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LOVE YOUR LIFE!

BURN MORE

kJs

EVERY DAY! New science on metabolism BREAKTHROUGH

A cure for cancer?

Stay flexible at 40+ Your

best year

ever

STARTS NOW!

20

NATURAL REMEDIES doctors love!

LOVE THE SKIN YOU'RE IN!

FIRST STEP: DROP THE FAT TALK!

Quinoa snacks for energy

DEBORAH HUTTON “It's time to put yourself first!”

Better health Less stress More adventure

With inspiring stories from real women (p.95) preventionaus.com.au


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132 84

110 102 95

50

68

62 136 78

IN THIS ISSUE Features

Health

love These healing treatments are as close as your kitchen cupboard!

professionals are embracing virtual reality to help patients relax

78 Deborah Hutton on finding balance The ageless presenter talks about embracing change in midlife

21 Your body on: the ocean

84 How to outsmart your metabolism We look at the science of metabolism and share practical advice to help you end yo-yo dieting forever

22 Problem solved: adult acne

95 Agents for change: meet the

Fitness

68 20 home remedies doctors

enablers We introduce three women who can inspire you to make positive changes to your life this year

17 Nature’s balm How health

The ways in which a summer dip helps soothe and restore your body and mind

Those angry red blotches happen to grown-ups, too, especially women – here’s how to keep them at bay

25 Mind before body Researchers have found that meditation can boost the benefits of your workout

106 Mind games Discover how some common beliefs about the brain are all in the mind!

110 Immunotherapy – the newest weapon in the war on cancer Scientists are calling this gentle, non-invasive treatment the possible cure we have all been waiting for

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28 Fun in the sun! These cool outdoor accessories can make your summer a whole lot more active

102 Flexible after 40 Being fit is no guarantee of being supple, so follow our easy 10-minute routine to help keep muscle twinges at bay


68

21

February/March 2017 Nutrition

31 Sip this to fight sunburn

46 Golden goddess Five fab ways to get a glorious summer glow!

132 What’s for breakfast? Delicious ways to start your day

Whip up this healthy smoothie that protects against UV from the inside

48 Stay hydrated Smart ideas to

136 Healthy sweet treats made with quinoa Protein-packed snacks

keep skin looking refreshed and radiant

35 Eat these foods to lower blood pressure Help keep your blood pressure on an even keel with magnesium-rich foods 37 Summer’s plum way to lose weight New findings show that plums, especially the black variety, are ripe with antioxidants that help you to burn fat

50 Sunscreen protection deception Discover what everyone should know about covering up safely

Mind

57 The 10-second anti-anxiety trick Try this when you’re anxious and see how it helps you regain your cool

Every issue 9 10 13 14 143 146

From the editor Meet the Prevention team Over to you What’s on Your pets The view from 45

38 Do I need iron supplements? See how the right foods can give you enough energising iron every day

62 Mirror images One writer shares how bad-mouthing your body can warp your self-image and how you can stop

Subscribe to

40 15-minute organic meal Turn zucchini into noodles and just add our tasty toppings!

66 Sex shouldn’t hurt Simple tips so you don’t have to take pain lying down

Beauty

Food

findings on how probiotics can help you fight thinning hair

Quick and healthy recipes that make the most of the summer harvest

43 Hair-loss immunity New

120 Sumptuous summer food

today and you could win a Vitamix Total Nutrition Center worth $995. See p118

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7


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Editor’s letter

A new year - let’s make it the best one yet! Starting a new year is always a great opportunity to put in place new habits. Maybe it’s making time for fitness, taking up a sport or maybe, as our cover star Deborah Hutton says, putting yourself first. So, while the days are warm and long, why not ask yourself, What small changes can I make to my routine to make myself healthier? I’m starting my new year as the new editor. So my resolution is to continue bringing you cutting-edge information about health and wellness. We’re going to inspire and empower you to really live your best life. If you’re feeling like you might have pushed the boat out a little too far during the festive season, and you’re vowing to get back on track, you must read our important cover story, which dives deep into what scientists are now discovering about how our metabolism works. The findings suggest what many of us have already suspected: crash dieting doesn’t work. A groundbreaking study on participants from the US version of the TV series The Biggest Loser followed them over seven years. The findings make sobering reading: not only did the participants regain most of the weight they’d so dramatically shed for prime-time viewing, but their metabolisms had been permanently damaged, so that they now burned 25 per cent less kilojoules to maintain their weight. When it comes to healthy weight management, all the experts agree that the way to success is to move more. We speak to three inspiring women who share with us

TRYING SOMETHING NEW IS ALWAYS A GOOD IDEA! It’s surprising where it might take you. Years ago, I was invited to trek in the Himalaya, and my response was to laugh (I’d been a kid who could barely jump puddles without falling in). But then I thought, It’s a chance I will never get again – and it changed my life. I became fitter and healthier than I’d ever been, and I loved the power and vitality that gave me. It’s something I’ve never let go of. So what’s your dream in 2017? Meet three women on page 95 who may help you achieve it!

their journey towards making peace with their weight and their bodies. See the story on page 84. While we were shooting this month’s cover, I had the chance to sit down and chat with Deborah Hutton at her elegant Sydney beachside home (see her story on page 78). Deborah has been in the public eye for almost 40 years, and says she’s never felt fitter than she does now at age 55. Like many of us, she is at a time in her life when she’s asking, What do I want my future to look like? And with impressive energy, she is making it happen. (Her final email to me noted, “I’m in France, checking emails between warm baguettes and French champagne.” ) Making your best life happen is what Prevention helps you do. I look forward to sharing the journey with you.

ANDREA DUVALL EDITOR

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017 PREVENTION

9


Meet the team EDITOR Andrea Duvall ART DIRECTOR Sandra Markovic SUB EDITORS Kerrie Lee, Susannah Hayward EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES editor@preventionmagazine.com.au

WRITERS Pamela Bond, Amber Brenza, Harriet Brown, Micaela George, Erica Goatly, Ginny Graves, Bethany Kandel, Sarah Klein, Cindy Kuzma, Richard Laliberte, Stephanie Osfield, Amy Paturel

PHOTOGRAPHERS Jade Beall, Thayer Allyson Gowdy, Timothy Hogan, Michelle Holden, Sandra Markovic, Chris Middleton, Con Poulos, Sue Stubbs ADVERTISING National Advertising Manager Melissa Fernley mfernley@nextmedia.com.au 02 9901 6191 NSW Advertising Jamie-Lee Golden jgolden@nextmedia.com.au 02 9901 6164 VIC Advertising Georgia Falcke gfalcke@nextmedia.com.au 03 9804 3418 Advertising Traffic Charles Balyck PRODUCTION MANAGER Jon Bishop CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Carole Jones SUBSCRIPTIONS

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Robert Novick SVP, International Business Development and Partnerships Kevin LaBonge ExecutiveDirector, Business Development and Global Licensing

John Ville Editorial Director Angela Kim Director, Business Development and Global Licensing Tara Swansen Director, Global Marketing

ON THE COVER Photography Michelle Holden Hair & make-up Nicole Orlich Styling Maia Liakos Deborah Hutton wears Pampelone tunic

PREVENTION IS PUBLISHED BY Chief Executive Officer Commercial Director

David Gardiner Bruce Duncan

NEXTMEDIA Level 6, Building A, 207 Pacific Highway, St Leonards, NSW 2065 Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards, NSW 1590 Prevention® is a registered trademark of Rodale Inc. ©2017 Rodale Inc. All rights reserved. Prevention Australia is published under license from Rodale Inc by NEXTMEDIA ACN: 128 805 970, Level 6, Building A, 207 Pacific Highway, St Leonards, NSW 2065 © 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, in whole or in part, without the prior permission of the publisher. Printed by Bluestar WEB Sydney, distributed in Australia and New Zealand by Gordon and Gotch. ISSN 1328-6854. The publisher will not accept responsibility or any liability for the correctness of information or opinions expressed in the publication. All material submitted is at the owner’s risk and, while every care will be taken nextmedia does not accept liability for loss or damage.

Veronika Taylor Editorial Director Karl Rozemeyer Senior Content Manager Michele Mausser International Finance Manager Natanya Spies Editorial Assistant Shoi Greaves Administrative Assistant

Prevention International Editors-in-Chief Barbara O’Dair US Vasilis Vardakas Greece Sanghamitra Chakraborty India Heni Wiradimaja Indonesia Enriqueta Gallart Latin America, Mexico

Expert articles are for information purposes only and are not a substitute for medical advice or to be relied on for diagnosis or treatment. The Authors and the Publisher accept no responsibility for medical decisions readers may make. The Authors and the Publication assume no liability or responsibility for damage or injury to persons or property arising from any use of any product, information, idea or instruction contained in the articles. Always seek the advice of a qualified medical practitioner if you think you are suffering from a medical condition.

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Your say

Over to you The last issue’s hits were our creative summer salads, yoga for sleep and being sensational at 72

PHOTOGRAPHY: ISTOCK/GETTY IMAGES/MARK CHEW FROM KAREN MARTINI’S BOOK LIKE THIS, WANT MORE? (PLUM $39.99)

SUPER SALADS As a bit of a foodie, the recipes are the first pages I turn to with each new issue of Prevention. Karen Martini’s salad recipes in the December issue caught my eye. They are great ideas during the summer months when it is far too hot to even think about cooking. My favourite is the Salted Watermelon, Prawn and Feta [pictured right]. Well done for giving us recipe ideas using fresh seasonal ingredients. Christina Walden, via email INSPIRED AND ASHAMED! Your story “What does 72 look like?” (December) both appalled and inspired me. I was appalled at myself because Marian Burgess looks better at 72 than I do at 62. And I was inspired by her for taking up tennis at the age of 70 and playing three times a week. She puts me to shame and I’ve vowed to do something about it. It’s all too easy to reach a certain age and hide behind the number as an excuse to live a ‘smaller’ life. Thanks for the motivation. Julia Knight, via email

Winner!

MOST POPULAR

YOGA AND SLEEP I could really relate to your article “A good night’s sleep, naturally” (December). I’m only 48 but have started the menopause early and one of the worst things is not being able to sleep. My doctor prescribed sleeping pills which I hated taking and which left me feeling ‘druggy’ in the mornings so I threw them away. I’ve never considered doing yoga before, but your story has convinced me to give it a try. Anything has to be better than pills or exhaustion! Sophie Hill, via email

WRITE IN FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN... An Eco Tan organic tanning gift pack valued at $106.35 Get a healthy summer glow with Eco Tan. These organic fake tan and body care products are made in Australia and certified Cruelty Free. The prize pack includes an Invisible Tan, a Pink Himalayan Salt Scrub, an Extreme Exfoliant Glove and an Organic Personal Outdoor Spray. For your chance to win this great prize, write to us at: comps@preventionmagazine.com.au or Twitter or Facebook.

INSTAGRAM PIC

These creamy, smooth operators scored a hit as yummy ‘fast food’. We couldn’t agree more.

FAVOURITE FACEBOOK POST

“Loved this edition. Inspiring women sharing their story, beautiful healthy recipes I can’t wait to try and easy delicious smoothies. Gratefully, informed and inspired.” PINTEREST

This very true and thought-provoking quote struck a chord with the Prevention team and with the readers.

MOST SHARED TWEET

5 anti-ageing supplements that work.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017 PREVENTION

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What’s on

February/March The latest news on events in your area, plus new TV shows and our pick of the books

MIND, BODY & SPIRIT IN BRISBANE

TO SEE AND DO

TO WATCH AND READ

February: Heart Research Month Heart disease is responsible for more than three times as many deaths as breast cancer among Australian women. February is Heart Research Month and wherever you live, you can join the event’s ‘Red Army’, get active, have fun and help raise money for vital research. For more information on events in your area, visit redfeb.com.au

February brings welcome new television programs and SBS is serving up a food-show bonanza. Making a return to our screens is the marvellous Maeve O’Meara with two new series: Food Safari Earth and Food Safari Water. Also returning in 2017 is Matthew Evans, with a new season of Gourmet Farmer, and Shane Delia, with Recipe for Life. For more information and viewing dates and times, visit sbs.com.au

March 5: Clean Up Australia Day. Over the past 25 years, civic-minded Aussies have donated more than 27.2 million hours to this popular annual event. To join in, and help make your local beach or bushland clean and beautiful again, visit cleanupaustraliaday.org.au

Itching to give your Christmas blender a good workout? Food blogger and cook Tess Masters’ latest book, The Perfect Blend, could be just the ticket. All 100 recipes in the book are gluten-free and vegan, and include ‘optional boosters’ to enhance both flavour and nutrition. Published by Penguin Australia, rrp $35.

March 13–20: Coeliac Awareness Week. This autoimmune disease, which makes gluten hazardous to sufferers, is known to affect one in 70 Australians. To find out how you can help, visit coeliac.org.au/caw

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QUEEN OF THE BLENDER, TESS MASTERS

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March 17–19: Mind, Body, Spirit Festival, Brisbane Convention Centre. Covering health, nutrition, personal growth and meditation, this is the biggest festival of its kind, with more than 200 exhibitors. For details, visit mbsfestival.com.au Also in March: The annual Melanoma March is being held across the country on various dates to fund research into one of Australia’s most common cancers. To find your local march, visit melanomamarch.org.au

Celebrity nutritionist and chef Zoe Bingley-Pullin has released a new book, Falling in Love with Food, to celebrate her life-long passion. The eclectic mix of 80 recipes

covers the food spectrum, with themed chapters reflecting the different stages in her culinary journey. Published by Nutritional Edge, rrp $34.95. Nothing is more important to we humans than love, yet nothing is more painful than love gone wrong. In her book Lovelands, psychologist Dr Debra Campbell draws on personal and professional experience to provide a map for navigating the difficult terrain of affairs of the heart. Published by Hardie Grant Books, rrp $24.99.


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Health

THE BEST BREAKTHROUGH SCIENCE, MADE SIMPLE

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

Nature’s balm The prospect of a stay in hospital or even a visit to the dentist can fill many of us with great anxiety. Cue a dose of virtual reality (VR). Once the province of video gamers, VR is now being used in healthcare to help patients relax. In Stockholm, Sweden, people in pain are viewing nature scenes with soothing voiceovers, while in New York, similar calming scenes are being used to soothe the anxiety of waiting for the dentist. The feedback from patients is they’re more relaxed to receive care. Closer to home, patients at the Hollywood Private Hospital in Perth can don a headset and travel the world, without leaving their beds. We hope it catches on!

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017 PREVENTION

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Health now

1 in 7

The number of Australians who will have a thyroid issue in their lifetime.

10 SIGNS OF A THYROID OUT OF WHACK The thyroid is a small, butterflyshaped gland at the base of your throat. The hormones it pumps out regulate everything from appetite and energy levels to your body’s internal thermostat. That’s all good if it’s working properly but, if not, you could feel the effects in unpredictable ways. SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

A study in Finland has found that being pessimistic can double the risk of dying from coronary heart disease, although being an optimist alone does not necessarily protect against it. Researchers believe pessimism in people’s attitudes toward their futures might influence inflammation, a known risk factor for heart disease. It is also suggested that a more optimistic attitude might accompany a healthier lifestyle: more exercise, healthy eating patterns and lower BMI are all heart-healthy behaviours.

Is your appendix really a useless organ? 18

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The appendix has long been regarded as unnecessary, but is it about to make a comeback? “New evidence suggests that the appendix might play a role in repopulating the good bacteria in your body in the case of a wipeout due to a course of antibiotics,” says Dr Niket Sonpal. (But, adds Sonpal, if you do have it removed, you’ll still be fine.)

THE GOOD NEWS Women, especially older women, are more prone to thyroid problems than men. Diagnosis is made via a blood test. The good news is that a thyroid condition is usually treatable.

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

THINK POSITIVE

1 Unrelenting fatigue. 2 Feeling the cold. 3 Voice changes, such as persistent hoarseness. 4 Fluid retention (oedema). 5 Sudden weight gain or loss that can’t be explained by dietary or lifestyle changes. 6 High cholesterol. 7 Sore or aching joints, particularly in the hands, feet and knees. 8 Low mood or forgetfulness. 9 Dry skin. 10 An enlarged thyroid gland (goitre).


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Health

YOUR BODY ON

The Ocean Few things are more therapeutic than a dose of sea air − and there’s plenty of research to prove it. Here’s how a trip to the beach can soothe your body and mind BRAIN

LUNGS

Salty air has been shown to reduce lung inflammation, helping relieve asthma symptoms. Many patients with lung disease have also reported less coughing and sinus pressure when exposed to sea air.

A view of the ocean lowers stress, according to researchers who found that the more ‘blue space’ you see, the calmer you feel.

HEART

If the water is a little chilly, take a dip anyway. Plunging into cold sea water improves circulation.

SKIN

CHUCK FISHMAN/GETTY IMAGES

Sea salt helps restore the skin’s protective barrier, which seals in hydration longer, keeping skin smoother and softer.

JOINTS

Swimming in the ocean can ease painful conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, possibly due in part to the anti-inflammatory effects of soaking in salt water.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017 PREVENTION

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PROBLEM SOLVED:

adult acne

If you thought acne was a condition that plagued only teenagers, think again. Adults, too, can suffer from skin flare-ups, especially women. Here, we explain the reasons that acne occurs and how to prevent it BY RICHARD LALIBERTE

A

cne is surprisingly common among adults — almost one in six Aussie women over the age of 25 has it at some point. Hormones, especially male androgens (which are present in women, too), trigger oil production, which explains why acne often shows up around the onset of menstruation and then later during menopause, when oestrogen levels drop. “It’s important that people with adult acne don’t feel like freaks,” says Dr Jo-Anne See, a dermatologist with Central Sydney Dermatology and a specialist in adult acne. Our experts explain what’s happening and suggest these remedies.

ADJUST YOUR DIET

Studies find that eating sugary, carb-rich foods that are high on the glycaemic index (GI) – a measure of how quickly a food raises blood sugar – is associated with a greater likelihood of developing acne. High blood sugar promotes inflammation and increases oil production. Stick to foods with a low GI, such as whole grains, beans and lentils, and many fruits and vegetables.

22

acne worse by boosting oil production. Anything you can do to minimise stress may have beneficial effects on the skin. CONSIDER YOGA

One study found that a single 90-minute session of hatha yoga (a combination of poses and breathing exercises) reduced stress levels in women between the ages of 40 and 60. It was found that regular sessions reduced it even more. CLEANSE AND MOISTURISE

Washing the skin at the end of each day prevents dirt, makeup and dead skin cells from clogging hair follicles. Moisturising afterwards keeps skin from drying out and making oil glands more active. Use a gentle cleanser made for acne-prone skin and follow with a noncomedogenic (non-clogging) moisturiser. Your skin heals itself while you sleep, and good skin care helps prevents inflammation.

Medical treatments What a doctor might recommend

REDUCE STRESS

TOPICAL TREATMENTS ON PRESCRIPTION

“Acne very often occurs in times of stress,” says Dr See. This is due to the flood of androgens released during stress, which can cause acne flare-ups or make existing

A family of compounds related to vitamin A – retinoids, such as tretinoin (Retin-A) – work by reducing skin inflammation and preventing the skin

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cells from blocking follicles. For inflamed spots, an antibiotic lotion, such as clindamycin, kills the bacteria that can trigger the inflammation. Dapsone gel has been found not to dry or irritate the skin. ORAL DRUGS

Low-dose doxycycline attacks bacteria that may be causing the acne. Another medication is Aldactone. “It’s not a sexy drug,” says Dr See. “It’s an old-fashioned medication that has been around forever. But I’ve had patients say that it has changed their lives.” A GP might also prescribe oral contraceptives, which can help control the acne by correcting the androgen imbalances. They may recommend using a combination of a topical treatment and an oral antibiotic. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY

In the photodynamic therapy procedure, a qualified dermatologist applies a light-sensitive compound to the face and lets it seep into the skin for up to two hours. After that, the skin is treated with a blue-wavelength light that chemically reacts with the topical treatment to kill the acne bacteria and reduce oil production. This treatment costs around $350 per session. You need a referral from your GP to see a dermatologist.


Health

1 in 6

Aussie women suffer at some point from adult acne

DIY remedies Try these yourself BENZOYL PEROXIDE

These lotions and gels kill bacteria trapped in clogged follicles. Apply a product with 10 per cent or less benzoyl peroxide at night, then follow with a noncomedogenic moisturiser. SALICYLIC ACID

Most effective against blackheads and whiteheads, this cream or liquid exfoliates the outer layer of skin, so follicles don’t get clogged as easily. It can dry your skin, so choose a product with a moisturiser.

PHOTOGRAPHY TIMOTHY HOGAN

TEA TREE OIL

It has been found that a tea tree oil gel can reduce the number of mild to moderate acne spots by more than 40 per cent over six weeks. Some users find it makes skin itchy, so use as a spot treatment, rather than over the whole face.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 201 2017 PREVENTION

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Fitness

FEELING STRONGER, FITTER AND FIRMER AFTER 40 STARTS HERE

Mind before body

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

Put meditation before exercise and you’ll get a bigger psychological boost than by doing either activity alone or meditating after you work out, according to a recent study in the US journal Translational Psychiatry. Researchers found that meditating before working out can reduce the symptoms of depression by up to 40 per cent, which beats doing either activity solo. Why? Both activities affect the same areas of the brain but in different ways: exercise spurs brain-cell growth, while meditation helps neurons live longer – and meditating before exercising boosts the feel-good effects. Meditating first also increases focus, making exercise more enjoyable so you do it more often. Start with a few minutes of mindfulness before you walk, jog or take that yoga class.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2017 PREVENTION REVENTION

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Fitness now

TURN SUMMER FUN INTO FAT LOSS Yes, you can fit in a workout while having fun in the sun, as plenty of classic summer activities burn kilojoules. Here’s how many you can torch in 30 minutes* while enjoying yourself:

Swimming

858 Water volleyball

628

628

THE 10-MINUTE WORKOUT THAT BOOSTS HEALTH Including just one minute of intense exercise in a 10-minute workout may lower your heart disease and diabetes risk just as much as a slower, 50-minute slog, says a recent study. Earlier research also points to the heart and weight benefits of high-intensity exercise. Here’s how to make your 10 minutes count:

2 min 20 sec 2 min 20 sec 2 min 20 sec 3 min

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569

523

498

Walk, jog or cycle at a comfortable pace to warm up. Walk, jog or cycle as fast as you can.

Walk, jog, or cycle at a comfortable pace to cool down.

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Wash your car

Playing frisbee

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Walk, jog, or cycle at a comfortable pace to recover. Walk, jog, or cycle as fast as you can.

Boogie boarding

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Walk, jog or cycle at a comfortable pace to recover. Walk, jog or cycle as fast as you can.

Take a leisurely bike ride or do some gardening

KILOJOULES BURNED

Build a sandcastle

*Based on a 68 kilo woman

PHOTOGRPHY BY ISTOCK

sweat smarter

Jumping waves


Fuel Fabulous With tailored nutrition advice from an Accredited Practising Dietitian

If your performance is important, trust an Accredited Practising Dietitian. There is no substitute for the radiance that comes from true health, or the individualised nutrition advice an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) can give you. APDs are the only nutrition professionals recognised by the Australian Government and Medicare. Talk to an APD for nutrition advice to help fuel your performance.


Fitness

LOOK WHAT WE FOUND

Fun in the sun! Make the most of the warm summer days by getting active outdoors

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1 Bat and ball (Sunny Life beach paddles, $34.95 pair, sunnylife.com.au). 2 Workout to water The perfect towel to take you from yoga in the park to a run on the beach (Lorna Jane water and land towel, $45.99, lornajane.com.au). 3 Hands-free tech Monitor your activity (LJ MP3 phone holder, $29.99, lornajane.com.au). 4 Head turner A stylish and practical visor (Baku Aztec Visor, $39.95; and 5 Sun smart UV protection for in and out of the water (Baku Sun Savvy long-sleeve swim rashie, $119.95, bakuswimwear.com.au). 6 The social game Get the whole family involved (Cotton On Kids ying disc, $4.86, cottonon.com). 7 Happily hydrated Stay cool and refreshed at all times (Annabel Trends Watermate drink bottle, $16.95, annabeltrends.com). 8 Sweet shades Protect your peepers with polarised sunnies (Local Supply sunglasses, $55.95, localsupply.com).

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suncare with SPF 50+

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for face & body

Shield skin from damaging UVA/UVB rays This summer, enjoy the beautiful Australian outdoors with Natio’s very high broad spectrum sun protection. Light, quick dry formulas infused with Aloe and Vitamin E to moisturise and nourish skin all day. Use the ‘try me’ free testers on all Natio displays to experience the exceptional texture, quality and value. For all skin types, priced from RRP $11.95 www.natio.com.au Available at Myer, David Jones and participating Pharmacies Always read the label, use only as directed.


Something for everyone

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mymagazines.com.au


Nutrition

BETTER HEALTH, MORE ENERGY AND USEFUL, EXPERT-APPROVED ADVICE ON A PLATE

Sip this to fight sunburn What you eat can actually protect your skin from sun damage, according to research. Certain foods act like sunscreen in different ways: green tea contains catechin antioxidants shown to enhance DNA repair and reduce the risk of skin cancer, while carrots and mangoes pack beta-carotene and vitamin C, which may prevent UV-induced damage. Chia seeds have omega-3s to help keep skin moisturised, preventing the dryness that comes with sun exposure. Our Sun Shake combines all these ingredients in one delicious pre-beach treat. Sip before heading out, but remember to still apply plenty of sunscreen.

Sun shake

PHOTOGRAPHY: STOCKFOOD

Blend a handful of ice with 1 cup frozen mango, ½ cup full-fat coconut milk, ½ cup chilled green tea, 1 tablespoon organic protein powder, 1 tablespoon chia seeds, 1 teaspoon ground ginger and 2 carrots, peeled and chopped. Enjoy!

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Nutrition now

12 HEALTHY HYDRATING FOODS

To keep fluid levels high, think beyond drinks: 20 per cent of our daily hydration comes from the food we eat. These healthy picks will add to your fluid intake on steamy days

The quantity of water contained in these foods

¾ CUP 1 cup cooked zucchini

200g low-fat Greek yoghurt

1 large cucumber

3 SURPRISING CAUSES OF DEHYDRATION

1 cup rock melon

1 cup strawberries

1 large green capsicum

½ CUP 3 cups iceberg lettuce

1 cup watermelon

1 cup radishes

¼ CUP 1 cup broccoli florets

½ cup cooked brown rice

½ cup cooked black beans

1 Some prescription drugs and supplements. Many are diuretics, reducing water in cells and increasing trips to the toilet. Among the worst offenders are blood pressure medications and supplements such as ginger and hawthorn. 2 A low-carb diet. Carbohydrates are stored with fluids in the body, so slashing grains can reduce fluid stores. If you want to lose weight, consider eating a variety of whole foods in moderation. 3 Stress. Stress causes your adrenal glands to pump out stress hormones. And if you’re constantly under pressure, eventually your adrenals become exhausted. This can trigger dehydration and low electrolyte levels. While increasing fluid intake can help in the short term, it may be an idea to see your GP.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT: STOCKDISC. MITCH MANDEL. GOODSHOOT. MITCH MANDEL (2). TODD HUFFMAN. MITCH MANDEL. MATT RAINEY. GETTY IMAGES. MATT RAINEY. MITCH MANDEL. IMAGE SOURCE

CUP

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That’s the drop in the daily fresh fruit and veg intake of recently divorced men, according a study in the journal Social Science & Medicine. The study found that divorced women’s diets stayed the same.

Everyone needs to drink more water in hot and humid weather, but some of us are at greater risk of dehydration than others. Here are three little-known culprits.

2/3

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25%


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The strongest Chlorophyll on the market Containing 210mg of pure chlorophyll per 10ml serve, Melrose Chlorophyll Forte liquid contains premium quality ingredients to create the most potent Liquid Chlorophyll on the market. A highly nutritious superfood that is essential to maintain a healthy digestion, natural body cleanser and detox support formula with potent alkalising and antioxidant properties. Supporting a healthy digestion and promoting the growth of healthy gut bacteria, this natural green alkalising superfood is the most powerful way to get your dose of greens. Available at Health Food Stores nationally www.melrosehealth.com.au

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Nutrition

Eat these

foods to lower blood pressure You can help keep your blood pressure on an even keel by eating magnesium-rich foods eople who boost their magnesium intake to 368mg per day – just above the RDI for adult women – for three months can lower their blood pressure by several points without making other changes, according to the medical journal Hypertension. Magnesium relaxes blood vessels, which increases blood flow and decreases blood pressure. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, one in three Australian adults don’t get enough magnesium. Foods are the best source of the mineral, especially the foods below.

P

DARK CHOCOLATE PER 30 GRAM SERVE: 43MG

ALMONDS PER 30 GRAM SERVE: 77MG

SALMON PER 100 GRAM SERVE: 104MG

1 CUP COOKED SPINACH: 157MG

1 CUP PLAIN YOGHURT: 42MG

1 AVOCADO: 58MG

1 CUP COOKED BROWN RICE: 86MG

1 CUP WHITE BEANS: 113MG

1 MEDIUM BANANA: 32MG

PHOTOGRAPHY: ISTOCK

PUMPKIN SEED KERNELS PER 30 GRAM SERVE: 168MG

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Nutrition

SUMMER’S PLUM WAY TO

lose weight Take advantage of the season’s juicy stone fruit to help you burn fat. Black plums are especially good at the task in hand

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PHOTOGRAPHY: ISTOCK

ow-fat yoghurt, green tea, salad... these are foods people usually associate with weight loss. But surprising recent research shows a sweeter option may fight fat just as effectively: plums. This delicious stone fruit is abundant and cheap at this time of year. According to a recent study in the British Medical Journal, people who ate the most flavonoid antioxidants were found to have gained the least weight over time – and gram for gram, plums have more flavonoids than many other fruits. Black plums are particularly rich in anthocyanins, pigments shown to burn fat. So this summer, make plums your go-to snack. You can eat them on their own, add to your breakfast muesli or top with a dollop of yoghurt for a refreshing dessert.

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Nutrition

DO I NEED

iron supplements? Your body’s requirement for this vital mineral changes after 40, and food is the best source BY ANDREW WEIL

TOP FOOD SOURCES OF IRON Women need 16mg a day before menopause and 8mg afterwards.

If you’re no longer menstruating, the odds of you having an iron deficiency are slim. If you get enough iron in your diet, taking a supplement could actually do more harm than good.

IRON-RICH FOODS 3.5mg

While excessive amounts of some other vitamin and mineral supplements are easily flushed from the body, any extra iron you get builds up in the heart, liver, pancreas and other organs. Over time, this can lead to heart problems, liver disease and diabetes. High iron intake is even more dangerous for people with haemochromatosis, a genetic disorder in which the intestines absorb more iron than the body needs. For these reasons, you’re better off getting the iron you need from food (see our chart, right). Red meat and seafood, like oysters, are the richest sources of heme iron and the most easily absorbed. But there are plenty of other iron-rich options, such as dried beans, cooked greens, apricots and raisins. Since these contain nonheme iron, however, they’re best eaten with foods high in vitamin C or fermented foods such as miso, yoghurt and sauerkraut, all of which form a bond with this type of iron, making it easier to absorb. Plant compounds in coffee, tea and casein (a protein in milk), on the other hand, may impair iron absorption.

3.5mg 2.96mg 2.79mg 2.3mg 1.28mg a

1.2mg

1.07mg (SOURCE: NUTRITION AUSTRALIA)

Your GP can confirm if you have iron-deficiency anaemia with a blood test.

10 symptoms of an iron deficiency

You could be low in iron if you have: 1 Fatigue. 2 Lightheadedness. 3 Dizziness. 4 Cold hands or feet. 5 Hair loss. 6 Brittle nails. 7 Headache. 8 Shortness of breath. 9 Pale skin. 10 Restless legs syndrome.

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“If you’re no longer menstruating, the odds of you having an iron deficiency are slim”

WESTEND61/GETTY IMAGES. FATIGUE AND DIZZINESS ICONS BY JESSICA KUSUMA. COMB ICON BY MATTHIJS NIELSON OF THENOUNPROJECT.COM

S

upplements are usually only necessary for women who suffer from iron-deficiency anaemia, which is typically caused by heavy menstrual flow or internal blood loss due to ulcers. Overuse of aspirin or other antiinflammatories can also limit your body’s ability to absorb iron, as can gastric bypass surgery.


Muscle Cramps? Mag Phos Easily absorbed minerals* traditionally used in Tissue Salt therapy for the temporary relief of: muscle cramps, spasms & twitches. Available in health food stores & pharmacies For more information go to: schuesslertissuesalts.com.au

Spoil yourself! BUY ANY Schuessler Tissue Salt to enter log onto www.schuesslertissuesalts.com.au Competition closes 28th April 2017

SCHUESSLER TISSUE SALTS Contains lactose. Homeopathically prepared formulations*. Always read the label use only as directed. If symptoms persist, consult your healthcare professional.


Nutrition Clean + Easy

15-minute organic meal serves 4 for under $20 juice of 1 organic lemon

200g organic feta, crumbled

+

2 tablespoons organic olive oil

+

+

1 can (400g) organic white beans, rinsed and drained

+

½ cup chopped organic basil

+

=

NUTRITION (per serve) 1386kJ/332 cal Protein 16.5g Total fat 21.6g Sat fat 9.1g Carbs 14.2g Sugars 5.3g Fibre 8.8g Sodium 793mg Calcium 251mg Iron 2.8mg

Total: $19.80

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FROM TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): ANTHONYROSENBERG/GETTY IMAGES. ETIENNE VOSS/GETTY IMAGES. IMAGE SOURCE. MITCH MANDEL. LEVENTKONUK/GETTY IMAGES. MATT RAINEY. SHERI GIBLIN/OFFSET. COSTS CORRECT AS OF DECEMBER 2016

2 each organic zucchini and summer squash, peeled into thin strips


Helps relieve constipation

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Beauty

FAST, EASY WAYS TO LOOK AS GOOD AS YOU FEEL

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

Hair loss: can probiotics help? A lot of attention is paid to baldness in men but thinning hair and hair loss is more common in women, especially older women, than we might think. While there isn’t a cure, new research suggests that probiotics – the gut-friendly bacteria found in fermented foods, such as yoghurt, kefir, sauerkraut and kimchi – may be able to slow the process and even stop it from progressing. The research found a direct correlation between your immune system and gut health. While hair loss tends to be genetic, hair health is also influenced by diet and lifestyle. According to the research, hair follicles that are subjected to poor diet and environmental pollutants cannot sustain hair-growth activity and, as a result, die off. The study found that probiotics, together with a healthy diet, can trigger a positive immune and metabolic reaction. In other words, as your immune system becomes stronger, so should your hair follicles. Speak to your health-care professional about the type of probiotic that may be of benefit to you.

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Beauty now

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The number of times women over 40 should use an exfoliator on their face each week. We love DMK Revise-A Exfoliant Vitamin A Cream, $104. It lightly exfoliates for a smoother, fresher complexion.

EYES ON THE PRIZE THE BOOSTER Get those lazy cells around your eyes moving with O Cosmedics Eye Fusion, $129, a two-step system that contains a gel application, followed by a cream application, that work together to boost collagen and elastin.

Looking for a way to improve your skin’s texture naturally? Rosehip is extracted from the fruit of the rose, which is the little bulb that sits just under the petals. It’s high in vitamin C, a skin- brightening, anti-ageing oxidant, along with vitamin E, which calms and hydrates. It also contains the antixodant lycopene, which helps protect against premature ageing. You can find it in the products pictured right…

Bye bye, dry

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For the body Trilogy Pure Plant Body Oil, $27.95, for all-over hydration.

For the face In Essence Certified Organic Rose Hip Plus, $33.95, to help renew and regenerate healthy skin.

For face and body ROHR Remedy Boab and Rosehip, $40. Nourishes and reduces the appearance of fine lines.

During summer, increased exposure to sun, wind, chlorine and salt water can cause hair to oxidise and prematurely age. To combat this, Ben Martin at Salon XVI says heat and UV protection products are key. “We use Kevin Murphy Session Spray and Kevin Murphy Hair Resort because they offer protection from the elements,” he says. If you swim frequently, use a clarifying shampoo weekly to detox. To nourish and replace lost hydration, apply a couple of drops of hair oil to the ends of freshly washed, damp hair.

PREVENTIONAUS.COM.AU

THE RECOVERY Farewell fine lines with Dr. LeWinn’s Line Smoothing Complex S8 Eye Recovery Complex, $74.95. Key ingredients, Coenzyme Q10 and Snap-8, work to actively reduce the appearance of expression lines.

PHOTOGRAPHY STOCKSY

STAYING HIP

THE ANTI-AGER Prevage Anti-Aging Eye Serum, $130, helps turn back the clock on crow’s feet and dark circles around the eyes, while at the same time being gentle on the skin.


Beauty

5 OF THE BEST

Golden Goddess Get a glorious summer glow without baking in the sun, thanks to these wonder products!

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1 Sun-kissed beauty by Estée Lauder Bronze Goddess Powder Bronzer ($60, esteelauder.com.au) is available in a wide range of shades to suit every skin tone. 2 Hawaiian girl by Benefit Dew The Hoola (30ml, $49, benefitcosmetics.com/au/en-gb) is a liquid bronzer that is sheer, shimmerless and streak-free. 3 Lightweight and fast-absorbing, JERGENS Shea Beauty Oil (150ml, $10.99, jergens.com.au) contains argan oil to nourish your skin and enhance its sheen. 4 For a head-to-toe glow, NUXE Huile Prodigieuse OR (100ml, $42.99, cosmetiquesdefrance. com.au), a shimmering dry oil, nourishes, repairs and softens both skin and hair. 5 For ultimate night-time glamour, Nutrimetics Nutri-Rich Shimmer Body Oil (60ml, $34.90, nutrimetics.com.au) is a dry body oil infused with golden-bronze shimmer to enhance tanned skin.

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Beauty

Stay hydrated It is especially important to stay hydrated in summer and that goes for your skin, too! BY MICAELA GEORGE 1

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1 Hydrate and repair skin while you sleep with Avon Nutra Effects Hydration Gel Night Cream (50g, $15, shop.avon.com.au), suitable even for sensitive skin. 2 Spritz and go with A’kin Hydrating Mist Toner (150ml, $19.95, akin.com.au), infused with organic coconut water to cool, refresh and hydrate. 3 Reverse the clock with Jurlique Nutri-Define Restorative Hydrating Emulsion (50ml, $120, jurlique.com.au). 4 Keep your cool with Kester Black Lucky Hand & Body Fondant (500ml, $36, kesterblack.com), a soothing, hydrating cream for everyday use. 5 Face the day with Philosophy Renewed Hope In A Jar Re-Energizing Moisture Mask (120ml, $45, philosophyskincare.com.au), which includes three sources of hydration, plus a combination of skin illuminators. 6 Satiate thirsty skin with Sukin Ultra Hydrating Body Oil (100ml, $19.95, sukinorganics.com) – rosehip and marula-seed oils promote skin elasticity and radiance. 7 Try Obagi Hydrate Facial Moisturizer (48g, $49.95, obagi.net.au) for lasting results – perfect for any skin type. 8 Nourish and restore tired skin with Biology No.353 Ultra Hydrate Body Butter (200g, $45, biologyskin.com.au), which delivers essential vitamins and fatty acids to combat dryness.

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PHOTOGRAPHY SANDRA MARKOVIC

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SUNSCREEN PROTECTION DECEPTION Sunscreen use is soaring but so are the rates of melanoma. So what are we getting wrong? BY SARI HARRAR & SAMANTHA HOLLIS

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Beauty

“Sunscreen has been promoted as a top protection strategy against skin cancer but most people don’t understand its limitations”

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Even if you were lax in your younger days, starting now will pay dividends

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Beauty

A

re you protected or not? If you’re like most Aussies, the phrase ‘slip, slop, slap’ is etched on your brain. Today, 80 per cent of us buy sunscreen – and yet rates of melanoma have doubled in the 30 years from 1986. In 2016, more than 13,000 Australians were diagnosed with this potentially lethal skin cancer and nearly 1,800 died from it.

Medicare records show a staggering 974,767 treatments for squamous and basal cell carcinomas in one year alone. While these cancers aren’t fatal, they are potentially disfiguring – and 99 per cent of them are caused by sun exposure, says the Cancer Council. Despite what you think you know, it seems there is a whole new set of rules on how to use sunscreen if you want to stay safe this summer

SUN & AGEING Around 90 per cent of visible ageing is caused by external factors such as sun exposure. Whenever you go outside, whether it’s cloudy, sunny or somewhere in between, your skin absorbs two types of ultraviolet rays: UVB rays are at their strongest from midmorning to mid-afternoon. These primarily damage the skin’s upper layer, causing sunburn and age spots. Long-term exposure can make the skin thicker and leathery. UVA rays are present whenever the sun is up. They go deeper, harming the connective tissue and blood vessels, causing skin to become less elastic and more wrinkled over time. While both kinds of rays can lead to skin cancer, UVA is more dangerous because it penetrates deeper and harms cells called keratinocytes, which are involved in most skin cancers. And since UVA doesn’t cause sunburn, it can be hard to know how much exposure you are actually getting. In Australia, most sunscreens are ‘broad spectrum’, meaning they shield the skin from both UVB and UVA rays. “We are lucky in Australia that we have the gold standard in sunscreens,” says Adjunct Associate Professor Craig Sinclair, Chair, Skin Cancer Committee, Cancer Council Australia. “Sunscreen is very effective at preventing premature ageing.” Sinclair also says that even if you were lax with sunscreen in your youth, starting now can pay

huge dividends. “If you weren’t so vigilant when you were younger, it’s foolhardy to say, ‘Oh the harm is done’. Skin ageing occurs at any age. “It’s the cumulative effect of exposure to harmful rays that leads to ageing and sun damage. So every moment of protection is important,” he adds.

BE ALERT, NOT ALARMED “Sunscreen has been promoted as a top skincancer protection strategy, but I don’t think most people understand its limits,” says Associate Professor of Epidemiology, DeAnn Lazovich. “For many people, sunscreen is the only thing they do to stay safe, but they’re not paying attention to what’s in it or how best to use it.” Indeed, a few years ago there was a media report that using sunscreen may be harmful to our “Sunscreen health. This was based on a Melbourne study in which a is only as good as the type of cell in the human person using it and the immune system was exposed average person applies to zinc oxide nanoparticles only a third to half as (which are found in sunscreen) in a laboratory to see how they much as they would respond. The human cells should” absorbed the zinc oxide particles and broke them down. This was a false alarm because the study did not look at whether particles were absorbed through skin and into the bloodstream. “The evidence around any harm from the chemicals associated with sunscreen is limited at best,” says Sinclair. “And the benefits far outweigh any possible negative effect.”

THE RIGHT WAY TO APPLY “Sunscreen is only as good as the person using it, and the average person applies only a third to a half as much as they should,” says Sinclair. His recommendation? “A teaspoon per limb, and E

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PHOTOGRAPHY:ISTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY XXXXX


Beauty

one for the torso and back, which is approximately 35ml. If you think that the average tube has 100ml, you need to be using a third of that.” And we can’t rely on sunscreen alone, he advises. Sunscreen needs to be complemented by clothing, widebrimmed hats and sunglasses. Our misconceptions about sunscreen leave us open to more harmful exposure in other ways, too. One widely cited Italian study found that people wearing SPF 30 spent 25 per cent more time in the sun than those who wore SPF 10 and, as a result, were exposed to nearly the same dose of UV radiation. In other words, by opting for a higher SPF, we’re inclined to pay less attention to how often we reapply sunscreen. And we don’t do it often enough, say the experts. “You’re much better having an SPF 30 and using it regularly than a 50+ and not reapplying it,” advises Sinclair.

Applying sunscreen thoroughly is also crucial, even if you don’t think you’ll see the sun: exposure through car side windows, which don’t filter UV, can cause skin damage, a recent study showed. When researchers looked at nearly 900 people with skin cancer, they found that 74 per cent of melanomas occurred on the right side of their bodies. In all likelihood this was due to exposure through the driver’s side window. The case for daily sunscreen use is so strong that a study from Queensland − home of the world’s highest melanoma rates − found that people who wore sunscreen every day were 49 per cent less likely to develop melanoma after 15 years than those who used it occasionally or never. Daily sunscreen use also slashed the risk of invasive melanoma by nearly 75 per cent. So go on, slather it on – but don’t forget to cover up, as well!

What does SPF mean? The Sun Protection Factor, or SPF, is based on how quickly your skin burns. So, if your skin starts to burn in 10 minutes, then SPF 30 will protect you for 30 times longer − or 300 minutes. Even so, it’s good practice to reapply every two hours. “Sunscreens have been tested in laboratory conditions, so if your sunscreen says it protects for four hours, that’s not taking into account you rubbing it off on your towel or sweating,” says Associate Professor Craig Sinclair.

6 of the best

“The best sunscreen is one that you apply regularly,” says Craig Sinclair. “So look for a sunscreen that’s cosmetically appealing to you. Maybe it’s tinted, maybe it’s less masking than one of the high SPFs. That way, you’re more likely to use it.” Here are six sunscreens we love − see if one of them is right for you

1 SOLAR D DAILY USE SPF 50+, $13.99, solar-d.com This sunscreen provides broadspectrum protection while still allowing in some of the UVB light that our bodies use to make vitamin D.

2 DMK SOLEIL DEFENCE SPF 50+, $59, dannemking.com A non-greasy, broad-spectrum lotion that aims to protect against sunspots and premature skin ageing.

3 SKINSTITUT AGE DEFENCE SPF 50+, $45, skinstitut.com In addition to being a highprotection sunscreen, this can be used as a daytime moisturiser. One product, two uses!

4 KLIM BOOST SPORTS MOISTURISER SPF 30, $29.95, milkandco.com.au When exercising outdoors, this one is designed to be sweat-resistant, so it won’t block your pores.

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CANCER COUNCIL ACTIVE PINK DRY TOUCH SPF 50+, $14.95, cancercouncilshop. org.au This 50+ sunscreen dries super-fast, is non-greasy and water-resistant for up to four hours.

CETAPHIL SUNTIVITY SPF 50+ LIPOSOMAL LOTION, $20.95, cetaphil.com.au This lotion is hypoallergenic and fragrancefree for sun lovers with sensitive skin.

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Mind

SMART WAYS TO STAY SHARP, CALM AND POSITIVE

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

The 10-second anti-anxiety trick Next time you’re feeling anxious, rattle off as many ice-cream flavours as you can in 10 seconds. The exercise leverages a technique known as ‘grounding’ which can help bring your brain and body back to the present. “It’s a distraction technique,” says psychologist Vaile Wright. “It frees you from any overwhelming feelings and unhealthy thoughts spinning in your head.” Why ice-cream instead of, say, state capitals? The familiar yummy dessert adds a level of comfort and nostalgia that other topics can’t reach, researchers say.

What are your favourite flavours? Listing them can help ease your mind.

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Mind now

A study from the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that older adults who listened to music recorded at 60 to 80 beats per minute (bpm) for 30 to 45 minutes before bed fell asleep more quickly, stayed asleep longer and felt more rested in the morning. Researchers say this tempo relaxes the nervous system, while lowering alertness and increasing feel-good chemicals such as oxytocin. What’s special about 60 bpm? That’s our approximate heart rate when falling asleep, so similarly paced music can help set your body’s internal beat for sleep, the study found.

10 TUNES TO SNOOZE BY 1 I See Fire 2 Bridge Over Troubled Water 3 The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face 4 Everlong 5 Love Me Like You Do 6 Fall For You 7 A Whiter Shade of Pale 8 A Sky Full of Stars 9 Clair de Lune 10 Première Gymnopédie

Ed Sheeran Aretha Franklin Roberta Flack The Foo Fighters Ellie Goulding The Whitlams Annie Lennox Coldplay Claude Debussy Erik Satie

You probably know that antibiotics can kill good bacteria in the gut, but a new animal study in the online journal Cell Reports suggests they may also inhibit the growth of new cells in the part of the brain associated with memory. Researchers believe antibiotics prevent this growth by lowering levels of a type of white blood cell thought to connect the gut, brain and immune system. If you need to take an antibiotic, you can protect yourself by pairing it with a probiotic supplement, which may help counteract the antibiotic’s effect on brain cells, according to the research.

Moves for your mood Feel stronger today by simply changing how you position your body. Adopting these physical tweaks for two minutes can boost confidence and well-being.

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Force a smile Even if you’re not happy, faking a smile that engages muscles around your eyes releases endorphins that help lower stress and boost happiness.

Sit up straight Slouching lowers productivity, and can cause fatigue and feelings of sorrow. Sit up straight with shoulders back for energy and confidence.

Cross your arms While this may make you seem less approachable, the pose can help you tap into your problem-solving skills when faced with a difficult task.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES/GALLERY/ISTOCK. ICONS FROM THE NOUNPROJECT.COM

60-80 BPM

COULD ANTIBIOTICS HURT YOUR MEMORY?


Mind now

FICTION LOVERS HAVE MORE FEELINGS Ever worry that you’re ‘hiding’ behind a novel or that somehow reading fiction is a waste of time? Now you can put your worries to rest. Reading fiction increases empathy towards others, a Canadian study has found. According to the research, fiction engages readers in characters, scenes and life situations outside their ordinary experience, leading to a deeper understanding of other people. “We humans are a cooperative species, and in order to cooperate we need to understand other people,” says the study author, Professor Keith Oatley, a psychologist and novelist. “Reading fiction lets us do that better.” In particular, the study found that novels about different cultures and races helped participants to develop greater empathy for those who were ‘different’ to them in real life. The findings mirrored a 2014 Italian study in which researchers found lower levels of racism and prejudice among fans of a certain young wizard named Harry Potter and his friends.

28%

of Aussie women are more concerned with their mental and emotional health than their physical health. (Source: Jean Hailes 2016)

LIGHT UP YOUR BRAIN What sort of information engages more of your brain? It’s not maths, and it’s not music either. It’s storytelling, according to researchers at the University of California. Their studies show that listening to story podcasts activates sensations, emotions and memories across the entire brain, thereby up-ending the right brain/left brain theory.

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of yoga have been shown to reduce depression and anxiety, and increase self-esteem. An Indian study looked at elderly women who went through a simple warm-up routine, breathing techniques and stretching postures, and compared them with women who did not do yoga. There was significant improvement in the emotional well-being scores of the yoga participants.

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Listening to stories lights up the whole brain, not just a few areas, helping to explain why it’s easier to get lost in a good story. So next time you get stuck in a corner with the family raconteur, try to engage. Their ‘war stories’ are good for your mental health!

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

“Understanding a story requires access to all kinds of cognitive processes – social and spatial reasoning, emotional responses, visual imagery and more,” says study author and neuroscientist, Alexander Huth. The findings may one day help scientists ‘read’ the brains of people who can’t speak, due to stroke or disease.


Mirror

IMAGES Bad-mouthing your body can warp your self-image − and, by association, that of your children BY HARRIET BROWN

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very morning of her adult life, my mother stepped on a scale and recorded her weight on a chart hanging on the bathroom wall. She lost and regained the same 12 kilos a dozen times, and her comments about weight − her weight, mine and everyone else’s − were rarely tactful. “You could lose 10 kilos,” she announced when I was 15, looking me up and down. “You’d be able to wear nicer clothes.” I crept into my room, closed the door and sobbed. In my imagination, my body, which was already a source of anxiety, ballooned into a disgusting blob. I was a freak, and everyone could see it − even my mother, who was supposed to love me no matter what. I swore if I had daughters, I’d never, ever do that to them. I’d let them know from birth that they were perfect just the way they were. I wanted them to grow up knowing their worth did not depend

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on their dress size, that they didn’t have to lose weight to be loved. Although I never criticised my two daughters’ bodies, I didn’t do so well when it came to my own. I cringe now, remembering the times I stood in front of a full-length mirror with my daughters nearby and said things like, “Oh no, I had no idea my butt was that big!” and “Look at this disgusting stomach!” or “Oh, my God, I’m never wearing a bathing suit again.” I would never have uttered any of those things about my daughters or anybody else, but I said them all the time about myself − in front of them. At the time, I didn’t realise I was unintentionally giving my daughters a blueprint for body hatred. Research shows that when parents model body dissatisfaction − either by restricting their eating or complaining about their bodies − their children are likely to follow suit and can carry those behaviours into adulthood. So, while I was E


PHOTOGRAPHY JADE BEALL. LETTERING JESSICA KUSUMA. BODY-IMAGE EXPERT HARRIET BROWN’S MOST RECENT BOOK IS BODY OF TRUTH: HOW SCIENCE, HISTORY, AND CULTURE DRIVE OUR OBSESSION WITH WEIGHT – AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT

Mind

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Mind

“I COULDN’T UNDO

THE NEGATIVE ROLE-MODELLING, BUT I COULD PUT AN END TO IT”

who specialises in helping women develop healthy relationships with food and their bodies. My mother died five years ago, still dieting, still believing she needed to be smaller so people would find her attractive and lovable. How I wish I could have persuaded her that the size or shape of her body had nothing to do with who she really was. At least I − and my daughters, I hope − now know the truth. Here are five other strategies I’ve used that can help to break the negative cycle.

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GO EASIER ON YOURSELF Improving your body image starts with learning to appreciate your imperfections. Tell yourself, “I am lovable just as I am.”

horrified when my youngest daughter, then aged 14, stood in front of the mirror pinching her thighs and complaining about their size, I shouldn’t have been surprised. When I protested, she rolled her eyes and said, “If I don’t criticise my body, Mum, I won’t have any friends.” What had I done to allow my daughter to feel this way about her body? I silently asked myself the question, knowing in my heart that she’d received the message loud and clear from me. I knew things had to change and I knew it was up to me. I couldn’t undo the negative role-modelling my daughters had received, but I could put an end to it. It wasn’t easy. I’d grown up under my mother’s scrutiny. And research shows that even an offhand comment about appearance from a parent can reverberate in a girl’s head for years, putting her at long-term risk of low self-esteem, depression and even weight gain. I was sick of living in a body I was at war with. It’s a miserable way to be, and I decided it was time to do something about it for my daughters and for myself. The first thing I did was stop bad-mouthing myself in front of my children. “Modelling positive body image is one of the most important things we can do for our kids,” says Carmen Cool, a psychotherapist,

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2 DROP THE GROUP FAT TALK You know the drill: one woman complains about the size of her stomach and others join in, competing to see who can be the most critical of her own body. This might seem harmless, but studies show that the more you participate in it, the worse you feel. 3 KEEP ‘MUM’ ON WEIGHT When parents bring up weight with their children, they can unwittingly trigger disordered eating and other negative consequences. Even compliments about weight loss can cause damage, as they reinforce the idea that it’s important to have a specific body type. A better strategy, says Katie Loth, a dietitian and specialist in family health, is to model healthy eating and physical activity behaviours and support our children in doing the same.

4 AVOID DIET CHATTER Comments about kilos and carbs are not only damaging, but they also suck up a lot of mental real estate. What pressing problems might we help solve, or how much fun might we have, if we spent that energy on something more meaningful?

5 FIND DEEPER CONNECTIONS Instead of bonding through body-bashing, spend your time with friends in more productive ways. Plan a girls’ day, cook together, or watch a movie.


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solfinecremacolor AUS & NZ


Sex

shouldn’t hurt If you’re among the one in five Australian women who experience pain during intercourse, you don’t have to take it lying down BY SAMANTHA HOLLIS

W

omen who are perimenopausal or post-menopausal often admit to sex therapist Dr Ian Kerner that they find themselves groaning not with pleasure but with pain during sex. And if this becomes a pattern, it often leads to a waning interest in, if not outright avoidance of, sex. When you’ve enjoyed a perfectly happy sex life until now, what’s going on? The natural hormone shifts that occur during menopause can cause the vaginal walls to dry and thin out. Without effective lubrication, unpleasant chafing can occur. And some medications don’t help. Even decongestants can contribute to dryness. For some women, pain occurs because the vaginal walls contract during penetration. Known as vaginismus, this is one of the two most common causes of painful sex. “These contractions may have psychological roots, such as past sexual trauma,” says Kerner. He says mindfulness exercises can help: “Imagine yourself in a time and place in which you felt calm and pain-free. This can help vaginal touch become more comfortable.”. The other main cause of pain is vulvodynia, which is usually experienced around the vaginal entrance. Many women characterise the sensation as burning, stinging, tender and abrasive, although sometimes the pain is felt deeper in the vagina, as well. Kerner says the first strategy with any

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form of painful sex is to use an artificial lubricant. He recommends a water-based lube, such as KY Jelly. But it’s not the only line of defence. There are other treatments you can discuss with your doctor, including the following:  Oestrogen-based vaginal creams that are available on prescription can ease dryness. Unlike water-based lubricants which have no lasting effect, these creams are designed to be absorbed and, with regular use, can change the texture of the vagina.  Testosterone supplements. From our 20s onwards, women’s production of testosterone declines. Controlled studies have found that slightly raising our levels of testosterone can improve libido and arousal, and therefore vaginal lubrication.  Laser-pulse therapy is used to stimulate collagen growth in the vaginal walls. It’s fairly new to Australia and you can find clinics that offer this by searching online.  Botox can be a remedy for more serious forms of vaginismus. But if you’re going to explore this, be sure to look for a reputable clinic. At the same time, advises Kerner, it is important to be open with your partner while you are seeking a solution. “It’s a good idea for couples to work together by shifting the focus from intercourse to another form of intimacy, such as oral sex, which may allow the woman to remain sexual and orgasmic with her partner,” he says.

3 of a kind Here are some over-the-counter lubricants that can help ease dryness.

1

KY JELLY is arguably the most wellknown water-based lubricant that can provide temporary relief from vaginal dryness during sexual intercourse. It is available from pharmacies without a prescription.

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SLIQUID ORGANICS LUBRICANT Free of glycerine and made from botanical extracts, it is available from selected pharmacies and online.

3

PJUR MED SOFT GLIDE Contains jojoba oil for longer-lasting lubrication. From selected pharmacies and online.


Mind now

Many women are told that pain during sex is all in their head. Not so – it’s the body’s way of telling you something is wrong

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HEALTH

20 Home

Remedies doctors love

You won’t need a prescription for these little beauties − the solution to your problem could be as close as the pantry or bathroom cabinet BY BETHANY KANDEL & PAMELA BOND

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Government surveys show that millions of Australians use natural or complementary medicines, and the number is growing. The popularity of these remedies hasn’t been lost on GPs, who are increasingly acknowledging the usefulness of many alternative therapies. We asked doctors for their favourite natural remedies − the ones they use themselves and suggest to patients instead of writing a prescription. E

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Health


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Problem: Bacterial infections between the toes Try: white vinegar

When heat and humidity make the area between the toes red, cracked or oozy, vinegar soaks can help dry skin and treat any infection that may have developed. In the early stages of infection, the vinegar can be used alone: soak the foot in a bath of one part vinegar to three parts water. If the infection is more advanced, you may need to apply an over-the-counter antifungal treatment afterwards.

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HEALTH

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Problem: Bloating and nausea Try: fresh ginger

Ginger regulates the flow of digestive juices to make sure food is properly absorbed, improving the function of bile and pancreatic enzymes to help digestion. It can soothe the stomach and reduce discomfort from bloating, nausea and abdominal distension. Peel, slice and dice fresh ginger to add to a smoothie, or steep it in boiling water for about 10 minutes to make tea.

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

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Problem: Hay fever and other seasonal allergies Try: pycnogenol

This is a patented plant extract derived from pine bark. It works by reducing inflammation that can lead to allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, itchy eyes and irritated throat. Unlike antihistamines, pycnogenol doesn’t have such side effects as drowsiness and dizziness. Pycnogenol capsules can be useful to take in the lead-up to allergy season.

Problem: Sinusitis and bronchitis Try: humming Most sinus infections occur due to poor movement of the nasal cilia, microscopic hairs that continually beat backwards and forwards to expel bacteria and dust from the nose and sinuses. Similarly, when cilia in the air passages are compromised, bronchitis can result. Humming stimulates these nasal and bronchial cilia, and helps to break up the mucus in your nose, sinuses, throat and chest. E


HEALTH

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Problem: Constipation Try: unsulphured blackstrap molasses

This type of molasses is a wonderful stool softener. Take one tablespoon daily on its own, or stir it into water or any drink. It’s especially useful for pregnant women because it is a natural alternative to chemical laxatives, plus it contains iron and many other essential vitamins and minerals, including vitamin B6, magnesium, copper, calcium, potassium, manganese and selenium. Note: If you have diabetes, you should not take molasses.

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Problem: Cuts and abrasions Try: raw manuka honey Because of its antibacterial and anti-fungal properties, manuka honey helps speed the healing of cuts, burns and other wounds. It’s rich in gallic acid and the antioxidant quercetin, which both help with healing. Wash the affected area and massage a small amount of honey directly onto the wound, then cover it with an adhesive bandage.

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Problem: Dry scalp Try: extra virgin olive oil A dry scalp can be caused by a loss of moisture or a build-up of styling products. (The flakes from a dry scalp are finer than those from dandruff.) Warm about five tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, allow it to cool slightly, then massage it into the scalp. Comb through, then cover with a towel or shower cap and leave on for 20 to 40 minutes or overnight. Rinse with warm water. Repeat as needed.


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Problem: Headaches Try: peppermint oil You can make your own treatment by adding five drops of peppermint essential oil to 30ml almond or grapeseed oil. Shake well and store in a small glass jar. When you feel a tension headache coming on, massage a few drops of the oil into your temples. Close your eyes and take half a dozen deep breaths. Repeat in 20 to 30 minutes, if needed. Note: Keep the oil away from your eye area, and don’t use it on children under six.

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Problem: Hot flushes Try: cumin, coriander and fennel tea Steep half a teaspoon each of cumin, coriander and fennel seeds in a litre of boiling water. Strain into a heatproof vacuum flask and sip throughout the day until sunset. This is an Ayurvedic remedy that is said to improve digestion and sleep, and decrease palpitations, hot flushes, worry and anxiety,

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Problem: Gout Try: eating cherries Eating as few as six cherries a day can prevent recurrent attacks of gout. No one knows why or how this works, but specialists often report seeing success. If you suffer from gout frequently, it’s a nice remedy, particularly if you are wary of taking daily prescription medicine. E


HEALTH

Saffron can have a powerful effect on improving your mood


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Problem: Indigestion Try: oregano Oregano is a concentrated source of antioxidants, which help to reduce inflammation and soothe the stomach. Buy readymade oregano tea or steep one to two teaspoons of fresh or dried oregano in 25ml hot water for about 10 minutes. Drink the tea up to three times daily.

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Problem: Itching Try: Epsom salts Epsom salts can soothe basically anything that itches or burns the skin, including mosquito bites, bee stings and mild sunburn. Soak for at least 12 minutes in a bath made by dissolving two cups of salts under running water. Or make a compress by soaking a cotton washcloth in a cup of cold water mixed with two tablespoons of Epsom salts, then apply it gently to the itchy area.

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Problem: PMS Try: saffron Studies show the equivalent of 15mg of saffron − or about onetenth of a teaspoon of threads − twice daily can decrease PMS symptoms, including anxiety, irritability, depression, mood swings and insomnia. Add it to food, take it in capsule form or brew a cup of saffron tea. Note: People with bipolar disorder shouldn’t use saffron without consulting their doctor.

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Problem: Toenail fungus Try: tea tree oil

The compounds in tea tree oil are a safe, effective way to treat this problem, which is an infection inside the nail. Paint 100 per cent tea tree oil onto the toenail, as you would nail polish, twice a day. E

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15 Problem: Warts

Try: apple cider vinegar

Soak a cotton swab or cotton ball in vinegar and apply directly to the wart several times a day. If the vinegar stings too much, dilute it with water. Warts are caused by a viral infection in the top layer of the skin. The vinegar probably works because its acidity is toxic to the viral cells.

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Problem: Scalds and burns Try: aloe vera

If you scald yourself with hot water or forget to reapply the sunscreen, frequent, gentle application of aloe vera gel will soothe the burn. The anti-inflammatory gel creates a second skin to protect the burn from the air, which irritates exposed nerve endings.

17 Problem: Foot odour Try: vinegar or tea foot baths To eliminate smelly bacteria, soak feet nightly in a solution of one part apple cider vinegar to two parts warm water. Alternatively, give your feet a daily bath in strong black tea (let it cool first for 30 minutes). The tannic acid in tea kills bacteria and closes pores, keeping feet dry longer (bacteria thrive in moist environments). You’ll see results in a few days to a week. Do the soak only when feet are free of cuts.

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HEALTH

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Problem: Chapped lips Try: olive oil Rub on antioxidant-rich and moisturising olive oil two or three times a day to soothe, soften and lubricate your lips. They will feel better immediately, but keep using the oil, as it will take a few days before lips start to heal on their own.

19 Problem: Dry skin, rashes and eczema Try: an oatmeal bath Although oatmeal is a centuries-old skin soother, researchers have only recently recognised the avenanthramides in oats as the key compounds that calm inamed, itchy skin. Put whole oats in a clean, dry sock, seal the open end with a rubber band and then drop the sock into a warm bath. Soak in the bath for 15 to 20 minutes.

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Problem: Flatulence Try: enteric-coated peppermint capsules

Take one 200mg enteric-coated peppermint capsule three times a day. Peppermint kills bacteria that cause bloating and relaxes gastrointestinal muscles for smoother, spasm-free digestion. The enteric coating prevents capsules from opening in the stomach and increasing discomfort by causing heartburn and indigestion. The peppermint releases and goes to work lower in the gastrointestinal tract, where the digestive discomfort occurs.

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COVER STORY

DEBORAH HUTTON on finding balance From teenage cover girl to multimedia celebrity, Deborah Hutton has spent nearly four decades in the limelight. She speaks with Prevention about life’s challenges, embracing change, and how she has learned the liberating art of self-acceptance. E BY ANDREA DUVALL

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PHOTOGRAPHY MICHELLE HOLDEN


DEBORAH AT HOME WITH HER BELOVED BILLIE

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COVER STORY

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It’s late on a hectic day in the office when the phone rings. “Hi,” says the slow, deep voice. “It’s Deborah Hutton calling.” There’s an almostmeditative calm emanating from the other end of the phone line and I think to myself, Oh, to have some of that cool grace! But several days later, as we’re shooting this month’s cover in Deborah’s beachside Sydney home, I’m disarmed by the contrast between Deborah Hutton the serene icon and Deb ‘the real’, who is rushing up and down the stairs, bristling with energy and bursting into peals of laughter. As the photo team pack up and leave, and the house returns to stillness, we chat about her public image. “It’s interesting how people have a perception of you,” Deborah says. “When I met Harry Miller many, many years ago, he was my manager, and he always wanted to craft me into a Grace Kelly. I said to him, ‘Harry, I am so not Grace Kelly!’ I’m one of those people who puts her foot in her mouth and what you see is what you get. “I play a lot of corporate golf with people I’m meeting for the first time, and I get the greatest compliments back from people who say, ‘Oh, I didn’t think you were going to be so much fun’.” Indeed, Deborah is great fun. She laughs easily and often. And it’s reflected in her face. “When I look at all the lines and wrinkles, I think, Well, I deserve every one that I have!” And there’s that infectious chuckle again.

“I always say about the lines on your face that they are a representation of your attitude to life. I think if you frown a lot and you’re not a positive person, it really shows on your face. But if you laugh and embrace life with a positive mental attitude, that really shows, too. I do believe you end up with the face you’re meant to have.” It’s almost 40 years since Deborah first came into the public eye on the cover of Cosmo at just 16 years of age. After her international modelling career came a second career as fashion editor and face of The Australian Women’s Weekly, and as a TV presenter on shows such as Looking Good, Location Location, the Foxtel Movie Show and now Foxtel Arts’ weekly entertainment show, Stage & Screen. But as with any life, the reality has had a few bumps. In the lead-up to turning 50, Deborah confronted some harrowing experiences. Her two brothers died suddenly, within a year of each other: Rod died at the age of 46 as the result of an epileptic fit; David was diagnosed with liver cancer at 50 and died just three months later. Not long after, Deborah discovered that she had an aggressive form of skin cancer on her face that would require surgery from nose to chin.

“It really threatened my career,” she says. “Was I ever going to do anything on camera again?” Thanks to modern plastic surgery, it is impossible to see the scar, but emotionally, the trauma cut deep. Deborah found herself thinking about her future and what sort of life it might be without her old career − and, more importantly, what she wanted it to be. It’s the kind of intimate, inner conversation that defines resilience. “I was really thinking, My media career was never going to last forever, nothing ever does. So what am I going to do? Because retirement… the word is redundant. It’s all about reinvention. What’s the next step? “I wanted to tap into inspiring people and mentors who could help me find and embrace the new me. And I thought, Well, I could channel that information and give it to others, who are also going through this huge period of change in their lives.” That was the genesis of Deborah’s website, Balance by Deborah Hutton. “I wanted to talk to women like me who are over 45 or in their 50s, and have the conversations that are really relevant to them and can help them.” Over the past five years, her website has grown into a content-rich destination, featuring Deborah’s interviews with inspiring people, as well as information about style, relationships, food, exercise and health. It now has a team of contributors and a full-time producer. “I’m not giving out the information, I’m merely channelling it, and I’m learning, too,” she says. “I’ve had some extraordinary emails from people who have been inspired by the conversations we’ve had with the likes of Lucy Turnbull and Mel Doyle. It helps women feel like they’re not alone, that even these really successful people are going through the same personal challenges. “I love the fact that I’ve built something very positive. As women, we need constant support, inspiration and empowerment to remember how good we are. I think sometimes we’re very tough on ourselves. We should be celebrating the goodness in us and not being so judgemental of ourselves.” Self-acceptance comes up often when chatting to Deborah. She explains it’s been one of her E

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biggest personal challenges. When I ask her what she would want to go back now and tell her 20-year-old self, she thinks deeply. “Just accept yourself and stop being so selfcritical… so, so critical,” she says. “Leaving home and leaving school at 16, I always felt that I was really inferior to everybody else. I was always in a much older crowd. I thought, I’m surrounded by so many cool people and I’m so not cool. I was always trying to be someone other than who I was. So I’d say to her, I wish you’d just relax and understand that you are not like anybody else and accept that, and look at it as a positive thing.” Deborah applies that same positive approach to ageing. “Turning 50 was a real watershed

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moment and I embraced it and felt quite empowered by the fact that I was entering a new era – it really felt like I was entering the third age. “I’ve never been fitter than I am now. I’ve never been more engaged with exercise and looking after myself.” Now 55, Deborah works out every weekday, mixing it up between cardio classes, weight training and Pilates. “I’ve always said that as you get older, it doesn’t matter what size you are, but it’s really important that you’re flexible – to be able to bend down and tie your shoelaces and be mobile. If I had to choose one, I’d go for flexibility and then fitness.” She talks about her approach to dieting and health as one of “balance and imbalance”. “I like having fun, and enjoy travelling and entertaining and all those things that make a great life. But then, when the body starts showing the telltale signs, I go, Okay, it’s time to pull in the reins. And I do that, which is kind of where I am at the moment.” Hardest of all is her inability to sleep well. “It’s annoying. Everything I read says when you get to this point in your mid 50s and you’re menopausal or premenopausal, you’re definitely going to have an interrupted sleep pattern, which is unfortunate, because I get the grumps if I don’t sleep properly. I can survive on five or six hours, no problem, but it’s got to be quality sleep and it’s so apparent when I don’t. I just get a bit tetchy. “I don’t do stress well − I know that about myself. It comes from wanting to be a perfectionist. I can get stressed about the littlest things and I’m trying to learn to let go, but it’s not always easy. My partner Rob is very good at being calm and he reminds me that some of the things I get my knickers in a knot about aren’t that important. You do need to have people who can tap you on the shoulder and say, ‘Get a grip’.” Deborah is clearly gripping her life, and all the opportunities it offers, with both hands. “It’s about thinking, Is there any passion you haven’t addressed? I think, well, I’m 55, so what do I want to do that I haven’t done before and what does it look like? “I want to have a hands-on career but I also want to have time off. I want to be able to travel a bit more, and I’m about to do a massive renovation in my house, so my next big ambition is to finish my dream home. “To me, [my goal] is not about retirement, it’s about freedom; I’d like to wind back to having a couple of days for myself every week and that’s what I’m working towards. I reckon having three days where you don’t even look at a computer would be gold!” That sounds like the perfect balance.


COVER STORY

THINKING OUT LOUD ON AGEING “When I get really critical about myself, as we all do, I remember how a friend of mine said, ‘Oh, Deborah, I don’t know why you’re complaining, because in 10 years’ time you’ll wish you had the body you have today.’ If I wind back 10 years, I think, Absolutely right! So just go easy on yourself.”

STYLIST MAIA LIAKOS. HAIR & MAKEUP NICOLE ORLICH. DEBORAH WEARING ZARA TOP, KAREN MILLEN JEANS, CASSANDRA MAMONE RING, PAMPELONE TUNIC

ON COSMETIC SURGERY “I would never have a facelift. I’m scared of all that stuff. I want to age as gracefully as I can. I tried Botox once and I looked like Jack Nicholson with those pointy eyebrows. I couldn’t move my forehead and thought, That is so not me! But one thing I will fight until the bitter end is grey hair. My mother has got the most beautiful head of grey hair. I’ve got lots of greys but even if I have to get it coloured every other week, I will fight it to the death!”

ON FOOD “I tend to keep it really clean, without going crazy. I love good, healthy foods, but then I’ll occasionally do duck-fat potatoes – just not all the time.” So does she cook every night? “No!” Deborah laughs. “I go out a lot. I’ve still got a very high social life, but when I am home, I love it. My favourite thing, without a doubt, is having grilled salmon and the biggest pile of spinach, garlic and chilli stir-fried. I love greens. I’m a massive fan of greens with garlic and chilli.”

ON QUALITY PRIVATE TIME “At this point in life, it’s about putting yourself first. I like to sit looking out at the beach, and I read. The phone, everything, is away from me and I’ve usually got Billie” – Deborah scoops up her bichon frise cross shih tzu – “as my reminder of everything important and good in the world. I look at that face and I love her so much.”

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HOW TO

OUTSMART YOUR METABOLISM If you thought taking off weight was tough, new research shows that keeping it off is even tougher. Prevention looks at the science of metabolism and offers a plan to help you end yo-yo dieting forever E BY CINDY KUZMA

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PHOTOGRAPHY ALL YO-YOS MITCH MANDEL

WEIGHT FAST FITNESS LOSS

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WEIGHT LOSS

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f you’ve ever lost weight only to find that over time you regain every kilo, you’re not alone. The discouraging fact is that as many as 95 per cent of women and men who escape obesity eventually find themselves heavy again. Dieting, plain and simple, doesn’t seem to work. That’s because it’s not just our physical health that’s at stake but our mental health, too. Anyone whose weight has ever yo-yoed knows that the regained kilos are nearly always accompanied by an unhealthy serving of self-loathing. “People feel guilty when they gain the weight back, like it was a personal failing,” says endocrinologist Dr Scott Isaacs.

But you shouldn’t be so quick to judge yourself. According to Isaacs, the weight regain is not simply a matter of failed willpower − you’re battling biology. In fact, ongoing research has determined three powerful physiological changes that work side by side to drive your body to pack the kilos back on. While that’s frustrating news if you’re trying to lose weight, keep in mind that knowing what you’re up against is half the battle. So instead of giving up or thinking negative thoughts, keep reading and then you can pair your new understanding with these science-backed tactics. They’ll help you tackle the biological hurdles, and finally outsmart your metabolism and the dreaded yo-yo for good.

Challenge #1:

YOUR BODY WANTS TO HOLD ONTO ITS RESERVES Along with your eye and hair colour, your parents passed on other genetic characteristics. Increasingly, experts believe that one of them is a so-called set point − a general weight at which your body feels comfortable. While it is largely determined by genetics, which explains why some people struggle with gaining weight just as much as others struggle with losing it, scientists now believe that your set point can change throughout your life. Each time you put on weight, your body gets comfortable with your newfound bulk. Clueless to the fact that modern society is blessed with an abundance of food, your ‘just in case’ genes want to keep the extra body fat stockpiled for the famine that may be lurking around the corner. Basically, if you struggle with keeping weight off, part of the problem may be your genetic inheritance. After all, for most of human history, food was scarce. Your ancestors survived only because they hung onto enough extra weight to avoid starving to

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death. Then they passed their thrifty genes on to you, says weight-loss specialist Dr Caroline Cederquist. So how does your body know how much it has in reserve? The set point is largely governed by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. By reading the signals fat cells send, your hypothalamus gauges whether you have enough extra resources to outlive a sudden food shortage. “Our genetic predispositions haven’t kept up with our environmental shifts,” Isaacs says. In short, they don’t take account of the fact that food is available 24/7 in our modern world. “Our bodies still aim to prepare us for tough times ahead.” Biologically, your body has a few ways to try to preserve a new, heavier set point. One is by reducing the amount of energy it expends to stay alive. Just as you would adjust the thermostat to create the ideal room temperature, your body turns down the burn on your metabolism − and not just by a little. In a landmark study last year, researchers followed the lives of contestants on the US version of The Biggest Loser after the cameras had stopped rolling. In the heat of the spotlight, they had lost an average of 59kg. But six years on, almost all of them had regained an average of 41kg. Moreover, researchers calculated that the

Clueless to the fact that modern society has an abundance of food, your ‘just in case’ genes want to keep the extra body fat stockpiled participants’ resting metabolic rates − the amount they burn in a day without additional exercise − had slowed drastically. Six years after being on the show, each contestant was burning an average of 2,000 fewer kilojoules per day than would be expected of a person of similar size. E


Jane’s story: BREAKING THE YO-YO CYCLE Wellness coach Jane Turner, 54, was a serial dieter until reaching her 50s, when she finally acknowledged the damage caused by lifelong dieting, and developed a healthier relationship with food. “I’ve tried everything to lose weight,” she says. “Starvation, Jenny Craig, Lean Cuisine and Atkins. I also did crazy stuff like HCG [involving injections of human chorionic gonadotropin hormone], Isagenix [which advocates special supplements and nutritional cleansing for weight loss], and eating tiny amounts of one kind of food, such as grapes, all day, while having my body wrapped in mentholated bandages and lying in a freezing room all lunchtime. I actually got down to about 58 kilos that time, but I was absolutely starving and it was costing a fortune. “I started fasting, purging and bingeing in my early teens, when adolescence made me a little chubby and I panicked about it. These extreme methods only led me to gain more weight – and so my yo-yo dieting began. As an adult, I’ve had an ‘average’ weight of about 67 kilos – my highest was 79 kilos – and every time I lost around 10 kilos, I would rebound and regain it. Sadly, this emotional rollercoaster ruled my life, wrecked my metabolism, degraded my bone density and isolated me socially. “My turning point came when I reached 50 and realised my unhealthy methods no longer shifted any weight. I put myself on a wellness program and adopted ‘sensible’ strategies around food, exercise, stress management and mindset. “I now eat far more greens and plant foods, steer clear of processed foods, eat goodquality proteins and olive oil to feel fuller. And I make sure I never skip meals or allow myself to become ravenous. Breaking my dieting pattern led me to write a book called Thrive in Midlife, which really helped because I ‘came out’ about my painful background of compulsive dieting and admitted to myself how unhelpful it was. “I now use mindfulness to help me recognise and resist the feelings and thoughts that trigger unhealthy or obsessive eating, cravings and attitudes about my body shape. It has been such an emotional relief to break that toxic dieting pattern. I’m really proud that for the last two years, I have eaten well and not obsessively restricted food like I used to. “Now that I have broken that yo-yo dieting pattern, I hope that it will slowly help my metabolism get back on track.”

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How kilos weigh on your brain If it feels like your grey matter is compelling you to devour dessert, you’re not imagining things. Here’s why it’s so hard to resist The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is key to resisting cravings, is less active after weight gain (but can be strengthened through exercise).

Reward centres like the striatum are more active after weight loss and increase the pleasure of high-sugar, high-fat foods.

The hypothalamus, which processes signals from leptin and governs the biological urge to eat, becomes inflamed and damaged during weight gain. The medial prefrontal cortex, the source of focus and attention, becomes overactive when faced with food cues after weight loss.

Even less-extreme weight-loss programs can drive metabolisms to a lazier crawl. According to one US study, people who’d lost a more modest 10 per cent of their body weight burned about 600 fewer kilojoules at rest than would be expected, and these changes persisted for as long as six years. So even when you lose just a few kilos, biology works to drag your body back up to its set point or to a new, higher one

Solution #1:

OUTSMART YOUR SET POINT Does that mean biology really is destiny? Well, you can’t change your genetic heritage, but there are steps you can take to speed up your

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metabolism. Maintaining lean muscle mass as you lose weight gives you the best shot at burning as many kilojoules as possible throughout the day, since muscle tissue burns more kilojoules than fat tissue. Experts advise starting a total-body strength-training program and building up to two or three resistance workouts a week. (Don’t forget to squeeze in a cardio workout, which plays a big role in weight-loss maintenance, as well.) You can also encourage muscle building by eating plenty of lean protein, which provides your body with amino acids, the raw materials for making metabolism-revving muscle tissue. While the recommended daily intake of protein for the average woman is around 50g to 70g, some experts believe that a higher protein intake (100g to 120g) while losing weight is essential, so your body doesn’t lose lean tissue and cause your E


Yvonne’s story: DONE WITH DIETING Early-childhood educator Yvonne Appleby, 52, gained weight between the ages of 39 and 43, during a very stressful personal time. “I was doing the work-and-family juggle and in a sedentary job, and I wasn’t exercising regularly or always eating as well as I could have,” she says. “I went from weighing 55 kilos to 75 kilos. I’m only short [146cm], so my weight gain was very noticeable. By 46, I’d been diagnosed with diabetes type 2, which was upsetting, but it was a relief to go on medication because it gave me my energy back. “Initially, I took up dance classes to get fit. I was dancing nine to 10 hours a week; 15 kilos just fell off me and I felt great. But knee problems and osteoarthritis stopped me dancing for a long while. I tried Easy Slim three times, low-carb/high-protein diets, and protein supplements and gym training. “I got down to 55 kilos but I just couldn’t keep affording the gym membership and supplements, and I found the diets too restrictive. With every diet, I became hungrier and it became harder to lose weight. “In recent years, my weight has crept back up due to surgery, managing work and study, plus an injury, which stopped me dancing or exercising. I’m a size 16-18 now but I would like to get back down to a size 12. Unfortunately, years of dieting, plus diabetes, means my body holds onto weight and fights me shedding kilos. “So I no longer diet. Instead, I follow the eating tips from Diabetes NSW. I make food swaps, such as white bread for wholemeal and rye, white rice for basmati, and sugary cereals for oats. I also eat more vegetables, avoid processed foods and have smaller servings of food like pasta. Instead of skipping meals and skimping on kilojoules, which I know doesn’t work, I’ll aim for a slow and steady approach. “I have become a Diabetes NSW Ambassador, which leads me to meet many women like me who complain that no matter how little they eat and how much they exercise, they just can’t lose weight and keep it off.”

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metabolic rate to drop. To keep your body in muscle-building mode, Cederquist recommends evenly dividing your protein intake throughout the day. Ideally, you should aim for three proteinrich meals of about 30g each (a 100g chicken breast, for example, has 30g of protein) and several snacks with about 10g each (such as 40g of hard cheese or ¼ cup of tofu).

Challenge #2:

HUNGER HORMONES GO HAYWIRE The hormones that regulate how hungry or full you feel can step in when you start to shed weight. In the Biggest Loser study, scientists found that the blood levels of the appetite-suppressing hormone leptin in participants dropped 93 per cent – that is, to almost nothing − immediately after they left the show. Since leptin is the hormone that signals when we’re full, lower levels of it mean the body doesn’t receive the message to put the fork down. The leptin levels of Biggest Loser participants did rebound over six years, but only by two-thirds, so the participants continued to feel like they were starving, even after they’d met their daily kilojoule needs. Unfortunately, it is not just a problem for TV weight-loss contestants − a landmark study published a few years earlier in The New England Journal of Medicine confirmed that a flux in hormones could cause dieters to suffer from a ravenous appetite as the kilos fell away. Researchers followed 50 people who each shed about 14kg over 10 weeks on a medically supervised liquid and vegetable diet. A year later, they had regained an average of 5.5kg and had leptin levels 35 per cent lower than when they had started. In the study, blood samples also revealed changes in other fullness-signalling brain chemicals, including amylin, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 1, or GLP-1. The levels of nearly all these hormones fell off as the kilos did and never rebounded. Meanwhile, levels of ghrelin, the hormone that increases appetite, surged right after weight loss, then dropped slightly, and finally settled at a higher level than they had been before the weight loss. E

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Metabolic maths Setting aside exercise, a 50-year-old woman who has maintained a steady weight of around 73kg could consume as many as 6,000kJ per day and sustain her current size. However, a Biggest Loser contestant who dropped about 60kg and currently weighs 73kg could take in only 3,900kJ per day without expecting to regain weight. KILOJOULES BURNED BEFORE WEIGHT LOSS:

KILOJOULES BURNED AFTER WEIGHT LOSS:

6,000

3,900

A landmark study... confirmed that a flux in hormones could cause dieters to suffer from a ravenous appetite as the kilos fell away


Trish’s story: CHANGING TACK General manager Trish Cuthburt, 49, has found that whole foods and exercise work far better than rigid diets. “I first gained weight in my mid 30s, following the birth of my daughter,” she says. “In the years since, I’ve tried many diets, including The Liver Cleansing Diet, I Quit Sugar, Paleo, Weight Watchers, The 84-Day Body Challenge, detox kits, Bodytrim and Lite n’ Easy. “At my biggest, I weighed 80 kilos. With every diet, I would lose weight, but as I fell back into my old eating habits, I regained it over a 12- to 24-month period. Then, several years ago, I gained around 10 kilos after a period of losing focus, and eating and drinking too much. When I looked in the mirror, I didn’t like my body. That, as well as turning 50 soon, were huge motivators to lose the weight. “This time around, instead of dieting, I’ve tried eating whole foods and realised that approach works best for me. I also started functional fitness training and after doing the eight-week challenge, I realised what a difference exercise makes to my shape and energy. I’ve been going for six months and am now hooked, and I attend as often as I can – usually at 5.30am. I’m back down from a size 14 to about a size 11 and my aim is to get back to a size 10, which is the weight at which I feel happiest and healthiest. “I now know that to lose weight and maintain a healthy metabolism, I need to forget about fad diets and combine healthy whole foods with exercise. That combination has worked better for me than any diet I’ve ever tried, so I have made a commitment to continue my new healthy habits for life.”

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If you’ve gone through yo-yo weight changes more than once − especially if your regain was fuelled by junky carbs and fatty treats − your body may not be as quick to respond to hunger-satiating hormones. Research indicates that years of unhealthy eating can cause the body to develop a resistance to the remaining amounts of these hormones. That’s because foods rich in low-quality carbohydrates and saturated fat create inflammation that injures neurons in the brain. As a result, the neurons can no longer read the signals that hormones like leptin send, making you feel even hungrier, according to a recent article in the British Journal of Nutrition. And while losing weight reduces the inflammatory processes and helps repair the sensors, shedding kilos alone may not counter all the damage that has been done.

Solution #2:

OUTSMART YOUR HUNGER HORMONES While researchers look for medical solutions to manipulating those hunger-hormone levels, there are a few steps you can take by yourself to help tweak the system. For one thing, make sure you get enough sleep every night, since sleep deprivation makes the problem worse by further lowering levels of hunger-satisfying leptin and upping levels of hunger-stoking ghrelin. A lack of sleep also tempts you to make unhealthy food choices. In a recent study, people restricted to four and a half hours of sleep for four days consumed about 1,600 extra kilojoules in snacks, compared with when they were able to sleep for a solid eight hours. Dietary changes can help outsmart hunger hormones, too. Replacing simple carbs, like pasta and white bread, with low-kilojoule foods that are rich in water and nutrients, such as vegetables, can help combat a growling stomach. One year-long study found that people who ate the same number of kilojoules but double the amount of vegetables felt significantly less hungry. Why? Your plate looks full, your stomach expands, and it takes you a while to munch your way through the food. Adding in low-kilojoule, but filling, foods like water-rich vegetables doesn’t provoke the same spike in hunger-inducing hormones or the drop in fullness signals that typically occur following weight loss. Avoiding high-fat foods may also keep hunger

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If you’ve gone through yo-yo weight changes... your body may not be as quick to respond to hunger-satiating hormones hormones in check, since these can further disrupt the system from signalling satiety at the right time. Finally, studies have shown that a diet rich in protein and fibre can regulate ghrelin and decrease appetite.

Challenge #3:

YOUR BRAIN CRAVES FOOD Now you know the way biology turns your body against you in the fight to stay slim, can’t you trust your self-control to rise above these urges? Not easily, unfortunately. Weight loss also produces changes in the brain that may make it harder to resist the siren song of cake and chocolate. Research shows that reward pathways, similar to those that drive us to have sex, take drugs and gamble, light up brightly when, after shedding kilos, we’re faced with a tempting treat. One study scanned the brains of hungry dieters as they ogled photos of appetising food, both before and after a 12-week weight-loss program. After they’d shed kilos, dieters showed greater activation in part of the self-control system called the medial prefrontal cortex, which governs attention and focus. “We can translate that to mean food has become even more important than before they lost the weight,” says study author and medical researcher Amanda Bruce. You could call it a neurological double whammy: you’re more focused on, and motivated by, food and, at the same time, the unhealthiest food choices appear appealing.

Solution #3:

OUTSMART YOUR BRAIN To counteract these brain-directed urges, experts suggest you try providing yourself with alternative rewards. Weight loss feeds the brain with a steady supply of positive reinforcement: compliments, looser clothes, smaller numbers on the scale. But all these evaporate once you reach your weight goal, making the brain-pleasing allure of fatty, highkilojoule foods harder to resist, Bruce says. Replace


An inside look at the yo-yo cycle Do you start to drop the kilos, only to find that your weight quickly rebounds? Here’s how your body tries to hold onto every gram

Your resting metabolism – the number of kilojoules you burn just to stay alive – decreases.

Levels of leptin and other so-called satiety hormones drop. They eventually increase but never return to the starting point.

Inflammation damages the hypothalamus, which plays a key role in your body’s so-called set point.

Your brain perceives food – especially fatty, sugary items –as more rewarding and pleasurable than before.

these mini-highs with non-food sources of positive reinforcement, such as small monetary or shopping rewards, for sticking to your goals. This can send brain signals down similar reward pathways to those that drive you to seek food, making you less tempted to reach for dessert. Another way to boost your pleasure is to combine a small amount of the high-kilojoule dishes you

Levels of ghrelin and other appetite-stimulating hormones increase.

crave with a heaped helping of leafy greens or other nutritious items. This approach, called the vice-virtue bundle, cuts down the kilojoule count but still satisfies, a study published last year shows. If you aim for a ratio of 75 per cent wholesome and 25 per cent indulgent at each meal, you’ll tame cravings without issuing those extra kilos a return invitation, Isaacs says.

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INSPIRING WOMEN

Your best ye startsar now!

Agents for change

MEET THE ENABLERS AS TOLD TO ERICA GOATLY

PHOTOGRAPHY SANDRA MARKOVIC

Do you sometimes feel your life is stuck on ‘pause’? Finding a path to fulfilment doesn’t always mean making radical changes. Often you can discover a happier self just by adding one new thing to your lifestyle. On the following pages, we introduce you to three dynamic women who’ve changed track and, in doing so, found their way to exciting and fulfilling lives. Best of all, in their new roles, they can help you change your life, too – from discovering a calmer self through meditation, to getting to grips with eating healthily, and even adventuring around the world. We call these women agents for change. They’re the enablers, who can help make this your best year ever! E

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INSPIRING WOMEN

Judy Davie Passionate about eating for health, former marketing executive Judy Davie, 54, took a leap of faith to launch herself as The Food Coach and is now taking her message to some of our neediest communities

W

hen I was little, my dad used to call me ‘Pudding’. I was chubby as a kid and I liked food. We grew up in Scotland and I spent a lot of time in bed with undiagnosed asthma, and learned early on what it’s like to feel unwell and how much you miss out on. I have a big appetite and I realised I needed to learn how to eat good food and maintain my health and body. I moved to Sydney in 1987 and after a few years became very healthy, practising yoga three times a week and eating a wholefood diet, which included fish but no meat. I was working in marketing when, out of left field, a friend asked if I knew anyone who would like to work on the TV show Search for a Supermodel – a 17-day job as cook in a large house in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs, looking after kids [contestants] aged between 14 and 21. I had never cooked for large numbers before but I had blind faith that I could do it, provided I could cook healthy food. I saw early on that these beautiful, slender young girls knew nothing about healthy eating. Soon, I started to notice how unwell people in the city looked. Many looked tired and drained before the day had even begun. At that time, life coaching was popular, so I decided to become a food coach and coach people towards healthier eating habits. It was almost my destiny to be The Food Coach. In 2001, I registered the name as a business, selling a message about healthy eating. I built a website and invited a range of likeminded health professionals to contribute. On leaving my marketing job, I was training a consultant to take over from me and when she heard what I was going to do, she asked me to coach her and her husband – my first clients! Then someone in the office sent round a group email seeking help because she had low energy, had gained weight, was lethargic and under par. I had seen what she ate – buckets of chips with chicken salt – so helping her wasn’t complicated. The wife of a newly married man who had just turned 30 called me – he was a big emotional eater and more than 50kg overweight. I coached him to below 100kg and have helped him stay on track 10 years on. I am passionate about what is happening with food – small retailers being squeezed out by the supermarket

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giants and people persuaded to buy food they don’t need. Greengrocers are the real health-food stores of the community and they were one of the reasons I wrote my last book, The Greengrocer’s Diet. It was to be a marketing tool for greengrocers but has since become an incredible weight-loss tool, using recipes designed around the seasons, with lots of fresh produce and everything else that comprises a healthy, balanced,

“I read that Wagga was the fattest city in NSW, so decided to put it on a diet. It was an incredible six-month journey” sensible diet. While developing the recipes, I ran trials over 18 months and visited groups of testers weekly who had spectacularly positive stories, which convinced me even more that life is better when you eat well. After launching the book, I read that Wagga Wagga was the fattest city in NSW, so I decided to put the city on a diet, with a program called ‘Lighten Up Wagga’. It was an incredible journey over six months, made possible by some wonderful supporters in the community. Local business, local media, even the mayor got involved to support those who wanted to lose weight. The results were better than I could have hoped for. People were so proud of what they had achieved and grateful for the support. After the success of Wagga, I became obsessed with delivering a ‘Lighten Up’ model to people on a larger scale – I knew it had legs, so I threw myself in front of numerous government officials, hoping that they would listen to me. Now I’m working with Western Sydney Local Health District Prevention Alliance to develop a version of ‘Lighten Up’ there. It’s the area with the greatest number of people suffering from, or at risk of, type 2 diabetes and it’s not going to be easy but I’m committed to try. I’m working with a team, as well, which is nice after so many years of going it alone. Wish me luck! Visit thefoodcoach.com.au


JUDY DAVIE:

“LIFE IS BETTER IF YOU EAT WELL. WHAT I SELL IS A MESSAGE ABOUT HEALTHY EATING”


ANDREA POWIS:

“I WANT FEMALE TRAVELLERS TO FEEL REJUVENATED WITH LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE”


INSPIRING WOMEN

Andrea Powis

As a divorcee working for an airline, Andrea Powis, 54, understood the difficulties of being a single female traveller, so she founded a business catering specifically to the needs of solo women in search of adventure

had always been an avid traveller but, when I got divorced in my mid 30s, I had no one to travel with – all my girlfriends were having babies. I worked for British Airways in Sydney, Brisbane and London, in reservations, sales and marketing, and had the opportunity to do things I never thought I would – I flew on Concord, travelled several times a year to destinations like Africa and India, went on the QE2 and the Orient Express. My career path fed my travel addiction – I just loved it. I am quite gregarious when it comes to travel but my days of being happy to sit in a bar on my own are long gone. That is where the kernel of the idea formed – that a lot of women are solo travellers wanting company, but not in mixed groups. In the early 2000s, there was nothing obvious in the travel market that was femalespecific for single women. I launched the Travelling Divas website in 2009, with the idea of offering really good value, insider experiences that were not cookie-cutter – things you would not necessarily do on your own, a safe environment whether you’re single or travelling with friends. My first tour was a Pilates retreat to Fiji, with a mix of clients and friends there to support me – four nights with Pilates and good food, and it was beautiful. My second international tour was called ‘Do It Like Audrey Hepburn’, giving my divas the Roman Holiday experience in Italy − Vespa-riding in Tuscany, staying in Florence, shopping and visiting wineries. I don’t do large groups − the maximum number is 12, but last year I went to Peru with four people, which was amazing, and there were seven on my recent New York Thanksgiving tour. The age range is from around 40 upwards and my oldest client is 70. The insider experience is what I aim to provide – in New York, we went to Bloomingdale’s before opening hours; in Moscow, there was a private dinner with a university professor about pre- and post-Communism and what it is really like, and a private visit to the Kremlin Palace, which is not open to the public. I find that with female groups, the stories are shared as they get to know one another and everyone is so supportive and nurturing – there is no judgement,

they are positive, upbeat and fun. Great friendships have grown on these trips. It may be the first time they have travelled on their own, without a husband or partner, and I want them to come back feeling they have experienced something special – rejuvenation with a group of like-minded people. There are some days when they may not want to do something that has been planned and they are free to do

“I am quite gregarious when it comes to travel, but my days of being happy to sit in a bar on my own are long gone” their own thing. But when they come back to the hotel, they will have someone to have a drink and a chat with about their day – a little safety net. In the beginning, it was about food, fashion and spas, but, as my clients evolve, there is a lot more adventure. I am getting a lot of good feedback, as people tell me what they want – trips to see the Northern Lights, Santa in Lapland – and I am already organising 2018 tours tailored to their requests. I love the creative aspect of what I do and being able to deliver something amazing for clients. Because it is just me doing pretty much every tour, I have to make sure I get the experiences right – I visit the destinations in advance, check out hotels and transport, meet ground handlers I am going to work with. I have to keep an eye on potential risks – if Smart Traveller [Australian Government online travel advisory service] recommended against a trip, I wouldn’t do it. I remarried in 2005 and my husband Ivor comes with me on research trips and helps with the business side – he’s a great sounding board. I am away for four months a year and Ivor is very supportive – not many husbands would put up with a wife who is away so much. I would say I am a nurturer and an enabler and, when I travel a lot with the same women, we joke that we enable one another… to eat too much and shop too much! Visit travellingdivas.com.au

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INSPIRING WOMEN

Emma Wheater

Meditation was the salve that helped former health-and-wellbeing journalist Emma Wheater, 37, through the stress and loneliness of stopping work, and moving interstate with a busy husband and new baby. Now she is helping others to find their path to inner peace

I

found it hard to be the at-home mum when I left my job. On paper, I had a great life – living in a lovely part of Sydney, I had a new baby, a great husband, friends... yet, every morning, I would wake up dreading the day. My year-old daughter Josie did not sleep during the day and there was a lot of crying. In hindsight, I realised it was just her, but I couldn’t see that − I felt I was a crap mum. I couldn’t wait for my husband Murray to come home and if he wasn’t back at a decent time, I‘d get really shitty, expecting him to do his bit. I wasn’t myself and the person I felt myself to be was long gone. One day, I’d finally got Josie to sleep and thought, Thank God, this is my time now. Then for no reason the dog, Pedro, went to her door and barked… and Josie was awake and screaming. I wanted to kill Pedro. As I dragged him down the stairs by the collar, he reached round and bit me – just a warning bite, because I was hurting him. It really snapped me out of it. I thought, What am I doing? I’m not cruel. The dog was at our wedding, he was our first child! I had to change something. I decided that I had to meditate. So I searched around, found a teacher of Vedic meditation, based on the Indian philosophy of life, and knew that it was what I was looking for. It took six months of regular practice before I felt meditation was embedded in my day, but it changed my internal experience of life. Underneath, I had been paddling like mad, trying to swim against the tide, and once you realise you don’t have to do that, it is life-changing. After meditating, I feel the calm expansiveness you get after a glass of wine – relaxed and soft. In stressful situations, I used to feel as if I was holding my breath and all my muscles were clenched, tight and rigid the whole time. I don’t have that any more. Now, I don’t sweat the small stuff. I meditate twice a day for 20 minutes, starting off first thing in the morning before the household gets going and in the afternoon before school pick-up, while my son has his rest. I sit comfortably, close my eyes and think about my mantra, four or five words in Sanskrit designed to transcend thoughts and worries. I don’t like

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to do it too late in the day because it is like a rest for the nervous system and I get a burst of energy afterwards that is like having a cup of coffee. I practised meditation for three years before I started teacher-training in 2014, when my son Tom was eight months old. I desperately wanted to do some good with my time, to help someone who was having similar experiences to those I’d had.

“I practised meditation for three years before I started teacher-training, when my son Tom was eight months old” I’ve found people often come to meditation at a crisis point, when life has really delivered a kick in the guts. One woman came, seeking relief from terrible migraines, and had already done a lot with different modalities. Through meditation and her other treatments, her migraines have reduced dramatically in severity and frequency. Coming into it [meditation], she was wary, but now she knows she has to do it, not just for her migraines but because she feels so much better. Another person had depression and anxiety, and reduced their alcohol consumption through meditation. People report back that their life is just… better, that they can’t be overwhelmed so easily – in rough seas they are more like an ocean liner than a little boat. My husband now meditates and says it has made a massive difference to him. It isn’t a magic pill − it doesn’t mean you are never going to be sad again. Meditation is something that will benefit you when you do it on a daily basis. You have to commit to it; just like healthy eating and exercise, you have to plan it. With my teaching, there is nothing like the feeling that you have passed on something life-changing and wonderful to someone, but I am very aware that they are doing the work and I feel lucky to be part of it and support them.” Visit onemeditation.com.au.


EMMA WHEATER:

“MEDITATING IS SOMETHING YOU HAVE TO COMMIT TO, LIKE HEALTHY EATING AND EXERCISE”

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flexible No matter how much you exercise, your body can let you down when it comes to flexibility. On the following pages, Ginny Graves shares her 10-minute regimen to help boost suppleness and keep muscle pain at bay

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PHOTOGRAPHY THAYER ALLYSON GOWDY

after 40


FITNESS

HEALING STRETCHES After years of running, Ginny Graves’ muscles called for time out. Here, she tells us how daily limbering up has helped her get back on track

“A

s the starting gun of a 20km run sounded and I sprang forward just a little too enthusiastically, a jab of pain pierced my right hamstring. I kept running, slowly, but the off-and-on pain persisted long after I’d crossed the finish line. A few weeks later, my left knee started aching, and my left hip soon joined in. When I found myself buying a jumbo-sized pack of ibuprofen, I made an appointment with a physiotherapist who manipulated my body in various ways, revealing that the muscles in my chest, hips and lower back were as taut as violin strings, and were, she said, responsible for the growing list of woes, including neck and lower-back pain. I limped out of her office with a promise to start limbering up. But, I wondered, at 53, was it possible to regain my former flexibility? Geeky science journalist that I am, I started investigating. I discovered that as we age, our muscles and tendons stiffen up. Being menopausal doesn’t help either. As oestrogen, which bolsters muscles’ suppleness,

PERFECT YOUR POSTURE CORRECT ROUNDED SHOULDERS AND ALLEVIATE UPPER-BACK AND NECK PAIN WITH THIS FEEL-GOOD CHEST OPENER. Try it Stand with arms hanging in front of thighs, holding a belt or strap with hands slightly more than shoulder-width apart. Keeping arms straight, raise them in an arc overhead and back behind you. Pause, then slowly reverse movement to starting position. Continue for 30 seconds.

declines, so does the ability to scratch a mosquito bite in the middle of your back or reach for dishes on a high shelf in the kitchen. The key, it seemed, was to combine exercise such as walking, running, cycling or swimming, with stretching. A stretching and strengthening program, I learned, can be so effective for relieving back, neck and hip pain that it removes the need for medication. That was all the incentive I needed to start limbering up. The home-stretching routine on this and the following pages is the result of my research… I’ve been sitting at my desk for several hours when the alarm on my phone chirps, reminding me it’s time to start my home-stretching routine. As I work my way through, the viscous tissue in my chest, thighs, hips and shoulders experiences the same warming and lengthening sensation, and a few minutes later I return to my desk feeling more limber. As the days tick by, I wake in the morning with fewer aches, and can stand up after a few hours of sitting and not feel so creaky. When I lunge to grab a falling coffee mug, I don’t feel a single twinge in my back or hamstrings. My husband says my posture has improved, too. After more than a month of doing my at-home routine, my hip, back and neck pain is nearly gone, and my hamstrings and knees flare up only after 6km-plus runs. Equally surprising, I’ve come to enjoy my daily flexibility training. It’s a great stress reliever, and I love that it motivates me to get up from my desk and give my brain and body a break. I’m not going to be doing splits any time soon, but when I’m warmed up, I can bend over and almost reach my ankles. At an age when I’m too set in my ways to care about differences between Snapchat and WhatsApp, it’s nice to know that my muscles, at least, can still become more flexible! Here are some stretches that have worked for me and that you can try at home. E

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LOOSEN UP YOUR CALVES Shift your weight to your front foot until you feel a stretch in the calf of your back leg.

WALKING, RUNNING AND WEARING HEELED SHOES CAN RESULT IN TIGHT CALVES, WHICH CAN IN TURN LEAD TO FOOT AND KNEE PAIN. Try it Stand about 60cm from a wall, facing it in a staggered stance, one foot in front of the other. Keeping back heel down, place hands on the wall and lean against it. Hold for 30 seconds, then switch legs and repeat. Stretch each leg twice. Shift your weight to your front foot until you feel a stretch in the calf of your back leg.

UNLOCK YOUR HAMSTRINGS STIFF HAMSTRINGS DON’T JUST MAKE IT IMPOSSIBLE TO TOUCH YOUR TOES; THEY CAN ALSO PULL ON THE MUSCLES IN YOUR LOWER BACK AND CAUSE PAIN. Try it Lie on your back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor, holding one end of a belt or strap in each hand. Draw one knee in towards your chest and place the middle of the strap around the arch of the foot. Extend your leg towards the ceiling, holding it for 30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg. Stretch each leg twice. Keep a slight bend in your knee. Don’t arch your lower back.

Keep a slight bend in your knee. Don’t arch your lower back.


FITNESS

RELAX YOUR THIGHS

Place a rolled towel under your knee for extra padding.

EASING TENSION IN THE QUADRICEPS NOT ONLY FEELS GREAT BUT CAN ALSO IMPROVE YOUR POSTURE AND REDUCE YOUR RISK OF INJURY.

Stand tall and keep your abs engaged.

Try it Stand tall with one hand on the back of a sturdy chair for support. Bend one knee and grab top of foot with hand, pulling it towards your body and pushing hips forward until you feel a stretch in front of the thigh. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg. Stretch each leg twice. Stand tall and keep your abs engaged.

EASE YOUR ACHING HIPS TIGHT HIP FLEXORS CAN DRAW THE PELVIS FORWARD CAUSING LOWER-BACK PAIN. Try it Kneel on the floor. Place one foot in front of you, then slowly press hips forward until you feel a stretch in front of the back thigh. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg. Stretch each leg twice. Place a rolled-up towel on the floor under your knee for extra padding. You’ll feel a stretch on the side of your body.

BLISS OUT YOUR BACK THE MUSCLES IN YOUR UPPER BACK AND THE SIDES OF YOUR BODY CAN BECOME TIGHT FROM PROLONGED SITTING, LEADING TO PAIN AND STIFFNESS. THIS GENTLE STRETCHING EXERCISE SHOULD HELP TO LOOSEN YOUR MUSCLES. Try it Start with your arms stretched out in front of you and your forehead resting on the floor. Without moving your hips, ‘walk’ hands to one side. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat on opposite side.

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mind games AND THE

We explode common myth-conceptions about how the human brain works BY SARAH KLEIN

PHOTOGRAPHY ISTOCK

Thinking about the brain is a lot like contemplating the limits of outer space: so much lies beyond our grasp that it can be dizzying, especially when some of our fondest-held beliefs are challenged and proved wrong. Even then, some myths live on, defying logic. They’re so persistent that they’ve earned their own name: neuromyths. Neuromyths flourish because they seem to explain otherwise-bewildering phenomena. Here are some talking points for when you’re confronted with the most commonly held myth-conceptions. E

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YOUR BRAIN

Is it true that... XWomen’s brains work differently to men’s? XYou only use 10 per cent of your brain? XCreative thinkers are right-brained?

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MYTH: MEN’S AND WOMEN’S BRAINS FUNCTION DIFFERENTLY REALITY CHECK: “We tend to think of women as being more verbally than mathematically adept,” says clinical psychologist Cynthia Green. But when researchers compared the academic performance of male and female students in countries which don’t have these stereotypical attitudes, women’s maths skills were found to be easily on a par with men’s. Yes, there are structural differences between men’s and women’s brains, but they don’t directly affect behaviour, personality or learning. In fact, a 2015 Israeli study found that those differences don’t even allow researchers to identify any given brain as male or female. WHERE THE MYTH ORIGINATED: There are structural differences − for example, a band of nerve fibres called the corpus callosum that connects the two sides of the brain is thicker in women, while men’s brains tend to be larger overall. But these differences have less significance than was previously assumed. WHY THE MYTH PERSISTS: If men are from Mars and women are from Venus, their brains must be different! Gender bias is getting the better of anyone who buys into this one.

MYTH: YOU USE ONLY ABOUT 10 PER CENT OF YOUR BRAIN REALITY CHECK: You may not use your entire brain all the time – when you’re resting, for example – but you don’t have an untapped expanse of grey matter, either. “All of us use the entirety of our brains, but not every part constantly or equally,” says neuroscientist Stephen Kosslyn. Some areas function automatically, such as the brain stem, which controls unconscious activities like breathing. Others control higherlevel thinking and may be activated only when we’re reasoning, planning or solving problems. These are the regions famously thought to be

“When you scan people’s brains as they do tasks, you don’t see just one half light up” 108

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YOUR BRAIN

‘exercised’ by crossword puzzles, brain games and brain-training software. Although research has found that cognitive claims for brain games are unsubstantiated, they persist, partly due to ingenious marketing by the companies that make these products. In reality, there’s no silver bullet to ward off dementia, and we need to approach cognitive wellness from all angles, Green says, including intellectual stimulation, regular physical activity and a Mediterranean-style diet, which has been shown to be beneficial for brain health. WHERE THE MYTH ORIGINATED: “The 10 per cent idea may be based on a misreading of data that was collected in the 1920s and ’30s that showed rats could relearn how to run through mazes, even after having large amounts of their brains removed,” Kosslyn says. WHY THE MYTH PERSISTS: Who wouldn’t like to imagine a brain of nearly infinite capacity for brilliant ideas, just waiting to be tapped?

MYTH: THE RIGHT AND LEFT HEMISPHERES OF THE BRAIN OPERATE INDEPENDENTLY AND DETERMINE THE ‘TYPE’ OF THINKER YOU ARE REALITY CHECK: As neat and tidy as it seems to

We now know.. XMen’s brains tend to be larger than women’s. XThere is no dominant side in human brains. XAll of our brain is busy every day.

claim that ‘creative’ people are right-brained, while ‘logical’ ones lean to the left, in fact, both hemispheres work together. “When you scan people’s brains as they do tasks, you don’t see just one half light up with activity,” Kosslyn says. WHERE THE MYTH ORIGINATED: In the 1960s, researchers surgically separated the two sides of the brain and identified the areas that governed functions such as maths and language skills. Differences were found between the two hemispheres, but the right brain/left brain theory oversimplifies the science. Today, experts believe the communication between the two sides likely produces our most creative and logical thoughts. WHY THE MYTH PERSISTS: Simply because it makes pegging people easy. For instance, educators have relied on such faulty thinking to create learning strategies targeted at rightand left-brainers. Many teachers believe the differences in how individuals learn are due to the dominant side of their brains. As for the rest of us, personality quizzes would fall out of favour if we lost interest in knowing whether we are right- or left-brained and what our ‘type’ is. No one else’s brain, though, is exactly like your brain – and that can be as heady a concept as contemplating the cosmos.

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BREAKTHROUGH

o n u m m I N O P A E W T S E NEW N O R A W E H T IN R E C N CA

nt: r treatme e c n a c f rth es o three typ Now there’s a fou y n o d e li . re p otherapy unothera ave long Doctors h diation and chem arly promise, imm ith w e surgery, ra if it lives up to its e to be reckoned d, rc player an to be a fo e v ro p ld cou A HOLLIS SAMANTH TUREL & BY AMY PA

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y p a r the THE WAR BEGINS: A KILLER T CELL, ONE OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM’S SOLDIERS, ATTACKS A CANCER CELL

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UNTIL NOW, CANCER CELLS HAVE BEEN ABLE TO HIDE FROM OUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

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BREAKTHROUGH

PREVIOUS SPREAD: ILLUSTRATION CONEYL JAY/GETTY IMAGES. OPPOSITE PAGE: NICHOLAS EVELEIGH/GETTY IMAGES

mmunotherapy is widely considered one of the most important advances in cancer treatment in decades. It works by harnessing the power of the body’s own immune system, helping immune cells seek out and destroy cancer cells more effectively. Today, around 68 per cent of cancers detected in Australia are cured. According to Professor Sanchia Aranda, CEO of Cancer Council Australia, “The difference between immunotherapy and conventional chemotherapy is that, for a minority of patients with metastatic cancer [cancer that has spread from the original site to other parts of the body], there is a dramatic and enduring response that is being considered a cure, although long-term follow-up data is not yet available.” Padmanee Sharma, a professor of genitourinary medical oncology and immunology, explains why immunotherapy is so promising. “We’re not treating the cancer or tumour cells, we’re treating the immune system,” she says. “Once we get the immune system working correctly, it shouldn’t matter which type of tumour we’re targeting. This really represents a paradigm shift in cancer research and treatment, resulting in unprecedented responses in melanoma and lung and kidney cancers.” Researchers are hopeful that eventually all forms of cancer will succumb to this new treatment. “But,” says Aranda, “we know little about why some patients respond and others do not. Overall response rates in metastatic disease are around 18 per cent – higher in melanoma, but still not a majority.” More than 1,500 cancer immunotherapy drugs are currently in the research-anddevelopment pipeline internationally. Exciting news, but what does it all mean? We asked the experts.

IMMUNOTHERAPY DRUGS ARE GIVEN INTRAVENOUSLY, LIKE MOST TRADITIONAL CHEMOTHERAPY

CAN YOU EXPLAIN IMMUNOTHERAPY?

It has been part of the medical arsenal for decades, mainly in the form of vaccines that spark the body to produce antibodies to prevent infectious disease. The new immunotherapy treatments are drugs that have been specifically developed to help strengthen the body’s defence system against cancer. Doctors have long wondered why the immune system doesn’t fight off cancer as effectively as it does other diseases. “We knew the immune system should be able to fight cancer, but it wasn’t generating a strong enough response to kill off the disease,” says Nora Disis, Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington. As far back as the 1980s, scientists identified one of the problems: cancer cells sometimes contain many of the same molecules as normal cells, without enough abnormal molecules for the immune system to recognise them as dangerous. Armed with this new knowledge, scientists began the search for substances that would help the body identify the rogue cells and destroy them. “The cancer cells seem to be able to adapt to their environment and change their interaction with the immune system, and this effectively lets them hide,” Aranda says. “Treatments either stop them from hiding or increase the power of the immune system to find them. So some target the cancer and others the immune cells.”

2

HOW DO THESE DRUGS WORK?

The immune system features an intricate network of on-off switches that free immune cells to fight disease when and where necessary, but keep them in check otherwise, so they don’t spin out of control and damage healthy organs and tissues. The most widely used immunotherapy drugs, called immune checkpoint inhibitors, release the brakes and allow the immune system’s fighter T cells to attack cancer. The strategy seems to be working. For example, long-term follow-up of nearly 5,000 patients overseas with metastatic melanoma, a deadly form of cancer with a median survival rate of 11 months, shows that 20 per cent of those who took an immune checkpoint drug called ipilimumab (Yervoy) survived for three years; some lived five to 10 years or longer. Indeed, according to Aranda, if detected early, melanoma is curable. In Australia, ipilimumab has been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for melanoma therapy, along with other drugs, including nivolumab (Opdivo) and pembrolizumab (Keytruda). All are given intravenously, like most cancer chemotherapy drugs. E

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3  

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF THIS STRATEGY?

Many cancer treatments, including radiation and chemotherapy, result in a weakened immune system. In addition to obliterating cancer cells, they damage infection-detecting white blood cells. “With immunotherapy, there’s less risk of infection because those white blood cells remain intact,” explains Matthew Davids, an oncologist specialising in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Even cancer cells that are resistant to chemotherapy are responding to immunotherapy drugs, both in the short and long term. Once the drugs have enabled the body’s T cells to recognise and respond to tumour cells, the T cells are programmed to keep working until the tumour is eradicated. “Those targeted T cells remain in your system indefinitely,” says Disis. “So if the cancer ever comes back, [it is hoped] your immune system will kick in and kill it even before you realise you’re having a recurrence.” But, cautions Aranda, it’s early days.

4

DO THESE DRUGS HAVE ANY ADVERSE SIDE-EFFECTS?

Most side-effects from the immunotherapy drugs are considered mild to moderate, say the experts, but about 20 per cent of patients have reported adverse reactions that could be dangerous or even life-threatening. The most common reactions are flu-like symptoms, fatigue, changes in blood pressure. Less common are gastrointestinal and thyroid problems Sharma explains the reason for these adverse reactions. “When we release the brakes with checkpoint inhibitors, we’re allowing the immune system to fight cancer,” she says. “However, the resulting inflammation can damage the skin, lungs, intestines, joints and virtually any bodily system.” Disis adds: “If patients know what to watch for and see their doctor when those symptoms set in, we can stop the reaction and combat the symptoms.” This is usually achieved by stopping the drug altogether or lowering the dose.

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WHICH CANCERS ARE RESPONDING WELL TO THE TREATMENT? So far, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved checkpoint inhibitors for advanced melanoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a small subset of solid tumours, including cancers of the lung, kidney and bladder. Another type of immunotherapy, called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is still under investigation. It’s not a TGA-approved treatment yet, but patients overseas with blood cancers like leukaemia and lymphoma have been found to be responding well to this new form of therapy.

EVEN CANCER CELLS THAT ARE RESISTANT TO CHEMOTHERAPY ARE RESPONDING TO IMMUNOTHERAPY

6

WHY DOESN’T IMMUNOTHERAPY WORK FOR EVERYONE?

At present, checkpoint inhibitor drugs work for only 20 to 30 per cent of patients, and researchers aren’t entirely sure why. “We know that tumours with a lot of mutations, such as most melanomas and cancers of the lung and bladder, appear almost like mini-viruses, making them easier for the immune system to detect and fight,” says Disis. Researchers are trying to figure out how to boost tumour-specific immunity, so the drugs will work better. Scientists are also paying attention to something called the ‘tumour microenvironment’, which is the area immediately around the tumour. “Some tumours have built a wall, preventing the immune system’s T cells from getting in, so we have to find ways to break down the wall before the immune system can attack the cancer,” says Sharma. “Once we learn more about what the hurdles are, we can devise the strategies to overcome them.” E


BREAKTHROUGH

JEANETTE’S STORY... so far, so good Jeanette Devon, 53, was losing her devastating battle with lung cancer when her oncologist prescribed immunotherapy. Chemotherapy had failed her. She’d had one lung removed and cancer had returned in the other. Going through chemo had been tough, recalls the former Melbourne HR director who, until her diagnosis, had been fit, well and managing a staff of 90. “I found chemotherapy one of the most challenging times in my life,” Jeanette says. “It was a mental struggle every day. I was on the couch most of the time, feeling really unwell.” Despite the aggressive treatment, tests revealed a shattering diagnosis: “It was incurable, inoperable and I was given eight months to live.” Jeanette packed up her life, moved to Geelong to be closer to her daughter Sarah, 27 (her other daughter Laura, 23, still lives in Melbourne), and prepared for what she thought was “the final deadline”. At this time, her cancer was being managed with palliative chemotherapy: “Even though the oncologist says it was lolly water compared to the chemo I’d had before, I just had a nauseous feeling all the time and was very low psychologically. Everything was an effort.” Jeanette defied doctors’ predictions that she would survive just eight months and was into her 16th month of palliative care when she developed an allergy to the chemo. Her treatment was stopped immediately. That’s when an oncologist prescribed a new immuno-oncology drug. Exactly how miraculous the effect has been is best described by Jeanette: “I just competed in a 5K fun walk and I did it in an hour! “My quality of life is different. Immunotherapy has allowed me the energy to look after myself to get well, to cook good food, to do meditation… I’m doing all the things I can to give myself this best chance.” The treatment is easy: “I have an infusion every two weeks. It takes about an hour. “I have a blood test every fortnight and so far my results are normal. Slowly, I’m reclaiming my life. I feel really grateful that I have had this option open to me.”

JEAN ETTE WITH DAUGHTER S SARAH (CENTRE) AND LAUR A DURI NG THE DARK DAYS OF CHEM O.

JEANETTE (LEFT) TRIUMPHANT AFTER HER FUN RUN IN DECEMBER.

ALL SM ILES… JEANET TE TODAY WITH LAU RA (RIG HT) AN D SAR AH.

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7

ARE THERE PATIENTS WHOSE IMMUNE SYSTEMS DON’T RECOGNISE CANCER AS A THREAT?

For a checkpoint blockade to work effectively, the immune system has to have already produced fighter T cells against the tumour. Some cancers don’t generate any response from T cells, but scientists are finding ways to work around this obstacle by genetically engineering a patient’s own immune cells to spot and kill cancer. In CAR T-cell therapy, scientists harvest the T cells from a patient’s blood and genetically engineer them to target specific proteins in the tumour. They grow several billion of these modified cells in the lab and then reinfuse them into the patient, hoping

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this horde of extra immune cells will be able to overwhelm the tumour. So far, this approach has been used only against leukaemia and lymphoma, with dramatic responses. In early overseas trials in patients with advanced acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, many of the cancers disappeared entirely. “CAR T cells are sometimes called ‘serial killers’ because they persist in the body for a long time and protect against recurrence,” says Davids. “The trouble is, you need to genetically engineer CAR T cells for each patient, which is very labour intensive − and expensive.”

9

CAN THIS THERAPY ALSO BE USED TO PREVENT CANCER?

ARE THESE DRUGS CONSIDERED COST-EFFECTIVE?

There are vaccines targeting viruses that can trigger cancer, including hepatitis B (the leading cause of liver cancer) and human papillomavirus (HPV) that causes 99 per cent of cervical cancers. “If you’re vaccinated against the virus, you don’t get infected, so your chance of getting cancer is dramatically reduced,” says senior oncologist Brian Czerniecki. Since it became available in 2007 for girls and 2013 for boys, the HPV vaccine has helped reduce the prevalence of cervical cancer in Australia by 64 per cent in females ages 14 to 19 and by 34 per cent in those 20 to 24 years old.

Immunotherapy is a complicated technology that has already required significant time − and billions of dollars − to investigate. But if it actually cures, rather than just treats, cancer, it may turn out to be far less expensive to the public purse than rounds of chemotherapy and radiation that have to be repeated each time the cancer recurs.

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10 WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR THIS TYPE OF THERAPY?

In the fight against cancer, experts agree that the future of immunotherapy involves stringing together treatments, such as CAR T-cell therapy, cancer vaccines, immune checkpoint inhibitors and other techniques in order to produce even greater effects. Immunotherapy is also being looked at as a cure for other diseases. For cancer, the aim is to take off the immune brakes and get the system revved up. But if you make the brakes stronger instead, you may be able to halt autoimmune conditions − in which the immune system attacks the body itself, rather than an invader − such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. “Once we understand how to focus immunotherapy in specific ways, I can see lots of different ways it can be used,” says Sharma.

THERE ARE MORE THAN 1,500 NEW IMMUNOTHERAPY DRUGS CURRENTLY IN THE PIPELINE


BREAKTHROUGH

SCIENTISTS ARE ENGINEERING A PATIENT’S OWN IMMUNE CELLS TO SPOT AND KILL CANCER

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STEAK, PEACH & ROCKET SALAD SERVES 6 HANDS-ON TIME 10 MIN COOKING TIME 20 MIN

550g lean beef ďŹ llet 2 ears corn, husks and silk removed 2 large peaches, pitted, cut into 2cm wedges 1 large red onion, roughly chopped Âź cup olive oil 3 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon fresh thyme 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 punnet cherry tomatoes, halved 4 cups rocket 1 Heat a lightly greased chargrill pan over medium-high heat. Season steak with salt and pepper; grill for 10-12 minutes or to taste, turning once. Remove steak from pan; allow to rest for 5 minutes, then slice. 2 Meanwhile, put corn, peaches and onion in pan. Grill, turning once, until cooked, about 6 minutes. Cut kernels from corn. 3 In a medium bowl, whisk oil, juice, thyme and mustard. Put tomatoes and peaches in bowl with the dressing. Add corn and onion to bowl; toss. Arrange rocket on a platter; top with the fruit, vegetables and sliced steak. NUTRITION Per serving 1,502kJ/359cal. Protein 25.8g. Carbs 20.1g. Fibre 5.5g. Sugars 11.7g. Total fat 16.6g. Sat fat 3.8g. Sodium 152mg. Calcium 169mg. Iron 4.7mg.

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Deliciously fresh FOOD

TOMA T are hig OES h in pot vitam assium and in reduc B, which he e lp and lo cholesterol wer b pressu lood re.

TOMATO GALETTE SERVES 8 HANDS-ON TIME 10 MIN COOKING TIME 35 MIN

900g small to medium tomatoes, sliced 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 portion Basic Wholemeal Dough (see recipe, p 126) 110g bocconcini, halved 1 large egg, beaten 2 tablespoons store-bought pesto sauce Grated parmesan, to serve 1 Heat oven to 220°C. Line a lightly greased baking tray with baking paper. Put tomatoes in a bowl; season with salt and pepper. Add oil; toss. 2 Roll dough into a 30cm round, about 3mm thick. Place on prepared baking tray, leaving about 4cm dough around the edge to fold over filling. Put tomatoes on tray and top with bocconcini. Pleat overhanging dough and fold it over filling; brush with egg. Bake until pastry is golden and the filling bubbles, about 30 to 35 minutes. 3 To serve, drizzle with pesto and top with parmesan. NUTRITION Per serving 1,205kJ/288cal. Protein 8.8g. Carbs 17.6g. Fibre 3.9g. Sugars 3.1g. Total fat 19.5g. Sat fat 10.6g. Sodium 231mg. Calcium 122mg. Iron 1.2mg.

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BAKED EGGPLANT & ZUCCHINI WITH ROASTED-TOMATO DIP SERVES 8 HANDS-ON TIME 20 MIN COOKING TIME 30 MIN

124

1 cup cherry tomatoes 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 cup low-fat Greek-style yoghurt 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 5 large egg whites, whisked 2½ cups panko breadcrumbs, toasted 1 medium yellow squash, cut into 1cm slices 1 medium zucchini, cut into 1cm slices 1 small eggplant, cut into 1cm slices

2 To make dip, transfer tomatoes to a food processor. Add yoghurt, vinegar, mustard and ¼ teaspoon each of salt and pepper; purée until smooth. Transfer to a bowl; put in fridge until ready to serve. 3 Put egg whites in a bowl. In a separate bowl, mix breadcrumbs with ¼ teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Dip vegetables in egg white, then roll in breadcrumbs; place on prepared baking tray. Bake for 15-18 minutes, until golden. Serve with dip.

1 Preheat oven to 190°C. Lightly grease two baking trays. Put tomatoes and oil on one tray; toss to coat tomatoes with oil. Bake for 15 minutes.

NUTRITION Per serving 372kJ/89cal. Protein 6.7g.

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Carbs 11.2g. Fibre 1.9g. Sugars 4.6g. Total fat 1.1g. Sat fat 0.2g. Sodium 119mg. Calcium 83mg. Iron 0.4mg.


Deliciously fresh FOOD

PEACH & ROCKET GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH SERVES 4 HANDS-ON TIME 5 MIN COOKING TIME 15 MIN

8 slices wholegrain bread 110g grated cheddar 2 peaches, pitted and sliced 2 cups baby rocket 1 Toast bread. Put 4 slices of the toast on a board; top with cheese and peaches. Place under the grill; cook until cheese melts.

2 Remove from grill; top with rocket and make sandwiches with remaining slices of toast. NUTRITION Per serving 1,264kJ/302cal. Protein 14.3g. Carbs 32.4g. Fibre 4.6g. Sugars 6.8g. Total fat 11.6g. Sat fat 6.7g. Sodium 502mg. Calcium 318mg. Iron 1.7mg.

PEAC are an HES source excellent fibre an of dietary d minera essential kilojoulels – low in s, as we ll.

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SPICY WATERMELON SALAD SERVES 4 TIME TO MAKE 30 MIN

1 cup white vinegar ½-1 jalapeño, seeded and sliced ½ small red onion, sliced 1.4kg watermelon, peeled and cut into 5cm cubes (about 700g) 6-8 small heirloom tomatoes, halved ½ teaspoon ground cumin 50g feta, crumbled 2 tablespoons fresh coriander 2 tablespoons pepitas Lime wedges, to garnish (optional) 1 In a bowl, combine vinegar, jalapeño and onion; let stand for 15-20 minutes. 2 Arrange watermelon and tomatoes

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on a platter. Drain jalapeño-onion mix, reserving 1 tablespoon vinegar. Put vegetable mix on top of the watermelon and tomatoes; drizzle with reserved vinegar. Sprinkle with cumin; season to taste. Top with cheese, coriander and pepitas. Serve with lime wedges, if desired. NUTRITION Per serving 838kJ/200cal. Protein 8.1g. Carbs 23.8g. Fibre 5.7g. Sugars 22.8g. Total fat 5.5g. Sat fat 1.7g. Sodium 167mg. Calcium 92mg. Iron 3.1mg.


FOOD Deliciously fresh

WATE that’s r RMELON ip and giv e is heavy hollow es a deep, so you ta und when p it on bottom the .

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FOOD Deliciously fresh

HEALTHY BLUEBERRY CRUMBLE PIE SERVES 10 HANDS-ON TIME 10 MIN COOKING TIME 1 HOUR 10 MIN

6 cups fresh blueberries ½ cup tapioca flour 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 teaspoons lemon zest Pinch ground nutmeg ¾ cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 cup rolled oats ¼ cup sliced almonds 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into 2cm pieces 1 portion Basic Wholemeal Dough (see recipe, below left)

BASIC WHOLEMEAL DOUGH In a food processor, pulse 2½ cups wholemeal flour and ½ teaspoon salt. Add 12 tablespoons diced unsalted butter and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add 6 tablespoons cold water and pulse until mixture just comes together. Add extra water, if necessary, but do not over-mix. Divide dough into 2 equal portions, wrap them individually in plastic wrap, and chill for at least 30 minutes before using. Note: The dough can be frozen.

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1 Preheat oven to 220°C. In a medium bowl, combine blueberries, flour, juice, zest, nutmeg, ½ cup of the sugar, ½ teaspoon of the cinnamon and a pinch of salt. In a separate bowl, combine oats, almonds, butter, remaining sugar and remaining cinnamon. 2 Roll dough into a 30cm round and press it into a lightly greased 23cm pie dish; crimp edges. Add blueberry filling; top with oat mixture. Bake until topping begins to brown, about 20 minutes. Reduce heat to 190°C. 3 Remove pie from oven and make a foil ‘tent’ over the top. Return to oven and bake until filling bubbles, 40-50 minutes. Allow to cool before serving. NUTRITION Per serving 1,376kJ/329cal. Protein 4.2g. Carbs 45.2g. Fibre 4.8g. Sugars 20.9g. Total fat 13.8g. Sat fat 7.5g. Sodium 64mg. Calcium 45mg. Iron 1.4mg.


BLUEB are sw ERRIES juicier a eeter and year, m t this time of ea you ca ning that n sugar in use less d such a ishes s pie.

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WATERMELON & CUCUMBER SLUSHIE SERVES 2 TIME TO MAKE 5 MINUTES + FREEZING

500g watermelon cubes, frozen 1 Lebanese cucumber, peeled, cut up and frozen ¼ cup fresh basil 4 teaspoons fresh lime juice Combine all ingredients in blender. Add as little iced water as necessary to purée. NUTRITION Per serving 294kJ/70cal. Protein 1.1g. Carbs 13.7g. Fibre 2.2g. Sugars 13.7g. Total fat 0.6g. Sat fat 0g. Sodium 16mg. Calcium 56mg. Iron 1.2mg.

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FOOD STYLING BY KHALIL HYMORE; PROP STYLING BY KAITLYN DUROSS

Pure refreshment is moments away with drinks that mix herbs and summer produce for sweetness without added sugar


Deliciously fresh FOOD

FRUIT & HERB COOLERS Fill a glass or pitcher with ice. Add mashed, diced or sliced fruit of your choice, along with chopped fresh herbs. Top with sparkling water. Combinations we like: peaches and basil; blueberries and thyme; and watermelon and mint.

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What’s for

breakfast? Tired of cereal, toast and the usual morning suspects? Nutritionist and accredited cook Caroline Griffiths has created these smoothie bowls crammed with flavour and goodness − a delectable way to kick-start your day!

BLUEBERRY MUFFIN SMOOTHIE BOWL MAKES 2

Blueberries are little nutritional powerhouses. They are the star feature of this vibrant smoothie, which uses both fresh and freeze-dried blueberries, with each style adding its individual texture and variation on blueberry flavour. Freeze-dried berries are available from good health-food stores, some supermarkets and online. Edible flowers are available from good fruiterers and online. 1 cup natural yoghurt or 1 cup milk kefir ½ cup crushed ice 2 peeled bananas, frozen and roughly chopped 1 cup frozen blueberries 1 tablespoon ground linseed ( flaxseed meal) 1 teaspoon natural vanilla extract Freshly squeezed lime juice, to taste Honey, to taste TO SERVE

1 Whiz the yoghurt or kefir with the ice, banana, blueberries, linseed and vanilla extract in a high-speed blender or small food processor until smooth. Scrape down the inside of the blender or processor bowl, if required. If the mixture isn’t moving well in the blender, add a tablespoon or two of water or kefir, being careful not to add too much liquid. Taste the smoothie and add a squeeze of lime juice and a drizzle of honey to balance the flavour to your liking. 2 Spoon the thick smoothie mixture immediately into two chilled bowls and top with a swirl of yoghurt. Scatter with the banana, berries, buckwheat and flowers. NUTRITION Per serving 1,401kJ/335cal. Protein 11.1g. Carbs 53.5g. Fibre 6g. Sugars 47.9g. Total fat 7.2g. Sat fat 3.6g. Sodium 97mg. Calcium 262mg. Iron 1.1mg.

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PHOTOGRAPHY 2017 COPYRIGHT © CHRIS MIDDLETON

Natural yoghurt Sliced banana Fresh blueberries, freeze-dried and/or dried blueberries Dried mulberries Activated buckwheat Edible flowers


Summer goodness FOOD

DAIRY-FREE SMOOTHIES Replace the yoghurt or milk kefir with your favourite non-dairy alternative. VEGAN SMOOTHIES Swap honey for rice malt syrup, pure maple syrup or a couple of drops of liquid stevia.

SUMMER STONE FRUIT SMOOTHIE BOWL MAKES 2

This is a recipe for the height of summer. One of the delights of seasonality is enjoying produce when it is available from local suppliers – not only are you supporting the farmers, but the produce will be packed with nutrition and flavour. Edible flowers are available from good fruiterers and online. ½ cup natural yoghurt or ½ cup milk kefir ½ cup crushed ice 2 peeled bananas, frozen and roughly chopped 2 peaches, nectarines or plums, stones removed 1 tablespoon chia seeds (optional) Honey or pure maple syrup, to taste (optional) TO SERVE

Thinly sliced stone fruit Pitted cherries

Flaked almonds Edible flowers 1 Whiz the yoghurt or kefir with the ice, fruit and chia seeds (if using) in a high-speed blender or small food processor until smooth. Scrape down the inside of the blender or processor bowl, if required. If the mixture isn’t moving well in the blender, add a tablespoon or two of water or kefir, being careful not to add too much liquid. Taste the smoothie

and, if necessary, add a drizzle of honey or maple syrup to adjust the sweetness to your liking. 2 Spoon the thick smoothie mixture immediately into two chilled bowls; top with fruit, almonds and flowers. NUTRITION Per serving 1,374kJ/329cal. Protein 10.6g. Carbs 41g. Fibre 8.3g. Sugars 37.5g. Total fat 11.5g. Sat fat 2.4g. Sodium 54mg. Calcium 183mg. Iron 1.7mg.

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CARROT CAKE SMOOTHIE BOWL MAKES 2

This scrumptious smoothie bowl is like a cross between a carrot cake and a hummingbird cake − who says you can’t eat cake for breakfast! 1 cup natural yoghurt or 1 cup milk kefir ½ cup crushed ice 2 carrots, grated 1 cup pineapple cubes, frozen 1 peeled orange, chopped and frozen 1 peeled banana, frozen and roughly chopped 2 thin slices lemon with skin on 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger Pinch nutmeg Honey, to taste (optional)

TO SERVE

Julienned carrot Toasted walnuts Toasted pepitas Flaked coconut Ground cinnamon 1 Whiz yoghurt or kefir with ice, carrot, pineapple, orange, banana, lemon, vanilla extract, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg in a high-speed blender or small food processor until smooth. Scrape down the inside of the blender or processor bowl, if required. If the mixture isn’t moving well in the blender,

add a tablespoon or two of water or kefir, being careful not to add too much liquid. Taste and, if necessary, add a drizzle of honey. 2 Spoon the thick smoothie mixture immediately into two chilled bowls; top with the carrot, walnuts, pepitas and coconut, and sprinkle with cinnamon. NUTRITION Per serving 1,243kJ/297cal. Protein 11.6g. Carbs 35.5g. Fibre 8.4g. Sugars 33.3g. Total fat 9.7g. Sat fat 4.6g. Sodium 125mg. Calcium 324mg. Iron 2.5mg.

Recipes from Breakfast Bowls by Caroline Griffiths, published by Smith Street Books, on sale February 2017; rrp $29.99.

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Summer goodness FOOD

CAROB & ALMOND BROWNIE SMOOTHIE BOWL MAKES 2

Carob powder has a mild chocolate flavour, with caramel undertones. Combined with almond milk, it’s like a chocolate brownie in smoothie form. It is available from good health-food stores, some supermarkets and online. Edible flowers are available from good fruiterers and online. ½ cup crushed ice 2 peeled bananas, frozen and chopped ¼ cup carob powder 1 tablespoon chia seeds (optional) ½ cup unsweetened almond milk Honey, to taste Caramelised almonds and honey

¼ cup flaked almonds 1 tablespoon sesame seeds 1 tablespoon honey TO SERVE

Chopped banana Edible flowers Bee pollen Honey (optional)

1 To make the caramelised almonds and honey, heat the almonds and sesame seeds in a small frying pan over medium heat. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until golden and fragrant. Add the honey and cook for a further 2-3 minutes, stirring and shaking the pan constantly, until the mixture is well coated and the honey starts to darken slightly in colour. Spread onto a baking tray lined with baking paper and set aside to cool. Break into pieces. 2 Whiz the ice, banana, carob powder, chia seeds (if using) and almond milk in a highspeed blender or small food processor until smooth. Scrape down the inside of the blender or processor bowl, if required. If the mixture isn’t moving well in the

blender, add a tablespoon or two of water or almond milk, being careful not to add too much liquid. Taste the smoothie and add a drizzle of honey, if desired, to adjust the sweetness to your liking. 3 Spoon the thick smoothie mixture immediately into two chilled bowls and top with banana, the caramelised almonds, flowers and a sprinkling of bee pollen. If you like, finish with a drizzle of honey. Note: For a vegan smoothie, leave out the bee pollen. NUTRITION Per serving 1,820kJ/435cal.

Protein 11.5g. Carbs 46.9g. Fibre 10.6g. Sugars 40g. Total fat 20.9g. Sat fat 2.5g. Sodium 38mg. Calcium 97mg. Iron 3.9mg.

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HEALTHY SWEET TREATS

made with quinoa

Don’t just keep quinoa for salads – these delectable sweet treats are powered by the goodness of this wonder food. Quinoa is packed with hunger-busting protein, full of vitamins, totally free of gluten and low in carbs. What’s not to love? BY RENA PATTEN

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Energising snacks FOOD

FRUIT & ALMOND BARS MAKES ABOUT 16 HANDS-ON TIME 50 MIN COOKING TIME 30 MIN + COOLING

60g quinoa flakes 40g red quinoa grain, rinsed and drained 90g natural whole almonds with skin on, cut into pieces 1 teaspoon coconut oil 30g shredded coconut 40g puffed quinoa 40g pepitas 40g dried apricots, chopped 40g cranberries 60g sultanas 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup 3 tablespoons organic coconut oil, melted 3 extra large egg whites, lightly whisked 1 Preheat oven to 180ºC and line a baking tray with non-stick baking paper. 2 Place flakes, grain and almonds onto the baking tray and coat with the 1 teaspoon of coconut oil, then toast in the oven, stirring once or twice. Cook for about 7-10 minutes until golden. 3 Remove from the oven and place into a large mixing bowl, then add the coconut, puffed quinoa, pepitas, apricots, cranberries and s, and give them a good mix. 4 Stir in some of the honey or maple syrup and taste the mixture to check the level of sweetness. Adjust accordingly. 5 Reduce the oven temperature to 160ºC and line a 29 x 19 x 4cm baking tin with nonstick baking paper, leaving a good overhang of paper on the sides, so that the fruity bars can be lifted out easily. 6 Stir in the 3 tablespoons coconut oil and egg whites, and mix well so that all the ingredients are thoroughly coated in the oil and egg whites. 7 Press mixture into the second prepared baking tin and bake for about 20 minutes until warm to the touch and lightly golden. 8 Allow to cool in the tray for 10 minutes before cutting into desired bar sizes, then cool the bars completely in the tin. Remove and wrap each bar individually with greaseproof paper and store them in an airtight container. NUTRITION Per serving 687kJ/164cal. Protein 3.6g. Total fat 9.7g. Sat fat 4.9g. Carbs 16g. Fibre 2.6g. Sugars 10.3g. Sodium 16mg. Calcium 19mg. Iron 1.0mg.

CHOCOLATE, CHIA & COCONUT POWER BALLS MAKES 12 HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN + REFRIGERATION

60g almonds, with skin on 125g Medjool dates, pitted 3 tablespoons organic raw cacao powder 2 tablespoons organic raw coconut oil, melted 2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus extra, if needed 1 large orange, zest and juice, plus extra, if needed 2 tablespoons chia seeds 30g puffed quinoa 60g moist coconut flakes or shredded coconut 1 Place the almonds in a food processor and process until finely chopped. 2 Add dates, cacao powder, oil, maple syrup, zest and juice. Process until the mixture comes together and you have a paste-like consistency. If the mixture is too thick and not processing smoothly, add a little more orange juice to loosen.

3 Transfer mixture into a bowl. Stir in the chia seeds and puffed quinoa. 4 Mix all ingredients together until well combined, pressing as you mix so that it holds together. Taste for sweetness and add a little more maple syrup, if desired. 5 Wet the palms of your hands with a little cold water and roll the mixture into walnut-sized balls or whatever size you prefer. 6 Refrigerate for at least 3-4 hours before serving. Note: Store balls in the refrigerator in an airtight container for 3-4 weeks. COOK’S TIP I like to wrap these individually in cellophane and keep them in the refrigerator, ready to go. NUTRITION Per serving 662kJ/158cal.

Protein 2.6g. Total fat 10.5g. Sat fat 5.9g. Carbs 12.5g. Fibre 3.5g. Sugars 10.8g. Sodium 9.1mg. Calcium 30mg. Iron 1.0mg.

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RAW ENERGY BARS MAKES 20-24 HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN + REFRIGERATION

150g Medjool dates, pitted 90g unsalted cashews 60ml maple syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste 90g moist coconut flakes 45g quinoa flakes 60g sultanas 60g pepitas 45g sunflower seeds 60ml coconut oil, melted 1 Line the bottom of a 28 x 18cm baking tin with non-stick paper. Make sure the paper comes up over the sides of the tin for easy removal of the bars. 2 Place the dates, cashews, maple syrup and vanilla into a food processor and process until you have a sticky paste with a little texture. 3 Transfer the date mixture to a bowl. Add all the other ingredients and mix well. You will need to use a wooden or metal spoon to mix this properly. 4 Spread the mixture into the prepared tin and use the back of a metal spoon to flatten and even out the mixture. 5 Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. 6 Cut into small bars and keep in the refrigerator in a sealed container. Note: These bars will keep in the refrigerator for 4 weeks or more. COOK’S TIP You will find this to be quite a sticky mixture when preparing it. Don’t worry if it seems like it will never mix together properly – it will, but you may need to use a little more elbow grease. NUTRITION Per serving 656kJ/157cal. Protein 2.8g. Total fat 10.6g. Sat fat 5.7g. Carbs 12.4g. Fibre 2.9g. Sugars 10.3g. Sodium 4.6mg. Calcium 14mg. Iron 1.2mg.

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Energising snacks FOOD

ICE-CREAM BALLS MAKES ABOUT 20 HANDS-ON TIME 30 MIN + FREEZING

I litre good-quality vanilla ice-cream 90g almonds, skinned 45g puffed quinoa 2 tablespoons raw cacao 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste Fresh berries, to serve 1 Line a tray with non-stick baking paper and place into the freezer until it is really cold. If you like, you can place in the freezer days in advance, so it is ready for you when you need it. 2 Remove the ice-cream from the freezer and allow it to melt enough so that you can put a spoon through it easily. 3 Place almonds into a non-stick frying pan and toast until golden. Remove from the pan and cool, then roughly chop and set aside. 4 Place the puffed quinoa into a large nonstick frying pan in a single layer and toast lightly until golden. Keep an eye on the quinoa, as they burn easily. Keep tossing the pan to get an even toast. Set aside. 5 Place the ice-cream into a bowl and mix in the almonds, raw cacao, maple syrup and vanilla. 6 Return to the freezer and refreeze. When ice-cream is frozen again, take out a scoop and roll it in the toasted puffed quinoa. If the ice-cream is too solid, leave it to defrost slightly before rolling in the quinoa. 7 Place the coated ice-cream balls onto the prepared icy-cold tray as you go and freeze until needed. 8 Once completely frozen, cover with plastic wrap or transfer to an airtight plastic container until needed. 9 Serve with fresh berries. COOK’S TIP You can use whatever nuts you like instead of the almonds. Brazil nuts or hazelnuts are a good substitute. NUTRITION Per serving 427kJ/102cal. Protein 2.4g. Total fat 5.9g. Sat fat 2.4g. Carbs 9.8g. Fibre 1.1g. Sugars 7.9g. Sodium 18mg. Calcium 42mg. Iron 0.4mg.

This is an edited extract from Quinoa Flakes, Flour & Seeds by Rena Patten, published by New Holland, rrp $35.

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Profiled Smart ideas for your healthy lifestyle... Energising oil to set skin aglow Environ Intensive Hydrating Oil Capsules contain an effective combination of antioxidants and vitamin A to help energise and revitalise skin via the anti-ageing properties of green tea and lipochromalin (a form of vitamin E). This is the perfect treatment to make skin glow. The capsules are designed for all skin types and are an excellent treatment to protect against dry skin. From selected clinics and salons ($99 for 30 capsules); visit sensaskincare.com.au

Vitamin A breakthrough Medik8’s anti-ageing cream, r-Retinoate, contains both retinol and retinoic acid, which makes it a vitamin A breakthrough. Among other things, vitamin A helps to keep skin smooth and firm. The cream is suitable for sensitive skin and can be applied both day and night ($298 for 50ml). Visit medik8.com.au for stockists.

Gluten-free pick-me-up The newest addition to the Carman family is the Coconut, Yoghurt & Roasted Nut Gourmet Protein bar. It’s a perfect pick-me-up snack for when you’re on the go. The bars are also fibre-rich and gluten-free. From major supermarkets ($5.80 for a pack of 5).

A dip in the Med You can add a sun-soaked Mediterranean flavour to your next barbie or lunch party with Chobani’s Meze Dips. The Greekyoghurt-based, protein-packed dips come in six flavours, including Herbed Tzatziki, Chilli Lime and Three Peppers Salsa. Because each one contains less than 565kJ (135 cals) per 150g tub, they make a flavoursome, healthy snack any time you get the munchies. From supermarkets and delicatessens ($4.50).


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Essential for skin vitality Mother Nature’s laboratory is where In Essence, an Australian aromatherapy pioneer, sources its essential oils. The Skin Therapy Organic Camellia Treatment Oil contains camellia oleifera seed oil – a great antioxidant – and a potent mix of essential fatty acids and vitamins to repair and renew skin. From leading pharmacies, Myer, David Jones and selected beauty salons and spas ($49.95 for 30ml).

Dinner in minutes Woolworths Delicious Nutritious Beef & Tomato Casserole is made from tender beef in a tomato, olive and herb sauce, with sweet potato, chickpeas, harissa-spiced cauliflower and green beans. Packed full of fibre, it’s a quick single-serve meal. In the freezer section at Woolworths supermarkets ($7.99).


Your pets

SHOULD YOUR PUP

go Paleo? What you need to know about this back-to-basics approach to feeding your precious pooch

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES

BY AMBER BRENZA

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Your pets

I

f you’ve overhauled your diet in an effort to eat more like your ancestors, you might think about why you’re still feeding your dog dry food. In the past, canines ate mostly raw meat… should you consider this back-to-the-wild approach for your pampered pet? While there’s no solid scientific answer, there are strong opinions on both sides.

PERKS OF PALEO

Your dog’s sharp teeth and strong jaws are signs of his carnivorous heritage, says Dr Jean Hofve, a holistic vet. She explains that many commercial dog foods contain little or no meat, and are loaded with poor quality by-products and unnecessary carbs that are

can cause weight problems and promote inflammation. “Dry pet food is making many dogs sick and fat, and shortening their life spans,” Hofve warns. In contrast, dogs on the raw-meat-and-vegetable Paleo diet are thriving, she says, noting that digestive distress, allergies and

immune dysfunction often clear up after the switch from dry food. Hofve adds that whole, fresh foods contain important phytonutrients that can slow the aging process and delay onset of joint stiffness, cognitive disorders and even cancer. RISK ASSESSMENT

The Paleo diet may work well for animals in the wild, but domesticated dogs don’t necessarily have the same needs, according to Dr Cailin Heinze, a certified veterinary nutritionist. In fact, she says dogs fed home-prepared meals are more likely to develop nutritional deficiencies than those eating commercial pet food. Another concern is food-borne illness. Meat from the supermarket may contain harmful bacteria, so letting your dog eat it raw is risky, Heinze says. And she’s not convinced of the plan’s slimming effects: “Whether you’re feeding your pet a Paleo diet or not, if he’s eating too much, he’s going to get fat.”

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A carnivore’s dream come true! Most dogs won’t turn down raw meat, but experts disagree on whether it’s the healthiest choice

Switching safely If you decide to put your dog on the Paleo diet, follow these tips to limit risks to their health. Choose quality meat Between 60 and 80 per cent of a Paleo dog’s diet should be meat, preferably organic, grass-fed beef and free-range poultry, which have higher levels of important nutrients. The rest of their diet should come from steamed, non-starchy vegetables, such as broccoli. Take it slowly Start by adding a teaspoon of fresh meat to your dog’s dry food, then gradually increase the amount over a few weeks, as you decrease commercial dog food and introduce vegetables, says Hofve. Rushing the transition could upset your pooch’s stomach. Ask about supplements Dogs on the Paleo diet may become deficient in calcium, some vitamins, trace minerals and omega-3 fatty acids. Ask your vet to recommend a supplement brand and dosage, based on your dog’s size and breed.


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INSPIRING WOMEN

THE VIEW FROM

45 GEZ BEATTY

“I have to exercise every day. I’ve learnt that if I don’t, then I don’t feel good. I wake up with the daylight and I walk to the beach. That’s my meditation. Yoga is also hugely important to me. When I left my husband 15 years ago, I was holding a lot in. I went to yoga and it changed my life. Now, I need to do it so I can run my household, raise two teenage girls, have a full-time job and still remain calm. I came here from the UK as a backpacker when I was 21. I met my ex-husband here and we then lived in Vietnam and Germany, and different parts of Australia. Moving around, friendships come and go. My core mates are the friends I grew up with back in England, and a handful I’ve met here in Australia, who are family to me now. They are really valuable because if you’re down or you’ve got some good news, they’re the ones who are really going to get it. Growing up, I got endometriosis and I’ve had loads of surgery. I put it down to food, so then I really changed what I was eating. Now I cook every day, and I’m very conscious of what I put in my body. I like food that’s fresh and green. I know if I’ve had a big fat bowl of pasta that I’ll feel sluggish the next day. With my life as it is, being a single mum with a full-on job [as a sales, marketing and events manager], I can’t have a day where I feel bad because it would have a knock-on effect. I haven’t had any gynaecological issues since I changed my diet. Maybe food and health have become a bit of an obsession. I am a vegetarian. I try to buy organic, even though it’s really expensive. I have a fruit-and-veg box delivered every week. Eating right and exercising are huge for me, and I believe they help you live a longer life. I don’t have any demons, nothing attacks me any more. If I have a negative thought that comes into my head, I’ve taught myself to let it go. That brings me happiness – to find a place within myself where I am fully content with every situation that comes my way. I didn’t ever feel strong when I was young. Raising the girls alone for 15 years, I’ve had some dark times. My greatest achievement is doing it all on my own. And I’ve found that, actually, I am a strong person.”

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PREVENTIONAUS.COM.AU

AS TOLD TO ANDREA DUVALL

Yoga and a healthy diet have helped this single mum conquer medical issues, cope with a full-on career and embrace life


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