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New Look, Same Great Taste!

11 New Delicious Products! WE MAKE FOOD THAT MAKES SENSE We are Dr. Praeger’s — a multi-generational, family-owned food company, founded by two heart surgeons. We’re committed to encouraging a way of eating sensibly through inspired offerings. Everything we create in our own kitchen starts with no-compromise recipes that help support an active lifestyle, so your appetite rules, not your schedule. While the world has changed over the last 20 years that we’ve been in business, we remain true to our values and continue to create products that make our dads proud.

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may 2016 features

78

54 VEG WORLD MY VEGETARIAN MEXICO The PBS chef and author of the new cookbook Mexican Today shares the meat-free side of her homeland. BY PATI JINICH

60 5 INGREDIENTS SAUCE SENSATION A collection of light, easy pasta sauces to freshen up your weeknight pasta routine. BY STACY ADIMANDO

66 VEG BY THE BOOK SLICE IT RIGHT! The Vegetable Butcher author shares slicing-and-dicing tips, plus recipes for spring veggies. BY CARA MANGINI

72 1 FOOD, 5 WAYS

PHOTO: RICHARD CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

MUSHROOM MANIA Celebrate the spring return of fabulous mushrooms to farmers’ markets. BY SARAH TENAGLIA

78 EASY ENTERTAINING CINCO DE MAYO FIESTA TIME Staff members share their favorite fifth of May party recipes. BY MARY MARGARET CHAPPELL

00

on the cover 37

Ultra-Easy Dishes with Spring Veggies

44 High-Protein Lunch Salads 54 New Meatless Mexican Dishes 60 Fast & Flavorful Weeknight Meals

COVER C OV E R P PHOTOGRA H OTO G RA P H Y R Richard i h dC Cummings | FOOD STYLISTS Nancy and Jimmy Zamparelli | PROP STYLIST Nicole Dominic

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 1


departments TRENDING VEG

86 CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT IT

17

MIA EVANS This MasterChef Junior contestant cooks veg dishes for her health. BY NICOLE GREGORY

SOUL FOOD, VEGAN-STYLE A Washington, D.C., chef is changing perceptions about vegan food. BY THERESA WALKER

88 LAST BITE

CELEBRATE SPRING WITH AN APERITIVO These Italian-style cocktails provide a refreshing way to unwind. BY NICOLE GREGORY

22 ENERGY BARS TO KEEP YOU GOING A well-chosen snack bar can save the day when you’re on the go. BY KRISTEN KUCHAR

20

31 GARDEN TO TABLE

SPROUTED GRAIN ESSENE BREAD This is bread at its simplest— and healthiest. RECIPE BY LISA TURNER

86

31

GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT Add color and flavor to your spring dishes with these edible flowers. BY THERESE CIESINSKI

32 WHY MULCH IS A MUST Mulch protects your edible plants and makes gardening a breeze. BY SCOTT MEYER 35 LOSE THE GLUTEN SUPERFOOD SNACK CHIPS Dehydrated quinoa crisps nicely into healthy nibbles. BY JULIE MORRIS

37 30 MINUTES ROOT-TO-FROND COOKING Inventive dishes that use every bit of those luscious spring veggies. BY GABRIELLE LANGHOLTZ

44 WEEKEND WHIZ SALAD DAYS Make-ahead salads turn take-along lunches into noontime treats. BY JULIE MORRIS

25 HEALTHY VEG

25

M.I.A. NUTRIENTS Get 3 commonly overlooked nutrients with these easy dietary tweaks. BY MATTHEW KADEY, MS, RD

28

EASING JOINT PAIN Find solutions that work to soothe sore hips, hands, and knees. BY DAVID KALMANSOHN 2 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

50 ESSENTIAL COOKWARE GET COOKING! Our guide to must-have cookware for foolproof vegetarian cooking. BY TAMI FERTIG

10 5 6 10 87

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS COMMUNITY RECIPE INDEX

Issue 430, Vol. 42, No. 6. Vegetarian Times (ISSN 0164-8497, USPS 433-170) is published monthly except February, August, and December by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc., an Active Interest Media company. The known office of publication is at 5720 Flatiron Pkwy, Boulder, CO 80301. Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, CO, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to Vegetarian Times, PO Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. SUBSCRIPTIONS: Basic Rate: $19.90 per year (9 issues); Canada: $31.95 per year; all other international orders: $43.95 per year (U.S. funds only).

20


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Chocolate-Cherry Oatmeal Cookies

Sustainable. FSC and &RPSRVWDEOH&HUWLÂżHG Non-GMO. Non-Toxic. Gluten and Allergen Free. Totally Chlorine Free. Vegan. Vegetarian. Renewable Resources. All Natural.

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1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. 2. In a mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugars together. Add egg and vanilla until smooth. 3.,QDVHSDUDWHERZOPL[WRJHWKHUĂ&#x20AC;RXUEDNLQJVRGD salt and cinnamon. Add to butter mixture, DOWHUQDWLQJEHWZHHQRDWVDQGĂ&#x20AC;RXUPL[WXUHXQWLOIXOO\ incorporated. 4. Mix in cherries, chocolate chips, walnuts until just combined. 5./LQHDEDNLQJSDQZLWK,I<RX&DUH3DUFKPHQW3DSHU Using your hands, divide dough into 8-10 even balls DQGVSDFHRXWHYHQO\RQWKHSDUFKPHQWĂ&#x20AC;DWWHQLQJ VOLJKWO\ QRWH\RXPD\QHHGWREDNHLQPXOWLSOH batches). 6.%DNHIRUPLQXWHVXQWLOJROGHQEURZQAllow FRRNLHVWRFRROEHIRUHWUDQVIHUULQJWRZLUHUDFN

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PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: RICHARD CUMMINGS; HAIR/MAKEUP: BETH WALKER; RICHARD CUMMINGS; STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC; COURTESY OF SARA SULLIVAN; DAVID CALLAN/GETTY IMAGES

If you’re a vegan traveler headed to an exotic locale this summer, check out blogger Caitlin Galer-Unti’s tips for navigating foreign restaurants while sticking to your eating style. Author of The Essential Vegan Travel Guide, Galer-Unti provides useful guidelines for preparing ahead of time, having a backup plan, and being aware of local customs. VEGETARIANTIMES.COM / BLOG /

8-TIPS-FOR-VEGAN-TRAVELERS

SPRING SLIM-DOWN Feel the need to shed some winter weight? Join nutritionist and vegetarian Sara Sullivan in our 6 Weeks to PlantPowered Weight Loss course, which guides you through weekly plant-based eating modifications, grounded in sound nutrition principles, that will help you slim down while increasing your energy. AIMHEALTHYU.COM / PLANTPOWER FACEBOOK.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

CULINARY DREAMS HAVE YOU EVER thought about making vegetarian cooking your career? For anyone who dreams of taking their love of plant-based cooking to the next level, we have an amazing opportunity: the Natural Gourmet Institute for Health and Culinary Arts Vegetarian Times Scholarship, which provides $15,000 in tuition credit to a student in the institute’s Chef ’s Training Program. As part of our continuing partnership with the Natural Gourmet Institute (NGI), the New York–based culinary school for healthy-cooking enthusiasts, this scholarship program is open to anyone in the Vegetarian Times community. To be considered, you need to be a new applicant to the Chef ’s Training Program, be eligible for program enrollment in 2016, and submit all application materials plus a scholarship essay between May 1 and June 30. The scholarship winner will be announced by July 8, 2016. Check out the scholarship details at ngihca.edu/ vegetarian-times-scholarship. If your cooking aspirations are geared more toward what to make for dinner tonight, we’ve got plenty of great vegetarian and vegan recipe options in this issue. My favorites include the Mexican fare our staff created (“Cinco de Mayo Throw a fuss-free Cinco de Mayo party Fiesta Time,” p. 78), our “Root-to-Frond with these staff-selected Mexican dishes Cooking” dishes (p. 37) that use every bit (“Cinco de Mayo Fiesta Time,” p. 78). of those luscious spring vegetables, and inventive salads created by chef Julie Morris (“Salad Days,” p. 44) that you can make ahead and eat all week. Whatever your culinary dreams and ambitions this spring, enjoy the plant-based bounty of the season!

@VEGTIMES PINTEREST.COM/VEGTIMES INSTAGRAM.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

Michele Crockett Editor in Chief

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MAY 2016 5


WE ASKED OUR CONTRIBUTORS,

“What is your favorite food to bring to a celebration?” Theresa Walker “Soul Food, Vegan-Style,” p. 17

Look for our

11 New

Journalist Theresa Walker is a Southern California native who has worked for several publications in the Los Angeles area. She is currently a staff writer for the Orange County Register. “Guacamole, because green is good.”

delicious items! Find Dr.Praeger’s in your grocer’s freezer. MANUFACTURER’S COUPON

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Pati Jinich “Cinco de Mayo Fiesta Time,” p. 78 Pati Jinich, born in Mexico, hosts the PBS cooking show Pati’s Mexican Table. The cookbook author is also the resident chef at the Mexican Cultural Institute of Washington, DC. Jinich lives in Maryland with her husband and three sons.

Nicole Dominic Cover photo and recipe styling

$1.00 OFF

Denver-based prop and wardrobe stylist Nicole Dominic is a hiker, reader, and foodie whose goal is to make the world more interesting to look at.

Any Dr. Praeger’s Purely Sensible Foods Product NOT ELIGIBLE FOR DOUBLE COUPONING RETAILER: We will reimburse you the face value of this coupon plus 8¢ handling provided you and the customer have complied ÜÌ Ìi ÌiÀà v Ìà vviÀ° ÛVià «ÀÛ} «ÕÀV>Ãià v ÃÕvwViÌ ÃÌV  Ì VÛiÀ presented coupons must be shown on request. Any other application may constitute fraud. Coupon void where prohibited, taxed or restricted. Consumer must pay any sales tax. Cash value .001¢. Reproduction of this coupon is expressly prohibited. Mail to: Dr. Praeger’s, Inmar Dept. #80868, One Fawcett Drive, Del Rio, TX 78840

“Either an appetizer or dessert. In summer, there’s nothing better than homemade strawberry shortcake, especially when the strawberries come straight from my garden. My go-to appetizer is steamed artichokes made into a decadent dip, served warm with fresh, crusty bread from my favorite Denver bakery.”

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: THERESA WALKER; MICHAEL VENTURA; JENNIFER OLSON

“Dessert! It practically assures the involvement of one or more of my boys in the planning, making, and decorating. Also, most people await dessert eagerly. And for those who don’t, I love to tempt them with an extra-scrumptious one, so it’s a nice challenge for me, too.”


Be risky with your recipes, not with your ingredients. Courageous chefs, culinary explorers and those with a taste for adventure love San-J. As part of our commitment to the finest quality, our Asian Cooking Sauces and Tamari Soy Sauces are not only certified gluten free, they are now verified non GMO*. We use only quality ingredients and Japanese methods in brewing Tamari, which we have faithfully followed for over 200 years. These may just be the best tasting and most versatile sauces in your kitchen. So take a chance, try something new, but never compromise

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VEG EXPLORER FEATURED BLOG: With Food + Love withfoodandlove.com Sherrie Castellano is a certified health coach, food writer, and photographer based in St. Louis. The Midwest transplant’s blog, With Food + Love, features veg and gluten-free recipes inspired by the seasons, Castellano's travels, and her local produce finds.

2 large globe artichokes 2 Tbs. lemon juice 1 cup packed fresh basil leaves

2 Tbs. olive oil 2 cloves garlic, peeled ¼ tsp. sea salt, or more to taste

BASI L-BRUSHE D ROASTED ARTI CHOKES SERVES 2

Castellano loves artichokes, and this recipe features a fresh, simpler, lighter twist on the classic flavors of an Italian-style stuffed choke. The artichoke halves should be eaten leaf-by-leaf, as you would with whole ones. You can then scrape away the tiny inner leaves and choke spines to eat the heart whole.

¼ tsp. ground black pepper, or more to taste

juice 10 minutes, to draw out excess dirt. Drain, and wash chokes thoroughly. Trim 1 inch off tops, and cut off stem. Trim leaves with kitchen shears, and slice artichokes in half lengthwise.

3 Place artichoke halves in bottom of large pot and add 2 inches water. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and cook 20 to 25 minutes, or until tender. (Artichoke is cooked when outer leaf can be easily removed and inside is tender.) Remove from water with tongs, and set cut-side down on clean dish towel. 4 Pulse basil, olive oil, remaining lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in mini food processor until smooth. Brush cut sides of artichokes with basil spread, and roast cut-side up on baking sheet 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Serve with remaining basil spread.

10 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

PER SERVING (1 ARTICHOKE) 209 CAL; 6 G PROT; 14 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 20 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 394 MG SOD; 9 G FIBER; 2 G SUGARS

HEADSHOT: HANNAH FOLDY; ARTICHOKE PHOTO: SHERRIE CASTELLANO

1 Preheat oven to 400°F. 2 Soak artichokes in bowl filled with warm water plus 1 Tbs. lemon


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TELL VT What is your favorite food to bring to a celebration?

Hot and bubbly dip. artichoke-spinach-garlic —Mary Godwin

Slow-cooker vindaloo and brown rice. I go to a lot of gatherings where nobody makes anything for vegetarians or vegans. Funnily enough, the vindaloo and brown rice are always gone at the end of the night—and I make a double batch! —Peggy Ince

The Szechuan Black-Eyed Pea Salad that was featured in VT’s Readers’ Top-Rated Recipes special edition. I made it New Year’s Day, and it was a huge hit! —Kathy Rogers

Tell us what you’re cooking at facebook.com/ vegetariantimesmag

Orzo pasta salad with colorful veggies, beans, Italian seasoning, and dressing.

Chana masala—great recipe for a crowd. —Linda Gross

—Marie Salam

JOIN US ONLINE FACEBOOK.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

@VEGTIMES

Homemade hummus with crudités, and BBQ jackfruit sliders with homemade coleslaw. —Teri Miller

PINTEREST.COM/VEGTIMES INSTAGRAM.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

12 MAY 2016

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Mediterranean pasta salad, a true family/friends favorite. —Nanci Lawson

Homemade salsa. —Heather Weiss Knowlton

Vegetable enchiladas. —LaWanda Dean

PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO/ALINA SOLOVYOVA-VINCENT

Find Kathy’s favorite recipe at vegetariantimes.com/recipe/szechuan-black-eyed-pea-salad.


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Warm Carrot and Adzuki Bean Salad This sweet-and-spicy salad received 4,054 total comments, likes, and shares.

GET THE RECIPE vegetariantimes.com/recipe/ warm-carrot-and-adzukibean-salad

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MARCH-ISSUE RESPONSE » Several readers pointed out that our March story “Can Dogs and Cats Go Vegetarian?” (Trending Veg, p. 23) seemed to advocate feeding cats a vegetarian or vegan diet. While we strive to present expert information, even when the experts offer differing viewpoints, we agree with Bruce Kornreich, DVM, PhD, associate director of the Cornell Feline Health Center at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, with a specialty in cardiology, who says: “Cats, like many species such as birds of prey and dolphins, are obligate carnivores, meaning they require a strict meat diet. Cats need certain essential amino acids (those they cannot produce on their own); the most often-mentioned is taurine. Since cats cannot produce this on their own in significant amounts,

if they don’t have enough taurine in their diet, there can be deleterious effects on their heart, eyes, and reproductive system.” We presented our original article in response to the many questions and comments we’ve received from readers who feed their pets a vegetarian diet (or are contemplating it). We urge readers to discuss the health consequences of a vegetarian diet for their pets with a veterinarian before proceeding. 

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PHOTOS, FROM LEFT: MAREN CARUSO; ISTOCK/BRIAN ZANCHI

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{ TRENDING VEG }

Soul Food, Vegan-Style A prominent chef and his wife in the Washington, D.C., area promote a new way of eating By Theresa Walker

PHOTO: ERIN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY

MARRIAGE TURNED VERNON

Mickiyah and Vernon Woodland at their College Park, MD, NuVegan Café location.

Woodland into a vegan. The chef at and co-owner of the Washington, D.C., eatery NuVegan Café (formerly Woodland’s Vegan Bistro) grew up eating like other African-American youth in the city’s black neighborhoods: meals

centered on chicken, beef, and pork. And there was plenty of macaroni and cheese. His wife, Mickiyah Woodland, who spent her childhood years in Bermuda and in D.C., learned to cook at a young age in the vegan restaurants that her parents operated.

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 17


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At both NuVegan Café locations, diners can find vegan adaptations of fried chicken, mac and cheese, and a wide selection of salads, vegetable side dishes, and juices.

When the Woodlands, both 34, married 14 years ago, “she converted me over,” says Vernon, who trained at the New England Culinary Institute. “This whole vegan lifestyle was new to me and to a lot of people, especially in this area.”

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF NUVEGAN CAFÉ

A new wave of African-American vegans Now the couple is among an increasing number of black vegan enthusiasts, from megawatt celebrities like husband-and-wife recording artists Jay Z and Beyoncé to ordinary moms intent on better family nutrition. Plant-based cuisine is featured at black-owned restaurants and in cookbooks by black authors, like 2015 James Beard Foundation award winner Bryant Terry, chef-in-residence at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. Online, a host of African-American– centric venues tout the vegan lifestyle, including BlacksGoingVegan.com, BrownVegan.com, and SistahVegan.com. On Facebook, thousands follow the pages Black

Vegan Love and Beautiful Black Vegan Women. The Woodlands serve vegan adaptations of the beloved mac and cheese, and barbecue roast and fried chicken, plus a slew of veggie sides, salads, and juices. “We kind of made a name for ourselves as a soul-food vegan restaurant,” Vernon says proudly. Patrons include producer and businessman Russell Simmons, and one of the best-known advocates—black or white—for a diet that shuns animal products and manufactured food in favor of fruits and vegetables: activist and comedian Dick Gregory. Gregory’s 1974 book Dick Gregory’s Natural Diet for Folks Who Like to Eat: Cookin’ With Mother Nature remains popular. It influenced Darrin Wilkerson, a mental-health counselor in Los Angeles who administers the Facebook pages Beautiful Black Vegan Women and Positive Strong Black Vegan Men. “We are all learning at the same time,” says Wilkerson, 48, who also launched the Black Vegan Community on Facebook to share vegan experiences.

The switch to plant-based foods Wilkerson’s mom owned a fish market on the Jersey Shore, so he ate mostly seafood as a child. But for the past 10 years, he’s stuck to a plantbased diet. He finds support in the social group Vegans of Color. If it seems odd that a man is behind Beautiful Black Vegan Women, consider Wilkerson’s goal: generational change. “My whole point is to educate the women because they make the food decisions in the household. They are in control of the diet and nutritional value,” he says. Woodland learned from his wife, and in 2009 they took over the former Everlasting Life Café, changing the name to Woodland’s Vegan Bistro in 2013. It was rebranded as NuVegan Café this year. Their adapted comfort foods hooked locals who were being told by their doctors to eat healthier in order to combat health conditions— hypertension, diabetes, and obesity—prevalent among blacks (and the U.S. population as a whole). The Woodlands own a second NuVegan Café in College Park, MD, that caters to a younger crowd. “Our whole mission,” Vernon says, “is to change the perception of what vegan food is.”

The NuVegan Café attracts a regular neighborhood clientele and has also become a destination for celebrities like the singer Drake, shown here.

19,248 Number of fans on the Black Vegan Love Facebook page

Stevie Wonder is just one of many celebrities who has recently become vegan. He posed with the staff at the NuVegan Café.

Theresa Walker is a Southern California–based writer who specializes in feature writing, with a particular love for stories about ordinary people doing the extraordinary.

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 19


C E L E B R AT E S P R I N G W I T H A N

APERITIVO These Italian-style cocktails come in many variations, and all provide a refreshing way to unwind By Nicole Gregory

The classic spritz is three parts sparkling wine (e.g., prosecco), two parts bitters (e.g., Campari), and one part soda water, according to Talia Baiocchi, co-author with Leslie Pariseau of Spritz: Italy’s Most Iconic Aperitivo Cocktail, with Recipes (Ten Speed Press, 2016). Within these parameters, the combinations are endless. The authors toured Italy searching for traditional aperitivo drinks, and, in their book, share what they found, as well as many American-made versions. What does the word aperitivo mean? “In Italy, aperitivo refers to a drink consumed before dinner, so people will say, ‘Let’s have an aperitivo,’” says Baiocchi. “It also means a particular time of day—the Italian happy hour between work and dinner. It’s that moment of transition to leisure that is very important to Italian identity.” She explains that during the aperitivo hour at any Italian bar, food will be served, such as artichokes cooked in olive oil and white wine, or crostini topped with tomatoes, pesto, cheese, and mashed beans. The spritz is associated with warm weather. “But it doesn’t have to be seasonal—I drink spritz year-round,” Baiocchi says. 20 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

R IB TI CKLER ALEX DAY, NITECAP, NEW YORK CITY GLASS » WINE GLASS GARNISH » GRAPEFRUIT HALF-WHEEL

This drink was born out of the idea to create a more sippable, bubbly White Negroni. To start, bartender Alex Day was set on maintaining the White Negroni’s most distinctive element: bitter, gentian-forward Suze. From there, he built a sour recipe with lemon juice, St. Germain, and simple syrup, and maintained its backbone with dry, spicy Dolin. Though the drink doesn’t contain a traditional prosecco topper, it boasts a lighthearted spritz with its bittersweet twinge, sunshine-yellow hue, and bubbly personality.

2 oz. Dolin dry vermouth ¼ oz. Suze ½ oz. St. Germain ½ oz. fresh lemon juice ½ oz. simple syrup Soda water Grapefruit, cut into half-wheel, for garnish Pour the vermouth, Suze, St. Germain, lemon juice, and simple syrup into a wine glass over ice. Top with soda water and add grapefruit garnish. The spritz cocktail features three essential components, but the variations are endless.

PHOTO: DYLAN + JENI © 2016

are enjoying a new popularity in both Italy and America, and one delightful variation is the spritz. Bubbly, bitter, and low in alcohol, this effervescent cocktail is meant to ease the daily transition from work to home.

Recipe reprinted with permission from Spritz: Italy’s Most Iconic Aperitivo Cocktail, with Recipes, by Talia Baiocchi and Leslie Pariseau, copyright © 2016. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.

ITALIAN APERITIVO DRINKS


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KEEP YOU GOING When you’re on the go and hungry, and there’s not a salad bar in sight, having one of these energy bars—with ingredients you recognize, as well as plenty of protein—can save the day. By Kristen Kuchar

Bearded Brothers » Fabulous Ginger Peach We loved the slight kick from the fresh, pressed ginger in this organic, raw, vegan bar that’s free of gluten and soy. 238 CAL; 6 G PROT; 13 G TOT FAT; 14 MG SOD; 20 G SUGARS

$3.49/2 oz.; beardedbros.com

22 MAY 2016

Clif Bar » Chocolate Brownie Made with organic rolled oats, this chewy bar has all the sweetness and chocolaty goodness of a brownie. 250 CAL; 9 G PROT; 5 G TOT FAT; 170 MG SOD; 22 G SUGARS

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vegetariantimes.com

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200 CALORIES; 10 G PROT; 5 G TOT FAT; 350 MG SOD; 15 G SUGARS

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PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO/ADVENTURE_PHOTO

ENERGY BARS ARE packed with protein and nutrients—but often lots of calories, too. This is not a bad thing if you’ve got one to eat when you’d otherwise miss a meal. However, don’t think of an energy bar as a light snack like an apple or handful of nuts. “Bars should be used as a meal replacement, but the average person uses them as a snack,” says New York–based dietitian Maya Feller, MS. So pay attention not only to a bar’s calories but also to its fat, salt, and sugar content, she says.


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M .I. A . NUTRIENTS The nutrient trio of magnesium, EPA and DHA, and vitamin E is often overlooked, but with some easy dietary tweaks, you can get what you need By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD

BETWEEN MAKING SURE to eat enough fiber and trying not to skimp on iron and calcium, we vegetarians and vegans can unknowingly miss out on less well-known but equally key nutrients: magnesium, EPA and DHA, and vitamin E. And coming up short could negatively impact our health. Here’s how to easily include them in your diet.

MAGNESIUM

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: ISTOCKPHOTO/SUZIFOO; ISTOCKPHOTO/MAPODILE; ISTOCKPHOTO/FCAFOTODIGITAL

REQUIREMENT

400

mg daily for adult men

310-320 mg for women

POWER FOOD

Consider magnesium the Renaissance man of minerals— it’s a key player in hundreds of biochemical reactions in our bodies affecting nerve, muscle, heart, and bone function, as well as blood-sugar control. So poor intake over the long haul could put you at risk for a host of ills, including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, unhealthy cholesterol numbers, fragile bones, depression, and even migraines. And based on magnesium’s role in energy production within our cells, low levels could contribute to general fatigue.

COMING UP SHORT

GET WHAT YOU NEED

It’s a bleak picture when it comes to this MVP of the mineral world. About half of Americans aren’t taking in the minimum recommended amount. Why? “Processed, packaged foods too often edge out the whole foods where magnesium is predominantly found,” says Sharon Palmer, RDN, author of Plant-Powered for Life. Case in point: When a whole grain is refined, the magnesium-containing germ and bran are removed—leaving behind a plate of pasta bereft of the mineral.

Palmer says that magnesium is found in many high-fiber foods, such as legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, potatoes, and dark greens like spinach and broccoli. Chocoholics can rejoice that cocoa is a surprisingly good source, as well.

PUMPKIN SEEDS

1 150 ounce =

mg

Sprinkle these little magnesium powerhouses on oatmeal, salads, yogurt, roasted vegetables, and soups, or blend them into a pesto.

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 25


REQUIREMENT There aren’t yet any official EPA and DHA recommendations, but at least 250 mg a day is the likely minimum amount needed to confer adequate disease protection.

The duo of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) comprises long-chain omega-3 fats that have proven to be allies in the fight against heart disease, cognitive decline, depression, and osteoporosis. Both are important structural components of cell membranes.

COMING UP SHORT

GET WHAT YOU NEED

Unfortunately for vegetarians, the best sources of EPA and DHA are fatty fish like salmon, sardines, and mackerel. While ALA (alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 found in plants) can be converted in the body to EPA and DHA, many vegetarians and vegans still don’t consume high-enough amounts of ALA to make up for the generally low conversion rate.

In the absence of a direct source of EPA and DHA, Palmer encourages boosting your ALA intake: “The more ALA you start with, the more EPA and DHA you’ll end up with,” she says. Increasing ALA consumption also serves to tip your omega-3-toomega-6 ratio toward omega-3s, for better conversion. High-ALA edibles include chia seeds, flaxseed, flax oil, hemp seeds, canola oil, and walnuts.

VITAMIN E

POWER FOOD

MAGNESIUM

Natural Vitality Natural Calm Plus Calcium drink

GROUND FLAXSEED

1 1.6

tablespoon =

grams ALA

Sneak this omega stalwart into cooked cereals, smoothies, pancakes, and even homemade bread or pizza crust.

POWER FOOD

Vitamin E is a moniker given to a group of fat-soluble compounds that possess antioxidant powers. “Food sources of antioxidants, mg daily for adults such as vitamins C and E and phytochemicals, have been shown to reduce the cell-damaging effects of free radicals in the body, which may help protect against heart disease, cancer, mental decline, and even cataracts,” says Palmer.

REQUIREMENT

15

COMING UP SHORT

GET WHAT YOU NEED

More than 80 percent of American adults aren’t getting the vitamin E they need for optimal health. “Vitamin E is often present in higher-fat foods like vegetable oils, seeds, and nuts, so vegetarians following an extremely low-fat diet can be at risk for low intakes,” Palmer says.

To top up your vitamin E stores, scatter higher-fat foods like nuts, nut butters, seeds, avocado, and culinary oils (e.g., olive or flax oil) on dishes throughout the day. Made by isolating the nutrient-rich germ from wheat when it’s refined, inexpensive wheat germ also delivers healthy amounts.

Matthew Kadey is a Canada-based registered dietitian.

26 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

SUPPLEMENTS TO TRY

$46.95/16 oz.; naturalvitality.com

The Vitamin Shoppe Calm Zone Magnesium: Raspberry Lemon Flavor $11.99/8 oz. powder; vitaminshoppe.com EPA and DHA

Deva Vegan Omega-3 DHA-EPA  $29.99/90 500 mg caps; devanutrition.com

Nature Made 100% Vegetarian Omega-3 EPA+DHA $28.99/60 540 mg caps;  naturemade.com VITAMIN E

Deva Vegan Vitamin E

HAZELNUT OIL

1 6.4 tablespoon =

mg

Use this toasty oil to enliven salad dressings, pestos, dips, steamed greens, and pasta. Or use it to add a nutty nuance to homemade granola.

$27.99/90 400 IU vegan caps; devanutrition.com

Solgar Vitamin E $17/100 400 IU vegetarian softgels; solgar.com —Nicole Gregory

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: ISTOCKPHOTO/MAGONE; ISTOCKPHOTO/CHAMILLEWHITE

EPA AND DHA


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EASING

J O I N T PA I N By David Kalmansohn

THE ORIGINS OF joint pain are many, ranging from injury to magnesium deficiency. But the most common cause of all those sore hips, hands, and knees is arthritis, and the most common type of arthritis—affecting 27 million Americans—is osteoarthritis, a condition that occurs as joint cartilage and bone wear out. Numerous supplements can aid joint health (calcium, vitamin D3) or relieve joint pain (ginger, turmeric). But glucosamine may accomplish both goals.

POWER SOURCE

USE IT RIGHT

The amino sugar glucosamine sulfate is produced naturally in the body and helps to make and maintain the cartilage and thick fluid that surround and protect joints. Studies on glucosamine’s efficacy have yielded mixed results: Some found it to be no better than a placebo, while others found that glucosamine actually improves joint mobility while reducing osteoarthritis pain to the same degree as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs—but without NSAIDs’ potential vascular and gastrointestinal risks. Glucosamine does, however, take one to two months to work.

Of the several forms of glucosamine, the most studied—and thus most recommended—is glucosamine sulfate, which supplement manufacturers harvest from shellfish. Vegetarian options utilize a form called glucosamine hydrochloride. Manufacturers sometimes add ingredients like the connective-tissue builder chondroitin, but these have yet to demonstrate reliable benefits. Standard glucosamine dosage is 1,500 milligrams per day, preferably combined with weight loss (if you're carrying extra pounds), gentle exercise, and an antiinflammatory diet to help improve results.

STANDARD DOSAGE

1,500 mg daily

TRY

Deva Vegan Glucosamine $10/90 500 mg tablets; devanutrition.com

WATCH OUT FOR

Gl Hydrochloride

Few side effects have been reported. Do not use glucosamine if you take blood thinners or are pregnant or nursing. Quality control can be an issue, so choose a trusted brand or one that’s been tested independently.

$12.72/60 1,000 mg tablets; solgar.com

Journalist David Kalmansohn covers issues of mind, body, and spirit.

28 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

STOCK CREDIT

Glucosamine may provide relief, with few side effects


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GOOD ENOUGH

T O E AT PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ISTOCKPHOTO/DOHNAL; ISTOCKPHOTO/YOH4NN; ISTOCKPHOTO/FELINDA; ISTOCKPHOTO/_VILOR; ISTOCKPHOTO/SCISETTIALFIO; ISTOCKPHOTO/PICTUREPARTNERS

Edible flowers add color and flavor to food By Therese Ciesinski

HAVE YOU EVER swooned over the scent of a rose and thought, “It smells good enough to eat”? Go ahead and nibble. “Humans all over the world have a long history of eating flowers,” says Charlie Nardozzi, author of Foodscaping: Practical and Innovative Ways to Create an Edible Landscape (Cool Springs Press, 2015). “So eating flowers isn’t new—it’s just been rediscovered.” Edible flowers are everywhere: in flower gardens and along hedgerows, in your herb garden, or growing up through the lawn. Even some weeds—hello, dandelion petals!—are edible. The flowers of culinary herbs, such as thyme, rosemary, and basil, are always edible, as are the flowers of many vegetables: Radishes, peas, and squash are just a few. Most edible flowers have a mild taste, and their colors and flavors are best appreciated fresh.

The Details RESEARCH Not all flowers are edible: Know what you’re eating, and never eat flowers you’re unfamiliar with or that have been treated with pesticides.

GROW Most edible flowers want sunlight, water, and welldrained soil. They’re great in flowerbeds or containers, of course, as well as in the vegetable garden.

PICK Nardozzi recommends harvesting in the morning, when essential oils are at their highest levels. Pick fresh, healthy flowers that are just reaching their peak.

PREPARE First soak the flowers in a bowl of water to remove bugs and tiny bits of dirt. Remove the pistil and stamens, which have an unpleasant flavor.

USE Eat or use to cook immediately. You can refrigerate for a short time, but for the most part, fresh flowers and petals don’t keep.

NASTURTIUM (TROPAEOLUM MAJUS) This flower has a peppery tang. The leaves as well as the brilliant orange, red, and yellow flowers add zing to salads and sandwiches.

PANSY (VIOLA × WITTROCKIANA) Pansies have a gentle wintergreen flavor. Often candied and used to decorate cakes, the flowers also dress up fruit salads.

ROSE (ROSA) The fragrance is the flavor; darker petals have a stronger flavor. Use the petals, first cutting off the bitter white tips. Sprinkle on desserts or float in drinks.

Five with Flower Power

BORAGE (BORAGO OFFICINALIS) The flavor of these tiny, star-shaped flowers is cucumberlike, good in salads and cold soups, and lovely added to lemonade or seltzer.

CHIVE (ALLIUM SCHOENOPRASUM) The lavender blossoms are oniony, but mild. Pull the florets apart and sprinkle them over soups, salads, and egg dishes.

Therese Ciesinski has written for Garden Design, This Old House, and Coastal Home magazines, Houzz.com, and the Philadelphia Inquirer. She was an editor at Organic Gardening magazine, and lives and gardens in Southeastern Pennsylvania.

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 31


WHY MULCH

IS A MUST Mulch protects your plants and makes gardening a breeze By Scott Meyer

HAVE YOU HEARD about a miracle product that saves you from having to constantly weed and water your garden, and builds up soil while you do nothing? Sounds like hype, right? Well, believe it or not, mulch is all that and more. Covering your garden beds with mulch blocks light from reaching weeds so they can’t grow, plus keeps the topsoil from baking into a hard crust in the sun. And, as it decomposes, mulch pumps up your soil’s fertility. Choosing the right mulch for your purposes is easy, too. Here’s what you need to know:

WHAT Dry grass clippings, fallen leaves, and pine needles are ideal for mulching your veggie garden because they allow rainfall to percolate through to plants’ roots while shielding the soil from direct sunlight. Plus, they break down into nutrients that plants can absorb from the soil. Be sure the grass clippings come from lawns that are not treated with chemicals so they don’t poison your crops. You can also use organic straw purchased from a local farm. HOW Spread a 4-inch-deep layer atop your garden beds and continually replenish it as the mulch breaks down. Cover the soil when you plant seedlings or after seeds you’ve sown have sprouted. Soil should be warm—not cold or frozen—before mulching, and you should weed it first. Ideally, you’ll add the mulch after a rain.

Trees and Shrubs WHAT A barrier of hard-

wood or bark mulch protects trees and shrubs from the encroachment of lawn mowers and weed whackers. HOW Spread a 3-inch layer of mulch, but don’t mound it up around the tree or shrub trunk, because it will give shelter to bark-chewing rodents.

Flower Beds WHAT Grass, leaves, and straw are equally effective in ornamental gardens, but they are not very attractive. Shredded hardwood or pine-bark chips, available in bulk or bags, obstruct weeds and conserve moisture, all while giving your beds a more finished appearance. HOW Wood breaks down slowly so you only need to spread a 3-inch-deep layer of mulch once, at the start of growing season. Start with a bottom layer of grass or leaves and top it off with wood mulch.

32 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

Pathways WHAT To block weeds from coming up in your garden path, roll out an old carpet (ideally made of a natural material like wool) atop your pathway. Then, top if off with a few inches of pea gravel or shredded hardwood for aesthetics. HOW Wait until the soil has dried out to lay the carpet, so it isn’t soggy for weeks.

Scott Meyer is editorial director of Blue Root Media, author of The City Homesteader (Running Press, 2011), and former editor of Organic Gardening magazine. He lives with his wife and two children and tends his small but productive garden at his home near Philadelphia. 

PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO/CJP

Vegetable Beds


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Homemade Whole-Grain Goodness

SUPERFOOD SNACK CHIPS Dehydrated quinoa crisps nicely into healthy nibbles By Julie Morris

PHOTO: RICHARD CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

THERE’S A SNACK-CHIP revolution in the works, with healthy, whole-food products popping up on supermarket shelves everywhere. VT enlisted regular contributor and Superfood Snacks author Julie Morris to create a homemade chip recipe to rival those store-bought options. Made from puréed vegetables, seeds, grains, and spices, these snacks are dried and crisped in a dehydrator. The slow-cook dehydrating method allows for lower fat content and zero ⇒ller (not even ⇓our!), so you can nourish your crunchy cravings, guilt free.

V E GE TA B LE Q U INOA C HIPS MAKES 64 CHIPS

Thin and light, yet sturdy enough to plunge into a favorite dip, these irresistible highprotein chips prove that big crunch really does come in small packages. You can store the chips for several weeks at room temperature in a sealed container. 1 2 2 ¼ 2 1 1 2 ½

cup quinoa, rinsed and drained medium yellow bell peppers, chopped (2 cups) stalks celery, chopped (½ cup) cup ground flaxseeds Tbs. chia seeds, optional Tbs. nutritional yeast flakes Tbs. olive oil tsp. onion powder tsp. salt, plus extra for sprinkling, optional

1 Bring quinoa and 2 cups water to a boil in saucepan over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, without stirring, 15 minutes or until quinoa is tender and water has evaporated. Let stand 5 minutes, and then fluff with a fork. 2

Purée bell peppers, celery, flaxseed meal, chia seeds (if using), nutritional yeast, olive oil, onion powder, and salt in food processor until liquefied and smooth. Add quinoa, and blend 1 minute—mixture should be smooth but with some texture remaining.

3 Line 2 dehydrator trays with nonstick dehydrator sheets or parchment paper coated with oil or cooking spray. Spread quinoa mixture on sheets all the way to edge in smoothest layer possible. Score each sheet into 32 triangles by pressing knife blade into quinoa mixture without dragging knife. Sprinkle lightly with salt (if using). 4

Place trays in dehydrator and dehydrate at 145°F overnight (about 8 to 10 hours). Snap into triangles. If mixture still has soft spots, flip chips over and dehydrate 1 hour more.

PER SERVING (8 CHIPS) 128 CAL; 5 G PROT; 5 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 18 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 132 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 35


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COOKING

R O O T-T O -F R O N D PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO

Use every last bit of those luscious spring veggies! By Gabrielle Langholtzz

VEGETARIANS ARE USED to thinking hard about where our

food comes from, but what about where it goes? Increasingly, ecologists are urging eaters to look not just upstream, but also down. The scraps we throw away are a huge problem— but also a huge opportunity. When you put your waste stream on a diet, you’ll save money and green your kitchen, plus you just might discover that that veggie part you’ve been tossing out for years is your new favorite ingredient. vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 37


OPEN-FACED BEET SANDWICHES WITH GOAT CHEESE AND BEET-TOP PESTO SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

No need to peel the beets here: They roast up quickly when sliced, and you won’t mind the strips of skins. As for the tops—why toss them? The sweet, leafy greens can be cooked like spinach or chard. Here, they’re whirred into a pesto that’s assertive the moment it’s made but mellows deliciously as it sits. If you can’t find beet tops, substitute 2 cups Swiss chard. To make the sandwich vegan, you can swap in almond butter for the goat cheese. 4 ½ 2 ⁄3 2

medium beets, including tops cup plus 1 Tbs. olive oil, divided cup walnuts, toasted and cooled cloves garlic, peeled

8 oval slices of peasant bread, toasted 4 oz. fresh chèvre goat cheese, at room temperature

1 Preheat oven to 425˚F. Trim beets, and cut stems from beet greens. Reserve leaves of beet greens. Slice beets crosswise into ¼-inch-thick slices. Lay in single layer on baking sheet, drizzle with 1 Tbs. olive oil, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Roast 20 minutes, flipping halfway through. 2

Meanwhile, pulse beet greens, walnuts, garlic, and ½ cup olive oil 20 seconds, or until pesto forms. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

3 Spread each slice of toasted bread with 1 2 oz. goat cheese, top with several beet rounds, ⁄ and dollop with 2 Tbs. pesto.

Root-to-frond cooking is covered in depth in

course and using whole veggies in your cooking, nutrition.

38 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

PHOTOS: RICHARD CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

PER SANDWICH 306 CAL; 7 G PROT; 25 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 16 G CARB; 7 MG CHOL; 237 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS


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In March 2015, New York’s famed Blue Hill restaurant proved that so-called food waste can be something else: delicious. At “wastED,” an 18-day popup held in the three-star restaurant, the menu showcased ingredients that were otherwise bound for the compost pile, such as carrot peels, bok choy stems, pineapple cores, pasta-dough

trimmings, and even coffee grounds. Chefs transformed this “waste” into dishes that drew crowds, and soon there were lines down the block to eat things most of us unthinkingly toss. Blue Hill’s culinary director, Adam Kaye, points out that entire cuisines are based on thrifty, root-to-frond

mouthwatering ways to cook those

RED LENTILS WITH TURNIPS AND THEIR TOPS SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Turnip eaters often toss the tops, unaware that they’re a vitamin powerhouse akin to kale. Here, both the turnip root and greens are simmered into an Indian-inspired one-pot dinner. Serve with a crusty loaf of Italian bread to sop up every last bit. If your turnips don’t come with greens, substitute 2 cups turnip or mustard greens.

1 Heat oil in medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, cumin, coriander, and red pepper flakes, and season with salt, if desired. Sauté 8 minutes, or until onion is translucent. 2

3 2 2 2 1 3

Tbs. olive oil, plus more for drizzling medium yellow onions, diced (4 cups) tsp. whole cumin seeds tsp. ground coriander tsp. red pepper flakes medium turnips, roots scrubbed and diced, tops trimmed, divided

1 1⁄2 2 5 1 2

cups dried red lentils cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) cups low-sodium vegetable broth cup cilantro leaves, chopped Tbs. lemon juice

Add diced turnips, lentils, and garlic. Stir in broth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to mediumlow, and simmer, covered, 15 minutes.

3

Stir in turnip tops, and simmer, covered, 5 minutes more.

4

Remove from heat, and stir in cilantro and lemon juice.

PER 1-CUP SERVING 307 CAL; 15 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 47 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 177 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; 11 G SUGARS

40 MAY 2016

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COUSCOUS WITH CARROTS, CARROT TOPS, AND MAPLELE MON DRE SSIN G SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Yes, carrot tops are edible. Save the stalks for stock, but use the feathery leaves in pesto, soup, or even just as an herb like their close cousin, parsley. Here, a quick blanching softens the leaves up a bit before they’re tossed with the roasted roots in a maplelemon dressing with just a kick of cayenne. If you buy the carrots well before you’ll be cooking them, remove the tops and store separately, or they’ll pull moisture from the roots. Roasted Carrot Couscous 2 lbs. carrots, with tops (no need to peel); carrots sliced, tops reserved, divided 1 medium red onion, sliced into rings

¼ cup olive oil ⁄3 cup couscous ½ cup toasted, slivered almonds 2

Dressing 3 2 2 ¼

Tbs. olive oil Tbs. maple syrup Tbs. lemon juice tsp. cayenne pepper

1 To make Roasted Carrot Couscous: Preheat oven to 425˚F. Toss carrots and onion with olive oil in large bowl, and season with salt, if desired. Spread on large baking sheet. Roast 25 minutes, or until tender. 2

Meanwhile, bring 1 cup water to a boil. Chop ¼ cup tender carrot-top leaves (discard stems) and add to boiling water. Boil 1 minute, then pour mixture over couscous in medium bowl. Cover, and let stand 5 minutes.

3

To make Dressing: Shake together all ingredients in small jar.

4

Stir roasted carrots and almonds into couscous, then toss with Dressing.

Use 2 cups cooked quinoa or another gluten-free grain in place of the couscous.

1 2-CUP SERVING 332 CAL; 5 G PROT; PER 1 ⁄ 20 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 34 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 79 MG SOD; 8 G FIBER; 11 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 41


BIT TE R G RE ENS SAL AD WITH BUT TERNUT SQUASH AN D ROA S T ED S EED S SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

You’re probably used to discarding seeds when you cook butternut squash. But in Austria, many people do just the opposite, ignoring the sweet orange flesh in favor of the prized, protein-rich seeds. This recipe uses both to best advantage, but don’t just save the seeds for sprinkling on salad. Any time you’re cooking winter squash, roast the seeds with a bit of oil and salt, and perhaps a sprinkle of cayenne, until golden and crispy. They make for a great, energydense snack. Squash Salad

Dressing

1 butternut squash 2 Tbs. olive oil, divided 1 tsp. salt, divided 5 cups arugula or watercress 1 3 cup dried cherries ⁄

1 3 cup olive oil ⁄ 1 ½ Tbs. balsamic vinegar 1 clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.)

1 To make Squash Salad: Preheat oven to 425˚F. Peel and halve squash, scoop out and rinse seeds, and toss seeds with 1 Tbs. olive oil and ½ tsp. salt. Spread in single layer on baking sheet, and roast 25 minutes, or until seeds are golden and crunchy. 2 Meanwhile, peel and cut squash into 1-inch cubes, transfer to separate baking sheet, toss with 1 Tbs. olive oil, and season with salt, if desired. Roast 20 minutes, or until fork-tender, turning halfway through. 3 To make Dressing: Shake together all ingredients in small jar. 4

Place greens in large salad bowl and mix in half of Dressing. Cool squash on pan 5 minutes, then spoon over salad, garnishing with seeds and dried fruit. Drizzle with remaining Dressing.

PER 2-CUP SERVING 248 CAL; 2 G PROT; 20 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 17 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 409 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

42 MAY 2016

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PARSNIP PURÉE WITH SUNNY-SIDE-UP EGGS AND PAN-FRIED PEELS SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Parsnips are gaining traction as the root-cellar’s starchy star. You could make this dish with whole, unpeeled parsnips, but frying up their skins only takes a few seconds, yielding a sweet crunch that’s the perfect finishing touch to the comforting, silky-smooth purée. 1 1

lb. parsnips, scrubbed cup low-fat milk

1 1

Tbs. butter clove garlic, peeled and smashed

2 Tbs. olive oil 4 eggs

1 Skin parsnips, reserving peels. Roughly chop roots, and place in small saucepan with milk, butter, and garlic. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until parsnips are soft. 2

Cut parsnip peels into 2-inch pieces. Heat 2 Tbs. oil in skillet over medium heat. Add parsnip peels in a single layer (you might need to work in batches). Cook 15 seconds, or until peels are golden and crispy but not dark brown, then transfer to paper towel and sprinkle with salt, if desired. Set skillet aside.

3 Purée parsnips in blender, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. 4 Reheat skillet over medium-low heat. Fry eggs in oil remaining in skillet 2 at a time until whites are set, with yolks to desired doneness. Divide parsnip purée among 4 plates, top each with 1 egg, and sprinkle with parsnip peels. PER SERVING (1 EGG WITH 1 CUP PARSNIP PURÉE) 275 CAL; 10 G PROT; 18 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 23 G CARB; 195 MG CHOL; 156 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 43


In Weekend Whiz, we give you four simple, tasty recipes to make on the weekend (in about 2 to 3 hours) and enjoy throughout the upcoming week. Everything you need is right here, including a shopping list and a cooking timeline. And even if you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t doing the cooking-on-theweekend thing, each recipe is great all on its own.

Make-ahead salads turn take-along lunches into noontime treats

D

By Julie Morris

SPRING IS THE season of new bring-your-own lunch challenges, what

with soup and stew leftovers winding down as the weather warms up. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re craving anything and everything fresh and green, hearty salads that serve two and can be prepared ahead are the solution. (After all, no one wants to be eating the same batch of quinoa salad Monday through Friday.) Put the components together, pack them up, and you can head out each morning with a midday meal to eat at your desk or take to a park bench to enjoy in the sunshine.

44 MAY 2016

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*optional ingredient

C RU N C H Y THA I S A L A D WITH MARINATED TOFU SERVES 2

The longer tofu soaks in a tasty marinade, the better the flavor. We’ve applied that rule here by storing the tofu in the dressing you pour over the salad so that the dressing doubles as the marinade. For a bigger salad, include the optional sliced romaine lettuce. ¼ cup Chili-Lime Dressing 8 oz. extra-firm tofu, drained 2 small romaine lettuce hearts, 1 2-inch sliced ⁄ thick, optional ¼ lb. red cabbage, thinly shaved (2 cups)

1 large carrot, shredded 1 2 cup frozen peas, ⁄ thawed 1 Persian cucumber, thinly sliced 2 Tbs. slivered almonds ¼ cup fresh mint leaves, minced

Canned Goods, Dry Ingredients, and Seasonings

Produce, Refrigerated and Frozen Items, and Dairy

10 Tbs. slivered almonds 4 Tbs. roasted, hulled sunflower seeds ¼ cup dried goji berries ½ cup quinoa ½ cup dry black lentils 3 ⁄4 cup cooked chickpeas, or half a 15-oz. can chickpeas ¼ cup olive oil 1 Tbs. toasted sesame oil 1 ½ tsp. ume plum vinegar 3 Tbs. maple syrup 1 tsp. Dijon mustard 4 Tbs. tahini 1 tsp. ground cumin

1 ½ lbs. small carrots (1 bunch) 1 large carrot ½ lb. Broccolini 2 small romaine lettuce hearts, optional* 3 ⁄8 lb. red cabbage 1 Persian cucumber 1 bunch fresh mint 5 ½ cups baby spinach 5 packed cups baby kale 1 oz. sunflower sprouts (1 cup) 2 green apples 1 jalapeño chile 2 green onions ½ small avocado 2 lemons 1 lime 1 ½ cups frozen peas 8 oz. extra-firm tofu 1 Tbs. yellow miso

1 Prepare Chili-Lime Dressing (see recipe below). 2 Blot tofu between paper towels to remove surface moisture. Place in bowl, and set a heavy weight (such as a pot with a soup can inside) on top. Let drain 30 minutes in refrigerator. Blot once more, and cut into ½-inch cubes. Place in lidded container, and pour Chili-Lime Dressing on top. Seal, and shake to combine.

3

Toss together romaine (if using), cabbage, carrot, peas, cucumber, almonds, and mint in large bowl. Add tofu and dressing, and toss to coat. PER SERVING 325 CAL; 18 G PROT; 17 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 30 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 842 MG SOD; 9 G FIBER; 14 G SUGARS

PHOTOS: RICHARD CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; ASST. FOOD STYLIST: JIMMY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

C H I LI-LI ME D R ES S ING

1 Press tofu and preheat oven. 2 Prepare Chili-Lime, Zesty Lemon, and Cumin-Tahini dressings. 3 Roast Broccolini and carrots on 2 baking sheets. 4 Cook quinoa and black lentils in 2 medium saucepans. 5 Prep and chop all vegetables while Broccolini, carrots, quinoa, and lentils cool.

6 Halve all recipe components into two servings. Wrap servings of roasted vegetables in plastic wrap separate from salads, and place salads in lidded containers or resealable plastic bags. Store dressings in jars or small containers for individual servings.

MAKES ¼ CUP | 30 MINUTES OR LESS 1 1 1 1½

Tbs. lime juice Tbs. toasted sesame oil Tbs. maple syrup tsp. ume plum vinegar or red wine vinegar 1 jalapeño, seeded and chopped

Combine all ingredients in mini food processor or whisk together in small bowl until smooth.

Stored separately, the tofu marinating in the dressing and the salad will keep 5 days. For maximum freshness when packing the salad for lunch, layer tofu and cabbage on the bottom, add the other salad elements with the almonds on top, and then toss to combine just before eating.

PER SERVING 91 CAL; <1 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 8 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 789 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 45


FAR M E RS’ M AR K ET Q U INOA S A L AD SERVES 2

Young spring carrots from the farmers’ market are ideal for roasting, as they don’t require much prep before hitting the pan. If your market has an additional vegetable or fruit that looks particularly enticing (like pea shoots or apricots), feel free to include it in this recipe. ½ lb. small carrots, halved and cut into 4-inch pieces 3 Tbs. Zesty Lemon Vinaigrette, divided 1 2 cup quinoa ⁄ 4 cups baby spinach

1 1 1 2

green apple, cut into matchsticks cup sunflower sprouts (1 oz.) cup frozen peas, thawed Tbs. roasted, hulled sunflower seeds

1 Preheat oven to 425°F. Spread carrots on baking sheet, drizzle with 1 Tbs. Zesty Lemon Vinaigrette, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Toss well to coat carrots with dressing, then cover tightly with foil. Roast 15 minutes. Remove foil and roast 5 to 10 minutes more, or until carrots are browned and tender. Cool. 2 Bring quinoa and 1 cup water to a boil in medium saucepan. Reduce heat to mediumlow, and simmer 15 minutes, or until quinoa is tender and water has evaporated. Let stand 5 minutes, then fluff with fork. Cool to room temperature.

ZEST Y LE MON VI NAI G RE T TE MAKES ½ CUP

A touch of maple syrup sweetens this lemony vinaigrette just enough to make it to-die-for. Use extra vinaigrette for salads or as a dip. ¼ 2 2 2 1

cup olive oil Tbs. maple syrup Tbs. lemon juice tsp. grated lemon zest tsp. Dijon mustard

Blend all ingredients in blender or food processor until combined. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER SERVING 149 CAL; <1 G PROT; 14 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 8 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 32 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

3 Toss together spinach, apple, sprouts, peas, sunflower seeds, and quinoa in large bowl. 4 To assemble salad: Toss quinoa mixture with 2 Tbs. Zesty Lemon Vinaigrette and roasted carrots. PER SERVING 270 CAL; 8 G PROT; 13 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 33 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 118 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

Salad components, except for apple, will keep 5 days in the fridge. Cut apple into matchsticks just before packing or serving.

46 MAY 2016

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DON’T LET GREENS

GET ALL THE GLORY. Layered Mexican Bowl with Chipotle Black Bean Crumbles

Eating more veggies has taken on a whole new look and flavor. Served up savory, light and satisfying, as a snack or the main event, any way you veg is good for both you and the Earth. Find a new favorite recipe at MorningStarFarms.com.


ROASTED BROCCOLINI AND CHICKPEA SAL AD SERVES 2

The hearty flavors of cumin, beans, and roasted Broccolini are offset by a refreshing blend of sweet red cabbage and apple. Shave the cabbage very thin using a mandoline slicer or sharp knife. ½ lb. Broccolini, ends trimmed 2 Tbs. Zesty Lemon Vinaigrette (page 46) 1 2 cups baby spinach 1⁄ 1 cup thinly sliced red cabbage 1 green apple, shredded 2 Tbs. slivered almonds

CU M I N-TA H I N I D R ES S ING MAKES ⅔ CUP

Tahini sesame paste gives this dressing a rich, creamy texture that’s great for coating salad fixings. 4 2 1 1

Tbs. tahini paste Tbs. lemon juice Tbs. yellow miso tsp. ground cumin

Whisk together all ingredients plus 2 Tbs. water in small bowl. Add 1 Tbs. water if needed to thin (depending on natural thickness of tahini).

PER 1-TBS. SERVING 40 CAL; 1 G PROT; 3 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 2 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 79 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

BABY KALE AND BL AC K LE N TI L S A L A D SERVES 2

Black lentils hold their shape and retain a firm texture when cooked, which makes them the perfect addition to salads made with hearty greens like baby kale. Goji berries make a slightly sweet, antioxidant-rich addition, softening as the salad sits, but you can also substitute other dried fruits for the same effect. ½ cup dry black lentils 5 packed cups baby kale ¼ cup dried goji berries or cranberries

2 Tbs. roasted sunflower seeds, hulled 3 Tbs. Cumin-Tahini Dressing ½ small avocado, sliced

1 Bring 2 cups water to a simmer in medium saucepan. Add lentils, partially cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until lentils are tender. Remove from heat, and cool. 2 Toss together kale, goji berries, and sunflower seeds in large bowl. Toss with 3 Tbs. Cumin-Tahini Dressing. Garnish with avocado. PER 3-CUP SERVING 417 CAL; 22 G PROT; 16 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 52 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 216 MG SOD; 17 G FIBER; 9 G SUGARS

48 MAY 2016

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3

⁄4 cup cooked chickpeas, or half a 15-oz. can chickpeas, rinsed and drained 2 green onions, white and light-green parts thinly 1 3 cup) sliced ( ⁄ 3 Tbs. Cumin-Tahini Dressing

1 Preheat oven to 425° F. Toss Broccolini with Zesty Lemon Vinaigrette on baking sheet, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover tightly with foil. Roast 15 minutes. 2

Remove foil, and roast 10 minutes more, or until Broccolini is tender and partially charred. Cool. Cut stems into halves or thirds.

3

Toss together spinach, cabbage, apples, almonds, chickpeas, and green onions in large bowl.

4

Toss spinach mixture with Broccolini and 5 Tbs. Cumin-Tahini Dressing.

PER 2-CUP SERVING 360 CAL; 12 G PROT; 17 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 44 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 335 MG SOD; 12 G FIBER; 18 G SUGARS

Dice and add the avocado to kale mixture the day of serving. Salad without the diced avocado will keep up to 6 days in the fridge.


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MAY 2016 51


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MAY 2016 53


MY V E G E TA R I A N MEXICO PBS chef and author of Mexican Today Pati Jinich shares the easy, meat-free side of her homeland By Pati Jinich

IF YOU LOVE Mexican food—and most Americans do—then it’s time to dig deeper into the regional cuisines found south of the border. I always say that the food of a country tends to resemble its people, and if there is one characteristic that defines Mexicans, it’s that they are very accommodating, very versatile. Take the Chilorio Tacos (p. 56). Chilorio is a simple recipe from northern Mexico that keeps evolving—I’ve made it with tofu here! And once you know how to make chilorio or any regional Mexican dish, it opens you up to an endless variety of preparations.

54 MAY 2016

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PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: STOCKSY/PIXEL STORIES; ISTOCK/ALEXRATHS; ISTOCK/JAMES WRIGHT; STOCKSY/ALEJANDRO MORENO DE CARLOS

“MEXICAN FOOD IS REALLY HEALTHY AND WHOLESOME. IT’S LARGELY BASED ON VEGETABLES, FRUITS, GRAINS, AND BEANS. AND IT’S ALMOST NATURALLY GLUTEN-FREE.”

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 55


CHILORIO TACOS MAKES 18 SOFT TACOS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

A specialty of Mexico’s northern state of Sinaloa, chilorio is a dish served in almost every restaurant there. Chilorio can be used in burritos, enchiladas, omelets, and sandwiches, or simply to top a bowl of steamed rice. Serve the Chilorio Tacos with your favorite taco fixings.

2 ½ ½ ½ 4 1

dried ancho chiles rinsed, stemmed, and seeded cups boiling water cup apple cider vinegar cup coarsely chopped white onion cup fresh parsley leaves garlic cloves, peeled tsp. kosher or coarse sea salt, divided

1 ½ ¼ 4 2

1 18

tsp. dried oregano tsp. ground cumin tsp. ground black pepper Tbs. vegetable oil lbs. extra-firm tofu, cubed or cut into 1- x ¼-inch thick strips cup orange juice small (6-inch) corn or flour tortillas, warmed

1

Place chiles in small bowl and cover with 2 cups boiling water. Soak 10 minutes, or until chiles have rehydrated and are plump and soft. Purée chiles, 1 cup soaking water, vinegar, onion, parsley, garlic, salt, oregano, cumin, and black pepper in blender or food processor until completely smooth.

2

Meanwhile, heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add tofu, and cook 8 to 10 minutes, or until beginning to brown, turning occasionally. Reduce heat to medium, pour in orange juice, and simmer 5 minutes, or until juice has almost entirely cooked off.

RA DI S H, CUCUM BER, AND MINT PICO DE GALLO MAKES 4 CUPS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Pico de gallo, the chunky salsa that is typically raw, changes its ingredients and seasonings both regionally and according to the personal style of the cook. Pico de gallos made with radishes are quite common along the Pacific Coast of Mexico. ¼ 3 ½ 1 3 1

cup olive oil Tbs. lime juice tsp grated lime zest tsp. kosher or sea salt green onions, thinly sliced (½ cup) jalapeño or serrano chile, finely chopped

2

Tbs. coarsely chopped mint leaves 2 cups red radishes, halved and thinly sliced 2–4 baby cucumbers, halved and thinly sliced (1 cup)

3 Gently stir in ancho chile sauce, and cook, partially covered, 15 minutes, or until sauce has thickened and color has darkened. Mixture should very moist but not wet.

Whisk together oil, lime juice, and lime zest in bowl. Stir in green onions, chile, and mint. Fold in radishes and cucumbers, and let stand 10 minutes before serving.

4 Fill each tortilla with 3 heaping Tbs. chilorio mixture. PER TACO 203 CAL; 10 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 19 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 173 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

56 MAY 2016

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PER ¼-CUP SERVING 35 CAL; <1 G PROT; 3 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 1 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 126 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

PHOTO: RICHARD CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; ASST. FOOD STYLIST: JIMMY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

4


HE A RT S O F PAL M S O U P WITH SWEET POTATO CUBES SERVES 6 Most cooks are familiar with the Spanish influence on Mexican history, but a growing interest in the “Third Root,” the term for Mexico’s African heritage, is bringing culinary preparations that originated in Africa to the forefront. This recipe from the Veracruz state pays homage to that heritage. Veracruz has historically been the main gateway for immigrant waves, including those that came from Africa and the Caribbean. It has some of the strongest African influences in Mexico. ¼

cup (4 Tbs.) vegetable oil, divided ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. ancho chile powder, chipotle chile powder, or paprika Pinch ground black pepper 1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced (2 cups) 1 Tbs. unsalted butter

10 2 2

5 2

green onions, thinly sliced (1 cup) cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) 14-oz. cans hearts of palm, rinsed, drained, and sliced cups low-sodium vegetable broth Tbs. chopped chives

Hearts of Palm Soup with Sweet Potato Cubes, Warm Nopales with Guajillo Chiles and Corn, and Jericallas with Blackberry, Mint, and Lime Coulis recipes excerpted from Mexican Today, © 2016 by Pati Jinich. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Rux Martin Books. All rights reserved. Photos of Hearts of Palm Soup with Sweet Potato Cubes, and Warm Nopales with Guajillo Chiles and Corn by Ellen Silverman.

1

Preheat oven to 450˚F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper or foil.

2

Stir together 2 Tbs. of oil, salt, chile powder or paprika, and pepper. Add sweet potato, and toss to coat with oil and spices.

3 Spread sweet potato in single layer on baking sheet. Roast 20 to 25 minutes, flipping and turning halfway through, or until golden brown. Set aside.

4 Heat butter and remaining 2 Tbs. oil in large pot or Dutch oven over medium-low heat. Stir in green onions and garlic, and cook 12 to 14 minutes, or until soft.

5 Increase heat to medium, add hearts of palm, and cook

PHOTO: ELLEN SILVERMAN

2 minutes, or until heated through. Add broth and season with salt, if desired. Increase heat to medium-high, and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 5 minutes.

6

Purée soup in blender in batches until completely smooth. Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and reheat if necessary. Ladle soup into bowls, spoon ¼ cup sweet potatoes into center of each bowl, and sprinkle with chives. PER 1-CUP SERVING 169 CAL; 2 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 15 G CARB; 5 MG CHOL; 509 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

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MAY 2016 57


WARM NOPALES WITH GUA JILLO CHILES AND CORN SERVES 6

To clean fresh cactus paddles (nopales), lay the paddles on a work surface and use a sharp knife or vegetable peeler to remove the bumps and thorns covering the skin.

3 2 1½ ½ 5 2 1

Tbs. vegetable oil, divided lbs. fresh nopales (cactus paddles), cleaned and diced cups fresh or thawed, frozen corn kernels cup finely chopped white onion dried guajillo chiles, stemmed, seeded, and finely chopped cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) tsp. lime juice

1

Heat 2 Tbs. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add nopales, season with salt, if desired, and cook 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cover, reduce heat to medium, and cook 15 to 20 minutes, or until nopales have exuded gelatinous liquid that will begin to cook off.

2

Stir, and make room in center of pan. Add remaining 1 Tbs. oil, along with corn, onion, chiles, and garlic. Cook 2 minutes in middle of pan, then stir together with nopales. Cook 3 to 4 minutes more, stirring occasionally. Stir in lime juice, cover, and cook 3 to 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Serve hot or warm.

PHOTO: ELLEN SILVERMAN

PER ½-CUP SERVING 157 CAL; 5 G PROT; 8 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 19 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 40 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

58 MAY 2016

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JERICALL AS WITH BL ACKBERRY, MINT, AND LIME COULIS SERVES 10

Mariachi bands, tequila, and these crème brulée–like desserts all hail from Jalisco state in central Mexico.

PHOTO: RICHARD CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; ASST. FOOD STYLIST: JIMMY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

Jericallas 5 cups whole milk 1 Tbs. vanilla extract 1 2-inch stick canela (Ceylon or Mexican cinnamon) 9 large egg yolks 1 cup sugar Pinch fine sea salt

8 2

oz. semisweet chocolate, melted Tbs. coarsely chopped fresh mint

Coulis 2 2 2 1

cups blackberries, plus more for garnish Tbs. coarsely chopped fresh mint Tbs. sugar, or to taste tsp. lime juice, or to taste

1

To make Jericallas: Preheat oven to 350˚F. Bring milk, vanilla, and cinnamon stick to a simmer in medium saucepan over medium heat. Reduce heat to low, and simmer 5 minutes. Cool, then remove the cinnamon stick.

2

Whisk together egg yolks, sugar, and salt in large bowl 1 minute, or until pale yellow and thick. Slowly whisk in melted chocolate. Whisk in cooled milk ½ cup at a time.

3

Place ten 6-oz. ramekins in large roasting pan, and fill pan with ½ inch hot water. Ladle chocolate mixture into molds. Bake 40 minutes, or until custard has begun to set. Remove pan from oven and remove ramekins from water bath with tongs. Cool.

4 To make Coulis: Blend all ingredients in blender until liquefied. Strain, and discard blackberry seeds. 5 To serve: Spoon 1 to 2 Tbs. Coulis atop each Jericalla. Garnish with mint leaves and berries. PER SERVING 342 CAL; 8 G PROT; 16 G TOTAL FAT (9 G SAT FAT); 44 G CARB; 178 MG CHOL; 72 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 39 G SUGARS vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 59


Sauce 60 MAY 2016

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Freshen up your weeknight pasta routine with a collection of light, easy sauces

Sensation By Stacy Adimando Photography by Richard Cummings

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MAY 2016 61


SWEET CORN, CA RA M ELI ZED S HA LLOTS, A ND SPINACH SAUCE SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Golden corn and deeply cooked shallots add subtle sweetness that’s complemented by tangy goat cheese in this easy earlysummer sauce. Serve over one pound of a medium-sized pasta, such as casarecce.

SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Silky bitter greens plus sweet, chewy dried currants are a favorite Southern Italian pasta pairing. The bite-sized greens and small dried fruit work well with a pound of farfalle, or bowtie pasta. If you can’t find dandelion greens, try mustard greens or baby kale. 3 6 4 ¼ ¼

Tbs. olive oil cloves garlic, minced (2 Tbs.) cups (1 bunch) dandelion greens, torn into bite-sized pieces cup plus 2 Tbs. dried currants cup grated Parmesan cheese

Heat olive oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and cook 2 minutes, or until softened but not browned, stirring occasionally. Add dandelion greens, and season with salt, if desired; cook 2 minutes to wilt. Remove from heat, and stir in currants and Parmesan. Toss with hot pasta. PER ¾-CUP SERVING 180 CAL; 4 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 17 G CARB; 4 MG CHOL; 134 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

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cup (4 Tbs.) olive oil large shallots, thinly sliced (2 cups) cups fresh or frozen yellow corn kernels cups baby spinach leaves oz. soft goat cheese

1

Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain, and reserve 1⁄4 cup cooking water.

2

While pasta is cooking, heat 2 Tbs. olive oil in large skillet or Dutch oven over mediumhigh heat. Add shallots, season with salt, if desired, and cook 5 minutes, or until lightly browned in places, stirring frequently. Reduce heat to medium, and cook 3 to 5 minutes more, or until shallots are very soft. Add corn kernels and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cook 2 minutes. Add spinach and 1 4 cup reserved pasta-cooking water, and cook ⁄ 2 to 3 minutes, or until spinach is wilted. Serve over pasta, and dot with goat cheese. PER ¾-CUP SERVING 320 CAL; 11 G PROT; 20 G TOTAL FAT (6 G SAT FAT); 27 G CARB; 13 MG CHOL; 193 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; ASST. FOOD STYLIST: JIMMY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

G A RL I C KY G R EENS S AU C E

¼ 3 1¾ 4 4


BROT H Y B R AI S EDCAULIFLOWER SAUCE SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This couldn’t-be-simpler sauce delivers big on taste, thanks to lightly toasting the tomato paste before adding the other saucy ingredients. Yellow onion lends sweetness to the broth, and parsley (or any fresh green herb) delivers a bright, fresh ending. Serve with 12 ounces of cooked pasta shells or macaroni. 2 Tbs. tomato paste ½ large onion, finely chopped (1 ½ cups) 4 cups finely chopped cauliflower florets

3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth ¼ cup Italian parsley leaves

Heat Dutch oven or large saucepan over medium heat. Add tomato paste and onion, and cook 1 minute, or until tomato paste is fragrant and slightly darkened, stirring constantly. Add cauliflower, broth, and 1 ½ cups water, stirring to scrape up tomato paste from bottom of pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 6 to 8 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Stir in parsley leaves, and serve over pasta. PER 1 ½-CUP SERVING 70 CAL; 3 G PROT; <1 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 15 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 146 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

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ZUCCHINI CARBONARA SAUCE SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Hot pasta straight from the pot will cook the classic egg-and-cream carbonara combination into a thick sauce that’s perfect for coating spaghetti. We’ve added zucchini for color and crunch. Serve with 8 ounces of spaghetti or linguini. 3 1 ¼

Tbs. pine nuts large egg, plus 1 egg yolk cup whipping cream

3 3

Tbs. grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for garnishing small zucchinis, peeled into thin strips with a vegetable peeler (2 cups)

1

Toast pine nuts in small skillet over medium-high heat 3 minutes, or until browned. Transfer to plate to cool.

2

Whisk together egg, egg yolk, cream, and cheese in large serving bowl, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Stir in zucchini and pine nuts. Toss with hot pasta, adding 1 to 2 Tbs. water or pasta-cooking water if necessary to obtain desired sauce consistency. PER ½-CUP SERVING 157 CAL; 6 G PROT; 14 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 5 G CARB; 116 MG CHOL; 100 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

Here’s an easy trick to cut down on carbs and boost nutrients in your favorite pasta dishes: Substitute yellow squash or zucchini noodles for half of the cooked pasta you’d ordinarily use. For a recipe that calls for 1 lb. pasta, use only 8 oz. and add two cups of thin, peeled yellow squash or zucchini strips to the cooked, drained noodles. The heat of the pasta will soften the squash to the perfect consistency.

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GINGER-TOMATO SAUCE WITH CARROT MATCHSTICKS SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

While most tomato sauces get their kick from fresh garlic, this one substitutes fresh ginger for a similar punch that’s a natural match for sweet, tender spring carrots. Ribbons of pappardelle pasta (one 8- ounce package) will turn the light sauce into a hearty meal. 2 4 1¼

Tbs. olive oil  large carrots (1 lb.), cut into matchsticks tsp. grated fresh ginger

1 ½

28-oz. can whole peeled tomatoes, crushed well by hand cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves, divided

Heat oil in Dutch oven on medium-high. Add carrots, and season with salt, if desired. Cook 5 minutes, stirring once or twice, or until carrots are crisp-tender and lightly browned. Stir in ginger, then tomatoes and 3 large basil leaves. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook 10 to 12 minutes, or until carrots are fork-tender. Stir in remaining basil leaves. PER ¾-CUP SERVING 143 CAL; 3 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 18 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 493 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS vegetariantimes.com

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Who better to talk about how to cook ultra-seasonal veggies than a “vegetable butcher”? “BUTCHER” IS NOT A WORD that most vegetarians hold dear. Cara Mangini wants to change that. The chef and founder of the pop-up Little Eater in Columbus, OH, has put all of her veg-prep know-how into her first cookbook, The Vegetable Butcher: How to Select, Prep, Slice, Dice, and Masterfully Cook Vegetables from Artichokes to Zucchini. “I wanted to create a resource in which I answer the questions most people are afraid to ask or think they should already know the answer to, and hopefully inspire

To help you get inspired, check out Mangini’s explanations, expertise, and easy recipes for four spring veggies that are just coming into season.

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PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO/PEART

them to cook with vegetables,” Mangini explains.


PHOTO: ISTOCKPHOTO/PEART

IT RIGHT!

Recipes excerpted from The Vegetable Butcher, courtesy of Cara Mangini, The Vegetable Butcher, and Workman Publishing. Photos by Matthew Benson.

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MAY 2016 67


1

Bring medium pot of salted water to a boil. Set up ice-water bath next to stove.

2

Cook fava beans in boiling water 6 to 8 minutes, or until very tender. Drain, and immediately drop into ice-water bath to cool. Drain again, and peel off skins.

3 Heat 1 Tbs. oil in medium skillet over medium heat. Add shallot and sauté 2 minutes, or until it just begins to soften and become translucent. Add fava beans, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cook 8 minutes, or until fava beans are soft, stirring occasionally. Add 1 4 cup water (if beans start to stick to ⁄ bottom of pan, add water sooner), and cook 1 minute more, or until water is mostly absorbed.

MA SH E D FAVA B EANS AND MI NT CRO S TI NI SERVES 8

Fava, or broad, beans are a fresh shelling bean with a creamy texture. “Cooking with fava beans is a spring ritual for me. Because their season is fleeting, I appreciate them even more,” says Mangini. “The simpler the preparation, the better for fava beans. A cook’s job is merely to bring out that green, fresh, earthy, springtime flavor.” 5 large fresh mint leaves, finely sliced 8 slices toasted French or sourdough bread Slices of young, soft Pecorino cheese or freshly grated aged Pecorino, for garnish, optional

2 ½ cups shelled, fresh fava beans (from 2 lbs. of pods) 3 Tbs. olive oil, divided 1 Tbs. minced shallot

1

Starting from the top (pointed, closed) end, find the string along the side seam, and pull down to the tail (stem) end.

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4 Transfer mixture to medium bowl, and mash with back of fork or potato masher until creamy but textured. Stir in 2 Tbs. olive oil and half of sliced mint.

5 Spread 3 Tbs. mashed fava beans on each toasted bread slice. Top with Pecorino, if using, and garnish with the remaining mint. PER CROSTINI 112 CAL; 3 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 10 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 87 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

2

Pop open the fava bean pods, and release the beans without breaking them. Discard the pods, and cook the fava beans according to directions before peeling off skins.


NET TLE PES TO MAKES 1 ½ CUPS Nettles grow wild in western North America. While the stinging plant is most often viewed as a weed, it also makes a delicious spring green. “Nettles have an intense, wonderful, verdant, springtime flavor—I like to say that they are sweeter and stronger tasting than the best spinach you’ve ever had,” says Mangini. Pesto is an all-purpose nettle preparation that can be used on pasta, pizza, polenta, crostini, and roasted or steamed vegetables. 8 oz. fresh nettles 1 clove garlic ½ cup toasted whole walnuts

1 Tbs. lemon juice ½ cup olive oil ½ cup grated Parmesan

1

Bring large pot of lightly salted water to a boil.

1

With gloved hands, trim any thick central stems from nettles and discard— the same way you would remove any thick stems from a bunch of fresh herbs, leaving only small, thin stems attached.

2

Keep your gloves on; water won’t remove the nettles’ stinging properties.

2

Put on gloves, and separate nettle leaves from stems (see "Trimming and Cleaning Nettles," left). Rinse nettle leaves in bowl of cool water. Drop nettles into boiling water, and cook 2 to 3 minutes, or until fragrant and tender. Transfer to colander to drain. Press out excess water.

3 Pulse garlic in food processor to finely chop. Add nettles, walnuts, and lemon juice, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Pulse until nettles and nuts are finely chopped. With motor running, stream in olive oil through feed tube, and process until mixture is smooth. (To reach desired consistency, you can mix in as much as ¼ cup additional olive oil.) Scrape down side of bowl and add Parmesan, pulsing briefly until it just incorporates.

3 Rinse trimmed nettle leaves well in

4 Rather than pouring the leaves into a

a large bowl of cold water.

colander to drain, gently lift them out of the water and into a colander so that the dirt remains at the bottom of the bowl.

PER 1-TBS. SERVING 65 CAL; 1 G PROT; 6 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 1 G CARB; 1 MG CHOL; 36 MG SOD; 1 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

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EXTRA-GOOD EXTRA VIRGIN Many of Mangini’s recipes call for a finishing drizzle of “your best extra-virgin olive oil.” These higher-end, higherpriced elixirs bring out the natural flavors of the dishes without overpowering those of the produce.

1 Slice several spears at a time into / - to 1

8

¼-inch coins that can be used in soups and risottos. Reserve tips and leave whole.

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SLICE METHOD: Line several asparagus up on cutting board and slice away ends. You can use the bend method on one spear to determine where to cut the others.

2

Cut asparagus spears on a sharp angle to make oblong pieces that work well in pasta dishes and quiches.

“Buy as many of these early-spring vegetables as you can get your hands on and freeze them,” advises Mangini. “They’re all great in fall soups!”

ASPARAGUS PHOTO, TOP: ISTOCKPHOTO/OLLO

BEND METHOD: Break off tough ends of asparagus. Reserve ends, and use to make asparagus or vegetable broth.


1

1

Peel outer layer off bulb the way you would a green onion.

2 Trim root and discard, or save for stock.

Bring sliced ramp stalks and cream to a simmer in small saucepan over medium heat. Reduce heat to mediumlow, and simmer 10 minutes (15 minutes if using leeks), or until ramps are soft and cream has thickened. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

2

Bring broth and 1 cup water to a simmer in medium saucepan over medium-low heat.

3 Heat oil in Dutch oven or large

3 Separate leaves from stalks. Rinse the

4 Wash leaves in large bowl of cold water.

stalks and chop them separately.

Stack leaves to chiffonade or chop them the way you would basil or spinach.

saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, and cook 5 minutes, or until softened. Stir in rice or farro, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Continue to stir and cook 1 minute, or until rice is glossy. Add wine, and cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until liquid evaporates.

4

RAMP AND ASPARAGUS RISOT TO

LEEK PHOTO, TOP RIGHT: ISTOCKPHOTO/TTBPHOTO

SERVES 6

Also known as spring onions, wild leeks, or wild garlic, ramps are foraged members of the onion family that taste like a combination of garlic and onion. “Ramps are one of my very favorite springtime vegetables,” says Mangini. “Once you come to know their distinctive flavor, you really anticipate their arrival at the start of the growing season.” In this recipe, you can replace the ramps with two chopped green leeks. Leeks will need to cook about 5 extra minutes in the cream. ½ ½ 4 2 1 1½ ½

lb. ramps, roots trimmed, stalks thinly sliced, leaves chopped, divided cup heavy cream cups low-sodium vegetable broth Tbs. olive oil, plus extra for drizzling medium yellow onion, diced (1 ½ cups) cups Arborio rice or farro cup dry white wine

1

large bunch asparagus, tough ends snapped off, spears sliced crosswise into ¼-inch pieces, tips left intact ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese, plus more for garnish 2 Tbs. unsalted butter 2 tsp. lemon juice Grated lemon zest for topping, optional

Ladle 1 cup hot broth into rice mixture. Simmer 3 minutes, or until broth is absorbed, stirring frequently. Continue adding broth and simmering in this manner. With last addition of broth, add asparagus and cook, 3 to 4 minutes, or until asparagus is just tender and rice is creamy but slightly al dente. (This process can take up to 25 minutes total.)

5 Stir in chopped ramp leaves and sliced stalks plus cream, and cook 1 minute more. Stir in cheese, butter, and lemon juice. Remove from heat, and serve sprinkled with cheese, ground pepper, and lemon zest (if using). Drizzle with olive oil. PER 1-CUP SERVING 404 CAL; 8 G PROT; 20 G TOTAL FAT (9 G SAT FAT); 50 G CARB; 44 MG CHOL; 250 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

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Get in on the ’shroom bounty as the fabulous fungi return this spring to farmers’ markets By Sarah Tenaglia Photography by Richard Cummings

FOR MUSHROOM LOVERS, spring means that locally grown specialty mushrooms reappear

FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; ASST. FOOD STYLIST: JIMMY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

at farmers’ markets and in natural food stores. Plump, chewy shiitakes; meaty king trumpets; slender, crunchy enokis; rare, delicate morels; and feathery maitakes are the pick of the crop. Check out the five easy mushroom-marvelous recipes on the following pages.

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Thin-capped shiitakes may be available in supermarkets year-round, but the mass-distributed options offer only a hint of how good the mushrooms can be. Look for shiitakes that are pale, plump, and unwrinkled, with tender stems, and cook at least 10 minutes to remove any astringent flavor.

SHIITAKE MUSHROOM C RO Q UE M O NS I EUR MAKES 4 SANDWICHES

Shiitake mushrooms replace ham in this classic French café sandwich. 4½ 1¼ ½ 1½

Tbs. butter, divided, plus additional soft butter for spreading pounds shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced cup finely chopped shallots Tbs. all-purpose flour

1 ¼ cups 1 % milk 1 3 cup plus 8 tsp. finely grated ⁄ Parmesan cheese, divided 2 pinches ground nutmeg 8 slices country white bread 1 cup coarsely grated Swiss cheese (3 ounces)

1

Melt 3 Tbs. butter in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and shallots, and sauté 10 to 12 minutes, or until mushrooms are deep brown. Season generously with salt and pepper, if desired. Transfer to plate to cool.

2

Melt remaining 1 ½ Tbs. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Add flour and stir until mixture bubbles. Whisk in milk. Boil 1 minute, or until thickened, 1 3 cup Parmesan and nutmeg. Season whisking constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in ⁄ with salt and pepper, if desired. Set aside.

3 Butter 1 side of each of 8 bread slices. Place 4 slices buttered-side down on large baking sheet. Top each with ¼ mushroom mixture, then sprinkle each with ¼ cup Swiss cheese. Top with remaining bread slices, buttered-side up.

4 Preheat broiler. Heat large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add SHIITAKE PHOTO: ISTOCK/EDWARD WESTMACOTT

2 sandwiches, and cook 3 minutes per side, or until browned. Repeat with remaining sandwiches, and return sandwiches to baking sheet.

5 Spoon sauce over sandwiches, spreading to edges. Sprinkle each with 2 tsp. Store fresh mushrooms in a paper bag in the refrigerator to keep them dry and protected from light.

Parmesan. Broil 3 to 5 minutes, until bubbling and brown in spots, monitoring carefully. Transfer sandwiches to plates with spatula. PER SANDWICH 622 CAL; 21 G PROT; 33 G TOTAL FAT (19 G SAT FAT); 61 G CARB; 85 MG CHOL; 823 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

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KING TRUMPET CARPACCIO WITH AVOCADO, CIL ANTRO, AND LIME SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This elegant first course features hearty king trumpet mushrooms, noted for their chewy, meaty texture. When cutting the mushrooms, try to get slices that include both the cap and stem to best showcase the mushroom’s shape. Serrano chile adds a spicy kick, while fresh lime juice imparts a bright acidity. 5

1 ¾

Tbs. avocado oil or vegetable oil, plus more for brushing skillet, divided lb. king trumpet mushrooms, sliced ¼-inch thick cup packed fresh cilantro leaves, divided

2 tsp. lime juice 2 serrano chiles, thinly sliced 1 large avocado, thinly sliced Lime wedges, for garnish

1 Heat large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Brush skillet lightly with oil. 2 Working in batches, add mushrooms in single layer and sear 1 minute per side, or until brown on edges and beginning to soften. Transfer mushrooms to baking sheet to cool. Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and cool.

3 Purée ½ cup cilantro and 5 Tbs. oil in mini food processor until smooth. Strain oil through fine sieve into small bowl, pressing on solids to release as much oil as possible. Mix in lime juice and sliced chile.

4 Arrange avocado slices on platter. Top with mushrooms in single layer. Drizzle cilantro oil over top. Scatter remaining cilantro leaves over carpaccio. Serve with lime wedges. PER ¾-CUP SERVING 200 CAL; 4 G PROT; 19 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 11 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 169 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

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The mild, delicate flavor of king trumpet mushrooms comes as a surprise when you consider their ample size. The large stems and caps hold their shape when roasted or grilled, making them a great meat alternative. Choose king trumpet mushrooms with unblemished creamy-white stems and smooth tan caps.


KING TRUMPET PHOTO, LEFT: ISTOCK/YODASWAJ; ENOKI PHOTO, RIGHT: ISTOCK/PICHEST

ENOKI SAL AD WITH SUGAR SNAP PEAS, CU C U M B E R, AND G I NG ER-PONZU V I N A I GRE T T E SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Delicately flavored enoki mushrooms, with their tiny caps and long stems, are featured in a light, refreshing salad with homemade ponzu, a popular citrus-based sauce widely used in Japanese cuisine. Ponzu Vinaigrette

Salad

1½ 1 1 1 1 ½ ½

8 2 16

Tbs. seasoned rice vinegar Tbs. fresh lemon juice Tbs. avocado oil or peanut oil tsp. low-sodium soy sauce tsp. minced fresh ginger tsp. sugar tsp. grated lemon zest

4 1

cups baby lettuces (3 oz.) Persian cucumbers, sliced (1 cup) sugar snap peas, strings removed, sliced ½-inch thick on a bias radishes, thinly sliced 5.3-oz. package enoki mushrooms, root ends trimmed

Be gentle with enoki mushrooms: The delicate, round-capped strands are best when used raw in salads or when added at the last minute to soups and stirfries so that their crunchy texture and bright-white color remain. Sold in bunches, enoki mushrooms should look dry and have a brightwhite color. Trim off the clumped ends and rinse only as much as needed to remove any dirt.

1 To make Ponzu Vinaigrette: Whisk together all ingredients in small bowl. SPONSORED

2

To make Salad: Combine all ingredients in large bowl. Toss with Ponzu Vinaigrette, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER 1 ½-CUP SERVING 47 CAL; 1 G PROT; 2 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 6 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 150 MG SOD; 1 G FIBER; 2 G SUGARS

For soy sauce flavor that's naturally gluten-free in the Enoki Salad, opt for San-J Organic Tamari, made without wheat.

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MAY 2016 75


FARRO WITH MORELS, ASPARAGUS, AND TARRAGON G RE M O L ATA SERVES 6

Morels lend their earthy, smoky flavor to a seasonal grain dish featuring fresh asparagus. Look for semipearled farro, which cooks in just 20 minutes, for this recipe. 10 4 1¼ 3 1 8 2 1 1 1 13 ⁄ 16

oz. fresh morel mushrooms, cut crosswise into ¾-inch pieces, or ½-oz. package dried morel mushrooms cups low-sodium vegetable broth cups semi-pearled farro Tbs. olive oil, divided small onion, chopped (1 cup) oz. cremini mushrooms, sliced Tbs. chopped fresh Italian parsley Tbs. chopped fresh tarragon garlic clove, minced (1 tsp.) tsp. grated lemon zest cup coarsely chopped toasted hazelnuts large asparagus, ends trimmed, cut diagonally into 1 ½-inch-long pieces

1

If using dried morels, bring 1 cup water to boil in small saucepan. Add dried morels; cover, and remove from heat. Let stand 20 minutes. Drain, reserving soaking liquid. Coarsely chop morels.

2

Bring vegetable broth and mushroom-soaking liquid or 1 cup water to a boil in medium saucepan. Add farro, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, uncovered, 15 to 20 minutes, or until just tender but still slightly firm to bite. Drain farro, reserving cooking liquid.

3 Heat 2 Tbs. oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.

4 Stir together parsley, tarragon, garlic, and lemon zest in small bowl; set aside.

Spring is high hunting season for morel foragers, and the distinctive-looking wild mushrooms often find their way to farmers’ markets. Dried morels offer a year-round alternative. Don’t be put off by the high price of this robust-flavored fungi—a little goes a long way when using them.

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5 Heat remaining 1 Tbs. oil in small nonstick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add hazelnuts and sauté until heated through. Set aside.

6

Bring reserved farro-cooking liquid to a boil in a large saucepan. Add asparagus, and cook 2 minutes, or until crisp-tender. Using slotted spoon, transfer asparagus to morel mixture. Add farro, ¼ cup reserved cooking liquid, and half of gremolata, and toss over medium-high heat until warmed through.

7 Spoon farro into 4 shallow bowls. Spoon reserved cooking liquid around farro, if desired. Sprinkle with hazelnuts and remaining gremolata. PER SERVING 297 CAL; 10 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 40 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 109 MG SOD; 9 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

MOREL PHOTO, LEFT: ISTOCK/UROSHPETROVIC; MAITAKE PHOTO, RIGHT: ISTOCK/ZINCAN_YANAGIE

Add onion, and sauté 1 minute. Add morels and cremini mushrooms, and sauté 3 to 5 minutes, or until onions are deep golden and morels begin to crisp. Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and set aside.


MISO-ROASTED MAITAKE MUSHROOMS AND EGGPL ANT WITH SESAME SEEDS SERVES 4

Maitake mushrooms, also known as hen-of-the-woods, ram’s head, or sheep’s head mushrooms, have a woodsy, smokey flavor that pairs well with roasted vegetables. 2 3 2 2 2

Japanese eggplants, quartered lengthwise, cut crosswise 1 ½-inch thick Tbs. vegetable oil, divided 3.5-oz. packages maitake mushrooms, separated into smaller clumps Tbs. white miso Tbs. mirin

1 2 2 1½ 2 1

Tbs. toasted sesame oil tsp. light-brown sugar cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) tsp. minced peeled fresh ginger green onions (dark-green parts only), thinly sliced on sharp diagonal tsp. toasted sesame seeds

1

Preheat broiler. Spread eggplant on large, rimmed baking sheet; drizzle with 1 Tbs. oil, turning to coat. Broil eggplant 2 to 3 minutes, or until tender and beginning to brown, about 2 to 3 minutes.

2

Move eggplant to one side of baking sheet. Place mushrooms on opposite side of sheet, arranging in single layer.

3 Whisk together remaining 2 Tbs. oil, miso, mirin, sesame oil, sugar, garlic, and ginger in large bowl. Drizzle mixture over eggplant and mushrooms, turning to coat. Broil 3 to 5 minutes more. Transfer to serving bowl. Sprinkle with green onions and sesame seeds. PER SERVING 210 CAL; 4 G PROT; 15 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 17 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 274 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

These hen-of-the-woods mushrooms are credited with a rich, chickenlike flavor that is a boon in soups and stews. Look for maitake mushrooms that are plump and ruffled, without signs of darkening on the edges or dampness around the stems.

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C I N C O D E M AY O

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FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

FFiesta


Time The VT staff share their favorite fifth of May party dishes By Mary Margaret Chappell

//

Photography by Richard Cummings

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MAY 2016 79


“Everyone in my family has contributed ideas for what we now call ‘Perfect Guacamole.’ For ultimate chunky goodness, choose pear or grape tomatoes, which hold together better when sliced, and use a light hand when mixing ingredients to avoid over-mashing the avocado. Try this dip with plantain chips for variety.” Michele Crockett Editor-in-Chief

“Fresh lime juice is the essential ingredient in this straightforward margarita, which tastes terrific even with inexpensive tequila. My favorite way to serve these is in liberally salted glasses, with small cocktail ice cubes. The drinks disappear long before the ice melts!” Michele Crockett Editor-in-Chief

PERFECT GUACAMOLE MAKES 4 CUPS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

You might want to keep a copy of this recipe on hand if you take a batch to a party—guests will want to know how to make the flavorpacked dip themselves. Serve with tortilla or plantain chips. 5 5 12 ⁄ 2 2 5 1

avocados, halved and pitted green onions, finely chopped (1 cup) cup coarsely chopped cilantro serrano chiles, finely chopped Tbs. lime juice, or more to taste 1 2 Tbs.) cloves garlic, minced (1 ⁄ cup pear or grape tomatoes, halved

Scoop avocado flesh into medium bowl. Add green onions, cilantro, serrano chiles, lime juice, and garlic, and mix together with knife. Stir in tomatoes, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER 2-TBS SERVING 53 CAL; 1 G PROT; 5 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 3 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 3 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

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MI CHELE’S M A RG A RI TA S MAKES 8 MARGARITAS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

The brand of triple sec you choose does make a difference in a margarita’s flavor. Cointreau is a good choice because the subtle orange flavor won’t overpower the fresh lime. Lime-Infused Simple Syrup 12

⁄ cup sugar Strips of peel from 1 lime

Margaritas 1 3 cups fresh lime juice (7 to 8 limes), 1⁄ 2 lime halves and 8 strips of peel reserved 1 cup (8 oz./8 shots) tequila 1 2 cup Cointreau orange liqueur or other ⁄ brand of triple sec Ice, in small cocktail cubes Kosher salt, for glass rims

1 To make Lime-Infused Simple Syrup: Bring sugar and ⁄ cup water to a boil in small 12

saucepan. Boil 1 minute. Remove from heat, and add lime-peel strips. Cover, and cool. Remove and discard lime strips.

2 To make Margaritas: Stir or shake together lime juice, tequila, triple sec, ⁄ to ⁄ cup 14

12

Lime-Infused Simple Syrup, and plenty of ice.

3 Pour Kosher salt into small saucer. Rub each glass rim with reserved lime half (switch halves after 4 glasses), and dip in salt, if desired. Pour Margaritas into glasses, and garnish each glass with strip of lime peel. PER SERVING (3-OZ. DRINK WITH ICE) 139 CAL; <1 G PROT; <1 G TOTAL FAT (0 G SAT FAT); 15 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 721 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; 12 G SUGARS


TWO-BEAN TOMATILLO TAMALE PIE SERVES 12

Prepared tomatillo salsa or salsa verde lets you get the tangy, delicious flavor of tomatillos into the casserole filling without all the work of peeling and seasoning the veggies. Filling 1 Tbs. olive oil 1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced 1 Tbs. agave nectar 1 medium red bell pepper, diced 1 2 cups) (1 ⁄ 1 15-oz. can pinto or kidney beans, rinsed and drained 1 15-oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels 1 cup medium tomatillo salsa 1 2 cup coarsely chopped ⁄ cilantro 1 tsp. dried oregano

Topping 1 12 ⁄ 2 2 3 ⁄4 1

cup yellow cornmeal cup all-purpose flour Tbs. sugar tsp. baking powder tsp. salt cup buttermilk, low-fat milk, or nondairy milk 2 Tbs. melted butter or margarine 1 bunch (8) green onions, finely chopped

1

Preheat oven to 400˚F. Coat 9- x 9-inch baking dish or 10-inch oven-resistant skillet with cooking spray.

2

To make Filling: Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add onion, cover, and cook 5 minutes, or until onion has softened. Stir in agave nectar, and cook, uncovered, 5 to 7 minutes, or until onion has caramelized and begun to brown. Add red bell pepper, and sauté 2 to 3 minutes, or until bell pepper is softened. Stir in remaining ingredients, and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 10 minutes.

3 Meanwhile, to make Topping: Stir together cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in medium bowl. Whisk buttermilk, milk, or nondairy milk with melted butter or margarine in separate bowl. Stir milk mixture into cornmeal mixture. Fold in green onions.

4 Spread Filling in prepared baking dish or skillet. Dollop Topping over Filling, then gently spread Topping to cover Filling completely.

5 Bake 30 minutes on baking sheet, or until topping is golden brown. Use margarine and non-dairy milk in the cornbread topping.

Let stand 10 minutes before serving. PER 1-CUP SERVING 193 CAL; 7 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 34 G CARB; 6 MG CHOL; 464 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 8 G SUGARS

“Tamale pie and hard tacos were the only Mexican food I had growing up (unless you count Fritos and Doritos!), and I always loved the combination of Southern-style cornbread with a spicy Tex-Mex filling. I came up with this modern version when I wanted a crowd-pleasing casserole that would use all of my favorite Mexican flavors: tomatillos, black beans, and lots of cilantro.” Mary Margaret Chappell Food Editor

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 81


1

TACO SAL AD SERVES 8

To make Refried Beans: Place pinto beans in large saucepan; cover with 2 inches of water. Bring to a boil, and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand 1 hour, to quick-soak.

Nachos and Tex-Mex salads are only as good as the refried beans you use in them. We started by cooking our own beans in a seasoned broth, then used that broth to thicken the beans into a savory mash that’s so good you can eat it straight from the skillet.

Drain beans, return to saucepan, and add intact onion half, epazote or oregano, cilantro stems, and 4 smashed garlic cloves. Cover with 2 inches of water, and bring to a boil. Partially cover, reduce heat to medium-low, 1 2 hours, or until beans are very tender and some have and simmer 1 to 1 ⁄ split. Remove from heat, season cooking water with salt, if desired, and let stand 5 minutes.

Refried Beans

3 Drain beans, and reserve cooking liquid. Remove onion, herbs, and garlic.

2 cups dry pinto beans 1 2 onion 1 white onion; ⁄ 1 2 finely intact, other ⁄ diced, divided 4 sprigs epazote or fresh oregano 4 cilantro stems 8 cloves garlic; 4 smashed, 4 minced, divided 2 Tbs. olive oil 2 tsp. ground cumin

Taco Salad 8 cups tortilla chips 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese 2 avocados, sliced 1 cup cooked corn kernels 1 cup diced red bell pepper 4 green onions, finely 1 2 cup) chopped (⁄ 1 2 cup low-fat sour ⁄ cream Olive oil, for drizzling Balsamic vinegar, for drizzling

2

4 Heat oil in large skillet on medium-high. Add diced onion, and reduce heat to medium-low. Sauté 3 to 5 minutes, or until onion is soft and translucent. Add beans, 1 cup reserved bean-cooking liquid, and cumin, and simmer 1 to 2 minutes, mashing beans with wooden spoon or potato masher. Add 1 more cup cooking liquid, and continue cooking, mashing, and stirring until mixture is thickened. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

5 To make Taco Salad: Divide tortilla chips among 8 large serving plates. Top each with 1⁄4 cup Refried Beans (reserve extra for another use), then sprinkle with 2 Tbs. cheddar cheese. (Microwave each plate 15 seconds here if you want melted cheese.) Top with 4 avocado slices, 2 Tbs. corn kernels, 2 Tbs. diced red bell pepper, 1 Tbs. green onion, and 1 Tbs. sour cream. Drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

PER SERVING 530 CAL; 18 G PROT; 26 G TOTAL FAT (6 G SAT FAT); 60 G CARB; 15 MG CHOL; 206 MG SOD; 16 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

“A friend turned me onto what has become my family’s favorite Cinco de Mayo dish: crunched-up tortilla chips on a plate, topped with refried beans, cheddar cheese, salsa, and vegetables, as well as avocado, green onions, and a spoonful of sour cream with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar and olive oil. The name we made up for it is ‘Taco Salad’!” Nicole Gregory Contributing Editor

82 MAY 2016

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MA N GO-AL MO ND S H ER B E T SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

In the United States, sherbet is a frozen dessert made with fruit juice or purée and milk. Here, almond creamer is used for rich results without the dairy. The optional vodka or tequila helps keep the sherbet from turning icy when stored in the freezer, but you can omit it. 2 1⁄ 12 ⁄ 1

1-lb. bags frozen mango chunks cups almond creamer, divided tsp. almond extract, divided tsp. ground cinnamon, divided, plus more for dusting 1 4 tsp. cayenne pepper, divided ⁄ 1 4 cup (2 oz.) vodka or tequila, optional ⁄ Lime wedges for garnish, optional

12

1 Blend 1 lb. mango chunks, ⁄ cup almond creamer, ⁄ tsp. almond extract, ⁄ tsp. cinnamon, 3

4

14

12

1 8 tsp. ⁄

and cayenne pepper in blender or food processor until smooth, creamy, and sorbetlike. Blend in 1⁄8 cup (2 Tbs./1 shot) vodka or tequila, if using. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

2

Serve immediately, dusted with cinnamon and garnished with lime wedge, or freeze up to 3 days. If frozen, soften 10 to 15 minutes before serving. PER 1-CUP SERVING 90 CAL; 1 G PROT; <1 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 23 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; <1 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 17 G SUGARS

“My family makes this refreshing treat as a dessert spin on our usual almond milk–based smoothies. I love the combination of sweet and spicy! For a milder flavor, you can add less cayenne pepper or omit it altogether. You can also top the sherbet with chopped or slivered almonds and fresh strawberries.” Kristen Kuchar Assistant Editor

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 83


MAKE DINNER IN A FLASH WITH THESE SEASONAL FAVORITES

HEARTY QUINOA TABBOULEH [ P. 10 ]

vegetariantimes.com 1 1 MAY 2016 vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL SPECIALRECIPE RECIPESECTION SECTION


Hearty, healthy entrées that come together in under half an hour—who wouldn’t want more of these in their recipe repertoire? The following collection will meet all your supper cravings, from fresh, meal-sized salads to great grilling ideas, with comfort-food favorites like hot sandwiches and breakfasts thrown in for good measure.

THE SEASON’S BEST

Avocado-Spinach Panini, p. 3 Creamy-Crunchy Mango and Sprout Summer Rolls, p. 4 Spring Leek Hash with Polenta and Goat Cheese, p. 4 Blue Cheese, Radicchio, and Fig Sandwiches, p. 5 Lemony Minted Asparagus with Saffron Rice, p. 5

BREAKFAST FOR DINNER Sweet Potato Masala and Egg Mile-Highs, p. 6 Spicy Tempeh Hash, p. 7 Cinnamon-Apple French Toast, p. 7 Tofu Rancheros, p. 8

SUPER SUPPER SAL ADS

Classic Israeli Salad, p. 9 Hearty Quinoa Tabbouleh, p. 10 Savoy Cabbage Salad with Carrot-Ginger Dressing, p. 10 Soba Noodle Salad with Spicy Peanut Sauce, p. 11 Curried Quinoa Salad with Nectarines and Sugar Snap Peas, p. 12 Broccoli Slaw Salad with Five-Spice Tofu, p. 12

TORTILL A CUISINE Tomatillo Quesadillas, p. 13 Tortilla and Tomato Soup, p. 14 Black Bean Clayudas, p. 14

GRILL IT!

Summer Vegetable Kebabs with Fresh Corn Relish, p. 15 Farmers’ Market Grilled Vegetable Wraps, p. 16 Bok Choy and Kabocha Squash with Miso Sauce, p. 16

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MAY 2016 2


AVOCADO-SPINACH PANINI SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

When avocado and spinach are heated inside this satisfying panini, they become meltingly tender. Smoked sun-dried tomatoes add a salty, chewy, meaty element. 2 avocados, halved and thinly sliced ⁄ cup julienned, smoked sun-dried tomatoes (1 oz.) 13

2 Tbs. diced red onion 2 cups lightly packed baby spinach 4 4-oz. ciabatta rolls, split in half

1 Layer avocado slices, tomatoes, onion, and ½ cup spinach on each roll. Spray panini with cooking spray. 2 Coat skillet or grill pan with cooking spray, and heat over medium heat. Place panini in pan; press with smaller-diameter saucepan weighted with 1 or 2 cans. Cook 2 minutes, remove weight, flip panini, replace weight, and cook 1½ to 2 minutes more. PER PANINI 390 CAL; 12 G PROT; 13 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 65 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 528 MG SOD; 8 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

3 MAY 2016

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SPRING LEEK HASH WITH POLENTA AND G OAT CHEESE SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This colorful hash turns out like a casserole after it’s topped with polenta and cheese and warmed in the oven. 1 Tbs. olive oil 3 medium leeks, trimmed, halved, and chopped (6 cups) 1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced (1 cup) 2 Tbs. minced fresh thyme, divided

¼ tsp. red pepper flakes ½ cup low-sodium vegetable broth 3 cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.) 1 16-oz. tube prepared polenta, cut into slices 2 oz. crumbled aged chèvre (½ cup)

1 Preheat oven to 400°F. Heat oil in ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add leeks, bell pepper, 1 Tbs. thyme, and red pepper flakes; sauté 10 minutes. Stir in broth and garlic. C R E A MY-C RU NC HY MA NGO A ND SPROUT SUMMER ROLLS

2 Arrange polenta slices over leek mixture in skillet; top with crumbled chèvre and remaining 1 Tbs. thyme.

SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

3 Bake 10 minutes, or until chèvre softens and begins to brown.

Vietnamese rice-paper wrappers offer a light, gluten-free wrap alternative to flour tortillas. The white disks, sold in the Asian section of most supermarkets, are easy to work with once you’ve moistened one or two and gotten a feel for how they soften up.

PER SERVING (1 CUP HASH, 4 OZ. POLENTA, AND 2 TBS. CHEESE) 257 CAL; 8 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT FAT); 40 G CARB; 11 MG CHOL; 470 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

2

cup diced avocado Tbs. lime juice tsp. grated lime zest cup finely chopped red bell pepper ½ cup vegan cream cheese, softened 1 3 cup thinly sliced green ⁄ onions (white and palegreen parts only) ⁄3 2 2 2 ⁄3

1 3 cup chopped cilantro ⁄ 1 tsp. hot sauce, such as sriracha 8 8½-inch Vietnamese ricepaper wrappers 2 cups alfalfa sprouts 1½ cups thinly sliced fresh mango

1 Combine avocado, lime juice, and lime zest in small bowl. Stir in bell pepper, cream cheese, green onions, cilantro, and hot sauce; set aside. 2 Fill large bowl (9-inch diameter) with warm water. Submerge 1 ricepaper wrapper 10 seconds in water, or just until it becomes soft. Remove wrapper to flat work surface, and let rest 30 seconds; it will become more pliable. 3 Spoon ¼ cup avocado mixture just below middle of rice-paper wrapper, leaving 1-inch border on either side. Top with ¼ cup alfalfa sprouts and 2 mango slices. Fold bottom of wrapper up over filling, pressing filling as you go. Fold both sides of rice paper inward. Gently press to seal. Roll up wrapper to edge like cigar. Brush water on top edge, if necessary, to seal. Repeat steps 2 and 3 with remaining ingredients. PER SERVING (2 ROLLS) 227 CAL; 6 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT);

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MAY 2016 4


B LU E CH E E S E, RADICCHIO, AND FIG SANDWICHES SERVES 4 30 MINUTES OR LESS

We've grilled the ingredients of a popular Italian salad between two slices of bread for a hearty sandwich. 3 3 8 8

oz. crumbled blue cheese oz. reduced-fat cream cheese slices sprouted whole-grain bread tsp. melted butter, trans fat–free margarine, or olive oil, divided 4 Tbs. fig jam 1 cup thinly sliced radicchio or Belgian endive

1 Mash blue cheese and cream cheese together in small bowl, leaving some blue cheese chunks. Set aside. 2 Brush 4 slices bread with half of butter, and set bread butter-side down on baking sheet. Spread each slice with 1 Tbs. jam, and sprinkle with 1⁄4 cup radicchio. Spread remaining 4 slices bread with blue cheese mixture, and set on top of radicchio. Brush sandwich tops with remaining melted butter.

3 Heat large skillet or griddle over mediumlow heat. Cook sandwiches in skillet 4 minutes, or until browned and crisp. Flip, and cook 3 minutes more, or until second side is browned. PER SERVING 419 CAL; 15 G PROT; 20 G TOTAL FAT (12 G SAT FAT); 48 G CARB; 52 MG CHOL; 607 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 17 G SUGARS

5 MAY 2016

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LEM ONY MI NTE D ASPARAG US WITH SAFFRON RICE SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

With fresh mint and lemon zest accenting asparagus spears, this stir-fry captures the brightness of spring. If you can’t find toasted, sliced almonds, toast your own for 3 to 5 minutes on a baking sheet in a 300°F oven. 1½ 3 1 1 9

cups white rice cups low-sodium vegetable broth pinch saffron threads Tbs. vegetable oil green onions, sliced into ¼-inch lengths (2⁄3 cup) 1–2 small, fresh red chiles, thinly sliced (1 Tbs.)

2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1½ lbs. asparagus spears, cut diagonally into 1-inch lengths (3½ cups) ½ cup toasted, sliced almonds ¼ cup sliced mint leaves 2 lemons, cut into wedges, for garnish

1 Combine rice and broth in large saucepan, and crumble in saffron threads. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer 20 minutes. Remove from heat, and let stand, covered, 5 minutes. 2

Meanwhile, heat wok over high heat, until water droplets evaporate within 1 second. Add oil, swirl to coat pan, then add green onions, chiles, and garlic; stir-fry 1 to 2 minutes, or until onions turn bright green and soften. Add asparagus, and stir-fry 2 minutes more, or until asparagus is bright green and tender. Remove from heat, stir in almonds and mint, and season with salt and pepper, if desired.

3

Fluff rice, and spoon onto serving plate. Top with asparagus mixture. Garnish with lemon wedges. 1 2-CUP SERVING 276 CAL; 7 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 47 G CARB; PER 1 ⁄ 0 MG CHOL; 81 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

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SWEET POTATO MASAL A AND EGG MILE-HIGHS SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Grated sweet potatoes are the base for these fried egg stacks, which get a spicy boost from a quick sauce made with seasoned, canned crushed tomatoes. 1 5 ¼ ¼ 5 1 2 1

sweet potato, peeled and shredded large eggs, divided tsp. ground coriander, divided tsp. ground cumin, divided Tbs. vegetable oil, divided cup crushed tomatoes with roasted onion and garlic Tbs. lime juice cup arugula

1 Combine sweet potato, 1 egg, ⁄ tsp. coriander, and ⁄ tsp. cumin 18

18

in bowl. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

2

Heat 3 Tbs. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat until hot 1 3 cup sweet potato mixture into pan for but not smoking. Scoop ⁄ each of 4 pancakes. Flatten gently with spatula; cook 5 minutes per side. Set aside; keep warm.

3 Wipe out pan, and add 1 Tbs. oil and remaining ⁄ tsp. 1 8

1 8 tsp. ⁄

coriander and cumin. Stir 10 seconds over medium-high heat, add crushed tomatoes, and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 5 minutes. Transfer to small bowl, and stir in lime juice.

4 Wipe out pan, add remaining 1 Tbs. oil, and fry remaining 4 eggs sunny-side up or over easy. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

5 To serve: Place 1 sweet potato pancake on each of 4 plates, top with 1 egg, 1⁄4 cup sauce, and 1⁄4 cup arugula. PER SERVING 297 CAL; 10 G PROT; 24 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 11 G CARB; 233 MG CHOL; 111 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

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MAY 2016 6


SPICY TEMPEH HASH SERVES 2 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Cubed tempeh turns classic hashbrowns into a protein-packed meal. 8 1 1 1

oz. cubed tempeh Tbs. canola oil cup chopped onions cup chopped green bell pepper 1 cup diced potatoes 2 tsp. paprika ½ tsp. garlic powder ½ tsp. onion powder 1 pinch cayenne pepper

1 Spread tempeh in bottom of large nonstick 1 2 cup water, cover, and bring to a skillet. Add ⁄ boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 5 minutes. Drain in colander, and wipe out skillet. 2 Add oil to skillet, and heat over mediumhigh heat. Return tempeh to pan along with onion, green bell pepper, and potatoes. Sauté 5 to 7 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Sprinkle with paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, and cayenne pepper. Sauté 7 to 8 minutes, or until potatoes are browned. 1 2-CUP SERVING 397 CAL; PER 1⁄ 24 G PROT; 20 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 40 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 22 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

7 MAY 2016

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CINNAMON-APPLE FRENCH TOAST SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Quick-sautéed apples top cinnamon-flavored French toast for a sweet treat that's lower in sugar than dousing the breakfast favorite in maple syrup. Apple Topping 4 large tart, firm apples, peeled, cored, and sliced 3 Tbs. sugar ½ tsp. cinnamon 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice

French Toast 2 ½ 1 1 ¼ 12

cups plain or vanilla soymilk cup apple butter tsp. vanilla extract tsp. ground cinnamon tsp. salt slices soft-crust French bread, sliced ½-inch thick

1 To make Apple Topping: Coat nonstick skillet with cooking spray, and heat over medium-high heat. Sauté apples 5 to 7 minutes, or until softened. Reduce heat to medium. Add sugar and cinnamon, and cook 5 to 10 minutes more, or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in lemon juice, and remove from heat. 2 To make French Toast: Blend soymilk, apple butter, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt in blender until smooth. Pour into shallow bowl.

3 Coat nonstick skillet with cooking spray, and heat over medium heat. Dip bread slices into batter, coating evenly. Cook 2 to 3 minutes on each side, or until lightly browned. Place 2 slices bread on each plate, and divide Apple Topping among servings. PER SERVING (2 SLICES) 273 CAL; 6 G PROT; 1 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 55 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 345 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 25 G SUGARS

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TOFU RANCHEROS SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This tasty scramble is a veganized version of huevos rancheros. It’s an easy dinner dish, served with slices of avocado and orange. 1 ½ Tbs. olive oil 1 medium onion, quartered and thinly sliced (1½ cups) 1 medium green bell pepper, cut into short, thin strips (1½ cups) 1 14- to 16-oz. package soft or firm tofu, drained, patted dry, and cut crosswise into 6 slabs 1 cup prepared medium or mild salsa, plus more for serving

2 medium tomatoes, diced (1 cup) 1–2 small fresh jalapeño chiles, seeded and minced 2 Tbs. nutritional yeast, optional 1 tsp. ground cumin ¼ tsp. ground turmeric, optional 1 cup cilantro leaves, chopped 8 corn tortillas, warmed

1 Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add onion, and sauté 5 minutes, or until translucent. Add bell pepper, and cook 5 to 7 minutes more, or until vegetables begin to brown. Add tofu to skillet, crumbling each slab as it goes in. 2

Stir in salsa, tomatoes, and chiles, followed by nutritional yeast (if using), cumin, and turmeric (if using). Cook 5 to 8 minutes, or until tomatoes have softened and ingredients are melded and piping hot. Stir in cilantro, then season with salt and pepper, if desired.

3

Divide tofu mixture among tortillas, and serve with salsa. PER SERVING (2 TORTILLAS) 285 CAL; 15 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 34 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 524 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

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MAY 2016 8


C L A SSI C I S R AEL I S AL AD SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

An Israeli breakfast staple, this salad makes for a light dinner when served with hummus and pita. Some top it with feta and olives, or dress it with tahini sauce. 4 Roma tomatoes, diced (2 cups) 2 Persian cucumbers or ½ English cucumber, 1 3 cups) diced (1⁄ ½ yellow bell pepper, diced (2⁄3 cup)

2

⁄3 3 2 2

cup chopped Italian parsley Tbs. chopped green onion tsp. olive oil tsp. lemon juice

Toss together all ingredients in large bowl. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER 1-CUP SERVING 49 CAL; 2 G PROT; 3 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 6 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 10 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

9 MAY 2016

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H E A RT Y QU INOA TA B B OU LE H (pictured on opener, p. 1)

SERVES 4 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Tabbouleh is a Middle Eastern salad that's usually made with couscous. By swapping in quinoa for the couscous, we've given the recipe a protein count that makes it a meal option. Feel free to fill it out even more with diced tofu, chopped nuts, or crumbled cheese. 1 13 ⁄ 2 1 1 1 ½ ¼

¼ ¼

cup quinoa cup red wine vinegar tsp. olive oil tsp. garlic, minced medium red bell pepper, chopped (1 cup) medium yellow bell pepper, chopped (1 cup) cup chopped cucumber cup sliced kalamata or other high-quality black olives cup chopped red onion cup chopped fresh parsley

1 Cook quinoa according to package directions. Meanwhile, make dressing: In small bowl, whisk together vinegar, oil, and garlic. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside. 2 Combine peppers, cucumber, olives, onion, and parsley in large bowl. Add dressing and toss to coat. Add quinoa; stir gently but thoroughly to combine. Serve warm or at room temperature. PER SERVING 220 CAL; 7 G PROT; 6 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 38 G CARB; 85 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER

SAVOY CABBAGE SAL AD WITH CARROT-GINGER DRESSING SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Blended raw carrots give this zippy dressing texture and color. Make extra, and keep it in the fridge for dipping raw vegetables. For added protein, top with 12 ounces cubed baked or extra-firm tofu. Dressing ½ 2 2 1½ 1 2 1

cup grated carrots Tbs. finely chopped fresh ginger Tbs. rice vinegar Tbs. chunky mixed-grain or white miso paste Tbs. roasted sesame oil tsp. grape seed or canola oil tsp. maple syrup

Salad 4 cups thinly sliced savoy cabbage (½ cabbage) 1 medium radicchio head, thinly sliced (1½ cups) 1 avocado, thinly sliced (1 cup) ½ cup thinly sliced sweet onion (½ small onion) 2 Tbs. hemp seeds, optional

1 To make Dressing: Blend all ingredients in blender until smooth. 2 To make Salad: Toss together cabbage, radicchio, avocado, and onion in large bowl. Pour in Dressing, and toss gently until all salad ingredients are coated. Sprinkle hemp seeds on top, if using, and serve. PER 1 3⁄4-CUP SERVING 199 CAL; 4 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 17 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 242 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

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MAY 2016 10


SOBA NOODLE SAL AD WITH SPICY PEANUT SAUCE SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Seared tofu and grapefruit pieces fill out a cold noodle salad that makes a great picnic supper. Spicy Peanut Sauce ¼ 2 1 2 2 1 1

cup seasoned rice vinegar Tbs. smooth peanut butter Tbs. low-sodium soy sauce tsp. agave nectar tsp. sesame oil tsp. chili oil clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.)

Soba Noodle Salad 1 5 5 6 8 2 8 3

small red bell pepper, sliced (1 cup) radishes, thinly sliced (2⁄3 cup) 1 3 cup) green onions, sliced (⁄ oz. snow peas oz. buckwheat soba noodles tsp. canola oil oz. seasoned tofu, cut into small cubes grapefruit, supremed (see instructions, right) ¼ cup chopped cilantro 1 Tbs. toasted black sesame seeds, optional, for garnish

1 To make Spicy Peanut Sauce: Purée all ingredients in blender or food processor until smooth. 2 To make Soba Noodle Salad: Toss together bell pepper, radishes, and green onions in large bowl. 3 Bring large pot of water to a boil, add snow peas, and cook 2 minutes. Transfer snow peas to bowl of ice water with slotted spoon; drain, and add to vegetables. Return water to a boil. 4

Cook soba noodles in same pot of boiling water according to package directions; drain, and rinse under cold water. Drain again, and set aside.

HOW TO SUPREME A GRAPEFRUIT

One challenge in cooking with grapefruit is peeling away the thick pith beneath the skin and the bitter membrane that surrounds the pulp. The solution is a culinary technique called supreming. Here’s how to do it:

5

Heat oil in skillet over medium-high heat. Add tofu, and cook 1 minute per side, or until lightly browned.

6 Toss tofu, grapefruit supremes, and soba noodles with vegetables. Divide among 6 bowls, drizzle with Spicy Peanut Sauce, and sprinkle with cilantro and sesame seeds, if using. PER SERVING 336 CAL; 7 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 26 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 481 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 18 G SUGARS

11 MAY 2016

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1 Trim ends all the way to juicy flesh.

2

Stand fruit upright, and remove peel and pith with knife, following curve of fruit from top to bottom. (A small, serrated paring knife works best.)

3

Holding fruit over a bowl, cut sections along membranes as if you were slicing out a wedge, releasing them one by one.

4

Set supremes aside, and squeeze the membrane “skeleton” over bowl to release any remaining juice.

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BROCCOLI SL AW SAL AD WITH FIVE-S PICE TOFU SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This crunchy salad comes together quickly and can be made in advance. You can find five-spice pressed tofu and Chinese black vinegar at most Asian grocery stores. Chinese black vinegar, in particular, is worth seeking out for its malty, sweet quality. Dressing 2 Tbs. roasted sesame oil 2 Tbs. Chinese black vinegar, or 1 Tbs. rice vinegar, plus 1 Tbs. balsamic vinegar 1 tsp. sriracha hot sauce 1 tsp. sugar

CURRIED QUINOA SAL AD WITH NECTARINES AND SUGAR SNAP PEAS SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

The dressing for this protein-packed salad is made with prepared mango chutney. Spoon around the fruit chunks in the chutney to use only the smooth, jammy sauce. 8 oz. stringless sugar snap peas or snow peas 1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained 2 Tbs. curry powder, divided 2½ Tbs. unseasoned rice vinegar 2½ Tbs. mango chutney (sauce only)

Salad 1 1-lb. package broccoli slaw, or 1 lb. broccoli florets, shaved on mandoline 1 small red bell pepper, thinly sliced (1 cup) 7 oz. five-spice pressed tofu, sliced into matchsticks 1 3 cup chopped cilantro ⁄ 2 green onions, chopped (¼ cup) 4 Tbs. chopped roasted peanuts

1 To make Dressing: Whisk together all ingredients in small bowl. Season with salt, if desired. 2 To make Salad: Toss together all ingredients with Dressing in large bowl. PER 2-CUP SERVING 221 CAL; 10 G PROT; 15 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 15 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 190 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 8 G SUGARS

2½ Tbs. olive oil 3 small nectarines or peaches (14 oz.), each cut into 10 wedges ½ medium red onion, thinly sliced (¾ cup) 2 cups coarsely chopped watercress, plus 4 sprigs for garnish

1 Cook sugar snap peas in large saucepan of boiling salted water 1 2 to 2 minutes, or until crisp-tender. Transfer to paper-towel-lined 1⁄ plate with slotted spoon to drain. 2 Stir quinoa and 1 Tbs. curry powder into same pot of boiling water. Cook 14 minutes, or until quinoa is tender, stirring occasionally. 3 Meanwhile, whisk together remaining 1 Tbs. curry powder, vinegar, chutney sauce, and oil in medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Set aside. 4 Toss together sugar snap peas, nectarines, and onion in large bowl. Add watercress.

5

Drain quinoa, and rinse under cold water to cool; drain again. Add quinoa and dressing to salad, and toss to coat. Serve salad garnished with watercress sprigs.

PER 2-CUP SERVING 350 CAL; 9 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 54 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 320 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; 19 G SUGARS

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MAY 2016 12


TO M ATI L LO QU E SA D I L L AS MAKES 8 PIZZAS 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Provolone cheese holds pairs of corn tortillas together for these double-decker quesadillas. If you can’t find tomatillos, use thinly sliced Roma or cocktail tomatoes. 4 ½ ½ 8 16 ½ 1

tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and sliced tsp. olive oil tsp. dried oregano slices reduced-fat provolone cheese 5-inch corn tortillas cup prepared salsa cup grated reduced-fat jalapeño Jack cheese (4 oz.)

1 Preheat oven to 425°F. 2 Toss together tomatillos, oil, and oregano in medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Set aside.

3 Sandwich 1 slice provolone between 2 tortillas, and set on baking sheet. Repeat with remaining tortillas and cheese slices. Top each tortilla “crust” with 1 Tbs. salsa. Drain or shake excess liquid from tomatillo slices, and arrange slices on top of pizzas. Sprinkle with Jack cheese.

4 Bake 6 to 8 minutes, or until tomatillos are soft and cheeses are melted. Cool on baking sheet 2 to 3 minutes before serving. PER SERVING (1 PIZZA) 186 CAL; 10 G PROT; 8 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 18 G CARB; 22 MG CHOL; 488 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

13 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


TORTILL A AND TOMATO SOUP SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

BL ACK BEAN CL AYUDAS

Corn tortillas work magic here: As they cook, they fall apart into noodle-sized pieces and thicken the soup.

SERVES 8 30 MINUTES OR LESS

1 Tbs. olive oil 1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped (1½ cups) 2 cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) 1 32-oz. can chopped fireroasted tomatoes

3 6-inch corn tortillas, cut into quarters 3 Tbs. chopped cilantro 1 tsp. hot sauce, optional 3 Tbs. fresh goat cheese, softened 2 Tbs. plain low-fat yogurt

1 Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, and sauté 7 minutes, or until soft, stirring occasionally. Add garlic, and sauté 1 minute more. 2 Add tomatoes, 2 cups water, and tortillas. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Cover, and simmer 15 minutes, or until tortillas have broken down into tiny pieces. Stir in cilantro and hot sauce, if using, and season with salt and pepper.

Clayudas are a Oaxacan dish similar to pizza. Tortillas are slathered with a spicy black-bean purée, baked, then sprinkled with various toppings. 1 1 1 1 1½

Tbs. canola oil small onion, diced (1 cup) clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.) tsp. ground cumin cups cooked black beans

1 ½ 4 8 ½ 2

canned chipotle chile, drained tsp. brown sugar 8-inch flour tortillas oz. slaw mix cup chopped cilantro Tbs. lime juice

1 Preheat oven to 450°F. Heat oil in saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion, and cook 5 minutes. Add garlic and cumin, and cook 1 minute more. Place onion mixture in blender with beans, chipotle chile, brown sugar, and 3 Tbs. water. Blend until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. 2

Place 2 tortillas each on 2 baking sheets. Spread bean mixture on tortillas, and bake 5 to 7 minutes, or until edges become golden.

3 Combine goat cheese and yogurt in small bowl. Ladle soup into bowls, then swirl goat cheese mixture into each serving.

3 Toss slaw in bowl with cilantro and lime juice. Season with salt and pepper,

PER SERVING 119 CAL; 4 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 15 G CARB; 4 MG CHOL; 488 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

PER SERVING (1 CLAYUDA) 157 CAL; 6 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (0.5 G SAT FAT); 25 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 436 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 2 G SUGARS

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

if desired. Top each clayuda with slaw, and cut into triangles.

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 14


SUMMER VEGETABLE KEBABS WITH FRESH CORN RELISH SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Easy-to-assemble vegetable kebabs are paired with a lightly sautéed corn relish for a dish that can be served as an entrée when placed atop couscous or another quick-cooking grain. To ensure even cooking, make sure all the vegetables are about the same size. Kebabs

Corn Relish 1 1

Tbs. olive oil medium yellow tomato, diced (2⁄3 cup) 1 large ear corn, kernels removed 1 3 cups kernels) (1⁄ 1 ½ Tbs. white balsamic or white wine vinegar ¼ tsp. dry mustard powder 2 Tbs. coarsely chopped fresh basil

¼ cup olive oil 2 Tbs. white balsamic or white wine vinegar ¾ tsp. dry mustard powder, divided 1 small yellow bell pepper, halved, seeded, and cut into 12 square pieces 1 medium zucchini, halved and cut into 12 slices ½ small red onion, cut into 12 chunks 12 whole cremini mushrooms 12 grape or cherry tomatoes

1 Coat grill grate or grill pan with cooking spray, and preheat over medium heat. 2

To make Corn Relish: Heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Add tomato, cover, and cook 4 minutes. Add corn kernels, and cook 2 minutes, or until corn is tender. Stir in vinegar and mustard powder, and cook 1 minute more. Remove from heat. Mix in basil; season with salt and pepper, if desired.

3 To make Kebabs: Whisk together oil, vinegar, and mustard powder in small bowl. 4 Thread each of 12 skewers with 1 bell pepper square, 1 zucchini slice, 1 red onion chunk, 1 mushroom, and 1 tomato. Place skewers on large platter, and brush with vinaigrette mixture. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

5 Grill skewers 6 to 8 minutes, turning every 2 minutes, or until vegetables are tender and browned on all sides. Serve with Corn Relish. 1 2 CUP RELISH) 247 CAL; 5 G PROT; 18 G TOTAL FAT PER SERVING (3 KEBABS AND ⁄ (3 G SAT FAT); 20 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 30 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 9 G SUGARS

15 MAY 2016

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


FARMERS’ MARKET GRILLED VEGETABLE WRAPS MAKES 2 WRAPS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This dinner for two means tasty leftovers for the rest of the week. When you roast asparagus, bell pepper, and squash for this recipe, you’ll be making extra veggies and squash that you can add to future salads, pasta, or rice dishes. 12 thin asparagus spears, trimmed 1 small red bell pepper, cut into ½-inch strips (1 cup) 1 small yellow summer squash or zucchini, cut into ¼-inch-thick rounds (1 cup) 1 Tbs. olive oil

½ 1 ½ 2 6 8 1

cup white beans small clove garlic, minced (½ tsp.) tsp. sriracha hot sauce 8-inch whole-grain tortillas small whole basil leaves thin slices red onion cup baby arugula leaves

1 Preheat grill or broiler. Toss together asparagus, bell pepper, squash, and oil on large baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Grill or broil vegetables 4 to 6 minutes per side, turning once. 2 Mash together beans, garlic, and hot sauce in small bowl until smooth. 1 2 cup roasted 3 Spread half of bean mixture over each tortilla. Top each with 3 basil leaves, ⁄ 1 vegetables, 4 onion slices, and ⁄2 cup arugula. Fold bottom third of tortillas over vegetables, and roll up tightly, tucking in sides as you go. Cut wraps in half on diagonal. Serve immediately, or wrap each half in foil or wax paper, and chill until ready to eat.

BOK CHOY AND KABOCHA SQUASH WITH MISO SAUCE SERVES 2 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

No outdoor grill? No problem! This dinner for two is designed to be made start to finish on a countertop electric grill. Serve over a bed of steamed rice. Vegetables ¼ kabocha or red kuri squash, seeded and cut into ½-inch-thick slices 1 small red onion, sliced 2 tsp. sesame oil 1 large bok choy, leaves separated

Miso Sauce 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 2

Tbs. miso paste clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.) tsp. light-brown sugar tsp. sesame oil tsp. rice vinegar green onions, chopped (¼ cup) 1 Tbs. toasted sesame seeds

PER SERVING 228 CAL; 11 G PROT; 3 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 51 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 419 MG SOD; 8 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

1 To make Vegetables: Brush squash and onion slices with oil. Spray countertop grill with cooking spray, and lay squash slices on grill. Close, and cook on medium-high 10 minutes, or until tender; transfer to plate. Place onion slices on grill; cook 5 minutes, or until crisp-tender; transfer to plate. Place bok choy on grill; cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until wilted and crisptender; transfer to plate. 2

Meanwhile, to make Miso Sauce: Combine miso paste, garlic, brown sugar, and 1⁄4 cup water in small saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook 1 minute, or until miso dissolves and begins to bloom. Remove from heat; stir in oil and vinegar. Fold in green onions and sesame seeds.

3

Serve Vegetables with Miso Sauce.

1 2 CUPS VEGETABLES AND PER SERVING (1⁄ 3 TBS. SAUCE) 184 CAL; 5 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 21 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 379 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 8 G SUGARS

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 16


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MASTERCHEF JUNIOR C O N T E S TA N T This 12-year-old must adhere to a strict diet for medical reasons, but she knows how to cook delicious veg dishes that she loves By Nicole Gregory

MIA EVANS is famous for what she eats and what she doesn’t eat. Not only did she appear on the fourth season of the Fox TV show MasterChef Junior, but she was also the show’s star vegetarian. Born with a metabolic condition called PKU, Evans must stay on a Mia Evans’s recipe for Potato Tacos strict low-protein diet includes potatoes, peppers, corn, onion, for the rest of her life. spices, and queso fresco. She accomplishes this with help from her doctor and a registered dietitian at Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas—and of course from her mother, Angela. Evans has risen to meet her dietary challenge by cooking great-tasting food, including desserts like sour cherry crumble with vanilla ice cream, that she can safely eat. And with school, basketball, and band practice, among other activities, she needs a nutritious diet. Here, she shares the story behind her enthusiasm for food and cooking.

86 MAY 2016

What’s your current favorite ingredient? Mushrooms! There are all these different ways you can use them—mushroom pizza, soups, and pasta dishes. You’ve said that TV food personality Alton Brown is your cooking hero—what do you like about him? I watched him for so long—

vegetariantimes.com

I saw all his shows, and that’s how I learned about classic dishes. Then Mom and I would go and alter them. He teaches a lot about the science of cooking. He’s so dorky, but he’s fun to watch. Do you talk to other kids about being a vegetarian? I like talking about how good vegetarian food is, and I tell

kids about all kinds of stuff that can substitute for meat, but everyone should be allowed to have their own food style. What are your favorite kitchen appliances? The Dutch oven because it is so versatile, and my trusty nonstick frying pan—for everything.

PHOTOS: JESSICA ATTIE

Who taught you to cook? Mostly my mom—I started cooking when I was four. She used to be the best cook in my house, but I have surpassed her! We started really simple— I made soups and pizza. I make this really cool pizza margherita with all these different layers of flavor.


GLUTEN-FREE

LOW-CALORIE

LOW SATURATED FAT

30 MINUTES OR LESS

DAIRY-FREE

VEGAN

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Bitter Greens Salad with Butternut Squash and Roasted Seeds, p. 42 Baby Kale and Black Lentil Salad, p. 48 Roasted Broccolini and Chickpea Salad, p. 48 Hearts of Palm Soup with Sweet Potato Cubes, p. 57 Enoki Salad with Sugar Snap Peas, Cucumber, and Ginger-Ponzu Vinaigrette, p. 75 ENTRÉES



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Open-Faced Beet Sandwiches with Goat Cheese and Beet-Top Pesto, p. 38 Red Lentils with Turnips and Their Tops, p. 40 Couscous with Carrots, Carrot Tops, and Maple-Lemon Dressing, p. 41 Parsnip Pureé with Sunny-Side-Up Eggs and Pan-Fried Peels, p. 43 Crunchy Thai Salad with Marinated Tofu, p. 45 Farmer’s Market Quinoa Salad, p. 46 Chilorio Tacos, p. 56 Warm Nopales with Guajillo Chiles and Corn, p. 58 Ramp and Asparagus Risotto, p. 71 Shiitake Mushroom Croque Monsieur, p. 73 King Trumpet Carpaccio with Avocado, Cilantro, and Lime, p. 74 Farro with Morels, Asparagus, and Tarragon Gremolata, p. 76 Miso-Roasted Maitake Mushrooms and Eggplant with Sesame Seeds, p. 77 Two-Bean Tomatillo Tamale Pie, p. 81 Taco Salad, p. 82 SAUCES & DRESSINGS

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Chili-Lime Dressing, p. 45 Zesty Lemon Vinaigrette, p. 46 Cumin-Tahini Dressing, p. 48 Radish, Cucumber, and Mint Pico de Gallo, p. 56 Garlicky Greens Sauce, p. 62 Sweet Corn, Caramelized Shallots, and Spinach Sauce, p. 62 Brothy Braised-Cauliflower Sauce, p. 63 Zucchini Carbonara Sauce, p. 64 Ginger-Tomato Sauce with Carrot Matchsticks, p. 65 Nettle Pesto, p. 69 Perfect Guacamole, p. 80 SNACKS, SIDES, DRINKS, & DESSERTS





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Basil-Brushed Roasted Artichokes, p. 10 Vegetable Quinoa Chips, p. 35 Jericallas with Blackberry, Mint, and Lime Coulis, p. 59 Mashed Fava Beans and Mint Crostini, p. 68 Michele’s Margaritas, p. 80 Mango-Almond Sherbet, p. 83 Cinnamon-Raisin Essene Bread, p. 88

vegetariantimes.com

MAY 2016 87


Named for the ancient Jewish sect credited with its invention, Essene bread is sprouted wheat bread at its simplest—and healthiest Recipe by Lisa Turner

NO YEAST, NO FILLER, no kneading, no rising time … Essene bread is the essence of easy, whole-grain goodness. The only thing that takes some time is the grain-sprouting process. But once you establish the right conditions with a large jar and some fresh water, Mother Nature does the rest of the work. Then, all you have to do is blend and bake.

CIN N A M O N-RA IS IN ES S ENE B R EAD MAKES 1 SMALL LOAF

A hint of cinnamonraisin sweetness turns a basic Essene bread recipe into a tasty breakfast option.

1 Place wheat berries in 2-quart wide-mouth jar, and cover with 4 cups lukewarm water. Cover jar mouth with cheesecloth held in place with rubber band, and set in cool, dark place to rehydrate for 12 hours, or overnight. Drain, rinse, and return wheat berries to jar. Lay jar on side so wheat berries spread in an even layer; cover mouth with cheesecloth, and store in cool, dark place 2 to 3 days to germinate, rinsing and draining wheat berries every 12 hours. 2 To make bread: Preheat oven to 250˚F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Soak raisins in 1 2 cups warm water in small bowl 5 minutes. Drain, and set aside. 1⁄

3 2 3 ⁄4 3 2

cups wheat berries cup raisins Tbs. coconut sugar Tbs. melted coconut oil or vegetable oil 1 Tbs. ground cinnamon 1 2 tsp. sea salt ⁄

88 MAY 2016

Pulse sprouted wheat berries with sugar, oil, cinnamon, and salt in food processor until smooth, stopping frequently to scrape down sides. Transfer to bowl, and stir in raisins. (Dough should be slightly moist but not wet, and should hold together well.)

4

Pat dough into domed mound, and transfer to prepared baking sheet. Score top of loaf with large X using sharp knife. Bake 1 hour 45 minutes to 2 hours, or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Cool completely before slicing. Store in refrigerator up to 1 week.

PER SLICE 228 CAL; 6 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 47 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 111 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 12 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

PHOTO: ASHTON RAY HANSEN; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; ASST. FOOD STYLIST: JIMMY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

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