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BY MAGNUS UNNAR


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ALICIA TOMLINSON JAY MITCHELL AIDEEN SHANNON ROWAN NEWMAN PAUL JOSEPH JACOPO NUVOLARI LEWIS TAYLOR NATALEE RANII-DROPCHO DEAN LAWSON DYLAN B. JONES FILIPPO GIULIANI CHAD BURTON LINDSAY ROBERTSON HOLLY OUNSTEAD RICCARDO CHIUDIONI ELLIE MCWHAN JACK REID JESSICA HOLDEN LINDSAY ROBERTSON HOLLY OUNSTEAD ALEX AULD VICKY BIRD ASHER HERR INGA LANGKAY RHYS JONES ANA OPSINA TYLER SHIELDS, CONNOR PAOLO, JEAN-DAVID MALAT, LOGAN MACDOUGALL POPE, LUC COIFFAIT, KIRIL KULETSKI, CERI DAVIES, ALEXANDER JORDAN, MARK CANT, JASON HINDLEY, CHARL MARAIS, JOANNA WILLS, SATY + PRATHA, KRISTIN VICARI, ARTHUR WOODCROFT, SONDRA STOCKER, NORMAN LEE, CECILE HARRIS, ANNIE OUNSTEAD, KARIN SODERQUIST, NORMAN LEE, YASMIN BAWA, ANDERS LINDEN, MAGNUS UNNAR. HANNAH TOMLINSON

GEORGIA BOWSER STEVE BROWN SOPHIE CULLEN NATALIE O’BRIEN CHARLOTTE AUBERT MADDIE HARRISON HARRIET DAVEY IZZIE STANWAY LAUREN KING

1883 magazine is published by 1883 media ltd publishers ALICIA TOMLINSON HANNAH TOMLINSON JAY MITCHELL special thanks

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SANTIGOLD

UK £3.99 ISSUE 5

BY MAGNUS UNNAR

photography MAGNUS UNNAR fashion FILIPPO GIULIANI top PROENZA SCHOULER @ HARVEY NICHOL Metal vest ERICKSON BEAMON

GO LOUDER SANTIGOLD BY MAGNUS UNNAR

UK £3.99 ISSUE 5

GO LOUDER

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EDITOR’S LETTER Dear Readers, It’s been a hectic few months since our last issue dropped. With the rain beating down and showing no sign of respite; we decided to say “sayonara!” to dreary London and swapped red telephone boxes for palm trees as we hit the West Coast of America, spending the guts of two weeks in Los Angeles. The States provided a fitting backdrop to this summer issue with its influence seeping into the pages both in the design and the content. In fact, leading our dedicated music issue is American singer, songwriter and producer, the supremely talented, Santigold. Back for round two with brand new album Master of My MakeBelieve, I’ve had the record on repeat ever since it landed in the office. We shot her cover story in the wake of her performance at Californian music fest Coachella where Santigold wowed the masses with her exciting new set. Coachella itself features also within this issue, as does Texas’ very own music extravaganza, SXSW. At SXSW, musician Kindness snapped his backstage diary, offering an intriguing insight into his world. Travelling back to LA, we caught up with Moby, who invited us to his castle in the Hollywood Hills and shared his favourite architecture of the city, both the incredibly beautiful and the down right-weird. Meanwhile, LA photography heavyweight Tyler Shields sits down with friend and actor Connor Paolo to discuss his brand new exhibition; as we meet two of Hollywood’s rising young actresses, the very beautiful Gillian Jacobs and Hannah Simone. We also managed to pin down colourful street artist extraordinaire Mr. Brainwash in between terrorizing the current LA art scene as he gears himself up for his impending London show. Of course, as much as we can’t bare the rain here, one thing we can’t deny is what we lack in sunshine we certainly make up for in talent. Flick through these pages to discover the spectacular stage costumier Alex Noble, the exquisite melody maker Lianne La Havas and Florence + the Machine songwriter and band member, the vivacious Isabella Summers. Throw into the mix luxurious fashion editorials, fascinating still life pieces and delicious beauty shoots side by side with behind the scenes action at record label Cascine, iconic studio Abbey Road and festival of the summer Lovebox, and you’re about to jump right into our most eclectic issue yet. So sit back, relax and relish this issue (hopefully) in the sun. Until next time, Alicia xxx

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Alicia Tomlinson Editor-in-Chief


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1. EDINBURGH FRINGE FESTIVAL

2. WILDERNESS

3. NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL

4. ELECTRIC ZOO

3rd-27th August 2012

10th-12th August 2012

26th-27th August 2012

31st August – 2nd September 2012

Edinburgh, Scotland

Cornbury Park, Oxfordshire, UK

Notting Hill, London, UK

Randall’s Island Park, New York, USA

Taking over the Scottish capital for three weeks, Edinburgh’s Fringe Festival offers art shows for every taste. From big names to unknown breakthrough acts, explore the worlds of theatre, comedy, music and art as the city becomes a honeypot of bristling creative talent.

Back for its second year Wilderness offers a gastronomic banquet for all the senses. Headliners Wilco, Spiritualized and Lianne La Havas play alongside three sumptuous feasts curated by a hearty smorgasbord of Britain’s best loved foodies.

Europe’s largest carnival is back and bigger than ever before. Twenty miles of vibrant colourful costume meets 40 static sound systems, throw in some of the juiciest jerk chicken you’ll get outside Jamaica…need we say more?

August sees the whole of Randall’s Island sway with the squirming trance tones of Electric Zoo. The weekendlong house-fest merges the cyclical beats of top global names with the slithering bass lines of underground talent last year’s main stage played host to everyone from Moby and Tiesto, to Rusko and SBTRKT.

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

5.

DIARIES AT THE READY, 1883 BRING YOU ANOTHER MÉLANGE OF UNMISSABLE EVENTS TO SEE YOU THROUGH THE SUMMER AND BEYOND... 5. BESTIVAL 6th-9th September 2012 Robin Hill Country Park Isle of Wight, UK Touted as the only way to end your summer, unleash the party animal from the hinterlands of your imagination with Bestival 2012’s beast of a theme, ‘wildlife.’ But if that’s not enough to coax out your primal side, maybe a line up boasting The XX, Sigur Rós and The Horrors just might?

6. SYDNEY UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL 6th-9th September 2012 Sydney, Australia From Snowtown to Sleeping Beauty, Australia is already making waves as a bristling indie film mecca. Championing hundreds of experimental and art-house movies, the four day event promises to rekindle interest in alternative film with a series of underground film screenings across the city.

7. BERLINER LISTE

8. HOLLYWOOD COSTUME AT THE V&A

13th-16th September 2012

20th October-27th January 2013

TRAFO, Köpenicker Straße 70 Berlin, Germany

Cromwell Road, London, UK

Showcasing more than 120 of the globes most innovative galleries, Berliner Liste presents a broad spectrum of contemporary art. Staged over a weekend in a disused power station, contemporary sculpture, drawing and performance art adds to the city’s already thriving creative landscape.

London gets a taste of Hollywood nostalgia as over 100 of the world’s most iconic movie costumes come to the city. Garnered from more than a century of film-making, think anything from Dorothy Gale’s plaid pinny to Erol Flynn’s Don Juan tights! Words by Rowan Newman

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1883 magazine | music

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A R T- FA S H I O N - C A B A R E T- C I R Q U E + LOTS MORE ACTS ON 12 STAGES

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

1. Jay Mitchell

2. Kristin Vicari

What do you feel is the most iconic piece of album art around? Definitely

All-time festival highlight? Hmm…

1883 Creative Director

WE FIND OUT WHAT MUSIC MAKES SOME OF OUR FAVOURITE PEOPLE TICK.

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Pink Floyd, Dark Side to the Moon. It needs no explanation! All-time festival highlight? Watching Keanu Reeves and Dogstar at Glastonbury being attacked by tomatoes. Most effective use of music in a movie? It would have to be Jaws. You could be in a room just with that soundtrack playing and straightaway you would think of that movie. A song to sum up your life? Probably some kind of soundtrack… maybe the theme tune to The Tron Legacy. It makes every day feel like an adventure! Best song for when you’re angry? I had an argument with my sister once and Puddle of Mudd, She Fucking Hates Me came on. So I guess I’d pick that one. Worst thing to happen to music? X Factor! Most fashionable person in music right now? Those who don’t care. Like the buskers on the tube. They keep it real and don’t care what’s going on! First band you ever saw live? I can’t remember the first band I saw, maybe REM at Glastonbury. They made me feel old because they’re an old band. A song that you could play over and over again? At the moment it’s Mike Mills by Air.

Photographer

it’s not a good one but I can definitely laugh about it now. The first and only time I went to Glastonbury, within the first hour I was there, an inebriated girl fell on my head and gave me a concussion that put me in the hospital for 3 days. If you could get any band/

artist cover any song, who would it be, which song and why? Florence and

the Machine to sing House of the Rising Sun. She has such a strong voice and it’s such a powerful song, it would be a match made in heaven! Most fashionable person in music right now? MIA. Tell

us about the first record you ever bought? I didn’t buy it, but the record I can remember having been given to me by my dad when I was about 4 years old was Madonna’s album, Like a Virgin. Material Girl was my favorite song and I would sing it constantly. I don’t think I understood what most of the songs meant at that time. I just really enjoyed dancing around to those beats.

If you had to pick one track to sum up your life, what would it be and why?

Goodbye Horses, Q Lazzarus. It’s about having a higher consciousness in life and not being too emotionally attached to material objects. I’ve always hoped to be like this, but I can’t say I’m any good at it ;) Greatest guilty pleasure on your playlist right now? Rhianna.

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3. James Lipsius

4. Zoobs

5. Iwan Rheon

The most effective use of music in a movie? Undoubtedly Titanic. If you wrote a song what would you write it about and what sort of song would it be? It would be a medieval inspired

Best music for when you’re angry? The

Musical guilty pleasure? Barry White,

Model and Dog Publicist

witch-house dance track about the plague. Tell us about the first record you ever bought? Smooth Criminal, Alien Ant Farm. I still listen to it. Alltime festival highlight? The Yeah Yeah Yeahs at Reading when I was 16 and maybe Beyonce last year at Glastonbury. If

you could get any band/artist cover any song, who would it be, which song and why? Lana Del Rey covering

Every You Every Me, Placebo. I think it would work well. Most fashionable person in music right now? No idea, probably Azealia Banks. Most iconic

piece of album art, what do you like about it? Screamadelica, Primal Scream.

It reminds me of being very young and seeing it around the house. If you had

to pick one track to sum up your life, what would it be and why? Something

very allegorical like Beethoven’s 7th Symphony, 2nd Movement. Worst thing

to happen to the music industry?

Commercial RnB for morally bankrupting a generation. Best music for romance? Beyond the Sea by Bobby Darin. A song

that you could play over and over again? Moon River, Henry Mancini.

Artist

Prodigy. Dubstep. Or any other music that lacks completely a soft emotive quality. Most iconic piece of album art, what do you like about it? David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane album cover. The simplicity of the iconography makes this album cover image instantly recognisable even decades later. If you wrote a

song what would you write it about and what sort of song would it be?

I have written songs that have never been sung before, some of which have been recited at poetry events. I wrote I Look For You about my late father and I’ve incorporated this in my visual art too. However, most people think it’s a romantic or love song when they first glance at the words. It’s interesting and amazing how people perceive things so differently to each other. If you

could duet with any artist alive or dead, who would it be any why?

I’m not sure how I would do that because I can’t sing. Assuming I could sing, probably someone with a very strong and distinctive voice like Nina Simone. All-time festival highlight? Something in Hyde Park hanging upside down off a tree. If you could get

any band/artist cover any song, who would it be, which song and why?

For the amusement factor, I’d like to see Eminem sing Hero by Mariah Carey.

Actor

everybody loves a bit of Barry White! First record you ever bought? I think initially I had some real shitty stuff, but I remember my brother one day saying you should listen to this band, Blur. So I got Parklife on tape then I think the first CD I got was Definitely Maybe by Oasis, they were both singles but I’m still really into them. If you were to

duet with anyone dead or alive, who would it be? Eva Cassidy, her voice

is the best thing I’ve ever heard!

Best song for when you’re angry?

Probably something like The Sex Pistols’ Anarchy in the UK… All-time festival highlight? It’s hard to say! Last year I saw Everything Everything at Latitude and they were really great. If you

wrote your own song what would you write about? I guess relationships with

people, things that affect me and women! I think it’s very interesting how people relate to each other. If you could get

any band to cover any song who, what song and why? That’s a tough question!

There are too many bands and too many songs! Most effective use of music in a movie? I think Adagio for the Strings by Barber in Platoon. The soundtrack made that film for me I think.

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC Déjà vu has never hit Charli XCX harder than mid-hair tease at The Old Peanut Factory in London’s Hackney Wick. “I swear it was right here,” the singer insists of her first rave performance at age 14. “It was called ‘The Peanut Rave.’ My parents really wanted to come, and we were all here together until six in the morning- a really weird family outing.” A drug-littered, paint-covered playground may not be the typical first venue for a rising pop star, but 19-year old Charli Aitchison was never stage shy; at age 4 she sang Aqua’s Barbie Girl in front of an entire cruise ship a capella. With the Spice Girls as her idols, she started writing songs at 7 and at double the lifeline spent weekends in glitter, rolling on the floor and clinging to the legs of strangers. “When I played here I was standing on a crate wearing a tutu,” she recalls. I used to write these nursery rhyme raps out about dinosaurs and 5-year olds and Christmas in a highpitched voice; they were really terrible.” Fast forward five years and Charli’s technicolor dream has burst from the confines of East London warehouses to a cult following of dark pop lovers- 11,000 on Facebook, which will most likely double by the time you read this. Although she will be the first to admit she’s never been a true “rave kid,” taking school just as seriously as face paint, she has deferred her Fine Art degree at London’s Slade School to focus on curating a hyper-sensory world.

“For a musician in the current climate, you can’t just be one dimensional anymore. You have to create a universe for people to access and that’s why visual art is so important to me. I want to be in charge of my videos, my artwork, what I wear.” One look at her first video for Nuclear Seasons, a flicker of Day-Glo rainbows and inverted geometry, and you see the perfect match to her goth-tinged pop melodies, which she describes as “a mixture of black, gold and pink.” One Synesthesia aside, her brazen style has a visual vocabulary all its own. Drawing from influences as varied as Disney kids, Wednesday Adams and teenage poster culture, it’s no surprise she gets dressed by throwing on whatever her open wardrobe spits out. “I grew up in Hertfordshire and there was no sense of fashion there. Basically, if I wore something and everyone thought it looked bad it was a guarantee in my head that it looked really great. The worse reaction it got in my hometown, the more I wanted to wear it.” Although she’s been remixed by Salem, toured with Sleigh Bells, and recorded a soundtrack for indie film Elfie Hopkins, she has yet to release a full-length of her own. The yet-to-be-named debut mixes tunes she wrote over the past five years into a complete girl power revival. “As I’ve grown up, my music has become a lot more focused and who I actually am as a person. Making my record has been a coming of age for a 19-year old, because it’s been going through all the different phases of my life… I still want to reference the rave scene, but I don’t want to be caught in the bubble anymore.”

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Words By Natalee Ranii-Dopcho


photography SATY + PRATHA fashion LINDSAY ROBERTSON hair AKIKO KAWASAKI beauty CIARA O’SHEA fashion assistant CHAD BURTON photo assistant DREW WHITTAM shot @ LUCIANO CISMONDI - THE STUDIO cross dress MARIA PEPE slip OWN bracelet MARIA PEPE shoes CHRISTIAN

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC Don't be fooled into thinking Ben Howard's a classic singer/songwriter who only sings about love and maybe sometimes about the blue ocean. It's his finger virtuosity, his guitar skills combined with refreshing songwriting that make his debut album Every Kingdom so impressive. Sell out shows in the UK and Europe, we managed to catch up with Ben in Berlin; right before his gig. After desperately trying to get a lane in the bowling centre next to the venue, we then found ourselves between a air hockey and a pinball machine. So now

here we are, something like four table hockey games later.

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Ben: What day is today? 1883: It’s Wednesday, I think… Ben: We are always on the road at the moment and it’s

super hectic and suddenly you don’t know anymore if it’s a Tuesday or Wednesday or Saturday, you know? In a way, it doesn‘t really matter at the moment. It just depends where you are. So where are you going to play tomorrow? Ben: We have a day off tomorrow. So I think we are all going to spend the afternoon in a tattoo shop in Berlin. Team tattoos? Ben: Yeah, I’m going to get a quote on my wrist and I think India is going to get one as well. 1883: Where do you know India from? (India is one of the polyinstrumentalists in the band) Ben: I’ve known India most of my life, since I was about 11. She’s from Devon too. She’s my sister’s best friend. I didn’t know that you have a sister… Ben: Yeah, well, my sister incidentally moved to Mexico. We kind of went two completely different ways in life. I’ve always been quite driven. Competitive in the best sense of the word. I mean, not like competitive and an arsehole. But I do like challenging myself, really. And I’ve always been focused. 1883: I imagine it gets harder to focus now, getting so much attention from everywhere?

Ben: I think you have to try not think about it too much. You have to be quite selfish to do this, really. If anyone tells you that they are doing it for greater causes than themselves, then that’s proper shit.

1883: What shall I write in the intro about your music style? I know that you don’t like generalising it… Ben: No, not really...I don’t like to categorise too much. I guess if anything, we play sort of ‘hard folk’. Folk rock just sounds like middle-of-the-road American music. We just like trying to test the boundaries of the genre. We get chopped into that sort of acoustic singer/songwriter category. Though I play a lot of electric as well and as a band, we are kind of playing more interesting music every day. So it’s not like straight-forward singer/songwriter tunes. There’s a lot of other weird stuff in there and we got a couple of drum and bass lines too. 1883: Let’s talk a bit about your writing process… Do you have sketchbooks? Ben: I have Moleskines, these little books that I always take with me. I always have a panic when I don’t have a pen with me. But I don’t write too much when we are on tour. I jam out quite a lot when we do the sound-checks and I have realised there’s some really cool, new stuff coming through. So now we just have to sit down and record it, but I honestly don’t know when. 1883: Your tour seems to be an almost never-ending one… Ben: Yeah, it’s relentless. After this tour in Europe we go back to America and then

but that’s the whole vibe of a festival. You have to have a lot of confidence and to be honest, just kind of realise that you are in the public eye. Everyone has their opinion on everything and that’s just how we are as people. So you can’t take any of it personally. You can just do your own thing and have fun and then get the fuck out of there. 1883: Are there any good stories about your last festival season? There are usually always a couple of good stories coming out of this mental season… Ben: Oh yeah definitely. Bestival last year was pretty funny. I played in a fucking anorak and my girlfriend’s jeans. We just had a massive night before and then we had a stage invasion. That was the most surreal thing ever. It’s just crazy, they lock you in that place for a couple of days and everyone is going mental... 1883: I guess you also like fancy dress parties then? Ben: Ermm… I’m not very good at it. I think that’s the problem. I enjoy it when I do it but I’m just not very good at making stuff. Some people are really amazing at making costumes – you give them like a piece of paper and a pencil and all of a sudden they make a bird suit and you are like: How the fuck did you do that? And you are really struggling to make a hat. 1883: A propos ‘creativity’...this ageold question of creativity versus commerce just popped into my mind: Are you always aware that there is a commercial reality? and how much does it affect your work? Ben: Well you are all part of a commercial world, really. The plus side of this industry at the moment is that we are all making money out of music, which is just amazing. I think a nice thing is that none of us initially intended to do music because of that. And yeah, sure there is a commercial aspect of it, but that means at the same time that we can all pay our bills and do what we wanna do for a living. We get the chance to travel around the world. You are definitely conscious of a commercial reality but in terms of creativity? It hasn’t really stifled me yet. 1883: It’s a really personal thing. Everyone deals so differently with this kind of stuff I think… Ben: Yeah, definitely. It’s a personal thing how you manage it and technically, you are trying to sell as much as you can...but I really love playing live music. I like sitting there and thinking that people bought tickets to come and see me, sitting there and singing songs about me. I find it hilarious sometimes. You never really understand it…

BEN SMITHARD’S DIVERSE REPERTOIRE HAS SPANNED ACROSS MUSIC, TV AND FILM. IN THE WAKE OF HIS WORK ON THE FAMED MY WEEK WITH MARILYN, THE BRITISH CINEMATOGRAPHER REVEALS AN INSIGHT INTO HIS WORLD BEHIND THE SCENES.

we got some good festivals. I‘m really looking forward to just cruising around. And it’s so different to play at festivals – it’s harder in some ways but there’s less pressure in a lot of other ways, you know? You probably sing out of tune sometimes and you only have a two-minute sound-check, so things sound a little bit ropey sometimes,

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

Singer, actress, fashion maven and wife to musical wunderkind Mr Mark Ronson, if there’s anything Joséphine de la Baume hasn’t mastered, the world is yet to see: “I do get super anxious on stage,” offers the slinky redhead. “I think I must finish a pack of anti-nausea tablets each ALMOND EYED WITH RAZOR set. I’m usually really chilled but I just get SHARP CHEEKBONES AND A COQUETTISH really neurotic! After the second song I start relaxing and it’s the best thing in the world, SPIRIT IN SYNC WITH HER STRAWBERRY but for the first two tracks I’m so on edge!” Pushing the parameters of the electro pop spectrum as one half of Gallic BLONDE HAIR, JOSÉPHINE DE LA BAUME’S pop-piece Singtank, the pocket-sized Parisian has left a large imprint on FACE IS TO BECOME INESCAPABLE OVER the industry with her rousing collection of dreamy Britpop. “I’d say we have quite a melodious sound, some songs are more poppy than others and THE NEXT TWELVE MONTHS. MARRIED some are a bit more epic,” she smiles. “Our album’s called In Wonder so TO ONE OF THE WORLD’S HOTTEST has a really strong sense of the imaginary and there’s a kind of playful naivety in there too which is actually more ironic than genuine!” PRODUCERS AND CURRENTLY RIDING THE Released this May, the bands premier long play fuses the SUCCESS OF HER OWN DEBUT ALBUM, forces of acclaimed producers Alan O’Connell and Nellee Hooper to create an impressive first offering from De la Baume HERE SHE ENLIGHTENS 1883 ON AN and her brother, who have been making music together for EXCITING YEAR TO COME. as long as the chanteuse recalls. “Even these days I love getting Alexandre to myself, he’s so cute,” she gushes. Swinging from the perennial childhood piano lesson to quickly becoming a way for the siblings to hang out, Joséphine recounts a swathe of teen years spent stumbling into her younger brother’s room to suss out his ever evolving musical soundscape, trading her fondness for White Stripe-like rock with his brooding adolescent lust for Pulp and Radiohead. “We had quite different musical interests growing up. I remember when we were little I was really into Michael Jackson and he was really into Elvis Presley. I would dress like Jackson and Alexandre always asked the hairdresser for the Presley quiff, so it was a kind of endless debate over who was the real king!” These days boasting a sonic vision considerably more on par, the delectable De la Baume lays well-crafted lyrics over Alexandre’s musical arrangements. The pair then rework the tracks together, embellishing the sound with trademark girl-boy harmonies, twee keyboard hooks and infectious indie-electro beats. “I think being brother and sister there’s something very fluid, I don’t need to explain everything, we just kind of understand each other,” she smiles. “We’re very complimentary now; my taste sways towards being slightly more aggressive music-wise whereas he’s a lot more lyrical so we kind of balance each other out!” As for future collaborations with her high profile paramour she laughs: “I’ve never really wanted to mix chiffon et chanson! Maybe one day if it made sense with the song and sound, but we’d probably end up pulling each other’s hair out!” Dividing her time between London and Paris, the young star is one in a line of French actresses who have successfully made noise in the music world. Among her peers lie a young Brigitte Bardot, Edith Piaf and even Charlotte Gainsbourg whom she stars alongside in the new Pete Doherty movie, Confession of a Child of the Century. “I always did music but I think I had a kind of guilt that it was too nice to be a job,” she explains. “I felt working had to be a little bit painful. Although acting and music are both very similar in a way, they both require you to strip back for something magical to happen. You kind 25 of have to open your secret diary and you can’t be prudent.”


With an exciting summer lined up for Singtank, who already count Kate Moss among their fans, the plucky French femme’s heart lies firmly in the band, “We really want the live show to sound as good as the record. So many artists are great in the studio but when you see them live there’s nothing there. I think we put a lot of pressure on ourselves but we still have a good time. After the second song,” she adds, “And after we’ve stopped sweating!” Words by Rowan Newman Photography by Kirill Kuletski top JASON WU trousers ANTONIO BERARDI ring CARTIER shot @ YUMCHAA fashion LINDSAY ROBERTSON hair TIM PATEMAN @ PHAMOUS make up KRISTINA VIDIC fashion assistant CHAD BURTON

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

ILLUMINATED BY LANDMARK MOMENTS IN MUSIC RECORDING AND A RICH HISTORY IN TECHNICAL INNOVATION, 1883 MAKE A RARE JOURNEY INTO THE WORLD FAMOUS STUDIO TWO TO CELEBRATE EIGHTY YEARS OF ABBEY ROAD.

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Studio Two is a musical Shangri-La. A coveted space in which so many sonic visions can, and have been realised, it’s a mecca of modern pop. Yes, the Beatles might have been looking for a revolution but Abbey Road had already found it – musically at least. Not only home to the world’s first ever stereo recording, but also the birthplace of 90 per cent of the fab four’s tracks, the notorious recording room has seen everyone from Ray Noble to Radiohead rattle its walls. Even for the non-music lover there’s something excruciatingly sentimental knowing you’ve footed the same floorboard as Ringo Starr or played – badly the same celesta keyboard as the late Syd Barrett. Opening its doors in 1931, with a symphonic rendition of Land of Hope and Glory, Abbey Road Studios became a landmark of the union between Columbia, Gramophone and HMV, forming the giant global music group, EMI. Deceivingly unassuming from the outside; a Georgian townhouse blending inconspicuously with a suburban London cityscape - aside from the scrawling symbols of Beatlemania graffitied on the outer wall - the former residency was extended to house three studios, each catering for a very different sonic aesthetic.


Pass through the guarded entrance and every hallway is a tribute to the artists who have feasted on the studios’ facilities. Classical composers sit next to candy-coated pop princesses, while a smattering of iconic faces decorate the period in between. But the second studio itself is strangely underwhelming. A tennis court sized hall, with white washed brick work and a herringbone floor that on first glance is very ordinary. In fact little has changed since The Shadows first found the metallic twangs of Apache. The legendary stairs to the control room still occupy the right hand corner and even the famous red chairs, championed for not squeaking, still line the space that has shaped so many seminal albums. And no artist came to know the studio quite like The Beatles. Here they would record late into the night, occasionally breaking into the canteen fridge after lockup to whiten their coffees. Moving from studio floor, to control room (Revolver), to the

tape machine space (Yer Blues) and even into the stairwell, the legendary foursome relished the exploration of sound and space, raiding the percussion cupboard under the stairs and pushing producer George Martin far beyond the hinterlands of his imagination. With over 20 years of research into EMI history Brian Kehew and Kevin Ryan have unearthed many of the studio’s secrets in their book Recording The Beatles. They explain: “The staff and the artists sponsored an environment of creativity. It’s a huge thing, to be seeking new sounds and changes, vs. just doing what other people have already been doing. Today it’s similar - most artists want to be and sound like other artists and it’s scary to say ‘we want to be unlike everyone else’, but the biggest groups at Abbey Road - and also the ones who sold the most - were the more creative ones!” Embodied by The Beatles but spanning the studios history from the world’s first foray into stereo in 1934 through to the psychedelic rock of Pink Floyd and beyond, it is this flare for progressive cultural creativity that has always been the lifeblood of Abbey Road recording. “Now it’s less driven by pop and rock, and fewer artists do full albums there. They come in for specialty things, to track a single song, or to add strings or the unique instruments they still have at the studio.” Brian adds. Film scoring, mixing and mastering are now at the forefront of the studios’ functionality. While the Live from Abbey Road series regularly descends upon Studio Two with a tremendous array of sonic textures, including the soaring tones of Lykke Li, the spliced sample beats of James Blake and legendary new wave band, Blondie. Words by Rowan Newman Photography by Luke Coiffait

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1883 magazine | music

A regular on this summer’s festival circuit, Spector are one soaring fivepiece about to hit the big time. with a blistering debut album dropping this august and a healthy bunch of sell-out dates to boot, here’s the Spector story so far…

The bespectacled face of Fred Macpherson is one that you’ve definitely seen before. In fact faced with nuclear war Fred would probably emerge unfazed, straightening his specs, dusting his lapel ready to strike another note, such is the gusto of the Spector frontman. With two faded indie bands already under his ‘girdle’ - Fred takes particular delight in jesting that he wears one of these on stage - as well as a brief stint presenting on MTV 2, the dogged former beau to Peaches Geldof is definitely not one for early retreat. Although if his new project is anything to go by this is a good thing, for in his latest venture the fresh and infectious lyricist might just have struck gold. With a name that summons one of music’s most iconic producers and a sound that champions all that we cherished from a myriad of noughties indie pop – we’re talking Strokelike vigour and hooks worthy of The Killers, Fred has finally fathered a winning formula in ascending indie five-piece, Spector. Quick to debunk any mystery surrounding their name, band guitarist Chris quips: “People always ask us if we’re named after Phil Spector but the truth is we’re named after Phil Mitchel.” While Fred explains his penchant for the James Bond villainy body, SPECTRE, a name that was unfortunately taken forcing the five-piece to indulge in some letter play. Entering our consciousness early last year, just twelve months have seen the quintet soar out from the depths of an East London basement to emblazon their name on almost every festival flier around, most recently extending their anthemic, scintillating melodies onto a crowd of 68,000 full looks Paul smith revellers at California’s gold-fest, Coachella.

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But what is it that gives Spector their incredible edge over the proggy goth rock of Ox.Eagle.Lion.Man and the Libertines like lustre of Les Incompétents, Fred’s previous incarnations who still sit rather stealthily in the depths of the YouTube search bar. “A record deal and the fact that we’re rich beyond our wildest dreams!” the lead vocalist proclaims as the rest of the band erupt with laughter. “No, there’s something effortless about Spector. Some of our best songs have taken just minutes to finish, it’s all about the moment of conception and not sitting down with a guitar and trying a million different things. I guess it’s a case of vomiting a song into existence, only to look back and think, ‘oh, so that’s what I had for lunch’.” Never Fade Away, released in April 2011, couldn’t be a more potent first offering from the resilient frontman and his well-crafted troupe. Born out of his bedroom the band’s debut track came as a blistering by-product of Fred’s experimentation with a USB deck and a handful of his flatmate’s Mum’s vinyls, which enlivened the songwriter to craft yet another band. Chris, Tom, Jed and Danny became the other four-fifths of Spector through friends of friends and Facebook, forming a fivesome who gel incredibly well, complete with racketeering humour and a rapid onslaught of deadpan that today came packaged in discussions about the acceptable levels of ‘horseplay’ on tour, and stories of near band breakups following the concealment of instant coffee in one member’s shoes. “I was actually annoyed because I wanted the horseplay to be heavier, I was willing to go harder, they could have used ground coffee at least!” Chris clarifies. With such a great relationship a year in, the quintet already boast a multitude of memorable moments. “There’s been some amazing times, we probably can’t remember the best ones. Playing Jools Holland really defined us, when you look around and think where the fuck am I? Who have I slept with to get here? What’s that weird rash on the inside of my thighs?” Fred jokes. “Yeh, it was like Bjork to the left of me, Chilis to my right here I am stuck in the middle with Jools,” adds Jed to more appreciative laughter and enthused hand clapping.

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Capturing this playfulness in their highly anticipated debut album dropping this August via esteemed Universal spinoff Fiction; Spector have worked with a menagerie of six producers, including the likes of Tom Vek and Trevor Horn, to keep their first long play as unique and engaging as they are as a group. “We didn’t want to make a conventional record with one sound and colour,” Fred explains. “On Rihanna’s album you see so many different styles and that’s what makes it a good listen. Each song feels like it has a place on there, we wanted to try and represent everything we do, but still allow people to understand the spine of our music, without having to slip a disk.” Drenched in sincere and romantic nostalgia, grand themes of love and heartbreak have become key players on the Spector sonisphere. “Although it does seem a bit of a cliché, heartbreak’s the gift that keeps on giving when it comes to song writing,” Fred explains. It is this rich and velvety flavour to their sound that propels them ever closer to the indie power-pop bracket currently inhabited by some of their own pinups such as The Strokes, The White Stripes and Yeah Yeah Yeahs. With two ‘Spectours’ already under their belt and summer appearances scheduled for Bestival, Leeds and Benicassim, this is one band going for the big time. Although they remain keen to avoid any typical genre stamping: “We try to do what’s right by the song and not worship at the altar of any particular style, I think that can hold music back. Like religion divides people, genre divides music in a way that shouldn’t happen,” Chris explains. “I guess we’re the scientologists of music…” Words by Rowan Newman

full looks DOLCE & GABBANA sunglasses RAY-BAN, CUTLER & GROSS photography ALEXANDER JORDAN fashion FILIPPO GIULIANI hair MEGGIE COUSLAND make up HOLLEIGH GALLON fashion assistant CHAD BURTON shot @ ACE CAFE


1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

WITH HIS SLICK SOUNDS AND FANCY FOOTWORK, WILLY MOON IS THE NEW AGE 50’S CROONER WHO’S LIKE NOTHING YOU’VE EVER SEEN BEFORE.

Willy Moon is on a mission. Unlit cigarette poised and ready in one hand, he weaves briskly through the graffiti splattered side streets of East London’s ghetto-fabulous Brick Lane in search of a suitable outdoor interview spot. Opting for bench outside a bustling café, he grabs a coffee before perching on the seat drenched in the afternoon sun and promptly bums a light off a random passerby. Brick Lane holds a lot of memories for Willy. He spent three years of his life there where he lived in a tiny apartment with his long-term girlfriend and creative accomplice, Sasha Rainbow. However, at the time of interview, they were just two days shy of moving into their brand new abode in Angel, North London. “I feel like now is the time to move on. Like that chapter of my life is over and now it’s time to move onto bigger and better things,” he says solemnly. In person, Willy is every inch the persona that he projects in his series of striking music videos that he devises along with Sasha, the one videographer he completely trusts with the job. Tall and slender, with parted, slicked back hair and an impeccable dress sense; Willy looks like he’s just whizzed right out of a framed black and white photo hanging on the wall of a 1950’s inspired street diner. He’s got a dry wit that can make a whole room crack up with laughter; yet at the same time, in deeper conversation, he choses his words carefully and exudes an air of someone well beyond his 22 years.

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jacket VERSACE shirt Z ZEGNA scarf ALEXANDER MCQUEEN


Willy was born in New Zealand, though as his parents were both teachers with a lust for travel, he spent a lot of his childhood along with them and his older sister in various different cities around the world, including spells in London when he was 9 and again aged 12. After feeling quite disillusioned by life in his homeland during his teenage years, at 17 he bought a one-way ticket back to the UK capital and has not looked back since. However, things weren’t as they were in a city he once adventured in as a child where he would hang out for hours in the Natural History Museum or escape to the South Bank to watch jazz. “It was a disaster. I lived in various places, couldn’t hold down a job. I spent a lot of time indulging in excessive behavior…” Willy’s voice trails off. This tumultuous time came to a head when Sasha and he wound up in Morocco flat broke. “I remember thinking at that point, what the fuck am I going to do now?” His savior came in moving to Berlin where he stayed with friends and sorted his life out, returning to London only once his German visa ran out. “I felt re-energized coming back as I was a completely different person in my head. It was like I was coming home.” With a new lease of life, he poured his all energy into music, something he’d a distinct affinity with ever since he was a child and first saw his dad strumming away on a guitar and then demanded he too learn the instrument. With his main tool now being his laptop computer however, it was through this aide that his concoction of powerful vocals, catchy lyrics and up-tempo beats soon led him to meet his manager before being snapped up by the legendary Island Records. He has since released a selection of toetapping tracks which truly embody his old-school style fused with a refreshing new twist, leading him to garner somewhat of a cult following. When praised for a packed performance at the famed West London venue, The Notting Hill Arts Club, his face lights up. “Thanks so much. That’s always so nice to hear,” he smiles graciously. The show, which had the crowd’s jaws hanging in awe at his impressive dance skills, does beg the question- where did he learn to move like that? “It’s just how I dance naturally,” he shrugs. “I’m just attempting to dance like a normal person and failing miserably. But hey, if people respond to it and like it, that’s just great.” On the subject of shows, Willy does express a certain delight when it comes to performing. “There’s no greater feeling than being on stage,” he beams. “It’s just so fucking fun.” Naturally, Willy expresses an eagerness to return to the stage and has numerous European tour dates in the works for the summertime. In the meantime, Willy is busy beavering away creating new material. Sure he hopes to release an album of some form later this year, but rather it happens organically and comes together when it’s ready. “I feel like I’m one tidal wave of creativity away from putting out a record. But I’d rather put out more singles and low-key material for now rather than appearing TA-DA! out of a box before no one really knows who I am. I would like to build up a bigger fan-base, more of a community, then release a proper album,” he explains. Tossing his abandoned cigarette butt aside, Willy says his goodbyes on that note. As he saunters confidently off into the sun, one thing is definitely for sure: Here’s one young singer who’s right on the brink of a brand new chapter in his life. And it’s about to get a whole lot more exciting than it ever was before.

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Words by Aideen Shannon

photography MARK CANT fashion CHAD BURTON hair MARY ROBERTSON make up ROSE ANGUS fashion assistant RICCARDO CHIUDIONI photography assistant SARAH ENGLAND

full look 0ZWALD BOATENG


1883 magazine | music

Over the last year Cascine has been generating an increasing amount of adoration and respect and is quickly cementing itself as one of the most exciting independent record labels around.

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I first discovered Cascine a year ago when I stumbled across a track called So Free by Finnish house duo Shine 2009. The bright pianos stabs, horns and early house beats had me instantly hooked, it was like stepping back in time. In fact when I saw that Paula Abdul had lent her vocals to the track I thought it might even be a re-release. Of course that wasn’t the case, it just so happened that the 80’s pop songstress had been dating Cascine boss Jeff Bratton at the time. The track has had a lasting affect on me and I’ve been having a love affair with Cascine ever since. The calibre of releases from this experimental pop label have been inspiring, with stand out albums from Chad Valley, Shine 2009 and Selebrities as well as a series of EPs from Jensen Sportag, Southern Shores, RxGibbs, Evan Voytas and World Tour. This isn’t throwaway pop music it stays with you and it’s reminded me just how good pop music can actually be. The label began just over a year ago as an offshoot from Swedish alt-pop label Service. Music publicist

Sandra Croft had approached the label, while Jeff Bratton was working there, with Shine 2009 hoping they would sign the duo. “They had this amazing sound that reminded me so much of Service’s pop aesthetic,” Sandra says, “it didn’t quite work out, but Jeff and I were both already in love with their music at that point.” The pair just couldn’t let it go and in the summer of 2010 they started Cascine with Shine 2009 as their first signing. Being linked to such an established record label, I did wonder what affect that had on Cascine early on. “There was pressure to maintain the integrity of the overall family,” Jeff explains. “But it always comes down to trusting our ears and intuition.” This is a sentiment that has formed the basis of many of Cascine’s decisions, including the artists they sign. “Unless it stirs us as people, we won’t put our name on it,” Jeff confesses. “I tell people, Cascine is like spreading my blood across the table. It’s such a personal thing.” With each release, the label is continuing to forge its own distinctive sound. This is experimental pop that reinvigorates past genres to make for an altogether nostalgic but refreshing experience. Take Selebrities for example. The three New Yorkers pull influences from late 70’s post punk, 80’s synth pop, Italo Disco and all the elements that made New Wave what it was in the 80’s. And they then breathe new life into it by adding their own contemporary edge.

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Vocalist Maria Usbeck admits “the new and the old combine to create a style that we like to think is timeless and all our own.” Jensen Sportag take the same approach but for a completely different sound. The Nashville duo create smooth R&B with euphoric breaks and a glossy electro pop finish. And harking back to the likes of Hall and Oates, the pair flirts unashamedly with seductive retro grooves and cheesy soulful vocals, pulling them off with such slick precision that they can get away with it. For me, it’s this sense of nostalgia and revival that draws me to Cascine’s releases, but Jeff admits that this sound was never intentional. “It’s always a matter of following what feels right,” says Jeff. “Which typically leads us back to our own musical reference points.” The sound of Cascine is essentially just a reflection of Jeff and Sandra’s musical tastes and the type of music that they feel a connection to.

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The emotive response that Jeff needs in order to sign artists is the same response that Cascine’s art director, Jason Romanelli, looks for when designing the artwork. “I try to find an image that represents a feeling I get from the music in some way. I tend to respond to abstract images or compositions taken out of context that convey this to me rather than a concrete idea.” Jason is responsible for most of the artwork as well as the label’s overall aesthetic, which has become just as recognisable as its sound. “It’s been an integral part of the conversation since the very beginning,” he explains, which is part of the reason why a lot of Cascine’s releases are available on vinyl as well as on digital download. They believe musical consumption should be about so much more than simply listening. “Vinyl allows us the creative freedom to bring something tactile to life,” says Jeff, with Jason elaborating, “I feel it has more of an impact on a person to experience the product in that way. Not only by virtue of it looking and sounding better but also in the act of holding the record in your hand, opening it, placing it on the turntable... It’s a real moment that involves almost all of your senses.” Cascine try to create a valued and memorable experience for their fans, experiences that are increasingly hard to come by with the advent of digital downloads in the last decade. Getting hold of music has become so easy. And you’re not actually holding anything, there is no physical product to touch and cherish, it’s just code. Jeff confesses that even he is part of this growing problem. “Myself included, I think that we consume media in an alarmingly fast rate these days. I don’t see a solution aside from us making personal decisions to slow down and spend more time with each release.” Of course, Cascine is a business and one that must adhere to modern day musical consumption and industry movements if it wants to be successful and make money. “I think the biggest challenge is withstanding the disposable and transient elements in the culture of music,” Sandra admits. “Trying to stay upright and stick to your beliefs when everythings swirling around you might not be in line with those beliefs.” So far sticking to their guns and what they know has served Cascine well and hopefully it will continue to do so. The label’s success has been testament to how much love and hard work has gone into it, not just from Jeff, Sandra, Jason and the rest of Cascine, but by all of the artists they’ve signed. “There’s not one release in the catalogue that we don’t feel deeply connected to,” Jeff says, with Sandra summing up “I’m really proud that we’ve managed to cultivate something true that resonates with people, a catalogue of unique and pure pop music.” Words by Paul Joseph The exclusive 1883//Cascine mixtape is available to download online at www.1883magaizne.com

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“Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, India Arie, Laura Marling and Little Dragon” are the names Lianne lists when asked who her influences are. They’re also a pretty good summary of what the South Londoner’s music sounds like. With stripped back instrumentals and powerful vocals Lianne’s sound is a fusion of soul, jazz and folk that’s complimented by an endearingly honest lyrical ability. “I feel like it represents the stuff I like musically, who I am now and what I’ve been through.” Lianne had a very musical upbringing. Her Jamaican mother introduced her to reggae, R&B, jazz and soul, while her Greek father was a multi-instrumentalist who taught her how to play the piano. A love of poetry and English soon had Lianne penning her own songs, “as I got into my teens I realised I was writing more about things that had actually happened in my life,” she explains. “Then I started playing guitar about 4 years ago and that changed the way I wrote songs. I became much more serious about it. I began sharing them with friends and doing open mic nights. Suddenly I felt like maybe I could to do this for the rest of my life.” It’s fair to say that if she carries on with her current momentum Lianne may just be able to achieve that.

Her Jools Holland performance last October was the moment things really got moving. The lineup for the show featured the likes of Feist and Bon Iver and it would have been so easy to be lost amongst these musical heavyweights. “It was very scary in there,” the singer admits. But she didn’t let the nerves faze her. In a simple arrangement of vocals and guitar she pulled off a heartwarming performance of Age that stole the show and lead to her being invited to support Bon Iver on tour. “Jools was probably the biggest thing that I’d dreamt of doing, but then we met on that show and they invited me to come on tour with them!” Lianne had certainly never dreamed of was having a global superstar like Prince as a fan. “He heard my music somehow through a friend of his and he got in touch and called me. He said he was a big fan and we just chatted about music. Then he said he’d like to maybe meet up and talk in person!” So what was he like? “Surreal, but you do realise that he’s a person too so I felt very comfortable around him,” she says, “he was very welcoming, kind, funny and cool… A real artist.” As far as future collaborations are concerned Lianne wasn’t giving anything away “maybe. We’re going to keep in touch…” There is one collaboration that will be making an appearance on her debut though and that’s her recent single No Room For Doubt with Willy Mason. Willy and Lianne shared a mutual friend in producer Dan Carey, and met almost by accident when they bumped into each other on the tube. “They were just on their way to a show! I went along with them, Willy and I got chatting and we just stayed in touch,” she explains, which led to the pair writing No Room No Doubt.”

BEFORE A GAME CHANGING PERFORMANCE ON JOOLS HOLLAND, LIANNE LA HAVAS WAS RELATIVELY UNKNOWN. BUT SINCE THEN SHE’S TOURED WITH BON IVER AND BOMBAY BICYCLE CLUB, WRITTEN SONGS WITH WILLY MASON AND HUNG OUT WITH PRINCE. ALL THAT BEFORE THIS RISING SOUL SENSATION HAD EVEN RELEASED HER DEBUT ALBUM. Something

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

Like Age the song is about Lianne’s relationship with her current boyfriend. For the debut album, aptly titled Is Your Love Big Enough, Lianne admits that she’s based much of her song writing on personal experiences. “I see it as being a journal of my thoughts and feelings in my head and heart from the last few years.” With all that’s happened to her over the past few months it seems that Lianne is just taking things in her stride. Let’s just hope she can keep it up because things are about to get a whole lot bigger. Words by Paul Joseph

photography SATY + PRATHA

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

SWEDISH SYNTH-POP DUO MALIN AND GUSTAF OF NIKI & THE DOVE UNCOVER THE MUSICAL ALLURE OF PROKOFIEV’S BLISSFUL MELODIES, AN IMPROMPTU ONSTAGE BRUSH-OFF AND THEIR INTRO TO ELECTRO VIA THE BIZARRE SOUNDSCAPE OF ELECTRICBOOGALOO. Favourite lyrics you ever wrote and what they mean to you? Malin: I’m fond of many different

lyrics that I have written. If I have an idea, I love to experiment. For example, at the time I wrote The Fox and Mother Protect, I was very into how you could use animals as symbols for human feelings and actions. So that was something I very consciously wanted to explore: How you would write something and what that would do to you when you wrote those lyrics. First record you ever bought? Malin: I can’t remember mine… Gustaf: I bought an electronic album when I was like 8 that nobody knows about. I think it was called Electricboogaloo. Really strange. And not that good actually.

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Any current style icons? Gustaf: It’s not like I see

someone and think, ‘Oh what a nice haircut’ or stuff like that. You can be affected by a person’s i.d or expression however. Like David Lynch for example. I saw a picture of him recently and I was just so inspired as he had so much expression you know? Malin: You can find inspiration from different things, but it’s more abstract than the obvious. Diana Ross would be for me. Her whole look, her voice…. She just shows up and her whole being is inspiring. Greatest musical discovery? Gustaf: It may seem a little pretentious, but the Russian composer Prokofiev as he opened up totally new doors for me. I am just so affected by his music. It is amazing. There’s something so joyous and rich in curiosity about it. When I see his music, it is almost as though I am seeing him right in front of me, like a child with so much music inside of him that it wants to get out.

An unforgettable memory from the road on one of your recent tours? Gustaf:

Once, when we played in Bristol, they were really picky about the time. I think we were like 30 seconds over our slot of 30 minutes when suddenly we heard a voice in our own speakers saying ‘Sorry guys….’ and they just cut us off! The whole audience was like ‘awwwwwwwwwww!’ But we weren’t allowed to play anymore, so we had to leave. They literally pulled the plug on us right in the middle of a song.

Best remix of one of one of your songs? Gustaf: I really like Fake

Blood’s remix of The Drummer. Malin: For me, I love Mylo’s remix of Gentle Roar. Most treasured possession? Gustaf: I’d have to say my computer. I’ve so much work in there! To be honest, it is the perfect tool for getting down ideas and remembering stuff. I can’t be more romantic than that. Malin: Headphones are also something that would be hard to live without. I’ll say that to match each other. They are an incredible invention as you get to be totally inside of something, where it’s so close to your ears and it is really intense.

What has been the most standout performance of yours to date? Malin: I remember when we did a gig at SXSW this year we used inear systems when we were performing. The show sounded so good in my ears and I had so much feeling! Then for some reason, I don’t know why, but I turned it down. When I heard the actual out-sound, that was not so good! Such a good concert in my ears though…. Another really great show was one we had in Stockholm some time back. I think we had about nine of us on stage: our friends, drummers, background vocals and dancers. It was just so good.

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Words by Aideen Shannon and Yasmin Bawa Photography by Anders Lindén


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1883 magazine | music

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1883 MAGAZINE| MUSIC

Day one at Coachella and it was well... it was April 20th, which is international pot smoking day so... we celebrated by the pool all day long and made our way to the festival later that night. Aaah, Spliff day by the pool.

Dragonette on stage, Martina is just so mesmorizing to watch performing.

Fans at Dragonette.

Totes Amaze.

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So I flew from London to LA to go to Coachella‘s second weekend.

I came a week early to hang out We went for a drive in the desert to and shoot with Dragonette who were take pictures of the band it was an playing at the festival. They‘re amazing sunset night. well fun. We were staying at a classic Palm Springs low-level desert house with an incredible swimming pool and a HUGE bbq pit that we cooked so much good food on!

There are a lot of strange cars that are decorated to go to Coachella.

When we got there we saw some great music like The Rapture and M83 were AMAZING! M83 are INCREDIBLE Live!!

Dragonette played on Saturday, so Festival grounds, scorching in the we went for the whole day. It was so desert heat. HOT! It ended up being 110 degrees F and there‘s not really much shade. But there was a great rose garden you could lounge in when all got too much. There were also some good fans for cooling off....

Azealia banks was SO FUCKING GOOD!

Love at Coachella.

Feist is so beautiful.

After the 13-hour day on Saturday, we decided to take it easy on Sunday and have one more fun-filled pool party.

We finally left hanging by the pool to catch the end of Coachella.

Florence was such an unforgettable ending to the weekend.

Coachella is in the most bizarre desert town where during the rest of the year it‘s quiet and full of retired citizens.

It also has some incredible architecture and landscapes. www.coachella.com

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

YOU KNOW FLORENCE. NOW MEET THE MACHINE.

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To say that Florence + The Machine are one of the most successful music acts to come out of the UK in recent years is to pretty much smack truth square between the eyes. Since Florence Welch and her band of merry music makers first burst onto the scene back in 2007, they have reached dizzying new heights with two critically acclaimed albums Lungs and Ceremonials sliding comfortably into the international topspots, not to mention having dozens of award nods and a flurry of sold-out tours world-over all under their belts. While flame haired, vintage-clad Florence is very much the poster child for the group; she owes a lot to her right hand woman, Isabella Summers. The co-creator of many of the collective’s iconic tracks as Dog Days and No Light, No Light; Isabella is not only a driving force behind Florence + The Machine, but a core member of the live band. She is hardly a shrinking violet however, shying away behind a keyboard and a name check on numerous record sleeves. Far from it, in fact. It’s a rain splattered Wednesday when the vivacious Isabella bursts through the doors of a Soho eatery, donning what can only be described as pajamas matched with hot pink stilettos. On each hand she wears a smattering of assorted rings and slung around her neck is a self-made trinket necklace. The charms, which consist of a miniature skull dubbed “Oliver” that she found in LA, a single “gothic” cross and a locket containing the cut out faces of Kurt Cobain and Dave Grohl; also include a lone gold letter “F”- for Florence. Since the duo first hooked up and concocted their first song together, they have become somewhat of creative soul mates. Though originally, they didn’t see eye to eye. “We used to have parties at my studios and I knew her boyfriend, so she was always knocking about wearing crazy ball gowns or looking like Pippi Longstocking in these grunge dresses with big long socks on,” remembers Isabella. “She sang ALL the time. I thought she was a complete weirdo. I think she must of thought I was weirdo too.”


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Back in those days, Isabella was only intent on becoming a hip-hop producer. Though she spent the first decade of her life in London, at 10 her family relocated to the countryside of Suffolk where as a bored teenager she would spend her evenings hanging out with the fishermen’s sons who “would smoke a ton of weed and listen to hiphop.” It was then her interest in making music began and by the time she returned to London to attend Arts School, she’d acquired a jumble of sixty quid’s worth of DJ decks and soon taught herself how to mix. A stint working alongside XFM’s Dan Greenpeace saw her mingling with the likes of The Game and Example, who were charmed by this “little turntablist girl” with dreams to make it big in their world. Sure enough, Isabella was more than determined to succeed and once she outgrew her original makeshift studio (that was in the cupboard of her shared flat no less), she set up base in a studio space in an ex-plastics factory in Crystal Palace. “I was a student and it was way out of my budget. So I decided to share it with my friend Gabriel. He used to really piss me off because he knew what he was doing, whereas I was still learning. I’d come to the studio and he’d already be there with all his friends making rap music. So I kicked him out. I drove all his equipment over to his house and told the landlord he hadn’t paid his rent. After that, I just locked myself away in the studio, learning how to make beats.” The ex-plastics factory soon became a thriving hotspot for local musicians who would mingle around the building, using it as a rehearsal space and a hangout. With such a mix of instrumentalists at her disposal, Isabella would constantly record samples of their music, fusing them with mixes she’d created from old vinyls. Then she reached a creative rut. “I finally got bored of hip-hop,” she says. “I thought, ‘really? Is this ever going to take me anywhere?’” Luckily for her, Florence showed up, appearing at the studios one bright summer’s day as her boyfriend was getting his guitar fixed. “I saw her and was like ‘whoa, you can sing! Wanna come make a song with me?’” Together the pair matched Isabella’s beats with Florence’s lyrics, adding backing vocals and then splicing it altogether. “She’d never done it before and I’d never done it before. But when we listened back to the track, we thought- “wow, this is amazing!’” Since then, their spontaneous dual creativity has prevailed in even the most random of situations. “No Light, No Light came together on a tour bus in between Amsterdam and Belgium, with my laptop on a seat, Flo singing into it and one single bass noise. She literally rambled on and I then chopped it up, put it all in time, added music behind it and gave it structure. Later I was like ‘hey Flo, check out what we made drunk at 4am!’” Though continuously writing tracks together, Isabella has also been performing with the band more or less from the beginning. Starting out, Florence had first only a guitarist, then a drummer. But after Isabella went to watch her support MGMT at the Astoria, she soon came on board as the group’s keyboardist. “She’d just worked out how to do Dog Days with that show. It was so much fun. Then afterwards she was like, ‘we wrote this song together- I want you to be in the band!’” Though hesitant at first, Isabella soon agreed, playing her first show to a soldout venue. The next stop was Glastonbury and from that point onwards, everything was to change. Now a seven strong band and touring the globe with two crew buses in tow, at the time of interview, Isabella was just in the beginnings of their latest international arena tour. Describing the feeling of being on stage and hearing the crowd of a giant sold-out venue singing back your songs as “absolutely amazing”, Isabella seemed pretty excited to hit the road again for the summer. In between touring however, she has been dipping her fingers in plenty of other pies. That week, she’d just purchased the domain mydadsmixedtapes.com and was set to launch her own personal project. Before she was even born, her father would make mixtapes. On family holidays, the tapes would be the sound-track to their journey, with his eclectic mish-mash of music pumping out of the radio. From snippets of rare Bob Dylan bootlegs to weird opera and beatnik poetry; her father built up an impressive archive of 150 tapes. Now, using the wonder of modern technology, he has transferred the tapes onto CDs and passed them onto Isabella who intends to stream them all on the website. What’s more, Isabella has been lending her beats further afield. A recent stint in the studio saw her teaming up with actress-come-musician, Juliette Lewis. “She. Is. Nuts,” Isabella booms. “Us in the studio together, is like two planets colliding. For a second there, I was likehow the fuck am I going to save this situation? But we battled through and made a great song. Now she wants me to do her a whole album.” 54


Having also recently given Beyoncé a load of beats, she hopes to be hitting the studio with the iconic singer later in the summer. In the meantime however, she and Florence have been branching out into Hollywood, with the duo together penning a melody for summer blockbuster Snow White and The Huntsman. With 2012 already shaping up to be a pretty successful year for Florence + The Machine, how does Isabella feel given the common misconception that Florence is flying completely solo? After all, you only have to look at the string of “Best Female Solo Artist” awards that Florence recently scooped. Isabella gives a nonchalant shrug. “It’s quite funny because we all know really that there’s so many more people involved. I don’t mind. She’s the face. I write the songs… she was the one who got signed in the first place, so a lot does rest on her shoulders. She does always speak about me in interviews though,” she says on the subject of deserved recognition. “Just one thing- I would like more perks please- more Alexander McQueen dresses!” Laughing, Isabella turns a little more serious. “Nah, they do look after us, everyone in the band. It is a bit of a funny situation to be in. But it does take the pressure off me and I do make the point of working with other people. Florence does her thing and I do mine. To be honest, we never thought all this would happen…I mean we knew we wanted it, but we’d no idea really how big this all was going to be.” With the next months devoted to epic live performances, Isabella admits they do strive to continue impromptu recording sessions on the road and is looking forward to working on the next record with Florence. Though these days, they have to keep things closer to the book. Well, not if they can get away with it. “We started this out of love and out of fun, before there was anyone telling us what to do. It’s funny how this industry tries to get in the middle of that. But somethings never change,” admits Isabella. “We’ll keep making songs wherever. That’s our relationship. I remember when she first went and started the band I thought, ‘oh no, where does that leave me?’ But I know deep down, we’ll always stick together. I said, ‘whatever happens in life, always come back and make songs with me. If you end up in studio with Justin Timberlake, call me.’” Words by Aideen Shannon Photography by Luc Coiffait

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jumpsuit INBAR SPECTOR ring CHOPARD shoes CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA @ NET-A-PORTER


1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

When the hologram of Tupac manifested on stage alongside his hip-hop comrades Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre at this year’s Coachella, the eye-popping performance that had the crowd’s jaws grazing desert floor in awe, was an unexpected addition that only a rare few were privy to prior to the so-called “resurrection”. Santigoldaka Santi White- was one of them. “Yeah I knew it was going to happen,” she says, her lips curling into a mysterious smile. “But I’m not going to say who told me!” Laughing, she settles into her seat in the suite of an East London hotel, artfully spearing her portion of sushi as the rain persistently cascades outsides. “Can you believe this?!” she exclaims. “Last weekend I played Coachella and it was like 110 Degrees outside. We literally had to mop ourselves down with wet wipes when we got off stage and then I fly straight to London and it just hasn’t stopped raining here since!” Coachella was a big show for Santi. Performing at the double weekend wonder to an audience of thousands was her last show before her sophomore album release, Master of My Make-Believe, dropped in the UK the following Monday. Sitting in the hotel room, now in the thick of her album promo, the petite star appears calm and collected yet readily admits to an eagerness in getting the record fully out there and experiencing the overall response to her work.

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It’s been four years since her inaugural outing Santogold (a nod to her previous moniker before legal reasons saw her switch to her current alias), a record that boasted such blistering tracks as Creator and L.E.S Artistes that in turn soared the charts and placed her firmly in the consciousness of worldwide musical acclaim. Numerous tours in the bag where she shared the stage with M.I.A, The Red Hot Chili Peppers and Rihanna amongst others saw her bolster her profile even further. Of course, never one to shy away from broadening her horizon, she has thrown a multiple off-stage collaborations into the mix. She joined forces with Mark Ronson on his acclaimed collection of covers Version, where she gave her own take of The Jam’s Pretty Green, lent a sample of her track Shove It to Kanye West for his submission Brooklyn Go Hard to soundtrack of The Notorious B.I.G. biopic Notorious and also donned a pair of Converse alongside N.E.R.D’s Pharrell Williams and The Strokes’ Julian Casablancas for their rendition of My Drive Thru. However, the list of her additional project partnerships is seemingly endless. With a reputation for concocting a kickass collection of genre bending music mash-ups, her eclectically produced repertoire certainly has packed a multitude of punches. Combined with an unforgettable on-stage persona, Santi has truly risen up the ranks, placing her within a refreshing generation of bold, bright and highly-influential female solo artists. While other musicians would perhaps hasten to release a follow up to their successful debut striking when the metaphorical iron was pretty much scalding; Santi however, opted for a different route. After the guts of two years solidifying her fan base by touring the globe to promote Santogold, she then dedicated the next one and half years to meticulously compile its sequel. “When I first went in there to start work on the new record, I ended up disappointed,” she admits solemnly. “I thought I’d pick up exactly where I left off. But that was completely wrong. It was my bad for having those expectations. Every project has to have its own new process. Luckily I learned that quickly, otherwise it wouldn’t have happened had we not opened up to that. Not to say it wasn’t productive-I got a lot of lyrics written during that timebut I soon learned fast that I needed to work with new people.” Initially feeling wholly disheartened, it was only when she began writing with Nick Zinner- the first of her new collaborators- did a fresh new outlook place her at ease and in turn, re-energized Santi, leaving her with a surge of new confidence both in herself and her work. From then on, she poured herself into working with a whole host of collaborators to produce this truly “communal” new affair. Still, while she felt recording with a variety of new people was essential in creating the record she hoped for, it was a trying process in that, for the most part, was tainted by loneliness. When she conceived Santogold, both her and John Hill (of Santi’s first band, Philadelphia-based punk rock collective Stiffed) were consistently together at the helm of the entire process. For round two, Santi was the only constant throughout. “The producer I worked the most with was for only about a month. For the entire time I spent working on this record, I spent most of it by myself piecing everything together. It was a challenge as I really had to learn to trust myself and my own vision and confidence in myself as a producer,” she affirms, noting the ultimate result of her new found creative process.

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jacket JC DE CASTELBAJAC headpiece RIITTA HAKKARAINEN FOR DANS LA VIE earrings DELFINA DELETTREZZ

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Words by Aideen Shannon

top PROENZA SCHOULER @ HARVEY NICHOLS metal vest ERICKSON BEAMON

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In recording Masters of My Make-Believe, Santi dipped in and out of studios in both New York and Los Angeles as well as Jamaica; the latter proving to be the scene of one of the most memorable experiences of the album journey. When she was invited to the Caribbean island by longtime friends and collaborators Diplo and Switch to record, they ended up renting a house in a supposedly “nice neighbourhood” after leaving the studio in Kingston. Despite this, Santi was dubious at first, not only by the disconcerting nature of plastic coated furniture but a lasting impression from Diplo’s previous choice of accommodation. Still, she rolled with it until night fell and they’d an unexpected disturbance. “Suddenly we heard POW! POW! POW!” she cries, hopping up in her seat in the recreation. “So I come downstairs and I see Diplo and the groundskeeper looking through the gates of the doors. I’m like, ‘Everything cool?’ and Diplo is like, ‘Yeah… probably just some firecrackers outside or something.’ I wasn’t so sure, so I grabbed a knife from the kitchen. Diplo was like ‘I’m going to get one too’ and I remember thinking that was a little strange he did that and not just laugh at me… I slept that night with a knife sticking out of my mattress.” The next day, they departed for Port Antonio for two days to check out a studio G Jam, which Santi had heard nothing but good things about. She fell in love with the place and it was to become the setting for recording numerous tracks on the album in the future. As for the rented house they were due to return to? They never went back. It was only back in New York three weeks later that Santi discovered what really happened that night. “Turns out two people were actually shot right outside the house!” she yelps. “They were drug dealers from Haiti. They washed up on shore the next day. They all knew and didn’t tell me!” Despite the shocking revelation, Santi was left unfazed and continued to return to the island along with Diplo, Switch and John to record, pretty much rounding up the album in July of last year. At that point, she was at record label limbo between Atlantic Records subsidiary Downtown and Atlantic proper. Leaving the politics to settle, she departing on tour, selecting obscure countries where she’d less of a profile to tout her new material and hone an entirely new act. Come November 2011, she’d officially signed to the legendary

Atlantic Records, a date was set for the new record release and all of a sudden, it was “go time.” “We straightaway started shooting the album artwork, the Big Mouth video and everything,” she explains. “Then I’d a vacation booked back to Jamaica so we shot the video for Disparate Youth out there, which I co-produced and codirected.” Though thoroughly involved in every creative aspect of her career, the video was her first dalliance into producing and directing and though admits was “a lot of extra work,” are inputs she hopes to continue with in the future.

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While the likes of new album exports Disparate Youth and Big Mouth relish in the quintessential up-tempo smorgasbord of sound Santi is known for; the record also makes a tentative foray into a ballad of sorts with the captivating beat and soft vocals of the sublime The Riot’s Gone. “That’s a special song for me. It’s a track unlike anything I’ve ever done before. I actually wrote it sitting at a piano, something that I rarely do.” The image of Santi poised over a piano initially seems a far cry from the expected visual of her usual approach to penning a melody right at the helm of a mixing desk, cooped up in a studio. But as she paints an idyllic picture of her current home life, Santi tinkling the ivories in her Brooklyn homestead suddenly does become all the more fitting. Citing her neighborhood as maintaining the close community aspect of her native Philadelphia that she loves, yet exuding the exact amount of creativity she desires; Santi thoroughly revels in her home-life when returning from life on the road. “It’s so nice go home there and just take time out and bring my Great Dane for a walk. My brother and sister live close by and I’ve just about convinced my mom to move to Brooklyn from Philadelphia too.” Born and raised in Philly, Santi loved growing up in the Pennsylvanian city. But she soon outgrew it and departed for New York in 1996. However, back in 2001 she returned to Philadelphia for a fouryear stint when she initially started out in music. There, she cultivated ideas as she ultimately masterminded the route of her intended career. Though once it was actually time to bring it to the next level, she had no choice but to leave. “There’s just no industry there and the people are conservative. Very conservative,” she adds. “I remember once I was walking down the street in these yellow pants with these black and white sneakers and my hair was kind of blonde in some parts… anyway this guy walks past and goes ‘BUMBLE BEE ASS LOOKING MOTHER F*CKER!’ I started laughing and was just like, ‘huh?’”

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top PANKAJ & NIDHI skirt CUSHNIE ET OCHS @ HARVEY NICHOLS earrings DELFINA DELETTREZ rings KYLE HOPKINS necklace MARIA PIANA shoes MANOLO BLAHNIK

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Now a million miles away from narrowminded ideals, Santi is very much on course to worldwide approval with her new collection of tracks. Already having notched up numerous sold-out shows both here in the UK and beyond, looks like she has busy time ahead. “Sure I enjoy it, but it does get tiring,” she puts. “Last summer, when I went back to performing after spending so much time in the studio, I absolutely loved it. That’s the thing; the grass is always greener on the other side! At first it’s great, then I can’t wait to get out of there and vice versa. I feel it’s always good to keeping switching it up. But then again, that’s just my personality.” Master of My Make-Believe is out now via Atlantic Records dress Lanvin @ Harvey Nichols shoes Manolo Blahnik neckpiece Erickson Beamon

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hair Tim Pateman @ Phamous Artists makeup Julie Jacobs @ One Make-up fashion assistants Chad Burton, Lindsay Robertson, Holly Ounstead, Ellie McWhan photography assistants Ben Peter Catchpole, Joe Jackson, Laly Ullaure retouchers SHADOWPLAY & eilish mccormick shot @ Aloft London Excel


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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

July 18th What a date for music. Electro-goddess Annie Mac said hello to the world, Houston got hitched and Pink Floyd played Hyde Park‌ absolutely free. Killers backman, Ronnie Vannucci took a stab at solo, iTunes hit 500 million sales and Disneyland CA opened its gates - can anyone really deny those offkilter afrobeats of Hakuna Matata?

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photography Aideen Shannon

Yes, whathappenedonthisdate.com explodes with episodes that decorate July 18th, but we’re not entirely satisfied. In fact we want to create history of our own. Yes, July 18th 1883 brings you our first ever, super-exclusive and of course highly unmissable live music bonanza. Prepare to have your ears fondled and your limbs tickled as a smouldering selection of our favourite breakthrough acts warm your joints, ready for a five-star chart topper who will shake you into the early hours. Partnering with Sony ATV to bring you a selection of the most blistering bands around, join readers, industry professionals and VIP Celebrity guests under the rafters of one of Camden’s most acclaimed venues. And if that doesn’t make you want to claim a piece of history, £1 of every ticket sale will be donated to mental health charity Up, devoted to combating the difficulties of depression in young adults. We can’t think of any better way to soothe those midweek sorrows than at the summer’s best party. For all line-up announcements and ticket sales, keep an eye on www.1883magazine.com.

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

SINCE MARKING HER ARRIVAL WITH THE DEEP HOUSE SMASH ‘WHAT THEY SAY’ IN 2010, 24 YEAR OLD MAYA JANE COLES HAS RAPIDLY BECOME ONE OF DANCE MUSIC’S HOTTEST PROPERTIES. A multi-instrumentalist, producer and established DJ, Maya’s musical ability and diversity has no bounds, releasing tracks and remixes across a range of genres from house and electronica to techno and dub. With a successful DJ Kicks mix already under her belt the Londoner is set to continue her meteoric rise with a highly anticipated debut album out later this year. How did you get into writing and producing? It was actually nearly a decade ago that I decided it was something I wanted to try out. I always had a massive passion for music and used to go out of my way to find new stuff. I played a few instruments and managed to get hold of a cracked version of Cubase and taught myself what I could. As soon as I got into it I knew it was what I wanted to do with my life. You’re very hands on with all aspects of the music making process, is it really important for you to be in full control of your creative output? Yes definitely. I usually have a very clear vision of how I want a track to be once I’ve got the idea going. When I’ve got something in my head I feel like I’m the only one that can execute that idea. I could never describe it in words for someone else to engineer for me. I understand that you’re very visually creative as well? I really enjoying drawing and painting, it’s something I’ve always done in my spare time, but more recently I haven’t had the opportunity to do as much. At some point in the future I’d like to focus more on merging my art and music together. You’ve been known to release tracks under several aliases, has this made it easier to venture into other musical styles? Yeah I guess so. I didn’t want to confuse people by releasing too much under one name at the same time. It made more sense to create different aliases. I like creating such a variety of stuff. I’ll always have a few different projects on the go. Do you think house is experiencing a revival in mainstream music? I don’t think it ever died, but it’s definitely getting a lot of focus right now. House is such a broad genre that covers such a wide spectrum of listeners, whether it be underground fans or people that are only exposed to mainstream music. I think for a long time only the cheesy side of house music reached out to the mainstream market, whereas now there seems to be a lot more space for the cooler stuff. When good quality music can hit the mainstream market without compromising the sound it can only be a good thing. How did the DJ-Kicks project come about? I was approached by K7! Records after they’d seen me play. I’d always been a fan of the series, I’d even bought some of the mixes before so when I got asked I was quite humbled and couldn’t turn down a challenge like that. I’m proud to be part of that DJ lineage.

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How did you select the tracks? I put word out that I was doing the mix and got some really nice exclusive stuff. There were a couple of my own exclusives and I had a lot of tracks that I’d recently bought that I felt hadn’t received the attention they deserved. It pieced itself together quite naturally. Can you tell us about your debut album? How does it sound compared to your previous work? It’s mostly songbased electronica, with a hint of club influence. As in it’s fairly bass heavy and beats driven, but very melodic and moody. And it’s all very vocal, I have some really exciting guests and am also doing a lot of the vocals myself. I guess my previous tracks like Nobody Else, You Senseless are closer to the vibe than the straight up housey stuff I’ve released. It’s a very personal record. You’ve got a few festivals lined up this year, what ones are you most looking forward to? I’m really looking forward to Movement in Detroit as I’ve never been and heard amazing stories. Also can’t wait for Sonar. Barcelona is one of my favourite cities. And then there’s my UK favourite Bestival. Fancy dress time! Words by Paul Joseph Photography by Luc Coiffait

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FEEL THE LOVE FOR LOVEBOX. CELEBRATING A SPECTACULAR DECADE OF SHOWCASING THE FRESHEST NEW TALENT COMBINED WITH THE MOST ICONIC MUSIC ACTS AROUND. For the past 10 years, LOVEBOX has been leading the pack by way of urban summer music festivals. Having firmly instilled a reputation for securing an enviable annual line-up of musical goodness fused with an incredible array of additional on-site entertainment; LOVEBOX has consistently wowed the crowds of thousands who disperse across this eclectic wonderland each year.

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1883 MAGAZINE | MUSIC

Planted in Hackney, East London each summer, the usual peaceful Victoria Park is transformed into a flamboyant circus for a three-day long extravaganza. Imagine colourful characters running around in next to nothing (more dirt than clothing) squealing at the top of their lungs whilst making their way to secret areas, appearing almost like mudsplattered zombies. Yes, LOVEBOX 2011 did that to me. Having experienced the full-on LOVEBOX effect last year; naturally, I’m quick to agree with LOVEBOX Director; Rob Silver’s suggestion to, “Get your tickets now!” With numerous stages taking you through musical treats, you’ll find it provides plenty of entertainment for all. Including Jodie Harsh’s Circus, Dalston Superstore Live and many, many more. Like a bad case of acne across the face, the stages are spread out across the park, dotted around to ensure you’re surrounded by constant activity. It’s brilliantly overwhelming. Acne, however, isn’t! 2012 is an exciting year for LOVEBOX, what with it being its 10 year-anniversary. Celebrating their years supporting and identifying new talent; LOVEBOX gives people a chance to party all day right through into the night. However, unlike most festivals, camping is not an option. A plus perhaps for the stylish city revellers who enjoy indulging in music festivals minus the dubious night’s sleep; LOVEBOX ticks all the boxes offering an accessible location and a choice of a day ticket endeavour or scooping all three in a one weekender. With slick acts lined up this year including; Hot Chip, Crystal Castles, Friendly Fires, Lana Del Rey and heroic headliner; Grace Jones, it’s pretty impressive that such a “family productive” festival can conjure up such fantastically cool talent. Silver reassures us that the line up will be effective, hinting, “We don’t rely on headliners- all the acts are extremely vital and we want them to know this.” His intentions are true. There’s no cliché or twist, what’s there is a given. Competition standing tall, it’s obvious organisers must prepare well in advance who to carefully collect before assembling all artists together. Silver describes the process as a case of, “lucky bidding wars.” Chosen a year in advance, he explains, “It’s as if you’re putting in an offer for a house. You hit agencies with your choices and you wait for them to plan and get back to you with their offer.” LOVEBOX certainly delivers. Quite sensibly, they “keep a family” of artists each year, simply “adding on” new acts, slotting them onto different stages to achieve the full “reminiscing” effect and celebration of new talent to come. Horse meat Disco DJ and Promoter, Jim Stanton has been involved with LOVEBOX for the last 5 years. He lets loose on what to expect. “It’s basically people, acknowledging queerness without having to be gay. Times are so hard socially and economically, this is a great way to learn how to be free.” Point well made. So get involved, grab yourself a ticket, it’ll cost you less than a weeks’ worth of work to save for and you will not be disappointed. See you there... LOVEBOX 2012 15th – 17th June See www.lovebox.co.uk for more details and tickets. Words by Ceri Davies Photography by Benjamin Eagle

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1883 MAGAZINE | FILM

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1. Alison Klayman

As a freelance journalist working in China, Alison was producing feature stories for the likes of NPR, AP Television, Voice of America and PBS Frontline. A story on the Chinese artist Ai WeiWei gave her the material she needed for her first feature documentary on the voice of freedom, Ai WeiWei: Never Sorry, which won the Special Jury Prize 2. Chris Moukarbel at Sundance. With degrees from The New School and Yale, Chris Moukarbel got his film break on YouTube with a short on the World Trade Center,

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upstaging the release of Oliver Stone’s feature and inciting national debate on intellectual property rights online. His first feature documentary, Me @ The Zoo, goes back to his viral roots to tell the story of video blogger Chris Crocker who became an Internet star.

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3. Stacy Peralta

While he can claim invention of the frontside lip to fakie, this ex-pro skateboarder and surfer has long since traded in his board for a video camera. Making films on what he knows best, he’s chronicled the rise of the wheels- his latest on the Bones Brigade, which he formed with George Powell back in 1978.

4. Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Launching into the art world as a portrait photographer, Timothy has captured the likeness of everyone from David Bowie to Anna Wintour. His first foray into documentary filmmakinga biopic on Lou Reed- won him a Grammy and his latest, About Face, dives into the world of supermodels to question the beauty ideals that pervade them.

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Words by Natalee Ranii- Dropcho

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dress CHRISTOPHER KANE shoes CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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1883 MAGAZINE | FILM

Gillian Jacobs is sitting poolside at a West Hollywood hotel, poised in a shaded corner that’s void of the searing rays of the Californian sun. “I used to live right round here,” she muses, gazing out beyond the pink flower framed horizon. Though originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Gillian (pronounced, Gill-ian, emphasis on the G) now calls sunny LA home.

Since she made her name here in hit TV sitcom Community playing livewire Britta Perry, the beautiful Julliard alum has secured somewhat of a cult status for her portrayal in the offbeat comedy. “You know, I’d never really done comedy before Community came around,” she says. “I’m pretty lucky now I’ve got a day job where I get to spend my time doing all these really ridicules fun things all day long.”

With a quick wit and a bright, affable energy, Gillian is a natural when it comes to comedy. Though her past repertoire has seen darker days. She’s dabbled as an exotic dancer in both Choke (2008) and Blackbird (2007), depicted a homeless teenage prostitute in Gardens of The Night (2008) and a drug addict when she threaded the boards in NYC Philip Seymour Hoffman-directed play The Little Flower of East Orange. Her next role in fact, shall see her play perhaps an ode to the latter, portraying an ecstasy-addled waitress in Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World. The movie, in which Gillian stars alongside Steve Carrell and Keira Knightley, sees the two mismatched protagonists embark on a road trip in the midst of an impending apocalypse, making a pit-stop along the way at a restaurant where they meet Gillian’s euphoric, drug induced character. When posed with the notion of a reoccurring theme amongst her work, her lips curl into a smile. “Ha! It was never really my intention to end up playing all these sorts of characters all the time. You just go where the work takes you. But suddenly you realize these patterns emerge and next thing you know, you’re being known for playing all these crazy girls! It’s not something I ever expected.”

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With a smattering of upcoming movies in the works, at the time of interview, Gillian was days away from filming her next feature, Teddy Bears out in Joshua Tree. The black comedy sees Gillian adopt the role of Emily who along with her other half and two other couples venture out to the desert to help their friend after the death of his mother. “The guy basically announces he’d like to sleep with all the women!” she says with a laugh. “And so it deals with the fall out from there.”

Albeit her colourful on-screen adventures, Gillian is quietly reserved when it comes to her own free time away from an intense shooting schedule. “Oh God, when I’ve got some time off, I just love to go for dinner. I feel like everyone in LA is such a foodie. There are so many great places to eat round here. I just love making new discoveries. Ha, there’s your answer: when I’m not filming, I’ve basically been eating my way through Los Angeles!”

Words By Aideen Shannon

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dress MARNI photography SONDRA STOCKER fashion FILIPPO GIULIANI hair MARCUS FRANCIS @ THE WALL GROUP makeup STEPHEN SOLLITTO @ STARWORK ARTISTS fashion assistant LAUREN MCKINLEY shot @ SUNSET PLAZA PART OF BEST WESTERN PLUS

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photography CHARIS KITCHHEIMER

photography AUTUMN DE WILDE

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dress ANTONIO BERADI shoes CHRISTIAN DIOR photography WCHRISTOPHER WRAY- MCCANN fashion FILIPPO GIULIANI hair DAVID GARDNER @ SOLO ARTISTS make up FIONA STILES @ WALL GROUP

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1883 MAGAZINE | FILM

BEAUTIFUL, SMART AND INCREDIBLY TALENTED; HANNAH SIMONE PLAYS CECE, THE SASSY MODEL AND BEST FRIEND TO ZOOEY DESCHANEL’S ‘NEW GIRL’ IN THE CULT TV SHOW OF THE YEAR. WITH THE FIRST SEASON NOW WRAPPED, SHE UNVEILS THE THRILLS AND THE SPILLS OF HER FIRST MAJOR ACTING DEBUT, NOT TO MENTION HER UNEXPECTED JOURNEY TO THE TOP.

You were born in London. How much time did you spend living there? Yep, born in London and I miss it so much! My family and l left when I was 1 to travel the world. I then ended up back there when I worked for the United Nations Association in Embankment and I lived in Holland Park, West London. These days, I haven’t been back for a couple of years. I’ve just been working so much with the show. I do hope to go back this summer though. My London friends are quite annoyed… Well not actually annoyed -coming from London to LA is not exactly a hardship- but I haven’t been back to hang out properly in London for a while. Now they’ve all been coming out here, which has been nice for me! What stands out in your mind when you think of London? It has an energy to it, it’s like I know the city and the city knows me and I feel more comfortable in London than anywhere else in the entire world. You lived in so many different countries as a child as Calgary, Saudi Arabia, Cyprus, and India. What was it like growing up in all these different places? It was funny because it sounds like it would be hard on a kid. But with those international schools, all the kids are in the same position. We thought it was normal! You might start a school and only be there for a semester or you might be there for three years. You learn a lot of really great life skills… It kind of really brings you out of your shell in a way that if you’re in one place the whole of your life, you may not be challenged like that. The hardest year I ever had at school was I returned to Canada for my final year, grade 12. All these kids had been together since kindergarten and knew each other their whole lives. That to me was the most difficult school to go to. Like the new girl? YES! I grew up constantly being the new girl! You started modelling as a teenager. How long did you do it for? I started when I was about 13 in Cyprus, which is a very safe and wonderful environment for a model. It was really fun. I’d model for magazines and also for my mother’s clothing store fashion shows. It was kind of like the family business, all of us pitching in. It was very cool to do all that when I was younger and it’s really funny now that I play a model on TV! You have achieved two degrees. (While attending the University of British Columbia, Simone received a BA in International Relations and Political Science. In 2004, while at Ryerson University, she received a BA in Radio and Television Arts). What made you decide to go down a whole different route after your first degree? Through my first degree I got offered a placement in London at the United Nations Association working on a human rights program.

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Then I started to realise that I was talking to a lot of ‘British youth’ and that they weren’t learning about the world through the policy briefing we were writing. They were learning about it through satirical television shows or Michael Moore movies. So I thought, ‘Ok, well I need to work out how to speak their language.’ That’s our most important demographic in this world in my opinion, the upcoming generation. So I went back and did my second degree and learned to write, produce, shoot, light, edit and make documentaries. I grew up in the world of BBC radio, so was really focused on radio documentaries. Then I worked in a radio station in Toronto. Soon MTV came calling because they were looking for somebody that could do all their social issue programming on the channel, so it just kind of led to me. At what point did you decide to make the switch from presenting to acting? I’ve been doing theatre since I was 9 and have always been so passionate about it. I never craved fame. I just loved to act. I’m also very passionate about human rights, so have been doing both my entire life with a lot of dedication and focus. When I came to the States as a presenter I got called in to an audition. So I was like ‘sure!’ I got this incredible opportunity (New Girl) to play a character that I ABSOLUTELY love and admire and makes me laugh. All that’s changed in my life is where the rent cheques come from. Now I’m getting paid to be an actor and I’m doing a lot of charity work on the side. Everyone says, ‘what made you switch?’ Well, nothing. Nothing’s actually switched in my life at all. Except what the name says on the top of the cheque! When you first landed the role in New Girl, did you ever imagine at the time that it would be such hit? When I read that script, I knew it was special. You shoot the pilot and think, ‘oh my goodness we all work together so well and the writing is so smart and funny and honest!’ But until you put it on TV, only then do you find out whether everyone else connects to it like you do. What’s been a highlight for you on working on the show? I think everything to be honest! It’s been the most incredible year of my life. Our cast is so kind generous and thoughtful with each other on set. It’s an amazing environment where you can get really silly or be really vulnerable and you know that you’re going to be safe. That’s such a great feeling. When we get the script and start reading, you can tell that these writers care about the characters so much and want to tell their story with an attitude that will really ring true and make you realise how funny life is. Any funny behind-the-scenes stories? I have a lot of scenes opposite Max Greenfield who plays Schmidt and I say to him that he’s unprofessionally funny because he’s so funny all the time and my character is never amused. That must be hard?! It’s SOOOO hard!! Especially when you can see the cameraman’s shoulders bobbing up and down because he’s laughing, the lighting guys are laughing and you can hear the producers sniggering in the background. Whereas I have to sit there looking bored, which is the opposite of how I feel! I remember once I had a scene with Max in this old folks home where he has to yell in pain… He went so loud, so over the top and started to writhe around…I don’t know what it was, it must have just been 22 episodes of pent up hysteria within me because I broke! I started to laugh so hard, I began hyperventilate. I fell on the chair, my hair was on the floor and they had to stop the show, get me up, fix my makeup… it was the most epic break that has ever happened, that anyone has ever seen. Then when you have to do it again, I bet that makes it even harder? That’s the thing- it was the final episode. Afterwards I told him ‘Thank God, I need like four months away from you just to recuperate from that laugh because I’ve never laughed like that in my life!’ So are you quite close as cast? Very. It’s one of those things that you go through that the only people that understand are those going through it with you. That bonds you in such a unique way. The key of a really great film or TV show is the chemistry within the cast and it has to be real. Where would you like to see your character go in the future? Like what would be a dream storyline for you? I know it’s a cliché but I cannot help it because it

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would be so much fun: I would love to do a Bollywood episode. I’d love the cast to go to a full Indian wedding! They could bring in real Bollywood guest stars. You could get really weird with it! Are movies next on the agenda? You never know now what door might open. It’s a very exciting time for all of us. I think we’re so focused right now on our show but who knows what will happen next. It would be wonderful because as long as I can remember, acting has been one of my greatest passions. Interview by That’s where I’ve channelled all my creativity, so the idea Rowan Newman and to get to do more- it would be a gift that keeps giving! Aideen Shannon


dress ANTONIO BERADI

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I left my full time job at 1883 magazine to pursue a career in TV presenting. In February I tried, in March I ran out of money and in April I got fired from a shop job within ten days. I stood in that shop rooted to the same spot for the entire time. I made no friends. When I was bored, I filled in the customer communication forms as miscellaneous celebrities. I was also beyond terrified of my colleagues who took customer service to a scary level of imposing and intense. I’m not sure if they fired me because their emails to Paris Hilton were bouncing back (thats.hot@hotmail.com) or whether it was because they noticed I was wholeheartedly unhappy. I was taught to direct customers to the toilet as if I was The Little Mermaid after lengthy periods of swimming in crack. When the time came to be assertive, I was dribbling due to brain loss, so I began writing poems on receipts and inappropriately invested time perfecting my Lana Del Rey impression. But most of all, I was thinking about my presenting show-reel: Did anyone like it? A few weeks prior to this embarrassing stint (that will remain invisible on my CV) I had worked hard to become a signed, credible TV presenter. This was the one and only obvious next step for me. It’s what I had left 1883 Magazine to do. With 1883’s videos under my belt, a few good articles under my hat and some positive press cuttings under another item of clothing; I began scheming. People who didn’t like me, liked my videos. TV producers got in touch to tell me they liked my videos and I (very occasionally) got recognised because of them. I was proud of my videos and it was all looking hopeful. I was lucky enough to be helped by a good contact and now friend who I had met through this magazine at a TOPMAN party. She worked in celebrity PR, believed I could do it and later gave me the names of the right people at all the right places. I decided to put my cv, show-reel, articles and press cuttings in a beautiful paper bag tied up in ribbons alongside an individually boxed cupcake, a cleverly hand written letter, some glitter, some sweets and a general helping of unavoidable effort. I hand delivered my plea for representation to all ten of her provided contacts. A few weeks passed and I thought they would never respond. Was it the bubblegum-flavoured cupcake from Greggs? After getting sacked and considering involvement in the Big Issue side of the magazine industry; I eventually had positive feedback from a few agencies (of which would help me tremendously). These are relationships I am now strategically building. I have found myself talking in impressive glass rooms about branding and of my POS (point of sale darling). I’m beyond happy and relieved that they like me and I’m extremely pleased they don’t know where I learned my excellent Lana Del Rey impression. Recently I was put in contact with a credible TV producer, who I am now lucky enough to start working with. He gave me some wonderful advice: “Keep at it.” And keeping at it is most certainly what I have done! Lots has changed for me very quickly, most of which, unfortunately, I cannot divulge (so very celeb). There is a lot to share in time though. It’s a whole new industry and I’m sure I will make some fabulous mistakes that will be worth reporting on soon. For now, this isn’t a Cinderella story. I definitely haven’t gone to the ball. In fact, I’m not sure I can even trust my friendly mice. But for a fairly cynical person, I’m pretty hopeful. Whatever the situation, I wont stop until I can write my biography From Sacked to Success by Lewis Taylor. But until then, I am incredibly happy to be on these pages. Thanks once again for reading my latest, Lewis Taylor Photography by Aideen Shannon image shot using the LOMO LC-A+ camera from LOMOGRAPHY

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1883 MAGAZINE | FASHION

fashion assistant RICCARDO CHUIDIONI photography assistant KEIKO (From Left to Right) book “UNDERSTAND RAP” BY WILLIAM BUCKHOLZ @ URBAN OUTFITTERS headphones MARSHALL @ URBAN OUTFITTERS bag YVES SAINT LAURENT @ HARRODS necklace AMANDA LI HOPE @ WOLF & BADGER card holder DIOR HOMME sunglasses RAY-BAN shoe LOUIS VUITTON shoe JIMMY CHOO watch RAYMOND WEIL card holder ZAGLIANI @ HARRODS bracelet & necklace DALL’AVA @ WOLF & BADGER cufflinks AMANDA LI HOPE @ WOLF & BADGER pencil necklace XXMILES @ WOLF & BADGER bag BULGARI necklace TOMASZ DONOCIK @ WOLF & BADGER tie YVES SAINT LAURENT @ HARRODS camera DIANA F+ @ URBAN OUTFITTERS wallet BULGARI belt ZANACCO @ WOLF & BADGER cufflinks TOURBILLON @ STEERWELL GROUP shoe DR.MARTENS cufflinks ALICE MADE THIS @ WOLF & BADGER peace cufflink PAUL SMITH book “IF YOU DON’T BELONG, DON’T BE” BY SCOTT CAMPBELL @ URBAN OUTFITTERS

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1883 MAGAZINE | FASHION

Despite flicking in and out of fashion for the last couple of years, the clutch has definetely made an affirmative comeback this season, and will continue to stay put as a fashion must have well into AW/12. Similarly, animal aesthetics continue to waver in and out of the latest craze. Pleased to be leaving fur behind with the wrath of winter, we now seem to be entering into a more exotic harmony for summer, in the form of a clutch. You only have to look at this Chanel clutch to feel the luxury and scrumptiousness of the brand that bears the double “C”. With a baby turquoise shade covering the fresh box-shaped design, this clutch sums up a picture of modern glamour. Less obvious, the Bottega Veneta clutch for men has a more relaxed beauty attached to it, the quality no other than perfect. The finish of this clutch is shiny and appealing, with a folded opening to finish of its class - a bag that would never let you down. With more designers delving into the accessories line, the demand for men’s bags has increased massively, with the clutch being one of them. Words by Filippo Giuliani

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navy clutch BOTTEGA VENETA powder blue clutch CHANEL photography SATY + PRATHA


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1883 MAGAZINE | FASHION

PHOTOGRAPHY CHARL MARAIS FASHION CHAD BURTON

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PHOTOGRAPHY KRISTIN VICARI FASHION JOANNA WILLS

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left jacket marni sunglasses ysl cuff YSL cuff marni right jacket versace sunglasses linda farrow earrings marni

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opposite page dress VALENTINO sleeveless jacket SACAI @ FEATHERS current page shirt JIL SANDER @ HARVEY NICHOLS trousers DRIES VAN NOTEN @ HARVEY NICHOLS shoes and bow STYLIST’S OWN


opposite page dress NICHOLAS OAKWOOD clutch CHANEL current page dress MISSONI boots R.SOLES necklace SERVANE GAXOTTE @ FEATHERS ring TATTY DEVINE


left dress RACHEL gilbert necklace tatty devine right dress chloe @ harvey nichols necklace servane gaxotte @ feathers sunglasses tatty devine hair roxane attard make up ciara o’shea fashion assistant holly ounstead models meve @ premier & felix @ fm


I don’t know what possessed me to purchase some of these past-trends, some are still accompanied by a tag. But, I am pretty certain I will not be needing them again - although they might conjure up an interesting halloween costume. I seem to have a closet full of clothes and still I cannot find a thing to wear, how did fast fashion become so addictive? Was it the cheapness, the convenience, or simply the need to feel fashionable that set us on this mission to purchase a bargain? One thing I am certain of is I would be foolish to think that in just a few hundred words I could fully illuminate the black hole quietly spreading amongst our wardrobes, and the price certain individuals have paid to allow us our lap of luxury in cheap trends. I want to dig a little deeper into our drawers, to try and understand the true cost of our guilty fast fashion fixes. I am pretty sure we are on the winners side of this bargain. Historically fashion has never been as widely available to us as it is today, the rise of consumerism has allowed us all a greater and more affordable choice of fashions and lifestyles. The average woman today owns four times the amount of clothes as a woman did in the 1980‘s, and we now appear to have got into a bad habit where we spend less and buy more. Our consumption level in 2007 saw that an incredible three pairs of jeans were sold every second. Taken slightly aback at the excessiveness of it all, I thought I’d count the jeans in my wardrobe (those that are still alive). I have eight working pairs hung up ready to wear, yet truthfully I only circulate between my three favourites. In Lucy Seigle’s book, Is Fashion The rest must be destined for someone else’s landfill. Wearing Out the World, she writes The Online Ethical Fashion Forum describes that in order to meet our demands, fast fashion as similar to fast food, ‘the big fashion engine is powered by ‘cheap, addictive and unsustainable,’ I’d an estimated forty million garment agree. A recent retail revolution has seen workers’. Yet an army of forty million supermarkets throwing their hats into the garment workers is still not strong ring of fashion, and despite the original enough to ethically conquer deadlines stigma attached to buying your turkey with set by fast fashion houses. In India, a trend, supermarkets have certainly been over seven billion items of western eating a large slice of the disposable styled clothing is manufactured fashion cookie. Tesco took the lead over annually, and those that still argue fashion retailers Bhs and River Island in the fast fashion craze is a ‘wealth a new report by Verdict, placing them as protection scheme’ for poor people are the ninth most used clothing retailer in hugely mistaken. Not only does this the UK. This is proof that it has become draw a line between ‘us’ and ‘them’ as extremely popular to buy your exotic fruits working citizens, but it is extremely with a dollop of Hawaiian print. Thankfully questionable to back such a statement my wardrobe is free from supermarket impulse ethically. Garment workers can expect buys, similar to fast food I have never to get paid the equivalent of £1.00 quite trusted where it comes from and what per day, making their pay packet one ingredients it contains. Promotions for cheaply produced wardrobe fillers continue to of the lowest in the world today. ‘If be publicised by different media worldwide. The media has you describe something as ethical, given current fashion trends a ‘must have’ label, flourishing you mean that it is morally right or a need amongst us all to keep on top of latest fashions. Asda morally acceptable’, states the good even went as far as to name one of their new collections old Collins English Dictionary. Is it ‘must have’, and in Topshop I always seem to be walking morally right or accectable to pay past a new ‘must buy’ rail, which is always overcrowded by the people that make our clothes so fast fashion hunters. The promotion of cut-price versions little? My wardrobe begins to look to celebrity high-end looks is just one example of how una little darker then before. I am ethically produced fashion is portrayed as an affordable curious to know whose hands have sewn glamourous alternative - I wonder how many “Rihanna armies” my fashionable must-haves together. we will see next week wearing the latest high street copycat? Fast fashion certainly wavers when it comes Ethical arguments such as the above are to ethical standards, with many retailers sadly only one of the blights affected still hiding behind a convenient amount of by our over indulgent wardrobes, there red tape when questions of manufacturing is also huge ecological corruption. It arise. Undoubtedly the media has helped fuel is impossible to make clothes without our obsession with fast fashion, which has fabrics, yet I wonder how many of us increased the demand for cheaper clothing. This know exactly which fabrics overflow our rise in demand has left fashion headquaters drawers? Wool, silk, satin, crepe, calculating how they can cut costs, squeeze cashmere, linen, velvet, the list budgets and increase orders to maximize profits. is endless. Unfortunately none of Of course, working within such tight margins these fabrics grow in a rainbow of means somebody somewhere is paying the price fashionable shades, the process is a for our impossibly fast moving wardrobes. long and time consuming one.

THE FAST FASHION PHENOMENON HAS AFFECTED US ALL. AS I BEGIN TO WRITE, I FIND MYSELF SAT DIRECTLY FACING MY WARDROBE AND IT BECOMES HARD NOT TO QUESTION MY OWN FAST-FASHION FOOTSTEPS WHEN A HISTORY OF IMPULSE BUYS, MICROTRENDS AND VINTAGE ACCESSORIES BULGE OUT FROM THE GAP BETWEEN MY CUPBOARD DOORS - AS IF IT WERE SOME SORT OF PERSONAL CLOTHES LANDFILL.

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1883 MAGAZINE| FASHION The main ingredient in our wardrobes is cotton. This fluffy crop represents half of what is used to make our clothes and textiles worldwide. Despite its popularity in dress making, cotton farming is one of the most polluting processes on our planet today, requiring a huge eleven percent stake in the global pesticide market. The severe overuse of dangerous pesticides on cotton farms results in the loss of twenty to forty thousand cotton workers lives every year. Immediately stripping this fashion favored crop of any glamour it may own. Along with its addiction to pesticide, cotton is also a thirsty crop. The extent of its thirst means ‘it takes twenty thousand litres of water to produce one kilogram of cotton, and one kilogram is equivalent to a single tee-shirt and one pair of jeans’. Yet through terrible irony, cotton continues to be farmed in some of the most water scarce areas on earth. The cotton crop is responsible for drinking the twenty six thousand three hundred square mile ecosystem that was the Areal Sea, leaving a dead, sandy terrain in its wake. Pesticides, drought and not to mention (in Usbekistan) the enforcement of child labour gives us a textile industry, especially in cotton, that should not be taken at face value. The colour-ways, prints and textures have transformed fashion fabrics into a glamourous story, far from the truth. Shocked, I decide to look for the label inside my jumper, I know it is located in the bottom right hand seam but I normally only ever check this for the washing temperature. I wouldn’t want to risk shrinking my cheap impulse buy now would I? “UK 8. MADE IN CHINA. 58% Nylon. 37% Angora Rabbit Hair. 5% wool. KEEP AWAY FROM FIRE.” Breaking my jumper down into separate ingredients makes me feel as though it comes with a story, although I am not sure it is one I would feel too comfortable hearing. Reflecting on what that story might be, it reaches into depths of morality, ecological impact and personal sacrifice which sadly I had not noticed before. So, it leaves me wondering whether the next time I see a cheap fashionable offer, I’ll ask myself, “How can this be possible? What’s the story?” Words by Holly Ounstead Photography by Annie Ounstead

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fashion assistant Lindsay Robertson set designer Karin Soderquist (From Left to Right) shoe kurt geiger shoe LOUIS VUITTON sunglasses BuLGArI glasses BuLGArI bracelet LUCIE CAMpBELL watch RAYMOND WEIL brooch TATTY DEVINE bag WILBER & GUSSIE pearl belt CHANEL ring LUCie CAMpBELL ring LUCIE CAMpBELL earring LUCIE CAMpBELL bag CHLOE @ harvey nichols bag LOUIS VUITTON camera DIANA F+ @ urban outfitters shoe CHANEL shoe ALBERTA 111 FERREtTI bee brooch LUCIE CAMpBELl


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PHOTOGRAPHY NORMAN LEE FASHION LINDSAY ROBERTSON

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top JOSEPH TURVEY trousers ETRO shoes J.W.ANDERSON

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opposite page shirt DIOR HOMME shorts LEVIS @ BEYOND RETRO jacket ALEXANDER MCQUEEN hat BEYOND RETRO shoes CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN current page left top J.W.ANDERSON trousers COS right top ISSEY MIYAKE MEN trousers RAG & BONE


opposite page both sunglasses Oliver Peoples current page top Pringle of Scotland shorts Tommy Hilfiger boots Hunter


left shirt tommy hilfiger shorts marni watch bulgari right shirt alexander mcqueen trousers tommy hilfiger watch bulgari shoes jen rally grooming Alex Price fashion assistant Chad Burton & JACK REID photography assistant Dani Bastidas props Clementine Keith-Roach models Jesse @ Storm & Daniel @ Nevs shot @ Supperclub London


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Photography Alexander Jordan Fashion Holly Ounstead

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top ACNE necklace TATTY DEVINE sunglasses STYLIST’S OWN

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opposite page dress ASHISH shoes ACNE bracelet HANNAH WARNER currrent page dungarees AMERICAN APPAREL top URBAN OUTFITTERS necklaces HANNAH WARNER shoes JIMMY CHOO


current page dress SIMONE ROCHA swimsuit BEYOND RETRO brooch TATTY DEVINE opposite page top URBAN OUTFITTERS collar SIMONE ROCHA trousers J.BRAND shoes URBAN OUTFITTERS hat STYLIST’S OWN location THE BOOK CLUB SHOREDITCH


opposite page top ACNE necklace TATTY DEVINE shorts BEYOND RETRO shoes RUSSELL & BROMLEY sunglasses STYLIST’S OWN current page top MAJE necklace TATTY DEVINE fashion assistant CHAD BURTON hair SIMON IZZARD @ FRANK AGENCY make up JAIMEE THOMAS @ FRANK AGENCY model JOHANNA @ NEXT MODELS

leather coat OSMAN lace mask BIJOU VAN NESS


1883 MAGAZINE | FASHION

Name: Allen Taylor Height: 6’1.5 Age: 19 Hometown: Surrey

Where were you first scouted? In Oxford Circus, shopping. What annoys you most about the model industry? Size zero women. If you were a cocktail what would you be called? The Amazing White Chocolate Exotic Express. Biggest surprise of your life? When I became a model probably. What is the highlight of your modelling career so far? Going to New York and doing a shoot with Terry Richardson and Nicola Formichetti. If you were invisible for a day what would you do? I would just have the most fun pranking people all day, getting into places I wouldn’t normally be allowed and seeing things I’ve always wanted to see. If you were writing your autobiography what would be the most dramatic chapter? My early teenage years. If you were a drink what would you be? Gone off milk. Nobody would want to drink me that way. Who was the last person you hung up on? My girlfriend. LOL.

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Words by Lindsay Robertson Photography by Matt Parfitt


1883 MAGAZINE | FASHION

While Alex Noble’s name may just be on the brink of breakthrough, his flamboyant and outré designs have already taken him to The Brits and back. Cutting cloth for some of music’s highest priestesses, the vanguard young designer may just hold the key to merging music and fashion; think Gaga’s red bondage bandage suit in her Bad Romance romp, or Florence Welch’s iconic cape and catsuit that billowed and beclothed the star on her sell-out Ceremonials tour. “I’m really drawn to the idea of strong and independent women and the idea of girls running the world! Gaga is so powerful and Florence is amazingly poetic, you can draw so much inspiration from both of their lyrics.” His work swings powerfully from racy body stockings to dramatic high-collared cover ups, both showcased extensively on Lady Gaga’s Monster Ball Tour. “I think way into the future my work could be commercial, but I’m talking at least 400 years!” he laughs. With three fashion weeks already under his belt, Noble has worked as an exhibiting artist, illustrator, costume designer and stylist, and also manages to be a very cool guy. An image of creeping tattoos, piercings, rings and effortlessly understated style, he thumbs through a table top of sketches to find a page filled with pencilled Aztec patterns and intricate columns. “I’m designing the exterior of one of the Lovebox venues this year, it’s a huge project but it’s going to be amazing and visible for quite a way away from the festival site.” The futuristic temple will play host to East London hot-spot, Dalston Superstore, a popular jaunt for Noble owed to the swathe of ultra-cool staff that gesture to his table upon my arrival. “Lovebox is going to be massive this year! I’m really looking forward to seeing Lana Del Rey, there’s been so much mixed press about her but the more people seem to hate her the more it makes me like her. She’d be very interesting to design for…”

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Words by Rowan Newman Sketches by Alex Noble

Florence Welch’s catsuit as seen on her recent Ceremonials tour


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1883 MAGAZINE | BEAUTY

PHOTOGRAPHY ARTHUR WOODCROFT BEAUTY HOLLY OUNSTEAD AND LINDSAY ROBERTSON

LAURA MERCIER nail varnish in lavender cloud NARS duo eye shadow in marie-galante NARS soft touch shadow pencil in calabria MAC eye kohl crayon in heirloom MAC lipstick in pink popcorn MAC eye shadow in digit satin

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MAC pigment in neo-orange MAC pro longwear lip pencil in shore leave CHANEL lip gloss in no.166 BUTTER LONDON nail polish in trout pout BENEFIT COSMETICS blush for hervana

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ESTテ右 LAUDER shimmer eye shadow in pink flash ESTテ右 LAUDER high gloss in pink cloud THAKOON for NARS nail varnish in amchoor BED HEAD TIGI totally baked volumizing and prepping hair meringue


MAC pro longwear bronzing powder in sun dipped LAURA MERCIER long lash mascara in bleu THAKOON for NARS nail varnish in koliary THAKOON for NARS nail varnish in kutki BAREMINERALS ready duo in the vison beauty assistant ELLIE MCWHAN


1883 MAGAZINE | ART & DESIGN

America is such a weird place. I think it holds true the sense that it has the best and worst of everything. We have some great food and some really bad food. We’ve extremely healthy people, then some of the fattest people on the planet. We’re puritans, yet America is also the centre of the world’s sex industry.

Architecturally, it’s the same thing. We’ve invented some of the worst architecture ever and at the same time, have intentionally or on some occasions accidentally come up with some of the strangest yet most compelling architecture on earth. I first became interested in architecture at a very young age. I grew up very poor in a really wealthy town. So I spent my entire childhood being obsessed with the differences between my house and the houses of my friends. The house my mom and I lived in was a small garage apartment. Then I’d go to the houses of my friends who lived in these big palatial estates and I became hyper aware of people’s homes.

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My mother, who is painter, raised me. Then I’ve an uncle who’s a sculptor and another who is a photographer, so there was always a lot of conversation growing up about aesthetics. So my obsession with houses coupled by being surrounded by all these wacky artists stemmed my interest in architecture. In 1995, I built my first home. It was a weird old loft in the Lower Eastside of Manhattan. I worked with an architect, who’d just graduated from Princeton and as he was very experimental in his work and together we built this really odd, interesting loft space completely on a budget. That’s when I became aware of what you can actually do with materials and I think that’s what furthered my interest in architecture as well as my appreciation for what architects have to do on a daily basis. I moved to LA about a year and a half ago from New York. I grew up in Connecticut, but spent most of my life living in the Lower Eastside of Manhattan. Without a doubt, New York has some amazing architecture. But it tends to be- not to malign New York- but predictable. There are the really iconic buildings like the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building, ones that everyone in the world knows about and have been photographed a million times. Then you go to the Lower Eastside and there are all these tenements and they all look the same. So it’s really hard to find in New York very unique and idiosyncratic architecture.

Sure there’s tons of architecture in New York, but there’s tenements tall building and town houses and that’s about it. That’s great and beautiful, though when I came to LA, I was baffled by the strangeness and the randomness of the architecture here. Another thing was the fact that in most cities, the good architecture is really easy to find. All you have to do is look at the likes of the Florence or Milan or London. Everyone knows about it and it’s in the centre of the city. Whereas in LA, architecture is hidden and it’s weird. That’s what led me to start my blog: To document the randomness, the strangeness and the overall arbitrary nature of LA architecture.

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1883 MAGAZINE | ART & DESIGN

2.Made in China by JOE BLACK

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1. The Wonderful World series by GERARD RANCINAN The past few years have been marked by several tragic wars, imagery of which tarnishes the inside of newspapers on a daily basis. With a thought-provoking take on photojournalism, Gerard Rancinan’s war pictures question, among other things, our perception of international conflicts and our societies’ real values. His new series of such images- entitled Wonderful World- are on show at Milan’s Triennale.

Produced using more than 5,500 toy soldiers, British artist Joe Black’s Made In China depicts the portrait of a Chinese soldier boy, as taken by legendary photographer Robert Capa. This photograph was used on the front cover of LIFE magazine in January 1938 to cover the Sino Japanese War. Now the iconic image has been turned into a visually challenging and amazing piece of art, best viewed from a 50-metre distance. The toy soldiers are manufactured in China, hence the title.

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3. Portrait of Coco Chanel by LITA CABELLUT Through a series of 35 monumental portraits, Lita Cabellut freed the fashion icon from her glamorous stereotype, just like Coco Chanel in her time changed the world by ridding women’s fashion from the confines of the corset, leaving behind a legacy of pure elegance.

4.The Unilever Series: Sunflower Seeds by AI WEIWEI Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds installation at Tate Modern was one of the most mediatic of the past year.

Lita Cabellut’s portraits of Coco Chanel depict the woman’s power, from the past all the way through the present times. It is historically accurate and undoubtedly, forever relevant.

Made up of millions of small works, each apparently identical, but actually unique, the installation is a comment on humanity and individualism in our modern societies. The fact that Ai Weiwei was imprisoned for two months shortly after the installation was put up, gives his message even more weight: individual rights are sometimes an illusion in nowadays’ world. 4.

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MISCHA BARTON

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1883 MAGAZINE | ART & DESIGN

A thrilling catalogue of portraiture that has seen the likes of a blood splattered, knife wielding Lindsay Lohan juxtaposed with more whimsical depictions as an elegant ballerina pirouetting amidst a whirling wind farm; Tyler’s work constantly straddles the boundaries prompting varying measures of acclaim as controversy. While procuring somewhat of enigmatic persona via the media over the years, in truth Tyler is an instantly likeable character, a man who is welcoming to all and deeply passionate about his art. Naturally, such a combination is what has led to Tyler to concoct such an eclectic portfolio featuring a whole host of familiar faces, many of which he counts as close friends.

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His latest exhibition, Mouthful, is his biggest show yet and opens the day of the launch of new E! series Mrs. Eastwood & Company this summer in which Tyler stars alongside girlfriend Francesca, daughter of iconic movie legend, Clint Eastwood. Francesca, who Tyler accredits as his current muse, appears heavily within his body of recent work, be it accompanying Tyler in such striking images as clambering up the gates of Buckingham Palace or seemingly floating off bright-red telephone boxes as well as lending her lips in a series of seductive of close-ups. Together, the duo have toyed with various notions as celebrity, fame and fortune through photography; their most jawdropping endeavor being the mutilation of thousands of dollars worth of designer accessories, all in honor of their art. In the run-up to the launch of his latest ventures, Tyler spoke with friend and actor Connor Paolo (star of hit US shows Gossip Girl and now Revenge), together delving into Tyler’s unyielding approach to his work.

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FRANCESSCA EASTWOOD & COMPANY

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Connor Paolo: In order to be a great artist do you believe you need to have a radical perception of life? Tyler Shields: Look you don’t have to be a crazy person to do what I do. Though I do think that you have to be willing to let go of the rules in society. With most people, when they create things they become concerned with all the reasons as to why they might not be able to do something. Whereas I never think of why I can’t do anything. I’m still trying to figure out how to fly, you know what I mean? To me, nothing is impossible. I just haven’t quite figured out how to do it yet. CP: It’s been well documented in the past that you’re an insomniac. Do you consider sleep, together with the aforementioned rules and general formalities as the enemy? TS: I had a photo before saying “sleep is the enemy.” You know, many years ago somebody once said to me, “It’ll take you 7 years to get good at photography.” I thought about that and then I broke it down. When they’re talking about time, it’s in the sense of how much time it takes you to do something, like the average person sleeps 181 days out of the year. Then you add into that meals, bathroom, shower…. that takes up to maybe 23-25 days out of the year, leaving the rest to work on your craft. So within the first 5 years I was doing this, I made sure I spent at least 295 days practicing photography. I would be that much further and have done it in a much faster time. CP: Is there a reason why you feel you have to move so quickly? TS: I live on the edge, man. I live like I could die tomorrow. I don’t want to die tomorrow. But the thing is, you never know. CP: Have you run across things recently or at least in easily recollected circumstances that gave you a serious pause? That ever really scared you? TS: No. The last time I was “scared” maybe was over 20 years ago when I got that feeling. When I was a kid I got into a really bad motorcycle accident and lost a whole month of my life that I can’t remember. I remember coming to and I was at a KFC with my dad and he handed me a bucket of chicken and I was like “I don’t want this!” and he was like- “what? You just ordered it?” and I was like “No I didn’t?” I had such bad head trauma that when I came back into reality, all of a sudden I’d a bucket of chicken in my hands. I don’t even eat fried chicken. CP: Ok, lets switch gears a little and talk fine art. So from 300, 400 years ago right up to more recent 19th century times… TS: They were good times. CP: They were great times. Syphilis was rampant. If you didn’t lose your nose, you were probably a virgin. A portrait was a very common art form. Yes you had to be very wealthy to enjoy, but it was something you saw a lot more than you do today. Generally a lot of artists don’t paint portraits as readily these days. Sure, it’s done for heads of states and powerful people one way or another, but generally it’s kind of died out. Do you see a similar future in store for…. TS: Photography? You know, the Internet definitely impacted a lot on photography. Now, everybody has a Facebook, a Twitter…. a MySpace. Everybody has had a least one of these at some point.

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Or everyone has a phone with a camera now. It’s very important to have these things. People love to take pictures and to share them. As magazines, newspapers and other printed materials die out, I think that art, printed art, such as printed high-end coffee table books, will become a luxury. It will be something people will be quite excited to have, almost like an artifact. I think years from now people won’t have like a library room in their homes anymore, even if they’re a wealthy person. It’s begun already with people having digital libraries such as iTunes and iPhoto. I believe photography will have a good run, just appear in different formats. As long as people have vanity, photography and portraiture will always exist.

CONNOR PAOLO & TYLER SHIELDS

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CP: You once regarded photography as creating history or rather proving history, which suggests a capacity to lie. In general, most people would say, “well look if someone took a picture of it, then it was real, it happened.” But I’d say you know better than anyone that quite often that’s not necessarily the case. Something happened- but not necessarily what you think happens. Is there truth in every picture, or can you fabricate everything? TS: So that’s the thing. I would say most photographs that come out these days are fake. Especially anything you see that’s action related. It’s green screened, it’s digital composed or it’s Photoshopped. Whatever you want to say. But that’s why I specifically don’t do any of those things so it’s known that I don’t use Photoshop. It’s known that I don’t fake anything. It’s known that I do it all for real. So if you see it you know, that somehow, I did it. Now, whatever that means…. CP: It means if it’s attained, it’s attainable. TS: Exactly. Like when we did that pepper spray thing that was real pepper spray. People really got sprayed and that was horrible (Tyler and Connor along with Francesca collaborated on a series of images where Francesca sprays a SWAT team with pepper spray to the flash of paparazzi cameras).

CP: It hurt. TS: But that being said, we took precautions. They had vests on and they had helmets on, shit like that. But still, they got burned really bad and it was real… CP: Why is that important then? When most people could say you could achieve the exact same shot, the exact same set-up…. fuck it, you could fake that colour if wanted to; why did that have to be real?

TS: Because at the end of it all, if I’m an old man and I’m sitting there in my house telling a story to my grandchild, I don’t want to tell the kid a story about the time I didn’t really pepper spray somebody. Or about the time I computer generated somebody jumping off a bridge or a cliff or something. You know, when I’m dead, I want them to look at all of it and say ‘Fuck that guy did all that shit!’ Whatever you see, they went there, they did that for real and here are all the people who were involved in that.

CP: So more so a case of showing people what they might be capable of? TS: It’s definitely that. Also, you cannot duplicate reaction. So if you really punch somebody, the reaction you get is that they’ve been punched. If you swing at air, and pretend like they’re being punchedthere’s a lot of acting as opposed to reacting. I don’t really believe in acting as much as I do believe in reacting. You know, if you run down the street barefoot in your underwear, you’re going to have a certain look. But if you’re on a treadmill by a green screen and we were in a studio with someone handing you a diet coke, it’s not the same thing and it never will be. CP: So essentially, your motto is: If you didn’t kill the buffalo; don’t draw it on the wall? TS: Exactly. If you can’t do it for real… then what’s the point? Make sure to check out Tyler this summer on E! in Mrs. Eastwood & Company and for even more on Tyler’s work, see: www.tylershields.com

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All Photography by Tyler Shields


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1883 MAGAZINE | ART & DESIGN

If you go down to the woods at Bestival you can be sure of a big surprise. Welcome to the Wishing Tree; an enchanting hybrid between ugly and beautiful; a pock marked, truncated installation decorated with complicated artworks and mesmerising curios that has easily become the most unworldly feature on the festival’s bristling skyline. First erupting from the soil in 2010, the 9 metre tall steel sub-structure was designed and created by Chris Coulton at set-building specialists, Spacial Installations. “The idea of a ‘wishing tree’ has been done world over, so instead of a tree that people can go up to we thought how about making it massive so people can actually party inside!” It is in fact the innards of the steel substructure that prove the most alluring. Working with his six-strong team, who practice everything from carpentry to metalwork, ragged vines creep across gnarled walls, while luminous organic silks pulse from the ceiling and cut out butterflies hang from ornate banisters. “We’re always adding things,” Chris explains, “I have a lot of sleepless nights thinking of a concept each year, but it’s always worth it in the end! People are completely engaged by it. They soak themselves in it. It’s almost the sense that this isn’t the modern world, it’s something different entirely...” Throw shapes inside the world’s best tree house at hedonistic, thrill-fest, Bestival. www.bestival.net

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If anyone knows the power of festival art in achieving the unimaginable, it’s independent East London artist, Sarah Cockings. Having released her own piece of floating paradise, Is-Land, at last year’s Secret Garden Party- a £12,000 airborne sculpture of a desert island proving well worthy of a Google hit – the avantgarde young designer tampers with reality yet again with her dystopian moon mime, LUNE. Full or crescent, blue or blood, the giant, helium-inflated sphere will hover above spacedout revellers at the SGP, before making the 5000 mile journey to the Nevada Desert. “The moon is on a pulley system so can be lowered and raised by festival goers in a fairy tale like manner,” Sarah explains. “It can be a huge glowing backdrop, winched down to the ground to almost be touched, or raised up to a height of 100m to appear as a distant orbital satellite high on the horizon.” Created in printed polyurethane and inspired by the iconic image of Luke Skywalker on Tatooine, gazing up at the pair of moons hanging in the twilight sky, Cockings’ celestial copy will be visible far beyond the festival sites. The ghostly twin will also be controlled remotely to transition between lunar phases. “The moon has a hold over us,” Sarah concludes, “Now we can have a hold over the moon!” Mess with the moon at The Secret Garden Party or Burning Man this Summer. www.secretgardenparty.com www.burningman.com

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When Gideon Berger spun a compilation LP of house classics back in 2006 he dreamt of one of the world’s most deliciously debauched homo-discos. “Music can conjure a complete fantasy environment,” he explains. “You can listen to a soul or funk track and imagine you’re in a late ‘70s New York basement surrounded by loads of sweaty men with moustaches!” And this is just what he created. Working with Block9 business partner, Steve Gallagher, The NYC Downlow was born as a 900 capacity, life-size replica of a bombed out New York City tenement, complete with a seedy porn kiosk and pumping playlist of acid house, vintage funk, soul and rare groove. “Imagine that a bomb went off in New York in 1979, and everything is destroyed in the whole world except for one gay disco. It’s off the hook, everyone wants to get involved!” Gideon laughs. Debuting at Glastonbury ‘07 and since becoming a firm Lovebox favourite, the project took seven months from conception to completion, “the first two or three of which were simply getting our heads around how it was going to work,” Steve explains. Once on site the Downlow demands a twentystrong build crew working solidly over a week to reawaken the murkiest fantasies of New York’s golden age. But the visual aesthetic only scratches the surface of the pair’s artistic involvement. Flaking billboards, and mangled mini cabs aside, Block9 also create everything from the extravagant tranny cabaret to the compulsory stick on moustaches that garnish the unique recreation of a retro gay scene. Clenching a wild cult following and attracting an impressive roll call of world famous DJ’s, including Chicago house master Robert Owens, the install recently spawned its own radio station, Downlow Radio, committed to transporting revellers back to the party for the other 51 weeks of the year. While Steve, a former set designer and Gideon, an underground rave curator, have gone on to father Glastonbury’s London Underground and Bestival’s Swamp Shack. “When you’re creating such an immersive environment people somehow manage to forget all the appropriate behaviour they’re conditioned into.” Steve explains. “It’s like a temporary autonomous zone where you can do whatever the fuck you want!” Gideon adds. “We don’t throw people out for having sex behind the speaker,” he laughs, “In fact we encourage it!” Grab a tash and lose yourself in the Downlow at this year’s Lovebox. www.lovebox.net Words by Rowan Newman

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1883 MAGAZINE | ART & DESIGN

MR. BRAINWASH IS THE MONIKER OF LOS ANGELES-BASED FILMMAKER AND POP ARTIST, THIERRY GUETTA. FOR THE BETTER PART OF THE LAST DECADE, THE EXUBERANT ARTIST HAS BEEN STRIVING TO CONCOCT THE ULTIMATE STREET ART DOCUMENTARY. Meanwhile, inspired by his eclectic array of

subjects, he has been hitting the streets from Los Angeles to Paris - armed with spray painted stencils and posters of his pop art inspired images. Such work has since seen him rapidly emerge as a renowned figure throughout the international street art scene. Today, after four solo installation shows (in Los Angeles, New York and Miami) and a comfortable establishment on the art market; Mr. Brainwash has earned not only the public’s recognition but also the worldwide appreciation of most of his street art peers. Represented by Opera Gallery around the world, he has consolidated his market presence and is now regarded as one of the most prolific and successful artists of his era.

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How would you describe your artistic style and what inspires you? There’s a freedom to my work. That would be how I’d describe it. I find it is ultimately people who constantly inspire my work. With an album cover for Madonna and one of the Faberge eggs amongst your commissions, who would you say your art is created for? Is there still a strong link to street-art? Do your roots still lie in this genre? My art is created for everyone. It’s not just street art. It’s art. Art can be in the street and everywhere. It’s a freedom of expression. Your first show in LA in 2008, Life is Beautiful, took place in a former Hollywood studio complex and your second show ICONS opened in an abandoned warehouse in the Meat Packing District of NY, which covered 15,000 square feet (1,400 m2) turning an unlikely venue into a gallery. With this in mindwould you say that location is key when it comes to displaying art? Yes, there has to be the right feeling when you come to a space. The energy has to be right. It doesn’t matter if it’s abandoned or not. For now, everything’s been good so we’ll see what’s going to happen next in London. When shall you be in London next and what do you plan on doing while you’re here? I’ll be there soon. I’m trying to take over a space located on Museum and Oxford that is 140,000 sq ft. and transform it with my work. I’m going to attempt and make it happen with the time that I will have. Will this monumental show have a theme or title to describe the works within? It’s too soon to say but what I do know is that it’s the Olympics and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee this year, which happens once in a lifetime. So do you intend to do any art works specifically commemorating the Olympics? For sure. I’m planning on making art that commemorates both the Olympics and the Queen of England. Are you planning any ‘naughty’ antics whilst in London this time? Yes. I won’t tell you where, what or how…. but yes. What, for you, encapsulates the essence of London? Royalty as well as fish and chips. If you could choose an iconic image to represent the UK, what would that be? The British flag, the red telephone booth, the double-decker bus, the Queen and her corgis. www.mrbrainwash.com Words by Jean David Malat

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all art work by MR BRAINWASH


1883 MAGAZINE | ART & DESIGN

SINCE THE DAWN OF SPORTS PRACTICE THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPORT AND DESIGN HAS REPRESENTED ONE OF THE MOST DURABLE AND PROFITABLE PARTNERSHIPS EVER. IN THE YEAR OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES, THE LONDON DESIGN MUSEUM IS GOING TO KICK OFF PROCEEDINGS WITH DESIGN TO WIN. CURATED BY ALEX NEWSON, THE EXHIBITION EXPLORES HOW INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES AND NEW MATERIALS HAVE SHAPED AND TRANSFORMED SPORTING ENTERPRISE OVER THE YEARS. With the passage

of time, the union between the sport and design has become increasingly more symbiotic. In the last decade, we have witnessed many significant innovations in design that have powerfully impacted sports like never before – from the way it is practiced to the one in which it is enjoyed by spectators – making sport itself a global industry encompassing areas such as fashion, advertising, art, film, business and even politics. Unquestionably, one of the most interesting and fascinating aspects of the interaction between sport and design is the on-going transformation of the venues in which competitions are held. In recent times, the construction of the National Stadium in Beijing – also known as Bird’s Nest – has marked a significant moment in this renewal process: designed by Swiss architect Herzog and De Meuron for the 2008 Olympic Games, the Bird’s Nest goes beyond its function as a building for sport becoming an enduring national landmark and a highlight for the new Olympiad.

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Intended to hold the football finals of the London Olympics in 2012, the Wembley Stadium certainly represents another milestone in sport venue architecture: designed by Fosters & Partners and Populus with a capacity of 90,000 people, it is the second largest stadium in Europe. Needless to say, it is precisely on the occasion of the Olympiad that the interaction between sport and design gives its best fruit. With the thirtieth edition of the Olympics just around the corner, the London Design Museum does its part hosting an exhibition, which looks at the myriad ways in which design and sport have been combining in a relationship of mutual and reciprocal influence. Organised by Alex Newson who also curated the 2010 and 2011 editions of Designs of the Year, Design to Win seeks to explore how design has shaped and progressively overturned the sporting world through the years. From running shoes to F1 car designs and racing bikes to the latest equipment for athletics, the exhibition focalises on the introduction of innovative technologies and revolutionary new materials which in turn have contributed to radically transform sporting enterprise, whilst tracing the creative process behind each innovation. “In most general terms, a design innovation comes from thinking about things in a rational way,” says Alex, adding that a new conception first requires us to “think about the critical function of the equipment under development, anticipating how we need or intend to use it.” The constant improvement ensured by technical innovations inevitably raises the question of the factual limit between a fair competition and one altered by what we might define as a kind of technological doping. “When it comes to performance and design you surely have to look at something that enables performers to compete at a higher level,” Alex admits. “While some sports actively seek to limit the impact of design and technology, others – such as yacht racing – make them their strength.” If many are the moments where design in tandem with the introduction of new materials – above all, carbon fibre according to Alex – have played a significant role in progressing sport, the reverse is also evidently true, and a section of the exhibition will certainly focus on the influence of sport on design, culture and art. In the incoming London Olympic summer, with the whole city turned into a hive of cultural and artistic events, Design to Win is expected to be a valuable insight into the never-ending affair between sport and design. Design to Win will be running from July 26th to November 18th at Design Museum, 28 Shad Themes, London SE1 2YD. Words by Jacopo Nuvolari

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1883 MAGAZINE | TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE

A REVOLUTION IN AIRCRAFT DESIGN.

Being cooped up inside the cramped confines of an airplane is never the most ideal situation to be in, especially if it happens to be a long haul flight. While Air New Zealand already exceeds in providing a liberating flight experience, the airline has still been constantly striving to up the ante even further.

The latest addition to their sleek onboard interior is the state-of-the-art Spaceseat located within the freshly renovated Premium Economy cabin of their fleet of Boeing 777-300ER planes. Forming a totally new concept within the airline industry, the design features the upmost flexibility and privacy through the angle of the seats combined with a configured 2-2-2 layout compared to usual 3-3-3 that is normally expected. “There was no Premium Economy seat available in the market that delivered the exclusive style of customer experience we were looking for,” says Chris Myers, Air New Zealand General Manager Europe. “The only answer was to design our own.” Designed by the in-house Air New Zealand team, the airline went onto do just that, creating the awardwinning Spaceseat that not only incorporates innovative practicality but is enviably sophisticated in its aesthetics also. Offering fixed back shells so a passenger in front can’t recline into the personal space of the person behind; the seat reclines by a base that slides forward into the copious amount of new foot room and then tilts up. Meanwhile an added foot bean bag adds extra comfort. Bearing in mind all travelers-both solo and couples alike, the ‘inny’ Spaceseats angle towards each other so couples can snuggle together or even dine at a mini common table using the retractable armrests. The sets of two window seats – ‘outy’ Spaceseats – are angled away from each other so as to offer the ultimate privacy for individual passengers. Combined with a built-in, multifaceted entertainment system featuring an eclectic array of movies, TV shows, music and games as well as an in-depth, interactive map of the journey (from boarding to landing no less); all the traveller has to do is sit back, relax and enjoy a flight like no other. For more, check out: www.airnewzealand.co.uk Words by Aideen Shannon

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JULIETTE’S CHELSEA-BASED ARCHITECTURAL INTERIOR DESIGN CONSULTANCY HAS ESTABLISHED A REPUTATION FOR CREATING ELEGANT AND SOPHISTICATED INTERIORS WHICH BLEND THE CLASSIC WITH THE CONTEMPORARY.

TOP 100 LEADING INTERIOR DESIGNERS 2012 BEST INTERIOR DESIGN LONDON 2010 28 Old Church Street, Chelsea, London, SW3 5BY www.juliettebyrne.com office@juliettebyrne.com tel 020 7352 1553


Fed up of a gloomy, rain splattered London; 1883 hitched a luxurious Air New Zealand flight to Los Angeles in search of eternal sunshine and the carefree American dream.

view of venise from rooftop bar hotel Erwin CA

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santa monic pier

1883 fashion editor at venice beach

rooftop bar hotel Erwin CA

Landing in Los Angeles, first stop: Venice Beach. Perched right on the edge of shoreline, Hotel Erwin is the only place to stay. Sleek and contemporary in its design, Hotel Erwin attracts a crowd and for all the right reasons. From the quirky décor of its unexpectedly huge rooms to its superb ocean views, the best part of this establishment is north. With a rooftop bar offering the most incredible panoramic views of Venice; it’s easy to get lost for hours in the summertime sounds wafting from the soundsystem as you nestle under the blankets provided and sip on one of their signature passion fruit mojitos. With a bright and affable staff catering to your every need and a thoroughly chilled-out atmosphere all-round, this hotel makes for the perfect place to unwind after sampling the sights and sounds of the area. Venturing out from the hotel, a pop at people-watching the colourful locals is certainly recommended. From the extremely buff gentlemen pumping weights at Muscle Beach to the gaggles of eclectic street artists and “musicians” dotted along the beachfront; it’s definitely worth a casual stroll to take in the bizarre scenes of Venice. Better still, rent a beach cruiser and bike the 15 mins to Santa Monica pier. There you can evoke your inner kid and munch on candy floss, play retro fairground games or get your fortune told by Zoltar in honor of the movie Big, all as the sun sets over the ocean, making the perfect evening time backdrop. During the day we suggest exploring the walks along the canals where Venice Beach adopted its namesake, checking out the vivid murals splashed across the sides of local buildings and then perusing the stores and cafes along the seriously cool main street of Abbot Kinney. When the sunshine peaks, take a drive down the palm tree lined coastline and dip your toes in the Pacific for a spot of surfing at Malibu Beach. Later, fend off hunger pangs and slide into a booth at Pann’s Restaurant, the diner whose associations with that crucial scene from Pulp Fiction has seen thousands flock through its doors over the years to absorb its retro feel seeped in movie history and most importantly, sample its famous fried chicken/waffle combo.

hotel Erwin CA

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Of course, no trip to LA would be complete without a stint in Hollywood. The Sunset Plaza on Sunset Boulevard makes for the ideal destination. Embodying an old-school, West Hollywood spirit, this beautiful hideaway boasts luxuriously big rooms, a gym and secluded central pool- perfect for chilling alongside and breathing in the sweet scent of the pink flowers dappled across the building’s Mediterranean-inspired exterior. In the mornings stock up on the quintessential All-American breakfast offered that includes copious amounts of coffee, a delicious array of donuts and of course, waffles. With its prime location on the Sunset Strip, the hotel is a stone’s throw away from iconic Hollywood nightspots as The House of Blues and The Viper Room, not to mention in walking distance to such sights as Grauman’s Chinese Theatre and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The hotel is also perfect place to chill out after a day’s worth of playing tourist, checking out the iconic Hollywood sign, or even taking a drive up the winding, mansionspeckled streets of the Hollywood Hills to see how the other half live. Heading downtown, it’s definitely worth a look at this ever-evolving area, which has now become deeply affiliated with the LA creative scene. A thriving urban hub, young musicians, artists and writers alike now call this seriously hip district home. Indeed LA is more than just a glamourized movie-land experience with deeply rooted fine art credentials. With this in mind, not to be missed is The Getty. Renowned for it’s vast collection of art, The Getty is also famed for its architecture, gardens and spectacular views. Sitting high on a hilltop, its three- car, cable-pulled tram has brought approx 1.3 million visitors to its doors each year.

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gillian jacobs POOLSIDE AT SUNSET PLAZA WEST HOLLYWOOD photography SONDRA STOCKER

While LA may be notorious for its vast highways, littered with bold billboard advertising and the most random selection of buildings on earth; spending a day picnicking in ones of its sprawling green-spaces as Griffith Park is the perfect lazy-day, relaxing experience. When it comes to something a bit more up-tempo however, catching a gig at the El Rey has to be done as does partying the night away at late night hangouts The Mandrake and The Cha Cha Lounge. Big, beautiful and certainly a place with some of the brightest sunshine earth; LA is 1883’s ultimate destination this summer. Words by Aideen Shannon Photography by Aideen Shannon, Logan MacDougall Pope and Jay Mitchell

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1883 magazine | travel & Lifestyle

Ever wondered what Eminem, Robbie Williams and Beyoncé have in common aside from a swathe of number one hits? The answer is they all admit to have suffered with depression at some point in their youth. As we struggle to cope with the pressures of money, work, relationships and simply finding our way in the world, sadly the under 30s become the most susceptible to mental disorder. In fact it is estimated that 1 in 4 are likely to experience depression at some point in their life, while in its most severe form it has become the second most common cause of death in the UK for men under 35. Unfortunately it is also young people who are most likely to not seek help. UP are an English charity run by a group of under 30s, committed to raising awareness about depression, reducing the stigma that surrounds it, and encouraging sufferers to speak out. They work hard to communicate the fact that it is a treatable illness that isn’t embarrassing or shameful. In fact everyone from Ewan McGregor to Beyoncé have experienced a mental health issue at some point in their lives – not something you would expect upon spinning Single Ladies or watching Down With Love. Holding a selection of fundraising events including comedy showcases and alternative sports days, the charity offers support to anyone who thinks they might be suffering from the illness. Last year’s Stand UP for Depression comedy gala proved a sell-out boasting a spectacular line-up of comedians including Ed Gamble, Tim Key and Nick Mohammed and raised £16,000 for the charity. They promote the idea that although treatment may not banish the illness for good, specialists are able to help people cope with and overcome mental health difficulties. The charity also works to help young people to identify mental disorders and, more importantly, helps them find effective treatment and the support that they need. To support the important work that UP do and for more information visit www.lookingup.org. Words by Rownan Newman

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Just steps from the sand, HOTEL ERWIN puts the soul of Venice Beach at your fingertips.

1697 PACIFIC AVENUE VENICE CA 90291 TEL 310.452.1111 RES 800.786.7789 HOTELERWIN.COM


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Luxury inLos Angeles Best Western Hotel Los Angeles, California, 90064-3123,US Phone: 310/477-9066 Fax: 310/478-4133


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1883 MAGAZINE | TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE

To you, what makes a great picture? Capturing people’s real energy, where they’re living in the moment. I love to be a voyeur and watch real people’s interactions where their true emotions shine through. Last show you saw? A rave called Beyond Wonderland with my friend Steve Aoki who was DJing. It was 40,000 raver kids in the rain. Best party ever? This “Demolition Party” in an upscale Paris hotel they were about to tear down. You had to sign a waver basically saying if you were killed, no one else was responsible. There were sledgehammers, spray paint and other destructive tools everywhere you got to just completely wreck this hotel to pieces. It was out of control. Earliest memory? I grew up in the hills and I remember seeing tourists everywhere. Also, driving to McDonalds and eating a lot of chicken Mc’Nuggets.

Who would play you in the movie of your life? Shia LaBeouf. People say I look like him. I’m not so sure. Current Muse? My girlfriend Diane. She’s such a rad Californian girl. She’s so free spirited and positive and that keeps me happy and motivated. She’s a blonde too, which is a real change for me, considering I’m known to have dated brunettes in the past. Motto for life? Be positive. Be consistent. Work hard.Any final last words? Keep checking the website. I’m constantly posting new stuff there, so it’s a new website everyday. Keep checking out The Cobra Shop too. We’re very reliable and have a lot of happy customers. Finally, don’t be afraid to be different or try to be successful in something people think is silly. Believe in yourself. www.thecobrasnake.com Words by Aideen Shannon Photography by Logan

MacDougall Pope

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1883 magazine issue 5