Page 1


Sajid Javid Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport

Vikki Heywood Chairman 14 –18 NOW

Culture is part of the fabric of our society, and so it is vital that the arts play an important role in our commemoration of the First World War, an event that changed forever the way we live. 14 –18 NOW will allow us to bring greater understanding of the war to new audiences, joining us together by offering insight into a part of our past that continues to forge the society we live in today. The First World War itself produced and inspired art, much of which has guided the way we understand the period now; I hope and expect that the newly commissioned work we will experience over the next four years will complement what has gone before and help all of us, old and especially young, to pause for a moment to reflect on those four years a century ago.

For all of us in the UK, the centenary of the First World War is a crucial landmark. Every part of our society was touched by the war. To honour this, our 14 –18 NOW series of artistic events hopes to reach young and old alike. 14 –18 NOW has commissioned projects in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Wales, and with our many free projects we aim to reach 10 million people by the end of 2018. None of this would be possible without the generous help of all our funders, led by the National Lottery through Arts Council England and the Heritage Lottery fund, and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, as well as our hosts the Imperial War Museums.

Principal funders

Supported by


Jenny Waldman Director 14 –18 NOW Welcome to the first season of 14 –18 NOW, with events taking place all across the UK and online from 12 June to 4 August. We have invited some of the world's leading artists to respond to the events of the War and to explore its resonance today. We hope there is something for everyone in this year’s programme. From theatre in Monmouthshire, London and Cornwall, to music in Worcester, Edinburgh and Barnsley; from dance, photography, and cartoons to literature, film and digital. Many events are UK-wide and others will be broadcast, thanks to our partnership with the BBC. You can enjoy many of the projects for free. See Dazzle Ships in Liverpool and London, where Carlos Cruz-Diez and Tobias Rehberger will reinvent these camouflage masterpieces in the Albert Dock and on the Thames. In Cornwall, WildWorks, working with the Lost Gardens of Heligan, explore the stories of local men who volunteered at the start of the war; Royal de Luxe brings its spectacular Giants to the streets of Liverpool; while in Glasgow you can see Graham Fagen’s new film based on the Jamaican soldiers’ experience of war at The Empire Café. Read what writers including Jeanette Winterson, NoViolet Bulawayo and Colm Tóibín have to say on war and artistic freedom in Lavinia Greenlaw’s Goodbye To All That; or sign up to receive hot off the press online cartoons by Ralph Steadman, Steve Bell and others responding to the events of 1914 Day-by-Day. We hope you will take part too – Stephen Fry, Malorie Blackman, Andrew Motion and many others are each writing a LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER – Kate Pullinger and Neil Bartlett invite you to write your letter to him. These thousands of letters will create a new kind of war memorial, constructed entirely of words.

4 August marks the very day that Britain entered the First World War a hundred years ago. A special BBC Prom will feature the last work of Sir John Tavener, and from 10pm-11pm LIGHTS OUT invites everyone across the UK to take part in marking the final hour leading to the declaration of war, through the simple act of switching out your lights and leaving on a single light source. This is just the beginning – we have a few surprises up our sleeves for this year, as well as many creative artists already planning exciting projects for our seasons in 2016 and 2018. Please look through the brochure and find out what interests you most and how you can take part – whether online or in person. We hope you’ll join us.


CONTENTS 4 6 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 34 36 37

DAZZLE SHIPS AFTER A WAR ANYA GALLACCIO MAMETZ LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER 1914 DAY-BY-DAY CARTOONS ART ON THE UNDERGROUND GOODBYE TO ALL THAT SHOT AT DAWN: CHLOE DEWE MATHEWS BLOOD: LEMN SISSAY MEMORIES OF AUGUST 1914 GRAHAM GINGLES CHARLIE WARD A FOREIGN FIELD RICHARD THOMPSON IF IT WASN’T FOR THEIR WELLIES WOMAD DOES IT MATTER? THE FORBIDDEN ZONE THE EMPIRE CAFÉ YOUNG MEN: BALLETBOYZ 100: THE DAY OUR WORLD CHANGED BBC PROMS: LATE NIGHT LIGHTS OUT ARTISTS & WAR BY MARGARET MACMILLAN PARTNERS TEAM & BOARD 2016 & 2018


4

FROM 12 JUNE 2014 LIVERPOOL FROM JULY 2014 LONDON

FREE

Edmund Gardner, a dry dock, near the Albert Dock, Liverpool L3 4AF. HMS President (1918), Victoria Embankment, London, EC4Y 0HJ

AN UNMISSABLE HOMAGE TO ARTISTS' CONTRIBUTION TO WARTIME HERITAGE CARLOS CRUZ-DIEZ/TOBIAS REHBERGER

DAZZLE SHIPS This summer two spectacular artworks will adorn the rivers of Liverpool and London. Two ships painted in specially-commissioned ‘dazzle’ designs will be an unmissable homage to artists' wartime contribution. The dazzle style in which the ships will be painted takes as its inspiration the famous glaring colours and jagged lines of the ‘dazzle’ camouflage, designed to confuse enemy U-boat captains. The geometricallypatterned boats would have been a familiar sight during the First World War, when hundreds of shipping convoys sailed to and from Britain’s ports. Carlos Cruz-Diez will create a new work for an historic pilot ship, the Edmund Gardner. One of the great figures of contemporary art, the Venezuelan artist is famous for his use of light, colour and movement in kinetic and optical art. A long-time resident of Paris, where he taught at the prestigious École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, his works can be found in the permanent collections of Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Modern, London and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. In London the HMS President (1918), which served as a Dazzle Ship during the First World War, will be ‘dazzled’ by Tobias Rehberger. Tobias Rehberger, one of the most respected European artists of his generation is a German sculptor whose work blurs the boundaries between

design, sculpture, furniture-making and installation. These eye-catching vessels remind local people and visitors of the crucial role ships played in the country’s wartime survival. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW, WW1 Centenary Art Commissions and Liverpool Biennial in association with the University of the Arts London Chelsea College of Arts, HMS President (1918) and Tate Liverpool, in partnership with Merseyside Maritime Museum. Supported by the National Lottery through Arts Council England and the Heritage Lottery Fund. Dazzle Ship London is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Goethe-Institut London.


Above: Š Estate of Edward Wadsworth. All rights reserved, DACS 2014


6

CURATED BY MARK BALL & TIM ETCHELLS

AFTER A WAR

TACKLING PAST EVENTS TO CAST LIGHT ON PRESENT ISSUES, AN ECLECTIC LINE-UP OF UNFORGETTABLE PERFORMANCES ASKS US TO REFLECT UPON A WAR...

LIFT, Tim Etchells (Artistic Director, Forced Entertainment) and 14 –18 NOW have invited 25 artists from across the world to react to the enduring social, political and cultural legacies of the first truly global conflict. From the Arab Spring to ferment in eastern Europe, the roots of the modern world can be found in the First World War. To the 21st century mind it can seem hopelessly remote – but this war dissolved empires, changed the nature of warfare and continues to define global relationships. Tackling past events to cast light on present issues, an eclectic line-up of unforgettable performances asks us to reflect upon a war that shaped the world we live in. A programme of events takes place at London’s Southbank Centre and Battersea Arts Centre, a potent venue which, from 1916 onwards, housed the trials of many of London’s conscientious objectors. After a War culminates in a three-day programme of performance, sound and film installations, participatory works, personal storytelling and more. Artists and companies include Stan’s Café (UK) who will use several thousand dominoes to demonstrate the impact of Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s assassination; Lucien Bourjeily (Lebanon) who invites you to draw maps of the Middle East; Lola Arias (Argentina) who meets veterans of the Falklands war; and Vlatka Horvat (Croatia) who will re-tell the history of Yugoslavia. Actors Touring Company & Nassim Soleimanpour transform Shakespeare’s Hamlet.


BATTERSEA ARTS CENTRE

SOUTHBANK CENTRE

Lavender Hill, London, SW11 5TN

London, SE1 8XX

24 – 26 JUNE 2014 THE NOTEBOOK

24 – 26 JUNE 2014 THE GREAT WAR

27 – 29 JUNE 2014 AFTER A WAR

24 – 26 JUNE 2014 EL ANO EN QUE NACI/THE YEAR I WAS BORN

28 – 29 JUNE 2014 A DREAM TURNS SOUR Also at Battersea Arts Centre, Forced Entertainment present The Notebook, a performance based on the award-winning 1986 novel Le grand cahier by Hungarian writer Ágota Kristóf. Directed by Tim Etchells, The Notebook tells the story of twin brothers evacuated to the Hungarian countryside during World War II. The Tiger Lillies, godfathers of alternative cabaret, will transform British First World War poetry in A Dream Turns Sour. The work of Wilfred Owen, Arthur West, John McCrae and Noel Hodgson will become an angry, lyrical set of songs providing a fitting finale to After a War. At the Southbank Centre, Hotel Modern & Arthur Sauer present The Great War. Using live animation and a miniature film set, Hotel Modern will recreate the experience of millions of soldiers in the trenches.

7

In Lola Arias’ El Ano En Que Naci / The Year I Was Born eleven performers born in Pinochet’s Chile in the 1970s and early 1980s tell the stories of their parents’ experience living in the grip of dictatorship. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and LIFT. A House on Fire project, presented by Southbank Centre and Battersea Arts Centre, supported by the Culture Programme of the European Union in partnership with the British Council and with the support of the Representation of the Government of Flanders in the UK. The Notebook is a Forced Entertainment production, co-produced by PACT Zollverein (Essen): LIFT and 14 –18 NOW. A House on Fire co-commission with HAU (Berlin), Kaaitheater (Brussels), Teatro Maria Matos (Lisbon), LIFT and Malta Festival Poznan. A Dream Turns Sour is also co-commissioned with Maison de la musique de Nanterre (FR). The Notebook is based on Le grand cahier by Ágota Kristóf original © Editions du Seuil, Paris, 1986.


8

14 – 29 JUNE 2014 ALDEBURGH FESTIVAL

TICKETS £10 ORFORD NESS FREE SNAPE MALTINGS Snape, Saxmundham, IP17 1SP Orford Ness, Orford, Woodbridge, IP12 2NU

ANYA GALLACCIO Inspired by the landscape on which the British military conducted its early experiments in flight, Scottish-born artist Anya Gallaccio exhibits a new work in two locations in Suffolk – at Orford Ness and at Snape Maltings. During the First World War the recently-formed Royal Flying Corps conducted trials in aerial photography and bombing at secret testing grounds on Orford Ness, to which the artist now returns.

GALLACCIO CREATES A SPECTACULAR INSTALLATION AND A SERIES OF IMAGES THAT DRAW ON HER FASCINATION WITH THE PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC MATTER AND THE FORCES OF DECAY AND DESTRUCTION.

Using images of imploded material taken from the site, original aerial photographs from the IWM's archive and the region’s constantly shifting shingle landscape, Gallaccio creates a spectacular installation with a series of photographic images that draw on her fascination with the properties of organic matter and the forces of decay and destruction. Co–commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Aldeburgh Music's SNAP visual arts programme, with the support of the National Trust.


24 JUNE – 05 JULY 2014 GREAT LLANCAYO UPPER WOOD MONMOUTHSHIRE

TICKETS £20 (£15 CONCESSIONS)

NATIONAL THEATRE WALES/OWEN SHEERS

MAMETZ

This large-scale, site-specific production – performed in the ancient Great Llancayo Upper Wood, near Usk, Monmouthshire – gives audiences a vivid glimpse into life and death in the trenches and on the battlefields of the Somme. Inspired by Welsh writer Owen Sheers’ poem Mametz Wood, it draws on written material by the poets who fought in or witnessed one of the war’s bloodiest conflicts – the Battle of Mametz Wood, in which 4,000 of the 38th (Welsh) Division were killed or wounded. Among the soldiers who took part were several key Welsh and English war poets, including Robert Graves, David Jones, Siegfried Sassoon and Llewelyn Wyn Griffith, and Sheers’ own great- great-uncle, William Cross. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and National Theatre Wales. With funding from Arts Council of Wales and the Welsh Government.

OWEN SHEERS WRITER MATTHEW DUNSTER DIRECTOR JON BAUSOR DESIGNER CHRISTOPHER MORRIS CREATIVE ASSOCIATE LEE CURRAN LIGHTING DESIGNER GEORGE DENNIS SOUND DESIGNER


10

LETTER TO AN

UNKNOWN KATE PULLINGER AND NEIL BARTLETT


28 JUNE – 04 AUGUST 2014

FREE – GET INVOLVED 1418NOW.ORG.UK/LETTER

11

HELP CREATE A NEW WAR MEMORIAL – ONE MADE ONLY OF WORDS, AND BY THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER invites you to create a new kind of war memorial, one built entirely from words. The famous Charles Jagger war memorial on Platform One of Paddington Station features a bronze soldier – large as life, dressed in full trench uniform and reading a letter from home. In the 37 days leading up to the anniversary of the declaration of war you are invited to write him that letter, telling him what you feel and think as the anniversary approaches – and then to send it to a specially created website. As they arrive, all of the letters will be published online, creating a new war memorial – one made only of words, and by thousands of people. Individuals, organisations, community groups and schools UK-wide are contributing – from a choir in Derbyshire, prisoners in Buckinghamshire, nurses in Hull, older people who will meet at the Empire Café in Glasgow, to a creative writing group in

Derry~Londonderry, and 400 pupils from one London school alone. 50 writers from England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland will also write letters to the soldier. These writers include: Sebastian Faulks, Stephen Fry, Andrew Motion, Kamila Shamsie, Caryl Churchill, Benjamin Zephaniah, Daljit Nagra, Bryony Lavery, Andy McNab, Liz Lochhead & Sheila Hancock. The LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER website goes live on the morning of 28 June; you can visit it now to find out more, and to see some of those fifty letters. Kate Pullinger is a novelist and Professor of Creative Writing and Digital Media at Bath Spa University. Neil Bartlett is a novelist and theatre director. This is their first collaboration. Commissioned by 14 –18 NOW in partnership with the BBC. Produced in association with Free Word.

SOLDIER


12

FROM 28 JUNE 2014

FREE ONLINE AT 1418NOW.ORG.UK AND BBC.CO.UK/RADIO4 The Cartoon Museum £7 35 Little Russell Street, London WC1A 2HH

1914 DAY-BY-DAY CARTOONS One of Our Minor Wars 'Well, if you knows of a better ‘ole, go to it.' Bruce Bairnsfather, Bystander, 24 November 1915

ARTISTS INCLUDE STEVE BELL, PETER BROOKES, STEVEN CAMLEY, KATE CHARLESWORTH, ACHIM GRESER & HERIBERT LENZ, JOHN MCCREA & FERG HANDLEY, JON MCNAUGHT, WOODROW PHOENIX, ZOOM ROCKMAN, POSY SIMMONDS, RALPH STEADMAN, AND LALIT KUMAR SHARMA & ALAN COWSILL

Over six weeks, twelve cartoonists and graphic artists will respond to the events that happened across the world as the world was heading to war one hundred years ago. You will be able to follow their illustrated commentary on the issues and incidents of the day as relations between the great powers deteriorated into war, via the BBC Radio 4 and 14 –18 NOW websites. Running alongside will be a real-time series on BBC Radio 4, 1914 Day-by-Day, in which Professor Margaret MacMillan (The War That Ended Peace) chronicles the weeks leading up to Britain’s entry into the conflict. Each week, two cartoonists react to the events of one hundred years ago through the prism of what we know, now. Their cartoons will be published online and distributed via social media, bringing home to a new audience the frightening speed with which global war can descend. The original works will be exhibited at The Cartoon Museum beside the exhibition Never Again – The First World War in Cartoon and Comic Art (11 June – 19 October 2014). Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and The Cartoon Museum in association with BBC Radio 4.


FROM JULY 2014 EDGWARE ROAD AND PICCADILLY CIRCUS TUBE STATIONS AND ACROSS LONDON UNDERGROUND

FREE

ART ON THE UNDERGROUND RICHARD WENTWORTH

British artist Richard Wentworth takes the idea of ‘mass communications’ as the starting point for a commission drawing upon London Transport’s use of the public information poster during the First World War. As war broke out in 1914 the power of communicating with the public through the Tube network became clear. Posters promoting war work, and encouraging travellers to enlist, sprang up across the network. Wentworth responds to their iconic imagery, and the theme of communication in the lead up to the war more generally, by creating a network-wide poster commission exhibited at stations across the city.

Above: What is your job?, unknown artist, 1914 © London Transport Museum

A chronicler of daily life, Wentworth has played a leading role in British sculpture since the 1970s and influenced numerous generations through his teaching at Goldsmiths College, Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art and the Royal College of Art, London. Art on the Underground, part of London Underground, makes a world-class programme of contemporary art available to travellers on the network. It continues a longstanding tradition of art and design at the core of London Underground's identity. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Art on the Underground.

13


14

GOODBYE TO ALL THAT

CURATED BY LAVINIA GREENLAW FEATURING NOVIOLET BULAWAYO XIAOLU GUO, DANIEL KEHLMANN ERWIN MORTIER, ELIF SHAFAK KAMILA SHAMSIE, ALI SMITH ALEŠ ŠTEGER, COLM TÓIBÍN AND JEANETTE WINTERSON

THESE STORIES, INVESTIGATIONS AND ESSAYS PAY TRIBUTE TO THE SPIRIT OF ROBERT GRAVES Lavinia Greenlaw, one of Britain’s most eminent poets and respected literary figures, invites ten writers from countries involved in the First World War to respond to the title of Robert Graves’ famous book. Each take the poignant phrase ‘Goodbye to All That’ as a starting point for a personal reflection on the aftermath of war, as well as on the continuing struggle for artistic freedom in the face of conflict in all its forms. Their written responses to Graves’ famous line will be published as an anthology by Pushkin Press, broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and read and discussed at live events in London and Edinburgh. These stories, investigations and essays pay tribute to the spirit of Graves, an artist who remained true to himself in the face of personal trauma and public hostility.

The poet, novelist and classicist Robert Graves fought at the Battle of the Somme alongside his close friend and fellow soldier-poet Siegfried Sasoon. Among the most celebrated writers to emerge from the conflict, his autobiography Goodbye to All That, which he described as a ‘bitter leave-taking of England’, depicts the horror of war and documents the momentous social changes it brought about. The anthology published by Pushkin Press, available for purchase online and in bookshops. Commissioned by 14 –18 NOW.

FROM 07 JULY 2014 READINGS ON BBC RADIO 3 1 AUGUST 2014 BOOK PUBLISHED

28 JULY 2014 BRITISH LIBRARY DISCUSSION 96 Euston Road, London, NW1 2DB


Award-winning photographer Chloe Dewe Mathews will present a series of images of the locations at which British, French and Belgian troops were executed for cowardice and desertion during the First World War. Dewe Mathews's photographs are taken as close as possible to the precise time when the executions took place, which was usually at daybreak. Drawing on meticulous research, she has been able to locate the exact sites at which scores of soldiers, found guilty of breaching military discipline, were executed by firing squad. The photographs will be published in book form by Ivorypress on 14 July 2014 before embarking on a two-year international exhibition tour to Edinburgh, London, Douchy-les-Mines, Dublin and Madrid.

Chloe Dewe Mathews is a British photographer whose photo series Caspian won the British Journal of Photography International Photography Award in 2011. She has exhibited internationally and her work has appeared in the Guardian, Times and Independent newspapers. She has recently been awarded the prestigious Robert Gardner Fellowship in Photography by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University. Commissioned by the Ruskin School of Art at the University of Oxford. Sponsored by Genesis Imaging and supported by the British Council, Government of Flanders, John Fell OUP Research Fund and the Van Houten Fund.

BOOK PUBLISHED 14 JULY 2014

CHLOE DEWE MATHEWS

SHOT AT DAWN


JULY 2014 THE VERBAL ARTS CENTRE DERRY~LONDONDERRY Stable Lane and Mall Wall, Bishop Street Within, Derry~Londonderry BT48 6PU Lemn Sissay makes books, records, public art and plays. His Landmark Poems are installed throughout Manchester and London, in venues including the Royal Festival Hall. He was part of the London 2012 Festival and placed poetry in the Olympic Park. He is associate artist at Southbank Centre, patron of The Letterbox Club and The Reader Organisation, and inaugural trustee of World Book Night. The Verbal Group, made up of Lagan Press, Sevengate Digital Publishing and the Verbal Arts Centre, is the only organisation of its kind in Ireland.  Focused on reading, writing, speaking and listening, it provides all members of the community with the opportunity to tell their story and engage with the stories of others. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Verbal.

BLOOD LEMN SISSAY

THE INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED WRITER AND ARTIST LEMN SISSAY COLLABORATES WITH DERRY~LONDONDERRY’S LOCAL COMMUNITIES TO CREATE NEW POETRY, ART AND PERFORMANCE.


23 – 27 JULY 2014 LIVERPOOL

FREE

Liverpool hosts one of the most astonishing events of the 2014 centenary when it welcomes Giants onto its streets in a city-wide spectacular stretching across five uninterrupted days. The world-renowned street theatre company Royal de Luxe retells the story of the famous Liverpool Pals Battalions, the young men who volunteered alongside their next-door neighbours, family members and friends to fight for Britain on the battlefields of Europe. Giants including the Little Girl, much missed since her previous visit to Liverpool, and her pet dog Xolo will roam the city, drawing crowds into its ranks wherever it ventures.

When the Giants last visited the city in 2012, to mark the centenary of the sinking of the Titanic, 800,000 people came out to see them. This summer they return to recall the fevered atmosphere of those early months of the war, and to honour a courageous generation of Liverpudlians. The Memories of August 1914 route and story will be announced at the beginning of June. For more information visit 1418NOW.org.uk. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Liverpool City Council.

MEMORIES OF AUGUST 1914 ROYAL DE LUXE

17


18

GRAHAM GINGLES

AT TIMES LIKE THESE, MEN WERE WISHING THEY WERE ALL KINDS OF INSECTS THE 17-YEAR-OLD PRINCESS MARY CAPTURED THE PUBLIC IMAGINATION WHEN SHE LAUNCHED A FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN TO ENSURE THAT EVERY UNIFORMED MAN AND WOMAN SERVING BRITAIN ABROAD ON CHRISTMAS DAY 1914 WOULD RECEIVE A ‘GIFT FROM THE NATION’.

Packed with presents ranging from lighters and cigarettes to chocolate and spices, these embossed brass boxes would become one of the most enduring keepsakes of the First World War, symbols of compassion in times of danger and hardship. This project began when the MAC Belfast gave an original Princess Mary box to the Northern Irish artist Graham Gingles. This gift led the artist to explore the experiences of the men at the front and in particular the wartime diaries of Robert McGookin, a soldier from Larne town, close to where he lives. Gingles dramatically scales up, to room size, the intimate and enigmatic wall-hanging sculptures for which he is known, and which are usually enclosed in meticulously crafted wood and glass cases. His new works occupy the entirety of the Sunken Gallery, which itself becomes a box into which the visitor enters. Sculptural and theatrical, this immersive work provokes the viewer to peer into the room’s nooks and crannies in a compelling treatment of memory and loss. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and the MAC.

03 JULY – 17 AUGUST 2014 THE MAC, BELFAST

FREE

10 Exchange Street West, Belfast BT1 2NJ


23 JULY 2014 – 03 AUGUST 2014 THE CINEMA MUSEUM, LONDON

TICKETS £5

19

The Cinema Museum, 2 Dugard Way, London, SE11 4TH

SOUND&FURY

CHARLIE WARD Some say that British soldiers in the trenches held up cardboard cutouts of Charlie Chaplin’s tramp in the hope that the enemy would die laughing. But as the carnage of war set in, Chaplin’s image was put to a different use... C Ward. 1914. In a makeshift hospital, behind the front line, the war’s first casualties are treated. To boost morale, medical staff arrange for a Chaplin film to be shown for the bedridden, with the ward’s ceiling serving as the silver screen. 

For one soldier, the flickering images, whirring projector and Chaplin’s perfect comic timing trigger complex emotions and memories. Cast from the trenches to childhood, from trauma to dreams, the hospital film show sets him on a journey into a personal no man’s land. Using their distinctive style – total darkness, minimal lighting and immersive sound design – Sound&Fury conjure up the extraordinary experience of being a patient on Charlie Ward. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Fuel.


20

31 JULY 2014 TICKETS £10 – £43 THREE CHOIRS FESTIVAL WORCESTER WORCESTER CATHEDRAL 8 College Yard, Worcester, WR1 2LA The celebrated German composer Torsten Rasch, the historic Three Choirs Festival and the worldfamous Philharmonia Orchestra will present a major 40-minute work for choir, soloists and orchestra that sets the poetry of the First World War to music. Commissioned jointly by the Three Choirs Festival and Germany’s Chemnitz Opera, where it will also be performed, A Foreign Field features singers from both companies. Born in Dresden, Torsten Rasch has previously written for English National Opera and the BBC. This powerful libretto is inspired by writers including the Dymock Poets – the group including Edward Thomas, Rupert Brooke and Robert Frost that wrote, read and walked together in the Gloucestershire countryside

before the war interrupted – and their Austro-German contemporaries Georg Trakl and Rainer Marie Rilke. Brought together in music, their words form an impassioned, moving memorial to the suffering endured on both sides. Conducted by Baldur Brönnimann, the programme also features Elgar’s The Spirit of England and Vaughan Williams’ much-loved The Lark Ascending. Commissioned by public subscription for the Three Choirs Festival 2014 and Städtische Theater Chemnitz, Erich-Schellhorn-Stiftung as part of 14 –18 NOW. This performance kindly supported by the Elmley Foundation and Anwen Walker. Choristers supported by Lee Bolton Monier-Williams.

THREE CHOIRS FESTIVAL CHORUS PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA BALDUR BRÖNNIMANN CONDUCTOR YUREE SUH SOPRANO RODERICK WILLIAMS BARITONE PETER HOARE TENOR

TORSTEN RASCH

A FOREIGN FIELD


21

RICHARD THOMPSON Legendary British songwriter Richard Thompson takes a suite of new songs inspired by wartime correspondence between soldiers and their families, friends and lovers to audiences across the country. Richard responds to the commission with the idea of setting letters to and from the front to music. This is the first set of a series of new songs that will be written and performed over the course of the centenary, growing into a major piece of performance. On this tour Richard plants seeds of inspiration – songs that will be scattered among his concert appearances through the summer. Richard Thompson is one of this country’s greatest songwriters, capable of breathtaking drama and sublime delicacy, prompting Rolling Stone to hail him as ‘a perennial dark-horse contender for the title of greatest living rock guitarist’. Commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and produced by Serious.

FROM 20 JULY 2014

Confirmed dates (more to be added) 20 July: Hatfield, Folk by the Oak 22 July: The Hawth, Crawley 23 July: The Forum, Bath 24 July: Warwick Folk Festival 27 July: Barnsley, Underneath the Stars Festival 30 July: Chester, Gawsforth Hall 01 Aug: Cambridge Folk Festival


22

LIVE MUSIC NOW SCOTLAND TOUR

EDINBURGH AUGUST 2014

JOHN MAXWELL GEDDES

IF IT WASN’T FOR THEIR WELLIES If it wasn't for their wellies brings generations of Edinburgh families together to share their memories and impressions of war through musical composition. Drawing on the shared heritage of families in communities including those associated with the North British Rubber Company, which supplied the British Army with vital supplies such as rubber boots and fire hoses, If it wasn't for their wellies unites Edinburgh’s older residents with exceptional young musicians under the charge of composer John Maxwell Geddes. Following a unique compositional model which was piloted in the 2013 Luminate Festival on five islands in the Scottish Hebrides, this project sees Maxwell Geddes working with care home residents

IF IT WASN’T FOR THEIR WELLIES BRINGS GENERATIONS OF EDINBURGH FAMILIES TOGETHER TO SHARE THEIR MEMORIES AND IMPRESSIONS OF WAR THROUGH MUSICAL COMPOSITION.

and lunch club users to source material for a suite of new songs. The complete cycle will be performed in the care homes and centres which inspired its composition, and on tour by Live Music Now Scotland musicians. Live Music Now is the UK’s largest provider of music in outreach settings. It was founded by Yehudi Menuhin and Ian Stoutzker to support outstanding young artists in building their professional careers while simultaneously bringing the joy of live music into the daily lives of those who would otherwise not have access to it. If it wasn’t for their wellies is part of Live Music Now Scotland's Composing with Care initiative. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Live Music Now Scotland.


24 – 27 JULY 2014 CHARLTON PARK, WILTSHIRE

WOMAD 14 –18 NOW is excited to be working with WOMAD, a festival that showcases the role of music and performance in world culture. Like 14 –18 NOW, WOMAD recognises the vital part played by the arts in the maintenance and enrichment of a society’s shared heritage. A specially-commissioned new work by Zimbabwean music collective Siyaya shows how a healthy musical culture can help to sustain communities through conflict and political upheaval. The Shona name ‘Siyaya’ means ‘we are on the move’, as befitting a high-energy group of musicians, percussionists, vocalists and dancers. Originally

23

FEATURING SIYAYA AND LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER

from Bulawayo, their work with schools and community programmes has shown how the continuity of culture can transcend tumultuous social change. This new work, created specifically for this concert, is performed amidst their traditional repertoire of songs and dances. Festival-goers are also invited to compose their own letter as part of LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER; for more details on this nationwide commission, see page 10. Siyaya’s new work is co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and WOMAD.


FREE ONLINE AT CHANNEL4.COM & 1418NOW.ORG.UK

DOES IT MATTER? When two million newly disabled British ex-servicemen returned from the First World War, society’s attitudes to disability had to change. In a series of short films curated by Artsadmin and Xenoki, five contemporary disabled artists present unorthodox, irreverent and unexpected takes on the legacies of war and disability in Britain today. Artists to be announced in May. Visit 1418NOW.org.uk for more information. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Channel 4. Produced by Artsadmin and Xenoki. Part of the Unlimited programme. Does it matter? — losing your legs? For people will always be kind, And you need not show that you mind When the others come in after hunting To gobble their muffins and eggs. Does it matter? — losing your sight? There’s such splendid work for the blind; And people will always be kind, As you sit on the terrace remembering And turning your face to the light. Do they matter? — those dreams from the pit? You can drink and forget and be glad, And people won’t say that you’re mad; For they’ll know you’ve fought for your country And no one will worry a bit. Does it Matter? Siegfried Sassoon, 1917 Right: Great Britain from a Wheelchair by Tony Heaton


02 AUGUST 2014 LIVE STREAM FROM SALZBURG FESTIVAL AT BARBICAN, LONDON

TICKETS £11.50

25

Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

DUNCAN MACMILLAN TEXT KATIE MITCHELL DIRECTOR LEO WARNER VIDEO DIRECTOR FINN ROSS VIDEO DESIGNER LIZZIE CLACHAN SET DESIGN SUSSIE JUHLIN-WALLEN COSTUME MELANIE WILSON AND GARETH FRY SOUND JACK KNOWLES LIGHTING JOHN HIGGINS PRODUCER

THE FORBIDDEN ZONE

KATIE MITCHELL AND DUNCAN MACMILLAN

Written by Duncan Macmillan with texts by Mary Borden, Virginia Woolf, Hannah Arendt, and others. Performed in English, German and French with subtitles. The ‘Chemist's War’ of 1914 –18 witnessed the deployment of the first weapon of mass destruction – poison gas. At the heart of the race to weaponise gas is the tragic story of the Haber family. Clara Immerwahr gave up her career in chemistry when she married the Nobel Prize-winning Fritz Haber. When Haber’s research turned to the development of Chlorine gas and its implementation in Ypres, Clara’s protests at this ‘perversion of science’ were unheard. Her fate was to be echoed in 1949 in Chicago when their grandchild, Claire Haber, saw her poison gas antidote research terminated as military funding turned to atomic warfare. Renowned for her innovative staging and immersive theatrical worlds, Katie Mitchell is among the most inventive directors in Britain. This unique production uses five video cameras and four film sets – including a moving subway train – to create a dynamic live cinema event. The Forbidden Zone has its world première at Salzburg Festival this summer. Co-produced by Salzburg Festival and Schaubühne am Lehniner Platz Berlin in collaboration with Managing Mayhem; UK live streaming is co-produced by 14 –18 NOW and the Barbican.


26

24 JULY – 01 AUGUST 2014 THE EMPIRE CAFÉ

FREE

The Briggait, Glasgow, G1 5HZ

GRAHAM FAGEN

THE EMPIRE CAFÉ The Empire Café is a week-long event in the Briggait, Glasgow during the 2014 Commonwealth Games, exploring the context of Scotland and the North Atlantic slave trade. As part of The Empire Café’s wider programme, 14 –18 NOW is commissioning a new piece of work by Scottish artist Graham Fagen to be exhibited in the Briggait (home of the Merchant’s Steeple) throughout the course of the week. Fagen considers the stories of Jamaican soldiers during the First World War through a new piece of film. Also in the Briggait, the designers of The Empire Café, Collective Architecture are creating a bespoke writing room where the public can go to be inspired and compose their own LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER as part of 14 –18 NOW’s UK-wide

participative project to get the public writing. Collective Architecture has designed a discrete pavilion within which Café visitors can reflect on what they want to say to the Unknown Soldier as he goes off to war in 1914. The work is led by author Louise Welsh and Jude Barber of Collective Architecture. The Empire Café is part of the Glasgow 2014 Cultural Programme, a partnership between the Glasgow 2014 Organising Committee, Glasgow Life, and Creative Scotland through National Lottery funding. The Empire Café is also supported by the British Council. LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER (see page 10) and Graham Fagen's new work are commissioned by 14 –18 NOW.


27

BALLETBOYZ

YOUNG MEN A year in development, BalletBoyz will present an excerpt of its much anticipated new full length show Young Men as part of an evening of dance at The Roundhouse. Drawing inspiration from images of war through the ages, and particularly the First World War, Young Men explores the theme of war and the bond that forms between the men that train and fight together. Choreographed by Iván Pérez with an original score by composer and musician Keaton Henson the show features film and projection by BalletBoyz. Winners of 2013 National Dance Award for Best Independent Company, BalletBoyz have revolutionized dance presentation formats and are at the forefront of digital dance creation. The evening will also feature the Company’s award winning double bill Serpent / Fallen by leading British choreographers Liam Scarlett and Russell Maliphant. Young Men is co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and Sadler's Wells. The full work will be premiered in January 2015 at Sadler’s Wells.

31 JULY & 01 AUGUST 2014 ROUNDHOUSE, LONDON Roundhouse, Chalk Farm Road, London NW1 8EH

TICKETS FROM £15


28

BILL MITCHELL DIRECTOR MYRIDDIN WANNELL DESIGNER MERCEDES KEMP DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY & RESEARCH SUE HILL PERFORMANCE DIRECTOR SEAMUS CAREY COMPOSER AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR

"They say we die twice, the first time when our body dies and the second when the last person to remember us dies." Bill Mitchell, Director WildWorks and The Lost Gardens of Heligan are collaborating on 100: The Day Our World Changed – culminating in a one day event. 100: The Day Our World Changed remembers the local men who went to war a hundred years ago and the stories of the people they left behind. This dawn to dusk, powerful and emotional experience will move from the harbour in Mevagissey to the sweeping fields of Heligan. It will involve stunning visual images, memorable new music, a core of familiar WildWorks theatre makers, traditional horse and steam power and many local people of all ages. Co-commissioned by 14 –18 NOW and The Lost Gardens of Heligan.

WILDWORKS

100: THE DAY OUR WORLD CHANGED

03 AUGUST 2014 FROM MEVAGISSEY TO HELIGAN, CORNWALL

FREE


04 AUGUST 2014, 9:15PM ROYAL ALBERT HALL, LONDON

SEATS £14/18 (BOOKING FEES APPLY) STANDING £5 (NO BOOKING FEE)

Kensington Gore, London SW7 2AP

HEATH QUARTET/TALLIS SCHOLARS PETER PHILLIPS CONDUCTOR

JOHN TAVENER

BBC PROMS: LATE NIGHT On 4 August 2014, as the nation remembers Britain’s entry into war one hundred years before, the music of one of its greatest composers will carry its audience through an evening of spiritual reflection at the BBC Proms. The performance will be part of a countrywide programme of events marking the hours leading up to 11pm, the exact time at which Britain’s ultimatum to Germany expired. Combining silence and sound, simplicity and radiance, John Tavener captured the public imagination like few other 20th century composers. The other-worldly atmosphere of a Late Night Prom frames a musical meditation on loss composed by this profoundly spiritual man just before his death last year, at the age of 69. For this world premiere of Requiem Fragments, the Tallis Scholars and conductor Peter Phillips are joined by the Heath Quartet. They will also perform Tavener’s Ikon of Light, appropriate for an evening on which light serves as a symbol of enduring hope through dark times. There will be no interval. A world premiere commissioned by the BBC for the BBC Proms as part of 14 –18 NOW.


30

LIGHTS


04 AUGUST 2014, 10 – 11PM UK WIDE EVENT

“THE LAMPS ARE GOING OUT ALL OVER EUROPE; WE SHALL NOT SEE THEM LIT AGAIN IN OUR LIFETIME.”

OUT

FREE – GET INVOLVED

31

At 11pm on 4 August 1914, the deadline for Britain’s ultimatum to Germany expired and war was declared, ushering in one of the darkest periods in our history. As the moment approached, the then Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey made the famous remark: “The lamps are going out all over Europe; we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime.” In a dramatic UK-wide event, LIGHTS OUT is an invitation to everyone to turn out their lights, replacing them with a single light source, for a collective moment of reflection. 14 –18 NOW is commissioning artists to create special digital artworks for download and large-scale, site-specific works at locations across the UK. More will be revealed in the coming months: visit 1418NOW.org.uk for updates. Commissioned by 14 –18 NOW.


ARTISTS AND WAR AN ESSAY BY MARGARET MACMILLAN

ARE ARTISTS THE CANARIES IN THE MINE WHO SENSE THE COMING EXPLOSION BEFORE ANYONE ELSE DOES?

Are artists the canaries in the mine who sense the coming explosion before anyone else does? It is hard not to look at the world before 1914 and wonder whether they somehow sensed that a catastrophe was bearing down on them and their societies. Henry James or Marcel Proust were challenging the old structures of plot in favour of exploring, often at great length, human psychology. The cubism of Braque or Picasso, the dissonant compositions of Schoenberg or Stravinsky, or the free flowing and often erotic choreography of Isadora Duncan or Nijinsky were acts of rebellion against the certainties of the old world and its traditions. Did they somehow know that they needed new ways of dealing with what was to come? Fanciful perhaps but artists may have antennae which the rest of us lack. We too often think of those last years of peace as a golden age of prosperity and stability, of complacency even. Yet all was not well in Europe. European science, technology and industry produced a better life for millions but they also fuelled an arms race. Rapid change had brought its own tensions, from social strife to national rivalries. Pacifist impulses vied with militarism for the soul of Europe. So often in the literature of the time we have the image of a thunderstorm about to break. Was revolution from below going to upturn the old order or were the powers going to send their massive armies and navies against each other? Intellectuals increasingly challenged the old comfortable assumption that human beings were rational and Europeans were more rational and more civilized than anyone else. Artists reflected that unease. Some turned away, at least in part, from the modern world. Think of composers such as Vaughan Williams or Antonín Dvořák who found inspiration in traditional folk songs. In Britain there was a craze for history paintings, often of the Middle Ages. Other artists though faced

OF THOSE ARTISTS WHO SURVIVED SOME FELL SILENT, UNABLE TO DEAL WITH THE ENORMITY OF THE WAR.


33

IN THOSE LONG FOUR YEARS EUROPE WAS TO LOSE OVER 9 MILLION MEN, AMONG THEM FUTURE LEADERS, SCIENTISTS, AND THINKERS.

forwards into the 20th century. Painters such as the Italian futurists, the German expressionists or the English Vorticists were fascinated by speed and the ways in which the modern world was shattering the conventions of the old. The old ways of painting, writing, sculpting or composing no longer seemed adequate to capture the world around them. Modernism was born in part out of the need to find new ways of expression to describe a new world which was unlike anything that had gone before. And for some, war and violence were not things to be feared but welcomed as ways of speeding up the destruction of the old and the outworn. War, said the Italian futurist Marinetti, ‘is the sole hygiene of the world’. Rupert Brooke longed, he told his friends, for ‘some sort of upheaval’. It came in the summer of 1914. Europeans, contrary to later myths, did not greet the outbreak of war with wild enthusiasm. The cheering crowds were only part of the picture. Crowds also marched through the streets to demand that their governments uphold the peace. For most across the Continent the coming of a storm so often anticipated was received with gloom, fear or sometimes with despair about European civilization. Yet across Europe, the publics also felt that their nation was the innocent one, that

their war was merely defensive. Artists in this at least were in tune with their own societies. Many were swept up in the burst of patriotism in the war’s early stages and volunteered. In those long four years Europe was to lose over 9 million men, among them future leaders, scientists, and thinkers. And of course artists. Franz Marc, the German expressionist, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, Wilfred Owen, all died on the Western Front. Of those artists who survived some fell silent, unable to deal with the enormity of the war. Others such as John Nash tried to grapple with it and found that the avant garde of the last years of peace had given them the tools they needed. The broken battlefields with their torn earth and their trees at crazy angles looked like cubist paintings while the bursts of shells in the night skies, the figures stumbling across no man’s land or the creeping clouds of greenish poison gas echoed symbolist paintings with their mystical landscapes and colours full of meaning. Ford Madox Ford’s great quartet about the war, Parade’s End, is like Proust in its exploration of the workings of the conscious and unconscious mind and the heart. We have the statistics from the Great War – so many killed and so many wounded, the lists of battles, the towns and cities destroyed, the countryside poisoned and flooded, or the resources expended – but they are too big to comprehend. And how do we make sense of the four years of fighting, the imperfect peace and the dreadful legacies left for the 20th century? Historians can tell part of the story but we need the artists to help us imagine what that war meant for those who were part of it and what it meant for European civilization.

Margaret MacMillan is Warden of St Antony’s College and a Professor of International History at the University of Oxford. Her most recent book, The War that Ended Peace, is published by Profile Books.


34

PARTNERS


35


36

TEAM

BOARD

Jenny Waldman Director Nigel Hinds Executive Producer Sarah Goodfellow Producer Pak Ling Wan General Manager Alice Boff Executive Assistant

Vikki Heywood CBE Chairman

Artistic Advisers Lavinia Greenlaw Michael Morris Ruth Mackenzie CBE Tessa Ross CBE Press & PR Bolton & Quinn Ltd Marketing The Cogency Identity & Brochure Design Bibliothèque 14 –18 NOW is an independent programme hosted within Imperial War Museums 14 –18 NOW IWM, Lambeth Road, SE1 6HZ

Alex Beard, CBE Bonnie Greer, OBE Tony Hall, CBE Diane Lees Dr. Anthony Seldon Jenny Waldman Jonathan Watkins


PHOTO CREDITS All images © copyright P4 HMS Kildwick in Dazzle by Surgeon Oscar Parkes All rights reserved, DACS 2014 P6 James Bridle P7 Rene Huemer P8 Anya Gallaccio P9 National Theatre Wales P10 Dom Agius P12 Bruce Bairnsfather, 1915 P13 London Transport Museum P15 Guardian News and Media Limited P16 Aida Muluneh P17 Ant Clausen P18 IWM's archive P19 Sound&Fury P21 Pamela Littky P22 Alan Cameron P23 Sabela Music Projects P24 Tony Heaton P26 Image of The Briggait by Andrew Lee P27 Mike Prior P28 Myriddin Wannell P29 Simone Canetty Clarke P32 Rob Judges

2016 & 2018 We will be announcing other events as part of our 2014 season in the coming months: the second season of 14 –18 NOW commissions will be presented in summer 2016 and the third season in autumn 2018. Keep in touch via the website and social media to be amongst the first to receive news and updates.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @1418NOW LIKE US ON FACEBOOK 1418NOW


2014 Brochure: Season one