__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

FALL 2012

ART BEAUTY FASHION TRAVEL INTERVIEWS

5

1968 MAGAZINE “FROM TORONTO TO THE WORLD”


FALL 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS

COVER Photographed by Haley Ballard

4

INTERVIEW Fashion Designer Danny Tang

6

INTERVIEW Jewellery Designer Maria Lau

8

MASTHEAD

9

IN THIS ISSUE...

10

SNOW RED Photographed by Haley Ballard

18

LUCY OF THE GOLDEN DAWN Photographed by Melissa Rodwell

28

RED STATE Photographed by Richard Dubois

34

DEEP IN THE OCEAN Photographed by Massimo Zanusso

42

VEILED/UNVEILED Photographed by Paolo Prisco

52

MAGIC BEAUTY Photographed by Barry Druxman

56

INTERVIEW Artist Mark Venaglia

62

INTERVIEW Fashion Designer Kim Kwang

64

INTERVIEW Model of the Issue - Dani Seitz

66

TRAVEL Thailand

www.1968magazine.com

3


INTERVIEW - FASHION DESIGNER

DANNY TANG

D

Fashion Designer

anny Tang is an outstanding womenswear designer who breathes vibrancy and beauty into his creations. A Malaysian designer, Danny Tang spent his childhood and initial training in Kuala Lumpur, excelling as the youngest student in the SML fashion academy, K.L. He began working from the age of 16, collaborating with the Malaysian Designer, Lester Wong. Danny moved to London in 2004 and attended the London College of Fashion and Instituto Marangoni. After finishing his studies he worked with designers Nana Aganavish and Ana Sekularac as well as carrying out successful freelance design and styling projects. In 2009 he launched his eponymous Danny Tang label. Initially this consisted of a collection of accessories that were created to add interest and glamour to the “simple black dress”. This range of shrugs, collars, belts and neck pieces were immediately picked up by leading stylists, being requested and worn by celebrities including Grace Jones and Anna Friel. Many prestigious stores were keen to be among the first to see these amazing works of art which led then to Danny launching a full collection at London Fashion Week. Danny Tang now shows his collections internationally each season, including New York, London, Paris, Shanghai and Tokyo.

You were the youngest student to join the SML fashion academy in Kuala Lumpur at 16. How did this impact you and your career? I was very lucky to have worked as an assistant to Malaysian fashion designer Lester Wong. Through my work with Lester and the recommendation letter I was accepted as a student at 16. It gave me an early head start to my fashion career and also enabled me to work with some amazing designers both in Europe and Asia. How did you transition from Danny Tang label consisting of a collection of accessories to launching a full collection? The accessories collection has always been part of the full collection. However, during my debut Autumn/Winter season for London Fashion Week 2010, before the collection was shown, British Vogue saw some of the accessories pieces and decided to feature them in their April 2010 issue. So, it was often mistaken I have accessories collection to transition for launching a full collection. What do you bring to fashion? I have always been inspired by Alexander McQueen’s work. When I was 15 I saw a fashion magazine featuring Alexander McQueen S/S 2001 “Voss” Collection… I was so taken by the beauty and magic of his work. That moment initiated my career in becoming a fashion designer. I believe my work is bringing back elements of what London fashion has been missing. My work has always shown what British fashion was, famous for class, elegance and sophistication, with a touch of edginess.

4

www.1968magazine.com


FASHION DESIGNER

How do you intend women to feel when wearing your designs? I imagine the woman who wears my clothing is a strongminded, independent woman, yet with sense of elegance and femininity. Who would you most like to dress in your designs? I would have loved to dress Grace Kelly. My modern day “Grace Kelly” is the Duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton. They both are strong and feminine, yet never lose their elegance at any moment. Is there any piece of clothing that you think every woman should have in her wardrobe? A little black dress and a Danny Tang Collar of course. A little black dress will look good at anytime and a Danny Tang Collar can be mixed and matched to your day-to-day wardrobe creating and adding some interest and glamour. What is your fashion dream? I think every fashion designer will share the same fashion dream as me, which is to have their fashion brands shown and sold internationally. What are your sources of inspiration? People, Places, Movies, Music, Travel and many more emotions are my sources of inspiration, but London inspires me in a special way. That is also why I’m based here. I love the people, they are so edgy and the city is so cosmopolitan. It gives me such an intense and nervous energy. To me London is a place where you can feel the contrast of the young and the old, the new and the history. It is just a great place to be inspired by. How would you define the overall style and aesthetic of your designs? I believe opposites attract like Black and White, Ying and Yang, Man and Woman, Masculine and Feminine. My designs’ style and aesthetic often work toward that. How have your recent travels through Japan influenced your collection? Japan is an amazing country, so rich with culture and inspirations. I was very inspired by the Japanese Origami folded technic and the use of color in Japanese fashion. As you can see in my collection, I have incorporated these two elements. Tell us about the role of origami in your designs. The origami fold technique is incorporated in my collar design and pieces of S/S2012 “New Dimension” collection. Each of the origami pieces are hand folded and hand sewn to the collar giving the signature Danny Tang Collar and the full collection a new modern and volumes movement.

What are your goals in the next 5 years as a designer? My goals for the next 5 years are to launch second line and a menswear collection. If you could do anything else, what would it be? If I was not a fashion designer I would have liked to be a cosmologist, I am very interested in cosmology and the study of the universe. I always wonder… “Are we alone in the Universe?”


INTERVIEW - DESIGNER

MARIA LAU

M

Jewellery Designer

aria Lau is a young, independent designer who is carving out a niche for creating elegant, luxury jewellery with a twist. Blurring the boundary between jewellery and clothing, Lau manipulates unconventional materials such as hosiery and shock-cord elastic, mixed with semi-precious stones and minerals to create braided and embellished statement pieces. Lau graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2003 with a Masters in Mixed Media Textiles. Since starting up her own label in 2006, Lau has since worked with upcoming, emerging fashion designers for catwalk presentations as well as major brands DKNY, and Harrods. Creating jewellery that extends beyond the norm, Lau’s collections include oversized collars and necklaces, African inspired cuffs and multi-functioning head and neckpieces as well as simple statements that reflect a more conceptual approach. Lau launched her eponymous label in 2008, which debuted at Treasure – London Jewellery Week. All Maria Lau jewellery is handmade within the designer’s studio in the UK.

What made you choose the field of jewellery design? I’ve always had a keen eye for detail, and working on an intricate scale comes easily to me, so jewellery became a natural progression. My textile work was often more sculptural and related to the body, which I then adapted to be worn on the body. When I set up my label, it made sense that jewellery should be the core product alongside the textiles, but with a more commercial angle to work towards. You have a non-conventional approach to creating jewellery, how would you define it? I have an experimental approach to design, and as a BritishCantonese designer, I like to play with duality. There is the notion that investment jewellery should be gold and diamonds, especially in the Asian culture. In my work, I like to take the ordinary and transform it into something luxurious through handcraft skills or unexpected combinations. How did you come up with the idea of using materials that are associated with clothing to create your designs? I was already working with textiles, it was more the ‘jewellery’ or hardware being a new medium. Clothing is such an everyday thing, you feel it against your skin and it feels soft, comfortable and familiar – I wanted to incorporate this feeling into jewellery, which traditionally is cold and hard when you put it on, but also make it sculptural and decorative to adorn the body. What inspires your designs? Super heroines, fantasy, nature, tribal cultures, architecture and materials! Also, sci-fi films, music, fashion, as well as what real people wear.

How and when did you know you wanted to start your career as a jewellery designer? Although I had experimented with jewellery/accessories early on, it wasn’t until studying MA Mixed Media Textiles at The Royal College of Art, that I knew I wanted to pursue this more. Being in such a creative environment with the opportunity to hone your skills in live projects, whilst living in London, opened my eyes to the possibility. Straight after my degree show, Michiko Koshino commissioned a range of hand accessories and concepts, so it set the tone for what I could do after my studies.

6

Do you remember what was the first piece of jewellery you ever designed? I made my first accessory when I was really young, about 7 or 8 years old, and it was a multi-functioning pencil-case/ handbag made of grey teddy-bear fabric with a detachable strap. I was really proud of it! My first piece of jewellery didn’t really come along until much later when I was at University, and it was probably a choker made of a colourful plastic tie-wrap normally found on cardboard boxes, embellished with seed beads and dyed monofilaments… it was inspired by sea-life!

www.1968magazine.com


DESIGNER

Do you have a favorite piece amongst what you have designed so far? Probably my earlier, chunkier pieces which are lush with textiles: ‘Nude Twisted Collar’ from ‘A Skin Less Ordinary’ and the ‘Tomoe’ braided necklace from ‘Dark Tales’. Do you hand make all your pieces? Yes, all pieces are handcrafted in my studio which I personally oversee to ensure consistency and quality. I make a lot of the pieces myself still, especially the collection samples.

How has your work evolved from your debut collection in 2009 to your most recent 2012 collection? My earlier collections were much more avant-garde with the use of soft textiles, which were juxtaposed against beautiful semi-precious stones. There were eclectic mixes of materials such as hosiery with synthetic hair, which really plays with the irony of wearing these everyday attachments on the body, but redefined as luxury concept jewellery. For 2012, I wanted to bring back ‘harder’ textiles such as the shock-cord, leather and plastics, which are all materials revisited from my MA collection. The collections are also evolving to appeal to a wider audience, which is more important to me now than before. What does the future hold for you? More collections selling to a wider audience - for my label or as well as others, showcasing abroad, such as in Paris or New York, starting a family and achieving a good work/life balance!

What are your favorite colors to work with and why? Grey/silver as I love monochromatic colours, black for textures and, nudes for the irony of wearing skin-tone jewellery on the skin. For accent and contrast colours I like hot pinks, yellows and greens as they ‘pop’ against the monochromatic canvas of my jewellery. How long does it take you to create a whole collection? It really varies, depending on the season and other factors, like being able to source the right materials and how much research I do. Anything from 6 weeks to 3 months with other jobs running alongside, it’s ongoing process sometimes. Generally, Autumn/Winter is quicker as it tends to be a darker update from Spring/Summer. I also find it much easier to design in dark colours. What role does music play in your creative process? I use music to inspire me as it helps create a certain mood if I need it. For example, the album ‘Untrue’ by Burial inspired Dark Tales AW09, it’s such a cinematic album that I created a story and character to drive the collection from it. It was a very dark and moody collection! As I spend less time designing now as the brand has been developing, music helps me to focus when working creatively.

What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? Who would be your ideal character or customer to create for and why? It would be for Princess Amidala or a sci-fi film actress where I could really push the creativity of the jewellery and textures. I’d love to make a headpiece that would cross the boundary between hair and jewellery! Anna della Russo, Bjork and Lady Gaga would also be really fun to create for.


1968 MAGAZINE TOM VAN RIPLE

Editor in Chief - Creative Director

1968 Team

Fashion and Art 1968

Contact us 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968

.1968

. .

.

.

.

.

Contributing Photographers Haley Ballard, Melissa Rodwell, Richard Dubois, Massimo Zanusso, Paolo Prisco, Barry Druxman Contributing Stylists Caterina Cardinali, Rodney Burns, Luca Termine, Paolo Prisco Contributing Makeup Artists, Hair Stylists and Manicurists Kunio Kataoka, Shinya Nakagawa, Camille Clark, Randi Petersen, Beth Fricke, Blair Petty, Mikaela Alleyson, Marco Minunno, Paolo Prisco, Carole Soueidan

1968

1968

.

. 1968 .

8

.

. 1968 . 1968

.

.

1968 .

. .1968

.

www.1968magazine.com

.

.

-

1968

.


IN THIS ISSUE...

Thailand

Mark Venaglia Wellness Artist and Cultural Activist Mark Venaglia describes his art as Post Abstract Representationalism. Collectors as diverse as Robert De Niro, Celine Dion, Eddie Murphy and Gloria Swanson have acquired the artist’s paintings. (Page 56)

Danny Tang His outstanding eye for detail and signature designs are highly anticipated each season and achieve international acclaim, resulting in Danny Tang quickly garnering a reputation as one of the most exciting new designers emerging today. (Page 4)

Kim Kwang Footwear designer Kim Kwang, draws you in with both his advertising concepts and designs. He started his career designing for Jimmy Choo and has now launched his own shoe collection. (Page 62)

Maria Lau Maria Lau creates unconventional jewellery using a surprising contrast of materials, blurring the boundary between jewellery and clothing. Her creations are playful yet elegant and are all hand made. (Page 6)

Dusit Thani Hua Hin is a luxury hotel with an unspoilt beach front location that provides a range of dining and entertainment options together with a variety of sports and recreational facilities. (Page 66)

Model of the Issue Introducing Dani Seitz as our model of the issue. Born in British Columbia, Canada, now lives in New York and is pursuing an international career. (Page 64)

We’d like to hear from you... 1968 Magazine would like to welcome letters from its readers. Please submit your letters via email to letters@1968magazine.com, including your name and hometown/country. Letters received may be edited and featured in www.1968magazine.com.

Photographers submissions 1968 Magazine is looking for original, different, unique and creative fashion editorial stories, with high quality photography. If you are interested and would like to contribute for future issues, please send your submission to submissions@1968magazine.com For Submission Guidelines visit www.1968magazine.com.

Invitation to writers 1968 Magazine welcomes new writing talents and experienced writers to submit articles to be featured in the magazine and website. Topics may vary from fashion, beauty, style and arts, to coverage of events, music, travel, food and drink. Articles or columns richly illustrated with images are mostly welcomed! Images are a major plus! So, if you enjoy writing and would like to share one of your articles with our readers, please email to submissions@1968magazine.com.

9


SNOW RED Photographed by Haley Ballard

Photographer Haley Ballard www.haleyballard.com Stylist Caterina Cardinali Makeup Artist Kunio Kataoka Hair Stylist Shinya Nakagawa Model Frances - Muse Models

10

www.1968magazine.com


Dress BLUGIRL Boots BLUGIRL


Dress VALENTINO Necklace INDECOROUS TASTE


Dress DAKS Cardigan TREDDY Shoes VALENTINO


Dress BLUGIRL Skirt SONIA RYKIEL Boots SatinBLUGIRL roushed green trouser VERSACE Hat GARBO jacket VERSCAE Chartreuse Gloves BLUGIRL Silk shirt Stylist’s own

14

www.1968magazine.com


Pink mesh dress with logo VERSACE worn as head dress Shirt TARA JARMON Pants BLUGIRL Head band BLUGIRL Shoes BLUMARINE


Fusha Blousejacket MAX with MARA roushed detail VERSACE Cobalt Vest PHILOSO blue pant PHIVERSACE Vintage Skirt TARA zip JARMON up body suit VERSACE Belt INDECOROUS TASTE Collar AU JOUR LE JOUR


Under dress BLUMARINE White v-neck dress MANGANO


LUCY OF THE GOLDEN DAWN Photographed by Melissa Rodwell

Photographer Melissa Rodwell www.melissarodwell.com Stylist Rodney Burns Church Boutique - Los Angeles Makeup Artist Camille Clark Represented by AIM Artist - Los Angeles Hair Stylist Randi Petersen Represented by Artists by Timothy Priano - Los Angeles Manicurist Beth Fricke Represented by Artists by Timothy Priano - Los Angeles Model Lucy - Photogenics Models - Los Angeles Location Los Angeles, USA

18

www.1968magazine.com


Top hat DONATO CROWLEY Black gown RAMI KASHOU Jewellery NATIVE JEWELS


Black velvet burnout caftan B+S Diamond + onyx necklace NATIVE JEWELS Raw diamond snake bracelets NATIVE JEWELS Sapphire ring NATIVE JEWELS


Ruby and diamond ring NATIVE JEWELS Mixed stone ring BURN 16 Gold sleeves CHRISTOFOROS KOTENTOS


Dress CESAR ARELLANES Black cape PETRO ZILLIA Black diamond ring NATIVE JEWELS Diamond + onyx skull necklace NATIVE JEWELS

22

www.1968magazine.com


Top hat DONATO CROWLEY Black gown RAMI KASHOU Jewellery NATIVE JEWELS


Ruby and diamond ring NATIVE JEWELS

24

www.1968magazine.com


Diamond + onyx necklace NATIVE JEWELS Lava rock necklace SORELENA Diamond + onyx bracelets MARCY MILLER Black dress CESAR ARELLANES Belt MANDULA


Top hat DONATO CROWLEY Black gown RAMI KASHOU Jewellery NATIVE JEWELS


Dress CESAR ARELLANES Black cape PETRO ZILLIA Black diamond ring NATIVE JEWELS Diamond + onyx skull necklace NATIVE JEWELS


RED STATE Photographed by Richard Dubois

Photographer Richard Dubois www.richarddubois.com Makeup Artist & Hair Stylist Blair Petty - Using Armani Cosmetics and Kevin Murphy Hair Care Represented by Judy Inc. Model Richelle - Sutherland Models Location Toronto, Canada

28

www.1968magazine.com


DEEP IN THE OCEAN Photographed by Massimo Zanusso

Photographer Massimo Zanusso www.massimozanusso.com Stylist Luca Termine Makeup Artist Mikaela Alleyson Represented by Greenapple Hair Stylist Marco Minunno Represented by MKS - Milan Model Lauren Bigelow - Next Models Location Milan, Italy

34

www.1968magazine.com


Bomber LEITMOTIV Skirt BURBERRY LONDON Pochette MAURO GRIFONI


Fur FRANKIE MORELLO Body AMERICAN APPAREL Boots ANGELOS FRENTZOS


Dress sirena latex SEX SADE


Blouse EQUIPMENT Earrings SHARRA PAGANO


Trench BURBERRY LONDON


Dress MIRKOG DI BRANDIMARTE Underwear WOLFORD


VEILED UNVEILED Photographed by Paolo Prisco

Photographer Paolo Prisco www.paoloprisco.fr Stylist Paolo Prisco Makeup Artist and Hair Stylist Paolo Prisco Models Dana Deliever Location Monaco

42

www.1968magazine.com


Studded jacket ZARA Shoes ZARA Headdress customized


Coat ZARA Bra H&M Sequins shorts H&M Golden bracelets Vintage Headdress customized


Top ZARA Denim short H&M Headdress customized


Denim studded jacket ZARA Niddle top H&M Shorts ZARA Shoes ZARA Headdress customized

www.1968magazine.com


Shirt and pants ZARA Feathers boa Vintage Golden shoes ZARA Headdress customized


Sequins top, jeans, jacket, socks H&M Sandals ZARA (vintage) Headdress customized


Leather jacket ZARA Sequins skirt H&M Shoes H&M


Shirt and pants ZARA Feathers boa Vintage Headdress customized


Coat ZARA Bra H&M Sequins shorts H&M Golden bracelets Vintage Headdress customized


MAGIC BEAUTY Photographed by Barry Druxman www.barrydruxmanphotography.com Makeup Artist and Hair Stylist Carole Soueidan Model Melissa Reed

52

www.1968magazine.com


INTERVIEW - ARTIST

Mark Venaglia

M

Artist

ark Venaglia is a Wellness Artist and cultural activist. Believing that all people are innately capable of greater visual comprehension than currently credited, Mark merges realism with abstraction. His paintings and murals are contained in corporate and civic collections, museums and private collections throughout the world. Collectors as diverse as Robert De Niro, Celine Dion, Eddie Murphy and Gloria Swanson have acquired the artist’s paintings and murals. His work is also included in the permanent collection of the New York Public Library.

Pastures

How and when did you know you wanted to become an artist? About age 7, I didn’t miss a holiday - everyone got laboriously crafted cards from me. Crayola was pushed to its limits. Later in NYC 1983, though I had been providing lavish Trompe L’oeil commissions all over town, my satisfaction dissipated over making a flat wall seem to extend for 4 miles or vines appear to be growing down from an atrium. I wanted to “say something,” which is when the real Pandora’s Box opened. The representative who handled my specific work as Trompe L’oeil asked, with that dreamy look in her eyes “How long did you wanted to be an artist Mark, all your life?” “About 6 months” was the honest answer. I was 26, it was 198x when she asked, and I’ve been making my living exclusively from commissioned art since I was 23.

56

Can you tell us a little about your background? I’m already bored as I hear my answer formulating in my head, may I share this in a manner that, I hope, first entertains and explains? I grew up on the Jersey side of The Hudson, watching the silent, looming blinking skyline of Manhattan. In fact, my bedroom window faced it - so where else could I have lived as an adult? I even traced the skyline with wax pencils right on the glass. A very Dickensian child, once I hit high school - all the cool and tough kids would secretly come up to me “Hey man, you’re the guy who goes into the city. Take us?” They were terrified, so I was a tour guide even back then. The city was a very dangerous place in the ‘70s, but still flooded with amazing creativity everywhere. I absorbed Manhattan and much of what it had to offer, though many would simply call it ‘developing street-smarts.” College exposed me to the harsh reality of show business. My education supported great exposure to influential and dedicated artists of precious centuries - which had already been dropped from standard art school late 70s curriculums. I was miserable in Pittsburgh…and when I declared my masters in Successful Women Artists of the 19th Century - they just about threw the MFA at me to get me out. It was in the days of education when non-conforming grad students were just pushed right through the system. I squatted in a townhouse just off Fifth Avenue in the 80s. My friends and I ended up taking over all the abandoned floors - staging Aids gatherings, art shows, movie premieres. This work caught the attention of an alternative therapies healing center in Sedona, where I served my first Residency. The energy of the American southwest is tremendous and introduced me to my lifelong passion for exploring nature. I also experienced the incestuous behavior of a few classic art colonies. LA art dealers saw my work when I was exhibiting in Scottsdale. They sponsored me to move, right into their Los Feliz mansion. I lived everywhere from Venice Beach to Hollywood, to another huge mansion in Pasadena, over a period of 2 decades. My work was acquired for astronomical figures by various celebs, and because I kept my lifestyle frugal, I had the freedom to really commence the exploration of abstract elements within realism. NEA and other grants gave me the opportunity to develop programs that used art to connect all the groups that feel aliened from each other - gay to hetero, Inner City youth to Toyota VPs, young people to their parents.

www.1968magazine.com


ARTIST

Where do you find inspiration? - From Central Park, it is one block away! In fact, anywhere in Manhattan. People are expressing themselves creatively in 360 degrees 24/7- it is the most invigorating, life-affirming period in this city’s history. Inspiration can be in large quantities from the art-lovers who support any of my tours. - I also derive strong inspiration from conversations with anyone outside of the art world. - From the artists of the 19th Century and prior - they considered communication one of their primary services to the viewing public, not affected obscurity. - History - the evidence of senses of humor and these superhero accomplishments happening in times so technologically behind ours as to seem like miracles.

Petal Dancer

Do you have an artist statement? I have 30 artist’s statements! At this point: I am a cultural activist utilizing murals, gallery exhibitions, art-making seminars, museums tours and art instruction. I am a Wellness Artist, offering a 21st century manner of inner peace via the art-making and art examining process for individuals and corporations. See? This is already too long. How would you best describe your art? Post Abstract Representationalism. I love Realism, but often it becomes very sterile through a devotion only to technique. The raw emotions in Abstract are very refreshing, though its execution is often very flat. Live actors usually have an abstract experience with painted scenery on stage, while the viewing audiences have a deeply dimensional experience, simultaneously. My art provides a dimensional abstract experience up close and an explosively realistic experience when first viewed from across the environment. Contemporary Realism somewhat works as a description of my work, though “Magic Realism” evokes a more accurate description. I had never read any literature from this thriving genre nor heard anything about it until a Bay Area art critic introduced me. He thought I had studied in South America, my style fit like a glove. What do you wish to communicate with your art? The pure, manipulation - free form of God that suffuses nature…establishing a personal relationship with this form of the Being that establishes an immediate respect for the planet and everything upon it. Not eco-respect out of guilt or elitism, but a much more complex yet simply emergent relationship with the seasons and climates and mutual inhabitants.

Is there a specific theme or concept you keep in all your work? Opposites, intrinsically found within each other. The organic qualities of architecture, the portraiture aspects of each leaf and flower, the visible nobility within animals’ faces, the hilarious animal qualities within human faces. The brighter moments in history that have been over-looked by those one-note, perpetually indignant historians. Extended Time


ARTIST

How would you describe your creative process? Constant. I keep legal yellow pads near me when meditating (from a past life when I must have been an accountant or clerk). I am fortunate to be able to see the completed art, so I’ll sketch it out and also verbal notations. Riding the subway generates so many new ideas, impossible to do when one is driving a car. I used to have to pull over in LA often to write down my ideas, until the traffic became unbearable there. I even tried a blackberry, then a smartphone - my friends insisted (they seem to love helping me spend money on tech!) Nothing replaces writing and sketching my ideas on the spot. Though clichéd, I have envelope scraps, tiny pages and full spiral bound notebooks describing the sketches and more sketches backing up the notes. I pull these demented little scraps out when I need to be reminded of something I wanted to create. I will always share my work with a variety of specifically selected people. As I am starting a friendship, we get to a museum pretty quickly. Our opinions don’t have to match, but if they see things in the art that I didn’t, I know they’ll do the same with my work. These are people I refer to during the process of painting. My art means nothing unless it is communicating, and that’s primary to the creative process, means contact with the human race. Though I’ve been painting for almost 3 decades, I utilize a recent innovation to my process. Let’s face it, realism techniques require a staggering amount of time in the studio…whenever I am now bored with a particular section, that’s my alert to try something new that reinvigorates the process for me. This is how the innovative elements have entered my work, for which I am thrilled. I feel like I could paint for another 75 years and not really put a dent in this synthesis of realism and abstraction. How have your years of Trompe L’oeil commissions influenced your artwork? I have painted subjects I would never, ever have considered, and pushed myself much further as an artist to get beyond neutrality or boredom and into the zaz-zone.

I then had to truly look inside to generate authentic inspiration for subjects I was not initially inspired by. All the trompe l’oeil techniquing gave me a profound respect for anyone working in a representational style…as my work moves further into the realms of abstraction; I am able to synthesize realism techniques into that abstract world. If I had only come to art with a traditional education in Art, I would only have concepts, footnotes, theory to go by. What do sunflowers mean to you and what part do they play in your art? FREEDOM! Every sunflower reminds me of the period in my life when I first discovered the sky is round not flat! I planted this little striped thing called a seed and within a short period of time it sprouted something green and alive that grew to be larger than my torso and taller than anything I’d ever seen in person. For my whole life, I’d only seen the sky between Manhattan canyons. My first residency at a healing center in Sedona introduced me to the immense roundness of the sky as it arches from horizon to horizon. I tried many times to translate this into art… impossible. Based upon viewers’ comments, I was able to capture the hugeness of the sky more successfully when rendering sunflowers on 7 and 10 feet canvasses. Each sunflower is a tribute to Scarlette Landscape Vincent. We are still just coming to appreciate how forward his work was. For one thing, he is the bridge between Asian and Western culture. His work will be even more important as the 2 cultures merge during the 21st Century. I honestly feel every time I paint one more, the weariness of his soul somewhere is lifted a bit. They are the ET plant, so obviously from another planet. Can anyone name a plant that resembles the size and power of a sunflower? They grow almost everywhere and date back to BC…our humanoid ancestors were cultivating them even then. The Russians are developing uses for the oil, and really exploring the geometrics inside the spiraling centers…I am trying to get the attention of as many as possible; decipher the sunflower.


ARTIST

What is the role of light in your paintings? It is when light bounces OFF of an object that fascinates me. Trying to capture light as a tangible tactile subject is the closest thing to depicting the meditation process as I can find. The role of light in my paintings is to evoke the presence of God, the Life Force in all things. In 2006 AT&T named you the premiere Renaissance artist of the green movement. How do you feel about it? An honor…everyone is so specialized now, not just within the minutia of the Arts but all fields. It was only when they made this statement that I understood how my holistic approach had been informing my art for many years. It was very humbling for me, to have a personal aspect of my work explained to be by someone within the corporate world, with a deep love of art, to recognize the summation of what I am doing as a creative person, which I had not understood myself. Beneath the oil paint of Renaissance paintings is casein. They laid in their work with casein first; I use casein as a symbol of stripping back to theorist origins of the Renaissance. I was deep moved that AT&T used this word which is not used much to describe modern artists. I got to meet executives with art collections of such quality, art one rarely sees in museums. The cultural discussions we had were very intimate and memorable. Most eco artists believe if they show a dead seagull with plastic six packs leaking out of its guts, this is going to accomplish something. I offer my work to make a lasting change, more of an expansion, in the viewer to become green to the core, not just in a momentary reaction. It was empowering to have the sustainability aspects of my work recognized and acknowledged. How do you feel about the obvious recognition your work has from a wide variety of critics and collectors? It is a shared victory, especially for the art dealers and collectors who would never, ever want to see their names in print! These especially are the people I am excited for, they comprehend my work and champion it every chance they get.

And in so doing, open themselves up to great ridicule because my work is unabashedly optimistic. The recognition my work gets and the acquisition prices are the results of very hard work and dedication from those with whom I collaborate. I also appreciate that you used the phrase “a wide variety.” I do want my work to speak to many of varied beliefs and points in their lives. I also feel victorious because the hustle required to secure attention while one is still alive requires monumental effort. Many artists who go this route adopt a kind of artistry that can be churned out in a few hours to allow the time required to market, expand their brand and do brunches. I am so proud of the unseen world and all the esoteric practices I utilize to refresh my soul and get true spirituality back into my work. The success of my art gives me great hope for the human race, as many who review and acquire art immediately recognize the multifaceted spiritual elements within my work, which indicates they, too, have active spiritual lives that provide a contentment that doesn’t require proclamations. I know many artists who work just as diligently as me (well, maybe 80% AS dedicated!) whose notoriety is still to come… so I recognize that I am just plain lucky, too! Art critics work so hard at sounding cynical, but they helplessly melt upon viewing La Nonna my work. To me, this demonstrates a deeper sense of humanity in all of us. If one just gives people the opportunity to be more humane, they rise to the occasion. EXHILARATION….because of recognition, when I enter a collector’s home, my opinion immediately matters. I now advise art collectors on what to buy. To witness a collection of spectacular, quality-based art be assembled is just tremendous. Though I cannot afford 99% of what they are acquiring, I know this work now belongs to people who truly appreciate it from an artist’s depth. To see younger artists, and older, sell their work to people who are ecstatic to own it…is thrilling. The recognition also provides more confidence to keep trying new approaches to painting.


ARTIST

How did your early work differ from what you‘re doing now? My early work had to be technically accurate without any concern for inner life. Now, as though making a living as a full time artist isn’t hard enough, I need everything I paint to have an inner gleam and zaz, as well as a more fluid kind of realism. Early in my career, I was challenging myself to paint like a Renaissance or Gilded Age artist, even if the painting technique became too stiff. What I am doing now is a more fluid, but equally detailed, form of visual communicating. Do you work on multiple pieces at a time? I can thank a great art dealer I’ve had the honor to know, may she rest in peace, Judy, who in that offhanded way Brits have of making comments that can completely change your life, said: “Darling, if it takes you a year to come up with one, cover all four walls and move about the room. See me in 12 months and have a minimum of four.” I now have 8-10 works stapled right into the drywall of the studio and do exactly as she recommended. What do you think are the key factors for a successful career as an artist? Sincerity. Authentic engagement in conversations with both art collectors and art dealers, and being very selective in associations with other artists. Longevity in the art world is sustained by honest relationships outside of the art industry, with people who love art. A key factor for a successful career is a dedication to making art, not artifice. So being approachable and real… matter. The kind of people who respond to and get something from my work - I want to honor their intelligence, and mine, by being fully attentive and sincere - which requires much less effort than the affectation of being edgy. Success also means enough income where my full attention is given to making art. So, simply: selective stubbornness. There are certain works that I have painted for Oblivious Inquisitor

5 years - being entirely honest with myself for that moment when the painting says back to me “I’m done”. I use this stubbornness with pricing. There are selected paintings (not all) for which I have one and only one price in mind, even if it takes a decade or more, the art is acquired at that one price only. This, amazingly, has forced a continuing amount of monetary success. What are now being classified as “Entrepreneurial” skills are essential to all artists working in the 21st Century. As an artist, what has been your greatest achievement? Adapting scenic painting techniques into Trompe L’oeil. Using just paint to make a flat surface appear to contain 3 dimensions at 6” away, not just from across a stage. Teaching myself to draw and paint in a realistic manner is one of my biggest challenges. I studied the Permanent Collection at the Met, not realizing until I became obsessed with history, this is exactly how the majority of artists were instructed in previous centuries. I came upon this educative technique by accident and it required significant dedication, traveling up to the Met, then back down to my loft to re-create with opaque gouache what I had just seen up close. Perhaps my greatest achievement so far is recognizing that art making is the most effective practice for perpetuating sanity and balance in any human being. You are now hosting tours of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. What can people expect from this experience with you? What a great question, thank you for noting. They can expect to have their entire ways of viewing art transformed, which then leaks into how they relate to their daily environment and all the people they think they know! Many tour participants later tell me they felt like they had taken a mind-altering substance for hours following a Tour. Like my artwork, I do strive to create the experience one can have on hallucinogenics, without taking any substance. They can expect to realize they know far more about art than anyone has ever allowed them to recognize, which is why I tend to favor work from 1940 and prior. Though I do offer a very robust Tour “Taking the Contempt Out of Contemporary Art.” Anne Combs-Brookes, who is a Specialist at the JP Getty Museum keeps saying, “Mark is the lighting rod around which we all gather!” which may be the best way to describe what they can expect to experience. How do you enjoy the interaction with the public? It is completely rejuvenating. Even exchange with the annoying ones, what an education!, vital and alive in the real world with dynamics that constantly change…far more educating than the safety and vacuum of a classroom. I love my interaction with the public because people are capable of far more cultural literacy and insight than they are given credit for.


ARTIST

aesthetic environment. The exhibition will create a large quantity of new jobs as well as provide a grand space in which everyone, from all political sides, will view Liberty like Monet saw the haystacks. Through viewing the art, participants can find new solutions, and re-consider what it means to be an American. And painting the vertical facades of Manhattan’s brilliant buildings as though each was a few miles of specific landscape continues to drive me mad. Something that you would like to share that can help us better understand who you are? 9 out of 10 adults who have experienced childhood trauma to the degree that I have end up incarcerated or dead. Though I did have the adult language at the time, constantly making art as a child and teen enabled me to process events that would have otherwise been the seeds of severe mental illness for me. Because of this, I feel I have earned the right to make art that is inspiring and powerfully optimistic.

Parrott Tulip

What can we expect from you in the future? My partnership with a Parisian hospitality genius has yielded a museum and walking tour website beyond anything I could have offered New York lovers on my own. Manhattan is in its second Golden Age. This new approach to cultural experiences celebrates everything joyous, controversial and fascinating about the city and the art here. www.LookAndSeeNY.com The next 4 phases of Wellness Through Art-making at The MS center of Louisville between September and December of 2013. I’m also doing a public mural for that town of a sunflower, the original flower of Louis 14, the Sun King. In November, a British corporation well known in tech security is flying their executives from all over the world to meet me in Manhattan. They challenged me to create an aesthetically rigorous series of team-building romps throughout The Met. I expanded upon this; each participant will be creating art in various workshops, too. A private NYC yoga studio first commissioned a new sunflower to fill one entire wall. After the partners realized I really did mean it when I told them I’ve been practicing yoga for 28 years, they’ve commissioned the entire studio. I am transforming 4,500 square feet into an installation, utilizing murals, neo-faux finishes, and 21st century graphics. It is one of the first, if not the first yoga environment with fine art as its core and basis. “Examining Liberty” …which I have ready been pitching to corporate sponsors and politicians. It is a traveling exhibition with a structure inspired by Ashes and Snow, in which Trompe L’oeil life-sized sections of Ms. Liberty create a vast,

What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? Why am I so excited to be included in a magazine with 1968 in its title? For all the polyester paisley and excessive drugging, the late 60s and all of the 70s supported a quest for deep spiritual understanding among the majority. Sometimes clumsy and sometimes epically profound, huge segments of the human race took quantum leaps forward in evolution. Humans landed on the moon in the following year, just one example of science fiction piercing into this reality. Music, architecture, food production, healthcare, to name a few, all took very brave steps into never-before-seen territory. Photos by Ron Luxemburgh Bouquet


INTERVIEW - FASHION DESIGNER

KIM KWANG

K

Fashion Designer

im Kwang was born in Beijing, China, started his career designing for Jimmy Choo and has now launched his own shoe collection line. Kim Kwang is a graduate from Cordwaines College (London College of Fashion) in a MA fashion footwear design as a Jimmy Choo Scholarship Student, and from Central Saint Martin’s Arts and Design College in Womensweare Design. Before London he studied in Milan at the Instituto Marangoni, receiving a MA Fashion Womenswear design with scholarship. Before establishing his own label, Kwang worked alongside Jimmy Choo on his “Couture Shoe Collection” as a footwear designer. “My first love is women’s footwear but I also work with passion on womenswear. My designs are made for the independent and fiercely fashionable woman who is not afraid to stand out from the crowd. I push boundaries in combining masculine strength with feminine confidence, juxtaposing sensual proportion that exaggerates the female shape with dominant structural high heels”.

You express having passion for womenswear, what made you focus on footwear design? Fashion is dynamic, not static. It’s about body movement. The ways women move. And how women move inspires and influences my designs. And that includes designing footwear, of course! And whether stiletto, wedge, or flat sole, the style and form of the shoes impact how women project themselves in the world. Can we expect to see a Kim Kwang women clothing collection in the near future? Very much so. Although my current focus is footwear, since my college days I’ve designed womenswear. Footwear is part of my ambition to design for the complete woman; from top to toe, including accessories! Can you describe the experience of working with Jimmy Choo? A fantastic learning experience where I worked alongside Jimmy Choo Couture line and his team in the studio. He taught me designing is not just about creativity but disciplined work, and knowing and respecting your audience and market.

62

How has this influenced your career? Working with Jimmy made me realize there’s no shortcut to success; it’s hard, dedicated work. How did you decide to establish your own label? It was always my ambition to have my own label. Own label is the ultimate sign of recognition and reward. Do your final designs reflect your original idea? The idea always develops, from first thoughts to final product. But the first thoughts drive the design, and remain core throughout the design process. What is your main source of inspiration? Living and working in London is such an inspiration. The diversity of its people, the street culture, its architecture, and the freedom I have in London to explore new ideas. What is your favorite material to work with? I love the mix of materials rather than any one particular material. For example, the contrast between patent leather and fur. But whatever the material I work with, it has to be the very best quality, and work with the design, not against it. Who would you most like to see using your designs? I design for the urban, independent woman who appreciates the finer things in life, the woman who knows what she wants, and how to get it! What has been your biggest achievement so far? The whole journey really. From my first days in design school, to seeing my collection on the catwalk. How have your designs evolved over the years? When I design I always learn. Testing new ideas, exploring new materials, talking to people, visiting new places – my designs are constantly evolving. What can we look forward to, from you in the future? Most immediately is my show at the London Fashion Week in September. But I never rest. Designing is 24/7. I’m constantly thinking about and working on my next collection, how to expand my range and make it better. And there’s always an element of surprise in the next collection, even for myself!

www.1968magazine.com


INTERVIEW - MODEL OF THE ISSUE

DaNI SEITZ

D

Model of the Issue

ani is an international model from British Columbia, Canada. She has worked in different countries such as United States, Australia, Portugal and Canada, to name a few. Agencies Sutherland Models, Toronto IMG New York www.sutherlandmodels.com www.imgmodels.com

How and when did you know you wanted to become a model? I never wanted to become a model as I was more into sports, so it took a bit of time to adjust‌ but now I am so happy that I did! Where were you discovered? I was discovered in a shopping mall. What do you like most about being a model? The opportunities I have been given, whether it’s travelling or meeting and working with people from different countries.

64

www.1968magazine.com


MODEL OF THE ISSUE

What has been the greatest experience you have had so far? There are so many… but my greatest experience would be working in Australia, it was like a vacation, and the people had such a nice relaxed vibe.

What is your favorite part of your body? My legs.

What is your fashion dream? My fashion dream has already come true: to live and work in NY. There are so many talented people that I have been given the opportunity to work with, I feel so blessed.

Is the fashion world what you expected it to be? It’s not as glamorous as I was told ha ha…and no, we do not get to keep the clothes!

What was your favorite city you traveled to work to? Sydney and New York. What are your goals in the next 5 years as a model? To reach my full potential as a model, whether it be through runway, Victoria’s Secret campaigns, or just to maintain a steady amount of work… that would make me happy. What are your secrets for a fit and healthy body? I study Nutrition and I am into Yoga, Pilates, Basketball and Volleyball, so I like to stay active.

What makes you feel sexy? When I feel and look healthy.

What do you enjoy doing when you are not working? I love camping, hiking, being at the beach, basically anything outdoors. What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? What has been one of your most memorable jobs? Working with Benjamin Kanarek for Vogue Portugal. I was told the day I flew in from Berlin to Canada that I would be heading back to Europe the next day, after my job in Canada for a one day shoot in Portugal, and then fly to NY…talk about Jetlag, but it was such a great opportunity and very worth it!


TRAVEL - THAILAND

DUSIT THANI HUA HIN - THAILAND

Aerial view

Hua Hin, once a summertime retreat for royalty and aristocracy, has been long famous for its magnificent beach, running from a rocky headland, which separates it from a tiny fishing port and curving gently to its southern point where Buddhist temples cling to cliffs. Apart from peaceful beaches and tropical sea, the area also offers several national parks, mountains, waterfalls, caves, temples and historic sites. Sporting life ranges from swimming, fishing, playing water sports, golfing to horse riding and others.

Conveniently located just 2.5 hours from Bangkok by car, or 25 minutes by plane, its fine sandy beach, superb tropical climate and lush greenery provide the ideal luxury resort atmosphere.

Dusit Thani Hua Hin hotel occupies a special place within a region known for its spectacular natural beauty along the west coast of the Gulf of Thailand.

To laze under a brilliant sun is the classic view of a tropical resort, and Dusit Thani Hua Hin has an ideal beach for the perfect escape. However, there is much, much more to

Commanding an unspoilt beachfront location, the spectacular Dusit Thani Hua Hin hotel combines sumptuous comfort with wondrous classic traditional style. An ornamental lake, lily pond and tropical gardens flank a magnificent swimming pool.

Hotel Lobby

66

www.1968magazine.com


TRAVEL

Hotel Entrance

enjoy, with a variety of water sports and recreational facilities, including two swimming pools, a Fitness Centre, jacuzzi, tennis and squash courts, horse riding, jogging and golf at several nearby championship-standard courses, plus the tranquil Devarana Spa. Set amidst the natural beauty of the Dusit Thani Hua Hin, guests to Devarana are welcomed by the delicate fragrance of frangipani trees in the surrounding grounds. The treatment rooms are spacious, private and naturally

attuned, while the Spa Villas offer the ultimate in elegance and privacy with their own secluded garden. The hotel offers an impressive selection of dinning venues. The Restaurant serves international cuisine and traditional Thai favourites, and features three open kitchens - Thai, international cuisine, and a BBQ grill area. The stunning golden-dome ceiling and crystal chandelier are matched by panoramic views of the ornamental pond, swimming pool and the Gulf of Siam beyond. Ban Benjarong


TRAVEL

Pool view

The adjoining Dusit Gourmet shop with its wide array of delicatessen items and display of selected wines in the wine cellar is equally as tempting. Enjoy authentic Royal Thai cuisine at the Dusit Thani Hua Hin’s famous “Baan Benjarong” in a traditional Thai setting overlooking the lagoon. Make your selection of dishes from our a la carte menu or help yourself to a delectable buffet spread. Named after the San Marco Piazza in Venice, the San Marco restaurant pays homage to this captivating destination. Resplendent in Italian décor, guests can find their traditional

Mediterranean favourites on the menu and San Marco hosts the resort’s ever popular ‘Pasta Factory Buffet,’ every Wednesday. A selection of Italian red and white wines provide the perfect complement. With its legendary events and pampering service, the Dusit Thani Hua Hin hotel has been accorded a reputation as the Thai beach resort of choice for Thai aristocracy.

For more information on Dusit Thani Hua Hin Thailand, please visit www.dusitthanihuahin.dusit.com Restaurant


Profile for 1968 Magazine

Issue 5 - Fall 2012  

1968 Magazine is a printed upscale fashion and art magazine, published four times a year, featuring high quality photography and dedicated t...

Issue 5 - Fall 2012  

1968 Magazine is a printed upscale fashion and art magazine, published four times a year, featuring high quality photography and dedicated t...