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From Dadbod to Six-Pack in 5 Moves!

MARCH 2017 $8.99 NZ $9.99 INC GST

Diesel

Boost Your Bench The 21-Day Plan to Upgrade Your Body

Lift 25% More

Melt Away Fat! While You Sleep

108 to Live i Fitter, i & Longer menshealth.com.au

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In This Issue 03.17 On the Cover p38 DADBOD TO SIX-PACK Ignore the Twitter trend: #dadbod is not cool. Here’s how to ditch yours – no gym required.

p40 MELT FAT IN YOUR SLEEP Lose while you snooze? You better believe it. Maximise your time in the sack to boost testosterone and torch lard.

p48 DOUBLE YOUR SEX STAMINA Tired of celebrating Christmas in July? Apply these staying tips from a one-time quick shooter.

p54 STRONG AND LEAN Heed the training wisdom of xXx star Vin Diesel to build a body worthy of the big screen.

p110 BOOST YOUR BENCH The classic bench press remains the ultimate man move. Send your PB through the roof with this plan.

p116 WIPE OUT BACK PAIN A chalky spine derailing your fitness plans? Don’t fret – we’ve booked you in for a session with the world-famous Back Mechanic.

t

MODEL: VIN DIESEL PHOTOGRAPHED BY PATRIK GIARDINO

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MARCH 2017

turn

page


Sections

p12

p15

p26

p54

p109

ASK MH

USEFUL STUFF

PERSONAL BEST

FEATURES

ELITE

Mind

Nutrition

Muscle

p16 SAY SORRY

A p12 CATCH OFF THE DAY

p30 GROW WITH THE FLOW

How seeking forgiveness for past misdeeds could clear your path to a brighter tomorrow.

Could the fish in the supermarket freezer be just as good for you as the fresh stuff?

Boost coordination and leg power, while carving your six-pack, with one super move.

p26 ROLL WITH THE PUNCHLINES

p32 FIRST ORDERS

p36 PUSH OUT FAT, PULL IN MUSCLE

Comic actor Josh Lawson shows you how to use humour to subdue pain and open doors.

We pitted wine against beer in a battle of nutritional clout. Here’s the, hiccup, verdict.

Combine the thruster and chin-up in a workout that will transform your body.

p84 MIND GAMES

p62 A MAN, A PAN, A PLAN

p112 ENTER A PARALLEL UNIVERSE

Hypnosis is gaining traction as a treatment for everything. Should you give it a go?

Eat like a king with these cheap, succulent recipes that no man could mess up.

Strong, supple, lithe . . . build the physique of your dreams with one piece of gear.

Sex

Health

Style

p16 FOOD AND SEX

p13 SNAP, CRACKLE AND POP

p122 THE CASUAL MAN’S TOOL KIT

The dietary secrets that will lift your performance between the sheets.

What to make of those disconcerting sounds coming from your hardworking joints.

A wardrobe stacked with versatile items is your key to a seamless seasonal switch-up.

p24 IS ONCE ENOUGH?

p44 THE LAST WORD ON GLUTEN

p128 STRAPPED FOR TIME

Our Girl Next Door reveals how women really feel about one-shot Charlies.

Avoiding this much-maligned protein is all the rage. Should you buck the trend?

Take a fresh look at your watch band . . . the perfect timepiece isn’t just a pretty face.

p66 BATTLE OF THE BRAINS

p72 HARD LABOUR

p132 URBAN HIKER

Men and women are wired differently. Read her better and reap the rewards.

Our desk-chained writer seeks out a cure for his all-consuming work addiction.

You don’t need to be desert-bound to favour clobber combining style and substance.

MARCH 2017

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Ed’s Letter

“Thee pacee of ourr livess has accelerated, but thee factt is thatt it’s neverr goingg to slow down.”

TOO BUSY TO HIT THE GYM? DON’T SWEAT IT. PACKED WITH SHORT, EFFECTIVE WORKOUTS AND RECIPES, 15-MINUTE TRAINING GUIDE IS YOUR SHORTCUT TO THE BODY YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED. BUY ONLINE AT SUBSCRIBETODAY. COM.AU/BUY/15TG

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Stress has become a perverse sort of status symbol. If you’re frazzled by work, it’s tacitly acknowledged as a sign that you’re busy and important. Having more on your plate than a spinster at a wedding suggests you lead a fast-paced life – people to meet, things to do, deadlines to knock out of the park. Your tidal wave of commitments shows that you’re dynamic and indispensable. And so it becomes self-perpetuating. In a screwed-up way, this compulsive pride in overworking is understandable. Being chronically overburdened may leave you drained and twitchy. But you also feel validated and useful, too. Your boss probably loves you. Plus, the adrenaline rush of charging between pitches, meetings and conference calls delivers a buzz that’s strangely addictive. Obviously, it’s not a good thing, though. After hours, you end up scrolling through work emails instead of engaging with the people you love. You’re constantly preoccupied or exhausted. More serious side efects can include burnout, depression, work-life conlict (so long, family!) and a host of physical ailments ranging from insomnia to heart disease. The Japanese coined a word for extreme cases: they call it “karoshi” – death from overwork. While this over-cafeinated lifestyle isn’t generally fatal, the symptoms are on the rise. As mobile technology chips away at the barriers between work and play, more and more people are susceptible. In “Hard Labour” on p72, Dan Williams brilliantly tackles his own struggle with becoming a workaholic and explains what you can do to break the cycle. It’s an important story that’s more timely than ever. We all recognise that the pace of our lives has accelerated, but the fact is that it’s never going to slow down. If you want to last the distance, then you have to enforce the speed limits yourself.

Twitter: @LukeBenedictus Email: menshealth@paciicmags.com.au 8

MARCH 2017


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Ask MH LIFE QUESTIONS, ANSWERED

Q Is fresh ish any healthier for me than the stuff I can grab in QL the frozen-food aisle?

It may sound fishy,but the frozen stuff is just as good for you.

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MARCH 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY: SAM KAPLAN

THE COLD, HARD TRUTH: it’s all pretty much frozen. Commercial ish operations lash-freeze their catch – often right on the boat – before sending it to distributors, who then decide whether it will stay frozen for purchase or be thawed and presented “fresh” by the retailer. Nutritionally, there’s not much diference between the two. As for taste, the majority of people in a Japanese study either favoured frozen ish or couldn’t tell the diference between fresh and frozen. (Repeated freezing and thawing can ruin texture and taste, though.) Bottom line? Buy it in any form , but just eat it. The average Australian man eats barely a third of the 550g (three serves) of ish recommended per week by Food Standards Australia New Zealand.


Q I love a bowl of cereal as a late-night snack – nutritional blasphemy, right?

AH

Well, it’s certainly the kind of fix to give uptight nutritionists nightmares, but we’re going to go against the grain here and say that your bedtime bowl isn’t such a bad thing. Consuming carbs in the evening can, in fact, help you relax because they promote the production of serotonin, a feel-good neurotransmitter, says nutrition consultant Dr Mike Roussell. Moreoever, in an Israeli study, people who took in most of their daily carbohydrates at dinner dropped more weight and felt fuller than those who diligently rationed their carb quota throughout the day. Oh, and the casein and whey protein in milk can help your muscles recover and rebuild as you sleep. So while your PT may scoff at the suggestion, we say go for it.

Q When I first get out of bed, it seems like everything cracks – my neck, ankles, knees. Am I just getting old?

JP

It’s only your joints preparing for the day ahead. As you move during the day, bubbles form in the fluid that lubricates your joints, says rehabilitation medicine specialist Greg Kawchuk. When they collapse, you hear them pop. It’s a harmless phenomenon and it might even help your joints glide as you move. Now, if a joint cracks every time you move it, that’s different; it could be a tendon snapping against a bone as a result of an injury, a change in your workout routine or a muscle imbalance. Ask a physiotherapist for advice. Finally, if every pop is painful, talk to your doctor: it could be a sign of arthritis, but know that cracking joints don’t appear to cause the condition.

Q My barber uses a straight razor on my neck, and I love the clean feeling. Is it safe to try on my face? SA WELL, HOW’S YOUR DRIVING? Our favourite description of this manly skill comes from John Rivera, a master barber at The Art of Shaving. “Using a straight razor is like driving a manual car,” Rivera told us. “You have more control, but it requires more efort.” Before the advent of the safety razor, the straight blade was it. If you want to use a straight razor at home for that smooth feel, you’ll have to lubricate your skin with shave oil before the cream goes on, and then stretch your skin taut so the blade can glide at a 35° angle without pulling on the whiskers. The nose of the blade can reach nooks under your nose and crannies around your Adam’s apple. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll get the closest shave and save a few bucks while you’re at it. “If you keep your blade clean and sharpen it every two or three shaves, it’ll last you a lifetime,” says Rivera. Aren’t moothie?

Q I hate stretching, but I know I need to do it. Is there one move I can do that hits everything? JW Try the reverse lunge to hamstring stretch. “It stretches your hips, hamstrings and lats, and activates your glutes, key areas to prep before any workout,” says PT Kevin Larrabee. To do it, stand with your feet together. Step back into a reverse lunge and raise your arms overhead, stretching your lats. Place your hands on each side of your front foot, raise your hips and lift your front toes, stretching your front hamstring. Drop your back knee, stretching your back hip; return to the start. Repeat on the other leg. MARCH 2017

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Tons of tips, tricks and strategies for life 03/2017

Mix the right spices and the benefits really stack up.

MINUTES TO FEED YOUR BRAIN A BUTTER CHICKEN

If a Friday-night takeaway after a long week at work feels like a foolh hardy indulgence, we are about to serve you some truly delicious science. Because the combination of the key ingredients in a standard curry sauce can prevent your blood pressure from boiling over and spice up your working memory in time for the week ahead. Research into the psychological effects of cinnamon published in the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology found that oral doses given to mice trigger a higher concentration of a protein involved in memory and learning in the hippocampus. This is your brain’s filing system, responsible for organising and recalling information. Meanwhile, a separate study in Planta Medica journal found that the blood pressurereducing powers of turmeric can be enhanced by 2000 per cent when paired with black pepper, thanks to a significant increase in the absorption of nutrients. Regardless of whether you’re a whizz with the spice paste or just watching the clock after ordering a lamb rogan josh, rest assured that your next curry is the thinking man’s cheat meal.

MARCH 2017

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NUTRITION KNOW-IT-ALL Jacqueline Alwill Adv Dip Nut Med

Q Does it matter if I buy my

canned tuna in olive oil rather than spring water? DE It comes back to reading the label. You see “in oil” or “Italian style” and you may assume it’s olive oil, but it’s actually a blend of predominantly sunflower or canola oil with olive oil. To get pure olive-oil tuna is expensive and you don’t see it on supermarket shelves. My tip would be to buy the tuna in springwater and then add your own, good quality extra virgin olive oil. That way you’re getting the healthy fats and not having to chew through dry tuna.

SHORE UP YOUR SHOULDERS

Shoulder pain? Do these moves. No shoulder pain? Do them anyway. Here’s why Adding one of these mobility-boosting moves to your routine will reduce your risk of shoulder injury and lessen any pain you’re already feeling, says Doug Kechijian of Resilient Performance Physical Therapy. His favourite is the arm bar, but you should find the one that’s right for you.

TRY THIS: ARM BAR Start as you would for a get-up: left leg straight, right leg bent (foot flat), a kettlebell in your right hand pressed over your shoulder. (Keep the bell here throughout.) Slowly roll left as you lift your right leg (still bent) and bring it over to your left side. You’ll end up on your side with your right leg on the floor. Do 3 sets of 6-8 reps per side.

rams r by men scale ightther ilo. SOURCE: OBESITY

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MARCH 2017

EASIER: RING PUSH-UP Assume a push-up position with your hands in rings or TRX handles that are 15-30cm above the floor. (The higher you go, the easier the move will be.) Try to keep your body perfectly straight from head to heels as you perform a push-up. Do four sets of perfect-form reps, stopping two reps short of failure.

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HARDER: HARDER CHAIR CHIN-UP CHIN UP Hang from a chin-up bar. Bend your knees so your thighs are parallel to the floor, as if you’re sitting in an invisible floating chair. Maintain that position as you slowly perform a chin-up, pulling your body up and then lowering yourself back down. Do four sets of controlled, highquality reps, stopping two reps short of failure.

Q The idea that some foods

are aphrodisiacs – a crock or not? BJ I doubt any food has an immediate aphrodisiac efect. But when it comes to nutrition and sex drive, I do suggest playing the long game. The ultimate benefit of a wholefoods diet is how you feel. You feel great about who you are – and you project that. Sugary foods cause you to crash, and you don’t want to be falling asleep as you hop into bed – you want to have your game on! On the flipside, favour a diet rich in zinc, vital for the production of sex hormones. Make fish, oysters and beef regulars in your diet. Jacqueline Alwill is a qualified, practising nutritionist and author of Seasons To Share: Nourishing family and friends with nutritious, seasonal wholefoods

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he Modern Man’s Rulebook: Say Sorry H Health resolutions are easy; hearts and minds are hard. Try this spirit lifter: apologise for something. s For starters, how about that stupid thing you said to your sister a the party for your parents’ 40th? True, saying “I’m sorry” may at n be your strong suit. But guess what? Developing humility is a not big step towards full-throated manhood. If you’re thinking of that passive-aggressive “I’m sorry if I hurt your feelings” stuf, forget it. You acted like a jerk. You’re sorry. Full stop. Keep it short, plain, simple and sincere. Get the words out and you’ll feel strong, renewed and maybe even forgiven.

ILLUSTRATIONS: STEVE SANFORD

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. . . . . . . . Eat This to . . S av e Your Knees . . Too much satu . rated fat may le . ad to knee arthritis. . Study particip . ants wh o ate the most . sat fat lost 48 pe . cent more join r t spac . . femur and tibia e between their (a . n in dicator of oesteoartritis) . over four years . than those who ate . the least. Choo . po se lyu ns at ur ated fa . . like walnuts, nu ts, found in foods . t butters, avoc ado and fatty fish, wh . ile going easy on . fatty cuts of re . d meat and . smoothies mad . e with coconu . t milk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clashing over finances is common and can lead to nasty splits. . . Here’s what happy couples do . . . . . 1/ Hire a Ref 2/ Keep Your Own Stash 3/ Invest in Sex . . If you’re focused on the kids’ Yes, you two should have a joint Set a weekly time to talk money . . private-school fees while she’s account for family expenses, – no judgment – for 10 minutes. . Percenta e of t . planning a second honeymoon, and you’ll need to agree on Have back-to-back meetings: . . no wonder you fight about amounts you’ll each throw into one at the kitchen table for . money. But in an Ameriprise the pot. But it’s a good idea to budget stuf, one in the . . Financial survey, 40 per cent of rats we mean – ro also have your own account to bedroom for whatever comes . . couples who couldn’t resolve use for anything you want, says up. It’ll defuse tension and . a four-day slee . Marcy Keckler, vice president boost your endorphins, says . their issues said an advisor study. Gym. Kitchen . helped them see eye to eye, of financial advice strategy at relationship therapist Bonnie . relieving tension in their Ameriprise. “That way there’s Eaker Weil, author of Financial . SOURCE: MUSCLE NERVE . relationship. Infidelity. no pointing fingers.” . . . ... . ... . ... . ... ... . ... . The Easy Way to Make Great Pizza ... . ... . Some pizza chains cover up bland crust with sugary sauce, rubbery cheese and cheap meats. ... . ... . This pizza, from Italian chef Pasquale Cozzolino, uses fresh ingredients, and you can inhale half ... . ... . of it for a mere 1800 kilojoules. It’s so good you won’t even miss the greasy pepperoni slices ... . ... . ... . STEP 1 STEP 3 STEP 5 ... . . Put 2¼ cups of cold water into Use your hands to mix the Preheat the oven to 260°C. On . . . ... . a big bowl. Add ½ teaspoon dough well, about 5 minutes. a baking sheet, roll the dough ... . ... . dry yeast, gradually stir in 3 Let it rest, covered, for a half into a 20cm circle. Top with ¼ ... . ... . cups flour. hour. (Go make a salad or cup sauce, 50 grams sliced ... . ... . something.) mozzarella, some fresh basil ... . ... . STEP 2 leaves and 1 tsp extra virgin ... . In a separate bowl, mix half a STEP 4 olive oil. Bake until golden ... . . Cut the dough in fourths. tablespoon of salt into 3 more brown, 5-10 minutes. Feeds 2. .. .. .. . ... . Freeze three portions (wrap cups of flour. Then gradually ... . ... . each one in plastic) and thaw stir this flour into your flour... . ... . when a craving hits. water mix. ... . ............................................................................................. ............................................................................................. .............................................................................................

I ESTIN TUALF

MARCH 2017

ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL BYERS

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T E CONKE - T QUIZ

JACK THE BARMAN

Here’s your job fatigue checklist. If any of these sound familiar, it could be time for a change You’re underpaid with no guaranteed raises ahead. You’re tired of co-workers trashing each other Whatever your boss says makes you seethe. Set up a “360 review” with HR, says Jessica Jafee of the employee review site Glassdoor. This is when you and the team can confidentially talk about . ou re ore ut on t want an new challenges ou re an extrovert w t ew peop e to int r t with urnout is more likel our personal nd b duties are a mismatch, research hows. Find wa s to diversi our duties to better matc our rsonal , e co a orat w t co-wor ers o ect

Straight-up adv things that drive men crazy

Your career path and training don’t point to your dream job. Remind yourself of why you took the position, and pursue skills that might help you land the gig you want, says career coach JT O’Donnell.

Q My boss keeps scheduling

meetings and then not showing up for them. Should I say something? Tim What’s to say? Unless he’s docking your pay for wasting your time, I don’t see what the problem is. Sometimes a customer will order a drink from me and then barely touch it. Fine with me. The boss is paying you for your time, right? If he’s wasting it, then his boss will let him know.

You don’t have enough time to handle your workload. Stress rises all day and hardly stops once you’re home. , ress on a scale of 1 no problem to 10 nke . Do this for a week or two and th n ass ss th r sults. If mor than hal o ur scores re ter above a , t at s un ea t y, so start oo ng, says O’Donnell.

Q I’m middle-aged and happily

married. When will I stop lusting after young women in the oice? Randall

ou ket is on mot vat on for st

If you’re like most men, Randy, I’m going to say when you retire. I’m not one of those prudes who think it’s a social sin to appreciate an intelligent woman who’s fit and dresses nicely. But that doesn’t give you permission to stare – to linger over every curve, smoke coming out of your ears. Sure, some things in this life make a man say, “Thank you, God” – and a beautiful woman is one of them. But so is a rainbow trout. And neither wants to go to bed with you. So whisper the gratitude to yourself and get back to work.

F YOU CHECKE t Hang tight and ho e. 4 to 6 Freshen our r sum . 7+ You’r still th r ?

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ou dog is so cute! And so are you, vi ntly. In a survey of 733 women, 5 r cent said adopting a pet ak s a guy seem hotter – and 68 er ent said a pooch is the sexiest et e can own. It suggests sociability and aretaking skills. She’ll tching you with Max, ile e ul. sa

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. . . . . . . The Bald and the Beautiful . . . KEY STATS FROM THE MANE GAME, WHICH EVERY GUY WANTS TO WIN . . . . . . . . . PER CENT PER CENT PER CENT PER CENT .. . . . Respondents who Men who said Respondents who Men who said . were aged “feeling said getting they’d have a hair . between 21-30 unattractive” was teased by friends transplant if more .. . when they first their motivator for or workmates conservative . noticed they were seeking prompted them to treatment . . losing their locks. treatment. didn’t work. take action. . . . SOURCE: HAIR LOSS IMPACT AND PREVENTION SURVEY, ASHLEY AND MARTIN . ......................................................... ......................................................... .........................................................

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The Picture of Mental Illness?

Men can be reluctant to admit they’re depressed, let alone ask for help. But social media may provide clues. Researchers have tapped technology to identify signs of depression in Instagram posts. Dark colours, low light and frequent posting were among the red flags. If your mate’s social media signals worry you and he seems tired or irritable, invite him over. Then suggest he see a doctor if he seems depressed. Or you can report any post that suggests selfharm: Instagram will send your friend an anonymous message with support resources.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alice Treloar . . . . . . Q Going up to a woman and . . telling her she’s beautiful: . . sweet . . . or creepy? GA . . . Depends on the context. If you’re . . ten beers deep, chances are . . she’ll put the compliment down to . . booze-related bravado. Hallmark . musings should be genuine. If it’s . . after a nice chicken parmigiana . . and you’ve clicked over your . . mutual love for cronuts and Adam . . Sandler flicks, speak freely. . Also, it won’t hurt to say why – . . beautiful freckles/laugh/energy . . – it shows you’re paying attention, . . which always pays of. . . . . . Q I can only manage it once . . per session. Could that be . . a problem? SV . . . For a few dames, perhaps. But . . the majority of lassies would be . . happy to stand down after one . . pop. Especially if you can keep . . your motor running for marathon . periods. Otherwise you could run . . into a handful of issues – too . . much chaing, too few Kleenex, . . two tired participants. Be kind to . . yourself, SV, and choose quality . over quantity. . . . . . . . . . . Your Prime Diabetes . . Risk Is Over Easy . . . Scramble your defences: according to . . a study in the American Journal of . Clinical Nutrition, eggs could be your . . key ally in the war on diabetes. Men . . . who consumed at least four medium. sized eggs a week had a 37 per cent . . lower risk of type 2 than those who . believe the chicken comes first. . . Antioxidant carotenoids found in the . . yolks fight inflammation associated . . with diabetes, researchers . . say. They suggest eating at . least one egg a day . . for the maximum . . benefit. No need to . . overdo it, though. . . After all, one egg . is un oeuf. . . ............................ ............................ ............................

THE GIRL NEXT DOOR

PHOTOGRAPHY BY AGATA PEC AT HEARST H STUDIOS

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lean on . . a mate to . keep the gym . . gains coming. . . . . Training with a friend won’t just give your PB a . . . lift – it will earn you an extra rest day, too . . . The smartest animals hunt in wobbly press – are one of the you on to train up to 90 . . per cent harder. But there’s packs and that goes for gym best ways to trigger a serious . . another good reason to lift en rats, too. Every seasoned spike in testosterone levels. . . masse and that’s so you can weightlifter will attest to the Why does that matter? For . spend more time out of the benefits of having a mate to one, we’re talking about a . . gym doing something far spot you on those last few resulting boost in muscle . . more exciting instead. A study reps, and there’s more to it protein synthesis every time . . in the Canadian Journal of than feeling brave under the you use the tandem . . Applied Physiology found that barbell. In fact, research technique. For another, that’s . forced reps – where a spotter conducted by The University enough to justify an extra day . . assists with the evacuation of of Kansas found the of the weights to let your . . the barbell from the vicinity of competitive nature of working muscles repair. Talk about . . your windpipe for a final out with a partner can spur friends with benefits. . . . . .............................................................. .............................................................. ..............................................................

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>IT’S AN INJURY When you’ve seriously injured yourself, it’s usually pretty obvious. If you’ve come flying off your bike, used your arm to break your fall and heard a snap, for example, seek medical attention immediately. But if you rolled your ankle going for a tackle, you could be dealing with a minor acute injury you could possibly treat at home. For immediate self-care of a sprain or strain, give the RICE approach a go1. That’s Rest. Ice. Compression. Elevation. Rest the suspected injury and don’t be a hero! If possible, keep the area elevated, especially at night, to allow gravity to do its thing and help reduce swelling1. If it gets worse, you’re worried, or you’re still sore after a couple of days, go see your doctor!

>YOU’RE FEELING SORE

HURT OR SORE? WHEN IT COMES TO WORKING OUT, NOT ALL ACHES ARE THE SAME. FIND OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING INSIDE AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO BEAT THE PAIN If you find it hard to tell the difference between normal post-workout pain and when you’ve actually done some damage, you’re not alone! Even the most seasoned athlete can struggle to decode the biggest workout aches. Sometimes the small twinge you thought was harmless can be a major injury in disguise, so it’s important to know what’s going on. Here’s our quick go-to guide to help you figure out whether you’re injured or just sore and what you can do to get back on top of your game. For the temporary relief of pain and or inflammation. Always read the label. Use only as directed. Incorrect use could be harmful. If symptoms persist, see your healthcare professional. This article is for your general information only and is not intended to diagnose or prescribe. Always see your healthcare professional if you have any questions. 1 www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sprains-and-strains/basics/lifestyle-home-remedies/con-20020958 2 www.painscience.com/articles/delayed-onset-muscle-soreness.php 3 Dewland P et al BMC Clinical Pharmacology 2009, 9:19 ASMI 27220-0117

When you try a new exercise or work your muscles harder than usual, it can lead to something the fitness pros call delayedonset muscle soreness (DOMS). Your muscles might be feeling sore and weak, the pain hitting with a bit of a delay after your workout, lasting as long as three days2. There are things you can do, like taking a couple of rest days, or you could try a pain relief option such as Nurofen Zavance. Just like all aches aren’t the same – not all Nurofen is the same either. Nurofen Zavance tablets contain a different formulation which includes a sodium salt that makes it absorb up to 2x faster than standard Nurofen3. From a scientific review, it has been shown that faster absorbing formulations generally provide more effective pain relief so you can get back on track faster. Of course, if the pain hangs around for more than three days or you’re concerned, it’s best to seek medical help.

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03/17

BEST Roll With The Punchlines y BY

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A ARON SCO

JOSH LAWSON, ONE OF Australia’s leading comic actors, is sitting in the dining room of Sydney’s Park Hyatt, picking politely at a chicken Caesar salad (dressing on the side) and expounding on . . . boxing. Yes, the man who’ll channel the inimitable Hoges in this month’s much-hyped mini-series, loves the sweet science. Loves it. Get him talking about ringcraft and his eyes widen and the words come at a rush. “I just love how boxing’s so

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deceptively precise,” he says. “It’s a game of inches. It’s all about the conservation of energy – the best fighters barely move because they know they have to last the rounds. In some ways it’s like a dance. In other ways it’s meditative, a Zen thing. . .” Back in his adopted hometown of Los Angeles – where he’s worked opposite Will Ferrell in Anchorman 2 and more recently alongside Don Cheadle in Showtime’s House of Lies – he’ll be in his local boxing gym most

days of the week, laying into bags and popping away at focus mitts. Before Christmas last year, he spent four weeks in a Muay Thai training camp in Chalong, on the island of Phuket. He went into the camp confident in his fitness but the opening day’s exertions almost broke him. He cracks a wry grin: “I was sitting there thinking: this is next-level shit. This is actual fitness. . .” Despite the pain, the camp proved a transformative experience. The


“You want to set ’em up and knock ’em down.” For Lawson, humour and boxing are driving passions that overlap.

MARCH 2017

27


morning run up to a mountain-top Buddha that tore him to shreds in the opening week gradually grew easier. By the final week he felt as if he was gliding up the mountain. “It was like a superpower,” he says. “When you notice your fitness changing that quickly, it’s hard not to feel invincible.” But as much as Lawson revelled in the hardships of that Muay Thai camp, boxing remains his true love. It’s a passion, an obsession. He sees fight-game metaphors everywhere (“When life throws punches at you, the worst thing you can do is panic, get flustered, burn through energy”). But he particularly sees these analogies in his chosen field of comedy. “You want to set ’em up and knock ’em down,” he explains. “That’s all a joke is: a beautiful, effortless set-up and a punchline you don’t see coming.” He smiles: “I mean, it’s easy to draw the analogy with boxing when literally the most important part of a joke is a punchline.” For Lawson, boxing may be a passion, but humour is even more important – it’s intrinsic to life. “If someone can make you laugh,” he says, “that’s a rare and special gift. In this day and age when life can be pretty shitty – stress, work, mortgages, all that stuff – laughter is an escape. You know, it’s tough to be stressed and laugh at the same time. If you can laugh, it alleviates the stress and pain of life. And the person who can give you that gift? That’s a special person.”

Lawson can’t remember a time when he didn’t want to be KNOW acting. As a nine-year-old, he YOUR pestered his mother until she CROWD got him an agent (“I was really precocious”). Throughout primary school he did ads and extras work. By the time he moved into his teens, he started picking up small TV roles. But it was in high school at Brisbane’s Gregory Terrace, a school renowned for churning out elite rugby players, that he began to realise the value of comedy as social currency. “I wasn’t a very sporty kid,” he explains. “In fact, I was in the lowest rugby team every year – the Es, Fs, the Gs. The other schools didn’t even have teams low enough to play us.” Desperate to fit into an environment where sport was everything, he started writing little skits about upcoming matches and performing them at school assembly. The skits got him noticed and won him friends. Best of all, they got people laughing. Lawson, of course, didn’t much care about rugby. But he knew for the skits to work, they had to be geared towards something the other kids at school did care about. And rugby was their religion. “The lesson: read the room. Know your audience. The only way you can make someone laugh is to understand what they like and what they don’t like. The worst

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thing you can do? Walk into a room and misjudge the temperature – then you’re dead.” Armed with this knowledge, Lawson’s fledgling career took flight. He graduated from NIDA in 2001, before stints on Home and Away, Blue Heelers and All Saints lifted him into the public eye. In 2006 he made his feature film debut in BoyTown, alongside Glenn Robbins and Mick Molloy. A year later, he moved to LA.

Lawson counts himself lucky for finding his passion in life KEEP at such a young age – he COMING shudders at the prospect of AT ’EM shuffling through life without a clear purpose. But, by the same token, Lawson’s infatuation with acting came with its own problems. “When you want something so bad, it can be a curse,” he says. “The rejections can torture you. And in acting, rejections are constant. Constant.” He points to his role as Kench Allenby in Anchorman 2, a film his agent drummed up as a career-changing opportunity. Lawson loved working with Will Ferrell – but the movie

didn’t send his career into the stratosphere. “Or take Any Questions For Ben?” he says. “Again, it was a big movie at the time and a big lead role for me. It meant a lot to me and I desperately wanted it to be more than it was.” But the “failure” Lawson dwells on is 2014’s The Little Death, a risqué comedy he wrote, directed and starred in. Ostensibly, the film wasn’t a failure – it was nominated for six ACTAA Awards, won audience awards at the SXSW and Thessaloniki Film Festivals and, most importantly, made money at the box office. “But I wanted that movie to be an enormous theatrical success. I wanted it to be the next Kenny or The Castle. And it wasn’t. You know, making a movie isn’t 2+2=4. You’re creating something out of nothing; you’re putting yourself on the line and exposing yourself to a hell of a lot of punches. And those punches can be really hurtful.” The take-home? Embrace the frequency of failure, Lawson urges. “It’s a horrible, egobruising thing to fail. But it’s so natural – everyone fails. And the good news is that failure makes you better – but only if you choose to keep going. Most people don’t. They give up after a couple of failures


TACTICS

LAUGHTER IS AN ESCAPE. IT’S TOUGH TO BE STRESSED AND LAUGH AT THE SAME TIME

THAT’S NOT A 6-PACK... That’s a 6-pack. A recent stint at a Muay Thai camp took Lawson’s fitness to new heights. Follow his lead to build a body no one will dare laugh at

DIRECTIONS Perform each exercise according to the Tabata protocol: work for 20 seconds, rest for 10 seconds, repeat 8 times. Rest as needed between exercises.

because it hurts too much. But if you learn to take those punches and keep going – knowing the failures will continue – you will eventually surpass everyone else. Why? Because you’ll outlast them.”

This month, Lawson’s career will, once again, face another game-changing moment when ENJOY THE he fills the titular role in Channel STRUGGLE 7’s Hoges. The part is a departure for Lawson – it’s the first time he’s ever played a living person. He still shakes his head at the surreal memory of calling Paul Hogan, a man he’d never met, to inform the iconic actor that he was going to be playing him in the mini-series. (“He was very, very kind,” Lawson recalls.) For Lawson, the role has added significance – he reveres Hogan as a trailblazer for actors like himself who’ve made a home in the US. “When Americans say they love that Australian sense of humour, they’re still thinking of the character that Paul Hogan presented to them all those years ago. He played a massive role in defining Australian humour. He put us on the

map. And any Australian doing comedy in America right now – like myself or Rebel Wilson or Chris Hemsworth – has to pay a debt of gratitude to Paul Hogan.” So now that he’s cracked this comedic acting gig, MH wonders . . . Lawson raises his hand: “I honestly don’t feel like I’ve cracked anything. I always think creative types are cursed like Sisyphus. They roll the boulder up the hill only to have it roll back down again. That’s what it feels like for me. Every time I feel like I’ve got somewhere, the boulder rolls back down again.” And Lawson’s okay with that. He’s quite content pushing the boulder. In his estimation, it’s the struggle of rolling the boulder that makes the small victories along the way all the more pleasurable. “You know, it took me nine years to make The Little Death. But to sit in the theatre at the Sydney Film Festival and hear people laughing? Worth it. Laughter made it all worthwhile. It’s the curse of the clown – we’ll do anything to get that laugh. So I’ll keep doing this until people stop laughing.” He grins: “And even then, I’ll probably keep doing it.”

WALL BALL THROW “This really got me,” says Lawson. “First, you’ve got to go low with the squat – arse to grass – then drive up and throw the ball as far up the wall as possible.” BACKWARDS BEAR CRAWL “Going forward is hard enough, but this is a real killer. It hits your abs, your shoulders, your back and it also works your co-ordination. You’ve really got to concentrate.” ROWING “They always say: the equipment no one uses at the gym is the equipment that’s best for you. Well, there’s a good reason no one ever uses the rower. It’s hard and it works.” BATTLE ROPES “It’s all about keeping that strong base position: semi squat, shoulders back, chest proud. Now keep those ropes moving in a nice ripple motion.”

Hoges airs on 7, February 12 & 19 at 8:30pm

MARCH 2017

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MUSCLE +

THE

FITNESS

BEST

EXERCISE YOU’RE NOTDOING BRACE FOR TAKE-OFF Crouch with h your hands on th he ground, mbbells. holding dum Yourr heels should be raised, directly below your glutes, and your ering above knees hove the floor.

Boot out boredom with the weighted front kick-through h to shred your abs and your brain in a single session Ignore the chumps shuffling back to the bench at the mention of “animal flow”; it’s not all crawling on your hands and knees while channelling your inner wolf. In fact, done right, it’s a shortcut to washboard abs, increased mobility and a beast of a mental boost, too. This weighted version of the regular kick-through is a complex movement in the technical sense of the word, meaning it requires the co-ordination of multiple muscle groups and joints. When performing it, you need to focus on stabilising your planted arm while hefting a dumbbell in the other, kicking your core into overdrive. However, it’s this complexity that transfers gains to both body and brain. “This exercise works wonders for your grey matter,” says PT Kemo Marriott. “Learning new movement patterns stimulates increased production of a protein that contributes to brain growth and development.” Which means not only will it prove the catalyst for fulfilling your abs aspirations, there’s an intelligence kicker to boot. Now that’s training smart.

EXPLODE OUT Raise your left foot and tense your abs in preparation – you’re about to do a lot of things simultaneously. Jump your right foot to where your right hand is, lifting your right han as you do.

WHAT YOU’LL GAIN

BEAST-MODE ABS

HEIGHTENED CO-ORDINATION

BREAK-DANCE MOVES

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FOLD BACK Hold the extended position for a beat before reversing the move in the same order. Then repeat to the other side. Abs already aching? Consider that proof it’s working.

WORDS: JACK HART; PHOTOGRAPHY: PHIL HAYNES

KICK THROUGH In a fluid movement, kick your left leg through the gap between your right foot and left hand, extending your leg as far as yo can. Still solid? This next bit is fairly trick


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NUTRITION

Pass the bar exam at happy hour with our glass-half-full guide to selecting the he best beverage for yo your wellbeing. g This round’s on us

S The number of units per pint. You’re looking at close to 920kJ, or a slice of pizza

The number of units in a large glass. At about 795kJ, that’s equal to a bag of chips ENDORSEMENT ENDORS

“RED WINE COULD GIVE ATHLETES A BOOST BY INCREASING FREE TESTOSTERONE”

“MILK IS FOR BABIES. WHEN YOU GROW UP YOU HAVE TO DRINK BEER”

Kingston University

Arnold Schwarzenegger

TIPPING POINTS

Balances BP

Ups bone density

Eases joint pain

HEALTH HERO

ELLAGIC ACID

Adding wine to meat reduces the toxic chemicals released during the breakdown of fat. Sauce-up your next casserole Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Enhances banter

XANTHOHUMOL

Extracted from pinot noir grapes, this antioxidant slows the growth of fat cells. Berries and walnuts are (less fun) sources The point at which blood-alcohol peaks after a glass of wine, the University of Texas says, measured from the last sip. Time humorous anecdotes accordingly

Helps gym recovery

A flavonoid found in hops, it could offer protection against Alzheimer’s disease. The required dosage is unclear, however HAPPY HOUR

54 minutes

62 minutes

PAIRING NOTES

Beer enters the bloodstream slightly slower. Note, subjects were asked to savour their beverage over 20 minutes. Necking it will have variable effects

Marinating meat in lager before flamegrilling cuts the formation of carcinogenic PAHs by 37%, or by 68% for dark beer Universidade do Porto, Portugal

WINE WINS! Wine’s profusion of heart-healthy antioxidants sets a high bar – but the right beer falls a close second. While a glass of red is still the top order, a hoppy IPA beats a sweet white. In moderation, there’s no need to bottle out when minding your health: a vin-vin situation.

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*AS PART OF YOUR WEEK’S 14 UNITS, THAT IS. WORDS: SCARLETT WRENCH; PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC

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PUSH THROUGH

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HEALTH

DEVIL’S ADVOCATE

Phones Update Your Health RECKON YOUR MOBILE IS FOR YOUR ? AUTOCORRECT THAT THOUGHT. IT COULD TRIGGER A FOR BODY AND MIND

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Now, while Facebook FOMO triggered by all your associates sunning themselves on holiday can make you question another late night at the office, can it really be true that mobiles make us anxious and lonely? Whether you’re meeting Tinder dates or organising a catch-up on WhatsApp, they certainly have a way of boosting your social life. You could even, you know, phone someone: the British Medical Journal has shown that talking can be as effective as drugs for countering depression. Less well known is how your phone can support your wellbeing. You can sync it to bodycomposition scales or wireless blood-pressure monitors to get medical biomarkers delivered to the palm of your hand. Previously, you’d only know if your blood pressure was high when it was too late. Now you can monitor everything from blood glucose (Glooko) to sleep quality (Sleep Cycle) and even heart-rate variability (Elite HRV). Deploy each one as a digital first line of defence for better health. Look, nobody is suggesting you hammer your phone all day. The message is to use it to create a positive environment. Delete Instagram downers and sign up for updates from motivational business people and fitness experts. Quit Candy Crush and switch to Lumosity, which trains your brain to keep you smarter and sharper. And sidestep newsfeeds of global misery for the guided meditation practices of Headspace. With a few upgrades, your phone is more than just a gadget – it’s your personal doctor, on-demand psychologist and training partner. Don’t drop it just yet.

HEALTH TRACKER

Use your phone to monitor blood pressure and you’ll please your doctor: 88 per cent say they want patients to track their health at home BREAK AWAY

Kansas State University proved that those who enjoy handset microbreaks at work are happier, more refreshed and more productive. CULL AWAY

According to Cornell University, positive online news works like an “emotional contagion” to lift your own mood, too. Twitter bores only bring you down.

WORDS: MARK BAILEY; PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC

THERE ARE NOW more mobile devices on the planet than human beings and SATAN’S LITTLE HELPER technophobes are Scott Laidler is a convinced these personal development beeping coach who specialises rectangles of in digital health doom are on a transformations mission to make you fat, lonely and depressed. Men perform 90 minutes of phone-poking per day and many scientists are convinced this is bad for your body. Kent State University found screen-addicts have inferior aerobic fitness and enjoy half the sporting activities of casual users. Mobiles are also blamed for poor sleep and weight gain: exposure to screen light unbalances the sleep hormone melatonin and the hunger hormones ghrelin and leptin, leading you to feel zombified and crave calorific succour. Phones also stand accused of trashing your mental health. A University of Illinois study suggests that users wired up to 24/7 updates are vulnerable to depression and anxiety, while a Chinese study has linked excessive use to loneliness. So far, so shrill. But our view of mobiles is in serious need of a system update. Used properly, your phone can make you palpably fitter, healthier and happier. Let’s start with fitness. A massive 82 per cent of recreational athletes now use fitness tech and apps, with 75 per cent saying these tools help them exercise more, not less. Lifesum and MyFitnessPal track kilojoule intake and burn (not so long ago we were all shooting in the dark) and with free workout apps such as FitStar, you’re never short of training ideas. Best of all, the gamification of working out through apps like Strava provides key mental weapons that psychologists know maintain motivation; namely inspiration, accountability, social support and achievement.


LOW CARB. HIGH PROTEIN. DON’T UNDO THE HARD WORK.

available at:

atkinslift.com


WEIGHT LOSS

Push Out Fat This full-body test is an absolute brute. Complete as many rounds as possible in 12 minutes – keep that sweat towel handy

02// HANG TIGHT

01/ SET THE BAR

Straight from the thrusters,, jump up to a chin-up bar and knock out 5. Forrget kipping; stick to sttrict reps with a tight core e and clean form. If you can n’t manage 5 in a row, use your time wiselyy and take a 10-secon nd pause before ca arrying on.

First up, thrusters. With the bar in a front-rack position, lower into a deep squat before pressing back up, using the momentum to drive the bar overhead. Your rep is complete when your arms are locked out, ears in front of biceps. Give us 5.

THE SCOREBOAR

36

THE TASKMASTER Jordan Wallace, CrossFit coach “AMRAP – as many rounds as possible – is a CrossFit staple. With a set end point, you can push yourself to that ‘dark place’ at high intensity levels, knowing it’s only for a short time.”

up your total before checking it against Wallace’s rankings

3 rounds

4-5 rounds

5-10 rounds

10+ rounds

BEGINNER

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCED

ELITE

Make chin-ups easier by engaging your strong upper-back muscles first. It’ll support your arms when they start pulling down on the bar.

Try mixing sprint sessions into your training. It could increase your anaerobic capacity by up to 30 per cent according to Norwegian researchers.

Increasing the cardio you do at max speed raises your lactic threshold, lending your muscles the stamina they need to break past 10 rounds.

Very well done. Now try with a weighted vest, or bump up the barbell weight. CrossFit always has another level.

MARCH 2017

WORDS: JACK HART; PHOTOGRAPHY: PHIL HAYNES

03// FINAL PUSH When you’ve finished 5 reps of both it’s straight back to the beginning g for another round of 5 thrusters. With 12 minutes to work, keep the pace steady or riskk wasting the final five collapsed d in a heap on the gym floor.


NEW

SERIES

With children comes plunging testosterone, an aching back and a doughy midsection, right? Our writer decides to fight back, nappies be damned [ BY ANDREW McUTCHEN ]

THE LOOK ON Andre Agassi’s face was one I recognised from childhood. The very same expression that would lick across his sweaty features when he dumped a cross-court forehand into the net. It was a wince. “Three kids under three?” he queried. “Yep. Three. Under three.” “Man, you’re pretty much in triage . . .” Triage. The place where doctors decide on the order of treatment of a large number of patients or casualties. What a genius. That’s exactly what I’m in. But let’s go back in time a little bit. I am interviewing Andre Agassi on the subject of watches. My whole life revolves around three things: my kids, who are aged just under three, a bit under two and about three months. My wife, who is aged 36, and a remarkable woman, for reasons already established. And watches. A little over two and a half years ago, I started Time+Tide, a digital media business purely about luxury Swiss watches. From Melbourne, mind you, the city that is surely the furthest from Switzerland. I guess I didn’t really think the logistics of that one through . . . It has, in fact, gone quite well. Long-haul travel, however, is a constant. Put these two things together – a house teeming with tiny humans and a business requiring regular overseas lights – and you have the perfect combination of ingredients for a brutal physical decline.

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Suddenly, the day-to-day has gone from one with a standard daily trot around a park or session in a gym to a world of weighing up a nappy change versus a toddler standing precariously on a balcony railing, to a wife who needs a cofee – now. It’s a lifestyle propped up by cafeine, alcohol and paracetamol, three amigos I have taken to afectionately calling “Cofohol-adol”. Cofee to feel human after four hours sleep. A vodka and soda or four to take the edge of a workday that will end in domestic chaos. And Panadol to dull all. Of. The. Loud. Noises. The solid food component of this #dadlife is really whatever you can prise from the ingers of your children and the odd boiled egg in the

Qantas lounge on an early morning light. Other important nutrients are gleaned, hopefully, from all those good things in red wine I read about in Men’s Health . . . The mark of this lifestyle is quick, soft and hard to take if you’re used to being it. Metabolism slows down and testosterone comes at a dribble. All of a sudden, no abs, no arms and absolutely no love for the bathroom mirror when you’re getting out of the shower. The only comfort I felt looking at the man in the mirror was that, apparently, there’s a new hashtag ready to love and accept the new me: #dadbod. Women love it. It’s a thing. Seth Rogen has one! Scratch that – Leonardo DiCaprio has one! And he has an Oscar . . .


HEALTH

2 1.5

DEFEAT DADBOD IN 10 MINUTES

Kilograms gained by fathers in their mid 30s who don’t live with their kids.

Targeting the big muscle groups in your legs and core, this no-fuss, body-weight workout from PT Phil Sims can be squeezed in between naps and nappy changes

Kilograms gained by fathers in their mid-30s who live with their kids.

DIRECTIONS

.6 Kilograms lost by men in their mid-30s who don’t have kids.

Perform these 5 exercises as a continuous circuit. Rest for 30 seconds at the end of each circuit. Complete as many circuits a possible in 10 minutes.

Walking lunge (10 reps each leg)

SOURCE: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEN’S HEALTH

Glute bridge (15 reps)

‘‘A dadbod should d have enough h off a g n show gun w that y u can you n rock yo ourr newborn to o sleep s p without ru unning g outt of firepower.’’ So, gents, there it is: the out. Surrender is trending on Twitter. Muffin tops are just ine for the new-age man. There are, according to several opinion columns, throngs of adoring female fans. All that’s left to do is put down the kettlebell and pick up the white lag. But I can’t. Perhaps I have self-acceptance issues. I may well be in denial. But I’m just too young to give up. I’m not even 40. I mean, I had a six-pack just over six months ago. I don’t want a dadbod. And that’s because of what’s happening underneath the surface, too. The stifening of joints from lack of use, the couching of vital organs in layers of oozy fat, the tightening of the lower back from the picking up of toys and toddlers.

I want to keep doing what I’ve done all through my 20s and 30s. But more than that, I want to redeine the term in the positive. A dadbod should be like a beachbod – a physique it for the task. It should have a strong core for lifting kids of any age, a rock solid lower back for picking up Lego like a boss, and enough of a gun show that you can rock your newborn to sleep without running out of irepower. And lastly, I don’t want my wife to be retiring to bed with a spare tyre where my waist used to be. I am officially waging war on the dadbod. But I am doing so with more than a faint sense of trepidation. For this is no retrowritten column from a happy place of nine per cent body fat and peaceful slumbers. If you take into account all the obstacles a new father faces – sick kids, niggling injuries, scant restorative sleep – there is absolutely no guarantee I’ll win this one. For example, I’m drinking red wine as I write this, while racking my sleepless brain for the last time I saw the box of Panadol. In the morning, if I don’t have cofee I will die. So we’re going to be building this together, if you join me. I hate the word journey almost as much as I hate the band Journey, but that’s exactly what this will be. I’ll be asking it dads for advice and then passing on their tips. Because, at the end of the day, while I enjoy Seth Rogen’s relaxed take on masculinity, I sure as hell don’t want his manboobs.

Bodyweight Squat (15 reps)

Plank (60 seconds)

Mountain Climber (10 reps each leg)

MARCH 2017

39


WEIGHT LOSS

tes

one resources

y i

i u

Ignore wooly bro science. Solid sleep is the way to burn fat

HAVE A GOOD NIGHT DEPLOY SOUND SLEEP SCIENCE BEFORE YOU HIT THE HAY TO GET YOURSELF IN THE ZONE

WARM UP

GO OFF GRID

DROP OUT

PUT A SOCK ON IT

ROLL OVER

Worried a post-work session will leave you wired? An Appalachian State University study found working out aids rest by boosting body heat, much like a warm bath.

Try a next-level digital detox and turn off the wifi: electromagnetic frequencies in your bedroom have been shown to affect sleep.

Supplementing with sleep hormone melatonin knocks you out faster. Liquid drops are the most easily absorbed.

Having warm feet enlarges blood vessels, lowering your core body temperature and helping you to doze off more rapidly.

Right-side snoozer? US doctors found sleeping on your left reduces the risk of sleep-disturbing acid reflux. Now, lights out.

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WORDS: TED LANE; PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER CROWTHER

MANY I woul clai a, when it comes to weight loss, there’s no substitute for sweating it out under a barbell or spending your evenings prepping chicken breasts in Tupperware. In truth, giving your bellyshrinking ambitions an edge is so easy you can do it with your eyes shut. Testosterone suffers from a dubious reputation, thanks to its association with top-heavy gym monsters armed with hypodermics. But this essential hormone – produced naturally in your sleep – not only has the potential to help you gain muscle mass, it can also target fat around your gut, providing a raft of health benefits beyond new abs. Research published in the Journal of Andrology found that catching superior Zs results in a T-boost that’s exponential – and that upping your kip from four hours to eight increases your levels of the fat-stripping hormone by more than 50 per cent. But simply being horizontal for the night doesn’t cut it. Studies have linked sleep efficiency – the quality and length of your deep sleep – to even higher testosterone. Think of it as the nocturnal fat-burning zone. Follow the steps below to enter this hallowed state as soon as your head hits the pillow. So go sleep it off.


MUSCLE + FITNESS

The idea that cardio curbs gains has no legs. Set the pace for extra growth HOLD ONTO YOUR snapback caps, because we’re about to bust one of the biggest myths of bro science. If you give the treadmill a wide berth on your way to the squat rack for fear of catabolism via osmosis, you’re doing your muscles a disservice. In fact, splitting legs day between heavy lifts and heavier running can help you build 28 per cent more muscle. Flying in the face of the popular notion that long-distance running is the route to a bag-ofbones physique, researchers found that combining endurance cardio with resistance training causes the release of specific proteins that stimulate growth in both the fast- and slow-twitch muscles. In addition, the PLOS One study also found that squats alone restrict development to fast-twitch muscles, therefore reducing your potential growth. Combining the two disciplines, however, enhances your fitness levels by a not-insignificant eight per cent, without the need to swap your protein shakes for energy gels. But how many times do you have to swap your Metcons for Ultra Boosts to profit? Well, short-of-breath bros can breathe a big sigh of relief because the benefits to your lower-body bulk can be earned through just two 30-minute treadmill sessions a week. It’s your first step to better fitness – run for it.

BIG NUMBERS Supersize your strength with MH’s science-backed stats

3X Increase your rest from 30 seconds to three minutes and it’ll triple your strength gains when squatting.

91% Take the wheel for a better six-pack. Roll-outs activate this many muscle fibres in your rectus abdominis.

35% Working out in the morning increases your growth-pumping testosterone by more than a third.

40 SECS Stretch opposite muscles to those you’re targeting for this long to get 15 per cent more reps out of every set.

Crush legs day with cardio to break your PBs.

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WORDS: TED LANE; PHOTOGRAPHY: JOBE LAWRENSON

ENTER THE RACE FOR MORE MUSCLE


HEALTH

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN . . .

I EAT GLUTEN? It’s a nutritional bête noire outlawed by athletes and #eatclean zealots alike. But is it all bad? MH breaks down dietetic enemy No.1

01

HARD TO STOMACH

Like Clive Palmer, gluten’s image problem is partly down to its size. “Gluten is a large protein with a low surface area,” says gastroenterologist Dr Ayesha Akbar. “As proteins pass through the digestive system, a greater surface area helps enzymes break them down.” Help your body out by chewing 15 times per mouthful.

02

RIGHTFUL VILIFICATION

“In the less than one per cent of people who suffer from coeliac disease, the body launches an autoimmune response to gluten, attacking the villi (tiny projections in your small intestines) and resulting in the malabsorption of nutrients,” says Akbar. That’s an extreme case, but 5-8 per cent of us can still experience some sensitivity, where your villi are intact, but diarrhoea and bloating regularly rear their heads.

03

GUT FEELING

We’re all inclined to think with our stomachs, but the relationship between brain and gut may be more intimate than you realise. “There are more serotonin-producing cells and nerve fibres in the gut than anywhere else in the body,” says Akbar. “In a recent study of individuals with gluten sensitivity, those given a placebo saw an improvement in mood compared to those given gluten capsules.” Sensitive souls on a “free-from” diet do have something to smile about.

04

NUTRITION OMISSION

Going gluten-free in the hope you’ll feel energised? “In some cases, giving up gluten can increase tiredness,” says Akbar. “Foods containing gluten provide a range of other nutrients, from iron to folic acid to fibre. Remove these from your diet and you’re creating nutrient deficiencies that can lead to fatigue.” Instead of simply switching to wheat substitutes, focus on eating more fruit and veg. Don’t make the cut.

Power of flour: gluten isn’t necessarily a nutritional no-no.

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Gwyneth Paltrow and an army of paleo fans would have you believe the gluten in your bread is to blame for bloating. Reality is a little more complicated. “It’s not uncommon for people to experience bloating after eating wheatbased foods,” says Akbar. “But how much of that water retention is down to the gluten, and how much is because of short-chain carbs is very hard to say.” Use your loaf: cutting off your crusts isn’t worth losing the fibre.

WORDS: DANIEL MASOLIVER

05

BLOATED STATE


GROWING MORNING KIDS ARE C AND SERVI IT’S TIME TEMPERAT

T

E

01

COOLER BEANS

The clue is in the name. Still, cold-brew coffee is often confused with the e milky confection that is iced coffee. “It’s actuallyy coffee brewed using cold water,” clarifies Hugh Duffie, co-founder of UK cold-brew brand Sa andows. This new-school brewing technique is hu uge in the trendierr corners of Europe and making g gains overr here. It’s also easy to home-brew. Firsst, though, you need to give it the right beans.

i) Light The preference of those who go black, light roasts let you taste the coffee’s delicate notes. They also tend to be naturally sweet, disinclining you to add sugar.

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ii) Medium While coffee fans are blinded by the light, health snobs may prefer turning to the darker side: lifeextending antioxidants release as beans roast. A happy medium indeed.

iii) Dark Big roast taste replaces subtlety, though some antioxidants are lost. The upside: darker roasts are less acidic – as are cold brews – and so are gentler on your gut.

In cold-brewing, heat is replaced with an extended brewing time (12-24 hours) so start the night before. Turn your grinder – Breville make a quality range (harveynorman.com.au) – to the coarsest setting, so your brew isn’t cloudy when you filter it. If you’re making the effort, you may as well prep your coffee in bulk, necessitating a 750ml filter-in-a-bottle. And it’s worth using decent water, given it constitutes the vast majority of your drink. Duffie suggests a punchy ratio of 100g coffee to a litre of water, leaving it for 16 hours on your benchtop (not in the fridge) before plunging. Strain through filter paper and repeat until your cold-brew runs crystal-clear, then pour yourself a glass. Store the rest in a sealed container in the fridge and . . . chill.

WORDS: JAMIE MILLAR; PHOTOGRAPHY: LOUISA PARRY; FOOD STYLIST: VAL MCARTHUR

02


NUTRITION

03

C Cold-brew is more versatile than TTodd Sampson. Indeed, it’s often referred to as “cocktail coffee” due to its popularityy with bartenders, especiallyy in concentrated form – and e not just because of the late shifts. Says n Duffie: “We’ve found it works with D vvodka, gin, whisky, tequila, mescal . . .” (Talk about tough jobs.) While a coffee ccocktail may be a classy late-lunch pick p ick-me-up, me up this being Men Men’ss Health, we’ve also mixed in a few non-alcoholic w blends forr cold-brew virgins. b

EXTRA COOL POINTS FRIGID COFFEE STILL LEAVING YOU COLD? WELL, MAYBE THESE GAINS WILL SWAY YOU

SWEET RELIEF The slow, heat-free process makes cold-brews taste smoother and less bitter, obviating the need for milk and sugar.

iii

WELL PRESERVED Your coffee is brewed properly, rather than simply by pouring hot espresso over ice: a watery grave for quality beans.

ii

INSTANT FIX Okay, so it takes time to make. But once prepped, your batch will keep for weeks. Decent coffee, on demand.

i

iv

COST-SAVING Cold coffee is easier to carry around, so you don’t have to shell out $3.50 every time the need for caffeine arises.

i) SYRUP SHRUB

ii) ESPRESSO MARTINI

iii)

iv)

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients

• • • •

• • • • •

• • • • •

• COLD-BREW, 100ml • PURE COCONUT WATER, 200-300ml • LARGE ICE CUBES (FOR SLOWER DILUTION)

COLD-BREW, 50ml BALSAMIC VINEGAR, 25ml MAPLE SYRUP, 12.5ml TOP TO THE BRIM WITH SODA WATER

Method Sprouting again in throwback hipster bars after withering away in the 18th century, shrubs are vinegar-based cocktails, often enjoyed as an aperitif and for their medicinal properties. It isn’t a load of moonshine: balsamic blunts blood-sugar spikes after meals, improves digestion and promotes satiety. It’s even healthier if, as with the recipe above, you lose the booze.

COLD-BREW, 25ml TEQUILA, 50ml COFFEE LIQUEUR, 10ml MAPLE SYRUP, 10ml ANGOSTURA BITTERS, DASH

Method Cold-brew is a boon to bartenders for many reasons: it’s real coffee, not flavoured syrup and doesn’t require dilution, unlike adding ice to the hot stuff. Plus they don’t have to waste time making espressos – you wouldn’t ask your barista for a martini. Simply combine the ingredients, shake well and enjoy like a hopped-up James Bond.

COLD-BREW, 200ml PROTEIN POWDER, SCOOP A BANANA OATS, SCOOP COCONUT MILK, 100ml

Method Providing an energy boost without the sugar rush, coldbrew brands are increasingly being stocked at uber-cool gyms and CrossFit boxes. This shake will also shovel in a solid hit of muscle-building protein. Blend all the ingredients together – adding an optional spoonful of nut butter – and neck it an hour before your workout.

ICE COFFEE

Method Cold-brew is considerably more refreshing than gulping down a volcanic long black on a scorching summer day. Replace even more lost sweat by adding electrolyte-rich coconut water in a 1:2 or 1:3 ratio, depending on your taste. Use concentrated coffee, because taste dilutes as the ice melts. This is a godsend after a big gym (or pub) session.

MARCH 2017

47


HEALTH

Let’s Not Be Premature Crowd-pleasing ways to last longer in bed [ BY DR IAN K ERNER ] As a chronic premature ejaculator, I was sure my epitaph would be “He came. He saw. He came again.” Sometimes I’d climax before I even got my boxers of, so forget sex. I avoided dates. Intimacy meant humiliation – and a load of washing. About 40 per cent of men have similar problems to varying degrees, say researchers in Malaysia. PE can be deined as ejaculation occurring within 60 seconds of penetration. This can utterly destroy your sex life. I overcame my condition in my late 20s, but it was a factor in my decision to become a sex therapist and to write a book titled, not ironically at all, She Comes First. Since then I’ve helped thousands of men beat their PE. What I’ve learned: any man can increase his staying power with the following tips. Try them tonight – and enjoy the ride.

Using a Numbing Spray

Master the Mini-Orgasm

Make Your Penis a Sex Toy

Pop This Pill

If a condom isn’t enough, try a delaying spray containing lidocaine. In one study, 74 per cent of men who used a lidocaine-based spray lasted longer than two minutes, versus just 22 per cent of the placebo group. And in a study I designed with researcher Dr Kristen Mark, many men using the spray Promescent lasted as long as 11 minutes. You only need two or three squirts, and it absorbs easily so it won’t leave you (or her) numb. Try it while masturbating, first using one spritz and then two to learn which dosage works best. Call it research.

Practise masturbating nearly to the point of ejaculation – then stop. Male orgasm consists of two phases: emission (when semen is loaded into the urethra) and ejaculation (when it’s expelled). You want to reach the emission phase, before ejaculation, and experience the feeling of a minor pelvic contraction or two but without fully ejaculating. This mini-orgasm functions as a release valve, easing some of the tension in your penis and dialling back the sexual response process. It takes a bit of practice to execute during sex, but we’re willing to bet you’ve had tougher homework assignments.

Perpendicular sex positions allow for clitoral stimulation without penetration, which can help you last longer. As you each lie on your side facing each other, create a 90° angle between your shaft and her vulva. Instead of penetrating, press your shaft lengthwise against her clitoris and gently move it back and forth. You’re basically creating a sex toy out of the top side of your penis, which is far less sensitive than the underside. When she’s getting close, switch to a more stimulating position. With luck she’ll reach orgasm first, even if you ejaculate within a minute or so.

If all else fails, a class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Zoloft, Prozac and Paroxetine, may help. One side effect is delayed ejaculation. Research suggests that taking an SSRI before sex may help men with PE last 4-5 times longer. In the same study, all 100 premature ejaculators who took some form of antidepressant before sex saw improvements in their staying power. Obviously your doctor will need to weigh in – heavily. In my case, I used an SSRI to good effect. And I’ve seen these drugs help a lot of other men with PE as well.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: TRAVIS RATHBONE / TRUNKARCHIVE.COM / SNAPPER MEDIA

Faulty nozzle? Don’t stress: up to 40 per cent of men suffer the same problem.


MULTITASKER • Gaviscon Dual Action Liquid and Tablets provide lasting relief for heartburn and indigestion in just four minutes. • Unlike other antacids, Gaviscon not only settles stomach acid, but also forms a protective barrier to prevent stomach acid coming back up the oesophagus (food pipe).

Before

After

Beat the burn Experiencing heartburn or indigestion can ruin a good time quickly. Eat with peace of mind and enjoy your guilty pleasures It’s a familiar scene for many of us. We’ve enjoyed a delicious meal with friends or family, perhaps overindulged a little, then we’re soon hit with a bout of heartburn or indigestion. Thankfully, a few simple tweaks can help keep the dreaded feeling at bay. Taking your time to eat slowly can help, as can keeping your weight in check and avoiding fatty, spicy foods.

It’s easy to overindulge sometimes! Be prepared and arm yourself with Gaviscon

Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist, see your healthcare professional. ASMI 27171-1216


MOTOR MOUTH

Master “car speak” with this idiotproof guide.

If you don’t speak “car”, listening to two petrol heads communicate is like trying to decipher Dothraki. But MH is here to help. Strategic deployment of the below motoring terms will make you sound like an instant expert [ BY STEPHEN CORBY ]

WHAT IS IT? Drifting, power sliding or spinning of the road and into a tree all occur thanks to oversteer. Put simply, it’s when your rear tyres attempt to overtake your front tyres, sending your car sideways – or worse – as you negotiate a corner. HOW DOES IT WORK? Common in powerful rearwheel-drive cars – especially before the proliferation of traction-control systems – oversteer generally occurs when the front wheels have begun turning into a corner, but the rear wheels break traction, sending the car into a controlled slide. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? It all comes down to intent. A controlled oversteer slide is the most heroic of driving manoeuvres. An accidental and uncontrolled slide is absolutely terrifying.

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WHAT IS IT? Front wheels are directly connected to the steering wheel and so are important in making sure your car goes where you ask it to. When those front wheels lose traction as you’re turning a corner, you can spin the wheel like you’re at the helm of a ship and nothing is going to happen. That’s understeer. HOW DOES IT WORK? Common to front-wheel-drive cars, understeer occurs when the front wheels are turning around a corner and the driver has either entered the corner too quickly or has fed too much power through the front end, causing the wheels to lose grip. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? When a car begins to understeer, it will continue in the same direction it was travelling when the wheels lost traction, regardless of which way the road goes or which way you turn the wheel. And that can be a very bad thing . . .


MOTORING

WHAT IS IT? No, not what you’re thinking. LSD is short for limited-slip diferential. HOW DOES IT WORK? When you corner, the inside wheel will spin faster than the outside wheel. It’s your car’s diferential that allows the wheels to spin safely at diferent speeds. But a diferential will always favour the faster spinning wheel, so if you put your foot down to power out of a corner, all that energy will be spun away uselessly in the fast-spinning wheel. A limited-slip diferential sends power into the slower spinning wheel, allowing you to accelerate through a bend. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? Because the diference between driving quickly and driving slowly is the ability to get power through the wheels and into the tarmac when you need to.

WHAT IS IT? You’re taught to drive by braking in a straight line, releasing the brake and turning into a corner before accelerating out the other side. But there is another way: trail braking. With this technique you continue to brake lightly as you turn into the corner, adjusting the pressure to control the car. HOW DOES IT WORK? By continuing to brake as you turn into the corner, you can use the force to control the position off the car, pitching it forwards or backwards as you enter the turn. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? Not only does it allow you to brake later in the corner, it also gives you more control over how the car behaves as you enter the bend. And that means faster cornering and better lap times.

WHAT IS IT? You know when you plant your foot in a front-wheel-drive car and the wheel suddenly jerks to the left or right, even though you’re holding it straight? That’s torque steer. HOW DOES IT WORK? In most cases, it’s the engine layout that causes torque steer – which is insanely complicated. But in short, the torque generated when you plant your foot afects the front wheels diferently, causing the wheel to jerk. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? Because if you ever ind your steering wheel jerked out of your hands unexpectedly, you’ll know why. And how to stop it happening again.

TRAIL BRAKING GIVES YOU MORE CONTROL AS YOU ENTER A BEND

Being wealthy has always made your choices in life simpler. Yes, I will have another bottle of Bollinger. And another lobster. Maybe a Porsche, too. And of course, the man who has everything invariably requires a sleek, two-door sports car that goes like the wind and makes a noise like a hurricane. Pity the poor tycoons, though, as their lives just got a little bit more difficult thanks to the arrival of Audi’s sensational new TT RS, which throws a particularly savage cat among the sleek, super-car pigeons. The good news for the rest of us is that, at a starting price of under $150K (Audi won’t say exactly how much yet, but it will go on sale mid-2017), it combines high-end speed and sexy looks in a (slightly) more affordable price bracket than ever. Just a few short years ago, Audi’s hugely expensive, Tony Stark-esque R8 could hit 100km/h in 4.3 seconds, with its bellowing V8 engine. This new TT RS – which looks like the familiarly beautiful TT Audi has offered for years, only covered in razor blades and bad attitude – can smash the 100 mark in just 3.7 seconds. Considering its theoretical competitor, a Porsche Cayman, takes 4.7 seconds to achieve that same feat, you get some idea what a quantum leap this car represents. Magically, all that performance comes from an engine of just 2.5 litres, with just five cylinders, somehow producing 294kW and 480Nm; enough to make an HSV owner weep. Throw in an interior that’s a mix of high-end yacht luxury and Apple executive tech-cool, and the TT RS really is a high-dollar, high-joy proposition. What really makes it special, though, is a combination of all-wheel-drive (or “quattro”) grip and super-clever torqueapportioning technology that makes it a staggeringly magnetic road holder in any conditions – or on any race track. It yg trulyy is both fast and furiously good fun. Being rich just got a little bit tougher. But also just a little bit more wonderful.

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A billion-dollar body? Diesel has bigger ambitions.

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COVER MODEL MUSCLE

Fuel For Thought SINCE COMING TO PROMINENCE IN SAVING PRIVATE RYAN, VIN DIESEL HAS CARVED OUT A LUCRATIVE CAREER AS A HIGH-OCTANE ACTION STAR. RECENTLY HE’S RETURNED TO HIS ROOTS IN A GRITTY WAR DRAMA WHILE GEARING UP FOR THE NEXT OUTING OF HIS MOST FAMOUS FRANCHISE. MH MEETS A MAN WHO’S NOT ONLY LARGER THAN LIFE, BUT SMARTER BY HALF BY

PETER FLAX

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

>

PATRIK GIARDINO

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Now he’s standing on the roof of a beaten-up car, forearms rippling and a huge smile on his face. He’s in the midst of MH’s photoshoot beside a gritty south Los Angeles warehouse, but he also has his iPhone in hand, throwing out an impromptu live video to millions of his Facebook followers. Some workers from a nearby factory are leaning of a ire escape, ilming the moment themselves and suddenly he’s conversing with them in Spanish. This is not your typical Hollywood junket; it’s a multilingual, multimedia vaudeville circus in which the star is evidently digging the chaos. Powwow over, he leaps of the car and walks toward the camera, assuming the familiar character that the public has come to know as textbook Vin Diesel. He simultaneously exudes menace and joviality; there is an edge under that smile, a kind heart somewhere under that edge. There are triceps like ham hocks, an uncontrollable laugh and a dangerous swagger. “Your walk is everything,” Diesel tells MH as the photographer lowers his lens. “Where I grew up in New York City, your walk deines you.”

A CHANGE OF GEAR Truly deining this man is no simple task, however. He likes to wrap himself in ambiguity and contradictions, defying the straightforward expectations that many people project onto his broad shoulders. Diesel may embrace his fame as a muscled, megaton action hero, but he’s also carving out a broader career – as an actor, director, producer, social-media pioneer and dealmaker. Consider some of his recent and upcoming ilm projects. A leading role in last October’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, a technically innovative and provocative war movie. He’s the star and producer of the current action thriller xXx: Return of Xander Cage; same for Fast & Furious 8, which opens locally in April. Later that month, his voice work

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will be on air in a Guardians of the Galaxy sequel. Then, having talked about it for years, Diesel has signed on to produce and star in a ilm adaptation of Kojak, a ’70s police series inspired by and shot around the New York neighbourhood in which he grew up. Diesel loves to talk of his formative years in the Big Apple. His family lived-in an artists’ commune in Greenwich Village and he later forged an identity as a bouncer at some iconic New York nightclubs. “I grew up surrounded by great artists – Miles Davis recorded in our building – and I was encouraged to act,” he says. “But I also worked as a bouncer and got in 500 ights a year. That’s just who I was – I was working the door at these famous nightclubs one night and then reading drama or playing Dungeons & Dragons the next. Back then he was plain old Mark Sinclair, only adopting the Diesel moniker later through friends who observed his limitless energy. A large portion of this energy was expended through working out, “not because I imagined a Hollywood career,” he says, “but mainly because I was looking for conidence.” Of course, Diesel oozes conidence and success these days. He and his entourage, for instance, roll up to our interview in a gleaming Ghost Sprinter van, a one-of-a-kind customisation of a Mercedes Benz by Rolls-Royce. (The interior has the feel of a private jet, with a lat screen on the wall and deep leather seats embedded with iPad screens; the exterior is bulletproof.) But such material triumphs only came after a long fallow period. After studying screenwriting in college, he sought out Hollywood but eventually led town after years without quality work or an agent. “It just didn’t happen that irst time, and that difficulty helped shape me, too,” says Diesel. “Back then, I think I was trying to overcompensate for being so big and for having this darkness from

>


COVER MODEL MUSCLE

“I ALSO WORKED AS A BOUNCER AND GOT IN 500 FIGHTS A YEAR”

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COVER MODEL MUSCLE

“I WORK OUT LESS THESE DAYS, BUT I ENJOY IT MORE. IT’S A TIME WHEN I CAN JUST BE PRESENT”

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COVER MODEL MUSCLE

being a bouncer – things that were probably getting in the way of me making it as an actor at the time – and I think that pushed me toward writing and directing.” After writing, directing and starring in a couple of small ilms that made waves at ilm festivals – including the semi autobiographical MultiFacial, which focuses on a young multiracial actor struggling to ind work – Diesel got his big break in 1998 when Steven Spielberg cast him as the hulking Italian-American rileman Adrian Caparzo in Saving Private Ryan. “That movie opened up so many doors for me,” says Diesel. “And I got to sit around the set and bug Spielberg with all these questions about directing. And later I got the chance to work for Sidney Lumet (Find Me Guilty), another director on my bucket list.” This year, he was given the opportunity to cross another name of that roll call by working with Ang Lee, the acclaimed director of The Ice Storm and Brokeback Mountain. “After doing so many movies where I wasn’t just acting but also writing and producing and thinking about what so many people were doing, it was really interesting to just go deep on one character,” Diesel says, referring to his role as a sergeant called Shroom. “Ang is just a master; the production was like a masterclass for me.” Even though he has tackled roles like this before, some observers might scratch their heads at the casting decision. But for Ang Lee, the decision to hire Diesel was elementary. “I had a bunch of names to consider, but I kept thinking about how the book [of the same name by Ben Fountain] describes Shroom as a Buddhist Rambo,” Lee says on the phone. “So, of course, that’s Vin Diesel. The guy has the heart of a serious actor,” he says. “People underestimate him because of his muscles. But he was extremely prepared and asked smart technical questions. What I’ll remember most is that he always wanted to talk about spirituality – and that Vin is never in a bad mood. He walked around smiling so much it was almost weird.”

PERPETUAL MOTION Indeed, Diesel seems to emit endless positivity – goofy jokes, musical interludes, friendly chatter. He is one of three human beings on Earth with over 100 million Facebook followers (he shares esteemed company with Shakira and Ronaldo) and he is constantly whipping out his phone to share little moments in his day with fans. He does not have a social media handler. “If there was an intermediary involved, people would feel it,” says Diesel. “I want to talk directly to them.” Wholesale sharing seems to come easily to Diesel, but the actor admits that it pushes the boundaries of his instinctual desire for privacy. “It’s a social media age and I want to be smart about connecting with my fans, my people,” he

says. “But the truth is I’m an old-school Hollywood guy – like Harrison Ford or George Clooney or even Brando – who doesn’t want my private life out there in certain ways. I think it’s better when people go to see my movies that there’s some sense of mystery about who I am. Maybe there’s a contradiction there – I’m still iguring it out.” This tension of mystery and availability might help explain how Diesel at once cherishes his cultural and racial diversity while delecting conversation about it. He was raised in a multiracial family (he has referred to himself as a “person of colour” in the past) and claims more than a dozen countries in his heritage. And while it initially complicated his acting ambitions, he has turned this multicultural heritage into a signiicant positive. “I’m proud of my background, and I don’t need to break it down so speciically,” says Diesel matter-of-factly. “There’s a reason I named my production company One Race.” Diesel is out there swaggering on a pretty ine line – trying to retain more privacy than many stars expect while sharing images and moments and videos with tens of millions of people nearly every day. He’s actively seeking directing gigs and Oscar-calibre roles – and the kind of credibility that comes with such work – while still churning out the stoic, muscle-bound roles that got him here in the irst place. “What can I say? I like ambiguity,” he laughs. He deploys the same sense of humour and disarming honesty when asked about his infamous “dad bod” moment. In October 2015, paparazzi photographs were published that showed the usually buf actor in somewhat softer shape. “Well, I was a new dad and that was my bod,” he jokes by way of explanation, before mentioning that he was in a long break between roles. But then he pivots to a more serious observation: “That stupid episode gave me an idea of how bad body shaming can be. I don’t really give a crap, but I saw how people could be cruel.” In any case, Diesel’s rock-hard body was visible on his Instagram feed within weeks. While he worked out compulsively as a young man, Diesel, now 49, has to juggle his itness goals amid a busy Hollywood career and a hands-on family life. (As a case in point, MH’s interview began late because he went to school to pick up his sick child.) “I work out less and enjoy it more these days,” Diesel says. “It’s a time in my week where I don’t have to juggle things. I can just exercise and be present.” Diesel says his routine varies depending on the project he’s working on. “When I play Dominic in Fast, I want to look strong but authentic – not buf,” he says, quickly asserting that he’s never taken steroids (“I never juiced, no effing way”) or even trained like a bodybuilder. “But to play Xander in xXx I work with MMA ighters. And I did a lot of yoga when I played Riddick. There aren’t a ton of constants – just cardio work and a lot of core.”

DIESEL’S #SQUAD PACKS SOME SERIOUS POWER

DWAYNE JOHNSON Hype about their feud is likely a ruse, as a recent Instagram pic showing Vin’s son hugging ‘Uncle Hobbs’ confirms. Regardless, it’s not an argument we’d mediate.

RONDA ROUSEY Vin wanted his seven-yearold daughter to be able to handle herself. So the Olympian judoka and UFC legend trained her. The playground has been quiet.

SNOOP DOGG Mr Dogg asked Diesel to narrate his miniseries, which charted his son’s quest to make the NFL. Naturally it made for some of the best Twit picks ever.

>

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Life in the fast lane . . . takes furious energy.

DRIVING AMBITION Thus far, the conversation has been relentlessly upbeat, but the temperature shifts when Paul Walker’s name comes up. It’s been three years since the actor – Diesel’s friend, both in real life and onscreen in the Fast & Furious franchise – died in a car crash. Diesel evidently still struggles with the loss. For the irst time all afternoon, there are 15 seconds of silence. “I think about him every day,” Diesel says carefully. “I think about him every time I look at my daughter.” Diesel recalls talking with Walker onset about having kids and how Walker urged him to be present in the delivery room. He has told this story before, but it still takes efort. “Paul was the irst person I told when we were pregnant. I cut my daughter’s umbilical cord because of him. I named her Pauline after him.” Diesel’s eyes are moist – no tears or prickly anger, just sadness and honesty. “I have to process the loss of a brother and I also have to help millions

of people process the loss of the most famous on-screen brotherhood in a generation, maybe forever,” he says. “I have good days and bad days – and some days it feels really heavy.” In a minute, the conversation will shift to other topics – his love of family; his progress in bringing both Kojak and a planned Hannibal trilogy to cinemas; stories of how he used to throw down cardboard and breakdance on the streets of Manhattan; about performing on stage and negotiating with studios. Diesel will return to his high-energy mode, attempting accents, cracking jokes, showing a philosophical side that people might not expect. In 10 minutes, he will stand up as this interview ends and ofer an ironclad handshake and head for a leather recliner in his Rolls-Royce Sprinter. But right now, he’s got one more thing to say about Walker. “It’s hard, man. It’s still hard,” he sighs. “I like to be private but I also like to be honest.”

VIN’S FITNESS MIXES STRENGTH WITH HONEST CARDIO. TRY THIS SESSION FROM PT JAMIE SAWYER. PERFORM SUPERSETS BACK-TO-BACK, REST 2 MINUTES. DO 3 CIRCUITS. DO IT THREE TIMES A WEEK AND THE SPRINTS TWICE A WEEK FOR ACTION-HERO RESULTS IN 21 DAYS.

SUPERSET 01

PRESS 1A SHOULDER (6-8 reps on each)

Chest

ISOMETRIC HOLD 1B LATERAL (10 seconds)

Stand with a dumbbell in each hand, arms raised above your head, palms forward (A). Keeping your right arm extended, lower the left arm until the dumbbell is by your ear (B), then push back to the starting position. Do 6-8 reps on your left. Repeat on your right.

Get a training buddy to stand behind you. Raise your arms until they’re at 45˚ to your shoulders, then get your partner to push down on your arms while you attempt to push up for 10 seconds. Now relax. If you end up with your arms by your ears, find a stronger partner. t

SUPERSET 02

BLOCK HOLD 2A PUSH-UP (10 seconds)

DUMBBELL BENCH PRESS 2B (8-12 reps)

Put two small blocks on the floor, slightly further than shoulder-width apart. From a push-up position, one hand on each block (A), lower until your nose is nearly touching the floor (B). Hold the position for 10 seconds. Think positive thoughts to repress the inevitable wobbling.

Lie on a flat bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand at chest level. Make sure your elbows are tucked close to your sides (A), then press the dumbbells above you until your arms are fully extended (B). Return to the start. Completed 8-12 reps? Time to hit your arms arms.

A

B

A B

A B

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FIRE UP YOUR ENGINE All-out sprints increase the production of growth hormone and testosterone, burning body fat and pumping up the effect of your weight training. Get down to an oval twice a week and blast out the following: • SPRINT FOR 20 SECONDS • REST FOR 10 SECONDS • REPEAT 8 TIMES • REST FOR THREE MINUTES • REPEAT CIRCUIT 3 TIMES “Recovery is crucial when you’re training hard,” says Sawyer. Go for a brisk walk, twice a week – low-level activity boosts muscle repair. And gives you time to tend to your social-media feeds.

SUPERSET 03

PHOTOGRAPHY: ADRIAN WEINBRECHT AND STUDIO 3

TENSION CURL 3A BICEPS (8-12 REPS)

SUPERSET 04

TENSION CURL 3B TRICEPS (8-12 REPS)

Stand holding dumbbells in front of you in each hand, palms facing up and elbows bent at 90˚ (A). Keep your left arm bent as you slowly straighten your right (B), then return it to the starting position. Now repeat with the opposite arm. That counts as 1 rep. Sorry.

You can probably see where this one is going. Stand with two dumbbells behind your shoulders, elbows bent to around 45˚ (A). Straighten your right arm, so the dumbbell is raised above your head (B). Now lower back to the start and repeat the move with the pposite arm. opposite ar

HOLD PUSHDOWN 4B STATIC (8-12 REPS)

HAMMER CURL 4A STATIC (8-12 REPS) Hold a dumbbell in each hand, arms by your sides and palms facing toward your hips. With your right arm, curl the bell up until it touches your shoulder (A). Lower until your elbow is at 90˚ and hold for two seconds (B), then lower to the start. Switch arms and repeat.t

Put a rope attachment on a cable machine and hold it in both hands, palms facing each other (A). Push down until your arms are straight (B). Reverse the action and pause at 90˚ for two seconds. Return to the start. You’re on your way to being vast and furious.

A B B A A A B

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NUTRITION

With a few ingredients, one tool and a heat source, you can eat well all week. We’ve got your fast food right here BY

PAUL KITA

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

How’d you like to wake up next to this hot piece of breakfast? If you have 10 minutes and the recipe on the next page, she’s all yours.

SAM K APLAN


This fish dodges the fryer yet still carries crunch with a choppedalmond crust. Beats the hell out of another grilled chicken breast.

NEWS FLASH: drive-thru diets contribute to the road toll. Literally: people who eat fast food weekly are more likely to gain 4.5kg over three years than those who eat it less often, a study in Obesity suggests. If your belly is shaped like a burger bun, that’s bad news. Heavier men have a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and prematurely passing through those big Golden Arches in the sky. Wait, there’s more: just five days of eating grease-laden food – like the kind in those takeaway bags – can mess with your insulin sensitivity, a 2015 study found. Other research suggests that fast food may contain phthalates,

a class of chemicals found in plastics that may damage sperm and weaken your immune system. Don’t stress, though. The fix, like the problem, is fast. If you can learn to cook using just one pan, you can bang out delicious, healthy meals that are way more satisfying than anything served up by a burger or chicken chain. Bonus: eat it straight out of the pan and you’ll only have one dish to clean. Grab a pan. Fire up a burner. Cook the four incredible meals on the next few pages. Take command of your kitchen – and your health – for good.> MARCH 2017

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+

a

+

as

and Spinach over Beef Patties Heat radiates outward from the centre of a frying pan, so the edges will always stay slightly cooler than the middle. Leverage that moderate heat to keep cooked ingredients warm while coaxing others to doneness. Practise with this meaty breakfast, which will keep your hunger reined in till lunch What You’ll Need 1 Tbsp olive oil 2 Beef patties (110g each) 2 Garlic cloves, minced ½ Cup baby spinach 1 Tomato, chopped 2 Large eggs Sourdough bread (optional)

How to Make It

In a large nonstick pan, heat the oil on medium. Add the beef patties and brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Flip them and push them to the edges of the pan. Now add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds or so. Stir in the spinach and tomato and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook till the spinach wilts, about 2 minutes. Remove the patties to a plate and crack in the eggs. Cook, covered, until the whites set, 2 to 3 minutes. Top the patties with the spinach and egg. Serve with toasted sourdough. Feeds 1 Per Serving: 3043kJ, 53g protein,

20g carbs, 7g fibre, 55g fat

+

lunch

Seared Roasted Lemon Cod with Almonds, Charred Tomatoes and Basil Withyoursturdycast-ironpan,youcansearfishonthestovetop to give it a crust and then shove the whole pan in the oven to cook through. The same technique also works for thicker cuts of beef, chicken or pork. Just don an oven mitt when you remove the pan or you’ll put a sear on your hand too What You’ll Need 1 Tbsp olive oil 1 170g cod fillet ¼ Tsp each salt and pepper 1 Tsp chopped thyme 1 Cup mixed cherry tomatoes ½ Lemon, sliced Sliced basil, for serving

How to Make It

Preheat the oven to 220°C in a cast-iron pan, heat the oil on medium high. Hit the fish with the salt and pepper and sear it in the pan for 2 to 3 minutes. Flip; then sprinkle on the almonds and thyme. Scatter the tomatoes and lemon slices around the fish and put the pan in the oven until the fish is cooked through, about 2 minutes. Serve with the basil. Feeds 1 Per Serving: 1380kJ, 33g protein,

10g carbs, 4g fibre, 18g fat

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If you’ve yet to master the pan-flip technique, don’t feel bad. Stirring with a spatula works just fine.


NUTRITION

+

+

lunch

Spicy Chicken Mince and Stir-Fry High heat cooks vegetables to crisp-tender perfection. But first sizzle the chicken so the produce cooks in the savoury juices of the meat What You’ll Need 220g Chicken mince 1 Tbsp olive oil 1 Tsp minced fresh ginger ½ Cup snow peas, strings removed ½ Cup fresh corn kernels 2 Baby bok choy, sliced 1 Small red chilli, sliced 2 Tbsp hoisin sauce

How to Make it

In a large nonstick pan, heat the oil on medium high. Add the ginger and mix it around until it smells good, about 30 seconds. Then add the chicken and cook, stirring often, until the meat is no longer pink, about 3 minutes. Add the snow peas, corn, bok choy and chilli. Stir-fry everything until the chicken is browned and the vegetables are just tender, about 2 minutes. Finally, thin the hoisin sauce with 2 teaspoons of water, stir it in and serve. Feeds 1 Per Serving: 2633kJ, 47g protein, 37g carbs, 7g fibre, 34g fat

dinner

Pork Chop and Peaches with Sage Butter This recipe uses a cast-iron grill pan, which gets hot enough to add a smoky char to meat. We like Le Creuset’s Marseille Square Grill Pan ($209,petersofkensington.com.au). It’ll last you at least one lifetime, but if you aren’t ready to shell out, a cast-iron pan will do the job What You’ll Need 1 Tbsp olive oil 1 Bone-in, thick-cut pork chop (340g) 1 Large shallot, cut into 8 wedges 1 Ripe peach, cut into 8 wedges 2 Tbsp unsalted butter 1-2 Tsp chopped fresh sage

How to Make it

Preheat the oven to 220°C. In a grill pan, heat the oil on medium high. Season the pork chop with salt and pepper; pop it into the pan. Sear it until grill marks form on the bottom, about 3 minutes and then flip and add the shallot and peach wedges. Transfer to the oven and bake until the meat is 60°C, about 6 minutes. Remove everything to a plate to rest. Add the butter and sage to the pan and toss. Pour the sage butter over the pork chop. Feeds 1 Per Serving: 2575kJ, 56g protein,

28g carbs, 2g fibre, 32g fat

MAR

2017

65


She’s got specs appeal

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SEX

Battle B ins IN CASE YOU HAVEN’T NOTICED, HER MIND WORKS DIFFERENTLY TO YOURS. HERE’S HOW TO BRING THE TWO CLOSER TOGETHER > ERIC SPITZNAGEL

PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN RUSCH/TRUNKARCHIVE.COM/SNAPPER MEDIA

BY

MARCH 2017

67


Stephen Hawking, the most famous living quantum physicist in the world, is baffled by women. Think about that: this is a man who expounds on Euclidean quantum gravity and has theories about the black hole information paradox, a concept we can’t even pretend to grasp. But when it comes to members of the opposite sex, Hawking calls them “a complete mystery”. This might seem discouraging. If the author of The Theory of Everything thinks women are unfathomable, what hope do regular guys have? But the problem isn’t that Hawking, a brilliant man, can’t understand them. The problem is that Hawking, like a lot of us, isn’t looking at the situation properly. “A big mistake men make is trying to put themselves in a woman’s shoes,” says Dr Louann Brizendine, a neuro-psychiatrist and the author of The Female Brain. “They look at a woman crying and try to identify with it. But they can’t do that. For a guy, if you’re crying, it means some serious shit has happened. So in that situation, putting yourself in another person’s shoes won’t bring you closer to understanding them.” Hawking didn’t approach the riddle of black holes by thinking, “How is this black hole like me?” He did it by removing emotion from the equation and saying, “Okay, let’s see what’s really going on here.” That’s our plan. We’re going inside the female brain (headlamps on; body armour secure!) where we’ll use cold, hard science to explain her most perplexing behaviours. And while we’re at it, we’ll identify what befuddles women most about men. Now that’s what we call a meeting of the minds. 68

MARCH 2017

Man Brain Wonders… She cried during an ad for an insurance company. That’s insane, right? As Brizendine explains, “About 24 to 48 hours before a woman’s period begins, her progestin is dropping and she...” Okay, Doc, let’s stop there before someone gets hurt. While this may be true, making hormonal assumptions is always a bad idea. It’d be like a woman saying to a man, “Why are you staring at me? Do you have a boner?” There’s better biology to explain her tears. In the 1980s, the biochemist William H. Frey analysed the chemical properties of emotional tears (as opposed to those onion-caused tears) and found that they contain prolactin. As it turns out, women have much higher blood levels of prolactin than men do. Ipso facto, tears are more easily provoked in women. Men may also have a built-in governor on tears. “Testosterone has an inhibiting inluence and elevates the threshold to cry,” says Ad Vingerhoets, the author of Why Only Humans Weep. Meaning, our testosterone is one of many reasons why our tears don’t spill until something serious hits us, like a death or a grand inal loss.

Woman Brain Wonders… He nearly cried the last time he had the flu! Why is he such a baby when he’s sick? The reason we’re not getting any sympathy when we have a bug is because oestrogen not only protects women from the lu but also helps lessen its severity. That’s according to research published last year in the American Journal of Physiology. Apparently the so-called “man lu” isn’t entirely a myth. The next time you’re sick and she tells you to stop complaining, remind her that it’s easy to act tough with all that oestrogen coursing through your veins.


SEX

“IT’S POSSIBLE WHAT SHE WEARS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH ATTRACTING THE MALE GAZE”

PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN RUSCH/TRUNKARCHIVE.COM/SNAPPER MEDIA

Man Brain Wonders… Why does she get miffed when I happen to notice another woman’s cleavage? Women may actually be biologically programmed to notice us noticing breasts. When a mother nurses her ofspring, a mother lode of the “love hormone,” oxytocin, loods her brain. The intense bond this creates basically hardwires the maternal instinct to protect her young, says Dr Larry Young, a neuropsychiatrist. A similar bond is aroused when she sees you – her baby now – eyeballing another woman’s breasts. But what about the woman sporting the cleavage? When she wears something revealing, is it cultural? Is she being driven by evolutionary history? Possibly. It’s also possible that what she wears has nothing to do with attracting a male gaze. “Women may have many socially dictated reasons for adopting the

sexualised look, none of which has much to do with intent to convey an interest in or consent to sex,” notes Dr Avigail Moor of Tel-Hai College in Israel. Translation: her body may be on display, but it’s unlikely it’s on display for you, according to the women Moor surveyed.

Woman Brain Wonders… Why does he get miffed when I accuse him of always thinking about sex? Men think about sex 19 times a day, an Ohio State University study found. It’s still more often than women (10 times a day), but it’s not “always”. The same study revealed that men think about food 18 times a day and sleep an average of 11 times a day. So tell her that if “hot daydreams about taking long naps in nacho cheese” count as sex to her, then yes, you’re “always” thinking about sex.

Man Brain Wonders… Why does she want to discuss every detail of a problem, even if I already know the solution?

If there’s one thing we’ve learned from every hack stand-up comic, it’s that women love to yack. Except, sorry, it’s not true. A 2007 study from the University of Arizona found that men average 15,669 words a day, versus 16,215 for women. But even though the word salad is about the same size for each sex, women seem to prefer to use verbal strategies to solve problems. “Women have increased connectivity between the left and right hemispheres of the brain, and men connect more from front to back,” says Dr Ragini Verma, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania who studies structural diferences between male and female brains. “Male brains facilitate connectivity between regions that handle perception

and action. Once men hear something, they want to act on it. But with women, it’s more about the connection between logic and intuition.” So what’s the solution? Take a deep breath, let her talk, and try not to take it personally. It’s not about whether you can or can’t solve the problem; it’s just the way her brain is wired for problem-solving. “She derives comfort from emotionally analysing the problem irst in the same way you get comfort from acting on the problem immediately,” Brizendine says.

Woman Brain Wonders… Why does he think he has the immediate answer to everything and never seems to listen to me?

A lot depends on what was happening while she was “rambling on”. Next time, tell her you may have been sufering from “inattentional deafness”. If she questions it, cite a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience that reported the condition. Researchers theorise that it stems from focusing so intently on a visual task that you momentarily become “deaf” to surrounding sounds. Tell her that if you aren’t making eye contact with her while she’s talking, you’re not listening.

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SEX

Women seek friendships for diferent reasons than men do. They want to “co-ruminate,” says Dr Tamas David-Barrett, a behavioural scientist at the University of Oxford. “They meet up and then tell each other, often in sequential monologue form, about their issue at that particular moment in their lives.” But men, he says, prefer active friendships. They’d rather socialise with other guys through another activity, such as playing golf or ishing. It could even be an “imaginary action,” says DavidBarrett, “like going to the pub to watch a game on TV together”. Women in particular typically behave this way because of an innate biological instinct researchers call “tend and befriend,” a UCLA study discovered. Females of a species cope with stress by nurturing their young (tending) and seeking social contact (befriending). This is diferent from the ight-orlight response typically used by males to deal with anxiety. When life gets stressful, women huddle together while the menfolk either start throwing punches or run for it. Remember this the next time she has yet another girls’ night out or travels by female posse to the restroom. What she’s really saying, deep in her evolutionary memory is: “I need to be with other women because I’m worried our tribe might be gored by saber-toothed tigers or decimated by famine.”

Woman Brain Wonders… Why is he in the bathroom for hours by himself? Men don’t get enough alone time. In fact, we actively avoid it. In a University of Virginia study, 67 per cent of men opted to give themselves a shock rather than be alone. So any time a man is alone, even if it’s on the porcelain throne, it’s a good thing. Tell her you’re just staying on the dunny to be a better man – for her. 70

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Man Brain Wonders… Why does she say she’s not hungry and then keep eating my French fries? Some women have a complicated relationship with food. Nearly 90 per cent of women are unhappy with their weight. They think about food roughly once an hour and sex about every 90 minutes. When was the last time you thought about sex? Probably while you were reading this sentence. “There’s the cultural pressure to be thin, which can make them self-conscious about eating in social situations,” says Brizendine. “They don’t want to be viewed as overindulging.” Just because they don’t order their own fries doesn’t mean they’re not hungry. But for many women, ordering a big meal is the social equivalent of a man crying in public. Even if nobody cares, it still feels like everybody is staring in judgment. Or maybe she wasn’t hungry until she caught sight of your fries, and then her internal chemistry reminded her that, yeah, hot fried potatoes would taste really good. (The hunger hormone ghrelin can be stimulated visually.) So next time just order the large fries and look the other way.

Man Brain Wonders… She says she’s not angry, but I can tell she is. Why won’t she admit it and just say what’s bothering her?

Woman Brain Wonders… He wants to know why I’m angry? How can he forget our anniversary – again?

“Women are rarely rewarded for anger the way men are,” says Dr Jessica Salerno, a behavioural scientist. Men, she says, are seen as more competent when they get mad, but women are labelled as emotional. The good news: you don’t have to know why she’s angry, just care that she is. In a 2012 study, women’s relationship satisfaction relied on whether partners were trying to understand their emotions, says study author Dr Shiri Cohen. So don’t feel you’re a failure if she’s mad. Just acknowledging her anger will make her feel better.

Nearly nine out of 10 men report problems remembering names and seven out of 10 recalling dates, according to a 2013 study of over 50,000 people. Age didn’t make a diference, with people in their 30s forgetting nearly as much as 60-year-olds. Phrase it this way: “With so much uncertainty in the world, isn’t it a comfort that you can rely on me to forget our anniversary for the next 30 years?”

Woman Brain Wonders… Why did he eat all that pepperoni pizza? I barely got any of it! Men are more likely to stuf their faces when a woman is present. We’ll eat 93 per cent more pizza (or 1.44 more slices) and 86 per cent more salad than usual, according to a 2015 Cornell study. This appears to have evolved partly as a way of signalling that the man has surplus health, says study author Dr Kevin Kniffin. So tell her you ate the last slice to prove you could protect her.

“FOR WOMEN, ORDERING A BIG MEAL IS THE EQUIVALENT OF A MAN CRYING IN PUBLIC”

PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN RUSCH/TRUNKARCHIVE.COM/SNAPPER MEDIA

Man Brain Wonders… Why does she go to the bathroom with her friends?


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HARD LABOUR Dinner at your desk, months of unused leave, relationships on life support. These are just a few of the signs you could be a fully fledged workaholic. Here’s how a man in the grip of an increasingly common obsession finally learned to clock off > BY

DANIEL WILLIAMS

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The nights are the worst. I wake feeling wired and figure dawn must be close, until the luminous red numbers of my clock set me straight. Hell, it’s only 11:22. Or 12:36. I’ve barely slept. Then comes the avalanche of thoughts – deadlines, stumbling blocks, loose ends – all connected to the one colossal dead weight that I can’t seem to crawl out from under: work. My job is to write stuf. With years of practice behind me, it used to happen smoothly enough. Recently, however, the process has turned torturous. I rework sentences over and over, but the last version is as limp or clunky as the irst. This goes on for the eight, nine, 12 hours I spend at the office each day, as the contents of my in-tray climb towards the ceiling. At home, instead of relaxing with my family, I’m ixated on my project of the moment, mulling over ideas that might pull the wreck out of the bog. On the couch one Friday evening it’s my wife who suggests I may have a problem. She’s been trying to talk to me about an overseas trip I had been promising to plan for months; trying to spark me up. “You know, all I hear from you these days is work talk,” she says. “I think you’re turning into a workaholic. Are you even listening to me right now?” “I’m going to need to head in early tomorrow,” I say. 74

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WORKED TO DEATH A workaholic? Me? Since school my approach to work has been to do what has to be done as well as possible, but as for going above and beyond – routinely taking on extras in pursuit of some burning ambition . . . I’ll pass. Yet there’s no disputing the shift that’s occurred. And no disputing it’s doing the rest of my life not a jot of good. And right there is your deinition of workaholism: a preoccupation with work that erodes the other pillars of your life – your marriage, friendships, hobbies. And your health. Overwork, research shows, is a shortcut to the crematorium. A UK study of more than 10,000 civil servants found those who routinely worked 10-plus hours a day were at 60 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease than the overtime averse. Other research has linked workaholic tendencies to alcohol abuse, disabling back pain and sleep disorders, while a study by the University of Bergen in Norway found work iends were up to three times more likely than nine-to-ivers to develop one or more psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. If I fall into the at-risk category, there’s no shortage of company: in the last decade the typical work week for fulltime employees in Australia has blown out from 37 to 43 hours, and 11 per cent of employees say they work seven days a week, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

We’ve also stockpiled more than 120 million days of annual leave – because who can see their way clear for a week’s snorkeling when you’re already underwater at work? “Look,” I say to my wife, “maybe I am a little wrapped up in my job right now. But why wouldn’t I be?” Like you, perhaps, I’m trying to stay relevant in an industry being reshaped by the digital revolution. Even if your role still exists six months from now, who’s to say you’ll be the guy holding it rather than the tech-savvy 23-year-old intern? Meanwhile, the technology that was meant to make our workdays more lexible has instead stretched them out to encompass virtually every waking moment. If the partition between work and play was once a towering brick wall, it’s now little more than an ankle-high strip of spotless glass. Add to the mix two kids, a colossal mortgage and the barrage of monthly bills and you could be excused for thinking that bunkering down at work – doing what’s necessary to survive – is a rational response to circumstance rather than a telltale symptom of lorid madness. But maybe that’s a view best put to the test.

THE WORKING BRAIN Psychologist Tom Gross ushers me towards the brown leather chair in his inner-Sydney office. Bearded and friendly, Gross specialises in treating addiction through the post-Freudian techniques


STATE OF MIND

ARE YOU A WORKAHOLIC? TAKE THIS TEST, KNOWN AS THE BERGEN WORK ADDICTION SCALE, TO GAUGE WHETHER YOU’RE LOSING THE PLOT IN YOUR COMMITMENT TO WORK. ANSWER EACH QUESTION WITH A NUMBER 1 TO 5, WITH 1 INDICATING “NEVER” AND 5 “ALWAYS”

Q1/ You think about ways to free up more time for work

Q2/ You spend significantly more time working than planned

Q3/ You work to reduce feelings of guilt, anxiety, or depression

of psychodynamic psychotherapy, which is a fancy way of saying “Tell me about your childhood”. And make no mistake, he says: workaholism is a type of addiction, even though guys rarely recognise it as such. Consequently, they never come to Gross pleading, Help me! I’m obsessed with work! Rather, they say their wife is about to leave them, or they’re having panic attacks, or they’re drinking like sailors, not realising how their crazed approach to work is at the root of their problem. “What’s the function of an addiction? It’s to manage the sense of self,” explains Gross. “Let’s say you’re married and you spend an absurd amount of time at work, and when you come home you think about it some more. Well, that’s because work’s an area where you feel capable, whereas you may not feel capable of dealing with your partner’s complex emotional needs. You’re shoring up your fragile sense of self with something that gives you a sense of competence.” So proven, Gross will start probing. What are the limits of your focus on work? Where’s the balance in your life? And, if there is none, what’s stopping you from having it? To which the only reply is, I don’t know, doc – I’m too busy to think about it.

TOIL AND TROUBLE Perhaps workaholism is in my genes; my brother had it for years. He worked like a Trojan through school and university, and then carried the same

fervour into his 20-year slog at one of the country’s biggest law irms. He’ll tell anyone who’ll listen that these irms want you to be a workaholic, loading you up with monstrous workloads and expectations to test what you’re made of. Those who can cope with never seeing the sun except through their office blinds rise to the top and wear their workaholism as a badge of honour; those who can’t collapse onto the scrapheap of couldn’t-cut-it losers. And go ind a job that isn’t also their life. Greg Foyster was in his early 20s when he cracked the Melbourne advertising scene, and was soon relishing his role as a “creative”. “You have this sense of being brilliant and smart and a problem-solver, one of capitalism’s little philosopher kings,” he says. With the example of his intense father burned into his psyche, Foyster viewed work and stress as inseparable. He reckoned that if his heart wasn’t pounding and his hands weren’t shaking then he wasn’t doing his job right. As his work hours blew out, his health and key relationships began to fray. After six years he summoned the resolve to toss in his job and, with girlfriend Sophie, cycle 6500km from Hobart to Cairns. His subsequent book, Changing Gears: A Pedal-Powered Detour from the Rat Race, tells the story of his eight months on the road picking the brains of an inspirational ragtag of downshifters and sea-changers. For Foyster, there was no going back. Now 33, he works part-time for a charity and with Sophie rents

Q4/ Others have told you to work less but you don’t listen to them

Q5/ You become stressed if you are prevented from working

Q6/ Work is prioritised before hobbies and exercise

Q7/ You work to the extent that it negatively impacts your health

HOW TO SCORE If you answered 4 or 5 to four or more questions, you’re a workaholic, according to the experts at the University of Bergen, Norway. Time to down tools and some make changes, comrade.

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GET A GRIP THINKING THE FAMILY PING PONG TABLE WOULD MAKE AN EXCELLENT DESK? KPMG WORKPLACE PERFORMANCE EXPERT ANDREW MAY GIVES YOU HIS TOP 5 TIPS FOR NIPPING WORK OBSESSION IN THE BUD

01 BEWARE BURNOUT “That means watching out for the warning signs – tiredness, irritability and disconnectedness,” says May. Got the lot? “Put boundaries around your working hours – no longer than 8am till 6pm.”

02 GET ON YOUR HOBBY HORSE “You need to build fun into your life outside of work,” says May. Learning a new skill and exercising with mates qualify. Updating your LinkedIn profile doesn’t.

03 SHUT IT DOWN Your smartphone was supposed to make work easier, not imprison you in an endless to and fro with colleagues and associates. Switch of when you knock of so as to engage with family and friends, advises May.

04 LOVE YOUR LEAVE Take your full quota for the year, resist any temptation to “check in” with the oice while away and use any break as an opportunity for a digital detox.

05 DEFINE SUCCESS Think about the kind of man/partner/father/friend and sure, employee, you want to be. This will change the lens through which you evaluate your work.

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communal housing. “Behind an obsession with work is the belief that what you do for a job deines you,” says Foyster. “Once you expand your sense of self to include your character, values, hobbies and relationships, the obsession starts to diminish.”

STOP-WORK

MEETING

“Hi, my name’s Daniel and there’s a fair chance I’m a workaholic.” It’s around midday on a baking Wednesday in Sydney’s north and I’m seated around a table with seven other troubled souls in a nondescript conference room. Because it’s hard to ind a support group anywhere that caters exclusively for workaholics, my fellow attendees at this Smart Recovery Australia meeting are addicts of various types: two alcoholics, two poker-machine junkies, one guy hooked on heroin and one blonde, freshfaced party-drug girl. “Good on you for coming along, Daniel, because a lot of guys don’t recognise what you’re going through as a problem,” says Sarah, the nononsense facilitator. Guided by Sarah, we all spend ive minutes telling or updating our stories. Juxtaposed with a heroin addiction triggered by the death of a spouse from cancer, my issue might seem trivial. Ominously, Sarah asks me – and me alone – to stay back after class. I suspect I’m about to be rebuked for wasting everyone’s time. But no. The part of my tale where I admit to being uninterested in holidays has tripped an alarm in Sarah’s mind. “Do you have a GP, Daniel?” she asks. “Because I think you might actually be depressed. I’ve seen a lot of men like you – high-functioning but depressed. Not caring about holidays . . . I mean, that’s the great stuf in life. I think you might beneit from a low-dose antidepressant. I think you’d ind the world could really open up for you were you to give that a go.” I thank Sarah for the advice, with no intention of following it. I’m not depressed. I’m just hung up on work right now. Sarah leaves me with a thought. Work addiction, alcoholism, sex mania – “They’re really all the same thing,” she says: symptoms of something bigger happening subconsciously; an insidious sense of guilt or self-hatred that’s being papered over, none too successfully.

BAD

CONNECTION

If not the cause of workaholism, your phone – “a weapon of mass distraction” – dials up the intensity into the red zone, argues KPMG’s Andrew May, one of Australia’s leading experts on workplace performance. May’s gym bag looded recently, leaving him phoneless for three days. “And it was freaking fantastic,” says May, who felt more focused and “present” than he had in years. “You think you have to stay on the grid to be connected, but you’re so connected that you

become disconnected,” he says. “A lot of the burnout we’re seeing is caused by having our sympathetic nervous system iring from 5.30 in the morning to 11 at night. Not so long ago we had stops. You’d go to work for eight hours and either side of that you’d talk to your family or your lat mates. Now everything’s blended.” May believes work addicts feed of praise. Perhaps you’re the toast of the office after making a crack presentation or landing a big sale. “But then you get home, and if you’re a dad the pecking order can be partner, kids, dog, you,” says May. “A lot of men feel they’re not getting that kudos, in which case it’s easy to ly into task-focused activities at work that dangle a reward.” Guys can carry on this way for years, May says . . . until their company discards them and their world implodes. Researching his book Between Jobs, May noted the men who coped best with redundancy were those who saw their work as one line of thread in the tapestry of their lives. “Their attitude was, I’ve lost my job and that’s a real crapper, but I have a family or a golf membership or I cycle with the boys. On the other hand, the guys who struggled, who didn’t bounce back, were the ones whose job accounted for their entire selfworth. Remove that – and this is what you see with workaholics – there’s nothing left.”


OUT

FROM

UNDER

Right on his game today is Richard Ayres, a “Living Skills Officer” with St Vincent de Paul. He, too, is a facilitator at an addicts meeting, at which, on this day, I’m the sole addict. Tall and thin with a kind face and Hollywood skin, Ayres wants neither to probe my psyche nor alter my brain chemistry with psychoactive drugs. He just listens, before making suggestions as to how I might set things right. Out it spills. The need to make my work perfect; the fading interest in leisure; the dread of redundancy, of irrelevancy, and related images of me holding down couch springs by day while my wife works, and her coming home at night to regard me with a blend of pity and contempt. Ayres starts with the perfectionism. “Who,” he wonders, “deines perfect?” Pull back a little, he says. See work for what it is. “In your case, it’s words on a page. That a human being has written. And you know what? You’re okay. You have ears and arms that work. A friend. Things aren’t so bad.” And if things are all right, why be so hard on yourself? We would never speak to another person in the harsh, even abusive, way we speak to ourselves when we feel we’re falling short. “Most problems are an inside job,” says Ayres – and the repair starts with being gentler on yourself.

“Challenge your thoughts,” he urges. “Right now your approach to work is, ‘I have to do this.’ But that probably isn’t so. You can say, ‘I choose to do this’, or better still, ‘I choose to leave this’. Because what’s going to happen if you walk away and switch of your phone for two hours? The efect might actually be that you return more relaxed and better placed to make headway.” As for visions of getting sacked and the ensuing domestic tension, these are entirely unhelpful, says Ayres. “What’s the evidence for any of it? It could happen. But it probably won’t. This is what we do. We create scenarios and embellish them to their darkest point, and the fuel for this process is fear.” Out on the street I remember something Thomas Keneally once told me about what matters in life. “Your children and grandchildren don’t give a bugger whether you’re a novelist,” he said. “They just want to go to the beach. They just want you to be crazy and follow their orders.” It’s a version of the idea that no man on his deathbed ever wishes he’d worked harder. And remembering it now plants the seed of a plan. Today I’m going to knock of work early and take my family out for dinner. And in a quiet moment towards the end of the meal I’ll lean into my wife, close enough that my cheek brushes her hair, and say, “Now, about that holiday . . .”

“MOST PROBLEMS ARE AN INSIDE JOB. AND THE REPAIR STARTS WITH BEING GENTLER ON YOURSELF”

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FITNESS

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ellar with e m a g Want stt the in the fitness > k u c o a h t b i w skin of lifelong R AVE N e m o s t L IL L E G Ge five pillars TURE theseW HE FFE R NAN P H OTO

BY

ANDR

GRAPH

Y BY

E

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FITNESS

A 55-year-old grandfather of eight is hanging from a pair of bungee cords 4.5m in the air, preparing to launch himself toward a pipe suspended 1.8m away. This is the scene at the recent Oklahoma City inals of American Ninja Warrior and Jon “Rockman” Stewart is tackling Bungee Road, an obstacle that has humbled several competitors half his age. The wiry 66kg fellow hurls himself into empty air, loats, locks onto the beam, swings a few times and dismounts. The crowd cheers and whistles. The eye-popping move secures the Utah-based construction manager a trip to the show’s national inals. Stewart comes by his itness naturally. “I got my core strength from working our family farm as a kid in Idaho,” he says. His ripped upper body and never-quit legs were forged from 20 years of scrambling up rock faces and frequent, rigorous mountain-bike outings. In other words, Stewart sculpted his incredible physique and athleticism by following his bliss. He’s not alone. “People are coming at itness from all these diferent angles now,” says Daniel Kunitz, the author of Lift, a book on itness history. Online videos have led to an exciting cross-pollination among itness tribes. CrossFitters are doing parkour and MMA; distance runners and triathletes are trying Olympic lifting. This newly omnivorous approach to staying in shape highlights an element that’s often missing from exercise programs. In the pursuit of ripped abs and lagstone pecs, many of us have lost sight of that most essential property of physical recreation – fun. Maybe it’s time for you to ind a plan that can give you the body you want without it feeling like forced labour. A plan that’s both engaging and efective, a challenge for your brain and biceps alike. Submitted for your approval: the new pillars of lifelong itness. 80

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1

QUIT OBSESSING OVER HOW YOU LOOK

Forty years ago, during the Pumping Iron era, fitness was defined by how you looked in Speedos. If you didn’t have coconut-sized biceps and single-digit body fat, you had no business calling yourself fit. Today, says Kunitz, “most guys realise that getting super jacked and lean is difficult to do and takes years.” A recent NCAA analysis found that single-digit body fat is rare, even among elite athletes in their prime. For example: the average body fat percentage for running backs at the NFL Combine from 2006 to 2013 was nearly 12 per cent. Indeed, extreme leanness and muscularity – the kind you see in supplement ads – is not only an unrealistic goal for most busy guys but also unnecessary for athleticism. Stop staring in the mirror and focus on performance instead. Work on nailing your first chin up, then your first five. Try cracking 21 minutes in a 5K, then 19. Conquer a 5.2 rock face, then a 5.3.

Train for Performance Consider the fitness journey of school teacher Scott Ferrara, 42. “In my 20s, my goal was to be as big as possible. I was in pain. I was eating 10 chicken breasts a day. It wasn’t enjoyable.” Ferrara eventually switched gears. He completed an Olympicdistance triathlon and then participated in numerous obstacle course races. Now that he’s more concerned about his finishing times than his arm circumference, he’s respecting his limits. “I check in to see what my body needs on a given day,” he says. Ironically, Ferrara says he looks better now than he did when he was pumping iron – a common result of switching to performance training. “Aesthetics are best obtained from training for performance,” says Mark Rippetoe, the author of Starting Strength. “Form follows function.”


Wheel deal: crank out some exercise every day to keep your body pumped and primed.

DO ANYTHING BUT NOTHING Some fitness hucksters believe that certain approaches work because they resemble the activities of our forefathers. Nonsense, says Dr Daniel Lieberman, a professor of human evolutionary biology at Harvard. “Prescribing fitness and diet regimens based solely on what our ancestors did is rife with logical problems. We also evolved to sometimes fight, lie, get anxious, age and die.” In fact, science suggests that you can get healthier, stronger and fitter by following any plan regularly. In the US, the Department of Health recommends 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, or 75-150 minutes of ‘vigorous’ movement a week. It’s not a high bar, but most men don’t reach it. That’s despite the fact that “moderate exercise” covers a broad array of activities, from jogging and yoga to martial arts and rock climbing. It even includes some activities many jocks might consider too easy. “Brisk walking on its own is great for health,” says Dr David Katz, director of Yale’s Prevention Research Center. The best exercise, he says, is the exercise people actually do.

Seek Simplicity and Proximity The simplest rule: do something every day. That’s not easy. For documentary filmmaker George Kunhardt, 29, that lesson came a bit later in life. “I was an athlete in high school, but when I got to uni I partied a lot.” By the time he started his career, his weight was normal but his body was soft. That’s when Kunhardt discovered a CrossFit gym near his office. The key variables to its appeal were proximity and simplicity: he could walk there and do the workout that was posted on the blackboard. Now Kunhardt trains six days a week; his body is harder and he can bang out sets of 40 unbroken chin-ups. He’s rediscovered both his competitive fire and his love of fitness. “It’s my number-one stress reliever. When I’m at the gym, I go to my happy place,” he says. > MARCH 2017

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TRAIN DON’T EXERCISE

95th percentile (top 5%)

47

25 62 52

39

~3 9

27

56

80 50

39 40 51

30 21

e4 Ag

~3 9

57

46

58

46.1 52

66.4

57 67.6

0~ 49

15

33

Age 20

SPEED 300m Run (seconds) 9 Ag 2 ~

59 0~ e5

STRENGTH Push-ups (max reps) 9 Ag 2 ~

30 Age

MARCH 2017

80th percentile (top 20%)

59 0~ e5

82

50th percentile (average)

30 Age

An effective exercise routine is shaped by specific goals – short-term as well as longterm – toward which every workout is a distinct stepping-stone. That often requires taking the long view. “Let’s say you want to run a 10K. You might have five obstacles you need to overcome before you can complete that goal,” says strength and conditioning coach Alex Viada of Complete Human Performance. You may need to address your mobility or body composition before you can start thinking about your running pace. But even if you have a long way to go, Viada says, just ask yourself what you can do now to bring each goal a little closer and make the big goal easier. Then get to work on that – consistently – one workout at a time.

Not sure where to focus your itness eforts? The following standards from the Cooper Institute in Texas show how you stack up against men your age on four key measures of itness. If you hit the 95th percentile on any test, you can consider yourself elite in that category. If you’re in the 80th, you’re it. Fall below 50th? That’s a weak point. You’ll need to focus your eforts on improving that area of itness.

0~ 49

Set Multiple Goals

Having a high vertical jump indicates that your type II muscles are in working order.

Age 20

cise and training are as different as chalk and cheese. “Exercise is something you do today because of how it makes you feel today,” says Rippetoe. “Training is a planned process to achieve a result somewhere down the road.” Most gym-goers are exercisers, says Rippetoe. They might hit chest and tris on Monday, run a few kays on Tuesday, and shoot hoops on Thursday. Each workout bears little relation to the one before or after it, so their progress is minimal. Yes, it’s infinitely better than nothing at all. But to improve your performance at a particular activity, you need to program a performance increase for that activity consistently. “I don’t want my muscles to be confused,” he says. “I want them to know exactly how I want them to adapt.”

e4 Ag


FITNESS

CHANGE IT UP need to take strategic recovery breaks. “A lot of activities that we think are helpful are not,” says Andreo Spina, a chiropractor and mobility expert. From cricket and basketball to swimming and track-and-field events, sports are “manmade” activities, Spina argues. Many of them place asymmetrical demands on the body. Tennis and squash, for example, tax one arm and shoulder while leaving the other mostly out of the action. Swimming works your upper body more than your lower, while running and cycling do the opposite. The potential damage isn’t limited to knees and ankles. A study in the Journal of Applied Physiology revealed that the heart valves of lifelong runners showed elevated risk of failure. For most of us, the ideal strategy is a three-weeks-on, one-week-off plan. For three weeks, gradually increase your workload at your activity of choice. Do more sets, reps and weight if you’re into strength training; more distance or speed if you’re a cyclist or runner; more height, speed or difficulty if you’re a climber. Then ease off for a week and come back to focus on a slightly different micro-goal.

52.5

35.5 61

43

59 0~ e5

Age 20

POWER Vertical Jump (centimetres) 9 Ag ~2

67.5 53 63.5 56

30 Age

49.5

48 40.5

~3 9

0~ 49

56

e4 Ag

0~ 49

9:4 7 11 :09

13 :05

10 :08 9:1 0

11 :58

59 0~ e5

:08 12 :27 10

5 :2 12

31 9: 8 :3 10

30 Age

~3 9

:33 14

Age 20

ENDURANCE 1.5 mile (2.41k) Run (minutes) 9 Ag ~2

e4 Ag

HIIT Your Target “If you’re a runner, you might plan a block where you do hills, another where you do speed or track work and another where you work on endurance,” says Matt Dixon, a former pro triathlete. “Even that simple change of stimulus will yield bigger results than just working randomly,” he says. Reams of research have shown that one approach worth most guys’ time is highintensity interval training, or HIIT. This involves multiple short bursts of superintense exercise (like eight rounds of 30-second bike sprints) separated by periods of low-intensity movement or rest (like 90 seconds of easy spinning). HIIT has many proven advantages over steady-state cardio. The workouts are short and adaptable, challenging both your aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and burning fat more effectively. The downside? You might work too hard, too fast. Avoid injury by doing body-weight exercises only, once a week. Squats, pushups and step-ups work well – 30 seconds on, 30 off, with a 2-minute rest, for 5-10 rounds. Bored or sore? Cut work periods and do mobility work in rests.

LISTEN TO YOUR BODY Two years ago, John Short, a 60-year-old professor, was a chronic over-exerter. He’d play 90 holes of golf over a weekend, jump into pick-up basketball games and power through sets of burpees – with an 18kg vest – just to see if he could do it. Sometime between his umpteenth acupuncture treatment and antiinflammatory injection, Short got wise. “When you’re in your late 50s, you have to walk a fine line between pushing enough and pushing too far,” he says. He dropped the weighted burpees, found a trainer and replaced running with rucking – walking with a weighted pack. He’s currently gunning for an injury-free, top-10 finish in a Spartan race. He’s training smarter. “So many guys my age get hurt and pack it in,” Short says. The answer isn’t to give up altogether; it’s to adjust your routine. “Beyond a certain point, there is actually net harm from extreme exertion,” says Katz.

Dialing It Back Can Be Smart How do you find the sweet spot? Make sure your workout feels like work. Lifting to “volitional fatigue,” the point at which you can’t do any more reps while maintaining good form, is a more significant factor in determining muscle growth than weight lifted or reps performed. “As long as you work to fatigue, it doesn’t matter whether you’re lifting 50kg 25 times or 110kg eight times,” says study author Dr Stuart Phillips, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University. Hard work leads to progress, regardless of the load lifted. To determine when you’ve reached your limit, try the toe-touch test: before your workout and between sets, bend forward and reach for your toes. “If the movement you’re performing agrees with you, you’ll find that your range of motion will increase,” says strength coach David Dellanave. Feeling looser means your body is greenlighting that exercise. Your mission, then, is to put these rules together to find your perfect training plan. It starts with doing things consistently (Pillar 2). Fine-tune with Pillar 4. Choose a range of activities in a variety of intensities: two or three days of highintensity activities (sprints, heavy lifting or body-weight circuits) with another two or three days of easier stuff, like jogging or cycling. Finally, track a few metrics and use the stats to decide if you go hard or you go home. MARCH 2017

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MIND

While once it existed to amuse sceptics and variety show fans alike, hypnosis is gaining ground as a treatment for multiple afflictions and addictions. But is the science of suggestion any more than a quack fix? BY

TOM WARD

ILLUSTRATIONS BY

MARTA CERDÀ ALIMBAU

You are feeling sleepy. Very, very sleepy. No one, you will be relieved to hear, has whispered these words into my ear since I decided to give myself over to regular hypnosis some two months ago. In fact, in many ways, the actual process of being hypnotised has been one of the most banal aspects of my journey. No one has swung a pocket watch before me, it has not been suggested that I start squawking like a chicken and I’m yet to be invited to stare heavy-lidded into someone’s eyes. But still, something has undoubtedly shifted inside my mind. And it is quite clear, to myself at least, that I’m no longer the person I used to be.>

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Proponents claim hypnosis can stub out bad habits.

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llow me to explain. Not so very long ago, hypnotism shows regularly cropped up on networks’ prime-time schedules. Then, mesmerism as entertainment lost its lustre. Fast forward a couple of decades, however, and hypnosis is back in the room – only this time it’s being taken seriously. Witnesses to the power of hypnosis are many. Kobe Bryant was routinely hypnotised before every match until his retirement, while Tiger Woods credited it with reining his powers of concentration. Matt Damon recently admitted turning to hypnosis in order to kick a two-pack-a-day smoking habit. At the less fabulous end of the social spectrum, a growing cabal of hypnotherapists is springing up across the country, while the treatment is now even covered as an extra in some private health funds. The purported beneits are manifold – hypnosis has been said to manage pain, enhance recovery, quash addictions, suppress IBS, relieve anxiety and boost conidence. Whether or not it can help secure a pay rise is unclear, but the odds appear to be stacked in its favour. Not being the type to take things lying down, my editor tasked me with inding out whether hypnotism has irst-hand legitimacy. Visit the lot, he said, from private practitioner to TV conjurer and ind out whether there’s anything in it. And that is how I found myself visiting four hypnotherapists over the course of eight weeks in an attempt to cure my own particular complaint: glossophobia.

SUGGESTED DEVELOPMENT The fear of public speaking – ‘glossa’ is Greek for “tongue” – is commonly sighted as a bigger fear than death for many people. For suferers, the symptoms are very real. A few years ago, I was to give a speech in front of a large audience that included a ilm director I admired. I was so nervous I cut my speech down to three lines and invented the word “studention” when I’d meant to say “student”. The director stopped me on my way back to my seat to tell me he’d enjoyed the speech, chiely for its brevity. Naturally, I’ve since retreated at full speed from any occasion that might require me to clear my throat in public. To develop a brass neck through hypnosis, then, would be my aim. But before submitting to the dubious power of trance, I ask Rowland Manthorpe, co-author of the assuredly titled book Conidence to shine a light on what being conident means. Manthorpe believes that to some degree, conidence – or a lack thereof – is self-perpetuating. “There’s a theory that the people who are happier to speak in 86

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front of a group believe they have ‘the right to voice’ – basically, you’ll never speak well unless you believe you should be speaking,” he says. “Ironically, the more you think about conidence, the more self-conident you become.” I resolve to break this cycle as I head out to meet my irst practitioner. From self-taught beginnings, Rory Z now travels the world as an “international stage/street hypnotist” and a member of Hypno Bros (hypnobros.com). It is with some apprehension that I meet Rory at London’s plush Royal Horseguards Hotel on a sunny summer evening. I needn’t have worried. In town for a conference before heading of to perform in Las Vegas, Rory is softly spoken, wears a “Keep Calm and Keep Hypnotising” T-shirt and bears a red tattoo reading ‘Freak’ on the inside of his wrist. We sit facing each other on high-backed chairs in an empty conference room. Approximately 80 per cent of the population are medium responders to hypnosis on the Stanford Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, so I’m hoping for the best. “Some people are naturally more suggestible than others,” Rory says. “But the human mind is highly powerful.” There are many scientists who would agree. Recent research at Stanford suggests that hypnosis has a profound efect on the brain. According to study leader David Spiegel, professor of psychiatry and behavioural sciences, hypnosis is well on its way to becoming “a very powerful means of changing the way we use our minds to control perception and our bodies”. This could have tangible medical applications, helping treat conditions ranging from asthma to migraines, smoking cessation to phobias and dental problems. I explain to Rory that my complaint is slightly less serious. He nods, then, out of nowhere, claps me on the shoulder and shouts, “Relax!” Strangely, I do. Then he starts speaking softly, telling me to focus on each part of my body, his voice drifting in and out. He tells me to picture myself standing at the top of a light of 10 stairs, with each step I take making me 10 per cent more relaxed. I then have to picture my “happy place”. Lacking imagination, I visualise Ed Norton’s ice cave from Fight Club. “Beyond this room,” Rory’s voice continues, “is a second room full

of levers and dials, where you can control any part of your mind.” I go into this room and look around. Rory tells me that the relaxation dial is set too low, while the anxiety lever is too high. I adjust them accordingly. I then return to my happy place where I picture a glowing, yellow ball of conidence in my chest. I can access it by squeezing my thumb and foreinger together whenever I want. Rory wakes me up and asks me how I feel. I tell him I feel very relaxed. Strangely buoyant, I leave and resolve to put Rory’s advice to work on Monday morning, in a staf meeting. A tense afair, the daily conference is an introvert’s natural enemy. I try Rory’s advice, pressing my ingers together, trying to ind the glowing ball of conidence, but this feels puerile, so I abandon it and focus on saying something intelligent. By the time I’ve decided on my point, the meeting is over.


Can the power of suggestion call time on our cravings?

ON THE MEND HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL FOUND HYPNOSIS HELPS BROKEN BONES HEAL UP TO 41 PER CENT FASTER. OR YOU COULD JUST TRY BEING MORE CAREFUL

8½ WEEKS Un-hypnotised patients with broken ankles hobbled for more than two months

6 WEEKS Hypnotised patients with fractured ankles were fully healed in this amount of time

‘‘Hypnosis is a means off changin the e wa we use our minds to control our odies” CIRCUIT TRAINING At Rory’s introduction, I make an appointment to see Dr Kate Beaven-Marks, an academic who balances research with work on hospital wards, hypnotising patients with conditions ranging from pre-surgery anxiety to needle phobia. We meet at the salubrious Royal Society of Medicine. In person BeavenMarks is warm and talkative, which makes telling her my woes all the easier. Like Rory, she says that the aim will be to re-programme how I react to given situations. “For every event, our brain has a neural pathway it uses to carry out its response,” she says. “But we can change this response by consciously opening up new pathways – or new ways of

doing things – which in time become our ‘go to’, while the old route fades away.” The links to psychology are clear, but she stresses that hypnosis and traditional cognitive therapies occupy separate ends of the spectrum. “Psychology comes from the disease model, meaning practitioners approach a problem with a view to curing it. Hypnotherapy is based on behavioural psychology, but is more about alleviating symptoms and wellbeing enhancement.” As for my hypnosis, Beaven-Marks asks me to close my eyes and, after some deepbreathing exercises, takes my mind down the familiar staircase, into the happy place and beyond to the switch room. Kate’s

qualiications give me conidence and I certainly feel relaxed, but if all hypnotists practise the same method, I’m left wondering just how tailored – and therefore useful – treatment can be. As the session closes, she gives me a list of breathing drills, as well as a mental exercise. “When you imagine giving a speech, instead of picturing all the ways it can go wrong, the key is to picture all the ways it can go right,” she says. “Things might not go to plan, but if you think about that in advance then you won’t be thrown of guard when it happens and you’ll know you can move past it.” I keep this in mind as I arrive at a small tech start-up where I’ve been invited to speak >

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Are the odds stacked against hypnosis fixing our addictions?

PAIN KILLERS STUDIES SUGGEST THAT HYPNOTISM CAN HAVE FAR-REACHING EFFECTS INCLUDING ALLEVIATING ACUTE PAIN*

25% Just a quarter of patients dealing with a variety of pains found no benefit to hypnotism sessions

75% This percentage of patients obtained “substantial relief” from hypnotic techniques

DODGE A SHONK READY TO SURRENDER YOUR SUBCONSCIOUS TO A STRANGER? EMPLOY THESE STEPS TO ENSURE YOU DON’T GET FLEECED

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DO A BACKGROUND CHECK

PHONE FIRST

Look for somebody who’s a member of the AHA or the Australian Society of Clinical Hypnotherapists. “Both have high standards and a complaints process,” says Matarasso. “If you’re not happy you have recourse.”

Before you book an appointment, pick up the phone and ask questions such as, “where did you train? Who is your supervisor?” advises Matarasso. If you’re not satisfied with the answers, don’t book it.


MIND

on the ways in which technology impacts journalism. I stand in front of a room of 20 or so programmers and start talking. Words tumble out and I’m certain that as long as I keep going I’ll chance upon something they want to listen to. It’s a quantitative rather than qualitative approach to public speaking, but miraculously, the audience seems engaged and a few even hang around to ask follow-up questions. I’m not sure it’s what Beaven-Marks had in mind, but a mix of the conidence her mental exercise instilled and my own nervous energy means the event isn’t quite the failure I’d been dreading.

*SOURCE: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL HYPNOSIS

COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN One problem facing a ield that’s long been ascribed mystical, often miraculous powers by Hollywood scriptwriters and producers of TV variety shows is that you can enter a therapist’s clinic expecting a quick ix. “Everyone thinks hypnosis is magic and they’ll go once and all their problems will go away,” says Antoine Matarasso, president emeritus of the Australian Hypnotherapy Association, a self-regulatory national body that aims to raise industry standards and accountability (see box ‘Dodge A Shonk’). “Yes it is short-course therapy, but it’s not unreasonable that if you’ve had a problem for a long time, you might see someone for a couple of months to help resolve it. It’s sometimes hard for people to get past the magic of TV and cinema.” I’ve perhaps been guilty of that myself but as it’s becoming clear, if hypnosis is to help my personal as well as professional life, I must brave the ire, speaking publicly not as a journalist, but as a person. In order to open myself up, I decide to go private and make an appointment with Aaron Surtees, a hypnotherapist who runs the City Hypnosis clinic. Surtees – a broad man, with a warm, low voice – tells me that daily meditation at school began his fascination with the mind. A degree in psychology and sociology followed and he’s been reining his hypnotherapy technique ever since. My session with Surtees begins with me wearing headphones while he speaks into a microphone. It’s the same old routine, only this time there’s a lift instead of stairs. If the hypnotists I’ve seen aren’t all reading from the same songbook, they’re at least turning the pages in the same order. I resurface some time later. I’ve either been under so deeply I wasn’t aware of time passing, or I’ve been asleep. That evening I have the opportunity to speak publicly again, at a small gathering

to celebrate the release of a book I’ve written. I think back to my session with Surtees for help, but my mind goes blank and the speech sputters out before it properly begins.

SUBCONSCIOUS EFFORT Nearing the end of my tether, I decide what’s needed is a well-regarded expert with proven, life-long experience in hypnosis. I ind this not in a clinic or university, but on the stage. I opt for Andrew Newton, the man who trained renowned TV hypnotist Paul McKenna. Newton is, he assures me, a big deal in New Zealand and his website declares him “The World’s Most Experienced Hypnotist”. In person, Newton – garbed in the uniform of the weathered entertainer: black shirt, open collar – proceeds to ill me in on how an amateur interest in psychology led him into a lucrative hypnotism career. The switch from stage to clinic came when a TV series on hypnosis gave the game away, simultaneously curing people of the need to go and see it for themselves and forcing working stage performers to diversify or die. Three hypnotists down, I have my doubts. We begin with basic exercises. I’m told to slouch and attempt to smile. I can’t. I’m asked to do the opposite, standing tall with shoulders back while feeling sad, and I can’t do that either. It’s a simple lesson, but an important one. From now on, Newton tells me, I’ll enter meeting rooms with perfect posture and (yet again) a glowing, yellow ball of conidence in my chest. The familiarities continue when it’s time to be hypnotised, but instead of descending a staircase, I’m watching the lights turn of in a tower block as I sink into relaxation. Newton then proceeds to tell me – in diferent ways – that I will be perfectly ine next time

I have to speak in public. Later, it’s the posture advice that sticks in my mind. That weekend I’m invited to speak on a radio station about my book. I’ll be doing it over the phone, but the idea is still daunting and I immediately ind myself panicking about producing yawning silences of dead air. I remember to practise Beaven-Marks’ breathing exercises and picture it going well, just as the phone rings. I use Newton’s advice and straighten my posture and smile. My mood instantly changes and the interview goes of without a hitch. “That was good,” the producer says of air. “You should do that more often.” Having entered the world of hypnotherapy with an open mind, I’ve quickly come to the conclusion that the idea of being put to sleep, before waking up cured of the urge to smoke, eat proiteroles or jump on chairs and wail at the sight of a Huntsman in your bathroom is pure iction. But while the focus on positives and standing tall sounds like common sense, under hypnosis and without distraction I was able to see their worth. “Hypnotherapy helps to bypass the ‘conscious critical factor’ of our minds,” says Rory via email from Las Vegas. “We more easily accept positive suggestions and act upon them, rather than thinking about all the reasons for them not to work.” Or, as Stanford’s Dr Spiegel puts it: “In hypnosis, you’re so absorbed you’re not worrying about anything else.” It makes sense: to overcome your problems you may need to escape yourself for a while. Which is why, as our collective appetite for wellness grows, we might all beneit from the ability to listen to someone telling us that, whatever our hang-up, there is a solution. Even if it is all in the mind.

“ALL HYPNOSIS IS SELF-HYPNOSIS,” SAYS KATE BEAVEN-MARKS. PRACTISE THE FOLLOWING DEEP BREATHING ROUTINE TWICE A DAY TO TURN DOWN THE WHITE NOISE OF EVERYDAY LIFE

BODY CHECK

BREATHE EASY

MIND OVER MATTERS

Eyes closed, concentrate on each part of your body from the toes up, feeling them grow heavier. This neuro-pacing is a shortcut to a stress-free escape, so don’t fight it. Relax.

Inhale for seven seconds, exhale for 11. Resist the urge to inhale early and you’ll slow your heartbeat while banishing intrusive thoughts from your mind. Hold for four, then repeat.

We’re in a natural pre-hypnosis state during steady-state exercise. Let the same sense of a freely wandering mind pull you under and you should feel your worries sinking away.

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LIFE

AUSTRALIAN

THERE ARE GOOD MEN, THERE ARE GREAT MEN AND THEN THERE ARE ICONS. BLOKES WHO STAND APART FROM THEIR PEERS DURING THEIR LIFETIMES AND CONTINUE TO INSPIRE GENERATIONS TO COME LONG AFTER THEY’RE GONE.

MH ENLISTS THE SERVICES OF THEIR FRIENDS, FAMILY MEMBERS AND LONGSTANDING ADMIRERS TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THEIR IMPACT ON MODERN MANHOOD AND THEIR ENDURING INFLUENCE

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1

THE COMEBACK KING WITH KNOCKOUT CHARISMA MUHAMMAD ALI, boxer I ORIGINALLY MET Muhammad Ali in Miami in 1964 when I was in the States to cover The Beatles’ irst tour. Cassius Clay, as he was then, was starting to make ripples in the boxing world so I went down to the 5th Street gym where he was training for his irst ight with Sonny Liston. Some clever PR had come up with the idea of having The Beatles in the gym with him and I got the picture of him appearing to punch one of them and the rest falling over like dominoes. Nobody knew at the time how special he would be. He was young, beautiful, the epitome of a wonderful athlete, but no-one gave him a chance against Liston. That ight preigured his extraordinary career with all its comebacks where he constantly achieved the impossible. His charisma and personality saw him transcend boxing, but his greatness still derived from his heroics in the ring. You never knew what to expect with him. [The boxing writer] Hugh McIlvanney and I met him very early on a training run. There were still stars in the sky and I pointed out a satellite. Ali responded, “That ain’t no satellite, that’s one of the spaceships sent up by the wise men in the East.” He then described how a leet of spaceships was going 92

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to destroy all US cities “for what they done to the black people”. Another time he asked us if we knew how much the world weighed. When we answered in the negative, he smiled, “No, you white guys weren’t around when they gave out that information.” Nevertheless, I think he was completely colour blind. He was always friendly, charming and inclusive to me and everyone he met. His level of fame is hard to comprehend. I saw Frank Sinatra at the irst Joe Frazier ight and he was taking pictures for Sports Illustrated. I was told he only did the job to get into the ight; it was impossible to get a ticket. What was striking about Ali in the ring was that you rarely saw him blink. He’d watch the punches come at him – he had lightning relexes obviously – but when he was hit he never shied away and he never blinked, which was very unusual. I guess he was the same outside the ring. He never shirked a challenge whether it was from the boxing authorities, the US government or ultimately his own once-perfect body. He always faced it with his eyes open with deiance and unwavering bravery. Four-time winner of The Sports Photographer of the Year Chris Smith photographed Ali countless times during his 30-year spell at The Sunday Times

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HIT MACHINE

PHOTOGRAPHY: THOMAS HOEPKER/MAGNUM PHOTOS/SNAPPER MEDIA

ONLY AN ATHLETE WITH KNOCKOUT CHARISMA COULD LEGITIMATELY DECLARE HIMSELF THE “DOUBLE GREATEST”

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2

THE FIRST ACTOR WHO LOOKED GOOD IN A WIFEBEATER MARLON BRANDO, actor MARLON BRANDO FIRST came to my attention in an English literature class. We were studying Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire and to accompany the text we watched the 1951 ilm. When Brando swaggered on screen, wearing a tight vest and clasping a bottle of beer, the efect on the girls was palpable. Meanwhile, the boys all felt a strange urge to go and do some push-ups, sharpish. Depending on your age and/or taste in ilms, there are many Brandos. You might know him as a stufed-cheeked Vito Corleone, the method-acting Godfather. Perhaps it’s Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz, dressed and shot in black to hide how fat he was when he arrived on set. For me, Streetcar’s Stanley Kowalski is peak Brando: a chiselled Greco-Roman screen god at the height of his powers. Brando’s raw animalism and powerful physique were such that, when he 94

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performed the play on Broadway, female audience members threw their hotel room keys at him. To prepare for the role (and long before it became the norm for actors), Brando hit the weights. With basic kit (and without a trainer or chef), he sculpted a igure that set the benchmark for leading men. Brando based Stanley on boxer Rocky Graziano, who he’d met at the gym. By way of thanks, he gave Graziano tickets to the show. The boxer’s reaction: “It’s that son of a bitch from the gym, and he’s playing me.” Truman Capote summed up Brando’s transformation thus: “It was as if a stranger’s head had been attached to a brawny body, as in certain counterfeit photographs.” Modern translation? “Dude looked like he’d been Photoshopped”. Jamie Millar has an A+ English Lit and an honours degree in man crushes.

SETTING THE SCENE BRANDO WROTE THE RULEBOOK FOR LEADING MEN IN YEARS TO COME


FLIP

PI

NG H E ME ECK SMER ISED WITH BATS CRAF MEN T , AND CUNN CHUT ING ZPAH 708 F OR TEST SCAL PS

WARN

3 THE KING OF SPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT WILSON/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

SHANE WARNE, cricketer

SITTING IN A PRESS BOX at Lord’s a few years ago, my peripheral vision detected an unusual streak of motion. Moving purposefully, it was a person – skin a shade of rust; a lash of teeth so white they were almost icy blue; a wardrobe coolly cut; a crop of rich, fair hair, expensively refurbished. I turned just in time to see Shane Warne surging up a light of stairs, his television public awaiting. My mind went back to interviewing him for the irst time, 20 years earlier, across a table in a pub, ashtray between us, smoke hanging in a generally easy air. Warne was becoming the hottest property in Australian sport – and had also experienced the irst of oh-somany brushes with controversy. He

was engaging, funny, down-to-earth, disarmingly polite. Perhaps, too, there was a irst glimmer of guardedness – he’d later ring back and ask if I could tone down any swearing. He answered every question with complete candour, though what stuck in my mind was the question he asked me as we were leaving: how had I found him? When I improvised an instantly forgotten reply, he relected: “Some people think they know me who’ve never even met me.” It was said without bitterness or rancour; it was the sound of someone coming to terms with a condition under which they would have to live, like it or not. Of course, Warne was great. His skill – leg-spin bowling – was narrow,

specialist, particular, and at irst almost against the grain of a macho, fast-bowling, big-hitting game. But his cricket was so all-encompassing that it deied English to describe it. You had to reach into foreign languages – for charisma, brio, schadenfreude – to do it justice. Then there is the way his deeds linger in the mind’s eye. It’s not only because we can, thanks to the miracle of YouTube, watch his feats so long after their accomplishment. It’s because we want to. Because they still occasion wonder – because they form part of our communal memory. And it’s a habit so hard to kick that still we turn our heads as he goes by. Gideon Haigh has written over 30 books on cricket and business

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4

THE MAN WHO INVENTED PUNK AND SURVIVED IGGY POP, rock star

GOLDEN AGE NOW PUSHING 70, IGGY HAS ENERGY AND INSPIRATION TO RIVAL ANY NEW TALENT

WE CAN LOVE ARTISTS because they’re clever and we can love them because they’re stupid. Iggy Pop is a champion in both categories, a key architect of today’s music and a poster-boy for self-destruction and heroic comebacks. With his legendary band of misits, The Stooges, Iggy Pop created a brutal, monolithic sound that proved the antithesis of hippie chic. The audience reaction was so hostile that Jim Osterberg, as he was, fashioned the ultimate alter-ego, Iggy Pop, to brazen it out. He hit the stage in ripped jeans and leather dog’s collar, his bare, lithe torso relecting the stripped-down music. In the process, he became the ultimate frontman, famously walking on top of a mesmerised crowd in Cincinnati. David Bowie bought the movie footage to copy his moves. Iggy and his Stooges famously crashed and burned, succumbing to drugs, violence and record company indiference. But his true gift turned out to be his physical and mental stamina. He recovered from a mental tail-spin via hard physical work and long runs in the California sun, before escaping with Bowie to Berlin where the pair crafted a radical, new, electronic music. Decades on, he reunited with his Stooges to ind the world had inally caught up with them. Some of Iggy Pop’s remarkable resilience and ripped torso derives from his tough Scandinavian genes. Yet mostly it is due to a spartan regime, spending time in a simple cottage in downtown Miami, practising Tai Chi and Chi Kung in the open air, drinking a single glass of red wine after a show. Nearly 50 years on, he’s still an untameable physical force, dancing across the stage like a spring lamb, his music sounding more contemporary than ever. Paul Trynka is a music writer and author of Iggy Pop: Open Up And Bleed: The Biography

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SLAM

D

UNK JORDA N’S A ERIAL ABILI TIES INSPI GENER RED ATION S OF SPORT FANS S (AND A TRAIN ER EM PIRE)

5 THE ATHLETE WHO BELIEVED HE COULD FLY MICHAEL JORDAN, athlete

CREATIVE. ATHLETIC. AUTHENTIC. ASPIRATIONAL. DRIVEN. All these words could be accurately used to describe a man who, in large swathes of my native United States, has been regarded as the greatest athlete to walk the earth since the days of Leonidas of Rhodes: Michael Jordan. As a child growing up on the Southside of Chicago, I had the great fortune of bearing witness to the beauty and limitlessness of human potential. Jordan, to us, represented style and grace in the form of an irreverent iconoclast. He would not be conined nor deined by the often misguided stereotypes of Black achievement. He represented honour, brotherhood, collective achievement and the complexity of the human spirit. If that sounds somewhat histrionic, if anything I’m downplaying the public feeling towards him at the time. His victories were our victories. His losses were our losses. We watched him achieve his dreams. We watched him display raw emotions as he lay motionless on the floor of the Bulls locker room in 1996, after winning his fourth championship on Father’s Day (his greatest victory coming on the day of his father’s untimely and tragic demise). We embraced him and made him one of our own. Chicago is a city that has also sufered tremendous loss. It is a city full of dreams deferred and yet we found direction and courage through Jordan’s achievements. His journey towards greatness was not one of grandeur but rather sacriice and defeat. We all wanted to be like him, if only for a moment. Today, the Air Jordan sneaker continues to stand alone as a cultural Rosetta Stone by which greatness can be deciphered and extended. This is what fuelled Jordan’s ascension from “The Man” to “The Brand”. Chicago-born Jason Mayden is the former global design director for Nike’s Jordan brand

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IT’S CRUNCH TIME PITT’S TYLER DURDEN WAS SINGLE-HANDEDLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ADDITION OF “INGUINAL CREASE” TO GYM-GOERS’ LEXICON

6

THE POSTER BOY WHO DEFINED MODERN MASCULINITY

BRAD PITT, actor SEX AND THE MOVING IMAGE have been sinuously intertwined ever since 8th century Javanese shadow puppeteers irst cast a light on their exotic, erotic creations. Gods of the silver screen have formed an unbroken chain from Valentino to Gosling, creating unquenchable crushes and bountiful box office with just a smouldering look. In 1991, Brad Pitt joined their ranks with a cameo of snake-hipped sensuality in Thelma And Louise. By the end of that decade – thanks to a performance of shredded physicality and explosive 98

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violence in Fight Club – Pitt proved he was more than a pretty boy and had broadened his appeal to include, well, everyone. Pitt updated the old James Bond maxim that men wanted to be him and women wanted to be with him. For Pitt, it was more straightforward: women and men shared the common purpose that both wanted his body. The search for the six-pack had begun. Pitt’s dilemma since then – miniature violins at the ready – has been to persuade audiences to look beyond his looks at the ine actor beneath. There have even been

whispers of contracts demanding covered torsos. In this respect, he undermined his cause somewhat with his leather-skirted, bulked up performance in Troy where he played Achilles, but could have doubled for Adonis. Yet, Pitt manages to appear not to take all this too seriously. He knows that we know one true fact which he conveys with a crooked grin of ininite charm and a lithe swivel of those still-slim hips: it will always be cool to be Brad Pitt. John Naughton is a journalist and ilm buff. He has never had a six-pack


LIFE

7

THE 007 WHO MADE BOND COOL AGAIN

DANIEL CRAIG, actor THERE USED TO BE two James Bonds. Most of us knew the cinematic one: wise-cracking and gadget-obsessed. For the more complex and brutal Bond conceived by Ian Fleming you had to go back to the books. In 2006, that Bond burst out of the pages. Daniel Craig gave Bond his dark soul back within 15 minutes – killing three men without a single pun. Dr No’s deining moment is Connery “appreciating” a bikini-clad Ursula Andress, but Casino’s was its isomer as Craig emerges from the waves in his trunks. The spy turned spied on. Similarly modernised was his love interest, Eva Green. No damsel in distress, she was now the one with the lines: “As charming as you are, Mr Bond, I will be keeping my eye on our government’s money – and of your perfectly formed arse.” The subsequent ilms have conirmed him both as ruthless as Fleming’s Bond and as nervy as today’s narcissistic, disordered world. And yet he has fun with Bond’s clichés. Spectre even sees him in a Connery-style white tuxedo. If Craig can make that cool again, he will be at an all-time high.

G MIN EW FLE A N ND E FOU LIF OF E S A E L

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PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY

Mike Shallcross is delighted that a fellow Scouser plays 007

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DIE L E T ND & BO IVE ’S

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8

THE WRESTLER WHO BODYSLAMMED HOLLYWOOD DWAYNE ‘THE ROCK’ JOHNSON, actor

ROCK STAR THE BIGGEST MAN IN HOLLYWOOD CONTINUES TO DEFY EXPECTATIONS

JOHNSON MAY HAVE MADE his name in the pantomime world of WWE but as the great man likes to say: “It doesn’t matter!” And it really doesn’t. We fans can easily exile the hokier aspects of his oeuvre from memory and instead focus on what makes the man such a resolute success: serious itness pedigree coupled with incontestable charisma. Here is someone who has both played professional football (American, obviously) and been crowned wrestling world champion 10 times. He gets up at 4am to train, 90 minutes a day, six days a week. At 44 years old, the dude looks better than ever. Meanwhile, jumping on board the Fast & Furious franchise four years ago just shows he’s in possession of a hard business head to match the traps. Now he’s inally found his groove in Hollywood as the go-to man mountain with a heart of gold. Schwarzenegger was there irst, of course, but while there was something distant and untouchable about Arnie, with Dwayne there’s always been a warmth and modesty. He’s the kind of mate you’d want to set the world to rights with as much as spot you in the gym. It’s why he has carved out the kind of movie career that the more showy likes of Hulk Hogan and Steve Austin could only ever dream. Okay, so he’s hardly a chameleon in the movies. You know what you’re going to get. But just like his old nickname The Rock, it’s his granite-like resistance to change that’s his greatest asset. He’s like the anti-Daniel Day Lewis. In a world of mercurial actors desperate to prove their versatility, it’s reassuring to know that Dwayne will always be resolutely Dwayne. James King is a ilm critic, presenter of The Movie Show and a qualiied itness instructor

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LIFE

9 THE COOLER KING STEVE McQUEEN, actor

THE DING AS

HIGH

AN W EEN D E H MCQU S D MPLI R AN ACCO RIDE E K I S B I H R OF MOTO MOST TS DID STUN N W O

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY; JOHN DOMINIS/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAG

RI

THE WORLD’S FIRST MODERN men’s magazine shoot did not feature in a modern men’s magazine. It appeared in the 12th July 1963 edition of LIFE and it followed a 33-year-old Steve McQueen, then teetering on the cusp of The Great Escape stardom, in and around his Californian home over the course of a few weeks. This famous photo-story by John Dominis managed to encapsulate everything that would earn its subject his King Of Cool sobriquet and anoint it in ink. From bombing down Sunset Boulevard in a Jaguar XKSS to working out in the Paramount Pictures Gym, lirting with his beautiful wife Neile in their hip Palm Springs bungalow to shooting pistols in the desert, the LIFE story is an icon’s handbook, a testament to McQueen’s efortless ability to look and play cooler than any man before or after. None of these things is what principally draw me to him now, however. Not now

that I’ve pored over them a thousand times. He still looks cool as the proverbial, of course, but it’s the quieter, broodier McQueen moments that resonate with me more. Forget the car chases for a moment and there’s an intensity to his depiction of the domestic Frank Bullitt, for example, that speaks of a simmering, caged anger within, a bundled mass of emotion and frustration deeply suppressed, barely contained. Much as I’m fond of a galloping Ford Mustang, it’s this raw and complex representation of alpha masculinity that makes him a true male icon in my eyes. Not so much new man as true man. Steve McQueen was not of the method school. His acting style was not, in his own words, “mannered.” He came from a broken, troubled home and was a fractious, wayward youth. When inally, having held down various jobs as lumberjack, oil rigger and marine, he won

a scholarship to New York’s Actors’ Studio, he went at it knowing that, “I couldn’t fail because it was the only thing I knew how to do.” The wiser directors he worked with knew to let McQueen’s unbaked character shine through. It may not have made for better technical acting – it certainly didn’t make for greater variety – but what we got was as real a representation of archetypal masculinity as we’ll probably see. Famously protective of his private life and reticent in the face of the press, in 1979 McQueen nevertheless gave a schoolboy amateur journalist an interview – his irst in over a decade and less than a year before his death. Why the silence, the teenager asked? “For one thing,” McQueen answered, “I don’t have anything to say.” He didn’t need to. Toby Wiseman’s favourite McQueen paramour is Cathy in Bullitt played by Jacqueline Bisset

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10 THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN TOUCH DAVID BECKHAM, footballer

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LIFE

I WAS THE YOUTH COACH at Manchester United for the famous Class of ’92. If anyone wanted to stay behind after training and do more, they could. David put his hand up straight away, every time. He was fanatical. We’d have little practice matches and give him a number of chances to score goals from dead balls. We’d chip balls to each other from 40 yards. But the thing that he did best was the crossbar challenge. We’d line up balls and ask him to hit the crossbar from various points on the pitch. He’d hit it pretty much every time. Twenty yards, 25 yards, just outside the box. He rarely missed. He’s not shy as such, just quiet. When he started playing in the youth team, his skills and knowledge of the game immediately came out. From a young age he was better than most at knowing which positions to get into, where he should be on the pitch – and there wasn’t exactly a dearth of talent among them. With David, I was certain he was going to be a irst-team player for a long, long time. The Class of ’92 were so good. I can’t remember them losing any youth games. That was largely down to the fact they had such a laugh in the dressing room and David was central to that. They were all genuine friends, and you’ve got to be friends to make a good team. I really believe that. When David did get in the irst team, there was a bit of mickey-taking with him from the senior players, like there always is, but he took it well. Of the ield, he was always modest and never bragged. On it, his football did the talking for him. He became iconic, of course. He started to resemble a ilm star more than an athlete, but I can tell you he always thought about being a footballer irst, rather than going to parties and all the rest of it. I’m proud of him. He had talent, but it was his efort, the way he took things on board, that elevated him above other, more naturally gifted players, and made him the most capped outield player in England’s history. He’s reached such a level of fame that people have forgotten what got him there in the irst place. Take it from me: he’s deserved everything he’s achieved. Eric Harrison was youth team coach at Manchester United from 1981-1998, and still coaches part-time

MONEY

BA

LLS BECKH AM IS SPORT A SMAN F IRST MULTI AND A -MILL ION D OLLAR BRAND SECON D

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11

NS IG GU T H E B R OLYMPIA,

R M FORME AND NATOR HAD GOVER ARNIE . R E NG A H C E E R GAM IN HE TO BE

THE ARCHETYPAL ACTION HERO ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, actor, governator

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PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY

LIFE

THE EVOLUTION OF THE ACTION HERO in American cinema in some ways resembles the search for the basic building blocks of matter – irst molecules, then atoms, quarks, neutrons, neutrinos and so on. People thought Robert Mitchum a little taciturn, but he was a model of garrulity when set next to Lee Marvin. People then thought Marvin too brutish until Clint Eastwood came along – and so on down the chain. Until you get to Schwarzenegger, the snickering endpoint of a graph vectored by wordless brutality on the one hand and rippling dorsals on the other: cinema’s unsplittable atom. Early critics who complained of Arnie’s rudimentary acting technique missed the point not just of Arnie but of movie acting in general: it’s not about pretending but about being, inding a new way of existing onscreen that is unique to you. “He ills the space, and you have to go with that,” said James Cameron, who initially had in mind a lithe Jurgen Prochnaw-type for the role of the Terminator, until he sat down to lunch with the 109kg Austrian, whose face and musculature photographed like a piece of the landscape. Does a mountain need to act? Arnie not only deined the role of the Terminator but reshaped American movies in the process, shrugging of the sweaty, self-lagellating martyrdom of Stallone and ushering the action movie into its high-tech, heavy-metal phase: ironic, monosyllabic, post-human. Schwarzenegger’s sheer improbability was always his greatest weapon. He strained credulity in an era of cinema that regularly stretched credibility, as fantastic as any special efect. These days, the action hero has gone on a low-carb diet. Audiences prefer slimmed-down ephebes like Chris Evans or Ryan Reynolds to negotiate the hairpin bends of the CGI universe and even muscle mountains like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson ape Arnie in his post-Twins toddler-friendly phase. Schwarzenegger’s career remains the model: irst muscle to the front, pose for the cameras, decimate the competition, then laugh at yourself. Pump irony. Tom Shone is a ilm writer and author of Blockbuster: How Hollywood Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Summer

12

NO JOKER LEDGER WAS POSTHUMOUSLY AWARDED AN ACADEMY AWARD FOR HIS ROLE IN THE

DARK KNIGHT

THE LEGEND IN HIS LIFETIME HEATH LEDGER, actor LIKE MOST OF US, I irst encountered Heath Ledger on screen. It was 1995. I was casting my ilm Blackrock, about a working class teenager whose loyalties are tested when his best friend is implicated in a rape and murder. We were on a tight budget and looking for young local actors, but casting agent Christine King insisted, “There’s this kid in Perth you have to see.” She showed me a couple of scenes from a teen TV drama he’d done. Even in this low-budget quickie you could see this 18-year-old had the trademarks that would deine his career. Presence, strength, honesty and vulnerability. He could ill a screen. The kid was Heath Ledger. Unable to ly to Perth on our tight budget, I asked a trusted friend Andrew Lloyde, then Head of Acting at WAPA, if he’d run a screen test on a few scenes. The tape he sent back was extraordinary. So extraordinary, in fact, that I’ve still got it. The only screen test tape I’ve ever kept. The presence, assurance and emotional range this young actor ofered was riveting. In fact, ironically, his screen presence was so strong that we ended

up not casting him in the lead. The lead character had to be in thrall to an older surfer and so dominated by him that he lost his moral compass. And if there was an actor who could dominate Heath on screen, we couldn’t ind him. So we cast Heath in a support role. But I showed his screen test tape to my agents and the rest, as they say, is history. Devastatingly, a history that was far too short. In his brief career Heath lived up to every bit of promise he showed in that early screen test. He created a number of performances that now stand as icons for a generation. Ennis in Brokeback Mountain, stone hard, closed and yet achingly vulnerable. The Joker in The Dark Knight, brutal, brutalised and psychotically playful. Both performances ofer a stunning glimpse into the depths Heath would have mined had he not been stolen from us so early. Stunning in his ability to reach exhilarating extremes with absolute, grounded authenticity, he was the great actor of his generation. Steve Vidler made his directorial debut with Blackrock in 1997. He is also an actor

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13

THE MAN WHO KICKED KUNG FU INTO THE MAINSTREAM

BRUCE LEE, martial artist & actor NOBODY COULD LOOK the way my father looked without putting in a serious amount of efort. He would typically work out for four to six hours every day when he wasn’t ilming. But more important than his physical discipline and prowess was his willpower. He injured his back quite badly towards the end of 1969 and was told that, not only would he never do martial arts again, but he might never walk properly. He was bedridden for months but he read extensively, created his own rehabilitation exercises and 106

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proceeded to build himself up to the best shape of his life. The reason people consider him to be the godfather of MMA is down to the way he would talk all the time about being a “complete” ighter. Watch his ilms and you can see that it’s not one particular style, it’s all of them. He called what he did “scientiic street-ighting”. My dad wasn’t perfect. He loved to tell really bad jokes and he couldn’t carry a tune. He was useless around the house and could barely change a lightbulb. Nor

KUNG

ITY F U D E HE TWO

OF T S ONE IN LEE I D MEN E R E V RE HE MOST RY. T O T S I S SE H FUCIU CHINE N O C IS OTHER

could he cook. But the main lesson I take away from him is one of self-cultivation. The way he honed his body, his writing, his reading, the clothes he wore and the art he created – he was always trying to peel back the layers and reveal his essence. I think that’s why we still watch his ilms to this day; it just jumps of the screen. There will never be anybody like him because he was so beautifully and powerfully himself. Shannon Lee is Bruce Lee’s daughter and founder of The Bruce Lee Foundation


LIFE

4

HE NICEST BAD UY IN SHOW USINESS

LEADER OF THE PACK JACKMAN’S BULK-UP SET THE MOVIE

WOLVERINE REGIMENS BAR FOR MUSCLE

HUGH JACKMAN, actor THERE’S JUST something really special about him. He’s absolutely iconic in his raw masculinity and yet he’s sensitive to other people and to the world at large. In fact, you’d struggle to ind another bloke – let alone actor – who better encapsulates modern manhood than Hugh. As a director, you want actors for certain parts who have that “weight” and inherent maleness, but you’re looking for a more feminine and intuitive side, too. That’s when his Wolverine is best: when he’s exiled and cramped and suddenly has to work out how he’s going to come back and be a ighting man. Last year I directed him in a play on Broadway called The River. Typically, he

was a joy to work with. In one scene he had to prepare a ish onstage to cook, so he’d come in early every morning to work out the best way of gutting and illeting ish. “Ah mate, get me six, I’ll come in at half-eight and do ’em in a row.” He didn’t have to do that. It’s testament to his incredible work ethic. As we were inishing rehearsals in New York, I was running and got hit by a bike. I ended up in intensive care with a fractured skull and a brain bleed. Hugh was the irst person to the hospital. He spoke to my wife back in London every day, giving her health reports. He brought in one of the best doctors in New York. He let all the nurses take selies with him.

It sounds like I’m idealising a star, creating some kind of fantasy. Yet I’ve found that sometimes people who reach Hugh’s level in life and work are extremely generous and thoughtful, and that’s partly how they’ve got there. They’ve used their empathetic warmth and it’s a kind of magnetic energy. Ask other people who’ve worked with him and they all tell you the same thing. So then you suddenly think, “I’ve got to ind some chink in this guy’s armour”. But I never have. There are so many things about being a good man underneath your physicality. Hugh has them all. Ian Rickson is a theatre director and friend.

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ELITE

112 HIT THE BARS FOR A GYMNAST’S BODY 115 UP THE FAT FOR FASTER WEIGHT LOSS 116 USE THESE EASY FIXES FOR YOUR BAD BACK

Because fit is the new rich

SET YOUR BENCH MARK THE BENCH PRESS IS, AND ALWAYS WILL BE, THE BIG DADDY OF UPPER-BODY MOVES. NAIL ITS EXECUTION AND SEND YOUR PHYSIQUE AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE TO NEW HEIGHTS

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Bench Your Best YOUR GUIDE TO THE ULTIMATE MAN MOVE BY

JOHN GILPATRICK

r s goal dd

e move

1 LEARN HOW TO BENCH

2 PLAN YOUR PROGRESS

Beforeyoustartslidingonplatesandpumping outreps,lockdownyourform.Preciseform helpsyouliftmoreweightusingthesame amountofeffort;italsoreducesyourinjury riskbecausetheloadishandledbyyour muscleandnotyourjoints,saysfitnessand sportstrainingexpertMikeRobertson.

Establish your baseline bench – that is, your one-rep max. This is the most weight you can press one time while still maintaining good form. To find it, do one rep with successively heavier loads until you hit the heaviest you can handle. Use a s otter.

Fo Fou ourr St Steps ep ps to P Perfect erfect Form Start with your hands beneath the bar, spaced just beyond shoulder width. Tighten your entire body (as if you’re about to take a punch) to activate more muscle. “The tighter you are, the lighter the bar will feel,” says Robertson. Now: 1. Unrack the bar and hold it above your chest.

s p

p

2. Slowly lower the bar towards your nipples, with your elbows at a 45˚ angle. 3. Push your chest up to the bar. 4. Touch the bar to your chest; then drive your feet into the floor and explosively press the bar back up.

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Th e O The Ope pe p er tructions t ru c t i o n s You’ll per out A and Workout B once a week on different days, with at least 72 hours between sessions. Workout A (right) is designed to recruit as many of your muscles’ motor neurons as possible, activating them to gain strength. For workout B you’ll do 100 reps, which signals your body to pack on mass and up your muscular endurance. Stay at the prescribed load until you can complete all your sets and reps with good form. When you’re ready, add 10 per cent more weight. But don’t be afraid to push the envelope, Maximus says, as long as your form stays true. “You never want your body to get too comfortable with the load you’re lifting.”


O

"MORE MUSCLE MEANS MORE STRENGTH. IF YOU LOSE MUSCLE, THE FIRST THING THAT GOES IS YOUR BENCH.”

Benching alone will give you strength and size galore, but won’t carve out the defined chest that turns heads at the beach. Add these three moves to your regimen – and perform them twice weekly – for pectoral perfection

D

Lie back on a flat bench, dumbbells held above you. Keeping a slight bend in the elbows, slowly draw the weights out and down, before driving them back to the starting position.

3 / BUILD MORE PUSHING POWER

4 / GO TO THE DARK SIDE

To raise a heavier bar, you’ll need a bigger, more solid foundation. “More muscle means more strength,” says Robertson. “If you lose muscle, the first thing that goes is your bench.” He’s coached guys who’ve plateaued, only to see massive gains when they go up a weight class. Give your body some building material: add about 800 extra kilojoules a day to your diet over this time period (for example, some peanut butter and a protein shake at night when you’d normally have been done eating for the day).

Maximus calls this the iPhone problem. If you don’t charge your phone at night, at some point the next day, it won’t function the way you want it to. The same goes for your body, which used to be more important. “The bed is your charger,” he says. “You can’t get the proper work done in the gym if you only get four, five or six hours of rest. So sleep at least eight hours.” Banish electronics from the bedroom and use blackout curtains to block light from outside. The darkness leads to better sleep.

WORKOUT A

S o

DIPS

STARTING WEIGHT

SETS

REPS

REST

80% 1-REP MAX

5

3

3 MINUTES*

D TILT

From a standard dip position, tilt your body forward so the move targets your chest more so than your triceps. Break at the elbows till your upper arms are parallel with the floor, and then drive back up to the starting position.

INCLINE 3

WORKOUT B

50% 1-REP MAX

10

10

2 MINUTES*

* Men who rested 3 minutes between heavy bench sets sustained higher testosterone levels than those who rested 1 minute. ** Ten sets of 10 reps is a method called German Volume Training. Popularised in the 1970s, it’s a secret to strength and size.

PRESS o

Get comfortable on a bench set to 45°, with a weighted dumbell held in each hand at your chest, palms facing out. Push the weights up explosively to just before lockout, then lower under control.

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ELITE

Enter a Parallel Universe Hit the bars to burn more fat, build stronger muscle and move with more grace

Pound for pound, gymnasts are among the strongest men on the planet. Just think of a move like the Iron Cross, where an athlete hangs in midair, arms outstretched, supported only by his hands. One of the training essentials is a piece of basic equipment you can use at home: parallel bars. “They’re simple but open up an infinite world of body-weight exercises,” says Dave Durante, a former Olympic gymnast and the co-owner of Power Monkey Fitness. “Use them to muscle up, forge functional strength and practise movement control.” Check out Durante’s eight favourite exercises below.

1 / Tuck Hold Support your weight on your hands and keep your arms straight as you hold your thighs angled g up p from the floor.

/ Tuck to L-Sit From r a tuck hold, straighten both legs simultaneously.

2 / Tuck to One-Leg Extension From a tuck hold, straighten your left leg. Pause and return it to the starting position. Repeat with your right leg.

4 / Press Hip Raise From a tuck hold, raise your hips so they’re in line with your shoulders, keeping your arms straight. Pause and return to the tuck hold.

5 / Tuck Shoot-Through Place a hand on each bar and assume a push-up position, your weight on the bars. Press your upper back up toward the ceiling, creating an arch in your upper back. Now kick your legs between the bars. You want your body to end up at the same angle as the push-up position, except your chest is facing up (as in a reverse push-up position). Push your chest up to the ceiling, creating an arch from your shoulders to your feet. Reverse and repeat.

6 / Maltese Push-up Position the bars into a V formation. Assume a push-up position, your upper back arched. Do a push-up, shifting your body forward at the bottom. Reverse and repeat.

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7 / Single Straddle Straddle parallel bars – bar between your legs, arms holding your weight. Hold that position and alternate straightening one leg at a time.


03/17 BAR RULES

In this gymnastic hold, you work every muscle without moving.

Gain more strength, make faster progress and avoid face plants by following these four rules

1

Stay Tight No matter which move you’re executing, be conscious of what every muscle in your body is doing, says Durante. The goal is to have your whole body perform as one continuous entity with no dead weight.

2 MAKE IT A WORKOUT Select three or four of the exercises shown on these pages and perform each move for 10 to 20 seconds, resting 90 seconds afterward. That’s 1 round; do 3.

Hold It People want to go right into flashy, dynamic movements, says Durante. “But to gain strength for those you need to master the holds, which are the foundation of movements,” he says. Practise holds like tucks, L-sits and wallassisted handstands.

3 / Plac from raise position (#4, left), except with your feet on the wall. Slowly slide your right leg up the wall, keeping your weight toward the wall. Reverse the move. Now slowly slide your left leg up the wall.

Master Two Positions The hollow and arch positions (seen in #5, the tuck shootthrough sequence) are key in body-weight training. “They reinforce correct muscle-group engagement for maximum strength,” says Durante.

4

Be Inventive The beauty of parallel bars is their versatility. “Get creative. Try your own moves and holds,” Durante suggests. For a longer workout, you can even mix in some classic moves like push-ups and squats.

MARCH 2017 113


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ELITE

03/17

WITH SUGAR NOW EXPOSED AS PUBLIC HEALTH ENEMY NO. 1, IT’S TIME TO RETHINK YOUR PANTRY. A DIET RICH IN FULL-FAT DAIRY WILL SPEED YOUR METABOLISM, CUT YOUR RISK OF HEART DISEASE AND FUEL YOUR WORKOUTS

TORTOISE, NOT HARE, FARE It’s your bread, not the butter you spread on it, that’s to blame for an expanding waistline. A Lancet study found rodents on a diet of fast-acting carbs (eg white flour) developed 70 per cent more fat than those feasting on slow-digesting wholefoods, such as nuts and beans – even though all rats finished testing at the same weight. So a diet of low-fat muffins could be damaging your metabolic state more than the bathroom scales let on.

EXPER

RETHINK YOUR MARATHON PLAN

EADLY DUO Processed carbs, like sugar, raise levels of the hormone insulin, which signals cells to store incoming fat. So any time you eat something high in both, your cells are going to greedily clutch on to fat instead of metabolising it for energy. It’s not the fat itself, but the sugary chaser that’s filling out your love handles.

Carb-loading endurance runners are making their muscles dependent on carbohydrates, which can’t be stored in large quantities – it’s why runners grasp for sugary drinks at the first sign of an incline. If your body is used to burning fat for energy, it has greater natural stores available – sttickyy gels necessary.

THINK THICK

I LU

EXPERIENCE: Auth Always Hungry? Lud has the skinny on ho fats can shed kilos f your waist and help live longer. CONTACT: drdavidludwig.com

HEALTH BEGINS AT 50 Identifying macro ratios – and sticking to them – is crucial to any diet. Fat should constitute 50 per cent of your intake if you’re used to a carb-heavy diet, to calm insulinswamped fat cells. Non-processed carbs should provide 25 per cent and protein the final 25 per cent.

HT R THOUG FOOD FO will also benefit

in fats eding A diet rich organs. Fe n a d other in nes ra b to r u ke yo h fatty matter wit ore m r fa your grey is ry glucose a g su f re o o d instea a much m d provides n a t n s, ie lu ic eff rgy. P rce of ene stable sou own to sh n e e b ave ketones h and antir e anti-canc te ra st bad n o dem hich isn’t a perties – w ro p g . in s e ke ag ur cornfla swap for yo

Semi-skimmed or fat-free milk has no nutritional benefit over the whole variety. In fact, since it’s thinner and less satisfying, you’re more likely to drink more or over-indulge on processed carbs to appease your tastebuds. Whole milk has the same amount of carbs and protein as semi-skimmed, plus more healthy fats. For guys out to build muscle, it’s a no-brainer.

LK OUT YOUR DIET A high-fat diet needs slow-digesting carbs to avoid ketosis (when the body runs short of glucose to burn for energy). Just be sure to balance it out with a steady protein intake to stave off hunger. Opt for 30g per meal – the optimum amount the body can digest in one sitting, says the University of Texas.

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ELITE than 250 studies that go way down the rabbit hole of investigating the causes of back pain and ways to prevent and treat it. His main takeaway: don’t worry about ab exercises like sit-ups and crunches, and don’t go looking for help from yoga, Pilates or a surgeon. You need to focus first on what triggers pain, and remove the cause. Then create a pain-free foundation by teaching your core muscles to stabilise your lower back and to develop endurance in those muscles.

KNOW WHY YOUR BACK HURTS

Fix It With The Back Mechanic TO SAVE HIS STRENGTH, OUR ACHING WRITER WENT TO SEE STUART MCGILL, THE MASTER CRAFTSMAN OF HEALTHY SPINES BY

LOU SCHULER

My exam began the moment I climbed out of my car and walked up the driveway – I just didn’t know it yet. Nor did I suspect that by the end of the day, I would learn that I’d been exercising wrong, that I had a semi-serious back injury and that most one-size-fits-all fitness recommendations are basically bullshit. All I knew was that after four decades of lifting, my workouts were no longer working. My squats were pathetic, my deadlift was dying and – worst of all – my back felt sore

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and unstable. If anybody could help me recapture my weight-room mojo, it was Stuart McGill, who welcomed me into his home clinic in Ontario, Canada. You may not recognise McGill’s name, but if you’ve ever done a side plank, you’ve been influenced by his 30 years of innovative research as a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo. McGill has seen hundreds of elite athletes and worst-of-the-worst back-pain cases over the course of his career. He’s published more

Your spine is a curved stack of vertebrae cushioned by gel-filled disks. If it bends out of that natural curve, that’s not a big deal – unless it’s bearing a load, whether that load is in the form of a barbell, a bag of mulch or a screaming three-year-old. When that happens, the compression on the improperly stacked disks causes the fibres that make up the disk wall to loosen and divide. With enough stress, the disks become compacted and the gel interior squirts out between the fibres. That gel then hardens and presses on nerves, creating a painful, bulging disk. Spinal injuries due to instability tend to follow a U-shaped curve. We’re most likely to mess up when the load is the lightest or the heaviest. When it’s light, we may not bother bracing with enough muscle to provide tension. When it’s heavy, those muscles can get overwhelmed. One of the most spinebending positions is a move you probably do every time you sit down or hit the gym; it’s probably a personal favourite: the squat.

FIX YOUR SQUAT It didn’t take McGill long to find the locus of my discomfort. All he had to do was press down on my third and fourth lumbar vertebrae and there it was. He couldn’t say exactly what type of injury I had, although it fit the pattern of a bulging disk that was probably pinching a nerve. Whatever it was, it was clear that the pain was brought on by the way I do the squat. He said he’d noticed something about the way my body moved exiting my car. So what was wrong with my squat? I was using standard form—feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing straight ahead, thighs parallel to the floor at the bottom of the descent. The problem: I have a non-standard body. Your body is likely non-standard, too. McGill explained that a squat is safe only if you keep a neutral spine, with your lower back maintaining its natural arch. If you squat deeper than you should, your spine


03/17 goes into “butt wink,” where your lower spine curves inward. Doing that with heavy weights can damage one or more of your spinal disks. (Without weights, a daily deep squat is actually good for you.) I was shocked to learn that due to my hip structure, it’s impossible for me not to shift into butt wink before my thighs are parallel to the floor. That’s why McGill recommended that I use a wider stance and squat to just above parallel. (To hone your own form, see “How Deep Should You Squat?” below.) The conventional notion that everyone should squat “arse to grass” is rubbish, says McGill. “Life isn’t fair. Your anatomy is what determines your safe squat depth and risk of injury.”

NEVER LET YOUR GUARD DOWN Risk can also be situational, and injury can happen when you least expect it. McGill says you’re especially vulnerable at these times: First thing the morning. After eight hours in bed, your disks will hold more water than usual. That means there’s more pressure within the disks, making them ripe to bulge. Wait at least an hour before you do anything that requires lifting or bending. When you Most of us instinctively bend over to sneeze, which puts the lower back into a compromised position. The propulsive force of the sneeze can then create or exacerbate an injury. It’s better to stand tall, lift your head and sneeze upward. When you go from sitting to moving. You see this a lot at the gym: a guy sits on a bench between sets, hunching over his phone; then he goes right into a heavy lift. Allow a little transition time to stand, then activate your core muscles to protect your back as you begin to lift.

much lying in bed tends to worsen back pain rather than fix it; and back surgery often isn’t necessary to relieve pain. So what works? The best way to protect your spine is to do four exercises every day. The first one is a body-weight squat, which is all you need to preserve your hip mobility without putting your back at risk. Next, do exercises that improve your core strength and endurance and stiffen your guy-wire system. McGill’s favourites are the bird dog, side bridge and curl-up. (For descriptions of all three, plus the squat, turn to “Your Back Pain Prescription”, overleaf.) On workout days, use these as part of your warm-up, he suggests.

SAVE YOUR SPINE WITH FOUR MOVES

DON’T FORCE IT

McGill’s research has busted key myths about what alleviates back pain. For example, he’s discovered that yoga and Pilates are not suited to some backs; too

When I first walked into McGill’s clinic, my goals were pretty straightforward: to learn why I’d lost so much strength on my squat and deadlift, and to get rid of my pain. But

now I’m realising that I might need to rethink my entire routine – including the loaded squat, one of my go-to moves. What’s the purpose of a loaded squat? “Why is it the best tool? Why not do a lunge or push a sled or climb steps?” McGill asks me. I don’t have a good answer. It just seems strange to give up on what everyone says is such a great muscle-building exercise. But McGill has talked to countless dinged-up athletes and knows we all have the same fear: if we can’t do the stuff we see other people doing, we feel diminished by comparison. And that’s absurd, he says, when you consider the alternatives. Whatever I choose, I’ll incorporate his core routine and remember that no lift is safe unless I pick up and put down every object as if it’s heavy enough to break my back. Because believe me, it is.>

HOW DEEP SHOULD YOU SQUAT? USE THE HIP ROCK-BACK TEST TO FIND OUT Start on all fours with your knees 10cm apart and lower back naturally arched. Slowly push your hips back until you feel movement in your lower back, a sign that you’re losing that arch. Return to the start. Spread your knees wider and repeat. Keep going until you find the position that allows the deepest range of motion without any change in your lower back. Try it again with your feet angled out to see if you can go even deeper. Apply that position to your squat.

CORRECT

WRONG

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ELITE

Your Back-Pain Prescription If you don’t have back pain now, just wait – chances are you will. Unless, of course, you learn to love these four moves. Stuart McGill, the author of Back Mechanic, says they can boost core strength and endurance, reduce pain and prevent injury DIRECTIONS rform h f r m s ai app ic l 0 c n h nf p En do n n s a w h df m

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h br d g c p an id p ank o c d h n w r p h nm

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ps p r i x c

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THE CURL-UP G t on your hands and knees with your hips and knees bent 90°. Lift your right leg and left hand; keep your raised foot and heel pointing back and away directly behind you, and your raised hand directly in front of you. Both limbs should be perfectly parallel and aligned with your torso. Hold the position for 10 seconds, then return to the starting position. Do all your reps and repeat with your left leg and right hand.

Lie on your back. Bend one knee so your foot is flat on the floor, and place your hands (palms down) beneath your lower back. Raise your elbows slightly and brace your core. Lift your head, neck and shoulders simultaneously a few centimetres off the floor. Hold the position for 10 seconds, then lower. That’s one rep. Do half your reps (6), switch legs and do the rest.

Aim: Prevent back flare-ups Time: 15 minutes Do It: Daily

SIDE PLANK

SQUAT

Lie on the floor on your left side. Prop yourself up on your left elbow and feet. Your top foot should be on the floor directly forward of your bottom foot. Place your right hand on your left shoulder and make sure your hips are pushed forward throughout. Hold the position for 10 seconds, then lower your hips. That’s 1 rep. Do all your reps and repeat on your other side.

Stand tall with your arms outstretched. Push your hips back, bend your knees, and lower your torso. Keep your back straight throughout the descent. Now relax and sink into the bottom of the squat for a few seconds. Begin building tension in your back to straighten it, and then push back up.

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

Our guide to what’s happening and what’s new

COOKED TO PERFECTION

SMART DESIGN SUSTAINED ENERGY Atkin’s LIFT is a delicious new range of highprotein, low-carb sports bars that come in three flavours and deliver sustained energy for optimal muscle recovery during or post workout. Ideal for snacking on-the-go, these low-sugar, gluten-free and soy-free bars contain 21g of protein and only 4.5g of carbohydrates. RRP $4.30.  atkinslift.com

The new Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link is the all-in-one machine to keep up with your home’s ever-changing environment. It functions as a fan to cool you in summer and as a heater to warm you in winter while intelligently purifying the air in your home all year round. Now connected to the Dyson Link app, you can monitor your indoor air quality and remotely control the product.

Ready in just 90 seconds, the SunRice steamed range delivers tasty whole grains cooked to perfection, locking in natural nutrients while preserving flavour. SunRice Rice & Quinoa is gluten free, and a source of protein and dietary fibre, which may help maintain digestive health. SunRice produces its microwave range using smart technology, with no added chemicals or preservatives.

Dyson Pure Hot+Cool Link RRP $749. dyson.com.au/purehotcoollink

PERFECTLY SUITED GET ON TRACK Start the new year on the right foot, in the right shoe. THE ICONIC SPORT has a large variety of brands to give you the best support including Nike, Mizuno and Asics. Start your running journey at theiconic.com.au

SPICE IT UP A spicy cocktail in which ginger, black pepper and cardamom, iced tea, mango and mandarin liqueur entice us down into a rich wood of acacia, golden benzoin and labdanum. EAU DE LACOSTE L.12.12 Rouge is an energetic, exotic concoction. RRP $89.

NUROFEN ZAVANCE Everything in the body is connected. So when you are feeling a headache, it may be caused by the muscles in your head and neck. Try Nurofen Zavance to target your headache at the source of pain fast. Always read the label. Use only as directed. Incorrect use could be harmful. If symptoms persist consult your healthcare professional. For the temporary relief of pain and/or inflammation. Bendtsen 2011, Curr Pain Headache Rep, Pgs 451, 456. Headache Classif’n Committee of IHS, Cephalgia 2013, Pg 659. Bendtsen 2009, pg 527. Fernandezde- las-Penas C et al Cephalgia 2007, pgs 383, 386, 387. ASMI code: 124434-0115

Superbly handcrafted in Portugal and made with 100 per cent Australian merino wool, the Farage London suit in grey features a ticket pocket and notch lapel that’s perfectly suited to the distinguished gent. Farage London suit: $820. Available at farage.com.au and the newly opened luxurious flagship store at 5 Martin Place, Sydney.


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PHOTOGRAPHER BEN SULLIVAN; STYLIST VIRGINIA VAN HEYTHUYSEN; GROOMING CHRIS COONROD

CLOTHING CREDITS ON P133

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122 Casual Man’s Toolkit Nail seasonal switch-ups

Strapped for Time Coming to a wrist near you . . .

130 Look the Business Put your best face forward in the office

132 Urban Hiker Combine style with hard-wearing substance

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THE CASUAL MAN’S AUTUMN STYLE TOOLKIT Don’t overcomplicate your seasonal switch-up. The key to navigating the cooling weather with insouciant style is to pick key pieces that dress up, down and anywhere in between. This is your cheat sheet on what to wear – and how to wear it – as summer finally fades S T Y L ING BY JEF F L ACK P HO T OGR A P H Y BY GEORGIN A

EG A N

01 Train and Gain

(Left to right) ▪ Tommy Hilfiger $219 ▪ Common Projects available @ mrporter.com $395 ▪ Vans $119.95

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01

Beginner The white trainer’s natural habitat is nestled under denim – the darker and stiffer the better. Some strategically applied duct tape inside the hem will stop indigo dye from the raw denim spoiling your pristine kicks.

02

Intermediate If your sneakers are entirely unadorned – no logos – then there’s no reason why they can’t substitute for traditional leather uppers. Try wearing with a slim blue suit and rollneck to dial down the stiffness and pep up your office garb.

03

Expert Dope kicks are statement items: they need the right strides to show them off. “Wider-legged trousers are making a big comeback and cut a modern look when hemmed at the ankle,” says Lawrence. Top with a cropped jacket to balance the profile.

ILLUSTRATION BY ADAM NICKEL

Menswear’s recent embrace of comfort over clean lines has helped turn the trainer from something lusted-over by 16-year-olds into something longed for by older, wiser, style obsessives. We’re not talking Yeezy Boosts here, though. “White, minimalist pumps made from quality materials will take the edge off an otherwise formal look so you don’t appear overdressed,” says James Lawrence, head of menswear design at Asos. Face wipes in the desk drawer will help keep them box-fresh.


STYLE

02 Know Your Knits Aside from being softer than your legs after a day of deadlifts, the superfine fibres of a knit made from merino or cashmere offer warmth without bulk. That makes a sweater the perfect layering piece when the weather remains as unpredictable as the Chinese stock market. If you’re going to invest in cashmere make sure you’re able to discern the good stuff: rub it between your fingers – if it leaves a residue it’s probably been cut with low-grade wool.

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Beginner Introducing your new w failsafe meet-the-in-laws uniform: cashmere ssw weater, crisp white shirt and ch hinos. The fabric shows tha at you’ve y made an effort; the cu c t shows you haven’t overthought it.

02

Intermediate “A crew-neck sweate er beneath a jacket will always look less ceremonial than a sh hir t,” says Damien Paul, att matchesfashion.com m. “That’s why it’s the perrfect vehicle for transitioning g from desk to drinks.”

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Expert Upgrading your fabriccs means ntim me you can pull off down clothes in more upscale situations. A cashmere sweater will make tailorred h white w joggers and boxfresh e. > kicks brunch-suitable

(Top to bottom) ▪ RM Williams knit $199 ▪ Tommy Hilfiger knit $250 ▪ Boss knit $279

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(Left to right) ▪ Aquila wool blazer $399, ▪ MJ Bale checked blazer $549 and pocket square $49.95 ▪ Boss cotton blazer $749 and Bailey Nelson frames $125

Blue Jacket Required There’s a fine line between sm martorre at casual steez and bar-room bo the yacht club, and it’s invaria ably bl defined by buttons. For a safe e rule of thumb, avoid anything oversized, gold or anchor-printed, and a navy blazer can pretty much work anywhere. “You can get away with the vibrancy of pattern and print on this particular jacket because it’s softened by the blue tone,” says Sam Kershaw, buyer at Mr Porter. “It also provides a contrasting backdrop if you want to pair it with bolder colours.” 124

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01

BEGINNER G “For a softer take on the classic lounge suit, dress up your unstructured blazer with a shirt and tie,” says Kershaw. A two-tone number (stripes or polka dots are standard) with the blazer’s shade echoed in the subordinate tone will mesh the look.

02

INTERMEDIATE Hit the bullseye of the smart-casual Venn diagram with a white button-down shirt and slim, dark denim, recommends Kershaw. What you wear on your feet settles the deal: leather brogues add politesse, white trainers keep it cool.

03

EXPERT A structured jacket demands a collar but a soft-shouldered blazer is casual enough to work with a Henley shirt or crew neck. Try wearing yours with a loose-fitting white tee and slim, tailored shorts if summer makes a late comeback.


STYLE

04 Choose A Tie That Binds Ties are inherently stuffy, being essentially decoration with no practical purpose. To air them out, texture will always trump pattern. “With its less precise, threedimensional character and casually blunted end, a knitted tie will always look more nonchalant than formal,” says Kershaw. To enhance this, you should never tuck the rear blade into the label of the front piece. Care-wise, try not to hang them: knitted ties are best rolled and tucked in a drawer to avoid stretching them out.

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BEGINNER Substituting a loosely woven knit for plain silk in a suit ensemble will soften your look and imbue more character. A darker shade will look chic yet distinctive; a lighter shade will bring some campus to court.

02

INTERMEDIATE Keep the tie and white shirt, but switch the suit for a double-breasted blazer and chinos. Feeling a little too gentrified? Sleek, minimalist, white trainers will subvert the effect and keep your look out of the Rotary Club.

03

EXPERT Don’t presume that neckwear only works with tailoring. A knitted tie’s casual malleability means your pairing options are almost endless: a crisp denim jacket will work brilliantly; a leather biker jacket has potential. >

(Left to right) ▪ Blaq tie $23.95, ▪ TM Lewin tie $50, ▪ MJ Bale knit tie $129.95 All available @ Myer

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05 Reinforce Your Point The right bag should be something of a chameleon; as comfortable next to a suit as a tracksuit, spacious enough that it’ll actually carry two days’ worth of clothes and built to withstand the rigours of travelling. “Durable fabrics and fastenings are key because they’re the things that will undergo the most daily stress,” says Topman design director Gordon Richardson. Look for metal fastenings and reinforced seams at the stress points – where the handles are attached is the big one. The whole thing should feel sturdy and hold its shape, even when empty. The knock-on effect will be that your clothes arrive less creased. “Try to find one with an easy-to-access pocket for your passport, too,” suggests Richardson. “It’ll save you a world of time.”

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01

BEGINNER Briefcases are for civil servants and those with limited post-work plans. Make the weekenderr your our new Friday bag as well w , and remove the need to o choose between taking a casual change or your laptop into the office.

02

INTERMEDIATE There’s nothing to sayy you y can’t use a bag like thiss for the gym, especially as it has sufficient storage fo orr a towel, change of clothes a and,, crucially, shoes. Carryin ng a pair of tailored joggers is also a nod to the üb ber-ccool “athleisure” trend.

03

EXPERT It’s entirely plausible e to use this as a kind of everyday bag, too. Altho A ough larger than strictly nece essary for a day’s worth of kit, k using u it to stash a raincoatt, umbrella and spare pair of sunnies in the changea able autumn weather will keep you ahead of climate ch hange.

(Top to bottom) ▪ Longchamp $1399 ▪ Boss black $1299 ▪ Von Routte $620 ▪ Hunt Leather $690


STYLE

06 Look Like The Bomb A good blouson jacket – that’s a bomber to you and us – can be the workhorse of your autumn wardrobe. “It’s the ultimate off-duty piece,” says Jason Broderick, fashion director at Harrods, “because it will either complement or complete most looks, elegant or relaxed.” Lightweight nylon versions are ideal for layering in these transitional months, adding both warmth and weather-proofing when forecasts look precarious. Just make sure you hang it up to dry if you get caught so that it doesn’t lose its shape. (Bottom to top) ▪ MJ Bale taupe suede bomber $899 ▪ Neuw Denim burgundy nylon bomber $259.95 ▪ Boss black wool bomber $1399

01

BEGINNER “For an effortless, understated look keep it simple and pair with good jeans and sleek trainers,” says Broderick. Layer up or pare down depending on the prevailing weather conditions; as a rule, though, less is more with this get-up.

02

INTERMEDIATE Take your style cues from ’70s bovver boys by wearing with a slim checked shirt, cuffed jeans and reconstructed clodhoppers (think Grenson, not Doc Martens). Needless to say, this is a tough look to get the nuances right. Just don’t actually kick anyone.

03

EXPERT A waistcoat can imply many things in 2017 – that you are a member of Mumford & Sons, for instance – and few of them good. Swap in a blouson, half-zipped, over a shirt and knit tie to give your tailoring an instant sports-luxe flex.

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STRAPPED FOR TIME Because picking the perfect timepiece depends on mor e Rightly or wrongly, benchmark of masc chunkier the the watch. It T-levels, then – and therefo women. Intended to b akin to a ring or bracel digging a pocket watc became a mite impractical, been doing it wrong all along..

s

Second Skin Leather was the first material employed for watch straps and it pretty much stayed that way until watches became waterproof and leather’s porous limitations were laid bare. If you aren’t planning on taking regular dips, however, leather is still unparalleled for elegance. Look for good quality stitching on the underside and check its origin – the best leather tends to be Italian, German or Swiss. From to ▪ ▪

Le Bemon $1700 Freder e Constant Wor r ufacture, $5895 Raymond Weil Maestr

Metal Works Metallic straps quickly gained favour as a more durable and waterproof alternative to leather. German company Staib, founded in 1922, is seen by many as producer of the best metallic mesh – or Milanese – straps. Meanwhile, by the ’30s Rolex had introduced its own now ubiquitous Oyster strap. Strong, striking and thanks to its large central links, it’s a style that has been imitated ever since. From top Breitling Transocean Unitime Pilot, $14,810 Rado Diamaster, $4000 Victorinox Night Vision Chronograph, $1350

▪ ▪ ▪

I. GEAR UP

WITH BRANDS SUCH AS SHINOLA NOW BOASTING STORES WITH THEIR VERY OWN WATCH STRAP BARS, MIXING AND MATCHING HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER. BUT WHAT IF YOU WANT TO CHANGE TACK AT HOME? WELL, THE KEY IS HAVING THE RIGHT TOOL AT HAND.

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Purchase a speciic strap-changing tool ($10; thesydneystrapco.com). It should have a fork attachment for spring bars and a pusher for nonspring bar watches. Do not think a screwdriver will work here – it will just make a mess of your case. Always work from the back so that, if you do slip, you’ll scratch the rear of your watch, not the front.


In t e ’60s an Austrian company called IsoFrane developed an alternative to rubber straps made especially for diver watches. Where rubber was sticky and prone to cracking at low temperatures while blistering in the heat, this isoprene compound, an offshoot from processing petroleum, had all the upsides of rubber (lightweight, waterproof) but with greater comfort and durability. F m ▪ ▪ ▪

D S k Pr o

$1 ,075 $5 5 M 00

r

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGINA EGAN

The first was develop sh soldiers in the ’70s. Its USP was that if the lugs of your watch broke, then the strap kept it on your wrist – though of course it quickly became a stylistic affectation. Curiously, fabric straps are sometimes referred to as NATOs, though not all woven straps are specifically NATOs. In order to bear that name they have to be made from one piece of woven material. From top Tag Heuer Aquaracer Calibre 5 $3550 Gucci GG2570 $1240 Longines Heritage Military COSD, $2225

▪ ▪ ▪

II. FORK ON

Insert the forked end of the tool between the lug and the strap, apply pressure away from the lug, while also pushing slightly downward so that the bar pops out. On a bracelet strap, you’re looking for two recesses on either side, into which you insert the forked end of the tool.

III. STRAP IN

Slide the removed spring bar into your new strap, then insert one end into the hole on the lug. Use the tool to depress the spring bar and slide it gently into the other hole. You’re ready to wear your newlook timepiece.

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STYLE

LOOK THE BUSINESS

Follow these simple grooming tips to climb the career ladder in style BY

C A EL I A CORSE

HAIR Look like you GAF. “Even the smallest amount of product adds polish and elevates your overall appearance,” says celebrity hairstylist and Pantene ambassador Remington Schultz. Choose the right tool for the job: curly hair needs a moisture product, straight hair needs thickening with a dry paste or sea-salt spray and wavy hair needs pomade. “Always add product to damp hair post-shower,” says Shultz. “Apply to the lengths and ends of your hair only. Avoid the roots – sweat and air conditioning draw the natural oil from the scalp. Add product to the equation, and your hair can become greasy as the day goes on.”

COLOGNE

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Don’t get a water-cooler rep as the cologne guy. If you’re working open plan, your office scent should be light, clean and universally appealing. Save your statement scent for the d-floor. “Zesty notes like bergamot, orange, lime and grapefruit seem to energise men and are very appealing to women,” says Dimitri Weber, international fragrance expert and founder of Goldfield and Banks Australia. Got the corner office and want everyone to know it? Woody and aromatic fragrances will give off a whiff of importance, says Weber.

Whiten Up Research published in the British Dental Journal found people with discoloured teeth were perceived as having lower intellect. (Clockwise from top left) ▪ TONY&GUY Hair Care Men Messy Sea Salt Spray, $16 ▪ De Lorenzo DMAN Pomade, $24.95 ▪ Dermalogica Oil Control Lotion, $61 ▪ Goldfield and Banks White Sandalwood, $229 ▪ Oral-B 3D White Advanced Seal Whitestrips, $35 ▪ Clinique For Men Face Scrub, $40

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGINA EGAN

SKIN Clean up your act: whether you’re working on a website or a building site, greasy skin and blackheads are a blight on your resume. Cleanse your face morning and night in the shower with a soap-free, non-comedogenic cleanser, says dermatologist Dr Shobhan Manoharan. For clogged pores and blackheads follow with a moisturiser containing salicylic acid. Gentle weekly exfoliation will also help, Manoharan adds.


URBAN HIKER EXTREME CONDITIONS BE DAMNED: CITY COMMUTERS AND ADVENTURERS ALIKE ARE HARNESSING GEAR THAT COMBINES STYLE WITH SUBSTANCE

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BEN SULLIVAN VIRGINIA VAN HEY THUYSEN GROOMING CHRIS COONROD PHOTOGR APHER ST YLIST

Menswear is increasingly guided as much by functionality as form. Recent seasons have seen fashion’s runways invaded by backpacks, anoraks and technical fabrics as high-end designers from Prada to Dior Homme have taken inspiration from the great outdoors. Throw in the rise and rise of luxe sportswear from high-end sneakers to elevated trackpants and the message is clear: your gear needs to look good, sure, but it also needs to meet the demands of your full-contact lifestyle. When it comes to wearing it, however, the implementation is less about alpine trails or running tracks than urban streets. Spliced and diced with deconstructed suiting and smart casual wear, this is clothing that’s equally adept at tackling the metropolis or the mountain.


STYLE

The Upside jacket $199

Hugo Boss cotton knit shirt $469

Tommy Hilfiger flannel chinos $299

Lacoste sneakers $199.95

Knomo backpack from Hunt Leather $269

COVER CREDITS (P121) ▪

Ben Sherman tweed jacket $499 vest $199.95 and trousers $249

Tommy Hilfiger T-shirt $65

Jac and Jack shirt $240

Ted Baker leather backpack $599 and brogues $349

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RAIN OR SHINE In a world where style now embraces practicality rather than demanding you tackle rainstorms in cashmere, a water-repellent jacket that’s long enough to keep your suit dry or stop your raw denim getting ruined is always practical whether you wear it (left) or keep it to hand (right) in case the weather turns ugly. And should you decide to trek across some mountain paths, you’re good too. ▪

Tommy Hilfiger parka $599

Prada waterproof top $720 and vest $770

Lacoste backpack $259

Prada sunglasses $420

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STYLE

Hugo Boss suit $1999

Gant knit $269

Prada anorak $3070

H&M backpack $40

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BACK ON TRACK The key to wearing trackpants outside of the gym is to ensure they’re made from formal materials like wool, cashmere and thick cotton. That means your baggy weekend sweats won’t work. Instead you’ll want ones that have a slim, tailored construction and look like formal pants, only much more comfortable. ▲ Ben Sherman tweed jacket $299 ▲ Country Road windbreaker $159 and sneakers $149 ▲ The Upside tank top $129 and track pants $149 ▲ Bally backpack $1025 ▲ Dolce & Gabanna sunglasses $340

► Paul Smith wool suit $1451 ► Calvin Klein Jeans T-shirt $59.95 ► Lacoste trench coat, $499 ► Ted Baker shoes, $379 ► H&M backpack $55

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STYLE

SOCIAL CLIMBING Backpacks have emerged as our favourite hands-free accessory. Load it up, sling it over both shoulders for a vibe that’s infinitely more rugged than any satchel or shoulder bag. ▪

Marcs cotton trench coat $379.95 and chinos $139

Ben Sherman shirt $130

Van Heusen jacket $279

Rockport shoes $269.95

Prada backpack $2710

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ONE WORD ANSWER What’s the best thing to swig to keep cool on a sweaty run?

TO STEP OUT in the midday sun, once sang Noël Coward, is an avocation only of mad dogs and Australians. Okay, we’ve paraphrased that slightly, but to whichever classification you belong, there’s no legitimate reason for keen runners to confine themselves to airconditioned gyms come summer. Instead, scientists at the University of Newcastle have found a refreshingly new way for you to take the heat in your stride. In their research, men were asked to complete a 5km treadmill slog in humid 33°C conditions. After each second kilometre, some of the participants were given a shot of menthol to swill for five seconds before spitting. Not only

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did this livener lead to an increase in speed, it also significantly decreased “perceived thermal sensation”. In other words, the swillers felt cooler – even more so than subjects who sipped a slushie pre-run. The mint men also had higher blood levels of prolactin – a hormone that indicates physical exertion – suggesting they were able to push even harder. So next time you feel the pull of the great outdoors, pack a mini bottle of mouthwash along with your iPod. Or, if sipping on Listerine mid-run doesn’t appeal, try adding a few crushed mint leaves to your sports bottle. Clocking a PB by April will be a welcome breath of fresh air.


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