Page 1

Half Marathon Calendar

The End of Pain?

23

Cutting-Edge Cures for Chronic Injuries

BEST NEW SHOES & Road-Tested 1 p7 d e w Revie

MIND+ BODY Special

Run Strong, Stay Healthy, and…

Eat Green for Energy The Plants That Power Scott Jurek’s Ultra Endurance Beginners

It’s Time to Run Your First Race!

Open Flap

Traci Copeland is a runner, yogi, and personal trainer.


13.1 Miles to the Party! 12 Fast, Scenic Races That Finish with Pancakes, Craft Beer, Jambalaya, and More

An Easier Way to Run Hard (It May Be More Effective, Too)

‌Find Balance 8 Yoga Poses That Will Make You Fitter, Faster, and Happier

Eat My Dust, Ewok Feeling the Force at Disney By Marc Parent


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WARMUP CONTENTS

MARCH 2017

RAVE RUN

EDITOR’S LETTER

THE LOOP

8

10

13

COV E R S T Y L I N G B Y A R GY KO U T S OT H A N AS I S ; H A I R A N D M A K E U P B Y AS H L E Y B O U R D O N F O R C E L E S T I N E AG E N C Y; T H I S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y ( S H O E S ); N I C K F E R R A R I ( BAC KG R O U N D S )

71

SPRING SHOE GUIDE We put the latest models through grueling tests on the road and in the lab, and found 23 pairs that lead the pack. BY JEFF DENGATE AND MARTYN SHORTEN, PH.D.

ON THE COVER Half Marathon Calendar ................86 The End of Pain?............................50 Run Strong, Stay Healthy ...............44 Time for Your First Run...................30 Eat Green for Energy .....................38 An Easier Way to Run Hard ............28 Eat My Dust, Ewok ........................58 Find Balance..................................44 Cover shot by Alex Aristei in Malibu, CA. Clothing: C9 Champion tank, GapFit sports bra, Vimmia compression shorts, Apple Watch Nike+, and Nike Air Zoom Vomero 12 shoes.

50 SPECIAL REPORT

58

64 RUNNING THE WORLD

THE END OF PAIN?

HYPERSPACE RACE

BELFAST

Can’t find relief? These cutting-edge therapies can heal running injuries that haven’t responded to other treatments.

A short time ago in a state not far away, a father and son joined forces to run Disney—and smoke a few Stormtroopers along the way.

The best way to cap off a running tour of this historic Northern Ireland port city? Sipping a pint, of course.

BY BRAD STULBERG

BY MARC PARENT

BY NELL McSHANE WULFHART

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 3


CONTENTS

42

INSIDE STORY Follow our Instagram, @runnersworldmag, to see our story feed: a behind-the-scenes peek at photo shoots, races, and the latest happenings at RW HQ.

96 HUMAN RACE 15

PERSONAL BEST

Social Movement Run 215 is Philly’s rowdiest running club.

18

Road Scholar A runner’s guide to (mostly) sensible eating.

19

Intersection Usain Bolt becomes the face of a bubbly brand; Justin Bieber takes to the trails.

TRAINING

BY PETER SAGAL

20

Ask Miles Advice for the gassy.

21

Street Style Running shorts? So last century. Alison O’Brien runs in kilts.

22

24

What It Takes To… Run across America and break a 36-year-old world record. These Running Times Why the starting line matters more than the finish.

“My mother always believed that cooking doesn’t need to be complex and that you don’t need to be a great chef to cook delicious food,” the renowned vegan ultrarunner says. “She would always say, ‘If you can read, you can cook.’ I couldn’t agree more.”

28

Crush It, Then Cool It Start with the tough parts for a more enjoyable (and productive) run.

30

The Starting Line Never raced? Here are four reasons to sign up.

32

The Fast Lane Speed down hills without trashing your leg muscles.

33

Race Prep Short recovery makes some workouts more beneficial.

34

Next Level Stephanie Bruce returns to marathoning after having two kids.

36

Ask the Experts How can I fit in sufficient strength-training?

Runner by the Numbers Carolyn Mather has run more miles than any woman alive.

How to Go Green Scott Jurek believes you can eat more plants without ditching your burger.

40

Quick Bites Five recipes that will take your muffin tin to new levels.

41

Fridge Wisdom Load up on these foods for improved brain health.

42

Athlete’s Palate A new spin on pasta from Nate Appleman.

44

Stretch Your Limits Why yoga should be part of your routine.

46

The Body Shop Eight essential yoga poses for runners.

48

It’s in the Bag What to take with you to the gym and the best bags to carry it all in.

RACES+PLACES 86

2017 Half Marathon Guide Races that reward you in the tastiest ways imaginable.

I’M A RUNNER 96

Chuck Todd NBC’s political director and host of Meet the Press does analysis on the run.

4 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

MIND+BODY

“I think ObamaRomney was the most fit presidential election ever,” Todd says. “These are two guys that eat healthy, exercise every day, and look it.”

We’ve revamped our online Shoe Finder to help you pick the ideal pair of kicks. Start searching at runnersworld.com/ shoefinder.

FUEL 38

BY JONATHAN BEVERLY 25

PERFECT FIT

GEAR

YOU’VE GOT MAIL Keep in touch with our two new email newsletters: “The Warmup” for daily motivation, and “The Rundown” for the latest in training, nutrition, and injury-prevention advice. Subscribe at runnersworld.com/ newsletters.

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RAVE RUN

LUANG PRABANG, LAOS RUNNER Kaitlin VanDerBas THE EXPERIENCE Across the Nam Khan River near the center of this historic city, the bamboo bridge connects to wilderness trails, offering stunning views of the Luang Prabang Mountain Range and ancient temples. “It’s really quite a magical place and one of my favorite runs in Southeast Asia,” VanDerBas says. FAST FACTS The local community rebuilds the bamboo bridge each year when the water of the Nam Khan River is low in October. The bridge gets swept away when levels rise during the rainy season from May to September. HILL TRAIN Run up the steep steps to nearby Wat Xieng Thong, an ancient temple in Luang Prabang, for spectacular vistas of the city, especially during sunrise or sunset. LOCAL FARE Less than 10 minutes from the bamboo bridge, the city’s night market (open from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.) offers regional specialties like barbecued chicken and sticky rice. PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Boyle

FOR DIRECTIONS, RESOURCE INFORMATION, AND DOWNLOADABLE WALLPAPER IMAGES, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/ RAVERUN.


MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 9


EDITOR’S LETTER

THREE RABBITS AND A GUINEA PIG

10 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

Desisa, Tadese, and Kipchoge (left to right) at Nike HQ.

Check out Episode 33, and stay tuned for more Breaking2 segments in upcoming shows.

I’m one of our wear-testers, and I’ve really enjoyed training in these shoes (see page 71 for full reviews).

Adidas Supernova (long runs)

New Balance Fresh Foam Zante v3 (track workouts)

Brooks Launch 4 (tempo runs)

Nike’s Brett Kirby pricks my finger (again) for a few drops of blood to measure my lactate threshold.

at the Austin Marathon in 2007. It was the third 26.2 I’d ever run, and I was aiming for a 3:20. I was on pace, but hamstring cramps slowed me and I finished in 3:24. It was a nine-minute PR, and I felt like I’d stepped bravely onto the first rung of a ladder. Turns out I was already at the top. I made several other attempts, and all resulted in late-race flameouts that soured me on marathons altogether. My “best” was also my most recent: a 3:39 at Marine Corps in 2013. It was 14 minutes shy of a BQ. In six years of striving, I had gotten 10 minutes farther from my goal. I haven’t been very good at training for marathons, either. I’ve routinely gotten injured and, with three kids and a demanding job, have struggled to find time to put in 50-mile weeks, never mind the cross-training that’s more important with each passing birthday. But this time I’ll be following the same approach as the Breaking2 elites—a plan that adapts to how I respond to training, not one set in stone for 16 weeks. From the get-go, everything is far more data-intensive than I’m accustomed to. Which is how I ended up on that treadmill during a reporting visit to Nike headquarters on December 1. I was being tested for three key indicators of aerobic fitness: VO2 max (essentially the amount of oxygen one can deliver to working muscles during intense exercise); running economy (a measure of how much oxygen one’s body requires during intense exercise); and lactate threshold (the fastest pace one can sustain without falling to pieces). With a mask on my face that measured the oxygen and carbon dioxide I inhaled and exhaled, I ran a PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E SY O F N I K E /C L AY TO N C OT T E R E L L ( AT H L E T E S , F I N G E R P R I C K ) ; M AT T R A I N E Y ( S H O E S , 3)

you back in touch with yourself like a little of your own blood,” the novelist Harry Crews wrote. He was referring to fighting. But I thought of that line recently in Portland, Oregon, as I straddled a treadmill belt that sped between my feet like a class V rapid. Brett Kirby, the head physiologist in the Nike Sports Research Lab, pricked my finger to measure how close to the red line I had run my last two-minute interval. My head was pulsing—I hadn’t pushed this hard in some time. One more, I thought. Can I do one more? In what the company described as a “moonshot,” Nike announced in December that three of the athletes it sponsors—Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia, and Zersenay Tadese of Eritrea—will attempt to run a marathon in under two hours. The current world record is 2:02:57, run by Dennis Kimetto of Kenya at the Berlin Marathon in 2014. The goal of knocking three minutes off that is so audacious that Contributing Editor Alex Hutchinson, writing for RW two years ago, predicted that the two-hour barrier wouldn’t be bested for a half-century if run naturally, as part of a race. Yannis Pitsiladis, a physiologist with his own sub-two project and Ethiopia’s Kenenisa Bekele,

“NOTHING GETS

the second-fastest marathoner in history, as his star pupil, has set the year 2019 as his goal. Adidas, which sponsors Kimetto, is also engineering a sub-two attempt, but their timeline is unclear. Nike says it hopes that one or more of its runners will clock 1:59:59 just a few months from now. Is that crazy? In fairness, a team of 20 coaches, scientists, and product designers at Nike have been working secretly on the Breaking2 project for two years. As Alex wrote on our website (and as we detailed in The Runner’s World Show podcast), the team will try to pull multiple levers—training, nutrition and hydration, gear and apparel, and race environment and tactics— simultaneously, optimizing each to find those three minutes. Runner’s World was offered behind-the-scenes access to report on this chase in detail, and we’ll be publishing more about it online and in an upcoming issue. But to find out if any of the Manhattan Project–level thinking might benefit mere mortals, I’m embarking on a moonshot of my own: to qualify for the 2018 Boston Marathon. I’ve been chasing my BQ for a decade, and it hasn’t been an encouraging journey. The good news is my quest is now five minutes easier, because I’ll turn 50 this year. I’ll need to run 3:30 or faster to qualify—although because of BQ fever, qualifying and getting a bib for Boston are two different things. Last year, runners needed to run two minutes and nine seconds faster than their qualifying times to get in. So if I really want to know what it’s like to kick down Boylston Street on Patriots’ Day, I’ll likely need to run a 3:27. That may not sound audacious, but here’s the thing: I’m not very good at running marathons, at least not when I try to run them fast. My first legit BQ attempt was


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Step One: Testing aerobic capacity in Portland.

middle of winter here in eastern Pennsylvania, and I’d be content to stick with a few days of moderate running every week. I asked Tony Bignell, VP of Footwear Innovation at Nike, a similar “why” question about Breaking2. “At the end of the day, we just want to show it can be done,” he said. I guess it’s that simple for me, as well. After 10 years of futility, I want to show myself that I can, in fact, do it. My early training is going well. I’m running four days a week, up to 25 miles total, with one track workout and one “long” run of up to 10 miles. For the first time, I’m wearing a heart-rate monitor on every run and uploading the data from my watch to my computer as soon as I walk

DAVID WILLEY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

@DWilleyRW

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E SY O F N I K E /C L AY TO N COT T E R E L L

series of two-minute intervals that got progressively faster. After every torturous burst, I paused to recover, grabbing the handrails so Kirby could prick my finger and get a few drops of blood. On my sixth and last segment, the treadmill was going at a pace of 6:34 per mile. I could only muster one minute. This was not looking good. Neither was I. A week later, I got the cold, hard facts during a follow-up call with Kirby and my Nike coaches. My VO2 max was 47, a big drop from the only other test I’d ever taken, in 1994, when I registered a 68. Kirby said that given my age, 47 was “very good.” My running economy, however, was 215, which Kirby politely called “not problematic.” My lactate threshold correlated to a 7:25-per-mile pace. These “predictive analytics” suggest I can run a 3:50 marathon. How on earth will I manage a 3:30, let alone a 3:27? In part (I hope) by improving those metrics so I can reach a faster pace and hold it longer. Perhaps a better question is, why am I going to spend the next four months chasing a result I’m iffy to reach? It is the

in the door, poring over the numbers for glimmers of improvement while I down my postrun smoothie. More important, I’m enjoying the process. This quest has turned my mind in a different direction. My aging, aching body, too. I feel like I’m rekindling my enthusiasm for the marathon, but leavening it with patience and discipline and maturity I hope I’ve picked up along the way. So sometime in May, I’ll take another shot. I won’t have the benefit of pacesetters or a time-trial course—that’s probably how Kipchoge, Desisa, and Tadese will make their sub-two-hour attempt—but I’ll choose a fast race in a location likely to have good weather. I’ll also be wearing whatever speed-enhancing shoes and apparel Nike dreams up for its elite trio. Our quests are eerily similar: There’s a 2.4 percent gap between the world record and 1:59:59—and between my PR and 3:29:59. My primary goal is to BQ, but I also aim to discover and share how regular runners can model their own moonshots on the fastest marathoners in the world. Yes, I’m doing this for you, too. So wish me luck—I’ll need it. And stay tuned.


THE LOOP

THE INBOX

COVER INSPIRATION Congratulations, Josh LaJaunie (male cover contest winner, December 2016)! Truly incredible! It’s hard for others who don’t run to understand what running can do for you. Thank you for wanting to be a better you. Thank you for embracing the running community. And thank you for the love and passion you bring with you. We love you right back! RACHEL JOHNSON, VIA FACEBOOK

Wow. Eileen Moon (female winner), you have inspired me beyond belief. I am a fair-weather runner. Living in the Pacific Northwest, that means as we head into our sopping winter season, it gets more challenging. Thank you for the wake-up call! KORINE FUJIWARA, VIA FACEBOOK

GEAUX RUN Excellent piece on running in New Orleans (January/February 2017). I run everywhere in this city, from the lake to the river down to Vieux Carré for weekend morning coffee. There’s so much scenery and history. Thanks for recognizing a great running city!

The December 2016 covers, featuring LaJaunie (top) and Moon.

JOHN GOLDEN, VIA EMAIL

COULDN’T STOP THE PRESSES The USA Half Marathon Invitational, featured in our December Races+Places section, was canceled just over a month before the November 19 race day. The issue went to press before the race notified registrants of the cancellation.

Send comments about Runner’s World to letters@runnersworld.com. RUNNER’S WORLD reserves the right to

edit readers’ submissions. All readers’ submissions become the sole property of RUNNER’S WORLD and may be published in any medium and for any use worldwide.

Head shots that ran with Liz’s column, which started in 1986.

THE COVER

Cover model Traci Copeland, 37, often finishes workouts with her signature move—a handstand. “It’s kind of like the icing on the cake after a run,” she says. “It reverses bloodflow and is part of the whole mind-body experience.” The two-time marathoner and yoga instructor based in New York City is a former gymnast, so she had no problem holding a stag pose (pictured above and, in modified form, on the cover gatefold) for the photo shoot.

Nutritionist Liz Applegate, Ph.D., ends her 30-year tenure with Runner’s World this month (“Fridge Wisdom,” page 41). We wish her many more happy miles and meals to come!

THE STAT

Running across America, Peter Kostelnick (“What It Takes To…,” page 22) ate as much as 17,000 calories in a day. That equals:

OR 17 pints of Häagen-Dazs ice cream

12 loaded beef burritos from Chipotle

OR 170 energy gels

6.79 pounds of cashews

Swiftwick Athlete-Peter Maksimow, Photo-Alexis Courthoud

K E I T H H O M A N /A L A M Y ( I C E C R E A M ); M I TC H M A N D E L ( E N E R GY G E L , CAS H E W S )

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A L E X A R I S T E I (C O P E L A N D); R W A R C H I V E S ( H E A D S H OT S ) ; M AT T R A I N E Y ( B U R R I TO);

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SOCIAL T N MOVEME

COME TOGETHER Run215 unites Philly’s diverse running crews. At Run215’s #NightShiftPHL, Philly runners conquer repeats using the Dilworth Park subway stairs.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS SEMBROT

At 9:30 p.m. on the Wednesday before the Philadelphia Marathon, runners in neon jackets and reflective tights gather in Center City Philadelphia. Even though it’s raining, nearly 100 people show up. Some wear T-shirts from various Philly-based clubs, such as 11th Hour Racing, Team Humane League, and Fishtown Beer Runners.

At the front of the crowd, Jon Lyons, 30, hands out glow sticks. “Welcome to Night Shift,” he says. “We’re going to run twoish miles. We’ll stop at Washington Square Park for tricep dips, run stairs in the subway, and then finish by the Love sign. Let’s go!” Lyons is the founder of Run215, a club named after the city’s area code

that acts as an overarching resource for all of Philadelphia’s run crews. Since its inception in 2014, the club has hosted events to bring together various running groups and to make it easier for Philly runners to share information about local fitness events. “When I started running, I was sick of going out alone but didn’t know

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 15


PARTY PLANNING Popular Run215 events CHILLY CHEEKS BUS Run215 rents two busses to bring 100 self-described “crazies” outside city limits to race up a mountain in the middle of January. Beer is involved.

Above, the #NightShiftPHL crew pauses at the end of mile two to dance by Philly’s Love sculpture. At right, Lyons oversees partner squats, then leads the run through the city’s downtown (far right).

16 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

effective platform for other running clubs to interact freely and easily—I was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time. I think it broke down the borders between clubs.” Lyons created a standalone website where Philadelphia runners could get up-to-date information about local races and group runs. What started as a gathering of friends has grown to be a citywide resource, with more than 8,000 Facebook followers and 35,000 monthly page visits on the Run215 site. “I never wanted to be authoritative,” says Lyons. “Run215

became a platform for many different groups, and that’s the only role I wanted us to play.” With the digital presence gathering steam, Lyons decided to host an in-person event. So he and his running pal Suzanne Allaire (cofounder of November Project Philly and associate marketing manager at Runner’s World) created #NightShiftPHL, a pop-up, late-night, party run. The event is announced through a swarm of social media posts, giving Run215 followers 24 hours’ notice and a place to meet. Lyons makes it clear that it’s BYO headlamp,

RUN215 CHALLENGE Lyons sets these up when the mood strikes. One was as simple as running the Ben Franklin Bridge every day for a week. Another challenged people to run a mile in their undies.

but he does provide glow sticks and music (from a giant speaker towed by bike). So far, it’s happened six times since 2015 and typically attracts anywhere from 100 to 200 runners. The success of #NightShiftPHL inspired other events (see “Party Planning,” left) that Lyons says are aimed to keep the city fit. In between all the fun, Run 215 has been lobbying officials to establish more pedestrian safety laws. “When I realized how much running could impact my life, I wanted to do that for the rest of the city,” Lyons says. “It was surprisingly simple to bring different crews together. There are no running rivalries in Philadelphia—instead, Run215 members have a lot of running friends.” —ALI NOLAN

P R E V I O U S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H B Y Z A N DY M A N G O L D ( R U N N E R I N H U M A N R AC E LO G O) ; T H I S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E S Y O F R U N 2 1 5 ( TO P R I G H T )

where to look to find someone to run with,” says Lyons, a sales and marketing associate. “So I decided to make a Facebook group in March 2014 to see if anyone wanted to join me.” Less than two weeks after creating the page, the group hit 300 members. As more group runs were scheduled, the numbers on Facebook continued to rise, reaching 1,500 people within one year. What Lyons noticed—and embraced—was that the conversation on Facebook was not just about where and when he was hosting workouts. There were also posts about what other clubs were doing. “Run215 became the page to display all the clubs’ schedules,” he says. “I don’t think anyone had established an

#RUNSTREAKPHL A citywide run streak in February, which requires photo evidence posted to Instagram with the hashtag #RunStreakPHL

Run215 members on the Chilly Cheeks bus


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Road Scholar BY PETER SAGAL

HOW TO EAT A runner’s guide to nutritional sanity (moon landing not required) ack in high school, I was a devotee of the Cookbook Diet. This is how it worked: Instead of eating lunch in the cafeteria, go to the school library and read cookbooks. Why not go to the cafeteria? Because I was trying to lose weight. Why cookbooks? Because, as I was intentionally starving myself, I was hungry all the time, and there is nothing, nothing more interesting to a starving person than food. I wouldn’t let myself eat, so I read cookbooks and looked longingly at the illustrations. Sometimes, when at home, I would pass the time by turning on the TV, ignoring the programs, and waiting for the food commercials. Maybe if I wade through more horrible episodes of Three’s Company there will be another spot for Dinty Moore Beef Stew! ¶ It was painful, stupid, unhealthy, impractical, mentally damaging and, of course, it didn’t last. But while it did, boy, did I lose weight! In that way, it was like every other diet I have ever tried, including the (forgotten but not lamented) Scarsdale Diet, the Don’t Eat After 8 PM Diet, or any variety of the low-fat diets that have helped Americans learn new ways to look confused as they gain weight anyway. ¶ The reason my lunchtime sojourns to the library worked—if making me skinny but miserable can be called “working”—is that, like all diets ever invented, it restricted my calories. You eat fewer calories, especially while increasing

B

18 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

your caloric expenditure, like, say, via obsessive running, and you will lose weight. A nutritionist named Mark Haub once lost 27 pounds by eating only Twinkies and other junk foods over a 10-week period. Why did it work? Because how many damned Twinkies can one man eat! So if a weight-obsessed runner like myself has been through the diet wringer and spit out the other side, at more or less the same weight he was before, how does he manage what he eats? If not a diet, then what? It’s simple. To quote the author and food activist Michael Pollan: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” By “Eat food,” Pollan means: Avoid the products of factories, the bizarre agglomerations of flavors and textures extruded from machines into cans and colorful plastic sacks that decorate miles of aisles in grocery stores and 7-Elevens nationwide. Eat foods with ingredient lists that would make sense to your grandmother (or now, perhaps, great-grandmother): beef, celery, salt, sugar, or strawberries—not lecithin, guar gum, or sodium benzoate. Once I’d read Pollan’s book The Omnivore’s Dilemma, I started shopping only in the perimeter of grocery stores, where the fresh produce, the meats, and the dairy lurk. Not all of those things are necessarily good for you, but at least you know what they are. “Not too much” has been difficult for me. I’m a fidgeter by nature, and my favorite way of fidgeting is to open a book and a bag of chips and just keep going until both are finished. I eat everything that’s put in front of me, quickly, and have been known to stab food on friends’ and family’s plates if they’re so slow and inefficient as to give me the chance. How do I keep from gorging myself—not out of hunger but boredom and nervous energy? I’ve found that two simple tricks help. First of all, I limit my portions. If I make a pot of noodles and vegetables, I don’t dump the whole thing in a two-quart mixing bowl and gobble it up (not that I’ve ever done that, it’s a completely fictional example, never ILLUSTRATION BY ZOHAR LAZAR


ple trinity: “Cook your own food.” Most of the things people buy premade, be they hamburger patties or pancakes, are ridiculously easy to prepare yourself, and taste much better when you do. A burger? I buy fresh ground beef, sprinkle it with salt and pepper, shape it loosely into a patty, and fry it in a hot pan. Pancakes? I whip up flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, butter, eggs, and milk in a bowl, pour it onto a griddle, and watch carefully. Food I make at home will generally be fresher, less processed, and less caloric than anything bought premade in a store, or even at most restaurants. Plus, when I bake my own bread, I know I didn’t slip in any high-fructose corn syrup, unless I have a split personality and my other self is slyly subverting my health.

Where running and culture collide COMPILED BY KATIE NEITZ

MOMENTOUS America Ferrera writes for The New York Times about how a triathlon helped silence her inner critic.

A Russian official says he hopes “our beloved Mr. Trump will put an end” to the doping investigation surrounding the country’s alleged support of performance-enhancing drugs in athletic events, including the 2012 London Olympics.

STOP!

M A I S O N M U M M ( B O LT W I T H C H A M PAG N E ); FA N A /A K M - G S I ( B I E B E R R U N N I N G ) ; CO U R T E SY O F N I K E ( S E L F- L AC I N G S H O E ) ; C O U R T E S Y U N R U H /J O N E S ( N I K E M O O N S H O E ); D R E W A N G E R E R /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( T R U M P ) ; A N D R E J I S A KOV I C/A F P/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( F L AG S )

W I T H E R S P O O N & WO O D L E Y ); M AT T C R O S S I C K /CO U R T E SY O F B B C A M E R I CA ( FA R A H & H A N K S ) ; U N I V E R S A L / E V E R E T T C O L L E C T I O N ( H A P P Y G I L M O R E ) ; C O U R T E SY O F B R O O KS ( B E E R M I L E S H O E ) ; U S A I N B O LT V I A I N S TAG R A M ( B I E B E R & B O LT ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E SY O F M A R AT H O N F OTO ( F E R R E R A ); CO U R T E SY O F R AC H E L A LV E S D E L I M A / N B C N E W S ’ TO DAY ( M O R A L E S ); CO U R T E SY O F L . A . 2024 (O LY M P I C B I D LO G O); CO U R T E SY O F H S N ( S H I R T ) ; D U N K I N D/ FA M E F LY N E T P I C T U R E S ( K I D M A N ,

I’ll add one more rule to Pollan’s sim-

THE INTERSECTION

Donald Trump expresses support for L.A.’s bid to host the 2024 Olympic Games.

West Coast Today show anchor Natalie Morales partners with Reebok to create kids’ running shoes.

Nike Moon Shoes, handmade prototypes of what would become the iconic waffle-soled running shoes, go for $11,200 on eBay.

GO!

happened). Instead, I carefully serve out one healthy but not insane portion into a normal dish, and put the rest away before I eat. It’s a lot easier to resist that extra serving when it’s behind the refrigerator door. For more desperate times, I’ve kept a food journal, simply a record of what I eat in a day. You will stop yourself from reaching into that potato chip bag if you know you have to confess it later. Lastly, “Mostly plants” means vegetables, fruits, grains, and things made from them, such as pasta and flour. Like just about everybody, I grew up believing a “meal” was a hunk of animal protein with some decorative vegetables on the side, a leafy chrome bumper on a chassis of flesh. What’s odd, of course, is that none of our ancestors ate this way. Back in the old country, nobody ate steak—who had a cow? Or if they did have one, who could afford to kill it and eat it, when it was so much more fun to stroll around with it and impress the neighbors? But in the new world, eating meat became a status symbol, a reward for American success. Once, in college, I brought a girlfriend to my grandmother’s house for dinner. My grandmother was famed for classic Jewish foods like kugel and prakas and kasha varnishkes—various combinations of noodles, grains, and vegetables, with the odd cheap cut of meat thrown in—but on this night, in honor of my lovely new girlfriend, Dubie made, for the first time in memory, prime rib. Huge slabs of bloody beef. Why? Because it was a special occasion. And it certainly was! Because my girlfriend was a vegetarian.

Danica Patrick debuts Warrior, an affordable athleisure brand. Marty McFly’s self-lacing, light-up sneakers are now a $720 reality. Nike is selling the Back to the Future Part II–inspired shoes with pressure sensors and cables that tighten and loosen laces automatically.

Justin Bieber is spotted running, and his dubious style—a red bandanna and basketball shorts—makes headlines.

Usain Bolt adds a new title to his résumé: Chief Entertainment Officer of Maison Mumm, a French champagne.

And Bolt and Biebs are spotted together at the I Am Bolt premiere.

Real-life runners Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, and Reese Witherspoon shoot a running scene in Monterey, CA, for Big Little Lies.

Mo Farah and Tom Hanks appear together on a British talk show and share how strangers demand that they “Run, Forrest, run!”

Brooks unveils a “Run Hoppy” Beer Mile racing flat with skid resistance and vents for drainage.

After Galen Rupp says Happy Gilmore inspired his bronze-medal performance in the Olympic Marathon, Adam Sandler calls to congratulate him for “running like a beast.”

FRIVOLOUS

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 19


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ASK MILES He’s been around the block a few times— and he’s got answers.

I see so many runners on the sidewalk in a race. Don’t they know they’re course-cutting? —Warren M., Culver City, CA

My thoughts are that this practice is annoying—and inevitable. It’s annoying because, as you correctly point out, runners who hop curbs and run on the sidewalk are breaking the rules. And some of us still care about rules. (Dagnabbit.) It’s inevitable because in a race with 20,000 runners flooding city streets, some folks are going to hop on a sidewalk here and there. For another thing, the average road racer today sees a race less as a competition than a personal challenge, emphasis on personal. Calling these folks out for “course-cutting” is like scolding them for coloring outside the lines. They just don’t care. But you and I do, Warren. I take some solace in that. Dagnabbit.

MILE S AS

KS

What is the proper etiquette for passing gas while running? —Shelby K., Apex, NC Shelby, you’re implying that runners play by their own rules when it comes to flatulence. And you’re right! Farting openly during a workout is one of the perks of being a runner, right up there with a low resting heart rate and guilt-free desserts. But I understand if you do not feel comfortable

taking advantage of this benefit. Luckily, there are ways to mask the deed— like coughing, or belting out a few lines from your favorite Broadway musical. If you’re running in a group, you might also consider drifting to the rear (so to speak) before letting go. Or if your running group is anything like mine, to the very front. Have a question for Miles? Email askmiles@ runnersworld.com and follow @askmiles on Twitter.

How are dogs better running buddies than humans? They never complain or stop running. @pdhovey No snot rockets. @lileAmile They never don’t want to go for a run. @melindamlee

And what if you can’t cook? Well, there was a time I couldn’t run a mile without gasping, and I managed to work my way through that problem. Cooking is significantly easier than you think. In fact, it’s easier than the people who are telling us how to cook seem to think. Modern food culture, as pushed by all the competitive cooking shows and food labs, seems to be a discipline requiring a Ph.D. in chemistry and a nuclear accelerator. But it turns out people have been cooking and eating well with a pan, a fire, and a knife for about 6,000 years, and if a peasant in ancient Sumer could do it, I can too. Probably. After some practice. I’ve learned to use recipes not as instructions but as lessons. For example, why do so many recipes begin with sautéing onions or garlic (or shallots or leeks)? It turns out those plants are called, along with a number of other flavorful plants and herbs, “aromatics,” because—not to get too technical here— they smell good. Sautéing them releases their aromas, which nicely flavor the sauce or stew or soup you’re making. Any given food needs to be handled differently: Mushrooms can be just sautéed in butter, broccoli needs to be blanched in boiling water first. Almost any dish, even sweet ones, can be brightened by the addition of a little acid, and for that you can buy acid dispensers at the grocery store—they’re called lemons. There was a time when running a marathon seemed like an impossible, technically complex goal, like a moon landing. It turns out, all I had to do was run and keep running until I could run 26.2 miles. Similarly, I have learned the secret to eating well is simply to eat well. The secret of a good diet is to cook and the secret of cooking is to care, about the food you’re making, about the ingredients you’re using, and mostly about the person you’re cooking for, especially if that is yourself. Back in high school, I waged war on my own body and my own desires, and to hate your desires is to hate yourself. These days, me and I get along much better. Sure, I could stand to lose a little weight—who couldn’t?—but I’m healthy for my age, I can still reel off a fast 10 miles if I need to, and besides all that, I’ve become a pretty good cook. Come on over sometime: I promise, whatever else happens, we’ll eat well.

They’re good pace setters. And they don’t talk. @MrEhdoh Because they’re dogs. @afoodiestaysfit

20 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

Peter Sagal is a 3:09 marathoner and the host of NPR’s Wait, Wait...Don’t Tell Me! For more, go to runnersworld.com/scholar.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDY REMENTER


STREET STYLE

ALISON O’BRIEN

“I originally bought this Fila top years ago (on sale) as a base layer, but it insulates well, so it sometimes becomes my only layer. I pair black with the kilt— it makes it pop.”

44, COFOUNDER AND OWNER OF JWALKING DESIGNS

When Alison O’Brien started running in 2006, she didn’t love the shorts: Compression shorts were too form-fitting and other styles chafed. So the Emmy-awardwinning television producer turned to skirts. As her running evolved—she’s now done 21 marathons and 55 half marathons—she found that skirts didn’t have adequate pockets. She decided to fix the problem herself, and in 2013 launched JWalking—a running skirt company out of her home in Union, New Jersey. At the same time, she saw men wearing kilts in races, and spotted an opportunity. Today, kilts are her best sellers. “People feel confident in them,” she says. “It implies you follow your own path.”

“I’ve worn my purple plaid kilt at every race since I first made it in 2014. It gives me a chance to stand out and show off. I train in a kilt, race in a kilt, wear a kilt out to dinner with boots, tights, and a sweater. It’s who I am.”

“This is a Garmin Forerunner 305, which I bring back from the dead more often than I’d like to admit. I love it too much to replace it.”

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PAYAM

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I TC H M A N D E L ( K I LT S , 2)

“Kilts date back to 16th-century Scotland and Ireland. Families wore the same pattern, or tartan, to represent their clan.”

“The men’s kilt is our best seller. In military days, it was said that a ‘true’ Scotsman went commando. Our men’s kilts don’t have sewnin shorts. But we do sew the front flap down.”

“Traditional kilts are wool, but we use material made from repurposed water bottles for activewear. Each garment is 84 percent recycled plastic and 16 percent spandex.”

“It takes my calves a bit to kick into gear. A few years ago, I realized that my Pro Compression recovery socks could also be my running socks. I wear them all seasons, all runs. You should see my tan lines in the summer.”

—MICHELLE HAMILTON

“Being cold is not fun, so in the winter I add leggings. These are by JWalking— and they fit seamlessly underneath our women’s skirts’ and kilts’ sewn-in shorts.”

KILTED

“I have eight pairs of Asics Noosa Tris. These are version 11. I’ve run four sprint triathlons— they aren’t pretty, but I get them done!”


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Peter Kostelnick is featured in this issue’s HR logo.

buffer in case weather or injury slowed him down. He missed the mark only twice. On the last day, he ran the longest, starting in the middle of the night and going for 87 miles to smash the record by more than four days.

WHAT IT TAKES TO...

BREAK THE TRANSCONTINENTAL RECORD! After 200-mile training weeks and serious planning, Peter Kostelnick became the fastest man to run across the United States.

SUFFER After setting the course record in the Badwater Ultramarathon last July, Kostelnick designed a brutal training regimen to prep for his transAmerica attempt. In the month and a half between the race and his endeavor, he logged more than 200 miles in a week three times. All this while maintaining a full-time job. “I put my body through hell in the months leading up to the run,” Kostelnick says. PLAN Kostelnick started browsing the walking directions from City Hall to City Hall on Google Maps, but his sister was in charge of drawing up the official route. In total, she compiled more than 100 pages of turn-by-turn directions. “We never once got lost, but I did run in the wrong direction for a few minutes a couple of times,” he says. CALCULATE To break the record, he needed to average more than 67 miles a day. He aimed for 70 to 72, hoping to build a

22 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

IGNORE THE MILEAGE “Thinking about completing 70 miles at once is unbearable,” Kostelnick says. So he broke the day into small twomile chunks, meeting crew members Chuck Dale and Dean Hart at each stop. “Knowing they would be up ahead to talk to, and to crack a joke, was a huge help.” GORGE “I ate pretty much everything I could,” Kostelnick says. The crew’s part-driver/massage therapist/chef, Cinder Wolff, maintained a strict calorie regimen based on miles run and elevation gain. At his peak, Kostelnick ate more than 15,000 calories per day, inhaling trail mix, pasta, red meat, and Ben & Jerry’s Tonight Dough ice cream. HEAL Kostelnick’s ankle swelled so severely he was forced to take an entire 24 hours of rest on day seven in Utah. “But Pete has what I call a self-healing body,” says Wolff, who stretched him twice a day. SIGHTSEE “Going up a mountain

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y Z A N DY M A N G O L D

For 36 years, renowned ultrarunners have tried to break the world record for fastest run across America, set in 1980 by a shoe salesman named Frank Giannino Jr. in 46 days, 8 hours, and 36 minutes. The elusive achievement—popularized in film by a hirsute Tom Hanks wearing retro Nikes—held firm until a clean-shaven 29-year-old financial analyst from Lincoln, Nebraska, ascended the steps of New York’s City Hall on October 24, 2016. Peter Kostelnick, a two-time 135-mile Badwater Ultramarathon champion, averaged 72 miles a day to shatter the mark, finishing the 3,067-mile trek from San Francisco’s City Hall in 42 days, 6 hours, and 30 minutes. At the finish, his friends and family wore shirts that read, “Forrest Gump is fiction.” This is what it took to accomplish the feat of Gumpian proportions, with the help of four crew members, a support van, and an RV nicknamed Jenny (yes, after that Jenny). —KIT FOX

PERSUADE “The biggest obstacle to keep the planning on track was to ask for the vacation time,” Kostelnick says. “My boss wasn’t surprised. He was like, ‘Oh, this is just another one of your crazy running adventures. Let me think about it.’ ” He got seven weeks off, promising to be back at work by November 1.


Day 39 in Pennsylvania

GEAR CHECK HOKA ONE ONE CLIFTON 3’S

“I went through eight pairs. I always looked at the bottom to check for wear. I usually rotated through two pairs a day.” SQUIRREL’S NUT BUTTER

“To prevent chafing, I went through 12 two-ounce tins.” SHORTS SUPPLY

“We did laundry every three days. I cycled between five pairs of shorts.”

Day four in the Nevada desert

pass in Utah, it started to snow,” Kostelnick says. “It was a tough pass to get over and the RV was parked at the top. I saw the snow line and a herd of about 1,000 sheep on the ridge. It looked like something out of Narnia. It didn’t seem real.” ASK While running through Iowa, the state’s wellknown distiller Templeton Rye gave him a bottle of whiskey. He stashed the booze in the RV until after he finished. But Kostelnick says the most important gift was a parking space. To save time, he wanted the RV to stay on his route. “So the crew would knock on doors and ask people if we could park in their

driveway or on their property,” he says. GORGE AGAIN “The crew started a tradition called ‘new state steak,’ ” Kostelnick says. When he crossed state lines (which he did 12 times), Wolff cooked a new cut of meat. RECORD To certify the attempt, Kostelnick wore a GPS watch on each wrist in case one broke or ran out of battery. He swapped for two freshly charged watches at lunch, uploading segments to Strava daily. Every time he finished a segment, he logged it on a big sheet of paper posted inside the RV. REUNITE Kostelnick never saw his wife, Nikki, during the trek, missing their fourth anniversary. He called her that night. “My wife and I decided my biggest motivator would be to wait and see her at the very end,” he says. She hugged him the entire way up the New York City Hall steps. WAKE UP “Since finishing, I’ve had a few nightmares where someone tells me, ‘Pete, we lost all the data from Ohio to New York, so you have to run that again,’ ” he says. Then he awakens, and realizes that he really is the fastest human to ever run across America.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 23


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These Running Times BY JONATHAN BEVERLY

THE RUN TO THE RACE It’s the starting line, not the finish, that matters. t’s late fall and I’m talking to the grandmother of a cross-country runner I coached a few years back. I’m pleased to hear he’s still running and has signed up for a spring half marathon. She asks about the upcoming championship season for this year’s team and how each of the runners has been doing. ¶ Then she asks, “When is your next race?” ¶ I’m confused, as we were just discussing that, but I start to tell her again that it will be the conference championship next Thursday. ¶ “No,” she says. “Not the team’s. When is your next race?” ¶ I mumble something about not thinking about my running during the season, and she moves on. Her question, however, stays with me. ¶ The fact is, I don’t have a race on my schedule. After a summer half marathon, I immersed myself in work and coaching and have failed to make any personal racing plans. A review of my training log, however, makes me realize that I need one. Before that half, I was putting in consistent 40- to 50-mile weeks. Since then, my weekly average is just shy of 30 and shows a startling inconsistency. ¶ I’ve been running regularly for nearly 40 years. I love getting outdoors, feeling fit and fast, the mental clarity, the endorphins. Yet as much as I cherish running, it is still—every time I lace up—a decision. I know I’ll feel better a few minutes into the run. But, too often, given any obstacle in scheduling, conditions, or my energy level, I’ll opt out or settle for less. The runs get squeezed in only when they are convenient, becoming shorter and less intense. “Only entropy comes easy,” Chekhov wrote. The natural order is for things to fall apart. If that was true at 22, it is exponentially so at 52. ¶ Over the years, I’ve found the best way to counteract the slide into lethargy is to schedule a race. I have always been a competitive runner. That said, I’m far from speedy enough to derive any economic value from racing or even much in the way of status. No one cares if I run a

I

24 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

minute, or 10 minutes, faster or slower on any given day. I recently interviewed Grant Robison, a former elite miler, who couldn’t understand why runners with no hope of being professional would train hard enough to hurt, or take racing so seriously as to leave a party early the night before. To truly fast people like him, a race is the end that justifies the suffering and sacrifice to get there. If you can’t achieve the results—in his case, making an Olympic team and securing a pro contract—training isn’t worthwhile. Which is why now, approaching 40, he hasn’t run at all for some time. For me, racing is not the end but the means to get me to do the things I want to do. The race provides a reason to choose a path I want to take, but one that is hard to see clearly without a beacon at the end lighting the way. Given my lifelong passion, I’ve often wondered why it can still be hard to get out the door without this prod. I found one explanation reading Harvard professor Daniel Lieberman’s book The Story of the Human Body. Lieberman explains this paradox as the result of a mismatch between what our bodies are suited for and the environment in which we find ourselves. Not long ago in human history, a run was not only always imminent but also necessary for survival. To be ready for the physical challenges our subconscious minds believe we may have to face at a moment’s notice, we’re programmed to conserve energy whenever we can. “We humans...sometimes behave in ways that are not in our best interests…,” Lieberman writes. “Because we are poorly adapted to control deep cravings for comforts and calories that used to be rare.” Even though we now wallow in comforts and calories, we need a powerful reason to convince our primitive brain that an energy expenditure is worthwhile. While it isn’t as compelling as a saber-toothed tiger breathing down my neck, a race gives me enough motivation to do more than the minimum. The threat of failure is real enough to sway my decision-making. With a goal ILLUSTRATION BY THOMAS FUCHS


P H OTO G R A P H S B Y V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N ( TO P C E N T E R ) ; K R I S T I N L E E /A L A M Y ( H E R S H E Y K I S S ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F CA R O LY N M AT H E R (4 )

looming, I start becoming the runner, and the person, I want to be. I seldom get up before dawn without a deadline looming. But I rarely feel better than when I do, like for a 20-miler near my house in Nebraska that I described in an old journal: I headed west at 4:15 a.m. with coyotes calling in the distance, my headlamp supplementing the light from the setting moon. Five miles in, horses appeared out of the gloom in the pasture on the right and ran alongside me for half a mile. At the turnaround, 10 miles from home, the sun had just peaked over the horizon to the east, painting the early morning sky orange and silhouetting the windmills on the sand hills. My legs warmed up and stride clicking, I flew home on the trail road—just in time for breakfast. That run came a month before a 2004 marathon. As it turned out, race day was unseasonably hot, leading to a death-march finish. In hindsight, however, the outcome was irrelevant. With no race I would likely have slept in and done an easier, shorter run that day—and would have been lesser for it. Training for a goal also makes me more strategic—engaging my mind as well as my body. Years ago, as an academic advisor at NYU, I asked a student what he thought of a course. “The teacher is okay, and the subject is interesting,” he said, “but there’s no final, and that takes all the energy out of the class.” The point of a class is learning, but without a measurement, it’s hard to hold onto attention. A race is the final to my running. Without one, I can put in mindless daily runs and get by, not knowing or caring about details or results. Without consequences, my focus wanders. Add a race and everything matters. I track my miles, pace, and heart rate. I dig deep and do speedwork, playing with reps and recoveries to work every system—and I actually go easy on easy days. I do supplemental strength and flexibility exercises. I turn down the second cookie. I pay attention to my form, cadence, and efficiency. I note what works and what doesn’t. My runs, indeed all of my life, become part of a grand experiment I never tire of. I love running all the time, but both it and I are at our best when I’m training for a race, studying for a final. Jonathan Beverly, the former editor-in-chief of Running Times , writes and runs on the high plains of the Nebraska/Colorado border.


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You might call these yoga Dat Mats ($40) “snackwave,” the term describing the trend of celebrating junk foods. While snackwave is rooted in pop culture, runners have embraced it, Instagramming themselves in shirts that say things like “Run All the Miles Eat All the Pizza” (Sarah Marie Design Studio, $30) or socks adorned with burgers, nachos, or pie (Sock Guy, $11). Working out on a Dat Mat might make you hungry, but because yoga boosts your mind-body connection, when you’re savoring your next treat, you’ll know to stop before you’re overstuffed, right? For more reasons to hit the mat, see page 44.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 27


TRAINING CRUSH IT. THEN COOL IT

New research suggests you may enjoy runs more if you get the tough parts out of the way early. By Cindy Kuzma

that end fast. Races where you cross the line with a kick. Long miles that toughen as they pile on. Many running experiences involve easing in—and finishing hard. But a new study in the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology supports flipping that format. Participants who ramped down as a workout progressed instead of building up

PROGRESSION RUNS

Finishing a hard or long run with a walking cooldown can help new and returning runners stay motivated.

rated the experience more pleasant, says study author Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Ph.D., of Iowa State University. Those good vibes probably increase the odds they’ll exercise again, he says. Still, many runners enjoy difficult efforts, but even they can benefit from an occasional easy-finish run. Here’s how to put ramping down into practice.

EVERYDAY RUNS

A new or recently rebooted running routine nearly always feels tough. Muscles and joints ache until your body adapts to the regular pounding of feet against ground. And your heart struggles to shuttle oxygen-rich blood to your muscles, leaving you huffing and puffing, says Greg McMillan, M.S., coach and exercise physiologist. Starting with runwalk intervals decreases physical and mental strain, says Mary Jung, Ph.D., an exercise psychology researcher at the University of British Columbia. A rampdown plan may trigger a surge of feel-good hormones earlier so you feel better during and after your workout, Ekkekakis says. TRY IT Walk for 10 minutes to warm up. Then, run for five minutes (or as long as you can without stopping) and walk for one minute. Decrease the running interval by one minute each time—so if you start at five minutes, you’re running for four, three, two, and then one minute, with one-minute walk breaks in between. End with a five- to 10-minute walk to cool down. INTERVAL WORKOUTS

What once felt like a lung-searing struggle gradually transforms into an easy jog as you run consistently. That’s why experienced runners use interval workouts—periods of harder, faster running

28 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

interspersed with jogging or walking breaks—to continue improving their speed and stamina. Many interval sessions involve repetitions of equal length. But “pyramid” workouts, which shift from short to long reps and then back down, add benefits by posing varied challenges to your body and mind, says Nikki Reiter, a British Columbia–based biomechanist and coach for The Run S.M.A.R.T. Project. For instance, you may train your fasttwitch muscle fibers, hone your ability to focus at race pace, and work on your finishing kick, all in one session. If you’re new to speedwork or coming back to it after a break, try a “one-sided pyramid,” in which you decrease the distance while maintaining the same intensity, Reiter says: You can fit in a hard workout without feeling as beat up. Over time, advanced runners can speed up as they decrease the length of their reps to reap more benefits. TRY IT Warm up with 10 minutes of jogging, then run the following repeats with oneminute jogging recoveries: one mile, 1200 meters, 1,000 meters, 800 meters, 400 meters. Cool down for five to 10 minutes. If you haven’t done speedwork lately, keep all reps at about 10K pace (where you could speak a few words, but not full sentences); if you’re more advanced, start there and gradually speed up, ending closer to your mile race pace.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KEVIN STEELE


on a slight downhill so maintaining the pace seems less difficult. LONG RUNS Finishing your run on a gentle downhill helps you remember it as fun. But don’t speed! (See page 32.)

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: G R I D P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S COT T M A R K E W I T Z ; DA N N Y Z A PA L AC ; T I M M CG U I R E /G E T T Y I M AG E S ; S T E P H E N M AT E R A

TEMPO RUNS

Holding a comfortably challenging pace trains your body to better cope with the metabolic by-products of faster running, so you can maintain harder efforts with less strain, McMillan says. These so-called tempo runs feel more difficult as you fatigue. That’s useful if you’re training for a fast race—you need to prepare to push hard when it counts. However, a tempo run that eases up as you go can give you a confidence boost as your goal event nears (or anytime you’re particularly down on your running ability). “Good mental vibes going into a race are very important,” McMillan says. In the last two to three weeks beforehand— when most of the hard training is done—he might prescribe slightly shorter tempo runs that use gravity to

make the final minutes feel easier. TRY IT After a 10-minute warmup, run at a tempo pace—one you could sustain for only about an hour—for two to four miles (or a distance slightly shorter than the longest you’ve run that pace earlier in training). Finish the last part of the hard effort

The goal of most long runs is to boost your heart’s ability to pump blood and increase the number of mitochondria in your muscles, adaptations that occur at relatively easy speeds, McMillan says. Whether yours lasts three miles or 23, maintaining a steady pace feels more difficult as you tire. But slowing too much due to fatigue can cause you to run with poor form, increasing injury risk, Reiter says. Instead of altering the workout, tack on a cooldown to help you recall the experience as less punishing. TRY IT After your longest run of the week, walk for five to 10 minutes. If you’re with a group, this relaxed time can seal your bond. On your own, try focusing on gratitude, McMillan says: Feeling thankful that your schedule and your body allowed you to log the miles can stoke satisfaction that will carry through to your next run.

RULES TO A RAMP-DOWN Keep these caveats in mind to make the most of the start-hard, finish-easy approach. WARM UP Especially if you’re on the comeback from a break or an injury, adequately prepare your muscles, joints, and bones for a hard effort right off the bat. Do at least 10 minutes of easy jogging and a few dynamic warmup moves, such as butt kicks and skips, before your workout. MIX AND MATCH Easy-finish runs won’t have the same effect on everyone, and increasingly difficult efforts have their place in building fitness and mental toughness. Plus, variety also boosts enjoyment. Limit ramp-down workouts to once every week or two. CHECK YOUR MATH If you want the same gains, you’ll have to spend the same amount of time working hard, even if you arrange the workout differently. For instance, if you want to swap in a ramp-down workout for five rounds of fiveminute-hard, one-minute-easy intervals, make sure your hard efforts still total 25 minutes.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 29


TRAINING

WHY RACE?

Because events can help you reach all kinds of goals. One of the greatest things about running is that each of us can choose our own destiny. We alone determine where, when, and how much to run. We alone decide to participate in races—or not. No one is less of a runner if they don’t race. However, there are several reasons you might want to sign up for and show up to an organized event.

TO GET MOTIVATED If you’re having trouble getting out the door, having a “deadline”—that is, race day—may inspire you to do the workouts needed to prepare. For a 5K, that means run-walking about every other day, working up to a weekly long run of at least three miles. If you’re still on the fence, try spectating at a local race: If you could bottle the energy you’ll find at the start and finish lines, you could run your car for a year.

TO PUSH YOURSELF When runners gather at a race, they inspire one another. The excitement helps runners of all levels run harder with less perceived effort. Once you’ve done your first race, you’ll likely want to go faster. We love

to improve, and races give us an evaluation tool. TO EXPLORE If you’re tired of the same old loops, a race in an unfamiliar neighborhood or park can help you break out of your rut. You can check out the terrain and scenery without fear of getting lost, and if you really enjoy yourself, you can return for a regular run in the future. TO SUPPORT A CAUSE Many small 5Ks exist to raise money. In general, these events support new racers, but there is a wide range of quality in the production. A local running store can tell you which races are managed best, but if a cause is truly dear to your heart, you may not care that its “5K” is not exactly 3.1 miles or that organizers run out of snacks before the last finishers arrive.

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. Is there a perfect goal distance for a first-time racer? The 5K (3.1 miles) is a doable goal for a beginner, and most communities have many runs at this distance. Pay attention to how your goal event is marketed: The words “fun run” usually mean “untimed,” so if you want to know how fast you finished, choose another race. What’s the most common mistake of first-time racers? It’s easy to start too fast. Let the first mile be your slowest, with more walk breaks than you usually take. By saving resources early, you can enjoy the feeling of passing people at the end without sprinting. Your goal should be to finish upright with a smile.

Fact or Fiction I shouldn’t walk during a race. FICTION Most runners find a run-walk strategy keeps their legs strong to the end and helps them avoid a slowdown. Some even find walk breaks help them finish faster. There’s also the rule, “Never try anything new on race day.” If you don’t run continuously in training, don’t do it in a race. 30

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TRAINING

RAPID DESCENT

How to go downhill—fast—without trashing your quads and calves

The real heartbreak in the Boston Marathon isn’t the famous climb in the 21st mile. It’s the steady opening downhill, which lures runners into a flying start that can wreak havoc on their legs. The problem exists no matter how long the descent: One study found that the muscle damage from a short and fast four-mile downhill run was similar to the damage seen in studies of mountain ultras of up to 200 miles. In both situations, running downhill requires eccentric muscle contractions as you brake with each stride: Momentum forces your quads and calves to lengthen as you’re trying to contract them. The resulting damage to muscle fibers eventually slows you down and can lead to crippling soreness. To ward off this damage, researchers have explored a few tactics.

BOOST YOUR CADENCE Taking short, quick steps can reduce the impact of each stride. One study found that increasing cadence (the number of steps taken each minute) by 8 percent compared to what felt natural reduced the loss of strength caused by a 45-minute downhill run. That said, some

people already shorten their steps when they run downhill and shortening them further would be inefficient. To figure out what works best for you, experiment with a range of quicker and slower strides in training, and try to settle into a stride that minimizes the feeling of braking with each step as you descend hills.

VARY FOOT STRIKE Which part of your foot should hit the ground first has been the topic of vigorous debate. There’s some evidence that landing on your heel as you descend is less fatiguing than landing on your forefoot or midfoot, thanks to the angle of the knee at the moment of contact. But a more practical approach is to think about varying your foot strike so you’re not always landing in the same position, which ensures the load is shared by different muscle groups. This is harder to do on smooth road courses, but uneven trails make it easy to mix up your landings. PRACTICE PLUMMETING Even one experience of eccentric muscle damage is enough to trigger the “repeated bout effect,” which lessens the muscle

damage and strength loss of a similar exercise session for up to 10 weeks. That’s why savvy Boston-bound marathoners include plenty of downhill training. The goal is to run downhill for long enough to leave you mildly sore the next day, but not so sore that you can’t run— which may take trial and error to get right. Tailor your downhill training to mimic the demands you’ll face in competition: duration, steepness, and intensity. If you’re preparing for a rolling trail race with lots of ups and downs, run fartleks on a hilly course and focus on pushing the pace on the downhills as quickly as you safely can. If you’re preparing for Boston, start a long run with four to five miles on a treadmill, varying the downhill incline between 2 and 4 percent, before heading onto the roads.

32

P H OTO G R A P H B Y E L S A /G E T T Y I M AG E S

Prepare for the five-mile decline at the start of the Boston Marathon and you’ll finish strong.


SHORT REST FOR 5K /10K R ACERS RACE PREP

THE FAST BREAK

Short recovery periods may help you reap more benefits from certain workouts.

You don’t reach your VO2 max until you’re one to two minutes into a 5K-pace repeat, so you might spend only half of a four-minute rep at the target intensity. Shorter reps with shorter rests can mean more time near VO2 max, Magill says. THE WORKOUT Try alternating one minute at 5K pace with a 30-second jog 15 to 20 times. More advanced runners can do 12 to 20 400-meter repeats at 5K pace with 100-meter jogging recoveries. Magill says the pace you can hold for 16 to 20 400s done this way two to four weeks before a goal 5K is the pace you’re ready to race.

By Scott Douglas FOLLOW enough training plans over the years and you’ll notice that some workouts appear often. These classics—1200-meter repeats at 5K pace with 400meter recovery jogs, for example, or three- to four-mile tempo runs—are structured to provide a certain stimulus to your body and mind. In the case of the reps, the goal is to boost your VO2 max, or how much oxygen you can deliver to muscles during fast running. Continuous tempo runs improve your physical and mental ability to sustain a “comfortably hard” pace. Tweaking these sessions usually results in a less-effective workout. For example, you might think shorter rest between reps better simulates how you’ll feel in a 5K. That’s “a faulty premise, because too little recovery means you wind up using the wrong energy systems and muscle-fiber types,” says Pete Magill, distance coach of the Cal Coast Track Club. With inadequate recovery between reps, the workout will do less to improve your race-readiness, and you’ll be more fatigued. There are, however, some short-rest workouts that are highly effective. Some allow you to accumulate more work at the correct intensity. Others can provide the same stimulus as a harder workout with less wear and tear. Which kind of short-rest workout is best for you depends on which distance you’re targeting.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY JANNE IIVONEN

SHORT REST FOR HALF-MAR ATHONERS

“I advise short-rest workouts when most of the running in the workout is at threshold pace,” says Olympian and elite coach Magdalena Boulet. Running at threshold pace—about the pace you can hold for a one-hour race—improves your ability to push harder for longer. THE WORKOUT Do four to six mile reps at threshold pace with one-minute jogs between: The break is short enough that your heart rate stays elevated, but it helps speed postworkout recovery. In the month before race day, do one or two nobreak race-pace runs to build mental toughness.

SHORT REST FOR MAR ATHONERS

Comfortably hard training miles are important for a fast marathon, but a steady threshold workout plus a long run every week can wear on you. Instead, Boulet has runners do three two-mile threshold reps with two-minute jogs between as a midweek workout. THE WORKOUT Once a month, shift that week’s threshold miles into your long run to learn to move on tired legs. After a brief warmup, do two two-mile threshold reps with a two-minute jog between, eight miles easy, another two-mile threshold rep, then a brief cooldown.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 33


TRAINING Key Workout

NEXT LEVEL

WHAT 12 miles, with six miles at marathon pace and six faster

MARATHON MOM

WHY It prepares you to run hard on tired legs.

With two sons under age 3, Stephanie Bruce balances training and parenthood. By Sarah Lorge Butler

STEPHANIE BRUCE gave

TIPS FROM THE TOP

LEARN RESTRAINT Marathon pacing requires practice, Bruce says. Going hard early may be effective in shorter races but will lead to crashing and burning over 26.2 miles.

34 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

REFUEL ASAP You must eat right after a workout—even if your kids are waiting. “Parents are used to putting themselves second, but nutrition is a huge part of recovery.”

WHEN Once, about a month before a marathon HOW Bruce does three miles at marathon pace (5:42) and five minutes jogging recovery. Then, she runs 6 × 1 mile: Miles 1, 3, and 5 are at 5:37 pace plus one minute of recovery. Miles 2, 4, and 6 are faster, at 5:22, 5:17, and 5:12 pace, with two minutes of recovery after 2 and 4 and five minutes after 6. She finishes with three more miles at marathon pace.

INCLUDE THE FAMILY Bruce encourages her older son to stretch with her, and she and her husband dance with the kids while they prepare smoothies. “It buys us time,” she says.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y K E V I N M O R R I S / P H OTO R U N

birth to two kids in 15 months, and she’s got the abs to prove it: Instead of the chiseled look typical of pros, she has loose skin and stretch marks. When Bruce, 32, Instagrammed that midsection last spring, the photo went viral and was lauded for its honesty. Now, as Bruce returns to frequent racing, she continues to share her training and family life with her fans. Last April, Bruce ran 32:14.42 for 10,000 meters, just under the standard she needed (32:15) to be eligible for the Rio Olympics and this past summer’s world championships. After a disappointing 20th-place finish at the Olympic Track Trials (in 34:27.48), she began marathon training and took second at Cal International in December in 2:32:37. To make that hap-

pen, Bruce ran 80- to 85-mile weeks, at times on less-than-ideal sleep. She and her husband, Ben, also an elite runner, take turns dropping the kids at daycare before going to practice with their team, Northern Arizona Elite, in Flagstaff, Arizona. Ben Rosario coaches the group of men and women, and Bruce loves the camaraderie. “Our team is awesome,” she says. “We support each other, lift each other up when we’re down.” Bruce plans to race various distances on the roads this spring. “I just want to practice different race tactics and put myself against different levels of competition,” she says. She also might try to make the world team in the 10,000 meters—a long shot. But as Bruce has learned from life with two toddlers, nothing is predictable.


TRAINING

ASK THE EXPERTS

How can I fit in strength-training? Most runners can do two sessions per week without cutting too much into running time. Each session should last at least 30 minutes, split into thirds among core, upper-body, and lower-body strengthening. I suggest scheduling sessions on easy-run or rest days. —Heather North, D.P.T., owns Red Hammer Rehab in Louisville, Colorado, and coaches local runners.

Lateral band walks strengthen the glutes, which is key to staying injury-free.

The Explainer Do twins ever run identical race times?

36 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

What is the minimum weekly mileage to finish a half marathon? You’ll want to work up to a peak week of at least 30 miles, with a long run of at least 12 miles, two weeks before the race. If you’re running at least 10 miles per week, first work to spread your mileage across four or five running days, then take a few months to gradually increase your midweek and long-run mileage. Weekday runs during this buildup should be 40 to 50 percent of your weekend long-run distance. —Michael Merlino is founder and head coach of Houston’s In Flight Running (inflightrunning.com).

Does extra body weight cost me extra time on hills? Body weight is not the most important factor in hill running, and there is no ideal body type or weight for running hills. Weighing less may help you ascend faster but may also slow your descent because you’ll have less momentum. Less weight may also mean less muscle to help you climb. Emphasizing weight at the expense of developing strength, speed, skill, or stamina can increase injury risk and even lead to disordered eating. —Jacob Puzey is an IAAF- and USATF-certified international running coach at peakrun performance.com.

They often come very close. In fact, German twins Anna and Lisa Hahner finished hand-inhand (in 2:45:32 and 2:45:33, respectively) at the Rio Olympic Marathon. Their paired finish came as no surprise to those who knew their best times were less than two minutes apart. There are many examples of identical twins with near-identical results. Takeshi and Shigeru Soh, two of Japan’s top marathoners in the 1970s and ’80s, posted lifetime bests of 2:08:55 and 2:09:06—just 11 seconds apart. And Canada’s tri-talented Puntous twins, Sylviane and Patricia, tied for first or placed 1-2 at most of the triathlons they entered, including close 1-2 finishes at the 1983 and 1984 Hawaii Ironman. Identical twins have identical DNA—and those who run often train together. Same genes plus same environment equals very similar results. PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL


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FUEL MIX IT UP

HOW TO GO GREEN Ultrarunner Scott Jurek shares his tried-and-true ways to eat more plants so you can run strong.

Beefing up— ahem!— your plant intake is an easy way to get more fiber and antioxidants into your diet.

38 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

MAP IT OUT

You don’t need to come up with an entirely new diet when transitioning to a more plant-based lifestyle. Instead, determine the nutritional makeup of the foods you’re already eating: What are their macronutrients (carbs, protein, and fat) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals)? Sub out animal products for plantbased ones that have similar nutritional profiles, paying close attention to micronutrients that are most commonly found in animal foods, such as vitamin B12, iron, zinc, and calcium (see “No Animals Here,” opposite).

HOLD THE MEAT, PLEASE!

I didn’t become vegan overnight. Take baby steps. Pick one meal a week to go plant-based or vegetarian—or a full day if you’re feeling adventurous, like a Meatless Monday. If you don’t trust your veggie cooking skills (yet), turn to the pros. Order the veggie or vegan option at a restaurant to expand your palate and come up with new ideas for your own menus.

EXPLORE THE STORE F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y BA R R E T T WA S H B U R N E

I WAS A MEAT-AND-POTATOES kid from Minnesota who hated vegetables. But 18 years ago I had a bowl of veggie chili that changed my life (and my running) when it sent me down the path of plant-based eating. Since then, I’ve fueled my ultrarunning with plants. But it didn’t happen all at once. I slowly started swapping out animal foods for plant-based ones: Meat and potatoes became tempeh and yams. My “salad” of iceberg lettuce and carrots became large bowls of dark leafy greens topped with chickpeas or kidney beans. Before I knew it, I had ditched animal products completely, and successfully ramped up my mileage, without injury or undue fatigue. Whether you want to forgo steak and eggs is up to you, but even runners who eat animal products can benefit from adding more plants to their plates. These small changes can help you try new foods, lose weight, and fuel your runs.

“But what about protein?” There’s a reason vegetarians and vegans get this question all the time: Animal products contain all nine essential amino acids needed to build protein. Plantbased foods? Only quinoa and soy can make that claim. In order to get enough complete proteins in your diet, combine a variety of foods: Mix and match beans and rice, lentils and chickpeas, and meat substitutes, like tofu or seitan.

Challenge yourself to experiment with one new fruit, vegetable, bean, or other plant-based food every week. This will force you out of your comfort zone (in a good way!) and allow you to try new recipes. PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL


Pair plant-based foods with each other (like rice and beans) for a complete protein.

These key nutrients can be found in plantbased foods. ZINC Legumes, nuts, seeds, oatmeal

PREP AHEAD

When you’re crunched for time or tired, it’s easy to revert back to normal eating habits. Carve out an hour over the weekend to make a large veggie salad or plant-based bowl (see “Let’s Go Bowling,” right) and save portions for lunch and dinner later in the week.

VITAMIN B12 Fortified foods (plant sources have negligible amounts) CALCIUM Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, wholewheat flour, dried figs, collard greens, molasses IRON Fortified cereals, beans, sesame seeds, quinoa, tofu

BE SNEAKY

P O R T R A I T I L LU S T R AT I O N B Y C H A R L I E L AY TO N ; F O O D I L LU S T R AT I O N S B Y O S CA R B O LTO N G R E E N

No Animals Here

If you’re not a greens lover, I get it: I despised veggies. Add dark leafy greens like spinach, kale, or arugula to your morning smoothies. You’ll get a dose of fiber, calcium, and folate, and the fruit will mask the flavor. SEEK ADVENTURE

Thanks to the ethnic dishes I found in vegetarian cookbooks, I uncovered a world of new flavors—literally. The wide range of spices and different ways of preparing foods keep things creative and fresh.

Scott Jurek—who won the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run a record seven consecutive times, among other notable achievements—is the author of Eat & Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness.

LET’S GO BOWLING Mix together items from each category for a nutrient-packed, plant-based meal. CARB LOAD Grains, rice, pasta, wheat berries, barley, millet, quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, rice pasta CARB BOOST Squash, sweet potatoes, yams, potatoes, plantains, dried fruit (raisins, dates, apricots) PROTEIN POWER Garbanzo beans, black beans, pinto beans, cannellini beans, lentils, tofu, tempeh, edamame, seitan VEGGIE KICK Fresh or steamed greens (romaine lettuce, arugula, kale, collards, chard), broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, carrots, cabbage, bok choy FAT FIX Avocado, olives, coconut, nuts (almonds, walnuts), seeds (pumpkin, sunflower, hemp, sesame), nut butter, olive oil, flax oil, sesame oil

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FUEL Prosciutto Bake

QUICK BITES

NUFFIN BEATS A MUFFIN

Five tasty, healthy recipes (without the guilt)

These muffins have no more than 80 to 170 calories each, compared to at least 400 for coffee-shop or store-bought ones.

By Matthew Kadey, M.S., R.D.

PROSCIUTTO BAKE

PESTO EGG CUPS

Eggs and prosciutto are packed with protein to help your muscles recover. Makes 2 LINE 2 greased muffin cups with 1 slice prosciutto each to cover bottoms and sides, leaving 1⁄4-inch overhang. TOP with sliced roasted red pepper and arugula. Crack an egg into each cup and sprinkle on fresh thyme and black pepper. BAKE at 375°F until whites are just set, about 15 minutes.

Lycopene, an antioxidant in tomatoes, may help ward off cancer. Makes 12 WHISK together 8 eggs, 1⁄3 cup sour cream, 1⁄3 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes, 3 Tbsp. pesto, ½ tsp. salt, and 1⁄4 tsp. red pepper flakes. POUR into 12 greased muffin cups and bake at 375°F until eggs are set, about 20 minutes. SERVE with chopped chives.

COCOA FRENCH TOASTIES

Fill up with fiber-rich beans. Makes 12 WHISK 2 eggs and stir in ½ cup cornmeal, 1 cup each pinto and black beans, 1 cup diced red pepper, 1 cup frozen corn kernels, 1 medium grated carrot, 1⁄3 cup tomato paste, 2 tsp. Cajun seasoning, and pinch of salt. PACK into 12 greased muffin cups and bake at 350°F for 20 minutes. SPRINKLE with grated cheddar cheese; bake 10 minutes more. SERVE with sour cream.

Sweet Potato Pancakes

CORNBREAD CHILI MUFFINS

Walnuts are high in potassium. Makes 12 BLEND together 4 eggs, ½ cup milk, 1⁄4 cup brown sugar, 3 Tbsp. cocoa powder, 1 tsp. vanilla, and 1 tsp. cinnamon. POUR into a bowl with 6 cups cubed whole-grain bread. SOAK 5 minutes and then stir in 1⁄3 cup chopped walnuts. Place in 12 greased muffin cups and bake at 350°F for 20 minutes. SERVE with Greek yogurt and berries. Cornbread SWEET POTATO PANCAKES

Cocoa French Toasties

Chili Muffins

Double the recipes and host a postrace brunch. Serve with coffee and mimosas. You know, for the vitamin C.

Pesto Egg Cups

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FOR PREP VIDEOS AND COMPLETE RECIPE NUTRITION DATA, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/MUFFINTINS.

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y BA R R E T T WA S H B U R N E

Sweet potatoes are packed with vitamin A for eye health. Makes 12 BLEND together 3⁄4 cup milk, 2 eggs, and 1 ½ cups sweet potato puree. BLEND in 1 cup oat flour, 3⁄4 cup almond flour, 1 tsp. cinnamon, 1 tsp. ginger powder, ½ tsp. each baking powder and baking soda, and 1⁄4 tsp. salt. POUR into 12 greased muffin cups and bake at 350°F for 20 minutes, or until cooked through. SERVE warm with maple syrup.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL


MINDful Day

BREAKFAST 1 cup steel-cut oats topped with ¾ cup mixed berries, and 1 cup plain kefir

GREENS Leafy greens are rich in folate, which researchers have linked to slower rates of brain decline. HOW OFTEN A salad per day

EAT TO REMEMBER

10 best foods for a quick mind and a strong body YOU THINK OF FOOD TO FUEL (and reward!) your workouts, but it also

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y BA R R E T T WA S H B U R N E

can improve your brainpower. A study from Rush University in Chicago found that adults who followed a heart-healthy diet reduced their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by 50 percent compared to those who didn’t. The diet, a hybrid of Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), is called MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay—phew), and was developed by researchers who found that people following meal plans designed to curb heart disease and type 2 diabetes also had lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease. BEANS In addition to fueling long runs and keeping you regular, these complex carbs are high in antioxidants to fight inflammation, keeping your brain healthy. HOW OFTEN Every other day BERRIES Berries may decrease PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

neuron loss and improve memory performance. HOW OFTEN At least twice per week COLORFUL VEGGIES Colors indicate that a food is rich in antioxidants, which help protect neurons from age-related decay. HOW OFTEN Once per day

NUTS Walnuts, almonds, pecans, hazelnuts, and pistachios are rich in fiber, fat, and vitamin E (walnuts are the best for your mind). HOW OFTEN Daily handful OLIVE OIL Olive oil, high in healthy fat, protects the blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the brain. HOW OFTEN Daily POULTRY Research suggests that the vitamin B₁₂ in chicken and turkey may play a role in fighting age-related decay in the brain. HOW OFTEN 3 to 4 oz. twice per week RED WINE AND DARK RED JUICES In moderation, red wine can help ward off brain decline, thanks to its antioxidants. Unsweetened grape and pomegranate

LUNCH 1 cup black bean soup with veggies, spinach salad with olive oil and 1 oz. chopped walnuts, and slice of wholegrain corn bread with almond butter PRERUN SNACK Handful blueberries, and green tea with squeeze of honey DINNER 4 oz. grilled salmon, 1 cup steamed asparagus, 1 cup wild rice, and 5 oz. red wine

juices can, too. HOW OFTEN No more than 5 oz. of wine (a typical glass) daily SALMON AND SEAFOOD The omega-3 fats in many fish are crucial for development and maintenance of brain health. HOW OFTEN 3 to 4 oz. at least once per week WHOLE GRAINS The B vitamins and vitamin E in whole grains, like whole wheat, oats, wild rice, and quinoa, may decrease risk of Alzheimer’s by ridding the body of compounds linked to brain damage. HOW OFTEN Three servings per day MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 41


FUEL

ATHLETE’S PALATE Thanks to their starch makeup, glass noodles (also called cellophane) are a good source of complex carbohydrates.

GLASS ACT

Change up your carbs with chef and runner Nate Appleman’s favorite noodle recipes. GLASS NOODLES, which are made from mung beans and appear translucent, are packed with carbs and iron. “I use glass noodles for Asian food, but they’re very versatile,” says Nate Appleman, chef, three-time marathoner, and culinary manager for Chipotle Grill. “You can substitute them for any pasta.” Slightly chewier than regular pasta, glass noodles are gluten-free. Find more Appleman meal ideas on Instagram @nappleman. —YISHANE LEE

FOR PREP VIDEOS AND COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/GLASSNOODLES.

ASPARAGUS AND CRAB NOODLES Crab meat is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. Makes 6 servings PREPARE 1 package glass noodles according to package directions, and drain. In a large skillet over medium, heat 3 Tbsp. olive oil, 3 cloves minced garlic, and 1 Tbsp. minced ginger. ADD 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed

SPICY TURKEY MEAT SAUCE AND NOODLES This prerace meal packs a punch of protein and carbs. Makes 6 servings PREPARE 1 package glass noodles according to package directions, and drain. Heat 2 Tbsp. olive oil in large pot or Dutch oven over medium-high. ADD 1 lb. ground turkey and ½ lb. turkey sausage (with casing removed); cook, using a spoon to crumble meat thoroughly, till browned through, 8 to 10 minutes. STIR IN 1 chopped yellow onion, 4 cloves minced garlic, 1 tsp. red pepper flakes, 1 tsp. dried oregano, ½ tsp. salt, and ¼ tsp. black pepper. MIX IN one 28 oz. can crushed tomatoes, reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, 15 to 20 minutes. REMOVE from heat and serve over prepared glass noodles, sprinkling with more red pepper flakes to taste and chopped fresh basil. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y BA R R E T T WAS H B U R N E

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Not only are these noodles lower in carbs and calories than traditional pasta, they also have vitamin B6 and calcium (and no gluten).

CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP This protein-packed, Asian-inspired dish is perfect after a cold run. Makes 6 servings PREPARE 1 package glass noodles according to package directions, and drain. In a large soup pot over medium, heat 3 Tbsp. canola oil, 2 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger, and 2 cloves minced garlic till fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. ADD shredded meat from 1 small rotisserie chicken, 1 qt. low-sodium chicken stock, and 2 cups water, and simmer till warmed through, 5 to 7 minutes. STIR IN 2 Tbsp. lime juice and 1 to 2 Tbsp. fish sauce. Add 5 oz. chopped greens, and cook till just wilted, 2 minutes. DIVIDE prepared noodles among 6 soup bowls. Ladle soup into bowls and top with chopped cilantro or scallions.

and cut into 1" pieces, and cook till tender but still bright green, 2 to 4 minutes. Reduce heat to low, add 1 lb. lump crab meat, drained, ¼ cup lowsodium chicken stock, and 1 ½ tsp. oyster sauce. Stir and cook till crab is warmed through, 2 minutes more. ADD noodles, folding gently to combine. ADD ½ tsp. salt and ¼ tsp. pepper, seasoning to taste. Serve in shallow bowls, with 3 lemon wedges. Garnish with chopped cilantro.


MIND+BODY

YOUR BODY ON YOGA

Instructor and physical therapist Diana Zotos explains what happens when you hit the mat.

STRETCH YOUR LIMITS

Add yoga to get faster and sidestep injuries. By Cindy Kuzma

BREATH CONTROL Yoga’s deep breathing techniques teach you to inhale and exhale from your diaphragm instead of your upper chest, perfusing your blood with more energizing oxygen which then feeds your muscles while running. Deep breathing also improves the function of stabilizing muscles in your core and pelvic floor, creating a more efficient stride.

L U L U L E M O N B R A TO P & T I G H T S

it from her perfectly arched wheel pose, Ann Mazur wasn’t always bendy. She grew up running and swimming, while her sister appeared to inherit her mother’s flexible genes (both of them were competitive gymnasts). Midway through Mazur’s time running for the University of Notre Dame, she developed severe IT band pain. In search of a cure, she tried practicing yoga more consistently, which improved her injury—and her performance. By her junior year, she dropped her 5K time from 20:16 to 17:11. “That experience really

THOUGH YOU’D NEVER GUESS

MINDFULNESS Yoga’s meditative qualities train your brain to focus on the present. That way, when a negative thought—such as This feels hard— pops up on the run, you can let it pass instead of dwelling on it. Mindfulness turns on your parasympathetic nervous system, which decreases blood pressure, eases muscular tension, and slows your breath so you can run faster with less effort.

FLEXIBILITY Research hasn’t yet settled the question of exactly how flexible runners should be or how much stretching is required to get there. But if tightness in your hips, ankles, trunk, or hamstrings affects your gait, your risk of injury may increase as you pile on miles.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY


solidified it for me,” she says. “Yoga will help you run better and faster.” Ten years, a yoga teaching certification, and a Ph.D. in English literature later, Mazur has built a mini-empire around the phrase “Do Yoga Run Faster.” That’s the tagline for her website, runnerslove yoga.com, and Instagram feed (@runnersloveyoga), where she offers video routines for runners and a line of activewear she designed, including shirts that say “Marathon then Savasana.” And she’s still speeding up, despite logging a relatively low 20 to 40 weekly miles, compared with the 60 she ran in college. Last STRENGTH The more you year, Mazur set personal practice yoga, the records in distances from more functional the mile (5:13.50) to the strength and half marathon (1:21:39). She muscular control can’t remember the last you’ll build all time she had a running injuover. Standing one-legged poses ry. For that she credits the and twists target hour of yoga she averages the muscles on each day. the sides of your New York City–based hips and core. physical therapist Diana Weakness here— common in runZotos agrees that runners ners—can cause who practice yoga regularly misalignment that tend to stay healthy and contributes to IT perform better. A halfband problems, marathoner herself, Zotos knee pain, and blends yoga into her treatother injuries. ments for running injuries. “Running is such a repetitive motion and mostly in one Cover model BODY AWARENESS Injury-prevention experts often tell runners to “listen to their bodies.” Yoga amplifies the messages your muscles, joints, and limbs send by revealing imbalances you might not notice otherwise. If pigeon pose is far easier on one side, you’ll know you have an issue—and also, a tool to address it.

and yoga instructor Traci Copeland (shown here) stretches her hips and glutes in this pigeon pose.

plane,” she says. “Yoga can help you maintain healthy joints, it rebalances your connective tissue, and it strengthens muscles in places you don’t target just through running.” What’s more, yoga reboots your brain and nervous system. By aligning your breath with your movements and staying in the present moment on your mat, you’ll train your body to flip from “fight or flight” mode into a more relaxed state. This translates into easier, more enjoyable running, Zotos says. (See “Your Body on Yoga” for a full roundup of its benefits.) Integrating yoga into the rest of your exercise regimen requires planning. But with regular practice, the stress relief and mindfulness training that yoga offers carries into other areas of life, helping you better balance running, work, and other responsibilities. Mazur cites her own life: Along with everything else, she’s a lecturer in English literature at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. “It’s kind of crazy to be teaching, running a company, teaching yoga, and running semi-professionally on the side,” she says. “But all the pieces balance each other out. There’s always something to give you a boost.”

IN PRACTICE How to make yoga a part of your running life EASE IN Begin with a sequence of one to three poses (see following page) as well as a meditation practice—set a timer for five minutes and breathe quietly, or use an app like Headspace for guided versions, Zotos says. Do the poses right after a run, when your muscles are warm. FIND YOUR NICHE For a more formal experience, look for a studio near your home or office, or stream an online class. (Find ours at runners world.com/yogacenter.) If you don’t like the first one you try, sample more until you find a style that works for you. DON’T COMPETE “Even if you’re a hardcore runner, you might be a beginner at yoga,” Zotos says. Ignore what others do in class, and tune into pain and discomfort that can mean you’re overstretching— and remember that, as in running, you’ll improve with time. SCHEDULE WISELY While yoga can be restorative, it’s still a workout, especially if you practice power or advanced varieties. It’s okay to do yoga on your days off from running, but avoid strenuous classes the day before a race or speed workout.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 45


MIND+BODY

THE BODY SHOP

POSE PRIORITIES Eight yoga moves for time-crunched runners

IF YOU HAVE

IF YOU HAVE

JUST A FEW MINUTES, DO...

10 MINUTES, ADD...

PIGEON POSE Bend your left leg and drop the knee to your left. Then, extend your right leg behind you. Press your right hip toward the mat. Inhale, then exhale as you walk your palms as far forward as is comfortable. Hold for at least 45 seconds. Repeat on the right.

IDEALLY, runners would balance their bodies and minds by practicing yoga for at least an hour twice a week, says New York City–based physical therapist and yoga instructor Diana Zotos. But any asanas (that is, poses) you can squeeze into your schedule may improve your performance, reduce injury risk, relieve stress, and increase mindfulness. Practice this postrun routine from certified yoga teacher Ann Mazur, founder of runnersloveyoga.com, to help release tension in the hips, quads, hamstrings, and other areas that are often tight in runners. —CINDY KUZMA

HIGH LUNGE QUAD STRETCH From standing, step your left foot back to come into a high lunge. Then exhale, gently bending your back leg until you feel a quad stretch. Inhale to lift back to the start. Raise and lower three or four times. Repeat on the other leg.

REVOLVED LOW LUNGE Start in a lunge with your right knee forward and your left knee and foot on the floor. Bring your hands into a prayer position, then cross your left elbow across your right knee for a twist. Hold for three to seven breaths, then repeat on the other side.

LIZARD POSE From a low lunge with your left knee forward, place your palms on your mat. Turn your left foot out to a 45degree angle, then roll it onto its outside edge. Press gently on your left inner quad. Hold for three to seven breaths. Repeat on the other side.

BOUND ANGLE POSE Sit and connect the soles of your feet. Grab your feet, inhale, and fold forward as you exhale. Hold for one to two minutes. (For a less intense version, place additional blocks or blankets under your knees for support.)

BRIDGE POSE Lie on your back. Roll up from the bottom of your spine until your hips are lifted. Tuck your shoulder blades to clasp your hands under your body. Press into your heels to send your hips up and round your chest toward your chin. Hold for three to seven breaths.

LEGS UP THE WALL Sit sideways next to a wall, then swivel your legs up the wall as you rest your torso on the floor. Tuck your shoulder blades under your back and allow your arms to relax at your sides or rest on your stomach. Hold for at least five minutes.

IF YOU HAVE

20 TO 30 MINUTES, ADD...

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SEE THESE EXERCISES IN MOTION AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/EIGHTMOVES.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT RAINEY

L U L U L E M O N B R A TO P & T I G H T S

DOUBLE PIGEON From pigeon pose, bring your right leg to the front, stacking your right shin atop the left. (Use a blanket or block if there is a big gap between your right knee and left leg.) Inhale, then exhale and fold forward. Hold for one to two minutes, then switch sides.


“WHO DO YOU SAY THAT I AM ?” -JESUS RUNFORGOD.COM

LOUISIANA HALF MARATHON

HALF THE DISTANCE FULL LOUISIANA JANUARY 12-14 // 2018

REGISTRATION OPENS MARCH 1ST FULL / HALF / QUARTER / 5K / KIDS MARATHON


4 / OARS + ALPS FACE WASH In a twist-up container like deodorant, this solid stick of men’s face cleanser won’t leak in your bag. Just rub the stick over your face and massage in with your fingers; activated charcoal exfoliates as the natural ingredients clean. $14

4

1

IT’S IN THE BAG

The best stuff to take to the gym, and how to carry it all

3

By Jeff Dengate

1 / TRACKSMITH MISSION TOP LOADER BAG With a rugged canvas body, metal hardware, and leather reinforcements, this top-loading sack will endure years of abuse. The canvas is wax-coated to keep water out and won’t rip should you overstuff the bag. It also has an undeniably cool retro vibe, complete with a zippered compartment

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to separate stinky shoes from clean clothes. $168 2 / BROOKS GHOST SHORT SLEEVE Heavy sweaters, do you fear leaving a puddle on a piece of equipment? Not with this nearly see-through T that has an abundance of ventilation where you need it—chest and back. The trim cut stops it from

2

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT RAINEY


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5 / JABRA ELITE SPORT HEADPHONES Free of wires like Apple’s AirPods, this model is ideal for runners, thanks to an in-ear heart-rate monitor and a companion app for onthe-run coaching. The battery lasts three hours. $250

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6 / NIKE AURALUX SOLID CLUB BAG With a polyester shell and plush-lined pockets, this duffel keeps your gear safe but won’t scream gym bag. $75 7 / WAHOO FITNESS TICKR X This heart-rate monitor tracks your running form and counts reps in the gym. Pair it with Wahoo’s 7-Minute Workout app to be

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The Lululemon tote brings style to the gym. (Shoes reviewed on page 77.)

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guided through 12 moves, each 30 seconds, with 10-second rest breaks. $100 8 / POLAR M600 Built upon Google’s wrist-based operating system, the M600 delivers alerts from your phone and tracks your moves 24/7. It also has an optical heart-rate monitor, motion sensors, and GPS. $330 9 / ORANGE MUD MODULAR GYM BAG This classic duffel is huge and has removable bags for wet clothes, toiletries, and shoes. $170 10 / JANJI RIFT VALLEY CAPRIS The trippy print is inspired by artists in Kenya, and a wide waistband holds tight during quick movements. $74 11 / NIKE DRI-FIT TANK Seamless construction, crisscross straps, and bodyhugging fabric are irritation-free. $65 12 / SCHMIDT’S NATURAL DEODORANT The best chemicalfree deodorant we’ve used. Get the bergamot and lime for an all-day whiff of citrus. $9 13 / LULULEMON ALL DAY TOTE This tote has an urban style that complements its tough-as-nails build, plus space for clothes, shoes, and your laptop. $128 14 / CAMELBAK CHUTE This 20-ounce vacuum-insulated bottle has an angled spout so you don’t end up wearing your beverage. $28


THE END OF

PAI A stubborn injury is a runner’s W O R S T N I G H T M A R E . Luckily, sports-medicine experts are developing N E W T E C H N I Q U E S to provide relief—without surgery. Here’s a guide to five C U T T I N G - E D G E T H E R A P I E S .

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMIE CHUNG


N ? BY

BRAD STULBERG

New ways to heal bones and joints require no more than a local anesthetic to perform the procedure and get you running without pain.


SPORTS MEDICINE has come a long way since the 1960s, when Runner’s World was first published. Back then, runners with a muscular or joint injury were prescribed rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE)—and that’s about it. X-rays detected fractures, which usually landed a runner in a hard cast with weeks of immobilization. Today there are many more diagnostic and treatment options available. From bone scans to MRIs, from biomechanical video analysis to gait retraining, from muscle stimulation to kinesio tape, sports-medicine practitioners have more tools than ever at their disposal to heal runners and keep them healthy. But that’s just the beginning. Researchers are always striving to develop advanced therapies that are more effective and that give athletes with persistent injuries a nonsurgical option. “The field is really at a fascinating juncture,” says Joseph C. McGinley, M.D., Ph.D., a sports-medicine physician and radiologist based in Casper, Wyoming, and clinical instructor in the department of radiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. “We are starting to treat conditions that once required surgery and significant downtime with minimally invasive therapies.” While the development of cutting-edge treatments is exciting, the research on some of them is young and the results thus far are mixed, says John Ball, D.C., C.C.S.P., an Arizona-based chiropractic sports physician. “This doesn’t mean some of these treatments can’t be effective, but they should be used as a last resort, for injuries that haven’t responded to traditional therapies.” Of course, it’s every runner’s dream to stay pain-free so there’s never need for any advanced interventions. But in case you aren’t so lucky, there’s value in knowing what might be available to you down the road—to help you stay on the road.

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Stem cells harvested from your own bone marrow may actually help grow new cartilage in your damaged joints.


Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) WHAT IS IT? PRP therapy involves using a runner’s own blood to stimulate the healing process in a damaged tendon or joint. Doctors draw a small amount of blood from a patient’s arm and spin it in a centrifuge, which isolates platelets and plasma containing natural growth factors and healing proteins, says Jonathan Drezner, M.D., a University of Washington School of Medicine sportsmedicine physician. The PRP is then injected into the injured area to spur cartilage, tendon, and muscle regeneration. WHAT DOES IT TREAT? PRP is generally used to treat chronic, ongoing injuries, including hamstring and Achilles tendon problems. “The worse the tendon degeneration is, the better PRP tends to work,” Drezner says. He suggests traditional protocols first: ice, rest, biomechanical adjustments, and physical therapy. If those fail, “PRP can be life-changing,” he says.

HOW EFFECTIVE? The literature on PRP describes mixed results, though a review in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology evaluated the effectiveness of PRP in sports-medicine cases and concluded that PRP may help connective tissue heal even when other treatments have failed. Drezner says the University of Washington Sports Medicine Center has treated more than 300 athletes using PRP, with positive results in 60 to 70 percent of cases. WHO’S HAD IT? Three-time U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials qualifier Michelle Lilienthal reportedly benefited from PRP for chronic high-hamstring pain, and Drezner says he’s treated several collegiate runners for severe tendon problems. DOES IT HURT? Drezner says that while the injection may be uncomfortable, “no one has ever jumped off the table.” Mild soreness for two or three days isn’t unusual.

WHO OFFERS IT? Most larger sports-medicine centers. WHAT’S THE COST? It can cost anywhere from $600 to $1,200. The less-expensive treatments may not use ultrasound to place the injection, which Drezner cautions against for tendon issues. “This treatment is about precision, and ultrasound allows us to be precise.” Most insurers don’t currently cover PRP, but Drezner says that could change if more studies confirm its effectiveness. TREATMENT PLAN? Most runners benefit from a single injection, though some require another, three to six months later. If the issue is not resolved then, Drezner says, PRP probably isn’t going to work.

STEM CELL THERAPY WHAT IS IT? Stem cells are immature cells that have the ability to grow into many different types of cells. In sports medicine, stem cells are harvested and then injected into an injured area, says Jonathan Finnoff, D.O., professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic and Medical Director

of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center in Minneapolis. While PRP therapy stimulates the healing process of tissue that is already there, stem cells may create new tissue. This is why researchers and physicians think this therapy may help joint injuries caused by wornout cartilage; in cell cultures,

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 53


stem cells can grow new cartilage, and if this can happen in a joint, it may prevent the need for a joint replacement. Bone marrow is generally harvested from the hip using an incision and specialized needle capable of penetrating bone. Then, similar to PRP therapy, the bone marrow is centrifuged to separate the stem cells and platelets, which are injected, under ultrasound guidance, into the injured area. WHAT DOES IT TREAT? Stem cell therapy is most commonly used for tendon, ligament, joint, and muscle injuries that are not responding to other treatments, including PRP, Finnoff says. “I almost always recommend PRP first—it is less invasive, less expensive, and there is more evidence supporting it.” HOW EFFECTIVE? The literature on stem

cell therapy is relatively scant. The most encouraging studies are in sheep, where stem cells have been shown to regenerate cartilage, in essence reversing the process of osteoarthritis. “This is still very experimental,” Finnoff says. “That said, I’m having runners respond to stem cells, folks who might otherwise need major surgery.” Former NFL star Peyton Manning reportedly underwent stem cell therapy in 2011 as a lastditch effort to treat a bulging disc in his neck. While Manning appeared to recover eventually, he also had at least one surgery after his stem cell treatment. Finnoff says he’s treated a handful of runners with WHO’S HAD IT?

stem cells, some of whom had great success. DOES IT HURT? The bone-marrowextraction process is typically performed under a local anesthetic or conscious sedation. Therefore, you won’t feel this part. Similar to PRP, the injection of stem cells shouldn’t be very painful. WHO OFFERS IT? Stem cell therapy is becoming increasingly available, especially at major academic medical centers, although the vast majority of stem cell products are not FDA approved. Finnoff recommends finding a physician associated with a college or university who is conducting research and has lots of experience with stem cells. WHAT’S THE COST? Anywhere from $3,000 to $10,000. The wide range is based on market demand, the equipment used, and the type of stem cell harvested. “Because insurance doesn’t cover this, providers charge what people are willing to pay,” says Finnoff. Still, he only recommends it for people with expendable income who have not had success with standard treatments. TREATMENT PLAN? Stem cell therapy is usually a one-time thing. “The only time I’ll administer a second injection is if someone had a good, but partial, response,” Finnoff says. “If a runner with osteoarthritis is starting to regrow cartilage, but they haven’t grown enough to run without pain, I’d consider a second treatment.”

McGinley Vascular Pressure Treatment WHAT IS IT? The same neurotoxin that has been popularized by the cosmetic surgery industry—Botox—is injected under ultrasound and CT guidance

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into the problem spot of a muscle compressing bloodflow, effectively freezing it for three to four months. “The goal of this patented procedure

is to isolate the part of the muscle that is causing an issue and use botulinum toxin to turn it off,” says sports-medicine physician McGinley.


Botox: It’s not just for wrinkles. Runners with debilitating lower-leg conditions have found relief through injections of this neurotoxin.

option is to inject botulinum toxin into the area of muscle that is impinging bloodflow. “The invasiveness and risks are minimal, especially when compared with surgery,” says McGinley, who is a pioneer of this treatment. Although runners lose some muscle function in the “frozen” area, it is generally a small loss, and, over time, the body compensates. HOW EFFECTIVE? Using botulinum toxin in this manner is novel; only one study has been published. But that research, published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine, found it eliminated pain in 94 percent of CECS subjects. Although 69 percent of subjects experienced some loss of strength, the authors reported that this had “no functional consequence.” WHO’S HAD IT? In 2011, Laura Stamp, a recent graduate of Williams College in Massachusetts, could hardly run. She was treated for CECS with botulinum toxin—the first patient to receive this treatment—and went on to have a successful collegiate career in crosscountry skiing and running. DOES IT HURT? The injection hurts no more than a flu shot, says McGinley. WHO OFFERS IT? Though he hopes to train other doctors, as of press time, McGinley is the only provider of botulinum toxin therapy. Therefore, runners seeking the treatment must travel to Casper, Wyoming, where McGinley treats athletes from all over the world. WHAT’S THE COST? Depending on the amount of botulinum toxin needed, the entire treatment may cost $5,000 to $8,000. Insurance covers the treatment only about 15 percent of the time, but McGinley says, “that number is rising as insurance companies realize this can prevent otherwise costly surgery.”

WHAT DOES IT TREAT? Botulinum injections are used to treat two lower-leg injuries: chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) and functional popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (fPAES). In afflicted athletes, a small part of the calf muscle compresses veins or arter-

ies, which can cause a buildup of pressure in the lower leg (CECS) or a lack of bloodflow to the lower leg (fPAES). The result is intense pain, swelling, and numbness in the calf, ankle, and foot. Runners with CECS or fPAES once required surgery. Now, another

TREATMENT PLAN? Most athletes need a second treatment six to seven months after the first. (This costs about $3,000.) Then, the portion of muscle that’s impinging bloodflow should atrophy, McGinley says, becoming so small that it no longer causes a problem.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 55


DRY NEEDLING WHAT IS IT? The most mainstream of the therapies described here, dry needling is used by physical therapists who want to reach problematic areas of tissue that lie deep in a muscle. They insert thin (acupuncture-like) needles into tense bands of muscle. When the needles penetrate them, they help relax these bands and release the neurochemicals that are causing pain, says Scott Epsley, P.T., R.M.S.K., director of physiotherapy and clinical diagnostics for the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers. “It causes muscles to relax, blood-

flow to increase, and the body’s natural healing process to activate,” he says. “Once the trigger point is released, the muscle quickly begins to contract and function normally.” WHAT DOES IT TREAT? Epsley says he frequently treats runners with lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, shin splints, and plantar fasciitis using dry needling. HOW EFFECTIVE? There is a growing body of published evidence showing the benefits of dry needling for soft-tissue injuries. WHO’S HAD IT? Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae uses the therapy when she is deep in training. While

Carfrae says deep-tissue massage work alleviates most of her problems, sometimes she’ll have a “super tight muscle” that just won’t loosen up. For these cases, she turns to dry needling, which “can go deeper and only takes a session or two to help the muscle relax.” DOES IT HURT? The needles are very fine, so there is minimal discomfort upon entry. Once the needles penetrate the trigger point, you can expect a dull pain, similar to someone pressing on a bruise, depending on the location. The needles remain in the trigger point for five to 15 minutes, or are inserted and withdrawn from the area several times. There may be some soreness for a day or two following the treatment, but “nothing so bad,” according to Epsley—with one exception: the calves. Epsley is judicious about needling this area, especially if a runner has an event coming up or needs to resume training immediately. “The calves tend to be more sore than other areas for a couple of days after needling,” he says. WHO OFFERS IT? Physical therapists are needling in about 25 states. That said, few use ultrasound to guide the needle, something Epsley does do and which he says “leads to more precise placement and thus better outcomes.” (A special certification is required for therapists to use ultrasound; Epsley believes more therapists will seek this certification, so the use of ultrasound should proliferate.)

These tiny needles can access and relax deep muscle tension that your massage therapist can’t reach.

56 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

WHAT’S THE COST? Most insurance companies do not cover dry needling. It may be employed as part of an overall consultation but cannot be billed separately, so sometimes there is a small fee for including it. Offered as a stand-alone treatment (without a prescription for PT), you can expect to pay anywhere from $65 to $120. TREATMENT PLAN? Epsley says runners require anywhere from two to seven sessions over the course of a few weeks. If the issue doesn’t improve after multiple treatments, he says, “something other than a soft-tissue issue, like a stress fracture, may be causing the problem.”


Using a bonestimulator kit at home can help you avoid surgery for a fracture that won’t heal—but the treatment could take three to four months to work.

COMING SOON What sportsmedicine docs are working on next

3-D PRINTING At some point in the future, braces and casts will be custom printed to the exact dimensions of a patient’s body, says Mark Davies, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon at Regional Medical Center of San Jose in California. And, way into the future, he says 3-D printing may even be used to print organic, cellular material, like ligaments, cartilage, and tendons.

his clinic, too. “It’s not that ultrasonic bone stimulation speeds up healing of common stress fractures,” he says, “but for ones that fail traditional therapy, or with the fifth metatarsal, it definitely helps.” WHO’S HAD IT? Rich Kenah, a former Olympian at the 800-meter distance, used a bone stimulator to help heal a navicular stress fracture in his foot. “The stress fracture healed, I returned to make an Olympic team, and I still run pain-free today,” Kenah says. “I am glad I chose this route over surgery.”

TISSUE ENGINEERING Today, a torn ligament is sewn back together or replaced using tissue harvested from another part of a patient’s body or a cadaver. Tomorrow, Davies says, collagen (the protein that makes up connective tissue) may be grown out of naturally occurring biological agents.

S T Y L I N G B Y A N G E L A CA M P O S AT S TO C K L A N D M A R T E L

ANABOLIC AGENTS Human growth hormone (HGH) and other anabolic agents may be used to speed the recovery process. This is controversial since it blurs the lines between sports medicine and performance enhancement and could also have negative side-effects. Mark Cuban, the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks, runs a foundation that is funding a study at the University of Michigan investigating the use of HGH following ACL-repair surgery.

Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasonic Bone Stimulation WHAT IS IT? Ultrasonic waves activate cells near a bone fracture to stimulate the healing process, says Stephen Pribut, D.P.M., a Washington, D.C., sports podiatrist who is a clinical assistant professor of surgery at George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences. Patients are given a small ultrasound kit to use at home. It straps onto the fracture site, usually on a foot or shin, so patients can sit and read or watch TV while undergoing treatment. WHAT DOES IT TREAT? Bone stimulation is generally used

if a shin or foot bone fails to heal after four to six months of traditional treatment. However, it’s sometimes used as an immediate treatment of fifth-metatarsal fractures and stress fractures, since this particular bone tends not to heal without stimulation or surgery. “If you’ve reached the point where you need to use a bone stimulator, this probably means that you’ll also be in a soft cast or on crutches,” Pribut says. HOW EFFECTIVE? A number of studies support it as an effective treatment. Pribut has found this to be true in

DOES IT HURT? Some people report a slight warmth, but most patients feel nothing. “All the vibration is deep and internal,” Pribut says. WHO OFFERS IT? Over the past decade, bone stimulators have become widely available. Most sports-medicine physicians should be aware of and have access to the technology, Pribut says. WHAT’S THE COST? Insurance usually covers stimulation for fractures that haven’t healed in four to six months, or for fractures and stress fractures of the fifth metatarsal. TREATMENT PLAN? Pribut suggests runners use the stimulator for 20 minutes per day over three to four months. Given that the process takes so long, Pribut says, “many elite athletes elect to have surgery instead.”

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 57


58 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

By MARC PARENT

PHOTOGRAPH BY NAME HERE

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y N A M E G O E S H E R E

HYPERSPACE RACE


A short time ago in a state not far away, a father and son joined forces to destroy the galaxy! Or finish a 10K, whichever came first… THERE ARE WORSE THINGS that can happen to your child than Osgood-Schlatter disease, but if it’s the only worst thing that’s ever happened, it’s pretty bad. In this condition, which usually develops in athletic children as the result of a PHOTOGRAPH BY NAME HERE

sustained growth spurt, the quadriceps pull on the tendon attaching the kneecap to the tibia, causing the tendon to pull away, and producing pain that can last many months. In severe cases, the tendon can separate from the shinbone, requiring

ILLUSTRATIONS BY CUN SHI

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 59


surgery for reattachment. The X-rays of my son’s right knee revealed his tendon had begun to do just that. “I don’t want to be that guy,” the orthopedic surgeon, Fred Barnes, said to Willem, who sat restlessly on the edge of a paper-covered exam table. “That guy who says you shouldn’t play any sports this year. But I have to be that guy.” Willem glanced at me. He was a four-sport sixth-grader who had constructed his entire identity around physical activity. “All sports?” I asked Dr. Barnes. He closed his eyes and nodded. Then he explained the perils of surgery and how close Willem was to needing it. “Can he run?” I asked. “Even if I said yes, I don’t think he’d be able to,” he said, which was true in the end. After dropping out of his teams, he made a last-ditch attempt to stay active with a commitment to maintain a slow mile, but quickly had to give that up as well. For the rest of the year and most of the next, he had difficulty just walking up stairs. I’m not sure what it is about watching your kid go through a protracted battle with a disease and come out better on the other end that makes you want to go to Disney. Of course there are less dramatic, happier reasons that might make you want to go there—you could celebrate a graduation or a report card or you could just eat a banana and say, “That’s it—we’re going to Disney World!” But if like me, you’re not a Disney person—if you’ve celebrated graduations and good report cards and eaten dozens of ba nanas and still not heard the Disney alarm bell, a recovery from a long childhood illness really makes it ring. I had never taken any of our kids to Disney World, but the afternoon I saw Willem walk across the field after a difficult game without limping, I suddenly wanted to put a stake into the heart of the long struggle he’d endured with the ultimate celebration. What better way to celebrate health than with a race, and what better place to hold that celebration than Disney World?

60 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

THIS YEAR, runDisney will hold nine themed events with courses ranging from 5K to 26.2 “magical miles,” taking runners past the most iconic landmarks of its California, Florida, and Paris theme parks. The half marathons and marathons usually start before the parks open, allowing runners unfettered passage through the lit-up spectacle of inarguably some of the world’s ultimate playgrounds. If you ever wanted to stand in sweat-soaked awe beneath the giant, hovering, violet and green-lit Spaceship Earth at Epcot, if you ever wanted to glide through the glittering castle gates of the Magic Kingdom with little more than the sound of your feet striking the cobblestones, there is a Disney race for you. If you want to run in a princess dress, a Chewbacca costume, or classic white puffy gloves and mouse ears, there is a Disney race for you. If you want to run and take a selfie with Tinker Bell or the Avengers, C-3PO, Jabba the Hutt, Cinderella, Merida, Ariel, Dopey, Goofy, Donald Duck, or the relentlessly cheerful Mickey Mouse himself, Disney has a race for you. In 2015, more than 250,000 runners ate the banana, heard the alarm, and answered the call. When I told Willem I wanted to run with him through Disney World, he didn’t jump at it—a reaction that was either a parental triumph or failure. “I have school,” he said. “It’s on a weekend. You’ll only miss a day. Let’s do it.” “Why?” “Because your knees don’t hurt anymore. Because you’re finally healthy again and healthy people run and we should celebrate that. Because you were resilient and patient and never complained and sometimes when people want to celebrate a difficult accomplishment that was a long time coming, they go to Disney World.” “Resilient.” He raised an eyebrow. “Yeah, a little slack, please. Dads acknowledge resilience.”

I signed us up for the inaugural Star Wars Half Marathon—The Dark Side weekend last April, where we would run the 10K race, a distance cleared by Dr. Barnes. After catching up on our Star Wars movies and two months of easy running, we landed in Orlando and less than an hour later, were shaking the big, white-gloved Mickey hand of a doorman for Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort, who somehow knew our names without us telling him. So the magic began. We made a quick visit to the Health and Fitness Race Expo at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex to sign waivers and pick up race packets. Within moments of stepping onto the grounds, we were met head-on by a marching formation of Stormtroopers, which was, you know, fantastic. It probably goes without saying, but these were not merely people dressed as Stormtroopers—they were actual Stormtroopers, from glossy full-body shine to blasters. “Real Stormtroopers!” I said to Will as they crossed us. “No way, where?” he said, and I pushed him from his stride. I had been told there was a certain polish to all things Disney, and the race expo was early proof of that. The caver nous arena with rows of exhibitors offering everything but fitness itself was like what you might expect to find in a heaven that favored runners. The well-stocked merchandise section was walled off by giant panels covered with Star Wars artwork that, like nearly everything else, produced anxiety if you passed them without taking a picture. Overwhelmed by the desire for everything, we left with nothing, save for a few Mini Clif bars. In the remaining hours of the day, we made a brief visit to the Animal Kingdom Theme Park, where we approached the massive Tree of Life and began our amazement at the scale of everything— in this case, the “tree trunk” carved with so many animals it would take a day to see them all. There is a builtin, reliable thrill you get from standing in front of something you’ve seen


a hundred times in photographs, and a similarly reliable charge in bringing your child with you to do so. At Disney, the effect is magnified to a level that causes a sort of recklessness. “We’re really here!” I said to Willem, indulging the feeling that every past and future childhood deficit was made moot by our presence at the base of this towering plastic tree. After hitting the major attractions of the park and eating a light dinner, we bussed back to the hotel and returned to the room, where our turned-down beds were decorated with hand towels elaborately folded into various Disney characters, including Mickey. Said Willem: “He’s everywhere.” WE WOKE TO OUR ALARMS at 3:30 a.m., showered, pinned on numbers, ate the Mini Clif bars with half-watered Gatorade, and stepped out into the night with hundreds of other sleepy racers. The 10K staging area in front of Epcot was a colorful blaze of arcing lights and chrome scaffolding stretching past six starting corrals and more than 12,000

runners. Enormous outdoor screens projected classic Star Wars scenes as the thunder of music and lightsabers and blasters and TIE Fighters seemed to rise straight from the ground. An adjacent lot was filled with hundreds of runners waiting in small lines to get snapshots with Star Wars characters—each scene staged and lit as if ripped straight from the movies. I dragged Willem over to my hero (and the shortest line): the fat, drooling, hookahsmoking Jabba the Hutt and his nasty little monkey-lizard pet. When it was our turn, we stepped into the scene and tried not to have a Star Wars meltdown like the ones we’d seen trembling runners have in the adjacent Darth Maul scene. With a half hour before the start of the race, Willem and I jogged through the happy mayhem to our assigned corral. No sooner had we oriented ourselves than a bright rash of fireworks burst from the arch of the starting gate and the first corral of runners howled with arms raised and took off. We moved forward to the base of an elevated stage where Jedi reenactors battled with noisy, flashing

lightsabers. Most of the people around us were dressed as Star Wars characters. I had thought about getting outfits for us and if I ever did this again, I would. You don’t get any seriousness points for running a Star Wars race at Disney just because you’re not in Wookiee boots. The onstage Jedi twirled and crashed their lightsabers furiously and the crowd around us cheered. Then the big screens pulsed with a starry countdown and another rash of overhead sparks released us onto the course. From the moment it began, the race was a kind of reverse parade, where instead of sitting stationary on a curb as the floats and dancers pass down the middle of the street, you run down the middle of the street as the stationary floats and dancers greet you from the curb. First came the marching band, probably a hundred strong, blaring the original Star Wars theme. Under a night sky, the song, with its up-beat drums and smashing cymbals, rivaled the Rocky theme as an adrenaline pumper. Then came the asteroid field—a projection of some sort that blended seamlessly with


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finishing time wasn’t really the point. I offered to sign him up for a 10K back home if he really wanted to see how fast he could go. As if on cue, R2-D2 appeared around the corner, and we detoured from the course and stopped for a closer look. We ran up Sunset Boulevard, stopped again to pose for a course photographer, under the looming shadow of the Twilight Zone Tower of Terror, then exited the park on our way to complete the second half of the race. Just after the four-and-a-half-mile water stop, we entered a long straightaway that began new mileage for Willem. In our training, I had never taken him past mile five. He asked if he could speed ahead and wait for me at the entrance of the final park. I nodded and he took off down a long line of belching fog machines and low green lights. In the weird and beautiful mash-up of an artificially manufactured landscape populated with hooting, costumed runners, thumping movie music, fictional interplanetary battles, and my own exhaustion, I gave in to a wave of genuine emotion. Willem flew ahead with giant leaping strides—strong and loose and fast as bands of green fog swirled in his wake. Given how different that stride was from the hobbling shuffle he’d had

for so long, it would have been moving to watch him run as effortlessly down a simple sidewalk, but add green fog and interstellar orchestral music to the mix and, well, a group of jogging mailmen would draw tears.

WHEN YOU VISIT DISNEY as a firsttimer, friends who have been before you raise great expectations about the importance and inevitability of the “Disney moment”—that speck of time that freezes in memory as a happy spot you can return to when you’re back in life and ever needing a lift. There was a medal at the end of the race I was looking forward to that might qualify for that moment, and a promising load of rides and sights in the days to follow, but when I saw Willem run ahead of me and glance back, smiling, I knew I’d experienced the promised Disney moment. We met up again at the entrance to the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex and plowed through the remainder of the course. As a testament to the number of run-stopping sights we’d enjoyed, we crossed the finish line together for a net time of 1:11:16. Under a hail of music and lights and cheering spectators, we cupped each other’s shoulders in an eighth-grade boy’s version of a hug.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y G R E G G M C G O U G H ( TO P R OW, 4 ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F M A R C PA R E N T ( B OT TO M R OW, 3 )

the darkness and seemed to engulf us with giant spinning boulders. We rounded a corner at the half mile and rushed straight for the Spaceship Earth at Epcot. We watched it grow large with our approach, filling the sky with colorful shimmering light, then we swung into Epcot and made our way over the charming paths and walkways surrounding the World Showcase, passing the Canada and United Kingdom pavilions—two of the 11 countries elaborately re-created along the loop. Crossing a wide bridge, we charged down another causeway along the rim of a smaller lagoon, then straight through the grand entrance of the Hollywood Studios park, which was fully lit and twinkling as if on the busiest holiday weekend. Up ahead, there was a large crowd of runners. We slowed as we approached and bumped fists with every human and nonhuman Star Wars character you can think of and many you couldn’t. Huge crowds formed around Darth Vader, who posed stoically for pictures, and C-3PO, who paced and waved and flashed his yellow eyes. I wanted to loop back, as many runners were, to get a second look at everyone, but Willem tore ahead. “How are the knees?” I asked when I caught up to him. He said they were good and asked if we could run a little faster. Despite the digital clocks at every mile marker and the ChronoTrack B-tags attached to our race bibs, I told him our

The author and his son Willem with Jabba the Hut (top left), “real” Stormtroopers (left), and Chewbacca (right).


BRING THE KIDS (OR PARENTS)!

Family-friendly races for all ages Munchkin Marathon

Olathe, Kansas April 22, 2017 Kids ages 5 to 15 log 25 miles in the months leading up to race day and finish 1.2 on the course of the grownups’ Garmin Marathon in the Land of Oz. Big kids can do a 10K or half. Everyone gets Wizard of Oz–themed goodies.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M A R K R E I S /C O U R T E S Y O F T H E WA L D O WA L D O 5 K

Peach Festival 5K

Fort Collins, Colorado August 19, 2017 A special family registration price includes two adults and two children. Stay for peach pancakes and live bands.

Twisted Maze Run

West Salem, Wisconsin September TBD, 2017 Run two miles through a corn maze—at night!—with a flashlight and receive a glow-in-the-dark race T-shirt.

The Waldo Waldo 5K

Colorado Springs, Colorado October 14, 2017 Where’s Waldo? All over the place in this event (top) that gives you a Waldo costume kit upon registration to support the restoration of Waldo Canyon, damaged by wildfires in 2012. —DANIELLE ZICKL

Then we ducked into fancy TIE Fighter medals and made our way to a large finishers’ area where we ate postrace snacks and posed for pictures with the BB-8 droid, a giant lamprey monster, and two Stormtroopers—real ones. Just before heading back to our room, we spotted Darth Vader standing in a blue spaceship. Willem was “okay with not actually meeting him.” “We have to,” I said. “I think you have to pay a fine of some sort if you complete this race and skip out on Darth Vader.” We stepped forward. “You—over here,” Darth Vader said, jabbing his finger at me and pointing to his right, the lights on his belt and vest blinking, the deep, commanding voice indistinguishable from that in

the movies. He turned to Willem and stared motionless at him, breathing his signature, aqua-lung rasp. Suddenly, he opened his folded arms and let them hover at his sides. Willem didn’t flinch but I could tell he was in a way melting. Vader leaned in slightly as if to look at him more closely. The moment seemed to last much longer than it probably did. Slowly, he turned his head and Willem followed along, taking the place to his left side. Then he folded his arms in front of him again and turned to me and said, “The Force is strong with this one.” I held up my medal and smiled for the picture, thinking: That. Just. Happened. If there is such a thing as a runDisney moment, we’d both just had one.


RUNNING

NAME

the W

Liam McGarry

RLD

AGE

39

BELFAST PROFESSION

NORTHERN IRELAND

Business Consultant Every route McGarry runs in Belfast brings him by a landmark, like Belfast City Hall, shown below.


THE TWO THINGS Belfast is famous for, unfortunately, are the Titanic (which was built here) and the Troubles (which tormented people for 30 years). But the city is safer now, and while we have the usual mob of headmelters, people here are generally good craic [fun]. Running is a neutral sport in Belfast, devoid of sectarianism. Some sports here, like Gaelic Athletic Association football, rugby, or field hockey, are probably played more by Catholic or Protestant schools. If you’re playing football, for example, you might be on a team from a certain area, wearing colors that identify you as such. But running’s never really been associated with any one group, and people have been very protective of that. This being Belfast, club runners are more likely to fight between themselves than with other clubs. But really, we just want to run, and we don’t want any bollocks. It’s a small city. In fact, you can see a lot of Belfast by running a 10K circuit. So even a short run will take you through different neighborhoods, many of which will always be Catholic or Protestant. If you were interestFrom top: at the Palm ed in the political House at the Botanic aspect, you could Gardens; on Linenhall go through four Street; and through different areas the roads around Donegall Square. and see flags and murals and “peace lines,” which are walls built between neighborhoods to help keep the peace. I started running in 1998. Before that, I played more traditional sports and then—

As told to Nell McShane Wulfhart

PHOTOGRAPHS BY FRED CORCORAN

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 65


RUNNING

the W

RLD

At the Titanic Belfast (top) and by the “peace line” where Shankill Road (Protestant) and Falls Road (Catholic) meet (below).

66 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017


B E L FA S T

once I was too injured for football—moved into running. Now I volunteer as a coach for Parkruns in Belfast. They’re free weekly 5K races that were started a few years ago by Matt Shields, a 2:19 marathoner and former chairman of the North Belfast Harriers, the oldest athletics club in Ireland. Now 62, he’s a great runner and coach, and he’s helped McGarry crosses the River Lagan (top), make running more passes the “Big Fish” popular here. He’s in Donegall Quay gotten a lot of kids (center), and climbs the trails on Divis in North Belfast— Mountain (bottom). the most sectarian part of the city—into running. His philosophy is that running should be free or as free as possible, and there should be no barriers to participation. There are now seven Parkruns across Belfast that draw about 300 people. These types of runs and other clubs and races have really helped encourage a healthier lifestyle. The typical diet here is bad—we don’t eat nearly enough fruits and vegetables. So I also helped Matt set up another program, JogBelfast, a couch-to-5K scheme. It’s about 90 percent women. You know they’re getting serious when they say, “I was out last night—I didn’t have the kids, and I still didn’t take the wine!” And the group runs are a chance for people to meet and socialize. Members in their 20s and 30s say, “If you don’t meet people in the pub, how else do you make friends?” So they meet through running. Now some clubs are wondering if we’re becoming too social. There is one sore point for runners, and that’s the Belfast City Marathon that happens every May. Over 2,000 people participate in the full and 10,000 run it as part of a relay team. It’s great for friends to do. I’ve been roped into it two or three times, partly because so

many people meet up in pubs afterward, and it’s hateful to be there with everyone having done it and you haven’t! The problem with the race is that the course goes along the side of the motorway and into an industrial estate. With so many great parks here, no one would ever run that route. There are places to run just outside the city, too. To me, the best place is Divis Mountain in the Belfast Hills. You can do a 14-miler there and back with lots of climbing. Just 10 minutes into the run and you’re in the hills. It’s best in the early morning, when you can see the city awaken through the mist. You’re surrounded by grass, the lough [lake], the cranes, the occasional cow. You can look out to Strangford Lough, south to the Mourne Mountains, or inward to Lough Neagh. It’s a spectacular place, and a place most people don’t go. It lets you get away from it all, in every sense.


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Spring

SHOE GUIDE BY JEFF DENGATE & MARTYN SHORTEN, PH.D. PHOTOGRAPHS BY NICK FERRARI

Best Buy: Brooks Ravenna 8 (page 80)

Best Debut: Reebok OSR Harmony Road (page 78)

Editor’s Choice: New Balance Fresh Foam Zante v3 (page 85)

Best Update: Adidas Supernova (page 77)


RW SHOE FINDER START HERE

YES

THE SHOE FINDER HELPS YOU PINPOINT SUITABLE MODELS BASED ON YOUR RUNNING HISTORY AND OTHER SHOES YOU LIKE. FOR MORE DETAILS ON FIT AND PERFORMANCE, SEE OUR REVIEWS ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES.

DO YOU KNOW THE TYPE OF SHOE THAT WORKS WELL FOR YOUR SIZE, STRIDE, AND PREFERRED RIDE? Proceed directly to the grid below. Shoes are arranged in terms of cushioning, weight, sole height, flexibility, and stability features as measured in the RW Shoe Lab. You’ll find lighter, less-supportive shoes in the bottom left and highly cushioned, more-stable shoes in the top right. Shoes in the middle provide a balance of performance and protection features and can work well for many runners.

NO

Put yourself into a runner group using the table at right. When you’ve arrived at a color-coded group on the bottom of the table, locate it on the grid below. Shoes in that encircled group tend to work well for runners like you. Start with shoes well within your group, but feel free to consider models along the border or in a neighboring group.

SHOES IN THIS REGION ARE LIGHT, FLEXIBLE, AND WELL CUSHIONED WITHOUT STABILITY AND SUPPORT FEATURES. Based on tests at the RW Shoe Lab, we fixed the shoes on this grid to show how they compare. Then we overlaid the grid with runner groups to show which shoes work well for certain runners.

LESS SHOE

Saucony Kinvara 7 Reviewed Previously

Saucony Freedom ISO p. 83 Under Armour Speedform Gemini 3 p. 82

BEST DEBUT Reebok OSR Harmony Road p. 78

C

Asics Gel-DS Trainer 22 p. 85 EDITOR’S CHOICE New Balance Fresh Foam Zante v3 p. 85

On Cloudflow p. 85

BEST BUY Brooks Ravenna 8 p. 80

BEST UPDATE Adidas Supernova p. 77

Salming enRoute p. 82

Brooks Launch 4 p. 84 Skechers Performance GOrun 5 p. 84

E

Saucony Kinvara 8 p. 80

Mizuno Wave Rider 20 p. 82

Newton Running Gravity 6 p. 78

MORE

Altra Intuition 4.0/ Instinct 4.0 p. 83

Altra Provision 3 p. 84

For every Shoe Guide, men’s and women’s models are tested on the road and in the lab. Images here are a mix of both.

A

SHOES IN THIS REGION OFFER A FIRM, CLOSE-TO-THE-GROUND RIDE WITH LITTLE WEIGHT AND FEW RESTRICTIONS ON FOOT MOTION.

B

LESS


WE ANALYZED DATA FROM MORE THAN 3 MILLION USERS OF THE RW ONLINE SHOE FINDER TO SORT RUNNERS INTO SEVEN GROUPS. RUNNERS IN EACH GROUP HAVE SIMILAR SHOE NEEDS BASED ON A FEW KEY VARIABLES.

RUNNER GROUPS

BODY SIZE Body Mass Index is calculated from your weight and height, and offers a fairly reliable indication of body type. BMI = Weight (pounds) / (Height [inches]) 2 x 703. Or use the calculator at runnersworld.com/bmi. Generally, the higher your BMI, the more shoe you need.

BMI < 23 Examples: Under 160 lb. for 5'10" man Under 134 lb. for 5'4" woman

BMI 23–27 Examples: 161–188 lb. for 5'10" man 135–157 lb. for 5'4" woman

BMI > 27 Examples: Over 189 lb. for 5'10" man Over 158 lb. for 5'4" woman

RUNNING EXPERIENCE This includes how long you’ve been running and how much you run. Find your level here by estimating your average miles per week over the past year. The more you run, the more efficient you tend to become and, generally, the less shoe you need.

More than 20 miles per week

More than 15 miles per week

More than 10 miles per week

INJURY EXPERIENCE During normal training, do you tend to develop problems in your joints, bones, and connective tissue? Those with higher incidence of injuries tend to need shoes with more support. Note: Shoes cannot cure injuries, and the causes of problems vary greatly. If you’re battling persistent injuries, you should see a medical professional. GROUPS

No

A

Fewer than 20 miles per week

Yes

Yes

No

B

No

C

Yes

Yes

B

D

No

No

E

Fewer than 10 miles per week

Yes

Yes

No

D

F

G

SHOES IN THIS REGION COMBINE MAXIMAL CUSHIONING AND SUPPORT, WITH PLENTY OF PROTECTIVE MATERIAL BETWEEN YOU AND THE GROUND.

CUSHION Hoka One One Arahi p. 77

Mizuno Wave Horizon p. 76

Brooks Transcend 4 p. 76

Nike Air Zoom Vomero 12 p. 77

Hoka One One Bondi 5 p. 76

Asics Gel-Nimbus 18 Reviewed Previously Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 33 Reviewed Previously

G MORE SHOE

MBT Speed 16 p. 78

D

361 Degrees 361-Sensation 2 p. 83

CUSHION

Fewer than 15 miles per week

“Reviewed Previously” shoes are well-known models, shown here for reference. Visit runnersworld.com/ shoesearch to read reviews of them.

F

SHOES IN THIS REGION COMBINE FIRM CUSHIONING AND AN ABUNDANCE OF STABILITY FEATURES, PROVIDING CONTROL AND PROTECTION.


INTRODUCING THE FREEDoM. Experience our first shoe to offer a full midsole of EVERUN Continuous Cushioning. Giving you even more energy return, more responsiveness, more amazing cushioning that you’ll feel throughout your entire run. Exclusively available at select retailers, find one at Saucony.com


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SPRING SHOE GUIDE 2017

MEN’S WOMEN’S

Hoka One One Bondi 5 $150

Brooks Transcend 4 $160

Mizuno Wave Horizon $160

The most cushioned road shoe Hoka One One makes, the Bondi maintains the same soft platform, rounded sole, and smooth ride as previous versions. This update, however, fits a little roomier in the toebox; a new last adds 3 mm width. The upper also has a sleek look, with an engineered mesh for better breathability and printed overlays. The most noticeable change is that it looks like a traditional running shoe. That’s because Hoka has painted the top half of the sidewalls—but rest assured, all that cushioning is intact.

A year ago, we gave the Transcend our Best Update award for softening the stability “guide rails” and giving the shoe an upturned toe for a faster ride. The steady improvements continue as the shoe sees reworked grooves in the sole for better forefoot flexibility. The guide rails—as in bumper bowling, they nudge you back to the middle if you stray to either side—have been raised on the lateral (outer) edge, while the heel counter has been extended farther down the inner side of the shoe to lock in the heel of a rotating foot.

The all-new Horizon has its sights set on highly cushioned stability shoes like the Asics Gel-Kayano. It uses a reengineered Wave plate sandwiched between two foams to deliver both cushioning and stability when the heel first makes contact on the ground. The plate extends three-quarters of the length of the shoe to continue stabilizing the foot as a runner transitions to his forefoot. The plate has also been tweaked to have a convex shape, so it deforms under pressure, then pops back into shape as you move through your stride.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

HEEL CUSHIONING SOFT

FIRM

FOREFOOT CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT

LESS

FIRM

FOREFOOT CUSHIONING FIRM

FLEXIBILITY

SOFT

FIRM

FLEXIBILITY MORE

10.3 oz 9.0 oz 43.5 mm (heel); 35.2 mm (forefoot) 38.8 mm (heel); 31.5 mm (forefoot)

LESS Weight: Height:

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING SOFT FLEXIBILITY

MORE 10.9 oz 8.8 oz 36.1 mm (heel); 25.3 mm (forefoot) 36.2 mm (heel); 24.2 mm (forefoot)

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

11.0 oz 9.1 oz 37.2 mm (heel); 25.4 mm (forefoot) 35.9 mm (heel); 24.6 mm (forefoot)

NOW ON RUNNERSWORLD.COM MORE SHOES AND REVIEWS In addition to the 23 shoes here, our website provides access to hundreds of shoe reviews. Go to runnersworld.com/shoefinder to see more shoes that meet your needs in fit and performance.

76 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

VIDEO BREAKDOWN Runner’s World Shoes & Gear Editor Jeff Dengate (left) walks you through each pair of running shoes reviewed in these pages. Watch and learn at runnersworld .com/shoeguide.

DRY OUT SOGGY SHOES Long run in the rain leave your shoes damp and stinky? For a gear hack that will quickly dry out your shoes and keep them smelling fresh, visit runners world.com/wetshoes.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y ( S H O E S T I L L S O N W H I T E )

Weight: Height:

HEEL CUSHIONING SOFT


Hoka One One Arahi $130 While many previous Hoka One One shoes have had some mixture of stability elements such as wide footprints and beveled heels, the Arahi is its first true support shoe. It uses a J-shaped piece of firm foam that wraps around the back of the heel and up the medial (inner) side of the shoe. The stack heights (heel and forefoot thicknesses) are on par with the company’s speedy trainer, the Clifton, for a similarly soft ride. HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

9.6 oz 7.9 oz 35.0 mm (heel); 29.0 mm (forefoot) 34.1 mm (heel); 26.7 mm (forefoot)

M

ADIDAS SUPERNOVA $130

S E T S T Y L I N G B Y N I CO L E H E F F R O N ; I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y C H A R L I E L AY TO N

Nike Air Zoom Vomero 12 $150 Comfort remains the key here, with a thick collar lining and tongue padding intact. The shoe sees a tweak to the Flywire system at the midfoot, with shorter straps connecting to small cables to distribute pressure across the attachment points. The outsole is now made of a durable foam, rather than rubber, for an exceptionally smooth and silent transition.

Adidas rolled out its Boost midsole foam in the Energy Boost in 2012, and we’ve been fans of the Supernova Glide that leveraged the material—we awarded versions 6 and 7 with Editor’s Choice awards. This version is essentially number 9, but Adidas has dropped Glide from the name. It also overhauled the shoe from top to bottom, making it softer to appeal HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT to even more runners. To amplify the cushioning, it added even more FOREFOOT CUSHIONING Boost in the heel for a bouncy feeling FIRM SOFT you really can sense. Tests at the FLEXIBILITY RW Shoe Lab show that both the LESS MORE heel and forefoot cushioning have Weight: 10.8 oz 9.2 oz gotten considerably softer. A rail of Height: 33.8 mm (heel); 23.2 mm (forefoot) firmer EVA foam helps runners stay 32.3 mm (heel); 21.1 mm (forefoot) centered over the midsole.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 10.4 oz 8.7 oz 34.5 mm (heel); 26.1 mm (forefoot) 32.3 mm (heel); 24.3 mm (forefoot)

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Derek Call AGE: 30 HEIGHT: 5'10" WEIGHT: 170 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 45 YEARS RUNNING: 20 HOME: Plymouth Meeting, PA OCCUPATION: RW Junior

Video Producer

“I was a huge fan of the Supernova Glide 6 a few years ago, and this model somehow improves on everything that made that shoe special. It seems everyone is coming out with next-gen foams underfoot, but I still find Adidas’s Boost to be the most responsive.”

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 77


SPRING SHOE GUIDE 2017

Newton Running Gravity 6 $175 The Gravity is Newton’s high-mileage trainer, with five lugs under the foot that deliver a highly responsive ride and fast feel. It’s also historically had plenty of cushioning in both the heel and forefoot. The newest model gets even softer, thanks to a new bouncy foam that sits close to the foot. Testers appreciated the extra padding, but also liked the upper fit.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

9.4 oz 7.9 oz 33.2 mm (heel); 26.8 mm (forefoot) 31.3 mm (heel); 25.2 mm (forefoot)

M

REEBOK OSR HARMONY ROAD $120

MBT Speed 16 $110 MBT shoes are defined by their massively padded, Hoka-esque midsole; they are clearly all about cushioning. The Speed 16, however, brings your foot much closer to the road—its profile is nearly in line with traditional trainers. The pronounced curve of the sole is still there to help you roll forward smoothly. Testers felt that the curve discouraged heel-striking.

Reebok, yes Reebok, is back with a standout running shoe that was a pleasant surprise for our wear-testers. (In fact, it has two new shoes available now. The Sweet Road is built on a similar platform but it’s a lighter, firmer shoe for fast days.) The Harmony Road is an all-arounder: a comfortable option for daily training with a soft landing and smooth HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT transition from heel to toe. Its secret ingredient is a high-rebound FOREFOOT CUSHIONING cushioning material, created with FIRM SOFT the company BASF and placed under FLEXIBILITY the heel. From the bottom, it looks LESS MORE like a bowl of ditalini pasta—tiny Weight: 10.7 oz 8.9 oz yellow tubes are steam-pressed in a Height: 36.1 mm (heel); 22.9 mm (forefoot) jumble, and all the extra space in the 34.4 mm (heel); 23.3 mm (forefoot) mix gives it room to compress.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 9.4 oz 7.9 oz 28.8 mm (heel); 25.9 mm (forefoot) 27.5 mm (heel); 25.5 mm (forefoot)

78 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Natasha Bliss AGE: 35 HEIGHT: 5'5" WEIGHT: 128 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 35 YEARS RUNNING: 20 HOME: La Mesa, CA OCCUPATION: Fundraiser

“I was a bit blown away by how much I liked this shoe. It was a great fit for me. As someone who overpronates slightly, I found this shoe to have just the right amount of cushion and support while also remaining light and flexible. It fit snugly around my midfoot, with plenty of room in the toebox.”


SPRING SHOE GUIDE 2017

Saucony Kinvara 8 $110 The Kinvara remains a flexible, soft shoe with low drop (the difference between how far your heel and toes sit from the road). This update gets “more energized,” Saucony says, through the use of a 3-mm-thick layer of bouncy foam under the sockliner, which runs the full length of the shoe (the 7 had just a puck of the material in the heel). That makes the shoe .3 ounce heavier, but testers raved about its fast ride.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 8.0 oz 6.8 oz 29.1 mm (heel); 23.5 mm (forefoot) 28.7 mm (heel); 23.2 mm (forefoot)

FROM THE LAB What Happened to Stability? Before 2012, we reviewed nearly as many stability shoes as neutral. But only a handful of shoes in this guide qualify as stability. Why? In part, the trend is a consequence of the brief but influential “minimal” era. Brands abandoned heavy and expensive support features for less visible devices: Nike, Puma, and Altra use a few degrees of internal wedging, for example, as an invisible but effective stabilizer. Even medially posted classics like the Brooks Adrenaline GTS and Saucony Guide have evolved to carry less weight and construction. The need for traditional pronation control is also under siege. The biomechanics community is uncertain about the connection between pronation and injury and the effectiveness of pronation control in running shoes. In our view, some runners do benefit from a shoe with stability features—but fewer runners than before, and they need less support than once thought.

80 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

BROOKS RAVENNA 8 $120 The Ravenna has long been a moderately supportive and cushioned shoe, capable of handling both long runs and tempo runs with ease. This year, Brooks is labeling it as one of its “Energize” shoes, recommending it as the stability sister shoe to the Launch (see page 84). The shoes now feature a number of similarities, such as 5.5 mm of blown rubber in the forefoot HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT for a softer ride and springier toe-off, and an X-shaped patch of rubber in FOREFOOT CUSHIONING the midfoot that smooths the gap FIRM SOFT between the heel and forefoot. A FLEXIBILITY new air mesh is more breathable than LESS MORE previous versions, but the upper still Weight: 10.8 oz 9.0 oz has plenty of structure to hold the Height: 34.9 mm (heel); 22.5 mm (forefoot) foot steady, thanks to an adjustable 31.9 mm (heel); 21.6 mm (forefoot) strap that locks into the laces.

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Jessica Paholsky AGE: 25 HEIGHT: 5'4" WEIGHT: 115 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 50 YEARS RUNNING: 10 HOME: Emmaus, PA OCCUPATION: Men’s

Health Video Editor

“I have been through at least four models of the Ravenna, and this is by far my favorite. The front of the shoe is now open mesh without plastic lining along the bunion area. Also the inner lining is the same smooth fabric as that of the 7. It has moderate cushioning and moderate flexibility.”


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SPRING SHOE GUIDE 2017

Under Armour Speedform Gemini 3 $130 Totally overhauled for 2017, the Gemini uses an engineered mesh in the front half of the shoe. Combined with a densely woven mesh farther back and external heel clip, it locks the heel and midfoot directly over Under Armour’s top-of-the-line foam. The shoe punches above its weight class, delivering a cushier ride than many shoes with similar profiles.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

9.9 oz 8.2 oz 31.4 mm (heel); 22.3 mm (forefoot) 29.6 mm (heel); 20.9 mm (forefoot)

M

MIZUNO WAVE RIDER 20 $120

Salming enRoute $159 This Swedish company has been building shoes for court sports like handball and squash, but it also makes unstructured, low-to-the-ground running shoes. Its new model has a more mainstream form than some of its earlier shoes, with a soft heel and plastic torsion unit in the midfoot for added structure. The midsole features Salming’s version of a bouncy EVA.

Entering its third decade, the Wave Rider mellows out and gets a little softer. The goal, Mizuno says, is to make a Nike Pegasus–type shoe, softer but with a good balance of weight and performance. Previous iterations of the Rider had focused heavily on performance, meaning the landing was always firm and the toe-off was responsive, to help you HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT run fast. To reach even more runners, Mizuno is using a new softer foam FOREFOOT CUSHIONING and has introduced a new shape to FIRM SOFT its Wave plate—basically flipping FLEXIBILITY it upside down. Now it’s convexLESS MORE shaped, so when you land, your Weight: 10.3 oz 8.3 oz heel presses down in the center as Height: 34.3 mm (heel); 22.1 mm (forefoot) you apply weight, and it snaps back 34.2 mm (heel); 22.2 mm (forefoot) when you shift forward.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 9.0 oz 6.8 oz 30.8 mm (heel); 22.9 mm (forefoot) 27.9 mm (heel); 21.3 mm (forefoot)

82 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Adam Izer AGE: 26 HEIGHT: 6'0" WEIGHT: 155 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 100 YEARS RUNNING: 10 HOME: Detroit, MI OCCUPATION: Veterinarian

“Love the shoe! I’m a big fan of the Wave Rider and this one didn’t let me down. I did everything from easy training runs to track workouts in it. The fit and bounce of the shoe make it very comfortable to put on and go for a run. But it could use some jazzing up in appearance.”


361 Degrees 361-Sensation 2 $120 A high-mileage trainer that hits the sweet spot of moderate cushioning and stability, the Sensation 2 has a quick feel for such a heavy shoe. That comes from an EVA and rubber blend it uses for the top layer of midsole. “This shoe is great for a slightly bigger runner,” says Jason Werner, a 6-foot, 175-pound tester from Pewamo, MI. “The fit and comfort of the shoe reminds me a lot of the classic Asics GT series.” HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

11.4 oz 9.2 oz 33.4 mm (heel); 22.3 mm (forefoot) 29.4 mm (heel); 21.7 mm (forefoot)

SAUCONY FREEDOM ISO $160

Altra Intuition 4.0 / Instinct 4.0 $120 The Intuition (women’s) and Instinct (men’s) put Altra on the map—we awarded the low-slung trainers as Best Debut in March 2012. In subsequent years they got softer, but customers kept asking for the original. So Altra is returning to the same last as the original, which will deliver the same fit. But they maintain the third version’s taller heel and forefoot heights. Testers loved the cushioning. HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 10.1 oz 7.7 oz 25.8 mm (heel); 25.5 mm (forefoot) 24.8 mm (heel); 25.0 mm (forefoot)

Saucony has had great success with Everun—the company’s bouncy material it’s been using in the heel and under the sockliner in shoes across its line. Now, for the first time, it’s rolled out a full midsole made entirely of the compound. The platform of the shoe is heavier than traditional foams, but it provides extra bounce and proves to be more durable over HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT time. To compensate for the heavier material, Saucony has stripped away FOREFOOT CUSHIONING all extra features from the upper, FIRM SOFT leaving just a lightweight mesh and FLEXIBILITY minimal tongue padding. While it has LESS MORE nearly an identical geometry to the Weight: 9.3 oz 7.5 oz Kinvara (heel and forefoot heights Height: 27.8 mm (heel); 22.9 mm (forefoot) are similar), the Freedom feels less 27.0 mm (heel); 22.3 mm (forefoot) squishy and bouncier on the run.

WHAT IS ENGINEERED MESH?

Typically, the fabrics used in running shoes are cut from a large sheet with a consistent weave. Now many shoes feature toeboxes with engineered mesh that is supportive on the sides yet looser (more open) above the toes for ventilation. “By constructing the mesh using this process, we can engineer support and breathability into the textile itself without using stitches, glue, and overlays like you’d see on a traditional shoe,” says Carson Caprara, senior manager of footwear product line management at Brooks.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 83


SPRING SHOE GUIDE 2017

Altra Provision 3 $120 This moderate-cushioned shoe with light stability gets an all-new construction. The midsole still delivers stability without the use of a rigid medial post. Instead, the heel is widened toward the inner edge and the crash pad has been extended to slow the inward roll of your foot. Guide rails are incorporated into the top layer of midsole foam and keep your foot traveling down the center of the shoe.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

10.5 oz 8.2 oz 25.9 mm (heel); 24.3 mm (forefoot) 25.8 mm (heel); 23.9 mm (forefoot)

SKECHERS PERFORMANCE GORUN 5 $100

Brooks Launch 4 $100 A peppy daily trainer from Brooks, the Launch has a firm heel and flexible forefoot that lets you run fast when the mood strikes. This update has more blown rubber in the forefoot than the previous version, delivering a softer (and quieter) landing while also shaving some weight. An extra flex groove up front makes the shoe bend much more easily for a shoe this thick.

Skechers stuck with model number 4 for two years because tweaks to the last version were too minor to warrant a new digit. This year, some smart updates refined the fit and underfoot feel of an already sound shoe. An updated circular-knit upper brings the materials closer to the foot, while ample venting lets the shoe breathe, much like we’re seeing HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT with all of the engineered-mesh uppers. Testers raved about the fit, FOREFOOT CUSHIONING which remained comfortable even at FIRM SOFT the end of long runs when feet were FLEXIBILITY swollen. The bottom of the shoe, LESS MORE too, has a new look, with a thin web Weight: 7.3 oz 6.2 oz of rubber replacing the pods of earliHeight: 28.5 mm (heel); 20.4 mm (forefoot) er models. This gives the shoe more 26.8 mm (heel); 20.2 mm (forefoot) surface contact with pavement.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 9.2 oz 7.7 oz 34.6 mm (heel); 22.6 mm (forefoot) 32.8 mm (heel); 22.2 mm (forefoot)

84 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Dean Williams AGE: 60 HEIGHT: 5'7" WEIGHT: 150 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 40 YEARS RUNNING: 7 HOME: Carlsbad, CA OCCUPATION: Retired

“Bottom line: This is a great-fitting, comfortable shoe for training or racing at any pace or distance. I like that versatility. Improved mesh-stretch and breathability on the GOrun 5 means better fit and comfort. There was a slight change of tongue design, which was actually an improvement.”


Asics Gel-DS Trainer 22 $120 This revered trainer/racer gets back to its roots. The 22 gets a full-length midsole made from FlyteFoam, Asics’s new lightweight material that’s been rolled out to premium shoes like the DynaFlyte and Kayano 23. That’s also helped bring this shoe back into the lightweight territory (two years ago, the DS Trainer weighed 9.2 ounces), making it a solid choice for intervals on the track and tempo runs on roads. HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

8.0 oz 6.7 oz 32.3 mm (heel); 21.8 mm (forefoot) 28.3 mm (heel); 20.1 mm (forefoot)

NEW BALANCE FRESH FOAM ZANTE v3 $100

On Cloudflow $140 The network of pods protruding off the bottom is a hallmark cushioning feature of all shoes built by this Swiss company. Whereas earlier models featured rubber pods, the Cloudflow is constructed from foam to reduce weight and improve flexibility. Testers found it a little firm for everyday training, but said the shoe excels when going fast. The thin upper is soft against the foot.

This lightweight, responsive shoe has gained a cult following since its debut because it’s a jack-of-all-trades: light enough for speedwork but soft enough to handle long runs and half-marathon races. Testers described this update as having “great ground feel” and “pop,” and as being “silky smooth.” To deliver that feeling, New Balance changed the shape of the HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT sidewall and outsole protrusions. The midsole now has convex (outwardFOREFOOT CUSHIONING pointing) hexagons that compress FIRM SOFT more easily upon landing. Likewise, FLEXIBILITY underfoot, reshaped treads are smallLESS MORE er and spread laterally (side to side), Weight: 8.6 oz 7.6 oz with small notches in each to increase Height: 26.6 mm (heel); 18.6 mm (forefoot) flexibility. A new engineered mesh is 25.0 mm (heel); 18.5 mm (forefoot) supportive yet breathable.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 8.2 oz 6.7 oz 29.2 mm (heel); 19.7 mm (forefoot) 30.2 mm (heel); 18.0 mm (forefoot)

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Erin Hunt AGE: 24 HEIGHT: 5'4" WEIGHT: 120 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 50 YEARS RUNNING: 10 HOME: Lansing, MI OCCUPATION: Running

Store Employee

“The Zante has been my go-to shoe, and New Balance did a great job with v3! It is similar enough to the previous model, but fits like a glove. I love the new engineered-mesh upper—it lies nicely on the foot and there was no fabric gathering like I’ve seen in previous models.”

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 85


RACES+PLACES

2017 HALF MARATHON GUIDE

RACE TO THE AFTER-PARTY These food- and beverage-themed races elevate your refueling fare, from chocolate to burritos to bourbon.

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E SY O F T H E M I D D L E B U RY M A P L E R U N A N D J O S H H U M M E L

Some runners are gluttons for punishment who love pushing their limits. Others are just straight-up gluttons who love nothing more than restocking carbs with an extravagant brunch and a celebratory beer (or two). If your idea of the perfect postrace party involves mugs of craft beer, bowls of jambalaya, or steaming plates of justflipped flapjacks, these food- and drink-themed half marathons are for you. Or if you prefer stuffing your face before the finish, we’ve got you covered there, too. So leave the supersnug compression tights at home and bring your appetite to the starting line of these tasty races. —A.C. SHILTON

Run 13.1 miles for pancakes and syrup at Vermont’s Middlebury Maple Run.

86 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017


Literally. After a bus ride to the starting line outside downtown Bozeman, nearly 4,500 runners hurry to the finish line at Pub 317 on Main Street. The net-downhill course sports a St. Paddy’s Day theme (check out the pub’s clever name), so wear green, expect bagpipers along the route, and celebrate with a free beer at the postrace party. March 11, Bozeman, Montana, runtothepub.com

THE LOUISIANA HALF MARATHON

( PA N CA K E S ); RYA N L E VA N D E R /CO U R T E SY O F T H E H O R S E TO OT H H A L F

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B I L L B O C H /G E T T Y I M AG E S (G U M B O); CO U R T E SY O F R U N TO T H E P U B H A L F ; T H E P I C T U R E PA N T RY/A L A M Y

RUN TO THE PUB HALF MARATHON

Southerners know how to throw a party: Each runner gets a wristband good for six servings of Cajun grub from 24 local restaurants. Options include jambalaya, gumbo, duck confit, shrimp étouffée, and pork-cheek sliders. There’s even a vegan village with choices for plant-based athletes. Earning your feast requires a fairly flat tour of Baton Rouge. You’ll run through neighborhoods lined with oak trees and plantation-style homes, the sprawling LSU campus, and cypress-shaded paths along the Mississippi. A crowd of 3,400 runners (plus another 2,000 marathoners who share the course) keeps things lively from start to finish. January 15, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, thelouisianamarathon.com

MIDDLEBURY MAPLE RUN HALF MARATHON HORSETOOTH HALF MARATHON When 2,000 thirsty runners finish at New Belgium’s flagship brewery, there’s unlimited free beer on tap. “New Belgium knows how to throw a party,” says Nick Clark, the race director. Getting to the brewery, though, takes work, with a 500-foot elevation gain in the first 1.8 miles, plus some additional rolling hills. April 23, Fort Collins, Colorado, horsetooth-half.com

First, run through bucolic, rolling Middlebury, with views of the Adirondacks to the west and the Green Mountains to the east. Then celebrate the finish with three fluffy pancakes topped with the state’s most famous export— locally tapped and generously poured. Yes, you are allowed seconds. May 7, Middlebury, Vermont, middleburymaplerun.com

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 87


Treats from Seattle Chocolates, a local, smallbatch chocolatier, accompany tables of chocolate cupcakes, chocolate-chip cookies, brownies, muffins, and chocolate-covered pretzels at the postrace “chocolate bar”—and that’s in addition to the chocolate gels and cookies at aid stations along the course. While the event is small (about 100 runners per race), the moderately rolling and relatively smooth singletrack is well marked to encourage chocaholic trail newbies to give the terrain a try. April 30 and November 5, Redmond, Washington, mudandchocolate.com

MOUNTAIN CHILE CHA CHA HALF MARATHON You’ll spend the last few miles of this flat and fast course, near the headquarters of the cheese company Sargento, dreaming about the finish line feast, replete with cheese-curd-topped Caesar salad, smoked brisket with horseradish sauce, and cheesy nachos. Age-group prizes include free cheese, and overall winners get cheesewedge-shaped hats. August 19, Hilbert, Wisconsin, cheeseheadrun.com

88 RUNNER’S WORLD MARCH 2017

The free postrace meat or bean breakfast burrito, stuffed with green chilies, doesn’t come easy. The challenging course over technical trails through private land on the Colorado–New Mexico border includes 1,800 feet of elevation change. September 30, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, joingecko.org/events

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I TC H M A N D E L (C U P CA K E ) ; A N D R I I G O R U L KO/A L A M Y (CO O K I E S ); F R A N K M I L L E R /CO U R T E SY O F F U E L E D B Y F I N E W I N E H A L F M A R AT H O N ; A L A M Y ( W I N E ) ; A L E K S A N D R B E L U G I N /A L A M Y ( P E P P E R ); T R E N T B O N A P H OTO G R A P H Y/CO U R T E SY O F T H E M O U N TA I N C H I L E C H A C H A H A L F M A R AT H O N ; B R A N D X P I C T U R E S ( N AC H O S )

MUD AND CHOCOLATE HALF MARATHON


URBAN BOURBON HALF MARATHON

M A R V I N YO U N G /CO U R T E SY O F T H E U R BA N B O U R B O N H A L F ( U R BA N B O U R B O N CO U R S E )

BA K E R ’ S D OZ E N H A L F ( M A N J U M P I N G ); K R I S TO F F E R T R I P P L A A R /A L A M Y ( T W I N K I E ); P H OTO D I S C ( D O U G H N U T ); B R I A N L E ATA R T/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( H OT D O G );

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M A R T I S A N S /A L A M Y ( B O U R B O N ); M AT T R A I N E Y ( B E E R ); V I K TO R F I S C H E R /A L A M Y ( B R AT W U R S T ) ; A L E X S A N T I AG O/C O U R T E S Y O F T H E

BEER-N-BRATS HALF MARATHON

Got prerace nerves? The (tiny!) bourbon samples at packet pickup will help. Organizers want the Urban Bourbon Half to be a weekend-long celebration of Kentucky’s whiskey history, though the biggest bourbon bash is (smartly) saved for the finish. You’ll start and finish in downtown Louisville, running by historic “Whiskey Row,” where distilleries have churned out the good stuff since the late 18th century. Though the “urban” in the race’s name is accurate—you’ll spend most of your time passing famous sites like the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory—the route also tours the Frederick Law Olmstead– designed Cherokee Park. The 3,500 finishers tend to stick around into the early afternoon, sipping spirits from 10 local distilleries and free craft beer while listening to music from a local band. Runners also get free pizza and Kentucky burgoo, the state’s play on chili. October 21, Louisville, Kentucky, urbanbourbonhalf.com

Leaf-peep en route to your Oktoberfest feast as you race through this Boise suburb. You’ll spend 11 miles running along the Boise River on this flat and fast course. Follow your nose to the after-party, where you’ll find brats cooked in beer. Locally based Sockeye Brewing provides suds for runners—your first beer is on the house; after that, they’re just $1. With no time cutoff and root beer for the under-21 crowd, this race is friendly to runners of all speeds and ages. October 21, Eagle, Idaho, beernbratsrun.com

BAKER’S DOZEN HALF MARATHON

D.C. HALF AND HALF HALF MARATHON Gird your guts for this outand-back event: At the turnaround point, runners attempt to consume a handful of potato chips and a half-smoke (D.C.’s iconic quarter-pound smoked hot dog topped with chili, mustard, and onions). Ben’s Chili Bowl, a Washington institution, provides halfsmokes for the 250 runners, plus meat-free weenies for vegetarians. In the five-year history of the race, no one has barfed, organizers say. Roll through wooded Rock Creek Park and past the National Zoo before touring the vibrant Adams Morgan neighborhood and stopping at Ben’s Chili Bowl. Be warned: There’s a steep uphill at mile 12.75, so if your chili-dog burps haven’t subsided by that point, it might be wise to walk it. It’s an untimed event, so there’s no penalty for taking it slow. November 11, Washington, D.C., halfandhalfmarathon.com

On a rolling 3.2mile loop, you’ll pass the “Sugar Shack,” stocked with doughnuts, Twinkies, and other sweets. Eat at least one treat per lap to earn a medal. The winner isn’t the fastest in this untimed event; it’s the glutton who downs the most baked goods, dubbed the “Sugar Slayer” (last year’s ate 58 sweets).

December 9, Hurricane, Utah, bakersdozenhalfmarathon.com

RUNNER’S WORLD (ISSN 0897-1706) IS PUBLISHED 11 TIMES A YEAR, MONTHLY EXCEPT BI-MONTHLY IN JANUARY/FEBRUARY, BY RODALE INC. VOLUME 52 NUMBER 2, EDITORIAL OFFICES 400 SOUTH 10TH ST, EMMAUS, PA 18049 (610-967-5171). ©2017 RODALE INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, P.O. BOX 26299, LEHIGH VALLEY, PA 18002-6299. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT EMMAUS, PA, AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. IN CANADA POSTAGE PAID AT GATEWAY MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO. CANADA POST PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 40063752. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADA ADDRESSES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, PO BOX 927 STN MAIN, MARKHAM, ON, L3P 9Z9. GST #R122988611. SUBSCRIBERS: IF THE POSTAL AUTHORITIES ALERT US THAT YOUR MAGAZINE IS UNDELIVERABLE, PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. WE HAVE NO FURTHER OBLIGATION UNLESS WE RECEIVE A CORRECTED ADDRESS WITHIN 18 MONTHS.

MARCH 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 89


RACE SPOTLIGHT

ADVERTISING SECTION

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RUN MOAB

CANYONLANDS

HALF MARATHON MARCH 18, 2017

THELMA & LOUISE

HALF MARATHON

June 3, 2017

THE OTHER HALF moabhalfmarathon.com

13.1 MILE RACE October 15, 2017

FO R A DV E RTI SI N G RATE S CON TACT S A RA DE SIMINE AT 212.808.1627 OR SARA.DESIMINE# RODALE.COM


RACE SPOTLIGHT

ADVERTISING SECTION

FO R A DV E RTI S I N G RATE S CON TACT SA RA DE SIMINE AT 212.808.1627 OR SARA.DESIMINE# RODALE.COM


RACE FINDER NORTH ATLANTIC

MAR 26 - Ocean Drive Marathon, 10 Miler, 5K & 1.5 Mile Fun Run Sea Isle City, NJ Contact: ODRC, Inc., P.O. Box 1245, Southeastern, PA 19399. (609) 523-0880 odmracedirector@comcast.net

SEP 16 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in DC’s Wine Country Leesburg, VA Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 561154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

Save 10% - Use RWDCMAR17 (Exp. 3/31/17)

OCT 21-22 - Myrtle Beach Mini Marathon Half Marathon & Coastal 5K Myrtle Beach, SC Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runmyrtlebeach.com

www.odmarathon.org

SEP 17 - Navy Air Force Half Marathon Washington, DC Contact: Joint Base Anacostia Bolling MWR, 12 Brookley Avenue, Washington, DC 20032. navyairforcehalfmarathon@gmail.com

www.runmyrtlebeach.com

Save 10% - Use RWMBMMMAR17 (Exp. 3/31/17)

www.navyhalf.com

NOV 10-12 - Outer Banks Marathon & Southern Fried

OCT 1 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in Long Island East Meadow, NY Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com

Half Marathon, 8K, 5K, Fun Run, Southern 6, 4 Challenges & Relay! Kitty Hawk, NC Contact: 2234 Lark Ave., Nags Head, NC 27959. (252) 255-6273 info@obxse.org

www.runlikeadiva.com

Save 10% - Use RWLIMAR17 (Exp. 3/31/17)

www.outerbanksmarathon.com

MAY 19-21 - Cellcom Green Bay Marathon, Half Marathon, Marathon Relay, Half Marathon Relay, 5K & WPS Kids Power Run Green Bay, WI Contact: Toni Jackels, 211 N. Broadway Street, Suite 104, Green Bay, WI 54303. (920) 432-6272 info@cellcomgreenbaymarathon.com www.cellcomgreenbaymarathon.com

ALL EVENTS RUN THROUGH LAMBEAU FIELD!

SEP 16 - Air Force Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K & 5K Dayton, OH Contact: Race Director, 5030 Pearson Rd., Building 219, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433. (937) 257-4350 usaf.marathon@us.af.mil www.usafmarathon.com

SOUTH CENTRAL

A LOUISIANA FESTIVAL WITH A RUNNING PROBLEM

NORTH CENTRAL

SOUTH ATLANTIC

APR 21-22 - Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon, Half Marathon, Marathon Relay, 10K, 5K & Youth Run Champaign-Urbana, IL Contact: Jan Seeley, P.O. Box 262, Champaign, IL 61824. (217) 369-8553 director@illinoismarathon.com

FINISH ON THE FIFTY!

www.illinoismarathon.com

Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon, Half Marathon, Relay & 5K APRIL 2, 2017 KNOXVILLE, TN Contact: Jason Altman

PO Box 53442, Knoxville, TN 37950 (865) 684-4294 knoxvillemarathon@gmail.com

www.knoxvillemarathon.com

APR 22 - 7th Annual Carmel Marathon Weekend, Marathon, Half Marathon, 8K & 5K Carmel, IN Contact: Todd Oliver, 3575 Inverness Blvd., Carmel, IN 46032. (317) 407-8489 todd@carmelmarathon.com www.carmelmarathon.com

Fast, BQ Pacers, Small Field, Sell out.

APR 30 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in Chicagoland Lake Zurich, IL Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

Save 10% - Use RWCHIMAR17 (Exp. 03/31/17)

Louisiana Marathon Running Festival Marathon, Half & Kids Races JANUARY 13-14, 2018 BATON ROUGE, LA Contact: Danny Bourgeois 21 Government Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70802 (888) 786-2001 danny@thelouisianamarathon.com

www.thelouisianamarathon.com APR 8 - Hogeye Marathon & Relays, Marathon, Half Marathon, & 4-Person Marathon Relay Springdale, AR Contact: Tabby Holmes, P.O. Box 8012, Fayetteville, AR 72703. rd@hogeyemarathon.com www.hogeyemarathon.com

APR 22-23 - Flying Pirate Half Marathon & First Flight 5K Kill Devil Hills, NC Contact: 2234 South Lark Ave., Nags Head, NC 27959. (252) 255-6273 info@obxse.org

JOIN US THE 1ST SUNDAY IN MAY FOR THE

APR 23 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in Galveston Galveston, TX Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

www.flyingpiratehalfmarathon.com

Save 10% - Use RWTXMAR17 (Exp. 03/31/17)

APR 29 - Aiken Electric Cooperative TSE RUN UNITED Half Marathon, 5K & Kids’ Run Aiken, SC Contact: Keyatta Priester, 2790 Wagener Rd., Aiken, SC 29801. (803) 617-3982 kpriester@aikenco-op.org

SOAK UP THE FUN

Cincinnati Flying Pig Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, 4-Person Relay & Kid's Race

www.aikenco-op.org/RunUnited

Funding assistance provided by Aiken County through Accommodations Tax Funds.

MAY 5-7, 2017 CINCINNATI, OH

APR 29 - Park to Park Half Marathon Waynesboro, VA Contact: Ben Lancaster (540) 942-6735 RTV@ci.waynesboro.va.us

Contact: Registration 644 Linn Street, Suite 626, Cincinnati, OH 45203. (513) 721-7667 registration@flyingpigmarathon.com

www.runthevalley.com

www.flyingpigmarathon.com

Mountain Vistas and Beautiful River Crossings.

MAY 7 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in North Myrtle Beach North Myrtle Beach, SC Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

Save 10% - Use RWNMBMAR17 (Exp. 3/31/17)

Mississippi Gulf Coast Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K & Kids Marathon DECEMBER 9-10, 2017 MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST

MAY 7 - Flying Pig Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K, 5K & 2-Mile Dog Race Cincinnati, OH Contact: Sarah Pelfrey, 644 Linn Street, Suite 626, Cincinnati, OH 45203. (513) 721-7447 sarah@flyingpigmarathon.com

Contact: Pat Fellows 2350 Beach Boulevard, Suite A, Biloxi, MS 39535 (888) 786-2001 pf@msgulfcoastmarathon.com

www.msgulfcoastmarathon.com

www.flyingpigmarathon.com

C LO S I NG DAT E FO R T H E M AY 2017 ISSUE IS FEBR UAR Y 17, 2017

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RACE FINDER

MARKETPLACE

MOUNTAIN PACIFIC

MAY 5-7 - Eugene Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K & Kids 1K Eugene, OR Contact: Richard Maher, 2300 Oakmont Way #211, Eugene, OR 97401. (541) 345-2230 info@eugenemarathon.com www.eugenemarathon.com

Finish at historic Hayward Field!

JUN 4 - DivasÂŽ Half Marathon & 5K in San Francisco Bay Burlingame, CA Contact: Continental Events & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

bondiband.com

Save 10% - Use RWSFBMAR17 (Exp. 3/31/17)

OCT 13-15 - Lake Tahoe, Lakeside, & Cal Neva Marathons; Nevada, Carnelian Bay, Emerald Bay Half Marathons; 4-Person Marathon Relay; 72 Mile Midnight Express, 16.6 Miler, Edgewood 10K, Super Hero 5K, Optimist Club Kids Pumpkin Run South Lake Tahoe, CA Contact: Les Wright, P.O. Box 20000, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96151. (530) 559-2261 leswright@sbcglobal.net

50 HEADBANDS % OFF ALL

PROMO CODE: SOLID50

S/H not included. Expires 2/28/17

www.runtahoe.com

JAN 14, 2018 - Maui OceanFront Marathon, Half Marathon, 15K, 10K & 5K Lahaina, HI Contact: Les Wright, P.O. Box 20000, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96151. (530) 559-2261 runmaui@gmail.com www.runmaui.com

INTERNATIONAL

MAY 7 - BMO Vancouver Marathon, Half Marathon, 8KM & Relay Vancouver, BC, Canada Contact: Vancouver International Marathon Society, 1288 Vernon Drive, Vancouver, BC V6A 4C9. (604) 872-2928 info@runvan.org www.bmovanmarathon.ca/visitors

Join runners from 50+ countries. Award-winning. Stunning Running.

MAY 7 - GoodLife Fitness Toronto Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K, 5K Run and Walk & Relay Toronto, ON, Canada Contact: Jay Glassman, PO Box 1240, Stn Main, Uxbridge, ON L9P 1N5. (416) 920-3466 info@torontomarathon.com www.torontomarathon.com

NOV 12 - Athens Marathon, 10K & 5K, Original Historical Course Athens, Greece Contact: Apostolos Greek Tours Inc., 2685 S. Dayton Way #14, Denver, CO 80231. (303) 755-2888 www.athensmarathon.com

Various Support Packages.

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F OR A DVERT I S I NG RAT ES C O NT AC T S ARA DESIM IN E AT 212.808.1627 OR sa r a .d esimine@r od a le.c om


Be the breakthrough.

Breakthroughs are the patients participating in clinical trials, the scientists and doctors working together to advance the fight against cancer, and the brave survivors like Tonya who never give up. Let’s be the breakthrough. To learn about appropriate screenings and clinical trials or to help someone with cancer, go to su2c.org/breakthrough. #cancerbreakthrough


I’M A RUNNER

Interview by Charles Bethea

CHUCK TODD

NBC NEWS POLITICAL DIRECTOR, 44, ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA

“When I learn a politician is a runner, it makes me believe they’re gonna work hard.”

MY STAFF will tell you, I’m a little obsessive about it now. Usually, my routine is somewhere between 4:30 and 5:30 a.m. If you say to yourself, I’ll try to do it at lunch... Nope. I learned that lesson the hard way. ON SUNDAYS, before Meet the Press, I’m in the office by 6 a.m., so I run at 4:30, and I role-play the interviews. I’M WAITING for Fitbit, Apple, or Nike to come up with something that will easily record my thoughts while running. But maybe that’s too Orwellian? I RAN on Election Day. I couldn’t sleep, so at 4 a.m. I said, “Screw it, I’ll do my run.” I actually ran longer than usual. I was trying to work out some extra energy. But I never ran the following day. ON NOVEMBER 10 I kept thinking: What did we miss? Why didn’t I second guess more things? In hindsight, it seems obvious who was the change candidate and who was status quo. DURING A RUN, I started to see some connectivity here. If you look at Obama and Trump and Bush and Bill Clinton and Reagan, they all were criticized for lacking experience. They all ran against people with deep résumés, and they all won.

THE SUMMER of 2013 was the most unhealthy I’d ever felt. I was close to 200 pounds, which, at five-foot-ten, is overweight. The stress of the job and middle age brought it on. SO I SAID, “Lemme see if I can run for a week straight.” Then it was two weeks, then three. I created a routine.

96

BY DECEMBER I’d dropped a few pounds. It was a real epiphany: Any day I didn’t run, I felt crappy. I’D READ about how intervals are a good way to drop weight. And it’s true: From 2013 to now, I’m 30 pounds lighter. I don’t eat much differently, but it’s funny how when you’re in better shape, you crave fresher food.

GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/IMARUNNER FOR A VIDEO INTERVIEW.

Todd’s goal for this year is a 10K or half marathon. Follow him on Twitter @chucktodd for political news (and sports) updates. Check local listings to watch Meet the Press Sundays on NBC.

I NEVER THOUGHT of myself as a runner. Jim Fixx was a runner. At the same time, it has personally and physically changed my life. So, I guess I am one. And I’m an evangelist for it. I’LL BE HONEST: I don’t love running. But I hate when I don’t run. And I love the feeling after.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFF ELKINS


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