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1968 SPRING 2012

art

elena anaya Photographed by

beauTy

Willy Camden

FASHION

nicky hilton

INTERVIEWS

Photographed by

Barry Druxman

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1968 Magazine “from Toronto to the world”

TRAVEL MUSIC


SPRING 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS

COVER Photographed by Willy Camden

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INTERVIEW Fashion Designer David Longshaw

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INTERVIEW Artist Bogdan Luca

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MASTHEAD

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IN THIS ISSUE...

ELENA Photographed by Willy Camden

24 NICKY HILTON Jewelry Line Collection Photographed by Barry Druxman

30 BOYISH, FITS ME RIGHT!

Photographed by Anna Gunselman

44 VANISHING BAROCCO

Photographed by Mariano Annoni

54 LOOK AT ME...

Photographed by Pascale Therien

60 JE SUIS A FEMME FATALE

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INTERVIEW Musician Clara Venice

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VICTIMOR VICTIMIZED A Personal Essay by Hayley Chato

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INTERVIEW Model of the Issue - Jenica VanderMeer

74 TORONTO FASHION WEEK

Photographed by Ana Coello

by Hayley Chato

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TRAVEL Bali, Indonesia

www.1968magazine.com

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INTERVIEW - FASHION DESIGNER

DAVID LONGSHAW

D

Fashion Designer

avid Longshaw, St Martin’s BA (Hons), RCA (MA), winner of the inaugural BFC/ ELLE Talent Launch Pad.

After graduating in 2007 David received a flurry of press attention and nominations for International Awards (ITS6, Trieste - Le Vif Weekend, Belgium - Cove Park, Scotland) and had secured a position

at Alberta Ferretti before his final graduate collection was even shown. Although very keen to launch his own label, he felt it was important to gain more international commercial experience, so went on to work for Max Mara. David is now concentrating on his own label, which he launched during February LFW 2010. With not only a natural talent for fashion, but also for illustration (winner of the Colin Barnes Drawing Prize 2005) he has contributed to a number of publications and uses his

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illustrations and story writing as a starting point for his collections. His characters include Selnec and Harriet, as well as Penketh and Chloe (who appear on his scarves) and Maude, described as his ‘cult creation’. Last year David was selected for the ‘Ones To Watch’ catwalk show, Vauxhall Fashion Scout, London Fashion Week (19th February 2010) David Longshaw’s collections including garments, bags, scarves, jewellery and illustrations, are sold worldwide including Britain, Italy, Japan, Russia, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

To start, can you tell us a bit about yourself? I was born in Manchester, England. I studied fashion at St Martins (BA Hons Womenswear) and the Royal College of Art (MA fashion design Womenswear). I then went on to design in Italy for Alberta Ferretti and Max Mara before coming back to England to start my own label. I also write and illustrate for a number of fashion magazines, through the characters I create.

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FASHION DESIGNER

What inspired you to get into fashion design? I loved the creativity and the possibilities that fashion designers seemed to have to create a world of their own. The idea that you could design something close to art that someone could wear and interact with; but then similarly you can design a T-shirt they could slouch around in. Fashion seemed to have an ability, unlike any other creative field, to touch people on a variety of levels, from the very superficial (which often is the point) to something much deeper. Any story about your early career that you would like to share? Not that are repeatable…. What role does your talent for illustration play in your design creation? Each season I create a short illustrated story which forms the inspiration for the collection - it feeds in to everything, from the colours and silhouettes to the prints where I combine my illustrations with my own photography to create unique graphics and prints. What do you bring to fashion? Creative fun. Can you tell us about Maude? Maude is Editor-in-Chief of MAUDEZINE, she is a fictional fabric mouse (100% cashmere suiting from Richard James of Savile Row). I made her in my final year at St Martins. I have written, illustrated and photographed (the 3D model version) Maude for a variety of publications, including vogue.co.uk and The London Fashion Week Newspaper. She has her own blog maudezine.tumblr.com and her own twitter account twitter@maude_maudezine How would you define your style? Complicated and feminine. What is your source of inspiration? My illustrated stories and animations (which I have on my website to accompany the collections www.davidlongshaw.co.uk)

What are your favourite fabrics? Digitally printed wool, silk and organza (with my own print designs, using my illustrations and photography). Do you have a favourite fashion house? It changes all the time, but I admire Givenchy, Prada, Balenciaga, Marc Jacobs, Iris Van Herpen and Kirtsy Ward. Is there a designer that you look towards for inspiration? Not really, I admire the work of a variety of designers but I try not to be too inspired by any particular one. How do you intend women to feel when wearing your designs? Interesting and perhaps fun. Who would you most like to dress in your designs? Maude. Do your final designs reflect your original idea? Occasionally, but they often evolve a lot through the design process. Do you have a fashion dream? To still be as creative as possible at 90 years of age… Ideally with as large a budget as possible to make all my fashion and creative whims come to reality. What are your goals in the next 5 years as a designer? More frocks, more Maude, more stores selling my collections - so more people can wear and enjoy them. If you could do anything else, what would it be? Either be a writer and illustrator of books, or an animator. What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? What’s your favourite drink? AM: Diet coke PM: Red wine


INTERVIEW - ARTIST

Bogdan Luca

B

Artist

ogdan Luca is a Toronto based artist who has recently shown a suite of large paintings entitled Spolia at Neubacher Shor Contemporary. He is a graduate from the University of Toronto Masters of Visual Studies program, and is now also a drawing and painting instructor at OCAD University. Bogdan has shown his work in Toronto, New York and Florence, Italy.

Diviner

What does art mean to you? Art is a way to talk about my views on life. A personal language that I strive to articulate as well as I can to reflect my curiosity about the world. We understand you arrived from Romania over 17 years ago. How would you say your cultural heritage has influenced your work? I consider myself fortunate to have experienced two cultures in a very meaningful way: Eastern Europe and North America. I grew up in Romania, and that is certainly an important part of who I am today. I lived through that country’s transition from a communist regime to a democratic one, and that gave me a sense of history and the world as mutable and

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flexible in meaning. It was quite interesting to witness events in 1989 Romania that are in many ways similar to some of the recent Arab Spring revolts. When a political system breaks down, an entire world, way of life, philosophy of life, ends. There is then a vacuum that is first filled with imagination and possibility, then other things, which sooner or later become the same old thing under a different name. This is what my work is about today. How did you enjoy your previous work experience as animator, illustrator and designer? Working as a commercial artist was a good experience for me. I like diversity, and as a freelance artist I was able to work on varied projects in many roles, including the ones you mentioned, as well as: storyboard artist, art director, background and concept artist. It’s not always as fulfilling because at the end of the day the client’s objective trumps your creative opinions/decisions, but I accepted that as a part of the deal. Most of the time a mutually agreeable compromise could be found. I enjoyed my work overall and I still do it occasionally. What made you change your attention to painting? Painting seems to have always been there for me. I remember making my first oil painting as a kid in Romania: green bottles. I also remember the first encounter with the smell of oil paint, something I still love to seek out today. Before that, there was watercolor as far as I can remember. Your question comes from my bio, where I said that I turned my full attention to painting when I enrolled in OCAD. I had already been painting and I was looking for more education in terms of contemporary art and theory. Having only painted from life observation, I wanted to learn other methods of making art and find out about ideas that informed the work of contemporary artists. My work changed in such a way that it now completely excludes painting from life. I only work from images. What is your favourite media and surface? Oil painting on canvas. What is your source of inspiration? I don’t have a specific source, but I seem to get a lot of ideas from reading. I find travel very inspiring as well, doing new things, having experiences.

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ARTIST

Tell us about your biggest achievement as an artist. This would have to be a recent public art piece I completed for Brock University. It was a 60’ painting commemorating the war of 1812 and subsequent local history of the Niagara region. Many things lined up just right: I was invited to apply for the competition by a colleague from U of T, I won it, I was very lucky to find a space where I could work on the five 8‘x12’ wooden panels, and I completed the piece in two months. It was a very exciting gig that pushed my abilities and allowed me to work on a scale larger than ever before: I used brooms to push paint around.

The Crossing

What are your favourite themes? I consider myself a figurative painter, so my favorite theme is the body. I am also fascinated with images: I am curious about how images shape the way we think about our bodies and the world in general. How would you describe your creative process? It takes me a long time to figure out what I will paint. I have an idea in mind which I have to fill out by making a rough photo collage using bits and pieces of image material from films, books, and digital sources. Once I am happy with this stage, I transfer it onto canvas where the painting starts and the image begins to change again. What message do you wish to communicate with your art? That possibilities always exist outside any prescribed norms. That imagination is a powerful medium that can help us build the world we want to live in. Are you seeking for a particular reaction from the viewer? l hope my work can arrest people and remind them of their own perspective on life. My work takes some time to fully reveal itself and I hope it can continue to speak to viewers over a long period of time. Would you say your paintings have a melancholic mood? lf they do, it’s not intended. My work is about right now and although it does engage with the past, it is not in a longing or melancholy way. I often bring together figures or environments from various periods and that sometimes can acquire a melancholic veneer. It may also have something to do with the cool palette of blues and purples. That, however, has more to do with referencing the cool light of an electronic screen, than notions of sadness or nostalgia.

What advise do you give aspiring artists in your current position as Instructor at OCAD University? To take it seriously. Being a good artist is as difficult as being good at any other profession. You have to put all of yourself into it, it takes all your time and energy. Even so, there is no guarantee of success. I try to make my courses both interesting and challenging to give students a good idea of what’s involved in being an artist. Hopefully they can get a better idea if it’s what they want to do. It seems to be that many arts graduates give up the dream soon after leaving the safety of the institution. I hope I can change that in some measure. What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? I’ve noticed that people I meet are often curious about my age. I was born in 1978. Transform


1968 MAGAZINE TOM VAN RIPLE

Editor in Chief - Creative Director

1968 Team

Fashion and Art Contact us 1968team@1968magazine.com advertising@1968magazine.com submissions@1968magazine.com letters@1968magazine.com info@1968magazine.com www.1968magazine.com

Contributing Photographers Willy Camden, Barry Druxman, Anna Gunselman, Mariano Annoni, Pascale Thérien, Ana Coello Contributing Stylists Emma Carlsen, Lina Rodriguez, Izabel Soucy, Patrycja Juraszczyk Contributing Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists Sarah Exeley, Lance Lowe, Yuliya Jade, Olsi Mile, Giulia Capresi, Valeria Lerda, Félicie Hubert, Junior Querios Contributing Writers Hayley Chato

1968 Magazine is a registered Copyright of 1968 Group. All rights reserved. No content or segment of 1968 Magazine is, under any circumstances, to be replicated, reproduced or diffused in any manner without the expressed written consent from the publisher. All work is copyright protected. 1968 Magazine is not responsible for copyright violations or misuse by others. The publisher protects the right to reject and/or amend any contribution or material supplied. All submitted material may or may not be published due to space, editorial review and/or quality. By submitting images, photographers certify that it is their own original work, for which they have the copyright and are holders of the model release, and give 1968 Magazine permission to publish it on any issue. Photographers grant a non-exclusive licence to use photographs in its submitted form, or subject to resizing to fit the magazine’s format. 1968 Magazine reserves the right to edit material and assumes no responsibility concerning any error and/or omission. Material may be also featured on www.1968magazine.com. Information presented is from various sources and thus, there can be no warranty or responsibility by the publisher as to accuracy, originality or completeness, despite the care taken in reviewing editorial content. 1968 Magazine assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein.

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IN THIS ISSUE...

Bali, Indonesia Bogdan Luca Toronto based artist, Bogdan Luca describes himself as a figurative painter, with the body being his favorite theme. He has shown his work in Toronto, New York, Florence... (Page 6)

Discover the newly opened Anantara Seminyak Resort & Spa inspired by a unique beachfront location and offering a truly authentic Balinese discovery. Experience untold luxury... (Page 76)

Model of the Issue Introducing Jenica VanderMeer as our model of the issue. Born in Niagara on the Lake, Canada. Although she is based in Toronto she frequents other markets like New York and Europe. (Page 72)

We’d like to hear from you... David Longshaw Fashion designer with not only a natural talent for fashion, but also for illustration. He uses his illustrations and story writing as a starting point for his collection. (Page 4)

1968 Magazine would like to welcome letters from its readers. Please submit your letters via email to letters@1968magazine.com, including your name and hometown/country. Letters received may be edited and featured in www.1968magazine.com.

Photographers submissions 1968 Magazine is looking for original, different, unique and creative fashion editorial stories, with high quality photography. If you are interested and would like to contribute for future issues, please send your submission to submissions@1968magazine.com For Submission Guidelines visit www.1968magazine.com.

Invitation to writers Clara Venice Clara Venice sings love songs. Only love songs. In her shows one can hear covers of California punk rock, sultry French pop, obscure 70’s one-hit wonders and a wild curatorial selection ranging from Iggy Pop to Weezer to Britney Spears. (Page 68)

1968 Magazine welcomes new writing talents and experienced writers to submit articles to be featured in the magazine and website. Topics may vary from fashion, beauty, style and arts, to coverage of events, music, travel, food and drink. Articles or columns richly illustrated with images are mostly welcomed! Images are a major plus! So, if you enjoy writing and would like to share one of your articles with our readers, please email to submissions@1968magazine.com.

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ELENA Photographed by Willy Camden

Photographer Willy Camden www.willycamden.com Stylist Emma Carlsen Hair Stylist Lance Lowe Makeup Artist Sarah Exeley Talent / Actress Elena Anaya Location London

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NICKY HILTON Jewelry line collection Photographed by Barry Druxman www.barrydruxman.com

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boyish, fits me right! Photographed by Anna Gunselman

Photographer Anna Gunselman www.annagunselman.com Stylist Lina Rodriguez Makeup Artist Yuliya Jade Hair Stylist Olsi Mile Models Mary - Next Models Miami Abigail - Elite Models Location Miami, USA

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Black top ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Black leather DIESEL


Blouse TAHARI Vest BCBG MAXAZRIA

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Gray jumpsuit HALSTON HERITAGE White button down TOMMY HILFIGER Watch BRAUN White Fedora VINTAGE


Black top ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Black leather DIESEL Houndstooth pants MARC JACOBS Black motorcycle boots RALPH LAUREN ISABELIE


Vest TAHARI Polka dot jacket SONIA RYKEL Black tie BEN SHERMAN Red wingtip shoes COLEMAN


Button down top TOMMY HILFIGER Cardigan TOMMY HILFIGER Black Jumpsuit DIESEL


Blouse BCBG MAXAZRIA


Gray jumpsuit HALSTON HERITAGE White button down TOMMY HILFIGER Watch BRAUN White Fedora VINTAGE


Vest TAHARI Packadot jacket SONIA RYKEL Black tie BEN SHERMAN

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Black top ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Black leather DIESEL Houndstooth pants MARC JACOBS


Blue button up SALVADOR FERRAGAMO Vest RALPH LAUREN Eggplant pants ROBERT RODRIGUEZ

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Button down top TOMMY HILFIGER Cardigan TOMMY HILFIGER Black Jumpsuit DIESEL


VANISHING BAROCCO Photographed by Mariano Annoni

Photographer Mariano Annoni www.marianoannoni.com Makeup Artist Giulia Capresi Hair Stylist Valeria Lerda Models Tessa - Urban Management Milan Scarlet - JCF Model Management Milan

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Dress Impero Couture Rome Hat TITTA’S


Dress SESSA MODE Hat ALLA POLOZENCO


Dress SESSA MODE Hat ALLA POLOZENCO


Dress Impero Couture Rome Hat TITTA’S


Dress Impero Couture Rome Necklace Stylist own


Dress Impero Couture Rome Necklace MAMO BIJIOUX

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Dress Impero Couture Rome Necklace CAPRICCI Shoes FRATELLI ROSSETTI


Dress SESSA MODE Hat ALLA POLOZENCO

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Dress Impero Couture Rome Necklace Stylist own


Look at me... Photographed by Pascale Thérien

Photographer Pascale Thérien www.pascaletherien.com Stylist Izabel Soucy Makeup Artist Félicie Hubert Model Kayla - Next Models Photographer Assistant Laurie Godin Rheault

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Sleeveless shirt GUESS Leopard ring ALDO Earrings, ring and necklace Stylist’s own


Dress TRINA TURKS AT LA BAIE Bracelet MALENE BIRGER Earrings and ring EXPRESSION AT LA BAIE Hand bag LIL BURGUNDY Necklace IMPERIAL BY MAGICO

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Vest RINASCIMENTO Tube bra AMERICAN APPAREL Shorts CHEAP MONDAY Shoes GUISSEPPE ZANOTTI Earrings, ring and bracelet Stylist’s own


Blouse GUESS Skirt HALTON Ring and bracelet H&M

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Bustier FREE PEOPLE Panties AMERICAN APPAREL Necklace and bracelet EXPRESSION AT LA BAIE


je suis a femme fatale Photographed by Ana Coello

Photographer Ana Coello www.anacoello.com Stylist Patrycja Juraszczyk Makeup Artist & Hair Stylist Junior Queiros Model Sara Smith - 5th Avenue Models - Barcelona Makeup Assistant Milena Castroverde Digital Editing Pablo Sagredo Location Barcelona, Spain

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Top PINKO Necklace OTAZU


Skull rings THOMAS SABO Crystal rings SWAROVSKI

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Lace bra as a mask ANDRES SARDA Necklace SWAROVSKI


Dress PINKO Glasses as a bow-tie ADELE CANY


Skull rings THOMAS SABO Crystal rings SWAROVSKI


Belt as a whip GUESS BY MARCIANO


Harness JUAN ANTONIO AVALOS Necklace OTAZU


INTERVIEW - MUSICIAN

CLARA VENICE

C

Singer

lara Venice sings love songs! She switches effortlessly from the notoriously difficult Theremin to guitar to violin in a one-girl show as delicate as watching a high-wire act. The stage wall behind her is alive with stop-motion animated, dreamlike and sometimes disturbing projections that blend perfectly with the sonic experience.

How and when did you know you wanted to start your career as a musician? For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be a musician. My parents say I could sing before I could talk, and I started violin lessons when I was four. I was in my first girl group when I was 10 – we dressed like bunnies and played at country clubs and trade shows. I played with a number of bands through my teens and early 20s, from a heavy metal band to an all girl punk band, to a country band, an acid jazz band, a Grateful Dead cover band, a hip hop group, and a couple electro bands. I also collaborated with several DJs. I knew I wanted to be a professional musician but I still wanted to go to university and study philosophy. I excelled at school, got lots of scholarships and graduated from the University of Toronto at the top of my class. Everyone expected me to go on to do post-graduate work, but what I really wanted was to take everything I had learned at school and mash it up with everything I had learned from my musical experiences, and create a really smart and cool project. Now I’m not writing philosophy, I’m doing it.

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You play a number of instruments, but what took you to start playing the theremin? Why did you choose this instrument? I didn’t choose the theremin – it chose me. It was love at first sight. I remember very clearly going into the Moog store and asking the guys behind the counter whether I could try out the theremin “to see if it was intuitive”. They laughed at me. At that point I didn’t know that they say that the theremin is the hardest instrument in the world to play. They moved the theremin into the middle of the room and stood around to see what I could do. To everyone’s surprise (including my own!) I could play scales, and even played along with the music in the store. One of the guys turned to me and said, “Well…I guess that’s yours then!”. I carried it home and haven’t ever looked back. As an aside, the greatest theremin virtuosa of all times was also named Clara – her name was Clara Rockmore. Coincidence? I don’t think so. Is there a message you wish to communicate with your music? I only sing love songs. I believe in love. I also believe in “and” instead of “or” – that is, I believe in expressing our contradictions rather than choosing one side or the other. In other words, just because I’m a classically trained violinist doesn’t mean I can’t play pop. Just because I play the theremin doesn’t mean I’m weird. Just because I’m a blonde (at least part of the time) doesn’t mean I can’t have intelligent lyrics. Just because I’m playful doesn’t mean I don’t go deep. By embracing all of these contradictions in my music and live performances I have created a completely unique project that I’m really proud of, and that no one can ever duplicate or replace. So basically my message is: Why be one thing when we can be everything?


MUSICIAN

What has been the greatest experience you have had so far? I have made a musical project that no one said was possible. Being a young woman in the music industry is not easy. When I was a teenager I went through the typical story of getting a manager and moving to L.A. in order to “make it” by working with producers and songwriters and choreographers who told me I had to listen to them in order to fit in to a record label’s “roster” - but I never fit in anywhere. No one would listen to me because I was just a girl and they were big producers, but I already had a vision and my vision was not “fitting in” to any roster - I wanted to do something great, that the world had never seen before. So I quit, went to U of T to get my degree in philosophy while I continued to write, produce, and play music that is both unique and pop. And in the end I proved them wrong by making the impossible possible, and it feels great. Do you have any dreams that you consider yet unfulfilled? To be the first theremin pop star. What has motivated your career? When I was little I wanted to be a pop star. By my teens I was classically trained in voice and violin. I figured the two belong together, even if it didn’t make sense. And I have never looked back. Who are your favorite musicians? My violin teacher, the late Maestro Eugene Kash, is my greatest musical hero. He played the violin until the day he died at the age of 91, and gave me my last lesson from his

hospital bed. He taught me the importance of discipline – to this day I practice my music for a few hours each day – and told me that “If you want to be heard, you have to show off.” I also love Marilyn Monroe (yes, she was an amazing singer), Eminem, Frank Sinatra, Serge Gainsbourg, Beethoven, Iggy Pop, the great chanteuse Barbara, the great thereminist Clara Rockmore, Leonard Cohen, Blondie, Bodi Bill, Stereo Total, Rancid, Daniel Lanois, Chopin, Bat For Lashes, Pizzicato Five, Cat Power, Kurt Cobain. Last but not least, my dad Kim Cameron and all the guys from his band the Limbo Springs, who taught me everything I know about being a real musician. What do you like most about this profession? I love winning over audiences. Because what I do is so unusual, people don’t necessarily know what to expect from me, especially when it comes to my look, or the combination of instruments and the fact that I’m a one-girl band. A lot of people assume that my music is either going to be dumb and superficial, or the opposite, arcane and experimental. But my songs are actually intelligent pop songs, and when I cover songs they’re all really familiar but deconstructed in a way that really makes people listen to the lyrics completely differently than they’re accustomed to. And of course I’m so happy that a lot of my fans are so committed that they come to almost all of my shows – but I really love changing peoples’ initial expectations, and just seeing them happy. A lot of people come up to me after my performances and tell me how brave I am to be one girl up there, essentially performing a kind of high-wire act that could go wrong at any time (and sometimes does!). But when I pull it off I think it makes everyone feel like the world is a little happier.


MUSICIAN

What was your favorite city you traveled to work to? Berlin. I made a lot of friends there who all had their own unique vision of the world, many of them artists who were doing very interesting work. The first month I was there I was like a little sponge, just absorbing as much as I could, going out every day and every night until dawn, meeting people and seeing things, watching bands, and it was like being a baby, everything was new to me. The second month I essentially locked myself into my studio and created out of all my feelings and thoughts. I wrote an album’s worth of songs, completely my own and completely different from anything I’d ever done. They were honest and haunted, like the city. That experience has shaped my work ever since. Do you listen to recordings of your work? Yes, I do – but not for fun. I always strive to do better, so I think it’s important to analyze my previous recordings in terms of what I liked and what I can improve the next time around. What do you enjoy doing when you are not working? I think I’m a geek. I read a lot (philosophy mixed with supermarket-checkout Archie comics). I’m part of an awesome film club. I play a lot of xBox Kinect. My favorite parties include ukeleles and costumes. I have a lot of friends, and you can find me out a lot – but I never look the same so it’s confusing. I take a lot of pleasure in constructing different personalities for myself with their own makeup, hair color, and I enjoy creating the confusion of people not quite knowing what to expect from me – especially when I’m at the grocery store or the library. But seriously – if you’re going to wear a tutu and cat ears to a party, you have to wear them to the grocery store too.

What does “love” mean to you? Vulnerability, trust and desire. A lot of people think love means happiness but it really means every feeling is heightened, the good and the bad. Nothing hurts as much as love, nothing feels as good. There are as many kinds of love as there are songs that describe it – that’s why I only sing love songs. What are your goals in the next 5 years as a musician? To play at Massey Hall, Palais Garnier, and Beacon Theater, all in the same week. And, to be the star of a TV show like “The Monkees”, mixing caper narrative with music. That sounds like a joke but it’s a project I’m actually working on now. Tell us about your performance at the Opening Gala for The Artist Project 2012 in Toronto. TAP 2012 was one of my favourite shows to date. It took a lot of preparation because I was invited to play on the mainstage all night, so I had to put together hours of material! I also had no idea what to expect since the Queen Elizabeth Building at the CNE is huge and I wasn’t even sure whether people would be able to hear me. As it turned out, they piped my music through all the speakers in the entire building, so it was kind of like having my own radio station. Thousands of people showed up, and the crowd was just amazing. They went crazy for the theremin, and so I played it more than I’ve ever played live, but they also really enjoyed the violin and even the glockenspiel. Playing the show was almost like being on display in a very large shop window; people would stroll by, stop, take pictures, and either try to figure out what I was doing (if I was playing the theremin, which is quite a magical looking instrument to play live since you don’t touch it) or just stop and listen. What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? Whether I am blonde, brunette, or redhead. And I wouldn’t answer.


ARTICLE

Victimor Victimized

T

A Personal Essay by Hayley Chato

he word “victim” originated from the Latin word victima, denoting a creature being killed as a religious sacrifice. There are many who are as devoted to fashion as others are to religion. And it’s this almost religious fervour that can be directed in less appealing ways when it comes to fashion. The term “fashion victim” is one that has been floating around our ears for years. It’s a phrase that usually involves some poor soul who has evidently tried to be a part of fashion so badly, they’ve either piled on every trend without room for breath, or have plastered themselves with only visibly branded items. But it’s also come to define someone who adores fashion, and perhaps who has devoted his/her career to it. However, is this what a fashion victim truly is? Has having a life devoted to fashion also started to fall under that category? My friend, Heather, believes it has, but that it has no place in that description. “Fashion is art,” she says vehemently, “So those of us that are devoted to it are in no way fashion victims.” It’s true. I wholeheartedly believe that fashion is a strong form of art, which is why I have struggled to make people who hold such a stereotype of fashion devotees like myself, think differently. After all, are people who are into collecting books, or gallery owners and art dealers whose whole world is fine art, put into the same position as fashion lovers are? Not really. Case in point, there are people all over the world who have chosen to fill their homes with a collection of pieces from one singular brand. They have selected that one brand because they feel it helps to convey to others how they define themselves, and that is an extremely powerful thing. These people who, say, choose to fill their homes with Comme de Garçons, are no different from those who feel that paintings by an artist, perhaps Rothko for example, speak to them on a level that little else can. And yet, those of us who choose to collect fashion over fine art are continually ridiculed and branded as being self-centered and materialistic. Perhaps it’s because fashion is a very emotional subject. It’s a medium that touches on a form of expression that is on vibrant display every time you walk out your door.

Fashion is the most powerful form of self-expression, and when one choses to harness that and create an identity for themselves that differs from that of the mass public, it’s hard not to notice. People have been ridiculed for ages for their unique way of dressing themselves, and yet we have continued to insist on interpreting fashion in our own way despite all of this negativity. However, the term ‘fashion victim’ has somehow come to describe everyone who chooses to make their love for fashion a part of daily life, even though personal style has come from such strong, artistic roots, and is a sign of confidence. It should come as no surprise that I’ve found that those people who use the term are not at all in the fashion industry, to experience first-hand how hard and wildly creative it really is. Though, all that really is is an echo of how much of society functions at a base level: it operates on first-impression basis and relies on this first impression regardless of future proof of the opposite. Yes, fashion is, of course, notorious for being an industry based largely on first impressions, but those of us in the industry allow our impressions to shift with the seasons. So, who should be put under the category of fashion victim? I personally believe that those that allow branding to take over how they dress are those that should be considered. It is when those that have no power to not allow the materialistic side of fashion to take over them feel they are taking part in the fashion world by, for example, buying up every visibly branded clothing item or accessory. In the same category, I recently overheard some girls talking about how they’ve realized that the only way to succeed in the fashion world is to dress properly and buy expensive things; and by expensive things, I knew that didn’t just mean beautifully made and designed pieces. They meant pieces that are iconic or emblazoned with the designer’s name, and that people on the street would recognize as being expensive. And what shocked me was that they were people like myself, who have chosen to immerse themselves in the industry. Even they were being driven by what society believes is fashion to create a fashionable persona. It is when consumers lose control over how they dress to the desire to be properly branded that they become fashion victims.

“...those of us who choose to collect fashion over fine art... make their love for fashion a part of daily life ...”

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INTERVIEW - MODEL OF THE ISSUE

Jenica vandermeer Model of the Issue

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enica has been with Ford Models for 3 years. She was discovered while working at her parents fruit stand. Jenica started her career after finishing high school and has been working full time since. Originally from Niagara on the Lake, she now resides in Hamilton with her husband. Although she is based in Toronto she frequents other markets like New York and Europe. Agency Ford Models, Toronto. www.fordmodels.com

How and when did you know you wanted to become a model? My desire to work in the fashion industry was more of a selfdiscovery process. It wasn’t until after I started working that I realized that I enjoyed it. Where were you discovered? I was discovered at my summer job working at a fruit stand in Niagara on the Lake. What do you like most about being a model? I enjoy the traveling and experiencing new cultures. It has always been something I’ve wanted to do and I feel so fortunate to have the opportunity to do it.

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www.1968magazine.com


MODEL OF THE ISSUE

What are your secrets for a fit and healthy body? My secrets for a fit and healthy body are eating lots of raw veggies, no red meats, and running. Also, it’s important for me to find time to enjoy the outdoors. What is your favorite part of your body? Whenever I see a picture of the back of head I think it’s so cute. Hahaha.  What makes you feel sexy? My husband. Is the fashion world what you expected it to be? The fashion world is great, but there are many challenges in unexpected place. What do you enjoy doing when you are not working? I love to sew, craft, quilt and be entrepreneurial. My latest endeavor is an etsy store, called vintageowlery that sells vintage clothing that I find during my travels. What would you ask yourself that we haven’t asked you in this interview? Something I can’t live without: my moisturizer.

What has been the greatest experience you have had so far? My greatest experience has been getting to work with some really great teams. It’s really amazing to see a vision come together into a final product. What is your fashion dream? When I first started modeling I wanted to be in a Gap commercial. They looked like they would be a lot of fun. Specifically the “trees” holiday one from 5 years ago. What was your favorite city you traveled to work to? I love the food and culture in Milan, Italy, but I would have to say Paris is the most beautiful. Who is your fashion icon? I get my inspiration from so many people it would be hard to pick one person.  A lot of my inspiration is from friends and other models. What are your goals in the next 5 years as a model? In the next five years I’d like to continue modeling but begin to take on a larger role behind the scenes. Possibly in the art direction or mentoring young models.


ARTICLE

Toronto Fashion Week

I

by Hayley Chato

t’s funny how much humans will drive themselves to exhaustion for something they love. Even though I only experienced two days of Toronto Fashion Week, by the time the lights came back up after the Pink Tartan show, my last show, on Thursday evening, I was ready to plonk myself down with a big bowl of chili and not have to worry about another day of hustle and bustle and pointy elbows in my sides while trying to get into shows. Would I want to go for the full week, though? of course! Toronto Fashion Week was held from 12 – 16 March 2012, at David Pecaut Square, where the event had been newly relocated. As a commuter, I loved how close it was to Union Station (subtext, “Whew, now I can wear my heels without having to walk too much!”), and the rest of the Toronto fashion pack loved that Starbucks was right across the street: a hop, skip, and a j-walk and you’re there! I got to the venue fairly early, and watched as Toronto’s best-dressed began to saunter over in groups in their Prada loafers, leopard print Louboutins, and Isabel Marant high-tops. Streetstyle photographers began to arrive as well, and the sound of their frenzied clicks began to mingle with laughter and excited voices as they captured the images of everyone from Jeanne Bekker to Stacie Mackenzie, as well as Bernadette Morra from Fashion Magazine, and simply anyone else who looked fabulous. I myself hadn’t come with anyone, so I tried to look nonchalant and busy by burying my nose in my phone, but there’s only so many times a girl can refresh her email. Finally, it was time to enter the tent and go to the runway. As I was heading to the front doors, a photographer leaped out beside me and began to take my picture, which scared me so much I prayed he hadn’t gotten my face, which probably looked hilariously terrified. It turns out the photographer was Lewis Mirrett, and I later discovered he in fact only got my lower half. Whew!

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First show up was Rudsak. In their notes, the designer explained that he had gotten their inspiration from their Canadian roots and the winter wear of our Aboriginals. The collection was sleek, black with pops of tan fur, and included fantastic boots, among which were a knee-high pair that I saw every woman’s eyes follow as models such as Amanda Laine stomped down the runway in them. Simple leather jackets were punctuated by fur and leather strap hardware and details, and men’s wool coats were punched up by leather lapels. As always with Rudsak, the focus was on wearable, quality outerwear, and the modern everyday woman and man who want to not have to think about looking great during the winter, will love the wearability of the collection. I shuffled out of Rudsak smiling widely and waited for Pink Tartan to start; however, it was ten minutes to showtime, and I wondered why nobody was letting us go to our seats. I texted my friend, who I had seen before Rudsak, asking where she’d gotten off to.

www.1968magazine.com


ARTICLE

“I’m at Ezra Constantine!” she replied. I nearly kicked myself and ran to the other side of the tent. I had completely forgotten that Ezra was next, and I felt incredibly stupid as I shuffled in quietly and sat down. There was a frenzy of activity in front of me and photographers rushed to get some last-minute snaps of a dark-skinned young woman with braided hair that was done up in a messily intricate up-do. It turns out Bob Marley’s granddaughter was sitting directly in front of me, as she was in Toronto filming a movie and doing charity work. I turned my attention to the big screen stating “Ezra Constantine” to my right. Stephen Wong and Kirk Pickersgill, the designers behind the brand as well as its big sister, Greta Constantine, garnered a lot of attention for this Fashion Week show. They famously haven’t shown at Fashion Week after a hiatus, and returned to show their menswear line that was born in 2009. The collection was decidedly minimalist: chunky black knit turtlenecks were punctuated by large yellow safety pins, and creamy white sweaters draped effortlessly over loose white pants, followed by a fantastic jumpsuits. Aside from the successful and beautiful collection, it was a nice surprise to see two of my friends work the runway; in Toronto, I guess once you get into a business, you do start to know everyone. And, as a side note, even though I’m a girl, I’d definitely love to wear a few pieces from the collection, especially the black and grey paneled skinny pants paired with black patent combat boots and silver foil sweatshirt. Last show of the day was Pink Tartan, and I have to say I was most excited about it. I chatted with my friends who were in the Media Lounge before heading in,

surrounded by photographers and bloggers furiously updating their twitter and websites. My friends all agreed that Pink Tartan was the show that they had been looking forward to. As soon as the first look came out, I knew I was going to have my mouth open the entire time. Kim NewportMimran truly outdid herself, proven by the audible gasps from the audience as look after look came out, each one better than the last. The peplum, a trend throughout many of the shows, were on a few structured shirts and skirts, and were accompanied by fantastic emerald green trousers, a black leather tunic dress, traditional houndstooth sculpted into shapely dresses, and red skinny jeans and fur coats. It was the ultimate feast for the eyes, and I found myself heartily wishing, once again, that I were allowed to use my student funds for clothing. After all, I need clothing for school... right? Right? And fur didn’t stop at coats and collars: booties were covered with long black strands, almost as though, wonderfully, the shoes had drank a few too many bottles of hair growth formula. One of the models tripped a couple of times on her heels (surprisingly not the furry ones) and finally took them off at the end of the runway to rounds of applause and cheers as she worked it down the rest of the way in flat feet. I wanted to see David Dixon, the last show of the evening, but I was about to fall over from hunger, and I knew that a bowl of chili was waiting for me at home. With one last wistful look at the bustling tent, filled with beautiful people and stunning collections, I swept off into the night, treating the sidewalk as my own personal runway. After all, it’s fashion, and a girl’s gotta dream.


TRAVEL - BALI, INDONESIA

ANANTARA SEMINYAK RESORT - BALI

Hotel Exterior

Steps away from the rolling Indian Ocean, the 60 elegant suites of the newly opened Anantara Seminyak Resort & Spa, Bali are inspired by a unique beachfront location, surrounded by the natural beauty of Bali’s pristine Seminyak beach, matched by engaging local adventures that will be forever imprinted in your heart and mind. Anantara Seminyak capitalizes on a stunning beachside location under a canopy of greenery, and light reflected by the ocean. The suites are infused with all the touches of 21st Century convenience and free-flowing living spaces – around 80

square metres – with Balinese-inspired décor, floor-toceiling glass doors and windows. Take in views of the sparkling ocean from signature terrazzo hydro tubs from your own private balcony. Lavish features like dark Indonesian wooden floors, oversized built-in beds covered with 300 thread-count linen and a mountain of pillows are perfectly complemented by sophisticated in-room amenities: double-sized Hansgrohe ‘rainmaker’ shower, Bose DVD player, a surround-sound system, 42 inch LCD TV, 80GB iPod with docking station, Wi-Fi internet and espresso machine. Dining by Design

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Wild Orchid Ocean Terrace


TRAVEL

Ocean View at dusk

Penthouse Terrace

Measuring 420 square metres and offering sweeping, 180-degree ocean vistas, the modern minimalist décor of The Anantara Penthouse suite is the embodiment of the ultimate luxury experience, consisting of two bedrooms, a lounge, library, kitchen, bar and dining area in an openplan style. Outdoors, it features an eight-meter long infinity edged private rooftop pool with glass roof, spacious 120sqm sundeck and outdoor terrace with Weber BBQ area, loungers, daybeds and a Jacuzzi. A private chef, sommelier, vintage cellar and full butler services, are on hand to deliver infinite services from custom designed menus and arranging spa treatments, private yoga and meditation sessions, to sunset cocktails prior to a lobster BBQ on the private deck. From the moment guests arrive a dedicated Penthouse Master is at service.

Unique activities and excursions provide guests with ample opportunities to explore the exotic natural beauty or spiritual heartland of Bali. Dive into an up-close discovery of Bali’s famous coral reefs, or take up surfing lessons with the ‘surf guru’, or hike to volcanic hinterlands rides on Harley Davidsons – or on elephant back! The Den is a stylish library to pick up a book, magazine or newspaper. A wide selection of all-time favourite movies is also available. Discover new culinary worlds at Anantara Seminyak and let the laid-back spirit of Bali set the tone for memorable dining experiences that combine sophisticated international tastes Pool View


TRAVEL

SOS Cocktails with a view

with the best of local flavours. SOS Supper Club, the rooftop bar, is the perfect setting for Seminyak’s famed sunsets. The resort’s bistro-style café next to the infinity-edge pool, Wild Orchid, is where to head to for savouring elegant afternoon tea or a light lunch. Spice up your evening at the signature Thai restaurant, Wild Orchid, while watching master chefs craft zesty creations right before your eyes.

popular water activities can be enjoyed, while the fitness centre is well equipped to work up.

Round off an adventurous day by relaxing at one of three pools overlooking the Indian Ocean (one of which is infinity-edged), or enjoy an invigorating Thai massage, ancient Ayurvedic spa therapy or the signature spa treatment utilizing special long pressure treatments and local oils at Bali’s first Anantara Spa. It’s located in the level 4 of the resort, and has a full view of palm tree and partial ocean view from all the room treatments. It provides for 2 single rooms treatment and 2 rooms treatment for couple. The resort also has its own Surf School. A number of sports and

Let your worries end and your journey begin…

And that, frankly, is just touching on the stylish surface of this latest resort that offers a truly authentic Balinese discovery. Step into the world of Anantara and experience untold luxury in surroundings of mystical allure.

From lush jungles to pristine beaches and legendary deserts to cosmopolitan cities, Anantara currently boasts 17 stunning properties located in Thailand, the Maldives, Bali, Vietnam and the United Arab Emirates and will see new openings in China, Bali and Abu Dhabi in 2012. For more information on Anantara Hotels, Resorts & Spas, please visit www.anantara.com. Penthouse pool by night

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Profile for 1968 Magazine

Issue 3 - Spring 2012  

1968 Magazine is a printed upscale fashion and art magazine, published four times a year, featuring high quality photography and dedicated t...

Issue 3 - Spring 2012  

1968 Magazine is a printed upscale fashion and art magazine, published four times a year, featuring high quality photography and dedicated t...