve.

There are a lot of Christmasthemed cocktails this time of year, but Adam Bernbach of 2 Birds 1 Stone offers a delicious balance with a Hanukkahthemed menu of “8 Crazy Cocktails!” The pun-heavy selections include the Gin & Tonica ($12), which pairs gin with a house-made green apple tonic, and the Chanunog ($12), which blends apricot eau de vie and sherry with buttermilk, egg and orange. Doi Moi’s kitchen gets in on the theme with a menu of Hanukkah bar snacks, including latkes. When: Saturday through Dec. 30 (closed Sunday and Monday), open at 6 p.m. Where: 2 Birds 1 Stone, 1800 14th St. NW (Metro: U Street). 2birds1stonedc.com. Admission: Free, drinks priced individually.

As the house band on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” the Roots have a highprofile full-time job that keeps the band plenty busy — and doesn’t allow as much time to tour as in the past. But D.C. fans of the groundbreaking hip-hop band are lucky: The show at the Fillmore will be the third time this year that Questlove, Black Thought and Co. have come to town, after appearances at the Summer Spirit Festival and the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Adding a bit of District flair to the bill: DJ Kool and go-go veterans Rare Essence. When: Tuesday at 8 p.m. Where: The Fillmore, 8656 Colesville Rd., Silver Spring (Metro: Silver Spring). fillmoresilverspring.com. Tickets: $69.50. — John Taylor and Fritz Hahn

www.ebook3000.com

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Cyrus Chestnut Trio

. FRIDAY,

‘Titanic’ Sure, you know how it ends. (That didn’t stop millions of people from going to see the 1997 Leonardo DiCaprio movie.) But it’s seeing the doomed cruise ship reproduced on a Northern Virginia stage that makes this production so impressive. Signature has assembled a “floating city” for the Tony Award-winning “Titanic,” featuring a cast of 20 and an orchestra of 17 in the second show staged in the round at the Shirlington theater. When: Through Jan. 29. Where: Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. sigtheatre.org. Tickets: $40-$114.

THE WASHINGTON POST

Stage The Kinsey Sicks bring “Oy Vey in a Manger” to Theater J. 19

This is Weird Washington at its holiday finest: Since 1986, a man dressed as Santa Claus has strapped on skis and hitched a ride on the Potomac River on Christmas Eve, waving to cheering onlookers. In the three decades since, the holiday spectacle has grown to include flying, acrobatic elves on boards and water scooters, costumed reindeer, Christmas tunes and Dr. Seuss’s mean Mr. Grinch, whipping his watercraft like his cartoon dog. The characters all come on shore in Alexandria for photographs and merriment afterward.


4 EZ

Plan Ahead

Noteworthy events over the next two weeks Jan. 5-29 ‘Copenhagen’ at Theater J

STEREO VISION PHOTOGRAPHY

Dec. 31, Jan. 6-7 Elvis’ Birthday Fight Club at Gala Hispanic Theatre This annual tilt, which celebrates the King of Rockand-Roll’s birthday (he would have turned 82) with slapstick battles staged from among a motley crew of the famous and fantastical, adds a New Year’s Eve countdown show, featuring music, dance and a champagne toast. The lineup for the regularly scheduled showdowns, hosted by Elvis (Jared Davis) and Kittie Glitter (Jei Spatola) remains a secret, but past matches have featured Count Chocula vs. the Count and the Lincoln Memorial vs. the Washington Monument. 8 p.m. Gala Hispanic Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. fightclubshow.com. $50 on New Year’s Eve, $25 Jan. 6-7.

Playwright Michael Frayn’s “Copenhagen,” which won a Tony Award in 2000, delves into the development of the atomic bomb, focusing on a 1941 meeting between renowned physicists Werner Heisenberg and Niels Bohr in the titular Danish capital. Eleanor Holdridge directs the Theater J production, which stars Sherri Edelen, Tim Getman and Michael Russotto. Washington District of Columbia Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th Street NW. washingtondcjcc.org. $30.38-$64.13.

Jan. 6-7 Michael Ian Black at Arlington Cinema ’N’ Drafthouse Michael Ian Black has been making us laugh for more than two decades, since he landed on MTV with the sketch comedy show “The State.” Since then, he’s branched out with more acting roles and podcasts (“How to be Amazing”), while also writing essays and children’s books: His latest is called “A Child’s First Book of Trump.” (Sample prose: “This beauty is called an American NATALIE BRASINGTON Trump. Its skin is bright orange, its figure is plump.”) Although he claims his comedy isn’t overly political, his Twitter feed has become a one-stop stream for criticism of the president-elect. Shows at 7, 7:30 and 10 p.m. Arlington Cinema ’N’ Drafthouse, 2903 Columbia Pike, Arlington. arlingtondrafthouse.com. $25.

RUN THE JEWELS

Jan. 12 Run the Jewels at Echostage The entertaining duo of producer-rapper El-P and rapper Killer Mike is back for another round, with “Run the Jewels 3,” set to be released in January — the day after their show at Echostage. The foul-mouthed, middle-aged entertainers have raised their profile since their 2014 follow-up, with Mike speaking out in support of Black Lives Matter and advocating for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders during the Democratic campaign. As Sanders told GQ: “Killer Mike has never killed anybody. It’s just, he’s a killer rapper.” 7 p.m. Echostage, 2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE. echostage.com. $35.

Email: goingoutguide@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-6808 Get listed: Our listings include events in the District; Montgomery, Prince George’s, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties in Maryland; and the area including Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince William counties and the city of Alexandria in Virginia. If you’d like your event to be considered, please email information to weekendlistings@washpost.com with the category in the subject line: theater, comedy, dance, classical music, pop music, museums or film. Listings are subject to space restrictions. We cannot acknowledge every submission. Advertising: Ron Ulrich, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com, 202-334-5289

WEEK E ND

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MARY

The Vantage Point

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CHRISTMAS

A MUSICAL BASED ON THE STORIES OF P.L. TRAVERS AND THE WALT DISNEY FILM

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O L N E Y T H E AT R E C E N T E R

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THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

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Music

5 EZ

Concerts ring in the new year Is there a better way to soundtrack the transition into a new year than live music? Here are five Dec. 31 concerts to help you ring in 2017. Black Cat New Year’s Eve Ball

Keeping with tradition, Peaches O’Dell and Her Orchestra will play swing and lounge music on the mainstage while DJ Dredd spins on the backstage. Black Cat at 7 p.m. blackcatdc.com. $30. Maze featuring Frankie Beverly

The R&B and funk group that formed in San Francisco in the ’70s brings some silky soul to its end-of-the-year party. DAR Constitution Hall at 10 p.m. dar.org/constitutionhall. $75-$125. MICHAEL WEINTROB

Throwing it together again Matt Butler isn’t afraid to hit reset with his Everyone Orchestra BY

R UDI G REENBERG

If you go Everyone Orchestra Dec. 30 and 31 at Gypsy Sally’s. Shows start at 9 p.m. 202-333-7700. gypsysallys.com. $25-$30 on Dec. 30; $50-$55 on Dec. 31.

Matt Butler is the founder, conductor and former drummer for Everyone Orchestra, which is playing two shows to end the year at Gypsy Sally’s.

Another New Year’s tradition finds local bluegrass institution The Seldom Scene picking and singing in Alexandria. The Birchmere at 8 p.m. birchmere.com. $39.50. White Ford Bronco

The all-’90s D.C. cover band will end 2016 at the same place it began the year: The Lincoln. Lincoln Theatre at 9 p.m. thelincolndc.com. $45. — Rudi Greenberg

JOE CAPRARO/ASSOCIATED PRESS VIA THE DAILY TEXAN

Rhett Miller and the Old 97’s play two shows (Dec. 30-31) at the Hamilton.

DECEMBER 23, 2016

rudi.greenberg@washpost.com

The Seldom Scene

. FRIDAY,

www.ebook3000.com

write songs in the moment. It doesn’t have to just be a solo and a jam and chaos and an end — let’s really compose music and aim for that.” Gypsy Sally’s has become Everyone Orchestra’s D.C. home base, and Butler will return to the Georgetown club for a pair of two-set shows — dubbed “Funk on the Fly” — to close out 2016. Both shows will feature a core lineup consisting of Jacobs; Thievery Corporation bassist Ashish “Hash” Vyas and drummer Jeff Franca; D.C. saxophonist Ron Holloway; Pink Floyd backup singer Durga McBroom, and percussionist/singer Jans Ingber. On Dec. 30, Love Canon’s Jay Starling will play keyboards; on New Year’s Eve, Particle’s Steve Molitz will man the keys and singer-guitarist Ryan Montbleau will join the fray. All nine musicians have played Everyone Orchestra shows before, although not all together. “By the time we’re wrapping up on the first of January 2017, this particular lineup of musicians is going to be a fine-tuned, spontaneous composing machine,” Butler says. “I think we have the potential to create some unbelievable, unforgettable moments.” If not, he’ll just start fresh at the next show.

Rhett Miller’s hard-rocking alt-country band returns to the Hamilton for two nights. The Hamilton at 8 p.m. (Dec. 30) and 8:30 p.m. (Dec. 31). live.thehamiltondc. com. $34.75-$85.

THE WASHINGTON POST

E

veryone Orchestra concerts always begin with a clean slate. Founder and conductor Matt Butler starts each of the ever-evolving project’s shows by writing a word (“beauty,” “scream,” “yeah,” “hey”) on a digital whiteboard. That word gives the musicians onstage — a rotating cast of players from the jam band scene — a starting point from which to launch into the first of many fully improvised songs. From there, anything is possible. “Musicians sometimes see it kinda like music sports, in a way, because if you’re not paying attention the pass is going to hit you in the face,” Butler says. “You don’t exactly know what’s going to happen, which is the beauty of it.” Butler founded Everyone Orchestra in 2001 after splitting from his ’90s band Jambay. “There was a really utilitarian aspect to it,” he says. “I was looking for something that was

different than the normal joining a band and getting in a van. I’ve already done that. I wanted to do something where I could bring musicians together at the spur of the moment.” At first, Butler played drums with Everyone Orchestra, as he did in Jambay, recruiting friends to try out his experiment. Eventually, Butler realized he needed some order to the unrehearsed chaos, and, after a string of guest conductors, he started conducting the shows from the front of the stage in 2005. “I’m a human volume knob, I’m calling out solos, I’m saying let’s go back to that chorus that we just created,” Butler says. “It becomes live production and the conductor has a really important role, but it’s also on equal footing with the musicians onstage.” At Gypsy Sally’s in May, for example, he improvised a chorus about a spring day in Washington, which turned into a call-andresponse with the audience. From there, vocalists Jen Hartswick, Natalie Cressman and Cris Jacobs created a verse. By the end of the 15-minute jam, it felt like a real, composed song. “We can create beautiful music that everybody goes home and sings,” Butler says. “That’s the power of what we can do. It really took a long time to get people on board with that concept: Let’s

Old 97’s


6 EZ

Nightlife

Winter warmers: Seasonal cocktails and fire pits BY

F RITZ H AHN

The blustery wind and frigid temperatures can be awful this time of year, but enjoying a drink next to flickering flames is always delightful. Try one of these new options for fireplaces and fire pits. Bar a Vin

1039 31st St. NW. chezbillysud.com. The bar at Georgetown’s Chez Billy Sud has a wood-burning fireplace and plenty of soulwarming French red wine. Hazel

808 V St. NW. hazelrestaurant.com. Rob Rubba’s Shaw restaurant has added fire pits to its attractive patio. Cold-weather menu options include skewers of Korean barbecue beef or black barbecue chicken for cooking over a tabletop grill, and a hot chocolate prepared with both green and yellow Chartreuse. Proof

775 G St. NW. proofdc.com. Fire pits and blankets will help keep guests warm on Proof ’s revamped patio, but if that’s not enough, cocktail guru Adam Bernbach has concocted a hot buttered cider cocktail, which is served in a thermos. Spider Kelly’s

3181 Wilson Blvd., Arlington. spiderkellys.com. Clarendon hotspot Spider Kelly’s opened a new back patio over

PROOF

the summer, complete with two large gas fire pits and several overhead heaters. Ten Tigers Parlour

3815 Georgia Ave. NW. tentigersdc.com. The space formerly occupied by Chez Billy in Petworth, which

Wunder Garten

wundergartendc.com. While the NoMa beer garden has added a tented heated pavilion for year-round drinking, hearty drinkers can sip their beers or wine outside by the wood-burning fire pit. fritz.hahn@washpost.com

Proof, near Verizon Center, opened its revamped patio with fire pits in October. The restaurant is also serving a hot buttered cider cocktail in a thermos.

1101 First St. NE.

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Don’t shoot your eye out at Radiator BY

. FRIDAY, THE WASHINGTON POST

serves soup dumplings and Asian street food under the direction of chef Tim Ma, has two wood-burning fireplaces: one in the secondfloor dining room and another on the back patio.

FRITZ HAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST

Like all of Radiator’s cocktails, the Triple Dog Dare Ya is inspired by “A Christmas Story” — specifically, the flagpole-licking scene.

F RITZ H AHN

If you’re looking for somewhere soak up the holiday spirit this weekend, point your sleigh (or Uber) toward the Mason & Rook Hotel in Logan Circle, where the Radiator bar has gone into full holiday mode. Tinsel, icicle-shaped lights and strands of colorful bulbs hang from the ceiling, while 15 rolls of wrapping paper are being used as wallpaper. Flickering, battery-powered candles dot the tables. Ella Fitzgerald’s “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Low’s “Just Like Christmas” play from the speakers. Lights and garlands also decorate the patio, as do a giant inflatable Santa, a reindeer and snowmen. At 8 p.m. every night, the staff

turns on large fans outside, which blow “snow” — actually a bubble mixture resembling slushy white flakes — past the windows. Squint a bit, and you’ll feel like you’re in a winter wonderland. The drinks are suitably seasonal, as bartender Sarah Rosner has revamped the cocktail menu with nine cocktails inspired by the movie “A Christmas Story.” Triple Dog Dare Ya could take its name from the potent mix of Hamilton Overproof 151 rum and Crème de Menthe, but the joke is in its presentation: The sweet, citrusy drink is served with a cold stainless-steel drinking straw, recalling the movie’s legendary flagpole scene. The Bo Ling Chop Suey Palace Co., meanwhile, combines Angel’s

Envy bourbon washed in duck fat with Giffard Abricot liqueur, marmalade and camomile tea, served in a small china teapot with two mugs. The overall effect — fun decorations, holiday music and a themed cocktail menu — is similar to the wildly popular Miracle on Seventh Street bars in Shaw. But Radiator is a simpler concept. There are no animatronic Demogorgon or narwhal projections here. On the other hand, Radiator doesn’t require waiting in line for an hour or two just to get in. That might be the greatest gift of all. Decorations will be up through Saturday. 1430 Rhode Island Ave. NW. radiatordc.com. Cocktails $10-$15. fritz.hahn@washpost.com


Ask Tom

Excerpts from Post Food Critic Tom Sietsema’s online discussion

7 EZ

Washington. I love the romantic Old World setting, the courtly service and the Indian cooking. Start with the duck kebab. Then check out the herby trout. It’s hard to go wrong on the menu there.

Q: I have a sister visiting during

the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend. Last time she visited, we managed to get a reservation at the omakase counter at Sushi Taro and she’s still raving about it. This time we weren’t quick enough to get a reservation. I’m hoping we somehow get off the waitlist, but do you have suggestions for a backup? A: I think I have what you’re looking for. Sushiko in Chevy Chase just launched Kobo, a restaurant-within-a-restaurant featuring a dozen (vegan and non-vegan) courses reflective of the season. I have yet to try it, but the menu sounds ambitious.

Q: Where should I go for dinner

within walking distance of the Kennedy Center? A: The best, closest place to eat is the dramatic Kingbird at the Watergate. Its chef previously worked at the very good Blue Duck Tavern. Q: Have you been to either Le

Q: I’m looking for a good

restaurant in the District that would hold a group of about 10, which I would still be able to reserve less than a month out. We are pretty adventurous eaters, although the group includes one or two vegetarians. I would like for it not to be too expensive. Also, I would like to decamp afterward to a nearby bar with good beer. One possibility I was thinking about was Red Hen, followed by a walk to Boundary Stone. A: I like your game plan. Elsewhere in town, you could

DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Your best bet for dinner before a Kennedy Center show is the new Kingbird at the Watergate Hotel, led by chef Michael Santoro.

start at Estadio for Spanish food and move on to the nearby Churchkey on 14th St. NW. In Georgetown, you could eat at Zannchi for Korean or Casolare for Italian and segue to the Sovereign for Belgian brews.

Q: Where would you go for a

lunch for one, on a weekday, to mark a professional milestone? Preferably somewhere downtown, near Farragut, or an easy walk away. A: Bombay Club never fails to transport me from workaday

Diplomate or Ghibellina recently? I’m taking the family to both next week. A: I was at the bistro not long ago, and it’s as good as ever. Someone told me Le Diplomate does 900 covers some nights, which is just astonishing. The food quality is high there. I haven’t been to Ghibellina recently, but I also haven’t heard anything negative of late. I think you’re good to go! Q: What is your take on Ris? A: It’s a solid neighborhood

restaurant that could use a little polish. I see a name from the news whenever I go there, so that’s always fun.

ideal New Year’s resolutions for restaurant patrons, for restaurateurs and their staffs, and even for restaurant critics? A: Off the top of my (undercaffeinated) head, I hope diners will make it a point to let restaurants know how much they’re valued by praising hardworking servers and managers (and tipping accordingly), and that restaurants will take both noise pollution and food waste more seriously. Bravo to the chefs who already offer halfportions and medium-size plates. As for myself, I hope to drop a few pounds I’ve put on this year, no thanks to the many terrific restaurants I’ve been lucky to cover.  Tom Sietsema hosts a weekly Q&A on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at live.washingtonpost.com.

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8 EZ

$20 Diner

Soup steals the show at Caphe Banh Mi Pho, vermicelli overshadow the namesake sandwiches BY

T IM C ARMAN

T

THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

he bottle racks and stainless-steel WineStation dispensers stand to the right when you enter Caphe Banh Mi. You can’t miss them. They’ll practically be panting on you, like drunks in a crowded subway, as you inevitably wait for a table in this cozy, neighborhood hideaway in Old Town Alexandria. If you’re forced to wait long enough, you might even begin to wonder which of these grapes could relate to the high-strung, high-maintenance broth found in the bottom of a typical bowl of pho. The thought crossed my mind as I huddled next to the bottles one evening, hoping no one would open the door and allow the winter air to blast-chill the tiny dining room. When I finally sat down, I asked the waiter for a wine recommendation to pair with my pho. His face went tight. He shook his head repeatedly, half-embarrassed, until he formed the words he didn’t want to speak: He doesn’t drink. I opted for a 2013 Burgundy from Meiomi, a California gladhander with the ingratiating flavors of black cherry and vanilla. The pho didn’t want anything to do with it. The soup itself was that rare bowl that requires no doctoring with tabletop condiments. The broth was copper colored, clarified but not completely clear. It had a tea-like clarity with a flavor profile to match: light, refined, balanced. The star anise, too often the alpha dog of pho, had been commanded to play nice with the puppies. As such, the spice’s biting, fennellike aromas were mere component parts, equal to the soup’s caramelized onions, the charred ginger and the sly buttery seduction of the beef broth. To drown this in Sriracha would be like affixing emoticons to American Gothic. The woman behind this broth is My Huynh, a Vietnamese native whose AlexanDINER CONTINUED ON 9

If you go CAPHE BANH MI 407 Cameron St., Alexandria. 703-549-0800. caphebanhmi.com. Hours: Monday-Friday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nearest Metro: King Street, with a 0.9-mile walk to the restaurant. Prices: Starters, salads and banh mi, $6- $12; pho and entrees, $9-$13.

The house pho at Caphe Banh Mi is built with a copper-colored beef broth, rare eye of round and brisket — the rare noodle soup that requires no doctoring with condiments and sauces. DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST


9 EZ

As the name indicates, Caphe also sells meaty banh mi, each served in a paper-lined basket with ringlets of jalapeño neatly stacked outside the baguette so you can control the pepper heat of your sandwich. The classic banh mi — a pig-intensive bite with sliced ham, country pâte, headcheese and cha lua sausage

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DECEMBER 23, 2016

features the slender, seahorseshaped outline of Vietnam, along with a series of raised letters, whose shadows spell out the names of major Vietnamese cities. The tabletops look like autumn leaves were trapped in amber. The place gives the average strip-center pho parlor an inferiority complex.

— hits many of the right notes, although the kitchen stiffed me on pickled vegetables. Without its acid tongue, the sandwich was an exercise in unctuousness. The pork shoulder banh mi trades mostly on its grilled meat, the other flavors retreating to the corners of the crusty bread, even the garlicky Vietnamese mayo. Even though Huynh prides herself on recreating the fresh, fragrant, fishy flavors that she savored in central Vietnam, she’s no straitjacketed purist. Her “sloppy Viet” banh mi is described as a baguette packed

. FRIDAY,

dria restaurant is a graceful rejoinder to her detractors, who happen to be relatives. Huynh used to help run a handful of Yogiberry frozen yogurt shops with her family, but they had a falling out. “According to my family, I couldn’t do anything on my own,” Huynh says. Caphe Banh Mi is evidence to the contrary, starting with the arty space itself. One section is reserved for the most tasteful wall map I’ve ever seen in a restaurant: A chalky white wall

Top: The tiny Caphe Banh Mi in Old Town Alexandria fills up fast, so expect to wait by the door. Above left: Owner and chef My Huynh’s restaurant features a wall map of Vietnam surrounded by city names. Above right: The charbroiled catfish and vermicelli, another dish that needs little doctoring.

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DINER FROM 8

with “spicy red curry ground beef,” but don’t let the semiSouth Asian language fool you: It’s basically sloppy joe meat spooned into that roll, a sweetand-spicy tomato mixture that Huynh developed to appease her kids. The sandwich is definitely engineered for a kid’s palate. While not as obvious as the banh mi for junior high cafeterias, other dishes also appear to acquiesce to Westernized palates. The dipping sauce known as nuoc cham strikes me as sweeter and less fishy at Caphe than at similar outlets at, say, the Eden Center. Yet that’s not necessarily a dealbreaker. The crisp, chewy imperial rolls pack plenty of flavor — crab, shrimp, pork, wood-ear mushrooms — without demanding the intoxicating umami punch of fish sauce. The same holds true for the charbroiled catfish that lounges atop vermicelli noodles: The fillet, prepared with turmeric and dill, actually tastes better without nuoc cham. Its texture is less flaccid, too. Of course, just when I thought I had sized up Caphe, the place would upend my expectations. Like the evening I ordered a vermicelli bowl paired with slices of grilled pork, crushed peanuts, mint, pickled daikon and big blocks of fried imperial roll. This time, the accompanying nuoc cham smelled as if a million little anchovies had died for the cause, their pungent juices supplying that rotting wave of deliciousness that ties together the best Vietnamese food. If I had zeroed in on my favorite dishes at Caphe — the pho, the catfish and pork vermicelli bowls, the filet mignon salad with its fresh, elevating notes of mint — I was still no closer to finding a wine to pair with the house noodle soup. One night, I selected a 2012 sauvignon blanc from Chimney Rock Winery in Napa Valley, a vintage that balanced its sweet pear nectar with a mild acidity. Ugh. The wine and pho just eyed each other suspiciously the entire meal. But then my friend proceeded to madly customize her bowl, like some Dr. Phokenstein. She squeezed an entire wedge of lime into the broth, followed by another wedge and another. She also dribbled in a few dots of Sriracha. I slurped her concoction, then sipped my wine. The sauvignon blanc had suddenly found a friend, one acid seeking out another. Later, on the phone with Huynh, I related my troubles finding a decent wine to match with her noodle soup. She wasted no words: “It doesn’t work so well with pho.”


10 EZ

Dining

The Federalist Pig offers D.C. a taste of Carolina BY

TIM CARMAN/THE WASHINGTON POST

K

Former DCity Smokehouse pitmaster Rob Sonderman opened his Federalist Pig barbecue joint in Adams Morgan earlier this month.

DECEMBER 23, 2016

. FRIDAY,

Washington’s reputation for attracting people from all corners of the United States has been part of the city’s problem in developing a barbecue identity of its own. Smoked meats throughout the region tend to pander to all palates, whether those palates were developed in Texas, Kansas City, Memphis or the Carolinas. (Hill Country, of course, is the notable exception to the District’s pan-’cue approach.) But of all the styles available in Washington, one has been conspicuously absent: North Carolina whole hog, a form of barbecue that often requires special equipment and can be next to impossible to execute without overcooking at least one part of the pig. The Federalist Pig in Adams Morgan isn’t selling whole hog barbecue, but former DCity Smokehouse pitmaster Rob Sonderman’s new place offers the next best thing: chopped pork studded with crispy bits of skin. Sonderman smokes a whole bone-in shoulder — not a whole hog, alas — then removes the skin and deep-fries it. Those crunchy bits, with a scant amount of fat still attached, are reserved exclu-

sively for Federalist Pig’s chopped pork sandwich, the Carolina on My Mind. But when I stopped by the smokehouse last Wednesday, Sonderman decided to throw this pig a bone. I ordered a three-meat sampler platter with pulled pork, brisket and turkey, and the pitmaster tossed some cracklings atop the pork, a little Louisianastyle lagniappe for a writer whom Sonderman has known for a couple years. The deep-fried skin provided a satisfying crunch to a dish that too often skates on its fatty acid, that mixture of lush pork and vinegar. The chopped pork itself was not some pucker-inducing pile of vinegared meat: Its wood-smoke perfume was subdued, ephemeral even, not a desert-island brush fire designed to draw the attention of passing planes. The saucing of the meat was even more refined, a light hit of spicy applecider vinegar designed to accent the pork. The chopped pork immediately ranks among my favorites in the area. Turns out, the thin smoke penetration was a recurring theme with my meat platter — possibly, I thought, connected to Sonderman’s efforts to transform a gaspowered machine into a full-on,

wood-burning smoker. While the slices of brisket and turkey were succulent and seasoned flawlessly, neither had the kind of pronounced smokiness I desire in barbecue. For what it’s worth, the brisket exhibited few signs of a smoke ring, either. On my way out the door, I mentioned to Sonderman that some of the meats were not smoky enough for my tastes. He didn’t disagree and shrugged his shoulders, saying he’s doing the best he can with what he has. But later he texted with another thought: “Light smoke profile could have to do with the wood as well — using the honey locust and the persimmon wood this week,” he wrote, clearly puzzling over the issue, as dedicated pitmasters do. “Both seem to be pretty mild on smoke flavor.” Sonderman will, no doubt, find the right mix of wood for his barbecue. I hope he also will decide to throw that crispy pig skin on his chopped pork, regardless of whether you order it as a sandwich or by the half-pound. Federalist Pig, 1654 Columbia Rd. NW. federalistpig.com. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 5 to 10 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, noon to 10 p.m. tim.carman@washpost.com

In case the season isn’t already sweet enough BY

THE WASHINGTON POST

T IM C ARMAN

B ECKY K RYSTAL

It’s only natural to be on a bit of a sweets kick this season. It’s a time for celebrating and indulging. It’s cold out, and your New Year’s resolutions haven’t kicked in yet. So prepare your sweet tooth. Culled from our database of five years of 40 Eats, these are some of the Washington area’s most essential desserts. Chocolate chip cookie from Bread Furst

Bread Furst’s chocolate chip cookie is a classic, but with the refined touches you’d expect from one of the city’s premier bakeries: organic flour, cultured butter and semisweet chocolate chips from a French chocolatier. 4434 Connecticut Ave. NW. Hazelnut milk chocolate tortino at Osteria Morini

This signature sweet has become a mainstay in pastry chef Alex Levin’s repertoire. It consists

of a warm chocolate cake filled with hazelnut milk chocolate, served with a scoop of vanilla gelato. 301 Water St. SE. Toasted marshmallow milkshake at Good Stuff Eatery

This creamy delight is a favorite at Spike Mendelsohn’s burger chain, and with good reason. Who doesn’t love the flavor of charred marshmallows mixed with rich custard? 303 Pennsylvania Ave. SE; 2110 Crystal Dr., Arlington; 3291 M St. NW; Reagan National Airport, Terminal B.

Above: The classic Tres Leches cake at Caramelo Bakery in Wheaton, layered with fruit jams and topped with whipped cream. Left: Roofers Union’s Breaking the Curse, a pistachio spongecake topped with a Greek yogurt mousse and saffron-poached oranges.

Merveilleux from Un Je Ne Sais Quoi

This French snowball of a confection is an enticing combination of whipped cream, ganache, meringue and various toppings. 1361 Connecticut Ave. NW. Crème brûlée doughnut at Astro Doughnuts & Fried Chicken

The local chain is known for this yeasted treat, which features

PHOTOS BY DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

a crunchy, caramelized top and vanilla custard filling. 1308 G St. NW; 7511 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church. Tres Leches cake at Caramelo Bakery

No need to mess with a classic:

This tres leches cake is soaked in a sauce of evaporated milk, condensed milk and vanilla, then layered with pineapple and strawberry jams and a topping of whipped cream. 11301 Georgia Ave., Wheaton.

Breaking the Curse at Roofers Union

Not overly rich or sweet, this dessert has a pistachio sponge cake adorned with a Greek yogurt mousse and saffron-poached oranges. 2446 18th St. NW. becky.krystal@washpost.com


11

VIRGINIA

N I G H T CL U B S Prices listed where available

POP|ROCK|FOLK| JAZZ|ETC. THE DISTRICT BLUES ALLEY Christmas with Jane Monheit, Friday, $40-$45; HerreraRichardson Holiday Jam with Lena Seikaly, Saturday, $20; Cyrus Chestnut Trio, Monday-Thursday, $30-$40. 1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW (rear). 202-337-4141. www.bluesalley.com. DC9 Ruse de Guerre, Deer Eat Birds and Cold Beaches, Thursday. 1940 Ninth St. NW. 202-483-5000. www.dcnine.com. $8. ECHOSTAGE Carnage, Bear Grillz, Friday, $25-$40; Mahmoud Ahmed, Madingo Afework and Robel Michael, Saturday, $48.40; Zedd, Thursday, $50. 2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE. 202-503-2330. www.echostage.com. GYPSY SALLY’S Miracle On 34th Street With the Woodshedders, By & By, Janet Emma & Seven West, Friday, in advance $10, day of the show $12; the Fat Catz, Albino Rhino, Wednesday, $8; Peoples Blues Of Richmond, the Shack Band, Thursday, $13. 3401 K St. NW. 202-3337700. www.gypsysallys.com. THE HAMILTON The 19th Street Band, Friday, no cover; Live at the Fillmore: The Definitive Tribute to the Original Allman Brothers Band, Tuesday, $15-$23; Start Making Sense — A Tribute to Talking Heads, HmfO: A Hall & Oates Tribute, Wednesday, $18-$25.50; Yellow

Dubmarine, Thursday, $14.40-$25.50; Moonshine Society, Thursday, no cover. 600 14th St. NW. 202-787-1000. www.thehamiltondc.com. THE HOWARD THEATRE A Decade of Soul, Prentiss McNeil, Friday, $20-$35; Joe Budden, Friday, $27.50-$67.50; Reggae Fest vs. Soca, Saturday, $20; Vivian Green, Monday, $35-$60; Lyfe Jennings, Tray Chaney, Tuesday, $35-$60; EPMD, Handles, Wednesday, $26-$50; Freddie Jackson, Thursday, $39.50-$65. 620 T St. NW. 202803-2899. www.thehowardtheatre.com. 9:30 CLUB The Pietasters, Mephiskapheles, Hub City Stompers and Loving Paupers, Friday, $15; Big Something & Yo Mamas Big Fat Booty Band and Bencoolen, Thursday, $20. 815 V St. NW. 202-265-0930. www.930.com. ROCK & ROLL HOTEL In Your Memory, Set For Tomorrow and Technicians, Friday. 1353 H St. NE. 202-388-7625. www.rockandrollhoteldc.com. $12. U STREET MUSIC HALL Juan Maclean, Friday, $10; Stooki Sound, Imad Royal and Jett Chandon, Thursday, $12. 1115 U St. NW. 202-588-1889. www.ustreetmusichall.com.

BIRCHMERE Hayes Carll, Allison Moorer, Monday, $25; Judy Collins, TuesdayWednesday, $59.50; Hank Williams Tribute, Thursday, $29.50. 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. 703-549-7500. www.birchmere.com. STATE THEATRE Lotus Land: The American Rush Tribute, Wednesday, $15; John Kadlecik Band, Thursday, in advance $15, day of the show $20. 220 N. Washington St., Falls Church. 703-237-0300. www.thestatetheatre.com.

CON CERTS Prices listed where available

POP|ROCK|FOLK|JAZZ|ETC. ALL-STAR CHRISTMAS DAY JAZZ JAM Sunday at 6. Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. www.kennedy-center.org. Free. HOLIDAY VAUDEVILLE Monday and

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On Exhibit M USE U M S EXHIBITIONS AMERICAN ART MUSEUM “Harlem Heroes: Photographs by Carl Van Vechten,” through March 19. An exhibition of 39 images — including those of James Baldwin, Ossie Davis, W.E.B. DuBois, Ella Fitzgerald, Althea Gibson, Langston Hughes, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson and Bessie Smith — by photographer, author and social

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commentator Van Vechten, who made portraits of central figures in the Harlem Renaissance. Open daily 11:30 to 7. Eighth and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. americanart.si.edu. Free. ANACOSTIA COMMUNITY MUSEUM “From the Regenia Perry Collection: The Backyard of Derek Webster’s Imagination,” through April 23. Webster created sculptures from scraps of wood, trash and found materials and adorned them with costume jewelry and brightly colored house paint. This exhibition consists of nine of his pieces

3701 Mount Vernon Ave. Alexandria, VA • 703-549-7500 For entire schedule go to Birchmere.com Find us on Facebook/Twitter! Tix @ Ticketmaster.com 800-745-3000

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created between 1980 and 1996. “Gateways/Portales,” through Aug. 6. Through the gateways of social justice, community access and public festivals, this exhibition explores the experiences of Latino migrants and immigrants in Washington, Baltimore, Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham, N.C. Open daily 10 to 5. 1901 Fort Pl. SE. 202-633-4844. www.anacostia.si.edu. Free. ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS “José Gómez Sicre’s Eye,” through Aug. 6. The museum celebrates the centennial of Sicre’s birth. Open Tuesday-Sunday 10 to 5. 201 18th St. NW. museum.oas.org. Free. ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY “Turquoise Mountain: Artists Transforming Afghanistan,” through Jan. 29. Artisans from the Murad Khani district of Old Kabul demonstrate their work and share their experiences. “Gauri Gill: Notes From the Desert,” through Feb. 12. Featuring 56 of Gill’s prints and including portraits and letters, this exhibition showcases her work photographing marginalized communities in remote western Rajasthan, India. “The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures From the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts,” through Feb. 20. This exhibition presents nearly 70 manuscripts that demonstrate, through calligraphy and illumination, the book’s significant role in the history of the arts in the Islamic world. “Red: Ming Dynasty/Mark Rothko,” through Feb. 20. Created more

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than five centuries apart and through disparate processes, an imperial Chinese porcelain dish and a painting by Rothko, juxtaposed, reveal an uncanny similarity in vivid red. “Chinamania,” through June 4. Inspired by his travels in China and by the kilns at Jingdezhen, contemporary artist Walter McConnell created an installation of Kangxi porcelains similar to those originally displayed in the Peacock Room. “Sky Blue: Color in Ceramics of the Islamic World,” through July 23. The vessels on view span the 9th through the 19th centuries and demonstrate mineral colors of cobalt blue and copper green as pigments for painting and writing on the clay or as colorants in glazes. Open daily 10 to 5:30. 1050 Independence Ave. SW. 202-633-1000. www.asia.si.edu. Free. FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY “First Folio! Shakespeare’s American Tour,” through Jan. 22. To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, the Folger is touring the largest display of his first folios to all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District. Open Monday-Saturday 10 to 5, Sunday noon to 5. 201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077. folger.edu. Free. GLENSTONE “Fred Sandback: Light, Space, Facts,” through Dec. 31. The exhibit includes works from different points in the artist’s career and displays drawings, wooden reliefs and sculptures. Open ThursdaySunday 10 to 5. 12002 Glen Rd., Potomac. www.glenstone.org. Free. HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN “Ragnar Kjartansson,” through Jan. 8. This exhibition of photographs, films, video installations, drawings and paintings by the Icelandic artist includes principal works “The Visitors” (2012), a video of musicians in a decaying mansion, and “The End,” 144 paintings made during the 2009 Venice Biennale. “Suspended Animation,” through March 12. Artists Ed Atkins, Antoine Catala, Ian Cheng, Josh Kline, Helen Marten and Agnieszka Polska challenge conceptions of reality. “Linn Meyers: Our View From Here,” through May 14. A site-specific wall drawing stretching the circumference of the innercircle galleries on the museum’s second level. Open daily 10 to 5:30; sculpture garden open 7:30 to dusk. Seventh Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-1000. hirshhorn.si.edu. Free. KREEGER MUSEUM “Selected Works: Sam Gilliam, Simmie Knox,” through Dec. 30. To celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the museum presents works from the permanent collection. “Smith/Paley,” through Dec. 30. The first exhibition to feature a collaboration by artists Clarice Smith and Albert Paley, it displays a selection of Smith’s paintings including a five-panel screen, “Gallop,” and a selection of Paley’s sculptures, including maquettes for the project documented in “Albert Paley on Park Avenue.” Guided tours by reservation Tuesday-Thursday at 10:30 and 1:30. Also open Friday and Saturday 10 to 4. 2401 Foxhall Rd. NW. 202-337-3050. www.kreegermuseum.org. $10, seniors and students $7, age 12 and younger free. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, MADISON BUILDING “#Opera Before Instagram: Portraits, 1890-1955,” through Jan. 21. This exhibition showcases 36 photographs of early opera stars from a collection assembled by the late Charles Jahant, in a format that explores how Jahant might have used an Instagram account were he alive today. Open Monday-Saturday, 8:30 to 4:30. 101 Independence Ave. SE. 202-707-9779. www.loc.gov. Free. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, JEFFERSON BUILDING “America Reads,” through Dec. 31. This exhibition celebrates the public’s choice of 65 books by American authors that have affected American life. “World War I: American Artists View the Great War,” through May 6. This exhibition showcases posters, political cartoons, illustrations, fine prints, popular prints, documentary photographs and fine-art photographs. Open Monday-Saturday 8:30 to 4:30. Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. 202-7079779. loc.gov. Free. NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM “A New Moon Rises: Views From the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera,” through Dec. 31. This exhibition showcases images of lunar landscapes, including the Apollo landing sites and mountain ranges at the lunar poles. Open daily 10 to 7:30. Sixth Street and Independence Avenue SW. airandspace.si.edu. Free. NATIONAL ARCHIVES “Amending America,” through Sept. 4. This exhibition of 50 original documents that demonstrate how and when the Constitution was amended, and how attempts were made to amend it, marks the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights. Constitution Avenue and Ninth

Street NW. 202-357-5000. www.archives.gov. Free. NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM “Small Stories: At Home in a Dollhouse,” through Jan. 22. This exhibition features 12 dollhouses from the Victoria and Albert Museum of Childhood in London. “District II,” through Feb. 12. A visual essay that explores the changing streets of downtown Washington in the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s through the photography of Bill Barrett, Chris Earnshaw and Joseph Mills. “The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Lawrence Halprin,” through Feb. 12. This exhibition of the landscape architect’s works marks the 100th anniversary of his birth. “Timber City: Innovations in Wood,” through May 21. To demonstrate recent technological innovations within the timber industry, this installation features samples of engineered wood, architectural models and wood walls. Open Monday-Saturday 10 to 5, Sunday 11 to 5. 401 F St. NW. nbm.org. $10; students, seniors and age 3 to 17 $7, age 2 and younger free. NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, EAST BUILDING “In the Tower: Barbara Kruger,” through Jan. 22. Timed to celebrate the newly renovated East Building galleries, this exhibition is of 15 of Kruger’s profile works. “Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery,” through Jan. 29. This exhibition features nearly 100 works from the donated collection of gallerist and patron Virginia Dwan. Founded in a storefront in Los Angeles in 1959, Dwan’s avant-garde space contained works by Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Edward Kienholz, Yves Klein, Arman, Martial Raysse, Niki di Saint Phalle and Jean Tinguely. “Photography Reinvented: The Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker,” through March 5. In celebration of the reopening of the East Building galleries, works from the collection including those by Thomas Demand, Thomas Struth, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Jeff Wall will be on view. Monday-Friday 10 to 5. Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. nga.gov. Free. NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WEST BUILDING “Damien Hirst: The Last Supper,” through Jan. 1. This exhibition of 13 prints that make up the “Last Supper” series refers to the number gathered at the biblical meal. Each print features a pharmaceutical label in which the name of a medicine has been replaced with that of common British food. “Drawings for Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt,” through Jan. 2. This exhibition of more than 90 drawings and 25 paintings by Aelbert Cuyp, Pieter Jansz Saenredam and Rembrandt van Rijn demonstrates how Dutch artists used preliminary drawings in the painting process. The exhibition includes compositional drawings, individual figure studies, ruled construction drawings and sketchbooks, and also examines underdrawings artists made on their panel and canvas supports before painting their scenes. “Intersections: Photographs and Videos,” through Jan. 2. This exhibition of works by Eadweard Muybridge and Alfred Stieglitz brings together highlights of the recently merged collections of the Corcoran and the National Gallery of Art by a variety of artists from the 1840s to today. “Recent Acquisitions of Dutch and Flemish Drawings,” through Jan. 2. Acquisitions including a page from a 15th-century manuscript (c. 1442) with illustrations by Barthelemy van Eyck, a miniature of “The Adoration of the Magi” (mid-1520s) by Simon Bening, a portrait drawing by Michiel Sweerts and two rare compositional studies by Gerrit van Honthorst are exhibited. “Stuart Davis: In Full Swing,” through March 5. American modernist Stuart Davis blurred distinctions between text and image, high and low art, abstraction and figuration. This exhibition is of nearly 100 of his jazz-inspired compositions. Open Monday-Saturday 10 to 5, Sunday 11 to 6. Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. nga.gov. Free. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MUSEUM “FotoweekDC Exhibition,” through Jan. 22. An exhibition featuring contemporarythemed images with social and political significance, fine art and more. Also featured will be the winners of the spring Faces & Places and fall photo competitions. “@NATGEO: The Most Popular Instagram Photos,” through April 30. National Geographic has more than 56 million followers on Instagram and more than 1 billion likes on its 11,000-plus posted images. This exhibition tells the stories of these images and the photographers behind them. Open daily 10 to 6. 17th and M streets NW. natgeomuseum.org. $15, students and seniors $12, ages 5 to 12 $10. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE Exhibitions that focus on a diversity of


On Exhibit

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STAN JORSTAD/NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

“100 Years of America’s National Park Service,” at the National Museum of Natural History through Aug. 31, includes this image of Badlands National Park in South Dakota.

GERALD PETERS GALLERY

“Steeplechase” by contemporary artist Clarice Smith, is on display as part of “Smith/Paley,” also featuring works by Albert Paley, at the Kreeger Museum through Dec. 30.

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Independence Avenue SW. nmai.si.edu. Free. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS “No Man’s Land: Women Artists From the Rubell Family Collection,” through Jan. 8. This exhibition of large-scale paintings and sculptural hybrids by 37 contemporary artists from 15 countries centers on images of the female body. “Wanderer/Wonderer: Pop-Ups by Colette Fu,” through Feb. 26. This exhibition of pop-up books is from Fu’s series “Haunted Philadelphia,” in which she re-creates spooky landmarks around her home city, and “We Are Tiger Dragon People,” inspired by the culture of Yunnan province, China, where her ancestors lived. “Bold Broadsides and Bitsy Books,” through March 17. The Dead Feminists’ broadside series presents profiles of international feminist heroes. Open Monday-Saturday 10 to 5, Sunday noon to 5. 1250 New York Ave. NW. 202-783-5000. nmwa.org. $10, students and seniors $8, age 18 and younger free. NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY “In the Groove: Jazz Portraits by Herman Leonard,” through Feb. 20. This exhibition is of Leonard’s photos of jazz greats. After opening a studio in Greenwich Village in 1948, Leonard photographed in New York’s jazz clubs. His pictures appeared on album covers and in magazines such as DownBeat and Metronome. “Bill Viola: The Moving Portrait,” through May 7. The exhibition, the gallery’s first devoted to media art, is a

2015 from the artist’s estate. “Arlene Shechet: From Here On Now,” through May 7. This exhibition is part of a series that explores the intersections between old and new traditions, modern and contemporary art practices and museum spaces, and artistic interventions. Shechet’s ceramic sculptures, some created specifically for the exhibition, are included. Open TuesdaySaturday 10 to 5, Sunday noon to 7, Thursday extended hours 5 to 8:30. 1600 21st St. NW. 202-387-2151. phillipscollection.org. $12, students and seniors $10, age 18 and younger free. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM “Bingata! Only in Okinawa,” through Jan. 30. This exhibition is of traditional and contemporary works by Okinawan artists and designers of bingata, a uniquely Okinawan dyeing technique noted for bright colors and bold patterns. “A Collector’s Vision: Creating the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection,” through May 1. In 2011, Small donated to George Washington University his collection of 1,000 maps, prints, rare letters, photographs and drawings that document the history of the District. Updated in the summer with a dozen new objects, this exhibition presents highlights of the collection, including Small’s first acquisition: a handwritten 1905 scrapbook of a survey of the city’s boundary stones. Open Monday and Wednesday-Friday 11:30 to 6:30, Saturday 10 to 5, Sunday 1 to 5. 701 21st St. NW. 202-994-5200. museum.gwu.edu/ collectors-vision. $8 suggested donation, children free. U.S. BOTANIC GARDEN “Season’s Greenings: National Parks and Historic Places,” through Jan. 2. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service and the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act, a large indoor tree will be decorated with ornaments from national parks. The collection of D.C. landmarks will be displayed in the Garden Court. Open daily 10 to 5. 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-2258333. usbg.gov/exhibits. Free. VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS “Jasper Johns and Edvard Munch: Love, Loss and the Cycle of Life,” through Feb. 20. An exhibition that explores the connection between Jasper Johns and Edvard Munch with displays of more than 100 works by the two artists side by side to highlight shared themes. Open Saturday-Wednesday 10 to 5, Thursday-Friday 10 to 9. 200 N. Boulevard, Richmond. 804-340-1400. vmfa.museum. $15. WOODROW WILSON HOUSE “Evolving Elections: The Transformation of Campaigns, Inclusivity, and Festivity, 1916 and 2016,” through Feb. 26. Comparing this year’s election with that of 100 years ago, the exhibition features 1916 campaign buttons and Woodrow Wilson’s unique election walking stick. Open TuesdaySunday 10 to 4. 2340 S St. NW. 202-3874062. woodrowwilsonhouse.org. Free.

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the national parks. “Nature’s Best Photography: The Best of the Best,” through Sept. 1. A curated selection of 20 years of nature photos by photographers from around the globe, with images of wildlife and landscapes on large-format prints and in HD videos. Open daily 10 to 5:30. 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202633-1000. www.naturesbestphotography.com. Free. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN “For a Love of His People: The Photography of Horace Poolaw,” through June 4. Born six years after the end of the reservation period, the photographer documented fellow Indians, relatives and friends during everyday and important life events, creating a visual history of multitribal native life in the mid-1920s and continuing for the next 50 years. “The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire.” To celebrate the construction of the Inca Road, which linked Cuzco, Peru, with the farthest reaches of the empire, the exhibition digs into its early foundations and the technologies that made building the road possible. “Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World.” The exhibition focuses on indigenous cosmologies, world views and philosophies related to the creation and order of the universe and the spiritual relationship between humankind and the natural world. Open daily 10 to 5:30. Fourth Street and

selection of Viola’s works that focus on the face and the body, using metaphors of water, light and spirituality. “One Life: Babe Ruth,” through May 21. This exhibition displays approximately 40 objects including prints and photographs of Ruth, personal paraphernalia and advertising memorabilia endorsed by Ruth. “Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs,” through June 4. This exhibition showcases 14 daguerreotypes, two portraits each of seven subjects including Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis and John Quincy Adams. Open daily 11:30 to 7. Eighth and F streets NW. npg.si.edu. Free. NATIONAL POSTAL MUSEUM “Trailblazing: 100 Years of Our National Parks.” Featuring original postage-stamp art from the Postal Service and artifacts loaned by the National Park Service, the exhibition explores the ways in which mail moves to, through and from our national parks. Open daily 10 to 5:30. 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE. 202-6335555. postalmuseum.si.edu. Free. NEWSEUM “1966: Civil Rights at 50,” through Jan. 2. This exhibition explores milestone civil rights events of 1966, including the rise of the Black Power movement and the ambush and shooting of James Meredith during his March Against Fear through Mississippi. “CNN Politics: Campaign 2016,” through Jan. 22. In partnership with CNN Politics, the Newseum launches a new kind of immersive, interactive exhibit to tell the story of the 2016 presidential campaign. “Refugee,” through March 12. Photographs created solely for the exhibition by five internationally acclaimed photographers — Lynsey Addario, Omar Victor Diop, Graciela Iturbide, Martin Schoeller and Tom Stoddart — aim to illuminate the plight of the displaced throughout the world. “Inside Today’s FBI.” A new version of the FBI exhibit “Fighting Crime in the Age of Terror” features evidence and artifacts from some of the FBI’s biggest cases. “Pulitzer Prizes at 100: Editorial Cartoons.” To mark the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prizes, this exhibit features work from the portfolio of Jack Ohman of the Sacramento Bee, the 2016 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Open daily 9 to 5. 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-292-6100. newseum.org. $22.95, seniors $18.95, ages 7 to 18 $13.95, younger than 7 free. PHILLIPS COLLECTION “People on the Move: Beauty and Struggle in Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series,” through Jan. 8. This 60-panel series documents the historic movement of millions of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North more than a century ago. “Whitfield Lovell: The Kin Series and Related Works,” through Jan. 8. This is an exhibition of more than 40 of the contemporary artist’s works from his “Kin” series, including Conté crayon images of anonymous African Americans with everyday objects and related works. “Jake Berthot: From the Collection and Promised Gifts,” through April 2. An exhibition of works received in

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historical subjects including the transatlantic slave trade, the civil rights movement, the history of African American music and other cultural expressions, visual arts, theater, sports and military history. 10 to 5:30. 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. nmaahc.si.edu. Free. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART “Senses of Time: Video and Film-Based Works of Africa,” through Jan. 1. Six African artists explore how time is experienced and produced by the body. Bodies stand, climb, dance and dissolve in seven works of video and film or “time-based” art. Open daily 10 to 5:30. 950 Independence Ave. SW. 202633-4600. africa.si.edu. Free. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY “Muppets and Marionettes,” through Jan. 1. An exhibition of Muppets and marionettes from the museum’s collection illustrating the evolution of puppetry. Included are the first Kermit, created by Jim Henson for the television program “Sam & Friends,” and Muppets Fozzie Bear and the Swedish Chef. “Ofrenda para Antonio Lomas, an Installation by Carmen Lomas Garza,” through Jan. 13. This installation by Mexican American visual artist Garza is in the tradition of Dia de los Muertos, created to honor her grandfather, Antonio Lomas, who migrated from Mexico to Texas in 1920 to work on the railroad. “Always Ready: Firefighting in the 19th Century,” through Feb. 1. Before the Civil War, American firefighters were volunteers. “Black Main Street: Funding Civil Rights in Jim Crow America,” through Feb. 1. This exhibition examines the ways in which African American businesses contributed to the civil rights movement, focusing specifically on Harold Cotton, who owned and operated Bob’s Hat Shop in Greensboro, N.C., from 1953 to 2005, and Marjorie Stewart Joyner, who supervised the training of thousands of African American beauticians as vice president of the Madam C.J. Walker Co. Objects on display include a National Cash Register from Cotton’s hat shop and beauticians’ styling tools. Open daily 10 to 5:30. 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. americanhistory.si.edu. Free. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY “Mud Masons of Mali,” through Feb. 1. Djenne, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Mali, is famous for its architecture. This exhibition of archival and contemporary photographs and early engravings demonstrates how the city’s masons, inheritors of a craft tradition handed down through generations since the 14th century, have given the city its character. “The Primordial Landscapes: Iceland Revealed,” through April 1. Photographs by Feodor Pitcairn and poetry by Ari Trausti Guomundsson focus on the natural beauty of Iceland. “100 Years of America’s National Park Service: Preserve, Enjoy, Inspire,” through Aug. 31. To celebrate its centennial, the National Park Service has teamed with the National Museum of Natural History to present more than 50 images showcasing


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On Exhibit

WILL PRYCE/WAUGH THISTLETON ARCHITECTS

The interior of London’s Murray Grove building, above, was constructed entirely of timber. The “Timber City” exhibition at the National Building Museum, right, features wood-based structures.

Pining for timber-based alternatives National Building Museum’s ‘Timber City’ exhibition showcases wooden structures BY

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DECEMBER 23, 2016

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M ARK J ENKINS

nyone who looks up while walking Washington’s streets can reckon what the building material of the future is. Most new structures feature glass walls, which have turned downtown into a giant peep show. Stone and concrete facades are being stripped and replaced with even more of the tempered, transparent material. “Timber City,” an illuminating if not see-through exhibition at the National Building Museum, proposes an alternative. Tomorrow’s buildings will — or should — be constructed of wood. Structures of prefabricated wooden panels can be erected faster than steel-and-concrete ones and could substantially reduce global carbon dioxide emissions. Wooden buildings are lighter, and thus require much smaller foundations. This is significant not just for financial reasons. Concrete manufacturing is the world’s third-largest source of greenhouse gases, and harvesting timber — a renewable resource — has a lower environmental cost than

mining the materials to make steel and concrete. Also, wood is 15 times as thermally efficient as concrete, reducing heating and air-conditioning demands. A new 10-story residential building on West 18th Street in New York is the city’s first structural timber building and will, the show explains, reduce energy consumption by 50 percent. Wood also sequesters rather than emits carbon. What if the kids in Apt. 8C play with matches? Fire is the principal reason building codes in the United States and elsewhere discourage or ban wood. But the structures “Timber City” extols are not rustic log cabins or the wood-and-paper houses of the city later renamed Tokyo, which used to burn so often that blazes were called “the flowers of Edo.” Today’s wood-frame structures employ such new materials as cross-laminated timber (CLT) and laminated veneer lumber, engineered composites that combine multiple pieces for greater strength. These resist fire better than unprotected steel, which weakens faster than wood when heated. Charring its exterior actu-

YASSINE EL MANSOURI/NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM

ally protects wood from fire, so it wasn’t just a poetic gesture when a recently constructed Oregon fire station was covered with blackened wood from a flame-damaged local barn. Wood is seen these days as primarily decorative. But wooden structures, charred or not, can stand for centuries. The exhibition includes pictures of the country’s oldest one, Fairbanks House in Massachusetts, built between

1637 and 1641, and the world’s most venerable wooden pagoda, China’s Sakyamuni, which dates to 1056. Wood may never enter one of architecture’s most pointless competitions — the quest to build ever-higher skyscrapers in places that generally have no other landmarks. But Skidmore, Owings & Merrill has designed a 42-story tower that, if built, will have a TIMBER CONTINUED ON 15

If you go TIMBER CITY National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. nbm.org. Dates: Through May 21. Prices: $10, $7 ages 3-17, students, and 60 and older.


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YASSINE EL MANSOURI/NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM

TIMBER FROM 14

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YASSINE EL MANSOURI/ NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM

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A residential building at 475 West 18th St. in New York, above, will be the first structural timber building in the city. The 10-story structure will reduce energy consumption by 50 percent. “Timber City” should engross those who don’t mind an exhibition that’s more text than pictures.

fir panels that dominate the exhibition. These are smaller cousins of the two largest pieces on display: a 63-foot vertical, which reaches the museum’s third floor, and a 40-foot horizontal. The panels also give the second-floor gallery a pleasant aroma. Although printing the text on giant planks is picturesque, it doesn’t disguise that the show is as wordy as it is woodsy. This is a forest of data, one in which visitors could get lost. The young and the restless may want to leave before they learn very much about CLT, sustainability and the struggle to update anti-wood building codes. Yet “Timber City” should engross those who don’t mind an exhibition that’s more text than pictures, more ideas than artifacts. If those ideas are as viable as they seem here, we will someday walk through neighborhoods where wooden buildings are as common as steel-and-glass ones are now.

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carbon footprint 60 percent smaller than that of a same-size edifice erected with steel and concrete. There would be concrete in that wooden skyscraper, just less of it than in a conventional structure. “Wood environments make people happy,” chirps the show’s text, yet “Timber City” doesn’t forecast a future of all-wood buildings. The design department hall at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, scheduled for completion next year, will feature an aluminum facade wrapped around its wooden skeleton. And, of course, wood frames can support glass curtain walls just as steel ones do. Exhibition curators and designers Yugon Kim and Tomomi Itakura, founding partners of the Boston architecture firm IKD, include architectural models, a video about managed forests and a world map that highlights more than 30 notable recent wooden buildings. There’s also a selection of tree stumps, examples of manufactured wood and types of lumber waste (nearly all of which can be used commercially). Most of the show’s copious information is printed on Douglas

“Timber City” at the District’s National Building Museum proposes that tomorrow’s buildings will — or should — be constructed of wood (or crosslaminated timber).


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From the Cover

MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON


Seasonal scenes, from far left: the picturesque ice rink at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden; Baltimore’s cheerful, over-the-top Miracle on 34th Street light display; and the annual “Season’s Greenings” exhibition at the U.S. Botanic Garden, featuring trains and historic displays.

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MLADEN ANTONOV/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

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Celebrating The season Is there a time of year more bound in traditions than the holiday season? Probably not, and that’s fine with us. There are certain things during these festive weeks that Must Be Done, from light displays to shopping and trips to the ice rink and zoo. But even if your agenda is rapidly filling up, perhaps you can still pluck a new holiday favorite from this list.

— Amy Joyce

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t wouldn’t be Christmas at our house without stockings filled with goodies from the quirky little Washington institution, Rodman’s. For several decades, part of my holiday ritual has been a solo expedition to the no-frills Washington location: I fill my basket with chocolate confections and marzipan fruits from Switzerland, Belgium and Latvia; pick out some French milled soaps; search out my family’s favorite German gingerbread cookies and maybe throw in a Hungarian salami to stick at the bottom of a stocking. This little pharmacy turned international food market, which dates to 1955, always has some new tasty surprises. Rodman’s, 5100 Wisconsin Ave. NW. rodmans.com. Additional locations in Silver Spring and Kensington.

U.S. BOTANIC GARDEN

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he “Season’s Greenings” exhibilighthouses to national parks, make tion at the U.S. Botanic Garden is annual visits fresh and interesting. Plus, my favorite holiday tradition in there’s nothing like wandering into the Washington, and not just because it’s muggy orchid hothouse on a cold Deopen on Christmas Day. The model cember afternoon. trains chugging around the room reUnited States Botanic Garden, 100 mind me of going to see similar displays Maryland Ave. SW. usbg.gov. with my family when I was young, and Open daily through Jan. 2. Free. www.ebook3000.com the rotating themes, from Maryland — Fritz Hahn

few years ago, I was singing Christmas carols in a senior center and I flubbed the words to “Silent Night.” “Sorry,” I whispered to the woman next to me. “I’m Jewish.” “Me too,” she whispered back. Since I came out of the closet as a carol-loving Jew, I’ve found that I’m in good company. Perhaps we are just a musical people, or maybe it’s something deeper: After all, some of the best Christmas songs were written at the turn of the century by Jewish Tin Pan Alley songwriters, recent immigrants with Eastern European folk tunes echoing in their ears. It’s probably not a coincidence that the opening bars of Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” sound a lot like the Israeli national anthem, “Hatikvah,” not to mention the Yiddish songs my greatgrandparents used to sing. Whatever the reason, I find myself oddly compelled, every December, to gather my friends, pass out Santa hats and march around my neighborhood demanding figgy pudding. If you see us, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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— Becky Krystal

around the holidays. The scene can’t be beat: I feel like we’re in a Norman Rockwell painting, and we always bump into someone we know. All skill levels are welcome at the rink. It’s easy to hold onto the wall for support, but confidence grows with each lap. Of course as soon as little toes and fingers get cold, we hit the Pavilion Café for hot chocolate and watch all the skaters twirl, fall, trip and laugh. Skating at the National Gallery reminds me of how lucky we are to live in this city. Also, you can’t beat that Zamboni. If only little boys’ dreams of driving it themselves could come true . . . Ice rink at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden, Seventh Street and Constitution Ave. NW. nga.gov. Open through March 12; closed Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. $7.50-$8.50; $3 skate rental.

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y sons and I love to go ice skating at the National Gallery of Art’s Sculpture Garden

— Jura Koncius

— Maura Judkis

y husband and I have a longstanding annual ZooLights date, typically paired with dinner somewhere in Cleveland Park. Yes, the light displays at this National Zoo tradition are often the same year to year, but we enjoy revisiting them anyway. Despite the hordes of children, an evening spent under the glow of LED animals is romantic, especially when you have to cuddle for warmth on a frigid December evening. There’s also something that feels vaguely rebellious about roaming the zoo at night. And since it’s free, the price can’t be beat. National Zoo, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. nationalzoo.si.edu. 5 to 9 p.m., closed Christmas Eve and Day. Free.

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THE WASHINGTON POST

don’t believe a house can ever have too many Christmas decorations. I never get sick of Christmas music. And the weeks between Thanksgiving and Dec. 25 never feel like enough time to make all the cookies I want. Call me a Christmas maximalist. So when I married into a family from Baltimore, my husband knew the one place that would delight a holiday-pajama-wearing, kitschy-decoration-loving holiday glutton like me: Baltimore’s Miracle on 34th Street, a street in the Hampden neighborhood that takes holiday lights as seriously as Clark Griswold does. Traffic around West 34th Street snarls as everyone comes in to gaze at the over-the-top, coordinated light displays, many of which have a Baltimore theme: Christmas Natty Boh or crabs, or light-up pink flamingos, a reference to native son John Waters. Some people get creative, constructing Christmas trees out of hubcaps or filling their lawns with inflatable Santas and snowmen — and shrugging off what I’m sure are costly electricity bills. Grab a mug of hot chocolate and stroll down the block for the most concentrated dose of holiday cheer around. Miracle on 34th Street, 720 West 34th St., Baltimore. christmasstreet.com. Lights are on 5:15 to 11 p.m. nightly through Dec. 31. Free.

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From the Cover

BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST

The annual Garden of Lights display at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton draws visitors young and old through New Year’s Day.

FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

though, please don’t actually give us figgy pudding. I think we can all agree that stuff is gross. For information about caroling at local senior centers and hospitals, visit the Holiday Project at holidayproject.info/wherewhen.

THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

— Sadie Dingfelder

L

ike many couples without relatives nearby, my wife and I alternate spending Thanksgiving and Christmas with our two families. As her family grew, they adopted an Italian American Christmas Eve tradition: the Feast of the Seven Fishes. Although origin stories vary, the dinner essentially is what it sounds like: a giant meal starring seven different types of seafood. It’s delicious (to everyone except my father-in-law, who dines on ravioli or sausages) and a lot of fun to plan, create and eat. So the first Christmas we knew we wouldn’t gather with her family, we found a way to enjoy the feast by booking a table at Roberto Donna’s Al Dente in Northwest Washington. A number of restaurants in the region now feature the meal in December, and some, including Bibiana, Centrolina, Equinox and Osteria Morini, serve it only on Christmas Eve. But Al Dente’s menu, featuring gnocchi with porcini mushrooms and bay scallops, seafood

ravioli and sautéed branzino, remains one of the best deals in D.C. And while we can’t replicate the family experience, we’ll have our meal prepared by a James Beard Award-winning chef — and I won’t have to wash the dishes. Al Dente, 3201 New Mexico Ave. NW. aldentedc.com. Feast of the Seven Fishes served through Christmas Eve. $50 a person for seven courses. — John Taylor

V

isiting the Garden of Lights at Brookside Gardens has long

been a favorite holiday activity of mine — one that began as a family outing when my brother and I were little. Now, my high school friends and I try to go every year as our own reunion of sorts. We pile into a friend’s minivan and drive to Wheaton Regional Park together, catch up as we wander by the light-up displays we remember from childhood (the green dragon slithering up out of the ground is a personal favorite) and take a group photo on the bright white Santa sleigh. Because every good holiday tradition provides ample opportunity for both nostalgia and Instagram. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Ave., Wheaton. montgomeryparks.org. Open through Jan. 1; closed Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. $25-$30 per car. — Ava Wallace

W

e don’t participate in Christmas, but we do celebrate it. We grab chopsticks, anoint ourselves with oily string beans and fill a lazy Susan with enough Chinese food to ensure days of leftover noshing. Welcome to Jewish Christmas. Slurping lo mein and painting rice pancakes with hoisin sauce and moo shu pork have become comforting rituals on a holiday ubiquitous to everyone around us. Because we live many states away from my hometown delivery joint (shout out to Hunan Emperor of Houston), my wife and I have used Christmas to explore a new Chinese restaurant every year. We’ve liked Paul Kee Restaurant in Wheaton (ignore the bare bones decor and order the black pepper short ribs) and City Lights in Dupont Circle (a warm change of pace if you come in from the cold, descend the stairs to the dining room and order a pot of Jasmine tea). Paul Kee Restaurant, 11305 Georgia Ave., Ste. B, Wheaton. paulkeewheaton.com. City Lights of China, 1731 Connecticut Ave. NW. citylightsofchina.com. — Gabe Hiatt

L

ast year, while covering Miracle on Seventh Street, the Christmasthemed pop-up bar that draws long lines nightly in Shaw, I asked a patron to explain the allure of a bar with choo-choo trains, Santa-shaped mugs of spiked hot

cocoa and tinsel dripping from ceiling to trendy concrete floors. Washingtonians, he’d replied, are far from home by definition, and thus cut off from holiday spirit by extension. I don’t get Christmas, really, but I instinctively understood the guy’s argument. There’s something about a bar at the holidays. For those of us who feel even a twinge of holiday-induced loneliness, a particularly cozy bar is a gathering place for those celebrating a night without work or worry, the ideal reunion spot for far-flung friends who haven’t seen each other in too long. Patrons seem a little bit kinder, staff a little more jovial. As others wrapped last-minute presents at home, I have danced to James Brown at the Black Cat and held a long-distance love tightly at American Ice Company. This year, the Falafel Frenzy will bring together hundreds of young Jewish Washingtonians at Eighteenth Street Lounge on Christmas Eve, and Miracle on Seventh will keep the holiday lights aglow till the wee hours, too. Wherever I decide to settle in for a hot toddy and nostalgia, I know I won’t feel alone. Falafel Frenzy, Saturday, 9 p.m. Eighteenth Street Lounge, 1212 18th St. NW. shalomdc.org/falafelfrenzy. $30 in advance; $40 (cash) at the door. Miracle on Seventh Street, 1843 Seventh St. NW. miracleon7thst.com. Through Dec. 31, closed Christmas Day. — Lavanya Ramanathan


On Stage

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PACO OJEDA

The songs you know by heart and some unforgettable originals K RISTEN P AGE- K IRBY

If you go OY VEY IN A MANGER Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-518-9400. edcjcc.org. Dates: Through Dec. 28. Prices: $17-$47.

The Kinsey Sicks — a dragapella barbershop quartet — brings satire and subversive humor to Theater J with “Oy Vey in a Manger.”

“I had to radically rewrite [the show],” Schatz says. “Satire involves exaggerating a kernel of truth. How do you exaggerate what’s happening now? But I think, like Donald Trump, we have sunk to the occasion.” Schatz says the group attracts a diverse fan base — people who like a cappella music, people who like drag and people who like progressive, subversive humor. That said, all are welcome — and some people are even encouraged to see the show. “I very much doubt Mike Pence will attend,” Schatz says, “but I’ll pay him if he sits through the whole thing.” kristen.page.kirby@washpost.com

DECEMBER 23, 2016

A

udiences “may not forgive seeing us,” Ben Schatz says. “But they won’t forget.” Schatz is a founding member and the self-described “grand poobah” of the Kinsey Sicks, a dragapella barbershop quartet that is staging its irreverent Christmas revue “Oy Vey in a Manger” at Theater J. In “Oy Vey,” the Kinsey Sicks

working full time on AIDS discrimination issues, and this was in the midst of the horrors of the AIDS epidemic,” he says. “I was on TV a lot and playing the earnest, respectful homosexual, but deep down I knew I was a bad girl.” That bad girl was Rachel, and she and her friends in the troupe were unleashed one late night after some revelry following a Bette Midler concert. Since then, Schatz and the gang have performed across the country. (Winnie, Trixie and Trampolina round out the current lineup.) Even with all of that experience, performing in Washington post-election — especially post-this-election — is www.ebook3000.com something entirely new.

. FRIDAY,

BY

have been living in the Bethlehem spot of Jesus’ birth for “about 2,016 years,” Schatz says. Now the property is being foreclosed upon, so the quartet must sell the manger. The show, Schatz says, “involves reminiscences of the day and has unforgettable and unforgivable parodies of classic holiday songs, both for Christmas and Hanukkah, and some original songs.” (“God Bless Ye Femmy Lesbians” and “I’m Dreaming of a Vanna White Christmas” are among them.) The Kinsey Sicks came to be in 1993, when Schatz needed a break from his job as executive director of a national gay health organization. “I was the first attorney

THE WASHINGTON POST

The perfect vamp for every occasion


20 EZ

On Stage AL SO P L AYIN G Prices are for the entire run of the show; individual shows may vary.

THE DISTRICT A CHRISTMAS CAROL Washington actor Craig Wallace plays Ebenezer Scrooge in this family-friendly production of Dickens’s classic tale. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. 202-347-4833. www.fords.org. $22-$107. AN IRISH CAROL Dickens’s classic Christmas story set in a pub. Andrew Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church St. NW. 202265-3767. www.keegantheatre.com. $35$45. ARTS ON THE HORIZON: ADVENTURES WITH MR. BEAR A world-premiere children’s play about a girl and her favorite toy bear. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993, Ext. 2. www.atlasarts.org. $6-$10. BLACK NATIVITY Langston Hughes’s retelling of the Christmas story. Anacostia Playhouse, 2020 Shannon Pl. SE. 202-2412539. www.theateralliance.com. $40-$50. DR. SEUSS’S HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS! THE MUSICAL Max the dog narrates as the mean, scheming Grinch discovers the real meaning of Christmas in this stage adaptation. National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-628-6161. $48-$108. INTO THE WOODS A theatrical remake of Stephen Sondheim’s Tony Award-winning musical. Kennedy Center, Eisenhower Theater, 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. www.kennedy-center.org. $45-175. LOOKINGGLASS THEATRE COMPANY’S MOBY DICK An adaptation of Herman Melville’s seafaring tale by director David Catlin featuring trapeze and other acrobatics. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. 202-488-3300. www.arenastage.org. $40$90. OY VEY IN A MANGER The Kinsey Sicks, a San Francisco-based “dragapella” troupe, performs. Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. 202777-3210. www.theaterj.org. $17-$47. THE SECOND CITY’S TWIST YOUR DICKENS The comedy troupe improvises and interacts with the audience in this parody of “A Christmas Carol.” Kennedy Center, Theater Lab, 2700 F St. NW. 202467-4600. www.kennedy-center.org. $49$79. THE SECRET GARDEN A young girl discovers and finds refuge in her late aunt’s hidden, magical garden. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. 202-547-1122. www.shakespearetheatre.org. $44-$128. WICKED A musical prequel to the “Wizard of Oz.” Kennedy Center, Opera House, 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. www.kennedycenter.org. $99-$359. KING UBU A Google Translate version of Alfred Jarry’s 1896 play, featuring puppets and mixed media. Flashpoint, 916 G St. NW. 202-733-6321. www.pointlesstheatre.com. $18-$30.

GRACE TOULOTTE

ABOVE: Erin Weaver, from left, Katie deBuys, Katie Kleiger and Miranda Rizzolo appear in Round House Theatre’s “Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley,” a holiday sequel to “Pride and Prejudice,” through Dec. 23.

THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

MARYLAND A CHRISTMAS CAROL Theater favorite Paul Morella returns for his adaptation of Dickens’s holiday classic. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Rd., Olney. 301-924-3400. www.olneytheatre.org. $20$40. DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Imagination Stage presents a live version of the 25-year-old animated musical. Suggested for age 4 and older. Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda. 301280-1660. www.imaginationstage.org. $12$30. THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE Adventure Theatre stages the play about a magical world called Narnia, based on the story by C.S. Lewis. Glen Echo Park, Adventure Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo. 301-634-2270. www.adventuretheatre-mtc.org. $19.50. MARY POPPINS Olney Theatre Center stages Disney’s musical about a magical nanny. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 OlneySandy Spring Rd., Olney. 301-924-3400. www.olneytheatre.org. $18-$90. MISS BENNET: CHRISTMAS AT PEMBERLEY A holiday sequel to “Pride and Prejudice.” Round House Theatre, 4545 East-West Hwy., Bethesda. 240-644-1100. www.roundhousetheatre.org. $10-$60.

VIRGINIA BROADWAY BOUND The third and last show in Neil Simon’s autobiographical trilogy of plays. 1st Stage, 1524 Spring Hill

Theater Lab, 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. www.kennedy-center.org. $39.

DANCE

LIZ LAUREN/LOOKINGGLASS THEATRE COMPANY

Jamie Abelson, left, is Ishmael and Anthony Fleming III is Queequeg in “Moby Dick,” an adaptation of Herman Melville’s seafaring tale, at Arena Stage through Dec. 24. Rd., McLean. 703-854-1856. www.1ststagetysons.org. $15-$30. SILVER BELLES A world-premiere musical by Matt Conner about a Christmas pageant in Sylva Ridge, Tenn. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. 703-820-

9771. www.sigtheatre.org. $40-$100. TITANIC: THE MUSICAL A musical inspired by Peter Stone’s story about the “unsinkable” ship. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. 703-820-9771. www.sigtheatre.org. $40-$100.

COMEDY THE SECOND CITY’S A CHRISTMAS CAROL: TWIST YOUR DICKENS Friday at 3 and 8, Saturday at 1, Monday-Thursday at 8. The legendary comedy troupe parodies Charles Dickens’s classic. Kennedy Center,

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET Friday. Manassas Ballet Theatre and the Manassas Ballet Theatre Orchestra perform the traditional holiday ballet. Hylton Performing Arts Center, Merchant Hall, 10960 George Mason Cir., Manassas. 703-257-1811. www.manassasballet.org. $15-$65. WASHINGTON BALLET: THE NUTCRACKER Friday at 2 and 7 and Saturday at 11 and 3:30. This version is set in Georgetown and includes historic figures such as George Washington. Warner Theatre, 13th and E streets NW. 202-362-3606. www.washingtonballet.org. $30-$130. MARYLAND YOUTH BALLET: THE NUTCRACKER Friday at 7, Monday and Tuesday at 1 and 5. Maryland Youth Ballet presents its production of the holiday classic, now in its 27th year. Montgomery College, Robert E. Parilla Performing Arts Center, 51 Mannakee St., Rockville. 301608-2232. www.marylandyouthballet.org. $26. STEP AFRIKA!’S MAGICAL, MUSICAL, HOLIDAY STEP SHOW Tuesday-Thursday at 7:30. The local percussive dance company celebrates the holidays with a show featuring animals and a dance party with DJ Frosty the Snowman. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993, Ext. 2. www.atlasarts.org. $18-$40.


21 PG

B FEATURED LISTING B The Washington Ballet’s The Nutcracker

Set in 1882 Georgetown, this gorgeous production showcases the grandeur of The Washington Ballet’s international roster of dancers and the majestic Tchaikovsky score. TWB’s The Nutcracker has become a tradition for generations of family and friends to celebrate the holidays.

Final Performances! On Stage Now! Through December 24

The Warner Theatre 513 13th St. NW Washington, DC 20004 202.397.SEAT (7328) Get more information at washingtonballet.org and ticketmaster.com

Tickets priced for everyone, starting at $36

“Simply gorgeous!” ~The Washington Post

HOLIDAY EVENTS A Christmas Carol Music by Alan Menken

A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story of Christmas

November 17 January 8 Must close December 31 Today @ 3 PM & 7:45 PM 12/24, 12/28, 12/31 @ 3 PM 12/27, 12/28, 12/29, 12/30 @ 7:45 PM

This traditional, heart-warming story of Scrooge is told in a brand new way with a score filled with beautiful melodies and emotional lyrics. Experience the unforgettable characters and vivid imagery as Charles Dickens originally intended – in his own words – and rediscover this timeless classic presented in a masterful solo performance. “…if you have a favorite [Christmas Carol] – well, God bless you, every one… mine is actor Paul Morella’s solo version” –The Wash Post

Toby’s Dinner Theatre of Columbia 410.730.8311 Tobysdinnertheatre.com

Call for 2017 Season tickets and Subcriptions information now on sale!

Olney Theatre Center Mulitz-Gudelsky Theatre Lab 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Rd 301-924-3400 Olneytheatre.org

Recommended Tickets ages 10 start at $20 for and up

THEATRE The Second City's

Black Side of the Moon

Now Playing Through January 1, 2017

Inspired by a true story

Thurs 1/5 at 8pm (Pay What You Can) Fri 1/6 at 8pm Sat 1/7 at 8pm

Charm By Philip Dawkins

Fully Committed By Becky Mode

The Secret Garden

An all-African American cast of Chicago’s funniest and most audacious sketch and stand-up artists deconstructs and r econstructs Blackness through comedy. 2016 Jefferson Award, Outstanding New Play. A “portrait of pain, kindness, and an LGBTQ community in transition” (Time Out Chicago) 40 outrageous characters and one iconic, irrepressible Washington actor. “Tom Story is a knockout.” DCMTA “a comedic tour de force.” DCTS.com

Through Jan 8 Tues.-Fri. at 8 Sat 3 & 8, Sun 3 & 7

Marsha Norman and Lucy Simon’s Drama Desk and Tony Award®-winning musical based on the beloved children’s book.

Now Playing

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Co. 641 D Street NW 202-393-3939, woollymammoth.net Atlas Perf. Arts Center 1333 H Street NE 202-399-7993 ext 2 MosaicTheater.org MetroStage 1201 N. Royal St. Alex. VA 703-548-9044 www.metrostage.org Sidney Harman Hall 610 F Street NW www.ShakespeareTheatre.org 202-547-1122

Regular Tickets start at $35

“deliriously funny” — Washington Post

Tickets from $20

Directed by Natsu Onoda Power

$35 & up Group, student milit disc

Xmas eve and New Year’s eve twilight shows

Newly Tickets extended start at $44 through January 8!

MUSIC - CONCERTS U.S. Air Force Band

Friday, Feb 3, 4p.m. Sunday, Feb 12, 3-5 p.m.

Join the Concert Band as they perform for the Fairfax County District 10 Honors Band on Feb 3 and for the culmination of the 3rd Annual USAF Band Collegiate Symposium on Feb 12. College students from around the country join the USAF Band for rehearsals & a final concert at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall.

Feb 3: No tickets required. Hayfield Secondary School, 7630 Telegraph Rd, Alexandria, VA. Feb 12: Tickets TBA, Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall & Arts Center, 4915 E Campus Dr, Alexandria, VA.

Feb 3: Free, no tickets req. Feb 12: TBA

Visit usafband.af. mil/events/ index.asp for additional info.

Washington National Cathedral 3101 Wisconsin Ave., NW, DC 202.544.7077 www.folger.edu/consort

$30 - $60 Check website for discount information

Pre-Show Discussion with WETA’s Robert Aubry Davis on Fri., Jan. 6 at 6:30pm; FREE

$36

Discounts available for groups of 10+. Call: 202-312-1427

Free, no tickets required

Free parking available at the mansion

MUSIC - CHAMBER Medieval Illuminations

Fri, January 6 at 8pm Sat., January 7 at 7pm

COMEDY What To Expect When You’re Electing

Fridays & Saturdays at 7:30pm

A musical, political satire. We put the MOCK in Democracy! www.capsteps.com | Info: 202.312.1555

Ronald Reagan Building 1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Tix available at 202.397.SEAT ticketmaster.com

EXHIBITIONS The Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, DC presents an international exhibition of 735 amazing & beautiful miniature works of art, none larger than 6" in any direction.

Strathmore Mansion 10701 Rockville Pike Bethesda, MD 20852 301-581-5109 www.mpsgs.org

The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon • Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351 To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com

Does this page look familiar? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber. www.ebook3000.com

16-2898

NF407 5x.25

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Now thru Dec. 31 Tues. Thurs. Fri. & Sat. 10-4. Wed. 10-9 Sun. 12-4 Closed Mondays & Holidays

. FRIDAY,

83rd Annual International Exhibition of Fine Art in Miniature

THE WASHINGTON POST

FOLGERCONSORT

London’s acclaimed vocal quartet Orlando Consort joins Folger Consort and guest instrumentalists in the gothic splendor of the Washington National Cathedral. Hear work from the most important source of medieval English music, the Old Hall Manuscript, including pieces by and celebrating Henry V, as well as 15th-century carols.


22 PG

WORLD MUSIC AND DANCE CPAA Productions Ltd. presents

Image China: “Confucius”

Friday & Saturday, January 13 & 14 at 7:30 Sunday, January 15 at 1:30

With traditional Chinese music, opulent costumes, and expressive choreography, Confucius tells the story of the legendary scholar's journey through the kingdoms of Zhou Dynasty China, and his quest to instill codes of ethics, honor, and benevolence among the empire's rulers.

Kennedy Center Opera House Washington, DC

$30-$150

(202) 467-4600 kennedy-center.org/tickets/

Written and premiered in China, now in the US

The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon • Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351 To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com

Callin

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Participating PostPoints Partners: 9:30 Club • Adventure Theatre MTC • Arena Stage Bethesda Blues and Jazz Supper Club • The Birchmere • Black Cat Bobby McKey’s Dueling Piano Bar • EagleBank Arena • Ford’s Theatre Gold’s Gym • Harlem Globetrotters • International Spy Museum Mosaic Theater Company of DC • National Geographic Live Olney Theatre Center • The Omni Homestead Resort • Rodman’s Shakespeare Theatre Company • Signature Theatre • Smithsonian Theaters South Moon Under • Strathmore • Studio Theatre • Theater J The Washington Ballet • Washington National Cathedral Washington Performing Arts • Washington Wizards

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. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Find the daily questions in the PostPoints Column (Metro section). Submit your answers online at washingtonpost.com/postpoints (click “Quizzes”). Earn a contest entry for every correct answer!


Movies

23 EZ

Hidden Figures    

HOPPER STONE/20TH CENTURY FOX

An exploration of NASA’s untold history

I

A NN H ORNADAY

or historical treatise, “Hidden Figures” is a warm, lively, often funny depiction of women whose brains and work ethics were indefatigable, even in the face of racism and sexism at their most oppressive. Adapted by Theodore Melfi and Allison Schroeder from Margot Lee Shetterly’s book and directed by Melfi, “Hidden Figures” takes place at the height of the space race in the early 1960s, when the Soviets are winning the competition to get a manned mission into orbit, and when the pressure is on to get astronaut John Glenn (Glen Powell) and his colleagues in the Mercury program into their own supercharged tin cans. Although NASA www.ebook3000.com is strictly segregated, with the

African American mathematicians occupying their own office, Katherine is the most gifted computer on the site. She’s sent to work with Al Harrison (Kevin Costner), who’s annoyed when she disappears frequently throughout the day, but is impressed by her impeccable results. It turns out she’s running a mile and a half to use the “colored only” bathroom, a sequence played for both laughs and wincing disbelief in “Hidden Figures.” Just as family and marriage pointed up the pathology of racism in “Loving,” this movie adroitly portrays the sheer waste and inefficiency of racism and misogyny. Just think how much has been lost, the movie suggests,

over centuries of depriving ourselves of the brains, talents and leadership of more than half our population? Those ideas weave their way gracefully through “Hidden Figures,” which centers mostly on Katherine (including her courtship with a handsome Army colonel named James Johnson, played by Mahershala Ali), but includes vividly effective scenes of Dorothy teaching herself to program a new piece of technology called the IBM, and Mary pursuing her engineering degree at a local allHIDDEN CONTINUED ON 24

DECEMBER 23, 2016

off to a spirited start and rarely lets up, sharing with viewers a little-known chapter of history as inspiring as it is intriguing. After a brief prologue, when we meet Katherine Johnson as a teenage math prodigy, the film catches up with her in 1961, when she’s a young widow working at NASA’s Langley facility in Hampton, Va., as a “human computer,” sharing a ride to work with her colleagues Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson. The fact that these gifted women are played by the equally gifted Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe, respectively, says all you need to know about a movie propelled by their alternately salty and affecting performances. Far from a dry scientific tutorial

Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe) helped NASA launch astronaut John Glenn into orbit.

. FRIDAY,

t’s a fact of movie life that, during the holiday season, tears will be shed. No sooner had viewers dried and fluffed their hankies after seeing “Moonlight” and “Manchester by the Sea” than they were awash again during “Loving” and “Lion.” Even “La La Land,” Damien Chazelle’s affectionate ode to song-and-dance musicals, tempers the celebration with a generous helping of heartache. So one of the most gratifying qualities of “Hidden Figures” is how it bursts onto the screen like a shot of distilled, exhilarating joy. This bracing movie, about a group of brilliant African American women whose scientific and mathematical skills helped NASA launch its space exploration program in the 1950s and 1960s, gets

Gripping film tells tale of three African American women behind space program

THE WASHINGTON POST

BY


24 EZ

Movies Ratings guide

Fences    

Masterpiece

 Very good

 Okay

 Poor



Also reviewed Lion An Indian adoptee searches for his birth mother in this fact-based drama. 25 Sing Cuddly animals compete in a singing competition in this animated comedy. 26

Plus Common Sense Media 28 DAVID LEE/PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Denzel Washington and Viola Davis reprise their Broadway roles as Troy and Rose Maxson in “Fences,” which Washington also directed.

Opening next week There are no new movies opening next week.

It’s Troy’s world, for better or worse Denzel Washington brings August Wilson’s triumph to the big screen

THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

BY

A NN H ORNADAY

D

enzel Washington delivers a leonine, devouringly powerful performance as one of American theater’s most imposing patriarchs in “Fences,” a classic of contemporary dramatic literature that has finally received a respectful, often stirring, adaptation for the screen.

HIDDEN FROM 23

white high school. Some of the film’s most stirring scenes feature the hackneyed conceit of clueless white folk being enlightened by their African American educators, but Henson, Spencer and Monáe give them grit and knowing gravitas. If characters played by Jim Parsons and Kirsten Dunst sometimes seem too cruel to be true, they feature in some of the

Washington takes on directing duties as well for a film that was adapted by playwright August Wilson before he died in 2005. As a piece of cinema, “Fences” doesn’t swing for the go-for-broke limits suggested by the title. Stagy, speech-y and limited mostly to a scruffy back yard of a working-class house in 1950s Pittsburgh, it often feels confined, even when Washington’s camera ventures out to a neighborhood bar or workplace. But the constricted atmosphere is precisely what is called for in a rich character study of a man bursting with pent-up resentment, thwarted potential and masculine pride. As the film’s ferociously charismatic protago-

nist Troy Maxson, Washington roars and keeps on roaring, serving up Wilson’s angry soliloquies not so much as verbal arias as alpha-male rituals of dominance and aggression. As he prowls his own postage-stamp sized piece of turf, Troy emerges as a figure every bit as mythic, contradictory and classically combative as his name suggests. There may not have been city sanitation workers in Euripides’s time, but Wilson imbues Troy’s profession with welcome gravitas and heroic meaning. As “Fences” opens, Troy and his best friend Bono (Stephen Henderson) are just finishing their shift, with Troy loudly complaining that the better-paid drivers’ jobs are un-

available to African Americans. When the two repair to Troy’s backyard to share a bottle of gin and repartee, Troy’s talk continues, escalating into an exuberant recollection of when he “stared down” death during a bout of pneumonia. With Washington seeming to grow steadily more tipsy in real time, the sequence announces in no uncertain terms that we’re in the hands of a master storyteller — a spinner of yarns for whom narrative has become both a prison and armor against a world in which, he says later, he was born with two strikes already against him. Part of the audience’s fascination with Troy is how swiftly he

film’s most bluntly effective scenes. Costner is ideally suited to play the rumpled, constantly eating Harrison, portrayed here as a man too focused and distracted to have time for petty prejudices. Attractively shot and designed and driven along by a catchy score by Pharrell Williams (who’s also a producer), “Hidden Figures” is pure pleasure to watch, with Melfi having as much fun with gorgeous period costumes

and interior elements as with ratcheting up the tension as Glenn’s takeoff approaches. (It’s Katherine’s breathtakingly precise calculations that allow him to launch and land safely.) Viewers old enough to remember how that voyage went will find it infused with new suspense and energy this time around; those who don’t are in for an unforgettable ride. With Glenn’s recent passing,

“Hidden Figures” has taken on even more poignancy and timeliness. It’s difficult to imagine a more stirring way to honor his memory, as well as the courage and vision of the extraordinary women who helped him soar.

FENCES CONTINUED ON 27

ann.hornaday@washpost.com

PG. Opens Sunday at area theaters. Contains some mature thematic elements and brief coarse language. 127 minutes.


Movies

25 EZ

Lion    

Lost long ago, a man searches Google for his past BY

S TEPHANIE M ERRY

“Lion” is based on one of those stories that’s almost too incredible to be true. As a young boy growing up in a poor village in India during the 1980s, Saroo Brierley got lost nearly 1,000 miles from home with no way to retrace his steps. Eventually adopted by an Australian couple, he became obsessed decades later with tracking down his birth family using Google Earth. Brierley’s book about his quest, “A Long Way Home,” is ideally suited for the screen — with or without the seamless product placement. Luke Davies adapted the memoir for the screen, separating the story into two distinct halves. The movie is necessarily more harrowing during its first chapter with the remarkable Sunny Pawar playing a 5-year-old Saroo. Things go awry one night after the little boy ventures out to help his brother make some money but ends up on an out-of-service train that chugs its way to Kolkata. Pawar is only 8, but he’s a spirited, adorable young actor capable of transmitting the depths of despair when it becomes clear he may never see his family

THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

Dev Patel stars as Saroo Brierly, an orphan who searches for his family in India, in “Lion.”

again, since he doesn’t even know the name of his village. Dev Patel picks up the baton to play the older Saroo. By that point, he’s a tortured soul who woos a girlfriend (Rooney Mara) only to neglect her by spending all of his time on his computer searching for a tiny spot on a map. This may be Patel’s best performance, and he was nominated for a Golden Globe for the role of a man who isn’t entirely sure who he is. Dur-

ing a conversation with new acquaintances, he explains that he’s from Kolkata. “What part?” an Indian man asks him. “I’m adopted — I’m not really Indian,” he explains, although he doesn’t seem entirely convinced. Soon after that, he begins having flashbacks to long-forgotten memories that he hopes might help him find his way back home. Nicole Kidman also was nominated for a Golden Globe for play-

ing Saroo’s mother, Sue. It’s welldeserved: She’s stunning and shattering as a slightly overprotective matriarch whose patience and compassion know no limits. She has her hands full with Saroo’s brother, Mantosh (Divian Ladwa), who has psychological wounds from childhood that may never heal. But her frustration never outweighs her tenderness. Where the first half of the movie is a nail-biter, as Saroo teeters on

the edge of danger, barely escaping multiple adults with nefarious intentions, the second has a harder time keeping its momentum. Internal journeys are more difficult to capture, and director Garth Davis struggles to make Saroo’s obsessive computer search as thrilling as his attempts to survive on the streets of Kolkata. If the pacing feels off, the film’s remarkable conclusion more than makes up for it. Technically, the movie is a marvel with gorgeous cinematography by Greig Fraser (“Zero Dark Thirty,” “Foxcatcher”) and an aching score by Dustin O’Halloran and Haushka, who are also up for a Golden Globe. “Lion” is a complex movie, with its profound themes of home and identity, and its tonally disparate halves. A smartly understated approach to Brierley’s story holds it all together. Sometimes the truth alone is enough. stephanie.merry@washpost.com

PG-13. Opens Sunday at area theaters. Contains some sensuality. In English, Hindi and Bengali with subtitles. 118 minutes.

Passengers    

This isn’t what they signed on for BY

A NN H ORNADAY

JAIMIE TRUEBLOOD/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT/COLUMBIA PICTURES

Aurora (Jennifer Lawrence) and Jim (Chris Pratt) wake up way too early in their voyage through space in “Passengers.”

“Passengers” to where it needs to go, which is a resolution in keeping with a movie that wants to have its cake and eat it too, no matter how much credibility it strains, or how many political and ethical quandaries it elides. ann.hornaday@washpost.com

PG-13. At area theaters. Contains sexuality, nudity, action and peril. 116 minutes.

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Visually, “Passengers” is attractive, if not terribly imaginative: Dominated by shades of white, chrome and gray, the production design is most memorable when Aurora does her daily laps in the coolest swimming pool in the known universe. Tyldum, best known for directing “The Imitation Game,” isn’t a dynamic stylist as much as a competent executor of what’s on the page. He gets

. FRIDAY,

is how a passenger named Aurora, played by Jennifer Lawrence, comes to figure in the story. Going into detail about that development wouldn’t be sporting, but it’s safe to say that, like the recent film “Collateral Beauty,” the plot of “Passengers” hinges on a morally dubious act that the filmmakers gloss over in a series of creepy justifications and a sudden thirdact reversal. Although Pratt doesn’t make much of an impact as the generically square-jawed Everyman hero, Lawrence exerts her usual magnetism in “Passengers,” her hair coifed into a meticulously messed-up platinum-blonde bob and her athletic frame slipping easily into a series of gorgeous minimalist outfits. Although Spaihts’s script doesn’t allow for much expressive range, she’s able, in one or two scenes, to infuse real warmth and feisty humor into an otherwise sterile, somewhat dreary setup. That makes it all the more disappointing when her gutsy spirit turns to mush late in www.ebook3000.com the proceedings.

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In “Passengers,” Chris Pratt plays a man who, while in suspended animation during a 120-year commercial space mission to a faraway colony planet, is mistakenly awakened mid-trip. Adrift and alone in a massive floating super-mall — tricked out with a basketball court, Japanese and Mexican restaurants and an elegant bar staffed by an obliging, crimson-jacketed droid — Pratt’s character faces the existential challenge of living out his days in solitude, dying long before his 5,000 fellow travelers reach their destination. Meanwhile, viewers face a challenge of their own in accepting a movie that feels alternately dreary and patently derivative, culminating in over-plotted set pieces, a conveniently jammed-in narrative device and a final image that beggars belief, patience and goodwill. Pratt’s character, a Denver mechanic named Jim Preston, is a bland, buff, utterly anonymous “good” guy, who wants to resettle on a distant outpost called Home-

stead II so he can return to making and repairing things. (A marketing video for the private company running the planet describes Earth as “overpopulated, overpriced and overrated.” Amen, sister!) Far more interesting is Arthur, the bartender with whom Jim strikes up a friendship and who, as channeled by Michael Sheen in an ingratiating performance, bears more than a passing resemblance to Alan Cumming at his most impishly subversive. Film fans will immediately detect a nod to “The Shining” in the bar sequences, which possess the same echoing sense of dislocation and weirdness. Director Morten Tyldum, working from a script by Jon Spaihts, doesn’t push the sci-fi genre forward as much as quote some of its greatest hits, from “2001: A Space Odyssey” to “Moon,” “Gravity” and “The Martian” and Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus,” which Spaihts also wrote. The most original and intriguing element of “Passengers” turns out to be its most troubling, which


26 EZ

Movies Sing    

Saved by the singing, anthropomorphic animals BY

M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN

The animated comedy “Sing” has one big thing going for it: movie stars playing singing animals. There’s a second appeal if you follow such television shows as “The Voice” and “American Idol.” The movie is set during an amateur vocal competition. Okay, so “La La Land” it ain’t. Still, the sight and sound of British heartthrob Taron Egerton as a crooning gorilla named Johnny — and Reese Witherspoon as the pig Rosita, Seth MacFarlane as the mouse Mike and Scarlett Johansson as the punk porcupine Ash, all singing their little hearts out — is just charming enough to keep anyone looking for a family-friendly movie option this holiday season happy. The naughty jokes never stray very far from the realm of flatulence, and the sounds coming out the other ends are, like those generated by Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in “La La Land,” surprisingly easy on the ears. Former “Idol” contestants Tori Kelly and Jennifer Hudson also provide voices for, respectively,

ILLUMINATION ENTERTAINMENT/UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

Theater owner Buster Moon (voiced by Matthew McConaughey), left, plans a singing competition to raise money to save his business, and Ash (Scarlett Johansson), a punk-rock porcupine, joins the fray.

an elephant with stage fright and a young sheep diva (voiced, in her later years, by Jennifer Saunders, who proved she had some pipes as the fairy godmother in “Shrek 2.”) The story, insubstantial as it is,

revolves around the efforts of a koala named Buster Moon (Matthew McConaughey) to revive the fortunes of his dying theater. Hence: the singing contest. Problems arise when the prize offered is mistakenly advertised as

$100,000, which Buster doesn’t have. Other mild conflicts emerge in the form of Rosita’s efforts to juggle her dreams of celebrity with the demands of a large family and Johnny’s struggle to leave behind a life of crime. The

tension is never unbearable, even when generated by a trio of mobster bears in pursuit of Mike, for reasons I have, quite frankly, forgotten. The animation, courtesy of Illumination Entertainment (“Despicable Me”), is serviceably cute, adding the eye-popping delights of bioluminescent squid to the strange allure of a menagerie of animals rendering everything from such contemporary charttoppers as Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off ” to Shocking Blue’s 1969 hit “Venus.” There’s even a snippet of obscure scat singer Shooby Taylor’s early-1980s oddity “StoutHearted Men.” (Kudos to the film’s music supervisor. Bonus points for Mom and Dad if they recognize it.) “Sing” ends, predictably and without straining, on a high note, with everybody’s problems resolved. If only real life could so easily be realigned, by a singing pig. michael.osullivan@washpost.com

PG. At area theaters. Contains some mild rude humor. 108 minutes.

Assassin’s Creed    

A powered-up journey to a violent past

THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

BY

M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN

My first thought, 20 minutes into “Assassin’s Creed” and the sonic assault of the soundtrack’s mix of bombastic guitar riffs and body-blow sound effects: This movie isn’t nearly loud enough. After all, I could still make out some of the dialogue. My second thought? Nobody goes to a movie like “Assassin’s Creed” for the dialogue. Director Justin Kurzel’s last film was the excellent and underappreciated “Macbeth,” which boasted a screenplay by William Shakespeare (more or less, courtesy of a smartly abridged adaptation by Todd Louiso, Jacob Koskoff and Michael Lesslie.) Inspired by the popular video game series about a time-traveling assassin, Kurzel and Lesslie are slumming a bit here — abetted by co-writers Adam Cooper and Bill Collage of “Exodus: Gods and Kings” — with a script that fleshes out the game’s backstory about the centuries-old conflict between the heroic Brotherhood of Assassins and the evil Knights

Templar with a script that is larded with often turgid (and occasionally unintelligible) declarations of mission and purpose. Although the movie, like the games, is clearly about little more than fighting — and running, climbing, jumping, kickboxing and bouncing off walls — all that parkour-like action has a lot to do with the search for Adam and Eve’s apple, a relic that’s advertised as holding the secret to world peace. The movie’s hero, Cal, a condemned murderer, is the last descendant in the bloodline of the 15th-century Assassins, who have sworn to protect it. A day after he is executed in a Texas prison, Cal awakens to find himself in a mysterious facility in Madrid, where scientists are about to plug him into something called the Animus, transporting him — or, rather, his consciousness — back to Inquisition-era Spain and the body of his ancestor, Aguilar. Two-time Academy Award nominee Michael Fassbender reunites with his “Macbeth” co-

star, Oscar-winner Marion Cotillard, as Cal and Sofia, the doctor who is overseeing Cal’s search for the so-called Apple of Eden. Why is a desiccated piece of fruit so important? As nearly as I could figure out, because it contains the genetic code for free will and the cure for human aggression. Its last known whereabouts were with Aguilar. Other big-name stars appearing in the film include Jeremy Irons, Charlotte Rampling and Brendan Gleeson, all of whom, collectively, lend it a patina of prestige and gravitas that, for the most part, it neither deserves nor even attempts to justify. Their sacrifice, however, is appreciated. Pretentious poppycock aside, “Assassin’s Creed” isn’t quite as bad as one might fear, as measured against the abysmal track record of movies inspired by video games. In other words, it’s incrementally more fun than it is silly. And Kurzel certainly knows his way around a camera, aided by “Macbeth” cinematographer Adam Arkapaw, who conjures a

KERRY BROWN/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

Cal’s (Michael Fassbender) bloodline saves him from death and sends him back in time to learn about an ancient ancestor.

pleasingly muted palette of grimy browns and grays for the scenes set in the past, in sharp contrast with the coldly clinical blues and whites of the present day. And the fight choreography, happily, is just coherent enough to make out who’s hitting whom. Why they’re hitting each other is a whole different story. “What the f--- is going on?” asks Cal at one point, expressing a senti-

ment that those in the audience who never picked up an Xbox controller — if they’re even naive enough to think this movie is for them — will no doubt be asking themselves. michael.osullivan@washpost.com

PG-13. At area theaters. Contains intense action and violence, mature thematic material and brief strong language. 115 minutes.


Movies

27 EZ

Why Him?    

Family values put through the wringer BY

A LAN Z ILBERMAN

Christmas is one of the busiest moviegoing days of the year, and not just because many families need a two-hour break from each other. Some of the year’s best, most exciting films come out around the holidays. “Why Him?” is not among them. The comedy from director and co-writer John Hamburg (“I Love You, Man”) exists primarily as counterprogramming for the miserable souls who need a movie when “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” and “Passengers” are sold out. Despite flashes of brilliance, “Why Him?” is perfunctory and boorish, the sort of film that already has begun to fade from memory before you’re too annoyed by it. Bryan Cranston risks typecasting as Ned Fleming, a middleclass Everyman who loves his family and the modest printing company he runs. His daughter, Stephanie (Zoey Deutch), is his jewel, so he is shocked when she announces that she will not be returning home from Stanford University for Christmas. Instead, she suggests that the Flemings fly out to visit her and meet Laird (James Franco), the tech mogul she’s dating. Laird does not make a good first impression, unwittingly talking about his nether regions during a video chat. His Silicon Valley home is bizarre, even vulgar, furnished

FENCES FROM 24

with intrusive gadgets and transgressive nude sculptures. The holiday becomes a battle of wills, as Ned tries to derail Stephanie’s new relationship and Laird attempts to ingratiate himself with the family. Although family and acceptance are themes of the film, “Why Him?” is not for all ages. It easily earns its R rating with a steady stream of obscenities and gross-out gags that make the

ann.hornaday@washpost.com

PG-13. Opens Sunday at area theaters. Contains mature thematic elements, obscenity and some sexual references. www.ebook3000.com 139 minutes.

goingoutguide@washpost.com

R. At area theaters. Contains coarse language, nudity, violence and crude humor. 111 minutes.

ALS O PLAYIN G Star ratings are from Post reviews; go to goingoutguide.com/movies for the full-length reviews. Movies not reviewed by The Post are marked “NR.” For showtimes, see the Movie Directory.

dysfunctional family at the holidays has all the right ingredients, but they’re mixed with a heavy hand. (PG-13, 111 minutes, contains comic sexual innuendo, prescription drug abuse and some obscenity. At area theaters.)

 THE ACCOUNTANT

Ben Affleck plays a math whiz with a secret life in this intriguing, actionfueled mystery story. (R, 128 minutes, contains strong violence and profanity. At University Mall Theatre.)  ALLIED

Crackling chemistry between Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard fails to ignite a soggy ending in this World War II melodrama. (R, 124 minutes, contains violence, coarse language, sensuality, nudity and brief drug use. At Bow Tie Harbour 9.)

 ARRIVAL Amy Adams delivers a moving performance as a linguist making contact with alien beings in this sleek, sophisticated and thoughtful sci-fi film from Denis Villeneuve. (PG-13, 116 minutes, contains brief strong obscenity. At area theaters.)  COLLATERAL BEAUTY Will Smith stars as a grieving father struggling to cope with the death of his daughter in this tear-jerker. (PG13, 97 minutes, contains brief strong language. At area theaters.)

 ALMOST CHRISTMAS

This feel-good comedy about a

MOVIES CONTINUED ON 29

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Those forces come together in the swirling vortex of Troy’s psyche in “Fences,” which takes the measure of its unruly main character, down to the last troublesome inch. Wilson’s writing and Washington’s generous performance allow the audience to revel in Troy’s spiky humor and brusquely delivered home truths, even while wincing at his capacity for self-deception and brutishness. Ringing with ancient wisdom and searing relevance, “Fences” feels as if it’s been crafted for the ages, and for this very minute. Like all timeless personalities, Troy is a man for our era, whether he’s coming at us in full roar or by way of a far more haunting whisper.

burg draws out well beyond the point of coherence. The comic potential of Gustav and Laird’s sparring matches, for instance, deflates faster than a whoopee cushion. Franco and Cranston are seasoned performers, and their antichemistry is kind of admirable. Laird may be forthright and strange, yet he has no idea how he constantly offends Ned, whose attempts at sabotage also demon-

. FRIDAY,

roles that earned each of them a Tony Award for the 2010 Broadway revival of “Fences.”) Other characters come and go, including Troy’s adult son by another marriage, and his brother Gabriel (Mykelti Williamson), a braininjured war veteran whose perfunctory appearances feel more symbolically convenient than organic. As Gabriel’s name suggests, the specter (or promise) of heavenly reckoning is a constant presence in “Fences,” which among its many virtues gives the lie to this era’s facile condemnations of identity politics. In this surpassingly American story, we see how historical and structural realities inscribe themselves into our most personal traumas and triumphs. The fates and legacies that clash and enmesh themselves throughout “Fences” are just as much products of Oedipal psychology and personal trauma as the Middle Passage and the Great Migration.

humor in “Bad Santa 2” seem tame by comparison. The best comic set pieces all involve understatement: One unreasonably funny scene features Laird’s assistant Gustav (Keegan-Michael Key) helping Ned operate a modern Japanese toilet. Few will be immune from the giggles when Ned’s efforts to preserve dignity are interrupted by well-timed toilet noises. Unfortunately, there are also scenes that Ham-

THE WASHINGTON POST

conjures dramatically competing emotions: One moment we’re sympathizing with him for not getting his shot as a professional baseball player, and the next he’s running down star players by pooh-poohing the Negro Leagues. One moment he embodies the kind of strength and self-reliance for which the American working class is deservedly lionized, the next he’s cruelly stamping out the ambitions of his teenage son Cory (Jovan Adepo), who wants to play football for his high school team. Overseeing Troy’s combustible mix of rage and remorse is his wife Rose, portrayed by Viola Davis in a magnificent performance rooted in stillness, but bursting with passion, life and — when the plot takes a devastating turn — superhuman fortitude and self-sacrifice. (Washington and Davis are reprising

SCOTT GARFIELD/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

For Christmas, Ned (Bryan Cranston), left, travels to California to meet the man he doesn’t want his daughter to marry — Laird (James Franco), a brash tech mogul — in “Why Him?”

strate a keen lack of self-awareness. The strait-laced guy who comes to find that no one respects him isn’t a new comic conceit, yet Cranston has enough skill that we can see the fear that informs his character’s behavior. Still, “Why Him?” has little curiosity about the impulses that drive its characters, relying instead on stale generation-gap humor. Ned’s dying, paper-based company is set up as a foil to Laird’s digital business model. Meanwhile, some viewers’ minds may wander from the plot to such thorny topics as the economics of printed wedding invitations. “Why Him?” ends on a folksy note, in a maudlin affirmation of family values that is both strange and strangely unsatisfying, given the film’s previous violations of good taste. (The most remarkable thing about it is its willingness to offend.) Contemporary comedy fans are likely to roll their eyes at the emotional parts, while more old-fashioned moviegoers may wonder what’s so funny about an aquarium filled with moose urine. When it comes to family entertainment options, board game night at home is looking better and better.


28 EZ

“THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR .” Movies MATTHEW JACOBS ‒ THE HUFFINGTON POST

Common Sense Media

What parents need to know

Sing

5

NOW PLAYING AT SELECT THEATRES

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES & SHOWTIMES

G O L D E N G L O B E®

B E ST P IC T U R E

3

DRAMA

N O M I NAT I O N S

DRAMA

BEST ACTOR CASEY AFFLECK MICHELLE WILLIAMS BEST DIRECTOR KENNETH LONERGAN BEST SCREENPLAY KENNETH LONERGAN BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

WINNER

C R I T I C S ’ C H O I C E AWA R D S INCLUDING

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“A

4

WINNER

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW AWARDS

BEST PICTURE BEST ACTOR CASEY AFFLECK INCLUDING

3

WINNER

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE AWARDS INCLUDING

BEST ACTOR CASEY AFFLECK

MASTERPIECE.” “####

NO FILM THIS YEAR HAS MOVED ME MORE WITH ITS HUMOR, HEART AND HUMANITY.”

WINNER

WINNER

BEST ACTOR

BEST ACTOR

CASEY AFFLECK G O T H A M AWA R D

CASEY AFFLECK BOSTON SOCIETY OF FILM CRITICS

977% as of 12/20/16

CASEY

AFFLECK

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AND

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. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

A PICTURE BY

KYLE

CHANDLER

(PG) Age 7+ Musical has great songs, slapstick laughs, mixed messages. “Sing” is an animated comedy (with tons of music and singing) from the producers of the “Despicable Me” films. It centers on a theater-owning koala (voiced by Matthew McConaughey) who decides to run a talent contest to boost ticket sales for his financially flagging theater. The A-list voice cast, reality talent show premise, familiar pop songs and cute animal characters make this an appealing pick for families with young kids. But note that there’s some peril and danger: Angry gangster bears try to kill a cheating mouse, a gorilla thief is mean to his son, and a building collapses spectacularly, putting many key characters in danger. There are also slapstick laughs, silly ILLUMINATION ENTERTAINMENT/ jokes, risque moments UNIVERSAL STUDIOS (from bunny singers waggling their bottoms while they sing “oh my gosh, look at her butt!” to a pig exclamation). The film also husband passionately kissing offers a realistic look at the his wife after she performs in a racial tensions of the Civil sexy costume) and insult Rights era (segregated language (“stupid,” “porky,” etc.). bathrooms, libraries, schools, And while the movie clearly facilities), and audiences will promotes trying hard, being learn a lot about these brave, working together and pioneering women and what following your dreams, it also they had to overcome to make has some stereotypes and mixed their mark at NASA. They’re messages about lying, parentexcellent role models, and their child relationships and the story is full of positive messages value of motherhood and and themes, including integrity, homemaking. (108 minutes) perseverance, teamwork and communication. (127 minutes) (PG) Age 10+ True story of African American women at NASA. “Hidden Figures” is based on the inspiring true story of three brilliant African American women who worked at NASA in the 1950s and ’60s as “human computers,” making calculations and contributions that helped launch the manned spaceflight program. Dorothy Vaughn (Octavia Spencer), Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe), and Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson) were engineers and computers at NASA at a time when both women and African Americans were still widely discriminated against, particularly in segregated Virginia, where NASA’s Langley Research Center is based. There’s a little bit of romance (a few kisses, flirty comments and slow dancing) and a bit of salty language (mostly along the lines of “damn” and “Jesus Christ” as an

Lion

(PG-13) Age 13+ Great performances in emotional, intense biographical drama. “Lion” is an emotional biographical drama about Saroo Brierley, who was lost to his family in India at age 5 after ending up on a train bound more than 1,000 miles from his home town. Based on Brierley’s memoir, “A Long Way Home,” the movie chronicles how Saroo (Dev Patel) used Google Earth to track down his birth family after a 25-year separation. Children are shown in danger — including a disturbing scene in which homeless children are abducted as they sleep, one in which young Saroo is physically inspected in a creepy manner and others in which he’s forced to live on the streets with no shelter or food. When the action switches to Saroo’s adulthood, there are scenes of implied sex

The German pig Gunter (voiced by comedian Nick Kroll) joins a competition launched to save a theater in “Sing.”

(he and his girlfriend are in bed, half dressed) and passionate kissing. Adults (20-somethings) drink at dinner parties, restaurants and at home; there’s also cigarette smoking and infrequent strong language (”s---,” “ass,” etc.). Underlying everything are powerful lessons about perseverance, gratitude, family bonds and the power of technology. (118 minutes)

Assassin’s Creed (PG-13) Age 13+ Confusing, boring, violent videogame-inspired movie. “Assassin’s Creed” is a fantasy action movie based on the popular video game series. As in the games, the main issue here is violence — although the movie is far less brutally gory than the games. Still, there are several battles with knives, slicing and stabbing, bows and arrows, and some dead bodies, including a mother, who’s found by her son. The same boy performs a dangerous stunt on his bike and crashes. Capital punishment is depicted, and a man grabs a woman roughly by the neck. Strong language is infrequent but includes uses of “f---” and “s---.” The main male character (Michael Fassbender) is shirtless for about half the movie, and there are references to a “pimp” and to “drug addicts.” Fans of the game may enjoy the movie, but otherwise, it’s a confusing, humorless, boring mess. (115 minutes) Common Sense Media helps families make smart media choices. Go to commonsensemedia.org for age-based and educational ratings and reviews for movies, games, apps, television shows, websites and books.


Movies

29 EZ

obscenity and crude sexual humor throughout, drug use and graphic nudity. At area theaters.)

MOVIES FROM 27

 DOCTOR STRANGE

This Marvel superhero story starring Benedict Cumberbatch has a ho-hum story, but offers a kaleidoscope of special effects. (PG-13, 115 minutes, contains scifi violence and action throughout, and an intense crash sequence. At area theaters.)

 ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY Gareth Edwards’s perfectly serviceable, if undistinguished, placeholder pays homage to the imaginative and physical world that George Lucas and his collaborators built four decades ago. (PG-13, 133 minutes, contains extended sequences of sci-fi action and violence. At area theaters.)

 THE EAGLE HUNTRESS

This documentary about a 13-yearold girl living with her nomadic family in Mongolia is spectacular to look at and inspiring to contemplate. (G, 87 minutes, contains nothing objectionable. In Kazakh with subtitles. At area theaters.)

 STORKS This animated comedy should delight the kiddie crowd, but no one else. (PG, 87 minutes, contains some mild rude humor. At University Mall Theatre.)

 ELLE

A brutal rape sets in motion a mystery about unruly gender expectations and desires in this French thriller starring Isabelle Huppert. (R, 131 minutes, contains violence involving sexual assault, disturbing sexual content, some grisly images, brief graphic nudity, and obscenity. In French with subtitles. At AFI Silver Theatre.)

 THINGS TO COME Isabelle Huppert plays a woman in the throes of change in this closely observed slice of middle-aged life. (PG-13, 102 minutes, contains brief profanity and drug use. In French with subtitles. At Cinema Arts Theatre.) BARRY WETCHER/WARNER BROS PICTURES

Brigitte (Helen Mirren), Amy (Keira Knightley) and Raffi (Jacob Latimore) are hired to impersonate Death, Love and Time to rattle a grief-stricken man in “Collateral Beauty.”

 FANTASTIC BEASTS AND

from Lin-Manuel Miranda and cultural authenticity. (PG, 96 minutes, contains peril, some scary images and material that may be upsetting to young viewers. At area theaters.)

WHERE TO FIND THEM This prequel, written by J.K. Rowling, should satisfy die-hard “Harry Potter” nerds who have been going through withdrawal. (PG-13, 132 minutes, contains fantasy action violence. At area theaters.)

 MOONLIGHT

Director Barry Jenkins turns a simple coming-of-age story into a thoughtful, reflective meditation. (R, 111 minutes, contains sexuality, drug use, brief violence and obscenity. At area theaters.)

 HACKSAW RIDGE

Mel Gibson directs this stirring portrait of self-sacrifice, about a pacifist who becomes a hero during one of the bloodiest battles of World War II. (R, 139 minutes, contains intense, prolonged, realistically graphic sequences of war violence, including grisly, bloody images. At area theaters.)  JACK REACHER: NEVER

 JACKIE

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling dazzle in Damien Chazelle’s exuberant, thoughtful ode to bygone movie musicals. (PG-13, 128 minutes, contains some obscenity. At area theaters.)

 LOVING

In this moving drama, Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton play Richard and Mildred Loving, the real-life couple who took their desire to marry outside their race to the Supreme Court in the 1960s. (PG-13, 123 minutes, contains mature thematic elements. At area theaters.)  A MAN CALLED OVE

This darkly comic drama is based on Fredrik Backman’s 2012 novel about a widower contemplating suicide. (PG-13, 116 minutes, contains strong language and some disturbing images. In Swedish with subtitles. At the Avalon and Cinema Arts Theatre.)

Lonergan drama brims with life. (R, 137 minutes, contains obscenity throughout and some sexual content. At area theaters.)  MISS PEREGRINE’S

HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN Director Tim Burton puts his stamp on the Ransom Riggs bestseller about magical misfits. (PG-13, 122 minutes, contains intense sequences of fantasy violence and peril. At University Mall Theatre.)  MISS SLOANE

This Washington-centric thriller stars Jessica Chastain as a highpower hired gun. (R, 129 minutes, contains crude language and some sexuality. At area theaters.)

 MANCHESTER BY THE

 MOANA

SEA Sweet and sad, with an emphasis on the latter, this Kenneth

This Disney animated feature about the daughter of a Polynesian chief, www.ebook3000.com boasts humor, catchy songs

 OFFICE CHRISTMAS

PARTY A talented cast (Jason Bateman, Olivia Munn, Courtney B. Vance, Jennifer Aniston) delivers lowbrow yuks (and yucks) with twinkly, sardonic verve in this holiday comedy. (R, 105 minutes, contains

“THRILLING!”

-A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES DC’s only nonprofit film center NOMINATED FOR SIX GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS!

MO ONLIGHT ####

Fri–Sat: 11:15 AM, 1:45, 4:45, 7:30 Sun–Thu: 2:10, 5:00, 7:40 GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE A MAN CALLED

OSCAR SHORT-LIST OVE Fri–Sat: 2:00, 8:00

Fri–Sat: 11:00 AM, 5:00 Sun–Thu: 2:20 Sun–Thu: 11:45 AM, 8:00 NOMINATED FOR TWO GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS! Sun–Thu: 11:30 AM, 5:15

LOVING

5612 Connecticut Ave NW • (202) 966-6000 tickets online: www.theavalon.org

THE

EAGLE HUNTRESS WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

WASHINGTON, DC Landmark’s West End Cinema (202) 534-1907 BETHESDA Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema (301) 652-7273

GREENBELT P & G Old Greenbelt (301) 474-9744 SILVER SPRING AFI Silver (301) 495-6700

WWW.THEEAGLEHUNTRESSMOVIE.COM

DECEMBER 23, 2016

 LA LA LAND

FILM FRAME ILM/LUCASFILM/WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES

Cassian Andor (Diego Luna) and K-2SO (voiced by Alan Tudyk) conspire against the Empire in “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.”

Amy Adams plays a woman tortured by her past bad behavior and her ex-husband’s new book in Tom Ford’s creepily elegant, enigmatic drama. (R, 116 minutes, contains violence, obscenity and graphic nudity. At area theaters.)

BARBARA KRUGER SELECTS “Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles,” Saturday at 1. Free. National Gallery of Art, East Building, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. www.nga.gov. IPERSIGNIFICATO: UMBERTO ECO AND FILM “L’Avventura” and “Stagecoach,” Wednesday at 12:30. Free. National Gallery of Art, East Building, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-7374215. www.nga.gov. SPECIAL EVENTS: FALL 2016 “Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art,” Thursday at 12:30. Free. National Gallery of Art, East Building, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-7374215. www.nga.gov.

. FRIDAY,

Natalie Portman plays an iconic first lady as masterful mythmaker in Pablo Larraín’s exceptionally smart, intriguing film. (R, 100 minutes, contains brief strong violence and obscenity. At area theaters.)

 NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

REPERTORY

THE WASHINGTON POST

GO BACK This generic sequel, based on the Lee Child thrillers, stars Tom Cruise as the titular loner, an ex-military cop who rights wrongs — usually with his fists. (PG-13, 118 minutes, contains sequences of violence and action, some bloody images and language. At University Mall Theatre.)

 TROLLS Anna Kendrick and Justin Timberlake shine as the odd-couple protagonists in this animated delight about making your own happiness. (PG, 94 minutes, contains mild crude humor and action. At area theaters.)


30 EZ

MOVIE DIRECTORY DISTRICT

Landmark Atlantic Plumbing Cinema 807 V Street, NW AMC Loews Georgetown 14 3111 K Street N.W. Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!)

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) CC: 10:30-7:00-10:15 Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:45-2:35-8:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) CC: 10:151:15-4:30-7:30-10:45 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 9:45-12:504:00-7:00-10:15 La La Land (PG-13) CC: 10:55-12:25-1:55-3:254:50-6:20-7:45-9:15-10:40 Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 12:002:40-5:20-8:00-10:40 Sing (PG) CC: 10:15-11:505:10-8:30-9:45 Manchester by the Sea (R) CC: 1:20-7:10 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) CC: 10:00-12:30-3:00-5:257:50-10:25 Sing 3D (PG) CC: 12:452:25-3:15-6:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30 Office Christmas Party (R) CC: 7:55-10:25 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 10:354:25-10:20 Jackie (R) CC: (!) 9:5512:20-2:45-5:10-7:40-11:05 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) CC: 1:15-4:00 Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 5:25-11:00 Passengers (PG-13) 11:001:45-4:30-7:15-10:15 AMC Loews Uptown 1 3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:304:00-10:40 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:40-7:30

THE WASHINGTON POST

. FRIDAY,

DECEMBER 23, 2016

AMC Mazza Gallerie 5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) CC: 10:002:30-4:00-5:30-10:00 Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 12:002:40-5:20-8:00-10:35 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:3011:30-5:00-10:10 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:15-4:40-7:20-9:45 Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:00-7:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:00-7:00 Moana (PG) CC: 11:101:50-4:30-7:10-9:50 Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:10-7:40-8:30-10:30 Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10-4:50 Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum 6th Street & Independence Ave SW

To Space and Back 11:00AM Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 11:30-12:30-1:302:30-3:30-4:30 Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00-1:00-2:00-3:004:00-5:00 One World, One Sky: Big Bird's Adventure (NR) 10:30AM

12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:357:15-8:15-10:00 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 12:151:00-2:30-3:30-7:00-9:30 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:30-3:40-5:457:45-9:50 Miss Sloane (R) CC: (!) 7:10-9:55 Arrival (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:003:30-7:30-10:00 Landmark E Street Cinema 555 11th Street NW

Moonlight (R) CC: (!) 1:104:10-7:10-9:40 La La Land (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-1:00-2:00-3:304:00-5:00-6:30-7:00-8:009:30-10:00 Manchester by the Sea (R) CC: (!) 12:15-1:05-3:154:05-7:05-10:05 Nocturnal Animals (R) CC: (!) 1:15-4:15-7:15-9:45 Jackie (R) CC: (!) 12:302:50-5:10-6:45-7:309:15-9:50 Landmark West End Cinema 2301 M Street NW

Loving (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:154:15-7:15-10:00 Hacksaw Ridge (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:50 The Eagle Huntress (G) CC: (!) 1:30-4:30-7:30-9:40 Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 701 Seventh Street NW

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 1:15-7:05 Moana (PG) 11:00-7:30 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG13) 4:30 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 9:45-12:15-2:15-3:00-6:057:50-9:00-10:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 11:30-1:00-1:35-2:35-4:205:40-7:25-8:00-8:30-9:0010:30-11:00 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:401:25-4:10-6:55-9:45 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:001:50-7:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:4512:00-2:00-3:10-4:50-5:156:20-9:30 Office Christmas Party (R) 10:05-11:40-12:45-2:103:20-4:45-5:55-7:15-9:5010:55 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 1:45 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 10:30-4:00-10:05 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 11:30-5:00-10:45 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 11:05-1:35-4:05-6:408:25-9:25 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:104:40-10:20 Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin IMAX Theater 601 Independence Avenue SW

(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket

MARYLAND

Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:30-12:151:20-4:00-6:45-8:45-9:30 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) (!) 11:00-2:30-6:00-9:40 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10-1:45-4:15Die Hard (R) 9:20 6:50-9:30 The Muppet Christmas Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:45Carol (G) 12:00-4:45 11:30-2:20-3:20-5:00-6:00The Eagle Huntress (G) 7:45-10:30 2:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Loving (PG-13) 11:45AM Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Elle (R) 4:20 10:45-2:00-2:30-5:15-5:45Arrival (PG-13) 9:15 8:30-9:00-11:45 Moonlight (R) 7:00 Jackie (R) (!) 11:00-1:00- Office Christmas Party (R) CC: 5:05-10:45 3:05-5:10-7:15-9:25 It's a Wonderful Life (1946) Arrival (PG-13) CC: 9:50 Jackie (R) CC: (!) 10:30(PG) 2:00-6:45 1:00-3:45-6:40-9:20 AMC Center Park 8 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG4001 Powder Mill Rd. 13) CC: (!) 2:10-8:00-10:55 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: CC: 1:10-7:00 (!) 11:30-12:30-2:20-5:10Passengers (PG-13) CC: 8:15-9:10-11:10 10:15-4:00-9:50 AMC Loews Rogue One: A Star Wars St. Charles Town Ctr. 9 Story (PG-13) CC: 9:3011115 Mall Circle 1:00-1:10-4:30-8:00-11:15 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Why Him? (R) CC: 11:45- CC: (!) 10:00-10:15 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45 Moana (PG) CC: 1:15Sing (PG) CC: 9:15-10:30- 4:15-7:00 12:00-3:45-4:30-7:15-9:30- Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:00 11:00-5:00 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Rogue One: A Star Wars CC: 2:40-5:15-8:00-10:30 Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:15Sing 3D (PG) CC: 1:10-6:30 1:30-3:45-4:45-8:00-11:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 11:15Story 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:15-8:15-11:00 8:45-10:00-12:00-3:30Sing (PG) CC: (!) 11:007:00-10:30 1:45-7:15 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 13) CC: 10:30-4:10-10:00 CC: (!) 9:15-12:00-2:45Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: 5:30-8:15-10:45 1:20-7:00 Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:30AMC Columbia 14 12:15-3:00-4:30-10:00 10300 Little Patuxent Pkwy Rogue One: A Star Wars Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) CC: 9:20-12:20-3:20-6:10- 9:15-12:30-5:45-7:00-9:0010:15 7:40-9:20-10:35 Office Christmas Party (R) Moana (PG) CC: 10:15CC: (!) 10:30-10:15 1:05-4:10-7:10 Passengers (PG-13) CC: Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) CC: (!) 1:00-4:00-7:15 9:50-10:55-12:40-1:403:30-4:30-6:40-7:45-9:30- Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:00-10:45; (!) 7:45 10:30 Fantastic Beasts and AMC Magic Johnson Capital Center 12 Where to Find Them (PG800 Shoppers Way 13) CC: 10:40AM Rogue One: A Star Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Wars Story (PG-13) CC: CC: (!) 4:45-10:15 9:30-10:30-1:00-4:30-5:30- Passengers (PG-13) CC: 8:00-11:40 10:15-4:15-10:10 Rogue One: A Star Wars Rogue One: A Star Wars Story An IMAX 3D Experi- Story (PG-13) CC: (!) ence (PG-13) 9:00-12:30- 11:55-6:00 4:00-7:30-11:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Why Him? (R) CC: 10:30- Story An IMAX 3D Experi1:10-3:50-6:50-9:40 ence (PG-13) (!) 10:00Sing (PG) CC: 10:20-11:20- 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 12:00-1:00-2:00-2:40-3:40- Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 10:454:40-5:15-6:20-7:20-9:10- 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45 10:10 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 11:00Manchester by the Sea 4:30-10:00 (R) 10:00 Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 1:45-7:15 CC: (!) 1:40-4:15-6:55-9:45 Rogue One: A Star Wars Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Story 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:00-9:00 10:00-1:30-2:00-5:00-8:30- Assassin's Creed 3D (PG9:00-11:30 13) CC: (!) 11:15-2:00-7:30 Office Christmas Party Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:50- 1:15-7:15 7:35-10:20 ArcLight Bethesda AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Center 8633 Colesville Road

AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 9811 Washingtonian Ctr.

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:20-4:55 Moana (PG) CC: 10:451:35-4:20-7:05 Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) Sing (PG) CC: 11:00-1:1510:10-1:15-3:05-4:25-5:553:30-5:40-6:45-9:00 7:15-10:10 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Fantastic Beasts and CC: 11:30-1:45-4:15-7:45Where to Find Them (PG10:00 13) CC: 10:40-1:55-7:40 Smithsonian - Samuel C. Why Him? (R) CC: 11:45Rogue One: A Star Wars Johnson IMAX Theater 2:00-4:30-7:15-9:30 10th Street & Constitution Ave NW Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:15Avalon 11:15-12:00-1:30-3:15Dinosaurs Alive! 3D (NR) 4:45-6:30-8:00-9:45-11:15 5612 Connecticut Avenue 11:20-2:05-3:55 Rogue One: A Star Wars A Man Called Ove (En Man Jean-Michel Cousteau's Story An IMAX 3D ExperiSom Heter Ove) (PG-13) Secret Ocean 3D (NR) 1:10 ence (PG-13) (!) 9:45-1:002:00-8:00 Miss Sloane (R) 11:00-5:00 National Parks Adventure 4:15-7:30-10:45 Moonlight (R) 11:15-1:45- 3D (America Wild 3D) (NR) Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 10:0010:25-12:15-3:00-4:50 4:45-7:30 1:10-4:00-7:10-10:00-11:30 Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market 550 Penn Street NE - Unit E

Journey to Space 3D (NR) 2:25 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 11:40-4:207:10-9:55 A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 10:30-3:15

7101 Democracy Boulevard

La La Land (PG-13) 10:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:30 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 9:45-12:15-5:40-8:10-9:1512:05 Moana (PG) 9:00-11:251:55-4:35-7:10-10:25 Passengers (PG-13) 9:3511:30-1:10-2:05-4:40-7:208:45-9:55-11:20 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG13) 12:05-5:25 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) 10:00-4:007:00-10:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) 1:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) 11:00-12:002:00-5:00-8:00-9:00-11:0012:00

La La Land (PG-13) 9:2011:40-2:30-5:30-8:30-11:30 Why Him? (R) 10:15-12:103:15-5:45-8:15-10:45-11:45 Sing (PG) 9:15-10:4011:45-2:15-3:45-4:45-6:157:15-9:45 Manchester by the Sea (R) 10:55-1:50-4:50-7:45-9:40 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 9:10-11:05-2:40-4:55-7:0510:50 Miss Sloane (R) 2:45 Sing 3D (PG) 1:15-8:40 Loving (PG-13) 9:30-11:55 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) 3:00-6:00 Office Christmas Party (R) 10:40 Nocturnal Animals (R) 9:05-5:15-10:55 Arrival (PG-13) 9:25-2:357:50 Moonlight (R) 2:50-8:20 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) 3:40-11:05 Passengers 3D (PG-13) 12:40-6:10

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:00-1:05-4:05-7:05-10:05 Sing (PG) 10:10-11:451:45-2:55-4:45-5:45-6:507:45-8:45-10:45 Sing 3D (PG) 9:55-12:503:45-9:45 Passengers (PG-13) 10:201:15-4:20-7:30-10:35 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) 9:551:10-4:30-7:55-11:15; 9:55-10:55-11:20-1:102:10-2:45-4:30-5:35-6:107:55-9:00-9:35-11:15 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG-13) 11:30-2:25-5:208:15-11:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) 11:553:20-6:45-10:10 Passengers 3D (PG-13) 11:35-2:50-6:00-9:10 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) XD: 4:00-7:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) 10:15Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11 11:55-1:35-3:20-5:00-6:458:25-10:10 1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall Hoyt's West Nursery Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Cinema 14 2:30-5:30-11:00 1591 West Nursery Road Moana (PG) 9:30-12:20Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 3:40-6:40 Passengers (PG-13) 9:50- CC: 10:30-11:30-1:10-2:103:50-4:50-6:40-7:40-9:201:00-4:40-7:40-10:40 10:20-12:05 Fantastic Beasts and Moana (PG) CC: 10:45Where to Find Them (PG-13) 9:40-12:50-3:50- 1:10-3:35-6:05 6:50-10:00 Passengers (PG-13) CC: 10:20-1:10-4:20-7:10-9:50Doctor Strange (PG-13) 12:20 9:40 Fantastic Beasts and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) 9:20-10:20- Where to Find Them 12:40-1:40-4:00-5:00-7:20- (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:408:20-10:20-11:20 6:40-9:40 Sing (PG) 10:00-11:00Rogue One: A Star Wars 1:20-4:20-5:20-7:00Story (PG-13) CC: 10:008:00-9:50 11:00-12:00-1:00-3:004:00-5:00-6:05-7:00-9:05Sing 3D (PG) 2:20-10:50 10:00-11:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) 11:20Almost Christmas (PG-13) 2:40-6:00-9:20 CC: 8:15-10:35-12:20 Office Christmas Party (R) Why Him? (R) CC: 11:0510:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30 1:40-4:40-7:35-10:10-12:05 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- Sing (PG) CC: 10:10-11:1013) 11:30-8:30 12:45-1:45-3:35-4:35-6:30Passengers 3D (PG-13) 7:20-9:05-9:55 10:50-2:00-5:40-8:40-11:15 Manchester by the Sea (R) CC: 10:00-1:00-4:00Bow Tie Harbour 9 7:00-10:00 2474 Solomons Island Road La La Land (PG-13) 10:30- Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 11:30-1:30-2:30-4:30-5:30- CC: 10:50-1:30-4:10-7:209:50-12:10 7:30-9:00-10:30 Hacksaw Ridge (R) 12:40- Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:40-9:30 Why Him? (R) 11:10-1:50- 2:00-8:00 Office Christmas Party (R) 4:40-7:40-10:20 Manchester by the Sea (R) CC: 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:4510:15-11:50 9:20-12:15-3:20-6:40-9:40 Landmark Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Bethesda Row Cinema 10:10-12:20-3:00-5:407235 Woodmont Avenue 8:10-10:40 Allied (R) 9:50-6:50 Elle (R) (!) 9:45 Arrival (PG-13) 11:00-1:40- Loving (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:255:00-7:50-10:30 4:15-6:55-9:55 Jackie (R) 10:00-11:20La La Land (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-2:00-3:10-4:50-5:50- 1:10-1:50-3:40-4:10-4:407:20-8:20-9:50 6:30-7:10-7:50-9:25-9:45 Manchester by the Sea Cinemark Egyptian (R) CC: (!) 12:55-1:15-4:0024 and XD 7:00-9:00 7000 Arundel Mills Circle Moana (PG) 10:00-11:25- The Eagle Huntress (G) CC: 12:55-2:20-4:00-5:25-6:55- (!) 1:20-3:30-5:35-7:40 Jackie (R) CC: (!) 1:008:20-9:55 1:30-3:15-4:20-5:30-6:50Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG- 7:40-9:55-10:00 13) 12:10-3:25-7:15-10:30 Old Greenbelt Theatre Doctor Strange (PG-13) 129 Centerway 11:50-3:05-5:55-8:55 The Eagle Huntress (G) 8:00 Almost Christmas (PG-13) Loving (PG-13) 5:15 10:40-1:55-4:50-7:40-10:30 Paragon Kentlands Why Him? (R) 10:50-12:20Stadium 10 1:50-3:15-4:55-6:20-7:50629 Center Point Way 9:20-10:50 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 12:05- Manchester by the Sea (R) (!) 1:10-4:05-7:00-9:55 3:50-7:25-10:45 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Sing 3D (PG) (!) 4:50 10:30-1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 2:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) XD: Moana (PG) 12:20-2:5012:45-10:45 5:20-7:50-10:20 Office Christmas Party (R) Assassin's Creed 3D (PG11:40-2:30-5:20-8:05-10:55 13) (!) 11:30AM Dhruva (NR) 11:00-6:05 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Vangaveeti (NR) 2:40-9:40 (!) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG13) 11:20-4:30-7:20 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 12:05-2:35-5:05-7:35 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) (!) 12:40-2:55-5:10-7:25-9:40 Why Him? (R) (!) 12:302:55-5:20-7:45-10:10 Office Christmas Party (R) 2:10-10:10 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 11:1011:50-2:40-4:40-5:30-7:158:20-10:05 Sing (PG) (!) 11:50-2:157:30-9:55 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:05 Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6 3899 Branch Avenue

Passengers (PG-13) 2:305:05-7:50-10:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) 12:05-3:056:30 Why Him? (R) 11:00-1:404:05-6:45-9:25 Sing (PG) 12:00-2:40-5:15-7:45 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 11:30-1:35-3:40-6:00-8:2010:25 Sing 3D (PG) 10:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) 9:30 Office Christmas Party (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00 Passengers 3D (PG-13) 11:35AM Regal Bowie Stadium 14 15200 Major Lansdale Blvd

Friday, December 23, 2016 www.washingtonpost.com/movies Regal Germantown Stadium 14 20000 Century Boulevard

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:30-4:20-7:15 Moana (PG) 10:10-1:104:10-7:05-10:05 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 12:50-2:00-3:40-6:308:00-9:30 Doctor Strange (PG-13) 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 10:001:05-4:15-7:30-10:45 Why Him? (R) CC: 11:402:30-5:20-8:10-10:55 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:151:15-4:00-7:00-9:50 Manchester by the Sea (R) 12:00-6:30 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 12:10-2:40-5:15-7:45-10:25 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 11:1512:15-2:45-3:30-6:00-6:459:15-10:00 Office Christmas Party (R) 3:25-9:50 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 1:25-10:10 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 11:00-5:00-11:00 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 12:454:05-7:20-10:30 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:25-2:104:50-7:50-10:35 Regal Hyattsville Royale Stadium 14 6505 America Blvd.

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:05-1:00-4:10-7:55-10:55 Moana (PG) 10:30-1:454:30-8:00-10:50 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 1:25-7:40 Doctor Strange (PG-13) 10:15-1:10-4:15-7:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 11:002:05-5:10-8:40-11:45 Almost Christmas (PG-13) CC: 10:25-1:15-4:25-7:4510:30 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:151:20-4:10-7:35-10:20 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:2012:55-3:55-7:20-10:00 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Regal Cinemas Majestic 11:45-2:15-4:45-7:40-10:15 Stadium 20 & IMAX Rogue One: A Star Wars 900 Ellsworth Drive Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:00Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:30-1:05-1:35-4:10-4:4010:20-1:15-4:10-7:20-10:30 7:40-8:10-10:45-11:15 Moana (PG) 10:40-1:40Office Christmas Party (R) 4:20-7:05-9:45 11:25-2:25-5:25-8:10-10:55 Fantastic Beasts and Nocturnal Animals (R) Where to Find Them (PG- CC: 10:25 13) 12:05-3:20-6:40-10:05 Assassin's Creed 3D Passengers (PG-13) (!) (PG-13) (!) 11:00-1:55-4:4510:10-1:10-4:05-7:257:35-10:25 10:25-12:15 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) Rogue One: A Star Wars 10:10-4:15-10:30 Story (PG-13) (!) 10:00Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:10-1:501:20-3:10-4:25-7:35-9:50- 4:30-7:10-9:50 11:10 Regal Laurel Towne Rogue One: A Star Wars Centre 12 Story An IMAX 3D Experi14716 Baltimore Avenue ence (PG-13) (!) 12:00Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 3:40-7:00-10:20 La La Land (PG-13) 10:15- 10:15-5:10-11:20 11:40-1:30-3:15-4:30-6:20- Moana (PG) 10:45-1:304:15-7:10-10:30 7:50-9:30-10:50 Manchester by the Sea (R) Passengers (PG-13) (!) 1:25-8:20 12:30-3:50-7:15-10:35 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:25- Fantastic Beasts and 1:25-4:40-7:30-10:45-12:25 Where to Find Them (PG13) 12:50-4:00-7:20-10:30 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:50Rogue One: A Star Wars 1:35-4:45-7:40-10:40 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Story (PG-13) (!) 10:0011:15-1:50-4:35-7:45-10:10 11:30-1:15-3:00-4:30-6:458:00-10:15-11:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Why Him? (R) CC: 11:15Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:30-11:00-11:30-2:10- 2:10-5:00-8:10-11:00 2:40-5:15-6:00-6:30-8:25- Sing (PG) CC: (!) 9:3012:30-3:30-6:30-9:30 9:10-11:40 Office Christmas Party (R) Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 12:15-2:50-5:30-8:10-10:55 9:15-12:35-3:10-6:25-9:45 Rogue One: A Star Wars Assassin's Creed 3D Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 9:00(PG-13) (!) 12:40-3:3512:10-3:55-7:15-10:45 6:50-10:00 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) Office Christmas Party (R) 11:10-1:45-4:25-7:00-9:50 12:25-3:25-6:45-9:55 Assassin's Creed 3D (PGSing 3D (PG) (!) 10:0512:50-3:30-6:35-9:40-12:20 13) (!) 12:45-6:55 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 11:25- Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 3:05-6:55-10:15 9:45-3:45-10:00 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 1:25-7:20 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 1:30-7:25 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 12:301:00-3:45-7:15-10:30 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:401:40-4:35-7:40-10:40 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:301:20-4:10-7:00-9:50 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 10:30-4:20-10:10 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:30-4:30-10:15 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:00-1:504:40-7:30-10:20

Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:00-1:50- Rogue One: A Star Wars 4:45-7:45-10:40 Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:1512:00-3:15-4:45-6:30-9:45Regal Rockville Center 11:15 Stadium 13 Office Christmas Party (R) 199 East Montgomery Ave Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 9:10-11:50-5:30-8:20-11:10 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 10:0010:05-1:25-7:55 1:20-4:20-7:50-11:05 Moana (PG) 10:20-1:00Assassin's Creed 3D (PG3:45-7:00-9:40 13) (!) 11:20-5:10-11:00 Passengers (PG-13) (!) Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:40-1:30-7:35 10:50-4:40-10:40 Fantastic Beasts and Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:00-1:40Where to Find Them (PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:30- 4:30-7:40-10:30 7:50-10:50 UA Snowden Square Stadium 14 Rogue One: A Star Wars 9161 Commerce Center Dr. Story (PG-13) (!) 9:4512:45-3:45-7:10-10:10 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Why Him? (R) CC: 11:30- 10:50-1:50-8:00 2:20-5:00-7:45-10:25 Moana (PG) 9:15-12:10Sing (PG) CC: (!) 12:403:00-6:00-9:00 3:30-9:30 Passengers (PG-13) (!) Manchester by the Sea (R) 10:40-1:40-7:50 9:30-12:50-4:00-7:25-10:30 Fantastic Beasts and Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Where to Find Them (PG10:50-1:45-4:15-6:50-9:20 13) 12:20-4:50-6:40-11:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:55- Story (PG-13) (!) 9:3011:40-1:55-2:40-4:15-4:45- 12:30-3:40-7:00-10:10 7:55-8:40-10:55 Why Him? (R) CC: 11:30Office Christmas Party (R) 2:10-5:15-8:10-10:45 10:25-1:05-4:05-7:05-9:45 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:30Jackie (R) 11:20-2:00-4:50- 11:20-12:50-1:30-7:10 7:30-10:00 Manchester by the Sea (R) Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- 9:40-1:10-4:40-7:20-10:50 13) (!) 4:55-11:00 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 9:50-12:40-3:50-6:20-9:10 5:40-10:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing 3D (PG) (!) 10:00-6:40 Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 9:0010:00-12:00-1:00-3:10Regal Waugh Chapel Stadium 12 & IMAX 4:10-6:30-7:30-9:40-10:40 1419 South Main Chapel Way Office Christmas Party (R) Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:10-4:00-6:50-9:30 Jackie (R) 9:10-11:40-2:2010:40-7:50 5:00-7:40-10:20 Moana (PG) 9:35-12:40Assassin's Creed 3D (PG3:30-6:40-9:45 13) (!) 9:20-3:30-10:00 Passengers (PG-13) (!) Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 1:10-7:20 Fantastic Beasts and Where 4:30-10:30 to Find Them (PG-13) 9:30- Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 2:3012:45-4:00-7:15-10:35 6:10-9:45 Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing 3D (PG) (!) 4:20-9:50 Story (PG-13) (!) 9:45-1:00Xscape Theatres 4:15-7:30-10:45 Brandywine 14 Rogue One: A Star 7710 Matapeake Business Dr. Wars Story An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) (!) 9:15- Trolls (PG) CC: 10:401:05-3:35 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 9:25-9:55- Assassin's Creed (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30-1:20-4:2012:50-7:10 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:30- 7:30-10:20 Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:20-4:35-7:40-10:30 Manchester by the Sea (R) 9:50-12:50-4:00-7:40-10:40 Rogue One: A Star Wars 12:20-3:35-6:50-10:00 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:5011:00-1:40-4:25-7:25-10:05 4:50-10:50 Almost Christmas (PG-13) Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:15- CC: 10:05-11:40-12:402:15-3:20-7:20-10:00 1:30-4:45-8:00-11:15 Office Christmas Party (R) Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 9:5511:10-2:10-5:00-8:10-10:50 12:20-2:45-5:30-8:00-10:30 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:201:00-3:50-7:00 13) (!) 1:50-4:55-11:00 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) Collateral Beauty (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:40-12:10-1:1010:05-4:05-10:20 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 3:55-9:55 3:40-8:10-10:45 Rogue One: A Star Wars Regal Westview Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Stadium 16 & IMAX 1:50-7:50-9:50 5243 Buckeystown Pike Office Christmas Party (R) Assassin's Creed (PG-13) CC: (!) 3:10-5:40-8:30-11:00 2:20-8:10 Moana (PG) CC: 10:00Moana (PG) 9:05-9:5011:30-2:30-5:00-6:20-9:20 12:40-3:40-7:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Passengers (PG-13) (!) Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:301:50-2:30-7:45-10:10 10:10-12:30-1:10-3:30Doctor Strange (PG-13) 4:10-5:20-6:00-6:30-7:1010:10-1:15-4:25-7:25-10:20 8:20-9:00-9:30-10:10-11:20 Fantastic Beasts and Sing (PG) CC: (!) 11:00Where to Find Them 1:40-4:30-6:10-9:10 (PG-13) 9:00-12:10-3:50iPic Pike & Rose 7:20-10:55 11830 Grand Park Avenue Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 9:45-1:00- Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:30-8:00-10:45 (!) 1:15-4:30-7:45-11:15 Moana (PG) 10:45-2:15Rogue One: A Star 6:15-9:45 Wars Story An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) (!) 9:15- Passengers (PG-13) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:15-10:45 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:251:10-4:00-7:10-10:00 Story (PG-13) (!) 10:30Why Him? (R) CC: 11:30- 11:00-3:00-7:00-11:00 2:10-5:00-7:55-10:35 Rogue One: A Star Wars Manchester by the Sea (R) Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 2:306:30-10:30 11:40-3:20-6:40-9:50 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Sing (PG) (!) 11:30-2:4510:40-1:25-4:10-6:50-9:20 6:00-9:15


Movies What Washington is watching on DVD

New on DVD

1. Ben-Hur 2. Bad Moms 3. Mechanic: Resurrection, left 4. Florence Foster Jenkins 5. Finding Dory



31 EZ

The Disappointments Room Goat  The Magnificent Seven  Storks  Sully, right 

SOURCE: Redbox, for the week ended Dec. 18.

DANIEL SMITH/SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

MOVIE DIRECTORY Office Christmas Party (R) 10:15-1:15-4:30-7:45-11:15 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) (!) 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:15

VIRGINIA

Office Christmas Party (R) CC: 12:05-2:35-8:05-10:40 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 8:1511:00 Jackie (R) CC: (!) 11:3012:30-2:00-3:15-4:45-6:057:15-8:30-9:45-11:00 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) CC: (!) 1:15-7:15-10:00 Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:45-2:30-5:158:00-11:05 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 10:001:30-5:00-8:30-11:30

Friday, December 23, 2016 www.washingtonpost.com/movies Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15 AMC Tysons Corner 16 7850e Tysons Corner Ctr.

Regal Countryside Stadium 20 45980 Regal Plaza

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:40-7:20 Moana (PG) 10:35-1:154:05-7:20-10:00 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 1:55-7:45 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG13) 12:50-3:50-6:55-9:50 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 12:003:15-6:30-9:45 Hacksaw Ridge (R) CC: 10:50-1:55-5:00-8:00-11:00 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:301:20-4:10-6:50-9:50 Why Him? (R) CC: 11:352:15-4:55-7:35-10:15 Manchester by the Sea (R) 10:30-1:40-4:50-7:55-11:00 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 12:40-3:20-5:45-8:05-10:40 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 12:301:00-3:45-4:15-7:00-7:3010:15-10:45 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 1:25-4:20-10:10 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:55-4:45-10:50 Befikre (NR) 10:25-1:304:30-7:35-10:35 Kahaani 2 (NR) 10:45-1:454:30-7:15-10:25 Dear Zindagi (NR) (!) 12:103:25-6:40-9:55 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 10:5011:40-2:25-3:25-6:10-7:109:30-10:30 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:00-1:504:40-7:50-10:30 Dhruva (NR) (!) 10:40-2:406:25-10:20 Vangaveeti (NR) (!) 3:00-9:05 Pittagoda (NR) (!) 12:05-6:20 Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10 4110 West Ox Road

Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:10-4:00-9:40 Rogue One: A Star Wars Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:309:05-2:40-5:30-8:15-11:00 1:45-4:50-8:00-11:00 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 11:25Moana (PG) 9:15-10:302:45-6:10-9:45 1:20-4:10-7:05-9:55 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 10:45-1:30Passengers (PG-13) (!) 4:20-7:45-10:45 10:40-1:30-4:25-7:15 Doctor Strange (PG-13) Regal Manassas 11:00-1:40-4:30-7:20-10:00 Stadium 14 & IMAX Fantastic Beasts and 11380 Bulloch Drive Where to Find Them Assassin's Creed (PG-13) (PG-13) 9:20-12:20-3:20- 10:20-7:20 6:20-9:20 Moana (PG) 10:40-1:30Rogue One: A Star Wars 4:10-6:50-9:40 Story (PG-13) (!) 9:45Passengers (PG-13) (!) 11:15-12:00-1:00-2:3011:10-1:50-4:40-7:40-10:30 3:15-4:15-5:45-6:30-7:30- Fantastic Beasts and 9:00-10:45 Where to Find Them (PGRogue One: A Star 13) 12:10-6:20 Wars Story An IMAX 3D Rogue One: A Star Wars Experience (PG-13) (!) 9:15- Story (PG-13) (!) 10:0012:30-3:45-7:00-10:15 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:35- Rogue One: A Star Wars 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30 Story An IMAX 3D ExperiSing (PG) CC: (!) 9:00ence (PG-13) (!) 11:0010:15-11:45-2:20-3:402:00-5:00-8:00-11:00 5:10-6:15-7:50-10:30 Why Him? (R) CC: 11:40Manchester by the Sea (R) 2:20-5:10-7:50-10:40 10:00-1:10-4:20-7:40-10:50 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 11:30Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 2:10-4:50-7:30-10:10 9:10-11:40-2:10-4:40Manchester by the Sea (R) 7:10-9:50 3:10-9:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 9:45 11:50-2:40-5:40-8:10-10:50 Office Christmas Party Rogue One: A Star Wars (R) 9:00-11:30-2:15-5:00- Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 12:007:45-10:20 3:00-6:00-9:00 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 9:50- Office Christmas Party (R) 12:40-3:30-6:10-8:50 10:50-1:40-4:30-7:10-9:50 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 11:50AM 13) (!) 1:20-4:20-10:20 Passengers 3D (PG-13) Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) (!) 10:10 10:10-12:50-3:40-6:40-9:30 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 12:50-9:10 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 11:202:50-6:10-9:45 Regal Kingstowne Sing 3D (PG) (!) 10:30-1:10Stadium 16 & RPX 3:50-6:30-9:10 5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16 1:35-7:25 3575 Potomac Avenue Moana (PG) 11:05-11:451:50-2:30-4:30-5:10-7:10- Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 7:55-10:10-10:55 10:50-2:00-4:55-7:50-10:40 Passengers (PG-13) (!) Moana (PG) 10:40-1:3011:20-1:05-2:10-5:00-6:50- 4:25-7:15-10:05 7:50-10:40 Passengers (PG-13) (!) Fantastic Beasts and 10:30-1:35-4:30-7:40-10:30 Where to Find Them (PG- Rogue One: A Star Wars 13) 11:50-3:20-6:40-9:50 Story (PG-13) (!) 10:30Rogue One: A Star Wars 11:50-1:40-3:15-4:50-6:15Story (PG-13) (!) 10:007:55-9:40-11:00 11:00-1:15-4:25-6:30-7:30- Why Him? (R) CC: 11:2010:35 2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:15Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:001:00-3:50-7:15-10:15 10:30-1:15-4:10-7:00-9:50 Why Him? (R) CC: 11:15- Manchester by the Sea (R) 2:00-4:55-7:40-10:50 12:15-3:25-6:40-9:45 Manchester by the Sea (R) Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 12:55-7:20 10:00-12:05-2:30-5:00Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 7:45-10:25 10:50-1:20-3:55-6:55-10:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:00Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 11:30- 12:20-1:00-3:45-4:15-6:453:00-3:30-7:00-9:35-10:05 7:25-10:15-10:35 Office Christmas Party (R) Office Christmas Party (R) 10:20-4:45-10:30 12:10-2:50-5:30-8:05-10:45 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- Arrival (PG-13) CC: 1:104:45-7:35-10:35 13) (!) 10:35-4:35-10:25

Assassin's Creed 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:20-1:25-4:207:20-10:10 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:00-12:50-4:00-7:1010:00 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 11:00-1:504:40-7:30-10:20 Regal Virginia Gateway Stadium 14 & RPX 8001 Gateway Promenade Place

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 10:30-1:20-7:50 Moana (PG) 10:50-1:404:20-7:30-10:30 Passengers (PG-13) (!) 11:20-2:10-4:50-7:40-10:20 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG-13) 9:40-12:40-3:506:50-9:40 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) (!) 11:002:00-5:00-8:00-11:00 Why Him? (R) CC: 9:501:10-4:30-7:10-9:50 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 11:101:50-4:40-7:20-10:10 Manchester by the Sea (R) 10:20-2:40-6:00-9:25 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 9:45-12:20-3:00-6:10-9:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 9:3012:30-3:30-6:30-9:30 Office Christmas Party (R) 11:30-2:30-5:50-8:20-10:50 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 4:10-10:40 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:40-1:30-4:05-6:40-9:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 10:1012:50-3:40-6:20-9:10 Smithsonian - Airbus MAX Theater 14390 Air & Space Museum Pkwy

D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) 2:05 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 11:20-3:106:00-8:55-11:50 A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 10:15AM University Mall Theatre 10659 Braddock Road

Trolls (PG) CC: 12:10-2:204:30-7:15 Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (PG-13) CC: 12:05-2:30-5:00 Storks (PG) CC: 12:002:10-4:20 Hacksaw Ridge (R) CC: 7:00-9:45-12:05 The Accountant (R) CC: 7:30-10:00-12:15 Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (PG-13) CC: 9:2012:00

DECEMBER 23, 2016

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 11:00-7:45 Moana (PG) 10:10-11:101:10-2:00-3:55-4:45-7:4010:25 Doctor Strange (PG-13) 10:00-12:45-3:30-6:40-9:40 Why Him? (R) CC: 10:201:15-4:20-7:20-10:15 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:0511:05-12:50-1:50-3:404:40-6:30-7:30-10:20 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 11:15-1:45-4:30-7:10-9:55 Office Christmas Party (R) 11:20-2:10-4:55-7:50-10:30 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 6:45-9:45 Nocturnal Animals (R) CC: 9:25 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 1:55-4:50-10:40 Sing 3D (PG) (!) 10:35-1:204:10-7:00-9:50

Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX 22875 Brambleton Plaza

. FRIDAY,

Manchester by the Sea (R) Why Him? (R) 11:50-2:3011:45-3:30-6:45-10:00 5:15-7:55-10:35-12:05 Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 10:15-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:30 12:20-2:45-5:25-8:00-10:50 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 12:00Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Sing 3D (PG) 9:45 Jackie (R) 11:15-2:00-4:45- 3:45-7:00-10:15 One Loudoun 7:15-9:45 Office Christmas Party (R) 20575 East Hampton Plaza Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- 5:05-10:40 Hugo (PG) 10:30AM 13) 11:30-7:45 Assassin's Creed 3D (PGPassengers (PG-13) 3D (PG-13) 13) 4:35-10:05 10:05-1:05-3:00-4:15-7:40- Passengers 10:15-7:15 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 9:50-10:40 10:30-1:25-7:20 Cinema Arts Theatre Fantastic Beasts and Vangaveeti (NR) 9:00 9650 Main St Where to Find Them (PGPassengers 3D (PG-13) Rogue One: A Star Wars 13) 11:40AM Story (PG-13) CC: 10:20- 4:45-10:25 Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:20Story (PG-13) 9:55-12:00- 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:10 1:25-2:40-3:30-4:55-6:20- Manchester by the Sea (R) 7:10-9:45 CC: 10:15-1:15-4:15-7:10-9:50 Passengers (PG-13) 10:207:00-8:25-10:30 1:55-7:30-12:01 Why Him? (R) 11:20-2:05- Loving (PG-13) CC: Rogue One: A Star Wars 10:00-2:30 5:10-8:05-11:05 Sing (PG) 10:45-1:45-4:35- Nocturnal Animals (R) CC: Story 3D (PG-13) 12:103:25-6:40-9:55 1:00-9:30 6:00-7:20-10:20 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 5:00-7:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Rogue One: A Star Wars Moonlight (R) CC: 4:45-9:20 Story (PG-13) 10:00-11:05Story 3D (PG-13) 8:55 1:15-2:20-4:30-5:35-7:45Office Christmas Party (R) Jackie (R) CC: 9:55-12:15- 8:50-11:00-12:05 9:40-12:35-3:45-6:40-9:35 2:25-4:50-7:20-9:30 Harry & Snowman (NR) Rave Cinemas Angelika Film Center 9:40-7:40 Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Mosaic A Man Called Ove (En Man 11900 Palace Way 2911 District Ave. Som Heter Ove) (PG-13) Passengers (PG-13) XD: Fantastic Beasts and 12:00-4:00 12:35-3:25-10:00 Where to Find Them (PG- Things to Come (L'Avenir) 13) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:30- (PG-13) 9:45-12:05-2:20- Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them 7:30-10:30 7:50 (PG-13) 9:35-10:35-12:55Manchester by the Sea Cobb Village 12 Leesburg 1:45-3:55-4:55-7:10-8:10(R) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:151600 Village Market Boulevard 10:25-11:15 7:15-10:15 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Rogue One: A Star Wars Jackie (R) CC: 10:10Story (PG-13) XD: 9:3012:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30 2:30-5:10-7:50 4:00-7:15 Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: Moana (PG) 11:45-2:154:55-7:25-9:55 Why Him? (R) 11:15-2:00(!) 11:45-5:00 Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) Passengers (PG-13) 2:10- 4:45-7:35-10:45 4:50-7:30 Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 11:402:15-7:45-10:45 Rogue One: A Star Wars 3:30-6:55-10:15 La La Land (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:15-11:15-1:15-2:15- Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 12:30- Manchester by the Sea (R) 11:55-3:05-6:20-9:30 4:15-5:15-7:15-8:10-10:15- 3:45-7:00-10:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 11:00 Story (PG-13) 11:30-1:30- 9:55-4:05-7:05 Rogue One: A Star Wars 2:45-4:45-5:45-7:45-8:45Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Sing (PG) 11:30-2:20-7:50 10:45 10:00-4:00 Sing 3D (PG) 5:10-10:35 Why Him? (R) 12:00-2:40Rogue One: A Star Wars Passengers 3D (PG-13) XD: 5:20-8:00-10:40 Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:009:40-6:50 Sing (PG) 1:50-4:30-7:15 1:00-2:00-5:00-7:00-8:00Passengers (PG-13) Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 10:00-11:00 12:10-3:00-5:30-7:55-10:25 11:05-8:00 Bow Tie Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing 3D (PG) 11:15-9:50 Reston Town Center 11 & BTX Story 3D (PG-13) XD: Rogue One: A Star Wars 11940 Market Street Story 3D (PG-13) (!) 12:30- 12:45-10:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Rogue One: A Star Wars 3:45-7:00-10:00 Story (PG-13) 11:00-8:00 Office Christmas Party (R) Story (PG-13) 10:00-11:00Rogue One: A Star Wars 11:20-2:05-4:40-7:20-10:05 12:30-1:15-2:15-3:45-4:30Story 3D (PG-13) 2:00Arrival (PG-13) 12:20-3:10- 5:30-7:00-7:45-8:45-10:1511:00 5:00-11:00 7:35-10:35 Assassin's Creed 3D (PGAssassin's Creed (PG-13) Nocturnal Animals (R) 2:15-5:00-10:45 11:25-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:15 13) 1:00-10:20 Moana (PG) 10:15-1:30Assassin's Creed 3D (PG- Passengers 3D (PG-13) 2:05-5:05-10:55 13) 11:50-10:30 4:30-7:30-10:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Passengers (PG-13) 1:00- Passengers 3D (PG-13) Story 3D (PG-13) 12:0011:40-10:20 4:15-10:15 3:15-6:30-9:45 Fantastic Beasts and Rave Where to Find Them (PGCinemas Centreville 12 Regal Ballston Common 13) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00 6201 Multiplex Drive Stadium 12 671 N. Glebe Road Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing 3D (PG) 10:10-1:05Story (PG-13) 10:00-12:30- 3:50-6:25 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 3:30-6:30-9:30-12:00 10:30-7:15 Moana (PG) 10:55-1:35Why Him? (R) 12:00-2:45- 4:10-6:50-9:25 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG5:30-8:15-11:00 13) (!) 1:25-4:20-10:10 Fantastic Beasts and Sing (PG) 10:30-1:15Where to Find Them (PG- Dangal (Hindi) (NR) 10:2513) 10:45-2:05-7:40 4:00-7:00 1:45-5:00-8:20-11:35 www.ebook3000.com

THE WASHINGTON POST

Assassin's Creed (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:45-7:35 AMC Courthouse Plaza 8 Moana (PG) CC: 10:352150 Clarendon Blvd. 1:20-4:10-7:05 Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) Assassin's Creed (PG-13) 11:25-2:10-5:15-8:05-10:50 CC: (!) 9:45-3:00-8:15 Fantastic Beasts and Moana (PG) CC: 1:15Where to Find Them (PG4:15-7:00 13) CC: 10:55-4:50 Fantastic Beasts and Rogue One: A Star Wars Where to Find Them (PGStory (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:3013) CC: 10:05-4:00-10:15 AMC Potomac Mills 18 1:40-4:45-7:50-11:00 Rogue One: A Star Wars 2700 Potomac Mills Circle Rogue One: A Star Story (PG-13) CC: (!) Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Wars Story An IMAX 3D 12:00-6:00 CC: 11:40-4:00-7:45-11:00 Experience (PG-13) (!) 9:45Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 10:00Moana (PG) CC: 10:4012:50-4:00-7:00-10:05 12:45-3:30-6:15-8:50-11:30 1:30-4:10-7:00 La La Land (PG-13) CC: Sing (PG) CC: (!) 12:30Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:00-10:25-12:00-1:355:40-10:00-11:00 3:05-4:40-6:10-7:40-9:1511:00-12:00-1:45-4:30Manchester by the Sea (R) 10:45 7:15-10:00 CC: 1:00-7:15 Why Him? (R) CC: (!) Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) 10:00- Fantastic Beasts and 11:15-3:15-5:00-7:30-8:30 Where to Find Them (PG- 9:00-11:40-2:20-5:00-7:459:55-10:55 13) CC: 9:00-10:20 Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing (PG) CC: (!) 10:50Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Doctor Strange (PG-13) 11:30-1:30-2:15-4:05-4:559:00-10:30-1:30-2:00-3:00- CC: 9:10AM 6:50-7:30-9:45 4:30-7:30-9:00-10:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Office Christmas Party (R) Story (PG-13) CC: 10:30- Collateral Beauty (PG-13) CC: 10:45-9:45 11:30-2:00-5:30-6:30-7:00- CC: (!) 9:15-11:35-2:054:30-7:15-9:50 Assassin's Creed 3D 8:30-9:00 Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:25(PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-5:50- Rogue One: A Star Wars 11:15 Story An IMAX 3D Experi- 12:15-2:55-5:40-8:20-11:05 AMC Hoffman Center 22 ence (PG-13) 9:00-12:30- Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 4:00-7:30-11:00 206 Swamp Fox Rd. 11:15-2:25-5:30-8:35Why Him? (R) CC: 10:40Trolls (PG) CC: 9:45AM 10:35-11:40 1:40-4:40-7:40-10:40 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Office Christmas Party (R) Sing (PG) CC: 9:00-10:00CC: (!) 10:30-11:45-4:15 CC: 2:00-8:00 10:30-11:30-12:00-12:45Moana (PG) CC: 10:45Arrival (PG-13) CC: 10:40 1:15-2:15-2:45-3:30-5:301:25-7:00 Assassin's Creed 3D (PG6:15-9:00 Passengers (PG-13) CC: 13) CC: (!) 4:35-10:20 Manchester by the Sea (R) (!) 10:30-12:15-1:15-3:15Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: 10:15 4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:00 CC: (!) 9:35-12:35-3:35Collateral Beauty (PG-13) Fantastic Beasts and 6:25-9:25 CC: 10:45-1:30-4:00-6:30Where to Find Them (PGRogue One: A Star Wars 9:00 13) CC: 4:05-9:50 Story (PG-13) (!) 9:05Sing 3D (PG) CC: 11:00Rogue One: A Star Wars 12:05-3:10-6:15-9:30 1:45-4:15-4:50-6:50-7:30Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30AMC Worldgate 9 9:30-10:00-10:30 11:30-12:00-2:30-3:3013025 Worldgate Drive Rogue One: A Star Wars 6:00-7:00-10:00-10:30 Assassin's Creed (PG-13) Story 3D (PG-13) CC: Rogue One: A Star 10:00-1:00-3:00-4:30-8:00- (!) 11:00-3:00-4:30 Wars Story An IMAX 3D Moana (PG) 1:40-4:20-7:00 Experience (PG-13) (!) 9:00- 10:00 Office Christmas Party (R) Passengers (PG-13) (!) 12:30-4:00-7:30-11:00 1:45-6:00-7:30-10:15 Why Him? (R) CC: (!) 11:00- CC: 2:45-5:15-7:50 Arrival (PG-13) CC: 12:00 Fantastic Beasts and 1:45-4:20-7:00-9:45 Jackie (R) CC: 9:00-11:25- Where to Find Them (PGSing (PG) CC: 13) 10:30AM 1:50-4:15-6:45-9:15 9:15-10:30-11:15Rogue One: A Star Wars Assassin's Creed 3D 12:00-1:15-2:00-3:00Story (PG-13) 10:00-12:004:00-4:45-5:45-7:00-7:45- (PG-13) CC: 9:00-2:204:00-10:00 5:00-10:30 8:30-10:00-10:30-11:05 Why Him? (R) (!) 11:45Manchester by the Sea (R) Passengers 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45 9:15-2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00 CC: (!) 11:00-5:15 Sing (PG) (!) 1:45-6:45Collateral Beauty (PG-13) AMC Shirlington 7 8:45-11:15 CC: (!) 10:45-1:15-2:302772 South Randolph St. Collateral Beauty (PG-13) 3:40-5:00-6:15-7:30-8:35- Passengers (PG-13) CC: (!) (!) 10:15-12:45-3:10-5:3510:15-11:00 10:15-4:05-7:00-9:45 8:05-10:30 Miss Sloane (R) CC: 2:15 Rogue One: A Star Wars Sing 3D (PG) 11:15-4:15Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:45- Story (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:00 9:15 12:45-3:30-6:30-9:15 Sing (PG) CC: (!) 11:00-4:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Loving (PG-13) CC: 5:15 Story 3D (PG-13) (!) Sing 3D (PG) CC: (!) Rogue One: A Star Wars 11:00-1:00-2:00-5:00-7:001:45-7:15 8:00-11:00 Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Rogue One: A Star Wars 9:30-1:00-2:00-4:30-5:30- Story 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Office Christmas Party (R) 9:45 9:45-4:15-7:30-10:45 8:00-9:00-11:30

Assassin's Creed 3D (PG13) (!) 1:30-7:15-10:00 Passengers 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:45-4:15


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DECEMBER 23, 2016

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