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4 January 2017

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THIS WEEK

Issue 6236 | Volume 291 | No 1 ‘It’s odd, British and unlikely’

N E W CA R S

54

NEWS 8 12 Bosch voice control CES concept previews new tech 14 Seat goes virtual High-tech quality control methods 16 Lotus’s SUV plans Lightweight model on the cards

Audi’s future factory Car-making changes planned

TESTED Volkswagen Up GTI Potent pint-sized prototype Mercedes-AMG GLC43 Coupé Sleek and swift SUV Mini Clubman JCW Four-wheel drive and 228bhp Audi Q5 2.0 TDI 190 quattro Entry-level diesel Dacia Sandero 1.0 SCe 75 Ambiance New engine Toyota C-HR 1.8 Hybrid Excel ROAD TEST

20 22 23 24 25 26

FEATURES New cars 2017 Full guide to the year’s launches

37

2017 COVER STORY

THE YEAR’S NEW ARRIVALS PREVIEWED — ALL 158 OF THEM 37

OUR CARS Kia Niro Petrol-electric crossover says hello Ssangyong Tivoli Cut-price SUV signs off Ford Mustang Enjoying the V8’s lazy nature Skoda Octavia vRS Long-distance load-lugging

58 60 63 65

EVERY WEEK 19 Subscribe Free Kitsound Manhattan headphones 34 Motorsport Record-breaking drag EV driven 54 Your views Encouragement for Vauxhall’s GT Vision 56 Matt Prior The squeezed middle fights back 82 Steve Cropley An eclectic mix of holiday motors

TOYOTA C-HR ROAD TESTED 26

DEALS James Ruppert AA trials reliability prediction tech Used buying guide Honda S2000s from £5000 Used car intelligence Driving an S2000 again Road test results Autocar’s data archive New cars A-Z All the latest models rated Classifieds Cars, number plates and services

TIPS ON BUYING A HONDA S2000 68

66 68 71 72 74 81

VOLKSWAGEN UP GTI PROTOTYPE DRIVEN 20

IF THIS IS THE FUTURE, MOST OF US ARE GOING TO LOVE IT ❞ STEVE CROPLEY ON THE HYDROGEN-FUELLED TOYOTA MIRAI 19

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THE NEXT FIVE YEARS AT LOTUS: BOSS REVEALS ALL 8 4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 5


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COMMENT

The original car magazine, published since 1895 ‘in the interests of the mechanically propelled road carriage’ EDITORIAL Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5630 Email autocar@haymarket.com Editor Matt Burt Editorial director, Automotive Jim Holder Editor-in-chief Steve Cropley Deputy editor Mark Tisshaw Head of video, features Matt Prior Managing editor Allan Muir Production editor Melanie Falconer Reviews editor Will Nightingale Chief tester Matt Saunders New cars editor Rory White Deputy reviews editors Nic Cackett, Vicky Parrott Senior reviewer John Howell Reviewers Alan Taylor-Jones, Neil Winn, Doug Revolta News editor Rachel Burgess Consumer editor Claire Evans Used car editor Alex Robbins Senior staff writer Sam Sheehan Content editor Darren Moss SEO manager Jon Cook SEO executive Oliver Hayman Senior digital reviews editor Mark Pearson Digital reviews editor Hemal Mistry Chief sub-editor Tim Dickson Sub-editor Alex Moores Production assistant Kris Culmer Group art editor Stephen Hopkins Art editor Sarah Özgül Deputy art editor Michèle Hall Junior designer Laura Bajorunaite Chief photographers John Bradshaw, Stan Papior Photographers Luc Lacey, Will Williams Videographers James Holloway, Mitch McCabe Picture editor Ben Summerell-Youde Editorial assistants Jimi Beckwith, George Hawkins

HERE ARE MY TWO CAR-RELATED NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS...

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS European editor Greg Kable Used car correspondent James Ruppert Senior contributing writer Andrew Frankel Senior contributing editor Richard Bremner Contributing editor Mike Duff Special correspondents Mauro Calo, Jesse Crosse, Hilton Holloway, Peter Liddiard, Julian Rendell, Richard Webber MEDIA ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)20 8541 3434 Contact Greg Cartwright (greg@performancecomms.com) SUBSCRIPTIONS Tel 0344 848 8816 Overseas +44 (0)1604 251450 Email help@autocar.themagazineshop.com SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)1962 867705 Contact Simon Fox (syndication@autocar.co.uk) LICENSING ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5024 Contact Isla Friend (isla.friend@haymarket.com) BACK ISSUES Tel 0344 848 8816 Email help@autocar.themagazineshop.com ADVERTISING Classified +44 (0)20 8267 5733 Display +44 (0)20 8267 5574 Production +44 (0)20 8267 5814 Fax +44 (0)20 8267 5312 Sales director Julia Dear Key account director Richard Potton Agency group head Andrew Barclay Agency account managers Adrianna Haynes, Lindsey Dobson Semi-display/retail executive Hannah Mathew PRODUCTION Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5219 Production manager Anthony Davis Senior production controller Roxy Agius MARKETING Direct marketing manager Maria Fernandez Newstrade marketing manager Richard Jeffries MANAGEMENT Brand director Rachael Prasher Business director Darren Pitt Brand manager Sarona Taylor Brand executive Charlene Harry © 2017, Haymarket Media Group Ltd. Autocar, Motor, Autocar & Motor are registered trademarks. Circulation enquiries: Frontline Ltd, Midgate House, Midgate, Peterborough PE1 1TN (01733 555161). Repro by Haymarket Pre-Press. Printed by William Gibbons, Wolverhampton. Registered as a newspaper with the Royal Mail. Member of the ABC. ISSN 1355-8293. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form except by permission. The publisher makes every effort to ensure contents are correct but cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions. Unsolicited material is submitted to Autocar entirely at the owner’s risk; the publisher accepts no responsibility for loss or damage. With regret, competitions and promotional offers, unless otherwise stated, are not available to readers outside the UK and Eire. North America: Autocar, ISSN number 135589X, is published weekly by Haymarket Media Group, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham TW1 3SP, United Kingdom. Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica, NY 11431. Subscription records are maintained at Haymarket Media Group, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham TW1 3SP. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent.

Autocar is a member of the organising committee of Car Of The Year caroftheyear.org Haymarket is certified by BSI to environmental standard ISO14001 and energy management standard ISO50001

HAPPY NEW YEAR to all Autocar readers. Did you make any new year’s resolutions? More pertinent, have you broken them already? Besides the obvious ones, such as being extra-pleasant to my colleagues and pledging not to demolish a six-pack of Tunnocks Tea Cakes in one sitting, I have two car-related vows I hope I can fulfil. The first is to put a used motor on my drive. I need something commodious for regular trips to the dump and transporting family members throughout the West Country. If that’s not asking the earth, my tight budget might be: I can probably stretch to £1000. I’ll be seeking advice from our used car gurus, James Ruppert and Alex Robbins, but I’d also love to hear suggestions from you. My second resolution is to get involved in motorsport again, more than a decade on from a season of rally co-driving alongside Autocar editorial director Jim Holder in a Nissan Micra. I’m browsing the Motor Sports Association’s gomotorsport.net website, trying to weigh up what to do and what to do it in. Hmmm. Perhaps my prospective used motor needs to be capable of towing a competition car. This could be an expensive year…

Matt Burt Editor matt.burt@haymarket.com EDITOR’S PICKS

ADDRESS Autocar is published by Haymarket Consumer Media, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham, Middlesex, TW1 3SP, UK haymarketgroup.com Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5000 Editorial director Mark Payton Strategy & planning director Bob McDowell Managing director David Prasher Chief executive Kevin Costello Autocar magazine is also published in China, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand. Autocar is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think we haven’t met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact autocar@haymarket.com. For more information, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk

@matt_burt_

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VW UP GTI TESTED

ELECTRIFIED ENFIELD

USED HONDA S2000

Golf GTI Mk1 reborn? A drive almost has Jim Holder convinced, p20

It was ahead of the curve in 1976. Now it’s king of the straights, p54

Just £5k buys a Japanese sports car bursting with character, p68

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 7


N E WS G O T A S T O RY ?

Email our news editor rachel.burgess@haymarket.com

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Lotus aims for dynamic leadership with new SUV Development work begins on Lotus’s first SUV, which could be on sale by 2022

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otus boss Jean-Marc Gales believes there is a gap in the market for a “lightweight, goodhandling SUV” as he plots the revitalised sports car maker’s future model plans. Gales has confirmed that the first Lotus to appear in a next-generation line-up will be a replacement for the

8 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Elise in 2020, followed soon after by its more hardcore Exige sibling. A new Evora will complete the new range of sports cars by 2022. By this point, Lotus’s SUV may well be ready for production as a fourth model line, with the Norfolkbased company joining the likes of Porsche, Jaguar,

Maserati, Lamborghini, Aston Martin, Rolls-Royce and Bentley in recognising the benefits an SUV can have in boosting profitability. Gales told Autocar recently that work on a prototype SUV model had started. The car has not yet been signed off for production, nor a design finalised, but if the

company makes a success of its turnaround plans, the SUV is “four or five years away, as with the rest of the new range”, said Gales. The most likely option for the development of the SUV is for Lotus to work with its Chinese engineering partner, Goldstar Heavy Industrial. Gales said

development work on the prototype was not something Lotus had started alone. However the car is developed and made, Gales said it would be “a nice addition to the line-up” and noted that “no one makes a lightweight, good-handling SUV”. He added: “It’s a niche, and it looks well positioned.”


Lotus’s SUV is expected to weigh less than rivals

do for now with existing sports cars,” said Gales. The current models will be made faster and lighter and with improved aerodynamics and build quality, before the next-generation line-up is kick-started with the launch of the new Elise in 2020. The new Elise and Exige will be built on an all-new version of Lotus’s bonded and extruded aluminium platform, and Gales has set his engineering team the task of making them the “handling benchmark”. Gales said the Elise will weigh less than 1000kg and ◊

Gales believes the SUV has the potential to double or even treble Lotus’s planned annual sales volume of 4000 units — more than double today’s figure — once its next generation of sports cars is in production early in the next decade for sale in all major global markets. Before the next generation of sports cars arrives, an open-top version of the Evora will be launched later next year, and more incremental improvements of Lotus’s existing Elise, Exige and Evora models will follow. “We will show what we can

Lotus recognises the benefits an SUV can have in boosting profits ❞

SHOULD LOTUS BUILD AN SUV? M A R K T I S S H AW

The idea of a Lotus SUV is no more sacrilegious than one from Aston Martin, Lamborghini or Porsche. Nor is it any less of a no-brainer. Porsche made the sporting SUV famous with its Cayenne, and the floodgates have been open across the industry ever since. It’s now hard to think of a specialist sports car or luxury brand without one, or plans for one. Make enough Macan and Cayenne SUVs (and make them well, of course) and you’ll have something profitable and desirable on your hands. Then pour said profits into the development

of the smaller-volume sports cars, which are still needed in order to give your brand the desirability and authenticity to sell SUVs in the first place. Rinse and repeat. Jaguar has been the most recent brand to do so. In the US in November, its sales were up 217% year on year, with more than half the models sold being F-Paces. A sporting reputation earned on the F-Type has brought with it buyers who want a piece of that brand promise with the F-Pace, a car they can actually use. Alfa Romeo will hope for the same later this year with the Stelvio.

Lotus’s SUV is a way off, but the project now has momentum behind it and the company is making money. As long as it sticks to boss Jean-Marc Gales’s desired formula of being the lightest, best-handling and most aerodynamic in its class, and with solid build quality to match, the SUV deserves to be a success — and it probably will be, if recent evidence of such cars is anything to go by. That it’ll secure the longterm future of company and help fund future sports car development is something we can all hope for.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9


∆ will grow only marginally in size, chiefly to accommodate a crash structure that will allow for sales in the US. The US is seen as a key market for the new Elise and Exige. Lotus has engineered the Evora for sale in the US in its present guise without needing any safety concessions and adding less than 10kg in weight. The early success of the Evora in the US has allowed Lotus to be cashflow positive and provide greater security to the future business. The same engineering process will be repeated for the Elise and Exige, allowing them to pass crash tests in the US and be sold with no safety concessions. “We will make the Elise and Exige US-compliant, as we did for the Evora,” said Gales. “We have the confidence in-house. We’re the smallest US car maker on the market to be fully

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10 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

type approved and sold with no concessions. The Evora has an 8kg weight penalty for the US. With the Elise and Exige, the target is the same again. Crash tests are very important.” Gales describes the next Elise and Exige launches as “the most significant, certainly” for Lotus in its history. Gales wants to build modularity into Lotus’s next sports car platform to allow the Elise and Exige to share more components with the next Evora, including heating and infotainment systems. There is little crossover at present, because the model ranges are built on separate bases. This will reduce complexity and engineering times. “The platform on which the future products are based will need to span 140-150bhp to 450bhp, so it needs to be a very good and solid platform and we know it,” said Gales.

The 3.5-litre V6 is likely to be downsized to 3.0 litres. Gales is not averse to it being turbocharged ❞ “I like our extruded and bonded aluminium chassis. No one will find a way of doing it stronger or lighter, and it’s of huge quality. No brand beats it. “I’d love a modular platform. Using big modules that are the same on all cars, such as the harnesses, lighting, infotainment and HVAC [heating, ventilation and air conditioning], would be a big step forward. We don’t do that at present. In the future, we will do that across all three sports car lines. It will reduce costs.” Gales also said he expects carbonfibre to be used for the

future bodies of Lotus models, sourced locally from a company called Polar, from which Lotus already sources the material in smaller quantities. As for what engines will power the future sports car range, Gales said Lotus “has a very good relationship with Toyota”. He added that the Japanese car maker was “the obvious choice”, although Lotus is keeping its eyes open for other partners. Expect 1.6 and 1.8-litre engines to remain the core four-cylinder powerplants in the future Lotus range, while

the supercharged 3.5-litre V6 is likely to be downsized to around 3.0 litres. Gales is not averse to the idea of that engine being turbocharged instead of supercharged. “A turbo could be right if done correctly,” he added. “I don’t preclude it.” Gales said the styling of the new Elise has been decided and will “evolve what we’ve got now” rather than try to reinvent Lotus design. “The new Elise is recognisable at 100 metres as an Elise,” he said. The quality of Lotus’s interiors will also continue to be improved, and Gales is looking at ways of making Lotus’s infotainment offerings more competitive. “Lotus is not known as a leader in infotainment but shouldn’t be last,” he said. “We’re working on improving. It needs to be fresh.” MARK TISSHAW


NEWS Q&A JEAN-MARC GALES, LOTUS BOSS How have you been able to improve your existing cars? “The cars are much better screwed together now. It took us time to fine tune the Evora, and the same with the Exige, and the improvements will filter down. It’s very important not to have squeaks or rattles, and we’re improving the attention to detail through the whole design process.” Is this about removing excuses for people not to buy a Lotus? “Absolutely. The quality is great nowadays. The cars feel so much better put together, more handmade with an attention to detail. We want to make high-quality cars that beat everything else [to drive] on a normal road.”

How have you funded these improvements? “We did this out of our own cashflow. The whole team understands the focus. We’re all about light weight and handling, and the absence of noise and squeaks. It’s a continuous improvement.” Are customers aware of these improvements? “It takes some time. We need customers who own them to say they are a pleasure to drive and own. It will take a couple of years; it’s a process. I know of many customers who had an Evora, then went to a Porsche 911 but came back as it didn’t give them the emotions. In nearest offerings, the emotion and speed is missing, the sound

and the analogue feel of the wheel when we point it. I see a trend towards these cars; look at the 911 R, the specials Aston Martin is making, cars with manual gearboxes and with fewer electronics.” Is there an upper price limit for a Lotus? “We have sold out of 3-Elevens until April, some having sold for £140,000. Some Evoras are £90-95,000 and the Exige can go up to £80,000 now. The next Exige and Evora could breach £100k. There is no notional price limit if we’re number one in the class for ride and handling, weight and aerodynamics, we look great and we’re free of quality problems. People would pay over £100k, we’re confident.”

Where’s the money coming from for the new models? “Clearly, cars that sell now will finance development of the new cars. We’re also looking for lending from banks, the probability of which is higher as we have positive cashflow now. The EBIT [earnings before interest and taxes] is

up, which is the real indicator. We have things to write off still from five or six years ago. Positive cashflow was the first target, then EBIT, then write off stuff from the past. We’re putting money away for new cars now and working on existing models after the open-top Evora.”

THE NEW RANGE AT A GL A NCE

ELISE (2020) Marginal size increase but still set to weigh less than 1000kg. Will keep 1.6 and 1.8-litre engines.

EXIGE (2021) As now, a harder, faster Elise, built on the same bonded and extruded aluminium chassis.

EVORA (2022) Will have more in common with the Elise/Exige than now, and not just the latter’s new 3.0-litre V6.

New Elise will grow slightly in size but still weigh under 1000kg

SUV (2022) Prototypes and designs in development. Expect the lightest and sharpesthandling SUV yet.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11


Audi set to reinvent car production process Modular assembly stations and AI could replace conventional production lines

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udi is teaming artificial intelligence with the power of ‘big data’ in a drive to introduce more flexible and 20% more efficient modular assembly factories. Among the innovations that Audi is working on are self-driving carts to move parts around its factories, drones to carry lightweight components, new, ‘human-robot’ production line tools and live data analysis to speed up pressing operations and the despatch of finished cars. “Artificial intelligence marks the birth of an exciting new

12 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

world of work in the factory,” said Audi production boss Hubert Waltl. “We are digitally merging fragmented processes and thinking beyond the assembly line of today.” The most radical change, if it happens, will be to replace the production line with a series of modular assembly stations, a process that Audi says could happen within 10 years. Modular assembly has been tried before in the car industry, most notably at Volvo’s Uddevalla plant, which was also hailed as the end of the production line. Opened in

Audi is experimenting with drones to transport lightweight parts such as steering wheels ❞ 1989, it was a qualified success but was mothballed just four years later in the midst of a market downturn. Audi is developing new ways of implementing modular car production, and advances in information technology will help immensely compared with those used in the 1980s. Audi’s goal is to find a new

type of production that can cope with increasingly varied individual model specifications and a wide range of powertrain options, including battery electric, that threatens to overwhelm the traditional production line. Audi has employed Arculus, a company formed by ex-Audi factory man Fabian Rusitschka

and staffed by just seven robotics and software experts, to oversee development of the modular production line. The main feature of Audi’s modular system is that it increases the number of assembly stations from 160 to 200 and introduces a variable operation (or ‘tact’) time for each process.


NEWS AUDI’S FAC TORY OF T HE F U T UR E IN DE TA IL DTS: DRIVERLESS TRANSPORT SYSTEMS Automatic guided vehicles have been in use since the 1980s, but their operation is often inflexible because their control systems are rudimentary. Audi believes the development of self-driving technology, combined with laser scanners and faster computer control, will make driverless transport systems (DTS) an integral part of modular assembly. DTSs can pick up parts from a remote warehouse and move to a modular assembly station to

a claimed accuracy of millimetres. Parts bins, powered by miniature electric ‘skateboards’, can be programmed to serve a workstation just as components are needed, or move between workstations in the modular factory, serving multiple locations with a single set of stores.

AUTONOMOUS FORKLIFTS Audi’s Ingolstadt factory uses around 500 forklifts or tugs to move parts around the plant. Replacing the drivers of these vehicles will reduce costs and improve efficiency and safety. Audi says it will redeploy staff onto more productive jobs.

TOOLROOM/BODYSHOP The starting point in any car factory is body assembly, with its enormous presses ti body b d panels l tto creating ti ht ttolerances. l P i tight Pressing

PRODUC T ION ASSISTA NCE SYST EMS currently relies heavily on operator experience and trial and error, but Audi believes ‘bi data’ can improve ‘big racy of the final parts accuracy by comparing the CAD d ign with highly detailed design computer analysis of finished parts. Differences can be interpreted to adjust the press tool and improve accuracy.

FLEXSHAPEGRIPPER Or ‘human-robot cooperation’, as Audi also calls it. Instead of robotising a complete assembly process, the latest computer control will allow humans and robots to work together, such as on the assembly of A3 roof aerials. An agile mechanical handling FlexShapeGripper is intelligent enough to chose the correct size and colour from a choice of 36

LBRINLINE A mini-robotised production station for fixing a variety of different undertrays to A3 models, the LBRInLine is controlled by a human, while four robots perform the fixing operations. An operation that once took 30 seconds is cut to 20.

3D PRINTING The technology is a brilliant prototyping tool, but Audi is experimenting with 3D printing for the production of intricate parts, such as the rear crossmember node in the R8 and Lamborghini Huracán spaceframe. The part can be made 30% lighter with 3D printing than with casting, but the

Currently a typical tact time might be 60 seconds and be identical at every one of the plant’s 160 stations, but Arculus’s modular line introduces a variable tact time of 60 to 240 seconds, allocated to the 200 stations depending on complexity. Volvo’s Uddevalla plant had even longer times — up to seven hours in some cases — at some stations. Audi is trialling some of the new assembly methods at its engine plant in Hungary and at Lamborghini in Modena. JULIAN RENDELL

challenge is to accelerate the process and reduce the cost. Currently a 3D printer can only make one metal component per day.

components and hand it to a human operator who can correctly fix it into position.

CLEVER KLAUS Inside an A4 door is a wiring loom with up to 14 electrical connections and 100 parts. Clever Klaus uses an infrared depth camera — designed for the Xbox — to monitor the assembly and warn if a connection is loose or the wrong part has been fitted.

P R E D I C T I V E YA R D M A N A G E M E N T

DRONES Ironically, the modern car factory often suffers from ‘traffic jams’ as mechanical handling equipment clogs up the narrow aisles. To take advantage of the free space above, Audi is experimenting with drones to transport lightweight parts, such as steering wheels or satellite navigation antennae.

Finished cars flow out of Audi’s German factories at a rate of 2300 per day, and despatching the cars to dealers is a huge undertaking. It currently takes 1.6 days to clear the stock of built-up cars. That puts pressure on the holding area, so Audi is using predictive big-data techniques to order car transporters earlier and smooth the flow of the finished cars to customers.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 13


The system is linked to the car’s selfdriving functions

Bosch tech moves voice control on CES concept previews system that brings ‘Internet of Things’ connectivity to the car

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osch has demonstrated an advanced concept car with voice control technology that can understand casual conversation, allowing drivers to speak naturally to control the car, house appliances and other connected devices. Revealed at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the so-called human machine interface (HMI) responds to significantly more words and sentences than current voice systems, allowing passengers

to issue commands in more natural spoken word. Janine Schlink, one of the concept’s leading designers, said: “You can ask your car to shut the windows at home or show you a recipe for dinner tonight.” HMI is one of several technologies on the concept that Bosch says are likely to make production by 2025. Schlink said the HMI system links to the car’s autonomous drive functions and is charged with keeping passengers informed of when manual drive

F1-STYLE DOORS FOR NEW 650S

mode will have to resume. “Think about your smartphone,” said Schlink. “You can have a look at what’s going on elsewhere using the Internet of Things. The car will be like a driving smartphone that you can personalise and use to control other devices.” Passengers will be able to control things such as lighting and cooking appliances in their home, as well as monitor certain things such as how much food is in the fridge. “The car will essentially

become a third living space, alongside the home and work,” added Schlink. Additionally, the CES concept has car-to-car and car-to-bicycle communication technology that significantly reduces the chances of impacts with either vehicle type. It also has gesture control functionality and uses organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays that are said to be significantly clearer that current production displays. “My favourite feature is the

haptic feedback touchscreen,” said Schlink. “It makes the buttons on the screen feel real by using tiny vibrations.” The system, called Neosense, received an Innovation Award at last year’s CES and is now said to be nearly ready for production. Schlink said several of the car’s systems are already being investigated for use by mainstream manufacturers, although she wouldn’t reveal any more detail at this stage. SAM SHEEHAN

Monocage II is said to be very rigid and light

McLaren’s 650S replacement, due to be unveiled in March, will feature dihedral doors that extend into the roof, like those on the iconic F1. A new monocoque, called Monocage II, uses a T-bar-shaped roof structure that allows for the extended dihedral doors, along with a wider entrance and OFFICIAL PICTURE lower sills in order to improve access. Codenamed P14, the 650S replacement is said to weigh 1283kg — 18kg less than the current car — largely thanks to the new “ultra-lightweight” and “immensely rigid” carbonfibre monocoque. McLaren says the structure also gives a lower centre of gravity. McLaren boss Mike Flewitt said: “This is the first time we have replaced a product family. The new Super Series will be a revolutionary leap forwards, both for our brand and the supercar segment.” 14 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017


NEWS

Next-gen XC60 key to Volvo’s global sales push THE CRUCIAL NEW Volvo XC60 is undergoing cold-weather trials in Sweden ahead of its arrival later this year. The current iteration of the mid-sized SUV has been on sale since 2008, but it remains one of Volvo’s best-selling cars. The XC60 is the third model to undergo wholesale reinvention since Volvo was acquired by Geely, following the successful new XC90 and the S90/V90. Under Geely, Volvo is on a mission to reinvent itself as a true luxury brand and dramatically increase its global sales to 800,000 per year by 2020 — an upswing of almost

300,000 units compared with its current performance. The second-generation XC60’s success is key to that mission, and Volvo is hoping the car’s new platform, improved efficiency and more sophisticated looks and technology will further enhance its appeal in the segment. Volvo chiefs have told Autocar they hope the success of the new XC90 will provide a further boost for its smaller SUVs and crossovers. Built upon Volvo’s Scalable Product Architecture (SPA), the XC60’s styling will be brought into line with the

current family look created by design chief Thomas Ingenlath. The XC60 will take cues from the XC90, including the ‘Thor’s Hammer’ daytime running lights and a bold new face. The SPA underpinnings will make it possible for the XC60 to accept Volvo’s latest diesel and petrol engines. At launch, the range-topping units are likely to be 2.0-litre four-cylinder diesel and petrol engines. At a later date, a new T5 three-cylinder plug-in hybrid system being developed by Volvo is also likely to feature. Inside, the XC60 will adopt many of the features

already seen in the XC90, including a portrait-orientated infotainment system flanked by large air vents, and a TFT instrument display behind the steering wheel in place of traditional dials. The XC60 is expected to be unveiled at the Geneva motor show in March and is slated to go on sale in August as a rival to premium crossovers such as the BMW X3 and new Audi Q5. It will sit in the middle of Volvo’s SUV range, between the upcoming XC40 and the XC90, with the former being build upon the firm’s CMA small car architecture.

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GOSSIP | RUMOURS | T R ENDS

THE MAZDA MX-5 will continue to thrive even if Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) doesn’t commit to building a next-gen version of the Fiat 124 Spider. Mazda R&D chief Kiyoshi Fujiwara said: “FCA of course helps, but the car can survive without them. There isn’t a word in our dictionary for ‘quit’ with the MX-5.” MITSUBISHI HAS YET to decide a direction for the replacement of its Shogun 4x4. The sixth-gen Shogun was launched at the Paris show in 2006, but the firm is for now focusing on two new soft-roaders and updating the Outlander. Design chief Tsunehiro Kunimoto said a new design direction for the Shogun “is unclear”. The global market for tough 4x4s is shrinking, making the decision harder, he added.

Mercedes-AMG plots upgraded GT coupés MERCEDES-AMG WILL launch a coupé version of the upcoming GT C Roadster in the spring. The GT C coupé will use the uprated, 547bhp twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 from the more powerful of the two roadster models. That means it’s 44bhp more powerful than the GT S and 30bhp less than the GT R. It will be lighter than the roadster, so it should accelerate from 0-62mph in less then the soft-top’s 3.7sec. Pricing will slightly undercut that of the GT C Roadster, which costs £138,565. The model recently spotted testing (right) is an Edition 50, which will be launched this year to celebrate AMG’s 50th birthday. It will come with extra standard kit and bespoke trim.

CONFIDENTIAL

S PY S H OTS

M E R C E D ES-A M G GT C E D I T I O N 5 0

GKN DRIVELINE WANTS to become a manufacturer of complete electric drive systems that can be used on multiple platforms. “Our job will be to integrate electric motors into an adaptable drive module,” said Theo Gassman, GKN’s director of advanced engineering and eDrive systems. “It’ll be up to the manufacturer to give the car its own DNA by making the parts the end user touches and sees.” PORSCHE BOSS OLIVER Blume says the firm’s proposed 800V EV charging system would outperform Tesla’s Supercharger, currently billed by its maker as “the world’s fastest” EV charger. Tesla owners would be able to use the new chargers via adapters, said Blume, and the door was open for the US car maker to join the ongoing crossmanufacturer project.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 15


Seat turns to VR to boost quality and durability of cars

Virtual reality, X-ray booths and electron microscopes are aiding Seat’s quality drive

S

eat has revealed a raft of new quality control technologies to ensure that its cars are not only more trouble-free when they leave the factory but they also continue to look well made and well finished after a decade on the roads. The Spanish company, which posted profits of £115 million in the first nine months of 2016 (some 11 times greater than in the same period in 2015), opened up its research and development facilities to Autocar last month. The laboratories are based

16 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

inside Seat’s big Martorell facility, which is situated to the north of Barcelona and builds the Seat Leon, Ibiza and new Ateca SUV. The facility has also been building the Audi Q3 SUV and will make the next A1 supermini when Q3 production moves to Hungary. Seat sources say the company is rolling out new quality control techniques that reach both earlier into the development process and much later in the vehicle’s life, so that the investments are still paying off when a car is as much as a decade old.

Without doubt, the most visually spectacular aspect of Seat’s quality drive is the virtual reality (VR) technology. The company demonstrated the VR tech’s potential on a socalled power wall in its factory prototype development centre. Seat engineers — led by development centre boss Javier Diaz — claim that the modelling of a new vehicle in extremely fine detail in virtual reality means that the development time can be reduced by as much as 30%. This super-fine rendering in virtual reality means that

not only can component positioning and packaging problems be seen in extraordinary detail, but the virtual 3D models can also be used to plan how the new vehicle might be constructed once it becomes a production line reality.

Diaz ran an animation, demonstrating how the VR creation of the new Ateca SUV was used to work out how the windscreen wiper linkages could be installed smoothly under the scuttle panel. Rather than waiting until all the vehicle components

Virtual reality allows many fit issues to be worked out three years before production ❞


NEWS

We go inside Seat’s secret quality assurance department Engineers can spot problems sooner using virtual reality tech

VR lets you zoom to fine detail and ‘slice’ your way through a car

Javier Diaz demonstrates VR on a power wall using a Seat Ateca have been designed and then manufactured using the first production tooling, Seat engineers say superdetailed VR allows many of the potential conflicts and fit issues to be worked out as much as three years before the start of production. The upshot is that when pilot-build vehicles are eventually constructed, much of the complication of a wholly new design should have been ironed out nearly two years before. Until you witness it first hand, it is hard to comprehend the way that it is possible to zoom through the virtual vehicle — as if you were slicing the vehicle up. Diaz zoomed in to the fine detail of the inside of the Ateca’s door construction. Small fastenings were rendered as being larger than his hand and the finest details of pressings and wiring looms were displayed in vivid high definition. Today, it is possible for engineers to interact with the

virtual vehicles through the use of VR glasses. Diaz admits that there is some way to go before this technology reaches its full potential. The key to achieving the peak of the VR revolution will involve new-generation glasses with a wider field of vision, the ability to deal with much higher levels of data, being able to render higher levels of detail and losing the cable connections — because current wi-fi technology isn’t able to handle the amount of information needed. Diaz says they are expecting wireless VR headsets in the future and that 5G mobile networks should be powerful enough to transmit the huge amount of data wirelessly. Indeed, by the end of the decade, Diaz admits, it should be possible to hold market research design clinics in VR and the opportunities for intracompany meetings for design and technical development will be unlimited in their scope. HILTON HOLLOWAY

BUILDING A BRAND such a Seat — which has its roots in value-for-money vehicles — into something that becomes synonymous with being good value for the (high) quality on offer is a job that requires long-range thinking. One of the most important considerations is what the vehicle will look like in five or even 10 years’ time. Producing vehicles that have aged poorly after five years and then sit at the side of the road for another five years is a good way to prevent your brand image from improving. That’s why, in 2014, PSA Group boss Carlos Tavares declared future cars would be designed to be “as new after three years” as part of a plan to improve residual values. Seat’s approach is not much different but, it’d argue, it is even more rigorous. A visit to Seat’s quality department shows in some detail the kind of processes needed to ensure that its models will age well even in the harshest conditions. For example, Seat has an X-ray booth that allows it to check the material quality and construction quality of many different types of components, from cast aluminium wheels to a complex multi-part moulded rubber and plastic fitting used in a turbocharging system. With the complex turbo part, once it is assembled, it would be impossible to check it internally without destroying it. However, the use of X-rays ensures it is assembled correctly, as well as checking the composition

Corrosion chambers test the robustness of items such as wheels of the aluminium alloy in the wheels for integrity. Next door to the X-ray room are Seat’s corrosion chambers. Here, items such as alloy wheels and badges are checked for robustness in poor conditions. Alloy wheels are held in a corrosion chamber for as long as 10 days, bathed in a high (90%) humidity atmosphere made up of water, copper chloride and acetic acid. Headlight reflectors are tested in up to 200deg C to see if the mirroring deforms or peels off the reflector itself. Painted interior parts undergo a temperature cycle running between 80deg C and -40deg C over 25 days. Such parts need to stay looking unworn over years of use and play such a big role in reinforcing the ‘quality’ message as the car ages. Sunlight is a significant cause of material degradation and Seat claims its tests are more rigorous than other makers’. The company has a room of small test machines that apply what’s known as the xenon test. This gives

out the equivalent strength of sunlight and UV light of a “very dry desert”, as well as “Florida-like” humidity and temperatures up to 65deg C. Components such as the tail-light clusters and interior air vents are subjected to significant exposure inside the machines. An interior air vent might spend 10-15 days in the machine, but a tail-light cluster can spend five months under attack. The final test department opened up by Seat contains a scanning electron microscope. This is so powerful that it can magnify down to a millionth of a millimetre and — theoretically — then on to DNA level. Described as a “big leap” for the company, the microscope is used by Seat primarily for examining adhesion between the primer and the surface of the steel panel, as well as the adhesion of the other layers of paint and lacquer to each other. Clearly, the longevity of the paint finish is one of the most important aspects of long-term quality. HH

Scanning electron microscope magnifies to a millionth of a millimetre and helps with paint quality 4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 17


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NEWS

Steve Cropley MY WEEK IN CARS

A 3D-printed Mirai model arrived with our new long-termer

A drive of a Jag Mk2 is still on the wish list

THURSDAY

My transport alternatives over Christmas must have set some kind of record. It would have been amazing enough to have driven the first 1500 miles in the Bentley Bentayga W12 that will be with us until mid-year, but I was also offered a few days in a McLaren 540C, established in a recent breathless story as my most desired supercar. So whenever we set off on a Yuletide journey, we had staggering options. The Bentley impressed anyone who came close with its remarkable interior and regal performance-withrefinement. The McLaren was massively quick but always reassuringly docile and easy to drive. Happily, neither car usurped our household’s usual wheels. Nothing totes logs better than the Citroën Berlingo. We needed the Fiat 500 Twinair for squeezing into tight car parks. The Mazda MX-5 fired us brilliantly along a twisty road to a friend’s party. And there was even time for 20 miles on the Harley Sportster, my innards bracingly rearranged by the V-twin’s vibes. Returned to work in prime condition; motoring may not be perfect, but it’s still wonderful.

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

To wash or not to wash? This question complicates my weekends at this time of the year, when attention turns to the Steering Committee’s

Whenever I see the Fiat 500, its shapely rear is covered in never-drying black gunge ❞ yellow Fiat 500. Her work currently calls for regular motorway journeys, which means whenever I see the car, its shapely rear is covered with that special, never-drying black gunge we road-users weirdly describe as ‘salt’, although nothing could be less like the inoffensive, snowwhite sodium chloride, once the treasure of kings, found in dainty quantities on dinner tables. It is no secret that this Fiat was bought especially for its canary colour, so its owner is particularly unhappy with doing hearse impressions up and down the M4. This causes her to use all kinds of low inducements to get

AND ANOTHER THING… Going through my phone, I came upon this pic of an early Discovery steel wheel. It looks great and is durable and cheap, so I wondered about the case for alloys with everything. I’ve decided it’s political: the vulnerability of alloys employs so many repairers that it boosts employment figures…

your humble servant to make with the bucket and sponge, but it’s hard for the car washer to tell himself the frozen fingers and drenched ankles are worthwhile when the Fiat will be gunged up again within a mile. My salvation is a commercial potion called Muc-Off, pricey but magical, which makes road salt melt away, even from multi-spoke wheels. If I could install a bowser, I’d do it.

MONDAY

From now on, Autocar will be running a second hydrogen fuel cell car, a Toyota Mirai, delivered today by Toyota’s hydrogen enthusiast-in-chief, Jon Hunt, whose real job is doing mammoth UK fleet deals but whose faith in a future hydrogen society is total. We’ll be telling you much more about life with this strange and wonderful car as time goes by, but our initial impressions are all about smoothness, silence, refinement, convenience and practicality. If this is the future, most of us are going to love it. Because it was Christmas, Hunt left me a superb, 3D-printed Mirai model, which made me almost as happy as possession of the full-sized thing.

WEDNESDAY

A few days into the new year and I’ve suddenly realised I spent so much of last year chasing new stuff that I failed to fulfil one of 2016’s more pressing classic-car ambitions: to drive my first ever Jaguar Mk2. Several kind reader-owners contacted me last January with offers, but we didn’t connect. My fault. If you’re still out there, chaps, I still feel the itch.

GET IN TOUCH

steve.cropley@haymarket.com

@StvCr

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 19


F I R ST D R I V E S N E W C A R S T E ST E D A N D R AT E D

TESTED 5.12.16, SOUTH AFRICA ON SALE EARLY 2018 PRICE £15,000 (EST)

VOLKSWAGEN UP GTI Appealing three-cylinder city car morphs into entry-level GTI

W

hen you scan the spec and see that the Volkswagen Up GTI is powered by a 1.0-litre, three-cylinder engine producing a meagre (by the standards of this illustrious performance brand today) 114bhp, you might wonder if this baby GTI is a cynical marketing exercise to add a bit of vim to the Up range. But even before you get behind the wheel or chat to the wide-eyed engineers working on the project, VW has a pretty convincing counterargument through a comparison with the first-generation Golf GTI. Demonstrating once again how safety needs have caused modern cars to grow, the Up GTI is, in fact, not far removed from the old Golf: the Up’s 3600mm of length plays 3705mm, its 1627mm width compares with 1610mm, a 2415mm wheelbase exceeds the Golf’s 2400mm and 1020kg shades 880kg. And if that latter figure makes you wince, consider that the Up’s

20 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

114bhp tops the 109bhp made by the 1.6-litre engine of the 1976 original. Sure, the safety kit and technology packs add a significant amount of extra heft, but the power-to-weight ratio is not far removed at all. No one is revealing torque figures just yet, but this manual Up GTI will cover

the 0-62mph sprint in 8.8sec, compared with the Golf’s 9.2sec. If it’s offered with a DSG dual-clutch automatic gearbox, the Up GTI’s time will come down further. Even on this prototype, all the GTI hallmarks are present. There’s a stripe along the bottom edge, tartan

seats, red stitching on the steering wheel and a fancy red and black finish on the moulded dashboard, plus a six-speed manual gearbox with reverse up and off to the left and a chunky steering wheel to grip. Entry-level GTI or not, no corners have been cut.

Up GTI sits 15mm lower than the standard car and uses Polo-derived brakes and steering


❝ The peppy engine pulls remarkably well and has a linear power band

The handling balance leans towards understeer; ride is good despite a sporty set-up The turbocharged 1.0-litre triple runs 1.5bar of boost pressure and a 10.5:1 compression ratio. Coupled with a water-cooled intercooler, the engine’s output is pretty impressive and, while engineers reckon they could have pushed closer to 125bhp, they insist this set-up gives the best combination of power, torque and response. And responsive the Up GTI is. The peppy engine pulls remarkably well and has a linear power band. The only interruption is an overly long second gear ratio, which pauses progress in the name of fuel economy gains. But work the engine hard and you’re amply rewarded, aided by the slick manual gearshift and precise control weights. And it’s surprisingly refined – almost disappointingly so, given its lineage. Mechanically, the Up GTI is much changed from standard, not least in its use of some Polo-derived (but heavily modified) parts such as the steering rack and ventilated brakes. The car sits 15mm lower and has a heavily reworked suspension set-up

(MacPherson struts up front and a torsion beam rear), including stiffened top mounts, new lower suspension arms and dampers tuned to control bounce at lower compression speeds. The effectiveness of all this was hard to judge on the largely straight roads of South Africa, where VW conducts hot-weather and durability testing, but what opportunities there were suggested the car is set up with a balance that leans towards neutral before dipping into understeer. VW’s engineers suggest you can make the Up GTI oversteer if you really try, but, again, the modern age demands they err towards a responsible set-up. Ride comfort was impressive, soaking up low-frequency ripples and damping down bigger bumps despite the sporty leanings. What we can conclude is that the Up GTI is a car that has abundant promise even so far from reaching production. It won’t make your eyes water, but it is engaging and eager to please; even in top gear, the engine keeps pulling towards

the car’s 119mph maximum speed. Some will struggle to reconcile the idea of a three-cylinder GTI, but it’s worth noting that VW is believed to be ahead of the curve here, with even the likes of Ford considering similar units for its ST models. As time has moved on, so have expectations, and for all the comparisons with the original Golf GTI, it would be misleading to think that the Up GTI is going to evoke memories of yesteryear and have a generation of retirees rushing to dealerships to relive their youth. It’s a different car for a different era. Instead, what VW is hoping to create is a car that will draw in a new generation of GTI lovers – albeit potentially financially aided by misty-eyed parents. Much will depend on pricing and running costs, especially insurance, but rumours already suggest an asking price of around £15,000. That’s a lot for such a small car, but on this evidence it may well be worth it. JIM HOLDER

@Jim_Holder

VOLKSWAGEN UP GTI Quick and refined baby GTI has promise in prototype form, proving that just enough is absolutely fine

AAAAC Price Engine Power Torque Gearbox Kerb weight 0-62mph Top speed Economy CO2/tax band RIVALS

£15,000 (est) 3 cyls, 999cc, turbo, petrol 114bhp na 6-spd manual 1020kg 8.8sec 119mph na na Renault Twingo GT, Abarth 595

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 21


TESTED 19.12.16, PORTUGAL ON SALE NOW PRICE £50,960

MERCEDES-AMG GLC43 COUPÉ Sporty-looking upmarket crossover receives the attention of AMG’s tuners

T

he GLC Coupé is a niche within a niche within a niche. It’s the sleeker-looking crossover version of the GLC SUV, which itself is an off-road-orientated iteration of the C-Class saloon. Its 3.0-litre twinturbo V6, meanwhile, is part of the cod-AMG ‘43’ range of Affalterbachlite powerplants engineered but not built at the famous factory of Mercedes’ in-house tuning division. So depending on your perspective, you can see it as a car that neatly cherry-picks the juiciest components from all the conceptual forms it represents – the style of a coupé, the practicality of an estate, the all-terrain ability of an SUV and the response of a sports car – or just a collection of disparate ideas, all lobbed at the wall in the hope that at least some of them will stick. In statistical terms, the GLC43 Coupé is the same as the GLC43 SUV from which it is derived: same 362bhp output, same 4.9sec 0-62mph sprint, same fuel economy, same CO2, same weight, same everything, in fact. But Mercedes says it has worked hard on the all-round air suspension

to give the car a feel of its own: firmer, more controlled and dynamic. More fun, in other words. Those who loathe the idea of cars like this for all the compromises their designs seem to encompass will likely hate the GLC43 Coupé even more, because they will find the way it drives infuriatingly hard to criticise. You sit high (but not perched) in a cabin whose quality is now a clear cut above that of anything else you might feel tempted to call a rival. Huge progress has been made to bring more character to this engine, and although it’s still some distance from the twin-turbo V8s in ‘proper’ AMGs, the V6 revs cleanly, snarls convincingly and even spits and bangs between shifts in Sport Plus mode. Those suspension revisions have worked well, too. The GLC43 Coupé is very composed for a car that’s so high and heavy. Indeed, working it hard across the Portuguese landscape, I soon forgot what kind of car I was in. It corners flat and fast and with genuine poise and precision. It’s a supremely easy car to drive quickly and a secure one, too.

But I’d still struggle to call it fun. Not in the way its roofline and AMG badging suggest it should be fun. Unquestionably competent, enjoyable for the sheer fluency with which it goes about its business, yes. But actual fun? Once the novelty of the snap, crackle and pop of the exhausts has worn off, not so much, no. So the first question is whether it is worth the extra £3000 charged over the price of a standard GLC43. That isn’t a lot of additional money, but it isn’t buying you a scrap more performance, many would contend that the Coupé is actually the less attractive car and you’re lumbering yourself with significantly reduced space in the back for both passengers and luggage. Seats down, there’s an enormous 200 litres of extra space available in the regular SUV. Which means you’re either really going to need to buy into the style or really want the best-handling car this kind of money can buy. And the problem with the latter approach is that although the GLC43 Coupé is unquestionably better to drive than its SUV compatriot, both still fall

Rakish looks and tuned suspension are the main changes from the GLC43 SUV; cabin remains a class apart for quality 22 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

a distance short of the standardsetting Porsche Macan GTS, which is convincingly better to drive than the GLC43 Coupé and bigger in the back seats and its boot. So if we were determined to buy a crossover coupé-cum-SUV in the £50,000 bracket, on looks alone we’d choose the Benz over its only natural rival, the BMW X4 xDrive35d M Sport. But the truth is that the aforementioned Macan and the Jaguar F-Pace 3.0S are more entertaining to drive and more versatile family holdalls. This remains a category for those more interested in show than go, and good though the GLC43 Coupé is, it does nothing to make us want to modify that view. ANDREW FRANKEL

@andrew_frankel

MERCEDES-AMG GLC43 COUPÉ Niche but extremely capable — if not as outright fun to drive as its best performance SUV rivals

AAABC Price Engine

£50,960 V6, 2996cc, twin-turbo, petrol Power 362bhp at 5500rpm Torque 383lb ft at 2500rpm 0-62mph  4.9sec Top speed 155mph Gearbox  9-spd dual-clutch automatic Kerb weight  1845kg Economy  34.0mpg (combined) CO2/tax band 192g/km, 37% RIVALS BMW X4 xDrive 35d M Sport, Porsche Macan GTS


FIRST DRIVES TESTED 15.12.16, AUSTRIA ON SALE NOW PRICE £30,945

MINI CLUBMAN JCW AUTOMATIC

Range-topping John Cooper Works version gets 228bhp and four-wheel drive

T

he axe has fallen on a number of Mini’s other oddball ideas (so long, Paceman), so it’s a surprise that the Clubman, the breadvan-aping larger cousin of the hatchback, is still clinging on, given that its shallow pool of buyers is presumably drawn from those dissatisfied with the regular fivedoor’s boot and apparently unmoved by the taller Countryman. Yet here we are with another variant, and the costliest there is. One suspects the number of Clubman buyers interested in a 228bhp, all-wheel-drive version will be minuscule, but the John Cooper Works (JCW) model is here regardless, starting at £29,345 for the six-speed manual version. As with the hatchback and convertible JCWs, the higher output comes courtesy of a Cooper S’s reworked 2.0-litre four, with an uprated turbo and intercooler. The Clubman’s quirk is to twin the petrol motor with Mini’s All4 set-up, which, due to a bevel gear on the front differential and an electrohydraulic clutch at the rear, lets the back axle share the torque distribution when the DSC system deems it appropriate. Similar attention has been paid to the Clubman’s chassis, where the car’s already firm suspension settings have been made firmer still on standard 18in wheels (19s are optional) and the brakes get four-piston calipers. Variable

If you like how it looks on the outside, you’re likely to feel the same about the interior design and layout dampers are also on the options list, as is an eight-speed Steptronic automatic transmission, which nudges our test car’s starting price up to £30,945. There’s inevitably a lot of work to do in order to live up to that price (a range-topping Ford Focus ST-3 Estate costs £3000 less), but the latest Mini interior does a decent job of showing you where the money has been invested. This is a premium product with the high-grade plastic fascia to prove it, and although the busy aesthetic is hardly a lesson in restraint, it’s fair to say that anyone at peace with the Clubman’s exterior is likely to be a Mini devotee of the unconditional sort and will no doubt feel at home inside. That’s a handy mindset to bring to the JCW, because the model is not overly endowed with objective strengths. Chiefly, it suffers from the

standard Clubman’s most enduring flaw: the often irritating attempt to mimic the smaller hatchback’s positivity with a steering rack that seizes on minor inputs and translates them into rigorous direction changes. The cooking model at least mitigates this with broader suppleness and less rim resistance, but in the severely sprung JCW, there is no yielding to ease of use. In Sport mode, the car simply tacks away from centre in cloying pursuit of some meaningless vector. This inability to settle might be forgivable if it awakened into subsequent animation, but its inconsistency is just too much of a hindrance – as is the unavoidable and patent sense of heaviness that taints the model dynamically. Furnished with bigger bones and four-wheel drive, the JCW’s kerb weight is around 200kg more than

The back axle shares the torque distribution when the DSC system deems it appropriate

that of the equivalent hatchback, and the extra mass ultimately subdues the normally healthy function of the 2.0-litre turbo engine. Mini may claim 6.3sec to 62mph, but the cheery, chest-compressing urgency that ought to be virtually guaranteed by 228bhp is gloomily absent, even in low gears. The perfunctory, stacked-up ratios and hazy upshifts of the slusher only serve to underline the mechanical strangulation, so much so that the Clubman rarely calls on the ancillary assistance of its driven back axle. Its failure to generate gratifying low-end thrust is particularly damning, because it’s the standard by which the wider segment gets graded – if nothing else, in a value for money equation. Put simply, the car doesn’t feel quick enough for the premium that Mini is asking. Nor is it practical enough, really. The boot is made accessible by the double rear doors but is nearly 250 litres smaller than that of a Volkswagen Golf R Estate. Neither feature would terminally damn it in our eyes had the JCW been suitably stimulating to drive, but the Clubman’s new range-topper is tediously adequate at best. NIC CACKETT

MINI CLUBMAN JOHN COOPER WORKS AUTOMATIC Four-wheel drive marshals its extra power — but the end result hardly justifies the premium

AABCC Price Engine  Power  Torque  Gearbox Kerb weight Top speed 0-62mph  Economy  CO2/tax band RIVALS

£30,945 4 cyls, 1998cc, turbo, petrol 228bhp at 5000-6000rpm 258lb ft at 1450-4500rpm 8-spd automatic 1565kg 148mph 6.3sec 41.5mpg (combined) 154g/km, 27% Volkswagen Golf R Estate, Ford Focus ST Estate

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 23


TESTED 5.12.16, MEXICO ON SALE NOW PRICE £37,170

AUDI Q5 2.0 TDI 190 QUATTRO Ingolstadt aims to mix economy with elan in entry-level diesel guise

D

id you watch Formula 1 in 2016? A now-retired German called Rosberg won the title over this other fella, Lewis Hamilton, despite being widely acknowledged as not quite as talented. Why? Because he was consistently good. Audi used to struggle to beat its rivals but has upped its game in recent times, slowly chipping away to hone its new models. Its offerings are still rarely the sharpest to drive but are consistently turning into all-round winning packages. The second-generation Q5 is altogether sharper than its predecessor, from the use of Audi’s latest design language through to the engineering underpinning it. Slightly bigger than before and packing a lot of new technology, it has nonetheless shed 90kg thanks to the use of aluminium in the front suspension mountings, front crash structure, bonnet and boot and a blend of cold and hot-formed steel elsewhere. Lighter means better performance, braking, handling and efficiency. And bolstering the last of those four is this 187bhp 2.0 TDI Ultra engine.

It has been fettled for improved economy and is mated to a new seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox that decouples the engine when you come off the throttle in order to save even more fuel. Then there’s the new quattro allwheel drive system, which dumps the old centre diff in favour of a switchable, rear-mounted clutch that defaults to powering the front wheels only. This reduces friction losses in the drivetrain, saving yet more fuel, but when you need a traction boost, it takes only 200 milliseconds for power to flow to the rear. New for old, combined economy is officially up by 16%, while CO2 emissions are down by 15%. And you get better acceleration to boot. We’ve already driven the buttery Q5 3.0 TDI 286, but as cheaper alternatives go, this four-cylinder version isn’t unruly. It’s hardly quick, but it has a decent smattering of torque between 1750 and 3000rpm, so you don’t have to wring its neck. When you do, there’s a low-key rumble up front, but no engine tremors leach into the cabin.

So 95% of the time its pace is adequate, but the gearbox does occasionally dither from a standing start. It’s something to factor in if you’re going for a marginal gap onto a busy roundabout, but apart from that it’s ever-alert on kickdown and breezes smoothly through changes. Since the Q7, we’ve been expecting a bit of waft from Audi SUVs, and the Q5 is no different. With lots of wheel travel and an inherent softness on the optional air springs, it patters over crags in the road and gently floats over low-frequency undulations. But what about those who prefer to corner with gusto? Well, with its suspension firmed up in Dynamic mode, the Q5 is far from soggy, but you can’t hustle it like you can a BMW X3 or Jaguar F-Pace. It won’t change direction as keenly, and the steering, while perfectly good at seven-tenths pace, doesn’t inspire the confidence of the Jag beyond that. Grip levels are pretty good, though. The elevated driving position is hard to fault and there are acres of space if you’re tall and sitting up front. Another two adults will be

equally comfortable behind you, while the 550-litre boot matches the best in class, and you can increase that to 610 litres by ordering the sliding and reclining rear seats. You’ll want for little in terms of toys. All trims come with automatic city braking, leather seats, threezone climate control and a powered tailgate, and the options list includes the superb 12.3in Virtual Cockpit. The Q5 certainly isn’t the sportiest SUV in the class. But, just like Rosberg, it’s so consistently good in every area that it’s hard to ignore. If you want something comfortable, quiet and spacious in which to waft around, the new Q5 might just have moved into pole position. Seriously, it’s that good. JOHN HOWELL

@autobabbler

AUDI Q5 2.0 TDI 190 QUATTRO SE S TRONIC Lacks the sportiness of some rivals, but in every other respect this is a properly sorted car

AAAAC Price Engine Power Torque Gearbox

There’s a floating compliance to the ride on optional air springs; it’s roomy and well equipped inside 24 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

£37,170 4 cyls, 1968cc, diesel 187bhp at 3800-4200rpm 295lb ft at 1750-3000rpm 7-spd dual-clutch automatic Kerb weight 1770kg 0-62mph 7.9sec Top speed 135mph Economy 56.5mpg (combined) CO2/tax band 132g/km, 26% RIVALS BMW X3 xDrive20d, Jaguar F-Pace 2.0D 180


FIRST DRIVES TESTED 11.12.16, CROATIA ON SALE NOW PRICE £6995

DACIA SANDERO 1.0 SCE 75

Can a facelift enhance the bargain-basement appeal of Britain’s cheapest car?

T

he Dacia Sandero has stoically remained the entry-level point to the new car market since its launch in 2013, and bargain hunters can continue to rejoice: even with some upgrades for this year, it remains the cheapest new car you can buy in the UK. The facelifted model includes reworked front and rear styling, LED daytime running lights, more equipment inside and a new engine, which slots into the bottom of the range as the entry-level option. The 73bhp, naturally aspirated 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol unit is marginally quicker and more fuel efficient than the four-cylinder 1.2 it replaces. It joins the line-up alongside the existing – and more powerful – turbocharged 0.9-litre petrol triple and the 1.4-litre diesel. Spec upgrades add DAB radio and air-con as standard on mid-level Ambiance trim, while range-topping Laureate models get a touchscreen infotainment system with satellite navigation and a reversing camera. The line-up starts with Access trim at the headline-grabbing £5995 entry price, but you still get very little kit. Ambiance carries a £1000 premium, while Laureate is another £1200 on top of that – all of which, in typical Dacia fashion, represents staggeringly good value. The new 1.0-litre engine sampled here will be available only with Access and Ambiance trims in the UK.

Soft set-up means Sandero is comfortable but not engaging; cabin now has nicer materials The 1.0-litre engine is 20kg lighter than the 1.2 it replaces, thanks in part to an all-aluminium block. Indeed, the whole car is light, even by supermini standards, but it doesn’t have much power. It’s peppy enough around town, but you need to keep the revs in the mid-range in order to make brisk progress. It isn’t too sluggish off the line, though, and throttle response is sharper than that of many three-cylinder engines. However, it’s short on refinement, with engine noise particularly noticeable above 3500rpm, and because you need to drive it hard on faster roads, the thrum can become tiresome. It settles at a cruise, but while this engine will be adequate for many buyers, we’d recommend going for the 0.9-litre turbo if you do regular motorway miles, even though the more powerful unit comes with a £1000 premium.

At least the 1.0-litre engine’s CO2 emissions and claimed economy make it comparable with rivals such as the Ford Ka+, although that new budget supermini is actually pretty good to drive and rides very well, so the Sandero’s days of lording over the bargain-basement end of the segment could be numbered. Apart from the new entry-level engine option, the facelifted Dacia is mechanically unchanged from the existing model, meaning it’s still not an engaging or fun car to drive. Its handling is at least accurate and the soft suspension set-up means the ride is decent. It’s quite composed, too, managing to soak up most modest imperfections at low speeds, although it doesn’t take much to unsettle it beyond that. The Sandero does have two trump cards to play on the Ka+: price and space. It’s considerably cheaper than

The Sandero’s jaw-dropping value will always make it worthy of consideration

the Ka+ and you’ll struggle to find a small car that packages its space so effectively, especially for passengers in the rear. Its tall body means there’s plenty of head room, and leg room isn’t stingy, either. The boot, meanwhile, is a practical size and will take a couple of big suitcases without any trouble, although the load lip is rather high. Inside, there’s been a decent step up in the level of standard equipment for each trim level. There are also some better-quality materials and a new steering wheel that is far more tactile than the previous item, all of which makes it slightly less obvious that you’re sitting in the cheapest new car in the country. While the Sandero lacks the accomplished dynamic finesse of more expensive superminis, its jawdropping value will always make it worthy of consideration, especially if you’re on a tight budget. This new engine is an improvement on the one it replaces and will cater for many prospective buyers. If you can stretch to it, cars such as the Ka+ and Skoda Citigo are much more satisfying to drive, but the Sandero’s price, practicality and upgraded interior mean it still competes with them.

DOUG REVOLTA

@DougRevolta

DACIA SANDERO 1.0 SCE 75 AMBIANCE Better value than ever, thanks to quicker, cleaner engine and smarter cabin, but only average to drive

AAABC Price Engine Power Torque Kerb weight Gearbox 0-62mph Top speed Economy CO2/tax band RIVALS

£6995 3 cyls, 998cc, petrol 73bhp at 6300rpm 72lb ft at 3500rpm 969kg 5-spd manual 14.2sec 98mph 54.3mpg (combined) 117g/km, 20% Ford Ka+, Skoda Citigo

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 25


ROAD TEST No 5301

TOYOTA C-HR Toyota takes on the Audi Q2 and Mini Countryman with its own ‘fashion’ crossover

PHOTOGRAPHY JED LEICESTER

Price £26,495

26 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

MODEL TESTED 1.8 HYBRID EXCEL

Power 121bhp Torque Unspecified 0-60mph 11.6sec 30-70mph in fourth na Fuel economy 48.9mpg CO2 emissions 87g/km 70-0mph 45.0m


ROAD TEST inding ‘white space’ between the glut of compact crossovers currently on the market has become a preoccupation for many car manufacturers of late. Toyota, though, seems to have found some for the C-HR, an all-new model intended to replace a number of five-door offerings in the firm’s international line-up. The disparate nature of its predecessors (which include conventional hatchbacks as well as a short-lived, oddball miniMPV, the Urban Cruiser) helps to explain some of the thinking behind the model’s mixed-up looks, designed

F

to combine coupé, hatchback and crossover influences. This approach could hardly be claimed as novel – crossing over conventional vehicle norms being what ‘crossovers’ were always intended to do – and yet, on first inspection, the C-HR seems to do it with more conviction than most. Just as it showed with the most recent Prius, Toyota is demonstrating a new-found fearlessness when it comes to design that is likely to lose it as many fans as it wins. Still, it doesn’t seem unreasonable to suggest that the C-HR might meet with a warmer reception from a fashionsavvy crossover-loving crowd than the latest Prius did with its largely middle-aged, moderate, conservative customer base. Underneath the skin, though, those two Toyota siblings are not so different. They share the same all-new global architecture, and the crossover also incorporates the latest version of the petrol-electric hybrid powertrain that made the Prius so famous in the first place. The hybrid model is partnered by a turbocharged 1.2-litre petrol option, but the car must toil against coupé, hatchback and crossover rivals without the downsized diesel motor that typically forms the backbone of two out of three sales in those segments. So it’s mildly bizarre to look at and doesn’t necessarily come with the engine you want. But if Toyota’s ambitions are anything to go by, those hurdles may be more manageable than they sound. The C-HR was originally conceived for Europe exclusively but has since been seized upon by a raft of other markets – most notably Japan – as an essential and presumably desirable part of the brand’s line-up over the next decade. Is it deserving of that kind of recognition? Read on.

WE LIKE

Striking alternative styling  High-quality, pleasant interior  Grippy yet fluent ride and handling WE DON’T LIKE

Slow, unwilling hybrid powertrain  Limited head room  So-so infotainment system

 Prominent headlights contribute tellingly to the C-HR’s aggressive nose. LED running lights are standard, but full LED units are the preserve of the costliest version.

 Save for the black roof available with Dynamic trim, most of the design features appear throughout the range, including the foglights, which are often subtracted from an entry-level model.

 Flared wheel arches and the deeply scalloped character line become indistinguishable from one another at points in the C-HR’s bodyside. The effect adds plenty of visual drama.

 A blue backdrop in the Toyota badge means you chose the hybrid version, although it’s spelled out at the back and on the flanks, just in case anyone misses the colour-coded reference.

 Don’t expect much downforce from the skeletal rear spoiler. It’s mainly there to jut out from the roofline and enhance the stationary impression of blurry speed.

 This model’s coupé-like outline meant concealed rear door handles were always likely, although they’ve been positioned so high that children may not be able to reach them.

 C-HR gets 17in alloy wheels as standard, although Excel and Dynamic models upgrade them to 18in. Dynamic gets a trim-specific design, too.

 There’s almost as much styling embellishment at the rear as at the front. Black trim in the rear bumper protrudes for extra physical presence.

DESIGN AND ENGINEERING

AAAAC The apparent determination of Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda to take the shackles off the designers for the C-HR is to be applauded. The visual drudgery of the Auris and others must have left a mark upon most buyers’ perception of the Toyota brand and an attempt to create a standout example of crossover style is welcome. Whether or not the stylists have succeeded in their aim is open to interpretation, but there’s no question that the Coupé High-Rider represents a proper swing for the fences. The indulgence of the coupé part of the equation – that swooping roofline and rear three-quarter – is enough to ensure that the model ◊

C-HR shares much with the current Prius

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 27


 No stubby Prius-style gear selector here but instead a palm-filling lump of expensive-feeling leather and chrome. It feels substantial through the gate, too.

 Trapezoidal ‘diamond’ design motif is repeated all over the C-HR’s exterior and cabin, but never more noticeably than in these classy-looking air vents.

M U LT I M E D I A S YS T E M

AAACC The 8.0in Toyota Touch 2 infotainment system is standard equipment on the C-HR. Including a DAB radio and reversing camera on £21,000 entry-level models is fairly generous, but you only get the navigation system upgrade if you buy a mid-spec or high-trim car. The Toyota Touch 2 with Go system uses the same-sized screen but also brings with it online connectivity options that work through your smartphone’s data connection and add real-time traffic information via TomTom. It also gives you Google

28 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Street View and allows you to browse fuel prices, weather reports and parking availability at your destination. The navigation mapping isn’t displayed in brilliant detail and the system isn’t particularly quick to respond to fingertip inputs. We’d still prefer an auxiliary input device. Toyota’s optional JBL premium audio system has 10 speakers and 576 watts of power and comes as part of the £1595 Premium Pack. It sounds strong but not outstandingly so, particularly by the standards of premium brands.

 Seats are part-leather on mid-spec cars, with lumbar support adjusted here. Shiny surrounding plastic is a rare instance where the C-HR looks or feels cheap.


ROAD TEST ∆ gives up some practicality to a raft of crossover-shaped opposition, a fact that Toyota acknowledges with the assertion that it is targeting a customer chiefly driven by “emotional considerations” with this car. But are we to expect this mash-up of a crossover to be as exciting to drive as it is to look at? It isn’t clear. The C-HR’s powertrain – a familiar tie-up of 1.8-litre Atkinson-cycle petrol engine and electric motor assistance – is the very latest iteration of the Toyota hybrid, meaning that it is lighter, sharper, more powerful (at 121bhp) and more efficient than before, with a CO2 output as low as 86g/km. But the hybrid’s familiar calling cards are smoothness and economy, rather than the midrange punchiness that is so often the hallmark of the diesel-powered compact crossover. The 114bhp 1.2-litre turbo four-pot alternative to the hybrid option promises little excitement, either, although at least that engine comes with the option of an adaptive all-wheel drive system capable of shuffling 50% of available torque rearward via an electromagnetic coupling. The C-HR shares the GA-C variant of Toyota’s new TNGA modular architecture with the Prius, along with its front MacPherson struts and rear double wishbone suspension,

although it gets a slightly shorter wheelbase and wider tracks. Toyota also says the underpinnings enable the car to have a lower centre of gravity than any direct rival.

INTERIOR

AAAAC Despite its lower-than-the-averagecrossover hip point, the C-HR still has a driver’s seat that you slide directly on to rather than bending down to access it. The A-pillars and roofline trace quite close to your head as you sit at the wheel, so this isn’t a car to recommend to a particularly tall driver. Head room is even more limited in the back, but leg room is generous enough in both rows. For a smaller adult or teenager sitting in the back seats, the high and tapering window line will make it feel more claustrophobic than it really is. We can perhaps afford to leave reservations about the C-HR’s practicality to one side, though, given that this car is aiming to appeal for its sense of style rather than outright space. And having done that, we’re left with a fairly comfortable, entirely pleasant, solidly built and consistently well-finished interior that shows evidence of thoughtful design and the same stylish flourish that distinguishes the exterior. An asymmetrical fascia is a ◊

 Driving position is medium high, while the seats are comfortable and roundly adjustable. Fascia is asymmetrical and angled towards the driver.

HOW BIG IS IT?

m

ax

0m

mm

68

0m

106

Kerb weight: 1420kg 2640mm

905mm

377 litres

Typical leg room 680mm

1565mm

950m

910mm

m max

0.32

815mm

4360mm

VISIBILITY Angle of the A-pillars, the lowness of the roof and the semi-raised driving position impose a small compromise here, but it’s still pretty good. The view rearwards is affected by the shape of the C-pillars and rear window.

HEADLIGHTS

 Second row offers good knee room and foot space but is too tight on head room to carry larger adults. The rising window line makes for a claustrophobic feel.

You get LED headlights on top-level Dynamic trim only. Test car’s halogen lights were bright enough, though.

30mm

circle: 11.0m Turning

Height 500-790mm

160mm

1540mm

Width 900-1230mm

10mm

Length 800-1550mm

Centre

1540mm

1795mm

W H E E L A N D P E DA L ALIGNMENT Pedal placement is good and a decentsized rest for your left foot is included. The steering wheel’s offset isn’t really noticeable in normal use.

 Double wishbone rear suspension makes for some boot intrusion. Split-folding seats favour a left-hand drive layout. The boot itself is a respectable size.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 29


∆ time-honoured trick for making a car feel instantly driver-focused, and the C-HR’s asymmetrical layout runs beyond the waterfall stack to the centre console below. Above, the integration of an 8.0in infotainment screen as a protrusion from the dashboard has allowed Toyota to keep the car’s fascia volumes low and preserve a sense of space up front. Toyota has used plenty of high-gloss piano black plastic as interior decoration, about which we’re ambivalent. It’s very eyecatching and on trend but shows up dust and fingerprints. In front of and behind the gear selector are deep, teardrop-shaped cupholders whose clever design more easily admits a mug with a handle than a round one will, and under the centre armrest is an equally deep storage cubby with a 12V power outlet contained within. The one thing you can’t miss in here is the effort made by Toyota to ensure a high-quality material finish. The tactile quality of the C-HR’s switchgear, its careful location and its designed look is

sufficiently impressive that the car could probably pull off a Lexus badge without too much trouble.

PERFORMANCE

AABCC Toyota’s modern petrol-electric hybrid driving experience is now sufficiently well established that time at the wheel of the C-HR is unlikely to surprise or bemuse a great many UK drivers. But it’s disappointing that this particular car conforms so closely to that dry, plodding, one-dimensional Toyota hybrid type, given that it has been designed and engineered in so many other ways to represent a bolder and more exciting take on the crossover. It wouldn’t have taken much, surely, for the C-HR’s hybrid powertrain to create a more athletic impression than the low-emissions crossovers it’s up against: the 1.5 and 1.6-litre diesel options from the Nissan Qashqai, Seat Ateca and Renault Kadjar ranges. Given the strides Toyota showed with the current Prius, which shares the C-HR’s hybrid powertrain, that

didn’t feel like such an unrealistic expectation before we drove the car. But the C-HR is not only relatively slow but also feels reluctant. The powertrain has Eco, Normal and Power modes, as Toyota hybrids tend to, and part of the problem is that they’re switched not via a button on the centre console (as they have been on every hybrid Toyota we can remember) but via the drive computer and the buttons on the steering wheel spokes. So you can drive for a long while without realising that there’s a way to mitigate the deadness of the accelerator pedal’s initial travel. In outright terms, it’s only about a second that the car gives up to its mostly diesel rivals on 0-60mph acceleration and half as much again on 30-70mph sprinting. But given that you have to flatten the pedal to make the C-HR feel like it’s picking up speed with any urgency whatsoever, you’d guess the difference was much greater. Toyota persists with its policy of blending regenerative braking in with friction braking as you progress through the pedal’s initial travel,

making the brakes feel spongy at times and overly sensitive at other times. But at least familiarity takes the edge off that problem. Want economy? That is something the C-HR can be good at. On our fairly gentle touring economy test, it got within a hair’s breadth of 60mpg – better than the 1.5-litre diesel Qashqai we tested in 2014.

RIDE AND HANDLING

AAAAB You may have read elsewhere that the C-HR is the first ‘normal’ car to be based on Toyota’s all-important new TNGA architecture. That is to assume that the Prius isn’t a ‘normal’ car, with which we’d disagree: there has never been a more normal-feeling Prius than there is right now. It’s true, though, that the C-HR uses modular underpinnings that will benefit almost every new small Toyota for the next five years or more – and that they also promise great strides for the way those hatchbacks, saloons, crossovers and estates will ride, handle and steer. The C-HR has close, progressive

T R AC K N O T E S The C-HR copes well when you fling it into a tight hairpin on a chilly winter morning. Slowing the car smoothly to the ideal entry speed and bleeding off the brakes as you turn in isn’t as easy as it should be, because the brake pedal is short on feel. Even so, the car’s nose turns in keenly, its body settles quickly on its outside wheels and the chassis will even allow you to tighten your line mid-corner, such is its assured hold on the tarmac. Understeer is held off very well indeed. On the exit of a corner, your line is often made untidy by the lack of progression to the accelerator pedal, which functions more like a switch than a pedal at times. Traction is generally strong, though, and the traction control system is dependable.

 It feels very stable and secure through faster kinks, such as T3.

 Grippy chassis and well-weighted steering make it easy to get the car around hairpin T2.

T2

T4 T3

T6

T1

 Well-tuned dampers and plenty of wheel travel soak up big compressions effectively.

T7

T5

FINISH

START

AC C E L E R AT I O N Toyota C-HR 1.8 Hybrid Excel (9deg C, dry) Standing quarter mile 18.6sec at 75.6mph, standing km 34.2sec at 93.7mph, 30-70mph 11.9sec, 30-70mph in fourth na 30mph

40mph

50mph

3.9s

5.9s

8.5s

60mph

70mph

11.6s

0

80mph

15.8s

10s

100mph

90mph

21.5s

43.5s

29.5s

20s

30s

40s

Seat Ateca 1.6 TDI Ecomotive SE (16deg C, damp) Standing quarter mile 18.2sec at 76.6mph, standing km 32.8sec at 97.7mph, 30-70mph 10.3sec, 30-70mph in fourth 13.7sec 30mph 40mph

50mph

3.8s

7.8s

5.4s

60mph

10.5s

0

BRAKING

70mph

14.1s

80mph

10s

100mph

90mph

19.0s

35.6s

25.2s 20s

30s

60-0mph: 2.70sec

Toyota C-HR 1.8 Hybrid Excel (9deg C, dry) 30mph-0

50mph-0

8.4m 0

70mph-0

22.8m 10m

45.0m

20m

30m

40m

Seat Ateca 1.6 TDI Ecomotive SE (16deg C, damp) 30mph-0

50mph-0

9.1m 0

30 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

70mph-0

24.7m 10m

20m

47.7m 30m

40m


ROAD TEST

❝ It controls its mass cleverly and stays balanced at all times ❞

ride control, crisp handling responses, good lateral adhesion and well-balanced grip levels. It rides fluently and quietly, keeping constant close tabs on excessive vertical body movement. And it steers with a very sophisticated meeting of weight and directness that gives you an instinctive command over the car’s position on the road and its direction along it. The relatively low centre of gravity and sophisticated rear suspension pay dynamic dividends here, because they allow the C-HR to come by its sense of handling response and precision easily – without needing to fall back on unyielding springing, oversized wheels, beefed-up anti-roll bars or extra-firm bushing. And so what’s pleasing about the way the car conducts itself around town, arcing around a motorway slip road and on a country lane is that it controls its mass very cleverly, stays balanced at all times and manages not to let any movement adversely affect the authority of its steered axle or the consistency of its grip level. Can you enjoy driving the C-HR quickly? If you can overcome the discouraging need to squeeze every drop of available pace out of that hybrid powertrain, yes, absolutely.

BUYING AND OWNING

AAAAB The availability of a conventional combustion engine in the C-HR provides a fairly competitive starting point for the range. The £20,995

starting price for an Icon-spec 1.2-litre turbo model looks like decent but not outstanding value. But then Toyota wisely declines the opportunity to provide a povertyspec entry-level car, the bottomrung C-HR getting dual-zone air conditioning, 17in alloy wheels, rain-sensing wipers and the Touch 2 touchscreen. That relative generosity also makes the Icon-spec hybrid a realistic option, the £23,595 starting price placing it in direct competition with a regiment of mid-spec mainstream compact crossovers. Nevertheless, Toyota will doubtless expect to shift more examples of the mid-level Excel model tested here, as it better fits the premium-minded billing Toyota will give the C-HR. To that end, the addition of part-leather upholstery, heated front seats, keyless entry, parking sensors, 18in alloys and a raft of driver assistance safety features is intended to convince the prospective customer that the car is worth having over a premiumbranded alternative. Range-topping Dynamic trim gilds the lily and is probably not worth the premium, unless you’re attached to the idea of a contrasting black roof. Although there are levels at which the C-HR’s generous kit count does make it look a bit pricey, the low CO2 emissions of the hybrid model should help to compensate for company car tax-paying fleet drivers, and for those buying on a PCP, strong residual value forecasts should keep monthly costs sensible. ◊

 Straight-line pace in the hybrid model feels even more modest than it actually is, but the C-HR rides quietly and capably, handles crisply and steers with precision.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 31


DATA L O G T OYO TA C - H R 1 . 8 H Y B R I D E XC E L On-the-road price Price as tested Value after 3yrs/36k miles Contract hire pcm Cost per mile Insurance/typical quote

£26,495 £28,895 £13,225 £314 45 pence na

45 litres

EQUIPMENT CHECKLIST

1.3 kWh

T E C H N I C A L L AYO U T

Toyota’s TNGA platform revolution means the C-HR has all-independent suspension, with double wishbones at the rear, but it also delivers the lowest centre of gravity in the crossover class and has enough flexibility for a shorter wheelbase than the Prius’s. Hybrid and manual 1.2T models are front-wheel drive only. The 1.2T CVT has the option of electronically controlled four-wheel drive. £1595 £795 £850 £400

R A N G E AT A G L A N C E ENGINES 1.2T 1.8 Hybrid

POWER 114bhp 121bhp

FROM £20,995 £23,595

TRANSMISSIONS eCVT

ECONOMY TEST MPG CLAIMED

Track Touring Average Urban Extra-urban Combined

30.4mpg 59.5mpg 48.9mpg 80.7mpg 68.9mpg 72.4mpg

Tank size Test range

45 litres 484 miles

AC C E L E R AT I O N MPH 0-30 0-40 0-50 0-60 0-70 0-80 0-90 0-100 0-110 0-120 0-130 0-140 0-150 0-160

TIME (sec) 3.9 5.9 8.5 11.6 15.8 21.5 29.5 43.5 -

ENGINE

C H A S S I S & B O DY

Installation

Construction Weight/as tested Drag coefficient Wheels Tyres

Front, transverse, front-wheel drive Type 4 cyls in line, 1798cc, Atkinson-cycle petrol, plus hybrid electric assist Compression ratio 13:1 Engine power 97bhp at 5200rpm Engine torque 105lb ft at 3600-4000rpm Electric motor 600V AC synchronous, 71bhp, 120lb ft Drive battery Nickel metal hydride, 202V, 6.5Ah System power 121bhp at 5200rpm System torque Unspecified Power to weight 85bhp per tonne Specific output 54bhp per litre

TRANSMISSION Type eCVT Input/output range Unspecified Final drive ratio 3.22:1

SUSPENSION

BRAKES

SAFET Y

Front MacPherson struts, coil springs, anti-roll bar Rear Double wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bar

Front Rear Anti-lock

ABS, VSC, TRC, EBD, EBA, HSA Euro NCAP crash rating Not tested

STEERING

CABIN NOISE

Type Electromechanical, rack and pinion Turns lock to lock 2.7 Turning circle 11.0m

Idle 45dB Max rpm in 3rd gear 73dB 30mph 58dB 50mph 63dB 70mph 67dB

AC C E L E R AT I O N I N KICKDOWN MPH 20-40 30-50 40-60 50-70 60-80 70-90 80-100 90-110 100-120 110-130 120-140 130-150 140-160

-

TIME (sec) 3.6 4.6 5.7 7.3 9.9 13.9 22.1 -

THE SMALL PRINT Power-to-weight and torque-to-weight figures are calculated using manufacturer’s claimed kerb weight. © 2017, Haymarket Media Group Ltd. Test results may not be reproduced without editor’s written permission. For information on the C-HR, contact Toyota Customer Relations, Toyota (GB) plc, Great Burgh, Burgh Heath, Epsom, Surrey, KT18 5UX (0344 701 6202, toyota.co.uk). Cost-per-mile figures calculated over three years/36,000 miles, including depreciation and maintenance but not insurance; Lex Autolease (0800 389 3690). Insurance quote covers 35-year-old professional male with clean licence and full no-claims bonus living in Swindon; quote from Liverpool Victoria (0800 066 5161, lv.com). Contract hire figure based on a three-year lease/36,000mile contract including maintenance; Wessex Fleet Solutions (01722 322888).

32 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Steel monocoque 1420kg/na 0.32 7Jx18in 225/50 R18 95V, Michelin Primacy 3 Mobility kit

Spare

299mm ventilated discs 281mm solid discs Standard, with brake assist

E M I S S I O N S & TA X CO2 emissions Tax at 20/40% pcm

87g/km £66/£132

R E S I D UA L S 30

Nissan Qashqai 1.5 dCi 25

Toyota C-HR Hybrid

20 Value (£1000s)

Front, side, curtain and knee airbags Toyota Safety Sense (including pre-collision system, lane departure alert, automatic high beam, road sign assist) Toyota Touch 2 with Go 8.0in touchscreen infotainment with navigation, online connectivity, advanced Bluetooth, reversing camera, aux in and USB Parking sensors, front and rear Heated front seats 18in alloy wheels Adaptive cruise control Privacy glass Premium Pack (including leather upholstery, JBL premium audio) White Pearl pearlescent paint Sport Pack (including extended front and rear valances and side sills) Accent Pack (including coloured inserts for bumpers and sills, in chrome, red, grey, white, green or brown) Options in bold fitted to test car = Standard na = not available

15 10

Seat Ateca 1.6 TDI Ecomotive

5 0 New

1 year

2 years

3 years

4 years

 A warm reception is predicted for the C-HR, which CAP expects to keep residuals higher than key competitors.

R OA D T E S T N o 53 0 1

Read all of our road tests autocar.co.uk


ROAD TEST

VERDICT

TOYOTA C-HR

TESTERS’ N O T E S

Avant-garde crossover gets everything right apart from the engine

AAAAC he Toyota C-HR is an interesting, refreshing and genuinely good addition to the crossover class. The difference between ‘good’ and ‘very good’ for this car might have been a more rounded, big-selling engine. Toyota’s latest 1.8-litre hybrid powerplant would probably have struggled to motivate any car of this size and type, but throw it in one that’s cast as youthful and exciting and it’s way out of its depth. And yet Toyota has impressed us with this car – wheezy, monotone powertrain and all. Creating a crossover that stands out for its dynamic sophistication is a tall order these days and getting tougher all the time. Doing that on a vehicle that also so plainly shows the effect of time and effort lavished on its styling and cabin is an even greater feat. Although it is not quite a class leader, the C-HR feels like the product of a giant of the global car industry getting out of its seat on the periphery of the European market to up the ante. Given the announcements made by the company in recent weeks about more involving engines, it’ll be fascinating to watch what happens next.

T

R OA D T E S T R I VA L S

1

2

SEAT ATECA 1.6 TDI ECOMOTIVE SE TECHNOLOGY £23,890 Smart-looking, fine-handling, practical and well-priced Seat hits the bullseye dead centre.

B

3

NISSAN QASHQAI 1.5 DCI N-VISION £25,410 The defining modern crossover. Latest one is particularly fuelefficient, roomy and refined.

B

4

SKODA YETI 2.0 TDI 110 SE L £22,335 Roomy, useful, unpretentious and truly cheery Skoda shows crossovers can also be charmers.

C

5

RENAULT KADJAR DCI 110 DYNAMIQUE S NAV EDC AUTO £24,845 Not quite as classy as its Nissan sibling but better priced and with a style of its own.

C

V E R D I C T S O N E V E RY N E W C A R , P 74

TOYOTA C-HR 1.8 HYBRID EXCEL £26,495 Striking looks, smart cabin and ownership costs all recommend it. Hybrid powertrain doesn’t.

C

MATT SAUNDERS I never knew a cupholder could make me so happy, but the C-HR’s are genius: teardrop-shaped, beautifully illuminated and deep, with a blanking shelf to make one of them shallower if you need to. NIC CACKETT All that sculpture in the bodyside looks fussy in pictures, but it makes the C-HR really interesting to look at in the raw. Our test car caused admirers to stop us and demand to know what it was. And which was the last Toyota to do that?

S P E C A DV I C E If you’re a fleet driver, the hybrid might just be worth tolerating. If not, go for an Icon-spec 1.2-litre petrol version and add metallic paint (£545), the Parking Pack (£500) and the Sport Pack (£850).

JOBS FOR T H E FAC E L I F T  Work on making that hybrid powertrain more tractable and responsive on part-throttle.  Carve out a bit of extra head room front and rear.  Find a way to fit the old-style ‘drive mode’ button by the gearlever.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 33


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N E W CA RS

2017 The coming year is going to be a bumper one for new cars, with 158 launches planned. What should you start saving for? The next 16 pages reveal all WORDS BY JIMI BECKWITH, RACHEL BURGESS, KRIS CULMER, SAM SHEEHAN AND MARK TISSHAW

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 37


ON SALE FEBRUARY

BMW 5 SERIES than before, to the benefit of handling and fuel economy. Inside, the 5 Series’ slight growth means better rear room, helped by a reshaped rear bench with a properly defined central seat. One of the strongest non-mechanical suits of BMWs in recent years has been the iDrive infotainment system. The latest version in the 5 Series is superior to that of the 7 Series. It gets a voice control system that recognises natural speech rather than specific command

words, and the on-screen menus are now customisable. Electronic driver aids include semiautonomous features. The optional £2250 Driving Assistant Plus lets you take your hands off the steering wheel for up to 30 seconds at a time (keep your eyes on the road, though, please), with the car braking and steering accordingly to keep you in lane and a safe distance from other cars. A Touring model will come in August, earlier than previous estate variants

have followed the saloon, as will an allnew M5 at the end of the year, a car you can read about overleaf. But for now, it’s the saloon we focus on. Here’s Greg Kable’s verdict from his recent drive, which should whet your appetite ahead of its UK launch. He liked it a lot. “The crowning achievement for BMW has been to broaden the ability of the 5 Series to a point where is it now every bit as capable, if not more so, than the talented Mercedes-Benz E-Class. The 5 Series has taken a big step forward.”

ABARTH 500X

AC CO B R A

AC CO B R A 378

AU D I A5 CAB RI O LET

AUT U M N

SUMMER

M A RC H

S PR I N G

Abarth will move into SUVs with its own 170bhp version of the 500X.

Nine will be built to the exact original 1962 spec, each costing £500,000.

This will be a modernised version of the original, with a more accessible price.

Soft-top A5 has a much more rigid body, which should make for better handling.

ALSO COMING

SUVs may be the biggest thing on the road at the moment (in both senses), but the BMW 5 Series sells in such numbers that it remains BMW’s most profitable model. We’ve already driven the new one and what a lovely thing it is, improved in every area from before. Munich’s main focus has been on equipping the 5 Series with the latest technology, both inside and out. It has also adopted the firm’s modular CLAR platform, introduced first on the 7 Series, which is stronger and lighter

IMAGE

38 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW ON SALE APRIL BMW ’S OTHER NEWCOMERS

BMW X2

B MW X3

2018

AUTU M N

The small five-door SUV-coupé is a radical styling departure for BMW and will look almost unchanged from this concept. It’s based on the same front-wheel drive underpinnings as the more conventional X1. It will go on sale in 2018 (along with an i8 Roadster), but we’ll see it first in 2017.

The new X3 SUV is set to get an evolutionary look, growing in size to become almost as big as a firstgeneration X5. It will be powered by updated four-cylinder and all-new six-cylinder petrol and diesel units. The more spacious interior gets a bigger infotainment screen with the latest version of iDrive.

B M W M 76 0 L I XDRIVE

B M W M 3/ M 4 FAC E L I F T

MARCH

J U LY

The top dog of BMW’s range gets a twinturbocharged 6.6-litre V12 engine with 592bhp and 590lb ft, mated to a rear-biased xDrive all-wheel drive system. A 0-62mph time of 3.9sec is promised, along with a 155mph top speed. It’s an M7 in all but name.

Mild styling and kit changes but no power or dynamic revisions. The real headlines are saved for the faster, more focused CS model joining the M4 range.

PORSCHE PANAMERA

The Panamera range will get another six models as production is ramped up following the new car’s introduction late last year. Included is a pair of entrylevel models: the rear-wheel-drive Panamera (£66,386) and four-wheeldrive Panamera 4 (£69,412). They are joined by a quartet of long-wheelbase four-wheel-drive models: 4 Executive (£76,034), 4 E-Hybrid Executive

(£84,838), 4S Executive (£98,672) and Turbo Executive (£122,480). The first batch of Panameras are reaching the UK now, with the Turbo the highlight. It’s plusher inside but has the same grip and pace that made the original model so great to drive. It’s phenomenally quick and generates levels of lateral acceleration seemingly impossible for such a large car.

ON SALE DECEMBER

BENTLEY CONTINENTAL GT

S E VE N N E W ALPI NAS Alpina will release the B3S (its take on the 3 Series) in April, an updated B4S and D4 in May and four 5 Series-based cars in September.

At last — after 14 years of the old model — there’s a new Continental GT, a model that shares its MSB underpinnings with the Panamera. Bentley’s core model was revolutionary when it was launched, but it has fallen behind these days. Expect a racier new look with better proportions yet still the timeless appeal that the original Conti GT exudes. Powertrains will include the all-new

600bhp W12 that’s making its debut in the Bentayga and an updated 4.0-litre petrol V8. There will also be a petrol V6 plug-in hybrid, which will use the set-up that develops 410bhp in today’s Porsche Cayenne plug-in hybrid. Bentley is unlikely to offer a diesel V8 option in the Continental. The handling of all models should be improved by the significant weight reductions planned.

AU D I RS3 S PO RTBACK

AU D I A5 S PO RTBACK

AU D I A8

AU D I RS3 SALOO N

JA N UA RY

D EC E M B E R

AUTU M N

AU TU M N

Larger cabin and bigger boot than before. Engines are 2.0 petrol and diesels.

High-tech flagship is set to usher in an all-new design language for Audi. At last.

A 394bhp five-pot powers this spiritual successor to rally-bred saloons of old.

Super-hatch is due a mid-life facelift, gaining the new saloon’s hotter engine.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 39


The rise of AMG AMG may just be the world’s most successful enthusiast sports car brand right now. Once known as a slightly esoteric tuning company, AMG has benefited from a sustained period of investment by its owner, MercedesBenz, to the point where it’s likely to have pushed through 80,000 sales in 2016. It’s hard to find any other performance brand with this volume of sales — Porsche excepted — now spread across 48 models, with more to come. There is no surer sign of confidence oozing out of AMG than the announcement of a headline-grabbing hypercar, due in 2018, with the unique proposition of a 1000bhp road-legal hybrid powertrain said to be lifted straight out of the Formula 1 car. Today, AMG’s success is built on two pillars: the performance versions of mainstream Mercedes cars, and the GT supercar, the 450bhp-plus twoseater priced from £95k and aimed at high-end Porsche 911 models. The GT range will expand in 2017, with a new GT Roadster and a hotter GT C model (C for ‘clearly visible genes’, apparently) being launched to top the Roadster range and sit above the GT S coupé. A GT C coupé is also tipped to appear before 2017 is out. The range will be crowned as a whole with the launch of the GT R coupé. The 577bhp, more focused model is billed as a road-going version of Mercedes’ Nürburgring 24-hour race-winning GT3. Taking a leaf out of Porsche’s ‘how to’ book on launching multiple 911 variants, the GT range is now bewilderingly complex, with at least four different engine outputs from the 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8, two bodystyles and two different rear axle configurations: standard and wide track.

O N S A L E J U LY

MERCEDES-AMG GT R COUPÉ

AMG is coy about sales and production of the GT, but numbers from industry analyst JATO suggest the GT is doing very well but has a long way to go to match the 911. In Europe, the GT sold 1914 units in the first half of 2016 — a 12% increase — and it remains ahead of the SL (1343 units), Bentley Continental (1144), BMW i8 (1105) and Audi R8 (1054). But the 911 stands head and shoulders above the field, with 11,701 European sales in the same period. Overall, Porsche is in a class of its own, with a unique range of own-badge products — which AMG has yet to match — and sales in six-figure numbers. But if the GT can start to close the gap and AMG gets even more ambitious, who knows what the future might hold for Aufrecht Melcher Grossaspach?

ON SALE APRIL

MERCEDES-AMG GT, GT C ROADSTER

ALSO COMING

AU D I T T RS AUT U M N

AU D I S5 S PO RTBACK JA N UA RY

Now better to drive and with a calmer ride but rivals offer greater involvement.

40 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

This 394bhp, 3.7secto-62mph, £51,800 sports car has R8level performance and takes the fight to the Porsche Cayman. A total of 200 early cars have already been sold, with more expected late in 2017.

B E NTLE Y B E NTAYGA D I ES E L JA N UA RY

Triple-charged V8 is so potent and refined that you’d never guess it was a diesel.


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW IT’S A BUSY YEAR FOR MERCEDES...

M E R C E D E S - B E N Z X- C L A S S

SEPTEMBER

Mercedes claims its new pick-up, the new X-Class, is more than a reskinned Nissan Navara and Renault Alaskan, both of which it will be built alongside. Mercedes commercial vehicle boss Volker Mornhinweg said the firm was aiming for “crisp handling” and “a lot of work” had gone into refinement.

ON SALE DECEMBER MERCEDES - BENZ E- CLASS ALL TERRAIN CAB R I O LE T SEPTEMBER CO U PE APRIL

IMAGE

J U LY

The E-Class range is set to gain three new additions in 2017. The Coupé has the greatest significance, bringing with it a more conservative design approach. The Cabriolet will be spun off that model, and the All Terrain is effectively a version of the E-Class Estate with a rugged Audi Allroad-style treatment.

ON SALE MARCH

M E R C E D E S - A M G E 63 VS B M W M 5 The flagship saloons of great performance rivals BMW M and Mercedes-AMG both get all-new versions in 2017. Both are set to be closely matched, being powered by twin-turbo V8s with more than 600bhp but this time adopting four-wheel drive, a first. We’ve already driven the E63 S — “a 603bhp supercar”, said our Matt Prior — but we must wait until the end of the year to see the M5. We hear that the E63’s drifting ability is something BMW wants to at least match with the M5. Bring on the twin test — conducted sideways.

MERCEDESBENZ GLA

MERCEDESBENZ S- CLASS

MERCEDES-AMG G L C 63

APRIL

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

Minor tweaks for the GLA will bring it in line with the A-Class. Expect more power for the AMG-badged GLA45, with a boost to around 376bhp.

The biggest changes in this facelift will take place inside, with lashings of new technology added along with a wider, frameless dual-screen set-up.

Mercedes will turn the GLC into a super-SUV by giving it the twinturbocharged 4.0-litre V8 engine from the C63 saloon. It will have more than 500bhp.

B E NTLE Y M U LSAN N E

B MW 2 S E RI ES

B MW 4 S E RI ES

N OW

O C TO B E R

J U LY

B MW 6 S E RI ES GT O C TO B E R

A new extended-wheelbase version takes the model into true limo territory.

A light refresh to the 2 Series Coupé and Convertible includes the latest iDrive.

Minor facelift. Tweaked bumpers and new interior tech are among the tweaks.

The 5 Series GT becomes the 6 Series GT and gets a much more resolved look.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 41


It can drink 7.4 single-shot glasses of petrol a second, just beating the consumption rate of an 18-year-old in Magaluf. Flat out, it can empty its 100-litre tank in 9min.

BUGATTI CHIRON ON SALE JANUARY

Chiron’s quadturbo W16 engine produces 185bhp per litre. With 8.0 litres in total, the final figure stands at 1479bhp. That’s 492bhp more than the Veyron.

It has 1179lb ft in total, to give 591lb ft per tonne. That dwarfs even the Ferrari 488 GTB, with a ‘measly’ 211lb ft per tonne from its twin-turbo 3.9-litre V8.

Despite its 1995kg weight, the Chiron can cover 0-62mph in under 2.5sec, surge past 124mph four seconds later and hit 186mph in under 13.6sec.

ON SALE OCTOBER

KIA GT

ALSO COMING

Kia will look to enter the performance big league this year with the launch of its first sports saloon. The firm has been hard at work at the Nürburgring, developing it under the leadership of ex-BMW M boss Albert Biermann ahead of its launch at next week’s Detroit motor show. The four-door sports saloon’s design takes inspiration from the striking GT concept of 2011. It’s likely to use a 315bhp turbocharged four-cylinder engine to drive the rear wheels. There’ll also be a diesel version for Europe — most likely with the 197bhp 2.2-litre engine from the Sorento.

CITRO E N C3 PI CASSO

DACIA DUSTE R

DACIA SAN D E RO

J U LY

FE B RUA RY

JA N UA RY

JA N UA RY

The C3 Picasso will become the latest MPV trying to be more like an SUV.

Facelift includes a new 1.2 turbo engine, along with a dual-clutch auto gearbox.

Subtle styling tweaks and updated infotainment for UK’s cheapest new car.

Same updates as the Sandero but enters the market with higher standard trim.

42 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

DACIA SAN D E RO STE PWAY


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW The average Chiron owner also has 64 other cars, three helicopters, three jets and a yacht. They will drive their Chiron an average of 1550 miles a year.

O T H E R FA S T C A R S W O R T H WA I T I N G F O R The Chiron has a top speed of 261mph, which is 7mph faster than the Veyron’s terminal velocity and 11mph faster than the take-off speed of Concorde.

Each gram of rubber in the Chiron’s tyres can withstand a centrifugal force of 3800g, which is more than the rubber on a Formula 1 car can manage.

F E R R A R I F 12 M

JAG UA R F-T Y P E

AUG UST

MARCH

The Ferrari F12’s successor will land at the Geneva motor show with a reworked naturally aspirated V12 with close to the 769bhp of the F12 tdf.

A facelifted F-Type range will arrive with a lightly tweaked exterior and gain a turbocharged four-cylinder engine option with 300bhp.

LAMBORGHINI H U R AC Á N S P Y D E R R W D

FERRARI GTC4 LUSSO T

APRIL

Ferrari has swapped a V12 for a turbocharged 3.9-litre V8 engine to create the GTC4 Lusso T. It’s lighter and has more torque than its sibling.

Lamborghini’s rear-drive Huracán gets a soft-top along with minor aerodynamic tweaks.

MARCH

ON SALE MARCH

HONDA CIVIC

It’s a weird one, the Civic. It has a cool cult following among youths in America but has only ever been seen as a quirky choice in Blighty. Either way, this new one hasn’t changed too much. It’s slightly bigger and more conservative inside, but its essence remains. It just should be more competitive in the market. The petrol engines are two downsized turbocharged VTEC units: 1.0 and 1.5 litres with 127bhp to 180bhp. The 118bhp 1.6 i-DTEC diesel is carried over from the old model. The 1.5 petrol engine offers significantly better performance and driveability than the current, normally aspirated lumps, and there’s refinement and roundedness to the dynamic character that should suit the car’s existing customer base nicely. Unfortunately, it’s no sportier than before, even in Sport trim. Still, even though it isn’t agile, it steers with well-judged pace and weight and corners precisely.

WE’VE DRIVEN IT

IMAGE

DACIA LOGAN M CV

DS SUV

FIAT 124 HARD -TO P

JA N UA RY

W I N TE R

D EC E M B E R

FIAT 500L SUMMER

Logan MCV gets new infotainment and design changes this month.

First of DS’s ‘second wave’ of models will be a petrol-electric hybrid.

A coupé version of the 124 Spider will be launched. It could get more power, too.

Fiat will apply visual tweaks to the MPV to bring it into line with the latest 500.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 43


O N S A L E J U LY

ALFA ROMEO STELVIO Alfa Romeo has a complicated relationship with those who love the brand and want to see it prosper. For decades, we’ve watched this great, historic company struggle to get its footing, coming perilously close to falling flat on its face at times as it has created often pretty cars that have otherwise lacked the character promised by the Alfa badge. This time, though, prosperity might

just be around the corner, thanks to a new SUV called the Stelvio. It’s the second new-generation Alfa after the Giulia saloon (deliveries of which have finally now started) and the one with the greatest sales and profit potential. The Stelvio, if it’s a success, is the precursor to a potential nine-car assault over the next five years that will include a BMW 5 Series rival, a new sports car and a flagship

large SUV based on the Maserati Levante. Put simply, if the Stelvio works, it can allow Alfa to make the kinds of cars we love guilt-free and with the company in the black. It will be launched in hot Quadrifoglio form, with a Ferrari-derived allaluminium 2.9-litre V6 producing 503bhp and mated to an eight-speed automatic gearbox and a rear-biased four-wheel drive system with torque

vectoring. Lower powered two-wheeldrive Stelvios are likely to feature a 207bhp diesel engine. Alfa is promising driver-focused dynamics with excellent handling, saying the Stelvio has been “uniquely engineered to challenge two-door cars on the track without compromising the SUV side of its character”. The base model will cost from about £40,000 and the Quadrifoglio £65,000.

H O N DA CR -V

HYU N DAI i10

ON SALE 2018

LYNK&CO 01

ALSO COMING

‘Made in China’ is a phrase you seem to see written on most goods nowadays, but the faraway People’s Republic has yet to conquer one of the most visible markets of all: the European car market. Geely, owner of Volvo, is looking to change that with a new brand, Lynk&Co, the 01 being the first mainstream Chinese car to go on sale in Europe. It will be launched in China in 2017, with European sales following in 2018. This 01 is claimed to be the most ‘connected’ car yet, being continuously connected to the internet, and owners will be able to control, monitor and lease their cars with their smartphones. Based on the soon-to-be-launched

Volvo XC40, the 01 will have a range of engines from Volvo’s family of 2.0-litre fours and 1.5-litre triples, with a plug-in hybrid due shortly after launch. Lynk&Co’s head honchos want to “revolutionise and simplify” car buying and the 01 will not have traditional trim levels. Instead, it will have fixed-price equipment collections that “draw inspiration from contemporary fashion and technology sectors”. It will also be the first mass-market to car to be open API (application programming interface), essentially allowing outside software developers to “enrich the automotive experience” of the 01 with ideas of their own.

H O N DA CIVI C T YPE R S E P TE M B E R

Aiming for a ’Ring lap record, the front-drive Type R will go on sale much earlier in the Civic’s lifecycle than it has in the past.

44 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

D EC E M B E R

JA N UA RY

Volvo XC60 rival gets all-new platform and is now available with turbo engines.

Minor facelift for the city car adds a 7.0in infotainment touchscreen.


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW M O R E C R U C I A L S U VS M A Z DA CX- 5 J U LY

Another one on the evolutionary trail, the CX-5 gets a plusher interior.

MINI C O U N T RY M A N FE B RUA RY

Same odd looks on a bigger body, and with more standard kit.

MITSUBISHI SUV N OVE M B E R

Hugely important and as yet unnamed Nissan Qashqai rival.

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S E AT A R O N A DECEMBER

Shrunken Ateca will sneak into UK showrooms as a Nissan Juke rival before 2017 is out.

S S A N GYO N G REXTON SEPTEMBER

It comes with a new range of engines and modern safety tech.

ON SALE JANUARY

IMAGE

PEUGEOT 3008 Like many of us this month, the Peugeot 3008 has hit the gym. The popular people-carrier has been transformed into an SUV, but does the driving experience live up to its trendy looks? It sure does. The 1.6 turbo petrol model has a smooth engine that

WE’VE DRIVEN IT

VAU X H A L L CROSSLAND X J U LY

Replacement for the Meriva MPV is a “familyfriendly urban vehicle”. pleasantly complements its stable handling, well-controlled body and soft, largely comfortable ride. Its luxurious, modern interior is even more impressive. Material quality is hugely improved, as is the infotainment system, and an excellent 12.3in digital instrument display is standard. All the seats are comfy and there’s plenty of room.

V W T- R O C DECEMBER

Golf-based SUV gets an autumn launch after a Geneva debut as a lightly veiled concept.

ISUZU D - MA X

JAGUAR XF S PO RTB R AKE

KIA N I RO PH E V

FE B RUA RY

J U LY

AU G UST

KIA PI CANTO A PR I L

Facelifted pick-up truck should be more refined, in line with rivals’ improvements.

XF estate arrives after a Geneva show debut. Now, where’s the SVR version?

Regular hybrid’s launch to be followed by a more frugal plug-in version.

All-new city car to ditch three-door version and boost interior quality.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 45


ON SALE FEBRUARY

ALSO COMING

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY

The original Discovery, which is 28 years old, has long been at the heart of the Land Rover brand, giving ordinary car buyers a (relatively) affordable car that could be a tough but comfortable, family-oriented off-roader. Now in its fifth generation, this new model gets an altogether less rugged appearance as part of a push upmarket, with a design that’s arguably no longer as distinctive as it once was. Looks aren’t everything, though, and Land Rover promises that the Discovery will be no less capable on rock-strewn paths than its predecessor, and our recent early drive of a prototype in Scotland confirmed that. Despite being bigger inside and out, it’s faster, lighter and more efficient than its predecessor. A bonded

aluminium monocoque replaces the heavy old ladder chassis and allows the Discovery to be up to 480kg lighter than the fourth-generation car. The weight loss has allowed Land Rover to fit a new twin-turbo fourcylinder diesel engine to the car for the first time, alongside V6 petrol and diesel models. Four-wheel drive and an automatic transmission are standard. The seven-seat cabin is this new Discovery’s strongest suit and it’s where the bulk of the development has focused. There is genuinely room for seven adults and each person will be able to keep their backside warm with a heated seat, charge their phone, find a space for their water bottle, keys, wallet and other oddments, and connect to the car’s wi-fi hotspot.

KIA CROSSOVE R

KIA SO RE NTO

KIA SOU L E V

D EC E M B E R

D EC E M B E R

J U LY

S PR I N G

Kia’s crucial Juke rival is likely to get a plug-in hybrid option and 2WD only.

Big, burly SUV is due to receive a mid-life refresh at the end of the year.

Range anxiety will be further reduced for buyers of electric Souls.

V12 supercar gets an extra 40bhp and four-wheel steering.

46 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Q&A GERRY McGOVERN, LAND ROVER DESIGN BOSS How would you summarise the new Discovery? “It still has all the practical elements Discoverys are famous for, while doing the job in a way that is more relevant to today and will bring more people to the brand.” Has Land Rover changed its opinion on what a Discovery should be? “Yes. Discovery 3 won various design awards and had a no-nonsense, utilitarian look and feel. But it

polarised opinions, especially in the US. We gave it a friendlier face and a more luxurious interior in the Discovery 4 and that sold like hot cakes.” What is the priority for the new Discovery: eye-catching design or practical engineering? “Design is right up there with engineering. Nowadays, Nick Rogers [Jaguar Land Rover engineering director] and I are joined at the hip. Our engineers want great designs and our designers want vehicles that are brilliantly engineered.”

L AM BO RG H I N I AVE NTADO R S


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW ON SALE SEPTEMBER FA M I LY S U V R I VA L S

J E E P C O M PA S S

RANGE ROVER SPORT COUPE

IMAGE

DECEMBER

New model replaces both the Compass and Patriot and is more refined and rugged than ever.

R E N AU LT KO L E O S

The big gap between the Range Rover Evoque and Range Rover Sport will be plugged with a new model that we’re likely see at the Geneva motor show in March for the first time. It is set to be sportier and more road-biased than other Range Rover offerings. Another Land Rover hit in the waiting?

J U LY

If you fail the first time, regroup and try again. Large SUV will crown Renault’s line-up.

S KO DA KO D I AQ

APRIL

Seven-seater further builds on Skoda’s fearsomely solid reputation.

ON SALE APRIL

AUDI Q5 VAU X H A L L G R A N D L A N D X DECEMBER

Zafira-sized SUV joins the Crossland X and Mokka X as part of Vauxhall’s SUV push.

This well-built but unspectacular WE’VE SUV is Audi’s DRIVEN IT best-selling car, to such a degree that Audi has built an entire factory in Mexico just to manufacture the new model coming this year. Engines include a 2.0-litre diesel with 187bhp and a 2.0-litre

petrol unit with 249bhp, plus a range-topping 282bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel due soon after launch. The new Q5 has so much going for it: it’s quiet, comfortable, lovely to sit in and unlikely to cost you too much to run, thanks to competitive fuel economy and emissions and probable strong residual values. Anyone who

buys one will do so for one or all of those reasons and not be disappointed with what is a very impressively engineered car. But it’s not much fun to drive, which is a bigger shame in the Q5’s case, because you can tell that it has a mighty fine chassis just waiting to be tuned in a more involving way.

IMAGE

LE XUS IS

LE XUS LC

JA N UA RY

AU G UST

Redesigned front end and an additional 3.3in of touchscreen inside.

Gorgeous, luxury sports coupé gets 467bhp in naturally aspirated V8 guise.

LOTUS E VO R A 400 ROADSTE R

LOTUS E XI G E S PO RT 380

D EC E M B E R

Lower weight, improved aero and an extra 30bhp for Exige.

Chassis as stiff as the coupe’s; 400bhp.

S PR I N G

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 47


ON SALE SUMMER

ALPINE A120 We’ve been waiting for the resurgence of the Alpine brand for a long time now. Renault, its owner, has done little with it since 1995, despite coming close to reviving it in 2008 before the credit crunch hit and killed off that idea. There have been a few concepts since — the Mégane-racer-based Alpine A110-50 and the Alpine Celebration at Le Mans — but, realistically, all of

Alpine’s heritage dates from before 1995. That history includes sales of more than 30,000 road cars and more than 100 race cars produced. So, finally, the time is here for a proper revival. This new model, heavily based on the Alpine Vision concept revealed early last year, is a pure sports car inspired by previous gems such as the A110 and A160.

Rumoured to be called the A120, it will be a lightweight, mid-engined, two-seat machine. It is expected to be powered by a 1.8-litre petrol engine derived from the turbocharged 1.6-litre motor used in the Renault Clio RS, producing around 250bhp and good for a 0-62mph time of 4.5sec. A 300bhp variant is also on the cards, as is a convertible. The A120 will send drive to

its rear wheels through a dual-clutch automatic gearbox with steering wheel-mounted shift paddles. Leaked images and test cars have revealed that the production car, a £50,000 Porsche Cayman rival, has no rear wing but smoother lines and a rear diffuser with a centrally mounted exhaust. In addition, A110-inspired foglights have been kept.

IMAGE ASTON’S GRAND PLAN

ON SALE WINTER

ASTON MARTIN V8 VANTAGE

ALSO COMING

This is the second model in Aston’s ‘second century’ plan after the acclaimed DB11. The all-new sports car will be the replacement for today’s Vantage and it will feature a design heavily inspired by the DB10 created for the James Bond film Spectre. It should be much sportier in nature than its predecessor, too. Aston boss Andy Palmer has described it as “Aston’s race car, the weekend warrior, a track car — much edgier”.

The DB11 grand tourer has been out for only a few months, but it has been met with great acclaim (we love it) and sales success should follow. It’s one of five new Aston models planned by 2020, spanning three distinct model lines and forming part of a plan to build 7000 cars per year by 2020. On the ‘sporty’ line will be the new Vantage, followed by an all-new Vanquish in 2018. Two models with no direct predecessors will join them: the DBX, Aston’s entry into the luxury SUV segment, and the Lagonda saloon, named for the palatial luxury marque of the early 20th century. Aston will also launch two ‘special’ cars each year until the end of the decade.

MAZDA MX-5 RF JA N UA RY

N O B LE M600 S PE E DSTE R

MAS E R ATI G H I B LI

S PR I N G

SUMMER

Supercar loses its roof; 650bhp V8 straight into your ear ’oles.

New infotainment and a Sport pack for the interior form part of its facelift.

48 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Folding hardtop MX-5s have historically been the best sellers in the UK, and the latest one arrives this month with a stylish new targalike roof design.


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW NICHE SPORTS CARS TO KEEP AN EYE ON

ATA L A N TA S P O R T S C A R

BRISTOL BULLET

MARCH

The quirkiest and most enigmatic car maker out there is back, six years after it stopped making new cars. This new speedster, which features Bristol’s classic mouth, bonnet scoop and tail fins, is powered by a BMW-sourced V8 engine.

Atalanta closed its doors after World War 2, having built just 25 luxury sports cars. Now revived, its new model features an aluminium composite structure with ash wood cladding. It will cost from £149,950.

SUMMER

H E N N E S S E Y M U S TA N G 2 5 T H A N N I V E R S A RY E D I T I O N H P E 8 0 0 JA N UA RY Master tuner stuffs an incredible 804bhp and 648lb ft into the Ford Mustang, thanks to an upgraded supercharged 5.0-litre V8 engine. Just 25 will be built.

PIECHA AMG

ZE NOS E11

SPRING

More road-friendly version of the E10 sports car should be ready this year. Zenos’s relationship with Ford means that the E11 is likely to be powered by the 2.3-litre Ecoboost motor.

German tuning firm Piecha has taken Mercedes-AMG’s already crazy GT S and given it new aerodynamic bodywork and an extra 101bhp.

S PYKE R C8 P R E L I AT O R

GLM G4

WINTER

WINTER

Savage Rivale’s Roadyacht GTS of 2009 has been reborn and renamed by a Japanese start-up firm. It gets an electric drivetrain with 738lb ft of torque and 536bhp in place of the old Chevrolet V8.

SPRING

Reborn Dutch supercar maker brings the successor to the C8 Aileron of 2009. Its 4.2-litre V8 produces 518bhp and 443lb ft.

ON SALE JUNE

ON SALE JANUARY

ASTON MARTIN VANQUISH S

VAUXHALL INSIGNIA

Can Vauxhall tempt people out of their BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Classes? Don’t scoff. All three new Insignias — the Grand Sport large hatch, the Sports Tourer estate and the Country Tourer soft-roader — are claimed to be much improved inside and out. The interior is far plusher, with more modern tech, and the engines should be more frugal, both for fuel and tax.

Harder, better, faster, stronger. Aston’s range-topping GT gets more power, sportier suspension and some new trims in one last round of changes before a 2018 replacement. Its reworked 5.9-litre V12 gets 595bhp, 27bhp more than the outgoing car. Torque remains at 465lb ft. Available in coupé and convertible Volante bodystyles, it looks much the same as before but with new carbonfibre aerodynamic features such as a revised front splitter and rear diffuser.

MERCEDES -AMG E63 ESTATE

MERCEDES V- CLASS CAMPER

J U LY

A PR I L

Same 603bhp as the saloon. Expect a sub-3.5sec 0-62mph time.

V-Class gets the sleepover treatment; plush interior and elevating roof bed.

M ITSU B IS H I OUTL AN D E R PH E V

N ISSAN QAS H QAI

JA N UA RY

Class-defining crossover gets a facelift and Propilot semi-autonomous tech.

Minor spec updates happen this month.

AU TU M N

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 49


FORD FIESTA ON SALE SEPTEMBER

The Ford Fiesta supermini is the car that just won’t go away, topping UK sales charts for what seems like a billion years. (In reality, it’s eight.) And this new model not only promises more of the same, but it also introduces the Fiesta Active, a crossover-style trim level, and a luxury Vignale

spec, both tapping into growing parts of the car market. You’d be forgiven for noticing little difference between the previous generation and this new one, with Ford executives choosing to play it safe — and you can understand why. But the interior has been overhauled,

HYUNDAI i30 AND i30N Having established its models as being among the most competitive mainstream offerings in Europe, Hyundai is now moving on to another popular trend: performance versions of its models. Rivals such as Toyota’s new Gazoo arm aren’t far behind. First to launch will be the i30N, based on the all-new i30 hatchback

ALSO COMING

ON SALE MARCH

the ride and handling are claimed to be even better than now and there’s a more efficient version of Ford’s popular 1.0-litre Ecoboost engine. Still, the early signs suggest that it will be pricey compared with some rivals, starting at around £15,000. There are two key reasons for this: one,

low-spec Fiestas don’t sell well, and two, Ford doesn’t want to cannibalise sales of its new, cheaper Ka+ supermini, introduced last year. The real test will come when we drive the Fiesta — and know the pricing — but it’s hard to believe that Ford will have messed up such a winning formula.

ON SALE NOVEMBER

also due this year and using a 2.0-litre turbocharged engine with more than 260bhp. It has been developed at Hyundai’s centre at the Nürburgring and there are high hopes for the hot hatch, which will top the range of the third-generation i30. Meanwhile, the Hyundai reckons the more sedate, standard i30 is “accessible, appealing in design and great to drive”. On looks at least, the i30 may not be cutting edge, but Hyundai’s cars just keep on improving, aesthetically and otherwise, so we’d be surprised if the i30 wasn’t keenly priced, well specified and pretty decent to drive when it goes on sale in March.

N ISSAN X-TR AI L

PEUG EOT 5008

RE NAU LT CAP TU R

AUT U M N

FE B RUA RY

M AY

JA N UA RY

Refreshed looks for the roomy seven-seater.

People-carrier ditches its stodgy image with a striking new SUV look.

With more rivals than ever, it gets a facelift to keep it in the crossover game.

There’s no RS on the horizon, so the GT becomes the model’s range-topper.

50 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

RE NAU LT T WI N GO GT


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW

ON SALE SPRING

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF Who doesn’t love a Golf? And Volkswagen knows it. Despite all the VW drama of late, it has had very little impact on the popularity of its ubiquitous hatchback. So VW has taken the evolutionary route with the design of the facelifted version, on sale this spring. The eighth-generation Golf will arrive in 2019, with VW boss Herbert Diess recently describing it to Autocar as “very innovative, a major milestone and with more traditional drivetrains” (as opposed to its planned line-up of electric vehicles).

In the meantime, this update will tide customers over, with an upgraded interior and a new 1.5-litre turbocharged petrol engine. There’s also a focus on technology and connectivity, with gesture control, an updated app system to integrate Apple CarPlay and more, and safety systems such as Traffic Jam Assist. So how does VW see the Golf fitting alongside its ID electric hatchback in the future? Diess insists they will run in parallel, noting that EVs will be irrelevant in some regions for at least a decade. Watch this space.

N E W FA M I LY FAVO U R I T E S

CITROE N C3

NISSAN MICRA

JA N UA RY

The second model in the brand’s new-age makeover, the C3 has styling that reflects the distinctive C4 Cactus’s.

S E AT L E O N

MARCH

Our early drive gave the new Micra 4.5 stars — promising great things for Nissan’s completely reinvented supermini.

IMAGE

FE B RUA RY

This generation of the Leon kick-started Seat’s renaissance, and now an update brings more technology and a 1.0 TSI petrol engine.

IMAGE

S E AT I B I Z A

KIA RIO

JUNE

The Ibiza is the brand’s UK best seller, and the new one will allow it to catch up with the larger Leon and Ateca for quality.

SUZUKI SWIFT

FE B RUA RY

Kia hopes the new five-door-only Rio will help to increase its supermini’s sales by a third in Europe, aided by improved quality and handling.

JUNE

The new Swift’s arrival will be followed by the popular Swift Sport, which will use a more potent version of the Vitara’s 138bhp 1.4 turbo engine.

IMAGE

S E AT LEO N CU PR A R

S E AT ARO NA X- PE RI E N CE

S E AT ATECA X- PE RI E N CE

M A RC H

D EC E M B E R

D EC E M B E R

S KO DA OC TAVIA M A RC H

Hot Leon gets 296bhp and 280lb ft and is joined by a four-wheel-drive ST estate.

Ibiza-sized SUV hasn’t arrived yet, but Seat is already plotting a rugged version.

Nissan Qashqai rival will have all-wheel drive and off-road design credentials.

Facelift adds split headlights that make it look like the previous Merc E-Class.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 51


ON SALE WINTER

JAGUAR I-PACE How quickly things progress. This time last year we showed you the F-Pace — Jaguar’s first SUV. Now the I-Pace has come to the fore and looks set to jolt Jaguar’s electric revolution into life when it is revealed in production form late this year. When the concept version of Jaguar’s first EV was launched at the SUV-heavy Los Angeles motor show in November, it was a showstealer from the moment the covers came off. We expect the I-Pace to go on sale in 2018, and if the reaction to the F-Pace is anything to go by, it’ll be a hit. The I-Pace will be a direct

rival to the Tesla Model X, with a 90kWh battery pack providing the necessary punch. Sure, it’s a concept for now, but Jaguar’s intentions are clear, and the I-Pace puts into practice the EV packaging advantages that Jaguar chief designer Ian Callum forecast. The LA motor show provided an accurate picture of where the car industry is going, though, with nearly as many EVs as there were SUVs. The I-Pace will cover the EV base for Jaguar and is expected to be priced at around £60,000. Meanwhile, the raft of manufacturers with SUVs, electric cars or both on the way continues to grow.

ON SALE WINTER

FARADAY FUTURE SUV

ON SALE WINTER

NIO NP9

ALSO COMING

NextEV’s Nio NP9 all-electric hypercar has 1360bhp, Chinese backing, a 0-62mph time of 2.7sec, a 194mph top speed and a production run of just six. Only in 2017 could a hypercar be out-accelerated by a sports saloon — the 2.4sec-to-60mph Tesla Model S

P100D — but NextEV will soon have that base covered, too, with a fleet of mainstream EVs from 2017. NextEV says the Nio NP9 has lapped the Nürburgring in 7min 5.12sec, just 8.0sec slower than the Porsche 918 Spyder, which holds the EV lap record.

Faraday Future is readying an electric SUV. A preview campaign suggests in-wheel motors, but headlines have focused on its rivalry with the Tesla Model X, the huge, fast-growing Faraday Future factory and the money worries of founder Jia Yueting. FF’s SUV is perfectly timed, given the popularity of both SUVs and EVs. After the car’s launch at CES in Las Vegas this month, it could be 2018 before the first examples reach the UK.

S KO DA R API D

S KO DA CITI GO

SU BARU B RZ

JUNE

JUNE

S PR I N G

S PR I N G

Standard and Spaceback versions of the Rapid will get tweaks inside and out.

Revisions include more personalisation on trim levels and better infotainment.

Facelift gives it improved aero, better economy and just the one spec level.

Left-field sports estate is refreshed with minor styling and interior tweaks.

52 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

SU BARU LE VO RG


NEW CARS 2017 PREVIEW F O U R N E W VO LVO S T O WAT C H O U T F O R

S90 R - D ES I G N AN D V90 R - D ES I G N

V 9 0 C R O S S C O U N T RY

FE B RUA RY

FE B RUA RY

Performance-inspired models with ‘sports chassis’ should give an energetic drive.

Big in Sweden. High-riding estate expands yet another oddball market niche.

S90 AN D V90 T8

XC 6 0

AUG UST

Recently launched saloon and estate turn plug-in hybrid with electric and petrol power sources.

AUG UST

Popular SUV is long overdue a replacement and is expected to reflect the latest XC90’s styling.

MORE ELECTRIC CARS CHARGING IN

S M A R T E Vs

R E N AU LT Z O E

SEPTEMBER

JA N UA RY

Smart’s Electric Drive range incorporates a 17.6kWh battery across its whole line-up. A range of almost 100 miles is claimed.

Updated Zoe has 250 miles of range with a denser battery, and almost doubles its capacity, at 41kWh.

R E N AU LT M E G A N E H Y B R I D ASSIST SUMMER SCE N IC, G R AN D S C E N I C H Y B R I D A S S I S T M AY Renault’s Hybrid Assist couples the dCi 110 diesel engine to a 10kW electric motor across the Mégane and Scenic ranges, with CO2 emissions of 92g/km.

T OYO TA P R I U S PH E V MARCH

V W E- GOLF

Toyota claims 202mpg and 32g/km of CO2 for the new Prius plug-in hybrid, which has tweaked styling over its hybrid sister.

VW’s updated e-Golf gets 50% more range, as well as faster acceleration, improved to 9.6sec for the 0-62mph dash.

MARCH

SUZU KI I G N IS JA N UA RY

Suzuki’s A-segment SUV titch is priced from £9995 in the UK and promises oodles of charm to rival off-roading Fiat Pandas.

V W ARTEO N

V W GO LF HYB RI D

SUMMER

M A RC H

It replaces the CC but is longer to create more boot space and rear leg room.

Non-GTE hybrid will get a 12V system coupled to a 1.5-litre petrol engine.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 53


THE MAN WHO PROVED AUTOCAR WRONG

Four decades ago, we said the tiny Enfield 8000 wouldn’t make a great drag car. Jonny Smith had other ideas, as he tells Jesse Crosse PHOTOGRAPHY STAN PAPIOR asted on the transmission tunnel inside Jonny Smith’s Flux Capacitor is a clipping from the 1976 Autocar road test of the Enfield 8000 EV. It reads: “Naturally, with a kerb weight of just a little under 1 ton and only 8bhp to propel it, the Enfield is no candidate for the drag strips.” Even the safest assumptions can be risky in this business. On 16 July last year the 800bhp Flux Capacitor, named after the device that powers Dr Emmett Brown’s DeLorean time machine in Back to the Future, became the fastest street-legal electric vehicle in the world, covering Santa Pod Raceway’s quarter mile in 9.86sec

P

54 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

with a terminal speed of 121mph. At 1725mm, the Enfield’s wheelbase is shorter than its owner stands tall, and the car looks like something out of a circus act. If the thought of multiplying the Enfield’s power output of 8bhp by a factor of 100 seems preposterous, that’s because it is. “Everyone said it would be undriveable,” says Smith, “but it has exceeded expectations.” So why choose such an unlikely candidate? Smith’s idea first formed during a trip to Japan in 2009, where a drive in a prototype Nissan Leaf made an impression. “I made up my mind then to build a hot rod EV but didn’t want to convert a piston engine car,” he continues. “I wanted to do an old EV and found this. I liked

Flux Capacitor sticks two fingers up at our 1976 verdict


MOTORSPORT FEELING T YR ED

XAVIER FRAIPONT Dunlop’s motorsport boss

What keeps Dunlop racing in the World Endurance Championship? “Endurance racing is core to the brand, as it requires racing tyres to make a compromise between performance and longevity. “While having to produce a consistent tyre, we also have to make one that can produce the fastest lap time. The technology is relevant for our road division, too.”

Despite its looks, it’s stable and rides well; three batteries up front, one in the rear; Smith (on right): “It’s exceeded expectations” it immediately because it was odd, British and unlikely.” It took a year to track the rare car down and conversion work began in 2012. The 8bhp electric motor and Reliant rear axle were removed. Two 9.0in DC motors, rated at 2000A and producing a combined 800bhp and 1200lb ft, now fit in a cradle mounted inside the Enfield’s transmission tunnel. The axle has been replaced by a specially made Ford unit attached to the body by four trailing links. There’s no gearbox, drive is direct through a 6.0in propshaft and 400V are supplied by four lithium ion battery packs. Three are mounted under the bonnet and one is in the rear, all assembled from a total of 188 military-grade pouch cells. It is fitting that the same batteries are used to power the Gatling guns in a Bell SuperCobra helicopter, because, in all honesty, the entire machine looks positively lethal. Folding a 6ft frame into the tiny dragster’s JAZ bucket seat and fastening the six-point harness is hilarious but just about doable. Inside, things look more serious, with a full FIA roll cage, lots of switches and, of course, a Flux Capacitor box, which is actually a phone charger and just for fun. With a toggle switch set to ‘Valet’ rather than ‘Race’, we set off along the country lanes. The motors whirr noisily, but the soundtrack is dominated by the creaking noises from an aggressive limited-slip differential and a cacophony of clunks from the metal-bushed motorsport suspension. Valet mode delivers ‘only’ around

From a standing start, it can hit 60mph in under three seconds

❞ 1200A, but even so, the acceleration is strong and the response from the motors immediate. There’s no clutch and the Enfield has a two-pedal setup with an oddly positioned brake. It stops well, though, with front brakes that consist of specially made discs with Caterham calipers. Amazingly, despite the insanely short wheelbase

and high-geared steering, the car tracks dead straight even on a bumpy surface. That’s partly due to the fourlink mounting of the axle, which ensures there’s no steering effect from the rear. It rides well, too. Smith flicks the switch from Valet to Race and says: “Now give it a quick squirt.” The response to the accelerator is now neckwrenchingly brutal and the Flux Capacitor takes off at a pace normally reserved for something packing a big supercharged engine. In fact, launched from a standing start, it can hit 60mph in under three seconds. The lack of a ferocious soundtrack is at odds with the rate of progress, and a slight smell of ozone wafts up the nostrils as we are whisked rapidly towards the space-time continuum. Thankfully, more judicious use of the accelerator prevents our transition back to the future, but it felt like a close-run thing. L

GENESIS OF THE ENFIELD 8000 The Enfield 8000 was designed in 1971 by Enfield Automotive’s John Ackroyd in response to the fuel crisis. It had a drag coefficient of 0.29, which would put many modern cars to shame, and its body was an aluminium spaceframe clad in aluminium. The weight distribution was 50/50 and it was powered by an 8bhp motor and eight 55Ah lead acid batteries, giving a 35-55-mile range. It weighed 975kg (300kg of which were batteries), 0-30mph took 12.5sec and top speed was 48mph. At 2.84m long, it was 21cm shorter than a Mini but, at £2808, more than twice the price. That and the end of the fuel crisis signalled the Enfield’s demise in 1977.

There are big rule changes for the LMP2 class. How do you expect the 2017 tyres to fare? “LMP2 will have 100bhp more and more downforce, so tyre development is tougher. But we have all the lessons from 2016 and we’ve developed a base tyre from that. We’ve been offering it to all chassis manufacturers, and they use that for shakedown tests.” “We might still do minor tuning after the pre-season tests, but we will have done massive testing mileage by then, so we’ll be able to deliver the best product.” Would you consider creating LMP1 Hybrid tyres in the future? “If the opportunity came, we’d consider it, but it would need significant investment, so we’d need to analyse the pros and cons. “For now, the place we want to be is the GTE, GT3 and GT4 categories. That’s where we can show superior performance and the link to [road cars] is closer. “At Le Mans, we do about 2.5 times the length of an F1 grand prix per stint, so we think the performance link in GT is better.” Will Dunlop enter any other series? “We will look at the money situation to decide where to invest next, but we’re in a good place. We are continuously improving in the VLN series and at the Nürburgring 24Hrs, and we were very successful in the WEC in 2016. “In coming years GT will gain more cars from Lamborghini, Mercedes-AMG, McLaren and Porsche. There will be a fierce battle and we want to be part of it.”

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 55


YO U R V I E WS WRITE TO

autocar@haymarket.com Electric: no contest

LETTER OF THE WEEK

Your correspondent David Herb, describing the problems of electric cars (You Views, 7 December), has obviously never experienced the future of electric motoring. Having just completed 16,000 miles over the past eight months in my Tesla Model S, I have never experienced the catalogue of negatives he describes. Viable electric motoring without compromises is available now. Dr B A Hutchinson Northumberland

I-Pace needs ICE

I cannot be alone in my belief that the Jaguar I-Pace concept’s stunning styling makes it one of the most desirable SUVs ever designed. It could be the biggest-selling SUV if it were available with petrol and diesel derivatives. The F-Pace ticks all my boxes in being Britishbuilt and with Jaguar standards of performance and handling, but it appears visually so similar to many other SUVs and, to me, is just too big for our overcrowded roads. In terms of styling and size, the I-Pace looks to be the perfect younger brother to the F-Pace. It just yearns for a 1.6-litre petrol turbo or 2.0-litre diesel, in addition to electric power, in order to give it huge all-round international appeal. Much as I’m attracted by the instant power of electric vehicles, I just don’t think I can ever come to terms with a short range, long charging periods and the consequent stress of worrying about running out of charge and seeking charging points. It’s one thing to carry a spare can of fuel, but quite another to carry a petrol-fuelled generator. Richard Homer Via email

Points make prizes

Much has been made of the fact that Lewis Hamilton won more races than Nico Rosberg but he is not the 2016 Formula 1 world champion. How did this happen? Nico scored more points. There was a year in

Vauxhall needs a partner for its GT vision I was encouraged by the positive noises from OpelVauxhall’s Karl-Thomas Neumann, expressing his hope that a production car derived from the GT Letter of the week concept could yet appear (News, 7 December). wins this ValetPRO It is great to see such passion from the exterior protection engineering and design teams. To make it and maintenance kit happen, they ideally need a willing and cashworth £58.95 rich partner, and surely there is only one: SAIC. It already has close ties with GM, and it seems a no-brainer for these two strategic partners to deliver a lightweight rear-wheel drive platform that th t would underpin an MG as well as the Opel, Vauxhall Vauxh and maybe a baby sister to the mighty Corvette. SAIC has recently shut the assembly lines at Longbridge. Perhaps a new sports car venture justifies a bespoke low-volume assembly plant. The UK would be a logical home for it.

WIN

David Knowles Via email

the American USAC series where defending champion Tom Sneva won the championship in 1978 as well. He managed this without winning any races but had a good finishing record. The current scoring system should ensure the same won’t happen in F1 – but it might. Michael Copeman Via email

USAC that year used a ‘two points per mile’ system that awarded more for the longer races, so finishing fi fth in a 500-miler was equivalent to winning a race that was half as long. Sneva was a quick and worthy winner, though, claiming seven pole positions from the 18 races – MB

Infiniti’s time test

Infinitis need harder-wearing cabins 56 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Interesting read on the new Infiniti Q60 (7 December). It’s a great-looking car and they always seem smooth when seated inside (when new). To me, the biggest drawback is that

after a couple of years, they all feel as simple inside as the Nissans they’re based on. I don’t think Infiniti, or Lexus, for that matter, will reach the stature of their German rivals until they learn to stand the test of time. I had a 20-year-old BMW 240d in the 1990s and it still felt very special to be in. The same goes for my current Audis. When their lease ends, I’m still as satisfied as the day they arrived. Tim Washington Via email

Take a pew

Why are presenters of online video car reviews increasingly referring to a car’s seating as ‘chairs’? Yes, you too, Autocar, on at least one occasion. They’re seats, as they are in trucks, aircraft, boats, cinemas and theatres. Chairs are items of furniture. Please lead the way in getting it right. Rod Craig London

Powertrain of thought

I can claim to be a much ‘better’ Luddite than Kerry Giddings (Your Views, 7 December). I skip articles on autonomous vehicles, those that feature electric vehicles and especially those that feature vehicles that are only available as automatics. The new BMW 5 Series is a case in point (First Drives, 7 December). I started to read with enthusiasm about the optional six-speed manual gearbox, only to have my hopes dashed when I find it ceases to be an option with multi-cylinder engines. For me, a six-cylinder engine (preferably a straight six) and a manual gearbox is a perfect combination, but in the mid-sized exec segment it is forbidden fruit. This lack of availability has meant I’ve kept my manual 530 Touring for more than 16 years. Those who are keen on the advent of autonomous cars can get halfway there by choosing an auto. It’s just a pity it’s so often Hobson’s choice for those of us who like driving. John Batstone Via email

We aim to drive all powertrain options over the course of a car’s life, John, provided the manufacturer is able to make them available to us – MB


LETTERS G R E AT R E A S O N S T O B U Y

NEXT WEEK’S ISSUE O N S A L E 1 1 JA N UA RY R OA D T E S T A BMW 3 Series — or is it a 7 Series? Or maybe an A6…

Copper load of this

If they insist on giving us sleeping policemen, you might as well make a game out of them. Approach the bump without slowing and jam your brakes on just before the front wheels hit it. If you time it right, the movement up over the bump will counteract the compression of the front springs and the forward transfer of the car’s centre of gravity. You shouldn’t feel it. This game was all my Audi 100 Avant was good for. The car was so long that it didn’t really matter what happened when the rear wheels reached the hump. Roderick W Ramage Via email

Did you read about that in the Highway Code, Roderick? – MB

Model life is rubbish

Having spent the past five months driving all across Europe, I’ve noticed how similar all of the

new BMWs, Mercedes and Audis are. At first glance, I couldn’t tell the difference between models, from the new Mercedes C, E and S-Class and Audi A4, A6 and A8 to the BMW 3, 5 and 7 Series. I genuinely struggled to pick an A4 from an A6 or A8 when either coming up to pass one or being overtaken. They all seem to look the same, but a little bigger. It seems even Jaguar is up to it. It’s such a shame car design has come to this. I used to love waiting for new models to be released but now could probably draw them myself. Mock Chris Bangle as much as you like, but at least there was a clear difference in his designs. Maybe it’s time for a Volvo, which at least pays lip service to segregating its models by design. Of course, now I’ve said that, the next XC60 will look precisely like the new XC90 and the next V70 like the new V90.

Audi S5

Our expert testers pore over every detail of the range-topping A5 derivative C O M PA R I S O N

FIRST DRIVE

Paul Hallett Via email

Alfa Giulia vs rivals

Porsche Macan Turbo

Acid test for Italian exec saloon as it faces Jaguar XE and BMW 3 Series

Performance Package enhances an already potent SUV

LONG DRIVE

Off road all the way

Tom Sneva was ’78 USAC champ but didn’t win a race

Across the width of Britain in a Mercedes G-Class — without taking to the public road SUBSCRIBE

autocar.co.uk/subscribe or see p34 4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 57


O U R CA RS F E AT U R E D T H I S W E E K

DS 3 PERFORMANCE

FORD MUSTANG

HONDA JAZZ

JAGUAR XF

KIA NIRO

MINI CLUBMAN

MORGAN 3 WHEELER

SKODA OCTAVIA VRS

SSANGYONG TIVOLI

FIRST REPORT

KIA NIRO A crossover with a petrol-electric powertrain ought to be a recipe for success. We’ve got nine months to find out if that’s the case with Kia’s first dedicated hybrid ne of my favourite cars to live with has been a Nissan Qashqai. For six months in 2013-2014, I was the keeper of this most practical of crossovers. And I loved it. The Qashqai did everything we asked of it, and more, without once batting an eyelid. It was almost perfect – but what would such a package be like with a hybrid powertrain instead of the torquey diesel engines favoured by UK buyers? Surely, it would be the ideal combination of practicality and low running costs? Well, I’ve got the chance to find out with this Kia Niro. This is new territory for Kia. For years, it has watched the slow uptake of hybrid and electric cars in the UK, waiting to dip its toe into what is becoming an important segment.

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58 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

With the launch of sister brand Hyundai’s Ioniq, the timing seemed right. Kia has taken the Ioniq’s platform and powertrain – in regular hybrid form only, rather than the plug-in versions, for now – and put it into a very on-trend crossover body. On paper, it seems to be a smart move: a crossover with space for the family and their luggage combined with fuel economy that can rival the most frugal diesels but with lower running costs. What’s more, for now, a CO2 output of 101g/km means it will cost you nothing to tax in the first year and just £10 thereafter. Still, the UK’s hybrid and electric vehicle market is a slow burner. Just 3.3% of new cars sold so far this year have been classed as alternatively fuelled vehicles, according

to the latest Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders data. Although that’s 0.6% up on last year, it still equates to just 82,650 vehicles – a small part of the 2.7 million new cars sold overall. It’s worth noting, too, that although the Niro’s hybrid package is no longer a new phenomenon, it is new to Kia. It took Toyota several iterations of the Prius to finally build a hybrid that feels normal to drive, so Kia has to play catch-up, and quickly. With a starting price of £21,295, the Niro is more expensive than many other cars of this size – and significantly pricier than titans of this class like the Qashqai. However, it’s £2300 cheaper than a Prius. You do get plenty of standard equipment for that price. Every

Niro comes with dual-zone climate control, automatic lights, cruise control and a lane keeping system. Our upper-range 3 version of the Niro may not be the one that most owners will choose, but it’s a good opportunity to sample a wider array of the Niro’s kit. Our car is fitted with luxuries such as heated seats and steering wheel, an 8.0in touchscreen infotainment system with sat-nav, black leather upholstery, front and rear parking sensors, a reversing camera and wireless phone charger. In fact, the only option fitted to our car is metallic paint. Powering it is a 1.6-litre petrol engine, running on the more frugal Atkinson cycle, and a small electric motor. For the most part, it’s the petrol engine that provides power,


Electric motor kicks in to boost torque — handy around town

A hybrid crossover promises an ideal mix of practicality and low running costs ❞

Withh 3 spec, you get an 8.0in touchscreen infotainment system as standard

Driving position is slightly elevated, but not to SUV levels

with the electric motor cutting in to provide instant torque from a standing start, or to supplement the engine at cruising speeds. Like most hybrids, the Niro uses a lithium ion battery pack to store electricity, but whereas other cars have to sacrifice boot space to hide the pack, the Niro’s is so power dense that it’s compact enough to sit under the rear seats. That means there’s a very usable 427-litre load capacity with the rear bench in place – and 1425 litres with it folded flat. In both cases, that’s slightly less than in a Qashqai, but it’s more than enough

for two suitcases or a big weekly shop. Our first impressions of the Niro, though, have been mixed. The car shifts seamlessly between electric and engine power and the six-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox works better than the CVTs you’ll find in most other hybrids – but the throttle response is loose and leaves the driver feeling disconnected. In fact, there’s very little in the way of the fun driving style that Kia has promised Niro owners. Our car arrived with just 195 miles on the clock, so some bedding in will be required before we can judge fuel

Boot is 427 litres, aided by the battery pack being under the rear seats

economy with any clarity. Kia claims 64.2mpg combined, but so far we’re seeing around 42mpg. When we road tested the Niro, this was one of our sore points, because its real-world fuel economy wasn’t breathtaking and its subdued driving style left us cold. Most SUV buyers choose diesel engines for their efficiency and more accessible torque, so if its fuel economy doesn’t improve, the Niro could find itself tripping up at the first hurdle. The Niro has a tough task ahead as we ask it to try to at least match the ownership experience delivered by the Qashqai – a car that passed almost every test we threw at it with flying colours. But on the face of it,

the hybrid Kia has the tools it needs to get the job done. We’ll be putting the Niro through a similar regimen to that successfully faced by the Qashqai, so it’ll be a fair comparison. Can it rise to the challenge? We’ve got the next nine months to find out. DARREN MOSS

TEST DATA KIA NIRO 1.6 GDI HEV 3 Price new £24,695 Price as tested £25,240 Options Metallic paint £545 Economy 42.0mpg Faults None Expenses None

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE darren.moss@haymarket.com 4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 59


FINAL REPORT

SSANGYONG TIVOLI

Our cut-price Korean SUV’s time with us is up, and despite its striking value and capability, it hasn’t all been plain sailing he Tivoli does a fine impression of the multitude of other small SUVs on the market, with its sharp but chunky styling, a slightly raised height and large wheels. It’s standard fodder for the current craze in the motor industry. This means that the Tivoli had a lot to live up to. It needed, in short, to be many things to many people, offering substance to go with its style and flexibility in spades. The small SUV segment is as diverse as it is competitive, and right from the off the Tivoli manages to stand out with its low pricing. It’s not a segment that’s renowned for outstanding cars – even Ford slipped up here with the Ecosport – so Ssangyong had an opportunity

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60 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

to take the market by storm with a relevant offering at a bargain price. The pressure was on. In ELX guise, our Tivoli belied its fairly anonymous exterior with an interior build quality and spec that many more expensive cars would be happy to deliver. Right away, the Ssangyong’s shaky low-speed ride and gravelly engine note were noticeable but forgivable, given that our high-spec model was a four-figure price less than a Nissan Juke or Mazda CX-3. A generous lump of torque from the 1.6-litre diesel engine kept things brisk enough, too. Less forgivable was the handbrake button refusing to pop back out of the handle once pressed in, although it was quickly fixed at my local Ssangyong dealer.

Camping trip proved the Tivoli’s ability to lug serious loads

We didn’t make any attempt to venture off road in our two-wheeldrive Tivoli. It scrabbled for grip on a wet grassy verge, although we had no issues on the firm, flat grass of a campsite. It was on that same camping trip that the car proved not only its load-lugging capability but also its narrow-road nimbleness, fuel economy and unique aesthetic appeal; other campers were intrigued by what it was when they realised it wasn’t a Mini Countryman. The Tivoli’s white roof stood out in the expansive Saunton Sands car park too – an added bonus. The Tivoli was starting to grow on me by this point, and my endearment to it wasn’t just a holiday romance. Most impressive of all was the Tivoli’s all-round capability. Cars

such as this aren’t bought specifically as tough-mudders, load-luggers or people carriers, but the Ssangyong was a snug fit into the automobileshaped hole in my life. It’s easy to see why this model is its maker’s shot at the big league – and why the small SUV segment is growing as it is. Despite this, though, the Tivoli wasn’t immune from electrical gremlins, and for the closing two months of our year-long stint with the car, the engine warning light’s persistence was nothing short of parade-dampening. Ssangyong assured me that it was an isolated problem, although social media correspondence from another owner suggested otherwise. In ELX spec, which I’m glad we had, the Tivoli came well


TEST DATA

The rear cabin is spacious enough to seat three tall adults

S S A N GYO N G TIVO LI 1.6D E L X

Cabin finish and ELX-spec kit count were high points

The Tivoli turned out to be a car of much use and few weaknesses equipped, with highlights being the infotainment system, cruise control and leather trim. The infotainment was imperfect, with a sometimes shaky Bluetooth connection and frustrating sat-nav, although the cruise control brought the car together as a whole package. In diesel guise, it munched motorway miles with gusto, and the cruise control, although not adaptive, made longer journeys stress-free, if slightly noisy due to the 18in wheels. In a lower spec, road noise would have been improved with a couple of extra inches of tyre sidewall to soften the roar, but the lower equipment level would have sullied the experience, despite the lower price. The interior was of particular note. Where rivals – the Suzuki Vitara, for instance – are cheap and cheerful but with the emphasis on the former, the Tivoli felt and looked plush and solid, with some places displaying a heft that would put (dare I say it?) even a Volkswagen to shame. Only the frustratingly liberal use of blank buttons – a bugbear of mine – spoiled the show. Passengers, however, were astounded by the rear shoulder,

head and leg room. Even my uncles and mum – 6ft 4in, 6ft 3in and 5ft 11in tall respectively – were able to sit comfortably across the rear seat. Being front-wheel drive, there wasn’t much of a transmission tunnel to eat into rear leg room, either. The Tivoli, then, turned out to be a car of much use and few weaknesses, although having to explain what it was to curious passers-by quickly became a scripted spiel. The brand anonymity works to Ssangyong’s favour in this respect: it doesn’t yet have a particular reputation here in the UK, although I fear the badge’s thoroughly Eastern phonetics may take a while to be well received by the conventional UK market. As time went on, the Tivoli was easy to get used to, and an update carried out by Ssangyong – shortly before a rather costly £236 service – to reduce engine noise added a muchneeded dose of extra refinement. Unfortunately, and for unknown reasons, the Tivoli seemed to accrue a concerning number of door dings and scrapes, with a front three-quarter scrape in particular highlighting quite thin and gummy paint. Such cost-cutting measures were

TEST STARTED 11.11.15 Mileage at start 1500 Mileage at end 11,067 PRICES List price new £17,250 List price now £17,750 Price as tested £18,150 Dealer value now £14,050 Private value now £12,364 Trade value now £12,900 OPTIONS Metallic paint £500, Styling Pack (contrasting roof and door mirror colour, 18in diamond-cut alloy wheels) £400 FUEL CONSUMPTION AND RANGE Claimed economy 65.7mpg (combined) Fuel tank 47 litres Test average 45.9mpg Test best 50.9mpg Test worst 39.0mpg Real-world range 474 miles TECH HIGHLIGHTS 0-62mph 12.0sec Top speed 109mph Engine 4 cyls, 1597cc, diesel Max power 113bhp at 3400-4000rpm Max torque 221lb ft at 1500-2000rpm Transmission 5-spd manual Boot 423-1115 litres Wheels 6.5Jx18in Tyres 215/45 R18, Hankook Kerb weight 1430kg SERVICE AND RUNNING COSTS Contract hire rate £308.17 per month (£287.63 without metallic paint or Styling Pack) 113g/km CO2 Service costs £235.99 Other costs None Fuel costs £1004.36 Running costs including fuel £1240.36 Cost per mile 11.2 pence Depreciation £4100 Cost per mile including depreciation 48.5 pence Faults Sticky rear door handles, faulty handbrake button, engine warning light (multiple causes) PREVIOUS REPORTS 11 Nov 2015, 2 Dec, 30 Dec, 20 Jan 2016, 10 Feb, 23 Mar, 13 Apr, 25 May, 22 Jun, 13 Jul, 31 Aug, 14 Sep, 12 Oct, 9 Nov

sometimes clear to see but blended into the background soon after. It’s a shame about the electrical gremlins, which sullied an otherwise largely inoffensive year-long stint in the Tivoli. There’s no one good reason why the Tivoli deserves any less success than the Nissan Juke, although there are smaller niggles that may attract the wrong sort of attention from prospective buyers. What’s more disheartening is that the Tivoli might be overlooked by some simply for being different in some ways, in a market where being different in other ways – see the Juke – is roundly praised. I’ll certainly not be able to pass the few Tivolis I see on the road without remembering ours. JIMI BECKWITH

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE james.beckwith@haymarket.com

L OV E I T

IMAGE Funky styling, particularly at the rear, makes the Tivoli stand out in its price bracket.

PRACTICALITY It’s a spacious (particularly across the rear bench), usable and utilitarian small SUV.

L OAT H E I T

FINISH Various fit and finish issues, such as this wrinkled white roof sticker, were evident.

SATELLITE NAVIGATION Sat-nav is premature with its commands, often leading to wrong turns in congested, built-up areas.

RELIABILITY The Tivoli had more than its fair share of teething problems and isolated gremlins.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 61


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FORD MUSTANG

The Mustang is run in, so time to unleash the horses — or not ith just over 1200 miles on the clock, the Mustang should be fully run in now, but you might be disappointed to learn that it’s not getting a caning. That’s partly because I believe in mechanical sympathy but also to do with the engine’s characteristics. Despite the capacity, it revs freely enough to the 6500rpm red line, but the huge reserves of torque on tap lower down are more fun to exploit. With so much torque, rear-wheel drive and a 53/47% front/rear weight distribution, the V8 Mustang is a little more nose-heavy than some. Add to that the fact that Ford clearly didn’t want to ruin things with over-zealous traction control and

W

Mark is torn between his manual Jazz and the CVT model

MILEAGE 3995

HONDA JAZZ

The Jazz is available with a continuously variable transmission, but is it any good?

it’s possible to get the tail out without trying too hard. Day-to-day driving on a variety of rural roads is returning about 23.5mpg, but it’s worth it for the fun I get. Although the gearchange is light, the gearbox doesn’t feel like it wants to be rushed, so the smoothest shifts are deliberate and measured. That’s possibly because of the capacity of the transmission in terms of the amount of torque it has to transmit and the sheer size of the components whizzing around inside it. I’ve had to do a little maintenance in the form of topping up the oil, which was down to the minimum mark by around 800 miles. My local dealer had previously mentioned they were often shipped a little on the low side. The engine takes what seems like insanely low-viscosity oil: SAE 5W/20. This follows the industry trend of improving efficiency by reducing the drag caused by higherviscosity oil. I couldn’t buy that in Halfords and picked a litre up at a Ford dealer instead for £13.20. Half a litre was enough to do the job, though. The complexity of the gorgeous alloys that come with the Custom Pack prompted me to buy some new wheel cleaning brushes. I won’t be going near a car wash and plan to look after the paint with this one. JESSE CROSSE

TEST DATA F O R D M U S TA N G 5 . 0 G T Price £34,995 Price as tested £36,035 Economy 23.5mpg Faults None Expenses Litre of oil £13.20 Last seen 23.11.16

The 5.0-litre V8 needed an oil topup at 800 miles

IF YOUNGSTERS DISMISS the Jazz as an old person’s car, I dread to think what they’d make of the CVT version, the transmission of which is about as highly regarded by the motoring press as a fart in a lift. And yet a large proportion of Jazz sales are of the automatic version. With that in mind, and in the interests of providing good consumer advice, I decided to borrow one from Honda to compare it with our six-speed manual long-termer. I must confess that I have never shared the view that there is something masculine or sporty or even vaguely mechanically efficient about the old-fashioned manual gearbox and its accompanying clutch pedal. It being 2017, I would no more expect to find a manual gearbox in any civilised car than I would to find a horse in my living room. To a degree, I’m proved right by these two cars. The Jazz CVT is good in town, easy to drive and smart away from the lights, whereas the manual can be rather hiccupy if you fumble the clutch and touchy throttle (easily done). On the motorway, where the manual Jazz is a little too

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE autocar@haymarket.com

loud, the CVT is quieter thanks to its theoretically higher gearing when cruising, even if refinement still leaves something to be desired. So the CVT wins, then? Well no, not quite. You see, if you floor the accelerator, the engine roars like a rutting stag, and it’s about as responsive, even in its Sport mode, as a dead turbot. Like many steplessly variable transmissions, it also offers the option of using seven stepped ratios, but I find this rather irritating, although I realise I might be alone in that. Also, the gearchange in my manual Jazz is a particularly good one, short of throw and precise in action. So my learned consumer advice is this: pay your money and make your own choice, or buy one of each. MARK PEARSON

TEST DATA H O N DA JA ZZ 1.3 I -V TEC S E N AV I Price £15,605 Price as tested £16,105 Economy 44.6mpg Faults None Expenses None Last seen 23.11.16

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 63


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SKODA OCTAVIA VRS

LAST SEEN 23.11.16

Just as I was starting to really enjoy driving the DS, it’s developed a fault. I’m not sure what’s wrong, but the engine management and service lights have illuminated and the infotainment screen occasionally flashes up an ‘engine fault’ message. On top of that, the turbo occasionally feels as if it’s not boosting, so performance is rather sluggish. Off to the local dealership it goes. SS

A trip to Cornwall and a weekend blast test our Skoda’s mettle he last time the Octavia featured in these pages, I was singing its praises as a consummate allrounder. And since then it has set about proving my point. First, snapper Will Williams nabbed it for a weekend in Cornwall, a trip from which he returned with a washing machine lodged firmly in the Skoda’s sizeable boot. Will reports that the Skoda was the perfect tool for the trip: fuel economy was distinctly respectable, the automatic gearbox made the inevitable traffic jams a breeze and, of course, the vRS’s gutsy diesel pulled well even with a domestic appliance sequestered within. It was the weekend after Will’s return, though, that really highlighted just what a fantastic jack of all trades the Skoda can be. Sunday morning was one of those crisp late autumn days that heralded the onset of winter proper, and with

T

MILEAGE 6459

JAGUAR XF

I JUMPED AT the offer of the Jaguar XF for a weekend, before realising what my Friday night had in store for me: yet another trip to Ikea.

Washing machine looks lost in there the sun rising and the roads quiet, I quite fancied going for a drive. I could have taken my old BMW 635 CSi, but it was about time the Octavia got the chance to get its teeth into something other than my daily commute. The tight, twisting B-roads of the North Downs proved ideal. The pace was slow, given the possibility of black ice, but even so, the Skoda’s ability to inspire confidence through faithful steering and prodigious grip shone through. Granted, traction was an issue when the going got slippery, but Plenty of questions were fired at the XF’s guardian, Matt Burt, all asking about the car’s practicality. From memory, the Jaguar didn’t have the rear space and access of many cars out there, not least my current long-termer, the very different Seat Ateca, but the Jaguar’s spec sheet lists the boot as being 30 litres larger than the Seat’s, at 540 litres. So, armed with a tape measure, I wandered over to our car park one lunchtime to scope the boot out for myself. I was quickly reminded how limiting the boot aperture is, and then there was the mystery of how to fold down the rear seats. Eventually I gave in and read the manual, which directed me to two (almost hidden) yellow levers in the roof of the boot.

feathering the throttle slightly would tuck the Skoda’s nose back in obediently without any hint of tailend lightness or body wallow. No, the vRS doesn’t feel quite as sharp as some smaller hot hatchbacks. But then again, neither can you sling white goods into, say, a Volkswagen Golf GTI or Seat Leon Cupra with such abandon. The Octavia’s ability to carry all your stuff one minute and make you smile the next is quite a rare quality. ALEX ROBBINS

TEST DATA S KO D A O C TAV I A 2 . 0 T D I V R S E S TAT E Price new (2011) £19,905 Price now £15,000 Economy 42.8mpg Faults Starting glitch Expenses None Last seen 7.12.16

Mini Clubman MILEAGE 2546

LAST SEEN 30.11.16

The Mini’s infotainment benefits from being derived from those made for BMWs, so it has programmable shortcuts, flawless sat-nav and beautiful graphics. It even tells you what kind of radio broadcast you’re listening to. It’s curious, though, that this is what it deems an appropriate graphical accompaniment to Radio 4’s Today programme… SP

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE alex.robbins@haymarket.com Bear in mind, too, that while our XF has the 60/40 split rear seats as standard, that’s not the case on the car’s two lower trims; they cost £420 extra. That might not sit well with some buyers, but it’s a similar scenario with the BMW 5 Series. How did we fare at Ikea? It was a sedate spending spree, but the XF handled the job in fine style, easily swallowing a sizeable mirror and various household fripperies. RACHEL BURGESS

TEST DATA J AG U A R X F 3 . 0 T D V6 S Price £49,995 Price as tested £61,920 Economy 41.6mpg Faults None Expenses None Last seen 30.11.16

Morgan 3 Wheeler MILEAGE 2241

LAST SEEN 7.12.16

Six hours in the Morgan is a tad punishing with the temperature only a little above freezing, but the trip back to Malvern was worth it. Our long-termer now sports Yokohama W.Drive V902 winter tyres, or rather tyre, because there’s no cold-weather variant for the skinny fronts. We’re reasonably confident that won’t matter. Reasonably. NC

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 65


USED CARS W I T H JA M E S R U P P E RT, T H E H I G H P R I E ST O F BA N G E R N O M I C S

Most AA callouts result from tyre or battery problems

PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE

The AA is trialling tech that predicts your next breakdown. James Ruppert reports f the FAQs that pass this way, one of the most FA (that’s ‘frequently asked’, before you get other ideas) involves just how to tell when a motor is about to turn. As in, turn all annoyingly unreliable and start breaking down all over the place. Well, it now seems as though technology may be about to come to our rescue, rather than leave us stranded by the roadside. That’s what the clever bods at the AA reckon, anyway, and they could be right. A trial of AA Connect technology in 10,000 cars has found that almost one in five developed problems that were identified before they led to a breakdown, enabling the AA to repair the fault and helping to prevent an issue at the roadside. This is in addition to identifying battery issues that could lead to a car not starting on a cold morning. After

O

tyres, batteries represent 16% of the AA’s typical breakdown workload. The technology involves fitting your car with a device plugged into its onboard diagnostic (OBD) socket. From there, it monitors data such as battery condition, electrics and engine management, identifying problems before they trigger a warning light or manifest as a failure. As well as the stuff about catching breakdowns before they happen, the system will also help users to make changes to their driving style. This, in turn, can pay dividends in terms of fuel economy and maintenance costs and potentially reduce their car insurance premiums. Of course, the best bit about having a used car is that point at which you become bored, it breaks down and you have a legitimate excuse to buy something else. In future, perhaps this dongle will help with that, too.

I’d go with an E39 5 Series, provided it is petrol and, possibly, a practical Touring ❞ 66 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

The most interesting fact to come from this research, however, is that, battery problems aside, the top three faults that occur on our old motors are now ignition coil failure, exhaust gas recirculation valve issues and dodgy mass airflow sensors. So assuming that just about every car made since the early 1990s has an OBD port, which cars should we buy to give the AA dongle less to do? I know we’ve been down the Lexus route in recent weeks, but really, a

GS 300 with a full history still seems to offer the best combination of reliability, comfort and class. Otherwise I’d go with an E39 5 Series, the last of the fixable BMWs – provided it is petrol and, more than possibly, a practical Touring. Or perhaps a petrolpowered grey import Mitsubishi Pajero (aka Shogun) V6, if you need some 4x4 goodness. All of these banger orphans cost just a few grand and answer every FAQ ever asked.

Lexus GS 300: so reliable it’s worth saying twice


TA L E S F R O M R U P P E R T ’ S GA R AG E

WHAT I SPIED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

£10k MEGAWAGON

Practical and potent Audi estate So what’s the next thing we should all be rushing out to buy before everyone else does? Well, that could be an almost unnecessarily fast Audi RS6 in load-carrying Avant shape. This 86,000-mile example from 2003 has had a cambelt, water pump and all the proper servicing done — all of which makes the £10,500 asking price seem pretty reasonable.

MILE AGE 72,387

BMW X5 The door handle is finally sorted. We ordered a new one through the garage and that cost £20.70. It turns out that the plastic moulding was always going to give up eventually. Just a couple of ridges hold it in place, and after 14 years they had naturally worn down. As I mentioned last week, we’ve also had the world’s slowest puncture. Every couple of weeks I’ve been pumping up the offside front tyre. Finding the screw that was embedded in it and fixing the hole cost £14.40. Expensive times. READER’S RIDE

CITROEN C2 FOR £1621

Compact Citroën cracks the Code The stubby little C2 is an overlooked but charming thing, and here in VTR trim it makes a refreshing change from the more obvious pocket rockets. This 68,000-mile limited-edition Code example from 2007 isn’t exactly hot in performance terms but seems cheap at a very particular £1621, comes from a main dealer and has a whole heap of interesting extras, including leather trim. What could possibly go wrong?

£22.5k MONSTER TRUCK

An outsize Ford 4x4

Volvo V70 Keith Dumpleton bought his 1997 Volvo V70 diesel automatic nearly two years ago for just £250. “It needed tyres and had a short MOT, two previous owners, 162k miles and 21 stamps in the book,” says Keith. “It’s a CD spec, with sunroof and heated leather seats. Everything works, including the air-con. Now on 174k miles, it passed its 2015 MOT first time and needed just a couple of ball joints this year. It goes well

and returns 40mpg, although it smokes a bit under load and the power steering moans when worked hard. It even earns its keep by doing light removals for a neighbour’s buy-to-let property empire.”

SEND YOUR USED CAR TALES TO

james@bangernomics.com

Here’s an impossibly huge four-wheel-drive pick-up truck that is totally inappropriate for our tiny, crowded roads, so what’s not to like? If the size really doesn’t faze you, this 2006 Ford F-250 in special-edition Harley-Davidson guise is an American legend with added upgrades including bull bars, new wheels and a tow bar, plus some other option packages that are unfathomable to me. Just £22,500, then, doesn’t seem half bad.

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 67


W H Y YO U N E E D A U S E D

HONDA S2000 I N YO U R L I FE

1 litre

The quantity of oil a healthy S2000 engine can consume in 1000 miles.

HONDA’S LEGAL HIGH With a bulletproof engine that revs to 9000rpm, the Honda S2000 is one of the most thrilling roadsters you’ll find for as little as £5000. John Evans checks it out hen most sports car engines are shutting up shop, the Honda S2000’s is opening for business. At around 6000rpm, the VTEC variable valve timing system swaps cam lobes to allow the F20C engine to fill its lungs. At 7500rpm, it’s developing a modest 153lb ft torque; at 8300rpm, peak power of 237bhp, good for 0-62mph in 6.2sec. Finally, at 9000rpm, the shutters come down. Impressive figures but, given the engine’s otherwise relative inactivity at lower revs, also the reason Honda’s roadster dwells in the shadows of more accessible rivals. But if you hanker after the kind of engineering on which Honda’s reputation was built, the S2000 is worth a peek. Prices start at around £5000 for

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68 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

models with partial service histories, but around £7000 should secure a cherished example with a properly undersealed chassis and, so you can tweak the fully adjustable suspension without having to cut out and replace seized fittings, rust-free bolts and adjusters. Mileage might be on the high side, but fear not: no S2000 went pop through hard work. The longitudinally mounted, naturally aspirated 2.0-litre engine (front/mid for better weight distribution) drives the rear wheels through a six-speed gearbox and Torsen limited-slip diff. Suspension is double wishbone all round and steering electrically assisted. Early cars were criticised for uncommunicative steering and tricky on-limit handling.

Accordingly, in 2002 the suspension was tweaked. At the same time, a GT version with a removable hard-top joined the range. (Standard cars have an electrically powered vinyl hood.) The critics weren’t entirely silenced by the suspension mods so, in 2004, Honda introduced a raft of changes to the chassis, including stiffer body bracing, retuned springs and antiroll bars, fractionally slower steering and larger wheels (from 16s to 17s). At the same time, torque was increased slightly at lower revs. New triplebeam projector lights and restyled front and rear bumpers completed what is known as the AP1 facelift. Two years later, and seven years into the model’s production life, Honda’s commitment to the S2000 remained undimmed. Vehicle

Stability Assist (VSA), intended to provide additional cornering control and boost traction on loose surfaces, was added to the options list. It became standard in 2008, along with further suspension refinements. The model bowed out the following year. Fortunately, the S2000 seems to attract the mechanically sympathetic, so it isn’t unusual to see high-milers with full history. Honda’s approved used scheme covers cars up to eight years old, so you’ll still find some thoroughly vetted 2008s on main dealer forecourts. As an alternative to UK cars, check out grey-import S2000s. They tend to be in better condition and with lower mileages. Among them, you’ll find the 2.2-litre model as well as a sprinkling of Type Vs and later, stripped-out Type Ss.


USED CARS On-limit handling can be a bit tricky on earlier models

H O W T O G E T O N E I N YO U R GA R AG E

TOM GAN NON , TG M “I’ve been racing and working on Hondas since 1991. The engines are really well engineered, the S2000’s especially. It’s designed for high revs and a long life. Standard mods don’t yield much, so we go the forced induction route with a supercharger. An HKS or Rotrex supercharger will increase power to around 360-380bhp and torque to 250lb ft. It spans 3000rpm to 9000rpm, making the car much more driveable. The kit costs around £4500 to £5000 supplied and fitted. We also recommend a brake, suspension and clutch upgrade.”

Buyer beware…

ENGINE Oil and filter (5W40 fully synthetic) every 9k miles or once a year. When the engine is hot, listen for timing chain tensioner rattle. It can fail at around 75k miles. CLUTCH, TRANSMISSION Clutch can pack up as early as 50k miles. Propshaft and diff are both strong, but inner joints of driveshafts can wear prematurely. SUSPENSION Poor anti-rust protection can cause suspension nuts, bolts and eccentric adjusters to seize. The bill for work and parts can be £750. Front compliance bush on the front lower wishbones can wear. Otherwise, suspension is strong.

catches aren’t worn. If it’s a GT, check the hard-top stand is with the car.

Also worth knowing

Honda’s approved used scheme covers qualifying cars up to eight years old and unlimited mileage. This means there are still some late S2000s at main dealers. One we found is a 2009 GT with 64k miles, priced at £13,995.

How much to spend

£5 0 0 0 - £6 9 0 0 Launch cars to 2002 with high mileage but some with full service histories. £70 0 0 - £ 8 2 5 0 Cherished, lower-mileage early cars plus a sprinkling of world-weary, high-mileage 2006-2007 cars. £8500 - £11,000 Mid-mileage 2005-2007 cars including GTs, plus more low-mileage early ones. £ 1 1 , 5 0 0 - £ 12 , 5 0 0 Very tidy, mid-mileage 2007-2008 cars. Even a few tidy 2004-2006 cars. £ 12 ,75 0 - £ 13 , 5 0 0 More mid-mileage 2006-2009 cars, including Honda approved used, plus some ultra-low-mileage 2006-on cars. £ 13 ,75 0 - £ 1 5 , 5 0 0 More Honda approved used 2009 cars plus best low-miles 2008-2009 cars.

STEERING Steering rack mounts can fail. BRAKES Calipers can seize, causing the car to pull to one side during braking. U N D E R B O DY Corrosion can be an issue because anti-rust protection was so poor.

Cockpit is a bit of a squeeze; fittings can feel fragile

At 7500rpm, it’s developing a modest 153lb ft; at 8300rpm, peak power of 237bhp ❞

INTERIOR Tough but spoiled by fragile plastic fittings, especially around the stereo. ROOF This can leak near the windscreen pillars, so check for a damp carpet. It can develop a small tear where it’s pulled too tightly as well. Ensure the

One we found

H O N D A S 2 0 0 0 , 2 0 0 5/5 6 , 1 0 6 K M I L E S , £78 9 0 This one-owner facelifted car has full Honda main dealer service history, factory upgrade headrest speakers and bi-xenon lights. It’s a private sale, so you’ll have contact with the owner, whose demeanour will reveal more about its condition than any test drive.

WHAT’S IT LIKE TO DRIVE?

P71

»

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 69

With thanks to Tom Gannon (tgmsport.co.uk), Ian Eygelsheim (s2kuk.com), Tristan Longden (torque-gt.co.uk)

An expert’s view


USED CARS

USED CAR HEROES

PAST MASTER: HONDA S2000 You’ve read how to buy one; now Alex Robbins finds out what Honda’s two-seat roadster is like to drive today

Despite its reputation, the Honda is usable as an everyday driver

TESTED 6.12.16, SURREY ON SALE 1999-2009 PRICE £5000-£18,000

❝ The chassis lets you know what you can get away with

t’s a horrible cliché to describe a Honda VTEC engine at full chat as ‘shrieking’ or ‘screaming’. It’s also wrong. This isn’t a fearful yelp, it’s a shout – drawn out and filled with rage. A Honda S2000, approaching that mind-boggling 9000rpm red line with its throttle fully open, sounds angry. What is it angry about? Perhaps you aren’t driving it hard enough. It’s no secret that the S2000 loves to be thrashed. But while some love its on-off power delivery, others can’t bear the fact that there’s all the torque of a strimmer lower down. Actually, that’s not fair. While the S2000 doesn’t feel as balls-out quick low down as it does at higher revs, there’s still enough grunt to give warm hatch-like performance. And the fact that the S2000 can be

I

S2000’s digital dials aren’t to everyone’s taste

so docile is one reason why it makes such a great used buy, whether you’re after a weekend toy for occasional use or a two-seat daily driver. If all you want is to drive home from work without hassle, it’ll do it. And then the moment you fancy a kick up the backside, knock it down to second (yes, second, don’t forget that rev range), and watch it transform in an instant. There are other reasons why the car has its detractors. The dashboard, for example, is uncluttered to some eyes but plain and plasticky to others, while the digital dials are a retro indulgence or a cheap throwback, depending on your point of view. Then there’s the steering. The early electrically assisted system matches dull, artificial weight with an almost complete lack of feel. That sounds disappointing and was a

You’ll be busy with this making use of all the revs

source of much of the ire early on. But actually, in practice, it doesn’t matter too much. That chassis sends so much information through your backside that you barely miss the communication from the wheel. The example we’re driving is a GT Edition 100, a run-out special, which gives it the white paintwork, red leather seats and graphite alloys. As a 2009 car, it also gets the third suspension set-up the S2000 came with in the UK, derived from the Japanese Type-S version that wasn’t officially imported. The original and post-2004-facelift cars had the first and second set-ups respectively. Twitchy? Well, even on greasy winter roads it’s not as bad as the faintly terrifying first-generation S2000, but you still need to be gentle and feed the power in smoothly. Driven like this, the chassis shimmies

and twitches to let you know what you can and can’t get away with. Armed with that knowledge, you can push harder, the corners getting faster as a rhythm builds and your smile grows with it. It’s the manic engine that dominates the experience, though. On its own, its character and noise are enough to make Honda’s little roadster a must-drive. But throw in the dancing chassis, remarkable usability and astonishing record for reliability and suddenly the S2000 seems more like a must-have.

HONDA S2000 Not the perfect roadster but one of the most usable and huge fun. And with prices on the rise, a great buy

AAAAC Price Engine Power Torque Gearbox Kerb weight 0-62mph Top speed Economy CO2/tax band RIVALS

£5000-£18,000 4 cyls, 1997cc, petrol 237bhp at 8300rpm 162lb ft at 6500rpm 6-spd manual 1285kg 6.2sec 150mph 28.2mpg (combined) na BMW Z3, Porsche Boxster, Mercedes-Benz SLK

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 71


A L FA R O M E O Mito 3dr hatch AAABC 1.4 Cloverleaf 136 7.9 21.1 6.9 7.3 2.7 168 184 23.2 36/42 Giulietta 5dr hatch AAABC 2.0 JTDm 135 8.4 22.3 7.7 7.9 2.7 168 258 34.8 40/57 4C 2dr coupé/convertible AAACC Spider 160 5.1 12.4 4.0 5.8 2.97 237 258 29.6 32/44

1265

7.4.10

1475 13.10.10 940

27.1.16

ALPINA B3 Biturbo 4dr saloon AAAAB B3 Biturbo 155 4.7 10.3 3.8 6.8 2.9 404 443 41.5

27/35

1610 29.8.13

ARIEL Atom 0dr open AAAAB V8 170 3.0 5.7 1.9 3.7 2.55 475 268 16.4 21/37 Nomad 0dr open AAAAA Nomad 125 4.5 12.7 3.9 7.7 3.10 235 221 26.7 —/—

650

10.8.11

735

24.6.15

ASTON MARTIN V8 Vantage 2dr coupé AAAAC V8 Roadster 175 5.2 12.0 3.6 7.9 GT8 190 4.6 10.4 3.6 6.1 DB11 2dr coupé AAAAB Launch Edition 200 4.0 8.4 3.0 10.1 Rapide 4dr saloon AAAAC Rapide S 190 5.3 11.3 4.3 8.3

2.7 380 302 26.0 17/22 2.6 440 361 25.3 19/29

1713 25.4.07 1530 12.10.16

2.6 600 516 46.2 24/34

1910

3.03 550 457 33.6 19/23

1990 20.3.13

21.9.16

1165 10.11.10 1390 28.5.14

148 236 30 48/59 201 258 30.7 45/49 362 343 34.2 26/37

1355 26.9.12 1540 31.12.14 1595 10.6.15

187 295 37.1

1940

45/50

4.11.15

237 368 35.7 32/43

1755 25.7.07

201 295 39.9 34/46 552 516 40.0 20/28

1805 19.10.11 2010 3.7.13

241 369 42.9 31/40

1940

346 590 53.1

28/35

2130 16.6.10

227 273 30.1 394 354 35.1

29/35 27/37

1305 26.11.14 1440 7.12.16

9.2.11

148 184 29.4 45/56

1265

9.11.16

175 280 35.8 33/46 306 310 32.4 32.4

1710 1655

16.11.11 1.1.14

268 443 47.6 32/36 429 664 47.6 24/38

2245 12.8.15 2330 26.10.16

602 413 26.8 15/23

1555 30.12.15

BENTLEY

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb/ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

30-70mph

Mpg test/touring

1585 18.9.13 1585 9.7.14

36/46 27/33 19/28

1830 31.3.10 1925 23.5.12 1975 29.12.11

33/45

1840

2.11.11

40/49

1795

11.11.15

294wh/m 1390 22.1.14 50/40

1560

43/49

1625 14.10.15

17.9.14

37/43

1825

34/45

1895 27.8.14

28/34 21/26

2265 13.11.13 2350 13.5.15

26/31

2275 11.6.08

12.1.11

Veyron 2dr coupé AAAAB Super Sport 268 2.6 5.0 1.7

5.9 2.6 1183 1106 40.6 12/18

1995

2.3.11

C AT E R H A M Seven 2dr roadster AAAAC CSR 260 143 4.1 9.8 3.1 4.4 3.3 260 200 22.8 24/26 160 100 8.4 — 8.7 7.6 4.8 80 79 16.7 39/45 620S 145 3.8 9.2 3.2 5.7 2.7 310 219 21.2 25/29

570 11.10.05 490 20.11.13 610 9.3.16

CHEVROLET Camaro 2dr coupé AAAAC 6.2 V8 155 5.6 12.4 4.5 12.2 2.7 426 419 43.3 23/29 Corvette 2dr coupé AAAAC Stingray 181 4.4 9.4 3.3 11.7 2.3 460 465 48.4 22/33

1175 20.6.12 1539 8.10.14

C H RYS LE R 300C 4dr saloon AAACC 3.0 Executive 144 7.3 21.1 7.5

*4.5 2.6 236 399 38.8 30/34

2040 29.8.12

27.4 18/27 34.9 7/15

2470 2375

44.5 18/26

2475

7.8.13

44.8 18/21

2745

21.9.11

48.2 20/25

4.4.12 1.6.11

2440 18.5.16

1 Series 3dr/5dr hatch AAABC 116d ED Plus 124 10.2 30.0 10.0 17.3 — 114 199 37.7 2 Series 3dr coupé/convertible AAAAB 220d SE 143 7.8 20.9 7.3 8.8 2.9 181 280 39.6 220d C’vble 140 8.5 24.7 8.4 9.0 2.1 187 295 34.5 M235i 155 6.3 14.7 5.7 5.4 2.7 322 332 28.1 M2 155 4.4 10.3 3.6 6.2 2.6 365 343 33.7 2 Series Active Tourer 5dr MPV AAAAC 218d Luxury 129 8.9 26.5 8.7 12.1 3.0 148 243 40.4 3 Series 4dr saloon/5dr estate/5dr hatch AAAAB 320d Sport 146 7.7 20.9 7.6 9.7 2.6 181 280 36.2 330d Touring 155 5.5 14.2 5.1 8.8 2.6 255 413 45.2 318d Sport GT 130 9.5 28.6 9.5 12.4 2.7 141 236 36.5

54/60

1395 27.5.15

46/62 50/53 26/35 31/37

1450 19.3.14 1610 1.4.15 1530 23.4.14 1595 15.6.16

42/56

1450 24.12.14

41/57 43/54 50/57

1535 22.2.12 1735 21.11.12 1615 17.7.13

Weight (kg)

TEST DATE

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb/ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

B-Max 5dr MPV AAAAB 1.0T Ecoboost 117 11.6 39.0 11.1 11.0 2.8 118 Fiesta 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 Zetec 109 11.9 43.4 11.9 21.8 2.7 95 ST-2 137 7.0 17.0 6.0 7.1 2.6 180 Focus 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 TDCi Zetec 121 10.9 36.3 10.9 10.3 3.35 118 RS 165 5.3 13.9 5.3 6.9 3.5 345 Grand C-Max 5dr MPV AAAAB 2.0 TDCi T’ium 124 9.2 28.6 8.8 11.1 2.8 138 S-Max 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 TDCi T’im 123 10.5 32.0 10.4 13.9 2.5 148 Grand Tourneo Connect 5dr MPV AAAAC 1.6 TDCi T’ium 103 13.2 — 13.9 19.1 2.9 114 Mondeo 4dr saloon/5dr/estate AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 130 10.0 28.8 9.4 12.7 3.1 148 Mustang 2dr coupé AAAAC 5.0 V8 GT F’back 155 5.2 11.6 4.2 9.4 2.7 410 Ecosport 5dr SUV AABCC 1.5 TDCi 99 14.3 — 15.2 14.4 2.7 89 Kuga 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 122 10.9 44.2 11.8 7.4 2.6 161 Edge 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 TDCi 131 9.7 27.6 9.2 5.6* 2.6 207

1345

2.1.13

94 21.9 34/41 177 26.5 32/41

1090 15.10.08 1163 15.5.13

199 33.1 59/63 325 27.3 28/37

1343 28.1.15 1599 4.5.16

236 35.6 37/48

1705 17.11.10

C3 5dr hatch AAABC P’tech 110 Flair 117 9.6 36.6 9.4 10.5 2.6 C4 5dr hatch AAACC 2.0 HDi Excl. 129 8.5 25.2 7.9 9.2 3.15 C4 Cactus 5dr hatch AAACC 1.6 BlueHDi 100 114 11.8 41.2 11.7 7.2 2.9 C4 Grand Picasso 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 BlueHDi 130 10.1 30.1 9.6 12.5 2.9

27

47/62

1050 28.12.16

148 251 34.2 43/49

1470

5.1.11

99

1225

16.7.14

187 36.1

47/62

148 273 34.7 44/52

1430 27.11.13

DACIA

3 5dr hatch AAABC BlueHDi 120 118 9.9 32.2 9.4 11.1 3.1 118 4 Crossback 5dr hatch AAACC BlueHDi 120 117 12.0 48.8 12.3 18.0 2.9 118 5 5dr hatch AAABC 2.0 HDi 160 134 9.1 26.5 8.7 11.0 2.9 161

79

20.3 32/38

941

27.2.13

210 36.4 59/67

1150 23.3.16

221 36.7 49/50

1290

251 40.1

1660 18.4.12

42/55

6.1.16

FERRARI 1525 25.5.16 1630

6.11.13

F I AT 3.0 68 3.0 84

1785

6.8.14

258 38

1597

14.1.15

53/56

391 35.1

19/25

1720 24.2.16

151

39/48

1384

251 31.6

34/39

1707 13.3.13

332 37

36/39

1949 27.7.16

28

3.9.14

G40R 2dr coupé AAAAC 2.0 140 6.3 17.2 6.1

8.3 3.6 175 140 22.6 28/-

880

5.10.11

1480 1378

11.1.12 5.8.15

H O N DA Civic 5dr hatch AAABC 2.2 i-DTEC EX 135 8.3 24 Type R GT 167 5.5 13.4 NSX 2dr coupé AAAAB NSX 191 3.3 7.3 HR-V 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 i-DTEC SE 119 10.5 34.9 CR-V 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 i-DTEC EX 118 9.7 31.3

7.9 12.2 — 148 258 38.7 38/55 5.0 6.7 2.7 306 295 27 32/37 2.6 4.3 2.7 573 476 35.8 25/32

1725 5.10.16

10.4 11.2 —

1324

9.9

118

221 34.4 56/57

5.9 2.5 148 258 32.4 36/45

16.9.15

1806 24.10.12

HYU N DAI i10 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SE 96 14.7 — 16.2 i20 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 SE 114 12.2 42.4 12.1 i30 5dr hatch AAABC 1.6 CRDi Active 115 11.7 38.3 11.5 i40 5dr estate AAABC 1.7 CRDi 118 12.2 41.4 12.5 ix35 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 Premium 112 10.9 40.9 11.1 Santa Fe 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2 CRDi 118 9.0 27.6 9.2

19.9 2.9 65

70

20.0 44/51

925

29.1.14

17.3 3.0 99

99

21.8

1060

7.1.14

43/54

14.8 2.8 109 192 22.5 49/60

1360 14.3.12

12.3 2.9 114

192 29.4 44/51

1555

7.9.11

36/44

1695

17.3.10

37.5 36/43

1940

19.9.12

9.2 2.9 134 236 29.1 *5.5 2.7 194 311

INFINITI Q30 5dr hatch AAABC 1.6t Premium 124 9.4 26.4 9.1 15.5 2.85 120 148 31.6 35/39 Q50 4dr saloon AABCC 2.2 Premium 143 8.7 25.0 8.7 5.1* 3.0 168 295 42.5 49/59 Q70 4dr saloon AABCC 2.2 Prm’m Tech 137 9.6 28.6 9.6 15.8 3.2 168 295 40.8 39/45

1436 17.2.16 1750

5.2.14

1896 25.2.15

JAG UAR F-Type 2dr convertible/3dr coupé AAAAB V8 S cabrio 186 4.0 9.4 3.4 8.0 2.8 488 460 V6 S coupé 171 4.9 12.1 4.2 12.7 2.7 375 339 XF 4dr saloon AAAAB R-Sport 2.0 136 9.4 26.1 9.0 16.1 2.9 178 318 XE 4dr saloon AAAAB R-Sport 2.0 147 7.6 19.0 6.9 13.3 2.7 197 206 XJ 4dr saloon AAAAC 3.0D LWB 155 6.3 16.5 6.6 *3.6 2.7 271 443 F-Pace 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0d AWD 129 9.2 30.9 9.7 7.4 — 178 318

46.8 19/29 36.2 24/33

1655 12.6.13 1594 11.6.14

44.1

1595 2.12.15

47/56

33.8 30/49

1530

1.7.15

43.5 28/36

1960

9.6.10

41.3

1775

11.5.16

37/40

Renegade 5dr 4x4 AAABC 2.0 M’jet 4x4 L’d 113 10.8 37.6 11.2 10.0 3.5 138 258 34.0 41/53 Cherokee 5dr 4x4 AABCC 2.0 140 4x4 Ltd 117 12.3 43.4 13.0 13.8 2.7 138 258 34.7 39/43

1502 28.10.15 1846 24.6.14

KIA Picanto 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.0 1 95 13.8 — 14.9 Carens 5dr MPV AAABC 1.7 CRDi 2 112 12.9 51.2 13.9 Rio 5dr hatch AAABC 1.4i 2 114 11.4 39.1 11.5 Optima 4dr saloon AAACC 2 1.7 CRDi 125 10.5 35.4 10.4 Niro 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 GDI DCT 2 101 9.7 30.0 9.5 Sportage 5dr SUV AAABC 1.7 CRDi ISG 2 109 12.1 46.4 13.1 Sorento 5dr 4x4 AAABC 2.2 CRDi KX-4 128 9.3 28.6 9.4

24.4 3.2 68

70

21.3

33/54

950

15.2 2.8 114

192 31.7

47/56

1581 29.5.13

19.1 3.0 107 101

23.3 40/50

10.6 3.2 134 239 31.9

41/46

3.8.11

1155

14.9.11

1535

8.2.12

12.8 3.5 139 108/125 31.9 49/50

1500 31.8.16

16.8 3.3 114

207 34.4 50/51

1500

2.3.16

197 325 35.2 35/39

1953

8.4.15

*5.7 —

L AN D ROVE R

488 GTB 2dr coupé AAAAA 488 GTB 205 3.0 5.9 2.0 3.7 2.43 661 561 28.9 —/— F12 2dr coupé AAAAB F12 Berlinetta 211 3.0 6.5 2.3 5.4 2.2 731 509 29.7 13/18 Panda 5dr hatch AAAAB 1.2 Easy 102 14.6 — 15.3 19.9 4x4 TwinAir 103 14.6 — 15.8 16.0 500 3dr hatch AAAAC Abarth 595 130 7.5 20.1 6.4 7.0 500 Twinair 108 11.7 — 13 15.3 Tipo 5dr hatch AABCC 1.6 M’jet Lounge 124 9.6 31.6 9.8 8.7 124 Spider 2dr roadster AAABC Lusso Plus 134 7.3 20.9 7.1 7.2

1725 26.8.15

236 26.7 40/45

JEEP

108 151

Sandero 5dr hatch AAACC 1.2 75 Access 97 15.3 — 17.6 23.0 3.0 74

258 39.5 44/46

G I N E T TA

CITROEN

DS

BMW

72 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

28/37 29/36

B U G AT T I

120 148 30.2 34/43 228 273 25.6 30/39

Continental GT 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC GTC V8 187 4.5 10.8 3.9 *2.7 2.8 500 487 GT 198 4.6 10.9 4.2 *2.4 2.5 567 516 Flying Spur 4dr saloon AAABC W12 200 4.5 10.4 3.6 8.4 3.0 616 590 Mulsanne 4dr saloon AAAAC 6.75 V8 184 5.7 13.7 4.8 *2.8 2.6 505 752 Bentayga 5dr SUV AAAAB W12 187 4.9 11.6 4.4 8.7 3.0 600 664

50-70mph

0-60mph

0-100mph

Top speed

4 Series 2dr coupé AAAAC 435i M Sport 155 5.5 13.2 5.2 6.3 2.7 302 295 28.2 M4 155 4.1 8.8 3.2 6.1 2.4 425 406 34.0 5 Series 4dr saloon/5dr GT/5dr estate AAAAC 530d SE 155 6.4 16.1 5.4 *3.3 3.0 241 398 48.1 ActiveHybrid5 155 5.6 13.5 5.0 10.5 2.6 335 332 40.4 M5 155 4.3 9.0 3.6 6.4 2.8 552 502 38.2 6 Series 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC 640d M Sport 155 5.3 13.1 4.6 *2.7 2.6 309 464 42.1 7 Series 4dr saloon AAAAC 730Ld 153 6.4 17.1 6.0 8.2 3.1 261 457 50.2 i3 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.3 Range Extd 93 8.1 — 7.6 *4.9 3.4 168 184 — i8 2dr coupé AAAAB i8 155 4.5 10.6 3.7 3.3 2.8 357 420 33.3 X1 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive20d xLine 136 8.2 24.2 8.0 11.8 2.8 187 295 35.1 X3 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive20d SE 130 8.4 27.4 8.7 10.7 3.15 181 280 33.5 X4 5dr SUV AAABC xDrive30d 145 5.9 16.9 5.8 11.1 2.6 255 416 43.7 X5 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive M50d 155 5.7 15.3 5.2 9.5 2.9 376 546 40.5 M 155 4.2 9.8 3.5 10.2 2.8 567 553 42.3 x6 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive35d 147 7.3 21.2 7.1 *4.1 2.6 282 428 34.0

AU D I A1 3dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 TFSI Sport 126 8.4 22.4 8.9 12.8 2.2 S1 155 5.9 14.4 5.2 5.4 2.6 A3 3dr/5dr hatch AAAAC 2.0 TDI Sport 134 8.9 25.9 11.4 10.8 2.7 S’back e-tron 138 7.9 20.9 6.6 8.5 3.0 RS3 S’Back 155 4.1 10.3 3.7 7.7 2.8 A4 4dr saloon AAAAC 2.0 TDI S line 147 8.4 22.2 7.3 11.2 3.1 A5 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC 3.0 TDI quattro 155 6.4 16.6 5.9 8.0 2.7 A6 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 3.0 TDI SE 155 7.2 20.3 6.4 3.9 2.9 RS6 Avant 155 3.7 8.7 3.1 12.8 2.4 A7 Sportback 4dr saloon AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI 155 6.7 18.7 6.5 *4.0 2.8 A8 4dr saloon AAAAC 4.2 V8 TDI 155 5.0 13.0 5.4 *3.4 2.5 TT 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC 2.0 TFSI S-line 155 6.6 14.5 5.0 6.5 2.5 RS 155 3.6 8.4 3.0 7.8 2.7 Q2 5dr SUV AAABC 1.4 TFSI Sport 132 8.1 23.9 8.2 9.8 2.7 Q3 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 TDI SE 132 8.3 25.5 8.1 *11.5 2.7 RS 155 5.0 12.6 4.5 8.3 2.8 Q7 5dr SUV AAAAC 3.0 TDI S line 145 6.2 17.6 6.2 *3.8 — SQ7 4.0 TDI 155 5.1 12.6 4.4 7.0 2.9 R8 2dr coupé AAAAC V10 Plus 205 3.1 6.7 2.6 5.7 2.8

147 23.6 35/41

FORD

» 30 -70 M PH Indicates overtaking ability through the gears » 50 -70 M PH Recorded in top gear (*kickdown with an automatic) and demonstrates flexibility » FU E L ECO N O MY Prior to 7.1.15, figures are touring, recorded over a set road route, and test average. From 7.1.15 on, figures are average and extra-urban, to the What Car?/True MPG standard » B R AKI N G 60 - 0 M PH Recorded on a high-grip surface at a test track » M PH/1000 R PM Figure is the speed achieved in top gear Make and Model

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb/ft)

Braking 60-0mph

Power (bhp)

30-70mph

50-70mph

0-60mph

0-100mph

Top speed

Make and Model

No one produces as thorough a judgement on a new car as Autocar. As well as acceleration, braking, fuel economy and noise tests, we carry out benchmark limit-handling tests, setting lap times if appropriate. But we don’t just drive at the track, essential as it is for finding the limits of performance; we also drive on a wide range of roads. We aim to produce the most complete, objective verdict in the business, so you can be sure how good a car is. Where we have tested more than one model in a range, the rating is for the range overall; where a model within the range meets our coveted five-star standard, it is highlighted in yellow.

0-60mph

Facts, figures, from the best road tests

Top speed

Make and Model

ROAD TEST RESULTS

75 22.2 39/49 107 20.8 37/44

1020 25.4.12 1050 17.4.13

2.8 158 170 23.9 34/39 3.3 84 107 22.9 35/39

1035 26.2.14 1070 24.11.10

2.9 118

1295

236 35.0 49/62

2.8 138 177 24.9 34/38

2.11.16

1050 28.9.16

Discovery Sport 5dr SUV AAAAC HSE Luxury 117 8.9 27.6 9.0 11.8 2.4 188 Range Rover 5dr SUV AAAAB 4.4 SDV8 135 7.0 19.0 6.7 *3.8 2.9 334 Range Rover Evoque 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2 DS4 121 8.4 30.8 9.5 *5.7 3.1 187 Range Rover Sport 5dr SUV AAAAB 3.0 TDV6 130 7.8 22.5 7.5 12.2 3.1 255 SVR 162 4.4 10.3 3.8 12.6 2.6 542

310 47.2 34/37

1863 18.3.15

516 41.8

2625 12.12.12

25/35

310 37.3 30/36

1815

442 43.1 502 41.8

33/42 22/19

2115 2.10.13 2335 15.4.15

13.7.11

39/48

1720 21.8.13

46/52

1450 23.3.11

LEXUS IS 4dr saloon AAABC IS300h 143 8.1 20.2 7.3 *4.3 2.7 220 163 — CT200h 5dr hatch AAACC SE-L 112 11.1 37.2ff 11.4 *7.0 2.7 134 105/153 —


1765 18.2.15

14.3 2.9 134 118 24.7 39/42 7.2 2.5 243 184 24.7 27/32

900 26.5.10 920 29.6.16

6.8 2.4 345 295 34.8 21/26

1430 30.3.11

5.5 2.5 345 295 27

1176

21/30

3.4.13

M A S E R AT I GranTurismo 2dr coupé AAABC 4.2 GT 177 5.6 13.0 4.9 *2.8 2.8 GranCabrio 2dr cabriolet AAABC 4.7 V8 175 5.1 11.9 4.5 11.2 2.4 Ghibli 4dr saloon AAABC Diesel 155 6.5 17.2 6.0 5.1 2.7 Levante 5dr SUV AAACC Diesel 143 6.8 19.9 6.9 4.3 3.4

400 339 32.1

18/27

1975 2.2.08

433 362 32.1

17/22

2085 14.7.10

271 443 43.3 31/40 271 443 46

3.1 89

26/42

109 27.9 51/55

3.0 148 280 29.7 46/60 2.9 113

199 31.3

2.7 173 309 35 3.3 129 111 —

35/40 44/56

24.5 46/49

104 199 34.8 59/60

2.3 148 280 34.9 24/55

MCLAREN 570S 2dr coupé AAAAA 3.8 V8 204 3.1 6.4 2.2 10.2 2.6 562 443 36.5 23/37 650S 2dr coupé/roadster AAAAB 3.8 V8 Spider 204 3.2 6.3 2.2 5.9 2.5 641 500 35.4 18/24 P1 2dr coupé AAAAA P1 217 2.8 5.2 2.2 6.0 2.3 903 664 36.0 19.6/—

MERCEDES-AMG C63 4dr saloon AAAAB C63 155 4.4 9.7 3.4 7.5 2.7 469 479 38.1 19/25 GT 2dr coupé AAAAC S 193 3.6 7.8 2.8 5.5 2.5 503 479 34.7 20/29 SLC 2dr convertible AAABC SLC 43 155 5.5 12.3 4.2 12.7 3.0 362 384 40.4 27/33

42/54

1036 9.10.13

13.1 2.9 108 192 35.7 50/57

81

21.8

1307 12.11.14

12.7 3.0 115 117 19.5 36/46 7.2 2.5 197 184 23.8 31/39

1230 3.11.10 1295 22.5.13

7.3 2.8 107 207 8.76

320Wh/m 1545 27.4.11

12.9 2.9 109 192 35.0 49/56

1365 19.2.14

11.2 3.0 128 236 32.8 42/48

1550 13.8.14

5.3 2.7 562 470 28.0 22/31

1752 16.11.16

18.7.12 11.2.15

13.9 3.0 114

199 38.5 48/59

1395

15.1.14

5.8 2.57 161

255 32.3 32/46

1680 25.5.11

11.8 3.2 114

199 32.7 49/59

1180

9.8 3.1 107 192 28.1

20/48

19.6.13

1547 27.1.10

2.5 380 310 25.5 28/—

1340 23.9.15

2.5 296 280 25.8 26/36 2.5 345 310 25.8 28/29

1335 8.6.16 1430 10.8.16

2.4 493 339 24.2 20/28

1495 19.8.15

2.9 414 369 36.4 27/31

1535 20.1.16

2.3 874 944 41.2

28/44

1740 22.10.14

2.5 493 567 45.0 20/28

2045 20.9.09

2.4 394 406 35.7 22/31

2000 4.6.14

RADICAL SR3 SL 2dr roadster AAAAC SR3 SL 161 3.4 8.4 3.7 4.8 2.7 245 265 24.9 14/-

3.6.15

1715

29.7.15

1595

Twingo 5dr hatch AAABC Dynamique 94 17.6 — 19.1 29.4 Zoe 5dr hatch AAABC Dynamique 84 12.3 — 13.9 9.1 7.11.12 Clio 5dr hatch AAAAC 113 13.4 — 13.9 19.1 14.8.13 0.9 TCE RS 200 Turbo 143 7.4 20.9 6.9 9.1 29.2.12 Mégane 3dr hatch AAAAB 275 Trophy-R 158 6.4 14.0 5.0 6.4 23.7.14 New Mégane 5dr hatch AAACC 1.5 dCi Dyn S Nav 116 11.1 35.2 11.1 13.2 26.6.13 Kad jar 5dr SUV AAAAC 14.6 17.2 18.11.15 1.5dCi D’qe S Nv 113 14.5 —

1475 1555 1495 1700 1525 1555

1780 24.6.09 1775 1980

13.4.11 9.1.13

1975 16.10.13 2070 3.12.14 1535 14.5.14 1845 10.2.16 2310

2.5.12

2455 24.7.13 1815

8.8.12

1150 25.12.13 1395 20.7.16

148 243 34.9 51/52

1320 25.11.15

134 162 31.0

1280

6.4.16

1490

21.7.10

MITSUBISHI

1675 27.3.13 1810 16.4.14

MORGAN

765

30.11.11

R E N A U LT

6.7.16

1235 2.4.14 1160 20.2.13

Plus 8 2dr roadster AAACC 4.8 V8 — 4.9 11.1 4.0 8.3 3.2 390 370 36.0 24/32 3 Wheeler 2dr roadster AAAAA 3 Wheeler 115 8.0 29.9 7.7 5.1 3.56 80 103 21.3 30/-

1080 1160

1715

189 221 26.4 35/54 215 192 23.6 34/45

ASX 5dr SUV AAABC 1.8 DiD 3 124 10.0 28.8 10.1 8.6 2.8 148 221 29.6 49/57 Outlander 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 DiD GX5 118 10.2 32.9 10.1 11.1 3.07 147 265 34.7 38/45 PHEV GX4hs 106 10.0 30.5 9.5 6.2 3.0 200 245 — 44/38

9.1 2.9 81 87 21.2 41/45 6.7 2.9 205 221 25.6 41/42

Old Cayman 2dr coupé AAAAA 1050 2.9.15 GT4 183 4.6 10.0 3.5 6.0 718 2dr coupé/roadster AAAAB 1275 22.7.15 Boxster 171 5.4 12.2 4.3 5.2 Cayman S 177 4.8 10.5 3.9 4.8 1575 13.6.12 911 2dr coupé AAAAB GT3 RS 193 3.4 7.8 2.8 6.9 New 911 2dr coupé AAAAB Carrera S 190 4.5 9.4 3.4 7.3 1440 30.3.16 918 Spyder 2dr coupé AAAAA 4.6 V8 214 2.6 5.3 1.9 2.2 1468 30.7.13 Panamera 4dr saloon AAABC 4.8 Turbo 188 4.0 9.2 3.4 13.5 — 7.5.14 Macan 5dr SUV AAAAB Turbo 165 4.7 11.8 4.3 7.9

2.9 69

67

2.9 87

162 7.8

20.8 42/52

865 29.10.14

250Wh/m 1468

31.7.13

2.8 89 100 23.8 38/47 2.8 197 177 20.8 32/37

1009 6.3.13 1204 23.10.13

3.1 271 266 27

1297

5.11.14

2.8 108 192 33.9 47.2

1387

17.8.16

2.3 108 192 35.0 52/69

1380 21.10.15

26/33

R O L L S - R OYC E Phantom 4dr saloon AAAAC Phantom 149 6.0 14.7 5.3 *3.0 2dr Coupé 155 6.1 15.5 5.9 *3.4 Ghost 4dr saloon AAAAC Ghost 155 4.9 10.6 3.9 *2.3 Wraith 2dr coupé AAAAB Wraith 155 4.6 10.0 4.5 *2.1 Dawn 2dr convertible AAAAC Dawn 155 5.2 11.6 4.2 *2.4

2.7 453 531 38.7 8/17 2.9 453 531 38.7 7/18

2485 2.4.03 2495 27.8.08

2.6 563 575 46.0 18/23

2450

2.9 624 590 45.9 15/27

2435 21.5.14

2.9 563 575 47.7

19/25

2560

31/40

1172 21.10.09

9.6 2.9 181 280 35.6 47/54 7.1 2.7 276 258 27.2 28/36

1350 4.9.13 1441 26.3.14

7.7.10

1.6.16

S E AT Ibiza 3/5dr hatch AAAAC Cupra 1.4 TSI 140 7.0 19.6 6.3 Leon 3/5dr hatch AAAAC SC 2.0 TDI FR 142 8.0 22.1 7.5 Cupra SC 280 155 5.9 13.6 4.4 Alhambra 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 TDI 170 DSG 127 10.5 38.3 11.2 Ateca 5dr SUV AAAAB 1.6 TDI SE 114 10.5 35.6 9.3

*3.6 2.4 178 184 21.3

*7.0 3.0 168 258 30.5 35/40

1935

14.0 2.9 114

184 36.4 50/62

1300 19.10.16

1.12.10

97

880

SMART Fortwo 3dr hatch AAACC Prime 96 11.2 — 11.4 12.3 3.2 89

520

Tivoli XLV AAACC ELX auto 107 12.0 44.5 12.6 7.9 3.1 113

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb/ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

50-70mph

21.0 2.6 168 184 31.9

1465 21.3.12

34/36

1537

13.1.16

11.0 2.9 145 258 33.0 41/49

1540

5.6.13

9.4 2.8 296 300 27.6 23/31

1534 25.6.14

SUZUKI Swift 3/5dr hatch AAABC 1.2 SZ4 103 11.6 37.2 11.1 18.7 Celerio 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SZ4 96 12.9 — 14.3 25.0 Baleno 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0T B’jet SZ5 124 9.8 29.5 9.7 11.2 SX4 S-Cross 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 DDiS SZ4 111 10.0 32.6 10.1 8.9 Vitara 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 SZ5 112 9.5 29.8 9.5 15.5

3.0 93

87

21.5

3.0 67

66

22.4 54/57

2.9 110

125 26.3 50/55

950

2.57 118

236 35.1

57/67

1290 30.10.13

115

24.3 49/47

1075 29.4.15

118

Model S 4dr saloon AAAAB Performance 130 4.7 11.7 3.7 2.2 2.7 416 443 8.7 P90D 155 3.5 9.1 3.0 1.9 2.9 525 713 8.5

43/47

1010

15.9.10

835 25.3.15 3.8.16

411Wh/m 2108 11.9.13 420Wh/m 2200 20.4.16

T OYO TA Aygo 5dr hatchback AAABC 1.0 VVTi 99 13.9 — 15.2 24.1 Yaris 5dr hatchback AAABC 1.33 TR 114 11.5 43.6 10.9 19.6 Verso-S 5dr hatchback AAACC 1.3 T Spirit 106 12.1 38.5 11.7 19.2 GT86 2dr coupé AAAAA 2.0 manual 140 7.4 18.8 6.8 10.6 Auris 3/5dr hatch AAACC 1.6 T Spirit 117 9.9 30.7 9.4 13.4 Prius 5dr hatch AAAAC Business E’tion 112 11.1 32.0 10.7 *6.4 Mirai 4dr saloon AAAAC Mirai 111 10.1 36.5 10.2 *6.5 C-HR 5dr SUV AAAAC Excel 1.8 Hybrid 106 11.6 43.5 11.9 *7.3

3.0 68

70

22.5 49/63

900

2.9 98

92

23.7 42/51

1065 28.9.11

2.9 98

92

39/48

1125

9.3.11

23.5 30/45

1235

4.7.12

2.7 122 116

20.0 30/37

1275

17.1.07

3.1 121

1400 16.3.16

2.6 197 151

21.7

2.7.14

53/63

3.3 152 247 22.5 44/62

1400 27.4.16

2.7 121

49/60

1420

4.1.17

VA U X H A L L Adam 3dr hatch AAACC 1.2 Jam Ecoflex 103 14.3 — 15.3 20.8 2.8 Viva 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SE A/C 106 13.0 — 14.1 19.0 — Corsa 3/ 5dr hatch AAABC 1.4T SRi VX-Line 115 11.7 45.1 12.1 15.3 2.9 VXR 143 7.2 18.3 6.4 7.8 2.4 Meriva 5dr MPV AAABC 1.4T 140 SE 122 9.4 28.3 8.7 13.1 2.6 Astra 5dr hatch/estate AAAAC 1.6 CDTi 136 SRi 127 8.8 25.7 8.8 8.6 2.6 ST CDTi B’tbo SRi137 8.4 22.2 7.7 8.1 2.6 Insignia 5dr hatch/estate AAAAC 2.0 CDTi 160 135 9.1 25.3 8.4 10.3 2.7 Zafira Tourer 5dr MPV AAABC 2.0 CDTi 165 129 10.4 36.8 10.2 14.3 3.2 Mokka 5dr SUV AAABC 1.4T 118 10.0 30.6 9.4 13.7 3.0 VXR8 4dr saloon AAAAB GTS 155 4.8 10.2 3.7 7.4 2.5

68

85

21.8

39/45

1086

6.2.13

74

70

20.3 49/55

938

15.7.15

99 148 34.8 37/42 202 181 23.8 29/34

1176 19.11.14 1280 6.5.15

138 148 25.5 31/37

1465

134 236 33.4 55/58 158 258 33.7 57/59

1350 30.9.15 1435 13.4.16

158 258 36.1

2.6.10

19/44

1655 19.11.08

163 258 37.7 38/46

1805 15.2.12

138 148 26.1

32/40

1350 28.11.12

577 546 34.9 18/25

1882 30.4.14

V O L K S WA G E N Up 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.0 High Up 106 13.8 — 14.7 18.6 2.8 74 Polo 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 TSI BlueGT 130 7.5 22.2 7.1 8.0 2.9 138 Golf 3/5dr hatch AAAAB GTI Perf DSG 155 6.5 16.4 5.9 8.9 2.8 227 GTI Clubsport S 165 6.1 12.7 4.9 5.5 2.5 306 2.0 TDI 134 9.6 27.6 8.6 11.7 2.9 148 R 155 4.8 12.0 4.3 6.5 2.9 296 e-Golf 87 10.5 — 11.0 7.0 2.7 113 GTE 138 7.7 18.2 6.1 7.7 2.5 201 Scirocco 2dr coupé AAAAB 2.0 TSI R 155 6.5 13.7 4.9 5.9 2.7 261 Passat 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.0 TDI 190 GT 144 8.7 23.6 8.1 13.1 3.2 187 GTE 140 7.6 19.0 6.1 7.8 3.3 215 Touran 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 SE 128 9.9 29.3 9.7 13.6 3.2 148 Tiguan 5dr SUV AAAAB 2.0 TDI 150 SE 127 10.4 33 9.6 12.4 3.2 148 Touareg 5dr SUV AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI SE 135 6.9 19.8 6.8 *3.9 2.7 236 Caravelle 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 BiTDI Exec 126 11.6 36.1 11.7 10.2 3.2 201

118

26.1

45/49

1109

184 32.3 46/56

1230

118

1175

26.1

40/47

V40 5dr hatch AAABC D3 SE Lux 130 8.9 26.6 8.7 S60 4dr saloon AAAAC D4 SE Nav 143 7.6 20.4 6.9 21.1.15 S90 4dr saloon AAAAC D4 Momentum 140 8.2 22.1 7.9 10.4.13 V60 5dr estate AAABC D5 SE Lux 143 8.1 21.0 7.1 5.12.12 Polestar 155 5.3 13.1 4.6 XC60 5dr SUV AAAAC 9.9.15 D5 SE Lux 118 9.5 30.5 9.5 XC90 5dr SUV AAAC 7.10.09 D5 Momentum 137 8.3 23.9 8.3 4.3.15

251 37.2 47/54

1505

236 34.5 36/46

1545

251 33.5 37/48

1751 23.11.16

S S A N GYO N G 1230 22.8.12

10.1 2.7 145 258 34.7 39/51

70

945

7.12.11

184 28.1

20.5 44/59 40/49

1212

13.2.13

258 280 236 280 199 258

32/38 29/36 44/56 34/29 244Wh/m 44/45

1402 10.7.13 1285 24.8.16 1390 16.1.13 1495 9.4.14 1585 10.9.14 1599 20.5.15

34.4 26.9 37.4 27.1 7.6 7.6

258 26.3 28/34

1400 24.2.10

295 37.9 45/52 295 32.3 38/43

1614 1722

4.2.15 7.9.16

251 37.0 54/60

1571

3.2.16

251 40

1683

3.2.16 1.9.10

44/52

406 38.5 32/37

2155

332 22.7 38/45

2386 23.12.15

10.2 2.8 148 258 36.5 46/52

1545 15.8.12

V O LV O 22.3 —/—

S KO DA Fabia 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.2 TSI 90 SE-L 113 12.6 46 12.5 15.0 3.4 89 Octavia 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 1.6 TDI SE 121 11.6 43.0 12.5 13.6 2.7 104 Rapid 4dr saloon AAABC 1.2 TSI 114 11.3 45.5 11.5 14.2 2.9 84 Superb 5dr hatch/estate AAAAB 2.0 TDI SE 135 8.8 24.9 8.2 11.2 2.8 148 Yeti 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDI 140 119 10.7 39.1 11.2 12.3 2.7 138 Kodiaq 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDI Edition 121 9.5 34.7 10.1 12.2 2.8 148

XV 5dr SUV AAACC 2.0D SE 120 8.9 29.1 9.5 Levorg 5dr estate AAACC GT 1.6i L’tronic 130 8.4 24.6 7.9 Forester 5dr SUV AAACC 2.0d XC 118 9.9 36.5 10.5 WRX 4dr saloon AAACC STi Type UK 159 5.4 13.3 5.1

TESLA

PORSCHE

1480 23.1.13

MINI

46/53

1305 14.10.09

PEUGEOT

208 3/5dr hatch AAACC 1.2 VTI Active 109 14.2 — 14.5 2205 30.11.16 GTi 30th 143 6.5 16.1 5.8 308 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.6 e-HDI 115 118 10.1 32.6 10.4 508 SW estate AAAAC 1050 22.4.15 2.0 HDi 163 138 9.6 28.6 9.7 2008 5dr SUV AAABC 1470 4.12.13 1.6 e-HDi 117 10.7 37.8 11.5 5008 5dr MPV AAAAC 1555 16.2.11 1.6 HDi 110 114 13.0 22.0 13.2

MG 3 5dr hatch AAABC 1.5 3Form Spt 108 11.4 41.5 11.6 19.6 2.8 105 101 22.2 37/41 GS 5dr SUV AAACC 1.5 TGI Excite 118 8.9 25.5 8.3 12.4 2.8 164 184 29.3 29/38

Make and Model

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb/ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

20.3 2.9 79

SUBARU

M600 2dr coupé AAAAB M600 225 3.5 6.8 2.5 4.7 2.45 650 604 29.9 18/25

1835 12.3.14

MERCEDES-BENZ A-Class 5dr hatch AAABC A 200 CDI Sport 130 8.9 28.3 9.0 10.1 2.5 134 221 37.1 48/58 A 45 AMG 168 4.2 11.5 4.3 4.5 2.8 355 322 38.1 27/37 B-Class 5dr MPV AAABC B 200 CDI Sport 130 9.4 28.8 9.6 11.9 2.7 134 221 37.8 20/52 C-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC C 220 Bluetec 145 8.1 22.9 8.1 11.7 2.8 168 295 42.4 41/51 CLA 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAABC 220 CDI Sport 143 8.3 23.1 8.0 4.8 2.9 168 258 37.3 44/54 200 CDI S’t S’Brk 134 10.1 29.7 9.6 11.9 3.4 134 221 33.5 53/59 E-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate/2dr convertible AAAAC E 250 CDI auto 149 7.7 20.3 7.4 *4.4 2.9 201 367 34.8 36/42 CLS 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 350 BlueEff. 155 6.5 16.0 5.7 *3.3 2.5 302 273 37.6 29/38 350 CDI S’Brake 155 7.0 18.5 6.4 *3.8 2.9 261 457 39.6 36/43 S-Class 4dr saloon/2dr coupé AAAAA S350 Bluetec 155 7.3 19.0 6.8 *3.9 2.7 255 457 45.6 34/44 S63 AMG coupé 155 4.5 9.6 3.4 6.8 2.7 577 664 42.8 22/25 GLA 5dr SUV AAABC 220 CDI SE 134 8.1 23.8 7.8 4.7 2.65 168 258 36.4 40/48 GLC 5dr SUV AAAAC GLC 250d 143 7.8 23.5 7.8 15.7 3.2 201 369 46.9 39/43 M-Class 5dr SUV AAAAC ML 250 130 8.8 28.4 9.3 11.0 2.9 201 368 36.2 38/41 GL 5dr SUV AAAAC GL350 AMG Spt 137 8.3 24.8 8.2 5.0* 2.6 255 457 37.7 28/33 SL 2dr convertible AAAAC SL 500 155 4.3 9.9 3.6 6.5 2.7 429 516 39.6 10/24

Mini 3dr hatch AAAAB Cooper S 146 6.9 17.1 5.9 6.7 2.5 JCW GP 150 6.6 14.9 5.2 5.6 2.4 Clubman 5dr hatch AAABC Cooper D 132 8.6 25.9 8.2 10.0 2.9 Convertible 2dr convertible AAAAB Cooper 129 9.2 25.4 8.8 12.4 2.7

Note 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.2 Acenta Prm 106 12.6 — 13.4 Pulsar 5dr hatch AAACC 1.5 dCi n-tec 118 10.9 35.5 10.8 Juke 5dr SUV AAABC Acenta 1.6 111 10.3 41.6 9.9 Nismo 1.6 134 6.9 17.2 6.0 Leaf 5dr hatch AAABC Leaf 91 10.9 — 11.4 Qashqai 5dr SUV AAAAB 1.5 dCi 2WD 113 10.8 39.2 11.1 X-Trail 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 dCi 2WD 117 11.2 39.7 11.7 GT-R 2dr coupé AAAAB Recaro 196 3.4 7.8 2.7

NOBLE

MAZDA 2 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 Sky’v-G SE 114 10.4 38.0 7.0 20.2 3 5dr hatch AAAAC 2.2 SE-L 130 9.0 26.6 9.1 9.9 5 5dr MPV AAACC 1.6D Sport 111 12.5 — 13.4 11.1 6 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.2 Sport Nav 139 7.9 21.2 7.1 7.9 MX-5 2dr roadster AAAAB 1.5 SE-L Nav 127 8.4 24.8 7.9 14.7 CX-3 5dr SUV AAABC 1.5D SE-L Nav 110 10.3 34.7 10.3 10.3 CX-5 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 Sport Nav 126 9.4 28.0 9.1 9.7

50-70mph

NISSAN

LOTUS Elise 2dr roadster AAABC 1.6 127 6.7 21.1 7.1 Cup 250 154 4.7 11.9 4.5 Evora 2dr coupé AAAAC Evora S 2+0 172 4.5 11.3 4.0 Exige S 2dr coupé AAAAB Exige S 170 4.1 9.6 3.7

30-70mph

1.10.14

0-100mph

1905

0-60mph

1.8.12

Top speed

1695

Make and Model

TEST DATE

GS 4dr saloon AAABC GS250 144 9.2 26.0 9.0 16.2 2.9 207 187 34.4 26/32 NX 5dr SUV AAACC 300h 112 9.7 30.4 9.1 *5.6 2.7 194 na — 32/38 RC F 2dr coupé AAACC RC F 168 4.8 10.7 3.9 12.9 2.9 471 391 39 24/28

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb/ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

Make and Model

ROAD TEST RESULTS

221 33.2 45/58

9.2 3.0 179 295 39.4 46/59

1580

5.3.14

11.1 2.6 187 295 40.1

1717

13.7.16

40/51

8.2 2.7 202 310 39.2 32/48 9.0 2.6 345 369 34.8 26/32

1700 8.12.10 1834 15.10.14

*5.8 2.9 182 295 33.6 17/36

1930 26.11.08

*5.0 —

2009 17.6.15

222 347 33.6 37/39

ZENOS E10 0dr roadster AAAAB S 140 4.3 11.2 4.1

5.3 2.9 250 295 33.9 21/23

725

7.10.15

1425 14.9.16

6.6.12

4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 73


NEW CARS

A-Z For full reviews of every car listed here, visit our website, autocar.co.uk

ABARTH 595 3dr hatch £15,090-£21,640 Good value hot hatch and great fun to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 T-Jet Competizione 595 Convertible 2dr open £17,090£23,640 Open-top hot hatch has a softer ride than the tin-top car AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 T-Jet C Competizione Biposto 695 3dr hatch £33,055 Fastest Abarth has merit as an entrylevel track car, but a firm ride spoils its otherwise convincing dynamic ability on public roads AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 T-Jet 124 Spider 2dr open £29,565-£31,605 Only a mildly tuned upgrade of Fiat’s standard car but it’s a revelation, albeit one that comes with a hefty price tag AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4T Multijet

A L FA R O M E O Mito 3dr hatch £12,960-£20,500 Likeable hatch is well-equipped, good looking, cheap to run and practical, but dynamic flaws make it a class also-ran AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 TB Twinair 105 Progression Giulietta 5dr hatch £18,700-£28,735 Long in the tooth, but styling and dynamic verve still have the power to seduce. Not rounded enough, nor quite expensive enough to the touch AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 TB Multiair 150 Super Giulia 4dr saloon £29,180-£59,000 Alfa is taking the fight to the Germans with its good-looking saloon. Lacks the finesse of its rivals and is only available as an automatic. However the V6 Quadriofoglio is a compelling car AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d Multijet 180 Super 4C 2dr coupé/spider £52,505-£59,505 Flawed, but the best current Alfa by miles. Rewarding to drive, if not the last word in finesse AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.75T Spider

ALPINA

STAR RATINGS EXPLAINED CCCCC 0-20% Inherently dangerous/ unsafe.Tragically, irredeemably flawed. BCCCC 20-35% Appalling. Massively significant failings. ACCCC 35-50% Very poor. Fails to meet any accepted class boundaries. ABCCC 50-60% Poor. Within acceptable class boundaries in a few areas. Still not recommendable. AACCC 60-65% Off the pace. Below average in nearly all areas. AABCC 5-70% Acceptable. About average in key areas, but disappoints. AAACC 70-75% Competent. Above average in some areas, average in others. Outstanding in none. AAABC 75-80% Good. Competitive in key areas. AAAAC 80-85% Very good. Very competitive in key areas, competitive in secondary respects. AAAAB 85-92% Excellent. Near class leading in key areas, and in some ways outstanding. AAAAA >93% Brilliant, unsurpassed. All but flawless.

74 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

B3 4dr saloon/5dr estate £57,450- £58,950 Has fallen behind on the power stakes. Still a niche proposition AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: B3 Biturbo B4 2dr saloon/convertible £58,950-£62,950 Less well-mannered than an M4. Better on the road than the track AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: B4 Biturbo B5 4dr saloon £81950 Huge pace and better suited to the autobahns than B-roads AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: B5 Biturbo B6 2dr coupé/convertible £96,950-£113,613 A ballistic coupé and convertible, but more at home on the autobahns AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: B6 Biturbo B7 4dr saloon £115,000-£123,782 A luxury saloon without a huge amount of power — an S-Class AMG challenger AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: B7 Biturbo LWB AWD D3 4dr saloon/ 5dr estate £47,950-£49,950 An intoxicating mix of performance and fuel economy AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: D3 Biturbo D4 2dr coupé/convertible £50,950-£54,950 Precise dynamics with added Alpina kudos and a great engine AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: D4 Biturbo

ARIEL Atom 0dr open £30,572 Superbike-fast lightweight mentalist is as exhilarating as they come. Less usable than some but no less marvellous AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 i-VTEC 310 Nomad 0dr open £na If there were simply a list of our top five favourite cars, the Nomad might just top it. A revelation and a riot AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 2.4 i-VTEC 235

ASTON MARTIN Vantage 2dr coupé £88,747-£96,244 What the Vantage lacks in agility it makes up for with pomp, presence and grunty V8 power. V12 S version is very special AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 S

TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 190 Sport Ultra

design-icon style AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TFSI S Line

A4 Allroad 5dr estate £37,725-£39,630 The classy and demure estate gets a rugged makeover making it a capable 4x4 A4 AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 190

R8 2dr coupé /spyder £119,520-£134,520 Usable but no less involving or dramatic for it. V10 is brutal AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.2 FSI 540 V10

New A5 Coupé 2dr coupé £30,700-£4700 Refreshed A5 gets a sharper look and a refreshed interior and carrys the fight to the 4 Series and C-Class coupé AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 TDI 286 S Line

Mono 2dr open £111,168 An F-22 Raptor for the road — only better built AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: Mono 2.3

BAC

BENTLEY

A5 Coupé 2dr coupé £31,910-£44,870 Good-looking coupé is showing its age now AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 190 S Line

Continental GT 2dr coupé £140,355-£168,355 Audi-sourced V8 is so good that it completely reinvigorates the Conti. Cabin is as lavish and sumptuous as you’ll find AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.0 V8 S

Vantage Roadster 2dr open £97,744-£105,244 Drop-top suits the Vantage’s relaxed nature AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 S

A5 Sportback 5dr hatch £30,035-£44,070 Refined four-door coupé is short on charm and finesse AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 190 S Line

Continental GT Convertible 2dr open £154,455-£185,255 Lavish and sumptuous convertible AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.0 V8 S

DB9 2dr coupé £140,062-£165,949 As attractive-looking as ever but also showing its age. V12 is disarming; handling is equally so. A bit unrefined AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 GT

A5 Cabriolet 2dr open £35,690-£47,045 No spring chicken but still appeals for its looks. Little more practical than smaller options. Lower-powered, steel-sprung trim is best AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 TFSI 177 S Line

Mulsanne 4dr saloon £229,415-£252,055 If the Phantom is best experienced from the back seat, the Mulsanne is best sampled from the front. Uniquely torquey, laid-back V8 AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.75 V8 Speed

DB9 Volante 2dr open £152,942 Open-top version of the handsome DB9 is just as charming AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 DB11 2dr coupé £154,955-167,070 The stunning replacement for the attractive, if long in the tooth, DB9 AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 5.2 V12

A6 4dr saloon £32,995-£57,215 Perfect choice for anyone looking for a smart office cubicle on wheels. Supremely constructed but a bit soulless to drive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 TDI 218 SE

A6 Avant 5dr estate £35,095-£86,420 A capable stress buster; BiTDI engine Vanquish 2dr coupé is a giant-killer AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 BiTDI 320 SE £196,005-£199,000 Dazzling exterior beauty and a warm, quattro expressive motive character are the A6 Allroad 5dr estate big Aston’s selling points. Plays the £46,505-£56,480 cruiser very well AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 Rugged 4x4 A6. Even more pricey AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 TDI 218 quattro Vanquish Volante 2dr open £200,050-208,005 A7 Sportback 5dr hatch A dazzling cruiser at heart with £46,865-£92,060 infinite head room AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 Curiously droopy looks don’t flatter an otherwise impressive machine. Rapide S 4dr saloon £150,749 Packed with gadgetry. Excellent There may not be room in the back engines; a bit remote to drive AAABC for top hats, but the Rapide is the most elegant four-door sports car in TESTERS’ PICK: 4.0 TFSI 560 RS7 quattro the world AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.9 V12 S A8 4dr saloon £63,520-£99,265 AU D I Doesn’t convince across the A1 3dr hatch £14,530-£25,600 board, but there’s no denying that Audi’s answer to the Mini. Fun and the brand’s strengths make for a refined AAABC convincing limousine AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 TFSI 150 S Line TESTERS’ PICK: 4.2 TDI 385 SE Exec quattro A1 Sportback 5dr hatch £15,150-£26,335 Q2 5dr SUV £22,380-£32,720 Rear doors add convenience to an Another small SUV from Audi, with attractive package AAABC the intention of being the stepping TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 TFSI 150 S Line stone between the A3 and the SUV range AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 TFSI 150 S Line A3 3dr hatch £19,365-£33,840 Outstanding cabin quality, peppy Q3 5dr SUV £26,150-£49,185 engines and low costs of ownership Typically refined and competent but make it eerily good for more feels more A3 than SUV AAABC disinterested drivers AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 2.0 TDI 150 TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 S Line Sport, 2.0 TSI 310 S3 quattro Q5 5dr SUV £33,710-£52,300 A3 Sportback 5dr hatch Appealing combination of Audi £19,985-£35,930 brand allure with affordable SUV All of the above but with five doors practicality. Nothing special to drive AAABC and a usefully larger boot AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TFSI 230 S TESTERS’ PICKS: 2.0 TDI 150 Line quattro Sport, 2.0 TSI 310 S3 quattro A3 Saloon 4dr saloon £24,235-£36,480 Undercuts the case to own an A4 very effectively indeed. Upmarket interior and unexpectedly good to drive — if a bit shy on space AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 Sport A3 Cabriolet 2dr open £26,875-£40,670 Compact, affordable, usable and refined, with strong performance and composed handling AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 Sport

D5 4dr saloon/5dr estate £56,950-£59,950 A rapid, usable and cheaper alternative to an M5 AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: D5 Biturbo

A4 4dr saloon £26,350-£44,000 High quality and competent; leaves the dynamic finesse to its rivals AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TFSI 252 Sport quattro

XD3 5dr SUV £56,450 Hugely fast, capable and desirable. A triumph AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 XD3

A4 Avant 5dr estate £27,880-£45,400 Classy, demure and very tech savvy Audi estate AAAAC

Flying Spur 4dr saloon £142,855-£161,580 Undoubtedly luxurious and with a lovely interior, but misses the class mark on rolling refinement and tech sophistication AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.0 W12 Bentayga 4dr SUV £160,255-£229,555 Bentley’s first attempt to crack the luxury SUV market AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.0 W12

BMW 1 Series 3dr hatch £20,875-£31,875 Strong on performance and economy but not as good as it could be AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: M140i 1 Series 5dr hatch £21,460-£32,405 Still looks clumsy from some angles, and not as fine-handling as the feeder BMW ought to be. Strong on performance and economy AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: M140i 2 Series Coupé 2dr coupé £23,040-£44,070 A proper compact coupé now. Could be better equipped AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: M2 2 Series Convertible 2dr open £26,730-£38,535 Better than 1-series forebear, but still lacks truly distinguishing premiumbrand qualities AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: M240i 2 Series Active Tourer 5dr MPV £23,010-£34,405 BMW’s front-drive hatch is a proper contender AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 220d Sport 2 Series Gran Tourer 5dr MPV £25,010-£34,770 Brings a proper premium brand to the table but appeals for more reasons than that. Third row seats are not adult-sized AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 220d Sport

3 Series 4dr saloon £25,160-£59,605 Q7 5dr SUV £48,455-£70,970 Beats the rival Jaguar XE on cabin Biggest Audi is typically remote and space and engine range; doesn’t unengaging to drive but fast and light quite measure up on handling on its feel. Cabin is both huge and finesse. Still a talent, mind you AAAAB brilliantly classy AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 TDI 218 SE TESTERS’ PICKS: 320d M Sport, M3 TT 2dr coupé £27,585-£41,050 TT is still doing what it always did well: serving up plenty of pace, style and usability for the money. Now better to drive, too AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TFSI Sport TT Roadster 2dr open £29,215-£42,800 Plenty of pace and driver reward, as well as Audi-brand prestige and

3 Series Touring 5dr estate £26,590-£42,355 There are more practical estates on the market, but the 3 Series Touring’s handling and performance make it one of the most enjoyable options AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 320d M Sport 3 Series GT 5dr hatch £30,405-£43,415

A L FA R O M E O 4 C S P I D E R

‘Direct, communicative handling makes up for a disappointing paddleshift powertrain’ M O R E AT A U T O C A R . C O . U K


NEW CAR PRICES C AT E R H A M S E V E N

‘Still going strong. Super-expensive 620S delivers supercharged thrills’ M O R E AT A U T O C A R . C O . U K

Hatchback practicality meets 3 Series talent. Duller but decent AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 320d M Sport

miles in mind, it could revolutionise your motoring AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: i3 94Ah EV Range Extender

4 Series 2dr coupé £30,260-£60,065 More of a talented GT than brilliant B-road steer AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 420d M Sport, M4

i8 2dr coupé £104,540-£112,535 If BMW’s plug-in hybrid is what the future of the sports car looks like, we welcome it. A visual knock-out; not quite mind-blowing to drive — but close AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5

4 Series Convertible 2dr open £35,025-£63,360 Mixes creditable, sporting driving dynamics with fine engines and usable back seats. Balanced and complete AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 420d M Sport, M4 4 Series Gran Coupé 4dr saloon £30,260-£45,745 A prettier 3 Series. Very good — but not better AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 420d M Sport 5 Series 4dr saloon £33,380-£73,985 Performance, efficiency, handling, practicality, desirability and value rolled into one. Excellent AAAAB TESTERS’ PICKS: 520d M Sport, M5 5 Series Touring 5dr estate £35,620-£51,270 Excellent car made more practical. 520d is the best AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 520d M Sport 5 Series GT 5dr hatch £49,475-£60,475 Fine cabin but only seats four. Poor ride and steering AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 520d M Sport

CAD I LL AC CT6 4dr saloon £69,990 Sharp-looking big saloon is a replacement for the CTS, but still needs a diesel AACCC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0TT V6 AWD Platinum CTS-V 4dr saloon £75,415 Supercharged Chevy V8 serves up 640bhp: eat your heart out, Germany. Handling lacks distinguishing finesse AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.2 V8 Escalade 5dr SUV £81,380-£94,740 Cadillac’s luxury SUV, but it remains large and ungainly. AACCC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.2 V8 Premium AWD

C AT E R H A M Seven 2dr open £18,995-£49,995 360R is the sweet spot in the revised range, its remapped Duratec giving just the right hit of performance AAAAB TESTERS’ PICKS: 0.7 160S, 2.0 360

CHEVROLET

Corvette 2dr coupé/convertible £62,470-£93,240 6 Series Coupé 2dr coupé LHD only and less usable and deft£59,535-£93,265 handling than the class standard, but Munich’s big GT comes in two-door, disarming and inimitable. Serious four-door and drop-top guises. All engine for the money AAABC feel heavy and just a little bit ordinary TESTERS’ PICK: 6.2 V8 Z06 3LZ to spend time in AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 640i SE Camaro 2dr coupé/convertible £31,755-£46,480 6 Series Gran Coupé 4dr saloon An affordable American muscle £59,535-£95,665 car, but LHD only and less usable Back doors prove to be a brilliant and deft-handling than the class visual coup AAAAC standard. Charming and fierce TESTERS’ PICK: 640i SE nonethelessAAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.2 V8 6 Series Convertible 2dr open CITROEN £65,435-£98,215 C-Zero 5dr hatch £16,995 Great engines and interior. More GT Well-engineered electric city car. Too than sports car AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 640i SE expensive AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 49kW 7 Series 4dr saloon C1 3dr hatch £8495-£11,925 £63,350-£80,330 Slightly better priced than its Toyota Rules on in-car entertainment and sibling but less visually charming diesel powertrain sophistication; AAABC otherwise too bland to stand out AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech TESTERS’ PICK: 730d M Sport 82 Feel X1 5dr SUV £27,440-£36,720 Pick of the premium brand bunch, but doesn’t rule the class as BMWs do elsewhere. A bit unrefined and ordinary-handling AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: xDrive 20d M Sport X3 5dr SUV £33,945-£46,050 A close match for the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Jaguar F-Pace on practicality and on-road dynamism, with better engines and better equipment levels AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: xDrive20d M Sport X4 5dr SUV £37,545-£50,645 A downsized X6 is respectable enough, but the cheaper X3 is a better option AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: xDrive20d M Sport X5 5dr SUV £44,575-£90,200 Accomplished and luxurious but no longer the standard-setter on SUV handling. Comfortable and capable; avoid the blingy M50d AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: xDrive30d SE X6 5dr SUV £56,515-£93,100 The world’s first off-road coupé, but appearances make it difficult to love AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: X6M i3 5dr hatch £32,330-£35,480 Our favourite high-end small car of the moment happens to be an EV. With a generous budget and modest

C1 5dr hatch £10,555-£12,775 As above but with rear doors AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech 82 Feel C3 5dr hatch £11,580-£17,565 Comfortable and well priced but not much fun AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech 82 Edition C4 5dr hatch £15,195-£20,850 Good looking but lacks the polish of the latest rivals AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 100 Flair C4 Cactus 5dr hatch £12,990-£20,495 Interesting and novel but flawed to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech 82 Flair C3 Picasso 5dr MPV £16,575-£18,640 Soft-handling, square, quirky. Not up to Citroën’s latest standards on cabin finish or handling AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 100 Edition C4 Picasso 5dr MPV £19,635-£27,660 Plushness and an improved dynamic make for a better car AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Exclusive S&S

Grand C4 Picasso 5dr MPV £21,935-£29,360 Alternative approach to MPV design produces something fresh and unusual, as well as comfy, spacious and quietly upmarket AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Exclusive S&S Berlingo Multispace 5dr MPV £13,995-£19,325 Likeable, practical van-based MPV AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 100 Feel Edition S&S

DACIA Duster 5dr SUV £9495-£16,795 The value champion of the crossover world. Basic in entry-level trim, but if cheap family transport is what you need, the Duster provides it AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 16v 115 Ambiance Prime 2WD Sandero 5dr hatch £5995-£10095 A clever budget prospect, but its limitations are unavoidable AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 Ambiance Prime Sandero Stepway 5dr hatch £8495-£11,395 More expensive — but still limited AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 TCe Laureate Logan MCV 5dr estate £6995-£11,095 Lacks its stablemates’ charm but retains their cheapness AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 Ambiance Prime

DS 3 3dr hatch £14,395-£25,495 Premium-brand philosophy and adventurous aesthetics appeal, as do strong engines, but those more focused on dynamics will prefer the less expensive Mini Cooper AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 100 Prestige S&S 3 CABRIOLET 2dr open £18,595-£25,295 A zesty car that remains fun to drive despite removing its roof. Not as composed as some of its rivals AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 100 Prestige S&S 4 5dr hatch £20,045-£26,045 Jack of all trades, master of none. Nice styling AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Prestige 4 Crossback 5dr hatch £22,295-£27,045 A more rugged form of the DS 4 doesn’t make it any better AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech 130 S&S 5 5dr hatch £27,950-£35,970 Design marvel. Shame it doesn’t function so well AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 150 Elegance

FERRARI California 2dr open £154,360 New turbocharged engine brings entry-level Ferrari back to a competitive mark. Heavy but slick and rewarding to drive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.9 V8 T 488 GTB 2dr coupé £182,864 Calm ride mixed with explosive performance AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 4.5 V8 488 Spider 2dr open £204,391 The complete supercar. Minus roof. A world-class head-turner AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 4.5 V8 F12 Berlinetta 2dr coupé £238,993 Thrilling like only a front-engined V12 Ferrari could be. Crushing performance and unparalleled drama, albeit highly strung AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 6.3 V12 tdf GTC4Lusso 2dr coupé £230,430 V12 Prancing Horse with four-wheel drive and four-wheel steer plus room for extra passengers. What’s not to like? AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.3 V12

F I AT 500 3dr hatch £11,050-£15,350 Super-desirable, super-cute city car. Pleasant, if not involving, to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Twinair 105 Lounge

500C 2dr open £13,700-£19,830 Roll-top cabriolet is a better drive than the hatch AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Twinair 105 Lounge

AUTOCAR TO P FIVES

CIT Y CARS

500L 5dr MPV ££13,665-£22,465 A costly option but has the style to fill out some of its missing substance AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.3 Multijet Lounge 500L MPW 5dr MPV £19,205-£21,705 Loses some of its charm as it gets bigger, but has seven-seats AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.3 Multijet Lounge 500X 5dr hatch £14,295-£26,315 Familiar styling works rather well as a crossover. Drives okay, too AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 Multiair 140 Cross Tipo 5dr hatch/estate £12,995-£19,995 A 90s reboot, but without the flabby and uninspiring nature. The new Tipo is a decent car to drive and has ample space inside AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Twinair Lounge

1 Volkswagen Up From £8800 VW’s city car is no revolution, just a trademarked effort to beat its rivals on finish, refinement and economy. AAAAC

Panda 5dr hatch £9510-£18,260 May not have quite kept pace with its rivals on equipment and value but still sells robust, practical charm better than most AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Twinair Lounge Punto 3dr hatch £11,485-£13,260 Spacious and characterful supermini. Still heavily dated, though AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 Pop+ Qubo 5dr MPV £11,695-£15,695 Fiat’s take on a versatile van-based MPV AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 Active Doblo 5dr MPV £13,775-£19,940 Outdated MPV kept afloat by new engines AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 95 Easy Air

2 Hyundai i10 From £8700 The latest i10 prioritises maturity over its former liveliness, but the refined result is still a first-rate city car. AAAAC

124 Spider 2dr open £19,545-23,295 The 124 name revived through a shared platform with Mazda AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 Multiair 140

FORD KA+ 5dr hatch £8995-£10,295 Besides the plus added to the name, the Ka gets two extra doors and signals a breath of fresh air for the range AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 Zetec Fiesta 3dr hatch £13,545-£22,895 No longer a class-beater in every regard, but so far ahead of the curve on ride and handling that it’s unassailable AAAAB TESTERS’ PICKS: 1.0T 100 Ecoboost Zetec, 1.6T Ecoboost ST-3

3 Suzuki Celerio

From £7000 Pleasing to drive, cheap to buy and decent to sit in, the Celerio is a no-nonsense option — and very likeable for it. AAABC

Fiesta 5dr hatch £14,145-£18,495 As above, but even more useful with rear doors AAAAB TESTERS’ PICKS: 1.0T 100 Ecoboost Zetec, 1.5 TDCi 75 Titanium Focus 5dr hatch £16,445-£31,250 Still appeals for its ride and handling, though not as much as perhaps it should. Spacious, stylish and wellpriced. AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 1.0T 100 Ecoboost Style, 1.5 TDCi 120 Zetec Focus Estate 5dr estate £17,545-£29,245 Well-mannered and comfortable, but a Skoda Octavia carries more AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 1.0T 100 Ecoboost Style, 1.5 TDCi 120 Zetec

4 Fiat Panda

From £9400 The Panda may not have quite kept pace with its rivals, but it still sells robust, practical charm better than most. AAABC

Mondeo 5dr hatch/saloon £21,795-£32,745 Does what great Fords always have: massively over-delivers on practicality, value and handling. Cabin low-rent in places, but otherwise excellent AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0T Ecoboost 240 Mondeo Estate 5dr estate £22,945-£30,360 A vast and enjoyable estate. Reasonably priced AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 180 Titanium B-Max 5dr MPV £15,345-£19,795 Sliding back doors, responsive handling and keen value give supermini-sized B-Max some convincing selling points AAABC

5 Vauxhall Viva From £8000 A derivative and charisma-free take on the modern city car but not devoid of usability or space. Cabin is decent, too. AAABC 4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 75


TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 105 Titanium X Powershift C-Max 5dr MPV £19,195-£27,395 As fun to drive and easy to live with five-seat MPV AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6T 182 E’boost Titanium X SS Grand C-Max 5dr MPV £21,295-£28,865 Mid-sized Ford handles well, and can be had in five- or seven-seat versions. Good value, good to drive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 150 Titanium

TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 i-DTEC SE Navi

Focused on-road SUV. Drives well; very little interior space AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.7 V6 QX GT

CR-V 5dr SUV £22,755-£36,210 Tardis-like SUV stalwart has lots of space for five and a big boot. Frugal and easy to drive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 i-VTEC SE Plus 2WD

QX70 5dr SUV £43,770-£55,270 Big, powerful SUV. None of the finesse of the X5 or Land Rovers AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.7 V6 GT Premium

HYU N DAI i10 5dr hatch £8995-£13,045 Prioritises maturity over the liveliness of its forebear, but the resulting car is practical and wellpriced AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 SE

ISUZU

S-Max 5dr MPV £25,895-£37,045 Better looking and better to drive than most but not quite the classleader its predecessor was AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 150 Zetec

i20 5dr hatch £10,995-£17,700 Appealing budget supermini combines decent performance and equipment with good practicality and low running costs AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 84 Premium SE

Galaxy 5dr MPV £27,845-£38,045 Huge seven-seat MPV. Easy to place on the road. Not cheap AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 180 Titanium

i20 COUPE 3dr hatch £13,025-£16,200 As above, in sleeker coupé form. Lacking dynamically AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 84 Sport

Tourneo Connect 5dr MPV £16,545£21,245 Ford’s van-based MPV is practical and spacious AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 TDCi 120 Zetec

i30 5dr hatch £15,295-£23,105 As good as we’ve come to expect but not one inch better AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 110 SE Nav

Grand Tourneo Connect 5dr MPV £19,945-£23,495 Van-based seven-seater offers huge carrying capacity and better dynamic manners than you’d expect AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 TDCi 120 Zetec Tourneo Custom 5dr MPV £32,635-£36,950 A Ford Transit developed to haul people about AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 130 Zetec L2 Ecosport 5dr hatch £15,045-£17,995 Pumped up Fiesta is okay, but developing-world origins show through AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0T Ecoboost 125 Zetec Edge 5dr SUV £29,995-£40,250 Mid-sized US-developed SUV joins Ford’s fleet to take on the crossover market AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 210 Sport AWD Kuga 5dr SUV £20,845-£34,445 Bigger,bolder and sharper-looking than its predecessor but still in possession of taut, responsive handling. Not brilliant over rougher terrain AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDCi 150 Zetec Ranger 5dr SUV £17,876-£27,776 Ford’s UK pick-up gets a US-style facelift. A rugged beast AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2 TDCi 160 XL Double Cab Mustang 2dr coupé/convertible £31,745-£40,745 American muscle built for the UK AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8 Fastback

G I N E T TA G40 2dr coupé £29,950 A balanced, affordable and finelooking thing. Closed cockpit is a nice touch; some of the finish not quite up to snuff AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: G40R

H O N DA Jazz 5dr hatch £13,495-£17,705 Not the most compact or vivacious car in the segment, but cleverly packaged. Handling decent; engines could be better AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.3 i-VTEC SE Navi Civic 5dr hatch £16,470-£32,300 Gets expensive if you want a high equipment level, but frugal diesel engine merits attention. Quirky but spacious with it AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 1.6 i-DTEC Sport Navi, 2.0 i-VTEC Turbo Type-R Civic Tourer 5dr estate £18,585-£27,035 Versatile, comfortable and frugal; only its price marks its scorecard AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 i-DTEC SE Plus Navi

i40 4dr saloon £19,695-£27,595 Useful, inoffensive and well-priced. No fireworks here AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.7 CRDi 141 SE Nav i40 Tourer 5dr estate £20,945-£28,945 A practical estate but still rather dull and ordinary AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.7 CRDi 141 SE Nav Genesis 4dr saloon £50,705 Only available with a petrol V6 and only at close to £50k. Ambitious but quite a long way out of its depth AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V6 GDi RWD ix20 5dr hatch £14,145-£16,845 Usable high-roofed hatch is short on flair AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 115 SE i800 MPV £24,845-£26,845 Van-based MPV is surprisingly decent and easy to drive. Lots of seats if you need ’em AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.5 CRDi 136 SE Tucson 5dr SUV £18,995-£32,700 Classy, roomy cabin and predictable handling. Very competitive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 CRDi 185 SE Nav 4WD

76 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

M O R E AT A U T O C A R . C O . U K

dynamically forgettable AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 134 GT-Line ISG Cee’d Sportwagon 5dr estate £17,595-£23,430 Another looker, this time slightly bigger but also forgettable AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 134 GT-Line ISG

JAG UAR

Procee’d 3dr hatch £17,495-£23,310 Slightly smaller and a more dynamic looker, but still not one to remember AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 134 GT-Line ISG

XF 4dr saloon £32,300-£49,995 Outstanding ride and handling and a rich, pleasant cabin. Not as roomy as some; four-cylinder engines disappoint AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 V6 380 RWD Auto XJ 4dr saloon £58,690-99,370 No one else mixes dynamism and refinement like Jaguar. It makes the XJ a rare blend — although not as spacious or cosetting as some AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8 XJR F-Type 2dr coupé £51,775-£110,000 A full-blooded assault on Porsche’s back yard, with noise, power and beauty. As characterful as any Jag, ever AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8 SVR AWD

Soul 5dr hatch £12,805-£29,995 Looks divide opinion. Better value now, but still hardly the best option AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi Connect Optima 4dr saloon £21,495-£33,995 Looks the part but is well off the European saloon pace AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.7 CRDi 2 ISG Optima Sportwagon 5dr estate £22,295-£29,595 Looks the part but it’s engine and finish are well off the European estate pace AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.7 CRDi 2 ISG Venga 5dr MPV £11,995-£18,570 Versatile interior, but firm ride and high price disappoint AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 114 3 ISG

F-Type Convertible 2dr open £57,260-£115,485 Serious money, but a serious car with a likeable wild side AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8 SVR AWD

Carens 5dr MPV £18,195-£27,150 Nicely up to scratch now but no class leader. Good value, without feeling at all cheap or austere AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 114 3 ISG

F-Pace 5dr SUV £35,020-£52,300 Credible first SUV effort handles like a proper Jaguar. Deserves a better engine; ticks all the boxes for refinement, handling and ease of use AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0d V6 300 S AWD Auto

Niro 5dr SUV £21,295-£26,995 Kia’s first fully hybrid car launched in the UK is a solid attempt, but lacks the refinement of others on the market AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 GDi 2

JEEP Renegade 5dr SUV £17,495-£28,595 Middling compact crossover with chunky looks but no obvious charm AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 Multijet II Longitude

Wrangler 3dr SUV £31,840-£36,435 Santa Fe 5dr SUV £31,850-£38,295 Heavy-duty off-roader lacks on-road Another big Korean with lots of space manners AABCC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.6 V6 Rubicon on offer for not a lot of cash. Slick, comfy and likeable, if a bit expensive Wrangler 5dr SUV to own AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2 CRDi Premium £33,510-£34,910 7st Heavy-duty and large off-roader is rather cumbersome AABCC INFINITI TESTERS’ PICK: 3.6 V6 Rubicon Q30 5dr hatch £20,550-£32,330 Infiniti’s first hatch uses a lot of Cherokee 5dr SUV the Mercedes A-Class blueprint £26,345-£40,150 AAABC Hamstrung by poor UK spec. TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d Premium Uninspiring, but roomy and practical AABCC Tech Auto TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0d Longitude+ Q50 4dr saloon £29,320-£47,625 Credible compact saloon competitor Grand Cherokee 5dr SUV £45,050-£69,865 with some novel touches AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d Premium The best Jeep. Comfortable and Tech Auto well-equipped AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 V6 CRD Overland Q70 4dr saloon £33,750-£47,700 Big Infiniti has a spacious cabin but KIA limited practicality in the broader Picanto 5dr hatch £8545-£12,595 sense. Daimler diesel engine is quite Nice drive and cabin, but coarse and slow AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d Premium overshadowed now by rivals AAACC Tech TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 SE Rio 5dr hatch £10,945-£17,445 QX30 5dr hatch £29,490-£33,370 Looks great and is well-priced but Infiniti’s first hatchback gets a nowhere near its European rivals higher-riding, more rugged look AAABC AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 CRDi 3 TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d 7CT AWD Premium Cee’d 5dr hatch £15,105-£23,610 Another looker from Schreyer but QX50 5dr SUV £34,500-£42,600

HR-V 5dr hatch £18,495-£26,055 Cleverly packaged and comfortable crossover. Bland performance and forgettable, though AAABC

‘An enhanced and more likeable Evora. Crucially, it’s easier to live with, too’

D-Max 4dr pick-up £17,942-£32,342 Impressive towing and payload ability; let down by agricultural engines AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.5d 4x4 Single Cab XE 4dr saloon £29,775-£44,995 Baby Jag tops the pile thanks to outstanding driver appeal. Poised and engaging but refined with it. Not as roomy as some AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0i 340 S

i30 Tourer 5dr estate £16,995-£24,795 As good as we’ve come to expect and more practical AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CRDi 110 SE Nav

LOTUS E VO R A 400

F O R D F I E S TA S T

‘Our reigning hot supermini provides enormous fun for the money’ M O R E AT A U T O C A R . C O . U K

Sportage 5dr SUV £18,000-£31,650 Good ride, handling and usability. Looks good and is decent value AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 CRDi 134 GT-Line AWD Sorento 5dr SUV £28,795-£40,950 Kia aims to move upmarket with this smart, nicely appointed sevenseater. Plenty of car for the money AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2 CRDi KX-1 ISG

KTM X-Bow 0dr £57,345-£70,717 Eccentric looks, sharp handling Expensive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TFSI RR

LAMBORGHINI Hurácan 2dr coupé/spyder £162,000-205,000 Junior Lambo mixes usability and drama skillfully. Chassis and steering need work, but two-wheel-drive LP 580-2 is the best one yet AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.2 V10 LP 580-2 Aventador 2dr coupé/spyder £260,040-£315,078 Big, hairy V12 Lambo has astonishing visuals and performance. Handling could be sweeter; oddly, roadster beats coupé in that respect AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.5 V12 LP750-£4

L AN D ROVE R Range Rover Evoque Coupé 3dr SUV £33,000-£51,200 Dripping with desirability; poised and capable on road and off it. Not exactly practical, though AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 eD4 SE Tech 2WD Range Rover Evoque 5dr SUV £35,000-£51,200 As above but slightly more practical AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 eD4 SE Tech 2WD Range Rover Evoque Convertible 2dr open SUV £47,500-£52,400 Loses its roof but retains 4WD AAABC

TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TD4 HSE Dyn Convertible Discovery Sport 5dr SUV £31,095-£46,510 Seven seats, lots of space, fine on-road handling and Land Rover’s usual off-road ability — plus new found desirability AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TD4 SE Discovery 5dr SUV £47,505-£56,005 Beginning to look and feel like an outmoded hulk, but the Disco still handles well and could be all the car you’ll ever need AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 SDV6 Landmark Range Rover Sport 5dr SUV £59,700-96,900 Now bigger and better: a cut-price Range Rover rather than a jumpedup Discovery. Expensive to buy and run, but justifies it AAAAB TESTERS’ PICKS: 3.0 SDV6 HSE Dynamic, 5.0 V8 SVR Range Rover 5dr SUV £76,350-£166,400 Whether outside the Dorchester or atop Ben Nevis, the Rangie envelops you in a lavish, invincible sense of occasion AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8 Autobiography

LEXUS CT 5dr hatch £21,245-£29,745 Hybrid-only hatchback has a pokey cabin and curiously mismatched motive character traits. Alternative but flawed — and pricey with it AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 200h F Sport

M A S E R AT I Ghibli 4dr saloon £49,860-£65,325 Bologna’s attempt at an exotic saloon has a certain allure – but it’s pricey, under-powered and poorly finished in places AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 V6 S GranTurismo 2dr coupé £82,910-£119,485 Not short on richness or desirability, and well capable of stirring the soul. Material quality and fit and finish not what it should be, though AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.7 V8 Sport GranCabrio 2dr open £98,970-£125,675 Fantastic looks and soundtrack, average chassis AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.7 V8 Sport Quattroporte 4dr saloon £70,510-£115,980 Now a full-sized executive limo, with some (but not much) added Maserati-brand flair. Off the pace in several key areas AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V8 GTS Levante 4dr SUV £54,335 Italian flair and good looks applied to an SUV body AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0D V6

MAZDA 2 5dr hatch £12,195-£17,395 A very grown-up and well-made supermini. Drives with charm and vigour; engines aren’t brilliant AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 90 Sport 3 5dr hatch £17,095-£23,995 Uncomplicated handling dynamism teamed with strong practicality and punchy, efficient diesel engines. Too sporty for some tastes AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 165 Sport Nav 3 Fastback 4dr saloon £17,395-£22,795 Refined and dynamically satisfying in saloon body style AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 120 Sport Nav

IS 4dr saloon £28,995-£36,750 Sleek junior exec, well made and interesting. Still a left-field choice AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 300h F Sport

6 4dr saloon £19,795-£27,995 A compelling mix of size, economy and performance. Interior a let-down AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 165 Sport Nav

GS 4dr saloon £33,495-£69,995 Restrictive engine range limits GS’s appeal, but outstanding refinement and cabin quality make amends to a point AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8 F

6 Tourer 5dr estate £22,425-£28,895 Attractively styled but average to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2D 150 Sport Nav

LS 4dr saloon £99,995 Immutably built Lexus flagship is quiet and gadget-packed but not genuinely talented or special. Hybrid model worth relatively little on CO2 tax AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 460 F-Sport

CX-3 5dr SUV £17,595-£24,695 Another supermini SUV with a sporting bent. Petrol models much better than diesel. Both quite pricey but nicely appointed AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 120 Sport Nav

NX 5dr hatch £29,995-£42,995 Some good ideas but dramatically off the pace to drive AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 300h F Sport RX 5dr SUV £39,995-£57,995 Low flexibility, but hybrid option makes a degree of economic sense AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 450h F Sport RC 2dr coupé £34,995-£67,995 An also-ran in the segment, although the V8 RC-F packs plenty of alternative character and handles well enough AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 5.0 V8

LOTUS Elise 2dr open £29,900-£45,600 If you want a delicate, vivid and unfettered drive, none does it better; if you want a daily driver, shop elsewhere. More powerful S worth the extra AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 250 Cup Exige 2dr coupé £55,900 Sharp, uncompromising track car. Unforgiving on the road AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 3.5 V6 Sport 350 Evora 2dr coupé £72,000-£79,900 The ride and handling put nearly everything else in its shade. Shame the interior quality doesn’t match the price AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.5 V6 GT4 3-Eleven 0dr open £68,750-£97,083 Hardcore track car has a broad enough talent to be driven on the road AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.5 V6 410 Road

CX-5 5dr SUV £23,195-£30,995 Offers powerful diesel engines and strong performance mixed with low emissions. Crisp handling AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2D 150 Sport Nav MX-5 2dr open £18,495-£23,695 Brilliantly packaged, brilliantly priced and even more vibrant and perfectly poised to drive than the original. The 2.0 is worth the extra outlay AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0i Sport Nav

McLAREN 540C 2dr coupé £126,055 The affordable end of McLaren’s spectrum AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V8 570S 2dr coupé £143,305 A supercar-slayer for a new age. Blisteringly fast and exciting, with handling appeal far in advance of its price AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V8 570GT 2dr coupé £154,000 A supercar-slayer for a new age with added touring ability. Blisteringly fast and exciting AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V8 650S 2dr coupé £198,055 McLaren’s mainstay goes from convincing to utterly compelling. Better day to day than a Ferrari 488 but not as special AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V8 650S SPIDER 2dr open £218,305 More of the same although noisier — and better for it AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 V8


NEW CAR PRICES MERCEDES-BENZ A-Class 5dr hatch £19,990-£40,695 We’re warming to the A-class, but the sportier trim levels should be avoided. Desirable and attractive but lacking a distinguishing drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICKS: A 200 d SE, A 45 AMG 4MATIC B-Class 5dr hatch £22,170-£32,965 A slightly odd prospect, but practical and classy AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: B 200 d SE CLA 4dr saloon £25,395-£43,515 Facelifted CLA still suffers from divisive styling AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: CLA 200 d Sport CLA Shooting Brake 5dr estate £26,375-£44,365 Facelifted and equally appealing AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: CLA 250 AMG 4Matic C-Class 4dr saloon £29,295-£67,450 Merc ramps up the richness with outstanding interior plushness and curvaceous good looks. Engines and dynamics not quite as refined, though AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: C220 d SE, C63 AMG C-Class Estate 5dr estate £29,495-£68,650 Decent practicality and fantastic interior. Only okay to drive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: C220 d SE, C63 AMG C-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £31,585-£77,540 Nice balance of style, usability and driver reward AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: C200 d Sport, C63 AMG C-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £36,200-£78,295 Nice balance of style, usability and driver reward AAABC TESTERS’ PICKS: C 220 d Sport, C 63 AMG CLS 4dr saloon £47,000-£87,025 Original added-desirability fourdoor. Almost as refined to drive as it is to behold. Shooting Brake is a car of rare elegance AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: CLS 63 AMG S CLS Shooting Brake 5dr estate £48,580-£87,525 Handsome and practical estate AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: CLS63 S AMG E-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate £34,440-£55,695 A wee bit pricey, and less sporting than key rivals. Four-pot diesels a bit sluggish. Estate version supremely practical AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: E350 d SE, E63 S AMG

with matching price tag AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: V220 d Sport GLA 5dr SUV £25,260-£45,555 Not the most practical crossover but good looking and very decent to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: GLA200 AMG Line

Paceman 3dr coupé £19,125-£29,600 GLC 5dr SUV £35,580-£47,875 Two-door Countryman is a Mini too Not exactly exciting to drive, but does far for us. Tough to like AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 Cooper S luxury and refinement better than anything else in the class AAAAC MITSUBISHI TESTERS’ PICK: GLC250d AMG Mirage 5dr hatch £11,499-£13,499 Line Straightforward hatchback. Not for the likes of us AAACC GLC Coupé 5dr SUV TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 MiVEC Juro £40,580-£43,245 A SUV with coupé looks. Destined ASX 5dr hatch £15,249-28,399 to be outrun by the X4 and only Decent engine, but otherwise an available with a diesel engine AAAAC unexceptional crossover AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: GLC250d AMG TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 MiVEC ZC-M 2WD Leather GLE 5dr SUV £50,075-£95,215 The ML replacement isn’t inspiring Shogun 5DR 4x4 £29,634-£40,299 to drive but it has a classy interior Has its appeal. Needs more chassis AAAAC finesse, but still charming AABCC TESTERS’ PICK: GLE250d AMG Line TESTERS’ PICK: 3.2 Di-DC SG2 SWB Barbarian GLE Coupé 5dr SUV £61,350-£97,235 Outlander 5dr SUV A SUV with coupé looks. Destined to £24,799-£45,499 be outrun by the X6 AAAAC Creditable effort from Japan’s SUV TESTERS’ PICK: GLE450 AMG specialists offers a lot for the money. Still feels cheap in places: PHEV a G-CLASS 5dr SUV boon for fleet users AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 PHEV GX3h+ £88,800-£150,975 £35249 Massively expensive and compromised, but with character L200 5dr 4x4 £20,998-£30,238 to spare AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: G63 AMG L200 pick-up is a practical, efficient and muscular workhorse AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.5D Series 4 GLS 5dr SUV £69,110-£102,350 4Life Single The impending replacement for the GL-Class AAABC MORGAN TESTERS’ PICK: GLS350d AMG 3-Wheeler 0dr open Line £31,140-£34,955 The eccentric, characterful and SLC 2dr open £30,495-£46,360 deftly brilliant Morgan is a threeAnother small convertible edition wheeled testament to English with all the Mercedes charm AAABC creativity AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: SLC300 AMG Line TESTERS’ PICK: 1.9 115 Sport SL 2dr open £73,810-£173,315 Big, luxurious drop-top is classier than a royal stud farm. Few cruisers feel more special for the money AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: SL400 AMG Line AMG GT 2dr coupé £98,915-£111,495 Million-dollar looks and a railgun V8, but uncompromisingly firm chassis undermines its every-occasion, anyroad usability AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.0 V8

MG 3 5dr hatch £8399-10,499 Neatly tuned and nice sporty style. Breaks the mould of sub-£9000 superminis AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 3Form GS 5dr SUV £14,995-£19,495 MG’s first attempt at a small SUV is an attempt to re-establish the brand AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 TGi Explore

MINI

E-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £38,635-£46,430 Big, laid-back, genuine four-seat cabrios are rare birds, particularly when they’re as refined and sophisticated as this one AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: E400 AMG Line Edition

3DR Hatch 3dr hatch £14,075-£23,155 Three-pot engines and cleverly redesigned interior make the Mini a superb choice. Pricey to buy but worth the money AAAAB TESTERS’ PICKS: 1.5 Cooper, 2.0 John Cooper Works

E-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £42,045-£49,800 Refined and sophisticated four-seat cabriolet AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: E200 AMG Line Edition

5DR Hatch 5dr hatch £14,675-£22,575 Mini charm in a more usable package, but still not as practical as rivals AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 Cooper

S-Class 4dr saloon £72,900-£183,560 So long in the legs that continents flash by mid-stride. Has a businesslike opulence. Still the best luxury car in the real world. Calm, advanced, rewarding AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: S500 AMG Line L

Convertible 2dr open £18,615-£26,635 Open-top fun but compromised on practicality and dynamics AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 Cooper

S-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £98,050-£185,480 Heavyweight contender. Continentsmothering luxury AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: S 63 AMG S-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £110,120-£192,805 As above, with the option to open it up to the elements AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: S63 AMG V-Class 5dr MPV £45,490-£52,335 Expensively appointed mini bus —

Countryman 5dr SUV £17,125-£29,010 Big, but still more funky than useful AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 John Cooper Works

Clubman 5dr hatchback £21,375-£29,345 Cheery and alternative Mini ‘six-door’ takes the brand into mainstream territory. Not as rounded as some, but usable and likeable nonetheless AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 Cooper

4-4 2dr open £29,995 Has its appeal, but not as rewarding to drive as it could be AACCC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 Plus 4 2dr open £38,100-£43,200 Needs more chassis finesse, but the Plus 4 charms nonetheless AABCC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 2 Seater Roadster 2dr open £48,000-£55,140 More advanced, but pricey and needs better brakes AACCC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.7 V6 Plus 8 2dr open £73,494 Old V8 charm lives on, but there’s no ignoring the high price AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.8 V8

NISSAN Micra 5dr hatch £7995-£13,455 Running costs are low, but it’s below average overall AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 n-tec Note 5dr hatch £10,995-£17,895 It lacks a bit of verve, but objectively the Note is entirely fit for purpose AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 DIG-S Acenta Pulsar 5dr hatch £13,995-£23,015 Undeniably fit for purpose, but its appeal goes no deeper than that AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 DIG-S Acenta Leaf 5dr hatch £26,180-£31,880 Comfortable and still the cheapest way into the EV world AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 24kW Acenta Juke 5dr hatch £14,320-£24,610 High-riding, funky hatch is a compelling package. High CO2 figures AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 DIG-T 190 Tekna Qashqai 5dr hatch £18,545-£27,310 The defining crossover. Second-gen model better all round, notably efficiency, space and refinement AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 dCi 130 N-Connecta

M A Z D A M X- 5

‘A modernisation masterstroke. Weight loss commitment is the key’ M O R E AT AU T O C A R . C O . U K

AUTOCAR TO P FIVES

X-Trail 5dr SUV £21,995-£32,110 There aren’t many cheaper routes into a seven-seat SUV. Bit of a lightweight on power and 4x4 capability, though AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 dCi n-tec 2WD

SUPERSPORTS CARS

NV200 Combi MPV £20,297-£21,067 Van-based multi-seat vehicle is flexible and economical AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 dCi 90 Acenta 7st E-NV200 Evalia MPV £28,527-31,869 Battery-powered people-mover is world’s first seven-seat EV MPV AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 80kW Tekna Rapid Navara NP300 5dr 4x4 £23,635-£31,845 A tough pick-up happy both on the road and off it AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.3 dCi 160 Acenta King Cab

1 McLaren 570S From £143,000 A supercar-slayer for a new age. Blisteringly fast and exciting, with handling appeal far in advance of its price. AAAAA

370Z 2dr coupé £27,860-£38,050 Old-school, profoundly mechanical and quite hairy-chested. An Austin Healey 3000 for our age — but meaner AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.7 V6 Nismo GT-R 2dr coupé £79,995-91,995 The monstrously fast Nissan has been tweaked and sharpened to close the gap on charismatic rival in the market AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.8 Track Edition

NOBLE M600 2dr coupé £248,184-£277,309 Deliciously natural and involving; a bit ergonomically flawed. Outrageous pace and handling AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.4 V8 Sport Coupé

PEUGEOT

2 Porsche 911 Turbo S From £142,000 Still rules the everyday-use, any-occasion sporting ranks. Practical, easy-going and monstrously quick. AAAAB

iOn 5dr hatch £16,995 Good electric powertrain, comically expensive AABCC TESTERS’ PICK: 47kW 108 3dr hatch £8495-£13,585 Sister car to the Aygo — and distant second to most city car rivals AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech Allure Top 108 5dr hatch £10,485-£13,985 Five-door version is less appealing than its Citroën and Toyota siblings AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech Allure Top 208 3dr hatch £12,365-£22,665 A big improvement for Peugeot, if not for the supermini class AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech Allure S&S

3 BMW i8

From £104,500 If BMW’s plug-in hybrid is what the future of the sports car looks like, we welcome it. Visually, its a knockout. AAAAC

208 5dr hatch £12,965-£18,915 As above, with added five-door practicality AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 PureTech Allure S&S 308 5dr hatch £15,930-£28,890 No name change, but the classy allround appeal of the latest 308 is allnew. A bit tight on space but a serious contender nonetheless AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 THP 270 GTi by PS 308 SW 5dr estate £18,315-£27,815 Estate body style enjoys the classy appeal of the hatch AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Allure 508 4dr saloon £23,650-£31,500 Competent and likeable package, although it lacks any real spark AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Allure

4 Audi R8 V10 Plus From £134,500 Massive grip and pace, with an engine ready to drown out the apocalypse. Less sweet-handling than the Mk1. AAAAC

508 SW 5dr estate £24,905-£37,550 As good as the saloon, only better looking AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Allure 2008 5dr hatch £13,970-£20,920 Efficient and well-mannered but facelift doesn’t improve the shortness on space and style AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Allure 3008 5dr MPV £21,110-£25,160 Cleverly packaged Peugeot offers just enough SUV DNA to make the

5 Aston Martin V12 Vantage S From £138,000 Soulful, sultry Brit is part sports car, part GT. Wonderful engine, with simple, engaging, old-school handling. AAAAC 4 JANUARY 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 77


AUTOCAR TO P FIVES

POCKET ROCKETS

difference, but is really in need of its facelift. Good value AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Allure 5008 5dr MPV £23,130-£27,030 Another mid-sized five-plus-twoseater. The 5008 feels its age but still offers a slicker and more engaging drive than many AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 120 Allure Partner Tepee 5dr MPV £15,645-£20,030 Likeable, practical van-based MPV AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 BlueHDi 100 Active

1 Ford Fiesta ST

From £17,000 Given the long wait, this could have been a huge anti-climax. It isn’t. Firm ride aside, it’s brilliant. And cheap. AAAAB

RCZ 2dr coupé £24,200-£27,500 Classy, interesting, fun coupé. Peugeot has got its mojo back AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 HDi 163 GT

PORSCHE 718 Boxster 2dr open £41,739-£52,617 Our idea of drop-top perfection is also an outstanding sporting twoseater. Exceptional to drive, whether cruising or hurrying AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 718 718 Cayman 2dr coupé £39,878-£50,756 Scalpel-blade incisiveness, supreme balance and outstanding driver involvement. Very practical too — for a two-seater AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 718

2 Mini Cooper S

From £19,000 Came a hair’s breadth from toppling the ST. Arguably the more well-rounded option but not quite as much fun. AAAAC

911 2dr coupé £76,412-£145,773 Delivered on the eve of a sixth decade, the 991 is as brilliant and distinctive as any before it. Still more than worthy of its iconic status AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: Carrera S 911 Cabriolet 2dr open £85,253-£154,614 The best Porsche doesn’t lose any of its charm without its roof AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: Carrera S Panamera 5dr hatch £79,715-£113,075 Technically brilliant but lacking a bit of soul and visual allure. V6 diesel is an outstanding long-distance car AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.8 V8 Turbo PDK

3 Renault Clio RS 220 Trophy

From £22,000 Massively improved with additional grunt and a sterner chassis. The old Renault Sport magic returns. AAAAC

Macan 5dr SUV £43,553-£68,073 Spookily good handling. A sports utility vehicle in the purest sense AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 3.6 V6 Turbo PDK Cayenne 5dr SUV £52,689-£119,720 Agile, capable, desirable. V8 diesel makes the line-up more varied. Not as practical as some, but a classy cabin and mostly good fun AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 4.2 V8 S Diesel Tiptronic S

PROTON Savvy 5dr hatch £7995 Compromise in quality isn’t worth the saving AACCC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 Style Satria Neo 3dr hatch £8495-£9495 Best Proton yet but still unjustifiable AACCC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 GSX

4 Peugeot 208 GTi by Peugeot Sport From £22,000 Easy to live with, easy to enjoy and quick in a straight line, the 208 is the best GTi Peugeot has built in a decade. AAAAC

5 Audi S1

From £25,000 There’s no denying its raucous attitude, although its price limits the appeal. Easily the most entertaining S-badged Audi. AAAAC

78 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

Gen-2 5dr hatch £9195-£11,195 Hugely disappointing despite price ACCCC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.3 GLS

RADICAL SR3 2dr open £58,200-£66,958 Spectacular on the track; not so good on the way home AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: RSX

MERCEDES-BENZ SL500

‘The luxurious SL at its best. Bags of performance and refinement’ M O R E AT A U T O C A R . C O . U K

city car — but not the class leader AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 TCe 90 Dynamique Energy Clio 5dr hatch £11,815-£22,425 An attractive, stylish and fairly practical proposition that does the French tradition credit. Fluent handling; cabin cheap in places AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: Renault Sport 220 Trophy Captur 5dr hatch £14,745-£21,885 Jacked-up Clio is among the better downsized options. Cabin space and value better than the class norm. Stylish and fluent-riding AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.5 dCi 110 Signature Nav Megane 5dr hatch £16,950-£25,850 Stylish and refined but bland. Nothing exceptional AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TCe 115 GT Line Nav Kad jar 5dr SUV £18,795-£28,495 Fine value, good cabin space, decent to drive and fine-looking. Not quite as classy as its Nissan sibling, but not far away AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 dCi 130 Signature Nav 2WD

R O L L S - R OYC E Wraith 2dr coupé £237,471-278,223 An intimate, involving Rolls-Royce. Less grand than its rangemates, but often in the measures that make it great in other ways AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 6.6 V12 Dawn 2dr open £264,055 Essentially as above, but de-tuned and in an elegant convertible form. AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 6.6 V12 Ghost 4dr saloon £224,943-£260,823 ‘Affordable’ Rolls is a more modern, driver-focused car than its bigger brother. Still hugely special. Ride just a little bit unsettled at times AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.6 V12 Phantom 4dr saloon £320,175-£373,743 BMW built a sublime Rolls-Royce when it took over in 1998. Still the greatest and most aristocratic limo money can buy AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 6.8 V12 Phantom Coupé 2dr coupé £349,311 Luxury in abundance, but in a sportier form AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.8 V12 Phantom Drophead Coupé 2dr open £369,687 Extreme luxury with a removable roof AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.8 V12

Leon 5dr hatch £18,230-£31,790 Ditto above, but here in more conventional five-door form AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 290 Cupra Leon ST 5dr estate £19,225-£32,785 Good-looking and responsive hatchback-turned-estate AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 290 Cupra Toledo 5dr hatch £17,195-£19,995 Makes practical sense but leaves no other lasting impression AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 TDI 115 Style Alhambra 5dr MPV £24,885-£36,130 A cheaper, plainer and less desirable sister for the VW Sharan. Spacious, versatile and decent to drive AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 SE Ecomotive Ateca 5dr SUV £17,990-£29,990 Seat’s first attempt to take on the SUV market — and it’s good AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 TDI 115 SE Ecomotive

S KO DA Citigo 3dr hatch £8275-£10,770 Czech take on the city car is more plain than some but well finished and strong to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 60 SE Citigo 5dr hatch £8625-£11,120 As above, with added rear-door practicality AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 60 SE Fabia 5dr hatch £10,750-£18,025 A touch derivative design-wise, and no class-leader on handling or cabin space, but strong claims everywhere else AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TSI 110 SE Fabia 5dr estate £12,630-£18,910 A touch derivative design-wise, and no class-leader on handling or cabin space, but strong claims everywhere else AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TSI 110 SE

Forfour 5dr hatch £11,620-£14,930 Four doors gives the Smart more mainstream practicality. Still expensive, though AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Proxy

S S A N GYO N G Tivoli 5dr hatch £12,950-£19,500 Trails the Duster as the best-value small crossover — but not by much AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6d EX Tivoli XLV 5dr hatch £18,250-£20,500 Tivoli on steroids - grown in size for more practicality and is joined by a range of personalisation options AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6d 4x4 Korando 5dr hatch £15,995-£22,495 Good for a Ssangyong, poor by class standards AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d EX 2WD Korando Sports 4dr pick-up £17,337-22,977 A rugged-looking pick-up, but lacks all of the finesse shown by its nearest rivals AABCC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0d EX 4WD Rexton W 5dr SUV £22,995-£28,995 Rugged seven-seater makes short work of mud. Asphalt more tricky AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d EX Turismo 5dr MPV £18,995-£24,995 Incredibly ungainly but offers huge real estate for the money AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.2d EX

SUBARU Impreza 4dr hatchback £17,495 Appealing hatchback, but feels a tad old-fashioned AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6i RC WRX STI 4dr saloon £28,995 Appealing and behind the times all at once AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.5 STI

Rapid 5dr saloon £16,505-£19,110 Essentially a Fabia in saloon form, so likeable if slightly dull AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TSI 110 SE

XV 5dr SUV £21,995-£26,995 No-nonsense crossover doesn’t quite make enough sense AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0D SE

Rapid Spaceback 5dr estate £13,675-£18,520 Estate shape makes most sense of Rapid’s skinny body AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TSI 110 SE Sport

Levorg 5dr estate £27,495 Impressively practical but only available with an auto ’box and one trim AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6i GT Auto AWD

Octavia 5dr hatch £16,660-£27,990 Almost too big to qualify as a hatchback, the Octavia does comfort and practicality like no other. Good engines, too AAAAC TESTERS’ PICKS: 2.0 TDI 150 SE L, 2.0 TSI 230 vRS

Forester 5dr SUV £25,495-£30,995 Solid, spacious and wilfully unsexy AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0i XE

Octavia Estate 5dr estate £17,880-£29,410 S E AT Class-leading amount of space Mii 3dr hatch £8440-£11,265 and practicality. Comfortable, too Not as desirable or plush inside as the AAAAC Up, but damn near as good to drive — TESTERS’ PICKS: 2.0 TDI 150 SE L, 2.0 TSI 230 vRS and well-priced with it AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 60 SE Technology Superb 4dr saloon £19,060-£34,305 Another commendable Czech value Mii 5dr hatch £8795-£11,995 option big on quality and space, small As above, but in more usable fiveon price AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 220 SE door form AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 60 SE L DSG Technology Superb Estate 5dr estate £20,260Ibiza SC 3dr hatch £10,000-£18,900 £35,505 A sharp-looking coupé that handles Even more commendable than well. Cupra version is a riot. AAABC above thanks to huge estate boot TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TSI 110 FR AAAAC

RXC 2dr coupé £94,500-£117,500 Designed for pounding around a track. Not for the open road AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.7 V6 Ibiza 5dr hatch £12,210-£15,735 Sharp-looking five door hatch lacks the verve of the Ford Fiesta AAABC R E N A U LT TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 TSI 110 FR Twizy 2dr hatch £6895-7795 Zany solution to personal mobility. Ibiza ST 5dr estate £12,910-£18,035 Suitably irreverent and impractical Rivals are more practical, but that AAABC doesn’t impact on its fun nature TESTERS’ PICK: EV Dynamique AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 TDI 105 FR Zoe 5dr hatch £17,795-£20,245 Leon SC 3dr hatch £17,400-£31,485 Far more practical zero-emission As ever, a Golf in cut-price Spanish solution. Attractive price AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: Dynamique Nav clothing — except slightly crisperlooking and better-handling. Worth Twingo 5dr hatch £9545-£13,595 considering AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 290 Cupra Handsome, unusual rear-engined

Fortwo Convertible 2dr open £13,265-£15,950 A similar story in open-top form as for the hatch AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Proxy

TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 220 SE L DSG Yeti 5dr SUV £17,210-£27,545 One of the first to successfully miniaturise the crossover formula. Spacious, useful, unpretentious and genuinely cheery AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 110 SE

SMART Fortwo 3dr hatch £11,125-£13,810 Pricey two-seater has lots of urban appeal but out of town performance and handling isn’t as rounded as others AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 0.9 Proxy

Outback 5dr estate £27,995-31,495 Acceptable in isolation but no benchmark AABCC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.5i SE Lineartronic BRZ 2dr coupé £22,495-£25,495 The GT-86’s half brother looks just as good in Subaru blue. Cheaper, too AAAAA TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0i SE

SUZUKI Celerio 5dr hatch £6999-9799 Pleasing to drive, cheap to buy and decent to sit in, the Celerio is a no-nonsense option — and very likeable for it AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 Dualjet SZ3 Swift 3dr hatch £8999-£14,149 Cute looks and rewarding handling. Sport is excellent fun AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 Sport Swift 5dr hatch £9499-£14,649 Cute looks and rewarding handling, even in this more practical form AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 Sport Baleno 5dr hatch £13,249-£15,599 Suzuki’s family-sized hatchback makes use of clever little engines AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2 Dualjet SZ5 Jimny 3dr 4x4 £12,499-£15,279 The smallest four-wheel-drive Suzuki


NEW CAR PRICES is looking dated AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.3 SZ4

TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0D 180 Family Compact

Vitara 5dr SUV £14,499-£22,849 Utterly worthy addition to the class; drives better than most AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 Boosterjet S Allgrip

C-HR 5DR SUV £20,995-£27,995 Coupé-shaped crossover aims to bring the fight to Nissan and the Juke. Thus far its seems to hit the right notes AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 Hybrid Excel

SX4 S-Cross 5dr SUV £14,999-£24,349 Not a class leader, but a very worthy crossover. Refreshed look gives it a new lease of life AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 SZ-T Allgrip

TESLA Model S 5dr hatch £53,880-£114,580 Genuine 300-mile range doesn’t just make the Model S a standout electric car; it feels like the future of luxury motoring AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: P90D AWD Model X 5dr SUV £64,480-£117,580 Genuine 300-mile range doesn’t just make the Model X a standout electric car; it’s a luxury seven seater with falcon doors AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 90D AWD

T OYO TA Aygo 3dr hatch £9135-£13,245 Impactful styling does a lot to recommend it. Strong on infotainment but not as refined or practical as some AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 x-pression Aygo 5dr hatch £9535-£14,345 As above, but with rear doors AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 x-pression Yaris 3dr hatch £11,750-£13,920 Good space and value but not a class leader AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 VVT-i Icon Yaris 5dr hatch £12,350-£18,095 Stylish interior but ultimately a scaled-down version of bigger Toyotas AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.33 VVT-i Icon £14265 Auris 5dr hatch £16,390-£25,140 Disappointingly average. There are many better rivals AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2T VVT-i Design Auris Touring Sports 5dr estate £17,490-£26,240 Nothing wrong, but nothing exceptional AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.2T VVT-i Design Prius 5dr hatch £23,600-£27,355 Better all-round compared to its predecessors AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 VVT-i Business Edition Prius Plug-In 5dr hatch £33,450 Plug-in hybrid Prius is clever and appealing in its own right AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 VVT-i Plug-In Prius+ 5dr MPV £27,050-£31,300 Expensive and ugly. Bigger though AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 VVT-i Excel Avensis 4dr saloon £19,300-£27,085 Nothing wrong, but nothing exceptional. Good spec AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 V-matic Business Edition Avensis Tourer 5dr estate £20,480-£28,890 Good spec but an unexceptional estate otherwise AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.8 V-matic Business Edition Verso 5dr MPV £18,925-£26,095 One of Toyota’s better niche models is unburdened by a hybrid powertrain and offers decent space, a respectable drive and a keen price AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 V-matic Icon 7seats Proace Verso 5dr MPV £26,050-£35,400 One of Toyota’s niche models is unburdened by a hybrid powertrain and provides decent competition to the Vivaro and Transit equivalents AAABC

RAV4 5dr SUV £23,755-£32,975 A solid option, but ultimately outgunned by Korean competition AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 D-4D Icon Land Cruiser 5dr 4x4 £36,465-£55,465 A real go-anywhere vehicle. Available with seven-seats AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.8 D-4D Active Hilux 5dr 4x4 £22,955-£35,265 A real go-anywhere vehicle with the added practicality of being a pick-up AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.5 D-4D Active Double Cab GT86 2dr coupé £22,705-£28,695 Who knew Toyota had another dynamic masterstroke in it after the Lexus LFA? Almost as much fun as a limited budget can buy. Splendid AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 Aero

VA U X H A L L

on persuasive quality just like the Mokka AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4T 140 Design Nav VXR8 4dr saloon £55,550-£56,220 Charismatic Vauxhall is more brutish and unsophisticated than some. Unbeatable on horsepower-perpound, though AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 6.2 V8 Maloo LSA

V O L K S WA G E N Up 3dr hatch £8995-£11,350 VW’s city car is no revolution — just a trademark effort to beat its rivals on finish, refinement, desirability and economy AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 60 Look Up Up 5dr hatch £9395-£25,280 Ditto above, with added five-door convenience AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 60 Look Up Polo 3dr hatch £11,525-£20,370 Still the sensible choice in a lot of ways: usable, refined, easy-going, desirable and very solidly built AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 TSI 110 SE L Polo 5dr hatch £12,155-£21,000 And even more useful with five doors AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 TSI 110 SE L

Viva 5dr hatch £8745-10,145 Plenty of space for the money but lacking equipment and youthful joie de vivre AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0 75 Ecoflex SE

Golf 3dr hatch £17,625-£33,100 A little expensive it may be, but there’s enough quality here to justify the expense. Classiness democratised AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 220 GTI

Adam 3dr hatch £12,110-£19,045 Certainly looks the part, but there are better superminis ahead of it AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4 150 Rocks S

Golf 5dr hatch £18,280-£35,820 As above but in the five-door form most buyers are likely to opt for AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 220 GTI

Corsa 3dr hatch £9745-£18,630 Very refined, stylish and practical, but its engines aren’t so good AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0T 90 Ecoflex SE

Golf Estate 5dr estate £18,980-£34,455 And even more practical in loadlugging body style AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 300 R 4Motion DSG

Corsa 5dr hatch £13,250-£19,200 A more practical version of the Corsa, which is refined and practical AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0T 90 Ecoflex SE Astra 5dr hatch £15,445-£22,965 Good handling and nice engines but its working-class roots still show through AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.0T 105 Ecoflex Tech Line Astra Sports Tourer 5dr estate £16,735-£24,255 More composed and practical than the hatchback AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 CDTi 160 BiTurbo SRi Insignia 5dr hatch £17,439-£32,404 Nearly as good as a Mondeo. Inert steering AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 CDTi 170 Ecoflex SRi Insignia Sports Tourer 5dr estate £19,669-£33,704 Hugely spacious but no fun to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 CDTi 170 Ecoflex SRi Meriva 5dr MPV £13,410-£22,395 Clever Flexdoors make sense for young families. Nice to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4T 140 Exclusiv Zafira Tourer 5dr MPV £18,615-£29,580 Looks upmarket but feels less so on the inside. Some clever packaging features make good use of what space there is. Ordinary to drive AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.4T 140 Exclusiv Vivaro Combi MPV £23,623-£25,216 Vauxhall people-mover based on its popular van AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 CDTi 90 Ecoflex SWB Mokka X 5dr hatch £19,655-£26,765 Compact and competent but short

ZENOS E10 R

‘The E10 is already special. A Focus RS engine makes the R properly compelling’ M O R E AT A U T O C A R . C O . U K

Golf SV 5dr MPV £19,255-£27,610 MQB platform gives the Golf proper MPV proportions. Still no C-Max, though AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 SE Jetta 4dr saloon £19,155-£25,055 Big boot, pleasant dynamics and good pricing. A bit dull AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 SE Beetle 3dr hatch £16,820-£25,390 Huge improvement, but the Golf hiding underneath is a superior car AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 Sport Beetle Cabriolet 2dr open £19,775-£28,545 Huge improvement and quite chic in open-top form AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 110 Scirocco 2dr coupé £21,040-£34,390 A complete coupé. Entertaining, practical and stylish AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TSI 280 R Passat 4dr saloon £22,680-£40,180 Lands convincing blows with quality, usability, smart looks and civilised manners. A touch too conservative to be entertaining, though AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 SE Passat Estate 5dr estate £24,230-£41,730 Smart-looking and civilised estate AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 190 SCR GT

Caddy Life 5dr MPV £19,759-£26,316 Rugged workhorse built to supplement the Touran and Sharan AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 Caravelle 5dr MPV £37,686-£55,362 Rugged workhorse built to carry people AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 204 SE SWB California 5dr MPV £38,214-£55,790 Rugged workhorse built to carry people and put them up for the night AAACC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 Tiguan 5dr SUV £22,510-£36,375 An improvement on the previous generation, but is it a winner? AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI SCR 150 SE Nav Touareg 5dr SUV £43,935-£49,895 An unusually straightforward sort: comfy, capable, refined and obedient-handling. Five seats only AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 3.0 V6 TDI 262 SE Amarok 5dr 4x4 £25,419-£35,931 Volkswagen quality of build and interior matched to a rugged exterior AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 BiTDI 180 Trendline

V O LV O V40 5dr hatch £21,950-33,775 Not perfect, but a handsome, wellpackaged, pragmatic and likeable car: rare commodities in the class AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 T3 R-Design S60 4dr saloon £22,395-31,625 New frugal four-pot diesel has given Volvo’s middleweight a new lease of life. Determinedly understated, mature and laid back AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 D4 SE Lux Nav V60 5dr estate £23,075-£52,270 Mature and appealing cabin, nice looks and smooth drive. Too small AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 D4 Cross Country Lux Nav S90 4dr saloon £32,555-£42,055 The new mid-size executive car ready to take on the Germans AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: D4 Inscription V90 5dr estate £34,555-£44,055 The new luxury Swedish saloon in a more practical estate form AAABC TESTERS’ PICK: D4 Inscription XC60 5dr SUV £32,685-39,890 Refreshing car design from Volvo, made more competitive by its engine revolution. Not quite as spacious as some but has useful features AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 D4 R-Design Nav XC90 5dr SUV £46,850-£64,555 Cleverly packaged, smartly styled, competitively priced and pleasing to drive. As close a thing to a classleader as Volvo has had in a long time AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 D5 Inscription AWD

VUHL 05 2dr open £59,995-£89,995 Mexican track day special has a pleasingly pragmatic and forgiving chassis. Turbo engine isn’t the most characterful AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: RR 2.3 Ecoboost

CC 4dr saloon £25,475-£33,515 WESTFIELD Loses a name and adds some flair but SPORT 2dr open £20,588-£28,745 never compels AAAAC TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 184 GT Entry-level Westfield. Sport Turbo is very quick and fun but no Caterham AAAAC Touran 5dr MPV £22,270-£31,535 TESTERS’ PICK: 1.6 Sigma 155 The medium-sized people-carrier Sport done conservatively — but done very well. Refined and wieldy, with ZENOS excellent infotainment options AAAAC E10 0dr open £26,995-£39,995 TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI SCR 150 SE The latest in a long line of English mid-engined marvels. Earns its Sharan 5dr MPV £26,680-£36,660 stripes immediately; expect a Full-sized seven-seater offers dedicated following AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.3 R outstanding versatility and space with tidy handling and VW-brand desirability AAAAB TESTERS’ PICK: 2.0 TDI 150 SE

W H AT ’ S C O M I N G W H E N JA N UA RY Audi A5 Sportback, Aston Martin Vanquish S, Bentley Bentayga Diesel, Bugatti Chiron, Citroën C3, Dacia Logan MCV update, Sandero update, Sandero Stepway update, Ford Mustang Black Shadow, Mustang Blue Edition, Hennessey Mustang HPE800, Hyundai i10 update, Lexus IS update, Mazda MX-5 RF, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV update, Peugeot 3008, Renault Twingo GT, Zoe update, Suzuki Ignis, Toyota C-HR, Prius Plug-in Hybrid F E B R UA RY BMW 5 Series, Dacia Duster update, Ford Ecosport update, Isuzu D-Max, Kia Rio, Land Rover Discovery, Mini Countryman, Peugeot 5008, Renault Scénic Hybrid Assist, Grand Scénic Hybrid Assist, Seat Leon update, Volvo S90 R-Design, V90 Cross Country, V90 R-Design MARCH AC Cobra 378, Atalanta sports car, Bentley Mulsanne update, BMW M760Li update, X2, Ferrari GTC4 Lusso T, Ford GT, Ford Fiesta, Honda Civic, Hyundai i30, Jaguar F-Type update, Mercedes-AMG E63, Mercedes-Maybach S600 Cabriolet, Nissan Micra, Noble M600 Speedster, Piecha AMG GT-RSR, Renault Mégane update, Mégane Hybrid Assist, Seat Leon Cupra 300 update, Leon ST Estate 4WD, Skoda Octavia update, Spyker C8 Preliator, Suzuki SX4 S-Cross update, Vauxhall Insignia, Volkswagen Golf Hybrid APRIL Alpina D4 update, B4 update, Audi Q5, Kia Picanto, GT, Lamborghini Huracán Spyder RWD, Mercedes-AMG GT C Roadster, Mercedes-Benz E-Class Coupé, V-Class Camper, Porsche Panamera, Skoda Kodiaq M I D -20 17 AC Cobra, Alfa Romeo Stelvio, Alpina B3S, Alpine A120, Audi A5 Cabriolet, S5 Cabriolet, S5 Sportback, BMW 1 Series update, 2 Series update, 4 Series update, 5 Series Touring, M4 update, M5, Bristol Bullet, Citroën C3 Picasso, Ferrari F12 M, LaFerrari Aperta, Fiat 500L update, Ford Fiesta Active, Honda Clarity, Jaguar XF Sportbrake, Kia Soul EV update, Niro PHEV, Lamborghini Aventador update, Aventador S, Lexus LC, Lotus Exige Sport 380, Mahindra e2o Plus, Maserati Ghibli update, Mazda CX-5, Mercedes-AMG E63, E63 Estate, GT R Coupé, Mercedes-Benz E-Class All Terrain, S-Class update, Mitsubishi ASX update, Porsche 911 GT3 update, Renault Captur update, Koleos, Seat Ibiza, Leon update, Skoda Citigo update, Rapid update, Smart Forfour ED, Fortwo ED, Fortwo Cabriolet ED, Subaru BRZ update, Levorg update, Suzuki Swift, Vauxhall Crossland X, Insignia, Volkswagen Arteon, Golf update, Polo GTI, Tiguan LWB, Touareg, Volvo XC60, V90 T8, V90 T8 L AT E 20 17 Abarth 500X, Aston Martin V8 Vantage, Audi A8, RS3 Saloon, RS3 Sportback, TT RS, Bentley Continental GT, BMW 2 Series update, 6 Series GT, X3, Faraday Future SUV, Fisker Emotion, Ford Fiesta, GLM G4, Honda Civic Type R, CR-V, Hyundai i30 N, Jaguar F-Type update, I-Pace, Jeep Compass, Kia GT, Sorento update, small SUV, Lotus Evora 400 Roadster, Mercedes-AMG GLC63, Mercedes-Benz E-Class Cabriolet, S-Class update, X-Class, Mitsubishi SUV, Shogun, Nio EP9, Nissan Juke, Qashqai update, X-Trail update, Range Rover Hybrid, Sport Coupé, Sport SVR, Renault Kadjar update, Seat Arona, Ateca X-Perience, Ssangyong Rexton, Tesla Model 3, Toyota Yaris Gazoo, Vauxhall Insignia VXR, Grandland X, Volkswagen T-Roc, Tiguan Allspace, Volvo V40, V60, XC60, Zenos E11

Stay up to date with the latest new car launches with Autocar’s online news page. Head to autocar.co.uk

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2 DOG........................£30,000 98 DS.........................£18,000 400 DS.........................£8,800 DS 7938.......................£2,300 I00 DVO.......................£3,600 E C4 EGC .......................£7,500 93I ELC........................£1,400 EI0 TTT .......................£2,500 ETM 800......................£2,800 2I3 EMM ......................£2,800 EMW 520.....................£2,500 I0 EN..........................£13,000 EP 3582.......................£2,500 EPII ATE ......................£1,000 ERR IK.......................£12,000 F I9 F.............................£65,000 UKI5 FAB.....................£4,500 LA55 FAT.....................£4,500 550 FB.........................£9,800 RI2 FCS..........................£650 862 FDT.......................£1,800 FDZ 483..........................£900 FP 23 ...........................£8,500 R555 FRY....................£1,000 FUN IT .........................£3,800 G I7 G ............................£52,500 222 GA ........................£9,000 GAC 88I.......................£3,000 I20 GC .........................£7,500 GE 4768.......................£2,600 II GEM........................£15,000 I GFX............................£8,500 I GGX...........................£9,500 II GGX..........................£5,500 250 GH ........................£9,000 20 GJS.........................£6,800 IIII GK.........................£12,000 55 GN ..........................£9,500 400 GP ........................£9,500 H HAZ 750 ......................£2,500

I50 HB..........................£8,000 38 HGB........................£5,800 3959 HJ .......................£1,300 R9 HJH........................£1,200 HJR IN .........................£1,300 777 HM........................£7,000 HN 4626 ......................£1,400 II HNS ..........................£5,000 AD02 HOD.....................£850 R8 HRD .......................£1,200 HSK 288......................£1,200 HU5ICAN.....................£4,500 II0 HXH........................£1,900 J JAG 8T.......................£12,000 RI00 JAG.....................£5,500 II JCD...........................£5,500 JCG IG.........................£1,800 4 JCK.........................£10,000 WI8 JEM......................£1,300 624 JGC ......................£1,495 JJW 624.......................£5,500 JOD I7S.......................£4,000 24 JRC.........................£6,800 K48 JRP .........................£600 JW I86I ........................£3,800 K KAT 6V.........................£4,500 K794 KAB.......................£600 KCT 96I........................£2,000 KEN I7P.......................£2,800 KER 557Y....................£2,000 KH 9064 ......................£2,800 35 KL............................£9,800 660 KO.........................£4,800 3 KOR ..........................£5,500 I KRL..........................£19,000 KRL III..........................£5,800 4 KSG ..........................£8,800 66 KXK ........................£1,500 L S9 LCW ..........................£800 LEE 782.......................£3,500 300 LH.........................£9,500

400 LH.........................£9,500 88 LOV.........................£5,500 I90 LR ..........................£7,000 L2 LTY ............................£950 RII LVE............................£950 LXS 40.........................£2,200 LYN 554Y ....................£4,500 M II MCF..........................£8,500 MDS I7.........................£7,000 2I ME..........................£15,000 MEJ 2.........................£12,500 AI0 MFC ......................£1,300 60 MG....................... £25,000 V8 MGB.......................£3,500 50 MGL........................£5,500 X7 MHB..........................£950 MKE I.........................£75,000 MKS I .........................£35,000 S29 MLE.........................£450 WI MLW.......................£1,995 866 MMB.....................£2,800 MUB I.........................£12,000 N 79 N........................... £23,000 S330 NCK......................£700 T444 NDV.......................£600 NFG 20........................£2,800 II NMS..........................£5,000 66 NSX ........................£3,500 84 NT...........................£7,500 70 NXN........................£1,900 0 55 OFB ........................£4,500 I6 OG ...........................£8,800 30 OJ ...........................£7,500 6 OOO .......................£30,000 OOO IX........................£8,800 N5 OOO ......................£5,000 Y7 OSH .......................£1,800 I00 OT........................£20,000 I OTO ........................ £22,000 III OTX .........................£1,500 I000 OW ....................£20,000

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P P I00...........................£65,000 PAM I32Y ....................£1,200 450 PAT.......................£3,500 PAT 228.......................£5,500 P6 PBR........................£1,000 PCY I.......................... £17,000 50 PE .........................£16,000 362 PG ........................£3,600 PHC 7 ..........................£6,800 PIL 2003.........................£800 7584 PJ........................£1,800 507 PMY......................£2,800 X5 PNE........................£1,600 PP II ...........................£55,000 X6 PPD...........................£600 PRE 35E......................£2,000 1996 PS.......................£5,500 R R80 RAK .....................£1,200 R777 LLY.....................£3,000 BI RBW...........................£950 CI7 RDS ......................£2,300 J30 REP ......................£1,300 P99 REY.........................£600 RFW 9..........................£9,800 I50 RG .........................£7,500 RGC 943 .....................£1,800 RHA 77........................£5,000 REJ 3.........................£10,800 69 RJ............................£8,800 I9 RMS.........................£8,500 P90 RNR ........................£700 ROO2 ERT..................£2,400 I965 RR .....................£20,000 RTL I ..........................£75,000 RTL 2.........................£55,000 I2 RTP..........................£3,000 S 3 SAC.........................£14,000 SAM 293......................£8,800 MII SBB ..........................£700 I SBX..........................£13,800 T8 SCS........................£1,500

J33 SEA ......................£1,000 SEJ I50........................£3,300 SEZ 5692 ....................... £150 SHII RLS....................£15,000 40 SJX.........................£1,700 I3 SLK..........................£5,500 2 SLR.........................£24,000 I28 SM .........................£9,800 SNO 30........................£3,500 50 UND....................£130,000 SPD 346......................£3,500 SOP 853......................£3,200 S4 SPY........................£4,500 208 SR.......................£10,000 4 SXM..........................£4,800 T THE 800T..................£15,000 I828 TJ.........................£1,900 TKJ 46 .........................£3,500 I50 TL...........................£6,000 78 TR ...........................£8,000 TRI3 MPH....................£5,500 TRN I..........................£29,000 TSE 6...........................£5,500 TUR80G....................£18,500 G35I TVR ....................£1,000 TVR 653X....................£1,000 U I UDY......................... £23,000 I UEE............................£8,500 M66 UFC.....................£1,800 UNA 332......................£3,500 7 UNO..........................£4,500 RI0 UNO......................£1,200 500 UOX......................£1,300 USA 3I8 .......................£5,500 L5 UST.........................£2,000 V VER 73X......................£2,000 P2I VGB.......................£1,200 VJI I50.............................£950 VJV 306.......................£1,800 7 VJX............................£3,800 935 VPD......................£1,500

VSN I......................... £28,000 VVC 2.........................£10,000 W 450 W ..........................£8,500 WBK 598 .....................£2,100 92 WM .........................£8,500 52 WR........................£11,000 I7 WRF.........................£2,800 WWK 92 ......................£5,500 I WWW ....................£115,000 I0 WWW......................£9,500 500 WXW.....................£1,100 X 333 X .........................£15,000 I000 X ........................£32,000 I XAD ...........................£9,500 I XBC..........................£15,500 4 XCG ..........................£4,800 8 XDR ..........................£5,000 4 XFJ............................£4,500 40 XKY ........................£1,800 50 OXH........................£1,500 I00 XS..........................£8,000 4 XX ...........................£45,500 I XXG .........................£13,000 XXX 4.........................£18,000 Y II YPB...........................£3,000 YI0 YDS.......................£2,300 II YLP ...........................£3,000 YSX 88.........................£2,000 I YTA ............................£9,000 REDUCED REGMARKS 850 AT.................... £3,900 II DCP......................£3,650 206 ELY...................£1,900 6 GCD..................... £3,300 I0 JDJ ..................... £2,400 II JDJ....................... £2,800 26 JRC ................... £3,500 222 LP.....................£4,600 22 SMR .................. £3,600 444 Y ...................... £5,800

All plus dot & some plus VAT 4 January 2017 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 81


Matt Prior TESTER’S NOTES

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New car registrations The final figures are in; how did the events of 2016 affect the UK market?

Vauxhall is fighting for space on the UK’s best-selling cars list think the middle market is starting to fight back. The recovery has been a while coming, given that it has probably been about 20 years since budget brands decided that they didn’t only want to be budget brands any more, and about the same amount of time since premium brands decided they didn’t want to be just premium brands any more. Kia, Hyundai and Skoda opted to move, little by little, into the midmarket sector. And Audi, MercedesBenz and BMW did the same from the other end – an end from which it is rather easier to move, because we’d all like a £15,000 Audi, but no one wants a £50,000 Hyundai. And all of this meant what? That Ford, Vauxhall/Opel, Peugeot, Citroën, Renault, Fiat, Toyota, Nissan and Honda were left in the middle, feeling the squeeze. And a squeeze it is. Not much more than a decade ago, the top 10 best sellers in the UK would have been three Fords, three Vauxhalls (all

I

New Toyota C-HR is interesting to look at 82 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 4 JANUARY 2017

If cars are good enough, they’ll find buyers, as former budget brands have found

Autocar’s cars of 2016 Looking back at our favourite cars of the past 12 months

❞ ordinary hatchbacks and saloons), the Volkswagen Golf, a couple of French cars and something like the Nissan Micra. But today, Ford and Vauxhall can count on just two each – small cars, too, on which it’s hard to make large profits – with six spaces ripe for the taking by others. The Peugeot 306 used to be the eighth best-selling car in the country. Today, its equivalent isn’t even the eighth best-selling car in its class. Today’s top 10 usually includes a BMW, Mercedes or Audi. There will be Nissans still, too, because with extraordinary foresight, Nissan saw the demand for SUVs and crossovers coming. Or perhaps it created it. Who knows? But for too long the rest of the mid-market sat steady, just doing what it always did and hoping that the market would come back to it. Belatedly, it appears to have realised that that approach isn’t going to wash any more. A flurry of new cars are being introduced and they are, finally, interesting. Such as? Such as the Toyota C-HR, road tested on p26. Not only is it rather nice to look at, inside and out, but it’s also much better to drive than you might expect. Ford would like you to unlearn everything you know about it, because it has launched the Edge,

Mustang and the Vignale brand – although I suspect it’ll take the arrival of the next Fiesta before Vignale starts making headway. The Peugeot 3008 is, like the C-HR, very pleasant to sit in. Citroën doesn’t have an equivalent yet, but there is DS. I’m not sure how much demand there will be for posh Citroëns, even if no chevron badges appear on them, but the will is clearly there. And if the cars are good enough, they’ll find buyers – as former budget brands have found. Sports cars will be back, too. Toyota is reviving the Supra and its Gazoo racing division might start developing hot Toyota road cars. Honda’s range is still, for the most part, quite dull, as is Vauxhall’s. But at least the NSX is back, to provide some kind of halo, while the new Vauxhall Insignia is massive inside in a sort of Skoda Superb take on things. What’s notable is that all of these cars are at least trying to give you a compelling reason to buy them. For too long, the saturated middle market hasn’t been able to do that. Finally, it seems, it has woken up.

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