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Slovo Park Project J. Bennett - J.Casson - C Filipe - I Van Wyk with contribution from M. Hatingh and L.Makgatbutlane

a process of understanding


Housing and Urban Environments Research Field Project____Honours Class 2010

This book documents the process of a pilot programme with the Housing and Urban Environments research group,in the Architecture Department, at the University of Pretoria, and the community of Slovo Park.

Slovo Park Project a process of understanding

The documentation process narrates the partnerships and exchanges between a group of Honours students within the HUE research field, and the community itself. It is a result of a five month interaction process, including preliminary research, participative research methods, student urban framework proposals and the physical implementation of the upgrading of the Community Hall.

Slovo Park Honours Group

Compiled by:J. Bennett - J.Casson - C Filipe - I Van Wyk with contribution from M. Hatingh and L.Makgatbutlane Edited by C. Filipe


abstract sponsors and partners

Introduction

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

a process of participation

a process of understanding

a process of implementation

a process of reflection

01 context and background -context site and history -partnerships objectives and outcomes -participants stakeholders and agents

02 testing research methodology -research by observation -research by quantitive methods -research by participation -research conclusions

05 project planning -project planning -project programme -project costing -project funding

03 community feedback

06 construction team

04 defining a new brief -programmatic needs -site analysis -proposed design

07 construction process -construction week 1 -construction week 2 -construction week 3

08 transforming details -details1 Foundations and Slab Casting -details 2 Structural Wall -details 3 Reed Screens and Panels -details 4 Water Point -details 5 Siteworks and Grading -details 6 Paving and Planting -details 7 Waterpoint -details 8 Post Boxes

09 final product -final before and after -final handover -final successes and failures 10 future of slovo park -future plans 11 lessons learnt -lessons learnt -lessons team experience 12 appendices


“Slum/Shack Dwellers International (SDI) is a confederation of country-level organisations (called ‘federations’) of the urban poor from 28 countries of the Global South (as of September 2008). It was launched in 1996 and became a formally registered entity in 1999. Several well-developed national federations of community-based organisations of slum and shack dwellers – particularly in India, South Africa and Thailand – joined hands to found SDI “(http://www. sdinet.org/about-us/)

“The Community Organisation Resource Centre has been fully operational since March 2002. For the first three years of its existence the Resource Centre was involved only in the facilitation of learning through exchange programmes to grass roots communities involved in innovative development. These communities were almost always affiliated to either the Coalition of the Urban Poor (CUP) or the the Alliance of Rural Communities (ARC).”( http://www.courc. co.za/aboutus.html)

“FEDUP is the South African affiliate of Shack Dwellers International and is the primary support initiative for many urban poor movements in Africa. FEDUP mobilises urban poor communities through savings. It has over 700 affiliates in informal settlements and urban poor neighbourhoods in cities and towns in all nine provinces. FEDU has been able to secure tenure for more than 25,000 families and has facilitated the creation of grassroots housing associations that have constructed over 15,000 formal houses. “(http://www.courc.co.za/fedup.html).

Thank you to all our donators and sponsors whose kind contributions , have assisted in making the Slovo Park Project a reality

partners and sponsors


Introduction a process of participation

The issue of housing and human settlements and, the contradictions and problems associated with eradicating informal settlements is investigated in terms of how places, can be made when a community is fully involved in the creation of that human settlement, and through partnerships and participation, a common interest or shared value can be used to suggest ways forward. It is a process of understanding, where qualitative research and interaction, can produce human settlements which have value for the people who live in them.


Context and Background

01

[site/history/objectives/outcomes/participants]

Slovo Park is a community with a rich history and strong leadership. Founded nearly thirty years ago, Slovo Park is far from an informal settlement denoted by government GIS Data, but instead is well established community, with a good and long standing relationship with its neighbours.


History

Site

Slovo Park came into being in the early 1980’s, during which time the area of Nancefield was undergoing continuous subdivision. The land originally the portion of the farm Olifantsvlei 316-IQ, was a vacant reserve,ear marked for industrial activity.

The community of Slovo Park is situated south of Johannesburg, five kilometers from Kliptown. It fits into a parcel of land that is the remainder of the farm Olifantsfontein,contained by the Moroka Bypass (N12) on the north and a declining industrial agglomeration on the South. The Klipspruit and Harrington streams form natural east west boundaries, spatially connecting Slovo Park to Eldorado Park, Kliptown and Soweto to the north; and Lenasia and Orange farm to the south. It is in this small informal community of 2500 people, in which catalytic upgrade projects ,under strong leadership are taking place.The Slovo Park Project and its partnership with the university, is just one of the initiatives,undertaken by the community , working towards gradual formalization and service provision.

Slovo Park, Nancefield, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa. 26° 18’ 17.87” S 27° 54’ 3.57” E

Slovo Hall

Many of the property owners in Nancefield Industrial,speak of the beginnings of the community .Mr M??? , the founder of Slovo Park,still speaks of the difficulty of getting the area serviced. The first standpipes in Slovo Park, which still stand, were facilitated by a partnership with the Nancefield Industrial business forum, a relationship which still exists to this day. In 1994???? the community made a bold move in initiating the first steps in formalizing their community. Frank Mapara , a community leader set out a street grid ,borrowed from adjacent Eldorado Park.,to which plots were subdivided and homes voluntarily demolished and rebuilt in support of the communities greater vision. The settlement is ready and prepared for services, awaiting governments mobilization. The community is a sustainable and thriving neighbourhood, with workshops, crèches, soccer leagues, HIV support groups, community forums, business forums,and previous partnerships with ngos concerning travelling clinics and libraries. It is within this context that the architecture students began their six month engagement with the community.

Aerial photograph. Slovo Park. City of Johannesburg 2006

Photograph: Frank Mapara ( Slovo Park) and Linda Matgatbutlane ( University of Pretoria). Author 2010

context site and history pg 12 I

01 context and background

pg 13 I 01 context and background


The Partnership

The Outcomes

spaces,enterprises,private space,water drainage

5.Diagrams illustrated the phases of

interviews

-investigate the role of the architect in housing processes, in particular self build initiatives. -investigate the possible role of other agents within the built environment within the context. 2. Semi structured Interviews where deFig1.Tools used during the Project The range of research methods described adjacent are aimed at revealing the complexity and intangible meaning of place that is difficult to ascertain, from an objective reading of space.

mographic and everyday patterns were discussed.

3. Quantitive where the environment is measured and counted. Including survey questions and documentation of homes

models

-investigate the value of participation in the research and design process in terms of community building,and a local understanding of place. -identify a catalyst intervention, as an idea generator or proposal for future development

mapping

the project in relation to time

documentation

observation

The research conducted by the students and led by Carin Combrinck became a testing ground for the tools of particative planning and community building. The students were guided in different participatory mapping and interviewing techniques., with the hopes of identifying needs and patterns that would inform possible design ideas to present to the community,as options. These tools and techniques were loosely informed by the tools suggested in Nabeel Hamdis , The Placemakers Guide to Community Building.(2010).The objectives of the study were to

-

4. Mapping cognintive mapping of the community by the community revealed the intangible.

1. Looking. Direct Observation of public

The Objectives

The outcomes of the research was intended to be an accumulation of knowledge and ideas for future developments . Multidisciplinary and layered. A built intervention was meant to be of a small scale,short term but meaningful intervention from the capacity of a small student project. It was not anticipated, what commitment ,scale of project and amount of participation that actually emanated from this participation process

5. models

for communicating the different phases of the project and final product to the community

diagrams

The project was initiated by the research interests of senior lecturer and architect Carin Combrinck in contact with Patrick Motsepe. of Fedup.,as a multidisciplinary approach to the upgrading of informal settlements.

The Placemakers Guide Nabeel Hamdi refers to the term “Placemaker” rather than architects and planners and experts. This is direct reference to his thought process that the place makers within a community should involve not just the “experts” but also the people and communities who are the inhabitants, thus it should be “ inclusive of all who make and sustain the quality of human settlements” (Hamdi, 2010, p. xviii).

pg 5 I 01 context and background

partnership objectives and outcomes pg 14 I

01 context and background

pg 15 I 01 context and background


(above)Image.Network of partciapants at different levels.Author 2010

students in planning and carrying out the project. The roles assumed by this group ranged from project management,material procurement,marketing,and facilitating communication lines between the, FEDUP; and built environment professionals,such as engineers and contractors,and sponsors

of the urban poor,headed by Max Romau in this particular project facilitated the partnership between the university and Slovo Park.The organization also played a crucial role in funding an important element of the project and monitoring its progress Contractors donated their time and professional knowledge, in ensuring that certain phases of the work,were carried out correctly. Sponsors provided the necessary materials, on a continual basisi throughout the project

This particular group of actors included the local government,the contributions of local business, not directly associated with the community,and the participation of affliates of Fedup within the Ekhuruleni Metropolitan Area.

external stakeholders

Melani is a well organized committee of people with specific portfolios , and roles in implementing and communicating projects within the community. They worked with and co-ordinated with the UP

Fedup,the federation

The Building Team consisted of a diverse range of people and builders,experienced and inexperienced, young and old. The role of builder was extended to making contact with external stakeholders,within each persons own networks and encouraging them to get involved in the project

sponsors and ngos

The Slovo Park project was able to attain its goals through the interaction of multiple agents acting in the built environment both professionally and as citizens. Different roles needed to be assumed and even muluiple roles were necessary.

Slovo Park Leadership ,headed by Mohau

the volunteers

Hamdi identifies and differentiates between primary ,secondary stakeholders and “external stakeholders. The adjacent diagram illustrates the relationships between primary and secondary stakeholders, and their involvement at different levels within the project( 2010;95)

internal stakeholders

Stakeholders and Agents

Diverging and Converging Interests

A difficulty within the project was trying to undertsand the different interests ,with which each agent in the project had.. Ultimately the goal was to make a catalytic intervention that contributed to the community, mobilized interest within and outside the community , and prompted future development. However, it was found that at times the research or academic requirements of the students, had to be balanced with the real world needs and expectations of the community. Similarly the level of participation of professionals, varied for different private interests. The definition of the project changed continuously from the “community’s project”, to “finishing the students exam”. This complexity arose out of the mutually beneficial relationship and skills transfer between all particpants.

(left)Photograph: Diverse Group of Participants .Author 2010

participants stakeholders and agents pg 16 I

01 context and background

pg 17 I 01 context and background


Part 1

a process of understanding

The research process during the engagement with the community employed a variety of methods to gain a better understanding of the context, to inform future design decisions.The value of participative reserach methods were demonstrated in a proposed urban framework, that included the intangible meanings ,particular to place


Testing Research Methodology

02

[observation/documentaion/interviews/participation/mapping/frameworks]

This documented process reveals how a different understanding of a place is informed by the different research methods. The result is a multifaceted perspective, of seeing the community through different and changing perspectives from the observer, to the visitor, to being for a short time part of the community.


Research and Participation

Conclusions

The first level of research was based on observations of the visitor, through site visits , and an objective mapping from aerial photos and governemental spatial data.

Within this mapping exercise ,certain conclusions about what the research team deemed to be significant were identified.

The adjacent images demonstrate the outcomes of an objective mapping of Slovo Park within the context of Johannesburg South.

From the objective mapping of the area it was assumed that:

Areas identified as crucial were the major shopping centres, the influence and threats of the streams and their flood plains, the danger presented by high tension electricity pylons and the boundaries created by the N12 Bypass. The mapping exercise demonstrated the close proximity of services, a Rea Vaya Bus Depot, a declining industrial area, the importance of funeral homes and the dramatic presence of cemeteries in the landscape. This objective reading of the landscape brought to the for a set of questions, which were hoped to be answered by a quantitative survey. The type and validity of this research method was tested against a more informal one with surprising impacts on the proposed urban framework.

Fig. Objective mapping of different elements of urban space. Author 2010

The Moroka N12 Bypass was an important transport connection The pedestrian bridge north of the site was a very important social space and informal market. The cemeteries were important places within the cultural landscape. The dumping of refuse on the southern side of the site, meant that it had no value There was no particularly important street within Slovo Park. That the road between the bridge and the Industrial area through Slovo was used often That there was a barrier between the industrial area and Slovo Park.

Photograph. Gateway into Eldorado Park Cemetery. Author 2010

research by observation pg 22 I 02 testing research methodology

pg 23 I 02 testing research methodology


Surveys and Documentation

The next level within the research, was conducted via structured surveys, and documentation of homes. During this process, more informal conversations revealed underlying concerns and interests that could not be understood otherwise. By understanding where people originally came from, it was learnt why they came to Slovo, who helped them settle in, under what circumstances things changed. Frank Mapara Street was chosen as the study area as it was learnt to be the first street in Slovo Park, named after an important community member.

Conclusions

The patterns which emerged from this exercise ,although limited to specific study area, revealed a condition of migration,and permanence, thriving in the same space. The majority of the homes on the street, were well establlished for a number of years, with a flux of tenants for short periods of time renting space in the backyard. During the research period, a documented Zozo, was removed from a backyard and its tenants were no longer in Slovo Park. The monthly rentals were approximately R50 per month.

The results of the survey and the house documentation revealed spatial clues in terms of architecture, and also family relationships

Image. Axonemetric Streetscape of Frank Mapara Street with associated survey data. Author 2010

research by documentation pg 24 I 02 testing research methodology

pg 25 I 02 testing research methodology


Slovo Park Streetscapes

Photographic streetscapes of Mapara Street , were used to understand the relationships between building elements,thresholds, neighbours and their interaction with the street. Frank Mapara Street was the first formalized street in the settlement and was therefore considered a logical start to document the well established neighbourhood, for research purposes and historical documentation. It will be interesting to observe in retrospect, the changing dynamic and language of the street, especially with future additions of government subsidised housing on the existing stands as planned, by the community.

Fig. Photomontage. Portion of Frank Mapara Street South. Author 2010 Fig. Photomontage. Portion of Frank Mapara Street South. Author 2010 Fig. Photomontage. Portion of Frank Mapara Street North. Author 2010

pg 26 I 02 testing research methodology

pg 27 I 02 testing research methodology


( Top Right )Fig. Image. Documentation of 341 Mapara Street.. Author 2010 ( Bottom Left to right) Fig.Photograph.Detail of window. Author 2010 Fig.Photograph. Roof Anchoring and Waterproofing. Fig. Photograph. Sill Detail. Author 2010

pg 28 I 02 testing research methodology

( Top Left). Fig. Documentation of 684 Mapara Street. ( From right to left ). Fig. Photograph. Children Measuring their home. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Detail of IBR sheeting. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Detail of Entry Door. Author 2010

pg 29 I 02 testing research methodology


( Top Right ). Fig. Image.Documentaion of 320 Mapara Street.Author 2010 ( Bottom left to right). Fig. Photograph. Threshold detail. Author 2010. Fig. Photograph.Interior of kitchen. Author 2010. Fig. Photograph. Yard. Author 2010.

pg 30 I 02 testing research methodology

( Top Left ). Fig. Image. Documentation of 696 Mapara Street. Author 2010 ( Bottom Left to Right ). Fig. Photograph. Tenant. Author 2010. Fig. Photograph. Tool Shed and Material Storage. Author 2010. Fig. Photograph. Shack interior. Author 2010

pg 31 I 02 testing research methodology


Community Mapping

Mapping of the Macro Context

During the third visit to site, the community was asked to participate in a mapping exercise of the area,using large scale photographs, stickers and markers.

A large scale map of the community including surrounding suburbs was used to understand the extent of the relationship with Slovo Park and these adjacent areas.

The resultant maps reveal the outcome of this process It revealed a difference in perception, as to which spaces were considered important and most used by the community.

The orange dots represent schools and shops in the area that are used by the community. The blue dots represent the shopping centres most utilized by the community.The purple dots represent perceived areas of danger.The community also marked the routes that were considered safe and unsafe to use.

Public facilities and economic activities were quickly identified .Patterns and meanings emerged that would otherwise not be identified from an objective point of view. Place, as an abstract concept, and all the meaning it entails was made tangible through this process.

From this information it was possible to conclude that there was a strong reliance on two major shopping centres,represented by the blue dots. The Jamila Centre, just over the Moroka Bypass,and Kliptown, to the north, where building materials and wholesale goods for business were purchased.The mapping process did not only reveal where and what in terms of local movement patterns ,but also why.

The legend accompanying the maps describes the elements investigated on site: the existing economic situations and the aspirations of the community for the future.

For example,the pedestrian bridge connecting Slovo Park to Eldorado Park is considered a dangerous crossing and oppurtunity for crime. Boundary road bordering Kliptown Informal settlement is considered a dangerous route,despite being a main road, and people choose to use the route between the suburbs if they are on foot.

(right). Photograph.Community Mapping Process.Author 2010.Author 2010.

Schools and Shops Dangerous areas Main Commercial centre Event Space

(top left). Photograph. Carin Combrinck explains the mapping process to a group of volunteers. Author 2010 (middle).Photograph. Community Leader Mohau Melani. Author 2010 (bottom). Photograph.Locating different activities within Slovo Park (left) Image.Macro Community map.png

research by participation pg 32 I 02 testing research methodology

pg 33 I 02 testing research methodology


Mapping of the Micro Context

Proposed Urban Frameworks

The mapping of the micro context ,communicated the communities priority areas for development,their problem areas, existing businesses, public facilities ,diversity in religion, and mixed use nature of many of the places. T

The conclusions of the interviews and mapping were brought together in a conceptual urban framework presented by the students. The concept was centred arounf the idea of edge definition and incremental growth. It is this theme that permeated through the rest of the project.

1 3

There was a common understanding between community members, that the existing community meeting space, still had value as a public space and that Frank Mapara Street was of particular significance within the history of the community. 4

1.Establishing Slovo Park /Nancefield Industrial as a third major node in a public transport route 2

2. Establishing a safe pedestrian route to Kliptown 3. Harringtonspruit as community farming plots concurrent with existing use

5

6

4.Klipspruit River as sacred landscape,connecting the culturally significant cemeteries ,as important spaces within the context 5.Incremental definition of Frank Mapara Street and existing community hall 6. Forming a partnership with Nancefield Industrial, based on a common interest

Taverns/Shebeens Childrens playground

Fig. Photograph. Product of local participative mapping. Author 2010

Spaza Shops/taverns Areas that require development Community facilities/Community plots Churches

research conclusions and proposals pg 34 I 02 testing research methodology

Fig. Image. Proposed Student Urban Framework. Author 2010

pg 35 I 02 testing research methodology


community feedback 1

03

[presentation/feedback]

The community were presented with the framework proposals and projects, as results from the research. During the feedback session,assumptions made by design were either proved wrong or found to be quite successful and appropriate.


Mapping of the Micro Context

Mapping of the Micro Context

The mapping of the micro context ,communicated the communities priority areas for development,their problem areas, existing businesses, public facilities ,diversity in religion, and mixed use nature of many of the places. T

The mapping of the micro context ,communicated the communities priority areas for development,their problem areas, existing businesses, public facilities ,diversity in religion, and mixed use nature of many of the places. T

There was a common understanding between community members, that the existing community meeting space, still had value as a public space and that Frank Mapara Street was of particular significance within the history of the community.

There was a common understanding between community members, that the existing community meeting space, still had value as a public space and that Frank Mapara Street was of particular significance within the history of the community.

Fig. Photograph. Community Meeting July 2010. Author 2010

community presentation 1 pg 38 I 03 community feedback

( Top Left)Fig.Photograph. Jacquiline Casson explains the project. Author 2010 ( Bottom left to right)Fig. Photograph.Community Meeting. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph.Community Leadership reviewing the Work. Author 2010 Fig.Photograph. Community Reviewing the work

pg 39 I 03 community feedback


defining a new brief

04

[design/location/intent/principles/presentation]

The issue of housing and human settlements and, the contradictions and problems associated with eradicating informal settlements is investigated in terms of how places, can be made when a community is fully involved in the creation of that human settlement, and through partnerships and par tic a pat ion, a common interest or shared value can be used to suggest ways forward. It is a process of understanding, where quantitative research and inter a action, and produce human settlements which have value for the people who live in


Interpreting Community Feedback

“We were like urban acupuncturists looking for interventions that could release the energy latent in place and, with it, the capacity to self-improve or recover: small interventions to release strong and lasting ripples that would pervade extensively. We would be looking to get something started quickly and visibly, a catalyst or series of catalysts, with immediate, practical impact to generate interest and mobilize effort.” (Hamdi 2010:64) After completion of the previous quarter’s individual projects the decision was made by Carin Combrink that the students would design and partake in a six week community build project within Slovo Park . The option was given to either choose and continue with one of the individual projects, or to choose a new site and design. It was decided to identify a new site and design intervention.,based on the feedback received by the community in a previous meeting. The project would attempt to develop a design intervention that would act as a catalyst for further development and respond to the needs of the community.

Site of “Acupuncture”

Informed by a previous framework study,the public space adjacent to the soccer field located in Frank Mapara Street was chosen as the new site. This site was identified as a historically and current significant space within the community.

( Right)Fig. Image. Existing Site Condition. Author 2010 (Opposite)Fig. Image. Site Analysis Function Diagram. Author 2010

Existing Condition and Use

The first presentation to the community took place in the intersection of Mitchell and Mapara streets. The dilapidated postboxes had created a voluminous barrier between the civic space to the north and the well-used meeting ground in the street. Two pit Latrines that service all old soccer grounds stood broken and filled to capacity (about 50mm from the surface). Awkwardly placed in the centre of a communal open space, it created opportunity for misuse and vandalism. Adjacent to the pit latrines stood two severely rusted and unused postboxes, where the small dark spaces housed unfavourable activity at night. The existing community hall was destroyed in a fire during a riot and the wall panels were removed as rubber bullet shield. According to the community there was also a community Policing Forum (Slovo Parks informal police force) built on the site which was destroyed in the same riot. The existing condition of the community hall was unfit for use. The slab had crumbled,and the 45 x45 steel angle framed structure swayed precariously in mild winds with lack of support and bracing. Strong north westerly winds and low eastern an western sun, made the hall an exposed and uncomfortable space for any event. An additional problem associated with the site was the stormwater that regularly flooded the hall during highveld storms. (Right)Fig. Photograph. Existing Community Hall.Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Existing Pit Latrine.Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Existing Post Boxes. Author 2010

design location pg 42I 04 defining a new brief

pg 43I 04 defining a new brief


design intent pg 44I 04 defining a new brief

pg 45I 04 defining a new brief


Edges and Fixing

The edges and the junction between elements are the most detailed elements of the project. They will hopefully have the longest life span, in the project. They are design features that convey and emphasize the nature of the two step building process: defining the edge and incremental infill. The edge also defines the level of skill ,time and quality of material invested into that aspect.

Infill

The infill within the Slovo Park Project, prioritizes, cost, maintenance, and material availability .Understanding also that the type of material available at a particular point of growth of the project will vary and change as the community does. With that in mind, the edges and fixing details needed to be adaptable and robust enough to cope with that uncertainty.

Adaptability and Flexibility

The idea of adaptability and flexibility does not alone apply to the robust assembly and disassemble of parts: it includes a change in programme and use of space. A critical question asked during this process is to how the detail, can become something else, what dual function can it possess? If the project fails, How can the material be appropriated successfully?

Reuse , Recycle, Reinvent

With no funding the project was reliant on making the most of what exists and what can be sourced. The materials extracted from the existing site, were reused, recycled and reinvented. . There was a concern to minimise material waste in this project, as it simply couldnt afford it.

Materiality

Peter Zumthor argues that the materiality used may have an imbued meaning in a particular context. ( Zumthor(1999 :11).The materiality assumed in the project is not only determined by availability but also, about what the community values, aspires to, is familiar with.

Skills

The design details had to take into consideration the set of skills required, to complete the job. As much as possible, the design aimed at limiting reliance on professionals for the completion of the project.

Maintenance

Details had to take into consideration the cost of the material, if it had a short life cycle and required continuous replacing. Maintenance is to be kept to a minimum, to ensure a long life of the project. Edges played the role of being more permanent and robust while the infill,was subject to being replaced by different options according to availability.

Incremental Growth Cost

Despite the sponsorship of materials, the construction process needed to assess the cost implications on the community, for maintaining the intervention, and making any repairs. The execution also needed to be aware of the cost implications, of relying on outside professionals to correct the problem.

A major theme during this process was the idea of incremental growth. The project was explained to the community as a first step in creating a permanent and civic space for the future of Slovo Park ,based on the current resource availability, and time afforded in creating a catalyst. This is expressed in the elements of the project which, were intended to allow for reappropriation and continued and reinvented use.

Fig. Photograph. Presentation of the Project to the Community. Author 2010)) Fig . Photograph. The construction process banner was used to communicated graphically the different phases of the project. Author 2010 Fig . Site Model of Built intervention. Author 2010

design principles pg 46I 04 defining a new brief

pg 47I 04 defining a new brief


Presenting the Project to the Cllient

The project was presented to the community in terms of the scope of work that the project would entail, the capacity to which the students would be able to help, and the objectives that the project was trying to achieve. There were concerns and some miscommunication about who the students were, why they couldnt build a proper clinic and a proper school. Models were used to communicate the end objectives graphically, and questions were translated into sotho and Zulu so that it was accessible to the entire audience. The community agreed and supported the idea of incremental growth.

Fig. Photograph Marco voices his concern over some of the project elements in the community meeting. . Author 2010

design presentation pg pg 48 48II04 04defining definingaanew newbrief brief

pg 49I 04 defining a new brief


Part 2

a process of implementation

The implementation process revealed the potential value of participation during the construction phase.The project became a testing ground for ideas, methodologies, expressions,in a iterative process that sought to reach a common inderstanding as to what the Six Week Goal should be.


project planning

05

[planning/programme/funding/costing/communication]

The time constraints of a Six Week Goal, with no funding, no materials, no transport,and no resolved working drawings, meant that a programme had to be defined that ensured that the critical paths of the project were met. The impacts of outside influences, changing circumstance, and contingency plans are reflected within the site programming process


Project Planning

The planning of the project was co-ordinated between the community leadership and the students involved in the project. Necessary roles needed to be assumed by different team members, despite lack of familiarity or experience. Different portfolios were created to manage the process and the roles played by each participant in order for the project to be completed. Project Manager, Funding, and Costing Drawing Office Manager, Marketing Manager, Project Documentation and Site Manager, were the portfolios that the students initiated amongst themselves. WHAT WERE THE COMMUNITIES ROLES?

Strategic Meeting_5th Oct 2010

A strategic meeting was held by the Slovo Park Community Leadership in a tavern in Slovo Park, to discuss what needs to be done and organized within the community and with University, so that the first phase of site work can take place on Monday. Details about what to present to the community at the public meeting were finalised. Plans of the proposed intervention were discussed, and sourcing of necessary skilled labour,power tools and outstanding material were delegated.

Fig x. Photograph. From left: Claudia Filipe (UP), Jaqueline Casson ( UP), Mohau Melani,Buccanneer Surname,Dan Surname , Naledi Surname, Sam Motsamai, Mapho Surname, Unkown, Patricia, happy

project planning pg 54 I 05 project planning

pg 55 I 05 project planning


Dual Roles

The student team member with the most real-world experience and necessary qualifications was selected as project manager. Based on past experience, and Microsoft Project Gannt Chart was used to set a project programme, determine critical paths and determine deadlines. The critical path was based on the conditional completion of necessary construction drawings and funding, however the unstable and iterative process of the project, and the uncertainties associated with relying on outside funding and material donations, it was difficult to complete these tasks. Funding, design changes and drawing amendments continued throughout the process, as different materials incrementally became available, and with interaction with the community, suggesting alternatives to the proposed construction methods. This impacted time and material needed to complete the project. The interaction process and continuous input and participation of the project contributed to its richness but hampered the project in terms of attaining a complete product. The graphic ( right) illustrates the complexity with the project programme particular to projects of this nature

Critical Paths and Time Constraints

The critical path within the project changed with circumstances. Funding, availible material, and known or familaiar ways of building affected the initial project programme. Miscommunication with drawings also affected the project programme.

Flow Diagram of Initial Critical Path

Concrete Slab Shuttering

Concrete Casting

Site Grading

Paving

Flow Resultant Critical Path

Additional concrete Required

Strip Foundation Footing

Bricks for footing to be sourced

Foundation Wall

Site Grading

Slab Casting

Paving

Structural Wall Increase in Scope of Work Fig. Photograph. Project Planning Meeting September 2010. Author 2010

project programme pg 56 I 05 project planning

Addendum A- MS Project Gannt Chart- pg 160

pg 57 I 05 project planning


Project Needs

Project Quantities and Cost

Community participation and a dependency on sponsorships for material procurement led to design details changing according to the interaction between the involved parties and the materials being sponsored.

Due to the sponsorship nature of the intervention, the quantities were always more important than the cost. Sponsors were also more eager to sponsor materials, rather than cash. In the end the cost estimate only served as an indicator of the size of the project.

4000

Important for this project were the initial estimated quantities for all the materials needed, to inform possible sponsors of the required items. It was also beneficial to keep optional materials in mind. Materials were preliminary specified and changed as sponsorships were received. Estimated quantities and cost were adjusted continuously according to the received materials and their quantities.

A standard form BOQ was also not appropriate for this project for the same reason. In standard form one item is inclusive of everything; namely the cost of the material, transport, and labour. The price for a ground floor surface bed per square metre, for instance, is inclusive of all the individual materials needed as well as the transport and labour the contractor will charge to deliver the slab. In the case of Slovo Park project every material had to be quantified individually for the sake of sponsorships.

3500

3000

Due to this constant change the quantities were never fixed and were adapted as the process was happening and design and/or drawings changed.

2500

2000

1500

1000

500

Cost Fig. Photograph. Reuse of post box numbers in landscaping elements.Author 2010

project costing pg 58 I 05 project planning

0 Nancefield Industrial Business Forum

Slovo Park Business Owners

Local Churches

Community Collections

Eldorado Park University Fund Community Raiser

Private donations

Fig. Graph: Approximate monetary value of project elements. Author 2010

pg 59 I 05 project planning


Cash Donations

Project Funding and Material Sourcing

Initial hope was too have all funding sorted out and finalized by week 2. On the outset we were all very confident that we could get this project funded and had allocated 2 weeks to the sourcing and securing of funding. However, with the time frame that was available the time line for funding and sponsorship of materials happened differently to what we had hoped.

Short Term Funding

Immediate cash donations and material sponsorships occurred sporadically throughout the progression of the project. This limited the participation of large corporations interested in investing in the project, as a long term partnership. Application processes and time of year played a crucial role within the project. Short Term funding , is the primary means by which the project was made feasible.

4000

3500

Process

Long term funding

3000

It became obvious that funding could not be finalized in the original time frame. This was gauged from the slow response from potential donors during this time period. On outset we were still unsure of exact building materials that would be needed. and quanttities.Abrupt changes to the design (influenced by community participation, availability of skilled labour etc) led to change of materiality. The nature of the project meant that as design changed the materials needed changed too.It was realized that funding received would not be in the form of cash but rather in specific materials from specific companies.

This includes the plans for the future of Slovo Park. There are plans for possible further upgrade in coming years. It was considered to implement a long term fund through which similar projects could take place. There were interested companies , concerning the future developments of Slovo Park.

2500

2000

Local Investment

The adjacent graph graphically illustrates the main contributors to the project, in terms of monetary donations

1500

Problems and Obstacles

The recession has influenced the building industry immensely. Many companies expressed interest in the project but could unfortunately not budget for this. It was extremely hard getting hold of the right people. We spent hours and hours on the phone being put through from one person to the next. I found it extremely important to keep a written record of interactions, who you spoke too and what the response was. When you have 6 call backs the following day (two before 10am, one at 12 sharp, three callbacks any time after 2pm and one call back at 6pm) it is crucial to be able to keep track of it all.

1000

500

0

Time

Nancefield Industrial Business Forum

Slovo Park Business Owners

Local Churches

Community Collections

Eldorado Park University Fund Community Raiser

Private donations

Fig. Photograph. Delivery of sponsored steel. Author 2010 Fig. Image. Cash Donations. Author 2010

project funding pg 60 I 05 project planning

pg 61 I 05 project planning


contractors

This was successful in communicating the project to peers and gaining volunteers on a weekly basis

The documentation needed to communicate how work was to be carried out and completed on site took a different route. It required grading plans for professionals, to 3ds.However the most effective form of communication were the simple hand drawings completed and discussed on site. For the students, the implication of correct, simple and legible drawings became important, and also the relevancy of setting out dimensions clearly as they relate to manner in which elements on site are set out and built. The building team, comprised a group of experienced artisans, well skilled in the trade. Through simple drawings on site. There was an implicit understanding of what needed to be done. Although there was a a major error in a set of drawings, the builders commented that they knew what was implied.

3D site

Sponsors were more willing to take part in the project assisted by official letterheads A marketing book was useful and necessary when trying to approach local business for support.

On Site Hand

The two powerful tools of tangible and intangible presentation media together were key in the future success of the project

the letterhead

Blogspot

The blogspot for Slovo Park was not only used to market the project, but also document its process day by day so that sponsors could see the results of their donations. It also allowed the project to be communicated to other interested parties and ngos, who came across the project.

Project Technical Documentation

facebookgroup

Marketing became more crucial to attaining donations as companies seemed much happier to donate to an organisation that existed on the web. This was achieved through the use of a small document that explained the project thoroughly, emailed interested parties, and used by the team members when approaching the local businessesd for funding.The marketing booklet played a key role as the project itself was much easier to explain and sell on a well presented and clear format such as the ten page booklet.

the blog

n order to get the necessary funding for the project, and create a public face to which possible sponsors could refer marketing became an important element of the project.

The blog became the main means of communication and documentation of the project used to generate sponsor interest in the project

marketing book

Project Marketing

The most effective drawings on site were three dimensional and simple plan diagrams. HOwever due to the changing nature of material availability, drawing up of plans and perfecting detailing , struggled to keep up with the project..

Fig. Image. Shop Drawings and Grading Drawings for professional. Author 2010 Fig. Image. 3d Drawings most effective on Site. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph: Details resolved on site without drawings. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph: On Site Drawings of Reed Screen Fixing. Author 2010

Fig. Image main means of communictation for funding and public participation. Author 2010

project communication pg 62 I 05 project planning

pg 63 I 05 project planning


the construction team

06

[skills harvesting]

The construction process was a process of exchange of knowledge,skills, and understanding. The final result was a built expression of the engagement and participation of many actors, and the subsequent common understanding that eventually emerged.


Frank Mapara

Community Leader and General Builder

Mahau

naledi

Community Leader community leader

philemon

plumber, and general Builder

marco

plumber, and general Builder

sam

Electrician, Welder, Instrumentation

mokebeshakes Welder

jo

general builder

petrose

david (dupes)

driver and community leader

arthur general building

mpho

gardener and labourerremo c

johannes builder

paulus

general builder

Plumber

Photograph. Group Portrats. Author 2010

construction the building team pg 66 I 06 the construction team

pg 67 I 06 the construction team


Buccanner

Siti

Slovo Park Business Owner Community Leader

Thembile

Community Leader

Naledi

Slovo Park Community

Mpho%

Slovo Park Community

Bertha

Unknown

Community Leader andCommunity Leader and General Builder General Builder

Lidia

Miriam SelemongoEva Molautse

Slovo Park Community Community Leader and General Builder

bertha

frank

Community Leader and Community Leader and Community Leader General Builder General Builder and General Builder

Skills Harvesting

An account of the skills and trades available on site was easily achieved , through a strategic meeting, held, one week after construction. During this meeting a community was asked to contribute to the project in any way. People offered their time to assist in catering, clearing of site, and general building work, with the result that there was on average, a good team of approximately twenty people available and willing to work each day

Skills Transfer

During the process, different people were able to gain some experience in terms of site layout, plumbing, welding, photography and even surveying. Both students and the younger members of the teams were able to benefit from the knowledge and experience of older people in the community

construction the building team pg 68 I 06 the construction team

pg 69 I 06 the construction team


construction process

07

[week 1/week 2/week 3/week 5/week 6]

The construction process was a process of exchange of knowledge,skills, and understanding. The final result was a built expression of the engagement and participation of many actors, and the subsequent common understanding that eventually emerged.


The first week of construction entailed the clearing of the site and the demolition of ill placed pit latrines at the centre of the site. The construction process began with the excavation of foundation trenches, casting of strip foundations and the subsequent building of a low foundation wall. The projects first public build day was attended by architecture students from the University of Pretoria

construction week 1 pg 72 I 07 construction process

pg 73 I 06 the construction team


“During a meeting with the community members involved in the future build we began discussing the issue around moving the post boxes on site. We started to talk about how some sort of tractor or truck could move the boxes as they were designed to moved “with the with the inclusion of a tow hitch and sleds underneath.

I arrived early in the morning to meet with the man from Afrimix, Tony would will be donating readymix concrete for our slab and to check on the progress of the removal of toilets and clearing of excrement using a honey-sucker organised by the community

cleaning of pit latrines

wednesday 20 Oct

digging of tranches contractors and empty sites

I arrived on site expecting to see the same weary faces we always meet but I was met by a hive of activity with a large group of mostly Mozambican woman raking, digging and cleaning site. In there beautifully coloured skirts and wrap dresses they were solidly working the ground, while a group of mean stood in the shade and debated a good many things with regards to how

Day 3_

the informal siteworks

the existing condition of the community centre meant that its unstable nature would be affected by the intended construction of a raft foundation

Day 2_

meetings all day

unrealized scope of work

tuesday 25 Oct

existing conditions

Day 1_

monday 24 Oct

I arrived early in the morning to meet with the man from Afrimix, Tony would will be donating readymix concrete for our slab and to check on the progress of the removal of toilets and clearing of excrement using a honey-sucker organised by the community

an eager group of volunteers

stiffening of beam

moving of postboxes

contractors and empty sites

critical siteworks

the demolition of pit latrines was critical for the preparation of the site for grading.

taking initiative Shakes welded flat bar to the existing structure to stiffen the angles as a beam.

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


Steel Contractors assisted in producing two steel frames for the reed screens to be used as prototypes on site ,from which additional frames would be made

For six weeks a public build day was initiated. The community inited anyone interested ,from the community, university and general public to participate in the implementation of the project.The first week was attended by UP undergraduate

planning for a critical path

plans for the foundation walls and casting of the strip foundations were discussed with the building team, The complexity of the proposed wall required the input of an engineer

Critical path:foundation

Day 5_thursday 20 Oct

a reed screen prototype

clearing the site

foundation discussions

Day 4_

steel contractors role

misunderstanding

delivery of drawings

Wednesday, October 13, 2010 Day 3:Destruction of Toilets We arrived on site early to deliver drawings hoping to dispel any miscommunication. After showing a clearer image of the future plan we had more interest and what seems like more understanding.

clearing of the site

Thursday, October 14, 2010Day 4:Site Works and Sponsorship The morning was spent acquiring materials from Kliptown from a benevolent hardware store owner who was kind enough to give us 5 cubes of pre-mix as well as all his broken bags of cement to cast a foundation.

thursday 20 Oct

material sourcing

local sponsorship

strip foundations

were cast on the friday ,with concrte donated by Afrimix and additional cement bags donated by a local business to complete the job

Build Day 1 public building days

For six weeks a public build day was initiated. The community inited anyone interested ,from the community, university and general public to participate in the implementation of the project.The first week was attended by UP undergraduate

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


Foundation walls for the concrete slab were finished and the first slab casting took place. For one day a bobcat and a bomag cleaned, cleared, levelled and compacted the site. The paving edge was excavated and the new water point set out. For Build Day 2 volunteers helped to excavate for the water point and placement of gum poles.

construction week 2 pg 78 I 07 construction process

pg 79 I 06 the construction team


surveying

mpho and arthur assisted mienke in establishing the levels osite

site visit

The first few panels of the slab were cast in place and floated,

saturday 20 Oct

critical path a bobcat and a roller donated by a sponsor graded the site and compacted the fill for the concrete slab

nightcasting of concrete slabs

Day 12_

part of the team discussed the types of roleer courses and bonds they would like like to completes the foundation wall with

earthworks

Day 10_thursday 20 Oct

on site design

Day 9_

the practical application of the Up students instructions in the foundation and wall plan were tested on site.. issues of setting out, dimensioning was made appaerent by Philemon.

wednesday 20 Oct

material s reading the foundation plans

design:patterns

Day 7_monday 18 Oct

foundation walls

gumpoles were donated by one of the employers of our building team and similarly by the brick by brick donations of the community itself

grading and rolling

the unexpected

Fr Jorge Anzorena from Shack Dwellers International, Tokyo, visited the site and gave advice on completing the

Build Day 2


The third week of construction kicked off with the planting of 14 sponsored trees. The first gum poles were erected. Work on the new feature wall commenced. Work on the first post box got on its way; one of the post boxes was removed and sanding and priming commenced. On Build Day 3 volunteers from Jacaranda residence helped to prime the existing steel structure.

construction week 3 pg 82 I 07 construction process

pg 83 I 06 the construction team


structural wall

material s

The removal of the postbox shelves from the main structure required a lot of time, energy and manpower. Further cutting of the boxes was considered a waste of time and energy for the impact it would eventually have on the project.

Day 15

There was some confusion concerning the drawings. It was soon realized that there is a reason why the dimensions on the plan are taken from specific points. They serve to set out the wall, and as such needed setting out points and running dimensions. On site we ended up using calculators to work out setting ou points

energy intensive interventions

wednesday _26 Oct

building of structural wall drawing conventions and practice

removal of postbox

Day 14

miscommunication

The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

tuesday _25 Oct

Day 13

monday _24 Oct

tree planting

water efficient planting

corobrik sponsorship

structural wind wall

The corobik factory in Lawley , Lenasia, allowed the building team to source the rejected face bricks,using Frans’ truck. This donation made it possible for the structural wall to be completed.

Alternative brick patterns were discussed , to accommodate the occurrence of different types of sponsored bricks

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


The new steel frames for the existing steel structure got fixed and welded. The second and third casting of the concrete slab happened, as well as blinding for the paving edge and the concrete footing for the benches and water points. Work on the structural wall concluded, while the last of the gum poles were erected. The first reeds were cut for the new reed screens. The children from Slovo Park painted the second post box for Build Day 4.

construction week 4 pg 86 I 07 construction process

pg 87 I 06 the construction team


welding of reed screens

Based on the prototype frame produced by the contractor and designed by the students, the community produced a duplicate, but adjusting the fixing details and opening mechanism for a much smoother finish

Based on the prototype frame produced by the contractor and designed by the students, the community produced a duplicate, but adjusting the fixing details and opening mechanism for a much smoother finish

structural wall progress

A vast amount of time and energy went into converting the postboxes into spaza shops. The extremely delapidated condition of the structure, required throrough sanding and removal of whole sections of flooring to remove rusted and brittle material

plumbing of water point

pretreating the steel

structural wall progress

Based on the prototype frame produced by the contractor and designed by the students, the community produced a duplicate, but adjusting the fixing details and opening mechanism for a much smoother finish

Day 13

monday _24 Oct

structural wall progress

modifying the prototype priming of postboxes

Day 13

monday _24 Oct

welding of reed screens

welding of reed screens

welding of reed screens Based on the prototype frame produced by the contractor and designed by the students, the community produced a duplicate, but adjusting the fixing details and opening mechanism for a much smoother finish

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


team lunches As the project picked up monentum and word of m outh spread, various officials ,ward

monday _24 Oct

hiv testing campaign

Almost everyday,for the duration of the project, the ladies of Slovo Park made lunches for the team , sometimes without being paid for their efforts. Community collections were used for this, and it became a very important part of the project

As the project picked up monentum and word of m outh spread, various officials ,ward councillors and interested individuals,including the sponsors visited the site, and drove by to view its progress

water points

The postboxes were primed with the assistance of slovos smallest helpers. The build day coincided with an HIV campaign that took place on the south west corner ,since construction was still underway.

Day 13

lunch times

generating interest

landscape edges and waterpoint

site visit Gumpoles donated by the employer of a community member were used to create vertical masts:support structures for shaded temporary meeting spaces.

Day 13

monday _24 Oct

vertical elements

team lunches

Day 13

monday _24 Oct

placing of gumpoles

priming the postboxes

Build Day 3

priming the postboxes The postboxes were primed with the assistance of slovos smallest helpers. The build day coincided with an HIV campaign that took place on the south west corner ,since construction was still underway.

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


. During week 5 there was a few big rainstorm and we were able to review and finalise the water runoff. Puddles were filled up, as well as the area in front of the community hall to prevent water from running the site. The water points, benches and steel screens were completed. The reed screens continued and work on the new counter for the post box commenced. For the Build Day 5 a new tar surface was applied.

construction week 5 pg 92 I 07 construction process

pg 93 I 06 the construction team


became a social event, as everyone sat in conversation completing different phases of its making

seating and bucket height walls were built with extra brick and decorated with different patterns by the community.

visits the site to discuss the activities on site and provincial involement in the project co-ordination

clearing the site

reed cutting ,cleaning and tying

Day 13

the benches were a product of found materials and surplus concrete. After casting, inspired by the work of antoni Gaudi they became sculptural.

monday _24 Oct

site visit

making the reedscreens correcting casting

brick waterpoint

Day 13

and temporary earth mounds flooded the site.It did however reveal the most vulnerable parts of the site. Subsequently, new work in the form of a grass berm in front of the hall was initiated.

monday _24 Oct plastering of benches

Day 13

monday _24 Oct site floods

changes to site contours

joburg city council

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


On the first day of week 6 we received the first of the paving bricks. River sand was also delivered and paving could commence. The tree rings were laid out, and timber seating for the benches was fixed into place. The reed screens and the post box counter were finished. The concrete floor was tiled, and the area in front of the community hall was planted with grass. The post boxes got their final paint. The site was cleared and cleaned for Saturday’s crit.

construction week 6 pg 96 I 07 construction process

pg 97 I 06 the construction team


The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

final day of construction

painting postbox The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

seating for the benches The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

a little bit of colour

the final group photo

The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

tree planting

skills transfer and volunteers

tuesday 16 Nov

tree planting

The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes

laying of tiles

logistics and critical paths

flatbed truck

Day 31_

elled and paving begins

Day 31_16tuesday Nov

tree planting

Day 13_

monday 24 Oct

riversand arrives is lev-

the need of a

a little bit of colour The trees are all supplemented with a short piece of piping found on site to allow for water access straight to the roots and the trees around the future water point having specially designed drainage pipes from the water stand’s catchment area

[excerpts from the construction process ] www.slovo-park.blogspot.com


transforming details

08

[earthworks/foundation/slab/screens/site furniture/post boxes/site landscaping/paving]

This process demonstrates how certain elements within the project ,changed by material availability, the clients requirements, the perspective of the builder and the implications of unforseen circumstances, that required a creative outlook during this process.. The outputs of participation and eventual implicit understandingare expressed in the changes in these details. The details are discussed along the crticical path along which they were initiated


A new concrete slab was needed to replace the existing slab that was demolished, and serving as an unstable substructure for the existing superstructure. Due to lack of funding this had to be undertaken in a resource efficient manner.

Materiality

Defined by convention, the concrete slab and initial raft foundations, of 15 Mpa concrete as per availability. The joints and the character of the surface , were wood floated and prepared for tiling

Fig. Image. Original Intention. Author 2010 Concrete Casting Plan.jpg

Edge

In the case of the concrete footing and the the slab, the setting out of the footing and its manner of construction influenced the height and character of the space or plinth defining the interior space. In this case, the concern was what the edges were made of , as an implication of what they became. The shuttering had to be resource efficient and in this case the first day casting provided the edge for the second day casting. ( Fig REf )The masonry foundation wall acted as permanent shuttering

Fig. Image. Resultant Trecnch and Foundation. Author 2010

Concrete Casting Plan.jpg

Miscommunication

Infill

The masonry foundation wall provided a permanent edge definition and shuttering, for the infill of the slab, where jointing and finishes were transformed by the community themselves FIg. Image. FInal Product. Author 2010

Fig. Photograph. On site design of Structural Wall. Author 2010

Concrete Casting Plan.jpg

Due to miscommunication in our original drawing the community builders thought the existing structure was being re-invented as the large hall and didn’t not understand that the big hall was to be where the paving is, and as such assumed we would be building brick walls on the raft foundations, they then dug the trenches too deep for a raft resulting in a need for extra concrete for a strip foundation for the whole perimeter.

details 1 foundations and slab pg 102 I 08 transforming details

pg 103 I 08 transforming details


ment for fixing between the screens

The intention of the reed screeens was to provide an edge and define enclosed space, as cheaply as possible and to protect the space from the harsh western and eaatern light in the mornings and afternoon.

an additional peg to the suppo

did not crack

fixing to existing structure

Materiality

The material nature of the surface elements were determined, by availible materials, namely the locally availible reeds at the two adjacent rivers, light,security and lightness of structure, as to not compromise the sxisiting structure.

fixing to floor

Edge

The edge comprmised of the welding of steel sections, in apanels, that could be used and reused in the future as cladinng elelementsa dn strcutural support for more permanent materials. Her the edge is a temporarl one, expressed and informed by its fixing.

Infill

Reed was chosen as a freely avaible, easily replaceable material that , would not be stolen in oppeosition of more “valued materails such as zinc

PB020075.JPG

Fixing of Screen to Existing Structure

The initial details for the reed screens were informed by an asusmed availibility of square tubing, and an assumption that the existing structure would be stable and not warped

(above)Fig. Photograph. Steelwork. Author 2010 (opposite). Photograph. Steel Frame. Author 2010

details 2 reed screens pg 104 I 08 transforming details

pg 105 I 08 transforming details


Opposition to Reed Screens

There was initial opposition to the reed screens by the community, because of its lack of permanence. When a prototype was completed opinions changed. There was also a legend about a three eyed snake that lives in the banks of the streams

The Completion of the Reed Screens

The completion of the reed screens involved a large group of community members. Almost daily a group went to the stream to cut reeds, using local trucks to deliver to site. A group of ladies cleaned the reeds, while another team cut and another team assembled and tied them to the existing structure. At one stage the community hall was filled with over twenty people working hard to complete that one task. On site , the community chose how they would like to finish of the reeds, adding additional elements that abutted the steel columns

Fig. Photograph. Preparing the Reeds. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Volunteer. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. The Reed Screen Ladies. Author 2010

pg 106 I 08 transforming details

pg 107 I 08 transforming details


The wall was intended to block out strong north western gusts that would make the community centre an uninhabitable space, especially as a venue for community meetings 004 bw.jpg

Materiality

Originally intended to be made of a temporary material, and of possible fibrecement, the donation of bricks from the nearby Lawley Factory Meant that a more Permanent solution could be used.

Edge

The wall defines space, and acts as a cornerstone for future development phases as proposed by the master plan

Infill

In this case, edge wa infill, but it successfully defined a room.

Fig. Photograph. Structural Wind Break . Author 2010

On Site Design

The final detail tries to look at how light can be manipulated and the highlight the wall as a feature of the community centre, with minimal material difficulty and speacialized labour Fig. Image. Correction to wall and roof junction. Author 2010 Fig. Image. Original Wall Detail. Author 2010 Fig. Image. Adjusted Wall Detail. Author 2010

details 3 structural wall pg 108 I 08 transforming details

pg 109 I 08 transforming details


Creating a clear and defined water point where the community could easily access, and that becomes a social space in the central meeting space.

Materiality

phase 1

phase2

The materiality of the water point was informed by the availability of materials. Security and robustness, from vandalization. It was also informed by the ergonomics of people collecting water.

PB020183.JPG

Edge

The edge was expressed and defined as a permanent and mass element, to create an outdoor room. This provided a conceptual framework, where the room, the infill was interpreted and moulded by the community Infill The basic edges provided by L-Shaped benches, was filled and interpreted by Philemon, Slovo Park’s plumber and his apprentice Arthur. The form that the water point took form, was free of rules set by the design, and instead grew organically from the masonry edges

phase 3

Plumbing of Water Point

The final water point detail was a result of available material, and drainage details proposed by the community. (above). Fig. Photograph. Philemon and Arthur. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Plumbing Connection. Author 2010

details 4 waterpoint pg 110 I 08 transforming details

pg 111 I 08 transforming details


The paving was meant to define a civic space within the community and create a surface that could easily be removed and replaced when more permanent buildings become part of the site

option 1

option 2

option 3

Materiality

The extent of work determined by sponsorship. The paving of the meeting area became an iterative process of materials available and contingencies incase the sponsorship fell through.

Edge

The edge of the paving was defined by a brick on edge and concrete blinding, which at minimum would define a space which the community could infill later. This in fact happened.

Infill

option 4

Storm Water Problems

A major problem on site and similar sites other than Slovo is storm water and the uneven terrain of the roads. A grading contractor was necessary to alleviate this problem, an expensive exercise, with which if not donated, would not have been possible

Even the broken bricks were used to create decorative patterns within the defined edge

details 5 landscape paving edges pg 112 I 08 transforming details

pg 113 I 08 transforming details


The benches were used to define the edge of the meeting area and create outdoor .

phase 1

Materiality

phase2

The design of the benches happened on site, with the slow accrual of waste material and donated items. Steel frames concrete, timber from pellet boxes and the shelves from the postboxes were the primary materials.

Edge the elements themselves defined spatial boundaries

Infill

Timber seating can be easily replaced as better materials are sourced or when the life cyclc of the material reaaches its completion.

phase 3

Associated Problems with Benches

Problems encountered with the construction of the benches were the ......

details 5 landscape furniture pg 114 I 08 transforming details

pg 115 I 08 transforming details


The benches were used to define the edge of the meeting area and create outdoor .

phase 1

Materiality

The design of the benches happened on site, with the slow accrual of waste material and donated items. Steel frames concrete, timber from pellet boxes and the shelves from the postboxes were the primary materials.

Edge the elements themselves defined spatial boundaries

Infill

Timber seating can be easily replaced as better materials are sourced or when the life cycle of the material reaches its completion.

phase2

A solution to site flooding

An earth berm filled on the western edge of the community hall, filled a depression that continuously flooded and dammed water against the structure. The new grass seating area shaded in the future by stinkwood trees, was a solution and barrier to preventing the ingress of water on site.

details landscape vegetation pg 116 I 08 transforming details

pg 117 I 08 transforming details


The little resources available on site, allowed opportunity to reuse the otherwise derelict postboxes, which stood rusted and unusable.

Materiality

The postboxes were constructed of flat steel sheets sections and sturdy postboxes seam welded to the main structure. As a result of of this power tools were constantly needed, priming was essential together with the removal of dangerous edges. Sourcing replacement flat sheet proved a difficult exercise.

Edge

The small structures themselves played a crucial role in defining the edges of the meeting space and creating an outdoor room. Infill Infill within the postboxes was not important but rather the reuse of the postbox shelving and collapsible eaves of the postboxes, to make it adaptable for a variety of uses. It eventually became a Bar and DJ Booth.

Working with what you have

This energy intensive and time intensive element o fthe project eventually made use of the potentials of the structure as it stood. The addition of a plywood counter and usie of the existing adjustable eaves ,provided security for its future purpose as a spaza shop,bar, or DJ booth for community events

details postboxes pg 118 I 08 transforming details

pg 119 I 08 transforming details


Part 3

a process of reflection

During this process , lessons were learnt, opinons exchanged, skills transferred.These lessons were not confined to the role of the architect-builder-client relationship but as actors in the built environment, but included the roles that different people had to assume at different stages of the project.The reflection on the project allows a critical evaluation of scope of work achieved and the manner it was achieved.


final product

09

[earthworks/foundation/slab/screens/site furniture/post boxes/site landscaping/paving]

This process demonstrates how certain elements within the project ,changed by material availability, the clients requirements, the perspective of the builder and the implications of unforeseen circumstances, that required a creative outlook during this process.. The outputs of participation and eventual implicit understanding are expressed in the changes in these details. The details are discussed along the critical path along which they were initiated


Before

After

Before

After

final product before and after pg 124 I 09 final product

pg 125 I 09 final product


pg 126 I 09 final product

pg 127 I 09 final product


pg 128 I 09 final product

pg 129 I 09 final product


pg 130 I 09 final product

pg 131 I 09 final product


Official Opening 20 November 2010

The official opening of Slovo Hall coincided with the honours architecture exam. The site was cleaned and prepared the night before and final touches were made to the project. A community meeting was held on that day.Various guests were invited to the opening including FEDUP, Shack Dwellers International, the DA Ward Councillor, The founder of Slovo Park, the local municipality, the electricity campaign,representatives of the churches and sponsors. During the various speeches people suggested ways in which they hoped the new community centre could be used.

Celebrations

The rest of the day was filled with celebrations and first formal use of the meeting space as a place for the community.

33 Community meeting held on the 20 November 2010. [Photograph. Author 2010]

final product handover pg 132 I 09 final product

pg 133 I 09 final product


Community Meeting

During the community meeting the UP students and community had an opportunity to convey their feelings about the six month interaction and to identify and suggest possible ways forward, in terms of the communities needs.The intentions of the final product were discussed. As previously mentioned,the programme of a meeting space was borne while presenting the research work to the community and only having an open road intersections and a microphone to communicate findings and interact with the community. There was no shade, no formal structure and no sense of place, but the meeting was happening anyway. The team used this discovery as strong design catalyst for the future intervention and its subsequent phased development.

Assesing the Meeting Space

The final hand over day was not only intended to be the formal ceremony of completion but the first real test run of the newly completed meeting space. The bright sun and light north easterly breeze provided the site with its first functional day as working hub of community inter activity. Several meetings were planned for the day, the first being the University of Pretoria’s final examination of the work completed. This was swiftly followed by the formal opening of the center, a presentation by the Housing Forum leader Mahau, a discussion of the future servicing of Slovo in regard to water and electricity a presentation by the Political handler of the area and finally a formal community thank you for the building team that culminated instead of a polite round of applause but a 5 minute eruption of dancing and truly south African ululation. The remainder of the day was spent enjoying donated meals, drinks and a community DJ booth that captured the

pg 134 I 09 final product

pg 135 I 09 final product


Observing Successes and Failures

From a designers point of view it was interesting to see how the spaces and elements drawn up on paper were now animated by different people. The way people interacted with the project also spoke of its successes and possible points of improvement. A very successful element was the conversion of the postboxes into a kiosk and spaza shop. During the celebrations the serving counter acted as a DJ Booth and Bar and the meeting space as a dance floor. The other postbox became a storage room for building materials and for elements that the community used during the events. The benches along the dges were well used and the lawn infront of the hall provided a comfortable space for people to sit under Umbrellas while still being part of the meeting. In the future that lawn will be shaded by the the stinkwood trees defining its edge.

Response from the Community

The community found the most value and use of the project through the definition of a public space. Since the handover the hall and its outdoor area have been used for public viewing of soccer games, community christmas celebrations on the 16th of December, amongst other community meetings and initiatives. With the departure of the students on site, the community is already mobilizing effort to begin the more permanent structures which will be on site ,including a policing forum, crèche and clinic.

Bollards became seating, plinths became seating, the idea of edge came into full fruition.

Fig. Photograph. Handover Party, 20 November 2010. Author 2010

Fig. Photograph. Bar for Public Events. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. Use of Public Seating. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph.Use of New Waterpoint. Author 2010 Fig. Photograph. DJ in Refubished Postbox. Author 2010

final product successes and failures pg 136 I 09 final product

pg 137 I 09 final product


The Final Product

As the project drew to an end the UP team began to realise that the building itself was not the product constructed. The building of the connections between the community members and the relationships constructed between the people of Slovo Park and its neighbouring communities were the valued result of the 8 weeks on site The physically manifested structure was simply the vessel that housed this process. The University of Pretoria students came to see that in the end they did not share the building itself with the people of Slovo, but instead were partial owners in the journey of understanding both sides which the project embarked.

Fig. Photograph. Slovo Hall. Author 2010

pg 138 I 09 final product

pg 139 I 09 final product


The Future of the Slovo Park Project

10

[future plans/workshops/participation]

The future of the Slovo Park Project will continue with the immediate handing over of the project , and the commencement of the next phase of development as suggested by the students. The role of architecture in this process is assessed and evaluated, as a catalyst for future activities.


Participation, Workshops and Programmes

Built Phases

The future of the Slovo Park Project will continue with the immediate handing over of the project , and the commencement of the next phase of development as suggested by the students. The role of architecture in this process is assessed and evaluated, as a catalyst for future activities

The organisation and commitment demonstrated by the community of Slovo Park during the project bodes well for the future of the community and the project itself.

Before the project was even completed , ownership of the various spaces had already begun. The post boxes, were used as a kiosk for serving lunches, and painted as desired. This serves as an example of how the client designer relationship differs in participation projects. The project transformed from the vision of a designer, to the shared vision of the community, to the communities own future vision for Slovo Park

1

2

3

During the procurement phase of the project monetary funding was difficult to obtain. Material donation was far easier and provided by many of the business around and within Slovo Park.

Already through the website and links established with other Universities and NGO’s such as the University of Witwaterstrand and Shack Dwellers International (SDI) communication lines have been established to further the involvement of academic and non-governmental bodies towards the development of Slovo Park. The University of Pretoria will retain its role at an advisory level and aid where possible with future development plans, as well as educational programmes and workshops planned for future education around such projects and initiatives.

4

These long term relationships will be the key factor in allowing the people of Slovo to build and grow their community centre as well as linking themselves to better employment relations and possible partnerships in the future.

1

The act of engaging these business and opening dialogue between the community and them was one of the most crucial processes during the build.

2 5

3 4 5 6 ( Top right). Fig. Image. Future Development Phases. authoor 2010. ( Right ). Fig. Image. Site Plan Future Development Phase site plan. Author 2010

1. New Clinic 2.Playground and Creche 3.Phase A- Slovo Hall 4. Extension to Slovo Hall 5. Informal meeting Space 6.Community Notice Wall 7. Soccer Field

6

Although the team did not understand fully the importance of these relationships at the beginning of the process , it soon became very clear that beyond the built product the relationships fostered between the community members themselves and the neighbouring communities was immeasurably important

future plans pg 142 I 10 the future of the slovo park project

pg 143 I 10 the future of the slovo park project


Lessons Learnt

11

[lessons learnt /team experiences/conclusions]

The lessons learnt during this process could not possibly be summed up in two pages .What follows are lessons both practical, life enduring and even the frivolous and light hearted of was an incredibly enriching experience


1. The recession makes sponsorship of these projects difficult 2. People are eager to get involved in a good project that is already “on the go”; the problem is finding “investors” before you really have any tangible material for the proposal 3. Emails to prospective investors, have to be well formulated documents The Six Week Goal of the project, made initial correspondence organized and unprofessional 4. Have one person in charge of funding to keep records of money and materials received. 5. All members on the team should send out the basic information pack to any potential sponsors/ companies/individuals 6. Phone the company. Ask who is responsible for funding and/or sponsorship, often bigger companies have a separate department dealing with social responsibility and BEE compliance. 7.If the person in the funding/social responsibility department if not immediately available ask for an email address. Ask for an email address of the secretary/PA and ask if it is ok to CC them in the email. Ask them to forward the email to the person you are trying to reach 8.Keep calling back, persistence is the key. It helps when the per son you are speaking too has had an opportunity to look at the website or read the email sent previously.

lessons learnt pg 146 I 11 lessons learnt

11.Call back when you say you will. 12.Ask the company/individual/sponsor if they could deliver the material to site. 14.Acquire materials long before they are to be used on site. Certain elements within the project became expensive as a result of the last minute purchasing of materialls and fixers. 15.Go with the community leaders too the businesses in the immediate area. They are often willing to support on a short term day to day basis, i.e. some bricks, some food, some materials. 16. Understand that people will make empty promises to please you at that given time 17. Do your research on the company and ask for something specific. 18. While working on site during the Slovo Park project we learned not to think we already know what needs to be known. A lot can be learned from communities through participation. The project was intensely participatory, small in scale, problem based,and based on achievable actions. Feedback back and forth was encouraged and local knowledge and skills were used. On site we couldn’t always wait for complete data to get going. 19. Incremental design. The starting points rather than end product were important. Results were quick and visible.

20. The intervention resulted in an incremental design, starting small rather than once off. The starting points rather than end product were important. Results were quick and visible. 21. One of the key conditions to effective participation is strong local organisation within the community which is dominant in Slovo Park. The community self organises in response to need, from the bottom up. We worked within this order and within the framework the community set for themselves. 22. Successful participation hinges on good communication, it involves listening and being understood as one who wants to listen. Wait for gaps and silences. It is usually in these silences that valuable lessons are learnt. Non-verbal communication is of great importance, especially to prevent miscommunication. 23. As professionals we should be very aware of how we communicate. We can unwitingly patronise in our language and in our assumptions. Ego’s can get in the way,and result in; ‘What we think is most important’. Always organise complex infomation in simple and understandable ways. Less is more in the way we speak,listen, plan, and implement. 24. As principal actors, the developers and the inhabitants have conflicting agendas and diverging interests,remembering Robert Chamber’s question (Hamdi 2004), ‘whose reality counts?’ the long term inhabitant of the informal settlement or of that of visitor/ develo pment professional?

29.Energy The designer you have energy is a resource. The community volunteers’ energy is a more valuable resource. These should be used very carefully and understood on a daily basis as well as over the project life cycle.

38. Language The biggest gap in the project has been the language barrier. At least one local language of the 15 in Slovo needed to be learnt.

48. Prototypes work well as a starting point for communicating ideas and intention. On site the majority of the projects were prototypes that transformed on site, based on material availability, skill and the preference of the builder and client.

42.Establish a formal design intent early 30. Strategy The energies of the people and available materials need to be strategized on day to day basis and again over the project life cycle. 31. Materials vs. Cost.High energy finishes don’t work on these sites. Items that require more than one transport option don’t work. 32. Choose materials that come from the same transport option. 33. Most crucial resource. Independent building components. The architectural elements should exist in isolation of each other and not be dependent on each other. This applies to the techniques and process on site. These should all be interdependent. 36. Strategic public participation. Although it was almost impossible to foresee what was going to be needed 37. Meals. The time spent around lunch time meals is crucial to the project. The age old action of sharing a meal with someone does more in bringing people to together than any on- site activity.

39.Start trying to get funding at least 6 months prior to starting a project 40.If you start something finish it. 41. Logistics of building materials will always be an issue and cost in community projects 42.You have to be very clear about what you want, when you want it, and the requirements you need , before the task can be performed. 43. If you are relying on external stakeholders, make sure to get their commitments in writing. The same applies to sponsorship. 44 Always have a contingency plan, for elements of the project you know are beyond your control. 45. Try not to make the critical path of the project dependent on a subcontractor or external stakeholder. 46. Set out frameworks,.To get work done. 47. Be open to the fact that your design will change on site

49. Mistakes are an opportunity for real design work: solving a problem. 50. You don’t have to buy

additional mate-

rial to complete the project, in contexts that can

easily source much more appropriate alternatives.

51. Your aptitude and strengths are different to other members in the team. Acknowledge that ,and apply it in places where it works. 52. Team members who had a longer experience in the field, prior to the project, coped better with the real life dynamics of site. The rest learnt and caught up in a short time. 53. Drawing on site is often very necessary to communicate ideas and changing details. 54. 3D drawings are essential for communication, and also fully understand the complexity of what you are implying. 55. Complicated notes on drawings are not necessary. People didn’t read on site. They looked. The implicit and non-verbal had more value than the verbal. 56.Dont make promises you can’t keep

pg 147 I 11 lessons learnt


Jhono Bennett

Mlilo

From working in an office to becoming a student again, this year has been dominated by a large scale changes in process and preconceived ideas. This has been most obvious working in Slovo Park, where the preconceived notions held for so long have slowly been dissolved in what can only be described as a true mixture of architecture through social education. Working at Slovo Park has been filled with the alternative: Alternative lessons, alternative process alternative outcomes. Each day has presented its own challenges and often the scale of these challenges was equal to the consequent the reward. The merits from working hand in hand with those community members who are the game changers in their community has been the single most valuable lesson in my architectural career. Most of the decisions made during the design process were based on very thin ideas of what’s really going on.

Claudia Filipe

Jacqueline Casson

Madam

The last twelve weeks in Slovo have been a very valuable experience in building practice, design through process and restriction of material as well as group dynamics within our group of students and within the greater slovo park construction team. as the project manager I gained a special type of insight by working closely with the community leaders with a shared goal. The challenges were obviously time, scope and materials but the challenges we did not foresee were catering, perception and motivation. Where we knew if there was one day without either a material arrival or a noticeable progression on site, there would be less workers the next day. Working in Slovo is like building a project with my father, except in Slovo there are 12 old men with set ways of doing things whose opinions are very difficult to manipulate. They also don’t agree with each other half the time so it becomes a dimplomatic mission. As we are different we are the same.

Claudi

The project was a massive learning curve in all aspects. The short term meant that a lot of our energy, was spent trying to market the project and get funding. The fast pace of the construction, meant that it was often difficult to keep up with priorities which often changed at a moments notice. We learnt which drawings were essential, the importance and logic behind a correctly annotated drawing that communicates well, and follows the practical construction sequence, particularly the process of setting out, how to be resourceful and adapt quickly to circumstances beyond our control The process and logistics between the different actors in creating a built project, and the time involved in planning and executing. The interaction with the community of Slovo Park, the majority skilled tradesman in the built environment allowed me to understand who are the receivers, and implementing agents of our ideas. What we appreciate most is the patience in which,Slovo Park, allowed us to learn.

Mienke Hattingh

Mienki

Driving to Eldorado Park to pick up the generator, chatting away with Mahau. I realized how my perception of this place and its people has dramatically changed in the last four months. What surprised me most about the project was the time heart and effort so many individuals have put into this project to make it a reality. Long hours, heat, wind, rain, and cold rain. These guys stood through it all. The dedication and ownership shown through the project is outstanding. It was a tough project. Specifically in the given time frame. Tears, dust, frustration. But new understanding of people. Both the people of Slovo Park and also ourselves. It was a humbling experience, a realization of my own naivety and many questions on my position as an architect in the future.

Isabel Van Wyk

Shabella During the participation stage the architect relinquishes some of his duties to the community and develops a different set of skills. Hamdi (2004) calls for “a kind of professional artistry which enables us to improvise and be informed”, working between order and chaos. For a development to be socially sustainable it has to be adaptable to the users’ needs and grow with the grassroot social structures that are already in place. Through community participation the architect can determine the needs and find the right balance between the creativity of emergence (growth) and the stability of design. Within the public housing sector and the participatory process no set rules or method exist. Circumstances alter projects, context differ. If a simple and successful approach to social housing existed it would have been identified by now. The architect’s biggest virtue is to adapt to each context and continue the learning process.

Naledi Ntosai

Leader

I have learnt a lot from the project as I did not know what was meant the word project itself, when we first started the area was a mess but we managed to turn it into a beauty, what I have also realized is the fact most of the community have a passion for the area which they live on,.I have also realized that people have sacrificed a lot for the project as they on daily basis woke for the project and not seeking an employment but to improve their area. I have seen that people like nice things. The student also managed to do their best to encourage us, whether by lifting spades and working as hard as we did .Everyone did the bit they had to do when they were suppose to. What encouraged us even more was the fact that the students also managed to organize the things which we had seen for the first in the settlement, like small graders which helped to level the area, paving, tiles and primers.etc.

Mohau Melani

Leader

For me being able to design a working program and keeping to the timeframes was one the most valuable lesson learnt from the project. Being able to identify the resources within the community and outside of the community and tapping into them was also something for one to write home about. A Rememberable day was the day which the paving was supposed to arrive at our site at 08:00am, but it arrived late as there was a delay with the transport, when it finally arrived at about 22:00pm there was no one on the site to help offload.We had forgotten of the community because of the pressure faced. We started phoning around the shops and in no time the site was full with the people. It took about 20-30 people 3 hours to offload, with many bricks being damaged and Mlilo (Jhono) had to sleep in the informal settlement. That was one of the key days which indicated the beauty of community participation

One other thing which we have managed to achieve after our skills audit was to building a working team for those not working, which at time when the times were trying they managed to come to work and work without complaining or if there were complains to put them outside the scope of what must be done. To encourage and sharpen the hunger to want to do more alive from the working team. To level the standard, we all ate the same food, the same plates and at the same time regardless where we came from. The major achievement was that of meeting our timeframes and deadlines the efforts put in the project is overwhelming. Our ability to fix each others mistakes and respond to challenges as when they arise. The fact that we were mostly young and willing to from each other, from the mistakes we have made and from the elders who were part of the project.

lessons team experience pg 148 I 11 lessons learnt

pg 149 I 11 lessons learnt


Achieving Project Goals The intention of the project was to provide a civic meeting space, and space for future development , with the very little resources that were available and within the capacity of the students and the time constraints of the project. An extract from Nabeel Hamdi’ss Placemakers Guide to Community Building (2010) accurately captures the intention and the affects of the Slovo Park Project, which ,with hope ,will progress into the future.

“ We were like urban acupuncturists looking for interventions that could release the energy latent in place, and with it, the capacity to self improve or recover.... we would be looking to get something started quickly and visibly, a catalyst or series of catalysts,with immediate,practical impact to generate interest and mobilize effort.� ( Hamdi,2010)

lessons final remarks pg 150 I 11 lessons learnt

pg 151 I 11 lessons learnt


Appendices

12

[appendices /list of figures/references]


Appendix 1 Site Plan and Elevation


Appendix 2 Structural Wall Detail

Appendix 3 Waterpoint Detail


Appendix 3 Slovo Hall Upgrade

Appendix 4 Paving Layout


Addendum 5 Waterpoint Detail

Addendum 6 Structural Wall Detail


List of Figures

www.slovo-park.blogspot.com

pg 162 I 12 appendices

Aerial photograph. Slovo Park. City of Johannesburg 2006 12 Photograph: Frank Mapara ( Slovo Park) and Linda Matgatbutlane ( University of Pretoria). Author 2010 13 Fig1.Tools used during the Project 14 The range of research methods described adjacent are aimed at revealing the complexity and intangible meaning of place that is difficult to ascertain, from an objective reading of space. 14 (above)Image.Network of partciapants at different levels.Author 2010 16 (left)Photograph: Diverse Group of Participants .Author 2010 17 Fig. Objective mapping of different elements of urban space. Author 2010 22 Photograph. Gateway into Eldorado Park Cemetery. Author 2010 23 Image. Axonemetric Streetscape of Frank Mapara Street with associated survey data. Author 2010 25 Fig. Photomontage. Portion of Frank Mapara Street South. Author 2010 26 Fig. Photomontage. Portion of Frank Mapara Street South. Author 2010 26 Fig. Photomontage. Portion of Frank Mapara Street North. Author 2010 26 ( Top Right )Fig. Image. Documentation of 341 Mapara Street.. Author 2010 28 ( Bottom Left to right) 28 Fig.Photograph.Detail of window. Author 2010 28 Fig.Photograph. Roof Anchoring and Waterproofing. 28 Fig. Photograph. Sill Detail. Author 2010 28 ( Top Left). Fig. Documentation of 684 Mapara Street. 29 ( From right to left ). 29 Fig. Photograph. Children Measuring their home. Author 2010 29 Fig. Photograph. Detail of IBR sheeting. Author 2010 29 Fig. Photograph. Detail of Entry Door. Author 2010 29 ( Top Right ). Fig. Image.Documentaion of 320 Mapara Street.Author 2010 30 ( Bottom left to right). Fig. Photograph. Threshold detail. Author 2010. 30 Fig. Photograph.Interior of kitchen. Author 2010.Fig. Photograph. Yard. Author 2010. 30 ( Top Left ). Fig. Image. Documentation of 696 Mapara Street. Author 2010 31 ( Bottom Left to Right ). Fig. Photograph. Tenant. Author 2010. 31 Fig. Photograph. Tool Shed and Material Storage. Author 2010. 31 Fig. Photograph. Shack interior. Author 2010 31 (right). Photograph.Community Mapping Process.Author 2010.Author 2010. 32 (top left). Photograph. Carin Combrinck explains the mapping process to a group of volunteers. Author 2010 33 (middle).Photograph. Community Leader Mohau Melani.Author 2010 33 (bottom). Photograph.Locating different activities within Slovo Park 33 (left) Image.Macro Community map.png 33 Fig. Photograph. Product of local participative mapping. Author 2010 34 Fig. Image. Proposed Student Urban Framework. Author 2010 35 Fig. Photograph. Community Meeting July 2010. Author 2010 38 ( Top Left)Fig.Photograph. Jacquiline Casson explains the project. Author 2010 39 ( Bottom left to right)Fig. Photograph.Community Meeting. Author 2010 39 Fig. Photograph.Community Leadership reviewing the Work. Author 2010 39 Fig.Photograph. Community Reviewing the work 39 ( Right)Fig. Image. Existing Site Condition. Author 2010 42 (Opposite)Fig. Image. Site Analysis Function Diagram. Author 2010 42 (Right)Fig. Photograph. Existing Community Hall.Author 2010 43 Fig. Photograph. Existing Pit Latrine.Author 2010 43 Fig. Photograph. Existing Post Boxes. Author 2010 43 Fig. Photograph. Presentation of the Project to the Community. Author 2010)) 47 Fig . Photograph. The construction process banner was used to communicated graphically the different phases of the project. Author 2010 47 Fig . Site Model of Built intervention. Author 2010 47 Fig. Photograph Marco voices his concern over some of the project elements in the community meeting. . Author 2010 48

Fig x. Photograph. From left: Claudia Filipe (UP), Jaqueline Casson ( UP), Mohau Melani,Buccanneer Surname,Dan Surname , Naledi Surname, Sam Motsamai, Mapho Surname, Unkown, Patricia, happy 54 Fig. Photograph. Project Planning Meeting September 2010. Author 2010 56 Fig. Photograph. Reuse of post box numbers in landscaping elements.Author 2010 58 Fig. Graph: Approximate monetary value of project elements. Author 2010 59 Fig. Photograph. Delivery of sponsored steel. Author 2010 61 Fig. Image. Cash Donations. Author 2010 61 Fig. Image main means of communictation for funding and public participation. Author 2010 62 Fig. Image. Shop Drawings and Grading Drawings for professional. Author 2010 63 Fig. Image. 3d Drawings most effective on Site. Author 2010 63 Fig. Photograph: Details resolved on site without drawings. Author 2010 63 Fig. Photograph: On Site Drawings of Reed Screen Fixing. Author 2010 63 Photograph. Group Portrats. Author 2010 66 Fig. Photograph. Preparing the Reeds. Author 2010 107 Fig. Photograph. Volunteer. Author 2010 107 Fig. Photograph. The Reed Screen Ladies. Author 2010 107 33 Community meeting held on the 20 November 2010. [Photograph. Author 2010] 132 Fig. Photograph. Handover Party, 20 November 2010. Author 2010 138 Fig. Photograph. Bar for Public Events. Author 2010 139 Fig. Photograph. Use of Public Seating. Author 2010 139 Fig. Photograph.Use of New Waterpoint. Author 2010 139 Fig. Photograph. DJ in Refubished Postbox. Author 2010 139 ( Top right). Fig. Image. Future Development Phases. authoor 2010. 142 ( Right ). Fig. Image. Site Plan Future Development Phase site plan. Author 2010 142

References

Hamdi, N.2010. Placemakers Guide to Community Building Natakusa. 2005. Slovo Park History ( Draft Version)

pg 163 I 12 appendices

Profile for 1to1 - Agency of Engagement

Slovo Park Project 2010  

In 2010 a group of Students began a research project with a developing community in Soweto South. This project quickly became something much...

Slovo Park Project 2010  

In 2010 a group of Students began a research project with a developing community in Soweto South. This project quickly became something much...

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