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January-february 2017

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

the last bawa

The greaT sri lankan archiTecT’s mOsT impOrTanT residence: The Jayawardene hOuse

eXCLusiVe

The whiTe house

TOur The privaTe quarTers Of The Obama family befOre The Trumps redecOraTe!

#Trending

The peOple, places and ideas ThaT will define design in 2017

The BaThroom reporT

AD’s annual rOund-up Of pOwder rOOms and persOnal spas


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CONTENTS January-February 2017

20 22

EDITOR’S LETTER CONTRIBUTORS

DISCOVER

29

FOCUS Take a seat in this city-spanning photo shoot of chairs.

44

SHOPS Get spoilt for choice with these selections of products—based on five distinct decor styles.

56

AGENDA A round-up of people, ideas, innovations and events in the news.

68

TECHNIQUE AD explores the intricate work that goes into the making of Audemars Piguet’s latest minute repeater.

70

INDULGE With the latest in fashion and design, this is luxury shopping like you’ve never seen.

ON THE COVER

MAX ZAMBELLI

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

The Jayawardene House was Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa’s last project (‘A Roof Of One’s Own’, pg 122). Photographer: Sebastian Posingis

Pg 134


contents 74

ICONIC HOMES Minimalist architect John Pawson writes about a residence that significantly inspired him—a sprawling house designed by the legendary Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, just outside Chicago.

Pg 82

PERSPECTIVE

77

SPOTLIGHT AD looks to the future to find out what will be trending this year. With an introduction by famed forecaster Li Edelkoort, this is your ultimate prep guide for 2017—from colourful carpets by Tarun Tahiliani, to Konstantin Grcic’s latest products, and Rajasthan’s hot new hotel property designed by Ayush Kasliwal.

105

SHOWCASE A must-have for design aficionados, AD presents a comprehensive list of the art, design and cultural events in 2017.

VALLEY HIGH Visitors to this Aamby Valley City residance will be hard-pressed to choose the more impressive view: the 10,000-square-foot home designed by Sonal Sancheti and Rahul Gore of Opolis, or the magnificent Sahyadri Range.

122

A ROOF OF ONE’S OWN Located on the cliffs of Mirissa, overlooking Sri Lanka’s Weligama Bay, the Jayawardene House is the last residence to be built by the late Geoffrey Bawa. The architect’s swan song stands as a reminder of his inimitable style.

Pg 74

CAROL M HIGHSMITH/BUYENLARGE/GETTY IMAGES

113

PAUL MICHELON

SPACES


contents Pg 142 Pg 169

Pg 169 Pg 44

MONTSE GARRIGA

Pg 44

Pg 44

134

A NEW VISION The furniture created by Italian brand Visionnaire found a perfect home in the art-filled residence of Eleonore Cavalli—the brand’s art director—which she shares with her husband.

142

ON COURSE Interior designer Varrun Motihar was aided by the expansive views of a golf course while decorating this Gurugram apartment in a contemporary, sophisticated style for its residents.

150

160

14|

EXECUTIVE ORDER AD takes you on an exclusive tour of the White House. Before the Trumps redecorate, get an inside look at the presidential residence as designed for the Obamas: arguably America’s most stylish First Family. EARTH SONG The brand director of luxury home store Good Earth, Beenu Bawa brought a dash of her globetrotting style and her brand’s traditional aesthetic to her sea-facing apartment in a Mumbai suburb.

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

INSIDE

169

ADVICE Mirrors, bathtubs, faucets, showers and more—AD’s annual bathroom report brings you a host of options for this personal space.

178

STYLE Elaborately designed bottles and the intricate fragrances they house, are ideal finishing touches for your powder room.

181

HOTEL The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort and Spa in New Chandigarh combines old-world charm with modern-day amenities.

183

RSVP Photos from a celebration of AD’s Art Issue and Asian Paints’ latest collection of exterior paints.

186

SCOUTS A low-down on the hottest products and newest launches to hit the market this season.

190 196

STOCKISTS An A to Z of the stores in our pages. AD 10 Ashish Goel—CEO and co-founder of Urban Ladder—shares the products, places and people on his list of inspirations.


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THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

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January-february 2017

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THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

IndIa

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

the last bawa

The greaT sri lankan archiTecT’s mOsT impOrTanT residence: The Jayawardene hOuse

Published under Joint Venture: Brazil: Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour, GQ Style Russia: Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Condé Nast Traveller, Allure

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eXCLusiVe

The whiTe house

TOur The privaTe quarTers Of The Obama family befOre The Trumps redecOraTe!

the art issue

SudarShan Shetty by Dayanita Singh Make your own rana BeguM UnfolD thiS cover! In reSIdence amin Jaffer roShini vaDehra the campana brotherS

#Trending

The peOple, places and ideas ThaT will define design in 2017

The BaThroom reporT

AD’s annual rOund-up Of pOwder rOOms and persOnal spas

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Clockwise from right: Dia Mehta Bhupal at her installation, Bathroom Set 2016, at Aspinwall House. Roshini Vadehra Kapoor (centre) with FICA members, at the Old Harbour Hotel, Kochi. Leighton Pierce’s Threshold of Affinity installation at Pepper House. Aleš Šteger’s The Pyramid of Exiled Poets, outside Aspinwall House.

T

his issue is all about what’s new in design for 2017. there’s a long list of where to go, what to see, trends and innovations. but if i had to pick one thing you must do this year, i’d say go to Kochi. i’m writing this as i return from a whirlwind 48 hours at the opening of the biennale, which runs until 29 march. the fun (sorry, work) started early on monday at mumbai airport, where dior’s anurag tyagi and Gucci’s mini manak, as well as a sprinkling of bombay gallerists, were on the same plane. the art world is bitchy (they make interior designers look like angels) and the buzz in the cabin was that nothing was ready, no one was going, and it was going to be a huge flop. What rubbish! a few hours after landing, as i entered the aspinwall house exhibition compound, i couldn’t help but be impressed by the series of mammoth installations. there is a giant water body—The Sea of Pain by raúl Zurita—that visitors were encouraged to wade through; an incredibly intricate model of a textile factory by Csákány istván; and, surprisingly, a public toilet by artist dia mehta bhupal. there is even a giant pyramid, constructed by aleš Šteger. AD’s founding editor manju sara rajan was named Ceo of the biennale just before it began, and i knew she would have built that pyramid herself if it meant opening on time. after all, she had done that with her own Kerala house. Congratulations to manju, riyas, bose, sudarshan and V sunil for pulling off a spectacular show, which will only get better as it runs. after a late lunch with rajiv saini, shilpa Gupta and udit bhambri, i did a dash around Pepper house. here, i discovered my favourite work in Kochi: a fantastic sound and video installation by leighton Pierce. underneath the wooden eaves of a dutch colonial bungalow, it consists of 14 monitors, set next to open windows that look onto trees. the airy room fuses contemporary art with nature and traditional architecture; i would move into a space like that. by 7pm, i’d missed most of the speeches at the official opening, but the ambition was clear: Kochi is to be the Venice biennale of asia, and the local government will be dedicating more and more buildings as permanent exhibition spaces. the energy at this, their third edition, suggests they’ll get there. after a quick change at the brunton boatyard hotel (i was sleeping on someone’s floor as all the hotels were booked), there was dinner with the delhi gang. roshini Vadehra had kindly invited me to join the members of FiCa—her foundation—in the pretty garden of the old harbour hotel. lit by candles, it was magical—but so dark that i couldn’t quite see who everyone was. it was only later, via an instagram post i was tagged in, that i discovered i was sat with the who’s who of the art world. that’s them (plus me) in the picture on the left. thank you, roshini. tuesday morning, i did an eight-kilometre run around Kochi, where i was struck by the gorgeous colonial architecture, and made a note of a few houses that AD should get inside. energized, i was ready for work. First up was the india art Fair breakfast, then the british Council breakfast, followed by the abu dhabi brunch, where Gunjan Gupta kidnapped Jamini ahluwalia and me, to take us to see her exhibition in Jew town. What a show! Gunjan’s work with chairs is always clever and she has continued her investigation into the importance of seating in indian culture with a series of new thrones, and a brilliant couch made of potato sacks. it is a show as witty as the designer herself, and with brilliant scenography by Vishal dhar. i started hyperventilating as i explored heritage arts, where Gunjan’s exhibition was taking place. no, it wasn’t the dust that had me panting, but the treasure trove of colonial furniture, antiques and unusual objects on offer by owner nb manju. Warehouse after warehouse was a revelation. the room filled with giant papier-mâché horses was perhaps my favourite. but apparently all the good stuff had already gone; interior designer Jai danani (who had helped roshini style the table at her dinner) had purposely swooped in a few days early to pick up the best pieces. none of us had any cash, so Jamini and i literally hitchhiked on the side of the road until Pooja singhal picked us up to take us to the Christie’s lunch at the brunton boatyard, where amin Jaffer had brought together the most starry art crowd. everyone was dressed in that billionaire-on-vacation uniform of linen shirt and tod’s loafers, except Zain masud, who never misses an opportunity to look like an installation herself. last on my agenda was bharat sikka’s show at anand Warehouse, which everyone was raving about. i didn’t have time to see it, but managed to have a quick coffee with him at the Kashi art Café, to persuade him to do a project for us. Watch this space! by 5pm, i had to leave for the airport. When i was younger, i used to think that the aim of art fairs like art basel was to hitch a ride home on a private jet. but despite being introduced to Kiran nadar twice (thank you, amin) and shamelessly pushing a copy of AD’s art issue under the door of her hotel room, i returned on a delayed air india plane rather than her embraer jet which was waiting on the runway. Failure! but what an experience! Kochi is a whirlwind of art, design and architecture in the most beautiful setting—and names, names, and more names. you’d never believe that my new year’s resolution is no more name dropping.

GreG Foster

adeditorial@condenast.in NB: For the latest in art, design, architecture and style, log on to www.architecturaldigest.in. Follow us on Instagram @ArchDigestIndia.

Portrait: r burman. diya mehta bhuPal Photo: samir rana

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contributors

orla connolly

John Pawson

Jignesh Jhaveri

PHOTOGRAPHER A creative entrepreneur, award-winning photographer and cinematographer, Jignesh Jhaveri is based in Mumbai, and travels the world to create his imagery for various publications. In This Issue: In ‘Off The Shelf’ (pg 178), Jhaveri photographed a selection of fragrances, diffusers and scented candles at one of Mumbai’s newest restaurants. “Shooting at Masque was great. I loved the textures of the space and found lots of areas to set up shots. The structure of both the furniture and space were inspiring.” 22|

WRITER John Pawson has spent over 30 years making rigorously simple architecture, based on the qualities of proportion, light and materials. His most recent project is the Design Museum in London. Aside from creating Calvin Klein’s first flagship store in Manhattan, Pawson is best known for his minimalist private residences. In This Issue: In ‘The Farnsworth House’ (pg 74), Pawson writes about a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe house in Chicago that first inspired him.“It is always a pleasure reflecting on memories of visits to Mies’s architecture. The briefest annotation on one of his drawings is so rich in what it conveys; but one can learn so much more from actually being in one of his spaces.”

sebastian Posingis

PHOTOGRAPHER German photographer Sebastian Posingis spent much of his childhood in Iran, India and Sri Lanka, and gained a degree in anthropology from the University of Canterbury, before turning to his first love, architectural photography. In This Issue: Posingis photographed a Sri Lankan home by the late Geoffrey Bawa in ‘A Roof Of One’s Own’ (pg 122). “I only had 10 minutes to take these pictures; I hope to go back and take more soon. It’s a photographer’s dream.”

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2017

ravina rawal

WRITER A frequent AD contributor, Ravina Rawal is a writer and editor who lives between New Delhi, Mumbai and a lime-green suitcase. In This Issue: For ‘On Course’ (pg 142), Rawal interviewed interior designer Varrun Motihar about his work on a Gurugram apartment. For Rawal, the designer proved more than capable, creating interiors that complemented the expansive views of the adjacent golf course. “I fell in love with Varrun’s delicious play of stark whites and warm light.”


contributors

li eDelkoorT

WRITER A renowned trend forecaster and colourist, Li Edelkoort works across the design world—from fashion to food, architecture, beauty, automotive, and retail. Her company Trend Union produces trend tools for strategists, designers and marketers. Since 2015, she has been the Dean of Hybrid Studies, Parsons, in New York, where she is also starting a masters course in textiles this year. Most recently, she founded the first-ever New York Textile Month in collaboration with The New School and Cooper Hewitt. In This Issue: In ‘Li Edelkoort on 2017’ (pg 78), the forecaster predicts the shape for the year: the circle. She outlines the dynamic, omnipresent nature of the circle in the industry— and our lives.

Divya Thakur

WRITER Divya Thakur is a design practitioner and entrepreneur who seeks to create and curate a relevant identity for Indian design. The founder of multi-disciplinary studio Design Temple, she also curates exhibits as often as she can; her most recent exhibition is Design: The India Story. In This Issue: Thakur explores the re-emergence of one of India’s most quintessential motifs in ‘The New Jali’ (pg 79). She extends her discussion on surface design to describe the global resurgence of this iconic feature. 24|

Manolo yllera

PHOTOGRAPHER Spain-based Manolo Yllera is the quintessential globetrotter, capturing stunning interior spaces from around the world. In This Issue: Yllera photographed the Mumbai home of Beenu Bawa in ‘Earth Song’ (pg 160). “I found Beenu to be a very spiritual woman—curious about life. The shoot was very nice, since we had a lot to talk about; sometimes I had to remind myself to stop talking and concentrate on the shoot. I think Beenu’s character is reflected in her home in many ways.”

ArchitecturAl Digest|JANuArY-FeBruArY 2017

SMriTi Daniel

WRITER With over a decade of experience in journalism, Smriti Daniel relishes stories that allow her to explore the intersections of culture, politics, development and history. In This Issue: In ‘A Roof Of One’s Own’ (pg 122), Daniel wrote about a Geoffrey Bawa-designed home in Sri Lanka. “Bawa never ceases to surprise me. Writing about him can feel like detective work—a rediscovery of the man through the eyes of the people who knew him intimately, and best of all, the beautiful buildings he left behind.”


YOUNG INDIA’S

RISING STARS

Millennials who are making big changes, student entrepreneurs, and other bright young things

INNOVATIONS IN EDUCATION A new breed of start-ups

is changing how (and what) students learn

COIMBATORE COOL How this southern city

is attracting—and nurturing—fresh talent

UNVEILS A SPECIAL ISSUE ON

YOUNG INDIA


PHOTOGRAPH: PANKAJ ANAND

A PREVIEW OF THE MAKE IN INDIA (YOUNG INDIA) MAGAZINE

Indian millennials are ‘digital natives’ that are culturally affected by the vast canvas of technology. They are also adventurous and value-driven, along with being socially and environmentally conscious. Make in India magazine—now in its third edition—attempts to profile some of the young, dynamic and creative minds of the country, while shedding light on what drives them. You can also look forward to stories written by game changers along with features on Coimbatore as India’s start-up hub, a breed of student entrepreneurs and the urgent need to develop skills in the country, among others, that promise a fascinating read.


OUR ROUND-UP FROM THE FRONT LINES OF DESIGN: TRENDS, PRODUCTS, STyLES, bOOkS aND EVENTS

ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY? Then we’ll begin... with a round-up of chairs, from Irani classics to the latest contemporary Indian designs StyliSt Samir Wadekar . PhotograPher Neville Sukhia

‘Lady b’ armchair by Cécile Maia Pujol; Roche Bobois.

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LOCATION COURTESY THE GREAT EASTERN HOME

(Clockwise from left) Bronze chair with leather seat, antique red-lacquered Chinese chair; The Great Eastern Home. Leather chair; Ficus Fine Living. Folding reclining chair; Phillips Antiques. Louis XVI-style gold-leaf chair; The Great Eastern Home.

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(From left) ‘Chair 33’ armchair by Ton; at Kala Ghoda Moderna. Irani chair with cane seat; Anemos. Bentwood chair; Phillips Antiques. Antique swivel office chair by Gebrüder Thonet Vienna; Moorthy’s. (On wall) Watercolour drawings from the Party Wall, Tokyo series by Vishwa Shroff; TARQ.

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Location courtesy tarQ

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Home at last.

AGENT FOR INDIA VITA MODERNA

MUMBAI SHOWROOM 1001/2, Sapphire Plaza, Dadabhai Cross Lane No.2, Opp. CNM School, Vile Parle (W) Mumbai - 400 056 Mob. 9920780590 Tel. +91-22-61270011 info@vitamoderna.in

LIVING ART INTERIORS LLP # 614/615, 12th Main Road HAL 2nd Stage, Indiranagar Bangalore - 560038, INDIA Mob. 9481112340 Tel. 080-65699990 livingartinteriorsllp@gmail.com info@livingartinteriors.in

GROUNDPIECE SECTIONAL SOFA

design by Antonio Citterio

FLEXFORM www.flexform.it


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LOCATION COURTESY THE RAJ COMPANY

(Clockwise from top left) ‘Dora’ chair by Massimo Scolari for Giorgetti, ‘Progetti Blossom’ armchair by Giorgetti; at Sources Unlimited. ‘Dumas’ teak armchair (blue upholstery), ‘Throne’ chair, ‘Teak Ghost’ armchair; The Raj Company.


CURIOS FOR EVERY OCCASION

Innovation. Inspiration. Inimitable creations. This is what unforgettable gifts are made of. And this is what you will uncover at CuroCarte—the emerging luxury brand that designs contemporary lifestyle pieces inspired from around the world There is a certain nostalgia that allures people to curio shops. The intricacy of detail. The reminiscence of the past. The journey into the future of imagination. Those seemingly unusual finds are far more personal than we realise. And they make for the most precious presents for any occasion. CuroCarte, born from the belief that one should create to inspire and connect people, presents a vibrant mix of created and curated masterpieces, an artful blend of the quirky, contemporary and vintage. The brand recreates through design intervention on rare crafts and gives them an extra edge by adding a flair of modernity. From Mughal-musing bronze lanterns and eclectically detailed showpieces to stunning Tanjore paintings and Celadon ceramics. From the mastery of Balinese woodcarvings and travelinspired home aesthetics to unique wall hangings and more—CuroCarte is a glorious blend of old-world charm and new age glamour. Each piece is a narrative in its own right, each detail deliberate, each with a story that’ll linger long after the celebration. CuroCarte’s in-house designers collaborate with craftsmen from around the world including countries like Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia and UK to design a repertoire of resplendent handcrafted pieces that are imbued with love and emotion. A gift that’s rare is a gift of care—all you have to do is log on to CuroCarte.com, the ultimate destination for gifting, and discover the bounty of handmade pieces exuding everlasting exuberance and meaning. For more information, call 1800-210-0006 or visit www.curocarte.com


Location courtesy tarQ

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(From left) ‘Rodin’ chair; bentchair.com. ‘Colombo’ chair by This And That; at Khazana Stores. ‘Reed’ chair from the Cube series; Various at Dhobi Talao. (On wall) Ink-on-paper drawings from the Corridor series by Vishwa Shroff; TARQ.

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LOCATION COURTESY SNDT KANYASHALA, MUMBAI, A RESTORATION PROJECT BY ABHA NARAIN LAMBAH ASSOCIATES, FUNDED BY THE JSW FOUNDATION

(Clockwise from left) ‘Serpentine’ armchair by Éléonore Nalet for Ligne Roset; at And More Stories. ‘Naga’ chair with cane back; Sarita Handa. Mid-century sofa chair; The House of Mahendra Doshi. ‘Flora’ chair (white); Abaca.

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(From left) ‘Walnut’ chair; Defurn. ‘Lamb’ chair (blue seat); Khazana Stores. Upholstered dining chair; Defurn. ‘Folding Flat’ chair (leather seat); Casegoods. Production: Temple Road Productions

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LOCATION COURTESY SNDT KANYASHALA, MUMBAI, A RESTORATION PROJECT BY ABHA NARAIN LAMBAH ASSOCIATES, FUNDED BY THE JSW FOUNDATION

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discover ds r SHOPS

MARKETPLACE From the glamour of gold to the grace of architectural forms, five stylish mood boards for your next update

creates

STYLIST SAMIR WADEKAR 3

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GOLD RUSH

Add an element of understated excess with these burnished objects of fancy

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1. ‘Pendant No 3’ lamp, `5,45,000, Naama Hoffman. 2. Table knife, spoon and fork by Koichi Futatsumata, `3,390 each, at Valerie Objects. 3. ‘Liaison’ cabinet, `7,69,000, Kelly Wearstler. 4. ‘Arena’ bowl, `10,585, INV Home. 5. ‘Stay’ bench with velvet upholstery, `2,70,000, Sé. 6. ‘Strip Wrap’ stool, `31,120, Devi Design. 7. ‘Neo’ vessel (white/ bianco arabescato), `1,60,000, Apparatusstudio.com. 8. ‘Hexa’ tea light, `360, Taamaa. 9. ‘Moon Light’ solid bronze sculptural light, `4,25,000, Ben & Aja Blanc. 10. ‘Shadow Gold’ rug by Isabella Sodi, `3,50,000 onwards, Golran. 11. ‘Mountain’ wallpaper from the Satori collection, `3,600 per square foot, Calico Wallpaper.

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PHOTOGRAPHER: THIRU S/WHITE LIGHT DESIGN. ASSISTANT STYLIST: KRITI VIJ.

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discover COLOUR THERAPY Eclectic prints and patterns when paired with bold colours add dynamism to any space

1. ‘Utrecht C90’ limited-edition armchair by Cassina, `3,79,608, at Poltrona Frau Group Design Center. 2. ‘Fantasque – 37970329’ (magenta/ roux) fabric by Casamance, `19,495 per metre, at F&F. 3. ‘Dotty’ clock (ABI11 W) by Abi Alice, `5,532, Alessi. 4. ‘Amber’, ‘Samphire’ and ‘Tonka’ resin sculptures from the Sculpting Scent collection by Zuza Mengham, `97,000 each, Laboratory Perfumes. 5. ‘Harakiri’ coat stand by Alessandro Zambelli for Seletti, `16,964, at Bycollage.com. 6. ‘Bauhaus’ table, price on request, La French Studio. 7. ‘Prism’ centrepiece by Tomás Alonso, price on request, Atelier Swarovski. 8. ‘Ottoman’ pouffe from the Nouveaux Classiques collection by Maison Christian Lacroix, `2,78,890, Roche Bobois. 9. Library shelf, `1,75,000, Moonriver. 10. ‘Coccio’ limited-edition vase (opaque pink/ black), `2,70,000, Venini. 11. ‘Bottoms Up’ artwork by Avinash Jai Singh, `800 onwards, Kultureshop.in.

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PHOTOGRAPHER: THIRU S/WHITE LIGHT DESIGN. ASSISTANT STYLIST: NITYA DHINGRA.

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discover DESIGN DISTRICT

Form reigns supreme with these architecture-inspired products

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1. ‘Flora’ lamp, price on request, Marcin Rusak Studio. 2. ‘Castle 12-01’ ceiling light by Jason Miller, `6,00,000, Roll & Hill. 3. ‘Round Staircase’ table by Rooms, `5,50,000, Rossana Orlandi. 4. ‘Stair’ black, bronze and clear mirror with walnut frame, `3,55,000, Bower. 5. ‘Lucite Nails’ obelisk, `26,333, Jonathanadler.com. 6. ‘Console Arche’ by Hervé Van der Straeten, price on request, Galerie Hervé Van der Straeten. 7. Black cushion cover by Injiri, `7,540, Indelust.com 8. ‘Senate’ chair by Pierre Jeanneret, price on request, Phillips Antiques. 9. ‘Two in One’ artwork by Ravi Arora, `700 onwards, Kultureshop.in. 10. ‘Reposo’ cabinet, price on request, Kelly Wearstler. 11. ‘RFS’ ceramic vessel, `90,000, Ben Medansky.

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PHOTOGRAPHER: JENNICA JOHNSTONE.

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discover DARK SIDE These edgy pieces are reminders that dark tones and earthy shades need not necessarily be sombre 1. ‘Jumbo 29 Bubble’ chandelier (darkbrown leather with satin brass finish), `4,60,000, Pelle. 2. Vase, `4,950, Fennel. 3. ‘Ember’ wallpaper from the Willow collection, `2,100 per square foot, Calico Wallpaper. 4. ‘Balance’ mirror, `88,100, Katharina Eisenkoeck. 5. ‘Glory’ console, price on request, Arketipo Firenze. 6. ‘Cityscape Slab Construction’ ceramic sculpture, `40,000, Ben Medansky. 7. ‘Greta’ armchair by Draga & Aurel, `2,81,637, Baxter. 8. ‘Drift’ limited-edition sofa, price on request, Fernando Mastrangelo Studio. 9. ‘Autopsy Blue’ and ‘Autopsy Bronze’ bronze sculptural tables by Mary-Lynn and Carlo Massoud, `6,60,000 each, Carwan Gallery. 10. Dinner plate and container by IVY, `699 and `999 respectively, at HomeStop.

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PHOTOGRAPHER: ANSHUMAN SEN. ASSISTANT STYLIST: KRITI VIJ.

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EXPRESSIONS OF LIFE

Bringing the bounty of beauty from the outdoors inside, Asian Paints presents a special series of patterns where nature has been reimagined and vividly expressed with the launch of WALLART—The Earth Series, and its four unique looks

Amit Syngle, President Sales, Marketing and Technology, Asian Paints

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nspired by life and the reflection of our times, contemporary abstractions of natural elements that will resonate with you and your environment are brought to life. Each expression of The Earth Series—Flow, Tree of Life, Walk in the Woods and Prayer for Earth—is a celebration of life in its strength and vulnerability. Flow, both in meaning and form, is open to diverse interpretation. Featuring two distinct expressions, Flow 01, reminiscent of watercolour, is painted directly on the wall, showcasing free flowing form and melding colours. While Flow 02 creates a unique look with its defined outlines highlighted through unique textures of emboss or flush. Tree of Life is an expression of hope and harmony, a gentle reminder of the vulnerability of our earth. Realised in two different styles, Tree of Life 01 accentuates the sinews and natural lines of the tress and exudes a raw, artistic feel. Tree of Life 02 showcases the pairing of crisp, computer drawn lines and the organic roots, creating a subtle contrast. Walk in the Woods imagines footprints that burst with life, depicted by strewn flowers featured in different variations. From a wall art piece that can be carved in wood to being directly painted on the wall where layers of paint are scooped out to reveal the pattern and a special representation through a screen printing technique, this is a contemplative piece that’ll light up any space. Finally, Prayer for Earth is inspired by Buddhist philosophy and imagery, and draws from the mantras inscribed on stones in sacred spaces. In an interplay of three elements— individual pebbles, their colours and the symbols of life engraved on it— depending on the form of your wall, you can mix and match different combinations perfect for you.

Walk in the Woods

Flow

Prayer for Earth

Tree of Life

Speaking about the collection, Mr Amit Syngle, President – Sales, Marketing & Technology, Asian Paints, said “At Asian Paints we acknowledge that people possess an inherent need to connect with and customise their façade as a canvas of self-expression. Drawing from the vastness of nature, The Earth Series is a celebration of this life in abundance”.

For more information, email colourpro@asianpaints.com or visit www.asianpaints.com


discover TRIBAL CHIC

2

Add ethnic accents to a space with modern patterns, earthy tones and geometric shapes 1. ‘Mr B’ sculptural oak accessory, `12,000, E15. 2. ‘Tonga’ baskets, `3,000 each, Maison 15. 3. ‘Angle’ room divider, `17,999, InLiving. 4. ‘Cabana Yeti’ armchair by Timothy Oulton, price on request, at Tarun Vadehra. 5. ‘Always Together’ pair of ceramic sculptures by Claymen, `12,000, Indelust.com. 6. ‘Crossfade’ table by Damien Gernay, `1,95,500, Mogg. 7. Ceramic side table, `1,13,800, SIMONE. 8. ‘Vintage’ armchair, `32,000, Cane Boutique. 9. ‘Tribal Flatweave’ rug, `11,500, Imperial Knots. 10. Dog sculpture (papiermâché on wood), `6,500, Cinnamon.

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For details, see Stockists

PHOTOGRAPHER: SHAMANTH PATIL J. ASSISTANT STYLIST: LEANNE ALCASOAS.

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mod. Formentera Luxury Group s.p.a.

Luxury Interiors and Accessories for Exclusive Homes, Hotels, Executive Offices & Yachts Headquarters: via Corticella 5/7/9 - loc. Valenzatico - 51039 Quarrata - Italy Tel: +39 0573 790066 - Fax: +39 0573 734332 Gallery: Piazza de’ Mozzi, 4 - 50125 Firenze - Italy info@formitalia.it - www.formitalia.it - www.lamborghini-casa.com


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AGENDA

NEWSFLASH

names to know right now A round-up of events, ideas, innovations and COMPILED BY DIVYA MISHRA & LEENA DESAI

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A DATE WITH DESIGN

The ‘DodeCal’—a portmanteau of ‘dodecahedron’ and ‘calendar’—is the brainchild of London-based designer Ric Bell. The idea for a twelve-sided three-dimensional calendar came to Bell in 2012, when he was studying these shapes and absentmindedly scribbled a note to himself that simply read, “Put a calendar on a 12-sided polyhedra”. The result, after much experimentation, is this tactile, functional and contemporary design object, which is made from sycamore wood, and combines digital technology with traditional craftsmanship. The ‘DodeCal’ is priced at £79 per piece, and can be ordered online. dodecal.com 56|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

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MODERN(IST) LIFE

Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier’s work appears to be an endless font of inspiration for London-based studio Doshi Levien. The studio has previously designed curtains for Kvadrat and furniture for Moroso influenced by the architect of Chandigarh. In their third series of such design objects, Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien, founders of the studio, have created the Objects of Devotion series for Galerie Kreo in Paris. Comprising a daybed and a floor lamp, the objects attempt to combine the visual experience of Corbusier’s buildings—often seen in black and white— with the physical experience, described by the designers as “multi-layered and dynamic, temporal and emotional, chaotic and colourful”. galeriekreo.com


discover

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BIRD CAGE

After designing interiors for restaurants, hotels and offices, as well as homes for Mumbai’s glitterati—among them Parineeti Chopra, whose home was seen on the cover of AD’s May-June 2016 issue, and Irrfan Khan, whose home was seen in AD’s October 2016 issue— Mumbai-based designer Shabnam Gupta launched the first flagship store for her brand Peacock Life, in Bandra, Mumbai. The three-storeyed store specializes in designer furniture, lifestyle and interior products, all curated by Gupta, whose idiosyncratic aesthetic is visible throughout. In keeping with the times, the store also showcases recycled and environmentally friendly furniture, along with lighting fixtures, quirky wall hangings, playful accessories and curios—all handpicked by Gupta herself. peacocklife.com 58|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

5AD HEARS

Archiprix 2017, the biennial event showcasing the best graduate projects by students of architecture all over the world, is being held at the Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT), in Ahmedabad. The awards will be announced on 10 February, and AD50 architect Marina Tabassum, from Bangladesh, is one of the judges for the 2017 edition. archiprix.org

© FLURINA ROTHENBERGER/COURTESY JAIPUR PHOTO FESTIVAL

On from 24 February to 5 March, JaipurPhoto (previously known as Travel Photo Jaipur), in its second edition, will be staged at several locations across the Pink City, in Rajasthan. The international open-air celebration of travel photography showcases a curated selection of works inspired by the notion of journeys, and the perspective of the outsider. Federica Chiocchetti, the founding director of the online photo-literary platform Photocaptionist, will be the guest co-curator for the 2017 edition. jaipurphoto.in

© ANDRE GELPKE/COURTESY JAIPURPHOTO

REEL LIFE


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reinterpreting the greats Atul Dodiya’s new exhibition— Girlfriends: French, German, Italian, Santiniketan, Ghatkopar...—at New Delhi’s Vadehra Art Gallery is an ode to the figurative portraiture practised by 19th-century artists like Albert Müller and Francis Picabia

Tell us about your latest body of work. I have been influenced a lot by art history and painters like Albert Müller and Francis Picabia. I have grown up looking at their art; and it has been the muse for my paintings. In the course of this [collection], I have attempted something I haven’t before. I am a figurative painter; but within the figurative genre, there are immense possibilities. There is no point in simply copying Müller or Picabia. What is important is how I transform my inspiration and how much emotional quality I am able to imbue in the portraits. This is a project that I wanted to do for a long time. I do believe that there is a time for a specific work of art to be produced—to enter an artist’s oeuvre. You are known for using unusual materials in your work. Does this collection include any? No, it doesn’t. I wanted to avoid an unconventional medium, which I sometimes use in my art—like metal shutters, laminates, Formica, etc. This time, I decided to stick to very old conventional mediums: oil, watercolour, textured drawings, charcoal. The works as well as the mediums of choice have been influenced by the work of the great Western masters, who have made a huge impression on me. Your work is famous for its allusion to other artists and their work… Yes, but in the past, these references have been a small part of the larger canvas. In this collection, the references are almost the base of the paintings. I’ve seen the original great works of art and I’ve tried to reinterpret them, understand the process, change it and invest them with qualities important to me. How long did it take you to finish the collection? The actual painting process has taken around six months. But the thinking process has been going on for nearly 15 years. Girlfriends: French, German, Italian, Santiniketan, Ghatkopar... will be showing at Vadehra Art Gallery, from 31 January to 4 March. 62|

ArchitecturAl Digest|jAnuAry-februAry 2017


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INDIA ART FAIR PREVIEW The art world was abuzz late last year when, after months of speculation, it was finally announced that Swiss-based MCH Group—the parent company of Art Basel—had taken a controlling stake in the India Art Fair. The question on everyone’s lips was if the fair—taking place from 2 to 5 February—would be rebranded as one of the many international editions of Art Basel, as happened when MCH bought Art HK in 2012, turning it into Art Basel Hong Kong in 2013. Not yet is the answer given by India Art Fair director Neha Kirpal. But it’s certainly on the cards. And with both Christie’s and Sotheby’s upping their presence in the country, international collectors are already starting to appear at sales in New Delhi and Mumbai. What has the MCH association changed for the fair? Neha Kirpal: From a collector’s point of view, there’s a big contribution in the MCH’s coming aboard. We’ve seen a great increase in terms of the international collectors’ confirmations, also in terms of the museum delegations, and people who are part of [MCH’s] patrons’ programme. We’ve never had so many important Western institutions coming, whether it’s Richard Armstrong, the head of the Guggenheim, or Sheena Wagstaff [who heads the

8 NET RESULTS

Bengaluru-based Ranjani Shettar is famous for her netted installations and sculptures, which have been exhibited at prestigious venues like the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York; Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi; and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Her upcoming exhibition at Talwar Gallery features her signature works: installations in wave-like patterns made with stainless-steel stalks, lacquered wooden spheres and colourful beeswax spheres, suspended with delicate threads. The exhibition will be on from 31 January to 29 April at Talwar Gallery, New Delhi. 64|

7 PHOTO: ANSHUMAN SEN

THE ART BASEL EFFECT

Modern and Contemporary Art department at the Met, New York]. Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, one of the biggest collectors in the world, is coming from the Middle East. Collectors who have never been to India before are coming; and it’s very encouraging.

IN FULL VIEW

Starting 14 January, New Delhi’s National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) will host a comprehensive showing of artist Jitish Kallat’s body of work—from 1995 onwards. Titled Here After Here, the show will be curated by Catherine David—a deputy director at the National Museum of Modern Art at the Centre Pompidou in Paris—and will include works that have never been exhibited in India. It is being organized by four galleries that represent Kallat: Nature Morte in New Delhi, Galerie Templon in Paris, Chemould Prescott Road in Mumbai, and Arario Gallery in Seoul. The NGMA will also be releasing a book of short essays on Kallat’s work in tandem with the show. Here After Here will be on from 14 January to 26 February at the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi.

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BOX ART

Amongst the international galleries which will be participating at the India Art Fair is New York’s Aicon Gallery. For the 2017 edition, the gallery will curate a sitespecific presentation comprising artworks from the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East and North Africa. This will include works by Adeela Suleman, GR Iranna, Natvar Bhavsar, MF Husain and Rachid Koraïchi. Also on view: Anila Quayyum Agha’s geometric artwork Red Cube, the latest addition to her Intersections series, inspired by a visit to the Alhambra in Granada, Spain.


discover

I

n Le Brassus—a small, snowy village in western Switzerland—nestled in the watchmaking region of Vallée de Joux in the Jura Mountains, you’ll find the Audemars Piguet headquarters. Founded in 1875, for over 140 years now, the company has consistently broken new ground in the world of horology, crafting highly complicated mechanical movements using methods passed down over generations. Today, the watchmaker is known not only for its technically proficient creations, but also for its glamorous designs. And through 2016, it had the horology fraternity buzzing over the ‘Royal Oak Concept Supersonnerie’, a limited-edition watch priced at $597,400, with an intriguing tag line: ‘the sound awakened’. The Supersonnerie is one of the most remarkable minute repeaters available today. In 2015, after eight years of research and development, the brand previewed a highly innovative concept prototype, the RD#1; however with patents pending, there was not much open for discussion. Bold, iconic, and featuring the brand’s signature octagonal case and screw detailing, the teaser model left watch enthusiasts wanting more. Once Audemars Piguet had

TECHNIQUE

TIME MACHINE Possibly their most revolutionary watch release in recent times, Audemars Piguet’s ‘Royal Oak Concept Supersonnerie’ combines state-of- the-art sound engineering with 100-year-old watchmaking techniques Writer Rishna shah


the necessary patents in hand, production was green-lighted, and the final results were revealed in Geneva last year, at the Salon de la Haute Horologerie, the world-renowned annual tradeshow for high-end horology. “This is not simply a striking watch; it is devised as a musical instrument,” explains Claudio Cavaliere, Audemars Piguet’s global brand ambassador. “It is the result obtained by a group of passionate people— watchmakers, engineers and musicians— who shared their respective expertise in order to break the rules in chiming watch design and reach the perfect sound, a sound you can now share with everyone,” he adds, referring to the crisp and clear marvel of a melody it produces. SOUND LAB To really appreciate the timepiece, it’s important to understand what a minute repeater is. The age-old complication is an acoustic way of telling the time, on demand. Activating a lever on the side of the case sets into motion tiny hammers that hit a coiled steel wire gong in the watch. The chimes announce the hours, quarter hours and minutes passed from the last quarter hour, usually through two gongs making two different notes, meticulously adjusted by hand. Often there’s a pause between the hours and the minutes, but in Audemars Piguet’s version, the silence is eliminated to create a more harmonious tune. “[Sound] is

one of the most traditional and prestigious ways to indicate the passing of time,” enthuses Cavaliere. “It is a strong symbol that often brings back our childhood memories and represents the miniaturization of church bells,” he muses. “The human brain reacts differently when it comes to frequencies, therefore you need an expert’s touch to perfectly tune minute repeaters,” says Cavaliere. To hone its sound and dominate the field with cuttingedge technology, Audemars Piguet partnered with the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in 2006. It took three patents to make sure this timepiece would sound like no other. The first was for the manufacturing of the steel gongs, which were hand-filed to achieve the ideal tone, pitch and frequency. The second: Instead of fixing the gongs to the main plate, the watchmakers opted to attach them to a copper alloy resonance membrane, a soundboard of sorts, sandwiched between the plate and the case back. This, along with the apertures in the case, enhanced the acoustics. “While industrial machines may help producing certain complications quite well, sound is very subjective as it depends on our own perception, and on the watchmaker’s perception,” states Cavaliere, adding that it’s the watchmaker who fine-tunes the watch for the perfect sound. The third patent was for the regulator, which controls the tempo and speed of the chimes.

By designing a unique steel anchor that doubles as a shock absorber, Audemars Piguet was able to remove the buzzing sound made by traditional minute repeaters. It also helped that the watch was crafted out of low-density titanium, as opposed to gold or platinum. BIGGER PICTURE It’s easy to overlook the other features on this watch, which in themselves are commendable watchmaking feats. The hand-wound device is presented in a 44-millimetre case, a grand presence on the wrist, with a black rubber strap and matching ceramic accents. Inside, an 8.28-millimetrethin mechanism—the calibre 2937—makes sure everything runs smoothly; the watch also has a guaranteed power reserve of 42 hours. The timepiece is also water-resistant to 20 metres—another technical feat for a minute repeater. Let’s not forget the tourbillon at 6 o’clock, a key focal point; a chronograph with a central sweep seconds hand; and a 30-minute counter at 3 o’clock. When Jules-Louis Audemars and Edward-Auguste Piguet combined their respective watchmaking concerns in 1875, their interest was primarily to specialize in complicated movements, with minute repeaters accounting for at least half of their timepieces between 1882 and 1892. The ‘Royal Oak Concept Supersonnerie’ is just the latest innovation of their legacy.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

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IN DU LG E

GO T ODHE LIF E

discover ‘DAMIER CABOCHON’ CABOCHON NECKLACE AND FRO EARRINGS FROM ARCHITECTUR THE ARCHITECTURE INSPIRÉE COLLECTION, BOUCHERON

From the latest in fashion and design, curates a range of stylish luxury products STYLIST SAMIR WADEKAR

‘KENZO WORLD’ FRAGRANCE, KENZO ‘OYSTER PERPETUAL LADY-DATEJUST 28’ WATCH, ROLEX

‘GEMME STRAORDINARIE’ WITH 11-CARAT MOZAMBIQUE RUBY, BVLGARI

‘DECO CLOUS DE PARIS’ CUFF, SAINT LAURENT

‘METAL RIBBON’ BAG, PRADA

‘CAMAIL’ LEATHER KEY CASE, HERMÈS

‘LANVIN LANVIN MIROIR’ FLAT SANDALS, LANVIN

‘PHANTOM’ BAG WITH CUT-OUTS, CÉLINE

SANDALS FROM THE RESORT 2017 COLLECTION, MARNI


RUNNER IN FELT, SUEDE AND NYLON, GIVENCHY

‘MI’ DRONE, XIAOMI

‘SENNHEISER HE 1’ AMPLIFIER, SENNHEISER HR GIGER BOOK, TASCHEN

‘L.U.C PERPETUAL T C TWIN’ WATCH, C O CHOPARD

AVANT-GARDE ROUNDED BLUE SUNGLASSES, DIOR HOMME

SNEAKERS, TOD’S

‘ASTROGRAPH’ PEN, MB&F + CARAN D’ACHE

‘GLOBEMASTER ANNUAL CALENDAR’ WATCH, OMEGA

Assisted by: Tyrel Rodricks

‘BURLINGTON’ BACKPACK, SMYTHSON

For details, see Stockists JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

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discover

ICONIC hOmes

THE FarnsworTH HousE

In 1950, when German-American architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe began building this house, it already had a reputation. Designed as a country retreat along the Fox River for a Chicago-based nephrologist by the name of Edith Farnsworth, a model of it had been exhibited, to great acclaim, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York three years before, in 1947.

Carol M HigHsMitH/Buyenlarge/getty iMages

In the first of a series by architects on the houses that have most inspired them, John Pawson writes a sensitive tribute to this International Style structure in Plano, near Chicago, by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe


“Viewed from across the water, there is something magical about the way the architecture of the Farnsworth house seems to float in the landscape, and then, as you move around the spaces, you realize everything is perfect: the proportions, the surfaces and the light. The design uses the minimum of gestures, each of which has been meticulously honed. Einstein talked about the importance of making everything ‘as simple as possible but not any simpler’. This idea of the perfect expression of simplicity lies at the heart of what has always driven my own work. Mies died when I was 20, and working in my father’s

manufacturing business in Yorkshire—young enough to be interested in architecture, but long before I had considered it as a possible way of spending my life. I had seen photographs and drawings of the house years before I managed to see it in real life. During my eventual visit, the only way to secure a brief period of quiet contemplation was to suggest to the guardian that we observe a minute’s silence in Mies’s honour. I can now say, that with the exception, perhaps, of the Japanese designer Shiro Kuramata, no other individual has had a greater impact on my architectural thinking than Mies.” —JoHN PAWSoN


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

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NEWSMAKERS, OPINIONS THAT MATTER, PLUS THE LATEST IN ART, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

#TRENDING

What’s new and what’s hot in the design world? From a preview of David Chipperfield’s first project in India to a report on some of the most talented young design graduates internationally, we showcase the people, places and ideas that will define the coming year. Welcome to a well-designed 2017.


#TRENDING2017 #WHATSBREWING #DESIGNINGTHEFUTURE #NEWSMAKERS #TRENDSETTERS #LOOKINGFORWARD #DEFININGDESIGN #NEWDIRECTION #THECUTTINGEDGE #NEEDTOKNOW #FIRSTONTHESCENE #INFLUENCERS #EARLYADOPTERS

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#TurningInCircles

li EDelkoort on 2017 The world’s most famous trend forecaster and colourist predicts the shape of design and interiors for the year

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circle is the simplest shape in geometry. It is totally symmetric in shape and all circles are also similar— comfortable. It is a reassuring constant and soothing form. Casting a circle is a reality of life because of the relationship that exists between the outer world (the macrocosm) and man’s inner universe (the microcosm). The circle has been the basis for the invention of the wheel and has made modern machinery, transport and speed possible. Hence the circle can be seen as the motor of modernization and progress. What is interesting about the circle is that it can host all other symmetrical geometric shapes—like the triangle and the square. An interior or a building can therefore become a composition, which uses the dot as the focal point, but conceptualizes a dialogue between different geometric forms. Therefore, the circle is often used in graphic configurations that resemble either naive and playful mobiles or serious constructivist art. When the basic form is a square that contains a circle as a central point that radiates balance, we call the configuration a mandala—a circle in a square that acts as a spiritual and ritual symbol and represents the universe. Here, the circle is seen as a creative cosmos that stimulates meditation and concentration. The circle is a potent social symbol of inclusiveness and togetherness—a vision of our planet and our milky ways of life. The rounder edge of materials will soon deliver objects for a softer and more harmonious interior and the round shapes of lighting will be emanating in a softer fashion, as if they possess an aura. Form will be further pushed to a perfected sphere, with round tables, round stools and round carpets. In the process, legs will be turned, ceramics thrown and structures bent to abide by the rule of the round, confirming the remarkable return of the decorative arts. The psychoanalyst Carl Jung stated that if one has an urge to draw circles, it is an expression of immense personal growth, a profound rebalancing process that is powerful and manifestly underway in our psyche. Therefore, in 2017, the round sphere can be seen as a rebalancing act of the current human circus, jumping fearlessly through the hoop of fire, taking risks and gaining momentum. The symbolic nature of the circle is much needed; it can help us reach deeper levels of the subconscious, procuring an almost mystical sense of oneness with the universe.


The New Jali

Divya Thakur writes about this ancient and iconic Indian architectural motif that is

finding new favour in the hands of contemporary designers the world over

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art veil, part wall, and part window, jalis are used to great sculptural scale and effect, their perforated forms—as both latticed partitions and chiselled structures—allowing light and ventilation, along with privacy. Their original purpose was to provide breathable visual barriers, but a new generation of designers is using them for shade, as windbreakers or simply decoration. Though the word ‘jali’ has its roots in Urdu, in India, the carving of apertures in repetitive patterns dates as far back as the

8th century, as seen in the rock-cut architecture at the Kailasa temple at Ellora in Maharashtra, and the Pattadakal temple complex in Karnataka. Today, in the hands of contemporary designers and architects, jalis are being recreated in new materials like stainless steel, bamboo, concrete, limestone, and exposed brick. On the one hand, designers like Rooshad Shroff are using laser cutting to create ethereal surfaces for interiors; on the other, architects are using perforated, or ‘breathing’ walls to create > january-february 2017|

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#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

#CraftsmanshipRevived


#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

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< distinct design languages. Some examples in the Indian context include the brick jali walls at the Centre for Development Studies in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, and the South Asian Human Rights Documentation Centre offices in New Delhi; the concrete jali walls at Rabindra Bhavan in New Delhi; the metal jali walls at the Raas hotel in Jodhpur by Studio Lotus and Praxis, and the Lakshmi Machine Works headquarters in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu by RMA Architects; and the wooden walls at the Nirvana Films office in Bengaluru by SJK Architects. Once the sole preserve of tropical countries, perforated walls can now be seen in global architecture as well. Of special note is the work of Brazil-based Marcio Kogan, whose work combines the sublime aesthetics of perforation with minimal modernism, as seen in his firm’s B+B House, White House, and Cobogó House, all in Brazil.

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ArchitecturAl Digest|JAnuAry-februAry 2017

Historically, jalis imitated the porosity of fabric, and their usage in interior spaces—as semi-permanent demarcators between genders and social classes—was not uncommon. Early manifestations also included cane blinds and sheer cloth. One could say that these perforated walls reached the zenith of craftsmanship and stylistic expression under Mughal patronage. In New Delhi’s Red Fort, the ‘woven’ marble resembles popular carpet designs of the time. Designs from this period were predominantly geometrical. Even when the motifs were natureinspired, they revealed a strong mathematical undertone. Symmetrical patterns were developed by intersecting simple geometric shapes such as the circle, square, triangle and polygon, among others. The endlessly duplicated patterns allude to the infinite nature of the universe, while also providing light, shade, air and artistry—an architectural motif that bears repeating.


Greenery: Pantone 15-0343 Pantone’s colour of the year is meant to signal a closer connect with nature through food, fashion, and a greater awareness of the environment

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s, perhaps, an antidote to the bleakness of 2016, the Pantone Color Institute has picked a delicate yellowgreen—officially known as ‘Greenery 15-0343’—as the colour of 2017. Late last year, as it has been doing every year since 2000, Pantone gathered its colour experts to debate and decide on the colour for 2017. The eventual choice of colour is meant to be

symbolic of the zeitgeist. “Greenery bursts forth in 2017 to provide us with the reassurance we yearn for amid a tumultuous social and political environment. Satisfying our growing desire to rejuvenate and revitalize, Greenery symbolizes the reconnection we seek with nature, one another and a larger purpose,” says Leatrice Eiseman, the executive director of the Institute. January-February 2017|

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#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

#ColouroftheYear


samuel barclay and anne geenen of case design and casegoods. Facing page, clockwise from top left: ‘rolling round’ lights; ‘three leg’ tables and ‘topologic’ bowls; ‘folding flat’ chairs; a top view of three ‘topologic’ bowls and a ‘three leg’ table.

PHOTO: ankiTa cHandra

#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

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#TheHotNewBrand

CASEGOODS

Mumbai-based studio Case Design has applied its architectural expertise to product design, the result of which is Casegoods—a sophisticated collection of furniture, lights and accessories Writer Kaveri acharya

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creative eye and curious spirit brought a young American architecture student to Mumbai over a decade ago. The wide-eyed student was Samuel Barclay whom Bijoy Jain, one of India’s most celebrated architects, took under his wing. Fast-forward to 11 years later and Barclay, with a dynamic international team of designers and architects, runs Case Design—a successful architectural practice that ties together his core belief in high-quality, sustainable design. Over the years, as Barclay and his team crisscrossed the country, working on projects and discovering the wealth of Indian craft, they found themselves frequently seeking out carpenters and craftsmen who could collaborate with them in designing and fabricating customized furniture, lights and objects. Today, the

small-scale, one-off production has blossomed into Casegoods—a brand that extends the parent firm’s refined design sensibilities and ethics into contemporary furniture and accessories. Only a couple of months old, Casegoods has its vision firmly in place. Barclay says, “We are focused on creating products of exceptional quality. Rather than chasing an aesthetic or style, we try to emphasize the material richness and sensuous form of each piece.” The debut collection has been created using superior quality materials like teak, rosewood and brass, which are both durable and alluring. Casegoods is led by a team consisting of Barclay, Anne Geenen—his partner in Case Design—and Paul Michelon, who is the lead designer for the brand. Additionally, they are supported by


PHOTOS: PAUL MICHELON

a team of craftsmen—long-time collaborators of Barclay—who create the brand’s unique range of products at its Mumbai studio. Drawing upon the wealth of Indian artisanal traditions while also referencing contemporary, international design, Casegoods’ products bear the mark of a lively, collaborative process. Take the ‘Rolling Round’ lamp for example; the perfection of the globular body—available in rosewood or brass—is reminiscent of the timeless Indian lota. It’s been given, quite literally, a playful spin, through the meticulous calibration of the sphere’s centre of gravity, so that a gentle nudge gets the lamp rolling on its base, eventually coming to rest in its original position. The brand’s belief in the universal appeal of pure geometry and stimulating design is also articulated in its other products. The

‘Topologic’ bowls—available in multiple sizes, with material options of teak, rosewood or mahogany—play with squares, circles and triangles; and the ‘Three Leg’ tables, with options of rosewood or teak for the legs, and stone or wood for the tops, are connected by a unique T-formation. The wooden furniture, in particular, embodies the ethics of sustainability that drive Casegoods. Each piece of teak or mahogany wood is sourced locally, reclaimed from old buildings being taken down. Even at its infant stage, Casegoods appears to be a vital movement in the right direction when it comes to beautiful, wholesome and sustainable design. We’re watching this brand closely for its sophisticated mix of contemporary design and traditional craftsmanship. JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

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© DAVID CHIPPERFIELD ARCHITECTS

#TRENDING2017 #WHATSBREWING #DESIGNINGTHEFUTURE #NEWSMAKERS #TRENDSETTERS #LOOKINGFORWARD #DEFININGDESIGN #NEWDIRECTION #THECUTTINGEDGE #NEEDTOKNOW #FIRSTONTHESCENE #INFLUENCERS #EARLYADOPTERS

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#MughalMuseum

David Chipperfield is here! The ‘starchitect’ has collaborated with Studio Archohm on the Mughal Museum, a modern marble palace next door to the Taj Mahal WRITER DIVYA MISHRA

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hen Shah Jahan, the fifth Mughal emperor of India, commissioned the construction of the Taj Mahal—a mausoleum for his favourite wife—it was unlikely that he expected footfalls in the range of 7 to 8 million a year, almost 400 years down the line. It was, after all, a mausoleum. And yet, it is to these numbers that Agra’s new Mughal Museum will cater, at approximately a tenth of the size, and an even tinier fraction of the mausoleum’s original budget. Opening later this year, it will be aimed at educating visitors about the Mughal Empire through its architecture and art. Situated near the eastern gate of the Taj, the museum is the result of a collaboration between New Delhi-based Studio Archohm, and David Chipperfield Architects Berlin, whose founder is responsible for some of the most stunning museums in the world today, including the stately Neues Museum in Berlin.

At a modest 20,000 square metres, the Mughal Museum is part of a larger plan to improve visitor facilities in the area surrounding the mausoleum, and will house, among other things, exhibition spaces (both temporary and permanent), an auditorium, a store and a resource centre. In keeping with Chipperfield’s elemental style, its design brings traditional Mughal architecture’s themes of rationality, order and repetition into a modern context that, almost magically, links the city’s past with its present. As a nod to the Taj, considered one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture in the world, the museum’s facade is white marble. It was rumoured that once the Taj was built, Shah Jahan had the hands of its chief architect, Ustad Ahmad Lahori, chopped off so he would never be able to replicate its beauty. The rumours are unsubstantiated, and Lahori most likely kept his hands. And if he were alive today, he might just have given the Mughal Museum one.


#TRENDING2017 #WHATSBREWING #DESIGNINGTHEFUTURE #NEWSMAKERS #TRENDSETTERS #LOOKINGFORWARD #DEFININGDESIGN #NEWDIRECTION #THECUTTINGEDGE #NEEDTOKNOW #FIRSTONTHESCENE #INFLUENCERS #EARLYADOPTERS

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#TheCollaboration

TARUN tahiliani & obeetee Working with the nearly-century-old carpet maker opened up a whole new world for Tarun Tahiliani’s inimitable style. GAURI KELKAR talks to the designer about his new designs for Obeetee

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rom fashion to home interiors to jewellery design—and even art—Tarun Tahiliani displays an enviable felicity to adapt his aesthetic to any design requirement. This time, a collaboration with Obeetee, makers of handmade carpets, gave him an opportunity to extend his oeuvre and try his hand at designing carpets. Based broadly on three themes, this limited-edition collection steers clear of the ‘more of the same’ mould—where carpets become symbols of a bygone era, celebrating history and heritage as it was meant to be. Instead, the collection sees Tahiliani and Obeetee leverage generations-old skills to give tradition a contemporary interpretation, with designs du jour. For the Antique Frames collection, Tahiliani gave new-age expressions to antique Mughal miniatures; and for the Chikankari collection, he reinvented the delicate floral embroidery as geometric lines. A carpet he designed for the Abstract Art collection had a more immediate source of inspiration—one of his own abstract artworks (pictured). “It’s [inspired by] a bronze by John Burman, of a man holding a flower or a globe on his head. I had first used this as one of our prints in a collection some years ago. I thought this was a wonderful point of departure with another painting of a sunset done in the same technique as a reference for the carpet,” he explains.

For the painting, Tahiliani employed the ‘drip’ technique, in which the oils slowly eat away the paint “by moving the canvas around and then adding a whole lot of textures and colours”. To replicate that saturation of colours on a carpet, though, was no mean feat. “There are probably over a couple thousand of shades, at least, if not more, because as the oil eats through, it leaves different intensities of shades. And as things fuse together or smudge, that again leads to new colours, which are difficult to reproduce, leave alone do on a carpet where you are dyeing and hand-knotting pieces of wool.” To create it, the Obeetee artisans and design team, along with Tahiliani, worked with computer scans and added classical references to the borders. “The Obeetee technicians translated this into a vector that made this possible,” he adds. The final result was impressive enough for Tahiliani to order a monochromatic version of the carpet, created in beige, to be showcased at his New Delhi store, which opened in December. Launching this month at New York’s ABC Carpets and Home, this limited-edition collection may be a first for Tahiliani, but the designer is open to developing this into “a full-scale thing, but that depends on the kind of response we get”. For now, though, this collection is a chance for Tahiliani loyalists to see what their favourite designer has conjured on a new kind of canvas.


Konstantin Grcic with his ‘StoolTool’ for Vitra. Facing page, clockwise from top left: Sledframe chair with armrests, fourlegged wooden frame chair, four-star frame chair and table— all from the Pro collection for Flötotto; ‘Waver’ chair for Vitra.

photo: markus james

#TrendinG2017 #WhaTSbreWinG #deSiGninGTheFuTure #neWSmaKerS #TrendSeTTerS #looKinGForWard #deFininGdeSiGn #neWdirecTion #ThecuTTinGedGe #needToKnoW #FirSTonTheScene #inFluencerS #earlyadoPTerS

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#InTheHotSeat

Konstantin Grcic

This designer’s work explores innovative uses of materials and techniques and shapes the way we live Writer NoNie NiesewaNd

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or Konstantin Grcic, there is no better launch pad in the world than a pop-up store. The Berlin-based designer likes to test each of his novel design solutions, and get feedback from an audience before it goes mainstream. Vitra chose to introduce Grcic’s new ‘Stool-Tool’ in a fashionable pop-up during the London Design Festival last September, ahead of the Orgatec trade fair in Cologne, Germany, where power brokers buy their office furniture. A design-savvy audience pulled up a seat—Vitra’s new ‘Stool-Tool’—to hear its designer, Konstantin Grcic, tell them just how contemporary works in public environments shape the way we sit. Seeing him perched on one of his upturned polycarbonate buckets—monolithic, slightly pyramidical, and hollowed inside— we got the picture. The stackable, portable bucket seat allows swivelling around, has a backrest that’s the right height, becomes a handle, and doubles as a work surface. It really is something new. “A monolithic volume… both levels can be used in whatever way you want” is Grcic’s description of his ‘Stool-Tool’. It finds just

the right balance between leaving a small footprint and offering a variety of surfaces to sit on and use for work. In any office— whether a cool, informal start-up or a more traditional workspace—there are situations when people need to congregate away from base. The ‘Stool-Tool’ provides the perfect solution for impromptu seating requirements—or even hot-desking. Researching how office furniture might work in the digital age, Grcic looked at companies in Los Angeles and San Francisco, which gave him, he says, a great insight into the Silicon Valley mentality. It updated his 2010 research into how student performances improve with well-designed chairs. A study published by the German Federal Ministry of Family Affairs— titled ‘Work Place School’—proved that moving around, even when seated, could have a positive impact on emotional wellbeing. The study observed that students who continuously sit straight display sluggish behaviour; and changing position frequently while seated achieves better results. Based on his research, Grcic created the Pro chair collection


PHOTOS: MIRO ZAGNOLI; ART DIRECTOR: JAMES IRVINE; GRAPHIC DESIGN: MARCO STRINA; STYLING: NATASCIA VUK

with Flötotto. Its round seat allows swivelling; the slim backrest gives the torso room to move around; and the lowered curve of the backrest reduces strain on the lower back and pelvis. Grcic always pushes materials to their limits. Even solid marble achieves a fluidity on his ‘Bebek’ shelf for Marsotto (2011) which seamlessly pins a circle and a square to the wall with an invisible double-wedge lock used by shop fitters. High-performance sporting materials are referenced in his ‘Waver’ chair for Vitra (2011), which hints at windsurfing and paragliding; its ballooning seat is held within tubular rigging. For Michael Maharam, in 2013, Grcic worked with soft materials to create the ‘Three’ bag, crafting the soft bag on a sewing machine in his office using waxed water-repellent cotton canvas, then latticing it in black webbing for another edition called ‘Frame’. Man Machine (2014) is a series of glass chairs and tables for Galerie Kreo. Grcic used industrial gas pistons—“a kind of magic muscle”—to allow chair backrests to move, tables to fold away, and boxes to open their glass lids. Never easy, Konstantin Grcic’s designs are edgy. Once he

looked up the origins of the word ‘object’ in Latin. “It means to put—or even throw—something in your way. I like that because it has a little bit of aggression. I’m putting an object in your way almost as an obstacle; and you deal with it.” Asked to design the visual branding for the Hugo Boss racing yacht as “an expression of ultimate performance”—piloted around the oceans by Alex Thomson, Grcic executed a design that could have starred in war-mongering Waterworld. Coloured black, the hull, even the sails, “makes it look determined—even menacing”. The deck was covered in tessellating silver hexagons in reference to the honeycombed material, Nomex, used for the boat’s structure. Konstantin Grcic’s portfolio is rooted in the cabinetmaking skills he learnt at the Parnham Wood School in England. Whatever the material he explores, like a carpenter, Grcic appreciates construction that remains visible, and easy to read, “that turns structure into form”. In January, Grcic will be part of an exhibition at the Design Museum, London, titled The New Old: Designing For Our Future Selves. JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

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Alia Zaal Sultan Lootah, curator and artist, and JeanFrançois Charnier, Scientific Director, Louvre Abu Dhabi.

photo: RAJESh RAGhAV

#trenDing2017 #whAtSbrewing #DeSigningtheFuture #newSmAkerS #trenDSetterS #LookingForwArD #DeFiningDeSign #newDireCtion #theCuttingeDge #neeDtoknow #FirStontheSCene #inFLuenCerS #eArLyADopterS

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#MostAnticipatedBuildingOf2017

Louvre Abu Dhabi

The Jean Nouvel-designed outpost of the world’s most prestigious museum is set to be the Pritzer Prize-winner’s most recognized building yet Writer Gauri KelKar

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t’s difficult to remember which of the many architectural projects commissioned within the Middle East have actually been built, which are under construction, which were quietly cancelled, and which were never more than ambitious competition proposals. With the exception of a few incredible structures, like the Museum of Islamic Art by IM Pei in Qatar, which was completed in 2008, most of these projects exist merely on the drawing board. That’s all set to change with the opening of one of the most anticipated buildings of 2017: the Louvre Abu Dhabi (LAD), designed by French architect Jean Nouvel on Saadiyat island—a tourism and cultural destination being developed by the Abu Dhabi Tourism & Cultural Authority. Among the Priztker Prize-winner’s works are the Philharmonie de Paris, Madrid’s Reina Sofía museum and, in the region, the skyscraping Burj Doha. Conceiving it as a museum city floating on the sea, Nouvel was inspired by the traditional Arab medinas and low-slung

settlements to create a series of 55 pristine white buildings. The modern element manifests in the choice of material—ultra high-performance concrete. But it is the 180-metre-wide, eight-layered dome that sits like a canopy over a majority of the buildings that elevates the structure to icon status. Supported by four piers hidden away from view, the dome looks like it’s floating on the water. Its perforated roof ensures the sun’s rays punch through the membrane in a deliberately crafted ‘rain of light’ effect, and flood the 8,600-square-metre interior. Tasked with assembling the museum’s collection are JeanFrançois Charnier, Scientific Director, LAD, and Emirati curator and artist Alia Zaal Sultan Lootah, a graduate of Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi and École du Louvre. There’s more to come on Saadiyat island: next door, Frank Gehry is constructing an outpost of the Guggenheim museum, which will—in typical Gehry style—explode onto the landscape in 2018.


photo: Sheena Sippy

#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

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#TheHottestTableInTown

Sameep Padora's Theory Roshni Bajaj sanghvi explores Mumbai’s latest—and arguably sexiest—drinking

and dining spot designed by the Harvard-trained architect

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oal. Lots of it. That’s the first thing you see, and it’s the defining feature of Theory. The bar is a mammoth matte block of textured black carbon—the kind you want to run your hands over. It’s organic not only in its materiality, but also in its form, sculpted into coves punctuated by long wooden tables that extrude from it. This malleability allows intimacy and community, a spot for it all: pre-dinner libations, dinner, digestifs. Above, suspended patterned glass shelves hold the only swathe of colour: bottles of liquor, alcohol as adornment. Linger and look beyond the 160-foot-long, 5,000-kilogram coal block and more details become evident. Dark hand-charred planks wrap the walls; beyond considerable columns, the dining section has black leather-lined, lightly tufted booths, and long, glossy, bare wooden tables; those meant for two considerately occupy the quieter edges of the room. The floor is grey wood; the ceiling floats in light rough-hewn stone, emphasized with opaque cut-outs. “The way the space is laid out enables a porosity between the bar and dining programmes, with both feeding off the energies of

the other,” says AD50 architect Sameep Padora, founding principal of Mumbai-based firm sP+a, who designed the space. Padora is known for his work at Neel at Tote on The Turf, Khar Social, and Indigo Deli Palladium. With Theory’s co-owner Mickhiel Pinto, he transformed a space that was once a tube-lit bank into something that’s “dark, mysterious and sensual, yet liberated from the excesses of ostentatious embellishment”. Pinto, who previously helmed marketing at deGustibus, has been heating up Mumbai’s party scene in recent years with the Magnanimous Group (formerly Network Prive)—of which he is a co-founder. This is a team that knows how to create ideal frames in which Mumbai might relax, imbibe, and celebrate. To this end is a menu of small and large potions and portions. The drinks programme, led by Ema Pereira, features balance in flavour and adaptability in taste—both with booze and without— fortified with a variety of house tinctures. Chef Simarpal Singh Vardi’s somewhat straightforward-sounding small and large international plates are layered, much like Theory itself, with thrilling details and little astonishments that demand a closer look.


courtesy nirav modi

#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

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#ReinventingTradition

nirav modi’s endless cut The jewellery brand’s newest patented cut virtually curves diamonds to create a continuous ring with no visible setting Writer ArAti Menon

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or 10 years, Nirav Modi’s chief muse (and nemesis) came in the form of a jade ring. Cut from a single block of the precious stone, the ring was smoothed and polished down to perfection. “I wanted to create a similar ring using diamonds,” says the luxury diamond jeweller. “However, cutting out a single uninterrupted ring of diamond from a larger chunk was obviously not feasible.” Caving in wasn’t an option either; it took him and his team a decade to find a solution: the NIRAV MODI Endless cut, a seamless “halo of diamonds” with calibrated curves to create a continuous effect. The cut of a diamond, the fourth in a suite of Cs that bestows pedigree on the stone, may not be as celebrated as carat and clarity, but make no mistake, it takes very precise artistry and workmanship to tease out all that lustre and light. Master cutters are like sculptor-alchemists, transforming dull rough pieces of stone into brilliant, shiny, desirable objects. Over time, some cuts, like the modern round brilliant invented in 1919, practically changed—with all its 58 facets—the way people perceived sparkle. For Modi—the first Indian jeweller to have been featured on the

covers of Christie’s and Sotheby’s catalogues—the cut of a diamond holds a particular fascination. “We put a tremendous amount of R&D and innovation into our patented cuts, and each of them serves a purpose, which makes them more desirable. Take, for example, our latest—the Jasmine cut—which maximizes the shine of the high-quality diamonds used.” Jasmine, essentially a reinterpretation of the classic rose cut, was designed to emulate the way a jasmine blossom unfurls. The Mughal cut, another one of Modi’s patented cuts, uses a precision technique—and four artisans that are experts at different stages of cutting—to create diamond flower petals inspired by Mughal miniatures. Whilst some jewellers can be accused of taking the shortcut, by simply adding extra facets to modify the round brilliant, Modi takes the art of cutting very seriously. “Our clients who are connoisseurs and collectors definitely look to buy our patented cuts.” The Jasmine and Mughal cuts might still be the most popular, but Modi is proudest of his Endless cut: “Each diamond has to be sized, measured and calibrated to the wearer’s finger, but it is well worth the effort.”


NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2016

INDIa `150

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

the art issue

Su SudarShan Sh han S Shetty y by Dayanita a Singh gh yo ow rana r guM UnfolD o D thiS cover! co ! Make your y r own BeguM I reSIdence reS ce amin a Ja roShi roShini va vaDehra In Jaffer v Dehra ra the campana brotherS brother


in the diwan-e-khaas, the carpet is vintage; the tables, bench and lamps are by akfd; the cabinets and chairs were custom-made; the art on the piano is by graphic designer kriti monga.

PHOTO: sHine bHOla

#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

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#ContemporaryMeetsClassic

Narendra Bhawan

’s Leena Desai visits the newest luxury hotel in Bikaner, Rajasthan. Designed by Ayush Kasliwal, the hotel retells the story of its erstwhile owner, Maharaja Narendra Singh

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hen it comes to a royal welcome, very little can beat being driven in a vintage convertible Chevy right up to the entrance of your hotel, where you are then showered with rose petals, like some glamorous Rajasthani potentate. To balance this rather grand reception to the gorgeous new design hotel by the Rajasthan-based MRS Group, I am received by Karan Singh, the president of Narendra Bhawan—dressed in a cotton kurta and a lungi—accompanied by his two excited dogs. None of the staff, it turns out, is formally dressed. You won’t find anyone in suits here, and there isn’t even a reception area—at least not a conventional one. The atmosphere is casual, certainly, but it’s the kind of informality that is achieved with a lot of deliberation and forethought. For Narendra Bhawan is not just another Rajasthani haveli-turned-hotel, it’s a hotel designed as testament to the charisma of its former owner, Maharaja Narendra Singh of Bikaner, who lived here till his passing in 2003.

BUILDING ON MEMORY For its designer Ayush Kasliwal—who heads Jaipur-based design and manufacturing firms AKFD and Anantaya—this was his first big interiors undertaking, and one that came with its fair share of challenges. “Narendra Bhawan is a space based a lot on memory and remembrances. We did not have any references of another hotel being done like this,” he says. Every space in the hotel has a connection to its previous owner, right from the foyer. The wide hall is divided in two parts: the diwan-e-aam (hall of public audience), where Maharaja Narendra Singh would have met his people and the diwan-e-khaas, where he would have held private audience. Decorated with handembroidered tribal art, Chinese urns, bulbous chandeliers and custommade furniture, the two spaces evoke the personality of the maharaja. “Instead of just recreating history, we wondered, had Narendra Singhji been alive today, how would he have lived?” says Kasliwal, adding,


TOP & BOTTOM LEFT: SHINE BHOLA; TOP & BOTTOM RIGHTT: ANKUSH MARIA

The Diwali Chowk courtyard. Right: The corridor has furniture designed by Ayush Kasliwal. Below right: Kasliwal also designed the furniture in the ‘Residence’ rooms. Below left: The P&C restaurant features chairs by Windsor Chair Company; the tables and consoles were made on site.

“A lot of what you see is what we gleaned of his personality from old letters and photos; some, we imagined.” Small details catch your eye. Like photos of the maharaja’s family with other royals and dignitaries; photos of Narendra Singhji’s dogs (he had over 100 dogs of high pedigree); an antique baby piano inscribed with the lyrics of Edith Piaf’s Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien; there’s even a taxidermy leopard. It’s hard to believe that when Kasliwal started the project, this was an empty shell. “This building was bare; it only had doors, windows and a bathtub!” he says, “The ground floor was one big hall with just a couple of columns. We gave it geometric orientation and figured out how the spaces would flow into each other. Functionality, visual character and operational simplicity were the governing factors in designating the places.” And it shows; after guests catch their breath in the diwan-e-khaas and check in at the informal reception, they can nibble on the goodies at the Mad Hatter cafe, or tuck into an authentic Rajasthani meal at the all-day dining space P&C (an abbreviation of ‘pearls and chiffon’, the quintessential sartorial choice of the Indian maharani). For a digestif, guests can retreat into the den or the poolroom to enjoy the tipple of their choice. DESIGN-LED Upstairs, what was once the terrace of Narendra Bhawan is now a brightly lit, breezy courtyard. Named Diwali Chowk, it is decorated

with planters from Cambodia that hold kinnow orange trees from Hanumangarh (a city to the north of Bikaner). The effect is that of a lush oasis in the middle of the hotel. The three-storeyed structure surrounding the courtyard was added to the original haveli when plans to turn it into a hotel were finalized. Although completely new, they seamlessly blend into the rest of the spaces, thanks to the intricate jali work on the facade that mirrors the aesthetic of old Rajasthani havelis. Even the rooms reflect the lifestyle of the haveli’s erstwhile occupant. The flamboyance of the ‘Prince’ rooms, for instance, evoke his youth when he was a global bon vivant. These lead to the ‘Regimental’ rooms that hark back to his military career. At the top end are the ‘Republic’ and ‘India’ suites. With their strong modernist, Le Corbusier-inspired influences, they embody the maharaja’s reclaiming of his heritage, as the country came into its own post Independence. This kind of thoughtful design is evident— but never obtrusive—everywhere in Narendra Bhawan. Kasliwal puts it best when he says, “Although the involvement of design— from selection to production to curation—has been extremely intense, we had to learn how to negate design, as in, make design invisible.” This unlearning of design has paid off, and Narendra Bhawan today feels less like a hotel and more like a home. It’s a space that once belonged to a maharaja, and now succeeds in treating all its guests like royalty. JANUARY-FABRUARY 2017|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|99


#TRENDING2017 #WHATSBREWING #DESIGNINGTHEFUTURE #NEWSMAKERS #TRENDSETTERS #LOOKINGFORWARD #DEFININGDESIGN #NEWDIRECTION #THECUTTINGEDGE #NEEDTOKNOW #FIRSTONTHESCENE #INFLUENCERS #EARLYADOPTERS

perspective #GlobalGraduates

patents pending

Visionary designs showcased at the Global Grad Show in Dubai shine a light on the emerging talent shaping our future WRITER NONIE NIESEWAND

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usiness plans to make farming more productive; devices powered by the sun or wind; refugee shelters; inventions that reduce waste and clean up our oceans; violin strings spun by spiders. The Global Grad Show at last October’s Dubai Design Week showed 145 inventions by young designers from 50 design schools across 30 countries. Curator Brendan McGetrick described the projects as “an overview of the human experience and a new model for making it better”. Significantly, they all serve to power new technologies for the future.

According to McGetrick, designers today are well thought of, but poorly understood. “Most of us assume that a designer’s job is to make things beautifully, to elevate an object so that it sparkles. The assumption isn’t unfair, but it misses something essential. The beauty of a design is often in its idea, in the impulse that the work responds to and the effectiveness of its answer. A great design delivers both a diagnosis and a cure.” Here’s a look at nine technology-led designs that go beyond the aesthetic to offer solutions that enhance the human experience.

Algae Ocean Harvester

A drone that sweeps the seas to suck up algae that is toxic and harmful to fish, the ‘Algae Ocean Harvester’ was created by Fredrik Ausinsch from the Umeà Institute of Design in Sweden. The remotely controlled vacuum spews out water as it travels. Algae that is stored in its tanks can then be used for biofuel production. The designer proposes using algae biomass as a natural resource in the future.

Micro Wind Turbine

silk violin

After running out of power on a trek, Nils Ferber, a graduate from Lausanne’s University of Art and Design, contacted mountaineers about their experiences. All used solar panels for recharging, but said they could not rely upon sunlight to charge equipment. To offer an alternative, the designer created the ‘Micro Wind Turbine’ a folding, windpowered charger, with an in-built battery, that generates a constant 5 watts of power, from a wind speed of 18 kilometres per hour.

Luca Alessandrini, a graduate of Imperial College, London and the Royal College of Art, turned to biometrics to improve acoustics. His ‘Silk Violin’, made from a composite of silk and resin, is strung with webbing from the Australian Golden Orb spider, it customizes sound played on instruments and, in the future, high-end speakers and headphones.

Wearable shelter

As a response to the lack of adequate waterproof shelter and warm clothing in refugee camps, Gabriella Geagea and AnneSophie Geay from the Royal College of Art in London designed ‘Wearable Shelter’. The rain-proof cape, which stores personal items, unzips into a sleeping bag, and doubles as a tent with the insertion of lightweight steel rods.


raiden

Lightning at your fingertips allows 12,000 volts of raw electricity to spark from the Tesla coil drivers inside this glove. ‘Raiden’—named after a character in a video game, Mortal Kombat— could eliminate our reliance upon batteries. The thrill of this glove by Kourosh Atefipour from the Royal College of Art is that it can solder metal.

blendor

A set of three handheld pods teaches children computerized colour mixing, which is not the same as painting in artists’ colours. There is no digital equivalent of yellow, for example, so for bananas on screen, you mix red with green. Lee Si Min, a graduate in industrial design from the University of Singapore, designed the touch-sensitive pods to flood with intense digital colours, which can be poured from one pod into another.

Ephemerae

A kaftan in a drab green isn’t what most fashionistas would choose to wear, but for Angella Mackey, it’s a blank canvas. A designer from the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, Mackey picked the same colours that are used on film sets to overlay visual effects for this garment. A simple chroma key smartphone application makes the “green screen” garment a canvas for different styles projected onto it.

GROWFRAME

Coffee as a material

A strong, heat- and stain-resistant chair made from used coffee grounds is the ultimate cafe chair for a coffee break. Tackling the waste generated globally by coffee consumption, ‘Coffee As A Material’ by Jose Roberto Hernandez Euan from the University of Guadalajara, Mexico generates a new construction material by recycling coffee grounds with resins.

This collapsible floating farm is the brainwave of Philippe Hohlfeld, a postgraduate at the Royal College of Art in London, who designed them for the many shipping containers that return empty to their homelands in Asia. Equipped with batteryoperated LEDs and nutrients, ‘GrowFrame’ grows vegetables inside airtight containers. Cabbages, spinach, lettuce and beans have been harvested and a mushroom crop turned oxygen back into CO2 to balance the microsystem. Hohlfeld was shortlisted for the James Dyson Designer of the Year 2016 award.

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the corridor leading up to the roop rooms of the design hotel chennai is inspired by the traditional indian kalash and imitates the entrance pathways of indian temples.

photo: Shivani Gupta

#trending2017 #whatsbrewing #designingthefuture #newsmakers #trendsetters #lookingforward #definingdesign #newdirection #thecuttingedge #needtoknow #firstonthescene #influencers #earlyadopters

perspective

#CheckingIn

Design Hotel Chennai

The rich heritage of South India gets a contemporary design tribute in this boutique hotel. ’s Tora agarwala talks to its architect and designer, Pronit Nath

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hink of the humble kalash meeting Zaha Hadid’s fluid lines, the commonplace tilak meeting the unrestrained maximalism of Marcel Wanders, or traditional Tamil jewellery meeting the majestic minimalism of John Pawson. Welcome to the Design Hotel Chennai: a boutique hotel housed— of all places—in a mall. But that’s not the only thing that makes it a space for contradictory, yet surprisingly complementary, ideals. It’s tiny but extravagant, standard but niche, modern but traditional. The brainchild of Vijay Choraria, managing director, Crest Ventures Ltd, the hotel is located in the premises of the Phoenix MarketCity mall in Chennai. Promoting the arts since its 2013 launch, the mall hosts ArtC, a contemporary art programme curated by Diana Campbell Betancourt. The Design Hotel is an extension of the mall’s creative bent—a collaboration between Choraria and architect Pronit Nath of Mumbai-based Urban Studio. “It was on a trip to Madrid that Vijay came across the Silken Puerta América hotel, famous for having each of its floors designed by a different architect,” says Nath, “and that provided much fodder for inspiration.” But how does cross-continental inspiration—and a tellingly

European aesthetic—translate onto Indian soil? Not that easily. “Adapting contemporary design styles to a context that is quintessentially South Indian, and specifically ‘Tamil Nadu’, was hard work,” says Nath. But the hard work clearly paid off. The hotel is full of examples of an oddly successful marriage of forms—entire walls adorned by lenticular prints of Tanjore paintings and incandescent resin screens fashioned on statement pieces of traditional jewellery. These find space in the four distinct sections of the 26-room hotel. The fluid geometries of the Roop rooms are inspired by Hadid’s architecture. The spatial effects in the Maya rooms are typically Jean Nouvel. The minimalist Nunya rooms follow a Pawson-esque style. And the maximalism of the Ati rooms brings to mind Wanders’s aesthetic. “Service these days has increasingly become about the experience more than anything else,” says Nath. “The Design Hotel offers the whole gamut: the local flavour, a modern touch and—by virtue of it being located within a mall—a range of facilities.” But at the end of the day, when you settle into your bed, surrounded by images of dancing apsaras and patterns from the borders of Kanchipuram silks, there remains only one chief takeaway: thoughtful, relevant design.


#TRENDING2017 #WHATSBREWING #DESIGNINGTHEFUTURE #NEWSMAKERS #TRENDSETTERS #LOOKINGFORWARD #DEFININGDESIGN #NEWDIRECTION #THECUTTINGEDGE #NEEDTOKNOW #FIRSTONTHESCENE #INFLUENCERS #EARLYADOPTERS

perspective

#WhoNeedsAnInteriorDesigner

Digital Decorating D’Decor’ s new mobile app provides the millennial homeowner design inspiration at their fingertips WRITER PRAACHI RANIWALA

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n this age of apps and immediacy, D’Decor hopes to change how homeowners select fabrics for their spaces. Known for their contemporary designs and versatile collections, the brand has launched this app to create a uniquely tailored experience for customers. Built around D’Decor’s ‘live beautiful’ philosophy, it opens up the brand’s portfolio—of over 10,000 designs—bringing their retail experience to mobile phone screens around the country. The app is divided into five easy-to-browse categories. The ‘Get inspired’ section brings the user a host of ideas, lookbooks and mood boards. The process is kicked off with a quiz that is aimed at deciphering each user’s tastes, followed by design suggestions based on the results. Users can then browse through styles, trends, and colour charts. ‘Our range’ is a systematic presentation of their collections—

spanning curtains, upholstery, bed linen, wallpapers, and blinds. Each section is further divided based on current offerings, with a dedicated ‘Where to buy’ button that throws up corresponding store listings with relevant directions. The in-app calculator also provides an estimated cost, based on the quantity to be purchased. Tying the experience together to make it a seamlessly all-round one for the user is the ‘Shop’ section, which launches soon. Through this, the brand will retail bed sheets, ready-made curtains, cushions, and towels. Rounding up the app is the ‘Request an appointment’ section. Factoring the shopper’s ultimate convenience into the core of the app’s design, it allows users to make a shortlist, choose the nearest store, request the store to keep the selection ready, and set up a suitable appointment to view it. Decking up your home really doesn’t get any easier than this.


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spaces

TAKE A JOURNEY THROUGH SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

The granite Buddha at the entrance— with a face on either side—was sourced from Andhra Pradesh and accentuates the Zen-like calm of the villa.

VALLEY

HIGH Designed to align with the lay of the land, this house in a valley in Maharashtra’s Pune district, is built to frame, perfectly, its view of the mountains WRITER RAJASHREE BALARAM . PHOTOGRAPHER RICHARD POWERS


The house looks out to stunning views of the Sahyadri range. The lotus pond at the edge of the ground floor creates a seamless connection between the ground and basement levels.


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Nine locally sourced lamps in the drawing room watch over the sitting area. The two smooth-lined Eames chairs contrast the raw form of the coffee tables. The tables were fashioned from cross-sections of tree trunks, and pair especially well with the buff limestone flooring.

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A long, uninterrupted passage connects the entrance to all the other rooms. Left: The bedrooms are simple, uncluttered and functional; the view outside compensates for the almost austere interiors. Above left: The dining area is an extension of the drawing room and includes chairs sourced from Mumbai; the rectangular lighting enclosure above the table is an unexpectedly playful touch, meant to mimic the lights usually seen above table tennis and carrom tables. Above: The soft, muted colour palette in the bathrooms makes them exceptionally tranquil spaces.


The passages and corridors are mostly kept empty, except for some ethnic furniture sourced from around the country. The raised platform seen outside the window used to be a lotus pond, but was emptied out when it started attracting water snakes. The large windows with vertical louvres make an unusual design statement.

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The most priceless piece of art in this 10,000-square-foot, threestoreyed weekend home in Aamby Valley City, in Maharashtra’s Pune district, is easily the spectacular vista that greets you from its glassfronted drawing room. The design that holds the house and the view together is marked by a seamlessness that has clearly taken a significant amount of thought and effort. It feels as if the magnificent Sahyadri range that faces the sprawling villa holds it in a warm embrace. As Sonal Sancheti, the Mumbai-based architect and co-founder—with architect Rahul Gore—of AD50 firm Opolis explains, “The design is deeply influenced by the Japanese architectural philosophy of borrowing the scenery. The homeowners were emphatic in their brief

The entrance of the house is through a large wooden door; a panoramic view of the mountains, on the left, is a surprise that greets guests as soon as they walk in through the door. Above: The lawns facing the ground level are edged by buff and grey limestone and concrete; the rainwater collected on the veranda of the top floor is directed through discreet draining channels.


that they wanted the house to extend and forge a bond with the surrounding landscape.” MAPPING PROJECTIONS Perched on the shoulder of a steep incline, the spatiality of the house is accentuated by the rolling highs and lows of the land it is built on. The unevenness of the topography came with a set of challenges that took over four years of design and construction to overcome. Gore says, “When we first dug up the land, we had a tough time finding a hard stratum at the level we had estimated in the blueprint. So there was a lot of filling and digging to be done, and an extra floor of beams that went in before we could lay down the foundation. The idea was to build into the context and not move away from it.” This design principle is clearly manifested in the lotus pond near the entrance on the ground level, which subtly underlines the drop to the next level. The three-storeyed structure is best described as a sandwich of stone, concrete and roofs. “The homeowners wanted the house to reflect an organic earthiness and simplicity. The grandeur of it lies in the sheer size,” says Sancheti. While the vastness of the space is what first draws you in, once indoors, you see a house that demands tactile exploration. The limestone floors in the hall and in every balcony invite you to take off your shoes and walk barefoot. The facing walls in the drawing room, clad in local stone, are rough-hewn and unyielding, but cool to the touch. INSIDE STORY A walk around the property makes it clear that the homeowners have a Architect Sonal Sancheti believes the factors that define “the endurance and permanence” of a house ultimately make it more beautiful in the long run.

soft spot for statuary. The Buddha bust on the lawns, with a face on either side; the somnolent lion in the driveway; the forest goddess Vandevi in the backyard; the elephant-headed god Ganesha in the parking area—all granite sculptures—have been brought in from Andhra Pradesh. But, the Eames chairs, or “the world’s most comfortable chairs” as Sancheti describes them, were added by Opolis. Two large cross-sections of tree-trunks fashioned into coffee tables were picked up by the owners on their travels abroad. The curious contrast between the minimal lines of the Eames chair and the earthy form of the coffee tables, or the many landscape paintings bought from Italy, is hard to miss. Instead of being jarring though, the differences lend a charming eclecticism to the interiors. Gore and Sancheti admit that the interiors were not part of a theme. Sancheti says, “Weekend homes are spaces that evolve over a period of time. It is about leisure, after all. They also encompass the emotional and spiritual growth of the people who inhabit them. As architects, we are more consumed by the form and structure of the place, which ultimately defines its endurance and permanence. Much of the furniture here is what the owners chose.” The greatest challenge for Gore and Sancheti was to retain the minimalism of the design without losing the warmth and functionality of the spaces. Gore says, “The drawing room is where the whole family spends their day together, and it also happens to be a massive space. So it was important to create cosy, warm zones within it, and anchor the space with a presiding design element.” In accordance with this idea, the cluster of ceiling lamps in one part of the drawing room marks the sitting area, while the rectangular-boxed lighting creates a sense of togetherness around the large dining table. “I was inspired by the lights that one typically has over a carrom or table tennis table, something reminiscent of a warm and playful mood,” says Gore. Aside from the profusion of vertically louvred windows to facilitate ventilation, there are discreet skylights throughout that bring in the light from the outdoors—in softened, mellow tones. NATuRE’S VAllEY But living in the lap of Mother Nature also means bearing witness to her playful, wilful side. Like the lotus pond in the front, there were initially two other water bodies on the premises—one near the entrance and one at the back. “But when water snakes started to come crawling in, those water bodies were converted into lawns,” says Sancheti. Thanks to frequent nocturnal visits by wild boars that mercilessly uprooted the gardens, the choice of foliage was also a matter of debate within the family. For now, there is a beautiful, lone mulberry bush, and a few guava, mango and orange trees. Despite the differing opinions among the family members on the choice of flora, the decision to leave the panoramic view of the mountains unobstructed by trees was unanimous. The rain that lashes this region every monsoon is as much a gift as it is a challenge. “Thankfully, the house faces the east, so we didn’t need low-slung roofs to protect the side facing the mountains. The south-west assault at the back, though, demands an extremely sturdy, low-hanging roof, which adds a certain magnificence and solidity to the form,” says Gore. A vast soundproof music room, with an attached bedroom, is the newest addition to the house. The homeowners, all music lovers, have their individual tastes in music, but with a view like that and a space like this, there is more than enough room for Hindustani classical and jazz to coexist in peace.

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A radical distillation of the late Geoffrey Bawa’s own ideas of tropical modernism, this steel and glass house, high on the red cliffs of Mirissa in Sri Lanka, was the architect’s last project and arguably his most important work

WRITER SMRITI DANIEL . PHOTOGRAPHER SEBASTIAN POSINGIS


The Jayawardene House offers stunning views of Weligama Bay. Commissioned in 1996 by Pradeep Jayawardeneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the grandson of former Sri Lankan president and prime minister JR Jayawardeneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the house was designed to be a retreat for the family.

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n early 1996, when Geoffrey Bawa first asked Pradeep Jayawardene what kind of home he wanted, he replied: “My perfect house would be a garden.” Pradeep knew that if anyone could do this, it would be Bawa. He had visited the architect’s Lunuganga estate in Bentota, and had fallen instantly in love with what was already one of Asia’s most famous gardens. Nature and constructed form merged so seamlessly there that Lunuganga stood like a creation out of time, a place filled with secret corners that opened unexpectedly onto sweeping vistas of water and rolling green earth. Now, Pradeep wanted Bawa to build on the site of his grandfather’s old holiday home, high up on the red cliffs of Mirissa. For David Robson—Bawa’s best-known biographer and the author of the recently published book In Search of Bawa: Master Architect of Sri Lanka—the Jayawardene House, as it came to be known, is simply one of the most important homes in the architect’s oeuvre. By the time he died in 2003, Bawa was widely celebrated as one of South Asia’s most important architects, and hailed as the ‘Father of Tropical Modernism’. BARE NECESSITIES The Jayawardene House, coming as late as it did in his career, was

proof that he was in no danger of running out of ideas. “It was as if Bawa had worked for 40 years to distil the tropical house to its bare essentials—an umbrella roof floating in a copse of casuarinas and coconut palms,” says Robson. “People talk about minimalism; here was just about the most minimalist statement you could make.” Pradeep recalls that he drove Bawa down to the site himself. Another structure once stood on this land; an old colonial bungalow that belonged to Pradeep’s grandfather JR Jayawardene, who had held office as both president and prime minister of Sri Lanka in the 1970s and ’80s. His family had loved the holiday bungalow, but towards the end of 1980, it was burnt to the ground, by, some believe, political insurgents. “My grandfather dealt with that as he did with any difficult thing—he simply did not talk about it,” Pradeep says. Now, just off the Galle-Matara highway, a steep road winds to the top of the cliff, and a final bend reveals a breathtaking view. The approach to the house, over a flat lawn speckled with small woody cones from the casuarina trees, is full of promise. The boundaries of the property fall away steeply and all around is the wide sweep of Weligama Bay, glittering blue under the noonday sun. The slender columns that hold up the thin, horizontal ‘floating roof’ could be mistaken for the trunks of coconut trees. There are three rows of them, and that is all: no walls, no doors and no >


Bedrooms and service areas are tucked into a half-enclosed lower level.

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The experience of this house shifts with both season and time of day: at noon, you can see the lighthouse at Dondra Head; come sunset, the sky and the cliffs are awash in shades of orange, pink and gold.

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The Jayawardene family and their guests would spend much of their time in this open space.

< windows. The living space is anchored by a large dining table, the

top of which rests on an antique electricity generator—one of the few objects to survive the torching of the old bungalow. A glass-enclosed stairway leads down into a lower level with a small living room, bedrooms and service areas. The rooms look out onto a lower courtyard. Pradeep’s favourite time in the house is split between hot afternoons, when you can see for miles out over the bay; and the early morning, when the sun is coming up and the red cliffs come ablaze. He quotes the German naturalist and philosopher Ernst Haeckel, who visited the site a century ago, and wrote of the cliffs: ‘They seem to burn like live coal.’ To the Jayawardene family, this is an idyllic holiday home. When they feel like a dip, they follow the steep road down to the base of the cliffs, which leads to a private beach. Their guests have included their relative, the writer Michael Ondaatje, who wrote a poem meditating on the sound of the wind in the trees around the house: “the sea is in the leaves / the waves are in the palms / old language in the arms of the casuarina pine.”

OPEN ACCESS “It is a house that demands you are active. It changes with the seasons,” says Channa Daswatte, a member of the Bawa Trust and a protégé of the architect himself. Describing watching the monsoon

come charging through the bay, he says: “It is not a house of safety and quiet but an open house. It catches life.” Using steel and glass, the design flew in the face of everything people had come to expect of Bawa’s ‘vernacular architecture’, and yet it was undoubtedly a masterpiece. “It was a precursor to the kind of work Sri Lankan architects are doing now,” says Daswatte. “Goodness knows what Bawa would have accomplished if he had lived another 10 years.” The very last site visit Bawa ever made was to the Jayawardene House, in 1998, and both Robson and Daswatte kept him company on that trip. The family had just moved in and the architect was pleased to see the building occupied. Later that same night, Bawa had a stroke that left him paralysed and unable to speak. He died in 2003, five very difficult years later. Bawa had planned for two additional rooms to be built, and Pradeep has plans to complete the architect’s vision. He has come to treasure his unconventional house. “It grew on me. It was such a radical design. We are used to thinking of houses as offering security; but very quickly, I came to love its openness.” He remembers standing in front of the completed structure with Bawa, and the architect turning to him and saying: “How come you let me do this? I don’t think any other client would have.” Pradeep tells me that he still doesn’t have an answer—but he has no regrets either.


ON THE DRAWING BOARD

The first impromptu sketch Geoffrey Bawa showed homeowner Pradeep Jayawardene was tiny: “It was a small drawing of a house, just two inches long, but I could see perfectly what he wanted to do,” Pradeep remembers. “It was a house you could see right through.” For his part, Bawa was completely won over by the beauty of the site itself.


The UlTimaTe RefeRence foR GeoffRey Bawa’s woRk

david robson’s In Search of Bawa: Master Architect of Sri Lanka (2016)—published by Talisman Publishing for Laurence King Publishing (London)—features a comprehensive collection of bawa’s projects, with photographs by Sebastian Posingis. robson is the Sri Lankan architect’s official biographer.

SKETCH & PHOTO COurTESy david rObSOn

Geoffrey Bawa on site at Mirissa in 1997 with his client Pradeep Jayawardene (left) and his assistant Channa Daswatte (right); this was the last project Bawa would see through to completion, and though wheelchairbound, he still navigated this rough terrain, choosing how the paths and the garden should be laid out.


The Jayawardene House, 1997


courtesy david robson


In the left-hand corner stands a dining table with an antique generator for a base. Bawa spotted it when the rubble of the colonial bungalow that once stood here was being cleared away. The architect wanted it to serve as a memento of a much-beloved holiday home.

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A NEW VISION At her Milan apartment, Eleonore Cavalli—the art director of Visionnaire—fused the brand’s classical furniture with contemporary art to create an edgy family home Writer Gauri KelKar . PhotograPher Max ZaMbelli


In the dining room, the ‘Keu’ table is by Alessandro La Spada and Samuele Mazza; the ‘Galahad’ chandelier is by Alessandro La Spada, Samuele Mazza and Philippe Montels; the ceramic artworks on the table are by Rita Miranda, and the artwork on the wall is by Loris Cecchini. Facing page: Homeowner Eleonore Cavalli and her husband Marco Morandini; the sculpture is by Alessandro Brighetti.


The ‘Eugene’ sofa is by Roberto Lazzeroni. The ‘Lancillotto’ low table and ‘Brunilde’ wall lamps are by Alessandro La Spada and Samuele Mazza. The artwork on the wall is by Susy Gómez. The vase sculpture is by Stefania Pennacchio. The ‘Tinne’ ceramic wall sculptures were designed by Samuele Mazza.


The ‘Ginevra’ sofa and ‘Lancillotto’ centre table are Alessandro La Spada and Samuele Mazza designs; the ‘Helmut’ vase is by Samuele Mazza; the ‘Gothic Dreaming’ tiles on the centre table were designed by La Conca; the oil painting is by Emmanuel Barcilon. Left: The ‘Speyer’ bookshelf and ‘Brunilde’ wall lamp are by Alessandro La Spada and Samuele Mazza; the ‘Saturnia’ ceiling lamp and ‘Aspen’ metallic cushions are by Philippe Montels; the carpet is from Visionnaire.

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historic building overlooking a patch of greenery; Roman ruins; the stillness of a quiet day punctuated by the tolling of church bells. You’d think this was a typical day in the countryside. Except that this is not your regular off-the-grid locale; this is Milan—a decidedly globalized city. And in its historic heart, Sant’Ambrogio, is where Eleonore Cavalli decided to set up home, moving to the city two years ago from the south of Bologna, where she lived in a 17th-century villa with her family. To the casual observer, Cavalli and her art-curator husband, Marco Morandini, had the standard relocation process entirely backwards. But for the art director of classical Italian furniture brand Visionnaire, family always comes first. “Our eldest son, Matteo, is learning dance at Accademia del Teatro alla Scala, Milan, and we moved here to support him in this part of his journey,” says Cavalli. OPEN SEASON Given the magnificent natural light flooding its spacious interiors, the 350-square-metre, fourth-floor apartment in this corner of the city appealed to Cavalli and Morandini immediately. But not before they were done with transforming the place to make sure it lived up to its potential. When the couple first laid eyes on it, the house had a very compartmentalized layout that did nothing to highlight “the natural light that streams in from outside”. So the first things to go were > 139


The custom-made bed was created by the Visionnaire team. The ‘Kenanz’ side table is by Steve Leung. The ‘Breuil’ chandelier is by Samuele Mazza. The oil painting is by a German artist.


The facade of the building. Left: The ‘Big Sleep’ bed is by Roberto Lazzeroni; the ‘Mizar’ chandelier is by Alessandro La Spada and Samuele Mazza; the ‘Lydia’ table lamp is by Giuseppe Viganò; the oil painting is by Italian artist Domenico Grenci.

< several walls in the living room, which was earlier divided into four rooms by a corridor. Now a single open space, Cavalli says, “it has given the home a stronger contemporary identity”. Once the space was opened out, the living room became the heart of the fourbedroom house. “It is the part we value the most,” she adds, describing it as the centre of their daily activities, where they congregate for meals, work, or relaxation. Completely hands-on when it came to redoing the space, the couple had the benefit of their own professional expertise to engineer the transformation. “From the very beginning, we had a clear dialogue between spaces and design,” Cavalli says. As a result, the restructuring process took them only a few months. “If we had to mirror ourselves in our home, it would reflect a sober and thoughtful personality with hints of exuberance. My husband and I like to contrast soft and warm colours, and offset materials like velvets against stainless steel, bronze and crystals.” In this case, they layered a neutral space with a strong personality, through furniture, lights and accessories. A pristine white shade went up on the walls and “gave a sense of light and cleanliness to the rooms. It also became one of the essential buffers in our interiors, mediating between the furnishings and our selection of art”, Cavalli explains. TREASURE HUNT When it came to furnishing, the couple didn’t have to look far. “I have many pieces of Visionnaire furniture that we collected over the years,” says Cavalli. She had a diverse collection to choose from, and did full justice to the variety at her disposal. With the occasional

splash of bold colours to offset the minimalism that they tend towards, the couple set about articulating a coherent interaction between pure, minimal forms and others that were more complex. Pairing the vintage with the modern, and clean-lined symmetry with fluid forms, Cavalli chose pieces that also complemented the proportions of the house. Like the classic form of the ‘Galahad’ chandelier, which is made of aluminium bars. Or the ‘Ginevra’ sofa that highlights the sharp symmetry of the ‘Keu’ dining table. “We like to combine these pieces and create a dialogue with some vintage designs as well, such as the brass cabinets with bronzed mirrors that are in our bedroom, or the contemporary accessories in polycarbonate, creating a sort of confrontation,” she explains. While the furniture and accessories add an artistic touch to the contemporary space, artworks add to the conversation—an inevitability, given that both Cavalli and Morandini are passionate collectors. “We believe that an interior project must include a balance between furniture and art pieces.” The selection of works was pure intuition for Cavalli, who let the art dictate its placement in the house. “I can’t say that I follow specific ideas for placement of art, but every time, it finds its natural place,” she explains. The most recent addition to the art in the space is a kinetic sculpture of a symbolic flower placed inside a niche, “to remind us of our roots”, adds Cavalli. And they are strong roots that reach deep into history, art, fashion and design. “All the pieces in my home are special. I love each one individually as they are all designed for the purpose of beauty and functionality.” There simply could not be a more perfect setup—for the furniture, the art or the people inhabiting the space.


Aided by views of the expansive DLF Golf and Country Club in Gurugram, interior designer Varrun Motihar created an apartment where a sense of wonder and delight are par for the course Writer Ravina Rawal . PhotograPher Montse GaRRiGa


The Paresh Maity oil-on-canvas is from the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Varanasi series; the cushions are upholstered in a Designers Guild fabric; the side-table bases are inlaid with Italian marble. Facing page: At the far end of this passage to the living room is a recessed light installation created with Italian marble and LED cove lighting; the photographs on the wall are by Karan Khanna.


All the furniture in the living and dining areas is custom-made by interior designer Varrun Motiharâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studio, MOVA1.


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f you can’t have a home by the sea or up in the mountains, one that overlooks the expanse and gentle curvature of a golf course is a mighty fine ‘plan B’. The calming effect of the greens stretched out in full view, a generous breeze teasing the curtains, sunlight swooping in at whim—interior designer and MOVA1 founder and director Varrun Motihar already had a highly accommodating backdrop. He just had to pull that meditative ease into the rest of the Gurugram apartment, which was to house a couple and their two grown-up daughters. Having rented out the ninth-floor apartment for a few years, the owners were finally moving in themselves. The brief was to please the ladies; after all, they are in the majority in this particular house. Luckily for Motihar, he already had one of them on his side. One of the daughters had sought him out after falling in love with a friend’s house in New Delhi that MOVA1 had designed and decorated. A quick introductory conversation with her mother sealed the deal. “A large part of being an interior designer is getting along with the people you’re going to be working with, and being able to communicate freely,” explains Motihar. “It is, after all, a six-month-long relationship, and there’s a lot of money involved; if your ideas and perspectives are not in sync from the get-go, things are likely to get messy down the line.”

WHITE SPACE Motihar’s canvas was a 6,000-square-foot space that had been tastefully designed about five years prior to its planned redesign; the colonial touches that were once favoured now looked and felt a bit dated. The homeowners were keen to liven things up. While they weren’t looking for anything ultra-modern, they did want a contemporary feel—something sophisticated with subtle feminine touches. Without the luxury of being able to play with the structural elements of a flat, Motihar had to find a way to rework spaces and move things around within a Rubik’s cube system of permanent plumbing points and fixtures. Retaining the mochaccino marble floors, Motihar immediately knew that he wanted to keep things light, which for him meant using a lot of whites and wood. Almost all the walls are painted white—the few coloured ones feature very muted tones. But there was one wall, in particular, that he couldn’t get out of his mind. It’s the first (and only) thing you see as you enter the home at the end of a long corridor, on either side of which sit all the rooms of the house. In Motihar’s mind, that wall was the focal point. He had to do something with it. “Instead of adding to it, as people normally do, I decided to take away from it,” says Motihar. A scooped-out sphere, fitted with warm cove lighting—his interpretation of a mother’s


have been thrown together till you take a much closer look; such is its seamlessness. Enhancing the textures are accessories from the couple’s last home in Africa, paintings by Paresh Maity and Raj More, and art photographs by Karan Khanna and Arun Paul. A third, important characteristic of Motihar’s sensibility is retaining a linear design. While some designers prefer to create starkly different spaces within a single house, Motihar would rather the whole thing look like one cohesive whole, even if you want to make some distinctions. The television room, for instance, was about creating an island for the man of the house, who otherwise chose to stay out of other design decisions. Here, Motihar wanted to retain the same design language as the rest of the house, but you can see that he’s straightened out the lines and swapped organic forms for more geometric ones. Low and deep grey-brown sectional sofas, a massive television, a handsome book bureau and a thunderous sound system come together to form the sort of space you never want to leave.

The dining table is in black oak and has an Italian marble top. The homeowners brought the dining chairs from their home in Kenya. The abstract photographic print above the dining table is by Arun Paul. The divider on the left houses bookshelves and a gas fireplace.

womb—became an important design feature, also mimicked on the ceiling of the same corridor. “It’s an extremely simple idea, but I think it’s also very effective,” he asserts. With this in place, he carried forward organic forms with soft, curvaceous edges, warm materials, and a muted colour palette that would allow pops of colour to come from the accessories of the house: artwork, patterned fabrics and upholstery, for instance. Having spent some time with the family members—who were excited about their new home—Motihar gleaned that the women of the house would prefer subtle hints of glamour in their spaces, so he also worked with a lot of mirrors and glossy surfaces. “Since I am a modern designer, the space may not immediately strike everybody as being a particularly feminine one, but for me, it was definitely moving in that direction.” Another design element that has been repeated through the house is the wood panelling that those familiar with MOVA1’s aesthetic will recognize immediately. Also characteristic of the firm’s work is their play with more materials than one would think necessary; besides the panelled walls, there’s a lot of Italian marble, mirrors, rustic jute and cane-work, bamboo, rich fabrics, personally designed Indian teak-wood furniture, and handcrafted and beaten leather—purchased together with the couple. You’d think it was all a bit much, but you don’t even notice that so many different things

LIGHT TOUCH Back outside in the land of the living and dining area, there’s a fireplace demanding a similar surrender, with a gorgeous oil painting by Paresh Maity from his Varanasi series. But that’s not the only source for drama. Because of the keen attention paid to the lighting of the house, the circuitry of dimmers, the cove lighting, pendant lights and spotlights all work together to create a little theatre within the walls when the sky outside starts darkening. “I’m extremely conscious about lighting when I’m doing up any space,” explains Motihar. “It adds soul to a place, and can really be layered in a way that’s beautiful, interesting and keeps a conversation going even subconsciously. It’s as much about controlling the darkness as it is about directing the light.” Over the next five months, Motihar worked with the homeowners to create something they’d be excited about living in. “With any project, the challenge is to execute with balance and harmony the concept you’ve got everyone involved to agree on right at the beginning,” he explains. “But sometimes what you have in mind just doesn’t fit the available template, and you drive yourself crazy trying to arrange and rearrange materials, patterns, perspectives and measurements to meet the idea you have in your head and on paper. Sometimes you’re able to work it all out like a puzzle, sometimes you have to realize it’s time to let an idea go—no matter how attached you have become to it.” While neither Motihar nor the homeowners follow vastu or feng shui principles, they are big on getting the right energy from spaces. Regardless of how brilliantly something works on the drawing board, once it’s taken on a life of its own, it also needs to “feel” right in terms of harmony and balance. “It’s also important for any place you’re spending time in to have soul. I find that a lot of people in my field, including me, get so caught up in the technicalities of modern design that you lose the warmth, love and naivety. That’s the scariest part for me—to suddenly end up with a cold space, devoid of intimacy,” he admits, stressing on the equal importance of undesigned spaces and needing to draw energy and inspiration from artistic abstraction. Eventually, all the pieces finally came together the way he was hoping they would and he handed over a home that didn’t look too perfectly put together, one that the homeowners could continue to build upon. “Weeks later, I got a call from them saying they still walk around the house with a sense of wonder and delight. What more could I ask for?”


The homeowners brought this hardwood four-poster bed from their home in Kenya; the furnishings are from Good Earth; the photographs are by Arun Paul. Left: This custom-made Burma teak unit in the master bedroom is by MOVA1. Above: The armchairs in the master bedroom are by MOVA1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;upholstered in a Designers Guild fabric; the bed is from Portside Cafe.


The outdoor furniture is from Indonesia, and was bought at World Bazaar, New Delhi. The cushions are upholstered in a Designers Guild fabric.


ExEcutivE OrdEr Decorated by Michael S Smith for the Obamas, the White Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private quarters are as worldly and relaxed as the family that calls them home Writer Mayer rus . PhotograPher Michael Mundy StyliSt carolina irving . Producer Margaret russell


Designer Michael S Smith specified a Donald Kaufman paint for the Yellow Oval Room. Artworks by Paul CĂŠzanne (left) and Daniel Garber flank the mantel, and a Claremont fabric and Samuel & Sons trim dress the sofas.

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Smith mellowed the Yellow Oval Room with smoky browns, greens, golds and blues. The 1978 Camp David peace accords were signed at the antique Denis-Louis Ancellet desk in the foreground.


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Stéphane Boudin, Kaki Hockersmith—anyone who had ever contributed to the history of this building,” Smith says. That immersion process extended to phone calls with Nancy Reagan and a lunch with Lee Radziwill, Kennedy’s sister. Smith had a more hands-on ally in William Allman, the curator of the White House. “Michael was sensitive to staying within the traditions of the White House while, at the same time, adding strategic modern touches,” Allman says. “He managed to introduce an array of abstract and contemporary artworks—particularly in the Obamas’ private rooms—without disrupting the gravitas and historic character of the building.”

SETTING PRECEDENT Smith was introduced to the Obamas by a mutual friend in Chicago following the 2008 election. “They were unbelievably charming, gracious, and thoughtful—and those qualities were reflected in the design of their home,” the decorator says. “It was very welcoming and comfortable, with books everywhere, and I immediately grasped the spirit of their family.” With less than two months to make plans before the Obamas moved into the White House, Smith had to hustle. “The number one priority for the First Lady was getting Malia’s and Sasha’s rooms and her mother’s room set up,” explains Melissa Winter, who is the deputy assistant to the President and senior adviser to the First Lady. “The most important thing was ensuring the comfort and happiness of her family.” The Smith-Obama collaboration progressed in much the same way as any typical designer-client relationship. Smith began by sending the Obamas various design books—his own included—which they notated extensively. “They’re very focused, and they laid out their preferences quite clearly,” Smith says. “They’re drawn to elegant, simple things.” Still, for all the talk about the comfort and ease of a young family, the Obamas and Smith were acutely aware of the symbolic resonance of any changes they made to the White House. “To understand the context, I read every letter and note from Abigail Adams, Jacqueline Kennedy, Sister Parish,

BY DECREE That delicate balancing act comes to life with particular eloquence in the redesign of the State Floor’s Old Family Dining Room, which, at Mrs Obama’s behest, was opened for public viewing in 2015 for the first time in White House history. There, alongside a stately early-19th-century mahogany dining table and a sideboard once owned by Daniel Webster, the First Lady selected several American abstract works that were donated to the White House permanent collection. They include two of Josef Albers’s signature nested squares, a 1998 piece by Robert Rauschenberg, and a 1966 canvas by Alma Thomas, the first African-American woman artist represented in the White House. Art intended for the permanent collection goes through extensive vetting by Allman’s office as well as the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, an advisory board on which the First Lady serves as honorary chair. The works displayed in the residence and offices, however, are chosen at the discretion of the President and First Lady, and it is in those private spaces that the Obamas unleashed their desire for a more diverse art programme that underscores the message of an inclusive administration and closely hews to their own particular tastes. More than any of Smith’s soigné flourishes—the dreamy Oushak carpet in the Yellow Oval Room, the custom-stencilled abaca wall covering in the Treaty Room, the Peter Schlesinger ceramic urns in the West Hall Sitting Room—it is the art that rings the most clarion bell of modernity in the Obama White House. With many works borrowed from august Washington repositories—the National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn and Smithsonian museums—the remarkable assortment includes pieces by contemporary artists Glenn Ligon, Sean Scully, Robert Mangold, and Pat Steir, as well as by Jasper Johns, Louise Nevelson, Sam Francis, and Hans Hofmann. Lest any traditionalists start clutching their pearls over the influx of so much bold modern and contemporary art, it should be noted that the President and First Lady selected an unimpeachable nocturne painting by James McNeill Whistler to hang above the fireplace in their serene, monochromatic master bedroom. As Smith points out, “This is their sanctuary—private, elegant, and calm. You really want to make sure that the President of the United States gets a good night’s sleep.”

onsidering the epochal achievements of the Obama administration—the Affordable Care Act, the legalization of same-sex marriage, the Recovery Act, the Paris Agreement on climate change, and so much more—it seems trivial to append a footnote that reads, “The President and First Lady have a pretty chic dining room, too.” But the fact is they do. And for anyone who appreciates the power of design, Michelle and Barack Obama’s emendations to the White House speak volumes about the sea change in American culture the two have championed for the past eight years. Adorned with an unprecedented array of 20th- and 21st-century artworks, their private quarters remain an oasis of civility and, yes, refined taste in a political arena so often bereft of both. “Because of Michael Smith, the private residence of the White House has not only reflected our taste but also upheld the proud history of this building. Above all, it has truly felt like a home for our family,” says Mrs Obama in praise of the Los Angeles-based decorator, who has collaborated closely with the First Family during their tenure in Washington, DC. Smith returns the compliment by describing his work as a response to the First Lady’s progressive spirit: “Mrs Obama often talks about bringing new voices into the national conversation, and that idea informed many of the decisions we made,” he says. “We selected artists and designers who would never have appeared in the White House before.”

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Late-1960s Robert Mangold works hang on the Family Dining Roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jasper-fabric-covered walls. The circa-1800 sideboard hosts Christopher Spitzmiller ceramic lamps.


The Treaty Room—filled with memorabilia, including one of the President’s two Grammy Awards, family photos, and a personalized American football—is where the President often retreats late at night. He uses the room’s namesake table (far right), which has been in the White House since 1869, as a desk. George Catlin scenes of Native American life hang on walls covered in custom-stencilled Larsen abaca; the room also features an 1850s overmantel mirror and a 1930s Hereke carpet.

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The master suiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s antique canopy bed is curtained with Larsen and Jasper fabrics and outfitted with Nancy Koltes bed linens. The mirrors and sofa fabric are by Jasper.

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EARTH SONG

Much like the luxury home store she is the brand director of, Beenu Bawa balances international sophistication with an inherent Indianness at her home in Mumbaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bandra suburb Writer Gayatri ranGachari Shah . PhotograPher Manolo yllera


The ‘Annamalai’ wallpaper and the ‘Savannah’ bamboo trolley are both from Good Earth; the vintage glass chandelier is from Chor Bazaar; the dining table and chairs—the latter, made in Indonesia, is woven in water hyacinth—are from Good Earth; the mask above the window is from Bali. Facing page: The ikat cushions (woven by master craftsmen in Samarkand, Uzbekistan), the Gudri tapestry throw, and the Malabar chair with custom handwoven ikat upholstery are all from Good Earth; the Peruvian blanket in the corner was bought at the base of Machu Picchu; the ‘Mughal Pop’ acrylic cube pedestal is by Mozez Singh; the tiles on the wall are from the Registan Square observatory in Samarkand.


The landlord’s 90-year-old swing—with a backrest that swings around—has hand-painted tile inserts. Below: The kitchen is equipped with a range of tinned copper vessels from the Maharaj Gunj spice market in Srinagar.

“When I saw the [Good Earth] Raghuvanshi Mills store in 2005, which [Anita and Simran Lal] had done all by themselves, my jaw dropped. It was unique and beautiful. You could feel its Indianness and yet, it could have been anywhere.”

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In the living room, the photograph titled Into The Crowd is by Sunhil Sippy. The ‘Gypsy’ cushion (left) is from Good Earth’s Samarqand collection.


In the master bedroom, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Personal Cloudâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bed by Good Earth has 600-thread-count linens and a seven-star-standard feather mattress; next to it is a mercury-glazed stool; on the lower shelf of the bedside table are Mughal-star mirror trivets from Hyderabad. Below right: Beenu Bawa. Below left: The bathroom features a distressed amber mirror; the bespoke lotus-shaped sink was created by the Good Earth team.


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eyond its architecture, nightlife, public spaces and cultural institutions, the factors that lend any city distinction are its people. For Mumbai, Beenu Bawa is one such person. A California transplant with a peripatetic childhood that included stints in Kuwait and Los Angeles, Beenu moved to Mumbai 11 years ago. Now, by virtue of her wit, and her lively telling of unending adventures, she adds a je ne sais quoi to life in the Maximum City. Given her free-spirited personality, one would imagine that this brand director at luxury home store Good Earth would have a riotous, offbeat, maybe even chaotic home. Instead, Beenu’s immaculate, sunlit, sea-facing residence is a haven of tranquillity. “The city is an assault on the senses, so to go back to a place that offers respite, where I can hear the ocean and the birds, is a relief,” she says.

POINTING NORTH Explaining her move six years ago from the heart of south Mumbai to its Bandra suburb, Beenu lists a combination of factors—not the least of which was the acute water shortage she faced living in Colaba. Fed up with the inconvenience, and finding that she was spending a lot of time between work in Lower Parel and her friends in the suburbs, she decided to move. After looking at more than 100 apartments—with her primary criteria being to find a space that was “new, functional and practical”—Beenu came upon one in Bandra’s Bandstand neighbourhood that was in desperate need of an overhaul, but had an outstanding view of the sea. Her first thought on seeing it was: “What a pity it’s such an old place, because the view and light are amazing.” She faced a tough choice—between renting a more expensive, but state-of-the-art flat, or choosing this sea-facing, but down-atthe-heels place—and turned to her confidants for advice. Beenu credits her friend, marketing maven Emmanuel Balayer, for giving her the idea of renting and renovating. She ended up eschewing the more functional option, and chose the fixer-upper with the view. “Once that idea took hold, I thought: ‘What can I do to make this place better?’” Beenu’s previous experience as a real estate agent in Los Angeles helped her visualize the changes, as did her knowledge of materials, textiles and home decor, gleaned from her work at Good Earth. Six weeks, a `10-lakh budget, and a good contractor later, her newly refurbished retreat was ready. Beenu fixed the kitchen by removing the old tiles, installing Bison Panel boards, and adding more cabinets; renovated one bathroom by dividing the shower and the toilet into separate spaces; utilized outdoor tiles to save on cost; and cleverly applied paint to add freshness and elan. And although white dominates the overall palette, it is complemented by bursts of colour—from dramatic, custom-made, natureinspired Good Earth wallpapers, among other things.

INDIA MODERN Good Earth—founded by Beenu’s aunt Anita Lal, and run by her cousin Simran—was an integral part of Beenu’s discovery of India. “When I saw the Raghuvanshi Mills store in 2005, which they had done all by themselves, my jaw dropped,” she recalls. “It was unique and beautiful. You could feel its Indianness, and yet, it could have been anywhere. I had this incredible sense of pride and envy. Envy because it was a modern Indianness to which I wasn’t connected. I thought: ‘This is something I want to be a part of.’ Here was my family, shaping modern India; and it was exciting.” While a lot of the furniture in her apartment is from Good Earth, the mix of variously sourced objects reflects Beenu’s eclectic taste. The striking antique-style blue chandelier above the dining table was even originally part of the visual merchandising display in the Raghuvanshi Mills store. It was gifted to Beenu as a surprise by Anita, and she considers it her most prized possession. In the living room, the almost-century-old swing, which belongs to her landlord, has a backrest that can be lifted and swung over to face either the dining table, or the view outside. A well-used trolley doubles up as a bar for entertaining, and the walls are decorated with photographs and artworks by friends in Beenu’s wide social circle. The artefacts were collected on her numerous travels to artisan centres in India, Uzbekistan, Indonesia and South America. In deliberate contrast, Beenu painted her bedroom a light sky blue, and placed a simple white bed opposite an altar, on which she keeps various spiritual objects. “I am very social and like to go out, but I also like time by myself,” Beenu says. “There’s an austerity in my bedroom. It’s my Zen sanctuary.” Every room has a different fragrance. The bedroom has notes of geranium and lavender; the study-and-guest room has hints of rose, jasmine and bergamot; and in the living room is the signature Good Earth Samarkand scent. “I wanted a home that was urban, yet beachy,” says Beenu. “A tropical vibe has always appealed to me and just to be able to see the sunset from each bedroom in the evening—what more could I want?”

“I am very social and like to go out, but I also like time by myself. There’s an austerity in my bedroom. It’s my Zen sanctuary.”

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Ratul Sood, Indrani Dasgupta, Vijendra Bhardwaj & AD Singh

Anuj & Deepika Agarwal

Harsh Chamria

Chauhan Mehek & Anshul The Ermenegildo Zeg na display

Varun Thapar

Peter Thewlis, Dushyant Thakkar & Surabhi Negi

Almona Bhatia & Sanjeev Mehra

The Gentlemen’s Club – an editorial initiative to bring together India’s finest gentlemen who share a common passion – was hosted at The Chambers, Taj Bengal on the 7th of September with partners Ermenegildo Zegna, Audi, Kérastase and PS Group. The evening saw some of the city’s most discerning gather for a session of engaging discussions over drinks and a gourmet meal.

The Audi A8 L & Audi S5

Neha & Siddhant Arya with Samrat Dutta


Govind Atwal & Kshitij Saxena Poonam Tharar

Saharsh & Devangi Parekh with Anahita & Rahul Kayan Seema Bahety

Manish Poddar

Hariom Sood & Rituparna Sengupta Sangeeta & Raj Kejriwal

The Chivas Rega l

18 Year Old

Meghna Mehrotra

Mouth-watering desserts courtesy the Taj Bengal

Punam & Gaurav Dugar with Prashant & Payal Chopra

Prakash Agarwal Shreya Pandey &

Sidharth Pansari Gaurav Bajaj & Praveen Agarwal

Gaurav Malhotra

The newly launched KĂŠrastase DensitĂŠ Homme collection


inside

expert advice, decor tips, and style essentials for the contemporary indian home

BATHING GRACE :THE B

OM REPO R T HRO

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jignesh jhaveri

From Salone del Mobile in Milan to the Cersaie bathroom fair in Bologna, has scoured the globe for the latest trends in showers, spas and more—and reveals where to get the look in India Located in a repurposed warehouse in Mahalaxmi, a former cotton district in Mumbai, Masque is a restaurant that’s being talked about as much for its dramatic Ashiesh Shah-designed dining room as it is for its nouvelle cuisine. But our favourite element is the singular powder room. Hidden under the stairs, with low lighting, there is something ceremonial about washing one’s hands under the monolithic circular basin. No wonder there’s a queue to get inside.


inside ADVICE

MAKING A

Taking inspiration from the creations of renowned designers and firms, ’s SAMIR WADEKAR helps you create the perfect bathroom with six selections of accessories and products

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CREATIVE INSTINCT

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The Fontane Bianche collection—designed by Elisa Ossino for Salvatori—uses Bianco Carrara marble to showcase its pure and simple aesthetic. 1. ‘Axor Starck V’ (red gold) basin mixer, Hansgrohe. 2. ‘Agra Taupe’ mosaic cladding from the Vetrite collection by Sicis, at C Bhogilal West-End. 3. ‘Memoria Black’ bathroom furniture collection, VitrA. 4. Five-knob diverter from the Kristall collection, Sternhagen. 5. The Shower Plus collection by Zucchetti, at Intersekt. 6. Basin by Boing, at Häfele. 7. ‘Eurocube Joy’ single-lever basin mixer, Grohe. 8. ‘Anger’ mirror by Philippe Starck, Kartell.

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WATER WORKS

American designers Samuel and Caitlin Dowe-Sandes used tiles by Popham Design and lights by Muuto in their Moroccan home, as an experiment in colour and pattern.

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PHOTO: RICHARD POWERS

1. ‘Milos’ tile from the Puzzle collection by Barber & Osgerby, Mutina. 2. ‘Neriage Feather’ tile by Ann Sacks, at C Bhogilal West-End. 3. ‘Nativo’ washbasin by Giovanni Levanti with the Stilema graphic by Alessandro Mendini, Azzurra. 4. Shower fittings from the Lissé collection, Dornbracht. 5. ‘In-Wash Khroma’ one-piece smart toilet, Roca. 6. Wall-mounted soap dish by Boffi, at Studio Creo. 7. ‘Composed’ faucet, Kohler. 8. Waste basket by Fornasetti, yoox.com.

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The Carpet Cellar

Rare Persian Carpets, Modern Carpets, Kilims, Textiles and Pashmina Shawls

1, Anand Lok, August Kranti Marg, Siri Fort Road, New Delhi – 110049, Tel: +91 11 41641777 Email: info@carpetcellar.com • Website: www.carpetcellar.com 348 D, Sultanpur, MG Road, Adjacent to the Sultanpur Metro Station, New Delhi - 110030, Tel: +91 11 26808777 (Herbal Washing & Restoration also undertaken) OPEN ON ALL DAYS: 10:30 AM TO 6:30 PM


inside 1

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PHOTO: RICARDO LABOUGLE/MADDUX CREATIVE

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GOLD RUSH

London-based design duo Scott Maddux and Jo leGleud of Maddux Creative paired art deco shapes with metallic fittings for classic bathroom glamour.

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1. ‘EDI MODEL 1’ light by Alberto Biagetti, Venini. 2. ‘Losanghe’ candle by Fornasetti (left) and ‘Gold Fish’ candle by Rory Dobner, yoox.com. 3. ‘Kannadi brass’ cast-metal mirror, tiipoi.com. 4. ‘Blue Jeans’ marble, A Class Marble. 5. ‘Eden’ towel rack, Maison Valentina. 6. ‘Lamé’ bathtub by Devon&Devon, at C Bhogilal West-End. 7. ‘Monte Carlo’ tap (24-carat yellow gold and black Swarovski crystals) by THG, at C Bhogilal West-End. ucchetti, at C Bhogilal West-End.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

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LUXE DETAILS

Ace Spanish decorator Lorenzo Castillo used vintage pieces and brass features to complement the grey palette of this space. 1. ‘Seed’ pendant lamps by Bec Brittain by Roll & Hill, at Sources Unlimited. 2. ‘Orion’ tile, Nitco. 3. ‘Litze’ (luxe gold) wall-mounted faucet, Brizo. 4. ‘Grey St Marie’ stone basin from the Mohs collection by Stefano Visconti, Purapietra. 5. ‘Darling New’ bathroom furniture and ceramics collection by Sieger Design, Duravit. 6. Mirror, Devi Design. 7. ‘Grey Series I’ (gold-plated) thermostatic shower system, Sherle Wagner.

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PHOTO: MANOLO YLLERA

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PHOTO: THIRU S/WHITE LIGHT DESIGN

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|175


inside STONE COLD

Using three types of marble—Negro Marquina, White Calacatta and Grey Rainbow—for the patterned wall, American design maven Kelly Wearstler created a modern space with a classic spirit. 1. ‘Apollo’ faucet with Apollo malachite levers, Sherle Wagner. 2. Three-knob diverter from the Düne collection, Sternhagen. 3. ‘Tono’ stone sink (cappuccino grey) by Porcelanosa, at Intersekt. 4. ‘Kristall’ toilet from the Düne collection, Sternhagen. 5. ‘Nami’ marble basin by Enzo Berti, Kreoo. 6. ‘Irish Green’ marble, Antolini. 7. ‘Texo’ (Verde Imperiale and Bianco Carrara) stone wall cladding, Kreoo.

1 PHOTO: GREY CRAWFORD

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SILVER STREAK

Designed by Mumbai-based firm Architecture BRIO, this bathroom features black and white marble with steel casings and details. 1. ‘Oros’ faucet from the Hindware Italian collection, Hindware. 2. ‘Nero Marquina’ field tile by Ann Sacks, at C Bhogilal West-End. 3. ‘Cobra Aluminium’ mosaic cladding from the Vetrite collection by Sicis, at C Bhogilal West-End. 4. Soap dish, Häfele. 5. ‘Shower 1600’ shower system by Porcelanosa, at Intersekt. 6. ‘Memoria’ mirror, VitrA. 7. ‘AC009’ faucet from the Artistic series, Bravat. 8. Silver countertop wash basin from the Lavabo series, Queo. 9. ‘Showerpipe’ shower unit by Front, Hansgrohe. 10. ‘Tailwater’ faucet, Artize. PHOTO: MICHEL FIGUET

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|177


STYLE

OFF THE SHELF The finishing touch to any glamorous bathroom is a vanity shelf curated with beautiful bottles, if not fabulous fragrances

StyliSt Samir Wadekar . PhotograPher JigneSh Jhaveri


inside (From left) Mother-of-pearl tray, CAC. ‘Melograno & Menta’ (pomegranate and mint) reed diffuser, Dr Vranjes. ‘Candela Con Cover’ (Pelle Frau SC 127 Siam) candle, Poltrona Frau Group Design Center. ‘Candy’ eau de parfum by Prada, at Parcos. ‘Missoni’ eau de parfum by Missoni, at Parcos. ‘Coco Mademoiselle’ eau de parfum, Chanel. ‘J’adore’ eau de toilette, Dior. Antique Bohemian crystal perfume bottle, Phillips Antiques. Attar bottle (cranberry), Essajees. Mother-of-pearl box, CAC. (Facing page, from left) European hand-painted fragrance dispenser, Essajees. ‘Pillar Lingam’ (black) candle, Design Temple. (Under candle) Black-and-white tray, CAC. ‘Musk Gold’ eau de toilette from the Essenze collection, Ermenegildo Zegna. Black ceramic soap dish, cinnamon and honey handmade soap, Trésorie. ‘Good Girl’ eau de parfum by Carolina Herrera, at Parcos. Diffuser (‘Aramara’ fragrance) with rattan sticks, from the Decor Classic collection by Culti, at Ergon Luxe. ‘Wellington’ (ebony) and double-edge (horn) razors, Truefitt & Hill. ‘Zebra Filled’ (gardenia) candle by Halcyon Days, at Ravissant. Black ceramic box, Trésorie. (On box) ‘Jour d’Hermès Absolu’ eau de parfum, Hermès. ‘Sauvage’ eau de toilette, Dior. ‘Icon Absolute’ eau de parfum by Dunhill, at Parcos. Metal tray, Trésorie. Candle by Borromeo & De Silva, yoox.com.


(Bottom shelf, from left) ‘Bamboo’ eau de parfum by Gucci, at Parcos. Diffuser (‘Thé’ fragrance) with rattan sticks, from the Colors collection by Culti, at Ergon Luxe. Shell tray, CAC. ‘Luna’ eau de toilette by Nina Ricci, at Parcos. ‘Baies’ (berries) candle by Diptyque, at Moonriver. ‘Trafalgar’ cologne, Truefitt & Hill. ‘Le Parfum Resort Collection’ eau de toilette by Elie Saab, at Parcos. (Middle shelf, from left) ‘Essence de Figuier’ scented candle by Hervé Gambs, at D’Decor. ‘Eau de narcisse bleu’ eau de cologne, Hermès. ‘Wooden Finish’ ceramic soap dish, Trésorie. (On soap dish) ‘Seven Islands’ eau de parfum, Bombay Perfumery. (Top shelf) ‘Wooden Finish’ ceramic holder, Trésorie. (In holder) Double-edge razors (ivory and horn), Truefitt & Hill. Production Assistant: Shreya Basu Location: Masque (masquerestaurant.com)

For details, see Stockists


inside The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort and Spa, Siswan Forest Range, New Chandigarh features elements of traditional Indian architecture, landscaped courtyards, gardens and water features. Below: The 25-acre resort offers guests both villa and tented accommodations.

HOTEL

OUT OF THE WOODS

The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort and Spa, Siswan Forest Range, New Chandigarh draws on nature to embellish the charm of its old-world aesthetic WRITER GAURI KELKAR

S

ometimes, an economy of words is enough to capture the essence of a location. Sample this: The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort and Spa, Siswan Forest Range, New Chandigarh sits pretty amid the dense forest at the foothills of the outer Himalayas. That should be enough to kick that imagination into overdrive. But this one has all the ingredients to trump any fantasy that your overactive imagination can cook up. Really. Given the location, you might think the luxury hotel group overplayed its hand in deciding to create something man-made on a site that showcases some of nature’s finest work. But this sprawling 25-acre estate holds its own. The newest addition to the hotel group’s wideranging portfolio—the resort opened in December 2016, the spa opens this month—the property looks like it was plucked straight out of the pages of some opulent period of history and planted here. LORD IT OVER A well-placed fountain here; manicured gardens there; intricately carved earth-coloured structures all around; and greenery everywhere—the resort seems almost like your own personal fiefdom. All palatial proportions and rich architecture, it elegantly wears influences of 18th- and 19th-century Mughal and Rajput styles. This is most evident as soon as you lay eyes on the limewashed facade and projected relief work of the main building, reached after traversing a network of courtyards. They are the focus of the villa accommodation as well, with eight clusters of six villas, each set around a courtyard. Echoing the design of the exterior, > JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|181


inside

Left: Rooms are appointed in colonial furniture and furnishings. Below left: The tents are luxurious, temperaturecontrolled spaces— equipped with modern conveniences.

spacious high-ceilinged spa wears a prominently off-white shade. A fireplace in the reception area with beige sandstone and Udaipur marble flooring should make you feel right at home—well, right at home in a palace, if the timber wainscot, chandeliers, wall sconces, and plaster relief works are anything to go by. The wet activity areas are dressed up in neutral shades as well. History, architecture and nature come together to deliver the kind of sublime luxury that was, in all probability, an everyday occurrence for kings and queens of yore. But it’s the state-of-theart appointments and thoroughly modern amenities available here that take vintage living to a whole new level of luxury—enough to make you the envy of rulers gone by.

< these villas feature plaster mouldings and cusped arches that

lead out to jharokhas (enclosed balconies) from the living areas; the latter have Burma teak flooring, and colonial furniture and furnishings sourced largely from north India. If the idea of looking out into the courtyard doesn’t quite satisfy your need to commune with nature, there’s always the option of tented accommodation. That should break down the final wall between you and your surroundings—almost. Low, curtaincovered walls and fabric-clad tented roofs retain their sense of being temporary structures, while full-height doors and windows bring light into the furnished teakwood-floored spaces. If you’re wondering about the luxury aspect, then that’s clearly evidenced by the open yet private marble-walled, timber-floored bathrooms equipped with high-end fixtures, and the lawn and pool right outside your doorstep.

A RARE INDULGENCE In keeping with the idea of channelling history, Anant Mahal and Raunaq—the restaurant and bar, respectively—are ornately dressed up, each overlooking some aspect of the natural lushness that dots the acreage. Hand-drawn paintings and blown-glass chandeliers, dropping down from the high ceilings, create a rich textured ambience and a genteel aura; both spaces continue the theme of opulent, palace-style living. Then there’s the pièce de résistance—which features in that mouthful of a moniker—the spa. Looking out to the forest, the 182|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

FROM THE CONCIERGE’S DESK A trip to this corner absolutely demands a journey into Chandigarh—particularly for the architecturally inclined. In the city designed by the legendary Le Corbusier, there’s no dearth of places to see.

CAPITOL COMPLEX:

What better place to start than Chandigarh’s Capitol Complex located in Sector 1. A designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, it houses three Corbusier-designed buildings—the Punjab and Haryana Secretariat, High Court and Palace of Assembly. Concrete monoliths all, the buildings have distinct design features; the sculptural roof of the Secretariat; the High Court’s brightly coloured columns that offset the dense grey facade; and the installations on the roof of the Palace of Assembly.

OPEN HAND: On the complex grounds, Corbusier’s 14-metre-tall Open Hand

sculpture made from metal sheets moves along with the direction of the wind. It represents a mind—and a government—open to ideas.

TOWER OF SHADOWS:

Also in the complex, this is a monument to Corbusier’s in-depth study of the path followed by the sun and ways in which its penetration of buildings can be controlled.

MARTYRS MEMORIAL:

Dedicated to those who sacrificed their lives in India’s freedom struggle, this memorial has a square enclosure, within which are figures of a supine man, a snake and a lion placed amidst ruins. An elongated concrete ramp on one side offers views of the Capitol Complex.

GEOMETRIC HILL: Adjacent to the memorial, the lower part of this earth-tilled hill has concrete relief work, while its top half is covered in grass.


inside

AD publisher Deepa Bhatia, Amit Syngle

The presentation area at The Korner House

AD editor Greg Foster, Abha Narain Lambah

RSVP

TIME TO CELEBRATE

Sejal Shah, Tejal Thakur

Kanhai Gandhi

Vijay Prakash K

Guillaume Dastros, Amandine Schira Nikhil Sharma

In December, Asian Paints and invited some of Mumbaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most celebrated architects and designers for an evening of art and architecture. For , it was to celebrate the success of the Art Issue, while for Asian Paints, it was the launch of their new Wall Art collection. Guests were treated to cocktails and canapes at The Korner House.

Vishpala Hundekari, Namrata Asudani

Anushka Contractor, Jannat Vasi

Rushabh Parekh, Shireen Mahna

Jaideep Kanse

Darshini Shah

Aparna Dhareshwar

Vicky Ratnani, Greg Foster

Kayzad Shroff

Ankit Puri, Shyam Swamy, Nadeem Karbhari, Kunal Adhvaryu

Rohina Anand Khira

Payal Machave, Jaidatt Udiyavar

Shefali Balwani and Robert Verrijt

Annkur Khosla, Rubel Dhuna

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

Tejal Mathur

Keshav Murugesh, Mangesh Lungare Nitin Barcha

Rakeshh Jeswaani

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|183


BE

S ST ND D TE RE UL NOW LA T O T E LK SHIGH THWA YOUG R T AT RIN CA WH EA

LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GADGETS GA RLS GIRLS W

INDIA

INDIAN EDITION

INDIAN EDITION

WITh ThIS ISSUE

8Special th Anniversary

THE WORLD’S LEADING MEN’S MAGAZINE MARCH 2009 RS 100

16 20

WITh

OCTOBER 2016 `150

DS AR AW

JUNE 2016 `150

Fathers & sons sPeCIaL

the 50 best dressed men In India noW!

HOW TWO VILLAGE KIDS BECAME BASEBALL PROS

CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

Farooq & omar abduLLah narayana murthy & rohan murty

HEIR TO THE THRONE

RANBIR KAPOOR

amartya & KabIr sen

KANGANA RANAUT PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

nagarjuna & aKhIL,ChaItanya

VIRAT KOHLI

ALL FIREDUP how a Punjabi Rapper turned into a youtube superstar The SmarT man’S Guide To euro 2016

INDIAN EDITION

OCTOBER 2015 `150

FROM U.P. TO THE U.S.

ViraT KohLi PhotograPhed by tarun VIshWa

MEN OF THE YE@R AWARDS

Kangana

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

ON SEX, PARTYING & WHY HE DOESN’T DESERVE ALL THE MONEY HE’S MAKING

THE

25 SEXIEST WOMEN IN FILM

INSIDE THE PLAYBOY MANSION

CAN HUGH HEFNER KEEP IT UP?

FORMULA 1 PREVIEW

YOUR GUIDE TO THE 2009 SEASON

RANBIR KAPOOR PHOTOGRAPHED FOR GQ BY TARUN KHIWAL

PLUS:

DOLCE & GABBANA’S RULES OF STYLE THE LATEST WATCH TRENDS HOW TO WEAR KHAKI THE COOLEST SUMMER SUITS

•ARMOUR YOUR AMBY •TIGER WOODS •GUIDE TO MANHATTAN •ASK MIA

INDIAN EDITION

2015

WHAT A MAN’S GOT TO DO JANUARY 2015 `150

NEW RULES OF OFFICE STYLE How to nail workwear in 2015

Why Microsoft’s

Satya Nadella

has the toughest job in Business INDIA’S BEST BREAKFAST SPOTS

AKSH@Y KUMAR THE ULTIMATE GQ MAN AKSHAY KUMAR PHOTOGRAPHED BY RAM SHERGILL DIGITAL ART BY THUKRAL & TAGRA

CRICKET Manjrekar on why we flopped in Australia in 1992 COLLECTOR’S EDITION

4

Arjun Kapoor

UNIQUE FOLD-OUT COVERS

THE UNEXPECTED MOVIE STAR

GET WIRED!

GET FIT!

WITH THE COUNTRY’S COOLEST TRAINERS

ARJUN KAPOOR PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERRIKOS ANDREOU

THE SUPER-CHARGED ISSUE

LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GADGETS GIRLS indian ediTion

what a man’s got to do sEPtEmBER 2013 `125

Fashion Trend reporT

INDIAN EDITION

The CloThes You should Be Wearing righT noW!

The Wild One

RaNveeR SiNgh hoW a JenniFer lopez lookalike

trapped the world’s Best counterfeiter

The hoTTesT nighTCluBs on The planeT

THE FUNNIEST MAN IN AMERICA

(Who else made the cut? Turn to page 103)

The Books everY modern genTleman should read

(or at least have heard of)

RANVEER SINGH photographed by prasad Naik

LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GADGETS GIRLS ST Y L E

INDIA

AUGUST 2016 `150

THE GQ INTERVIEW

Rakesh Sharma, India’s Reluctant Space Hero

JOHN

THE OUTLIER VIRAT KOHLI’s

Guide to Travelling Like a Pro THE

NOSTALGIA SPECIAL

Presenting the Best from the Past

How to Wear Vintage

30

MOST LUST-WORTHY WATCHES OF 2016

INDIAN EDITION

THE WORLD’S LEADING MEN’S MAGAZINE DECEMBER 2010 `100

How a

Bill Gates

lookalike executed the ultimate diamond heist The experts’ guide to bullshitting your way through whisky

FREIDA PINTO

LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GA BECLO TS 20 GIRLS INDIAN EDITION

50 0

The Th GREATEST things in the world right now (AND SOME OF THEM ARE FREE)

+

THE COOLEST BARS ON THE PLANET

INDIA’S HOTTEST EXPORT

FREIDA PINTO PHOTOGRAPHED FOR GQ BY MARC HOM

+ ++ • THE NEW JAGUAR • F1’S KARUN CHANDHOK • OPEN LETTER: DEAR SANTA

WE THE P AR S Y AG IN OUES G SO RIG H F HT OU NOLD W

THE WORLD’S LEADING MEN’S MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2010 RS 100

HOW TO BUILD A CRICKETER’S BODY (NO, NOT LIKE YUVI’S)

A MAN’S GUIDE TO THROWING KICK-A** PARTIES From drinks to dinner to... more drinks

ARE PEOPLE WATCHING

EXCLUSIVE: Catch Aamir, Travolta, the Bachchans, Ranbir, Priyanka and more at GQ’s big party

+ + + • GQ’S CAMERA GUIDE • MONSOON FASHION TIPS • TESTED: BMW 650i

AB

OR IS HE JUST BEING PARANOID?

SEX IN SPACE?

Meet Avatar’s sizzling hot Zoë Saldana CHARLES CORREA How one man revolutionized Indian architecture

ABHISHEK BACHCHAN PHOTOGRAPHED FOR GQ BY TEJAL PATNI

+ + + • KRIS VAN ASSCHE • TECH: GAMING SPECIAL • SINGAPORE F1 PREVIEW


LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GADGETS GIRLS

WHAT TO WeAR NOW

STyle Special

INDIAN EDITION

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e XC LUS I Ve

AMy JACkSOn

GQ’s GUIDE TO A MIDLIFE CRISIS

Hotter than Ever

(Oh yes it will happen to you) Inside the Insidious World of Video Games

How To look

Cool THiS

MAY 2016 `150

Investigating India’s Sudden Wrestling Obsession

THE KARAN JOHAR INTERVIEW:

Summer

ADITYA MITTAL ON WEALTH, WOMEN AND GLAMOUR THE GQ GUIDE:

RED ALERT

MONEY & POWER HOW TO MAKE IT

HOW

Hot IS

SID MALHOTRA STRAIGHT UP

IN THE NEW INDIA

SHRUTI HAASAN!

WELCOME TO

THE GOOD LIFE

CHECK OUT THE SIZZLING SHOOT INSIDE

13 Brilliant

Is It Time To Shave Your Beard?

Books you’ve Never Heard Of

20

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THe real STory of GermanwinGS fliGHT 9525

GQ KICKS OFF THE YEAR’S COOLEST PARTY WITH INDIA’S HOTTEST STARS

INDIAN EDITION

celebrating

EL

SPECIAL

SUMMER STYLE GUIDE How to look Cool in the Heat

Talking Watches with

THE BLING DYNASTY:

what a man’s got to do sEPtEmBER 2014 `150

GQ ’s 100th issue

Purifying the Internet from a cubicle in Bengaluru

NIMRAT KAUR

GQ’S NEW FAVOURITE GIRL

LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GADGETS GIRLS

LUXUR Y SPECIA L

YACHTS, ACCESSO FIRST CLA RIES, HOTEL SS CABINS, SUITES, COGNAC

A 400-YEAR REIGN COMES TO AN END

BLACK TIE RULES PARTY IN STYLE THIS NEW YEAR

LIQUID ASSETS

YOUR LOCAL SPERM BANK NEEDS YOU

VEGAS VICE A GUIDE TO AMERICA’S SIN CITY

AAMIR KHAN PHOTOGRAPHED FOR GQ BY PRASAD NAIK

AAMIR EXCLUSIVE: THE KARAN JOHAR INTERVIEW

U pG RaD e D

gQ gentlemen’s Club

From Tony Parsons’ 100-point guide to achieving success to profiles of influencers that cover style, health, work, relationships and family; from affairs of state and marriage to a healthy bank balance— this month, GQ India brings you the commandments of success, which every man should live by.

JANUARY 2017 ISSUE ON stANDs NOW

INDIAN EDITION

WHAT A MAN’S GOT TO DO DECEMBER 2014 `150

THE

50 BEST THINGS IN

THE WORLD

Inside Access

MEN OF THE YEAR AWARDS

UP IN THE AIR

How the world’s best airlines get you high

The Luxury Issue

Images of the hottest Party of 2014

Car Awards The GO

INTRODUCING

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO LOOK SHARP THIS WINTER The Strange Tale of the Last True Hermit ANUSHKA SHARMA PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

ON HOW DIVORCE WAS GOOD FOR HIM AND WHY MAYBE HE SHOULD KEEP HIS MOUTH SHUT

PLUS:

Inside Kanpur’s red hot nightlife

EvEr so cool

EXCLUSIVE

INDIA’S LAST AFRICAN KING

Everything a man needs to look his best

shahid Kapoor

FROM THE LUNCHBOX TO HOMELAND

THE WORLD’S LEADING MEN’S MAGAZINE DECEMBER 2008 RS 100

Fashion special

The woman behind hollywood high sTakes poker

The BATTLe FOR BANDRA

with our first-ever success special

DEV PATEL

Inside the lives of China’s new rich

MILE HIGH CLUB BACK TO SCHOOL WITH THE GIRLS OF KINGFISHER THE LATEST WATCH TRENDS

INDIAN eDItION

WHAT A MAN’S GOT TO DO APRIL 2015 `150

The14 Best Trips in the World

64

PAGES OF NEW SEASON FASHION

PLUS: •KEITH RICHARDS •BUILD A BOND BODY •10 RULES OF STYLE •PORSCHE LUXURY STYLE SPORT CARS GADGETS GIRLS

NIMRAT KAUR PHOTOGRAPHED BY R BURMAN

Sidharth MaLhOtra phoToGrAphed By BIKrAMJIT BoSe

TR

THE WORLD’S LEADING MEN’S MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2008 RS 100

shAhiD kApOOR photographEd by tarUN VIShWa

INDIA

Anushka

ON MEN, MEDIA & MADNESS

•DUCATI •MEGAN FOX •NASEERUDDIN SHAH •GQ LAUNCH PARTY PICTURES

LUXUrY STYLe SPOrT CarS GaDGeTS GIrLS

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CARS C S GADGETS GIRLS

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ThE WOrlD’s lEADINg mEN’s mAgAzINE jANuAry 2010 rs 100

kArEENA kApOOr PHOTOGRAPHED FOR GQ by RAm sHERGill

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HIT THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL

k a

NOW IN INDIA:

choose your harLeydaVidsoN

r e e n a

Under the covers with GQ’s favoUrite Girl

Presenting the 2014 Style Manifesto

SIZZLING

Katy Perry’s hottest shoot ever!

SHIKHAR DHAWAN

ON THE FRONT FOOT GQ EXCLUSIVE

everYthinG YoU need to Know aBoUt wine (but were afraid to ask)

+++ • the New year issue • oNe of two speciaL kareeNa coVers

The new Bentley Continental GT has arrived

INDIA

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THE TRAVEL ISSUE

Where to take your girl this summer THE BILLION DOLLAR BETRAYAL

WHAT A MAN’S GOT TO DO JULY 2014 `150

MEET THE 3O MOST POWERFUL GLOBAL INDIAN MEN The ultimate Monsoon Style Guide

WORLD CUP SPECIAL How to score in Brazil

Shraddha Kapoor SEXIER THAN EVER

Real men wear skinny pants. GQ shows you how

SLEEP ON THE JOB!

AND OTHER RULES FOR OFFICE SUCCESS

NOVEMBER 2016 `150

FARHAN

ROCKS THE ART

SHRADDHA KAPOOR PHOTOGRAPHED BY R BURMAN

INSIDE THE WEIRD WORLD OF DESI MALE RIGHTS

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GQ’s Guide To India’s Hippest Neighbourhoods

BEST 20 NEW COCKTAILS The Truth Behind Celebrity Instagrams OPEN LETTER

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Amp Up Your Wedding Style Game

DEAR JAY Z & COLDPLAY

FARHAN AKHTAR PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERRIKOS ANDREOU

INDIAN EDITION


scouts

NEWSREEL From the hottest products to the coolest launches, here’s a low-down on the latest in the market this season

HYGIENE FIRST

Whether you are the sole user of your bathroom or have a family to accommodate, hygiene in the bathroom is a factor you cannot avoid. The latest offerings from Hindware—the innovative rimless designs in the Enigma, Lava and Element ranges—have been designed to ease the process of keeping your bathroom spotless. These WCs have also been equipped with state-ofthe-art flushes that reduce the amount of water used, while increasing efficiency. Hindware rimless WCs have been recommended by the Indian Medical Academy of Preventive Health as 100 per cent bacteria free. (hindwarehomes.com)

TOUCH TECHNOLOGY

German brand Viega believes that electronics in bathrooms should make life easier, meeting a host of individual needs. The ‘Multiplex Trio E3’ electronic faucet for the bathtub (pictured) has two dials that combine intuitive operating comfort with excellent design. Using these dials, the temperature and level of the water can be selected, stored and recalled—with the help of a memory function. Not surprisingly, the series has received multiple design awards. (viega.com)

CREATIVE SPACES

The Loft gallery and studio is a high-ceilinged 2,200-squarefoot exhibition space in Mumbai’s Mahalaxmi area. Located in a former warehouse in Laxmi Woollen Mills—one of the growing design hubs in the city—it is equally ideal for art and photography exhibitions, shoots, and a host of other events. The air-conditioned gallery is equipped with track and spot lighting, a pantry and free Wi-Fi. Shelving, furniture and other accessories can also be provided. (theloftmumbai@gmail.com)


OPENING DOORS

When it comes to architectural hardware, Hettich is a trusted name in the fittings industry. Their wide collection of products— from hinges to handles, locks to door seals and patch fittings—use the latest technologies to ensure precision with quality. Equipped with a patented ball-bearing technology, this butt hinge (pictured) is available in 13 variations, and has a load-bearing capacity of 20-160 kilograms per door. Hettich has tested the hinge for a million movements. (hettich.com)

STYLISH LIVING

Almost 100 years old, Oasis is an Italian company with a strong manufacturing tradition. The brand offers a broad range of furniture for the home and bathroom segments, which have been handcrafted in Italy. This completely mirrored vanity unit (pictured) is from the Rivoli Special Edition collection, which takes inspiration from the art deco movement. Each deluxe vanity unit is fitted with a Venetian mirror, made by highly skilled artisans from Murano. (oasisgroup.it)

WATER WORLD

A brand with a strong global presence, Zero B is the pioneer of the revolutionary RO technology in India. Its products are crafted with meticulous attention to detail for protection against waterborne diseases. The brand recently introduced the Auto Soft automatic water conditioner range (pictured), which filters hard water into soft water. Manufactured with the use of food-grade materials, each product in this breakthrough range features a corrosion-proof salt tank, a back-up power pump, and a digital display with feathertouch keys. (zerobonline.com)

BATHROOM ESSENTIALS

India’s premium home solutions brand, CERA introduced Italian sanitaryware brand ISVEA to the country. Established in 1962, ISVEA is known for innovative products that are functional, stylish and integrate with the general lines of the home, transforming ordinary bathrooms into unique living spaces. ISVEA’s products— which have received multiple design awards, including the Red Dot—will be distributed through select CERA outlets across India. (cera-india.com) JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|187


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016 WINNERS INSIDE WIN A STAY

AT THE GRAND DRAGON LADAKH

THE LAST WORD IN TRAVEL DEC-JAN 2016-17 | 150

INDIAN EDITION

50 SHADES OF BLUE The best beach holidays around the world

Adventure alert

RAJA AMPAT

A diver’s paradise

SKIING IN ITALY How to do the Dolomites

Best of INDIA

WHAT MAKES SPITI SPECIAL WHERE TO SHOP IN DELHI GOA WITH YOUR KIDS Aditi Rao Hydari at the Park Hyatt Goa Resort and Spa beach

P L U S W H AT ’ S H O T ( A N D N O T ) I N L O N D O N

GREAT ADVENTURES ARE WAITING For the love of road trips, deep sea diving, skiing and voluntourism. This December, Condé Nast Traveller takes you from Tamil Nadu to Raja Ampat, from Spiti to Italy, and brings you closer to travel’s greatest adventures. Also in this issue: the best beach holidays around the world, what to do in Goa with your kids, and which restaurants are hot (and not) in London.

DECEMBER-JANUARY 2016-17 ISSUE ON STANDS NOW @CNTIndia

cntravellerindia

@cntravellerindia

www.cntraveller.in


Readers' Travel Awards 2016 LIST OF WINNERS DESTINATIONS Favourite Country 1. Switzerland 2. Thailand Favourite Overseas City 1. London 2. Paris Favourite Indian City 1. Mumbai 2. Jaipur Favourite Indian Leisure Destination 1. Goa 2. Kerala Favourite Emerging Overseas Destination 1. China 2. Sri Lanka Favourite Emerging Indian Destination 1. Leh-Ladakh 2. Gujarat

HOTELS Favourite Overseas Business Hotel 1. JW Marriott Marquis Hotel Dubai 2. The Fullerton Bay Hotel Singapore Favourite Indian Business Hotel 1. The Oberoi, Gurgaon 2. The Taj Mahal Palace, Mumbai Favourite Overseas Leisure Hotel 1. Taj Exotica Resort & Spa Maldives 2. The Address Dubai Mall, Downtown Dubai Favourite Indian Leisure Hotel 1. Park Hyatt Goa Resort and Spa 2. The Leela Palace Udaipur Favourite New Overseas Hotel 1. The Ritz-Carlton, Bali 2. Four Seasons Hotel Dubai International Financial Centre

HOSPITALITY SPONSOR

Favourite Online Tour Operator 1. MakeMyTrip 2. Cleartrip

Favourite New Leisure Hotel in India 1. InterContinental Chennai Mahabalipuram Resort 2. Novotel Goa Resorts & Spa

Favourite Travel App 1. TripAdvisor 2. MakeMyTrip

Favourite New Business Hotel in India 1. The St. Regis Mumbai 2. Pullman New Delhi Aerocity

Favourite Cruise 1. Princess Cruises 2. Royal Caribbean International

Favourite Indian Boutique Hotel 1. The Khyber Himalayan Resort & Spa, Gulmarg 2. RAAS Jodhpur

LOYALTY & FOOD Favourite Hotel Loyalty Programme 1. Trident Privilege 2. Club ITC Favourite Restaurant in an Indian Hotel 1. Bukhara at ITC Maurya, New Delhi 2. The China Kitchen at Hyatt Regency Delhi Favourite Restaurant in an Overseas Hotel 1. CUT at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore 2. Nobu at Atlantis, The Palm, Dubai

SPAS Favourite Destination Spa 1. Ananda in the Himalayas 2. The Shillim Spa at Hilton Shillim Estate Retreat & Spa Favourite Overseas Hotel Spa 1. Guerlain Spa at One&Only The Palm, Dubai 2. Talise Spa at Madinat Jumeirah Resort, Dubai Favourite Indian Hotel Spa 1. The Spa by ESPA at The Leela Palace Udaipur 2. Cedar Spa by Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OCCITANE at JW Marriott Mussoorie Walnut Grove Resort & Spa

AIR, APPS & CRUISES Favourite Airport 1. Changi Airport, Singapore 2. Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport, Mumbai Favourite Domestic Airline 1. IndiGo 2. Vistara Favourite International Airline 1. Etihad Airways 2. Emirates Favourite Tour Operator 1. Cox & Kings 2. Thomas Cook

ASSOCIATE SPONSOR

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Aman Nath EXCELLENCE AWARDS FOR SHOWCASING THE BEST OF INDIA

Ratish Nanda Devendra Jhajharia Sabyasachi Mukherjee

LIFESTYLE PARTNER


stockists

The merchandise featured in the magazine has been sourced from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. A CLASS MARBLE: New Delhi 09958791101 (aclassmarble.co.in) ABACA: Mumbai 022-24933522; Pune 09823233016 (abaca.in) ALESSI: (alessi.com) AND MORE STORIES: Mumbai 022-24931016 (andmorestories.com) ANEMOS: Mumbai 022-24934306 (anemos.in) ANTOLINI: Italy 0039-0456836611 (antolini.com) APPARATUSSTUDIO.COM: New York 001-646-5279732 ARKETIPO FIRENZE: (arketipo.com); see AND MORE STORIES; and at LIVING ART INTERIORS Bengaluru 080-65699990 (livingartinteriors.in) ARTIZE: Gurgaon 01244746800 (artize.com) ATELIER SWAROVSKI: (atelierswarovski.com) AZZURRA: Italy 0039-07-61518155 (azzurraceramica.com) BAXTER: Italy 0039-03-135999 (baxter.it) BEN & AJA BLANC:

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USA 001-323-5107121 (benandajablanc.com) BEN MEDANSKY: (benmedansky.com) BENTCHAIR.COM: New Delhi 011-39585711 BOMBAY PERFUMERY: Mumbai 022-24198850 (bombayperfumery.com) BOUCHERON: France 003301-42444030 (boucheron.com) BOWER: New York 001-347694-8709 (bowernyc.com) BRAVAT: Gurgaon 01244945070 (bravatindia.com) BRIZO: (brizo.com) BVLGARI: New Delhi 01140538623 (bulgari.com) BYCOLLAGE.COM: India 09890245900 C BHOGILAL WEST-END: Mumbai 022-61523100 (cbwestend.com) CAC: Mumbai 022-22013378 (cac.co.in) CALICO WALLPAPER: New York 001-718-2431705 (calicowallpaper.com) CANE BOUTIQUE: Bengaluru 080-41152891 (caneboutique.com) CARWAN GALLERY: Lebanon 00961-03-686089 (carwangallery.com) CASAMANCE: (casamance.fr); at F&F Gurgaon 0124-4632308 (fandf.in) CASEGOODS: (casegoods.in) CÉLINE: (celine.com) CHANEL: (chanel.com) CHOPARD: England 0044-20-74093140; Mumbai 022-22884757; New Delhi 011-46662834

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

CINNAMON: Bengaluru 080-41634220 (cinnamonthestore.com) D’DECOR: Ahmedabad 079-69000105; Bengaluru 080-41236677; Mumbai 022-66782030; New Delhi 011-41436677 (ddecor.com) DEFURN: Mumbai 02226369322 (defurn.co.in) DESIGN TEMPLE: Mumbai 022-22821001 (designtemple.com) DEVI DESIGN: Gurgaon 0124-4388430 (devidesign.in) DEVON&DEVON: (devon-devon.com); see C BHOGILAL WEST-END DIOR: Mumbai 022-67499091; New Delhi 011-46005900 (dior.com) DORNBRACHT: Mumbai 02226853900 (dornbracht.com); see C BHOGILAL WEST-END DR VRANJES: Florence 003905-5241748 (drvranjes.com) DURAVIT: (duravit.in) E15: Frankfurt 0049-6994549180 (e15.com) ERGON LUXE: Pune 08550992672 (ergonluxe.com) ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA: Mumbai 022-43471261; New Delhi 011-46060999 (zegna.com) ESSAJEES: Mumbai 02222021071 (essajees.com) FERNANDO MASTRANGELO STUDIO: (fernandomastrangelo.com) FICUS FINE LIVING: Mumbai 08976542300

(ficusliving.com) GIORGETTI: (giorgetti.eu); see SOURCES UNLIMITED GIVENCHY: (givenchy.com) GOLRAN: Milan 0039-0236580860 (golran.com) GROHE: Gurgaon 0124-4933000 (grohe.com) HÄFELE: Bengaluru 080-22226116; Kolkata 033-40086814; Mumbai 022-61426100; New Delhi 011-66574999 (hafeleindia.com) HANSGROHE: (hansgrohe.in) HERMÈS: Mumbai 022-22717404; New Delhi 01143421126; Pune 020-41418848 (hermes.com) HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN: Paris 0033-01-42789999 (vanderstraeten.fr) HINDWARE: Gurgaon 0124-4779200 (hindwareappliances.com) HOMESTOP: India 1-800-4196648, 2nd floor, Inorbit Mall, Malad Link Road, Malad (west), Mumbai IMPERIAL KNOTS: India 09555326200 (imperialknots.com) INDELUST.COM INLIVING: Bengaluru 080-42147307; New Delhi 09555591325; Pune 09021466568 (inliving.com) INTERSEKT New Delhi 01140521817 (theintersekt.com) INV HOME: Mumbai 02240020402; New Delhi 01129233122 (invhome.in)


JONATHANADLER.COM: USA 001-800-9630891 KALA GHODA MODERNA: (kala-ghoda-moderna. myshopify.com) KARTELL: (kartell.com) KATHARINA EISENKOECK: London 0044-78-60677545 (katharinaeisenkoeck.com) KELLY WEARSTLER: (kellywearstler.com) KENZO: (kenzo.com) KHAZANA STORES: Mumbai 08861177182 (khazanastores.com) KOHLER: (kohler.co.in) KREOO: (kreoo.com) KULTURESHOP.IN: Mumbai 022-26550982

PHOTOS: RICHARD POWERS, MANOLO YLLERA

LA FRENCH STUDIO: Mumbai 07045947761 (lafrenchstudio.com) LABORATORY PERFUMES: London 044-02-76222789 (laboratoryperfumes.com) LANVIN: (store.lanvin.com) MAISON 15: New Delhi 011-24106086 (maison15.in) MAISON VALENTINA: London 0044-02-35926789 (maisonvalentina.net) MARCIN RUSAK STUDIO: London 0044-07-599318516 (marcinrusak.com) MARNI: (marni.com) MASQUE: Mumbai 022-24991010 (masquerestaurant.com) MB&F + CARAN D’ACHE: Geneva 0041-22-7863618 (mbandf.com) MOGG: Italy 0039-03-

621723880 (mogg.it) MOONRIVER: New Delhi 01141617103 (moonriverstore.com) MOORTHY’S: Mumbai 02223512876 (moorthys.com) MUTINA: Italy 0039-0536812800 (mutina.it) NAAMA HOFFMAN: Tel Aviv 00972-52-8492224 (naamahofman.com) NITCO: Ahmedabad 079-26937719; Bengaluru 080-22861866; Chennai 044-28152963; Kolkata 033-40012873; Mumbai 022-67302500; New Delhi 011-24633685 (nitco.in) OMEGA: Mumbai 022-30602002; New Delhi 011-41513255; Bengaluru 080-40982106; Chennai 044-28464092; Hyderabad 040-23331144 PARCOS: Bengaluru 080-22682118; Chennai 044-43582897; Mumbai 022-23643685 PELLE: 001-212-6452602 (pelledesigns.com) PHILLIPS ANTIQUES: Mumbai 022-22020564 (phillipsantiques.com) POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER: Mumbai 022-22614848; New Delhi 01140817357 (poltronafrauindia.in) PORCELANOSA: Spain 003490-1100201 (porcelanosa.com); see INTERSEKT PRADA: (prada.com) PURAPIETRA: Italy 0039-0444-1807700 (purapietra.it)

QUEO: Gurgaon 0124-4779200 (queobathrooms.co.uk) RAVISSANT: Mumbai 022-22873405; New Delhi 011-46534595 (ravissant.in) ROCA: Chennai 044-49022000 (roca.in) ROCHE BOBOIS: Mumbai 02261062233 (roche-bobois.com) ROLEX: DiA, Mumbai 022-22042299; Kapoor Watch, New Delhi 011-46536667; The Helvetica, Chennai 044-28490013; Luxury Time, Ahmedabad 079-26469797 ROLL & HILL: (rollandhill.com); see SOURCES UNLIMITED ROSSANA ORLANDI: Milan 0039-02-4674471 (rossanaorlandi.com) SAINT LAURENT: (ysl.com) SARITA HANDA: Bengaluru 080-25566818; Mumbai 022-40052686; New Delhi 09555733344 (saritahanda.com) SÉ: London 0044-2076274282 (se-collections.com) SENNHEISER: Bengaluru 080-49037800; Gurgaon 0124-4187800; Mumbai 02242488400 (sennheiser.com) SHERLE WAGNER: Mumbai 022-22042277 (sherlewagner.com) SICIS: New Delhi 011-46114811 (sicis.com); see C BHOGILAL WEST-END SIMONE: Mumbai 022-71117700 (simone.com) SMYTHSON: (smythson.com) SOURCES UNLIMITED: Mumbai 022-26201700 (sourcesunlimited.co.in)

STERNHAGEN: (sternhagen.com) STUDIO CREO: New Delhi 01146002100 (studiocreo.com) TAAMAA: Gurgaon 08826847828 (taamaa.in) TARUN VADEHRA: New Delhi 011-24694660 (vadehra.com) TASCHEN: (taschen.com); at CMYK BOOKSTORE (www.cmykbookstore.com) THE GREAT EASTERN HOME: Mumbai 022-25777272 (thegreateasternhome.com) THE HOUSE OF MAHENDRA DOSHI: Mumbai 022-23630526 (mahendradoshi.com) THE RAJ COMPANY: Mumbai 022-23541971 (therajcompany.com) TIIPOI.COM TOD’S: New Delhi 011-46662700; Mumbai 022-42421818 (tods.com) TRUEFITT & HILL: (truefittandhill.in) VALERIE OBJECTS: (valerie-objects.com) VARIOUS AT DHOBI TALAO: Mumbai 022-22052743 (variousatdhobitalao.in) VENINI: India 09819010708 (venini.com) VITRA: India 09746473680 (vitraglobal.com) XIAOMI: India 1-800-103-6286 (mi.com/in) YOOX.COM ZUCCHETTI: Italy 0039-0322954700 (zucchettikos.it); see INTERSEKT


Rahul Khanna & Alex Kuruvilla

Jaya & Amitabh Bachchan

Ranveer Singh

Tiger Shroff & Che Kurrien

Kangana Ranaut

Saif Ali Khan


Raja Banerji

The Shillong Chamber Choir playing an electric set

The Chivas bar

Kiran Rao

Ruchir Sharma

A night that celebrated celebrat the outstanding dive achievements in diverse Th fields, GQ Men Of The wa a Year Awards 2016 was H ld night to remember. Held Hyatt at the Grand Hyatt, th Mumbai, the event, that also commemorated GQâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GQ s 8th anniversary, saw personalitie eminent personalities lm from the sports, film, literature, art and business world com come hos together. While host Cyrus Sahukar kickstarted the evening evening, which had 16 award highligh categories, the highlight was The Shillong Chamber Choir who regaled guests with their tracks.

Raghu Rai

Waluscha De Sousa

Sayani Gupta & Devendra Jhajh aria Vijay Shekhar Sharma

Radhika Apte

Sarah Jane Dias & Prateik Babbar

Shantanu & Nikhil Mehra

Adar & Natasha Poonawalla


bey & Abhishek Chau Manoj Adlakha

Fahad Samar, Simone Singh & Oona Dhabar

Sunjae Sharma

Kunal Kapoor

Pooja Hegde

Kabir Bedi & Parveen Dusanj Vicky Kaushal

Pulkith & Teena Modi

The Amex display

y Sudarshan Shett

Diana Penty

i Huracan The Lamborghin

Arunabh Kumar

Mandira Bedi


Delectable desse rts at the Grand Hyatt Mu mbai

jun Mehra Renu Oberoi, Ar & Kamal Sidhu

Carla Dennis

Erika Packard

Reena & Ashok Wadhwa

Sharad Agarwal

Rahul Bose

Ujjwala Raut & Almona Bhatia

Surveen Chawla Vijendra Bhardwaj

Huma Qureshi

Cyrus Sahukar

Kamal Sidhu, Nico Goghavala, Ratul Sood, AD Singh & Cecilia Oldne


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ASHISH GOEL

An entrepreneur and science lover, Ashish Goel is the CEO and co-founder of online furniture store Urban Ladder. He follows the design motto ‘Good design is a blend of surprise and familiarity’. Goel tells about his favourite things and design inspirations

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1. MUSEUM I love the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh. 2. MUSIC YOU LOVE I love Sufi music—especially songs by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. 3. BOOK My all-time favourite is Science: A History by John Gribbin. 4. HOLIDAY DESTINATION I would like to visit the Everest base camp. 5. FURNITURE FIXATION I have always wanted a bombéstyle (curved) chest of drawers. 6. URBAN LADDER FAVOURITE I love the products from our Lyon range. 7. IDEAL GIFT FOR A DESIGN ENTHUSIAST A trip to Kyoto. 8. ARCHITECT Le Corbusier has always been my design inspiration. His designs offer really elegant solutions with insights into how users think. 9. RESTAURANT Toast & Tonic in Bengaluru. 10. AUTOMOBILE MINI Cooper Convertible. —SHREYA BASU

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBURARY 2017

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PHOTOS: 1. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2. COURTESY REAL WORLD RECORDS LTD. 3. COURTESY PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE. 4. JAMES HEILMAN/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS. 5. BOMBAYCHEST.ORG. 6. ‘LYON’ OTTOMAN BY URBANLADDER.COM. 7. GFDL+CREATIVE COMMONS. 8. BV LA CHAUX-DE-FONDS (SWITZERLAND). 9. SANJAY RAMCHANDRAN. 10. COURTESY BMW AG.

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