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19 6 8 WINTER 2016-17

WINTER

ISSUE


MAZDA CX-5


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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THE HARVEST Joseph Saraceno

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THE GOLDEN BRAID Alvaro Goveia

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SIGRUN Peter Rosa

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LIGHT-BRIGHT Jennifer Goren

30 EVENT MCM

32 EVENT Cartier - Polo Challenge 34 ARTIST Janna Watson

COVER Photographed by David Fierro Stylist: Madeline Eagleton Model: Kristy McQuade - Elite Models New York

38 ILLUSTRATOR Deanna First 42 EVENT Kryolan

44 EVENT Rimmel & Cara Delevingne

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IN FIELDS I DREAM David Fierro

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HERE COMES THE DREAM... Patrick Lacsina

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UNDER CONSTRUCTION Michèle Bloch-Stuckens

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DARK MATTER Mauricio Ortiz

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LADY OF THE WIND Billie Chiasson

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TRAVEL Whistler, Canada

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IWC SCHAFFHAUSEN


1968 MAGAZINE MARTIN VOLPE

Editor in Chief - Creative Director

1968 Team

Fashion and Art Contact us info@1968magazine.com advertising@1968magazine.com submissions@1968magazine.com subscriptions@1968magazine.com letters@1968magazine.com Contributing Photographers Joseph Saraceno, Peter Rosa, Alvaro Goveia, Jennifer Goren, David Fierro, Mauricio Ortiz, Patrick Lacsina, Billie Chiasson, Michèle Bloch-Stuckens Contributing Stylists Tricia Hall, Amber Watkins, Jessica Albano, Madeline Eagleton, Samuel Fournier, Lucia Perna, Michelle Paiano, Delphine Dubreuil Contributing Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists Jessi Butterfield, Bradley Irion, Nickol Walkemeyer, Kirsten Klontz, Shawna Lee, Dylan K Hanson, Ellen Pratt, Laurie Deraps, Romy Zack, Shawnna Downing, Céline Martin, Quentin Guyen

1968 Magazine is a registered Copyright of 1968 Group. All rights reserved. No content or segment of 1968 Magazine is, under any circumstances, to be replicated, reproduced or diffused in any manner without the expressed written consent from the publisher. All work is copyright protected. 1968 Magazine is not responsible for copyright violations or misuse by others. The publisher protects the right to reject and/or amend any contribution or material supplied. All submitted material may or may not be published due to space, editorial review and/or quality. By submitting images, photographers certify that it is their own original work, for which they have the copyright and are holders of the model release, and give 1968 Magazine permission to publish it on any issue. Photographers grant an exclusive licence to use photographs in its submitted form, or subject to resizing to fit the magazine’s format. 1968 Magazine reserves the right to edit material and assumes no responsibility concerning any error and/or omission. Material may be also featured on www.1968magazine.com. Information presented is from various sources and thus, there can be no warranty or responsibility by the publisher as to accuracy, originality or completeness, despite the care taken in reviewing editorial content. 1968 Magazine assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein.

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THE HARVEST Photographed by Joseph Saraceno www.josephsaraceno.com Represented by Judy Inc Stylist: Tricia Hall Represented by Judy Inc

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Left: Bag - 3.1 Phillip Lim at Hudson’s Bay

Shoes - Gucci at Holt Renfrew


Bag - Salvatore Ferragamo at Holt Renfrew

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RIGHT: Shoes - B Brian Atwood exclusive to Hudson’s Bay

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SIGRUN Photographed by Peter Rosa

www.peterrosa.com Represented by Utopia Makeup Artist: Jessi Butterfield Hair Stylist: Bradley Irion Model: Sigrun Jonsdottir - Women 360 Management


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THE GOLDEN BRAID Photographed by Alvaro Goveia

www.alvarogoveia.com Stylist: Amber Watkins Makeup Artist: Nickol Walkemeyer, using MAC Hair Stylist: Kirsten Klontz, using Oribe Models: Francesca - Elite Models Lucie - Sutherland Models

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Left: Top - LIDIJA Dress - Lesley Hampton Earring - ARMED

Jacket - LAMARQUE Earring - ARMED


Earrings - Laurie Fleming

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Top - Lesley Hampton Stockings (worn as sleeves) - Hue Ear cuff and earring - Laurie Fleming


Top - VANDAL Ear cuff - Laurie Fleming

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Jacket - Bano Eemee Earring - ARMED Ear cuff - Laurie Fleming


Light - Bright Photographed by Jennifer Goren

www.jennifergorenphotography.ca Represented by A Plus Creative Art Direction and Hair Stylist: Dylan K Hanson Represented by Judy Inc and Wilhelmina Artists Image Stylist: Jessica Albano Makeup Artist: Shawna Lee Represented by Judy Inc Models: Erin Treschel - Plutino Models Brianna Pugh - Sutherland Models

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LEFT Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Stila eyeshadow duo in Bronze Glow, 100% Pure black masCara Cheek: Mac Harmony contour Lip: AudacioUs by NARS

Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Smashbox Full Exposure Palette, 100% Pure black mascara Cheek: NARS Contour blush in Talia Lip: MAC Rebel


Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Smashbox Full Exposure eyeshadow palette, black liner Phone Number by Mac, 100% Pure black mascara Cheek: NARS Contour Blush in Talia Lip: NARS lipstick in Vanessa

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Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Mac Cosmetics Electric Cool blue eyeshadow, 100% Pure Black Mascara Lip: Girl About Town Mac Cosmetics


Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Smashbox Full Exposure eyeshadow palette, black liner Phone Number by Mac, 100% Pure black mascara Cheek: NARS Contour Blush in Talia Lip: NARS lipstick in Vanessa

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Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: bare Lip: Girl About Town MAC


Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Smashbox Full Exposure eyeshadow palette, black liner Phone Number by Mac, 100% Pure black mascara Cheek: NARS Contour Blush in Talia Lip: NARS lipstick in Vanessa

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Skin: Makeup Forever ultra hd foundation, Laura Mercier Translucent powder, Pure Argan Oil for sheen Eyes: Stila eyeshadow duo in Bronze Glow, 100% Pure black masCara Cheek: Mac Harmony contour Lip: AudacioUs by NARS


EVENT

MCM celebrates its 40th Anniversary with a glittering evening in Munich

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odern Creation München (MCM) is a luxury travel goods and accessories brand with an attitude defined by combining a contemporary aesthetic and focus on functional innovation with the use of cutting edge techniques. Founded in 1976 at the pinnacle of Munich’s creative renaissance, today, through its association with art, music, technology and travel, MCM embodies the bold, irreverent and aspirational. Always with an eye on the new, the driving force behind MCM centers on revolutionizing classic design with futuristic materials.

This November MCM celebrated its 40th Anniversary in style with a very special evening in its hometown of Munich, Germany. In a fitting homecoming, leading cultural and fashion luminaries including style icon Claudia Schiffer attended a glittering after-hours party at the company’s flagship store in the heart of the city, Brienner Strasse 1. The exclusive reception embraced MCM’s current collection theme of “Munich Epoque” – with invited press, influencers and friends of the brand dressing up for an opulent and glamorous evening.

Paolo Fontanelli, CEO of MCM, Sung-Joo Kim, Chairwoman and CVO of MCM, model Claudia Schiffer and Michael Michalsky, Creative Advisor MCM

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TV presenter Viviane Geppert

Sebastian Klever, Managing Director MCM, and fashion blogger Maja Wyh

Following the cocktail reception, MCM’s Chief Visionary Officer Sung-Joo Kim invited friends of the brand such as Michael Michalsky (Creative Adviser at MCM) and Max von Thun (actor) among others to an intimate dinner at the world famous Munich Residenz, a stunning former royal palace of the Bavarian monarchs. The gala event, held inside one of the city’s most dazzling architectural gems, symbolized the company’s ongoing pride in its German roots, marking four successful decades of style and innovation.

It’s a long way from its humble beginnings, but in a nod to the Munich-based artists, musicians and jetset crowd that embraced MCM from the outset, the company continues to collaborate with leading creative talents from Germany and beyond.

Originally based out of a small shop on Kurfuerstenstrasse, MCM has grown to become a truly global 21st Century brand, and is currently sold in 430 stores in 35 countries.

The anniversary year began with a limited-edition collaboration with renowned German contemporary artist Tobias Rehberger, followed by a critically-acclaimed capsule collection by British fashion designer Christopher Raeburn. Both projects reinterpreted the brand’s history of bold, aspirational design for today’s global nomads; a very fitting tribute to four decades of MCM.


EVENT

Cartier International Dubai Polo Challenge

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edan Polo wins 12th edition of the Cartier International Dubai Polo Challenge. Under the patronage of HRH Princess Haya Bint Al Hussein, wife of HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, the 12th edition of the prestigious Cartier International Dubai Polo Challenge took place this November with a 9-6 win for Zedan Polo. Their valiant opponents in this final were Habtoor Polo, headed up by Mohammed Al Habtoor. HRH Princess Haya presented the impressive Cartier trophy to the Zedan team patrons Amr Zedan and Rashid Bin Drai. Cartier’s VIP guest Alessandra Ambrosio had earlier presented the La Martina Most Valuable Player of the Tournament Award to Habtoor Polo’s Santiago Gomez Romero. She also presented the Cartier Best Playing Pony Rug and a saddle to Mohammed Al Habtoor’s Sasha, which had been played by Habtoor Polo’s Tommy Iriarte.

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Some 600 Cartier guests attended this thrilling, four-chukka match, with HRH Princess Haya watching the game from the Royal Box, accompanied by HRH Princess Azemah of Brunei, Alessandra Ambrosio, Jerome Metzger, Retail Director Cartier Middle East and India and Ali Albwardy, the founder of the Desert Palm Resort and Polo Club – the home of Cartier polo in Dubai since 2006. The visitors also had a chance to view Cartier’s latest inspired collection, Cactus de Cartier. A stunning collection of yellow gold rings, bracelets, earrings and necklaces, featuring additional warmth from lapis lazuli, carnelians, emeralds and diamonds. This is the first time that Cartier has hosted its acclaimed Dubai Polo Challenge tournament in November and four 8-goal teams took part featuring players from the UAE, Saudi Arabia, England, Brunei, Scotland, Argentina, and Spain. This included today’s Desert Palm Trophy players, featuring the sponsor’s own team, Cartier and the home team, Desert Palm.

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INTERVIEW - ARTIST

Janna Watson

When did you realize you wanted to be an artist? My grandfather was an artist so I grew up in his influence. He used to buy me the most expensive high quality art supplies as a child, and he would challenge me with art lessons. Once he sent me out to his farm field to draw a picture of a tree; not a realistic version but an abstract version. When I brought back the drawing his critic was that it was “ok” but that I needed to get “wilder”, that is what abstraction is about, finding the passion and living emotional aspect in your subject. Because of him I have always wanted to be an artist. How would you describe the aesthetic of your work? My aesthetic is abstract. I use negative space and colour mixing to create compositions. Inspiration can come from many places, but is there someplace specific that yours comes from? Being alone. I’m an introvert so that is where I draw my energy. I’m inspired by connection…things like metaphors; those things that are regarded as representative of something else. I find metaphors very inspiring and humorous. It’s the reason I title my work the way I do. My titles are an extra entry point into the abstract world for the viewer. What keeps you motivated? When I was a child I was so stuck in my head I thought that one (myself) could not ever consistently converse with another human being. Those moments of silence when “hanging out” with another person really scared me. Also, at the beginning of my painting career I thought where else could I go with my skill - it must just end here? What I have learned is that when you are connecting to your subject, there can’t possibly be an end to it. I know I sound totally cheesy, but it’s like a river; it’s moving, there’s rough spots, deep spots, fast, slow, dry, etc., etc., but it’s all a journey moving forward. I’m motivated by knowing that truly connecting with yourself and your environment means there’s never an end to learning more about yourself, your loved ones, or any skill. I’m motivated by never knowing what’s ahead, but that truly connecting and getting older means never ending learning and depth.

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What is your favourite medium to work with? My grandfather taught me how to use water and pigment. I started off using water colour on paper, that is why I love working with water and pigment on birch wood. I find birch wood very similar to watercolour paper when untreated. So my favourite medium is water. Is there any other medium you enjoy working with? I’ve talked to a few psychics in my life.   What are your favourite themes? Emotion, non subjects, negative space, colour, metaphors.

Do you have an artist statement? Canadian painter Janna Watson uses abstraction as both an escape from and return to the real. As the world we know dematerializes into paint strokes, so too does her paint take stage as its very own character in a multi-act drama of composition. Bundles of colour, made up of discrete yet inseparable instances of pigment - what Watson refers to as “moments” - are teeming and poised as though caught mid-multiplication. Sweeps of paint re-direct sharply and fold over themselves; thin, rigid ink lines cut into the pictorial field as rudimentary elements in an increasingly complex system of painterly language. All the components play out on a surface of slow, chromatic gradation. Like many of Watson’s players, these backdrops tenderly gesture toward the familiar, stopping just short of representation. The result is a conceptual project (and distinct, stylistic signature) that speaks to a contemporary milieu in which abstract painting is not the retreat of meaning into an unrecognizable realm, but rather the emergence of medium as a “figure” in its own self-inscribed world of feeling and being. Watson does more than reveal paint’s potential to emote - she gives it a space to reveal itself, in its own time.


Is there a message that you most strive to communicate with your work? I’m serious and committed to it. How would you describe your creative process? Very intuitive. What does your work mean to you? Everything; it’s a long-term relationship. Sometimes I feel very disconnected and lonely with it, and other times very excited and passionate. The main thing is commitment. I go to the studio every day when I have a deadline, and that is usually every day whether I “feel” like it or not. This has made me a full time artist who pays all bills through art.

Do you have a favourite piece of art amongst your work? The pieces I have painted for my partner, and therefore live with, have grown on me. As an artist, what has been your greatest achievement? Three years ago I painted a 32 x 11 ft. painting for the largest residential building in Canada (Aura); it consisted of 4 – 8 x11 ft. panels that I couldn’t lift myself or fit in my studio. I was under a time restraint and painted in a storage unit for 40 days and 40 nights. I don’t mean to get biblical, but when the piece finally got approved by all of the levels of bureaucracy, and I finally was able to get out of that storage unit, I felt like my Arc had finally hit dry land. What was your first solo exhibit like? For my first “real” solo exhibit in a real gallery I was nervous and awkward. Not very many people came, except for a few of my very good friends. I wore a dress that was short and tight. I was insecure.

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Do you have any advice for aspiring artists? Get all of the exposure you can with your work. Feedback is important. Get a website and maybe a business card. Be committed to your work and don’t get crushed by criticism.   What can we expect to see from you in the future? I have no idea.   Where do you see yourself in 5 years? I will still be painting. I hope to get some more international exposure. www.jannawatson.com

Art can take on so many meanings for different people; how do you personally define “art”? This is bringing me back to art theory at OCAD. I think that art is truth + beauty or truth. I don’t think beauty can stand alone without authenticity. Do you have a favourite stylistic period in the history of art? Abstract Expressionism.   How do you feel about the current art community in Toronto? There are a lot of amazing galleries in Toronto that recognize and curate great artists. If you could move anywhere in the world and open up a studio, where would you go? This is a hard question. I would go somewhere beautiful where I could swim in the ocean and be surrounded by nature, but also have a city to go to for good food and culture.


INTERVIEW - ILLUSTRATOR

Deanna First

Having studied fashion design, when did you realize that you wanted to be an illustrator? I’ve wanted to be an artist since pre-school. When the time came for me to decide on a major, I was debating between Fine Arts and Fashion Design. I ended up getting a Bachelor Degree from Kent State University where I studied Technical Design. I worked in the fashion industry a few years at Elie Tahari, J.Crew and Ralph Lauren. Once I discovered there was a job that combined my love of art and fashion, I knew I wanted to be a full-time illustrator!

How would you describe your creative process? I’m a night owl and find that I am most inspired once it gets dark. I put on relaxing tunes while my cat peeks over my shoulder while I work. I start by sketching everything by hand before scanning my work into the computer to add further shading and playing with colour-ways.

How would you describe your style? I have two styles; one is loose and sketchy, the other more vivid and detailed. Both are full of fluidity and movement.

Are there any techniques or materials you would like to explore in the future? I would love to work more with oil paint or painting on unconventional objects.

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What is your favourite medium to work with? I prefer pencil and pastels. I like using my hands to smudge and shade, so these mediums are perfect for that.

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What fascinates you? I’m fascinated by human emotion. I love drawing eyes mainly because you can feel so much about a person when you look into their eyes. I’ve never really been a fan of drawing objects or anything else that is not living. I lose interest far too fast if I don’t feel a connection. What is your source of inspiration? Oh wow, where do I begin? From the latest models to the impeccably dressed women on Fifth Avenue; I take a huge inspiration from their clothes and hair, and constantly gather ideas for my sketchbook. I go into the city to people-watch, and also flip through old fashion mags, taking the eye of one model and the lips of another to keep on hand and use in a future illustration.

What motivates you? The fear of not living up to my full potential motivates me. Do you have a one favourite illustration amongst your work? It has to be one of my personal projects inspired by Kate Moss. I love working in neutral tones with charcoal and soft pastels. It’s difficult to be completely satisfied with a “finished” piece of art, but with this particular illustration, I’ve never felt the need to go back and add more. That is rare for me. Looking at your client list, how does it feel knowing you have worked with so many esteemed brands? It still feels surreal to me knowing that I have worked with some of my dream companies. When I started my journey


a few years ago I could not have imagined some of the opportunities that have been presented to me this past year! What has been your biggest achievement so far? I just finished a live sketch event in partnership with Papyrus at The Daily Front Row’s Art Basel fashion and art extravaganza at The Faena Art Dome in Miami. I attended Art Basel last year as a guest and this year was able to actually be part of one of the main events! What do you think it is about illustration that appeals to people? I think it is always exciting for people to see how an illustrator interprets a reference image. It’s fun to see how an artist adds in their own unique twist and which elements inspire them when creating.

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What do you think sets your illustrations apart from others? I have several different illustration styles. I’m capable of a sketchy style and of a more realistic style. This attracts a wide range of clients since my work can appeal to several different tastes. Do you have a favourite artist (illustrator or otherwise)? Stina Persson, David Downtown, Michael Carson, and François-Henri Galland. I’m drawn to artwork with a strong sense of emotion that incorporates fluidity and movement. Do you have any advice for aspiring illustrators? Yes! Don’t give up too soon and don’t be afraid to take risks. I did not go to school for illustration. After working in the fashion industry for 2 years I picked up a part-time job to

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save money and grow my client list while continuing to illustrate on the side. Patience is key in order to achieve your dreams. What would you be doing if you weren’t an illustrator? I would be doing something involving saving stray cats/dogs and/or opening a specialty chocolate shop. I have a sweet tooth that is a bit out of control and have always had a love for animals and urge to try and save them all. What are your goals for the next 5 years in your career? I love this question! In the next 5 years I plan on opening a separate work studio with all glass windows overlooking the city. I would feel so inspired waking up with a rooftop view of Manhattan and painting the cityscapes. I would love to start

drawing/painting on large scale canvases and creating a few series. I plan on having art shows in various cities featuring my latest collections. Traveling more, continuing to grow as an artist and using my art to raise money for animal shelters are all on my to do list. www.deannafirst.com


EVENT

Kryolan on the Bambi 2016 red carpet

F

Sting

Shermine Shahrivar

ounded in 1945, Kryolan is the leading international manufacturer of professional make-up. Kryolan’s roots are in theatre cosmetics. Over the past 40 years the company has greatly expanded internationally and long ago moved beyond limiting itself to just theatre. Kryolan is the exclusive make-up partner for BAMBI 2014, London Fashion Week, New York Fashion Week, Britain’s and Ireland’s and America’s Next Top Model, The Pink Ribbon Foundation London and even blockbusters like Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean, The White Ribbon, Hunger Games, Cloud Atlas or internationally successful series like Star Trek or Game of Thrones – all testament to the fact that make-up artists and stylists rely on Kryolan’s made-inGermany quality for film, TV and photographic productions.

The ‘Golden Deer’ awards ceremony is ‘the’ glamour spectacular in the world of German media. In addition to hosting local celebrities, no other event attracts so many international high calibre stars to Germany as this awards ceremony. A wonderful opportunity to walk down the red carpet in perfect style, present trends and show off your best side. The global producer of cosmetics Kryolan is once again the exclusive make-up partner, supporting the event by helping stars make the perfect appearance with its own looks created specifically for the red carpet: Rose Gold and Rouge Noir.

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Rarely are the faces of world-famous personalities exposed to such much pressure as they are on the red carpet, having to face the scrutiny of the spectators and cameras under the bright glare of the spotlights. That’s why once again this

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Robbie Williams

year the team at Kryolan is ensuring that national and international guests have the perfect make-up. ‘Metallic’ is this season’s trend: ‘Rose Gold’ stands out for its simplicity, lightness, naturalness and modern elegance. Skin radiates thanks to metallic highlights that create a romantic-looking glow. This wonderful combination of fine pink tones gives make-up an amazing effect. Delicate lip gloss rounds off the look with a touch of luxury and femininity. With classic dark lips and sensual smoky eyes, ‘Rouge Noir’ conveys beauty and strength. Eyeshadow in warm brown tones and deep black create dramatic highlights for an exciting reinterpretation of the classic look. Striking lips in a dark Bordeaux tone accentuate the trendy matt-look

Petra Nemcova

particularly well and lend an element of pure fascination. ‘No matter the look you pick, whether it’s light and angelic or brave and daring, everyone on the red carpet wants just one thing: perfect and flawless skin,’ says Dominik Langer from Kryolan. ‘We’re delighted to be able to support BAMBI once again this year with our long-standing expertise and experience in professional make-up,’ stated Langer further. Kryolan makes it possible for all make-up lovers to have a little bit of that red carpet feeling too: exclusively for the BAMBI awards, Kryolan customers can have their make-up done in store and feel just like a star with the matching look to the red-carpet event.


EVENT

Rimmel & Cara Delevingne Celebrate new Partnership

R

immel celebrated this November the addition of multi-talented model and actress Cara Delevingne to the Rimmel family. In honour of this collaboration Cara and Rimmel teamed up at Shoreditch’s cool hotel, the Ace, to present Rimmel’s new Scandaleyes Mascara and Cara’s first campaign with the brand.

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Before meeting Cara, guests from around the world were invited to enjoy bespoke Rimmel manicures by Global Rimmel Manicurist Adam Slee and meet Rimmel’s Global Makeup artist, Kirstin Piggott, for the low down on how to achieve Cara’s now iconic brow and eye look. Guests were then invited for the exclusive opportunity sit down with Cara and speak to her about all things beauty from her best tips learnt

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over the years, to her beauty must haves to how she felt joining the Rimmel squad and saying the iconic “Get the London Look� tagline. Not wanting her fans to feel left out, Cara ended the afternoon by giving them the amazing opportunity to participate in the event and ask her questions themselves on #RimmelxCara. Hosting an exclusive Facebook live Q&A session, Cara gave her followers from around the world a sneak peek into her preparations for the evening cocktail event from her hair and makeup to her arrival at the party answering all of their questions live along the way.

The day ended on a celebratory note as select guests joined Cara at Shoreditch’s Kachette, for bespoke cocktails and concerts by London artists Nadia Rose and Lady Leshurr, for the most Scandalous of all makeup parties.


In Fields I Dream Photographed by David Fierro

www.fierrophotography.com Stylist: Madeline Eagleton Makeup Artist: Ellen Pratt Represented by Judy Inc Model: Kristy McQuade - Elite Models New York

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Left: Sheer long sleeve Dress - ELAE slip - Zara Red fur - Vintage, Stylist Personal Collection Cowboy boots - Vintage BOULET Canada

Sheer Shirt - Oak and Fort silk Shirt - Quinta Colonna, Stylist Personal Collection vest - Dolce Cabo hat - vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage


Floral maxi dress - Vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage long coat - Vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage Boots - Aldo

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lacy shirt - Zara Coat - Vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage scarf - Dolce and Gabbana


Sheer Shirt - Oak and Fort silk Shirt - Quinta Colonna, Stylist Personal Collection vest - Dolce Cabo Leather Pants - Isabelle Marant vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage Boots - Zara hat - vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage

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High neck lace Shirt - Zara Embroidered multi-color Shirt - vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage lace up Shorts - Free People, Nordstrom Boots - Frye, Models Boots Sterling Coat - vintage Silver Jewelry - vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage


Floral Dress - Zara Thigh-high boots - Betty Muller military jacket - Zara

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Moto pants - Zara fringe tank top - Oasis Fringe jacket - Zara Larger jacket - vintage Hat - Hinge, Nordstrom Studded BootS - Nine WestÂ


Sheer long sleeve Dress - ELAE long coat - Vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage

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Floral maxi dress - Vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage long coat - Vintage, C’est La Vie Vintage Boots - Aldo


Dark Matter Photographed by Mauricio Ortiz www.mauricioortiz.com Stylist: Samuel Fournier Represented by Dulcedo Artist Makeup and Hair: Laurie Deraps Represented by Dulcedo Artist Model: Clodelle Lemay - Montage Models and Chantal Nadeau

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Left: Dress - MCQ by Alexander McQueen Bracelet - Stylist’s own

Dress - Elizabeth & James Shoes - Jeffrey Campbell


Top - Marie Saint-Pierre Hoodie - Denis Gagnon Skirt - Denis Gagnon

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Top - Marie Saint-Pierre Vest - Marie Saint-Pierre Skirt - MSGM


Dress - Elizabeth & James Shoes - Jeffrey Campbell

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Top - Marie Saint-Pierre Hoodie - Denis Gagnon Skirt - Denis Gagnon Shoes - Jeffrey Campbell


Jacket - Marie Saint-Pierre Skirt - Marie Saint-Pierre

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Pants - Marie Saint-Pierre Jacket - Marie Saint-Pierre Shoes - Jeffrey Campbell


HERE COMES THE DREAM OF YOU AND ME Photographed by Patrick Lacsina

www.patricklacsina.com Stylist: Lucia Perna Makeup and Hair: Romy Zack Models: Anna Edwards - Next Models Canada Michael Leblanc - Dulcedo Models

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Michael: Shirt - Zara Pants - Alexander Wang Shoes - Prada Anna: Coat - Zara Bodysuit - Wolford Shoes - Sergio Rossi Earrings - Topshop


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Anna: Shirt - Theory Bra - Calvin Klein Skirt - Topshop Michael: Sweater - The Kooples Pants - Zara


Michael: Sweater - Hugo Boss Anna: Coat - Zara Bodysuit - Wolford Earrings - Topshop

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Michael: Coat - Helmut Lang Pants - Saint Laurent Necklaces - Topman, ASOS Anna: Sequin top - vintage Ear cuff - Aldo Shoes - Giuseppe Zanotti


Lady of the wind Photographed by Billie Chiasson

www.billiechiassonphotography.com Stylist: Michelle Paiano Represented by Judy Inc Makeup and Hair: Shawnna Downing, using Make Up For Ever Model: Sam Rayner - Elite Models Toronto Photographer Assistant: Steph MacKinnon

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Top - MEO COLLECTIVE Skirt - MANI LASSAL


Dress - TOPSHOP

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Lace knit mock - TOPSHOP


Lace dress - RELIGION Hat - FALLEN BROKEN STREET

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Dress - NARCES


Blue lace top - KEEPSAKE Skirt - NARCES Hat - FALLEN BROKEN STREET

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Lace dress - RELIGION Hat - FALLEN BROKEN STREET


Top and Skirt - KENDAL & KYLIE

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Cape - RELIGION Boots - KENDAL & KYLIE


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Under Construction Photographed by Michèle Bloch-Stuckens www.micheleblochstuckens.com Stylist: Delphine Dubreuil Makeup Artist: Céline Martin Hair Stylist: Quentin Guyen Model: Anne Lise Maulin - City Models Paris Stylist assistant: Fanny Chevalier Post-production: Stéphanie Herbin

Satin plastron - DICE KAYEK Tweed coat - CHANEL “Camélia” golden leather brooch, « Eye » metal resine and pearl brooch and smily green resine and strass brooch - CHANEL


top - BARBARA BUI Blue velvet tail pie - RALPH LAUREN pants - CÉLINE socks - FALKE High-heel Platform sandals - PIERRE HARDY bag - AMÉLIE PICHARD

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top - CHRISTIAN DIOR dress - ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER pants - DICE KAYEK bag - BURBERRY


coat - FENDI Tights - FALKE

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Coat, pants, boots - CÉLINE rings - CHRISTIAN DIOR


SWEATER, skirt, boots - SCHIAPARELLI necklace - GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI

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coat with collar - SONIA RYKIEL pants - BURBERRY Casquette velours - MAISON MICHEL


TRAVEL - WHISTLER

Four Seasons Resort and Residences Whistler

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our Seasons Resort and Residences Whistler is one of North America’s top mountain resorts having been named Whistler’s only Forbes Five Star Resort and Canada’s only AAA 5-Diamond Resort. In addition to world-class skiing, this award winning Four Seasons Mountain Resort offers the ultimate year-round getaway in an enviable location, as well as fine dining, luxurious spa retreats and après ski  offerings. With the Resorts’ signature amenities and renowned, personalized service, Four Seasons Resort and Residences  Whistler is in a class of its own among mountain destinations. Grand in scale, intimate by nature, luxury Four Seasons Resort Whistler epitomizes the mountain spirit. Inside, find 273 luxury lodge guest rooms, hotel suites and townhouses with open-sky spaciousness and European-styled refinement.

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An expansive timber, glass and stone lobby harmonizes your transition between the great outdoors and the cosy wood hotel interiors of your private space in Whistler. As a resident of one of the luxurious and sophisticated mountain estates, you’ll be under the care of our acclaimed Residential Manager, and you’ll also have personal mountain guides, housekeepers, and a ski concierge at your service. Enhance your stay further with a private chef, personal butler, or personal chauffeur for the ultimate luxury experience, all available upon request. Our objective is to personalize your home away from home in our mountain paradise, ensuring that the personal items and conveniences you enjoy are made available. We’ll be happy to stock the fridge with your favourite champagne, arrange to have your favourite meals freshly prepared, customize a selection of music for your listening pleasure, ensure that your

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preferred linens and pillows are on the beds, and much more. We’ll do anything we can to ensure a comfortable stay. Named for the curvature on the side of a ski or snowboard, Sidecut Modern Steak + Bar declares its spectacular alpine location with glorious views of the local Whistler and Blackcomb mountains and a brilliant, fire-lit setting at Four Seasons Resort Whistler. A sleek wood interior, colourful earth tones and an open fire provide a cosy setting for your visit to our steakhouse. Winter creates a romantic setting with s’mores by the fire-pit after dinner, while summertime allows outdoor fine dining on the spacious heated patio, where an outdoor fireplace provides an inviting ambience. The vertical slopes of Whistler aren’t the only things worth carving into. Sidecut serves up a wide variety of regional meats, including Canadian prime beef from Alberta and BC fallow venison loin, cooked to perfection on a 1,800-degree

infrared grill, which cooks meat evenly while retaining its natural juices. Perhaps you’d rather dive into entrées sourced from the nearby Pacific Ocean and local mountain lakes, such as Queen Charlotte Sound halibut or wild Chinook salmon. Whichever you prefer, pair it with a selection from the more than 200 bottles and 30 wines by the glass on our extensive wine list, which highlights a wide variety of labels, from international classics to boutique British Columbia wines. Rustic mountain charm married with advanced technologies provides a memorable setting for meetings and business events, all with exemplary Four Seasons service. Two heated terraces provide year-round scenic venues, while cocktail parties and other outdoor events may be hosted in the covered Alpine Cabana during inclement weather.


The Resort offers a variety of activities to include Bear-viewing tours, Brewery tours, Cooking classes, Fishing, Golf, Mountain top salmon bake, Nature/ecology tours, Off-road 4x4 tours, Skiing, Spa/wellness, Tennis, Wine tasting/wine paring. Also, groups at Four Seasons Resort Whistler can fly by helicopter up 2,483 metres (8,000 feet) to a glacier plateau on Mount Currie to practise their drives with biodegradable balls. Ideal for groups of 50 or more, the Resort offers dinner by the lake. Four Seasons chefs will create a barbecue dinner for your group at one of Whistler’s five lakes just a short drive away. The unforgettable open-air feast will end with music, songs and a blaring beach bonfire. Another option, ideal for small groups, is the dinner at 6,000 feet. Your group will be whisked away in a fleet of helicopters

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6,000 feet up above the clouds where a canapé reception and barbecue picnic awaits atop a glacier. The Resort also offers a First Nations dinner, perfect for intimate group dinners. Located adjacent to Four Seasons Resort Whistler, our partner, the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre is open to groups for drum-making lessons during the day. In the evening, it transforms into a memorable setting for dinners and cocktail receptions, featuring gourmet First Nations fare and performance by a hoop dancer. As the world’s leading operator of luxury hotels, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts currently manages 101 hotels and resorts in 42 countries. For more information: www.fourseasons.com/whistler

1968magazine.com


Profile for 1968 Magazine

Issue 19 - Winter 2016/17  

This issue features fashion editorial stories from recognized photographers Joseph Saraceno, Peter Rosa, Alvaro Goveia, Jennifer Goren, Davi...

Issue 19 - Winter 2016/17  

This issue features fashion editorial stories from recognized photographers Joseph Saraceno, Peter Rosa, Alvaro Goveia, Jennifer Goren, Davi...

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