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FEB

Is

Botox

Feminist? 3,269

MILES FOR A TRIM The World Of Hair Tourism

Alicia Keys

Yes,

Will Lead the Revolution

VAGINAL BEAUTY Is Having a Moment

Beauty’s

New Rebels PLUS: Confessions of Hollywood’s Top Plastic Surgeons


FEBRUARY IN THIS ISSUE BEAUTY REPORTER 49 Look We Love: Goddess Hair 50 Editors’ Favorites 52 We’re Behind Bars Again • A Heated, Vibrating Facial Massager • One Lip Palette, Endless Combinations

54 Cult Object: Chanel’s Quirky-Chic Hair Accessories

56 Ciara on Her Secret Talent, Her Girl Crush, and More • Sage Scents 58 Near-Perfect Skin in a Bottle • Next-Level Antiperspirants • An Overachieving Toothpaste

FASHION 61 The Sweetest Thing. A whimsically embellished leather bag from Fendi 65 Red Handed. Five striking scarlet bags

66 Good Company. A fair-trade beauty balm and more chic picks from Allure’s fashion director, Rachael Wang. 68 Elements of Style. Gogoluxe cofounder Ramya Giangola pairs a multicolored sequined bomber jacket with equally flashy pieces.

NEWS & TRENDS 28 My Look. Talking Beauty With James Charles. Meet the 17-year-old makeup star who is making waves— and making history.

37 Beauty School. Hair, makeup, and

ROMANCE LANGUAGE Fall in love with these effortlessly cool pieces. Leather shoes by Max Mara. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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ALLURE FEBRUARY 2017

71 Readers’ Choice Awards. Vote for your favorite beauty products and you could win a trip to St. Lucia. STEVEN PAN

106

skin-care tips from the pros who help stars get red-carpet ready.


FEBRUARY

74 Beauty Passport. Have Hair,

81 Skin Secrets. What the Doctors Do. A DIY mask, gallons of sunscreen, an Australian beepollen extract—dermatologists tell us the products, treatments, and strategies they use to keep their own skin in top condition. 86 Investigation. Is Botox Feminist? Most health and beauty products cost more when they are marketed to women. But there is one surprising corner of the beauty world where women don’t pay more than men: the pink rebate, if you will.

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TWINKLE, TWINKLE A glitzy—yet subtle!— manicure, step by step.

FEATURES 92 Keys to Success. Outrageously talented, fiercely determined, and unapologetically opinionated, Alicia Keys is a force to be reckoned with on stage and off. By David DeNicolo

100 Pandora’s Box. Wherever you fall on the vajazzling to full-bush spectrum, there are more ways to pamper your vagina than ever. But are they all healthy? We get up close and personal with our most personal care. By Liana Schaffner 106 Take It Easy. Plush coats, eclectic prints, flowing dresses, and more relaxed, weekend-ready looks.

Deborah Lippmann nail polish in Lady Is a Tramp

ON THE COVER

ALLURE FEBRUARY 2017

REGULARS 20 Cover Look 26 Editor’s Letter 30 Beauty by Numbers 126 Shopping Guide 128 Autobiography. Shay Mitchell fills in the blanks.

114 Rise of the Rebel. Beauty is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Meet five up-andcoming models who are breaking down conventions and writing their own rules. By Lexi Novak

Alicia Keys’s look can be re-created with the following: MV Organic Skincare 9 Oil Cleansing Tonic, a jade face roller, Lanolips 101 Ointment Multipurpose Superbalm, Éminence Rosehip & Lemongrass Repair Balm, and SK-II Facial Treatment Mask. Bikini top by Alexander Wang. Nylon-blend top by Max Mara. Earring by Paula Mendoza Jewelry and Esteban Cortazar. Ring by Paula Mendoza Jewelry. Head scarves, Keys’s own. Photographed by Paola Kudacki. Hair: Esther Langham. Makeup: Dotti. Manicure: Dawn Sterling. Fashion stylist: Patrick Mackie. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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120 Secrets of Celebrity Plastic Surgeons. An armed guard outside the operating room, Botox in the basement of a Russian mansion, and a 29-year-old desperate for a face-lift: A look at the stranger-than-fiction world of the celebrity cosmetic surgeon. By Kristin Perrotta

FROM TOP: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2); PAOLA KUDACKI

Will Travel. Meet the women who go to great lengths—3,269 miles, in one case—for a great style.


ALLURE .COM Braids, Baubles, and Blooms! Whether you like your hair up, down, or tricked out with piles of accessories, there’s a fresh spring style for everyone. Visit allure.com/springhairstyles for the most appealing and inspirational looks of the season.

Our obsession with kale has moved beyond the Vitamix. Learn how to rock the leafy-green hue on your eyes, lips, and fingertips at allure.com/kale. Below: Butter London Nail Lacquer in Greenery.

Cold Comforts As temperatures dip, so does your skin’s moisture level. See how Allure editors stay dewy at allure.com/winter-moisturizers. Above, clockwise from top left: Dr. Jart+ Water Drop Hydrating Moisturizer, RoC Multi Correxion 5 in 1 Daily Moisturizer, SkinMedica HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator, La Mer Crème de la Mer, and Clé de Peau Beauté La Crème.

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ALLURE FEBRUARY 2017

JASON LLOYD-EVANS (PORTRAIT); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

Generation Green


EDITOR IN CHIEF MICHELLE LEE EXECUTIVE EDITOR DANIELLE PERGAMENT

DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR ELIZABETH SIEGEL SENIOR BEAUT Y EDITOR JESSICA CHIA

What is the most unexpected Valentine’s gift you’ve ever gotten?

BEAUT Y EDITOR LEXI NOVAK BEAUT Y ASSISTANT KATHLEEN SUICO

P H OTO PHOTO DIRECTOR STEPHANIE HUGHES BOOKINGS DIRECTOR RO PENULIAR

EXECUTIVE PHOTO EDITOR BETH GARRABRANT SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS AMBER VENERABLE, HOLLY WATSON

ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR HANNAH CHOI

R E S E A RC H

A huge box of Welch’s tropical fruit snacks.

RESEARCH DIRECTOR LORI SEGAL RESEARCH EDITOR AMBER ANGELLE

ASSOCIATE RESEARCH EDITOR CRISTINA RIVERA

FAS H I O N FASHION DIRECTOR RACHAEL WANG ACCESSORIES DIRECTOR NICOLE CHAPOTEAU ASSOCIATE FASHION EDITOR JENNA WOJCIECHOWSKI

A RT I C L E S DEPUT Y EDITOR PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ ASSOCIATE EDITOR LOREN SAVINI

A RT SENIOR ART DIRECTOR NICOLE ARGENTO ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR MEGAN MAQUERA JUNIOR DESIGNER BRIANA MARSHALL

P RO D U CT I O N PRODUCTION DIRECTOR HEATHER TUMA NAPOLITANO PRODUCTION MANAGER VALERIE THOMAS PRODUCTION ASSISTANT EMMA LOUISE JOSLYN

In high school, my boyfriend (now husband) bought me a Gucci watch— my mom made me give it back!

C O PY COPY CHIEF CATHERINE GAMBRELL COPY EDITOR AURA DAVIES

A L LU R E .C O M DIGITAL DIRECTOR SIMONE OLIVER DEPUT Y DIGITAL EDITOR RACHEL JACOBY ZOLDAN DIGITAL DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR SOPHIA PANYCH

B E AU T Y EXECUTIVE BEAUT Y DIRECTOR JENNY BAILLY

MANAGING EDITOR AMANDA MEIGHER

DESIGN DIRECTOR RENEE RUPCICH

I’ll let you know when I receive one!

SENIOR DIGITAL EDITOR DEENA CAMPBELL SENIOR SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR GERILYN MANAGO DIGITAL EDITORS ELIZABETH DENTON, SEUNGHEE SUH DIGITAL PRODUCTION MANAGER MONICA PERRY VIDEO PRODUCER MAYA MARGOLINA SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER REBECCA SHINNERS ASSOCIATE DIGITAL BEAUT Y EDITOR SARAH KINONEN ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR DEVON ABELMAN ASSOCIATE SOCIAL MEDIA PRODUCER ARIBA ALVI ASSOCIATE DIGITAL RESEARCH AND COPY EDITOR JANELL HAZELWOOD ASSOCIATE DIGITAL PRODUCER LARA ADEKOLA ASSOCIATE PREDITOR ANNA ST YPKO ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR CHANTEL MOREL SENIOR PRODUCT MANAGER RANDI EICHENBAUM ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT LINDSAY SANSONE ANALY TICS MANAGER TULIKA SINGH

CONTRIBUTING PRODUCTION DIRECTOR GRETCHEN VITAMVAS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JILLIAN DEMPSEY, DAVID DENICOLO, MEIRAV DEVASH, JOLENE EDGAR, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN, BROOKE LE POER TRENCH, CHRIS McMILLAN, JUDITH NEWMAN, LIANA SCHAFFNER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS ERIN KAPLAN SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR MEGAN SALERNO ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER TAYLOR SHEA ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF KRISTEN NICHOLS

FO U N D I N G E D I TO R LINDA WELLS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR ANNA WINTOUR

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ALLURE FEBRUARY 2017

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR PATRICIA ALFONSO TORTOLANI


PUBLISHER, CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER AGNES BOGDAN CHAPSKI

A DV E RT I S I N G EXECUTIVE INTEGRATED DIRECTORS MARIA GARCIA, KIM CONWAY HALEY, LAUREN DECKER LERMAN, SANDRA MAURIELLO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR– FASHION, JEWELRY, AND WATCH SARAH YORK RICHARDS

DIGITAL SALES DEVELOPMENT MANAGER SAMANTHA DANA

INTEGRATED MANAGER ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY

DIGITAL SALES PLANNER ELIZABETH MILLER

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DIRECTOR NATALIE BANKER TAQUINO 415-955-8280 NEW ENGLAND/DETROIT KRISTIN HAVENS 585-255-0207 DIRECT RESPONSE REBECCA VOLK 800-753-5370 EXT. 489 ITALY ELENA DE GIULI 011-39-02-655-84223 U.K./FRANCE SELIM MATARACI 011-33-1-44-78-00-62

SENIOR BUSINESS DIRECTOR SHERRI GINSBERG EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER VINCENT KEEGAN

DIGITAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES HARRIET KADAR, ALISON WOOD

DIGITAL CAMPAIGN MANAGER ERICA CHEUNG

EXECUTIVE MIDWEST DIRECTORS CHRISTINA KROLOPP 312-649-6731 ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST 312-649-3509

SALES ASSOCIATES JULIA BROKAW, CAROLINE GRANGER INTEGRATED ASSISTANTS ZUIE BILLINGS, ALEXANDRA KELIKIAN, CARA KURICA, STEPHANIE TILLISON

Homemade cupcakes and a cookie-scented candle from my roommate.

D I G I TA L HEAD OF DIGITAL REVENUE NICOLE AMICO SMITH

INTEGRATED DIRECTOR CARLY GRESH

EXECUTIVE SOUTHWEST DIRECTOR EZRA SEAN ALVAREZ 323-965-3564

What is the most unexpected Valentine’s gift you’ve ever gotten?

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE & OPERATIONS KEVIN DONOVAN

CONTENT MARKETING & PA RT N E RS H I PS CONTENT MARKETING DIRECTOR ALEXIS WALL BEAUT Y BOX MANAGER NICOLE SAFIR

I N T EG R AT E D M A R K E T I N G & C R E AT I V E S E RV I C E S I’m happily EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ERIN BRENNAN DESIGN DIRECTOR MARIS BODELL

married but not an observer.

SENIOR DIRECTORS STEFENI BELLOCK, CHRIS MANCIVALANO DIRECTOR JUSTIN REIS

HEAD OF BRAND MARKETING & STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON

SENIOR MANAGER MALLORY MILLER

M A R K E T I N G S E RV I C E S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR GERARD FARRELL SENIOR DIRECTOR, MARKETING INTELLIGENCE JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ

P U B L I S H E D BY C O N D É N AST CHAIRMAN EMERITUS S. I. NEWHOUSE , JR. PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER ROBERT A . SAUERBERG, JR. CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID E . GEITHNER

CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER & PRESIDENT OF REVENUE , CONDÉ NAST JAMES M. NORTON EVP & CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER FRED SANTARPIA CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER JOANN MURRAY

CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER CAMERON R. BLANCHARD CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER EDWARD CUDAHY EVP–CONSUMER MARKETING MONICA RAY SVP–BUSINESS OPERATIONS DAVID ORLIN SVP–MANAGING DIRECTOR, 23 STORIES JOSH STINCHCOMB SVP–NET WORK SALES & PARTNERSHIPS, CONDÉ NAST & CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER, CNÉ LISA VALENTINO SVP–FINANCIAL PLANNING & ANALYSIS SUZANNE REINHARDT SVP–STRATEGY, 23 STORIES PADRAIG CONNOLLY SVP–AD PRODUCTS & MONETIZATION DAVID ADAMS SVP–LICENSING CATHY HOFFMAN GLOSSER SVP–RESEARCH & ANALY TICS STEPHANIE FRIED SVP–DIGITAL OPERATIONS LARRY BAACH SVP–HUMAN RESOURCES NICOLE ZUSSMAN

C O N D É N AST E N T E RTA I N M E N T PRESIDENT DAWN OSTROFF EVP/GENERAL MANAGER, DIGITAL VIDEO JOY MARCUS EVP & CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER SAHAR ELHABASHI EVP–MOTION PICTURES JEREMY STECKLER EVP–ALTERNATIVE T V JOE LABRACIO EVP–CNÉ STUDIOS AL EDGINGTON SVP–MARKETING & PARTNER MANAGEMENT TEAL NEWLAND

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C O N D É N AST I N T E R N AT I O N A L CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE JONATHAN NEWHOUSE PRESIDENT NICHOLAS COLERIDGE

Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. CONDENAST.COM CONDENASTINTERNATIONAL .COM

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

GENERAL MANAGER–DIGITAL MATTHEW STARKER


COVER LOOK

ALICIA KEYS Behind the scenes at Allure’s cover shoot.

MEGHAN MCGARRY (2)

Alexander Wang top and earrings. Details, see Shopping Guide.

C

an we get someone in here to burn some sage?” joked Alicia Keys, upon hearing that the New York City location for her first Allure cover shoot was said to be haunted. The lights began flickering as Keys sifted through trays of earrings on the second floor of the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Washington Heights—one of George Washington’s makeshift headquarters during the Revolutionary War. It could have been the spirits trying to tell us something, or it could have been faulty wiring (the house was built in 1765). We may never know. With “Wicked Games” by the Weeknd playing in the background, the 15-time Grammy winner sipped chai tea as photographer Paola Kudacki told her about the makeup plan for the day: “I want to see your soul pour out of your pores. Your skin, your face will speak for itself.” But despite the lack of concealers and foundations, Keys did make a bold decision: She let the makeup artist try strong looks with color (right). This is the first makeup Keys has worn for an editorial shoot since going natural last spring. (You can see the full looks in “Keys to Success” on page 92.) The mansion’s chilly front lawn, where Keys posed in various pieces from Alexander Wang, Max Mara, and 3.1 Phillip Lim, soon felt more like an open house. The star’s mom, Terria Joseph; husband, Swizz Beatz; and 13-year-old goddaughter all took turns stopping in for quick hellos and hugs. As the sun went down and the temperature dropped, it was a wrap for the crew. But Keys still had hours ahead of her in the recording studio, doing what she does best—making music. Bring on the witching hour. —REPORTING BY PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ

Makeup artist Dotti used a synthetic-bristle shadow brush to paint on “rebellious, fun, rough” violet wings.

Watch a behind-the-scenes video of Alicia Keys’s cover shoot at allure.com/alicia-bts.


COVER LOOK

BEAUTY LESSON Hair “Alicia’s known for her head scarves, and they look so beautiful on her,” said hairstylist Esther Langham, who helped create the layered twist on the cover. To start, Keys tied her hair into a high bun and stretched the first wrap around the back of her head. She pulled the two sides forward, crossed them above her forehead, and coiled them in a circle before tucking in the ends. Then Langham wrapped the second scarf around Keys’s head in “a shape that worked from all angles,” knotting it in the back.

Keys’s look can be re-created with the following: MV Organic Skincare 9 Oil Cleansing Tonic, a jade face roller, Lanolips 101 Ointment Multipurpose Superbalm, Éminence Rosehip & Lemongrass Repair Balm, and SK-II Facial Treatment Mask (not pictured).

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MEGHAN MCGARRY (KEYS); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE)

Marni top. Head scarf, Keys’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Makeup To up the dewiness of Keys’s skin, Dotti first wiped her face clean with a cotton square soaked with cleansing oil and water. She then used a jade face roller that was chilled over ice to smooth on a moisturizing sheet mask. After peeling off the mask and blending in the leftover serum, Dotti applied a rich cream to Keys’s skin and dabbed her lips with clear balm.


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

CONQUERING true UGLINESS

As I write this, we’re a month past the presidential election, and I’m numb, not necessarily from the surprising results but from the rash of hatred spewed out toward women and various ethnic and religious groups in the weeks that followed. I’m taking it badly. And I’m taking it personally. Let me explain. In middle school, a group of adolescent bullies called me an “ugly chink” every day for two years. Every day. Lots of other kids heard—including my friends—and everyone turned a deaf ear, undoubtedly thankful that the venom wasn’t directed at them. I never said a word about it to my parents, partly too ashamed that I couldn’t handle it myself, partly mortified to repeat the slurs. At some point, I told the vice principal, who halfheartedly tried to help but failed to do anything. Then, in seventh grade, my French teacher made “ching chong” sounds and pulled his eyes into a slant while describing how Chinese people speak. I slunk down in my chair, trying to become invisible. During those years, I felt deeply that I was part of a system that didn’t protect me and left me feeling like I didn’t have a voice. Two days after the election, I burst into a full ugly cry in the car reading a collection of toxic, racist tweets that were sent to a CNN journalist. A friend in the car with me was sympathetic but clearly surprised by my emotional reaction. “You’re taking this very personally,” she remarked. I couldn’t explain it at the time. But it became clearer as the days passed: I didn’t feel despair because I felt like the victim again. I felt despair because I felt like a bystander. Most of my days are spent talking about beauty with the wonderfully diverse, intelligent, thoughtful women of Allure. On the one hand, we’re witnessing a celebration of diversity in the beauty world like we’ve never seen before. We have more foundation shades than ever. Women of color have more hair products made for their textures. Models now come in every shape, size, age, gender, and ethnicity. There is so much to celebrate in beauty’s embrace of diversity. Yet I couldn’t help but feel—at least for a fleeting moment—that the world was suddenly sliding backward. I know that therapists encourage you to let go of the past. But honestly, I don’t want to let it go. Remembering how I felt as a hurt, confused child ensures that I’ll never stand by while it happens to others. No matter who you voted for, letting this ugliness continue will tear us apart. I have a voice. We all do.

Michelle Lee, Editor in Chief @heymichellelee

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MY LOOK From left: Anastasia Beverly Hills Glow Kit in Sun Dipped, Morphe R44 brush, and CoverGirl Outlast Finishing Powder in Fair to Light.

On being a freckle face: “I don’t usually leave the house with makeup on. I wear it only for special occasions; I’m too lazy to get up in the morning before school and get glam. But if I had to pick one product I couldn’t live without, it would be a brow pencil because you can use it for your brows or to draw on freckles.”

If you’re most people, the only place your senior yearbook photo is going is on your parents’ wall. If you’re James Charles, it gets retweeted by Zendaya and nabs you a historic contract with a major makeup company. This would be impressive for any 17-year-old, but it’s especially so for Charles, who, you may have heard, is a guy. Men wearing makeup isn’t new (see David Bowie, Mick Jagger), but the rise in popularity of male beauty bloggers— that is, men who aren’t rock stars but who love a good highlighter—is. Meet the king of strobing. By Sophia Panych On breaking boundaries: “Men and makeup isn’t accepted by everybody, and that’s OK. People have a right to their opinion. But when I get messages from people saying that my wearing makeup inspired them to do the same and feel more confident, it makes me so happy—I wouldn’t trade that for anything in the world.” On foundation mishaps: “The first product I ever used was my mom’s foundation. When I was younger,

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I had pimples, so I just slapped it on and hoped it would fix the situation. It never did because it was about 18 shades too light for me.” On gluing his eyes shut: “I’m selftaught, and fake eyelashes definitely took the longest to master. I glued my eyes shut at least 15 times. It’s embarrassing, and I laugh about it now, but in my first ten Instagram pictures, the lashes are Photoshopped on because my mascara didn’t look good enough and I was too lazy to figure out how to actually put on the strips.”

On his dad, the contractor: “My photos would not be as high quality without my dad. He’s a contractor, and together we converted an area in our basement into a makeup studio with a desk, a mirror lined with dimmable lights, and storage areas. And we recently turned his old office into a filming space with soft boxes and a ring light for my YouTube channel.” On what should be seen from outer space: “Spraying your brush with setting spray before applying your highlighter makes the powder go on almost metallic-like. It’s my favorite trick if you want your highlights to be extremely poppin’—like, so bright they can be seen from outer space.” On Internet trolls: “I get really negative comments all the time, but the comments that really bother me are the ones that question my character. I try so hard to stay a positive role model. It’s sad to say, but you get used to it after a while, and I have a very thick skin, so I can take it. I’m having fun; I’m being myself; I’m doing what I love. That’s all that matters.” Charles is a spokesman for CoverGirl’s So Lashy Mascara (below in Extreme Black) and #LashEquality campaign.

ANNA STYPKO (CHARLES); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

Talking Beauty WITH JAMES CHARLES

On powder and lots of it: “I use my Beautyblender for everything—even powder. I set my foundation and concealer with loose powder, then I go back with a dampened Beautyblender and add more powder. It keeps powder from sitting on top of the skin.”


BEAUT Y BY NUMBERS

APHRODISIACS By definition, they trigger a reaction in the brain that increases sexual desire. In real life, they are Ryan Gosling, a platter of Kumamotos, or a Marvin Gaye song. We look at the facts—and perhaps a few fantasies—about getting it on. —REPORTING BY JESA CALAOR

50

NUMBER OF OYSTERS EIGHTEENTHcentury Italian author Giacomo Casanova is said to have eaten for breakfast every day to enhance his libido.

219

573 $

PERCENTAGE INCREASE in the number of oysters eaten on Valentine’s Day.

1,200

NUMBER OF YEARS AFTER his death that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a statement saying there is no scientific evidence connecting oysters to sex drive.

TEASPOONS OF MOON JUICE SEX DUST, a powder containing Chinese and Ayurvedic herbs, in Gwyneth Paltrow’s recipe for chocolate “sex bark.”

KILOGRAMS OF BUDS NEEDED to produce 200 grams of tuberose absolute, a scent that Victorians believed could produce spontaneous orgasms.

Frédéric Malle Carnal Flower

2014

YEAR THE NEW YORK POST PRINTED an open letter to the future Amal Clooney that read, “There’s no greater aphrodisiac than a happy woman with a full life, who is passionate about something besides getting a ring on her finger.”

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

380

PRICE OF A 100-MILLILITER bottle of Frédéric Malle Carnal Flower, the perfume with the highest percentage of tuberose.


OLIVIA MALONE/TRUNK ARCHIVE

BY JESA CALAOR

Beauty School WELCOME TO HOLLYWOOD

The pregame pampering, the over-the-top glamour, the dazzle of it all. We asked the beauty pros to the stars for a lesson on getting gorgeous. Because any event—big or small—can be your own red-carpet moment.

FEBRUARY 2017 ALLURE

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Hair IN KNOTS

Adir Abergel has styled the hair of nearly every A-lister for awards shows. His calling card: Updos that are sexy, messy, and cool.

1 2 3

Think about where to place your knot. On short hair, like Emilia Clarke’s (above), a slick low knot gives length; on thick hair, like Rooney Mara’s (right), a half-up look removes bulk; and on fine hair, a topknot can be teased before it’s twisted to give the illusion of fullness.

Go for sculptural. Once you’ve nailed down the placement, gather your hair into a ponytail and secure with an elastic. Split the tail into two sections and give them a tug so that the sides tighten and the top stays soft. Then twist your ponytail until it coils on itself and secure it with two pins.

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One of the biggest hair mistakes you can make: swiping or spritzing on too much product. “That can take away much of the luster from the hair,” says Abergel. In his bag, he keeps products that are too light to overdo: Ouai Texturizing Hair Spray, Bumble and Bumble Semisumo pomade, and Oribe Superfine Hair Spray.

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

Create textures. (Yes, two of them.) “The duality of a sharp architectural knot and softness everywhere else is what makes them so beautiful,” says Abergel. He starts with a smooth blowout, uses pomade to sculpt the knot and smooth down the sides, and sprays a texturizer everywhere else.


Makeup

THEN

NOW

PAST PERFECT

Carole Lombard, Greta Garbo, and Rita Hayworth are the holy trinity of inspiration for makeup artist Rachel Goodwin. She explains how to give their iconic looks a modern twist. THEN

THEN Take Greta Garbo’s vamp lips (above). Add a full modern brow. And finish with some contouring and highlighter. That’s how you get January Jones’s dewy take on a 1920s classic (right). “It gives the lip an edge,” says Goodwin. Above: Chanel Le Rouge Crayon de Couleur in Cassis.

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NOW

N

NOW

Rita Hayworth

Femme-fatale finger waves are about as old Hollywood as Technicolor. Try pairing them with criminally bold red lipstick. (We like Bite Beauty Cashmere Lip Cream in Sherry, shown.) Ground the look with warm bronze eye shadow to keep things current— and sexy. Really sexy.

Actress Ana de Armas

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

Carole Lombard

To offset Emma Stone’s pinup waves (left), Goodwin kept the makeup simple and fresh with defined brows (try Maybelline New York Brow Drama Pro Palette, shown) and luminous skin. “We always want her freckles to show,” says Goodwin, who handed Stone a mini makeup sponge soaked in rose water and foundation for touch-ups.


Makeup F

2. Conceal. Use concealer to cover up dark circles and redness but also to highlight your T-zone, says Ta. Pick one that’s a few shades lighter than your complexion and blend it across the center of your forehead, down the bridge of your nose, and onto your chin with a dampened Beautyblender.

1. Prep. Buff away flakes and grime using a gentle scrub, then massage on a lightweight gel moisturizer.

La Mer The Moisturizing Gel Cream

Maybelline New York Dream Brightening Creamy Concealer in Light Medium, Medium, Deep, and Medium Deep and Beautyblender Micro Mini Pro

O F UND S S A LE W

LA

ON TI

3. Glow. “To give your foundation a more natural look, add a drop of face oil,” says Ta. Mix them together in your hands, then blend all over for a dewy finish. Rodin Olio Lusso

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4. Contour. Instead of the usual blush, go for something a little sexier: “Blend a bronzy cream highlighter on the cheekbones and temples and down the center of the nose,” says Ta. Lancôme Glow Subtil in Glowing Lights

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o mo

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en

So you woke up with a pimple? “Use a green color corrector to cancel out redness before topping it with concealer,” says Ta. Then hands off: “Don’t add foundation, because it can look patchy.” Smashbox Color Correcting Stick in Get Less Red

COURTESY OF PATRICK TA (PORTRAIT); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

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Make Up For Ever HD Microfinish Powder

.

5. Set. Dust translucent powder over your T-zone, but not the rest of your face, so your skin can still look glow-y in pictures.


Skin

Rudu’s DIY Clarifying Toner Recipe

4 drops C.O. Bigelow Rose Absolute Essential Oil (calms and moisturizes)

+

SUPER PLUMPED

3 ounces Dickinson’s Original Witch Hazel (cleans pores)

+

1

To keep skin well hydrated, go easy on the soap. Rudu cleanses the skin with an exfoliating sponge and a fruit-enzyme cleanser. Gently buff dull, flaky skin by making circular motions with the sponge; do this for 60 seconds. Rinse with warm water and pat dry.

Kát Rudu Coco o Honey Hone ney y Papaya Enzymes Cleanser nser and Origins Clear Improvement Active Charcoal Mask

2 3

Degunk your pores with a clay face mask; let it sit for 15 minutes. After that’s done, “mist your face with a hydrating toner to tighten the pores,” says Rudu (her DIY recipe is at right).

Get to kneading: Smooth a hyaluronic acid serum over your face, then use your knuckles—yes, your knuckles—to really work it in. “I make fists and do a circular motion while applying light pressure, starting at the jawline and working up the face,” says Rudu.

3 ounces freshly brewed organic chamomile tea, chilled or at room temperature (soothes redness and irritation)

=

1 bottle toner

CHRIS COLLS/TRUNK ARCHIVE (PORTRAIT); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

Thirty days: The amount of time celebrities take to prep their skin before an event. Kát Rudu, the facialist behind the best glows in Los Angeles, rev reveals how to do it in ten minutes.


Nails

1

Get rich. Painting your nails a cherry red will make the crystals look cool, not cutesy. But first you’re going to need your nails to be at least a quarter inch past your fingertips for this look—or you’re going to need some acrylics.

Deborah Lippmann nail polish in Lady Is a Tramp

HIDDEN GEMS

2

Back it up. Paint the underside of each nail with two coats of the polish—but don’t use a regular nail-polish brush. Striping brushes are more precise (they have long, pointy bristles) and a billion times less messy. You can find them in beauty-supply stores.

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Make it sparkle. When your polish is dry, paint the back of one nail with topcoat. Let it sit for ten seconds (you want it to be tacky, not wet), then place the jewels on your nail using fine-point tweezers. Left: Crystals from Swarovski.

Lock it in. The topcoat should be sticky enough to hold the crystals in place all on its own. But if any of the jewels come loose, secure them with nail glue (you can use a chopstick to tap on the glue).

COURTESY OF DEBORAH LIPPMANN (HANDS); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES); GETTY IMAGES (PHOTO FRAMES)

Bedazzling, meet 2017. Manicurist Deborah Lippmann shows how to add some personality to a classic manicure. But, you know, keep it tasteful.


Below: Anastasia Beverly Hills Liquid Lipstick in Spicy and Rosantica Rosalinda headband.

FROM TOP: INDIGITALIMAGES.COM; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2)

LOOK WE LOVE

Goddess Worship

Beauty Reporter

T H E B E AU T Y N E W S YO U N E E D T O K N O W N O W

There’s Aphrodite, and then there’s Aphrodite’s groovy younger sister. At Mary Katrantzou’s Grecian-inspired spring show (shown), gone were the olive-wreath crowns. In their place: far-out headbands in modern shapes and psychedelic colors. The effect is hip, not hippie, when you pair the band with loose, zeroeffort (in appearance, if not in actuality) waves, matte crayon-bright lipstick, and totally bare eyes. Now all you need is some Yardbirds vinyl. —LOREN SAVINI

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BE AUT Y REPORTER

Shiseido 7 Colors Powder Revival Centennial Edition set in Green, Lavender, and Rose. Sweep on one of these superfine powders for instantly even, instantly unshiny skin. And the canvas boxes they come in? Heaven. $200.

Miu Miu L’Eau Bleue. Lighter than the original, it smells like a mix of powdered sugar, misty mornings, and whatever the scent of innocence is. (Plus, it’s impossible to overspritz.) $90 for 1.7 ounces.

EDITORS’ FAVORITES

THE STUFF WE PLAN TO STEAL FROM THE BEAUTY CLOSET WHEN NO ONE’S LOOKING.

Essie nail polish in On the Roadie and Excuse Me, Sur. The cheeriest way to break any polish rut: Splash on vibrant Kelly green or milky peach, or go big and try a swirl of both. $9 each.

Sea Bottle Coastal Lavender Hand Wash. Infused with aloe and argan oil, it won’t chap hands, and those coordinates? They point you to the Pacific Gyre, a reminder to recycle as if the earth depends on it. $22.

Diptyque Rosa Mundi Limited Edition Candle. The rose-andlychee favorite has been wrapped in a love letter designed by Parisian papermaking house Antoinette Poisson. $68.

Garnier SkinActive Moisture Bomb. Our foundation practically floated on after we used this cushiony, glycerin-rich gel. $16.99.

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

Conair UltraDetangler Nylon Round Brush. Bendy nylon bristles save hair from reckless raking through—oh, we raked— while a wooden (not metal) core checks heat damage. $14.99.


BE AUT Y REPORTER

A W H O L E N E W WAY T O :

Come Clean

I

t may look like a souped-up Scotch-Brite sponge, but the new Ivory Duo is the Swiss Army Knife of body cleansers: a scrubby loofah, soft washcloth, and 30-day supply of suds all in one palm-size pod. Yes, you toss it every month—but it’s actually more carbon-footprint-friendly than most liquid body washes, whose heavy bottles use more material and produce more greenhouse gas emissions than this 90-gram disc. We found the Duo’s doughy cleansing center so addictively squeezable that we gave in to the temptation to peel back its layers. The exfoliating side: A superthin layer of plastic polymers shaped into 10,000 tiny cones, whose round peaks lift dead skin without creating the tiny tears that grainy scrubs can. The cleansing center: A flexible, foaming cleansing solid made with glycerin, water, cleansers, and natural cellulose fibers, which help it keep its shape (kind of like a mini memory-foam mattress). The cloth side: A tissue-soft, polyethylene-andpolypropylene cloth that lets you suds without sloughing, if that’s your style. —JESSICA CHIA The Ivory Duo is a (very) souped-up soap on a rope.

PRODUCT REVIEW

Michael Todd SonicEraser Pro

ALL in the MIX B E AU T Y E Q UAT I O N

Anastasia Beverly Hills’s new Pro Lip Palette Vol. 1 beckons you to be your own Bob Ross (Google him). We asked makeup artist Sammy Mourabit to share a few color equations to kick-start your creativity. —KATHLEEN SUICO

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Your perfect neutral minus the shadeswatching marathon: purple + yellow. Add more yellow for warmth; cool it down with more purple.

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A versatile mauve that’s subtle by day, sexy by night: burgundy + blue + white. Add burgundy to brighten, blue to subdue.

+

+ =

= The color equivalent of happy: orange + yellow + white. Orange cools it; yellow adds heat.

The ultimate lipstick vault: 18 shades that create infinite options.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MANUEL PANDALIS/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (12)

It’s a… Heated, vibrating personal massager—for your face. It claims to… Dilate pores with 107-degree heat and drive moisturizing and anti-aging ingredients deeper into the skin using 30,000 pulses per minute. The first thing I noticed was… How much it reminded me of another kind of vibrating personal massager. When I used it… I was surprised by how gentle the buzzing was—even around my eyes. After I used it to apply my favorite moisturizer, my skin looked firm and soft. And the warmth of the metal plate gave me a subtle flush. An expert explained... That a combination of heat and vibrations increases blood flow, which can help active ingredients penetrate the outer layer of skin. According to Joshua Zeichner, a dermatologist in New York City, increased circulation can also mean more glow-y skin and better fluid drainage to decrease puffiness. So now I… Use it a few times a week before makeup. The relaxing massage would be nice before bed, but its depuffing and blushing effects are the best kind of morning wake-up. —LEXI NOVAK


BE AUT Y REPORTER

SPACING OUT CULT OBJECT

T

ake a hair elastic and attach a cheeky patch— an aggrieved cat robot would be good, or maybe an interstellar vista. This is how you create a cult object. Chanel’s spring hair accessories are equal parts style and camp, combining tasteful shimmer with space-y designs. In the spirit of vibing futuristic, we wound metallic thread around a length of hair secured by two of these elastics. Full disclosure: The moon landing may have been less painstaking. If you’re not feeling particularly ambitious, hairstylist Jordan M, who created the look on this page, recommends using one to secure an easy braid or bun, allowing the accessory to really take off. One small step for hair... —LIANA SCHAFFNER

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE. HAIR: JORDAN M.

Chanel hair ties, $575 each, at select Chanel stores.


BE AUT Y REPORTER

10WithMinutes CIARA

N

Ciara on set. Top left: Kiehl’s Creme de Corps body moisturizer, Revlon Super Length Mascara, and Revlon Ultra HD Matte Lipcolor in HD Seduction.

TA K I N G N OT E S

Ghost Story If you don’t think that paranormal activity could lead to a new fragrance, well, you’ve obviously never worked in a seventeenth-century canal house in Amsterdam. “Employees were complaining that our office was haunted,” says Viktor & Rolf designer Viktor Horsting. “We brought someone in to sage the building, and it helped, so we were inspired to use sage in our next perfume.” Viktor & Rolf Sage Spell is an absintheand-sage scent whose clean green aroma calls to mind a very chic aftershave. And it’s not the only fashion-house fragrance to feature the shrub: Ralph Lauren Collection Sage, an airy green floral, twines fig and fir balsam with the plant. Both, it’s worth noting, are to be worn, not waved around the room. Crystal-clutching purists may favor Sage & Salt’s Smokeless Smudge Spray, whose whitesage-and-palo-santo spritz is meant to zap bad vibes from any space. Though there’s no science on its exorcistic capabilities, sage may clear airborne bugs. White sage, also known as Salvia apiana, and its essential oils contain antimicrobial monoterpenes and an oxide that’s antifungal and antiviral, says Amy Galper, the founder of the New York Institute of Aromatherapy. Refined or raw, we’ll say this: It’s got good vibes. —J. C. Viktor & Rolf Magic collection Sage Spell was inspired by sage smudge sticks.

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COURTESY OF REVLON (CIARA); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

ot every little girl from Atlanta becomes a megapopular musician with a Revlon deal (and an IMG modeling contract and NFL quarterback husband). But then, not every little girl was auspiciously named after a Revlon fragrance (citrusy, woody Ciara debuted in 1973). It seems destiny—and fortune— are on this 31-year-old’s side. On the upside of pain: “I have a little bit of an obsession with tweezing eyebrows. I like the pain—and it’s so satisfying to get all those little hairs.” On simplicity: “I wash and moisturize my face twice a day with a cream from Cetaphil or Kiehl’s. That’s about it.” On what it takes to have everything: “Revlon’s ColorStay Brow Pencil. If you have your eyebrows right, you’ve got everything. And Revlon’s Super Length Mascara. It really makes my lashes—especially the lower ones— look longer.” On what kind of nude she is: “I use Aquaphor on my son’s skin—and to moisturize my lips before I put on color. I’m a pink-y, nude-y kind of girl.” On a secret talent: “Braiding hair was my first unofficial job. I can do really neat cornrows—I’ve done my son’s cornrows. I can also press my hair really well.” On the celebrity who still makes her a fangirl: “Tina Turner. She’s a true icon. And Sade. They’re both amazing.” On her favorite of her four hometowns (yes, she was an army brat): “I’d have to say Atlanta. That’s my soul.” —JESSICA CHIA


BE AUT Y REPORTER PRODUCT REVIEW

Almay Healthy Glow Makeup + Gradual Self Tan It’s supposed to… Look like a foundation and act like a self-tanner. The key ingredient is… Dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a sugar that reacts with amino acids in your skin to create a tawny tint. The first thing I noticed was… What it lacked. No awful fake-tanner smell here. When I wore it… My redness and acne scars were camouflaged, and its matte finish allowed me to skip setting powder. After two weeks I… Have a hint of color even on no-makeup days—and there are more of those. —DEVON ABELMAN

NO SWEAT

Any antiperspirant worth its (aluminum) salt will keep you dry. The newest sticks and sprays go a step further.

From left: Dove DrySpray Invisible, Degree DrySpray UltraClear Black + White, and Secret Invisible Solid in Cool Waterlily.

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Scent that won’t quit: You know that panicky, is-it-working feeling you get when you can’t smell your antiperspirant any more? The stuff is probably still going strong. The problem is your brain: It stops paying attention to a scent that’s been around for a while. So Secret has spiked its fragrances with sulfur, a pungent chemical that prevents our olfactory receptors from getting used to a smell. The concentration here is so low it’s undetectable, but we did get reassuring whiffs of the fruity-floral scent for more than 16 hours. Protection that won’t stain: Those annoying white streaks antiperspirant leaves behind are caused by the reflectivity of its white aluminum powder. Special oils in Dove’s new sticks and sprays blur that reflection, so you never get chalky stripes. Even more amazing: The formula tweak (you’ll find it in Degree’s antiperspirants, too) also saves white shirts from yellow pit stains. Your sweat can’t create that icky yellowing alone—it happens when sweat and deodorant residue mix with the laundry detergent on your shirt and your skin’s oils. These antiperspirants contain a specific oil that emulsifies the ones in skin, blocking the chain reaction. —JESSICA CHIA

ALLURE FEBRUARY 2017

DOWN TO EARTH

Brush With Greatness Add discarded bottle caps, empty yogurt cups, and plant compost to the list of things that you could be using to keep your teeth clean. That’s if you use a Bogobrush toothbrush. The company makes two kinds of earth-friendly toothbrushes, one out of salvaged plastic and one out of plant waste (they can be recycled or composted, respectively). And for each brush purchased, Bogobrush will donate another to an oral-care clinic that serves uninsured patients. Pretty easy to smile at that. —JESA CALAOR Bogobrush brush in Black Recycled

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RICCARDO TINELLI/TRUNK ARCHIVE; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (3)

Almay Healthy Glow Makeup + Gradual Self Tan in (from top) Medium, Light/Medium, and Light


JOSEPHINE SCHIELE. MANICURE: HOLLY FALCONE.

Fashion Notes

Fendi embroidered leather bag, $3,300, at Fendi, N.Y.C. (212-897-2244).

The

Sweetest Thing

CULT OBJECT

Fendi’s latest confection is a delectably charming bag done up in enticing colors, whimsical bows, and sugary blossoms that look almost good enough to eat.

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NOTES: EXTRAS

Red

Handed

Bold and beguiling with just the right amount of bite: Striking crimson bags that hit their mark every time.

Chanel leather bag, $3,100, at select Chanel stores.

Valentino Garavani python bag, $3,175, at Valentino stores.

LIAM GOODMAN (STILL LIFES)

Gucci leather bag, $2,890, at select Gucci stores.

Tod’s leather bag, $1,215, at Tod’s stores.

Makeup colors: Urban Decay Lipstick in Blackmail (O’s), M.A.C. Liptensity Lipstick in Marsala (X’s), and Shiseido Rouge Rouge lipstick in Ruby Copper (grid).

Proenza Schouler leather bag, $1,390 for similar styles, at Proenza Schouler, N.Y.C. (212-420-7300).


NOTES: EDITOR’S OBSESSIONS NEAL’S YARD REMEDIES WILD ROSE BEAUTY BALM. “Smells amazing and it’s fair trade.” $48 (nealsyardremedies.com). ARTICLE 22 NECKLACE. ”Handmade from old bombs in Laos.” $110 (article22.com).

Aurora James, the creative director of Brother Vellies, with a craftswoman in Kenya

Good Company

ACE & JIG COTTON DRESS. ”A sweet apron dress, and better yet, the dressmakers receive free childcare.” $365, at Barneys New York, N.Y.C. (212-826-8900).

Fashion director Rachael Wang is inspired by beautiful things—with equally beautiful missions. INDEGO AFRICA HAT. ”Whimsical and worthwhile: Profits go toward educating women.” $95 (indegoafrica.org).

MAY LINDSTROM SKIN THE CLEAN DIRT. ”Smooths and brightens with raw ingredients straight from the farm.” $60 (maylindstrom.com).

TRUSS PLASTIC BAG. “A durable tote made by Oaxacan weavers.” $180 (fwrd.com).

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A PEACE TREATY EARRINGS. ”I love this update to the classic hoop earring designed by Jaipur artisans.” $202 (apeacetreaty.com).

JASON ERIC HARDWICK (JAMES); COURTESY OF SUBJECT (WANG); COURTESY OF MAY LINDSTROM (THE CLEAN DIRT); LIAM GOODMAN (STILL LIFES)

BROTHER VELLIES SUEDE BOOTS. ”Created in the first African shoe workshop to make luxury heels.” $896 (brothervellies.com).


NOTES

ELEMENTS OF

STYLE

1 JACKET, 3 WAYS “I take risks, and I have fun,” says Ramya Giangola, who did just that with a multicolored sequined bomber jacket. The cofounder of Gogoluxe, a retail and brand consulting firm, paired what she calls the “in your face” jacket with pieces that are flashy, bright, and anything but safe. —Reporting by Patty Adams Martinez

“I LIKE CLASHING COLORS. THEY BRING COOLNESS TO AN OUTFIT.”

“IT’S NOT FOR KID DROP-OFF, BUT I’D DEFINITELY WEAR IT TO DINNER.”

Above: Sequined jacket by Gucci. Silk dress by Ellery. Top, stylist’s own. Leather sneakers by Golden Goose Deluxe Brand. Onyx ring from Dezso by Sara Beltrán. Bracelets and ankle bracelet, Giangola’s own. Left: Polyester dress by H&M. Bracelets by Roxanne Assoulin. Below: Cotton top by Theory. Silk pants by Adeam. Mink-fur slippers by Natasha Zinko. Diamond necklace from Dezso by Sara Beltrán. Hair: Nikki Providence. Makeup: Sage Maitri. Fashion stylist: Ashley Furnival. Details, see Shopping Guide. PHOTOGRAPHED BY GUY LOWNDES

“SEQUINS, STRIPES, A GRAPHIC PANT, FUZZY SLIPPERS—IT’S LAYERING PRINTS AND TEXTURES IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS.”


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WE’RE TAKING YOU TO

BENNY HORNE

Paradise

“Free trip to the Caribbean? Nah,” said exactly one person (but that was because she lived there). Tell us which beauty products you love and you’ll be entered for a chance to win a trip to St. Lucia, an emerald-green island with crystal-clear waters and breezy open-air massages. Head to allure.com, vote in our Readers’ Choice Awards survey, and, oh yeah, pack your sunblock. By Patricia Tortolani FEBRUARY 2017 ALLURE

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READERS’ CHOICE

T This could be you, hiking to the Pitons.

here are the usual beach vacations: You bring a book for the beach, you take a dip and a nap in the shade, maybe you collect some seashells. Those kinds of getaways are restorative and amazing. But a tropical destination like St. Lucia can be so much more than a dip and a nap. This island has bubbling sulfur springs that are said to heal acne, rain forests where you can swim under waterfalls (very Cocktail), and beautiful if vertigo-inducing volcanoes called the Pitons—a UNESCO World Heritage site that you have to see to believe. And even then you probably won’t.

Take our Readers’ Choice survey online and you’ll automatically be entered for a chance to win* one of the following prizes. THE ULTIMATE GETAWAY: A three-night trip for two to the BodyHoliday resort in St. Lucia, worth approximately $4,000. You and a guest will each get one spa treatment per day, plus complimentary meals and activities (such as yoga and kayaking), at this all-inclusive resort. Round-trip airfare will be provided by the St. Lucia Tourist Board. ALLURE APPROVED: Win one of our 2016 Best of Beauty suitcases filled with $2,950 worth of beauty products. THE RELAXATION PACKAGE: $400 in Bliss gift cards, plus $75 worth of Bliss products. YOUR OWN SKIN-CARE VAULT: An assortment of amazing Neutrogena products, valued at $500.

The BodyHoliday resort sits on the northwest tip of the 27-milelong island and is surrounded by 42 acres of tropical gardens.

HOW TO VOTE

Go to allurereaderschoiceawards.com to tell us the products you live and die for by 11:59 P.M. ET on February 20, 2017. (If you don’t have a favorite in a particular category, you can skip it.) *NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Completion of the ballot is not required to enter or win. To enter and for full rules, go to allurereaderschoiceawards.com. Starts at 9:00 A.M. ET on January 9, 2017, and ends at 11:59 P.M. ET on February 20, 2017. Open to legal residents of the 50 United States/D.C. 18 or older, except employees of Sponsor, their immediate families, and those living in the same household. Odds of winning depend on the number of entries received. Void outside the 50 United States/D.C. and where prohibited. A.R.V. of four prizes: $4,000, $2,950, $500, and $475. Sponsor: Condé Nast.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BENNY HORNE; BODYHOLIDAY (2); STOCK CONNECTION BLUE/ALAMY

THERE’S SWAG WITH YOUR NAME ON IT...


Passport Beauty

NEWS, TREATMENTS, AND OUR LATEST

OBSESSIONS FROM ABROAD

HAVE HAIR, WILL TRAVEL

TERRY RICHARDSON/ART PARTNER (MODEL); GETTY IMAGES (STAMP)

Flying to London for a bang trim. Or to Paris for highlights. Or to Los Angeles for layers. Traveling thousands of miles for your hair is nuts, unthinkable—and increasingly popular. Welcome to the world of haircations. By Sarah Ball


B E AU T Y PAS S P O RT

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George Northwood salon in London

Pretty, arty color by Renda Attia on Jourdan Dunn

Richard Ward Salon in London

Christophe Robin salon in Paris

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FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

winkly-candle dinners in Notting Hill, a browse at Browns, a working lunch at Soho House—Julia LeStage, a media executive from Boston, has her London itinerary down. But her nonnegotiable first stop off the plane? Her top priority? The magnetic pull across the Atlantic? It’s… [opens Burberry trench]…sexy blonde British bed head. That’s because a couple of times a year, when her roots are showing, LeStage hops into a chair at George Northwood in Fitzrovia. She gets London-made blonde, messy layers at the same salon where Alexa Chung’s shaggy lob was invented. And sometimes she brings her three daughters along, too, for their haircuts and a “tong” (Brit speak for messy curling-iron waves). For the four LeStage women, it’s exactly the kind of mussed cool they can’t get back home. “[My] stylist, Roi, is always on trend,” LeStage says. “He’s the hair king of our house.” That house being 3,269 miles away. Because at a time when hairstylists and colorists have never been more famous—and their famous clients have never been more eager to evangelize their #bronde #blessings—people are flying for hair. London-based hairstylist George Northwood lists clients from “New York, Brazil, and Switzerland” off the top of his head. And at colorist Christophe Robin’s salon in Paris, the reservation book is full of regulars from Ukraine, South America, and California—not to mention border-crossers from around the continent. “When people are prepared to travel to the other side of the planet, it implies they have a big problem they want you to solve,” Robin says. (“Big problem” in this case is, of course, a relative term.) “There is a lot of pressure involved in ‘fixing’ problems. Pressure is not always a gift.” Not that his clients are getting stress-y downdraft. Buenos Aires– based Rossella Della Giovampaola says she started going to Paris for her color because she “just felt it was time to make a change. That


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The Jet Set

was in 1998. I trusted him 18 years ago, and I still do.” So once a month, she flies across four time zones to see Robin, then jets to London to visit her daughter. So, yeah, this whole hair tourism thing is objectively ridiculous—and guess what? It gets even more extreme. There’s an elite, impeccably highlighted clientele who fly hairstylists, colorists, and pots of peroxide across continents to have their hair done in the comfort of their own homes. Hairstylist Chris McMillan, master of beachy, sexy California hair, flies from Los Angeles to Bangkok, London, and Gabon every few months for Bed-head chic at David regular—and very Mallett salon in Paris wealthy—clients. Corinne Adams, a colorist at Serge Normant at John Frieda salon in New York City, heads to “Moscow, London, or Paris, wherever the client happens to be that month.” It makes schlepping cross-country for air-dryable layers seem...not that crazy? When Susan Henderson Tyler chased down Harry Josh back in 2003, she was just a fellow New Yorker looking for the guy behind Gisele’s hair—“we all wanted Gisele hair,” she says. Now, with Josh internationally famous and Henderson Tyler living in Nashville, exactly nothing has changed. Six times a year, without an appointment, she jumps on an early plane, then waits in the salon until he’s free. She flies home that night. “This may sound crazy to some,” she says, “but I have to show up with my hair every day. The expense is well worth it.”

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David Mallett salon in Paris

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

Hair by Josh Wood at Barber & Parlour in London

The pros favored by the frequent-flier club. Chris McMillan (Los Angeles) MO: Sexy, lush cuts and stunning naturallooking color Regular: Jennifer Aniston George Northwood (London) MO: Shaggy lobs Regular: Alexa Chung David Mallett (Paris) MO: Tousled French-girl layers Regulars: Léa Seydoux, Diane Kruger, Marion Cotillard Josh Wood (London) MO: Buttery dip-dyed blondes Regular: Elle Macpherson Christophe Robin (Paris) MO: Rich reds and blondes in a boudoir-style setting Regular: Tilda Swinton Renda Attia (London) MO: Layering and balayage-ing curly hair to peak sexiness Regular: Jourdan Dunn Luke Hersheson (London) MO: Cool cuts to wear with a leather jacket Regulars: Keira Knightley, Sienna Miller Richard Ward (London) MO: Polished layers with a touch of sexiness Regulars: Kate Middleton, Lily Allen


SKIN SECRETS

What the DOCTORS Do Eleven dermatologists with 159 years of experience— but virtually no wrinkles—between them tell us all the weird and cool ways they treat their own skin. By Didi Gluck

THEY KNOW WHEN HYPE IS REAL

CLAIRE BRAND

Even the most well-informed and highly skeptical skin-care users (i.e., dermatologists) are buying into these buzzy treatments. DOUBLE-CLEANSING. Washing your face twice—with an oil-based cleanser followed by a water-based one—is a trend. But for Whitney Bowe, a dermatologist in New York City, it’s just part of her anti-aging regimen. “Double-cleansing can preserve collagen,” she says. Sure, that sounds like a tall order, but Bowe uses a DIY oil cleanser to dissolve makeup easily without the rubbing “that can age your skin.” She even takes off her mascara with the oil so she doesn’t have to tug on her lashes—“they’ve gotten thinner with age, so they fall out more easily.” Her recipe: two tablespoons of olive oil stirred into eight ounces of aloe vera water. She follows that with Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser

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SKIN SECRETS

ears, and the back of my hands every day,” she says. “It’s very sheer, and I reapply it.” For medium skin tones, Mona Gohara, a dermatologist in Danbury, Connecticut, who is Egyptian, says La Roche-Posay Anthelios SPF 30 soaks in very quickly and doesn’t leave a chalky cast. FOR SENSITIVE SKIN: “I have rosacea and sensitive skin, so I use mineral sunscreens, which are gentler than chemical ones,” says Elizabeth Tanzi, a dermatologist in Chevy Chase, Maryland, who likes SkinCeuticals Sheer Physical UV Defense SPF 50.

VAMPIRE FACIALS. OK, doctors actually call them “platelet-rich plasma injections,” but you’re probably more familiar with the Kardashianpopularized term. (In case you missed that episode: The treatment involves injecting extracts from a patient’s own blood back into her skin using tiny needles.) It seems bonkers/creepy, but “injecting plasma-rich platelets, which are full of stem cells, could help build new collagen,” says Marie Jhin, a dermatologist in San Francisco. “And replacing collagen in your skin as you age is a continuous battle.” She does the treatments on herself twice a year; Bowe does the same. COOLSCULPTING. This device destroys fat cells with extreme cold—in about an hour. The technique is called cryolipolysis, and it works best on small areas of fat, says Karyn Grossman, a dermatologist in Los Angeles. “I was happy with my overall weight, but fat had accumulated around my upper back and one hip. Two cycles of

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CoolSculpting completely changed the way my dress fit for my son’s bar mitzvah,” she says.

THEY’RE SERIOUS ABOUT SUN PROTECTION

If you remember only one thing from this story, remember this: Sunscreen is nonnegotiable. It helps prevent skin cancer, and people who wear it have 24 percent fewer signs of aging than those who don’t, according to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Dermatologists apply it every day, more than once, rain or shine. And they have a few things to say on the matter.

FOR SHEER COVERAGE: Too many sunscreens look obvious on skin of color. “They don’t blend in, or they make my skin look gray or purple,” says Jeanine Downie, a dermatologist— and an African-American woman— in Montclair, New Jersey. Her solution: SkinMedica Total Defense + Repair Broad Spectrum SPF 34 Sunscreen. “I wear it on my face, my neck, my

FOR THE WHOLE PACKAGE: Every single dermatologist we talked to layers sunscreen over an antioxidant serum or cream. “That’s key for neutralizing the free radicals from sunlight, pollution, and even heat that can slip through sunscreen, damage collagen, and set off pigment production in skin,” says Bowe, who likes Olay Total Effects 7 in One Anti-Aging Moisturizer with vitamin E and green tea extract for her sensitive skin. “I wear it at night, too—if you sleep in moisturizer, you wake up with more hydrated and plump skin.” And that means fine lines are less noticeable the next day.

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Dermatologists’ favorites, clockwise from left: Eau Thermale Avène Retrinal 0.1, La Roche-Posay Anthelios SPF 30, Obagi Nu-Derm Clear, and Epionce Purifying Toner.

FOR LASTING PROTECTION: Bowe and Gohara carry around the Colorescience Loose Mineral Foundation SPF 20 Powder Brush for touch-ups over makeup. It contains iron oxides, and “a recent study showed that sunscreens with iron oxides prevent melasma better than formulas without them,” says Gohara. It’s really (really) important to know, however, that powders are supplements to, not replacements for, traditional sunscreen lotions and creams. Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York City and a premelanoma survivor, applies a tinted formula with SPF, like Chanel Vitalumière Moisture-Rich Radiance Sunscreen Fluid Makeup Broad Spectrum SPF 15, each morning—and then reapplies it over her makeup before going outside throughout the day. “I do a lot of skin-cancer surgeries on the tops of the eyebrows, between the eyes, and around the nostrils, so I’m careful to cover those spots,” she says.


SKIN SECRETS Exfoliating makes skin glow-y, except when it doesn’t—if you use retinol or anti-acne products, scrubs can make skin red and dry.

THEY’RE FULL OF SURPRISES

Snoop around a doc’s bathroom (nosy) and you’ll find three unlikely standbys. TONER. While those harsh, stripping ones from the ’90s still get a bad rap, “I really love my Epionce Purifying Toner with willow-bark extract,” says Jhin. It’s gentle on the skin because it “has ingredients [like glycerin] that add hydration.” She uses it as a daily skin detox—it gets rid of dirt and makeup residue and preps the skin for other products with anti-aging ingredients, like peptides or retinol. (Olay Regenerist Micro-Sculpting Cream and Eau Thermale Avène Retrinal 0.1 are dermatologist favorites.)

COMPRESSION SOCKS. They’re not exactly sexy, but Gohara gets four or five pairs at the drugstore “at the beginning of pants season” and wears them daily to prevent the varicose veins caused by standing all day.

THEY DO DAMAGE CONTROL Even dermatologists’ skin acts up—the difference is they know how to get it back in shape, pronto. For mild eczema flare-ups, Jessica Wu, a dermatologist in Los Angeles, heads to the health aisle for an Australian bee-pollen extract called propolis. “It’s anti-inflammatory and antibacterial and has been shown to help skin heal itself,” she says. “If that’s not enough, then I’ll use prescription cortisone.”

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THEY GET CREATIVE

Then there are the smart choices dermatologists make that have nothing to do with creams or lotions or unattractive hosiery. THEY DON’T RUB THEIR EYES. “The skin there will darken if you’re a chronic rubber,” says Nada Elbuluk, a dermatologist in New York City, who recommends putting a cool compress on the eyes whenever you feel the urge to rub. Grossman goes as far as sleeping in bendy glasses, called Swissflex glasses. Uncomfortable? Maybe. But they keep her sleeping on her back, which prevents her skin from creasing against her pillow (and eventually wrinkling). THEY GO TO BED. “I’ve become neurotic about prioritizing sleep over an extra hour of iPad,” says Gohara. “When you don’t sleep, your cortisol levels shoot up, which causes inflammation in the body.” That can make skin conditions like acne and rosacea worse and, over time, lead to wrinkles. THEY GET PHYSICAL. “What I do with my body affects my skin almost as much as what I put on it,” says Gohara. To that end, she does 20 to 30 minutes of high-intensity interval training every morning to enhance her circulation, reduce stress, and decrease the inflammation that causes aging.

CLAIRE BRAND

HYDROQUINONE. This skin lightener is banned in Europe, and studies have shown it is carcinogenic in rats when ingested. But most American dermatologists are confident about its safety when it’s used topically—so confident that they rely on it to fade their own dark spots. It can brighten even the most intractable pigmentation and works faster than anything else (in as little as two months). Jhin applies a prescription Obagi Nu-Derm product twice a day; Alicia Barba, a dermatologist in Miami, uses Melamix Skin Lightener & Blending Crème Hydroquinone USP 4% at night for two to four weeks three times a year to treat her melasma.


I N V E S T I GAT I O N

Is Botox Feminist?

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y now you know the tedious choreography of the grooming gap. It starts with the dance of different gender expectations: Women need to pluck, tweeze, wax, highlight, polish, moisturize, powder, pencil, shadow, line, and gloss to feel put together in situations where even our gay BFFs can usually phone it in with a shave and a splash of cologne. Even worse, we spend more than just time in front of a mirror. From dry cleaning to haircuts, women are often charged a so-called pink tax of higher prices. Even when boy stuff and girl stuff are close to identical (pain relievers, shampoo, razors, shaving cream, even deodorant), they cost more if the products are swaddled in pink and marketed to women. A recent report by the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs found that women shell out 8 percent more for similar clothing and 13 percent more for similar personal-care products. The list goes on: Prescription drugs (ahem, Viagra) are exempt from sales tax in

PAPER BOAT CREATIVE/GETTY IMAGES

At the dawn of 2017, women still make less and pay more to look better. There’s even a name for it—the pink tax. But there’s one unlikely sector of the beauty market that may just have our best interests at heart. Lindsy Van Gelder explains.


I N V E S T I GAT I O N

many states; tampons are not. You can buy the steel-gray men’s razors in the manly packaging, of course. But what you can’t always do is look as if you’ve given up. (Obviously, sometimes, that’s perfectly fine.) If anything, we can be hit up for the pink tax because we can’t afford to be grooming dropouts. A recent study by Andrew Penner, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine, and Jaclyn Wong, a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Chicago, found that there is nothing a woman can do—including being born gorgeous—that matches the power of working really hard to look good. “Our research started out with the question of whether attractive people make more money than their average counterparts, and there was no surprise there,” explains Wong of the study, published in the journal Research in Social Stratification and Mobility. “Then we looked at gender differences, and we were surprised to find there were none—being attractive helps men in the workplace as much as it helps women.” But do you make more money if you’re born a hottie or if it’s something you’ve cultivated and

considered conventionally unattractive, the boost in salary between the well-groomed and the poorly groomed was one and a half times that of their male counterparts. Fair or not, if you want to succeed in business, be prepared to keep spending money on looking put together...and the pink tax that often goes along with it. But maybe we need to take a more historic view, suggests Kristen Barber, an assistant professor of sociology at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, and the author of Styling Masculinity: Gender, Class, and Inequality in the Men’s Grooming Industry (Rutgers Press). “It isn’t so much that men aren’t paying as much as women as that they’re paying for products they haven’t purchased in the past—there’s an array of new products targeted to men that aren’t new to women,” she explains. Women didn’t fully adopt cosmetics until World War II, when cosmetics “became patriotic and tied to womanhood,” says Barber. Even Rosie the Riveter (Rosie the Riveter!) wore lipstick, blush, and mascara. If women were going to work in the factories, build war machines, and make ammunition, they still had to look like women, dammit! Which is to say: They had to look like the female

There are a few corners where men pay more. Call it the pink rebate. worked on? This is where gender differences reared their unequal heads in the study. Although poor grooming handicapped both genders professionally, good grooming— everything from wearing heels to having a nice haircut—dramatically sealed the deal for women and mattered far more than natural beauty. In fact, among women

ideal promoted by a patriarchal society. Call it patriotic womanhood. It ushered in new consumer habits, and before you knew it, cosmetics became synonymous with womanhood. In fact, grooming was so successfully intertwined with female beauty, Barber adds, that there’s now a fast-growing industry dedicated to rebranding it as both “manly” and necessary to compete in business. Until guys are as willing to suffer for beauty as we are, “men’s products are going to cost a little bit less to encourage men to buy them,” she says. Several states have passed or are considering passing legislation to level the “paying” field.

Representative Jackie Speier of California and 24 cosponsors have also proposed a House bill to kill the pink tax nationwide. nd in fact there are a few tiny—but substantial!— corners where men already pay more than we do. Call it the pink rebate. For instance, male underwear is pricier, according to the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs report. (Although men don’t have to cough up for bras, and obviously the underwear in question is not Kiki de Montparnasse.) Botox for men costs about twice as much because “men have stronger muscles, and in order to relax them, it takes literally double the number of units,” says New York City dermatologist Whitney Bowe. The double-chin melter Kybella also takes about twice the number of vials for men, she adds, and in her experience, the CoolSculpting mini procedure—which targets the neck and chin and is often used in conjunction with Kybella—requires only one or two treatments for women but two to four for men. Waxing is often more expensive for men because they tend to be hairier, and “the hairs are much coarser,” explains Lidia Tivichi of the Maris Dusan salon in New York City. It comes down to this: Anything that forces professionals to take more time based on men’s physical characteristics is going to cut women a break. At the same time, anything that can be slapped with a pink label is fair game. It’s an injustice to be sure. So write your congressperson. Chip away at the unfairness of it all. And in the meantime, you might want to check out those steel-gray razors— they’re not half bad.


From Alicia,

WITH LOVE

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

They make us soft. They make us glow. They promise beauty, and boy, do they deliver. But what our favorite products (or, in this case, Keys’s) do best: They make us smile.

For product details, see Shopping Guide.


She may have talent coursing through her veins (plus shelves of Grammys to prove it), but the 36-year-old singer, songwriter, and judge on The Voice knows that if you want to spark a good debate, nothing beats giving up your concealer.

SUC By David DeNicolo

Photographed by Paola Kudacki


Wool coat by DKNY. Wool jumpsuit by DKNY Pure. Makeup colors: Eyeshadow in 1985 and B6 Vitamin–Infused Complexion Prep Priming Spray by Urban Decay. Opposite page: Bikini top by Alexander Wang. Nylon-blend top by Max Mara. Earring by Paula Mendoza Jewelry and Esteban Cortazar. Head scarves, Keys’s own. These pages: Hair, Esther Langham; makeup, Dotti; manicure, Dawn Sterling. Fashion stylist: Patrick Mackie. Details, see Shopping Guide.

CESS


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olls conducted only among your friends have no real scientific value. You’re basically just surveying a landscape of your own opinions. That’s a lesson we all learned last November. But knowing that I was going to ignore science altogether (hey, I should be writing schoolbooks in Texas! Or environmental policy in the new administration…), I decided to ask friends and acquaintances their opinion of Alicia Keys. Snapchatting millennial: “She’s on point.” Fortysomething mother of three: “She is wonderful on The Voice—so smart, sincere, and kind.” Straight dude: “She is hot.” Gay dude: “She is hot.” There were too many “Oh, I love her” and wistful “I wish I had her skin” comments to count. So the

body, and skin that looks almost suspiciously healthy, like she’s never eaten a potato chip in her life. (Gay dude was right, by the way: Even a perfect Kinsey 6 such as myself could not fail to register her charms.) What isn’t immediately apparent but sinks in after about ten minutes of conversation is her sincerity and warmth. (Mother of three was right, too.) Each question matters to her, and she considers her answers carefully. Alicia Keys is not playing a game. Her words, her music, her political activism—even her decision to do the no-makeup thing (this is the first time she has worn makeup in an editorial photo shoot since last spring) and to let her hair be free—are part of a cohesive whole. “I’m not a slave to makeup. I’m not a slave to not wearing makeup either. I get to choose at [any] given moment. That’s my right.” This is a woman who knows her own mind and says and does only what she wants. It may have taken her a while, in the category 5 shit storm that is the music business, but boy has she arrived, in a place of self-possession, creative autonomy, and power that few popular performers ever achieve. She is a 15-time Grammy winner. To put that in perspective: Adele has ten; Taylor Swift, ten also; Mary J. Blige, nine; Rihanna, eight.

“Mothers of the Movement,” a group that advocates for police reform and gun-violence prevention. The second one was a call to, in her words, “stand together and be united.” Keys’s deep disappointment with the election results is palpable. “The We Are Here Movement [a wide-ranging social-justice organization founded by Keys] will stand in support of Hispanics, refugees, people of color, Muslims, and anyone who feels afraid in the upcoming Trump era. I have a hope that President Trump, as a New Yorker, will have more liberal views than his campaign rhetoric suggests and that in the end our system of justice will prevail. But it does hurt that racism was not a deal breaker for millions in the election. However, as an artist, I expect to continue to use my voice for things that matter, as I have since the beginning of my career. That won’t change. As an activist, I will continue to fight for what’s right. That won’t change, either. It’s time for all of us to be engaged. As a mother, I am a lioness.” The politics of appearance is another realm in which Keys’s voice

“I’M NOT A SLAVE TO MAKEUP. I’M NOT A SLAVE TO NOT WEARING MAKEUP EITHER.” unscientific consensus is that she is a perfect amalgam of talent and beauty. But close up and in person, Alicia Keys is an insufferable monster. Kidding! I just wanted to see if you were still reading. Close up and in person, all of those observations are true. The first things you notice: the fabulous hair wrapped partially, casually, with a scarf; eyes that are alive with interest and maybe a little mischief; the angelic smile, sinful

Sometimes—rarely—in this world, prizes get awarded in a way that is commensurate with achievement, thank Allah, Jehovah, and Zeus. (Those are in alphabetical order, by the way; I may be a Christian, but if another guy’s deity wants to do me a solid, I’m very grateful. I do wish the entire panoply of gods could get together and stop my friends from using reply all. That’s what I pray for; I figure it’s an easier lift than universal amity or abolishing the electoral college.) On that topic, who could forget Keys’s impassioned performance of “Superwoman” and “In Common” at the Democratic National Convention last summer? The first song was dedicated to the

has an increasingly large microphone. Several months ago—she describes it more as an evolution, a process of self-realization, than an on-off switch— she took a break from wearing makeup, including on the set of The Voice, replete though it is with HD cameras. It caused quite a stir, and many people began to read into the decision all sorts of motivation and see it as a radical act. It was never intended as such. Keys is not antimakeup at all. “I think makeup can be


Silk top by Marni. Earring by Shikama. Head scarf, Keys’s own. Le Stylo Waterproof Long Lasting Eyeliner in Vert Tuileries by Lancôme. Details, see Shopping Guide.


2001

Yearbook picture “That was my graduation picture. I was the valedictorian. I’ll never forget the tone of the graduation speech I gave. [Groans] It was something about teachers holding you back and trying to tell you who to be.”

In the Netherlands “Back to my beginnings! I just love this. The whole look…all the beads in my hair. Those are some of the best memories ever. It’s another illusion, obviously, but I’ve come back to that place where I am very comfortable in my skin.”

2005 At the Grammy Awards “The Grammys that came along with the second album, The Diary of Alicia Keys. That was major.” Allure: What do you think of the straight hair? Keys: “I was born with curly hair, and I spent all my life trying to push it back, make it straighter, have it not be so big and frizzy. I have the option to do both, but I really like it curly right now.”

2008 At the Super Bowl “I performed during the pregame here, where the New York Giants were playing. It was a great performance, but the game didn’t go too well.”

2009 At the Vanity Fair Oscar party “Whoa, I barely recognize myself here. This is the Vanity Fair party. Who doesn’t want to go to that? It’s superexclusive, very Hollywood. That’s kind of how I feel in that picture: very Hollywood.”

2011 At a Knicks game at Madison Square Garden “That’s my first son [Egypt] right there. Probably one of his first basketball games. Now he’s such a fan. That was when he allowed us to dress him. He doesn’t anymore. So sad.”

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

1996


2004 On the Fashion Rocks red carpet “This was a time that I was more coming into my womanliness, with the hair, the braids. It was around the time of the second album, I think.”

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

2009

At the World Series [Squeals in delight] “Me and Jay! This was big; this was huuuuuge. Me and Jay performing ‘Empire’ at Yankee Stadium. It was nuts. And they woooon!”

2016 On The Voice “I totally underestimated the amount of fun I was going to have on The Voice. I’m having a crazy-good time. Just being able to share what I’ve learned with all these freaking talented people. It’s really pretty cool.”

Cotton top and gold earrings by Alexander Wang. Details, see Shopping Guide.

self-expression,” she says. “I have no intention to shame anyone at all [who chooses to wear it]. No one should be ashamed by the way you choose to express yourself. And that’s exactly the point. However, if you want to do that for yourself, you should do that.” Paradoxically, Keys’s personal experience with years in the spotlight has led her to the place she is today. “I started at 20 years old in this ridiculously invasive world [the music business] in which everyone covered me in makeup and then threw me under tons of lights, so I’d sweat for two or three hours.” She would break out because of it, making her feel

even more self-conscious, objectified, judged. “It took me so long to finally say, ‘Whoa!’ ” she says. “Who am I under there? That is just my own personal quest.” You do hear a little envious grousing occasionally, along the lines of “Well, if I had perfect skin like hers, I wouldn’t have to wear makeup, either.” Keys explains that she has suffered with skin problems for years, that she is not perfect, and that, most important, perfection is not the point. “I am all about a woman’s right to choose. I think a woman should do anything she wants as it relates to her face, her body, her health. Whatever mode of expression that empowers you, that’s what you should do. What I am not down for is this ridiculously high, unrealistic expectation about appearance that we as women are held to.”


Viscose jacket by 3.1 Phillip Lim. Silver earrings by Shikama. Calligraphie de Chanel Longwear Intense Cream Eyeliner in Hyperblack by Chanel. Details, see Shopping Guide.


ike her appearance, Keys’s music has evolved, too. You could say on a parallel track, but that would be a lazy oversimplification. (Mea culpa: That was the first thing I typed.) Keys traffics in subtlety, depth, and passion, which is what makes her such a compelling artist. Her new album, Here, is reflective of some of the personal growth she’s achieved in recent years. “It started with a list of things that I am sick of,” she says. (Gee, I think, that’s pretty much how every day starts at my house; if I had talent, maybe I could write music because I’ve got the sick-of list concept down.) “One of the big ones is that I was so sick of the way women were forced to feel inadequate in many different circumstances or forced to feel insecure by the way we’re portrayed or the way we look. Another one: I am so annoyed at the way we force boys to be fake strong— don’t cry, don’t be soft. Let a boy be able to dance! Let a boy paint his nails. So a boy wants to paint his nails. Who cares! All these strange, oppressive ideas.” Before I can offer a general note of agreement, another one springs to her mind: “You know what would be really cool? If we stopped offering our opinion unless asked. If nobody asked you, keep your mouth shut! Like with the Internet? That’s just too much opinion. People are mean. It’s a sickness.” You’d think that the music that started with a list of gripes would be, shall we say, bitter—and yet it’s expansive, affirming, and beautiful. The themes are love, family, society, and hope. The title signals the immediacy of her work and the need to capture the state of things as they are, not as they were or might be. “It’s because I’m finally here; I’m finally present. In my

Watch Alicia Keys play a game of Would You Rather at allure.com/alicia-keys.

is this glow that people refer to that I have. I kind of recognize that glow because I’ve begun to listen to myself inside. And I think there’s something really powerful that happens when you start to listen to yourself. It makes you feel more aware. In touch. More confident. I’m not more confident because I think I’m better than, but because I’ve been hearing myself more, listening to myself more. And that’s taken a little minute to arrive at that place. But there’s definitely something powerful about the way your inner feels that reflects on the outer, on your skin. That, to me, is real beauty.” It’s a gift to any writer. A moment of honesty and reflection, something that allows Keys’s story to make perfect sense. It’s something we call a kicker, and she wrapped it up in a big red bow. Now we can go.

CORNER

BEAUTY

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own skin, being able to look in the mirror, and seeing how that reflects the world I live in, the world we all live in. We’re all here. We’re all somewhere here. And how do we meet each other? We have to be in each other’s shoes a little bit more! It’s personal but also universal.” It’s time for Keys to go pick up her son, and soon we are exchanging pleasantries. (It’s so odd to me that she has a reputation for being tough—which she herself confirms— and yet she behaves as if her bedtime reading were Emily Post.) In a moment, her tone changes: She has left something unsaid, something that she’s considered and that seems tailored precisely for Allure. “I think there’s something really beautiful about what resonates from within us. One thing I’ve heard more than ever

What is your regular skin-care routine? “Drinking as much water as I can, simple cleanser (I like Eucerin products), toner spray, Epicuren Discovery Acidophilus Probiotic Facial Cream, blemish cream (as needed), undereye cream, occasional face masks.” What hair stuff can you not live without? “Scarves and large black cloth elastics. Pantene BB Crème.” What beauty lessons did you learn from your mother? “That beauty is from the inside out. My mother always said, ‘Beauty is as beauty does.’ I never understood that then, but I do now.” Who are your beauty icons? “Patti Smith, Bianca Jagger, Nina Simone, Bette Davis, Sade.” When you choose to wear lipstick, what’s your go-to color? “Currently none, but for lips I do love bright colors—red, deep pinks, even the right kind of orange is beautiful.” What’s your favorite fitness routine? “A mixture of cardio

and strength training. Does anyone really like to work out? Except that it does make you feel good and stronger and mentally clearer and ready to take on the world.... OK, I like it!” Guilty-pleasure food? “Bread! Damn it! Soft, yummy, croissant-like bread.” Do you find mirrors tell the truth? “I find mirrors reflect your perspective.” What most relaxes you? “A book, a nap, the breeze, and the sound of the ocean.” Things you need in your dressing room before a performance? “My piano, fruit, Throat Coat (tea), and space.” One lesson about beauty your current self could have taught your teenage self? “All girls don’t have to look the same, and beauty is not a math equation. And always, always do what feels good for you! Don’t let anyone define beauty for you. It’s your choice.”


PAN


DORA’S

CARLOS BONGIOVANNI

BOX Ten years after that “vajayjay” nonsense, we’re now saying the real word—loud, proud, and with a hearty emphasis on that second syllable. But could the vagina (vagina! vagina! vagina!) be getting a little too much airtime? All this attention (not to mention hair-removal lasers) has invited a new level of scrutiny...and the products and treatments that come with it. By Liana Schaffner


IT’S BEEN A FEW (VERY LONG) MONTHS SINCE AN INCIDENT WITH A HOT MIC PROMPTED WOMEN EVERYWHERE TO RECONSIDER THEIR STANCE ON CHASTITY BELTS.

vaginal steaming could pose physical and even psychological risks. “There’s a chance that someone might get burned,” says Hilda Hutcherson, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University Medical Center. “But I’m also worried about the message it sends. Treatments like this imply that vaginas are so unappealing, we basically have to send them out to be dry-cleaned.” Some very vocal feminist women have no problems with the concept, though: “We need the ghosts of old lovers to leave us,” joked Girls executive producer Jenni Konner when she and Lena Dunham praised vaginal steaming in an interview with Paltrow. Her lighthearted remark was off the cuff but may offer some insight into what’s really driving this trend. Vaginal steaming has started a dialogue about a previously uncomfortable subject: feminine hygiene. And it’s not unreasonable to assume that it’s the specter of shame, and not necessarily old lovers, that women want exorcised.

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The outrage sparked by Donald Trump’s horrifying, and now infamous, remark has settled into a simmer; on the national stage, concerns over national security have eclipsed conversations about sexual assault. But in case you were wondering, the pussy is still up for grabs. And the latest threat isn’t coming from a party bus or a presidential campaign (toemay-toe, toe-mah-toe). A new trend is putting focus on the way we care for our vaginas—and sometimes blurring the line between effective treatments and expensive gimmicks. “Women are taking a more proactive approach to their sexual health, which is a good thing, but they’re also having their insecurities exploited,” says Lauren Streicher, an associate professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago and the author of Sex Rx (Dey Street). “There’s a lot of money to be made in female genitalia.” And everyone wants a piece of the action. Services designed to pamper the vagina are appearing on spa menus with surprising regularity. Reported on by beauty editors and popularized by celebrities and reality-TV stars, these treatments have begun to exude a mainstream aura. It’s not unheard of for a woman to schedule a “vajacial” (a facial that goes nowhere near the face), and vaginal steaming is now a thing (thank you, Gwyneth). That particular service promises to cleanse the uterus, cervix, and labia with a warm infusion of aromatic herbs—a claim that has many doctors letting off steam of their own. “It’s absolute nonsense and offers zero benefits,” says Streicher. Beyond the dubious claims, doctors express real concern that

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any swear they’re not yielding to outside pressures, though—they’re taking control of a sensitive area. “You would not believe the number of women who tell me they’ve never had an orgasm,” says Cindy Barshop, the founder and CEO of VSpot Medi-Spa in New York City. In fact, we would: 43 percent of women report the inability to have an orgasm, according to Planned Parenthood. “I tell them about my own struggles with low desire and incontinence, and the floodgates just open. Women are dying to talk about these things. It’s incredible how much we won’t admit to just because we’re afraid of not appearing normal.” Of course, VSpot provides more than just heartto-hearts. The med-spa offers an array of nonsurgical vaginal-rejuvenation services, the most popular of which is the FDA-cleared FemiLift laser. Like the CO2 fractional devices used in facial resurfacing, the FemiLift stimulates collagen and elastin production. According to Carolyn Delucia, VSpot’s resident gynecologist, the laser improves lubrication and the elasticity of the vaginal wall and reduces urinary urgency. “Out of all the procedures I do, the FemiLift is the one thing that clients report 100 percent satisfaction on,” says Delucia. Barshop credits the device with virtually curing her own issues and


predicts the technology will be widely available within ten years. “It will be everywhere, like wax salons,” she says. Gynecologists, dermatologists, and plastic surgeons already provide the service in their offices, but a single session typically costs more than $1,000 (sometimes as much as $3,000) and is not covered by insurance. It’s a big sell—so you should know what you’re buying into. “This is a medical device that’s been scientifically proven to be extremely effective at treating postmenopausal dryness and painful intercourse,” says Streicher, who uses a CO2 laser, the MonaLisa Touch, in her own practice. “But some claims and promises—‘stronger orgasms! vaginal tightening!’—have been published only in the Journal of Wishful Thinking.” You don’t have to be highly optimistic and independently wealthy to get in on this trend, though. A boomlet of new feminine-hygiene

According to a recent poll by the Benchmarking Group, more than 50 percent of women are interested in purchasing natural and organic feminine-hygiene products. To know why, look no further than Lo Bosworth, a lifestyle influencer, a former star of MTV’s Laguna Beach, and the founder of one of these new all-natural feminine-hygiene brands: Love Wellness. “People are becoming much more ingredient-savvy,” says Bosworth, who developed her line after a long personal struggle with yeast infections. “But women are also desperate for products that they can feel good about and aren’t ashamed to display.” Her collection includes washes, wipes, powders, and vitamin supplements in packaging so spare, it’s easy to mistake them for high-end beauty products. And that’s the point. “My skin-care routine is complex and makes me feel like I’m at a spa,” says Bosworth. “There’s no reason why women shouldn’t take care of their feminine health in the same way.”

“TREATMENTS LIKE THIS IMPLY THAT VAGINAS ARE SO UNAPPEALING, WE BASICALLY HAVE TO SEND THEM OUT TO BE DRY-CLEANED.”

CARLOS BONGIOVANNI

products offers women much more reasonable ways to care for their genitalia. There are pH-regulating washes, foams, and wipes; infectionfighting suppositories; an isotonic odor-fighting gel; even oxygen-releasing maxi pads that aim to “do for vaginas what Nike Shox did for your feet.” (Make them run faster?) Aggressive marketing aside, most of this stuff is all-natural—even organic. Gynecologists must have something nice to say. Yeah, nope. “A complete and total waste of money,” insists Hutcherson, who bristles at the notion of using a cleansing product to prevent infections. “Your body regulates your pH, and it’s ridiculous to imply that something like a cleanser will maintain that balance for you.” Hutcherson says that the best way to wash is with a fragrance-free cleanser and plain old water. Anything beyond that, she says, is strictly unnecessary. “The vagina is a self-cleaning organ; it takes care of itself,” she says. “Of all the things that women have to worry about, washing or deodorizing their vulvas is not one of them.” But many of us, it seems, won’t be dissuaded.

The problem with devoting as much attention to your vagina as you do to your face is that it’s easy to become hyperaware of it. Waxing, steaming, and exfoliating the area opens the door to more scrutiny. Doctors draw a direct correlation between hair removal and far more aggressive procedures, such as labiaplasty—a surgical reduction of the labia. (Side note: VSpot’s Barshop just happens to be the former owner of the hair-removal chain Completely Bare.) “When women had abundant pubic hair, they couldn’t even see their labia. Now patients ask me about their labia all the time,” says Streicher. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the recommendation for labiaplasty “untenable,” noting “obvious risks” such as infection, scarring, and pain during sex. General


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gynecologists will perform medical labiaplasty only to relieve physical symptoms, such as chafing or discomfort during intercourse. But then there’s the specialized field of female genital plastic and cosmetic surgery. “When a woman feels strongly that her genitals are too large, it can affect her self-esteem, body image, and sex life,” says Michael P. Goodman, a genital plastic surgeon in Davis, California. “Most often, patients come to me with both functional and cosmetic concerns. I don’t think I have the right to dismiss either.” And while Goodman does trace the growing demand for genital surgery to hair-removal practices and the unrealistic standards circulated by pornography (“and that’s unfortunate”), he also considers it a “spin-off” of the women’s liberation movement. “Women are basically saying, ‘I can do what I want with my body,’ which is always a good thing.” Except when it really isn’t. On the surface, women seeking treatments to improve their sexual health and hygiene is just the sort of trend that inspires the word “empowerment.” We heard it used multiple times while reporting this story. But when those products and services are medically unnecessary, dearly priced, downright risky, or all of the above, the sterling narrative starts to unravel. Exploitation, after all, takes many forms. And if we may, getting grabbed is getting old.

HE LOWDOWN ON LUBES

Personal lubricants present something of a, well, slippery slope. Doctors agree that many commercial, water-based versions contain chemical preservatives, which may cause irritation. Glycerin is another ingredient commonly found on the “intimate care” shelf. Like glucose, a sugar, it can contribute to an overgrowth of yeast, says Streicher. For this reason, many women turn to homemade solutions—a well-meaning tactic that often does way more harm than good. Cooking oils (coconut, olive, vegetable), mineral oil, and petroleum jelly are hard to rinse off, trapping bacteria inside the vagina and promoting infection. What’s more, every single one of them dissolves latex, says Streicher, making condoms and diaphragms less effective. Look for a silicone-based lubricant instead. “They are condom compatible, last longer, and don’t contain preservatives or glycerin like water-based lubes,” says Streicher, who likes Replens Silky Smooth. Some doctors are also getting on board with organic lubricants. “They tend to be free of harsh chemicals and wash away easily,” says Hutcherson. One that fits the bill: Sustain organic personal lubricant.

“WOMEN ARE TAKING A MORE PROACTIVE APPROACH TO THEIR SEXUAL HEALTH...BUT THEY’RE ALSO HAVING THEIR INSECURITIES EXPLOITED.”


CARLOS BONGIOVANNI


TA K E I T E A SY Start with feminine tailoring and add a click of retro. Mix in dresses as sweet as new love and prints as eclectic as the big city. Then throw it all together (on a real couple) and let the comfort of Saturday morning do the rest. Photographed by Steven Pan


MIX IT UP Silk top by Max Mara. Jeans by Bally. Gen Nude Radiant Lipstick in Posh by BareMinerals. On him: Knit top by Christopher Kane. Opposite page: Rouge Rouge lipstick in Rouge Rum Punch by Shiseido. These pages: Hair, Mark Hampton; makeup, Pep Gay; manicure, Elisa Ferri. Models: Tilda Lindstam and John Hein. Fashion stylist: Michelle Cameron. Details, see Shopping Guide.


BLUE JEAN BABY Blue denim top and blue-and-red jeans by Hilfiger Collection. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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BIG SOFTIE Wool coat by Bottega Veneta. Slip by Spanx. Color Sensational lipstick in Toasted Truffle by Maybelline New York. On him: Cotton sweater by Hilfiger Edition. Details, see Shopping Guide.


A PERFECT MATCH Leather jacket and cotton dress by Fendi. On him: Wool jacket by Christopher Kane. Details, see Shopping Guide.


FLOWER DISTRICT Silk dress by Dior. Gold necklace by Mara Carrizo Scalise. Rouge Dior lipstick in Rendez-vous by Dior. On him: Cotton top by No. 21. Details, see Shopping Guide.


LOUD AND PROUD Polyester-blend dress by Rosie Assoulin. Necklace, Lindstam’s own. On him: Cotton top by Dior Homme. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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GOING BIG, GOING HOME Wool-blend sweatshirt and cotton-blend skirt by Marc Jacobs. Leather shoes by Freda Salvador. On him: Leather jacket and wool pants by Gucci. Leather shoes by Coach. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Rise of the ReBeL THEY’RE CONFIDENT. THEY’RE OUTSPOKEN. AND THEY’RE DONE WITH CONVENTIONAL THIS AND CLASSIC THAT. MEET FIVE MODELS WHO DOMINATED THE SPRING RUNWAYS, ALL WHILE REDEFINING BEAUTY AND FLIPPING OFF NORMS.

BY LEXI NOVAK PHOTOGRAPHED BY RICHARD BURBRIDGE

Opposite page: Silk top by Valentino. Makeup colors: Infallible Paints Eye Shadow in Shady Violet and Infallible Paints lip color in Nude Star by L’Oréal Paris. These pages: Hair, Diego Da Silva; makeup, Kanako Takase; manicure, Gina Edwards. Fashion editor: Rachael Wang. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Jazzelle “I woke up one day, chopped off my ponytail, and buzzed my hair. It’s so weird that a simple haircut can make you feel more in touch with yourself. I finally feel beautiful in my own skin.” —Jazzelle, who walked in the Public School spring 2017 runway show


Liene

“All my life I’ve had an androgynous look. I used to keep my hair long as if to say, ‘No, I’m girlie.’ But that’s my thing—I can be both. I’ve accepted that I’m a boyish girl.” —Liene Podina, who walked in the Balenciaga spring 2017 show and the Marc Jacobs resort 2017 show

This page: Jacquard jacket from Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini. Earrings, Podina’s own. Revitalizing Lip Balm in Sunny Berry by Neutrogena. Opposite page: Sequined top by Rodarte. Earrings and nose ring, Greene’s own. Makeup colors: High Impact Custom Black Kajal in Blackened Black and Pop Liquid Matte Lip Colour + Primer in Cake Pop by Clinique. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Caitie

“I used to think that there was only one definition of beauty. So I got my eyebrows waxed; I did a beach wave. But as I grew up and matured, I realized things are part of you for a reason. Don’t mess with what you’ve got. I even learned to love my eye bags.” —Caitie Greene, who was photographed by Steven Meisel for the cover of Italian Vogue and for Prada and Coach ad campaigns


Jay

“My ears go out all flappy like Dumbo. I actually considered having surgery to put them back when I was younger. But why would I [willingly] cut and sew my ears?” —Jay Wright, who walked in the Céline and Gucci spring 2017 shows Wool jacket and jersey top by Prada. Nose ring, Wright’s own. Aqua Cream eye shadow in 08 by Make Up For Ever. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Ally

Denim jacket and cotton top by Miu Miu. Makeup colors: Eye Shadow in How Royal and Cream Colour Base in Luna by M.A.C. Details, see Shopping Guide.

“I’m definitely on the taller side, almost six feet. I remember the moment my mom helped me envision myself as a giraffe. Once I found my other giraffes, I was like, OK, I can make this work.” —Ally Ertel, who walked in the Dior cruise 2017 show and the Marni spring 2017 show


SECRETS

All those buoyant breasts and chiseled cheekbones don’t shape—or heal—themselves. A look inside the rarefied world of the celebrity cosmetic surgeon. By Kristin Perrotta

of

CELEBRITY PLASTIC SURGEONS


STEVEN MEISEL/ART+COMMERCE


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illions of people will sit in front of their television for the spectacle that is the Oscars. Among them: Hollywood’s starmakers. The hairdressers who spent hours crafting updos, the designers who sketched and resketched gowns, the stylists who stacked the diamonds just so. With bated breath, they watch and wait, knowing that a red-carpet shout-out could be a career-making—and majorly revenue-boosting—moment. But there is one member of the so-called “glam squad” who knows his name will be spoken exactly nowhere near the red carpet. “It’s fun to watch the Academy Awards and see your work up there,” says Andrew Frankel, an associate clinical professor of otolaryngology at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles and a facial plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills. But is it going to get Frankel any new clients? Hell no. Welcome to the world of the celebrity plastic surgeon. Treating Oscar winners, royalty, billionaires, heads of state. Meeting, greeting, injecting—and, of course, operating on—VVVIPs the world over. The things you must see. The egos you must nurture. The tantrums you must tolerate. And, yes, the bald-faced lies you must witness.

“YOU’RE GOING TO SEE A BLACK VAN.” In this world, a house call is hardly unheard of. But there is a line between a client expecting a little hand-holding and a client who equates her crow’s-feet with, say, the nuclear launch codes. “We got a call from the assistant of one of our A-list patients,” recalls Jason Diamond, a plastic surgeon with offices in Beverly Hills, New York City, and Dubai. “She said, ‘One of our friends wants to see Dr. Diamond.’ But she couldn’t tell us who it was. Then the assistant says, ‘I’m not going to tell you who she is, but if you’re willing to get in your car and start driving, I’ll tell you where to go.’ I get in the car and start driving.” Wait. It gets weirder. The woman on the phone gave specific driving directions until Diamond arrived at a particular address. “She said, ‘OK, now you’re going to come to this house. You’re going to see a black van.’ ” The tinted window of the van rolled

down, and the man inside said, “ ‘Who are you?’ I said my name, and he asked, ‘What’s your business here?’ I said, ‘I don’t know.’ The garage door opens, and a security guard asks, ‘What’s your business here?’ and I’m like, ‘I still don’t know!’ Then finally the door to the house opens. There is this A-lister at the kitchen table with her stylist working on her hair. She’s got a fashion person, too—there were ten people there. She wanted to talk about some procedures, so we went to another room, and that was it. Since that time, I’ll only go to people’s houses when I know who they are.”

“A 29-YEAR-OLD ACTRESS CAME IN FOR A FACE-LIFT.” “As a general principle for all people, celebrity or not, there is an optimal window for a face-lift. It is my opinion [that it’s best] to do these things when they’re less severe because if you wait until you look like a droopy dog, people can see that dramatic change. If the change is subtle, you’ll get away with it. People will say things like ‘God, that woman never ages. She looks amazing,’ ” says Frankel. “But when I had a 29-year-old actress who didn’t like how she looked on a magazine cover come in here for a face-lift and say to me, ‘If I do it when I’m 29, I’ll always look 29,’ I had to explain that it doesn’t work that way. It’s almost as if they think the year that you have your surgery is when you stop aging. You have to just say no. I’m dealing with that right now with several clients. I can’t do enough to put them off.”

“THEY’LL DENY IT TO THE HILT.” “It’s interesting what people relay in the media when they’re interviewed,” says Robert Singer, a clinical professor of plastic surgery at the University of California, San Diego, and a former president of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. “I’ve had situations where actresses have said that they’d never have plastic surgery but that they’d consider Botox or maybe fillers, and they had just had a face-lift. They’ll deny it to the hilt,” says Frankel. Even to each other: “There was a very well-known TV show. And one day I was operating on the two stars of the show. Total coincidence,” he says. “But since they don’t want anyone to know what they are doing, they don’t even tell each other. So after the surgeries, the nurses are freaking out trying to make sure they don’t see each other. But in the end they did, and it was the weirdest moment. They looked at each other; they looked at me; I looked at them. No one said anything. It was hilarious.”


“We have five exits from our building—and we use them cleverly to divert and decoy the paparazzi,” says Frankel. But sometimes the problems start on the inside. “Years ago, we were sued by a very famous actor and his wife because there was information about them having had surgery here. A HIPAA [Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act] violation is a federal offense, so we called the FBI to investigate who might be our leak. The agents loved it because they were out here in Hollywood interviewing all these celebrities who had had surgery. The rags aren’t all bad—a lot of what you read in the tabloids is really true. I can tell you firsthand.”

BUT OCCASIONALLY THEY GET IT WRONG. “I once had a female celebrity in for facial surgery, and we knew there was going to be a problem with the paparazzi,” says Frankel. “She was my second case that day. The first was a regular woman from the Valley who was not famous. So we delayed discharging the first patient. When we did discharge her, we wrapped her up with a beekeeper’s hat, a veil, a scarf, and really big sunglasses. The nurse walked her out as if she were someone very, very famous. Sure enough, later that week, that lady from the Valley’s picture was on the cover of a magazine. She later called up laughing that she was on the cover of this magazine as so-and-so.”

“IT’S AN UNDERGROUND, INVITE-ONLY KIND OF THING.” “I go to Dubai every three months and Moscow once a year,” says Diamond. “In the Middle East, I have a license. In New York, obviously I have a license. But in Russia, I go without a license because most of it is underground. That’s why when I go to Moscow we have to be very, very discreet. It’s an underground, invite-only kind of thing. We’ll do injectables and consultations in very wealthy people’s basements. So when you ask how Russian celebrities avoid paparazzi? It’s literally underground. It’s not a clinic; it’s not an office.”

“HE’S TAKING A SHOWER WITH THE ROYAL.”

“A LOT OF WHAT YOU READ IN THE TABLOIDS IS REALLY TRUE.”

“NO! THAT’S WHY I HAVE NURSES.” “I guess I’m known for doing revision surgery— doctors will send me patients who have had unsatisfactory results,” says Simeon Wall Jr., an assistant clinical professor of plastic surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “I treated a royal, and unfortunately she had previously had some pretty bad plastic surgery: a tummy tuck, liposuction, fat grafting, and breast work. I pretty much did an overhaul of everything on her. It was a huge case that seemed like it took forever.” Wall’s office has guest suites so the most famous patients can bruise for days in privacy—this patient was staying in the VIP suite. “The day after surgery, I said, ‘You can shower—we’ll change you out of your surgical dressings,’ ” says Wall. “My nurses were there, but she wouldn’t let them touch her.” So this royal did what royals do and asked the good doctor to shower her. “I’m like, ‘No! That’s why I have nurses. Your husband’s here. He can do it.’ She refused.” So the good doctor relented: “I’m standing half in, half out of the shower in my scrubs, trying unsuccessfully not to get soaked while washing a grown woman. My wife [another plastic surgeon in the practice] asked one of the nurses, ‘Where’s Simi?’ And the nurse said, ‘He’s taking a shower with the royal.’ ”

LET’S JUST SAY MONEY WAS NO OBJECT. Celebrity patients expect their surgeons to make them comfortable. There are the pain meds, sure. And sometimes, there’s also furniture shopping. That royal? She had very specific ideas about where she should sit. “She moved out of our guest suites and into a hotel,” Wall recalls. “She had liked a recliner from our guest suite, so they called us and said, ‘We want that recliner.’ I said, ‘You can’t have the recliner because we have another patient using it now.’ They said, ‘Just get one.’ I called the manager of her hotel downtown, who is used to requests like this. He said, ‘Send me a picture of it. I’ll have one there in an hour.’ ”

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“Celebrities do not say who they don’t want to look like,” says Steven Teitelbaum, an associate clinical professor of plastic surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “Instead, they’ll say they like Kate Hudson’s boobs for their size and perkiness. But the name most mentioned as having perfect breasts—though bigger than some patients want—is Emily Ratajkowski. I tell patients, ‘I get it. But I’d be misleading you if I suggested that you’d look like her. She’s a genetic rarity; she is to breasts what Mozart was to music and Usain Bolt is to sprinting.’ ”

“THEY HAVE TO BE THE SAME AGE FOR 35 YEARS.” “There are different considerations [with different types of celebrities]. For the average rock star or movie star, the more their life demands that they are in public getting photographed and making appearances, the harder it is to find a window to perform a procedure,” says Frankel. “So while doing subtle changes in stages is a nice idea, you really have to get it all done in one procedure. Now, soap-opera stars are the exception. They have to kind of be the same age for 35 years. Yet they’re not supposed to look any different from day to day to the viewer. Those changes need to be done subtly and regularly to keep them going. And HDTV is extremely revealing.”

“THERE ARE ANATOMICAL LIMITATIONS.” “Celebrities tend to have expectations that are out of line with reality because they’re used to just being able to have everything,” says Wall. “They don’t understand that this is a surgical procedure; there are anatomical limitations. For example, someone with a boxy waist or narrow buttocks won’t understand that you can’t give them the shape they want. I’ll say, ‘I can reduce your waist by six inches or eight inches.’ But they’re like, ‘No, I want it reduced by a foot.’ And I have to tell them, ‘No, this is not reality. We can’t do this.’ They just don’t like hearing any of that.”

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“NO, THIS IS NOT REALITY. WE CAN’T DO THIS.”

“SHE IS TO BREASTS WHAT MOZART WAS TO MUSIC.”

“POSSESSION OF AN ASSAULT RIFLE IS A FEDERAL CRIME.” “I operated on the wife of a royal—she always had bodyguards,” says Teitelbaum. “During her surgery, they wanted to stand at the door to the OR. When I walked from the scrub sink into the OR, I saw that one of them had a machine gun partially hidden under his jacket. Possession of an assault rifle is a federal crime, but what was I going to do as I was walking into the OR with the patient already asleep? Call the ATF [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives] and risk a shoot-out in my office? Or perhaps they had some special clearance? I put it out of my head, focused on the case, and then did all the follow-up visits at her home so I didn’t have to worry about guns in my office again.”

“THERE’S AN EMPTY BEER, A FRESH CIGARETTE....” “I have an A-list person who always wants surgery at night to avoid being seen,” says Diamond. “After surgery—and this is past midnight— I go to his house to check on him. Normally people go to an aftercare facility, but he refuses— he wants to go to his house. I’d given him very specific instructions: ‘You leave the pressure wrap on for 48 hours, no smoking, et cetera.’ He’d been home for an hour. I get there and his assistant says, ‘He’ll be ready in a minute.’ I’m thinking, ‘What do you mean? He should be ready right now.’ I go upstairs, and there are girls running around, an empty beer, a fresh cigarette in the ashtray. He’s sitting in a lounge chair, and the pressure wrap was completely a mess. You could obviously tell he had taken it off and put it back on completely wrong. So I’m like, ‘What the hell is going on? You can’t do this!’ I probably gained 30 points on my blood pressure.”


MOST-SEARCHED

PLASTIC SURGERY PROCEDURES BY STATE ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA BREAST IDAHO IMPLANTS KANSAS MAINE MONTANA UTAH VERMONT WASHINGTON WYOMING

COLORADO MASSACHUSETTS NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW JERSEY OHIO OREGON RHODE ISLAND VIRGINIA LASER HAIR WISCONSIN REMOVAL

EYELID SURGERY

ARIZONA NEVADA NEW MEXICO

NORTH DAKOTA

LIP INJECTIONS

VAGINAL REJUVENATION

CONNECTICUT MINNESOTA SOUTH DAKOTA

ALABAMA DELAWARE FLORIDA GEORGIA ILLINOIS LOUISIANA MARYLAND LIPOSUCTION MISSISSIPPI NEW YORK NORTH CAROLINA PENNSYLVANIA SOUTH CAROLINA TENNESSEE TEXAS WEST VIRGINIA

ALASKA HAWAII INDIANA PENIS IOWA ENLARGEMENT KENTUCKY MICHIGAN MISSOURI NEBRASKA OKLAHOMA

Research from the Plastic Surgery Portal, according to September 2016 data, as compared with national search volume on Google


SHOPPING GUIDE Cover: Alexander Wang bikini top, price available upon request. Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. 212-977-9683. Max Mara nylon-blend top, $435. Max Mara, N.Y.C. 212-8796100. Paula Mendoza Jewelry and Esteban Cortazar earrings, $300. Paula mendoza.com. Paula Mendoza Jewelry ring, $385. Paulamendoza.com. Table of Contents, page 6: Max Mara leather shoes. Max Mara, Chicago. 312-4759500. Cover Look, page 20: Alexander Wang cotton top, price available upon request, and gold earrings, $395. Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. 212-977-9683. Page 24: Marni silk top, $2,160. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Elements of Style, page 68: Gucci sequined jacket, $6,500. Select Gucci stores. Ellery silk dress, $630. Ellery.com. Golden Goose Deluxe Brand leather sneakers. Dezso by Sara Beltrán onyx ring, $3,600. Forty Five Ten, Dallas. 214-559-4510. H&M polyester dress, $49.99. Hm .com. Roxanne Assoulin bracelets, $75 each. Roxanne assoulin.com. Theory cotton top, $265. Theory stores. Adeam silk pants, $765. Fivestoryny.com. Natasha Zinko mink-fur slippers, $1,425. Maxfield, Los Angeles. 310-274-8800. Dezso by Sara Beltrán diamond necklace, $5,600. Forty Five Ten, Dallas. 214-559-4510. From Alicia, With Love, page 91: Nubian Heritage African Black Soap Bar, SK-II Facial Treatment Mask, Nubian Heritage African Black Soap Body Lotion, Pantene BB Crème Multi-Tasking Beauty Balm, CND Vinylux Weekly Polish in Fern Flannel, and MV Organic Skincare Pure Jojoba. Keys to Success, page 93: Alexander Wang bikini top, price available upon request. Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. 212-977-9683. Max Mara nylon-blend top, $435. Max Mara, N.Y.C. 212-879-6100. Paula Mendoza Jewelry and Esteban Cortazar earrings, $300. Paula mendoza.com. DKNY wool coat, $898. Select DKNY stores. DKNY Pure wool jumpsuit, $798. Select DKNY stores. Page 95: Marni silk

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ALLURE FEBRUARY 2017

top, $2,160. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Shikama earring, $130. Robin Richman, Chicago. 773-2786150. Page 97: Alexander Wang cotton top, price available upon request, and gold earrings, $395. Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. 212-977-9683. Page 98: 3.1 Phillip Lim viscose jacket, $850 for similar styles. 31philliplim.com. Shikama silver earrings, $175. Lascruxes.com. Take It Easy, page 107: Max Mara silk top, $595. Max Mara, Chicago. 312-475-9500. Bally jeans, $750. Bally, Beverly Hills. 310-247-1012. Christopher Kane knit top, price available upon request for similar styles. Christopherkane.com. Page 108: Hilfiger Collection denim top, $190, and jeans, $260. Select Tommy Hilfiger stores. Page 109: Bottega Veneta wool coat, $9,500. 800-845-6790. Spanx slip, $68. Spanx.com. Hilfiger Edition cotton sweater, $329. Tommy Hilfiger, N.Y.C. 212-223-1824. Page 110: Fendi leather jacket, $4,650, and cotton dress, $3,850. Fendi, N.Y.C. 212-897-2244. Christopher Kane wool jacket, price available upon request for similar styles. Christopherkane.com. Page 111: Dior silk dress, $8,800. Dior stores. Mara Carrizo Scalise gold necklace, $805. Maramcs.com. No. 21 cotton top, $210. Numeroventuno .com. Page 112: Rosie Assoulin polyester-blend dress, $5,995. Neapolitan, Winnetka, Illinois. 847-4417784. Dior Homme cotton top, $1,000. Dior Homme stores. Page 113: Marc Jacobs wool-blend sweatshirt, $3,800, and cotton-blend skirt, $325. Marc Jacobs stores. Freda Salvador leather shoes, $375. Freda salvador.com. Gucci leather jacket, $5,250, and wool pants, $890. Select Gucci stores. Coach leather shoes, $350 for similar styles. Coach.com. Rise of the Rebel, page 114: Valentino silk top, $1,490. Valentino stores. Page 116: Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini Jacquard jacket, $1,170 for similar styles. Ikram, Chicago. 312-5871000. Rodarte sequined top, price available upon request. Modaoperandi.com. Page

118: Prada wool jacket, $2,195, and jersey top, $1,205. Select Prada stores. Page 119: Miu Miu denim jacket and cotton top, prices available upon request. Select Miu Miu stores. Autobiography, page 128: Bioré Free Your Pores Deep Cleansing Charcoal Pore Strips, Bioré Free Your Pores Self Heating One Minute Mask, Kapuluan Raw Organic Cold Pressed Coconut Oil, Orly Nail Lacquer in Kiss the Bride, and Smashbox Cover Shot Eye Palette in Smoky.

PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS Beauty School, page 38, clockwise from top left: @hairbyadir/Instagram; Matt Jones/Art Partner Licensing; Dominique Charriau/ WireImage; Josephine Schiele; Jen Lowery/Splash News/Newscom. Page 40, clockwise from top left: Everett Collection; Jeff Vespa/VF15/WireImage; Josephine Schiele; Kenneth

Willardt; Josephine Schiele; Everett Collection; Alex Cayley/Trunk Archive; Popperfoto/Getty Images; Josephine Schiele. Have Hair, Will Travel, page 76, clockwise from top: Getty Images; courtesy of George Northwood, Ltd.; Renda Attia; Tom Lee; Getty Images; Romain Boe. Page 78, clockwise from top left: Courtesy of Hair by Josh Wood at Barber & Parlour; Getty Images; courtesy of David Mallett; Getty Images; Laura Isaaz. Keys to Success, page 96, clockwise from top left: Courtesy of subject; Paul Bergen/ Redferns/Getty Images; Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images; James Devaney/ FilmMagic; George Pimentel/ WireImage; Robyn Beck/AFP/ Getty Images. Page 97, clockwise from top left: Gregory Pace/FilmMagic; Paola Kudacki; Michael Muller/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images; Rich Pilling/MLB Photos via Getty Images.

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AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Shay Mitchell

JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC (MITCHELL); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE)

FILLS IN THE BLANKS.

See what’s in Shay Mitchell’s travel bag at allure.com/shay-mitchell. Mitchell is a spokeswoman for Bioré and Smashbox. For details on a few of her favorite products (shown here), see Shopping Guide.



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