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MARCH 2017

Let’ L e ’s et’ et Go! Go! Go o!

EMILY RATAJKOWSKI

MODEL, ACTRESS, ACTIVIST

THE HOTTEST STYLE & BEAUTY

SHOES YOU YO OU CAN’T C AN’T LOSE LOS LO SE

THE COOLEST T-SHIRT

THE HE BEST OF THE SEASON

BUY INSIDE!

BEING ORIGINAL THE BEST LOOK EVER

FASHION ISSUE


MARCH 2017


3 1 9 N O R T H R O D E O D R I V E B E V E R LY H I L L S


FE N D I B O U T I Q U E S 646 520 2830 FE N D I .CO M


Welcome… ... to the new InStyle. From Emily Ratajkowski’s front-to-back cool and the legendary Christy Turlington in conversation with Valentino creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli to the style secrets of the supermodels—Linda Evangelista, Doutzen Kroes, Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, and more—it’s all here. On the culture front, Tracee Ellis Ross talks to Queen Latifah, and Michelle Dockery plays a modern-day lady in red (a far cry from Downton Abbey). Plus, with shoes you can’t lose and the season’s flirtiest florals, the best fashion is at your fingertips. Finally, we’re excited to welcome stellar writers Lena Dunham, Hari Nef, Rowan Blanchard, Joan Juliet Buck, Caroline de Maigret, and Leandra Medine, who have all penned sharp, honest, and funny essays. Let’s go!


Off-White C/O Virgil Abloh T-shirt, $120. Re/Done Levi’s vintage jeans. Cartier, David Yurman, and Jennifer Fisher earrings. Buccellati, Cartier, David Yurman, Jennifer Fisher, John Hardy, and Tiffany & Co. bracelets. Cartier watches. Tiffany & Co. ring.


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Volume 24 N umber 3 MARCH 20 17

320 LADY IN RED

Michelle Dockery on life after Downton Abbey. Photographed by Phil Poynter. Gabriela Hearst bodysuit and pants. Ana Khouri earring. Charlotte Chesnais ring. Manolo Blahnik sandals.

directory ON THE COVER

74 THE COOLEST T-SHIRT 180 BEING ORIGINAL: THE BEST LOOK EVER 299 EMILY RATAJKOWSKI: MODEL, ACTRESS, ACTIVIST 310, 330, 342 SUPERMODEL MOMENT! 336 SHOES YOU CAN’T LOSE COVER TO COVER THE HOTTEST STYLE & BEAUTY

FEATURES 174 AMERICAN VOICES As the first CoverGirl ambassador to wear a hijab, beauty vlogger Nura Afia urges young women to embrace their differences

176 AMERICA, C’EST CHIC Style star and author Caroline de Maigret on what Parisians can pick up from their stateside sisters

178 FLIPPING THE SWITCH After decades in fashion, Joan Juliet Buck learns how to turn her style game on and off

180 BEING AN ORIGINAL Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine on authenticity, nonconformity, and finding your voice

182 DRESSING THE PART Actress Rowan Blanchard discovers inspiration, comfort, and identity through clothing

184 DATE WITH DIANE Guest columnist Diane von Furstenberg catches up with entrepreneur Miroslava Duma

186 TAKING THE PERFECT SELFIE Ashley Graham’s top tips


DIRECTORY FEATURES (continued) 299 THIS YEAR’S GIRL An off-duty Emily

121

Ratajkowski on owning her sexuality and taking control of her career

310 SUPER STYLE Five supermodels in looks from fashion’s rising stars

318 DRESS TO UNIMPRESS Lena Dunham’s red-carpet rule breakers

328 THE CRYSTAL METHOD Kelly Oxford makes a case for metaphysical energy

330 WHEN CHRISTY MET PIERPAOLO Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccioli and his model muse Christy Turlington Burns reminisce

336 SHOES YOU CAN’T LOSE Spring’s showstopping stilettos and sandals

342 MODEL BEAUTY Fashion icon Linda Evangelista on the cream that changed her life

344 ROSETTA’S THRONE Balthazar and Rosetta Getty’s West Hollywood digs

350 IT’S GOOD TO BE QUEEN Tracee Ellis Ross chats with Queen Latifah

360 STYLE AS SUBSTANCE Hari Nef finds peace in dressing audaciously

Ellie Bamber in Emilia Wickstead and Delfina Delettrez.

THE START 99 Miranda Kerr partners with Mother, Kendall and Kylie Jenner design sunnies, and more news you need to know

330 310

ON DEMAND 113 This season’s must-have accessories, 360 Hari Nef in Gucci.

from tapestry pumps to fun-size bags

THE STYLE 121 ELLIE BAMBER The Nocturnal Animals breakout star masters spring’s dreamy pastels

132 PRINTS CHARMING As DVF’s new chief creative officer, Jonathan Saunders woos loyal fans like Allison Williams

THE LOOK 141 BEST DRESS Emma Stone in Gucci 142 THE LOOK Dot dresses, chic coats 148 THE LOOK OF THE GOLDEN GLOBES 153 SOLID GOLD Inside our Golden Globes after-party

162 HER BEST EVER Gwen Stefani 165 THE GIRL, THE WOMAN, THE LADY Gigi Hadid, Ruth Negga, Tilda Swinton

170 STYLE CRUSH Kenya Kinski-Jones 172 MY DAY Lily Aldridge’s low-key routine

INSTANT STYLE 207 WHAT TO WEAR, WHAT TO BUY Shop the best statement shades, retro-perfect graphic Ts, transitional toppers, and more

221 MY STYLE Vanessa Traina’s picks 225 IT’S SPRING! Our 2017 trend report 250 EXTRA SPECIAL 48

Accessories trend report I nST YLE M A RCH 20 1 7


New York Miami Las Vegas Beverly Hills South Coast Plaza lanvin.com


DIRECTORY BEAUTY 259 FRESH FACE Four ways to spring-clean your beauty regimen

262 THE GIRL WITH THE MAGIC HANDS Skin guru Shani Darden 264 TORY BURCH’S ICONS 266 THE INFLUENCER Chris McMillan

270 THE PICK Pastel nail polish 274 TRANSFORMATION Lady Gaga 281 DOES IT REALLY WORK? Charcoal toothpaste and lip plumpers

284 SO WHAT DO YOU DO? How WelleCo co-founder Elle Macpherson stays fit

288 MY BEAUTY MARK Karen Elson 290 BEAUTY TALK Joan Smalls 292 MATCHMAKER Nude lipstick 295 THE BUZZ Eight fab finds

THE LIFE 363 GARDEN PARTY Six tastemakers unwind by fawning over their flora

ALSO IN THE ISSUE 58 HELLO! 60 FEEDBACK 66 REAL STYLE 74 CONTRIBUTORS 78 THE COVER 84 HER STYLE 138 CAUSE & EFFECT Elizabeth Olsen 372 THE SIGN

354

378 WHY I LOVE Michael Kors

PRETTY IS BACK Isabeli Fontana stuns in moody florals and decadent jewels. Photographed by Hanna Tveite. Salvatore Ferragamo dress. Marni earrings.

189

STYLE IN Actress and guest editor Lily Collins sits down for an “unfiltered” interview and shares a few of her favorite things.

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Christy Turlington Burns and Pierpaolo Piccioli. Valentino gown.

Michelle Dockery. Ganni sweater. Bulgari ring.

Hello!

Welcome to the March fashion issue of InStyle. As you may have noticed, we’re shiny and new. And we made a T-shirt too! In the spirit of my editorial philosophy, “high and tight,” I’m going to keep this short. The new InStyle represents the work of our 53 contributors (pp. 76–77) as well as our incredible staff. Thank you all for showing up. From cover star Emily Ratajkowski and InStyle’s T-shirt designer, Off-White’s Virgil Abloh, to Christy Turlington Burns and Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccioli to Michelle Dockery, Lena Dunham, Hari Nef, and others—I am so lucky to call these brilliant people my friends. To the InStyle team—one of whom, our deputy creative director, Brian Anstey, flew to our Wisconsin printer to make sure the hot pink on the cover was just right—thank you for coming on this ride with me. What you have produced in such a short time is really incredible. And, to you, dear reader, we wouldn’t even be here without you. I hope that being in style is more exciting, fun, and fashionable than ever.

Emily Ratajkowski with editor in chief Laura Brown. Cotton T-shirts, Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh, $120 each; off---white.com.

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Let’s go! FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @instyle and follow me @laurabrown99 FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @instylemagazine and follow me @laurabrown99


SEPHORA

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I was drawn to the simplicity of the January issue of InStyle. And I must tell you how much I enjoyed reading the articles, including the very well-written Sarah Jessica Parker feature [“SJP”]. —GLORIA EVERETT, San Marcos, Calif.

DOUBLE TAKE // Haircolour on @powerofprive by @luiscolourist Haircolour on @sarahjessicaparker by... I’m not sure, but if you know, let me know! —@LUISCOLOURIST

THE ESTEEMED PATTY GREENE

SJP has always been fierce to me. I was a Square Pegs fan. Oops I’m showing my age. —@SHERRI1022, via Twitter

I’m outta Here #travelblogger #vacationmode #fashionista #styleglamchic #bloggerlifestyle #instagood #bloggerlife

Sarah Jessica Parker in a Carolina Herrera dress, Harry Winston earrings and bracelet, and SJP by Sarah Jessica Parker pumps.

—@STYLEGLAMCHIC

IN GOOD SHAPE

I love how InStyle celebrates different body types by including Ashley Graham’s page, but I would like to see a wider variety of sizes— like tall, short, a big belly, wide hips, thick arms—throughout the entire issue. Including more models and style icons with diverse figures would allow readers to celebrate their bodies and show that we can all be in style, no matter what our shape!

How to channel your inner Carrie Bradshaw: find a yellow taxi, a pink tutu, and the January issue of InStyle #SJP —@INGRIDFRAHM

—LIA BARNETT, Detroit

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For customer service and subscriptions, go to instyle.com/customerservice or call 800-274-6200


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FEEDBACK CONSERVATIVELY HOPEFUL #InStyle spotted in a 2001 episode of #SATC! Be jealous of that cover star no more, Carrie. #SJP stuns! —@INSTYLE ARTPHOTO

Follow us for InStyle extras! NEW LOOK, WHO THIS

As far as covers go, this is gorgeous! @InStyle @SJP #magazines #printisnotdead —@TEENSIE83, via Twitter

I have been a loyal subscriber to InStyle for more than 15 years. I have always loved the magazine for the style advice (no matter the budget), beauty products, and the celebrity slant. However, I’ve noticed a real political angle over the last few years and have become increasingly dismayed that liberal politics has invaded the world of fashion and beauty magazines. Your editor’s letter in the January issue encouraged me. There was only optimism and no mention of names. Many conservatives read and love your magazine. I will be watching closely to see how the magazine progresses this year under your watch. —SALLIE COONAN, Maitland, Fla.

F*** resolutions. Here’s to being HAPPY. Here’s to filling your year with people you love, experiences that help you grow and moments that make your heart smile.

Road trips call for fashion updates! Still can’t believe what I’m seeing here.... bringing my childhood days back!!! But hey, I am not complaining!!! —@SARAH TAGLIOSWEAT

—@KIKIKHOSLA

UNPARALLELED SJP

One of my biggest #icons. Love, love, love @SJP. Such a beauty inside and out. @InStyle #JanuaryIssue #fashion #style —@HANNAHHSMITHH__, via Twitter

About to put in some work this morning with my @karencivil pencil set. (About two have disappeared since purchasing, friends I’m looking at you.) —@AJSTYLEHOUSE

DIVERSE PROFILE

Catching up with my November issue, I was delighted to see that InStyle chose a person of color for “Pearl Crush.” It’s so important to reinforce this inclusivity. As a magazine, you are doing something valuable and important when you prominently feature people of color, and your readership notices. Thank you, and please keep it up. —CHARLIE LOVELACE

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GET IN TOUCH Via email Send a message to letters@instylemag.com. (All correspondence may be published and edited for clarity or length.) Via Twitter Tweet us @InStyle to share your thoughts. Via Instagram Tag us using the hashtag #InStyleMagazine with your favorite moments.

The one and only @billyeichner absolutely killing it in the January issue of @InStyle #ForADollar —@DANA_CHINNICI

Billy Eichner in a Dior Homme suit, shirt, and tie.


real style INSTYLE READERS TEST-DRIVE THE TRENDS FROM OUR PAGES

K KRISTIE LANDING, L Charleston, S.C.

@kristiesreverie

IN INSPIRED D BY Rethink Your … Shearling Coat (December 2016) HOW MADE IT HER OWN y over a sleek top and pumps, H W SHE E MA WN Layered L Landing’s ’ soft s shearling was ready to go from day to nigh ht with ease.

KARLIE KLOSS in a Stella McCartney blouse and Re/Done jeans MARINA SUMM UMM U MMERS MME RS S, M Morg organv anvill ille, e, N.J N . N.J. @everyda ay_s y_styl tyle_o e_of_i ff_ig g INSPIRED B BY “C “Cat’ at’ss Meow Meow”” (Jan (JJanuar uary y 2017 2017)) HER R OWN OWN Le Left HOW SHE MADE IT HE eftt untucked, Su umme mmers’ rs’ss p poli olishe shed dp puss ussy-b y y-bow ow top had a more ore o re weekend weeken wee kend-c d-chic chic hic feel. feel.

LINDSEY SIMON, Las Vegas @thenomisniche PRISCILLA AKOGYERAM, Columbia, Md.

@prissysavvy

INSPIRED BY The Chart (October 2016) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN A sheer top, sky-high stilettos, and bold red lips gave Akogyeram’s tartan trousers feminine flair.

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016) 01 6)) INSPIRED BY The Find (September 20 HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN Simon’s dark lip added more edge to herr neutral military-inspired look.


REAL STYLE

MONICA WARREN, Columbus, Ohio

@mreneedesign

INSPIRED BY The Guide: Leather Jackets (September 2016) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN Opalescent slacks and heels toned down the toughness of Warren’s classic leather jjacket.

MEGHAN WEBSTER & CATHERINE GREEN, Chicago and Washington, D.C. INSPIRED BY Her Style (December 2016) HOW THEY MADE IT THEIR OWN “Every Christmas, my sister and I exchange the same piece of jewelry to make us feel just a bit closer, despite our distance apart,” Webster says. “We loved Reese Witherspoon’s Tiffany T square bracelet, but it wasn’t quite in our budget this year. However, we managed to track down the steal version of this splurge [Need Supply Co.’s Marcel bracelet].”

MILICA MOM MCILOVIC, V , Chic c cago @madeofstarlightofficial g ffi INSPIRED BY Y Spring p g Style e Forecast (January 2017)) HOW SHE M MADE IT HER OW WN Designer accessories luxed up p Momcilovic’s casual T.

JENNIFER LANE, Chicago

@publicistinpearls

INSPIRED BY “Why You Should Wear Florals in the Fall and Winter” (InStyle.com) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN Black knee-high boots helped Lane make this springy ensemble cold-weather-friendly.

SHOW US YOUR STYLE E If o one e of ou ourr stories has inspired you to o tr try y a ne new w fashion, beauty, or home idea, we wa want nt to know. Send a pic (300 dpii or ger)) of yo or larg larger) your ur transformation to letters@ @inst @i nstyle ylemag mag.co .com, m, or tag us on Twitter or Insstag h tagram ram wi with th the hashtag #InspiredByInS e nStyle nSt yle

M A RCH 20 1 7 I nST YL E

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CONTRIBUTORS

Virgil Abloh Abloh at Off-White’s spring lookbook shoot in Paris.

T-shirts have always intrigued me. I wanted to design one that is coveted— and in style.”

THE MAN BEHIND OUR COVER T-SHIRT

I

t takes a special person to bring streetwear to Paris Fashion Week, but it certainly doesn’t hurt if Frank Ocean, Kanye West, and three Kardashians are seated front row. Such is the story of Virgil Abloh, the 36-yearold founder of Milan-based fashion label Off-White, who counts the aforementioned stars as close friends and fans. The designer’s buzzy spring runway show, held at the prestigious Paris Descartes University, focused on the (very) modern businesswoman, with suits cut in mismatched proportions and paired with T-shirts, track pants, and glittery boots for a casual riff on officewear. “The women in my life are super-empowered,” says Abloh, who also moonlights as one of West’s creative directors and DJs under the moniker Flat White. “They make their own decisions, pay their own rent, and control their own life.” Nobody embodies this independence better than actress and model Emily Ratajkowski, who dons one of Abloh’s high-grade cotton Ts—designed exclusively for InStyle and emblazoned with the name in ’80s-style typep face—for this month’s cover. “I approach T-shirts like couture items,” Ablo T oh says. “For my ggeneration they’re y jjust as imp portant as a ress. —CLAIRE CLAIRE STERN N rred-carpet p dress.” ress

WHO W O O’S THAT LADY? j Emily y Ratajkowski in Abloh’s T.. Cotton T-shirt, Off-White c/o Cott ton T-shirt gil Abloh, $120; off---white.com. Virgi

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Thank You VIRGIL ABLOH DESIGNER “Virgil Abloh,” p. 74

NURA AFIA BEAUTY VLOGGER American Voices, p. 174

CHRISTOPHER BAGLEY WRITER “This Year’s Girl,” p. 299

ELLIE BAMBER ACTRESS The Style, p. 121

ROWAN BLANCHARD ACTRESS “Dressing the Part,” p. 182

JONAS BRESNAN PHOTOGRAPHER “Super Style,” p. 310

JOAN JULIET BUCK WRITER AND ACTRESS “Flipping the Switch,” p. 178

TORY BURCH DESIGNER “Tory Burch’s Icons,” p. 264

SUE CHOI STYLIST “Rosetta’s Throne,” p. 344

TODD COLE PHOTOGRAPHER Style In, p. 189

LILY COLLINS ACTRESS Style In, p. 189

SHANI DARDEN AESTHETICIAN “The Girl with the Magic Hands,” p. 262

CAROLINE DE MAIGRET MODEL AND WRITER “America, C’est Chic,” p. 176

MICHELLE DOCKERY ACTRESS “Lady in Red,” p. 320

PATI DUBROFF MAKEUP ARTIST Style In, p. 189

LENA DUNHAM ACTRESS AND WRITER “Dress to Unimpress,” p. 318

LINDA EVANGELISTA MODEL “Model Beauty,” p. 342

FABRIZIO FERRI PHOTOGRAPHER “When Christy Met Pierpaolo,” p. 330

ISABELLI FONTANA MODEL “Pretty Is Back,” p. 354

RALPH GIBSON PHOTOGRAPHER “Shoes You Can’t Lose,” p. 336

ASHLEY GRAHAM MODEL “Taking the Perfect Selfie,” p. 186

KERRY HALLIHAN PHOTOGRAPHER “Prints Charming,” p. 132

ANGELICA HICKS ILLUSTRATOR The Sign, p. 372

HARRY JOSH HAIRSTYLIST “This Year’s Girl,” p. 299

LIYA KEBEDE MODEL “Super Style,” p. 310


… to everyone who showed up for the new InStyle. A tribute in selfies

KENYA KINSKI-JONES MODEL Style Crush, p. 170

KARLIE KLOSS MODEL “Super Style,” p. 310

DOUTZEN KROES MODEL “Super Style,” p. 310

ELLE MACPHERSON MODEL So What Do You Do, p. 284

PAUL MEANY DESIGN DIRECTOR

LEANDRA MEDINE WRITER “Being an Original,” p. 180

CHRIS MCMILLAN HAIRSTYLIST The Influencer, p. 266

PATRICK MOFFITT EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

HARI NEF ACTRESS AND MODEL “Style As Substance,” p. 360

KELLY OXFORD WRITER “The Crystal Method,” p. 328

PIERPAOLO PICCIOLI DESIGNER “When Christy Met Pierpaolo,” p. 330

QUEEN LATIFAH ACTRESS AND SINGER “It’s Good to Be Queen,” p. 350

EMILY RATAJKOWSKI ACTRESS AND MODEL “This Year’s Girl,” p. 299

TRACEE ELLIS ROSS ACTRESS “It’s Good to Be Queen,” p. 350

JASON SCHMIDT PHOTOGRAPHER “It’s Good to Be Queen,” p. 350 and “Style As Substance,” p. 360

SABINA SCHREDER STYLIST Style In, p. 189

DAVID SCHULZE PHOTOGRAPHER “Model Beauty,” p. 342

IRINA SHAYK MODEL “Super Style,” p. 310

JOAN SMALLS MODEL Beauty Talk, p. 290

LEÏLA SMARA STYLIST “Super Style,” p. 310

CARTER SMITH PHOTOGRAPHER “This Year’s Girl,” p. 299

LARA STONE MODEL “Super Style,” p. 310

VANESSA TRAINA DESIGNER AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR My Style, p. 221

CHRISTY TURLINGTON MODEL “When Christy Met Pierpaolo,” p. 330

HANNA TVEITE PHOTOGRAPHER “Pretty Is Back,” p. 354

HUNG VANNGO MAKEUP ARTIST “This Year’s Girl,” p. 299

KARLA WELCH STYLIST “This Year’s Girl,” p. 299

ALLISON WILLIAMS ACTRESS “Prints Charming,” p. 132


SUBTLE SHIMMER Marc Jacobs Beauty Twinkle Pop Stick Eyeshadow in Three Shakes, $28; sephora.com.

SWEET T Embellished cotton jersey T-shirt, Dolce & Gabbana, $4,645; at Dolce & Gabbana, 877-703-4872.

FANCY FOOTWEAR Satin slides with crystal buckles, Roger Vivier, $1,250; rogervivier.com.

Ratajkowski on set with photographer Carter Smith

RETRO WRAP Cotton bandana, $2; at Michaels stores.

the cover

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STELLA MCCARTNEY

The morning of our ’80s-inspired shoot, Emily y Ratajkowski arrived on set n s looking casual-co ooll in c comffy sweats and black CLASSIC CUFF Metal, resin, strass, Converse Conver sneakers. But when n and polyester bracelet, Chanel, shooting started, the model$1,525; at Chanel, 800-550-0005. actress was in full-on work mode. Sporting untamed waves created by hairstylist Harry Josh, Ratajkow fl d wski flipped through vintage photos of Madonna to o channell her inner Material Girl. Then she hit the streets (and rooftops) of Los Angeles, posing in a mix of pieces that ranged from couture gowns to printed pantsuits, all paired with bold bandanas and stacked bracelets. An ultimate ’80s soundtrack further set the mood, with “Buffalo Stance,” by Neneh Cherry, on repeat.

ROBERTO CAVALLI

BEHIND ND THE E SCENES SC SCE WITH OUR MARCH RCH CO COVER STAR, A EM MILY RATAJKOWSKII

EYE CANDY

Brass earrings, DSquared2, $545; dsquared2.com.

COVER CREDITS T-shirt Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh Jeans Re/Done x Levi’s Earrings Cartier, David Yurman, and Jennifer Fisher Bracelets Buccellati, Cartier, David Yurman, Jennifer Fisher, John Hardy, and Tiffany &Co. Rings Cartier, John Hardy, and Tiffany &Co. Minidress Marc Jacobs Earrings DSquared2 Bandana, worn as headband, stylist’s own Photographed for InStyle by Carter Smith. Styled by Karla Welch. Hair Harry Josh. Makeup Hung Vanngo. Manicure Marisa Carmichael.

See behind-the-scenes video from our cover shoot at instyle.com/ratajkowski


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her style

OUR MARCH COVER STAR, EMILY RATAJKOWSKI, PL AYS FAVORITES

LUXE LINGERIE Nylon-elastane underwire bra, La Perla, $210; laperla.com.

HAIR-CARE HERO Bumble and Bumble Prêt-à-Powder, $27; bumbleandbumble.com.

4 4. MUST-HAVE JEWELRY 18kt gold and sterling silver Nexus ring with pavé diamonds, Spinelli Kilcollin, $8,000; spinellikilcollin.com.

1 5

5. RESTAURANT OBSESSION Bestia in L.A. (2121 E. 7th Place; bestiala.com). 6. TOP TRAVEL SPOT Tokyo.

Dior dress, panty, choker, and fine jewelry rings. Adidas bra. Helen Kaminski hat. Roxanne Assoulin earrings, choker, and bracelets. Cartier bracelets. Van Cleef & Arpels bracelet and watch. AS29 rings.

GO-TO SNACK Hand rolls from KazuNori in downtown L.A. (421 S. Main St.; kazunorisushi.com).

2

SKIN-CARE SECRET Sisley-Paris Black Rose Precious Face Oil, $235; sisley-paris.com. 6

1. BEST BAG Canvas, leather, and wool shoulder bag with embroidery, Gucci, $850; gucci.com. 2. STANDOUT SHOE Two-toned calfskin slingbacks, Chanel, $800; at Chanel boutiques. 3. EYE ENHANCER Charlotte Tilbury Luxury Palette in The Dolce Vita, $52; charlottetilbury.com. 3

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SIGNATURE SHADES Metal sunglasses with clip, Garrett Leight California Optical, $460; garrettleight.com.


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CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Alan Murray

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Laura Brown

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Rina Stone EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITORS Patrick

Moffitt, Lavinel Savu

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I LIKE TO LOOK GOOD FOR YOU, BUT I LOVE TO LOOK GOOD FOR ME.


the start THE NEWS IN STYLE

Cotton ssh hir irt rrtt ($325) and an nd denim je ea eans an nss ($225), Miira iran nda n da d a + Mothe err; er; r; motherde enim enim en .com.

We heart her: Kerr sent us a selfie wearing the goods (cotton sweatshirt, Miranda + Mother, $138; mother denim.com),

COLLABORATION ALERT

MIRANDA KERR X MOTHER

Denim skirt, Miranda + Mother, $198; motherdenim .com.

The model–turned–wellness guru is bringing her brand off blissed-out cool to the Cali denim company for a new collection. Among the 12 free-spirited pieces: tops and Ts d boasting butterflies and mantras, and ’70s-style minis and e skinnies with the perfect well-worn wash. A portion of the n proceeds will go to Australia’s Royal Hospital for Women Foundation (where Kerr serves as an ambassador), so, yess, you really could use another pair of jeans.

Cot ttRitin n velilic c iae vo iae ia voll up upta p pt testr te tes tru rumq r mq quodi q dii dunda dun d dolum do olum ol o um sumqui qu a an niiss ssii ullabo To musti m mu ustti ul ull ullab ab bo. T bo o c comni ni ve vel v ele ecu ec e cu c ulp ulp pa p a au aut utt lla ac cea ce ea ea

C Cotton T-shirts,, M Miranda +M Mother, $105 each; mother $ er de im.com co . 99 denim. den com. 99


THE START

Fro m cro san top an ss-b dals : Le a d le o mo a dy ($49 ther t us del, her bag ( 5), .sa $4 san $6 nd 70 da 45 ro- ), S ls ) pa an (on , ris dr .co o; m.

Leather drawstring bag, Sandro, $325; us.sandro-paris.com.

CURRENTLY SHOPPING

Sandro Accessories

SPRING FLING Prabal Gurung partners with plus-size retailer Lane Bryant on a range of colorand print-packed pieces that are easy to wear—and easy on the wallet. Rayon-polyester T-shirt ($38), leather jacket ($398), and polyester skirt ($108), Prabal Gurung for Lane Bryant; lanebryant.com. All available in sizes 10–28.

Mastering the art of French girl style may prove to be elusive, but that won’t stop us from trying. Sandro, the Paris-based purveyor of nonchalant chic, is certainly helping the cause with its newly expanded line of extras. The punchy little bags and skin-baring sandals are just the thing for spring nights.

Visual History Make room on your coffee table for Blumarine: Anna Molinari, a gorgeous book that tells the story of the celebrated Italian designer and her (now-40-year-old) house. Blumarine: Anna Molinari, edited by Maria Luisa Frisa with text by Elena Loewenthal, Rizzoli, $75; amazon.com.

HAUTE COUTURE 101

POLO A-GO-GO

Get schooled in the Paris aesthetic at the Museum at FIT’s new exhibition, which showcases rare vintage work by labels such as Courrèges, Pierre Cardin, and Yves Saint Laurent.

The preppy staple gets a streetwear update, thanks to Alexander Wang’s collaboration with Adidas. To achieve peak ’90s nonchalance, just add vintage Levi’s.

“Paris Refashioned, 1957–1968” runs through April 15; fitnyc.edu.

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Yves Saint Laurent

Balenciaga

Chloé

Velour polos, Adidas Originals by Alexander Wang, $130 each; available in March at adidas.com/ originals or alexander wang.com.


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TH HE E START

B n London Bronte in Pietro Nolita in New York

ROSE ROOMS

The Next xt Step tep Louis Vuitton shoe director Fabrizio Viti makes his solo début with fabulous ladylike heels and flats. Metallic leather pumps, Fabrizio Viti, $980; barneys.com.

Le Sel in Nashville

Restaurateurs around the world have been collectively thinking pink lately, splashing interiors with shades of bubble gum and cotton candy. Sweet enough to eat, indeed.

STICK IT Who says stickers are just for kids? This playful collection of 100 badges celebrates the small victories of adult life, like paying bills on time. I Adulted, by Robb Pearlman, Universe, $12; amazon.com.

Sister Shade If there’s one product extension that makes complete sense for Kendall and Kylie Jenner, it’s sunglasses (all those prying eyes and camera flashbulbs, you know). The duo is adding a range of edgy yet glamorous styles, including rose-gold aviators and marbleized cat eyes, to their burgeoning merch empire. The best part? The frames look hot in selfies.

From left: Kendall wears the Lexi ($145), and Kylie wears the Priscilla ($190), Kendall + Kylie Eyewear; nordstrom.com.

THEY WORE WHAT? Eighty-one notables—from Saturday Night Live alum Molly Shannon to designer Rachel Antonoff—reveal their biggest style missteps (rabbit-ear baseball caps, fringed buckskin pants) in this laugh-out-loud homage to fashion don’ts. I Actually Wore This, by Tom Coleman, Rizzoli, $35; amazon.com.

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THE START

Cleo Wade Veronika Heilbrunner

Sarah Sophie Flicker

Role Models

To showcase her spring collection, designer Mara Hoffman teamed with Art Not War on a series of portraits featuring activists, artists, and generallyy badass women. The resulting images, shot by Amb berr Mahoney in natural light, meld personal style with th political statement to thoughtful effect.

Viscose georgette dress ($239; revolve .com), merino wool– blend pullover ($185; needsupply.com), Lyocell T-shirt ($97; shopbop.com), and viscose crêpe pants ($152; shopbop .com), Ganni.

BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE Whitney Pozgay, the indie m mastermind behind g girlish llabel Whit, lends her k knack for prints to a ne ew furniture line for Anthropologie. Mix and A d match the graphic m goods to create an g artfully disheveled a mise-en-scène, or use m e ju ust one to liven up an oth herwise sedate space.. Chair ($1,398), sofa ($2,698), and C p pouf ($16 $ 68), Whit for Anthropologiie;; anthropo h ologie.com.

CLOSET CLASSIC

Ganni

The Copenhagen-based brand is a fashion-editor favorite for good reason: It trades in the type of need-now pieces that totally make an outfit. Think swishy printed PJs, cheeky Ts, and romantic maxidresses that look equally fetching with Converse or stilettos.

STATE OF THE ART On March 17, the Whitney’s 78th biennial exhibition will be held for the first time at the museum’s new downtown Manhattan digs. Expect to see 63 emerging and established talents, including Susan Cianciolo and Jo Baer, making waves on the contemporary art scene. The 2017 Whitney Biennial runs through June 11; whitney.org. 104

I nST YLE M A RCH 20 1 7


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THE START

MANOLO A-TO-Z

Peek into the legendary shoemaker’s creative process with hiss greatest inspirations, presented alphabetically. Then check out the accompanying exhibition nexxt month at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. Manolo Blahnik: The Art of Shoes, by Cristina Carrillo de Albornoz Fisac, Skira Rizzoli, $45; amazon.com.

LAUNCH WE LOVE

Sara Battaglia The street-style set has known for years that the Italian designer’s design des igner er s colorful colorfu colo rful,l, tex textur tured ed db bagss make bag make fo forr grea greatt pict picture ures, s,, a he and herr first first re ready ady-to -to-we -wear ar col collec lectio tion n is is no no diffe differen rent. t. The e volumi vol luminou nouss silh silhoue lhouette ttess are are eve even n more more dr drama d amatic tic co court urtesy esy y o ruffl of ruffles, es, la lace, ce, an and d a ri riot ot of rai rainbo nbow w stri stripes pes..

BRANDON MAXWELL’S MOMENT After a mere three seasons in the game, the New York wunderkind (and Lady Gaga collaborator) is dominating the red carpet with his sexy, sculptural creations. Naomi Campbell at the MTV Video Music Awards, Lady Gaga at the American Music Awards, and Nicole Kidman at the Critics’ Choice Awards.

THESE SHOES WERE MADE FOR SKIPPING Hooray! One of our favorite stationery lines is now wearable. Pick from three spring-ready floral motifs by Rifle Paper Co.—whose whimsical, Wes Andersonesque designs never disappoint—splashed on different styles of Keds (we’re partial to the slip-ons). Canvas slip-ons, Keds, $60; keds.com. 106

I nST YLE M A RCH 20 1 7


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THE RIGHT STRIPE

Canvas and leather handbag, Fendi, $1,900; fendi.com.

YOU KNOW YOU WANT IT

photographed by JEFFREY WESTBROOK

113


ON DEMAND

DREAM WEAVERS Acetate and metal sunglasses, Bulgari, $320; at Bulgari. Tapestry and lizard pumps, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello, $995; ysl.com. Suede and calfskin tapestry bag, Loewe, $2,190; loewe.com.

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FUN-SIZE

Calfskin bag, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci, $450; at Givenchy, 212-650-0180. Calfskin bag with white gold chain, Hermès, $18,000; at Hermès. Metal lipstick case with chain, Valentino Garavani, $1,045; at Valentino.


ON DEMAND

INTO THE WOODS

Wood and brass bangle, Ralph Lauren Collection, $295; ralphlauren.com. Suede and wood platform mules, Gianvito Rossi, $695; at Barneys New York. Calf-leather and wood clutch, Michael Kors Collection, $990; at select Michael Kors stores.

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© 2017 Vera Bradley Designs, Inc.


G I RL O F TH E M O M ENT. TH E LOO KS FO R N OW

ELLIE BAMBER IN THIS SEASON’S DREAMIEST LOOKS, THE BREAKOUT STAR IS A BREATH OF FRESH AIR photographed by

HANNA TVEITE

Embroidered jersey gazar coat with feathers (price upon request) and rubber belt ($245), Prada; at select Prada boutiques. Alligator mules, Brock Collection x George Esquivel, price upon request; esquivelshoes.com. Fashion editor: Ali Pew.

M A RCH 20 1 7 I nST YL E

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THE STYLE

Above: Floral-embroidered jumpsuit, Chloé, price upon request; at Chloé. Calfleather handbag, Dolce & Gabbana, $2,645; at select Dolce & Gabbana boutiques. Diamond and 18kt gold ring, Delfina Delettrez, $2,295; delfinadelettrez.com. Right: Silk bra top ($250) and skirt ($1,895), Tory Burch; at Tory Burch, 212-510-8371. Diamond and 18kt gold earring ($680; hiro-taka .com) and Akoya pearl, freshwater pearl, and 10kt gold ear cuff ($285; at Barneys New York), Hirotaka. Diamond, agate, and 18kt gold ring, Delfina Delettrez, $2,295; delfina delettrez.com. Charlotte Olympia x Emilia Wickstead leather flats.

E 122

I nST YLE M A RCH 20 1 7

nglish actress Ellie Bamber insists she’s not the settling-down type, at least not when it comes to her wardrobe. “I don’t think I’ll ever stick to one specific look,” she says. “I’m very instinctual about my choices. Some days I want to look pretty and classic; others, I’d rather have a grungy street vibe.” For today’s interview, she’s dressed in a silver bomber and lug-soled combat boots, both by Chanel, an ensemble that reflects her relaxed approach to fashion. Her pants? Jeans—always jeans. “I have so many different styles. My favorites are from Amo, Levi’s, and Frame.” You could even say that denim helped her land her role in Tom Ford’s sophomore film, the neo-noir thriller Nocturnal Animals. “I was, of course, panicking over what to wear,” she says of meeting the famously detail-oriented designer for the first time. “But I knew Tom’s taste is simple and timeless, so I went with Paige flares, clogs I got in Spain, and a big white shirt tied at the hem. When I was leaving the audition, he said, ‘I can tell you have a good sense of style.’ ” He’s not the only one who has noticed. Karl Lagerfeld tapped Bamber as Chanel ambassador last year, and the brand has been her red carpet go-to ever since. “They put me in an amazing jazzy red dress and big hoop earrings for the Cannes Film Festival,” she says. “That was a moment.” One, undoubtedly, of many more to come. —ALISON SYRETT


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THE STYLE

Silk-cotton dress ($3,700) and silk bra (price upon request), Fendi; at Fendi, 212-897-2244. 18kt gold rings with freshwater pearl ($1,552) or diamond ($2,295), DelďŹ na Delettrez; delďŹ nadelettrez.com.


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THE STYLE Below: Georgette crêpe dress ($1,750, worn as top), cotton organza and silk skirt (price upon request), and metal and strass belt ($1,300), Chanel; at select Chanel boutiques. Diamond and 18kt gold earrings, Ana Khouri, price upon request; at Barneys New York. Diamond and 18kt gold rings, Delfina Delettrez, $2,295 each; delfina delettrez.com. Raffia, calf-leather, and wood mules, Mari Giudicelli, $446; modaoperandi.com. Right: Silk organza dress (price upon request; altuzarra.com) and napa leather heels ($795; barneys.com), Altuzarra. Hair: Dennis Devoy for Art Department. Makeup: Linda Gradin for L’Atelier NYC. Manicure: Yuko Wada for Atelier Management. Set design: Cooper Vasquez for The Magnet Agency.

I’m eclectic and free with my style. I wear whatever feels good.” 126

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kensie.com


Prints Charming When Diane von Furstenberg sought a designer to entrust with the future of her empire of wrap dresses, she found a soul mate in the Scottish talent JONATHAN SAUNDERS. Now her legions of fans, ALLISON WILLIAMS included, are being seduced once again by ERIC WILSON photographed by KERRY HALLIHAN

Girls star Allison Williams, wearing a silk dress and gold-plated earrings by Diane von Furstenberg, and Jonathan Saunders, the new chief creative oďŹƒcer of the house. Fashion editor: Ali Pew.

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FASHION STATEMENT


FASHION STATEMENT ders has brought to her business, which has experienced numerous revivals in its 45plus years but none as significant as this: In naming Saunders as chief creative officer, she has stepped back from the runway spotlight for the first time to instead focus on her philanthropic passions. And then there is what has happened to Saunders himself, who little more than a year ago had all but given up on fashion after resigning from his signature label in London. “I wanted to change my pace of life and do something different,” says Saunders, a confident 38-year-old who in fact had made plans to design a furniture collection when von Furstenberg came calling. He was hesitant to follow in the footsteps of such an iconic living designer. And yet the scale of the job—and the resonance of the von Furstenberg name in popular culture as well as in fashion—made it impossible for him to resist. “I saw an opportunity to tell a story with clothes but also to have more meaning,” he says. In his office at DVF’s modern glass headquarters in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, Saunders sits at a whimsical, rounded metal desk with colorful circular seats that swivel out like a vintage amusement park Diane von ride. It was designed by Ringo Starr and Robin Furstenberg Cruikshank in 1970. “I wanted people to relax cotton-spandex trenchcoat, silk and feel they could have a game of musical one-shoulder blouse, chairs after a meeting,” he says. On the wall is linen-viscose pants with a delightfully cartoonish painting by Greek ribbon belt, artist Thanasis Lalas. Behind him is an and specchio leather heels. Ettore Sottsass penis-shaped Shiva vase. Studs, worn throughout, Von Furstenberg says her decision to hire her own. Saunders was somewhat spontaneous but also based on a long admiration for his work, which, like hers, is known for a warm embrace of prints. His love of color theory—how certain tones and hen Jonathan Saunders packed combinations make you feel—stems from his early fixation on up his belongings last May to the Bauhaus period during his studies in product design and move from London, his home for textiles at the Glasgow School of Art. Then he switched to the past 16 years, to New York City, fashion at Central Saint Martins in London, where instructor where he would become Diane von Louise Wilson set him on a course of creating graphic womFurstenberg’s designated design enswear that delighted with the juxtaposition of luxurious successor, his biggest concern was for colors with sometimes purposely tacky ones. He also has a his dog, an ailing 14-year-old Stafforddoctorate of the arts from Glasgow University. shire bull terrier named Amber. “His incredible sense of color and prints is unique and so “She made it over the ocean, just,” perfect to refresh the heritage of the brand,” von FurstenSaunders says, six months after settling into a charming berg says. While her presence is less felt around the studio town house in the West Village along with his partner, these days (she has been remarkably hands-off in the transiJustin Padgett, a fashion publicist. “But she now has a kind tion), Saunders has been careful to establish his control with of strange second wind and this sprightly step. She’s socialrespect but not idolization. One of his first moves was to upizing. She’s been feeling a new lease on life.” date the label in block letters with white space that literally Amber, it turns out, is not alone in this regard. First, there separates “Diane” from “von Furstenberg.” But he has also is von Furstenberg and the bright new direction that Saun-

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TM


FASHION STATEMENT “It just makes the experience of wearing the clothes so much more fun,” says Williams. “The personality type that is attracted to becoming a designer fascinates me—part business and part creative. I’m so impressed they are able to innovate so quickly.” And once she met Saunders, she was naturally charmed by him. “I think I mostly expressed jealousy for his accent,” Williams recalls. “She asks a lot of questions, which I always think is a good sign,” says Saunders. “I instantly understood why she was a great person to know and to represent the brand, because of her character, down to where it’s about a talented, smart, emotional, warm, cool girl.” Saunders’s spring collection was a critical hit and also a departure from the wanderlusty glamour of von Furstenberg’s recent work. His —JONATHAN SAUNDERS more casual sportswear focus included easy knits, fluid wide-legged trousers, and silk kimono-like dresses in exotic floral prints that slyly hint at her signature wraps. He was inspired by artists like Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, and Bridget Riley, “people who used color in quite a provocative way,” he says. And “provocative” is a word he uses to describe the work of von Furstenberg, who famously designed garments that were sensual both in the way they were meant to be worn and unworn. Saunders arrives in New York at an interesting moment, as other major brands, like Calvin Klein and Oscar de la Renta, are preparing reinventions that will undoubtedly shift the perception of American fashion even farther from its pragmatic sportswear roots toward something Saunders believes should be seen as purely about individualism. Still, the transition has not been entirely seamless, professionally with the unexpected resignation of DVF’s chief executive, Paolo Riva, in November, and personally with the sudden death of the designer Richard Nicoll, a close friend and classmate from Central Saint Martins, in October. Saunders now wears a necklace that belonged to Nicoll as a sort of talisman, but, like Amber, he finds that life in New York has given him reason to look up. Ironically, he is now living in a home so Diane von Furstenberg irregularly shaped, with triangular floors and sequined nylon-spandex walls of windows, that it’s nearly impossible to dress. Ring, place any of his own furniture designs. Not her own. Hair: Ben Skervin that it bothers him all that much. for Streeters. “I seem to remember people shouting at me Makeup: Justine Purdue for Tim all the time when I used to come to New York Howard Management. Manicure: and that it was a very aggressive place,” he Yukie Miyakawa for says. “All of a sudden, it’s the opposite.” As for Kate Ryan Inc. Prop styling: Cooper Amber, “she has gotten a whole new range of Vasquez for The Magnet Agency. friends,” he says. “She’s officially an overopinionated, strong-minded New Yorker.” Q

taken time to seduce her customers and to understand their emotional attachment to what she represents. “I see a synergy with the people who have always believed in Diane and loved the clothes here,” he says. “They’re strong women. They are in touch with their emotions. They are funny. They are serious. And they are warm.” When he presented his spring collection, one of the first of those women he encountered was Allison Williams. She and von Furstenberg have been close since meeting at a party eight years ago for President Obama’s first inauguration, and as an astute observer of fashion, she has developed personal relationships with many designers.

“I saw an opportunity to tell a story with clothes but also to have more meaning.”

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For more insider info and analysis from our fashion news director, follow him on Twitter @ericwilsonsays


CAUSE & EFFECT

Elizabeth Olsen The actress explains why she spends her vacation time in Nicaragua refurbishing schools and improving latrine systems with The Latitude Project

T

hree years ago I booked a trip to Nicaragua for a yoga retreat, which got canceled at the last minute. I decided to go anyway, and I’m glad I did because I met The Latitude Project founders Jenn and Alanna Tynan in the little town of San Juan del Sur. The Tynans were working with impoverished local communities that needed infrastructure support, so I went with them to visit these areas and ended up volunteering in a school to repair desks and update the athletic equipment. I learned that Nicaragua is the second-poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, and each year The Latitude Project chooses a different community to partner with on a big initiative, which could be anything from building a preschool to improving access to latrines. Jenn and Alanna empower the community by fully involving everyone in the task at hand. Residents know that if they don’t show up to work then the project won’t get done. The locals take so much pride in it that they are motivated to maintain

“I got to play ball with these kids during a rainstorm,” says Olsen. “We were slipping around in the mud but couldn’t stop laughing.”

these structures and systems after the Latitude team leaves. Everyone knows the Tynan sisters as the hermanas. There is so much excitement around their presence because they have set a tone of trust and intimacy. This past fall I went on my second trip to San Juan del Sur and visited a new community. This area didn’t have any electricity, so we distributed solar lights. Because I’m not fluent in Spanish, the best way I can communicate with the people is physically—I play kickball with kids or act like a clown just to make them laugh. We’re all on the same level, and it’s important to remember that. For individuals who want to make a big impact, consider donating to a small nonprofit like Latitude (visit thelatitudeproject.com for information). Since it has no overhead costs, you’ll be able to see the direct effect of your contribution. Plus, you’ll walk away with new friends. Before I left Nicaragua, the kids I worked with asked, “When are we going to see you again?” Of course I’ll be back, so I responded, “Próximo año,” which means “next year.” —AS TOLD TO

VITAL STATS

$430

Average annual household income for families living in Nicaragua

500K

Approximate number of schoolage children not enrolled in school

100

Percentage of funds raised by The Latitude Project that go directly to on-the-ground project costs

CHRISTINA SHANAHAN

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For more inspiring stories about celebrity activism, go to instyle.com/cause&effect


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ESCAPE L I KE YO U ’ R E AT T H E W AT E R


t e ook by ERIC WILSON

BEST DRESS EMMA STONE in GUCCI Emblematic of the whimsical spirit of Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele, this eyepopping lemon yellow silk georgette and Lurex gown is decorated with sprays of fuchsia flowers that are barely brighter than Stone’s pink metallic high-heeled sandals, also by Gucci.

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THE LO LOOK OOK O OK AMERICA FERRERA in Alexia Maria

LIZZY CAPLAN in Elie Saab

MICHELLE MONAGHAN in Ronald van der Kemp

CHRISSY TEIGEN in Michael Kors Collection HILARY RHODA in Zac Zac Posen 142

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SIENNA MILLER in Michael Kors Collection

La Di Dots Between teensy polkas and Twister-size circles, fashion has gone spotty.

IMAN in Duro Olowu

GWYNETH PALTROW in Cienne JENNIFER CONNELLY in Louis Vuitton


THE LOOK K

Cold Relief Why settle for a coat of many colors when you can have one of each?

ALICIA VIKANDER in Club Monaco

LENA DUNHAM in Elizabeth and James

MIRANDA A KERR in Harris a s Wharf W London Lo do

VICTORIA BECKHAM in Victoria Beckham LADY Y GAGA G G in i Atelier te er Versace

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RITA ORA O A in Acne c e Studios u s


THE LOOK

No Sweat Designer g hoodiess come with a stringg attached:: They’re y too cool for a workou ut..

GIGI HADID in Danielle Guizio

ZENDA N AYA in Ivy y Park P

KENDALL L J JENNER R in i Vetement V ts

HAILEY BALDWIN in Balenciaga

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RITA ORA in O n Adidas Ad das MARION N COTILLAR RD CO R in Allmeida i Marques q l


THE LOOK

THE LOOK OF THE

The pace of fashion’s future is being set by red-hot stars who are making their marks in dazzlingly experimental style. The latest daring example is Ruth Negga, who wore a standout zip-front column of silver and rose gold sequins from Louis Vuitton, paired with a Fred Leighton cuff set with a 25-carat Gemfields Mozambican ruby

Golden Globes BY ERIC WILSON

P H OTO G R A P H BY K E V I N TAC H M A N


REESE WITHERSPOON in Atelier Versace

NATALIE PORTMAN in Prada

EMILY RATAJKOWSKI in Reem Acra

KERRY WASHINGTON in Dolce & Gabbana

VIOLA DAVIS in n Michael M ic Mic chae ha ae a el Ko Kor o rs Kors C Col ol o lec ec c ti tiio tio Co ect on

NAOMI CAMPBELL in Atelier Versace

OPTIMISTS PRIMED The bright and sunny palette of the Globes was a powerful argument for positivity, as bold yellows and silvery pinks got awards season off to a cheery start.

LAURA DERN in Burberry CLAIRE FOY in Erdem

ZOË SALDANA in Gucci

FELICITY JONES in Gucci


MERYL STREEP in Givenchy Haute Couture by Riccardo Tisci

A BUNCH OF PEOPLE FROM OTHER PLACES Meryl Streep’s fiery acceptance speech had everyone talking (and tweeting) all night, but hopefully, there’s one thing on which we can all agree: She was wearing a fabulous dress, which also got us thinking, Isn’t fashion, fashion like Holly Hollywood ywood, one big melting pot? ywoo

EVAN RACHEL WOOD in Altuzarra

THANDIE NEWTON in Monse

SAR AH H JESSIIC CA KER PARKER era in Ve a ng Wang c tio t on ti Collect

RICCARDO TISCI was born in Taranto, Italy, and lost his father at an early age. He and his eight sisters grew up poor, and he left home at 17 to pursue a life in fashion.

VERA WANG, the daughter of Chinese immigrants, grew up in New York City, competed as a figure skater, and worked as a fashion editor before becoming a designer.

BRIE LA LARSON iin Rodarte

JOSEPH ALTUZARRA was born in Paris to a French father and a ChineseAmerican mother and moved to New York to start his own line.

FERNANDO GARCIA AND LAURA KIM come from the Dominican Republic and South Korea, respectively; they teamed up at Oscar de la Renta.

KATE MULLEAVY AND LAURA MULLEAVY, sisters from Pasadena, Calif., began their careers with no formal training. Look at them now.


THE LOOK K Those aren’t brass knuckles. Tracee Ellis Ross, in Zuhair Murad Couture, wears rings by Hueb, L’ Dezen by Payal Shah, and Noudar.

AMY ADAMS in Tom Ford

Best actress in a drama winner Isabelle Huppert, in Giorgio Armani Privé, adds extra sparkle with Repossi earrings and an ear cuff.

Emma Stone, in Valentino Haute Couture, wears an archival gold, platinum, and diamond necklace by Tiffany & Co. from 1909.

MAKING IT PERSONAL The Golden Globes shed its reputation long ago as the most casual of awards nights, but even with the influx of contracts and couture, there remains an independent spirit on the red carpet. Just check out these fantastic examples of stars who turned a great look into their own by choosing a striking piece of statement jewelry.

The 18-karat white-gold Cartier ring with diamonds isn’t bad, but how can you take your eyes off the 18-karat white-gold bracelet, set with diamonds, obsidian, and tourmaline, from Cartier High Jewelry?

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THE LOOK

SOLID GOLD As soon as the Golden Globes wrapped, Hollywood’s biggest stars rushed to the InStyle after-party, packing the dance floor with trophies and trains. Here’s your VIP ticket PRIYANKA CHOPRA, in Ralph Lauren Collection, shared a moment with SOFÍA VERGARA, in Zuhair Murad Couture. “This is always the best party after the Golden Globes,” Vergara said.

photographed by KEVIN TACHMAN

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THE LOOK

T

hough the Golden Globes had ended by 9 p.m., the night was just getting started. “This is the party everyone literally runs to get to first,” said Blake Lively, before she and husband Ryan Reynolds made a beeline, hand in hand, through the lobby of the Beverly Hilton to get to the 18th annual InStyle & Warner Bros. Golden Globes after-party. Event designer Thomas Ford totally transformed the hotel’s Oasis Courtyard into a sleek, tented party scene that blended peacock blue and fuchsia lighting with opulent ’70s-inspired décor. As for the guests? They embraced the decadence full force. Kendall and Kylie Jenner headed straight to the dance floor, where DJ Michelle Pesce was playing everything from Lil’ Kim to Justin Timberlake. Meanwhile, partygoers packed the velvet banquettes that lined the room. Viola Davis immediately swapped her heels for a pair of ballet slippers and curled up on a couch with her husband and a glass of well-deserved bubbly. A famished Tracee Ellis Ross found heaven in the form of hors d’oeuvres, which included porcini mushroom risotto and rainbow carrots. “The pigs in a blanket are amazing,” she said. “The show was so much fun, of course, but I’m so grateful for food right now.” Priyanka Chopra and Sofía Vergara made it a girls’ night, posing for hilarious video shots in our gilded elevator-style Instagram booth before going inside to sip cocktails. “We are having a bonding moment,” Chopra told InStyle. Though she did admit that she would have done just one thing differently if she had had the chance. “I kept looking over at Viola wearing her flats and thinking, ‘Damn it! Here I am in 7-inch heels—and I’m extremely jealous of her right now.’” —KIM PEIFFER

RYAN GOSLING, in Gucci DIY, and La La Land co-star EMMA STONE, in Valentino Haute Couture, were this year’s best actor and actress in a motion picture musical. The film set a record for the most wins in Golden Globes history, with seven statuettes total.

“It feels fantastic,” said The Night Manager’s TOM HIDDLESTON, in Gucci DIY, who snagged the award for best actor in a limited series.

Blackish’s TRACEE ELLIS ROSS, in Zuhair Murad, showed off her award for best actress in a TV series (musical or comedy).

DREW BARRYMORE in Monique Lhuillier


“Primping for a night like this is sort of like getting ready for any other day, but it takes a lot longer and there’s a lot more fuss,” said BLAKE LIVELY, in Atelier Versace, with RYAN REYNOLDS, in Gucci.

DEREK HOUGH, in Brooks Brothers, struck a pose with HEIDI KLUM, in J Mendel Couture.

HAILEY BALDWIN, in Elie Saab, hit the dance floor with pals KYLIE JENNER, in LaBourjoisie, and KENDALL JENNER, in Paule Ka.


“Tonight I allowed myself to feel like I earned this,” said Fences star VIOLA DAVIS, in Michael Kors Collection. She won the award for best supporting actress in a motion picture.

“I had an out-of-body experience when I won,” said CLAIRE FOY, in Erdem, with EDDIE REDMAYNE, in Prada. “I kept telling myself, ‘Don’t goof up.’ It was bonkers.” Foy, who plays Queen Elizabeth II in The Crown, received the award for best actress in a TV series (drama).

DIANE KRUGER in Nina Ricci

MICHELLE WILLIAMS in Louis Vuitton

SOPHIE TURNER in Louis Vuitton

BUSY PHILIPPS in Stella McCartney

KRISTEN WIIG in Reem Acra


Stranger Things castmates FINN WOLFHARD, in Kenneth Cole, CALEB MCLAUGHLIN, in Book aTailor, GATEN MATARAZZO, in Neil Allyn, MILLIE BOBBY BROWN, in Jenny Packham, and NOAH SCHNAPP, in a custom-made suit by La Rukico Tailors, spent the night fielding requests for selfies from their Hollywood peers—even Blake Lively asked for a souvenir snap.

MIRANDA KERR in August Getty Atelier

GWENDOLINE CHRISTIE in Vivienne Westwood Couture

“The highlight of many highlights was meeting Atlanta’s Donald Glover,” said InStyle editor in chief LAURA BROWN, in Valentino. The feeling was mutual: “She’s so funny, and the whole party has a really cool vibe” said DONALD GLOVER, in Gucci DIY, who took home an award for best actor in a TV series (musical or comedy).

MILO VENTIMIGLIA in Ralph Lauren Purple Label

MANDY MOORE in Naeem Khan

additional reporting by BRANDI FOWLER and BRIANNA KING


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THE LOOK

Gwen Stefani HER BEST EVER

“Gwen’s look is constantly evolving,” says Mariel Haenn, who along with Rob Zangardi styles Stefani. “Back when she was with No Doubt, she liked a tomboy twist, but these days, she loves to put on a big, romantic gown. She’s found a way to embrace her femininity without losing that punk-rock edge. And since Gwen is also a designer, she has an eye for spotting interesting cuts and prints as well as beautiful craftsmanship. We never quite know what she’ll end up in—and that’s half the fun.”

2016: In YANINA COUTURE at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in L.A.

2004: In VIVIENNE WESTWOOD at the Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas 2016: In MARCHESA at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards in L.A. 2005: In L.A.M.B. at the MTV VMAs in Miami

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2013: In MAISON MARGIELA at the Met Gala in N.Y.C.


2015: In DOLCE & GABBANA at a luncheon for The Hollywood Reporter’s Celebration in L.A.

2007: In L.A.M.B. at the Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards in L.A.

2004: In VALENTINO at the Golden Globe Awards in L.A.

2015: In ZUHAIR MURAD at a taping of The Voice in L.A.

HER BEST!

2004: In LOUIS VUITTON at the MTV VMAs in Miami 2012: In STELLA McCARTNEY at the “My Valentine” video première in L.A.


THE LOOK

THE GIRL

Gigi Hadid

All hail America’s sweetheart of the street-style scene: For a look that’s sexy yy yet comfortable, the model mixes high gh and a low—think band Ts and sports bras paired with ele egant silhouettes ilhouettes.

Acetate sunglasses, Max Mara, $245; at Max Mara, 212-879-6100.

Cotton tank, Bravado, $25; www .bravado .com.

Cotton T-shirt, Alexander Wang, $325; at Alexander Wang, 212-977-9683.

Cubic zirconia and sterling silver earrings, Pandora Jewelry, $90; pandora.net.

Leather boots, Zadig & Voltaire, $698; us.zadiget-voltaire.com. Cotton cropped top, Tommy x Gigi, $30; tommy.com.

Wool-blend jacket, Armani Exchange, $170; at Armani Exchange. BEAUTY BEAT Spritz a leave-in shine spray like Christophe Robin Brightening Hair Finish Lotion ($48; sephora.com) on wet strands for lasting sheen.

Nubuck boots, Diamond and 14kt Timberland, white gold ring, Effy $170; timberland Jewelry, $1,095; .com. effyjewelry.com.

IN NA A ME M MET ET TA ALL AL L IC LL ICA CA C S RT T-S T-S SHIR HIR HIR AND AN A ND D KARE KARE KA EN WAL WALKE WA A K KE ER NG SUN S UN GL GLA LASSE SES SE in N in Ne New e Yo York rk

Satin crêpe pants, Haute Hippie, $365; hautehippie .com. Calf-hair belt, Vince Camuto, $42; vince camuto.com.

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THE LOOK

THE WOMAN

Ruth Negga

Follow this breakout star’s lead and make a sweeping romantic gesture in n Victorian-inspired V l lace and d ruffles. ffl B Bring i it iinto t the th now with h glowing l skin k and d zippy red d llips.

Georgette top, Kate Spade New York, $278; katespade .com.

Lace skirt, Sachin & Babi, $550; sachinandbabi.com.

Diamond and 18kt gold bracelet, Harry Winston, price upon request; at Harry Winston, 800-9884110.

Embroidered silk satin pouch, Attico, $357; my theresa .com.

18kt rose gold rings with ebony (top, $690) or diamonds ($1,870), Ginette NY; ginetteny.com.

Silk dress, Coach 1941, $795; coach .com.

Embellished suede sandals, Stuart Weitzman, $445; stuartweitzman.com.

Venice lace dress, Laundry by Shelli Segal, $148; lordand taylor.com.

BEAUTY BEAT Hairstylist Vernon François used his own coconut oil–infused Curl-Command Moisture Spray ($37; net-a-porter.com) to define Negga’s natural ringlets.

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IN N VA VALENTIN NO at the première e L ving in of Lo Angeles Los A

Leather sandals, Fratelli Rossetti, $610; at Fratelli Rossetti, 212-888-5107.


THE LOOK

THE LADY

Tilda Swinton

A true original, the actress puts her androgynous spin on traditio onal femininity ty u using sumptuous, jewel-tone l ed silks tailored with just enough gh slouch. l h. 18kt gold bracelet (left, $3,500) and 18kt gold bracelet with leather ($2,400), David Yurman; david yurman.com. Diamond and 14kt gold earrings, Zazen Bear, $420; zazen bear.com. Silk jacket, Brunello Cucinelli, $5,995; at Brunello Cucinelli, 212-3341010.

Triacetate dress, AYR, $385; ayr.com.

Viscose-silk pants, Sandro, $325; us .sandro-paris.com. Embossed leather sandals, Vince Camuto, $160; vince camuto.com.

BEAUTY BEAT A raspberry with a hint of gloss, like Nars Velvet Gloss Lip Pencil in Club Mix ($26; narscosmetics .com), amps up Swinton’s n naturall llip c l color.

Leather handbag, Diane von Furstenberg, $248; dvf.com.

Silk blouse, Vince, $295; vince.com. Washed satin dress, Camilla and Marc, $599; camillaand marc.com.

IN HAIDER R ACKERMANN N at Comic-Con n in San Diego o

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Suede sandals, Ann Taylor, $138; anntaylor.com.


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THE LOOK

Kenya Kinski-Jones STYLE CRUSH

AGE 24. INSTAGRAM @kenyakinskij. HOW YOU KNOW HER Kinski-Jones

comes from a famous family (her parents are producer Quincy Jones and actress Nastassja Kinski; Rashida Jones is her half sister), and now the model is having a breakout moment. In addition to being named a face of Stella McCartney’s Pop fragrance, she has posed alongside her real-life boyfriend, Will Peltz, for two Calvin Klein campaigns, walked for Chanel, and become a front-row fixture during Fashion Week. STYLE MANTRA “Do what you want and don’t follow any rules,” says Kinski-Jones. “It’s important to stay true to what you like without being swayed by anyone else.” STREET STAPLES “For a simple but cool look, I like to throw a vintage jacket over a T-shirt and black ripped Paige jeans. I also wear Stella McCartney’s Elyse shoes or Topshop booties almost every day.” MIXED MESSAGES “I’m attracted to duality, so I’ll pair a really feminine piece with something a bit boyish. It’s fun to wear a vintage T-shirt with heels or thigh-high boots with a colorblock sweatshirt.” GO-TO DESIGNERS “Karl Lagerfeld is amazing. Chanel is such an iconic brand, but he always finds innovative

ways to bring a contemporary feel to new collections. I also love Alexander Wang, Hedi Slimane, and, of course, Stella McCartney.” SHOPPING SPOT “What Goes Around Comes Around has so many unique pieces. It’s definitely pricey, so I don’t go all the time, but I love looking around and finding things that have their own history.” CLASSIC KEEPSAKES “I have a ton of vintage stuff from my mom. An oversize yellow Moschino blazer with a smiley face on the back is one of my favorites.” HAUTE HAND-ME-DOWNS “Rashida gave me two giant boxes of clothes when I first moved away for college, and I couldn’t wait to go through everything. I absolutely love her style. Every time we get together as a family, I ask where she got her outfit.” ULTIMATE ICON “David Bowie was always pushing the envelope. He didn’t follow the norm or care about blurring the line between gender roles. He took risks, and he always stood out.” TOP TRENDS “I’m very into rose-tinted glasses right now, and I have a fun pair from Chanel that’s outlined with pearls. I also like to wear long flared pants every now and then. They remind me of Penny Lane in Almost Famous.” —SAMANTHA SIMON

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MY DAY

One of fashion’s most-in-demand models (and the latest campaign star of Bulgari), Lily Aldridge never has a quiet day at the office. Off duty, however, the runway pro prefers a low-key routine: a family dinner before dark and keeping up with her Netflix queue BY ALISON SYRETT

6:30 A.M. |

8 A.M. | At the barre

12 P.M. | Clean

Breakfast buds I get up early, wake my daughter, Dixie Pearl, and give her a kiss. Then I make myself a cup of green tea, and we sit together to eat before she gets ready for school. She usually wants sausage, and I prefer steel-cut oatmeal w almond milk.. with

IIf I don’t have to work, I ex xercise next. It really clears my mind. I do cle Ballet Beautiful, Ba sometimes two times a so day if I have a big job da coming up. One session co will be more matw based, the other ba standing st tanding cardio.

eats For lunch, vegan home-delivery service Sakara sends me healthy prepackaged meals. When I’m busy, it’s especially helpful because the catering at photo h shoots h can be unpredictable.

Getting sweaty for VS Sport

Sapphire, ruby, diamond, and 18kt white gold necklace, Bulgari, price upon request; at Bulgari, 800-285-4274.

10 A A.M. M |

N Now boarding Every day is different for Eve me e. Modeling is definitely a round-the-clock job, whether that me eans keeping fit, taking an interview, or flying around the world. Be ecause my commute is usually on a plane, I’ve picked up a few tricks to avoid puffiness, like undereye patches from Klorane and Shiseido and a spritz of rose water before arrival.

WHEN IN ROME As the face of Bulgari’s global campaigns for 2017, Aldridge visited the Eternal City to work with legendary photographer Mario Testino. “It was incredible,” she says. “I could see the Vatican from the set and channeled this powerful character in outrageously beautiful jewelry.” Her favorite pieces? “The Serpenti collection. The look is very sexy.” A behind-the-scenes glimpse of Aldridge’s Bulgari shoot

1P P.M. M | Plugging in Social media is something I approach organically. It’s all me! Sometimes I’ll post four things in a few hours, but then I could go dark for a week.


THE LOOK ANGEL FOOD How does a Victoria’s Secret model survive hours of hair and makeup, interviews, and an internationally televised event? An eight-year veteran of the lingerie label’s annual extravaganza, Aldridge breaks down her show-day fuel.

Breakfast Every year is different, but last November I started with poached eggs, avocado, and green n tea tea. Lunch I’ll have something clean and healthy, like a quinoa salad. Pre-runway dinner Pasta. You need energy toward the end d of the day. It’s such a long one. Late-night snack Post-wrap, I usually have a pizza party.

3 P.M. | First priorities When Dixie gets out of school, I take her to ballet, soccer, or karate. Or if it’s a free afternoon, we might bake together. I love doing things with my daughter. There is nothing more important in my life than making her happy.

On the Victoria’s Secret 2016 catwalk in the label’s signature angel wings: “I usually ask for a lighter pair,” she admits. “The largest ones are tough to hold up. They’re so heavy!”

“Some days my style is more classic; on others it’s rock-and-roll. It all depends on how I fee l.” Some sweet mother-daughter downtime

MY TIME

5 P.M. | Home cooking When it’s time for

DATE NIGHT For an evening out, my husband and I enjoy a quiet meal together. One of our go-to restaurants is Barbuto in New York City.

supper, I’m very much an early bird, which I get teased for. My husband [Kings of Leon frontman Caleb Followill] grills an amazing steak, and I’ll make a side of peas and prosciutto.

GETAWAY I travel to Turks and Caicos to relax. The hotels are beautiful, the food is great, and the water is clear. HAIR CARE Tracey Cunningham has been doing my color for years at Mèche Salon in L.A. That’s something I like to switch up: I go lighter in the summer, darker for fall.

8 P.M. | Streaming now My daughter goes to bed, and I’ll stay up for a few hours longer watching Netflix to wind down. I’m just getting into The Crown, and I’m also a fan of Black Mirror.. “Turks and Caicos is so quiet. It’s one of the best places in the world.”

BOOK LIST I read all the time. Recently I’ve been recommending All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr.

“Modeling can b be g glamorous,, butt it’s important to realize that it is a job. I try to approach every opportunity from a place of professionalism and gratitude.” DAILY MANTRA

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FEATURE

AMERICAN VOICES

Nura Afia SHE GAINED A LOYAL FOLLOWING AS A BEAUTY VLOGGER BEFORE COVERGIRL NAMED HER AN AMBASSADOR, ITS FIRST TO WEAR A HIJAB. NOW SHE’S URGING GIRLS TO EMBRACE THEIR DIFFERENCES by SHALAYNE PULIA Makeup by Nura Afia

HOME Denver AGE 25 HOW YOU KNOW HER She caught the attention no of hundreds of thousands of YouTubers by wearing her hijab in the tutorials she shared. Now, as CoverGirl ambassador, Afia is featured alongside Chloe x Halle, Katy Perry, and Sofía Vergara in a promo for the brand’s So Lashy! BlastPRO mascara. WHAT’S NEXT Afia hopes to one day start her own makeup line and launch an athleisure collection featuring modest styles. What made the CoverGirl partnership so meaningful? If I had seen a Muslim girl wearing a hijab in a makeup commercial when I was younger, it would have done amazing things for my self-esteem. I didn’t have a role model in pop culture. I want other girls to see me and know they are not alone. You’ve said that you feel like you’re living the American dream. What do you want your 5-year-old daughter, Laila, to take away from that? I want all young women—regardless of their ethnicity or religion—to know that they can dream big. I never thought I’d get this far, but I got here all on my own, and others can too. I’m working to support Muslims’ representation in the media, but when I take my scarf off, I’m just an average girl. How did your family react to your success? My grandmother didn’t think that I could make a career out of my YouTube passion, so when I called her from the CoverGirl shoot on her birthday, she couldn’t have been happier. She just recently left a comment on my Facebook page that said, “You’re making all of us eat our own words.” Has your perception of beauty changed since you started vlogging? Now I see beauty in everything, and I never thought

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I’d be able to honestly say that. Growing up, my image of beauty was skinny girls with straight hair. I had really curly hair, so I didn’t consider myself pretty. I’ve learned that beauty comes from how you act, not how you look. If you try to be genuine, friendly, and just plain nice, then people will find you attractive. What surprises you most when you look at your earliest videos? That I was actually really bad at applying makeup! I’m self-taught, so I was such an amateur back then. Is YouTube still your favorite social media platform? Don’t get me wrong—I love a well-edited production. But YouTube has become almost too edited. I prefer to see someone in his or her natural state, which is why I love Snapchat. I try to make my own videos relatable, regardless of the platform. Sometimes you’ll see my daughter in the background watching Sesame Street. I also posted a video of my husband and me arguing because I’m so sick of seeing those seemingly perfect relationships on social media. It’s not reality. Who is your biggest supporter? My husband, Asef, has always been extremely helpful at home so that I could focus on my career. There was a period last fall when I was only home for one week out of the whole month. When I travel, he takes care of Laila. He dresses her, packs her lunch, and takes her to school, all while working full-time. That’s empowering. What makes you laugh? Kevin Hart. When we were visiting New York City, Asef and I got last-minute tickets to a midnight screening of his film What Now? I was cracking up, then I looked over to see my husband napping because it was so late. All I could think was, “How do you sleep through Kevin Hart?”


As usual, you saw that coming. There are a lot of things that are easy to see coming, like man buns and homemade kombucha going out of style, but some things are a little harder to detect. Like that pedestrian unexpectedly jaywalking. That’s why Toyota Safety Sense™ P,1 including a Pre-Collision System2 with Pedestrian Detection,3 comes standard on the new 2017 Corolla.

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FEATURE

America, C’est Chic

Style star Caroline de Maigret on what Parisian women can learn from their stateside sisters

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hen my friend Laura Brown, aka the new editor in chief of this magazine, first asked me to write about what French girls can learn from American style, I laughed because I thought it was going to be easy. I figured I’d pen a couple of quick sentences about wearing tight clothes to appear sexier (although that’s the last thing I want to do, as I like to eat and I’m not planning to live in Spandex) or applying extra makeup (my face needs more help than it used to, but I’m wary of waking up any earlier) and be done with it. That’s mainly because we Frenchwomen like to pretend we know it all. I’m certainly no exception: My book is titled How to Be Parisian Wherever You Are. But it turns out I’d been tricked. When I took a moment to really consider the key pieces of my wardrobe—a white shirt, jeans, a moto jacket, and white sneakers—I realized, for the first time, that my uniform was quintessentially American. How was this possible? Had I been fooling everyone all this time? I had been aware that certain elements, mainly gleaned from rock and roll—such as Patti Smith’s androgynous-cool blazers or the oversize, slouchy fit of Kurt Cobain’s shirts— had played a part in my look, but now it dawned on me that there was much more to it. If style is about personality—about conveying the very essence of who you are through your clothes (and I truly believe it is)—then I owe more to the U.S. than I knew. Growing up, I’d devoured work by so many American writers, artists, activists, and the like, each of whom shaped me and in turn left an impression, conscious or not, of what I

wanted in my closet. I fell in love with Joan Didion’s talent and courage, but also, maybe in the back of my mind, with the way she wore her long dresses, which were so simple and chic. Then there was Angela Davis’s fierce command of language and her commitment to speaking out, and also, hmm, those fantastic slim turtlenecks. And Ava Gardner’s brand of femininity—so powerful because of her will to do whatever she wanted—had a huge impact on my own. The list goes on: Nina Simone, Lauren Bacall, John Cassavetes, William Burroughs, Georgia O’Keefe … there are too many to name. Years, and many trips abroad, later, a few more things resonate. I see girls on the streets of New York and admire how fearless they are when it comes to getting dressed, taking risks for the fun of it while I stick to my same old uniform. And I envy the women in Los Angeles, who have no shame about how much time they spend on looking so perfectly put together—with their hair done, strong makeup, and flawless manicures. But however you choose to present yourself to the world, the most important thing is to make that look your own. That’s the Parisian in me talking—if there’s one thing we’re really good at, it’s sticking to what we feel is authentic and making it a signature. So I guess in the end you could say my style is American, but I wear it like a French girl. Q

I admire how fearless New York girls are when it comes to getting dressed, taking risks just for the fun of it.”

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Caroline de Maigret is the founder of CdMdiary and coauthor of How to Be Parisian Wherever You Are: Love, Style, and Bad Habits. She is also a model, Chanel muse, and music producer.


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FEATURE

Flipping the Switch

With a fashion career spanning six decades, Joan Juliet Buck has learned how to turn the style game on and off

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ou have to wrestle fashion into submission by calling the shots or it will eat you alive. There’s mastery in being both the made-up dazzler in dangerous heels and a glowing Zac Posen dress and the baffled nun wearing a calf-length sweater over a sports bra and Uggs with ankle socks. Constant perching on heels is bondage; permanent ankle socks are slovenly. If you juggle both personas, you’ve won. I think of fashion as a public illusion that I produce to obscure the private truth about the soft, shapeless things that I sleep in, wear throughout the day, and wash only when they’ve become indistinguishable clumps of stretchy matter: yoga pants, hoodies, leotards, leg warmers, sweaters that can house two at a time, a Snuggie. Worn in layers, they’re as welcoming, unpretentious, and horrifying as my Synchilla bathrobe. But I also love dressing up. At 6, I stuffed balledup newspapers inside my mother’s scratchy green taffeta skirt to make a crinoline, but the news-

Buck (clockwise from top) in 1955; in 1969; in 2002; and in 2008, wearing her beloved, possibly Schiaparelli, jacket. Opposite page: Buck in 1987

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papers fell out when I ran. Lesson one: Costume and exertion don’t mix. At 9, I turned my raincoat backwards and tied its belt around my knees to make it into an haute couture sack dress, but I couldn’t walk. Lesson two: Couture and walking don’t mix. As a teenager in Swinging London, I embraced vintage gold-braid uniform jackets, flapper dresses, and Egyptian net caftans. In Paris, working as a stylist for the surrealist photographer Guy Bourdin, I wore blue overalls, smeared red powder around my eyes, wrapped my head in a turban, and topped off the ensemble with a knitted floor-length kimono. My father never failed to greet this look with “Here comes downtown Warsaw.” Then I met real fashion. Years before Karl Lagerfeld went to Chanel, he became my friend through a shared passion for old clothes. When I was 22, he presented me with a perfect black crêpe jacket edged in gold leather curlicues: It was from the 1930s, possibly by Schiaparelli, and gave me a way to unite my passion for the past with the demands of fashion. I wore it to the Cannes Film Festival in 1972, to the opera in 1986, to the Vanity Fair party in 2005, and I wear it still. Diamonds are forever. In my life I’ve taken on just about every fashion persona short of Barbie. My look was Dolly Bird in the ’60s (dresses so short that I wore two pairs of panties for decency) and Distressed Peasant in the ’70s (fringed, soiled, suede). In the ’80s, a Chanel ciré raincoat and shoulderpadded superheroine suits landed me in the Best Dressed List Hall of Fame. I’m not sure what I was going for in the ’90s; I was editor in chief of Paris Vogue and had to wear so much current fashion that I completely forgot to love my clothes, except for the enormous country sweaters that Martin Margiela made at Hermès.


“There’s mastery in being both the made-up dazzler in a glowing Zac Posen dress and the baffled nun wearing a calf-length sweater and Uggs.” After I left Paris Vogue in 2001, I moved to Santa Fe, where no one cared what I wore, and at 52, I turned fashion off. But I wasn’t over luxury—I treasured my stash of big Hermès sweaters and found Italian cashmere ankle socks at the mall to complement the luxe-hermit look. I had a book to write. I was being private and economical, so instead of Chanel, Missoni, and Ann Demeulemeester, I bought noisy parkas and nylon inner shells from Arc’teryx and Patagonia. Eventually, I moved back to New York, lugging along the mountaineering gear. You never know when a peak might arise.

Today, unless I have to look sharp to promote my memoir, I dress as if I lived in rural Anatolia. I own some 40 identical hoodies in Polartec—the ecologically sound fleece made from recycled plastic bottles, just as many Uniqlo Heattech underbits, and about 20 pairs of floppy harem pants from Istanbul that I find wildly becoming. I think the Best Dressed List Hall of Fame is trying to eject me. They must have heard about the Polartec. Q Joan Juliet Buck’s memoir, The Price of Illusion, is out now.

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Being an Original Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine on authenticity, nonconformity, and finding your voice


FEATURE

T

here’s a quote attributed to Coco Chanel that negative voices in our heads; but it’s also very rarely wrong. often turns up on Facebook profiles: “In order Being in tune with and consistently working to cancel out to be irreplaceable, one must always be differ- the noise of what’s happening outside of you is the only way ent.” I’ve read it so many times that in spite of its to discover what’s inside—and, I would argue, the path to underlying message—be original—it’s become, real originality. I use clothes to pick up the slack where words fail, to porironically, completely unoriginal. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately. We’re taught as tray an image of the person I am proud to be but also aspiring kids to follow our heart and our gut, not what popular opinion to improve. I don’t endeavor to look original—and if I did, that recommends. Only when we’re truly one of a kind, we’re told, would defeat the whole purpose. It would remove honesty from the equation, and I’d be left wearing will we be destined for greatness. clothes I probably hate. But is this concept overrated? I’m tempted And another thing: Sometimes I feel like to think so. To be original, according to the Style is a wearing tight jeans or a very short skirt—not wise oracle Google, is to be an eccentric, unmonologue, a traditionally “man-repelling” garments—so I usual person. conversation do that. Often. Now, I’m often told that I have a very unconyou have with Here’s what I recommend: Instead of thinkventional style. It’s a compliment, I think, but ing, “How can I stand out?” ask yourself, “What more than that, I see it as a testament to how yourself, and well I’m getting to know myself. Style is a mono- for me, jeans and would make me happiest? What do I need to do to get there?” And then do that. Check in with logue, a conversation you have with yourself, a T-shirt just yourself. Make sure you’re being true to who and for me, jeans and a T-shirt just don’t cut it. don’t cut it.” you really are. If you’re passionate about waist But here’s the thing: If your personal style happens to be jeans and a T-shirt—unoriginal by Google’s belts, run with it! (I lament my own lack of buckle prowess.) But don’t forget that originality counts only when it comes definition—what are you supposed to do? Put on a pink tutu and a huge velvet bow and cry “independence”? That doesn’t from within, not from somewhere or someone else. And so regarding that Chanel make sense. You’d be masking who you are. anel quote: The good news is that we’re we re all fi Q Look at street-style photography. We often complain irreplaceable. Put tthat in your Facebook profile. about how downright fake the photos from Fashion n Week can feel. But we’ve been conditioned to believve that the craziest, loudest outfit wins. And here’s where we run into a problem: If you’re trying that hard to achieve originality, is it authentic? Isn’t genuine nonnconformity effortless, like breathing or blinking? The thing about originality is that you have to decidee what the word means in the context of your own life. y e. Was I acting originally when I married my husband at the tender age of 23? No. That was exactly what my family expected from me. Was it original that as a truly passionate, aspiring acquirer of expensive footwear, I entered the fashion industry? Not at all. As a child, I played d dress-up with my dolls and loved tryingg on my mom’s lipstick. Very average. When I was 20, I tried to convince my-self that I should be a political reporter. r. For a woman deeply concerned with how w she and the people around her dress, thatt career choice would have been a littlee more unorthodox and surprising than n writing about fashion. But the heart wants what it wants! So o who are we to deprive ourselves of what at the trenches of our gut say we need? Ourr gut is sometimes annoying, and it’s pesky, y, and we can get it mixed up with weird, d,

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FEATURE

Dressing the Part

Actress Rowan Blanchard on finding inspiration, comfort, and identity through personal style

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o me, fashion has always felt like acting—gettingto channel someoneelse by sticking out, blending in, or teleporting to different eras. To be Holly Golightly or Audrey Horne or Wednesday Addams, even for a day. And in 2016, which felt like the Year of the World Falling Apart (how it does in movies, only it wasn’t a movie), fashion and film became godlike for me; they let me be reborn again and again. There’s always been an immense comfort in knowing that if the real world became too much, I had acting—a separate realm where I didn’t have to think or feel anything personal. On set, it didn’t matter what was happening to me, and that was surprisingly a relief. I turned to that safe space when I didn’t want to watch the news, or hear what happened to girls around the world, or read what our president-elect was tweeting. Embracing fashion and film wasn’t giving in to the superficial; it was survival. When you’re a teenager, you already feel like the world is always ending and then holy s—, maybe it actually is. I’m not saying clothes saved me from the real world, but at least they brought a sense of fast change and renewal. As a girl, I’m not sure I believe in self-confidenceasmuchasI believeinacting self-confident,andIthinkpersonal style lives between the two. Fashion is more metaphor than concreteness, and the only thing I want for certain right now is metaphor. Fashion is my way of taking myself out of a society where men dominate. I take it as my tool, my choice, an empty fresh space that hasn’t been filled, and my attempt to fill it.

IN SP IRE D BY

INS PIR ED BY

ANNIE “I was probably 9 here. I loved Annie, and this outfit pays homage to Carol Burnett’s Miss Hannigan.”

IN SP IRE D BY

IN SP IR ED

AUDREY HEPBURN “I’ve been into Audrey Hepburn since age 7— like, seriously infatuated. This Chanel outfit felt like a modern manifestation of her.”

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T N SUIC CIDES THE VIRGIN ““This Miu M Miu M look is f s. one off my favorites I reminded me off tthe It p f m prom scene from The Virgin Suicides.”

GUYS AND DOLLS “When I was 7, my dad introduced me to Guys and Dolls. I was obsessed with the character Miss Adelaide and her outfit in the song ‘Take Back Your Mink.’”


VERAWANG.COM


FEATURE

Date with DIANE Guest columnist Diane von Furstenberg sits down with entrepreneur Miroslava Duma to talk style, motherhood, and finding balance

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG: Mira, what are

your earliest fashion memories? MIROSLAVA DUMA: When I was growing up in Russia, my mother showed me photos from 1959 when Dior débuted its collection on Red Square. I remember looking at the models on the streets of Moscow—they were so graceful, almost like aliens. It made a big impression on me. At the time, I also looked to Raisa Gorbachev, the first and only Russian first lady with elegant style, in my opinion. She was modern and empowering. DVF: Was your mother your style role model? MD: Yes, my mother was my first guide into the world of fashion. She had a big collection of Thierry Mugler dresses and suits at the beginning of the ’90s. My favorite was a dark blue suit that made her waist look super-tiny. I also adored my mom’s Chanel 2.55 bag, which I recently got from her. It’s more than 25 years old. DVF: Why did you decide to create your media company, Büro 24/7? MD: I had been an editor and a writer at Harper’s Bazaar, Tatler, and Vogue, and even though I loved it, I realized that the future was digital. I found myself turning to social media to get information and entertainment, yet it was really fragmented. So I decided to create one destination that has the pace of social media but still offers curated, high-quality content by editors and journalists. We cover contemporary culture—art, architecture, fashion, and more. DVF: Do you consider yourself Russian first— or more a citizen of the world? MD: We live in a digital era with no borders, so the notion of citizenship goes by the wayside. I consider myself a citizen of the world, but I’m a huge Russian patriot. I’m proud of its history, heritage, and scale. Now I’m trying to help other Russians—my Büro Fashion Initiative connects young talents with buyers, stylists, and editors. DVF: How has fashion impacted your life? MD: When I was growing up, the fashion indus-

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try didn’t really exist in my country, but I always had the passion inside me. Back then, I thought that men had more opportunities in life than women. I later realized that fashion is actually one of the advantages that women have. Men have few clothing options besides jeans, T-shirts, and suits. But there are no limits to what women can wear. Fashion can make us feel beautiful, different, and powerful. DVF: You also met your husband, Aleksey [Mikheev], at a fashion party, right? MD: Yes! I met my husband at the opening of a Moscow Louis Vuitton store 14 years ago. Fashion brought us together, but the funny thing is that he’s not into fashion at all—and he’s one of the most antisocial people I know. DVF: And now you’re a mom to two children [George and Anna]. How has motherhood changed you? MD: Motherhood is what I live and breathe. I have to be the coolest, funniest, and best example in life for my kids. There’s a Russian saying that translates to “The more you do, the more you manage.” I always have several projects in development, but family is still the most important thing. I make a top-five priority list every year, and when a project comes to me, I always look at it from the perspective of “Will this help me in my top five?” If the answer is yes, I do it; if it’s no, I don’t. Q

Fashion can make us feel beautiful, different, and powerful.” —MIROSLAVA DUMA


FEATURE 2

Taking the Perfect Selfie BY ASHLEY GRAHAM

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When I’m on set with an amazing photographer, sometimes all it takes is one or two snaps to get the shot. But selfies are different. Yes, even for a model, it’s completely normal to have to take 20 (or more) to get one that’s usable. If you’re feelin’ yourself, I always say post the pic with no regrets. But if you’re looking to really nail your next close-up, here’s what I keep in mind.

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FIND YOUR “LOW 45” People think I’m crazy when I say this, but I hold the camera at a low 45-degree angle instead of at eye level. It’s surprisingly flattering because it shows off your jawline.

WHAT YOU NEED To achieve the ultimate gram glow, Graham preps her skin with Decléor Facial Oil. After foundation, Giorgio Armani’s Fluid Sheer in No. 8 adds a hint of color to her cheeks, while Marc Jacobs’s Beauty Perfection Powder keeps her shine-free under the flash.

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BOOST CONTRAST INSTEAD OF FILTERING I’m not into Instagram filters or airbrushing apps. Why not just be you? When my selfie needs a boost, I pump up the contrast to make it look sharper.

Decléor Aromessence Néroli Hydrating Oil Serum, $73; decleorusa.com. Marc Jacobs Beauty Perfection Powder Featherweight Finish, $48; sephora.com. Giorgio Armani Fluid Sheer in No. 8, $62; giorgioarmani beauty-usa.com.

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LET THERE BE LIGHT Lighting is the secret to a good selfie. Wherever you are, find your best light, because it makes or breaks any picture. I have a LuMee case on my phone, and it never, ever comes off.

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KEEP IT REAL I get more likes on photos that are relaxed and natural rather than super-glam. So smile! And if it looks weird or forced, think of something funny to make yourself actually laugh out loud. I swear, it works.

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SHOW YOUR PERSONALITY We’re all on Insta to show the world a little piece of ourselves, so don’t overthink things. Be authentic, and most important, have fun with it!

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I nST YLE M A RCH 20 1 7


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L ILY CO L L IN S 189


MISS

With her empowering new book, Lily Collins— actress, author, and eyebrow icon—writes her best chapter yet by MARGARET WAPPLER photographed by TODD COLE


Viscose dress, Altuzarra, $995; neimanmarcus .com. Altuzarra bra. Leather choker with faux pearl, Coach 1941, $125; coach.com. Opposite: Leather jacket ($2,100, similar styles), cotton top ($450, similar styles) and skirt ($595), and leather choker with faux pearl ($125), Coach 1941; coach.com. Canvas sneakers, Converse, $55; converse.com. Opening page: Polyamide tulle coat, Osman, $1,739; at select Barneys New York stores. Leather choker with faux pearl, Coach 1941, $125; coach.com. Fashion editor: Sabina Schreder.

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Silk chiffon dress, Libertine, $3,750; bergdorfgoodman .com. Leather choker with faux pearl, Coach 1941, $125; coach.com. Diamond and 18kt gold ring, Dior Fine Jewelry, $970; at select Dior boutiques. BEAUTY BEAT Define your brows with Lancôme Sourcils Tint Eyebrow Pen in Brun ($27; lancome-usa.com).


Tech duchesse bomber, Brunello Cucinelli, $3,995; at Brunello Cucinelli, 212-334-1010. Silk crêpe de chine dress, Valentino, $5,800; at Valentino. Enamel-coated pins (on jacket), Roxanne Assoulin, $35 each; roxanneassoulin .com. Leather choker with faux pearl, Coach 1941, $125; coach.com. BEAUTY BEAT Enhance a natural flush with Lancôme Blush Subtil in Blushing Trésor ($32; lancome-usa.com).

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Silk jacket ($590) and cotton T-shirt ($70), Hilfiger Collection; at Tommy Hilfiger, 212-2231824. Suede skirt, Marc Jacobs, $1,200; marcjacobs .com. Leather choker with faux pearl, Coach 1941, $125; coach.com. Diamond and 18kt gold ring (top), Dior Fine Jewelry, $970; at select Dior boutiques. Diamond, enamel, and 18kt gold ring, Foundrae, $1,495; foundrae.com. Leather bag, Longchamp, $510; longchamp.com. BEAUTY BEAT For the prettiest pout, opt for Lancôme L’Absolu Rouge Lipstick in Peut-Être ($32; lancome-usa.com). Hair: Dennis Gots for The Wall Group. Makeup: Pati Dubroff for Forward Artists. Manicure: Pilar Noire for Nailing Hollywood.


ily Collins is still able to enjoy relative peace and quiet as she sips mint tea in a West Hollywood hotel café. This over-40 business lunch crowd is preoccupied with deals and salads, but if the place were more populated by young social-media savants, she’d be discreetly (or not) snapped and tagged to no end. To her 5.6-million-and-counting Instagram followers, she’s a glamorous but still candid ingénue, supplying a steady stream of coy selfies highlighting her distinctive ink-black eyebrows. This March Collins’s fans will get an even more intimate look at her life when she publishes Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me, a collection of personal essays inspired by the confessional stories her Instagram community has shared with her. Encouraged by their bravery, Collins, 27, says she showed a “side of myself that was completely raw” in Unfiltered, hence the title. “I can feel a bit freer because I’m not holding as much in.” In the film world, where she’s been making great strides since débuting as Sandra Bullock’s daughter in The Blind Side seven years ago, Collins is still on the rise. Growing up adjacent to the spotlight as the daughter of ’80s pop icon Phil Collins, she understands that she’s one of many starlets in a race to the top. She’s inching ever closer: Her turn as a ’50s pageant queen in Warren Beatty’s Rules Don’t Apply snagged her a Golden Globe nomination. Emma Stone (La La Land) took home the award, but Collins won the Instagram battle: The red-carpet video of her spinning in a pink Zuhair Murad gown garnered more than a million views in 24 hours. Despite Collins’s very-nowbrand of social-media fame, her appearance is utterly throwback. Her petite frame swimming in a cozy black sweater, Collins conjures images of Audrey Hepburn, whose boyish femininity and sharp wit “changed a lot of people’s perspectives about what it was to be a woman at that time,” she says. Collins isn’t surprised she’s been tapped for homages to Old Hollywood, including the upcoming Amazon series The Last Tycoon, based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1941 novel. “I’ve always been fascinated with old movie stars and the history of the place that I live in,” Collins says, sweetening her tea with her own bottle of Stevia. “I really love the romanticism and the mystery surrounding the period.”

Born in England, Collins was raised mostly in Beverly Hills by her mother, Jill Tavelman, a furniture dealer, after her parents split up when she was 5 (they officially divorced a few years later). Before she dedicated herself to acting in her early 20s, she modeled a bit and still serves as an ambassador to Lancôme. Modeling, however, wasn’t her first love; that distinction belongs to writing. As a teen she wrote for several outlets, including the Los Angeles Times,Teen Vogue, and the now-shuttered Elle Girl UK, where she penned a monthly column, a gig she got by cold-calling the magazine. For her collection of autobiographical essays, Collins returned to writing once more for its “incredibly therapeutic” powers. Don’t call Unfiltered a memoir, though: At her age, she says, “it’s not like I know everything.” It’s more like a secret diary crossed with a best friend’s guide to living (like the chapter titled “Be Silly. It’s Attractive. Normal Is So Boring”). Collins’s perspective is fresh and uplifting even or especially when she documents her challenges. (The word “no,” Collins writes, can simply mean “No, this isn’t for you right now.”) She details her gains in self-confidence, like when she learns to love her bold eyebrows after nearly plucking them bald. Unfiltered also delves into dark territory, chronicling troubled romantic relationships and her history of disordered eating, which started with obsessive calorie restrictions and exercise but eventually grew into full-blown bulimia. Revealing her struggles wasn’t just therapy for herself but potentially for “all these amazing young women who would share their stories about their insecurities or problems or fears” on her Instagram feed. “Sometimes they would preface it by saying, ‘Now, I know you probably can’t relate to it or you probably won’t understand or no one in Hollywood feels this way … ’ It so shocked me because it’s the furthest from the truth. I understand why they feel that way, but I’m reading these things thinking, ‘If only you knew, because I can completely understand what you’re going through.’ ” Collins announced the book on Instagram in October, thanking her followers for their stories: “If you’re brave enough to share yours, I need to be brave enough to share mine.” She sold the book proposal to Harper Teen in October 2015 and then landed three acting jobs, including a role as an anorexic young woman in Marti Noxon’s autobiographical dark comedy, To the Bone, which required her to lose and gain weight. Noxon’s film offered the star a chance to safely explore her past, which helped her write difficult passages of the book. The (CONTINUED ON PAGE 374)

I can feel a bit freer because I’m not holding as much in.”

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ST TYLE IN TY N BIGGEST ACCOMPLISHMENT “Writing my own book.”

BEAUTY BEA MUST-HAVES

Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me, by Lily Collins, HarperCollins, $19; amazon.com.

Pout Perfecter “YSL lipstick glides on smoothly with minimal shine.” YSL Rouge Pur Couture The Mats in Rouge Rock, $37; yslbeautyus.com.

Mascara MVP “I feel extra wideawake with one swipe of Lancôme Hypnôse.” Lancôme Hypnôse Drama, $28; lancome-usa.com.

FAVORITE FLOWER “Whenever I smell gardenias, I feel like I’m on vacation.”

WHAT

lily loves

SIGNATURE SCENT “Lancôme Miracle smells fresh and wears beautifully throughout the day.”

DESIGNER CRUSH

Lancôme Miracle eau de parfum spray, $99/3.4 fl. oz.; lancome-usa.com.

GO-TO LTER INSTAGRAM FI look “I like my feed to ays use uniform, so I alw Ludwig or Rise.”

“Alexander McQueen. The pieces look like paintings.”

SUN S SUNNIE NN NIES S SHE E SWEARS SWE ARS BY Y “ cla “A classi ssic c pair pairr of Ray Ray-Ba y-Bans. ns.””

STAPLE SHOE “I love the masculinefeminine mix of lace-ups. The silverr makes these pop.” Metallic calf-leather derbies, Brunello Cucinelli, $1,495; at Brunello Cucinelli, 212-334-1010.

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Acetate Acetat Ace tat s nglasses, sungla sun glasse g sses, s, Ray-Ban, Ray-Ba n, $15 $150; $ 0;; r -ban.c ray-ba ray b n.com. om..

CANDLE OF CHOICE “I’m always burning tons of Voluspa in my apartment.” Voluspa Baltic Amber Embossed Glass Scalloped Edge Candle, $20; voluspa.com.


STYLE IN

VICTORIA BECKHAM in Victoria Beckham

my icons CATE BLANCHETT in Giorgio Armani Privé

GWEN STEFANI in Blumarine

ZOË KRAVITZ in Alexander Wang

GWEN STEFANI She has reinvented herself time and time again and is never afraid to take a risk. I love that she has fun with fashion by mixing lots of colors, prints, and textures. VICTORIA BECKHAM She is always dressed impeccably. As her style evolves, she continually plays with new silhouettes and proportions. And her clothing line is beautiful. CATE BLANCHETT Her red-carpet picks never fail to surprise me because they are so edgy. She can rock anything from a pantsuit to a studded, feathered Givenchy gown. Her choic ces are ageless, and her hair and makeup are divine too. ZOË KRAVITZ This girl can do no wrong. She can literally pull off any look, including any hairstyle. Her attitude is incredib bly bl y sexy, intriguing, and a little bit girl next door. And her body is bangin’. I wish I could ge get g t away with everything she wears! AUDREY HEPBURN She was utterly chic an nd always put together, yet she maintained such a fresh, youthful look. Even though sh he dressed simply, it had a huge effect. She was petite but mighty. Plus, he er brows were epic. COCO CHANEL She taught us all so much abou ut y. fashion because she made the biggest impact on the industry es Her attention to detail was amazing. And since her piece are timeless, they can just as easily be worn today.

AUDREY HEPBURN

198

COCO CHANEL


OR STREAM IT ON ®

HBO NOW® is only accessible through participating partners in the US and certain US territories. Certain restrictions apply. ® & © 2017 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved.


STYLE IN

S LY’S LIL

sty

ile MOTO JACKET Leather, Coach 1941, $1,900; coach.com.

WH HAT SHE’S BUYING

2

LACE DRESS

3

KHAKI TRENCH Cotton-polyester, Express, $128; express.com.

HER TOP 3 LOOKS 1. In ZUHAIR MURAD COUTURE at the 2017 Golden Globes “This dress may have been the first piece I tried on, but I instantly knew it was right. My Harry Winston jewelry complemented it perfectly.”

1

PRINTED BAG

COLETTE

Leather, Longchamp, $1,295; longchamp.com.

2. In REEM ACRA at the L.A. première of Rules Don’t Apply “While this design has an art deco vibe, it also feels very modern. The result is sexy yet sophisticated.” 3. In ELIE SAAB at the Rome première of Love, Rosie “The best part of my gown was how its skirt dramatically blew in the wind.”

LILY’S PICKS JEWELRY OF CHOICE “I’m a big fan of Repossi—the pieces are delicate yet bold. And my rose gold Movado watch is practical but also makes a statement.” SIGNATURE OUTFIT “High-waist jeans with a cropped sweater, a black leather jacket, ballet flats, and a chic little backpack.”

Cotton and lace, Pinko, $655; pinko .com.

Rose Ros eg gold old d i -plate pl h ion ion-pl p ated d watc watch, h, M ado,, $ Movado Mov $695 695;; com. movado mov ado.co .co .com.

BEST STYLE ADVICE SHE’S EVER RECEIVED “Just because something is in style doesn’t mean it will work on you.”

SHOPPING DESTINATION “Colette in Paris has an amazingly curated selection. And the outfits on display are so beautifully put together.”

OLDEST ITEM IN HER CLOSET “My favorite pair of crazy studde ed jean jeanss from elementary school. I haven’’t ha had d the heart to get rid of them beca e ause of all the memories they evoke.””

FAVORITE SHOES “ arlott ’’s pla “Charl “Ch otte e Olym Olympia pia’s playfu yfull ball ballet et flat flats. s.. T y are They The are so flat flatter tering ing an and d fun fun to wea wear.” r.””

BIGGEST FASHION REGRET “Wearing icy blue lipstick that matched my blue leopard-print shirt and pants.” Raffia and metallic calfskin flats, Charlotte Olympia, $655; charlotteolympia.com.

200 20 200 00

InST YLE MONTH 20 17


WWW.HILARYRADLEY.COM


STYLE IN

1

“I love hot tea. That’s the Brit in me. Whether it’s Earl Grey, herbal licorice, or peppermint, I have to sip it the second I’ve poured the water, because nothing is less appealing than n lukewarm tea.”

3

happy

“Doing puzzles is one of the best ways to relieve stress. Some of them are superhard, so I feel like I’ve accomplished something when I finally get all the pieces to fit together.” 202

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THINGS THAT MAKE ME

4

“My My mom [Jill Tavelman] is my best friend, and she always makes me feel really happy and loved. She’s pretty much my partner in crime.”

2

“My happy place is a bench at my house in the English countryside. Ever since I was little, I’ve been going there to sit whenever I need to get away and have quality q alone time. It has such a beautiful view, and it always makes me feel so centered.”

5 “There’s nothing that makes me feel better than an amazing, huge laugh out loud.”


WHAT TO WEAR, WHAT TO BUY

2

1

3

4

5

6

9 7

8

11

12

10 13

Eyes onYou When it comes to these statement shades, there’s no such thing as too bold. 1 Rubber, Havaianas, $68; at Solstice Sunglasses. 2 Acetate, Gucci, $375; gucci.com. 3 Metal, Tommy Hilfiger, $134; at Tommy Hilfiger, 212-223-1824. 4 Acetate, Dolce & Gabbana, $270; at select Sunglass Hut stores. 5 Acetate, Kate Spade New York, $155; katespade.com. 6 Acetate, Vera Wang Eyewear, $198; baxterbonny.com. 7 Zyl, Salvatore Ferragamo, $275; ferragamo.com. 8 Acetate, Dax Gabler, $495; saks.com. 9 Metal, Fendi, $555; fendi.com. 10 Swarovski crystal and metal, Elie Saab, $1,200; at Solstice Sunglasses. 11 Acetate, Christopher Kane, $540; christopherkane.com. 12 Acetate, Marc Jacobs, $220; at Solstice Sunglasses. 13 Acetate, Just Cavalli, $142; at Just Cavalli. 14 Acetate, Garrett Leight x Clare V., $340; garrettleight.com. 15 Nylon resin, Chloé, $310; chloe.com.

14

15

Any Occasion Outfits Go to instyle.com/ instantstyle for full outfit ideas served daily

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INSTANT STYLE Cotton skirt, Leon Max Collection, $248; maxstudio.com.

PRADA

Viscose dress, Orley, $990; orley .us for info.

Cotton skirt, Beaufille, $790; fortyfiveten.com.

MINI TREND

Checks The pr prepp eppy y patt pattern ern fe feels els le less ss stodgy sto dgy d wh when hen spr spruce uced d up with with h femini fem inine ne flou flouris rishes hes— s— —hi, rru ruffles ffles— s— — and fr freeee-flow flowing ing si silho lhou uet ettes tes..

Cotton-blend trousers, Topshop, $75; us.topshop .com.

Silk-cotton shirt, Eileen Fisher, $238; eileenfisher .com.

WOVEN WONDERS

Braided leather footwear is shaping up to be the chicest way to get a little fresh air. Team a pair with crisp poplins or loose linens. 208

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EMILIA WICKSTEAD

Cotton shirt, Equipment, $188; equipment fr.com.

Calfskin lace-ups, Stuart Weitzman, $598; saks.com.

Kidskin and calfskin heels, Paul Andrew, $965; farfetch.com. Leather slides, Brother Vellies, $515; shopbird.com.


Cool-Girl Buys Miroslava Duma Entrepreneur and founder of Büro 24/7, Fashion Tech Labs, and The Tot

Pernille Teisbæk Stylist and co-founder and creative director of Social Zoo

Sofía Sanchez de Betak Creative director of Chufy.World

Mari Giudicelli Model and founder and designer of Mari Giudicelli shoes

Tamu McPherson Photographer and founder of All the Pretty Birds

@miraduma

@pernilleteisbaek

@chufy

@marigiudicelli

@tamumcpherson

From oversize suiting to micro hemlines, dramatic cuts are her signature.

She’s got a knack for giving streetwear a sophisticated spi pin.

An eye for clashing motifs equals an eclectic, gl b l sensibility. global ibilit .

Is it something Jane Birkin might own? Then Giudicelli probably owns it too.

Her calling cards: vivid colors, cheerful prints, and a g giant smile.

THE MUST-HAVE

VETEME

NTS

MARNI

THE STYLE

THE INSIDER

Five fashion insiders reveal the pieces they can’t wait to get their hands on.

““I have my sights sett o on a new w Gabriela ab e a bag It Hearst Nina bag. has a very distinctive character and goes well with jeans, evening dresses— everything!”

“ love how th “I he he folded-down heel g gives an edge to these classic Vetements x Manolo Blahnik slingbacks. The height is also great for everyday wear.”

Leather bag, $1,995; gabrielahearst.com.

Silk-blend slingbacks, $1,590; saks.com.

“This Silky Equipment blouse will be my go-to piece. The fit and relaxed shape are so effortless and cool.” Silk blouse, $218; equipmentfr.com.

“Once it warms up, I’ll be living in Haight swimwear. It’s so beautifully made and perfect for long days on the beach with friends.” Rayon-spandex one-piece, $287; farfetch.com.

“I want something from designer Consuelo Castiglioni’s last collection for Marni. This look is my favorite.” Silk crêpe dress, $5,660; at Marni.

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INSTANT STYLE

The Score Cheap thrills to fast-track your style.

$175 Stainless steel and ceramic watch, DKNY; dkny.com. $125 Lace blouse, & Other Stories; stories.com.

$98 Cotton-elastane cropped pants, Ann Taylor; anntaylor.com.

$148 Polyester top, French Connection; usa.french connection.com.

$75 Polyester and rubber heels, Aldo; aldoshoes.com.

$20 Crystal, acrylic, plastic, and metal earrings, Mango; shop .mango .com.

$98 Lace and fauxleather skirt, Bebe; bebe.com.

$38 Metallic faux-leather slides, ASOS; us.asos.com.

CAROLINE ISSA

$39 Fauxleather wristlet, LC Lauren Conrad for Kohl’s; kohls.com.

NICOLE WARNE

$34 Glass $98 Cottonelastane skirt, J.Crew; jcrew.com.

bead and coated metal earrings, Vera Bradley; verabradley .com.

$49 Polyurethane bag, Nine West; macys.com.

$138 Viscose chiffon top, Rebecca Minkoff; rebecca minkoff.com.

$152 Viscose dress, Ganni; needsupply .com.

$180

$88 Printed lambskin bag, French Connection; zappos.com.

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Textile and leather heels, Boden; bodenusa .com.

$95 Cotton T-shirt, Marimekko, $95; us .marimekko .com.


A orld of er own

Spring 2017


INSTANT STYLE 5

This…orAll This?

4

1 3

2

7

$2,710

1 Polyester skirt, Caroline Constas, $395; at Bergdorf Goodman. 2 Gold-plated and cord necklace with pearl, turquoise, and lapis, Lizzie Fortunato, $395; kirnazabete.com. 3 Polyester dress, ASOS, $91; us.asos .com. 4 Silk dress, Lilly Pulitzer, $198; 8 lillypulitzer.com. 5 Silk, bead, and gold-plated earrings, Kate Spade New York, $98; kate spade.com. 6 Viscose and nylon dress, Alice + Olivia by Stacey Bendet, $350; aliceandolivia .com. 7 Proviscose top, Splendid, $88; splendid .com. 8 Stretch-poplin cropped pants, Tory Burch, $250; toryburch .com. 9 Suede heels, Stuart Weitzman, $445; stuartweitzman .com. 10 Silk top, Nicole Miller, $275; nicolemiller.com. 11 Cotton clutch, Figue, $125; figue.com.

FOR ALL 11 PIECES

6

$2,595

10

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INSTANT STYLE ANYA ZIOUROVA

Cottonpolyester, Camp Collection, $48; shopcamp.com.

Get the Message

Cotton-polyester, (National Brand) Mighty Fine, $22; jcp.com.

Tucke T Tucke ked ed in into to jea jeans ns and d sttate atem m t ment men s rts al ski alike ike,, a re retro tro-pe -pe erfe rfec c ct grrra raphi phic c T fe feels els ve very ry now now..

Cotton, Être Cécile, $95; etrececile.com.

Jersey triblend, Sub_Urban Riot, $44; suburban riot.com.

Polyester-cotton, Wildfox, $68; wildfox.com.

YUYU

JASON WU

ISABEL MARANT

Copper and zinc bracelet (can be worn as anklet), Diane von Furstenberg, $198; dvf.com.

BOSS

A go-to accessory for stars like Kendall Jenner and Rihanna, this ’90s-era staple gives simple heels a subversive twist.

CÉLINE

HERMÈ S

THE RETURN OF ANKLETS

A LITTLE OFF THE SIDE

Ovver the cropped top? A new wave of cutout dreesses offers fresh ways to flash some midriff. 214

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INSTANT STYLE

BEST TRANSITIONAL

Toppers BOTTEGA VENETA

VERSACE

MICHAEL KORS

Weather changing forecasts with three of spring’s biggest outerwear trends.

UTILITY JACKET TRENCH

WINDBREAKER

From top: Cotton, Prada, $2,395; at select Prada boutiques. Cotton-rayon, Chico’s, $159; chicos.com. Cotton blend, See by Chloé, $695; at Steven Dann, 212-575-5551.

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From top: Nylon, New Balance x J.Crew, $125; jcrew.com. Polyamide-elastane, Hilfiger Collection, $390; at Tommy Hilfiger, 212-223-1824. Polyester, Adidas StellaSport, $115; adidas.com.

From top: Tencel, Gap, $138; gap.com. LyocellLycra, The Kooples Sport, $325; thekooples.com. Cotton blend, American Eagle Outfitters, $80; ae.com (available in sizes up to XXL).


DAY TO NIGHT

Low Heels

Good news: The season’s most covetable shoes are as stylish as they are walkable.

HEAVY ON THE GLITZ

For a striking play on scale, mix your dainty stacking rings with a menswearinspired stunner. DAY

NIGHT

Ivory cutout mules match the lightness of billowy trousers but are still meeting-ready.

No stilettos means you can do a super-shorrt skirt. Tasseled metallic nu umbers be s keep the look flirty.

Top Cotton, Jessica Simpson Collection, $60; jessicasimpson .com. Trousers Cotton, 3.1 Phillip Lim, $495; 31philliplim.com. Ring Diamond and 14kt gold, Effy Jewelry, $2,448; effyjewelry.com. Bag Leather, Kate Spade New York, $348; katespade.com. Heels Calfskin, The Row, $1,150; at The Row, 212-755-2017.

Dress Polyester, C/Meo Collective, $205; us.fashionbunker.com. Earrings Diamond and silver, Tacori, $1,810; tacori.com. Ring Sapphire, freshwater cultured pearl, and sterling silver, Honora, $235; at Honora, 212-8666326. Bag Calfskin, Theory, $295; theory.com. Heels Satin and metallic leather, Jimmy Choo, $750; at select Jimmy Choo stores.

Quartz, diamond, and 14kt white gold, Le Vian, $3,097; jared .com.

Tourmaline, enamel, and 9kt gold, Percossi Papi, $1,785; net-a-porter.com.

Enamel and 18kt gold, Foundrae, $2,850; foundrae.com.

LIGHT G STEP ST The street-style set has traded minimalist white sneakers for old-school kicks last seen in PE class. Run with it! From left: Synthetic and mesh, New Balance, $80; newbalance .com. Canvas, Converse, $55; converse.com. Leather, Nike, $125; nike.com. Vachetta leather, Michael Michael Kors, $130; at select Michael Kors Lifestyle stores. Nylon and suede, Reebok, $53; reebok.com.

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CHLOÉ

IN NSTAN NT STYLE

LOOK OF THE MOMENT

Riviera Refresh Leather bag, Brahmin, $285; brahmin.com.

Bre eezy fits in nautical hue es,, as es as seen seen n on the t runway at Chloé, brin ring g clas classic sic c South of France style up So p-to -to-da -date. te.

Viscose top, Miss Me, $59; missme.com.

Enamel, seed bead, and zinc necklace, Ann Taylor, $50; ann taylor .com.

Cotton organza dress, Teri Jon, $500; terijon.com.

Polyesterspandex dress, Tart Collections, $148; tart collections .com.

Polyesterviscose pants, Anne Klein, $89; macys.com.

THE BEST BASICS: KHAKIS Leather bag, Etienne Aigner, $345; etienne aigner.com.

Silk-viscose blouse, Brooks Brothers, $168; brooks brothers.com.

Cotton top, Rafaella, $58; bonton.com/ rafaella (available in sizes up to 3X).

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Stainless steel watch with leather strap, Fossil, $125; fossil .com.

Suede sandals, The Frye Company, $328; Polycarbonate and thefrye copper sunglasses, company Aldo, $16; aldo .com. shoes.com.

Wide, leggy cuts, elegant draping, and the occasional racing stripe let neutral tones take center stage. From top: Cotton blend, CH Carolina Herrera, $440; at CH Carolina Herrera. Cotton chino, Raey, $420; matches fashion.com. Cotton-blend twill, Tracy Reese, $298; tracyreese.com. Twill canvas, Adeam, $865; at Five Story, 212-288-1338.


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The hair dryer re-thought. dyson.com/hairdryer


INSTANT STYLE

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THE LINE CO-FOUNDER R AND D CR EATIVE DIRECTOR VANES SA C A TRAINA A NA ARES A FEW OF HER FAVOR N S SHA RITE THINGS 2

L 9 Lambskin flats, Chanel, $ $750;; a select C at Chanel boutiques..

6 I pref prefer er nat natura urall face face pr produ oducts cts.. Kahina Kah ina Giving Givin Gi ving g Beauty Beauty Beau ty makes makes some some of my favorites. 7 Chanel lipstick in a bright orange-based red is a signature of mine. 8 If I’m in bed and awake (a rarity!), I’m reading. The last book I finished was Fates and Furies, by Lauren Groff. 9 Most days you’ll find me wearing Chanel ballet flats. 10 Catherine Holstein’s label Khaite makes two of my fashion staples: a black b ac turtleneck tu t e ec ec bodysuit he high h-waist kinny bodysu bod ysuit it and d th the high-wa ist sk skinn y V essa M hus Vaness Van a jean jeans. s.. 11 My husban band d and I jus justt used used th this is dee deep p shad shade e of of balt l to re l brary. b ry. cobalt cob repai paint nt our lilibra

3 Weleda W l da Skin Food, $119; usa a .weled eda.com.. 4

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1 Every morning I drink English breakfast tea with milk and a touch of honey. 2 My mother [author Danielle Steel] has had a big influence on my personal style. I appreciate how women of her generation get dressed with an old-world elegance. 3 Weleda Skin Food is one of my beauty obsessions. I always have a tube in my purse. 4 Traveling in Italy for my honeymoon last fall, I was inspired by the work of Raphael [pictured] and Botticelli. 5 An Hermès Kelly is my go-to bag—it works with everything.

I’m not attracted to trends. I’d rather have items that fit well in my wardrobe and last for a long time.”

6 Kahina Giving Beauty Argan Oil, $82; kahina-giving beauty.com.

7 Chanel Rouge Coco Shine Hydrating Sheer Lipshine in Insoumise, $37; chanel.com.

Inside The Apartment by The Line in New York City, one of the company’s three Instagram-worthy stores

5 Leather bag, Hermès, similar styles from $7,000; at Christie’s New York Handbags, 212-641-3734 for info. M A RCH 20 1 6

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2017 TREND REPORT

It’s Spring! DIOR

Start the season with fashion’s freshest looks

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TREND REPORT THE TREND

Utilitarian

STELLA MCCARTNEY

A mix of menswear and military influences has all the right moves.

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®


BALENCIAGA

CHLOÉ É

LO LOEWE E

Something all fashion capitals can agree on: Clean lines and cargo pockets feel unstoppably stylish right now. At Mulberry and Marni, the elements took an army-inspired turn in crisp khaki separates and tailored fatigues; meanwhile, laidback workwear silhouettes went luxe (hello, leather boilersuits) in Bottega Veneta’s collection. Off the runway, you can count on colortinted shades and chunky gold jewelry to elevate any interpretation.

BOTTEGA VENETA

TREND REPORT

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ELLERY

CAROLINA HERRERA

ADAM SELMAN

ISABEL MARANT

OFF-WHITE C/O VIRGIL ABLOH

CÉLINE

MONSE

ALEXANDER WANG

WHAT TO TRY ... SHIRTING


MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

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STELLA MCCARTNEY

TOD’S O S

THE ACCESSORIES Canvas and cowhide bag, Sacai, $1,365; sacai.jp for stores.

Goldtoned necklace, Balenciaga, $1,695; at Balenciaga New York, 212-2060872.

Plastic and metal sunglasses, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci, $295; at Givenchy, 212-650-0180.

Faux-vachetta leather sandals, Stella McCartney, $795; stella mccartney.com.

Studded leather sandals, Jimmy Choo, $850; at select Jimmy Choo stores.

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TREND REPORT Cotton-spandex skirt, Guess, $79; shop.guess.com.

Cotton jacket, Pleione Clothing, $138; pleione clothing.com.

Leather bag, Longchamp, $895; longchamp.com.

Polyester coat, Kuho, $280; at Nordstrom.

Ion-plated watch with nylon strap, Citizen Watch, $195; citizen watch.com.

Tencelcotton shirt, The Blue Shirt Shop, $158; dl1961 .com.

Classic silhouettes get reworked at Givenchy.

Cottonelastane trousers, & Other Stories, $115; stories .com. Canvas skirt, SelfPortrait, $410; intermix online.com.

Poplin top, Tibi, $345; tibi.com.

Polyester dress, C/Meo Collective, $195; us.fashion bunker.com.

Calf-suede heels, Alumnae, $675; alumnae.nyc.

Leather sandals, Michael Michael Kors, $140; michael kors.com.

Cotton pants, Two by Vince Camuto, $79; vince camuto .com/ two-byvinceclothing.

Cottonspandex popover, Talbots, $80; talbots .com.

Leather bag, Sandro, $645; us.sandroparis.com.

Stainless steel and acetate sunglasses, Smoke x Mirrors, $350; smokex mirrors.com.

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Cottonspandex jacket, J.Jill, $99; jjill.com. (Available in sizes up to 4X.)

Brass and silver earrings, Anndra Neen, $85; anndra neen.com.


LANVIN

TREND REPORT

THE TREND

New Romance A fashion fairy tale comes to life in delicate fabrics and dainty embellishments.

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ALEXANDER A AN M MCQU EEN

PRADA

D OR DIOR

From frothy hy tullee skirts to inttricate c te floral beadiing, g, there’s no shortage ge of ways to expresss your feminine side. Consider a playful y l but polished appproach, succh as thee marabou feeather– atin su suittrimmed sat t ing at Pradaa, or thee cascade of chiffon on odarte.. ruffles at Ro Worried alll thatt flounce will feel ee too sweet? A hiint of subversion ((the outs att midriff cutouts Erdem and tthee studded blaack k leather at A lexane der McQueen) ugar keeps the sug content in check.. And don’t worry: y None of this meanss taking a breeak from m your beloveed jjeans. Few things look h a frillyy cooler with pastel blousse..

ERDEM M

TREND REPORT

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GABRIELA HEARST

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

BLUMARINE

MIU MIU

TORY BURCH

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

ROCHAS

DIOR

WHAT TO TRY ... BRA TOPS


Suede heels, Valentino Garavani, $995; at Valentino.

Cotton-blend bag, Mansur Gavriel, $695; mansur gavriel.com.

Metal with vintage silk, glass bead, and crystal earrings, Gucci, $1,750; gucci.com.

LANVIN

CHANEL

VALENTINO V

GIORGIO ARMANI G

RO ODARTE

ALBERTA FERRETTI

THE E ACCESSORIES A S

Metal and enamel minaudière, Dior, $8,000; at Dior.

Cotton mules, Alberta Ferretti, $925; fwrd .com.

Acetate sunglasses, Bottega Veneta, $540; at Bottega Veneta, 800845-6790.

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TREND REPORT

Cottonpolyester pants, Lisette L Sport, $155; lisettel .com.

Rose gold–toned watch, Bulova, $169; sterling jewelers .com.

Acetate sunglasses, Kate Spade New York, $155; kate spade.com.

Silk skirt, Joie, $248; joie.com.

Embroidered cotton-elastane bralette, Josie Natori, $450; natori.com.

Suede sandals, Brother Vellies, $650; brothervellies.com.

Brass, crystal, and resin earrings, Lele Sadoughi, $185; saks .com.

Cotton and lace jacket, Elie Tahari, $348; elietahari .com. At Ch Chanel, nel sideways baseball caps give pastel separates swagger.

Jacquard pants, BY. Bonnie Young, $2,200; barneys.com.

Leather sandals, Clarks, $80; clarks usa.com.

Polyestergeorgette dress, Catherine Catherine Malandrino, $148; macys .com.

Cotton top, Rebecca Taylor, $275; bloomingdales.com. Nylonelastane bra, La Perla, $95; laperla.com.

Polyester pants, Belle Badgley Mischka, $189; dillards .com.

Polyesterspandex skirt, Kensie, $69; at Macy’s.

Cotton shirt, CH Carolina Herrera, $350; at CH Carolina Herrera, 212-744-2076.

Calfskin loafers, Aquatalia, $495; aquatalia.com.

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Polyester dress, Dressbarn, $48; dressbarn.com. Leather bag, Dooney & Bourke, $650; dooney.com.


SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

TREND REPORT

THE TREND

’80s Flash Sparkle, sequins, and major shoulders are ready to party again.

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KENZO

Is it too soon for a Dynasty remake? Not according to designers (and the CW). Strong shoulders (some replete with prom ruffles, as seen at Gucci) are the new word in nighttime glamour, especially when set off by metallics and micro hems. The color palette is bold—think Michael Jackson’s black, white, and red, or Prince’s purples and pinks—and the patterns unapologetically wild. When accessorizing, remember: These clothes deserve dancing shoes.

CHRISTOPHER KANE

TREND REPORT

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SPORTMAX

MARCO DE VINCENZO

KENZO

DION LEE

ALEXANDER WANG

PROENZA SCHOULER

GUCCI

VERSACE

WHAT TO TRY ... SHINE


HAIDER ACKERMANN

SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

BALENCIAGA

LOUIS VUITTON

MARC JACOBS

GUCCI

THE ACCESSORIES Metallic goat leather bag, Bally, $1,995; at Bally, 212-751-9082. Crystal and metal earrings, Lanvin, $895; at Just One Eye, 888-563-6858.

Acetate and metal sunglasses, Max Mara, $250; maxmara.com. Calfskin boots, Céline, $1,190; at Céline, 212-535-3703.

Suede slingbacks with pearls and strass, René Caovilla, $1,200; at Bergdorf Goodman.

Stainless steel, malachite, and diamond watch with alligator strap, Gomelsky by Shinola, $1,300; shinola.com.

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TREND REPORT Metallic leather sandals, Banana Republic, $138; banana republic.com.

Cotton-rayon sweater, Bella Freud, $580; bellafreud.com.

Lurex jersey bodysuit, Alix, $165; available in March at net-a-porter .com.

Vinyl trenchcoat, Topshop, $210; us .topshop .com.

Gold-plated earrings, Trademark, $248; trademark.com.

Leather clutch, Calvin Klein, $198; calvinklein.com.

Viscose-polyamide dress, Pinko, $560; pinko.com. An abundance of jewels, bows, and leopard print at DSquared2 proves that too much is just the right amount.

Leather jacket, Maje, $945; maje .com.

Metal sunglasses, Karl Lagerfeld, $165; karl.com.

Metallic silkLurex skirt, Chelsea and Walker, $385; chelseaand walker.com.

Polyester foil camisole, Rosie HW x Paige, $178; paige.com.

Polyestercotton pants, H&M, $60; hm.com. Cotton pullover, Diesel, $228; diesel.com.

Silk-blend blazer, St. Emile, $795; st-emile .com.

Polyester minidress, ASOS, $98; asos .com. PVC bag, Boyy, $925; modaoperandi.com.

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Silk and leather pumps with crystals, Attico, $654; browns fashion.com.

Metallic silk-blend chion skirt, Mother of Pearl, $550; motherofpearl.co.uk for info.


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PRADA

TREND REPORT

THE TREND

The new uniform of team chic: graphic prints and primary hues that pop.

Sporty 244

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DOLCE & GABBANA

VERSACE

DKNY

The latest riff on performance wear is sure to get your heart racing, even if you run more errands than laps. Clingy, aerodynamic dresses (see Boss and Alexander Wang) catapult the trend onto a sexier playing field, while slouchy warm-up jackets and pants just look plain cool. If you’ve been slaving away at carving out a six-pack, you’re in luck: Cropped tops and sports bras are still going strong. Try retinasearing hues and heavy stripes to earn those second glances. Flatforms, as flashy as they were circa the Spice Girls days, provide a winning finish.

FENDI

TREND REPORT

246

MISSONI

MARC JACOBS

PORTS 1961

CHLOÉ

GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI

PROENZA SCHOULER

MIU MIU

SONIA RYKIEL

WHAT TO TRY ... STRIPES


Mesh shopper, Balenciaga, $2,025; at Barneys New York. Acetate sunglasses, Salvatore Ferragamo, $325; at Salvatore Ferragamo.

STELLA MCCARTNEY

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

PRADA

ALEXANDER WANG

OFF-WHITE W E C C/O VIRGIL V ABLOH

BOSS SS

THE ACCESSORIES

Coated brass earrings, Isabel Marant, $245; at Isabel Marant, 415781-0113.

Rubber sandals, Prada, price upon request; at select Prada boutiques.

Nubuck and taffeta sneakers, Brunello Cucinelli, $1,195; at Brunello Cucinelli, 212-334-1010. Patent calfskin slides, Chanel, $750; at select Chanel boutiques. M A RCH 20 1 7 I nST YL E

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TREND REPORT Rayonnylon dress, Kendall + Kylie, $275; joebrand .com. Metal and zyl sunglasses, MCM, $346; nordstrom.com.

Cotton mesh jacket, DKNY, $598; at Lord & Taylor. Silicone watch, Guess, $65; shop.guess .com.

Suede and woven lace sandals, Furla, $345; furla.com.

Jersey tank top, Polo Ralph Lauren, $90; ralphlauren .com.

Tech knit sweater, Tory Sport, $185; tory sport.com.

Take the gym gear to the streets in Versace’s colorblock tracksuits.

Cotton canvas tote, Lands’ End, $38; landsend .com.

Cotton dress, Demylee, $194; grethen house.com.

Polyamide sneakers, Armani Exchange, $180; armaniexchange .com.

Leather slides, Ugg, $110; ugg.com.

Polyester track pants, 1.State, $119; nordstrom .com.

Polyesternylon tank top, Athleta, $49; athleta .com.

Viscose-polyamide skirt, Tommy x Gigi, $150; tommy.com.

Polyester skirt, Banana Republic, $118; bananarepublic.com.

Polyamide-elastane bikini top, Profile Sport by Gottex, $78; amazon.com. Cotton bralette, Calvin Klein Underwear, $28; calvinklein.com.

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Cotton top, Ports 1961, $450; farfetch.com.


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Extra SPEC A IN T R O D U C IN G T H E BEST A N D BO LDEST A CC E S S O TH E SEA R IE I S SO N H A S TO O F F E p ho to gr ap R he d by y THOM A

Crystal-embroidered velvet flatforms, Gucci, $1,890; at select Gucci stores.

S S L AC K


ACCESSORIES From top: Velvet and leather, Attico, $624; at Bergdorf Goodman. Velvet, Valentino Garavani, $595; at Valentino.

THE TOPHANDLE BAG Saturated shades and glossy buckles say polished yet p b playful. y .

L Velvet Wrap Sandal CÉLINE

BALLY

SONIA RYKIEL

Where leather feels sturdy and serviceable, plush fabric takes the style to decadent heights.

THE UPDATED CHOKER Collar necklaces are in for another season thanks to a new twist: sleek and sophisticated chain details.

From top: Leather (comes with additional leather strap), Gucci, $2,490; at select Gucci stores. Crocodile, Bottega Veneta, $7,700; at Bottega Veneta, 800-845-6790. Calf leather and denim, Louis Vuitton, $2,880; at select Louis Vuitton stores. Calfskin, Michael Kors Collection, $1,550; at select Michael Kors stores. Leather, Miu Miu, $2,030; at select Miu Miu boutiques. Faux leather, Circus by Sam Edelman, $98; circusbysamedelman.com.

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ACCESSORIES Embossed leather jacket ($1,150), shorts ($2,475), and python sandals ($1,265), Tod’s; at Tod’s, 212-6445945. Diamond and 18kt gold vintage Cartier ring (right hand), Latest Revival, $9,950; latestrevival.com. Leather and snakeskin bag, Coach 1941, $695; coach .com. Diamond and 18kt rose gold ring (left hand, index finger), Ginette NY, $4,590; ginette-ny.com. Diamond and 18kt gold ring (left hand, middle finger), John Hardy, $1,950; johnhardy.com.

Snake Charmers The exotic motif gets fresh teamed with of-the-moment silhouettes.

THE BEACH-CHIC SHOE Raffia and linen lend ladylike mules and stacked heels a breezy vibe. From left: Linen and strass, Roger Vivier, $1,395; at Roger Vivier, 212-861-5371. Textile, ASOS, $34; asos.com. Raffia, suede, and wood, Mari Giudicelli, $486; at Barneys New York. Linen, Proenza Schouler, $595; proenzaschouler.com.

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Tomboy Touch

Anchor spring’s must-have pleated skirt with sporty add-ons, like a big, slouchy bag and old-school kicks.

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CHANEL

PRADA

Go sans strap with a structured pouch big enough for your daily essentials.

LONGCHAMP

THE PORTFOLIO CLUTCH

BANANA REPUBLIC

Cotton shirtdress with contrast skirt ($2,350) and canvas sneakers ($590), Céline; at Céline, 212-535-3703. Titanium watch with rubber strap, Omega, $9,500; omegawatches.com for stores. Leather bag, Marni, $2,640; at Marni.


ACCESSORIES

THE UTILITY SANDAL With lug soles and colorblocking, open-toe designs are a smart stand-in for sneakers.

From top: Calfskin bag, Mulberry, $2,095; mulberry.com. Cotton bag, Weekend Max Mara, $225; at Weekend Max Mara, 714-7541876. Silk mules, Sergio Rossi, $695; sergiorossi .com. Calf-leather clutch, Tomasini, $990; at Barneys New York.

Striped Statement

This prepster pattern reads more street style than boarding school.

From top: Leather, Tory Sport, $265; torysport.com. Leather, Camper, $150; camper.com. Calfskin, Kenzo, $260; kenzo.com. Tweed cord, Chanel, $975; at select Chanel boutiques. Technical cotton canvas, Hermès, $660; at Hermès. Calfskin and metal, Dior, $800; at Dior. Embroidered calf leather, Versace, $1,025; at select Versace boutiques.

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ACCESSORIES

THE MIDI PUMP Stilettos shrink down without sacrificing sex appeal.

Mood Lifters

Vibrant rainbow accents guarantee a smile on the grayest of days.

THE OVERSIZE SHIELD EARRING These dramatic danglers elevate everything from jeans to a cocktail dress.

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LOEWE

BALENCIAGA

SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

Viscose skirt, Salvatore Ferragamo, $890; at Salvatore Ferragamo. Calf-leather bag, Sara Battaglia, $597; at Bloomingdale’s. Suede mules, Alexandre Birman, $625; net-a-porter.com.

From top: Patent leather and calf leather, Aquatalia, $395; aquatalia .com. Satin, Chanel, $1,550; at select Chanel boutiques. Calfskin, Chloé, $875; at Chloé. Suede and Perspex, Jimmy Choo, $795; at select Jimmy Choo stores. Leather, Prada, price upon request; at select Prada boutiques. Patent leather, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci, $950; at Saks Fifth Avenue.


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beauty BOTTEGA VENETA

F Facresh e

SP R RO I N G CL UT E ST I RA NE W AN Y IGH ITH OU by R TF DIA R O F O U R B E AU NN MT AM TY EA HE AZ S ZO RU Y U P NE NW D AY AT E S

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BEAUTY PROEN ZA SCH O ULER

GLOWY SKIN

PRADA

First, apply a drop of liquid luminizer over your entire th a layer face. Then top with l y r n-finish of lightweight satin h aybelli e aybelline foundation like Ma Maybelli am New York Dream Cushion ($16; maybelline.com).. The result? A luminosity that leaves your skin looking dewy and refreshed. e eshed.

STELLA MCCARTNEY

NATURAL HAIR Embrace what you’ve got. A moisturizing conditioner amps up curls. Carol’s Daughter’s Pracaxi Nectar Wash-n-Go Leave-In ($11; sallybeauty.com) also adds shine.

BRUSHED-UP BROWS Groomed arches are the building blocks of the no-makeup makeup look. Try a pigmented gel: Glossier Boy Brow ($16; glossier.com) gives color, volume, and control in one product. Apply using short strokes for a clean finish.

TOMMY HILFIGER

For an instant wow, think bold. CoverGirl Colorlicious Lipstick in Bombshell Pink ($7; covergirl.com) pops on Kee every skin tone. Keep place with the color in pla th hing liner. MAC a matching C Cosmetics Lip Cos p Pencil in n Talking g Points ($18;; maccosmetics.com) maccosm maccos ) blends seam mlessly. b m y.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

CUSHNIE ET OCHS

BRIGHT LIPS

CHLOÉ

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hani Darden didn’t set out to be La La Land’s most-in-demand facialist, loved by the likes of Jessica Alba, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, January Jones, Emily Ratajkowski, and Chrissy Teigen. Growing up, Darden wanted to model, but it’s clear she was a skin-care guru in the making. “My friends from back home were like, ‘Duh. You were so into popping pimples and making egg masks,’’’ she says, laughing. Darden did model, in Canada and then in Los Angeles. “I kept getting cast in every hip-hop music video,” she says. “But I truly can’t dance.” (Check out LL Cool J’s “Phenomenon” for one Darden sighting.) So she chose the glowbiz over showbiz and went to school to be an aesthetician, working for a dermatologist and then a plastic surgeon to hone her skills. Word started to spread about this former model with the golden touch. Darden’s secret? “My clients would say it’s my simple approach to skin care,” she says. “I don’t need people to use a million products.” The one item she swears by? Retinol. “It makes such a differencee by boosting collagen and helping with fine lines, pigmentation, and acne. It can improve the texture of your skin.” The runner-up is sunscreen. “Not wearing it is the worst thing you can do,” she stresses. “Most aging that you see comes from not using sunscreen.” Perhaps Darden’s biggest gift is her empathy. She remembers a painful period in her 30s when she was breaking out all the time. “I didn’t even want to leave the house,” she says. “I know how awful it is when you have problem skin. It makes me feel good to help people look their best, for sure.” –KERRY DIAMOND

JESSICA ALBA

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SHANI’S FAVORITES Resurface by Shani Darden Retinol Reform, $95; shanidarden.com. LightStim for Wrinkles, $249; lightstim.com. iS Clinical Active Serum, $130; dermstore.com. The Honest Company Organic Lip Balm Trio, $9 (Lavender Mint shown); honest.com.

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BEAUTY

TORY BURCH’S

Icons MEET THE REMARKABLE INDIVIDUALS WHO INSP N PIRED THE DESIGNER WITH T STYLE AND SUBSTANCE THEIR S by MARCI ROBIN

BURCH’S PARENTS

Tory Burch Love Relentlessly eau de parfum, $115/3.4 fl. oz.; macys.com.

Princess Grace

Her Parents Burch’s ultimate icons? Her parents, Reva and Buddy. Love Relentlessly, Burch’s newest scent, with notes of pink pepper and rose, is a celebration of their nearly 50-year romance. “Their love affair was extraordinary,” Burch says. Fragrance played a big role in her parents’ lives and brings up many memories for the designer. She can still recall when she sampled all the bottles on her mom’s vanity in one sitting. “She had to throw me right in the bath!” And to this day, the smell of the classic Vetiver by Guerlain instantly reminds Burch of her father. The name of her latest fragrance is also a nod to him—he would place love notes disguised as help-wanted ads in the local newspaper and sign them “Love, Relentless.”

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GRACE KELLY CIRCA 1955

The Princess of Monaco was one of her mother’s beauty icons too. “Grace Kelly went on a few dates with my dad, though, so I’m not sure my mom loved her that much!”

Catherine Deneuve

CATH ERIN E DENEUVE IN 1966

The legendary French actress, famous for such films as The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and Belle de Jour, has served as muse for countless designers over the years, from Burch to Yves Saint Laurent. “There’s an inner strength to her,” Burch says. “She’s a classic beauty, but she also has depth, which is ultimately more interesting. She knows who she is, and that comes through.”


MALA LA YOUSAFZ AI

Romy Schneider Just search “Romy Schneider” on Pinterest and you’ll understand why Burch considers the enigmatic European actress a style icon. “Romy was incredibly chic in an understated, elegant way,” says Burch. “She brought a sense of vitality to her characters, but vulnerability too.”

ROMY SCHNEIDER IN 1974

CHLOE & HALLE

Malala Yousafzai

Chloe & Halle

Burch has nothing but admiration for the Pakistani education activist. “What she has endured and what she has done is really amazing,” says Burch. “I see the passion, and that’s so exciting.”

“They are so talented and unafraid of experimenting with their music and personal style,” Burch says about the sisters, 18 and 17, who opened for Beyoncé’s Formation tour. “They are effortlessly beautiful.”

Jackie Kennedy

BEAUTY FAVES

JACK IE KE NN EDY IN TH E 1960S

Grace under pressure— that’s what comes to Burch’s mind when she thinks of the First Lady. “She had the most exceptional personal style, the kind that comes from knowing oneself. She epitomized elegance and defined her era.”

Es stée Lauder Sumptuous S Extreme Mascara A swipe of this v volumizing ma mascara boosts an lengthens and lashes. $28; estee lauder.com.

MAC Cosmetics Mineralize Blush in Dainty This pale pink blush is a makeup must for the designer.

Pantene Panten e Pro-V S ooth Smoot Smo ot & Sleek Sle S ek Shampoo Burch Bur ch is a uc believ bel ieve e in ver high-l hig h ow b gh-low beauty. Thiss drug Thi drug gstore staple sta ple p is her go-to gog to sha ampoo. $ at dr $5; drug ug gstores.

$28; maccosmetics.com.

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BEAUTY

THE INFLUENCER

Chris McMillan JENNIFER ANISTON’S MANE MAN TALKS ABOUT PARISIAN HAIR, CALIFORNIA OMBRÉ, AND WHY GRANDMAS ARE THE NEW STYLE ICONS

GO-TO PRODUCTS

INSTYLE: You and Jennifer have worked together forever. Are you like siblings at this point? CHRIS MCMILLAN: We can think like each other, for sure. I know what she needs. One day I’ll wind up being her hairdresser and her personal assistant. I’ll just quit everything and take care of her. I’ve gotten to a point with Jen where I’m at this happy medium between making her feel comfortable and creating modern, current looks with her. IS: How do you stay up-to-date? CM: What really helps is traveling. Going to London or Tokyo. Anywhere. Paris is very influential for me too. I love that French girls do single-colored hair—long, short, bobs. You don’t see ombré hair in the streets of Paris. You go to L.A., you see ombré hair. IS: What makes you smile? CM: No ombré hair in Paris. IS: I’m getting the sense you’re anti-ombré. CM: I’m not, but I do love what’s fresh and new. I love that there’s short hair on girls again. I love bleached hair on girls. I love that everyone has a

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living-out-of-theirgrandma’s-house look. Like Gwyneth Paltrow in The Royal Tenenbaums. Like they grabbed coats out of their grandma’s closet. You know, like the look at Gucci. IS: What kind of hair do you rock with that? CM: I love a redhead. You’re seeing hippie hair and a ’70s vibe. I call it Marcia Brady babysitter hair. Jen’s always like, “Just do ’70s babysitter hair today.” IS: What’s the big trend in hair color? CM: Bronde hair. B-R-O-N-D-E. Brown-haired girls with just a touch of sun-kissed hair. Brown hair doesn’tt have to be flat. You can do lowlights and highlights. Bleaching your hair is so popular now. I love these new bleached-out icy blue, lavender, grayish looks. It’s like your hair is part of your wardrobe. But you don’t want to go too blue or too purple. IS: Do you ever do hair color anymore? CM: I don’t, d but I have an opinion. — —KERRY DIAMOND OND

Paltrow as Margot Tenenbaum

Gucci redheads

WHAT INSPIRES CHRIS

Tokyo

Paris

Just Relax When blowing major curls straigh ght, hiss hi McMillan mixes th with gel for the endss line lin e and along the hairline.

Color Cues C “For superda amaged hair, this iss unbelievable. It’s gr g é great for the ombré girls,” he says.

Lush Life Thick, healthy hair T reig rei igns g in L.A. McMillan llikes these supplements for boosting natural volume.

Kérastase Paris Elixir Ultime Original Oil, $58; kerastase-usa.com.

Living Proof Restore re Mask Treatment, $42; M sephora.com.

Viviscal Extra Strength, $50/60; viviscal.com.


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BRIAN HENN

6 3

1. Tenoverten’s polish in Prince toes the line between lilac and lavender ($18; tenoverten.com). 2. Like the inside of a shell, Gucci’s Rosette is a high-shine pink with just a hint of opalescence ($30; saks.com). 3. Smith & Cult’s periwinkle Exit the Void is like a shot of B12 for your fingertips ($18; available in March at neimanmarcus.com). 4. The creamy coral tones in Essie Excuse Me, Sur make the hue universally flattering ($9; essie.com).

4

5

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5. Don’t let the spiky cap fool you: Christian Louboutin’s Batignolles polish is as sweet as mint chocolate chip ($50; saks.com). 6. Tom Ford’s barely there Pink Crush won’t clash with spring’s It prints ($36; tomford.com).


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Lady Gaga “It’s It s the the Gaga Gaga effect,” says Anastasia Soare of Anastasia Beve Be verl rly y Hi Hillllss about the trickle-down that follows the ’ c hanging persona. And, adds Gaga’s brow sing si nger er’s ’s ch h pro, pr o, ““no no matter how extreme, her looks always k their way into the mainstream beauty make ma ke t world”—faux beauty marks, hair bows, and pastel past pa stel el dip-dyes dip d ip dye yess included. incl in clud uded ed..

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BEAUTY

Does It ReallyWork? Curaprox Black Is White Tough Whitening Toothpaste, $30; curaprox.com.

CAN BLACK TOOTHPASTE WHITEN TEETH? THE CLAIM Found in everything from face masks to nail polish and now toothpaste, activated charcoal is the buzziest of beauty ingredients. The Curaprox Natural Activated Charcoal Whitening System claims to remove stains without chemical bleaching agents. Curaden U.S.A. president Patrice Le Maire says you should think of charcoal like a water filter. “It acts as a magnet to pull out dirt and toxins. Brush for one to two minutes to remove impurities.” WHAT THE PRO SAYS N.Y.C. cosmetic dentist Timothy Chase says while the product does whiten teeth slightly and leave them feeling clean, the ADA has stated that charcoal is

Lazerfuzion Lip Plumping Phototherapy System, $260; lazerfuzion .com.

not proven to have any dental benefits. WHAT WE SAY Our tester admits she’s terrible at keeping up with inoffice appointments and even setting aside an hour for at-home whitening. “I’m a coffee drinker, so the idea of whitening without adding a step to my routine was appealing.” She says her teeth looked a little brighter after a few uses, and the toothpaste tasted good, but she noted one downside: “It takes longer to rinse off your teeth and tongue, and it leaves a black residue on your sink that requires immediate cleaning. But knowing I wasn’t brushing on harsh chemicals was enough to make m w me want to try this again.”

C CAN YOU PLUMP YOUR LIPS AT HOME? Y THE CLAIM Six minutes a day to T ffuller lips—where do we sign up? The Lazerfuzion System comes with a portable phototherapy device that uses collagen stimulation to enhance your pout. After applying the included hyaluronic lip scrub to gently exfoliate, press the tool, which is slightly larger than a lipstick bullet, against six sections of your mouth in 60-second increments, making sure no light escapes. Follow the procedure with the lanolin primer and lips should appear bigger and smoother in four weeks. WHAT THE PRO SAYS N.Y.C. dermatologist Joshua Zeichner says a red LED is proven to help firm skin and minimize the appearance of lines by stimulating collagen while topicals plump by drawing in water to the lips.

“This will create a mild, temporary effect, but for permanently plumper lips, in-office treatments are the only way to go,” says Dr. Zeichner, who notes that the latest generation of injectable fillers gives a soft, natural appearance with long-lasting results. WHAT WE SAY Our tester was intrigued by the idea of a device that she could use on the go. “The light was painless and easy. After holding it up to my mouth, I applied the primer, which was sticky but left my lips incredibly moisturized.” Two and a half weeks later, she did notice more fullness but overall felt the real value of the system was how smooth and hydrated her lips felt. During a dry New York winter, that was enough to sell her on it.

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Felicia Walker Benson is the highly sought-after beauty guru from the awardwinning blog ThisThatBeauty.com. Her readers always ask how to get flawless, luminous skin. Her answer? Start with a routine and a skincare brand you trust. Felicia learned that when it comes to beautiful skin, it’s worth it to be proactive. “Just like the body, the skin needs vitamins and nutrients to stay healthy and youthful,” she says. “The earlier you can start, the better.” “My routine varies with the condition of my skin and the season,” says Felicia, “but the principles remain the same: cleanse, tone, apply concentrate, then moisturize.” If it’s daytime, she’ll add an SPF to protect against sun

damage. She also recommends at-home treatments like masks and facials for help with inflammation and healing. Felicia relies on Olay Regenerist Miracle Boost Concentrate and Micro-Sculpting Cream for hydrated, plump, and camera-ready skin. “They are great preventatives and use a special ingredient called carob seed extract, which aids in skin repair and regeneration,” she says. “I layer the cream over the concentrate for maximum hydration.”

I immediately had more glowing, radiant skin, and over time it’s become smoother and firmer.” She believes the secret to gorgeous, younger-looking skin is all about working from the inside out. “With Olay’s anti-aging ingredients, you nourish the skin, which is important for a great complexion,” says Felicia.


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BEAUTY

SoWhat DoYou Do,

ELLE MACPHERSON? SKIN-CARE SMARTS “At 52, I don’t wear a lot of makeup unle e ess hy I’m in front of the camera. That’s why ayss having good skin is so important,” sa f m Macpherson. She’s a fan of products from an nNatura Bissé, Dr. Brandt, and Dr. Jean ollogist. Louis Sebagh, her favorite dermatol g . Natura Bissé C+C Vitamin Body Cream,, $99;; naturabisse.com. Dr. Brandt Microderma abrasion, $79; drbrandtskincare.com.

I went to a hip-hop dance class and laughed the whole time. I was terrible, but it was fun.”

WHEN YOUR NICKNAME IS “THE BODY,” being in shape is a big part of your life. So it’s no surprise that Elle Macpherson co-founded WelleCo, a luxury wellness brand of nutritional powders, sleep-enhancing tea, and more. The Australian-born, Miami-based supermodelturned-entrepreneur has some ome om e basi b basic asic c rules for staying fit and finding balance, ce, bu butt she she mak makes es sure to change things up up.. “It “It’ It s It’s important that I don’t get int i o into a rut,” Macpherson say ys..

S EE SLE EP R UA RITU AL Macpherson used to average nly M g on y h f h ht. three or four hours per nigh Now she N h aims for a solid seven by y drinking ng g callming tea and banishing electronic ic de devices 30 minutess me. before bedtime Welle W e eCo The T Super Elixir Sleep Welle F W Fortified Calming Te ea,, $69; welleco.co om.

WORKOUT WORKOU T ROUTINE E “I put an hour aside ide every id eve day e d to do some e obsessi b i ? sort of physical exercise.”” H Her currentt obsession? ki padd Boxing, but she also loves to water-ski, paddleboard, hike, and swim laps. Women’s Powerlock Hook & Loop Training Gloves, Everlast, $50; everlast.com.

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ELLE’S “LEMONADE” She makes this as an alternative to soda or other sugary beverages. Combine 1 cup room-temperature water, 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, 1 tablespoon agave, and ¹/₈ teaspoon cayenne pepper in a glass. Stir and enjoy.

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BEAUTY

MY BEAUTY MARK...

Karen Elson TH FAMOUSLY GINGER SUPERMODEL AND MUSICIAN THE TALKS A KS ABOUT ABOU A THE RED HAIR THAT DEFINES HER LOOK MY NATURAL HAIR COLOR IS …

a mix of copper and mousy strawberry blond. I’m a ginger, just not as bright as I am now. I DYED MY HAIR …

red when I was 15. I wanted to look like David Bowie but at the same time fit in. I’VE ALWAYS WANTED …

WIGGING OUT DAVID BOWIE

ashy blond hair, not brassy and yellow. I’ve been blond a few times, and it ruined my hair. I’ve also dyed my hair black. I liked it, but red is my color. It’s unique, and I feel special having it. MY ULTIMATE RED HAIR ICON IS …

Lucille Ball, because she was funny, goofy, incredibly smart, and a trailblazer. I’VE NEVER REGRETTED …

going red. My life has been dictated by my red mane.

Bronzer makes me look like a carrot.”

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SOME PRODUCTS I LOVE ARE …

Oribe Cleansing Crème ($44; oribe .com), Redken All Soft shampoo ($15; ulta.com) for smoothing frizz, Aesop Rose Hair & Scalp Moisturizing Masque ($35; aesop.com), Terax conditioner ($24; teraxhaircare.com), Moroccanoil treatment ($44; moroccanoil.com), and the hair-care line by Davines. It’s always a challenge keeping your red red!

I CAN’T WEAR …

MY SECRET BEAUTY WEAPON IS …

bronzer or fake tanner. They make me look like a carrot.

coconut oil, which I put in my hair and leave in overnight.

MY HAIR SQUAD IS … TEDDY DREAMS

lifesaver. He knows how to cut and color my hair for real life and for fashion, which is hard to achieve. In Nashville I see Cali DeVaney at Parlor & Juke, which is a really cool salon. She does my color and keeps my hair vibrant.

Joe Martino at Orlo Salon in New York. He’s become my

ONE LAST TIP …

is to use dry shampoo to keep from washing your hair all the time.

Elson’s new album, Double Roses, will be released next month.


n

B E AU T Y T TA ALK

s

TH E TR THE TRAI AILB LBLA LAZI ZING NG S UP UPER ERMO MODE DEL L AN AND D FACE FA CE O OF F ES ESTÉ TÉE É E LA LAUD UDER ER S SOU OUND NDS S OF OFF F ON A S E DIVE DI VERS RSIT ITY, Y, S EL ELFF-LO LOVE VE,, AN AND D WH WHAT AT SHE HE A LY E A S BE REAL RE ALLY EAT ATS BEFO FORE RE T THE HE V VIC ICTO TORI RIA’ A’S S A SHIO N SH W SECR SE CRET ET FA FASH ION SHOW OW

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BEAUTY

If someone doesn’t accept me for who I am, the way I look, or the color of my skin, that’s their problem—not mine.”

W

hen you were growing up in Puerto Rico, who taught you about beauty? My

mother and grandmother. We lived in the countryside and walked everywhere, and they’d always tell me to avoid the sun and drink lots of water. My grandmother was a simple woman. If she owned ChapStick, that was a big deal. But my mother, to this day, will say, “Aren’t you gonna put some lipstick on?” I’m like, “Mommy, I do have lipstick on. It’s called nude.” At what age did you start wearing makeup? Around 14. I have two older

sisters, and I’d always watch them get dressed. The first thing I learned from them was how to do a baby cat eye. I would always steal their liquid liner. If you need to be out the door in five minutes, what’s your beauty routine?

I moisturize, fill in my brows, throw on concealer and mascara, and put my hair into a bun or do a loose wave. Did you always want to model? No, I wanted to be a veterinarian. But one year I grew really tall, and I was awkwardly skinny. People would tell my parents to put me in modeling, so

MAY 2011 “This was my first Met Ball. I remember going back and forth about whether I should do something bold or play it safe. So I decided to just go for it.”

I entered a competition—and lost. I still wanted to give it a try, so I came to New York and did open calls with agencies. I got rejected by a bunch of them but eventually got signed. You’ve talked about the discrimination you’ve experienced in your career. As one of the leading faces of color in modeling, do you feel you have a responsibility to promote diversity?

JOAN’S MUST-HAVES Kérastase Paris Nutritive Masquintense, $63; kerastase-usa.com. MAC Cosmetics Full Lash Curler, $22; maccosmetics.com. Moroccanoil Treatment, $44; moroccan oil.com. Estée Lauder Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex II, $62/1 fl. oz.; esteelauder.com. Estée Lauder Double Wear Waterproof All Day Extreme Wear Concealer in 6N Extra Deep, $27; esteelauder.com.

Absolutely. The world we live in has so many faces from different backgrounds, and it’s important that the industry be reflective of that. Everyone should be represented in some way, shape, or form. Have you always been so confident?

I’ve always been sure of who I am. It’s how my parents raised me. I don’t linger on negativity or get put off by what people say. There will always be someone who accepts me and the way I look. What did you eat the day of the Victoria’s Secret fashion show? I had

scrambled eggs with herbs and cheese, a croissant, and a fresh juice in the morning. Then at the show, I ate something sweet because I needed sugar. I honestly don’t have the inner power to deprive myself. I’m Puerto Rican—I love flavorful food. —KAHLANA BARFIELD BROWN

APRIL 2014 “It was spring, my hair was light brown, and I wanted to do color on my eyes. In the picture it looks blue, but it’s actually purple. I used liner and went over it with shadow.”

DECEMBER 2014 “I did this makeup myself backstage at the Victoria’s Secret show: burgundy eyeliner on my lower lash lines traced with black inside. And I glued on individual lashes.”

JUNE 2016 “I’ve worn short hair for shoots but never in real life, so I wanted to switch it up. I did short bangs to show my brows, then I thought, ‘Hmm … a red lip? Let’s make it pop.’ ”

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MATCHMAKER

In the Nude RED-CARPET PICKS TO FL ATTER EVERY COMPLEXION

GUGU MBATHA-RAW A hint of salmon keeps warm complexions from looking washed out, says Mbatha-Raw’s makeup pro Nick Barose. Nars Velvet Lip Glide in Bound, $26; nars cosmetics.com.

CHRISSY TEIGEN Golden skin like Teigen’s can carry a pink with “super-warm” tones, says her makeup artist Mary Phillips. Tom Ford Lip Color in Spanish Pink, $53; tom ford.com.

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JANUARY JONES A blend of equal parts pink and beige won’t lean too red against rosy skin. L’Oréal Paris Colour Riche Lipcolour in Fairest Nude, $9; lorealparisusa.com.

GABRIELLE UNION Makeup artist Malika James found Union’s perfect neutral by matching the tawny-rose hue of the inside of her lip.

ASHLEY GRAHAM A shade that toes the line between cool and warm pink complements Graham’s bronze undertones. Lipstick Queen Cupid’s Bow Lipstick in Nymph, $22; lipstickqueen.com.

Julie Hewett Cheekie Cheek and Lip Shine in Destiny, $24; juliehewett.net.

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Let’s Bounce Highlighting goes high fashion. Givenchy’s Mémoire de Forme Highlighter ($45; barneys .com) has a springy texture. Swipe a bit on your fingertip and apply to the high points of your face for a subtle strobed effect.

FAB FIND Dry-shampoo fan? Ouai has developed a oo non-powdery formulation. Its Dry Shampoo ving Foam ($28; theouai.com) starts out like shav g n cream before melting into a sheer lotion yles. that can extend your blowout or other sty

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march From street to sparkle, spring is here. Are you ready?

DSquared2 jacket and shirt. Bandana, worn as headband, stylist's own.

P H OTO G R A P H E D BY C A R T E R S M I T H


This Year’s

GIRL

Emily Ratajkowski may be famous for her supernatural sex appeal, but her fiercest asset doesn’t fit into a bikini by CHRISTOPHER BAGLEY photographed by CARTER SMITH

Marc Jacobs sequined minidress. Jennifer Fisher brass earrings and rings (right hand). DSquared2 brass lips ring. Louis Vuitton brass and lacquer cuffs. Chanel patent calfskin bag (on counter). Bandanas, worn as headbands throughout, stylist’s own. Fashion editor: Karla Welch.


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Marc Jacobs sequined minidress. DSquared2 brass earrings. BEAUTY BEAT For shimmering eyes, try Revlon ColorStay Crème Eye Shadow in Honey ($8; at drugstores).


Dolce & Gabbana embellished cotton jersey T-shirt and brass earrings with crystals. Chanel metal, resin, and strass bracelet. Rihanna x Manolo Blahnik denim chaps boots.


Roberto Cavalli silk-cotton jacket and trousers. Re/Done x Hanes cotton customized T-shirt. Chanel metal, strass, and glass bead earrings and metal, strass, glass pearl, resin, glass, and rubber necklaces.

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Stella McCartney Lycra bodysuit. Chanel cotton voile and silk dress (styled as jacket) and resin, strass, polyester, and metal bracelets (left wrist). Altuzarra nylon tights. Louis Vuitton brass or brass and lead glass earrings. Canturi diamond and 18kt pink or white gold bracelets.


Max Mara nylon jacket, cotton bralette, and nylon pants. Jennifer Fisher brass earrings, necklace, ring (right hand, index ďŹ nger), and cus. Right hand: Spinelli Kilcollin diamond, sterling silver, and 18kt gold three-link ring. Left hand: Spinelli Kilcollin diamond, 18kt rose gold, and 18kt yellow gold index-ďŹ nger ring. Alison Lou 14kt gold rings with rubies or diamonds and enamel.


M aybe it wasn’t a wise idea to interview Emily Ratajkowski at Grand Central Market, the crowded emporium of taco stands and omelet spots in downtown Los Angeles. Ratajkowski—actress and model, activist and Instagram queen— has been known to cause the occasional stir, and as I push through the throngs on my way toward our meeting spot, I begin to bemoan the lack of secluded nooks. But when Ratajkowski shows up wearing an LPA hooded sweater, standing alone next to the agreed-upon ramen counter, there’s no outbreak of commotion. All the passersby—including me, at first—walk right past her. Oops. Already, I have committed the predictable gaffe of anyone encountering Ratajkowski for the first time: I have confused the social-media persona with the actual person, half-expecting her to arrive in a thong. (Her Instagram account, @emrata, is heavy on artfully lit butt close-ups and lingerie-shoot selfies. Number of followers: 10.5 million.) The next surprise, as we walk around looking for a seat, is that many of the market vendors already know Ratajkowski— not because of her fabled physique but because she lives in the neighborhood and eats here all the time. Once we’ve spent a few minutes talking, about subjects ranging from Charles Bukowski to her work on behalf of Black Lives Matter, I realize that she’s not someone with whom preconceptions are helpful. And just in case I haven’t figured that out, Ratajkowski tells me so herself. “There are some people who fit into categories very well,” she says. “But then there are a lot who don’t.” It wasn’t long ago that few seemed interested in seeing beyond Ratajkowski’s appearance. She made her first major

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splash by cavorting topless with Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams in the video for the 2013 megahit “Blurred Lines.” (To this day, drunken young men approach Ratajkowski in bars and gallantly quote from the controversial song: “You the hottest bitch in this place!”) But then director David Fincher called her in for a meeting and was impressed enough to cast her as Ben Affleck’s mistress in the thriller Gone Girl. More recently, Ratajkowski has been letting her political flag fly, stumping for Bernie Sanders and penning frank essays about feminism and body image. Meanwhile, the nearly nude selfies and the appearances on men’s magazines’ sexiestwomen lists continue apace. She’s playing the smart card and the sexy card with equal confidence, often with a hint of performance-art provocation. “Now,” she’s happy to note, “the people who come up to me are often like, ‘I read your essay, and I loved what you had to say.’” Director Joe Swanberg, whose latest project is the Netflix series Easy, chose Ratajkowski to star in one episode as a self-absorbed art student and let the actress take the lead in creating her character—everything from her name and hairstyle to her views on feminist art theory. “You just don’t often get people with such a level of comfort with their bodies along with an equal level of engagement and intelligence,” Swanberg says. “And when you do, those people tend to become massively famous or important.” If that happens, few people in Ratajkowski’s orbit will be surprised. Born in London, where her mother, an English professor, was then teaching under the Fulbright Program, she grew up in a beach town outside San Diego. At age 4 she was already getting used to attention from strangers. “Once, at the grocery store,” she remembers, “some woman told my mom I needed to get head shots. We got into the car and I burst into tears.” (She thought it meant that a doctor would be sticking syringes in her head.) Ratajkowski, an only child, hit puberty early and was seen as a sex object before she really understood what sex was. By 14, she was modeling in L.A., though she remained most comfortable around her bookish parents (her father is a painter and an art teacher). At school she was the quirky alt girl who wore a black cape or a Jimi Hendrix T-shirt she’d made herself; summers were spent with family friends in Ireland or Spain. “Whenever a Spice Girls song came on, everyone knew the words, but it was, like, totally over my head,” she says. The self-possessed adult who resulted from that adolescence has the kind of confidence that people tend to find supremely alluring, or a little bit threatening, or both. Ratajkowski spent a year at UCLA studying fine art but never adjusted to sharing a dorm with five sorority girls.

She moved to New York City in her early 20s and was dismayed to discover how artists had been squeezed out of town by rich kids and finance types, even in Brooklyn. “All I met was trust-fund babies,” she says. “And I was like, ‘Oh, this is no longer the amazing cultural center my parents had told me about.’” On the career front, Ratajkowski is now navigating the complexities of being a model-actress in a business that still prefers women to be one or the other. After Gone Girl, she was hit with a flood of offers, including a few “cheesy” ones that she admits she was too quick to accept. (She doesn’t name names, but her role in 2015’s We Are Your Friends seems a likely candidate.) “At the time I thought, ‘I’m going to just make a bunch of money and then go back to school,’” Ratajkowski says. “To be honest, I hadn’t figured out that I had a real career on my hands. So I was like, ‘OK, this person wants me to do this? Cool.’ And then all of a sudden I realized that these projects are just not me. That’s when I shifted toward more meaningful things.” Her feminist perspective took shape early, thanks in part to the influence of her mother, who gave her a copy of Naomi Wolf’s Promiscuities: The Secret Struggle for Womanhood when she was 12. Today Ratajkowski laments the fact that sexually expressive women are still often seen as attentionseeking. Her perspective, in a nutshell, reflected via her Instagram feed: It’s my body, and I’ll pose if I want to. “The main criticism that I get is ‘Aren’t you just conforming to a patriarchal standard of beauty?’” she says. “Well, this is just the body I was given. I didn’t do anything to it— it’s just my body. But even if I had altered it, that would be fine too.” Ratajkowski recently found herself arguing with friends over whether Caitlyn Jenner was setting a bad example by being so focused on her outfits and her nails. “She’s allowed to do that—it’s her choice. If she decides she wants to be a super-femme who’s all about the clothes, great. She can conform to that gender identity all she wants because it’s a personal decision.” Applying that same standard to everyone, Ratajkowski says, “is a way of including all women and also saying that no matter what the circumstances, it’s up to them how they want to be a woman.” That includes Jenner’s stepdaughter Kim Kardashian West, whom Ratajkowski rallied behind last spring after Piers Morgan publicly trashed her for posting a nude selfie as a 36-year-old mom. “Her body, her career,” Ratajkowski retorted in a tweet, calling Morgan’s comment “sexist bulls—.” Later the two women ran into each other—at a Justin Bieber concert, no less—and took an Internetbusting shot of themselves together in the bathroom, topless and flipping the bird. Another public flap arose in December, when photographer (CONTINUED ON PAGE 374)

It’s up to me to choose when and how I want to share my sexuality.”


Marc Jacobs velvet bomber. Versace beaded silk dress. Albertus Swanepoel denim cap. AS29 diamond and 18kt gold earrings. Spinelli Kilcollin 18kt yellow and rose gold link rings. Jimmy Choo kid leather pumps. Hair: Harry Josh for Jed Root. Makeup: Hung Vanngo for The Wall Group. Manicure: Marisa Carmichael for Streeters.


To preview the spring collections from Paris, five of today’s biggest models (and L’Oréal Paris ambassadors) show off looks from fashion’s rising stars by ERIC WILSON photographed by JONAS BRESNAN

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KARLIE KLOSS Olivier Theyskens python dress, polyamide-viscose blouse, and suede sandals. Jennifer Fisher brass earrings. Cartier lacquer, peridot, onyx, and 18kt gold ring. Fashion editor: LeĂŻla Smara.


DOUTZEN KROES Vionnet by Goga Ashkenazi tulle evening dress with rope detail. BEAUTY BEAT Pair a flick of L'Oréal Paris Infallible Super Slim Liner ($9) with a swipe of Infallible Le Rouge Lipstick in Ravishing Red ($10; loreal parisusa.com).


LARA STONE Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh cotton suitjacket dress.

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IRINA SHAYK Maison Rabih Kayrouz raffia top and silk taffeta pants. 314

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LIYA KEBEDE Emanuel Ungaro by Fausto Puglisi sequin-embroidered silk dress. Earrings, her own. Christian Louboutin patent leather shoes.


M

odels off duty, in fashionspeak, is how we describe the style of those who project in their everyday lives a certain aura of coolness—casual, seemingly offhand, and yet entirely unattainable by mere mortals. Spending enough time around the nutty world of designers gives a person a greater perspective on creativity, and often a better appreciation of the craft. For these five supermodels, all beauty ambassadors of L’Oréal Paris, recognizing a star in the making is a skill honed from experience. Likewise for the makeup company, which through its sponsorship of Paris Fashion Week works with designers early on by supporting their shows. “It’s interesting to see how many designers are taking on the big names of fashion,” says L’Oréal executive Cyril Chapuy of the major débuts at Dior, Lanvin, and Saint Laurent. “And yet the shows that were the biggest successes were from new names altogether.” In addition to the established houses, L’Oréal provides makeup artists and hairstylists to promising brands like Koché, Off-White, and Wanda Nylon, which are helping to maintain the energy and excitement of Paris. Chapuy adds, “Fresh air in every métier is critical.”

DOUTZEN KROES One of Kroes’s fondest childhood memories is witnessing the moment when Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, and Christy Turlington became modeling’s holy trinity. “To be around those girls and see them work was amazing,” she says. This season, Kroes was reunited with Campbell on the runway of Donatella Versace, whose show underlined diversity by including supers from several decades along with the social media–savvy models of today. Kroes sees a parallel with what is happening in fashion. “There is a new generation of designers too,” she says. “But there are no more rules. When I started, you did all the shows, and then campaigns, and then you got the contracts that made you rich. Now you just don’t know one clear path to success, but you can get there in many different ways.” Off the runway, she likes wearing oversize men’s clothes: “First, it’s comfortable, but it’s also cool to wear something bigger,” she says. And what does she like most on the runway? “It’s about characters again,” she says. “It’s OK to show your personality.”

KARLIE KLOSS Ten years ago, Kloss booked her very first campaign with Olivier Theyskens, then a rising young star who was transforming the house of Nina Ricci. “Mario Sorrenti was shooting, and I had these big, crazy shoes on and was dancing like I was a ballerina,” she recalls. “They thought I was some tall, skinny girl from the Midwest, so I don’t think they were expecting me to do all these weird, cool shapes. But they were clapping by the end.” And she remains loyal to Theyskens, who after turns at Ricci and Theory is launching a signature collection this spring. “I love working with new designers,” says Kloss. “There’s a lot of pressure—you have to be really responsible if you’re going after a big job and at the same time still be able to dream and not color inside the lines.” Her own style walks a similarly fine line between the restraint of classic silhouettes and the wow factor of playful accessories. “I’m obviously enormously tall,” she says, “so I like keeping a casual look but edging it up in certain ways.”

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IRINA SHAYK

LARA STONE

“My taste is very simple,” says Shayk. “Less is more.” So it goes without saying that she had no problem when Marc Jacobs asked her to close his spring show wearing a pair of silk shorts that left her naked backside as a lasting sign-off. There’s a funny story here. “When I went for my fitting, Marc said, ‘You know what? Last year we made you look like a grandma’—I was wearing a long skirt and a blue sweater—so he told me, ‘Now you have to have your booty out and close the show,’” Shayk says. Her response? “You know what? I’m Russian, and I love it.” She adds, “So I joked, ‘That’s how I was able to buy my West Village apartment. Let’s bring it!’” Like Shayk, many of the young designers she encounters today “are not afraid to go out and try something different,” she says. “I was walking around Paris, and I saw a Japanese girl dressed as a Pokémon. That’s cool because that’s how she feels. Through fashion, you can express yourself and show who you really are.”

Don’t expect an oration on fashion from Stone. “My personal style is, like, the most boring,” she says with a laugh. “You would probably not even call it style. Can you call jeans and T-shirts style?” Oh, but of course you can, and Stone is just being humble. She has a sharp eye for cut, fit, and most important, talent, gravitating toward an asymmetrical blazer dress by Virgil Abloh of the red-hot label OffWhite for this shoot. “I’m thinking about stealing it,” she says. “In the show they had these glittering sequined socks that are my favorite thing ever, but they aren’t that comfortable, so I probably wouldn’t wear them.” Isn’t there something that makes Stone go a little wild? She laughs. “I do like a bit of a thigh-high boot, I must say.”

LIYA KEBEDE Kebede’s hectic Paris runway schedule included stops at Haider Ackermann, Lanvin, Loewe, Paco Rabanne, and Valentino this season—not walking on the runways but sitting in the front rows, perfect as always. “I like a certain effortless look,” she says. “I wear a lot of jeans, men’s shirts, men’s sweaters, and flats.” Now also a designer and an activist, she still loves going to the shows. “I think it grew on me a lot after being in the industry for so long and working with really amazing people,” she says. “I feel that I can appreciate all their work, as opposed to just being backstage and seeing what they do with one outfit. It’s hard for people to understand how much work it takes for that 10- to 20-minute show. It’s incredible.” One thing she has learned is that it’s not hard to spot talent. “You know when you see what they are putting on the runway, and I think everybody sees it at the same time,” Kebede says. “Then suddenly they are taking on big houses. It’s a nice privilege to be there when they are first starting, when you know they have something going on.”

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Dress to Unimpress Lena Dunham’s five red-carpet-tested tricks for breaking the “rules” of fashion

I

never set out to annoy people with my clothes. Rather, like HPV or a screaming match with a cab driver, it just happened. I always leave the house thinking I look good. Let’s take a moment to define “good”: I don’t think I look like Adriana Lima or that I own Opening Ceremony. But am I accurately expressing myself? I always thought so, but apparently not. In my public life my outfits—at least on fashion blogs—have become something of a punch line. Internet critics constantly seem to be sighing at some shoe mismatch or moment of (perceived) delusion about my body type or just at the entire idea that I want to—gasp!—have fun. To be clear, this doesn’t keep me up at night. To quote the Dixie Chicks: “I made my bed, and I sleep like a baby.” To quote my friend Paul: “Looking chic was never your thing.” And to quote Nicki Minaj: “I give zero f—s, and I got zero chill in me.” I actually enjoy reading blogs that obliterate my wrinkled sundresses and tell me my hair makes me look like an ’80s cartoon. (I’ll analyze that in therapy later.) Plus, this research has also allowed me to home in on the best way to annoy people with my clothes, and I’ve reduced it to five simple rules. So join me, won’t you? It’s actually pretty fun, like a prank that never ends. 1. Don’t pay any attention to what’s considered “appropriate” for your body type.

Ya got some powerful thighs? Wear a satin shirt with house slippers and nothing else. No boobs? Let your neckline plunge like you’re J. Lo at the Grammys. Bend the rules because not only were they made to be broken, but they weren’t ever rules in the first place. Also, show your belly button even if it’s pale and mottled. 2. Make yourself laugh.

One of my favorite designers is the brilliant and daring Giambattista Valli, who designed my 2014 Emmys dress [pictured opposite]. I loved it because it was gorgeous, but I

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also loved it because I looked like a riot grrrl cake topper. I was deeply amused by myself when I left the house. I knew I wasn’t dressed like a siren—I was dressed like a piece of French pastry. That made people angry, and someone even dressed a goat up like me on Instagram. 3. Let your seams show. A wrinkled shirt here, a visible panty line there. Give people a nervous breakdown by letting them in on the secret that even celebrities don’t have a full-time wedgie picker following them around—and even if they could, they might want to use their resources some other way. If you really wanna make a fashion blogger crazy, do not hem your pants. 4. Have a grand old time. I smile in almost every picture. Sometimes I cackle. This is breaking form with what seems to be an almost unanimous decision to wear high fashion with the grim bearing of a girl attending a wake. Usually on a red carpet I run into a woman I love, or a photographer says something insane, and I open my mouth into the kind of joyous laugh that melts my own icy heart. This also means I look happy to be wearing my dress. Scandalous! 5. Choose comfortable shoes. I was once told I took the Golden Globes stage like a baby giraffe learning to walk or possibly dying. And it’s true! My heels almost killed me. So I now make an effort to wear shoes built for a human girl. Loafers. Flats. Kitten heels. Well, that won’t fly either. It appears I’m not meant to wear flats but rather must learn to walk in the treacherous stilettos that almost sent me to whatever heaven clothing-related death victims congregate in. (I see you, Isadora Duncan.) But guess what? I don’t care. Because, as I mentioned before, it turns out trolling the people who professionally critique fashion can be a real joy too. Postscript: I’ve been wearing a hoodie that says “Free the pimple” for a week, often with only boots and a choker. I’ve graduated a level and am very proud of myself. Q


LADY IN RED

She rose to fame as Lady Mary on Downton Abbey— now Good Behavior star Michelle Dockery is breaking out of the manor by LAURA BROWN photographed by PHIL POYNTER

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Gabriela Hearst cotton-viscose bodysuit and wool-Lycra pants. Ana Khouri 18kt gold earring. Charlotte Chesnais gold vermeil ring. Fashion editor: Columbine Smille.


Sportmax cotton jumpsuit and satin rope belt with ceramic. Bulgari 18kt white gold bracelet. Stuart Weitzman napa leather sandals.

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Kenzo nylon coat.


Dior silk cady dress. Manolo Blahnik leather pumps.


Gucci polyester top with plissé flounce details. BEAUTY BEAT Get ready for your close-up with Gucci Golden Glow Bronzer in Caribbean Ochre ($59; gucci.com).

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Marni cotton twill tunic. Ana Khouri diamond and 18kt gold earring. Hair: Daniel Martin for Bryant Artists. Makeup: Andrew Gallimore for CLM. Manicure: Ama Quashie for CLM.


I

f Michelle Dockery ever gives up acting, she can spend her days doing endorsements for Great Britain. She arrives at my London hotel room wearing a Burberry trenchcoat and Topshop jeans and carrying a ladylike Aspinal of London bag that she designed. (More on that later.) She then proceeds to pour the perfect cup of tea. “Oh, I love a regular cup of builder’s tea,” she says, sounding as close to a construction worker as she will ever get, as she flips an exotic strainer just so. “I never came across this one in my Downton Abbey days. And we poured a lot of tea.” Since last March’s final episode of Downton Abbey—the most successful British period drama in history—a lot has happened to Michelle Dockery. In a swift about-face from her beloved character, Lady Mary Crawley, she signed on to play con artist Letty Dobesh in the TNT series Good Behavior. “I was in from the get-go,” she says. “The first page of the script has her working in a burger joint, stealing a wallet from a guy who’s trying to molest her. I was like, ‘I am playing this role.’” Dockery wasn’t looking to shock Downton fans; it just happened. “Sometimes I’ll be up for a role and there’s feedback that they can’t quite see me as another character than Lady Mary. But not this show— it just came along so fast. I wasn’t expecting it.” And so it happened that the role, which Dockery started filming in Wilmington, N.C., in October 2015, would provide a much-needed escape. Two months later, she lost her fiancé, Irish PR executive John Dineen, to cancer. They had been together for two years, and he was just 34. Dockery won’t talk about the loss—adding a subtle reminder that she is not, in fact, obliged to. She coped by throwing herself into Good Behavior, with her sister Louise coming to spend time with her in Wilmington. “Yeah, it was a great change,” she says of her relocation. “First thing I did when I got there was go to the beach.” Dockery looks different too—her hair is longer and lighter, while a smattering of light freckles covers her face. “I like it,” she says of her warmer hue. “And I just wear a lot of sunscreen!” She’s enjoyed a break from the relentlessness of London celebrity. “I’m 35,” she says. “I’m getting to the point where I just kind of like...ease.” Recently, Dockery got her driver’s license as well—at long last. “I felt embarrassed that I didn’t have one for so long,” she laughs. “But Letty has to drive. So I had no choice.” When she wasn’t shooting—a challenging exercise, given she was in almost every scene—the grieving Dockery took

care of herself. “Protein in my smoothies, staying healthy as much as I could. And alcohol’s not always the best thing when you’re working that much,” she says. “Not like on Downton.” Ah, Downton. Dockery’s affection for the series that changed her life is palpable. “I miss those guys. I miss them so much. All those weekdays where we’d all end up back at the hotel with a bottle of wine.” There’s talk of a movie, and Dockery is all for it. “Everyone is waiting for the go-ahead,” she says. “It’s proving difficult to get 18 actors all available.” If wrangling gets hard, why not just knock a few off in a car crash? “Yeah,” she laughs. “If no one wants to do it, we’ll just throw that into the storyline. Matthew’s car.” She’s curious about what period a possible Downton movie would jump to. “There’s the General Strike in 1926, which is the next year. So...spoiler alert! Or there could be a bit of a time jump.” Ooh, could Downton jump right into the new right royal hit, The Crown? Dockery imagines the scenario: “Ooh yes, I could meet up with Claire Foy. Lady Mary goes to see her friend.” She slips into Mary’s immaculate accent. “‘I’m going in to see Elizabeth. We’ve become acquainted recently.’” Dockery, of course, has her own posse of actor mates. Beyond the Downton cast—particularly Laura Carmichael and Allen Leech— there’s Lupita Nyong’o, her co-star in the 2013 thriller Non-Stop, and Gwendoline Christie from Game of Thrones. “She has all these expressions,” Dockery says. “She calls it Nest of Tables. She’s brilliant.” One thing to know about Dockery: She is rather a fantastic dancer and DJ. She has a playlist named “DJ Dockers” that she pulls out on worthy occasions, like when she was shooting the new “feminist western” series Godless last year in New Mexico. The show is set in a curious town called La Belle, where all the residents are women. “There’s a saloon and everything!” Dockery says. Off set, the girls just got down. “We’d have these dance parties and I’d DJ.” On her extensive playlist: “Juicy,” by Notorious B.I.G.; “Love Like This,” by Faith Evans; “Sorry,” by Justin Bieber; and “Drop It Like It’s Hot,” by Snoop. So if work is a curative, Dockery’s prognosis is excellent. She’s enjoying her return to London. “I’ve been hibernating a bit since I’ve been back.” She is also delving further into her collaboration with storied British label Aspinal of London. She cracks open the Dockery, a classic black croc doctor’s bag, which comes in a rainbow of colors. “It’s based on a bag that my grandmother had, because I loved the way it opened. I love wearing bags like this.” Alongside the Dockery, there’s the Dockery Snap, which is not a dance move but a close cousin to the original, and a line of vintage- (CONTINUED ON PAGE 374)

I miss them so much,” she says of her Downton co-stars. “All those weekdays where we’d all end up back at the hotel with a bottle of wine.”

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THE CRYSTAL METHOD Kelly Oxford goes deep into the world of metaphysical energy with the help of a healer, a facialist, some rose quartz…and Spencer Pratt photographed by JEFFREY WESTBROOK

I’ve always been open to, yet skeptical of, “woo-woo” things like spirit guides, crystals, and juice cleanses. Crystals, in particular, made me think of sad people grasping for anything to get them through life. So when, in 2015, glamorous and not-at-all-sad Nicole Richie flashed me a palm full of glittering gems while shooting an unusually stressful scene with the cast of Love & Hip Hop on her VH1 show, Candidly Nicole, I was intrigued. Were they really working to keep the shouts from penetrating her core? Were they that powerful? Maybe this woo-woo-ness was actually for me. A few days later, as my children argued loudly over control of the TV, I thought back to Richie’s calm and knowing demeanor and immediately ordered The Crystal Bible and a piece of labradorite—you know, for strength. Since then I’ve purchased nearly a hundred crystals. Thankfully, you can get these things at any price point, from $1 to thousands of dollars. I’ve found a mysterious quartz dealer in Malibu (don’t ask; he’s not listed) and become a person who follows the moon cycles in order to charge stones under the moonlight. I thought I’d reached “peak crystal person” when people on Twitter accused me of stealing the Moon Juice quartz (I beg you to Google) and my Snapchat friend Spencer Pratt and I began to fantasize about opening a crystal store together in the San Fernando Valley. Look, when I go deep into a new subject I’m interested in, I go that deep. I. Go. Deep. Fast. But after collecting crystals, charging them, giving them intent, and enjoying them, my OCD led me to take another step. I couldn’t manage to learn everything on my own when there were true experts (CONTINUED ON PAGE 375)

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WHEN CHRISTY MET PIERPAOLO

The supermodel and the Valentino creative director discovered they had much more in common than fashion by LAURA BROWN photographed by FABRIZIO FERRI

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Christy Turlington Burns and Pierpaolo Piccioli, photographed in front of La Fontana della Dea Roma, in the courtyard of the Valentino atelier, in Rome. Valentino tulle gown embroidered with velvet and antiqued silver microbeads.


Valentino velvet brocade coat and satin crĂŠpon shirt.


s designer Pierpaolo Piccioli prepared to show his first collection as sole creative director of Valentino last October, after nearly a decade of sharing that position with his longtime design partner, Maria Grazia Chiuri, the biggest question he faced was this: How would he stand on his own? Few people in fashion knew of the duo as anything less than a perfectly matched partnership. So when Chiuri was appointed artistic director of Dior last year and Piccioli took over at Valentino, there was naturally a great deal of curiosity about what would be the brand’s new direction. Piccioli established himself brilliantly, with a spring collection that combined the ethereal with a touch of the surreal, resulting in what was undoubtedly one of the highlights of the Paris season last fall. Cascading dresses made of lace, stunning pink capes, sweet ballet sandals, and charming miniaturized bags belied a hidden undercurrent of darkness, shown in prints created by the English designer Zandra Rhodes, which she based in part on the wildly captivating paintings of Hieronymus Bosch. If you looked closely, you saw that earrings were shaped like tiny daggers. “This collection changed my approach to fashion,” Piccioli told me when we caught up in December. “I went back to my aesthetic roots. Back to the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the Renaissance, which is really part of my Italian culture.” Shortly after the Paris show, I’m happy to say, I had the opportunity to introduce Piccioli to another friend of mine, Christy Turlington Burns. The supermodel and maternalhealth advocate occasionally dips her toes back into fashion’s waters, and so it was no surprise to me when Piccioli immediately asked Turlington Burns to collaborate on his first solo Valentino campaign, which was photographed in New York. And when I heard Turlington Burns would then be heading to Rome, where Valentino is headquartered, to meet the pope, I asked her and Piccioli to come together once again for a meeting of the minds, documented here in a joint interview. LAURA BROWN: Ciao, you two! I’m looking at these beau-

tiful pictures you shot together at the Valentino atelier, and Christy, thanks for squeezing this in on your way to the

Vatican! I have to ask: Was the pope aware that you formed, with Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista, the original trinity of supermodels? CHRISTY TURLINGTON BURNS: Ah-ha-ha! If the Vatican even heard that, I probably wouldn’t have been welcome anywhere near him! Blasphemous! Oh my goodness. I will tell you, once, many years ago [in 1995], I actually did a Valentino campaign that was photographed by Herb Ritts, where I am dressed and the men are naked. PIERPAOLO PICCIOLI: Oh, I remember it! CTB: I was told, though, that the Vatican was not very happy with that campaign. PP: All the men were in the back. CTB: Exactly. They were all kind of…embracing me. Nobody forewarned me about that. It was a little uncomfortable. But, yeah, I was later told that it had reached Pope John Paul II, and the Vatican was not pleased. So I made amends by going back today and being a little bit more respectful. PP: Pope Francis is incredible, isn’t he? LB: Tell me about your experience with him. PP: I went to meet him with my family during Sunday celebrations. He’s really impressive, the way he looks into you. He creates an immediate connection with you. It’s like he sees into you and says the right words at the right moment. CTB: I absolutely agree. We didn’t exchange many words, because I literally could only say, “Thank you,” honestly. I was just in awe of him. He represents so many positive things in such a challenging time. He is so present and, again, respectful of each person he meets. I was there for a global forum with Fortune magazine and Time Inc. We presented some ideas to His Holiness, and he listened and spoke back to us. To watch person after person be greeted with the same level of dignity and respect was just an incredible experience.

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LB: Now tell me about your first impressions of each other. PP: Christy is a big part of my fashion path. When I was

younger, I wanted to be a movie director, not a designer. But when I started to look at photographs, I began to understand the power of fashion in telling stories. The very first shoot of Christy I saw was by Steven Meisel. To me, she embodied my idea of grace. She’s contemporary, but she’s as timeless as a beautiful painting. That kind of beauty comes from inside, not from physical attributes or trying to be cool. When I met her she was exactly how I thought of her in my mind. It was like I had always known her. CTB: It did feel that way. Of course, I was a fan of Pierpaolo’s from afar. And I’d been looking at his collection online. I arrived at the studio up in Harlem, and I was just sitting on the couch waiting. Pierpaolo came up to me, and he was the most approachable, warm, and friendly person I’d met in a very long time. It was like a reunion of some sort. PP: Do you remember that I had wanted you to come to my first show, but you were running a marathon? CTB: Yes, the Chicago Marathon. PP: I understood that you were running for something that you believe in. [Turlington Burns runs in support of Every Mother Counts, the organization she founded.] We have the same values. After 10 minutes, we were talking more about our children than fashion shows. LB: Pierpaolo, what does Christy represent as the face of your first collection? PP: Everything about this collection was more emotional and less thought-out. I had to do what was in my heart. And Christy was a part of that. LB: Christy, you’ve done a lot of campaigns in your career. Why did you say yes to this? CTB: Yes, quite a few [laughs]! Sometimes everything comes together in a special way: It just felt like there were a lot of signs from the universe. It’s a good day for me if I feel good and I’m around people I admire and I respect. And I

Strength today means showing your emotions and not hiding them. If you’re happy, show your happiness!” —PIERPAOLO PICCIOLI

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can’t say that’s the case with all of the campaigns that I’ve done over the years. Because I don’t spend so much time around the fashion industry anymore, I like to keep a little bit involved, and I was just intrigued by Pierpaolo’s designs. You know, designers don’t always go to their own advertising shoots. So the whole thing was unique. If it were always like that I would probably still be doing this job. PP: Yes, I think that it’s super-important—for me and for fashion—to give a message that goes beyond clothes. LB: Feminism was a huge message of the collections this season. Pierpaolo, you’ve always been surrounded by women. You worked with a female partner for a long time, and this collection was an organic feminine statement. Christy, what were your impressions? CTB: I’m not very stylish. My fashion sense is more simple and utilitarian. And I never really wear colors. So it was a real thrill to wear colors; I just bonded so much to them. When you put on color like that, it does something to uplift your spirits. I think we could all agree that we’re living in some interesting times. So the idea of feeling better about the world—and about yourself—by putting on something with such color and joy and love in it, that is really needed. There will be more of us relying on fashion, I think, in the days to come. Things are a bit bleak, but there’s a lot of sunshine in this collection. PP: It’s important to show not only the feminine side but also the sensitive side. That goes for people in general. Strength today means showing your emotions and not hiding them—not being the cliché of how you think people want to see you. Be exactly as you are. You know, if you’re happy, show your happiness! Also, I think “respect” is a word that is not used much today. We need to respect people for who they are, not for who we want them to be. LB: What else did you two find out you had in common? CTB: Now we have the pope in common! PP: I think we have values in common. Family, friendship, respect, dignity. Life is based on your values—not money or power or other things. CTB: I would agree. I think that we have that connection. I think we are of the same cloth, really. LB: No fashion pun intended. Now, Pierpaolo, Christy is obviously very big into running. PP: Of course! LB: Are you going to take a page out of her book and start running marathons? PP: I feel like I will. I can get into it. CTB: Hooray! LB: He’s got to quit smoking, though. CTB: Well, yes. That will be the next job. PP: [Laughs] I will be first in the category of smokers! Q


Valentino chion lace inlay dress with velvet. Valentino Garavani velvet sandals. Hair: Giulio Ordonselli for Toni & Guy Roma. Makeup: Arianna Campa for Close Up Milano.


s e o hu so ycan’t e s lo hing pping t y r eve howsto o d nt topring ’s s cept a w s ’ll ex You in this ndals— off d sa ke them n a ta ttos d by BSON e stile h p I ra G og LPH phot A R


Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello leather pumps. Fashion editor: Sam Broekema.

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Prada rubber slides and jersey shirt and pants with feathers.


Dior fabric and ribbon pumps and tulle dress.

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Paul Andrew napa leather and suede sandals. Bottega Veneta cotton knit dress.


Pierre Hardy leather mules. Kenzo silk shantung top and jacquard skirt.

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Model Beauty The legendary Linda Evangelista talks about the cream that changed her life, the supermodel “bubble,” and the successors to her throne by KERRY DIAMOND photographed by DAVID SCHULZE

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hen Linda Evangelista calls herself a beauty junkie, she’s not exaggerating. She has a magnifying mirror for precise tweezing (yes, she tends to her famous arches herself) and has amassed so many products that her brother had to build custom shelves in her apartment to contain all the lotions and potions. “I adore beauty,” she explains. “I’ve used everything out there, from drugstore to high end.” Friends, makeup artists, even strangers are always giving her items to try, so when her facialist’s husband gave her a bottle of an anti-aging concentrate from an indie skin-care brand called Erasa, she gave it a go. “I really started to notice a difference,” she says. “My pores got smaller, and my skin tone evened out.” Before she knew it, she’d used every drop. She was so impressed, she asked to meet the man who created it. She and Erasa founder Jules Zecchino, a chemist, clicked, and soon after, Evangelista joined the company not as a “face” or a spokesperson but as vice president and creative director. Erasa has only one product—Erasa XEP 30—but there are others in the pipeline, and Evangelista has thrown herself into the development process. She visits the lab in New Jersey, gets excited about third-party clinical trials, and can discuss the finer points of pigments and viscosity. “I really look forward to lab days,” she says. “My adrenaline starts flowing when I’m there.”

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For Evangelista’s fans, it seems like only yesterday when she and her posse ruled the supermodel scene. In the 1980s and ’90s, she and pals Naomi Campbell and Christy Turlington were the darlings of every designer, photographer, and editor. “When I think back to those days, I was so crazy and busy and had so many people doing things for me,” she says. “When you’re going, going, going, it’s hard to stop and grasp what’s happening.” If this sounds familiar, it’s because 2017 has its own phenom trio: Kendall, Gigi, and Bella. Except for one big difference. “We didn’t have social media,” explains Evangelista. “No Facebook, no Snapchat, no texting, no nothing.” Imagine, if you will, a world without likes. She marvels at how these next-gen superstars handle their careers in this digital era. “They’re great models,” she says. “They’re talented and hardworking.” It’s wonderful they have each other, she continues—for Evangelista, stratospheric success was isolating at times. “I was averaging 150 flights a year. When show season came around, it was great because I would see my friends. I didn’t feel lonely.” Her perspective on navigating stardom? Unplug— at least once in a while. “You actually lose touch with reality. You go into this cocoon, this bubble,” says Evangelista, now a single mom to Augustin, her 10-yearold son. “I don’t know if it was motherhood or growing up or the wisdom that comes with time, but I prefer where I am now.” Q


Gabriela Hearst cotton-wool trenchcoat. Foundrae enamel and 18kt gold orbit earrings. All other earrings, her own. Elsa Peretti for Tiany & Co. 18kt gold ring. Fashion editor: Ali Pew. Hair: Gavin Harwin for The Wall Group. Makeup: Christian McCulloch for Tim Howard Management. Manicure: Casey Herman for The Wall Group. Set design: Cooper Vasquez for The Magnet Agency.


Rosetta’s THRONE Balthazar and Rosetta Getty’s latest address is an expansive, ornate Spanish-style mansion in West Hollywood—and the perfect foil for her minimalist spring collection by ERIC WILSON photographed by FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER


Balthazar and Rosetta Getty share a moment in his recording studio, decorated with a vintage Getty gas station sign. On Rosetta: Rosetta Getty shirt and trousers. All jewelry, worn throughout, her own. Fashion editor: Sue Choi.


In a sunny living room with a sweeping view of Los Angeles, Rosetta gathers her muses (from left): performance artist Alexandra Marzella, daughter June, and actress Milla Jovovich, all in Rosetta Getty. All jewelry, worn throughout, their own.


M inutes after sunset, on a candy-colored stucco terrace overlooking a prime stretch of Sunset Boulevard and West Hollywood beyond, the director Paul W.S. Anderson is asking Balthazar Getty why on earth he chose to pack up his brood andmovebacktothispinkelephantofahouse,so large you can see it from the Equinox down the hill. It is a traditional Spanish-style mansion— the kind that used to cover the hills around Los Angeles until waves of movie moguls, musicians, and, lately, speculators tore them all down and built glass houses that resemble spaceships . Only a year ago, the Gettys were living in one of those at the top of Runyon Canyon, where Balthazar and his wife, the fashion designer Rosetta Getty, had painstakingly designed and built a house with floor-to-ceiling glass walls, a fire pit, and a stark-white pool suitable for a Calvin Klein advertisement. The construction took four years, during which time the family lived in several other Getty residences. They have at least three in Los Angeles, including this one, where Balthazar, an actor, producer, and DJ, keeps a recording studio; Rosetta has a showroom in the garage. “It was the quintessential California modern home,” Balthazar says to his guests. “We lived there for, like, six months, and then we left.” “Because the kids loved it here?” asks Milla Jovovich, who has just returned with Anderson, her husband, from a monthlong press tour for Resident Evil: The Final Chapter. “No, the kids all want to move back!” says Getty. “But this setup works better. In the modern house, you walk out of your bedroom and you’re in your kitchen. This is a historical house, and there are fewer and fewer of them in Hollywood, so if you can have one…” There is certainly room for everyone, more than 10,000 square feet over several rambling floors. Balthazar and Rosetta, their four kids (Grace, Violet, June, and Cassius), several dogs, and many more visitors are likely to be wander-

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Jovovich, on a Moroccanthemed porch, says of Rosetta, “She’s one of those rare people in L.A. who don’t care about who you are or what you do. She’s not a snob.” Rosetta Getty gown. Hair: Justine Marjan for Something Artists and Alex Brown. Makeup: Lauren Andersen for Something Artists and Marija Kopilas. Manicure: Debbie Leavitt for Nailing Hollywood. Prop styling: Kelly Fondry.


Rosetta chose a bright spot with sunset views for dining. “We entertain a lot,” she says. “There’s always a random guest at dinner, and we usually stay for a long time.”

ing around, as the Gettys often entertain in the space, which has a lot of history. They invite members of the extended Getty family as well as friends, such as Alexandra Marzella, a rising performance artist who drew praise after a 2014 installation of feminist work at Art Basel Miami Beach in which she cried on a mattress. Rosetta commissioned Marzella to make a film modeling her latest pre-fall collection. For many years, this was the home of Rick Rubin, the storied music producer and co-founder of Def Jam Records, who hosted artists like Johnny Cash and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Before that, it was an inn. Rosetta says she heard Lauren Hutton had once stayed here. And it seems as if every one has left a mark on the house, which is still filled with Rubin’s exotic taxidermy (how does one dispose of a mounted polar bear?) and stacks of gold records. Hidden behind an elaborately carved wooden fireplace is a secret room decorated with dark wooden pews and stainedglass windows imported from a European church. “I feel like my life is about finding spaces,” says Rosetta, whose clean, polished design aesthetic and unflappable poise suggest she would be happier just about any place but here. And yet sitting on an aging leather sofa in the dusty green library, with books up to the rafters and a crystal chandelier above, she relaxes into the space, to which she has added her own collection of contemporary art, including prints by Banksy, a column by Olympia Scarry made of blocks of rock salt, and a large cement and metal screen by Mark Hagen. “I’ve moved in and out of this house for about 20 years,” she says (Rubin is a longtime family friend, and the Gettys began staying there when he moved to Santa Monica). “But I think I have spent more time living here than in any other

While many original details remain, Getty decorated with her own furniture and art, including a print of Donuts Strawberry, by Banksy.

house. It’s so old, and it has problems—it always needs a new this or that.” Rosetta is attracted to the house partly because she grew up nearby in a commune in Silver Lake. As a teen, she embarked on a successful modeling career, working with Bruce Weber and Azzedine Alaïa, before starting a fashion business 20 years ago, first with children’s wear and then with grown-up designs that have become increasingly sophisticated. Her Rosetta Getty collection, launched in 2014, was conceived as a modern wardrobe for women who balance work and family with style. And because of its skyrocketing success, Rosetta was happy to have office space at home. Likewise, in New York City, the Gettys bought a TriBeCa apartment last year in the same building where she recently opened a sleek new atelier. “Because I consider myself a minimalist, this house doesn’t express that side of my personality,” she says. “There are things about it that are not as clean as I would normally like, because when things get too busy, it can be distracting. But sometimes, when things are too clean, I begin to feel like something is missing, so lately I’m really liking all its intricacies.” This is not to say that the Gettys have fully settled in. Rosetta says she is starting an ambitious restoration project over the next two years so that everything will be more to their taste when the house turns 100. Vines of ivy that once covered the exterior will be refreshed. She might tackle the house’s enormous attic. But the first thing she wants to change is the color, such a vivid shade that it isn’t really even fair to call it pink. “It’s salmon,” she says. “I struggle with it. But I think we’ll probably end up in this house for good.” Q

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IT’S GOOD TO BE QUEEN

For rap royal, powerhouse producer, and actress Queen Latifah, the throne is more than a game interviewed by TRACEE ELLIS ROSS photographed by JASON SCHMIDT


Alberta Ferretti Limited Edition silk cape and gown. Forevermark by Jade Trau diamond and 18kt gold cus. Fashion editor: Timothy Snell.


Giorgio Armani embroidered lace jacket with velvet details. Valentino Garavani brass earrings. BEAUTY BEAT For deďŹ ned lashes, try CoverGirl Queen Collection Lash Fanatic Mascara ($6; at drugstores). Hair: Iasia Merriweather. Makeup: Sam Fine. Manicure: Lisa Logan. Set design: Cooper Vasquez.


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etween takes in a Midtown Manhattan photo studio, Queen Latifah is fiddling with an $80,000 diamond-encrusted Fred Leighton crown. “Yep, this will do,” she says with a laugh. It’s quite a contrast to the ripped jeans and sneakers she’s sporting, but both extremes suit her equally well. “I’ve reinvented myself so many times throughout my career, but I always go back to my true essence,” she says. “Coming home to yourself might not always feel like the best place, but it’s you, and you’ve got to embrace that.” That’s the kind of self-knowledge that has propelled her through three decades of rapping, acting, and producing—a streak that started with her 1989 début album, All Hail the Queen, and continues with her role in Fox’s music-industry drama Star. How does she stay unstoppable? To find out, we enlisted Golden Globe–winning Black-ish star Tracee Ellis Ross, a royal badass in her own right (and heir to mom Diana’s throne). Long live the queens! TRACEE ELLIS ROSS: Even when you were just starting out, you always seemed comfortable in your own skin. How did you feel from the inside? QUEEN LATIFAH: I consider myself a confident person, but there’s always been an undercurrent of insecurity throughout my career. Self-esteem is never set in stone. It’s fluid, and it’s something you constantly have to manage. It can dip so easily, and when it does, you have to work to get it back up to a place where you can look at life properly. TER: How do you give yourself that boost when necessary? QL: I remind myself that although there are people less fortunate than me and people much more fortunate, none of that ultimately matters. I used to get caught up in comparing myself, especially in terms of body type, but I realized that often the people I envied were missing important things that I had in abundance—I’ve had romance and danger, family to come home to, and open-mindedness. It’s great to have plans and a vision for your life, but it’s more important to be open to the unexpected. That’s the secret to living a juicy, magical life. TER: Was there a particular moment when you felt like a successful adult? QL: I became a woman at age 24. I no longer felt like a kid who was afraid of

making the wrong decisions. I had left college to pursue a music career, released two albums, opened up a management company, and Living Single was airing. And my brother had just passed away, so I was living through major ups and downs. Losing a sibling was just about the worst thing that could happen, so I developed a “What could stop me now?” attitude. TER: We live in a culture where so many people pooh-pooh getting older, but I personally love being in my 40s. Did your 24-year-old self have a different definition of womanhood? QL: As great as I felt then, I really believed I would get better every year that followed. The people I know who have problems with aging set goals for themselves with deadlines of a certain date or year. If they didn’t meet those marks, they felt like failures. I’ve always hung out with people older than me, and they make life look good—like aging is something to strive for. My grandmother died at 94 with all her faculties and her sense of humor intact. Never think you can’t start something new because of your age. TER: I always credit my mom with paving the way for females to have such multifaceted careers in the entertainment industry. You and so many of our peers carry that on. Do you consider making an unprecedented career choice an act of self-love? QL: Absolutely, because if you don’t take those chances, you will feel so unfulfilled. I couldn’t be as good a Lil’ Kim as Lil’ Kim could be. I couldn’t be as good a Foxy Brown as Foxy could be. But they couldn’t be as good a Latifah as I could be, so it’s about finding your own niche and owning it. TER: Were there any career decisions that were particularly hard to make? QL: When I got the role of amateur bank robber Cleo Sims in Set It Off, I sat down with my younger siblings and told them, “Listen, I’m playing a gay character. Your classmates might tease you or say negative things about it. But I’m doing it because I believe I can bring positive attention to the gay African-American community, and I believe that I can do a great job as an actor.” They understood, and when those things inevitably happened in school, they were OK with it. TER: In our social-media age, when everyone is so overexposed, whom do you consider pop-culture royalty? QL: I respect people who started from the bottom and then grinded up—the ones who work as hard as I did when I started rapping. I’ve been a fan of Solange Knowles from the beginning. The biggest artist in the world is her older sister, yet she never relied on that. It doesn’t matter to me if the masses know who you are. I care about how you behaved when you were broke and whether you’ve stayed loyal to the people who rolled along with you back then—that’s the good s—. Q

It’s great to have plans, but it’s more important to be open to the unexpected. That’s the secret to living a juicy, magical life.”

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PRETTY IS BACK Supermodel Isabeli Fontana sizzles in moody florals and decadent jewels photographed by HANNA TVEITE

Dolce & Gabbana silk dress and 18kt gold and glass ďŹ ligree clip-on earrings. Fashion editor: Sam Broekema.


Carolina Herrera silk and polyester dress. Forevermark Maria Canale diamond and 18kt white gold earrings.

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Louis Vuitton Lurex knit pullover, laceembroidered leggings with skirt panel, and quartz and 18kt gold earrings.

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Coach 1941 silk dress with lace details. Hearts on Fire diamond and 18kt white gold earrings. BEAUTY BEAT For pillow-soft lips, try L’OrÊal Paris Colour Riche Le Gloss in Naturally Nude ($8; loreal parisusa.com).


Michael Kors Collection satin jersey dress. Chanel Fine Jewelry diamond, cultured pearl, and 18kt white gold earrings and necklace (worn as headband).


Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci jersey collar bandeau, devoré silk dress, and silk slip dress. Bulgari diamond and 18kt white gold earrings (one pair worn as hairpin). Hair: Ben Skervin for Streeters. Makeup: Linda Gradin for L’Atelier NYC. Manicure: Yuko Wada for Atelier Management.

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sabeli Fontana is grinning ear to sun-kissed ear as she remembers when her modeling career began to take off. “It was after a busy show season in Milan,” she says. “I took all my money straight home to Brazil and bought a house!” Her firstever style splurge, however, was a pair of brown ankle-strap pumps from Calvin Klein. “They cost $180-something, a fortune to me in those early days!” It was certainly a purchase she, a self-proclaimed “ugly duckling tomboy,” never imagined making before her mother entered her in a local runway contest at age 13. “Back then I didn’t care about getting dressed up at all.” Yet after 20 whirlwind years of playing muse to the industry’s most notable creatives—including late photographers Richard Avedon and Bert Stern and designer Nicolas Ghesquière during his

Balenciaga tenure—she’s developed a sense of “what looks good and how to put it together.” One thing that hasn’t changed? “I still always want to be comfortable.” Slim, high-waist jeans from Brazilian brand Damyller and boots (today’s are vintage Chanel) are her usual go-tos—she swaps in heels before a work meeting. But fashion is hardly her whole life. The São Paulo–based model spends much of her spare time raising worldwide polio awareness with Rotary International. “Without complete vaccination in developing countries, the virus can still spread globally. As a mother, it’s very important to me that children everywhere are immunized,” she says. Whether on set or at an international clinic, Fontana has only one mode: authentic. “You’re always acting in this business, but it’s more important to give intimacy. Let people see inside you.” —ALISON SYRETT

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Style As Substance When life feels untethered, actress and model Hari Nef finds peace in audacious, uncompromising fashion photographed by JASON SCHMIDT

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remember grocery shopping with my mother. She’d wheel me—giggling— down the snack aisle. I don’t know if they still do, but kids’ movies and TV shows used to collaborate with snack companies on promotions. The results were limited-edition sparkly bags of Scooby-Doo gummies or fluorescent boxes of Animaniacs mac ’n’ cheese. I’d reach for those. “You don’t like that kind,” my mom would say, and she’d be right. “I like the box,” I’d say. “It’s crazy!”

I met Adam for dinner on November 11, 2016. Adam, my best friend— who once described his personal style as that of a “gay Jewish Gianni Versace”—wore a white T, faded Levi’s, and a lumpy black coat. I wore about the same. “We look funny,” I said. “I know,” said Adam. “I got up this morning and I was like, this is Trump’s America and I’m too sad to wear actual clothes.” I think back to seeing white letters on black: YOUR SILENCE WILL NOT PROTECT YOU. The phrase has persisted on social media since the election. I knew my silence wouldn’t protect me, but I wondered if my coat would.

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Days later I decided it was OK to take my first selfie since the election. I pouted in a yellow Gucci dress: highlighter lemon with magenta embroidery. A silk flower exploded from the cap of its single sleeve; another bloomed from the crest of the opposite hip. I looked like a poisonous tropical fish in the shape of a sulky 20-something girl. I felt beautiful, but not effortlessly so. I mulled over the Instagram caption: “who let patti smith into zsa zsa’s closet?” “you can learn a lot of things from the flowers” “xoxo charlotte perkins gilman” I settled for absurdity by way of SpongeBob: “absorbent and yellow and porous is She.” Absurdity felt good: a way out of mourning without totally disavowing it for joy (or resignation). I looked absurd; the dress, perhaps (to most), was absurd. I looked intentional too—bold, maybe—which was nice because I didn’t feel either way. I’d been crying a lot, which was obvious, but the yellow made it less so. My friend Laura texted me with a screenshot of the post. “Yes!” she wrote, then “How are you?” It was too soon after the election to say “good” (was I good? I didn’t know). “Gucci as self-care,” I texted back. “LOL!”

Three weeks later I am laughing on the corner of 57th and Fifth. I’m standing where I climbed and partially wrecked a police cruiser during a protest march the night after Trump won the election. We’d marched from Union Square. #NOTMYPRESIDENT. I feel like I’m standing on a grave, or near a mausoleum. My laughing turns to giggling. The Gucci store, I realize, isn’t merely “near” Trump Tower but within it—doors flanked by secret service. I peer at the guards, then their guns. I check my purse for flakes of marijuana. I laugh some more. “Where are you going?” asks the security guard. I pinch my voice into the sweetest tone: “Around the corner.” He checks my bag. “Have a good day, ma’am.” A family beams for a photo under the Trump Tower sign: mom, dad, and a young daughter. The little one wanders to the Gucci window. A gold sneaker with a rainbow platform rotates on a pedestal; a peach chiffon dress with a pastel marabou train and crystal appliqué glimmers in the light; a men’s cardigan reads “Bowie” on the back, surrounded by hearts and exotic birds. “Wow,” says the mom, “who’s gonna wear that?” “I like it,” cries the girl. “It’s crazy!” I walk inside. Q


Gucci silk-wool gazar gown with duchesse bow belt, glass pearl, crystal, and aged gold–finished ring (right hand), and resin pearl and aged gold– finished multifinger ring. Fashion editor: Ali Pew. Hair: Eloise Cheung for Kate Ryan Inc. Makeup: Linda Gradin for L’Atelier NYC. Manicure: Yuko Wada for Atelier Management. Set design: Cooper Vasquez for The Magnet Agency.


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GARDEN PARTY

the life How does the style set unwind? With a watering can and shears, of course. Here, six tastemakers ers on the unique satisfaction of culttivating greeneryy by CLAIRE E STERN S N

Van Noten’s spring runway show featured intricate bouquets frozen in blocks of ice by Japanese artist Azuma Makoto.

DESIGNER

Dries Van Noten Florals have long been the driving force behind Dries Van Noten’s collections, so it makes sense that the Belgian designer is an avid planter himself. When he’s not dreaming up verdant prints, Van Noten is pruning the hedges around Ringenhof, the 55-acre estate in his native Antwerp that he shares with his partner in life and work, Patrick Vangheluwe. In the spring, a bounty of fresh roses colors the property’s gardens, ponds, and parklands—as well as his runway. On finding a green thumb My father loved gardening, but it barely interested me as a boy. I didn’t start to share his passion until I was 35. The difference between gardens and fashion Flowers wither and lose their luster with time; clothes can last for years.

Dream garden-party guest English poet and novelist Vita Sackville-West. Favorite book to read outside I learned a lot about design from Trees in a Landscape, by Graham Stuart Thomas. Flower of choice It depends on the season, but hydrangeas are spectacular.

“I garden and make clothes with the same eye. If I love a mix of blooms, that will often inspire a print.” 3 363


THE LIFE

“Hair and flowers both grow, are cut, then regrow. Flowers don’t talk back, unlike clients.”

Reading in the garden is one of McKnight’s favorite hobbies. “At the moment, I’m into Cecil Beaton’s Diaries,” he says.

HAIRSTYLIST

Sam McKnight It’s safe to say that someone who has spent 40 0 year yearss creating iconic hairstyles for every notable from m Prin Princes cesss Diana to Tilda Swinton knows what looks good d. An And d Sam Sam McKnight’s exceptional taste extends to his gard rden en in London, a modest 30-by-15-foot plot brimming ng wit with h daffodils and crocuses that he calls “a riotous ex explo e plosio p sion n of of organized chaos.” Want proof? Follow him on Inst nstagr agram g am m @sammcknight1 and you’ll find a colorful feed ful fulll of of exot exotic ic c blooms, all with the hashtag #mygarden.

McKnight’s favorite floral scent? Jasmine. “It’s potent and heady,” he says.

Ideal day in the garden Pottering around, doing odd jobs like pruning, watering. Go-to weeding outfit A T-shirt and shorts with Hunter boots. They’re easy to slip on and leave by the door, and they’re waterproof. Top florist Flora Starkey. Her arrangements are reminis-

Men’s rubber boots, Hunter Boot, $145; us.hunterboots.com.

cent of painting ngs by the ol old d Dutch masters. s. Botanical ingrre redie dients nts th that att are best for hairr Hibiscus, rosemary, and chamomile. Landscape inspiration The gardens at Great Dixter in East Sussex, England [right]. I love their wild, brave, and unexpected planting. Sapphire, ruby, diamond, and 14kt rose gold ring, Effy Jewelry, $3,150; effyjewelry.com.

A Flora Starkey bouquet of English roses, delphiniums, chives, and Gillenia trifoliata

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McKnight dressed up ponytails with silk and tulle flowers for Chanel’s Métiers d’Art show.


N°2 BRIGHT ™

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THE LIFE

“Our garden is a mass of palms,” says Hicks. “We live in the tropics, so we wanted a tropical garden.” Casuarina candle, India Hicks, $54; indiahicks.com.

Gold-plated brass cuff with pavé crystals, India Hicks, $180; indiahicks.com.

Palm Jungle wallpaper, Cole & Son, $176/20" x 25' leejofa l j fa 25'; .com.

Polyamidey elastane bikini, el bk , H fig Hilfiger g C Collection, $160; $ tommy com tommy.com.

LIFESTYLE GURU

India Hicks As the daughter of revered English interior deco ecorat rator or Dav David id Hic Hicks ks and a second cousin to Prince Charles, India Hickss is roy royalt royalty alty y in in two two sen senses ses of th the e word. Even though her blossoming brand has become a staple among the ladies-of-leisure class, the former model lives a surprisingly low-key life with her partner, David Flint Wood, and their five children at Hibiscus Hill, her family’s 3-acre home surrounded by rolling gardens and palm trees on Harbour Island in the Bahamas. Blooms of choice Peonies, roses, and lavender. I prefer a soft color palette. Go-to hosting outfits Cutoff jeans and flip-flops during the daytime, and a long silk caftan by Figue with lots of gold bangles and beads in the evening. bea

Fine voile vo microfiber scarf,, India Hicks, ks, $ $58; indiahicks.com.

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Dinner-party trick Fill oversize vases with elephantpalm fronds and line them up in the center of the table. They make the vibe feel very tropical. Design lesson from Dad Views are important. The more windows, the better.

In her book Island Style ($31; amazon .com), Hicks pulls back the curtain on her Bahamian oasis and shows how to achieve her trademark beachy aesthetic.


THE LIFE F FE

“I prefer not to wear gloves when I garden— getting dirty is the fun part!” says Kwong, who swears by Lollia hand salve ($25; lollialife.com).

Book recommendation: My Kind of Garden, by David Hicks. Kwong’s favorite look from Ulla Johnson’s spring show, which featured a spectacle of wildflowers and grasses

22kt gold necklace (with apatite) and ring (with stones), Marie-Hélène de Taillac, price upon request; at Marie-Hélène de Taillac, 212-249-0371.

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

Lily Kwong

De Taillac tending to the climbing plants on her terrace

JEWELRY DESIGNER

Marie-Hélène de Taillac “When I have flowers and the TV in front of me, I watch the flowers,” says the globe-trotting French jeweler. Each piece in her quirky collection, from dangling parrot earrings to a necklace of peacock feathers, is inspired by her bougainvilleafilled garden in Jaipur, India. Ideal day in the garden Clipping overgrown plants and watering. The flowers always look happy afterward. Favorite time of day to be outside Early morning. The light is beautiful, the temperature is pleasant, and I can watch the peacocks graze.

The difference between gardens and jewelry Flowers are ephemera; jewels have a life after us. Landscape inspiration The gardens at The Salutation house in Kent, England, designed by the British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Emb Emb belllllis issh he ed d pa pat p a ent ent nt ca calfs ffssk kin in n san an a nd dal da alls w a wiit iith tth h si silk lk fl flo flow ow o owe we ers er rs rss,, L Lan La a anvin vin n, $69 695 6 95 9 5;; at Bar Ba arn ar rrn ney ey eys yss N New ew e wY Yo orrk rk. k. k

22 2kt go old d earrrings with earrings wi onyx and pearls, Marie-Hélène de Taillac, $5,900; at Marie-Hélène de Taillac, 212-249-0371.

In her early 20s, model Lily Kwong quietly pursued a career in landscape design between fronting ad campaigns for Calvin Klein and Joseph Altuzarra (her cousin). Now 28, she designed a botanical-themed capsule collection for Maiyet last fall and installed a 7-by-12-foot vertical garden at the label’s N.Y.C. store. Landscape inspiration Maya Lin’s Wave Field installation at the Storm King Art Center [in New Windsor, N.Y.]. Garden beauty essential SkinCeuticals Physical Fusion UV Defense in SPF 50 [$34; skinceuticals.com]. It’s the only sunscreen that doesn’t make me break out.

Kwong’s garden must-haves: Felco clippers ($56; felco.com) and planters (starting at $34; thesill .com) by N.Y.C.– based brand The Sill.


PROMOTION

INSIDER PRODUCTS, PROMOTIONS & EVENTS

DANA AVIDAN COHN (LEFT) WITH ALEXANDRA DADDARIO (RIGHT)

AN EVENING WITH MOVADO To celebrate the holiday season, InStyle and Movado hosted an exclusive gathering on December 14 at NYC’s famed restaurant, Gabriel Kreuther. Friends of Movado enjoyed an intimate chat with Michelin-star Chef Gabriel Kreuther and were treated to a custom-curated three course meal. Guests also mingled with Movado Brand Ambassador Alexandra Daddario and InStyle Executive Style Correspondent Dana Avidan Cohn and enjoyed champagne.


O Ferrara’s On e a as mood m db board: d t s flo this floral a l ffrom look S Sonia R ’s Rykiel’s sspring i g c ll collection.

STYLIST

Laura Ferrara Italian-born, Brooklyn-bred stylist Laura Ferrara splits her time between dressing celebrities on set in New York City and picking apples at Westwind Orchard, the 32-acre Hudson Valley organic farm she shares with her husband, fashion photographer Fabio Chizzola. They grow raspberries, kale, squash, and zucchini flowers, which they toss onto their wood-fired pizzas, a favorite of friends and family who flock to their table for rustic country dinners. Go-to plowing outfit I keep it utilitarian: Carhartt cargo pants and Aigle slideon clogs. Vegetable of choice Garlic. Sowing the seeds is hugely satisfying. Best part about gardening Sharing something you have spent time growing.

Westwind Orchard sells eggs, homemade jams ($17; shopilbucovita.com), and pizzas topped with fresh ingredients. “Whatever we grow goes on the pizza,” Ferrara says.

BRILLIANTLY REFRESHING! © 2017 Del Monte Foods, Inc. All rights reserved.

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BY A N N E VO R R A S I

Dinner-party menu Roasted pig and homemade pasta topped with fresh tomatoes and basil. Favorite books to read outside Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan quartet. Since the novels are set in Naples, they remind me of where I grew up.


It ’s

o t e Tim

Unexpected flavors, exciting combinations, refreshing fruit waters.

It’s the Fruit Cup® all grown up! © 2017 Del Monte Foods, Inc. All rights reserved.


by SUSAN MILLER

ARIES MARCH 21–APRIL 19 As you begin March,

you’ll still have the privilege of Mars, your ruler, in Aries until the 9th. If you have a plan to initiate something truly important, do so in the month’s first nine days. You will be ultra-magnetic and persuasive. Meanwhile, Venus will begin to retrograde on the 4th and remain that way until April 15, so it’s not the time for radical changes to your appearance. At the end of the month, the new moon on the 27th has your name written all over it. The Sun, new moon, Venus, Uranus, and Mercury will be in Aries—that’s remarkable, for it adds up to having half the solar system in your sign—and those heavenly bodies will put you in the lead. You’ll have control over events and relationships, and things will likely go your way.

TAURUS APRIL 20–MAY 20 Something highly important is happening on the 4th, when your ruling planet, Venus, goes retrograde until April 15. This isn’t the time to make daring moves in regard to your looks or concerning any project that emphasizes beauty and design. Another big moment occurs on the 9th, when Mars goes into Taurus and remains in your sign until May 20, which is great news. It will give you a very high level of success in any new ventures. You’ll show strong determination, drive, and passion, and others will want to follow you wherever you lead. This will be one of your most powerful periods of 2017.

372

PISCES FEB. 19–MARCH 20 March will bring the last eclipse in a two-year series, a new moon solar eclipse that arrived days prior to the start of March, on February 26. That eclipse is sending its influence through March and the following six months. All Pisces will see opportunities arise, but those born within four days of February 26 will feel it more—you may see some immediate shifts in lifestyle this month. Neptune, your ruling planet, was orbiting close to that eclipse, indicating that what comes up will touch on something deeply personal and important to you and might well involve a fabulously creative project. Your significant other in either love or business will be your main focus at the full moon in your opposite sign of Virgo on the 12th. This full moon will ask you to make an important decision.

of a family member, or you may have an expense regarding your living space. Don’t fret, though—Pluto in your house of other people’s money suggests that you should have more than enough to cover any unexpected costs.

GEMINI

CANCER

MAY 21–JUNE 20 You start the month

JUNE 21–JULY 22 As you enter March,

with big changes happening in your career, triggered by the recent solar eclipse, February 26, that is still bringing big shifts. All changes will be positive, so go with them and don’t be tempted to resist. A lot will be going on in your life this month, for the full moon will put an emphasis on family or home (or other property that you might be focused on). Saturn will be at a hard angle, so you may need to take on the responsibility for the well-being

you may be planning to travel a great distance for your job or for pleasure. If you cannot travel, you may work on an international project that you’ll enjoy. Your career has brought surprises in the past years, perhaps especially recently around the time of last month’s new moon solar eclipse, February 26. If your birthday falls in June, last month’s eclipse was very strong, and sudden news should have been extra-beneficial. Mars is in a rare

I nST YLE M A RCH 20 1 7

tour of your 10th house of fame and honors, indicating that this is one of your best periods in two years for professional success.

LEO JULY 23–AUG. 22 Get in front of a

VIP, because your opportunities for advancement are great this month. From the 9th to April 21, Mars will begin to circulate in your 10th house of honors, awards, and achievement. You have a bit of a conundrum, however, in that Venus, the planet that rules your 10th house of fame, prestige, and honors, will be in retrograde during roughly the same time (from the 4th to April 15). It’s best not to commit to anything new just yet, but you can certainly explore possibilities. After May 18, Venus will not only be direct

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY A N G E L I C A H I C K S


but also be back to former strength. A potentially tough day may be the 17th, when the Sun, your ruler, will be in hard angle to Saturn, the latter now touring your romantic sector and also ruling your creative efforts.

VIRGO AUG. 23–SEPT. 22 This month marks your “winter” as the Sun is farthest away from Virgo. Until the Sun loops around its elliptical orbit at the end of this month and starts its journey back to your birthday time in September—a stretch of six months—you will do best to lie low and work collaboratively. The deck is temporarily stacked against you, but only for now. You must let others have their time in the sun and make their mistakes—you will learn from them. Your own interests will be center stage at the full moon in Virgo on the 12th. Pluto in Capricorn will be in an ideal angle to the full moon and Sun. At this time, something dearly important to you will reach culmination and finish.

LIBRA SEPT. 23–OCT. 22 Your March will start

with a long to-do list, for you have Neptune, Mercury, the Sun, and the new moon solar eclipse of February 26 making an impact on you. The opportunities still arising from the latter will continue to be especially strong and plentiful. Both at home and at work, new assignments will flow in, goals will progress, and through it all, luck will be on your side. Your ruler, Venus, will go retrograde from the 4th to April 15, so you might have a change of heart concerning a romantic partner, or put plans you’ve drawn up together on a back burner, due to outside conditions. Both Venus and Mars are in your partnership sector, a lovely romantic vibration, but Uranus, the planet of surprise, is there too, so a switch in plans or feelings may suddenly arise.

The enchanting spell of love may be temporarily interrupted by the new moon of the 27th, when your office will spring to life and assignments will pour in. Planets are gathering in your sixth house of work, all in Aries, suggesting something new and quite entrepreneurial will come up for you to focus on.

SAGITTARIUS NOV. 22–DEC. 21 As you enter March,

your mind will be strongly on your home in terms of either living conditions or improvements you would like to make. This comes due to a very powerful new moon solar eclipse that occurred February 26 and that will be influential through March and possibly for months ahead. By the full moon, on the 12th, you will need to redirect your attention to your career. Saturn will test your courage and determination, so you may have to finesse a challenging career situation. Again, Pluto will be at your side to help you get on top of things and will allow you to be a force to be reckoned with in your industry.

CAPRICORN DEC. 22–JAN 19 This month, when it

comes to career, be patient. Your 10th house of fame and honors—the only part of the chart that rules your ascent to the prestigious top—is ruled by Venus, and Venus will be retrograde, slowing your progress. Avoid taking a

new job or interviewing for one from the 4th to April 15. (And though Venus turns direct in April, it actually won’t be back to full strength until May 18.) Be patient—you’ll find much better aspects in the last quarter of 2017, a better time to act. Romance will be blossoming, however, now that Mars is about to enter your fifth house of true love from the 9th to April 21. Whether you’re single or attached, Cupid will be around the very next corner.

AQUARIUS JAN. 20–FEB. 18 As you begin March,

you enter one of the best periods of 2017 to ask for a raise, brought on by the solar eclipse of February 26, still strong now. Your focus on money will end at the full moon, on the 12th. You may huddle with your accountant to do savvy tax planning—and being that Pluto (which rules the government) will be in a helpful position to that full moon, tax news looks to be positive. If you want to take a home-related action that would involve funding, it may be best to wait a bit: Venus, ruling your home sector, will retrograde from the 4th to the 15th and not resume full power until May 18. Besides, Mercury, which governs contractual deals, will be retrograde too, from April 9 to May 3. For more of Susan Miller’s forecasts, go to astrologyzone.com.

Happy Birthday, Pisces! Rihanna, Feb. 20

SCORPIO

PISCES SAYS, “I BELIEVE.” You are highly creative, poetic, and artistic. Your sensitive soul finds beauty in areas that others fail to see. You are considered the most compassionate of all the signs; a modest, spiritual soul, you will sacrifice almost anything you have or want for yourself to bring relief to individuals near you who suffer, including complete strangers.

OCT. 23–NOV. 21 Even though February

is known as the month of love, March also looks to be an exciting month for romance for you. As March opens, you have no less than five heavenly bodies in your fifth house of true love: Neptune (glamour), Mercury (news, travel), the Sun (authority), and the new moon (opportunity). Neptune will be orbiting close to the solar eclipse, a highly glamorous vibration, so do your best to keep your feet on the ground, for it will be all too easy to get carried away.

Drew Barrymore, Feb. 22

Dakota Fanning, Feb. 23

Your year ahead The coming year will be one of enormous financial reward for you, thanks to Jupiter in Libra. Yours is the sign that is the least materialistic, but nevertheless, having a great deal of money coming in will give you many life choices. If you would like to work on your living situation, a good time to do so will be April 21 through June 4. In love, you will be most charismatic at the new moon (plus 10 days) starting June 23. This would be an ideal time to take a vacation too. Career success will come in heaps at year’s end, starting at the new moon, December 18, 2017—be ready! You will have five heavenly bodies in your house of fame and honors. It will be your time of reward for having worked hard—and smartly.

M A RCH 20 1 7 I nST YL E

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Collins says. Here at the table, she flashes an easy smile. “To take that and harness it and make it something empowering, that is a cool way of flipping it around.” Q

This Year’s Girl Miss Lily CO NTI N U ED FRO M PAG E 1 95

producers and director, all women, “were adamant I not put myself in any situation that felt dangerous or teetering. It was the perfect way to step into this situation and then write about it.” If there’s a theme to Collins’s life now, it’s turning former struggles into causes for celebration. Today she seems only to revel in the pleasures of her image, especially dressing up. She describes her personal style as “classic, ever-changing, and daring,” and everything she’s wearing–from her rose gold watch to her minimalist gray coat–is subtly gorgeous. Collins dresses with her grandmother in mind, a ballerina who “didn’t have to have a lot of things, but she knew what she liked and how she wanted to feel.” Calorie-counting has been replaced with a passion for baking, especially vegan or gluten-free muffins, pies, cakes, you name it. In the chapter “Food As Fuel, Not Punishment,” Collins writes that experimenting in the kitchen “makes me feel good. It gives me time to myself when I can zone out and be creative.” Not all her dishes are pretty enough to earn a spot on Instagram, but it doesn’t matter. “I now view food as energy for my mind and body rather than something to be scared of.” In one of the most touching stories in Unfiltered, Collins cooks a healthy dinner from scratch for her mother– steamed salmon and vegetables and, for dessert, her now-signature chocolate-chip quinoa cookies. “It’s lovely to have people enjoy something you’ve made, especially when that used to be a part of your insecurities,”

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CO NTI N U ED FRO M PAG E 30 8

Jonathan Leder announced the upcoming publication of some nudes that he had shot of Ratajkowski back in 2012. “So I used Twitter to reinforce an idea that I’ve believed in forever,” she says, “which is that it’s up to me to choose when and how I want to share my sexuality.” It was no accident that she posted a particularly revealing photo on Instagram a few days later. “Of course, a bunch of the headlines were like, ‘Emily complains about nude photos and then posts her own sexy selfie.’ And I was like, ‘That’s exactly my point! The difference is, it’s my decision to post that.’” As comfortable as she is on camera, naked or clothed, Ratajkowski says her modeling gigs in the world of high fashion initially unearthed some insecurities. “I come from such a middle-class background, so it was intimidating to be all of a sudden around really fancy, snobby people,” she says. “I mean, I’ve always loved aesthetics and fashion design, but I didn’t feel superconnected to the grandeur of it all.” Her next film releases are two indies: Anthony Byrne’s In Darkness, a thriller shot in London, and Robert Siegel’s Cruise, a romance set in ’80s suburbia. Swanberg thinks Ratajkowski is naturally suited to unique, unusual projects and not just to the big prestige movies that seemingly every actress goes for. In her career as well as in her life, Swanberg says, “Emily knows exactly what she’s doing. As long as she keeps making her own choices, she’s going to be fine.” Ratajkowski’s Los Angeles home is in the Arts District, east of downtown—a creative hub she calls “fake New York,” which she says she prefers to the real one (as well as to L.A.’s West

Side, with its Hollywood conventions and pretensions). “My friends are not in the industry—they’re young artists or knitwear designers or whatever,” she says. Her boyfriend, Jeff Magid, a musician who studied philosophy at Brown University, jokes to her that when he moved out west a few years ago he was eager to chill out in the land of carefree optimists but somehow he ended up with the dark, intense Ratajkowski—“the one cynical Californian.” Ratajkowski has been happily involved with Magid for almost three years. She extols his all-around awesomeness to me, but it’s probably no accident that his picture hardly ever turns up on her Instagram. The day after our December interview, I check what @emrata is up to, and there’s a new shot of Ratajkowski vamping in a Santa hat while plugging the holiday items that she has for sale on the Depop app. The photo had 422,359 likes at last count. Q

Lady in Red CO NTI N U ED FRO M PAG E 327

style scarves featuring animals in dreamlike woodland scenes. Lady Mary would be very impressed. In the near future, Godless and The Sense of an Ending—a relationship drama out this month, co-starring Jim Broadbent—can only mean more red-carpet twirling, and Dockery is more than game. A recent favorite: “I just loved the Oscar de la Renta dress I wore for the Emmys,” she says. “That dress was so beautiful.” On Instagram is a clip of a gleaming Dockery, in said silvery gown, getting down to “Juicy” in the back of her limo. “It’s so funny, the things that go on behind the scenes,” she notes. “There’s a whole array of different Spanx you can wear. You know those Spanx that have butt pads in them to make your bum look more curvy? I put them on the other way once, just for a laugh.” That’s the thing about Dockery: She’s kind of unsinkable. Whether it’s her British unflappability or her love of her work, she keeps calm and carries on. She wears her celebrity—


STEP 1 The Crystal Healer

able, like a doll out of a Rachel Comey factory. There’s zero woo-woo. I can tell immediately that her collection is extremely well-curated. She has a crystal for everything: rose quartz for emotions and love, selenite for clarity of mind and transformation, black tourmaline to release and repel negative energies, a quartz penis carving, generously life-size… “I got these penises for fun,” she says earnestly, and I love her. “They’re just carved so well,” I say, nodding, totally in agreement. “Truly lifelike.” She explains that problems with the body are tied to spirit and emotion and that crystals help us gain clarity. I would like some clarity. As I lie on the table, eyes closed, Lee explains that she is nothing but a guide on this metaphysical trip. She has me breathe into my chakras one by one and asks me to describe to her what I visualize. Sometimes I see a color, other times an object. In my heart chakra there’s a scary rabbit (it’s a long story that turns out OK, I swear). None of this feels weird; it’s like a lucid dream that Lee guides me through as she carefully selects and places crystals on my body. Dozens of crystals are put in patterns around my chakras. (At the end, I notice that when I’d mentioned seeing a color for a designated chakra, she’d found a crystal of the same color to set there.) I don’t even think about opening my eyes, not once, which I retrospectively find odd because under most circumstances I have the attention span of a gerbil. I leave my session with Lee with tools to self-calm (I’m notoriously anxious—see scary rabbit in heart): a large anthracite to sleep with, to “de-fuzz” old feelings from new events; an anhydrite to positively meditate with for one minute at the end of each day; and a rose quartz to carry around—my new lucky penny.

Azalea Lee’s cool, minimalist space is called Place 8 Healing and is located high above the shouts and honks of downtown Los Angeles. Lee has no pretentious vibes, despite the fact that she’s obviously been reincarnated. Her aesthetic is low-key-envi-

I’m on the table of Dayle Breault, aka the Goddess of Skin, and her poreless complexion is 100 percent enviable. She asks if I Googled her before coming in, and I tell her no, which is

overwhelming as it can be, especially in grief—as elegantly as Lady Mary’s gloves. “What I’ve learned to do is to have as much fun with it all as possible,” she explains. “I’ve traveled, I’ve seen and met extraordinary people and been to amazing places. Things I never dreamed I would experience in my life.” But when it comes to her personal life, Dockery will never be “Access all areas.” “It’s important for me personally that I keep a little bit held back. Well...a lot, in many ways.” She smiles and pours another cup of tea. Q

The Crystal Method CO NTI N U ED FRO M PAG E 328

out there—and even surrounded by crystals, I was still stressed. I realized I needed more than what I was learning from books; I needed some guides. So I booked an appointment with a crystal healer and a crystal facialist. I was ready to go to the next level: Keyser Söze.

STEP 2 The Crystal Facial

the truth. Of course, the moment I walked into her vast, glass-walled Venice work–living space and saw her clients’ faces on a standing cardboard cutout, I was hers forever. She’s the skin guru to Lisa Bonet, Cara Delevingne, and Zoë Kravitz. Once we start the facial, I’m in and out of consciousness right off the bat due to my Pavlovian reaction to a Palo Santo smudge and blessing. Breault massages my face with selenite; sandblasts me with amber; peels me with hot cinnamon, clove, and niacin; and uses a micro-pulsing tool to tighten my face. She does the latter in conjunction with creams made of heavenly scents, rubbing ruby and sapphire into my skin, which now feels as tight as a blinged-out snare drum. I know this may be the only situation that Cara Delevingne would ever want to trade places with me. Breault sends me home with some of her Synergy Mist (organic, nontoxic, crystal-infused, handcrafted, and blessed during a new or full moon) to layer on top of Truthful Serum moisturizer. (Btw: I did not know mists went on top of moisturizers.) I’ve had facials before, but this one felt magical. My skin ended up clearer and less red than it normally gets after regular, now-lameseeming facials. I get home and message my buddy Pratt: “Hey, Spencer, you should totally see the crystal healer and facialist I saw—neither of them were charlatans!” “I can’t,” he replies. “My skin is hypersensitive. I can only use Avène. But watching your crystal journey on Snapchat has relit my passion for stones. I used to do crazy things, like, it’s prob not chill taking rutilated quartz wands everywhere in public and moving peeps’ energy.” I type back, “Hahaha,” and get ready for bed while thinking about leveling up to Pratt’s crystal status by moving peeps’ energy in public with the penis quartz. I then come to a quick realization that between letting crystals guide a journey through my body and having them rubbed into my face, I have likely surpassed dear Spencer. The student has become the master. Q

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“My grandfather’s ring is from the 1930s. It’s made of rose gold, which isn’t something you see that often for men anymore.”

“I wanted the diamonds hidden inside the platinum bands so only we know they are there.”

Why I Love by MICHAEL KORS My grandparents were one of those couples who were like swans—they did everything together. They were married for 54 years, and when my grandfather Austin passed away, my grandmother Beatrice said, “You know, I think he wanted you to have his wedding ring.” Quite honestly, when I was growing up, I didn’t really dream there would ever be a time I would be able to get legally married. But as soon as the New York state law changed in 2011, my partner, Lance, and I went down to City Hall. His parents, Dixie and Harold, also had a wonderful marriage, so I said, ‘Wouldn’t it be amazing to have rings that symbolize both of our families and our future together?’ His father had left him a ring with seven diamonds, so I called jewelry designer Janis Savitt and asked her to create something bold that combined them. Lance wears one, and I wear mine stacked with my grandfather’s ring. Every day, whenever I look at my finger, I’m reminded of the past and the future at the same time. I’m full of optimism.” Michael Kors and Lance LePere were married August 16, 2011, in Southampton, N.Y.

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