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PRACTICAL IDEAS FROM THE EXPERTS

JANUARY 2017 £3.20

LOSE the BELLY

& improve your health EXPERT ADVICE

HOW to CUT SUGAR from your weekly shop LIVER HEALTH

Should you

DETOX? 12 HEALTHY FOOD TRENDS

Dietitian approved

All this for 449 calories!

772045 822039 9

healthyfood.co.uk

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VERS O E K A M IE R O 30 LOW- C AL

PLUS Easy recipes for l

amazing ALMONDS l New year BUDGET FREEZER GUIDE l Calorie-counted daily DIET PLAN

TV’s Dr van Tulleken on losing over 6st Shepherd’s pie with swede and carrot mash

Trifle smoothie bowl


RESTORE YOUR BODY A metabolism-boosting infusion of nature’s ďŹ nest organic ingredients to detoxify and assist natural weight loss. With antioxidant-rich yerba mate, and psyllium to cleanse the gut and promote healthy digestion.

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TA L K I N G P O I N T S

WELCOME

hfg

W

ELCOME TO THE MONTH of good intentions and new beginnings. Three

of the HFG team, myself included, are HAVING A DRY JANUARY to give our livers

a month off after the weeks of festive food and drink. Having said that, there’s no scientific reason to follow any of the extreme detox diets around at this time of year – find out the best way to LOOK AFTER YOUR LIVER on p40. Also, as it’s common to overindulge in sugar over Christmas, we asked dietitian Juliette Kellow HOW TO CUT THOSE HIDDEN ADDED SUGARS from our weekly shop all year round. Find her suggestions on p26.

ON LAEN SA J 0 1

If you’re carrying excess lbs, especially around your middle, our experts can help you LOSE IT FOR GOOD. Two well-known Italian food lovers – Aldo Zilli and Valentina Harris – have joined our Get Waisted challenge 2017 (p15). Both want to WHITTLE THEIR WAISTS and enjoy the improved health benefits. Read their stories and the diet advice they’re now following. But just beginning can be the hardest part, as TV’s Dr Xand van Tulleken understands only too well. He WITH THANKS TO GEMMA DOYLE, DIANA GALLIGAN

believes FINDING YOUR MOTIVATION IS THE CRUX – read his inspiring weight-loss story on p94. The best way to drop unwanted inches? Cook from scratch, using the EASY LOW-CAL BUT SATISFYING RECIPES in this issue. Let us know how you get on. Wishing you a healthier new year…

MELANIE LEYSHON, EDITOR

PS For more expert help, low-cal recipes and a special diet plan to shift those unhealthy lbs, get The Essential Guide To Losing Weight Recipe Collection, available at good retailers

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 3


CO N T E N T S

IN THIS MONTH’S JANUARY

p54

p15

p26 p40

p62

p12 p37 p57 p70 p31 p50

p73

TALKING POINTS 3 Editor’s letter 6 Meet our experts 8 Let’s talk… 94 How I stay healthy Dr Xand van Tulleken’s dramatic weight loss

HEALTH & NUTRITION 10 Health notes 15 Get Waisted challenge 2017 Join us to lose the belly for good 22 How to stick with weight loss Motivational tools that work

4 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

p66

p94

26 Secrets of a low-sugar trolley We help you shop more healthily 31 Your handy freezer guide How to save time and money 37 Hybrid fruit and veg Novelty or nutrition boost? 40 Look after your liver without going on a detox diet 44 10 ways to make 2017 your fit year Best fitness trends

RECIPES 48 December recipe index Plus a quick way to shop online

50 Lose weight the healthy way with our calorie-counted diet plan 54 The ultimate makeover Your top 6 recipes made healthy 62 Weeknight dinners 66 Hit refresh Easy smoothie bowls 70 Put it on the menu: almonds 72 More pie for your calories Filling, warming and healthy 78 4 ways to omelette The original fast food made delicious 80 Destination: taste Take your taste buds on a winter holiday 85 Speedy dinner for one Chicken laksa in 15 min


ISSUE

p26

p22

p82

EYE TO EYE MEDIA LTD, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES 01795 414778 Healthyfood.co.uk/subscribe EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 020 7803 4128 FAX 020 7803 4101 EMAIL Info@healthyfood.co.uk WEB Healthyfood.co.uk Editor Melanie Leyshon Art director Tina Betts Assistant editor Liz Atkins Senior sub editor Rebecca Almond Editorial assistant/writer Laura Day Nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow Recipe consultant Phil Mundy Digital editor Rebecca Brett Assistant web producer Isabella Bradford Digital intern Isabeau Brimeau ADVERTISING SALES Ad director Jason Elson 020 7150 5397 Senior sales Laura Collinder 020 7150 5043 Group head, partnerships Josh Jalloul 020 7150 5040 Regional business development manager Nicola Rearden 0161 209 3629

p72

SHOPPING 12 This year we love Good-for-you trends we think you need to know about 88 Is green tea the wonder brew? The health claims investigated

DON’T MISS 86 Coming up in next month’s issue On sale 1 February 92 Subscription offer Save 28% and receive a spiralizer, worth £20

p67

96 References 97 Nutrition lowdown 98 5 top facts to take away Our favourite snippets from this month’s issue

READ MORE ONLINE Find hundreds of healthy recipes, health features and blogs about health trends at

HEALTHYFOOD.CO.UK

Managing director Seamus Geoghegan 020 7803 4123 seamus@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Publishing director Adrienne Moyce 020 7803 4111 adrienne.moyce@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Consultant editorial director Jo Sandilands Circulation director Owen Arnot 020 7803 4121 Production director Jake Hopkins 020 7803 4110 Marketing consultant Julia Rich 020 7803 4129 Finance director Gary Pickett gary.pickett@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Finance manager Adam Wright 01733 373135 adam.wright@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Healthy Food Guide magazine is published by Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT, under licence from Healthy Life Media International Limited and its content includes copyright material which is owned or controlled by, and is reproduced under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The title Healthy Food Guide and the Healthy Food Guide logo are trade marks owned by, and used under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Healthy Life Media International Limited, its subsidiaries, affiliates or contributors. For licensing enquiries contact Phil Ryan, Healthy Life Media International, phil.ryan@hlmedia.co.nz.

ISSN 2045-8223. Printed in the UK by Southernprint Ltd. Colour origination by Rhapsody. Copyright Eye to Eye Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without permission. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in advertisements, articles, photographs or illustrations. Eye to Eye Media Ltd is a registered data user whose entries in the Data Protection Register contain descriptions of sources and disclosures of personal data. This paper is manufactured using pulp taken from well-managed, certified forests. All prices correct at time of going to press. UK basic annual subscription rate for 12 issues, £38.40; Europe and Eire, £55; rest of the world, £60. Back issues cost £5. Member of the Audit Bureau Of Circulations.


E X PE R T S

Get healthy the hfg way Eating and living well for longterm good health – that’s the HFG mission. We don’t believe in short-term fad diets, but making small changes for big gains. Read how our experts can help you...

l

Look for the symbols

on our recipes. They will enable you to pinpoint recipes for your needs. See p49 for more information.

LOW CAL

LOW FAT

We can help you break

l out of yo-yo dieting, as our recipes come in satisfying portion sizes. We use everyday ingredients to make your favourite dishes healthier and no foods are off the menu. We’d never recommend cutting out key food groups, unless you have an intolerance or allergy.

All our recipes

l are analysed by our qualified dietitians and nutritionists, below, and tried and tested by our recipe consultant Phil Mundy. They are created to guidelines set out by the NHS Eatwell Guide for key food groups, to ensure they’re well balanced.

We look at the science

l behind the headlines to clear up and demystify mixed messages about current health issues. Our experts always look at the body of evidence, never just one isolated study.

LOW SATS

vegetarian

LOW SALT

HIGH FIBRE

HIGH

HIGH

PROTEIN CALCIUM

gluten free

HIGH IRON

1

5-A-DAY

dairy free

Meet our experts: qualified dietitians, nutritionists and medical professionals

JULIETTE KELLOW is Healthy Food Guide’s nutrition consultant. She’s a registered dietitian who has worked in the NHS, the food industry and within the media.

DR DAWN HARPER works as a GP and runs regular clinics on women’s health and weight management. She appears on Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies.

JENNIFER LOW is a dietitian who works as a consultant for the NHS and the private sector. She specialises in eating disorders, IBS and bariatric surgery.

AMANDA URSELL has a degree in nutrition and a post-graduate diploma in dietetics. She is an award-winning writer and a visiting fellow at Oxford Brookes University.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTING EXPERT PANEL l Tracy Kelly, registered dietitian l Helen Bond, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association l Norma McGough, registered dietitian at Coeliac UK l Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation

6 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017


LET’S TALK… hfg

GO TO EONLINE N MONTER THI COM S T healt PETITHIO’S hyfo NS o

d.co. uk

YES TO CLEAN PLATES!

I love HFG, and read every issue from cover to cover. However, I have to tell you I think the tip in Think Yourself Slim (Dec issue) to ‘resign from the clean plate club’ is not actually good advice. Our family are very proud of not wasting any food at all – we grow most of our fruit and vegetables on two allotments, and any peelings, leaves, stalks, etc are composted, ready to enrich the soil from where they came. I cook what we need and when we’ve eaten, our plates are clean. We have five children and if each of us left a few bites on each of our seven plates, three times every day for 365 days a year, that would mean a) I was cooking too much food (bad planning) and b) all that extra food could have fed poorer or homeless families for a very long time. I can see where your advice was coming from, but we could NOT live with our consciences if we did that. Chris Collins

STAR LETTER

RECIPE LABELLING I have multiple sclerosis and IBS, so I take a lot of care with my diet. A high proportion of IBS sufferers find relief with the low-FODMAP diet, which is now a standard recommendation from dietitians and IBS specialists. As it’s fairly complex and the dos and don’ts can be confusing, would you consider highlighting low-FODMAP recipes or adding this as a search option on your website? I believe over 10% of the population suffer from IBS so this is likely to become more and more popular. Alison Hill HFG dietitian Jennifer Low says:

CONGRATULATIONS This month’s star letter writer will be set for healthy baking with this KitchenAid non-stick bakeware set (baking sheet, muffin tin, loaf pan and rectangular and square cake pans), worth £82, which comes with a five-year non-stick guarantee. kitchenaid.co.uk

Thanks for the suggestion. We agree the low-FODMAP diet can be very useful, but as an exclusion diet that must be carried out under a dietitian’s guidance, it’s highly personal. Each sufferer should avoid only foods that trigger their symptoms, with the aim being to return to as normal a diet as possible. HFG wouldn’t want to suggest all IBS sufferers should choose certain recipes or avoid all FODMAPs for life, especially as this diet does not work for all sufferers. You’ll find more information at bda.uk.com/foodfacts/IBSfoodfacts. pdf and kcl.ac.uk/fodmaps.

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK OF HFG (good and bad) and send your tips, pictures and queries to: info@healthyfood.co.uk. Or write to us at: Healthy Food Guide, Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT.

8 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017


N E WS A N D V I E WS

YOUR PICS

Sweet potato ‘lasagne’ #glutenfree #homemade

We’re detecting the comfort factor in your cooking this month – good to know it’s all energy boosting!

Ginger fried rice via @healthyfoodmag. Juiced the lemon before grating the zest though. D’oh! @lecnutrition

@claire_mapp

Yummy Spanish bean omelette off the @healthyfoodmag website – absolutely perfect after my Boxercise session! It was soooo good!!! @jogonmum

OUR NEWS

January is all about new ways to look at old favourites, including free-from (gluten, dairy, sugar, alcohol…) options

DRY JANUARY HOLDS NO FEAR

SCANDI FOR ALL SEASONS

Is coffee the new wine? We tried the various brewing methods at London’s new Coffee Island. Cold drip? Syphon? Chemex (pictured)? All delicious and made to order. Read our Dry January blog for tips. EMAIL US info@healthyfood.co.uk

Having made Signe Johansen’s Orkney crab, kale and fennel Nordic salad with avocado and rye over Christmas, we reckon it’s light enough to take with us into the new year. Find the recipe on our website.

FOLLOW US @healthyfoodmag

COOKING WITHOUT GLUTEN…

…dairy OR sugar is a tall order, but editor Melanie picked up tasty recipes from tutor James Hearfield at The Cookery School at Daylesford Organic Farm, Gloucestershire. Find these chestnut pancakes on the blog.

TALK TO US ON facebook.com/ healthyfoodguideuk

SHARE PICS ON INSTAGRAM @healthyfoodmag

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 9


S C I E N C E U PDAT E

HEALTH NOTES Diet and fitness facts for your wellbeing

Game, set and match for health COULD THERE REALLY BE ONE FORM OF EXERCISE that’s best for reducing our risk of death? Surprisingly, yes. Researchers at the University of Oxford found racket sports, such as tennis, badminton and squash, were the most effective at reducing the risk of death at any age by 47%. The next best were swimming (a 28% reduction) and aerobics (27%). That said, any form of physical activity is good for us, especially if we enjoy it.

Yo-yo dieting and the gut DIETERS WHO PILE pounds back on after periods of weight loss may be at the mercy of their gut bacteria. Researchers found the gut microbiome changes once you become obese – then stays that way. Even if you lose weight, what’s going on in your gut may predispose you to rapid weight regain, according to studies carried out with mice. Now we need to see whether the effects are the same for humans.

10 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

SEARCHES are available on the new Change4Life Be Food Smart phone app, which updates the Sugar Smart app. As well as sugar, you can now CHECK THE SALT AND SATURATED FAT in products on shelf by scanning the barcode. Get this simple tool to help you make healthier choices from 3 January by DOWNLOADING IT FOR FREE from the Apple App store or Google Play. Search Change4Life for more information.

3


H E A LT H

HEALTHY SCHOOL LUNCHBOX CHAMPS We put children at four schools to the test: could they make healthy choices?

T

EACHERS AT EACH SCHOOL used the HFG Healthy School Lunchboxes card that came with the Sept 2016 issue (download it at healthyfood.co.uk: click on ‘nutrition cards’) to teach pupils how to build a nutritious lunch, using the key food groups and healthy portion sizes. The children then set about creating their own lunchboxes. The results were impressive. ‘The entries showed that the children, aged from eight to 14, were really engaged in the process and enjoyed making healthy eating decisions,’ says editor Melanie Leyshon. ‘We know getting children to eat well throughout the day will improve energy levels and concentration in class.’ The HFG judging panel, led by dietitian Jennifer Low, agreed the standard was excellent. ‘I think children should be taught about healthy eating and have a say in their lunchbox content, with help from an adult,’ she says. ‘They’re much more likely to eat something they’ve chosen or made themselves.’

The winners The Year 9 class (aged 13–14), Bradfields Academy, Chatham, Medway The judges said: ‘These lunchboxes were fabulous. It’s a great idea to have the list of components at the side (eg, protein, dairy, veg, drink) to serve as a reminder. Sticking a list of food groups on your fridge will mean you don’t miss any out.’

Star pupil Nathan Shytermaja, year 9, Bradfields Academy The judges said: ‘Nathan chose an egg mayo wholemeal sandwich for sustained energy, a great selection of fruit and veg, plus a healthy homemade flapjack for a treat. Adding dairy would make it perfect – a carton of semi-skimmed milk or a yogurt to replace the flapjack on other days.’

Star pupil runner-up Ella Payne, Class 4N (aged 8–9), Delce Academy, Rochester, Medway The judges said: ‘Ella has included all the components for a healthy lunchbox. Her fruit skewers make fruit more appealing to children, and it looks about the right amount of food for someone of her age. Adding veg to the pasta would be a healthy tweak.’

ENTER OUR 2017 COMPETITION The HFG Healthy Lunchbox Challenge 2017 is now open to schools around the UK. Go to healthyfood.co.uk/ competitions for details. Entry closes 1 March 2017. For terms and conditions, see the website.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 11


H HEALTDS TRENr fo

2017

STAR SPICE

POWER VEG

TURMERIC It’s the spice of the moment for it’s antiinflammatory properties. Add to porridge, omelettes or use to make tea.

BEETROOT Fitness fans say it aids recovery, but we love beetroot for its sweet, earthy taste – and dose of antioxidants.

Get your healthy new year’s resolutions off to a good start with our round-up of the food trends worth buying into…

WE L VE Pukka Turmeric Gold, £2.49/20 teabags, Waitrose OTHERS TO TRY… Schwartz Ground Turmeric, Rude Health Ginger & Turmeric Oaty oatcakes

WE L VE James White Beet It Organic Beetroot Juice, £2.48/1 litre, supermarkets OTHERS TO TRY… Yorkshire Provender Beetroot Soup With Horseradish, Bioglan Beetroot Powder

CHOCOLATE SUBSTITUTE

PLANT-BASED PROTEIN

THIS YEAR

WE L VE

FORTIFIED WATERS

RAW SNACK BARS Fruit, veg and nut snack bars hit the sweet spot and make on-the-go healthy eating a breeze.

HEMP Hemp is a plant-based source of protein and contains all 20 amino acids. A top choice for veggies and vegans.

VITAMIN DRINKS New-generation refreshers come with added nutrition value (such as probiotics and vitamins) but no added sugars

WE L VE The Primal Pantry Paleo Protein Bar, £1.99/55g, widely available OTHERS TO TRY… Rude Health The Pumpkin, Nakd Posh Bits

WE L VE Braham & Murray Good Hemp Unsweetened Dairy Free, £1.50/1 litre, Waitrose, Tesco OTHERS TO TRY… Linwoods Shelled Hemp, Biona Hemp Seed Oil

WE L VE PlenishWater+, £2.29/330ml, Waitrose OTHERS TO TRY… Virtue Sparkling Energy Water, Aspire Healthy Energy drinks

12 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017


S H O PPI N G

COMPILED BY LAURA DAY. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

FITNESS BOOST

SUGAR SUBSTITUTES

CARB SWAPS

POWDERS Beefing up workouts and refuelling afterwards with specific blends is a good idea if you train hard. Pop one of these in a smoothie.

SWEETENERS Sugar is still the hot topic, making way for a better variety of palatable alternative sweeteners, particularly for baking.

VEGETABLE PASTAS Courgetti not quite ‘pasta’ enough? Bean and legume pastas have more spaghetti bite, minus the gluten.

WE L VE Bioglan Green Boost, £4.99/100g, Ocado, Holland & Barrett OTHERS TO TRY… Naturya Organic Wheatgrass Powder, Aduna Baobab Superfruit Powder

WE L VE Canderel Sugarly Granulated Sweetener, £3/275g, Sainsbury’s, Tesco OTHERS TO TRY… Silver Spoon Half Spoon, Total Sweet Xylitol

WE L VE Explore Asian Organic Edamame Spaghetti, £3/200g, Asda, Morrison’s, Ocado OTHERS TO TRY… Dell’Ugo Gluten Free Chickpea Fusilli, Waitrose Love Life Red Lentil Pasta

VEGAN

HIGH-PROTEIN DAIRY

FIVE-A-DAY SHORTCUTS

TOFU Plant-based eating is going mainstream and the meat-free protein options on supermarket shelves is getting tastier.

SKYR Thick, creamy, high protein and virtually fat free – no wonder it’s a staple in Iceland.

BERRIES They’re versatile, colourful and very good for you. Buy frozen to keep costs down but nutrition up.

WE L VE The Tofoo Co. Smoked Tofu, £2/280g, Tesco, Ocado OTHERS TO TRY… Cauldron Original Tofu, Clearspring Organic Silken & Smooth Tofu

WE L VE Milbona Skyr, 49p/ 350g, Lidl OTHERS TO TRY… Icelandic Skyr from Waitrose, Arla Skyr

WE L VE Asda Frozen For Freshness Blueberries, £2/350g OTHERS TO TRY… Arctic Power berry powders (1tsp = a handful of fresh berries!) JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 13


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Mary, 58 After one year of eating this cereal my cholesterol has been reduced from 15% risk to 5 % I am so pleased in fact I’m over the moon!!

Betavivo is not your ordinary oat product... A daily portion of Betavivo cereal is scientifically proven to lower cholesterol1. A unique way of treating Swedish oats and a patented composition. The cholesterol-lowering power of Betavivo equals at least three big bowls of porridge!

Liz, 55 I proved to my GP that it worked in lowering my cholesterol.

= As a bonus, the beta-glucan in Betavivo also contributes to reducing the rise in blood sugar after the meal. Find inspiring recipes and more information at www.betavivo.co.uk James, 48 Betavivo helps me lower both cholesterol and blood sugar. I recommend it to friends and family – and also others!

For your heart. Every day. Right now

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One serving of Betavivo cereal gives you the full three grams of oat beta-glucan fibre needed daily to lower cholesterol. Coronary heart disease has many risk factors. Altering one of these risk factors may or may not have a beneficial effect. A varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle are always important. 1

Ref: European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy. 2009. The EFSA Journal (2009) 1175, 1-9 | *Netigate marketing survey, April 2016


H E A LT H

LOSE the BELLY & boost your health The HFG annual Get Waisted weight-loss challenge is back. Join us to lose inches and gain confidence (studies show it will benefit your health, too). Let’s get started…

S

PARE TYRE, LOVE HANDLES, MUFFIN TOP… call it what you like. Excess belly fat doesn’t just look unsightly and feel uncomfortable – it’s now known to put your health at risk, too. If you join the HFG Get Waisted weight-loss challenge, our dietitians and experts can help you lose lbs and target dangerous visceral fat – the type that sits around your internal organs and increases your risk of lifestyle diseases. IF YOU NEED CONVINCING, over the page you can read about the risks of belly fat, along with success stories from two of last year’s challengers. You won’t be going it alone – we have an abundance of diet and lifestyle tips, plus two ‘hungry Italians’, chef and restaurateur Aldo Zilli and cookery writer Valentina Harris, have already pledged to trim their waists for better health in 2017. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 15


H E A LT H

REASONS TO WHITTLE YOUR WAISTLINE Why it matters if you can pinch more than an inch l For the sake of your heart A recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology confirmed that the spare tyre around your middle is a risk factor for heart disease.

l To lower your risk of diabetes Being overweight is known to increase the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, but the worst place to store fat is around the belly. Check your waist circumference: men who measure more than 102cm (40in) around the middle – and not below the belly – are five times more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than men with a smaller waistline, while women who measure more than 88cm (35in) are three times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, according to Public Health England.

l For healthy blood pressure Even if you’re otherwise lean and healthy, excess belly fat can cause your blood pressure to rise, warn researchers at the renowned Mayo Clinic in the US. They found that when weight gained showed up in the stomach area, there was a much sharper rise in blood pressure. l To live longer That paunch can double your chances of dying

prematurely from lifestyle diseases, compared with people who are heavier but have a more even fat distribution across their bodies, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The specialists who led the research at Mayo Clinic found belly fat is a sign of lower muscle mass, something strongly associated with metabolic disorders and early death.

l To lower your risk of breast cancer Expanding waistbands between the ages of 20 and 60 may increase the risk of

❛That paunch can double your chances of dying from lifestyle diseases ❜ 16 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

breast cancer in post-menopausal women, a study from the Institute for Women’s Health at University College London found. l To sleep better Researchers found strong evidence that belly fat is linked to sleep apnoea, a condition where the walls of the throat relax during sleep and interrupt normal breathing, robbing people of restful sleep. A big stomach is also known to trigger loud snoring.

l To improve your sex life Australian researchers cited belly fat as one of the most common causes of erectile dysfunction in men. Being overweight also lowers levels of the male hormone testosterone, which can further affect sexual performance.


SIMPLE WAYS TO SHRINK YOUR WAIST Dietitian Tracy Kelly shares practical advice for trimming your tum for the long run

CHANGE YOUR HABITS FOR GOODÉ

l Find your WHY Control your mind and you can conquer your body. Work out what you truly want and be clear about why it’s important to you – this will give you the incentive to keep going. Remember, doing the small things consistently leads to bigger success as making a change requires us to do something repeatedly until it becomes a new habit. Turn to p22 for help finding your motivation. l Move more Being active not only helps you lose inches from your waist, but it also keeps your heart and bones strong, improves insulin sensitivity (reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes), kicks in the endorphins so you actually feel better and – word to the wise – recent studies show it can make you smarter. If you’re time poor, try a 15–20 minute HIIT (high intensity interval training) session or put on your trainers and start walking – everywhere. If you’re desk bound, make an effort to get up and move every half hour. The fitter you get, the more your body adapts and burns fewer calories, so change your workout regularly for the best burn. l Stay calm Under stress, your body releases cortisol, which stimulates your appetite, slows metabolism and encourages fat to linger inside your abdomen. Yoga meditation breathing has been shown to be effective at helping

people manage stress. If yoga isn’t your thing, try another exercise to release those feelgood hormones and keep your cool.

l Find an accountability buddy People who tell others about what they’re aiming to achieve are more likely to reach their goal. Saying it aloud and being accountable turns good intentions into results. And, let’s face it, doing the tough stuff is always easier when you have someone on side. Do you know anyone on a similar journey, so you can support each other? A friend who’ll be your exercise buddy or a family member who can help with meal prep?

RETHINK YOUR FOOD AND DRINK l Eat protein at every meal It keeps you fuller for longer, expends energy to burn it and keeps your muscles healthy. The more muscle you have, the higher your metabolism. We lose 10% of our muscle mass each decade after the age of 30, which means our metabolism slows down unless we balance our food with exercise. l Drink water Drinking at least 1.5–2 litres of water consistently through the day will improve your decision-making, reduce fatigue, help keep you feeling full and promote healthier skin and joints. Try adding sliced lemon, cucumber or fresh mint to make it interesting.

l Cut down on refined carbs All the stuff like sugar, white bread, chips and sweets. They cause rapid increases in your blood glucose levels, which trigger a big insulin response. The result is your body stores that glucose

❛Saying it

aloud and being accountable turns our good intentions into results❜ as body fat if you aren’t doing enough exercise to burn it off. Wholegrains and slow-release carbs, such as sweet potatoes and wild grain rice, are better choices. Remember, pastries, sweets and chocolates aren’t actually a food group.

l Eat your starchy carbs at lunch rather than in the evening. You’ll have more time to digest and use them as energy rather than storing them as fat, which happens when we eat close to bedtime. Starchy carbs include wholegrain bread, couscous, pasta, rice, potatoes, etc. At dinnertime, get creative with veg instead.

l Make meals smaller as you go through the day. You know the saying: breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dine like a pauper – yet most of us do it the other way round. Getting a good breakfast with enough protein will kickstart your metabolism and keep you going until lunchtime – so you’re less likely to snack on high-sugar, high-fat foods mid-morning. Having breakfast also wakes up your metabolism and makes your body more efficient at burning calories throughout the day. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 17


H E A LT H

TWO HUNGRY ITALIANS Valentina Harris and Aldo Zilli both work with and love eating Italian food, so

VALENTINA HARRIS AGE 59 HEIGHT 1.73m (5ft 8in) WAIST 101cm (39½in) CURRENT WEIGHT 89kg (14st) When she’s not testing new Italian recipes, TV cookery presenter and food writer Valentina is tutoring at cookery schools or taking to the food stage at events such as the Ideal Home Show.

18 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

❛Bread is my greatest weakness❜

I

N THE PAST YEAR the pounds have really piled on, says Valentina – and most of them around her middle. She was keen to join the HFG Get Waisted challenge as she feels going public and cooking dietitian approved recipes will help her stay on track.

Valentina’s diet downfalls l Comfort and erratic eating are both an issue. And since I lost my adored dog Chef last April, the boredom has been getting worse. Immediately I was walking less. l After a hard day on my feet in the kitchen, I want a quick solution and my default is pasta – and lots of it. 80% of what I eat is Italian, so carbs feature heavily. l Bread is my greatest weakness. I often rely on a quick sandwich to fill a hole when I’m on the go. l Later in the day I get that low-blood-sugar feeling – only something sweet will help. An apple doesn’t cut it. I need a proper perk-me-up to lift me out of my mid-afternoon slump. l When I cook for myself, often I realise I’m cooking for more than just one – and I can’t bear wasting food. Portion control is hard for me.

Dietitian Jennifer Low’s diet advice

VALENTINA IS ALREADY MAKING changes to aid her weight loss. She is currently keeping a food diary, logging all her food and drink intake online at nutracheck.co.uk, which is helping her to spot the hidden calories in her day. FINDING A WAY TO EXERCISE IN YOUR LOCAL AREA makes it harder to avoid. Valentina has joined Wickwoods Country Club near her home and is getting help from a personal trainer. SWITCHING TO A DIFFERENT BREAD, such as fibre-rich rye, may help Valentina’s bread habit. And instead of the default sandwich, she should try a hearty veg soup. FOR SNACKS, Valentina should keep plenty of prepped crudités and tomatoes to hand. Oatcakes and peanut butter or cottage cheese also help to fill the gap. BATCH COOKING casseroles packed with pulses and veg, then freezing them in single portions will mean Valentina has a quick supper to heat up – in the right portion size. WEIGHING FOOD before cooking will also keep her portions under control. FOR THAT AFTERNOON DIP, Valentina could swap biscuits for fat-free Greek yogurt and berries, or make healthy energy balls (find recipes at healthyfood.co.uk). MINDFUL EATING, rather than eating to alleviate boredom or picking when she���s cooking, will help her control what she eats.


GET WAISTED

how are they shrinking their growing waists? HFG experts lead the way

ALDO ZILLI

Nutritionist Amanda Ursell’s diet advice

AGE 60 HEIGHT 1.72m (5ft 7½in) WAIST 96.5cm (38in) CURRENT WEIGHT 98kg (15st 6lb) Celebrity chef and restaurateur Aldo is a regular on TV, radio and in print.

A

LDO BEGAN HIS weightloss journey in the autumn after a health check at his doctor’s showed extra weight was putting his health at risk. He wants to stay active for his two youngest children, Rocco, 10, and Twiggy, eight.

Aldo’s diet downfalls l Drinking four cappuccinos a day, each with two sugars. l Picking at food in the kitchen throughout the day. l Eating loads of rich pasta dishes. l I love fruit, but I’d eat far too much in one go: a whole watermelon, three peaches, an entire box of figs… l At home I make different meals for the children: Twiggy likes pizza or pasta and Rocco will eat anything, especially meat. I’d find myself just eating a mixture of both dinners instead of cooking something for myself. l I love chocolate and could easily eat two or three Mars bars on a train journey.

ALDO’S STOPPED picking while at the restaurant and sharing his children’s dinner. He now makes his own meals around quinoa, pulses and soups. He’s eating more avocados – about one a day, and although these are high in fat and calories compared with other vegetables, they are satisfying and give a feeling of fullness to stave off hunger pangs. HE CHOOSES LEAN RED MEAT and he’s eating more chicken and fish, especially oily fish such as mackerel, sardines and salmon. He’s big into veg – especially winter veg and mushrooms, which are great for adding bulk to meals. ALDO HAS DECIDED TO GIVE UP alcohol completely, and finds he sleeps well and is ‘a better person all round’! Feeling less tired in the mornings, he’s less likely to reach for quick, sugary breakfasts and instead he’s tucking into more sustaining options such as eggs. HE NOW EATS in moderation. He loves cheese, which is fine in small amounts, but Aldo finds it hard to stop when he gets started, so cutting it out has been a good move for him personally. HE EATS HEALTHIER snacks such as nuts. He soaks brazil nuts in

at the restaurant ❛andPicking eating my children’s food added the inches❜

water and eats them the following day, as this gets rid of any bitterness. Nuts provide protein and fibre along with good fats and selenium, which is important for strong immunity. Plus, they don’t send blood sugar levels soaring. HE HITS THE GYM in the morning. Combining exercise with eating well is the best way to feel better. If you notice an improvement in the way you feel, you’re more likely to keep up the changes. IT’S A NEW WAY OF LIFE. Aldo wants to make his healthy eating a long-term change. This bodes well for long-term success as he’s not seeing it as a ‘quick fix diet’.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 19


THE 2016 SUCCESS STORIES

They did it – and so can you! Let our previous champs inspire you

❛Until this challenge, nothing had worked for me long term❜

❛I’m no longer eating the rubbish that was making me sluggish ❜

AGE 57

AGE 45

WAIST BEFORE 101.5cm (40in)

WAIST BEFORE 107cm (42in)

WAIST NOW 89cm (35in)

WAIST NOW 84cm (33in)

WAIST INCHES LOST 12.5cm (5in)

WAIST INCHES LOST 23cm (9in)

I

’M SO PLEASED I’m maintaining my slimmer waist. I’d been dieting for 20 years, but until this challenge nothing had worked for me long term. Now I understand more about food, portions and the difference exercise makes. WHENEVER I GO SHOPPING I know what to look out for, especially storecupboard essentials such as cans of tomatoes and legumes for making soup. I buy ready to eat pouches of spelt and quinoa, too – I’m much more inclined to eat healthy grains when they’re easy to prep. I SERVE GREENS WITH EVERY MEAL and always more veg than carbs. I cook spinach and curly kale a lot, and my freezer tends to be full of edamame beans and peas. I’VE GOT SWEET TREATS SUSSED. I love warm fruit in the evening – it feels more like dessert than eating it cold. I serve berries, chopped apple or sliced pear with reduced-fat Greek yogurt and sprinkle seeds on top. BEFORE THE CHALLENGE I could easily drink a bottle of wine on a Friday night. Now I stick to one small glass with dinner, and I don’t drink after I’ve finished eating. Having a glass of fizzy water before an alcoholic drink fills me up and means I don’t gulp down the drink. MY MOTIVATION is how energised and confident I feel since losing weight. I’m doing two exercise classes and a swim every week, and I walk as much as I can. I’m determined to keep shrinking my waist, ideally to 30in.

GARY HUNTER

P

EOPLE ASK ME WHY I’m high as a kite, and it’s because I’m not eating the rubbish that made me feel so sluggish – my energy is through the roof. The last time I lost weight, it was a short-term solution and not a lifestyle change like this. Now I can sustain it. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE COOKING. I use a breadmaker to make multi-seed loaves and I’m even making my own pasta. My other half is banned from the kitchen and the grocery shopping. Better yet, he doesn’t even realise what I feed him is healthy. I ATE SOME of my ‘former’ foods on holiday and had the worst indigestion. My body isn’t used to processing that sort of food any more. But I still eat out. I just go for tomato-based dishes rather than creamy ones and always add a salad to fill me up. MY NEW LIFESTYLE has influenced my work in the care sector. I’ve introduced healthy cooking sessions with the people I work with – we all love HFG pitta pizzas. We also do a Friday session on the rowing machines. IT’S TURNED INTO a family affair. My mum and my sister are making an effort to eat better and are going to the same exercise classes as me. In fact, it’s become a bit competitive, which is a good motivator for us all. I’VE REACHED MY IDEAL WEIGHT of 12st 13lb and am particularly happy to be fitting into smaller jeans!

My favourite HFG recipe

My favourite HFG recipe

BOILED EGGS WITH DUKKAH SOLDIERS

BEEF AND BASIL MEATBALLS

Find this and lots more healthy breakfast recipes at healthyfood.co.uk

Find this and lots more healthy main meal recipes at healthyfood.co.uk

20 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

WORDS: MELANIE LEYSHON, PETA BEE, LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

CHRISTINE WILKINSON


hf g

DIE T E ADVIC

HOW TO STICK WITH WEIGHT LOSS AND ENJOY LIFE

Another new year, another diet plan? If losing weight hasn’t worked out before, it’s time to look at why – and make 2017 the year you break the cycle


H E A LT H

I

f your plans for the new year include losing weight, getting fitter and feeling healthier, we’re with you all the way. But we understand, too, that there’s a good chance you’ve been here before and your efforts may not have been successful in the past. So why should this year be any different? The key to success is to identify your motivation – or reason – for wanting to lose weight. You will then have something definite to refer back to whenever you lose the will to continue. ‘If you have a history of dieting unsuccessfully, your mind may have attached negative feelings to losing weight, such as stress, boredom or feeling isolated and lonely,’ explains clinical hypnotherapist and weight-loss expert Georgia Foster. ‘So your mind is already scared and predicting failure before you’ve even started.’ That’s why identifying a positive motivation is the best start for healthier, happier weight loss. ‘From there, you need to learn to think about it from a space of calm and logic,’ says Georgia. Think specifics: what might be different when you lose weight? How will you feel? What will you be able to do that you can’t right now? Perhaps you’d love to go on a walking holiday but don’t feel fit enough. Maybe there’s a special occasion you want to buy a new outfit for. You might have had a health scare that you know a better lifestyle could address. Or you’d like the energy to be as involved as possible with a new grandchild. Mull this over for a day or two, then sit down and list all the motivations that have come to mind. Now you need to find a way to keep them going. Here’s where finding the right motivational tool comes in. We’ve identified five useful aids – choose the one that makes the most sense and find out how to make it work for you.

motivational tool

FIND A MANTRA

WHAT? ‘SELF-ESTEEM IS KEY to weight loss and keeping it off,’ says Georgia. ‘You need to learn to respect your decision to diet as an opportunity to embrace a healthier you – and not question it.’ This is how a mantra can be useful. It should be something reassuring, such as, ‘It’s safe for me to like myself as I am now, while I am losing weight.’

WHY? ‘IT’S IMPORTANT TO BREAK the association

❛Think

about weight loss as self-care – a gift to yourself

with dieting as something stressful, boring, frustrating or isolating,’ says Georgia. ‘Developing the right mindset means thinking about weight loss as self-care – a gift to yourself, not a punishment.’ Don’t try to be perfect. The ‘all or nothing syndrome’ inhibits success and affects your dieting self-esteem. Treat each meal as a separate situation. To discover the power of the link between your emotions and your relationship with food, keep an emotional diary for a few days, detailing what you’re feeling when you think about food in ways that could interfere with your goals.

HOW? KEEP THE MANTRA IN YOUR HEAD, on

your computer, phone and desk, and repeat it before eating. Whenever an internal voice in your head predicts failure, challenge it and repeat your mantra. Avoid anyone who’s a ‘feeder’ until you have the confidence to say no (if necessary, take a minute to repeat your mantra internally before speaking). Each time you think about food, focus on something that makes you feel happy and safe to let your brain register calm, safe feelings before you eat. • Try Georgia’s seven-day online programme, The Weight Less Mind, £54.97, georgiafoster.com (60-day moneyback guarantee). You can try the first day for free. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 23


motivational tool

JOIN A CLUB WHAT? WHETHER IT’S A

motivational tool

SLIMMING GROUP, a fitness class or a sports club, there can be great benefits to sharing your journey with others, rather than going it alone.

MEDITATE

WHAT? MEDITATION OR MINDFULNESS is a way

WHY? ‘EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT PHYSICALLY RUNNING around all day, your mind probably is,’ says Pete. ‘Meditation slows it down and gives you an opportunity to relax. It’s cheap, quick and empowering.’ Mindfulness can be very useful when it comes to weight loss, too. ‘People who meditate are more in control of their emotions and less likely to feel like overeating in response to them,’ says Pete.

HOW? MANY PEOPLE FEEL INTIMIDATED by the

idea of meditation, thinking they’ll never be able to master it. ’You wouldn’t reach for the heaviest weight first at the gym, so start small when it comes to your mind, too,’ Pete advises. ‘Go somewhere quiet, sit comfortably and close your eyes. Find a way of being mindful – that’s being in the present moment – that works for you. For some people that’s focusing on their breathing, for others it’s silently repeating a mantra (see previous page) or gazing into a candle. Start with one minute and build from there. If your mind wanders, just bring it back to your focus.’ Pete recommends meditating in the mornings: ‘Set yourself up to win, so you go on to create your day, rather than reacting to it,’ he says. • Pete offers free coaching every morning at 7am via a live online stream. Search Pete Cohen Mi365 on Facebook, or visit mi365.me, to join in.

24 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

WHY? PSYCHOLOGICAL

❛Seeing

others losing weight will inspire you to do the same

RESEARCH SHOWS that it’s easier to stick with a weight-loss plan if you have support, share tips and have exercise buddies. You’re more likely to lose weight and keep it off than if you go it alone. ‘It keeps you accountable,’ agrees fitness coach and weight-management consultant Susan Booth, who runs Alive Fitness – weekly groups aimed at women over 40 in Derbyshire. ‘We have a weigh-in, a 15-minute nutrition session and 45-minute exercise class. If you have friends who are looking forward to seeing you, you’re more likely to stick with it. You can share your successes, discuss difficulties – and seeing others losing weight will inspire you to do the same.’

HOW? ASK AROUND ABOUT

LOCAL GROUPS and, if your focus is weight loss, find somewhere that keeps a record of your weight and/ or measurements. Or start a club with friends, meeting at each other’s homes. To find a nationwide class like Susan’s, visit findmy.fitness (formerly the Rosemary Conley franchise). •To find out more about Susan’s groups, visit alive-fitness.co.uk.

WORDS: HANNAH EBELTHITE. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

of calming your mind and bringing clarity and focus into your life. People who practise it daily swear by its capacity to reduce stress. ‘It’s about getting to know your mind and putting a bit of peace and tranquility into your life,’ says life coach and meditation expert Pete Cohen.


H E A LT H

motivational tool

KEEP A DETAILED DIARY

motivational tool

LISTEN TO A PODCAST

WHAT? KEEPING A RECORD OF EVERYTHING you eat and drink is a tried and tested effective motivator. It can be useful to log your exercise, too, and how you feel emotionally and physically before and after eating and working out.

WHAT? MANY PEOPLE SWEAR BY Slimpods, daily podcasts that motivate you to lose weight by retraining your brain to want to eat less, cut down on sugar and move more. Thinkingslimmer.com, which makes them, is a national partner of Change4Life (the Department of Health’s healthy lifestyle campaign). One NHS consultant psychiatrist describes Slimpod’s effects as ‘profound and life-changing’. All you have to do is plug in your headphones for nine minutes a day.

WHY? STUDIES HAVE SHOWN

WHY? THE IDEA IS THAT BY LISTENING to Slimpods you’ll think, feel and behave in a different way towards food. ‘Thousands of people worldwide have achieved lasting weight loss,’ says founder and weight-loss specialist Sandra Roycroft-Davis. ‘They no longer need to rely on willpower to lose weight, and cravings become a thing of the past.’ Using cutting edge techniques from the fields of neuroscience, psychology and unconscious persuasion, Slimpods certainly seem to work. In a trial of 84 people, carried out by City, University of London for Slimpod, 95% of participants using them lost an average of 18lb.

HOW? BEFORE YOU GO TO SLEEP each night,

simply settle down to listen to the podcast, whether you’re already eating healthily or not. Extra support is available in the form of online forums, live chats and video coaching, depending on the package you choose. • Visit thinkingslimmer.com. Choose from the 21-day Slimpod Silver package, £39.99, the 12-week Gold package, £117, or one-to-one coaching on request.

Studies show people who keep a food diary are more likely to lose weight

THAT PEOPLE who keep a food diary are more likely to lose weight (one found it doubled weight loss). It makes you more aware of calories you don’t really need – that extra biscuit, the kids’ leftover chips. It works in reverse for exercise: if you wear an activity tracker, for example, you may be more likely to walk than take the car.

HOW? THERE ARE LOTS OF

WEBSITES and apps to help you log calories and nutrients. Be consistent, honest and log everything, every day. The NHS-approved Nutracheck counts calories, has a huge database of foods and a barcode scanner to make tracking easy. It also syncs with Fitbit devices to log your activity. • Visit nutracheck.co.uk. It’s free for seven days, then £7.99 a month. Or you can download a paper food diary template at healthyfood.co.uk (search ‘diary’). JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 25


SECRETS of a LOW-SUGAR TROLLEY Resolving to cut down on added sugar is easy, but turning it into reality at the supermarket is harder…. Nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow helps you identify where it often lurks, for a healthier weekly shop

S

UGAR IS TOP OF THE HEALTH AGENDA this new year – and with good reason. We’re all still eating far too much of it. On average, adults consume the equivalent of 15tsp a day (the maximum we should have is around 7tsp), and it’s an even bleaker picture for teenagers, at 20tsp for boys and 16tsp for girls. It’s little better for children, with four to 10-year-olds having an astonishing 13tsp a day. As well as encouraging us to retrain our sweet tooth, the government also has a plan to persuade the food industry – supermarkets, food manufacturers, cafés, restaurants and takeaway shops – to reduce the amount of sugar in their food by at least 20% by 2020. Producers of biscuits, cakes, confectionery, puddings, ice cream, sweet spreads, breakfast cereals and pastries, and yogurts – foods that make the biggest contribution to children’s daily sugar intakes – will be presented voluntary targets for the total amount of sugar they should have in their products, to help them achieve this reduction. Meanwhile, use this smart guide to sidestep added sugar in your weekly supermarket shop…


S H O PPI N G

GROCERIES

CHILLER CABINET

COOKING SAUCES

YOGURTS

Although often targeted for their high sugar content, a lot of this is the natural type in tomatoes, veg or pineapple. Check the ingredients list, though – the higher up sugar appears, the higher the added sugar will be.

These vary widely in sugar content and nutrition labelling doesn’t help us identify how much sugar is added and how much is naturally occurring. In plain varieties, it’s all from naturally-occurring lactose, but most fruit yogurts contain added sugar, too (‘diet’ and ‘fat-free’ types may include a sweetener).

BE SUGAR SMART Swap ready-made tomato sauces for passata that’s free from added sugar.

CANNED VEG AND PULSES These make an important contribution to our five-a-day and are rich in fibre. Beans, lentils and chickpeas are also a good source of iron for people on a vegetarian diet.

BE SUGAR SMART Choose

pulses without added sugar and reduced-sugar baked beans.

TABLE SAUCES Ketchup, pickles, brown sauce and salad dressings contain varying amounts of sugar (1tbsp ketchup contains 1tsp sugar). They don’t provide nutrients and are usually high in salt, too.

BE SUGAR SMART Choose

reduced-sugar versions, such as Real Good Tomato Ketchup. Boost flavour in meals with pepper, herbs and spices.

BREAKFAST CEREALS These only contribute 5% of the added sugar in our diets (8% in under-11s), although some are high in sugar, so check labels. Watch muesli and granolas that contain honey or syrups. Don’t worry about the natural sugars that come from dried fruit such as dates, raisins or sultanas.

BE SUGAR SMART A 30g

bowl of chocolate cereal or a 50g serving of crunchy muesli can contain 3tsp sugar. Swap them for Shredded Wheat, which is free from added sugar, or porridge (but watch the ready-to-go pots, which have added sugar). Opt for fibre-rich wholegrain cereals and those with the least sugar.

JAMS, PRESERVES AND HONEY Jam, marmalade, honey, maple syrup, agave syrup, coconut syrup, treacle… They’re all in the same category as the white stuff, so should be limited; 1tbsp honey has the equivalent of 4tsp sugar.

BE SUGAR SMART Choose reduced-sugar versions of jam and marmalade, or

BE SUGAR SMART Serving

natural yogurt with fresh fruit is the only way to guarantee no added sugar, but don’t let the sugar content put you or your children off enjoying fruit yogurts – just look for lower-sugar options. All yogurts are packed with nutrients, including bone-building calcium, and usually make a dessert that’s lower in calories and fat.

POTATO PRODUCTS Frozen or chilled chips, mash, roast and jacket potatoes tend to be free from added sugar, although if they have a batter or other coating, they may contain small amounts of dextrose, which is a type of sugar.

BE SUGAR SMART Choose lower-fat varieties without a coating.

PIZZAS AND READY MEALS Much of the sugar in these may be naturally occurring, from tomato sauces, veg and fruit such as pineapple. Ingredients lists can reveal some added sugar, though: for example, in pizza dough or sauces, or in processed meats such as pepperoni, ham and chicken. Burgers, sausages and breaded or battered products may also contain small amounts of sugar.

BE SUGAR SMART Look for

products that get a green traffic light for sugars.

COLESLAW, POTATO SALAD AND DIPS They contain some natural sugars from veg and soured cream, but anything with mayo includes added sugar. The main concern here should be their high calorie and fat count.

BE SUGAR SMART Check ingredients lists or, better still, make your own. Visit healthyfood. co.uk for recipes.

swap for no added sugar and salt nut butters. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 27


CAKES, PUDS & SNACKS

DRINKS

BREAD, WRAPS AND ROLLS

SOFT DRINKS

There’s around ¼–½tsp sugar in a slice of bread (to help activate the yeast and provide colour).

Whether fizzy or still, they contain added sugars so need to be limited – or avoided. A can of cola has 9tsp added sugar.

BE SUGAR SMART Don’t

BE SUGAR SMART Always

FRUIT LOAVES, TEACAKES AND SCONES Amounts of sugar vary, but some of it is natural, from the dried fruit. They tend to be lower in fat and calories than cakes, so make a better occasional snack.

BE SUGAR SMART Swap

a teacake (up to 5tsp) for a slice of fruit loaf, which has 1½tsp sugar.

CAKES AND PASTRIES Doughnuts, sponges, éclairs, etc are loaded with sugar and should be an occasional treat.

BE SUGAR SMART

Coffee-shop cakes and pastries can be very high in sugar, so check for nutrition information in the shop or online before you go. For example, a blueberry muffin can contain 6½tsp sugar – that’s almost all your recommended daily maximum.

choose diet versions.

CUSTARD AND RICE PUDDING While they provide protein, vitamins, minerals and some natural sugars from the milk, sugar is added, too. They’re often lower in fat and calories than other puds, though.

BE SUGAR SMART Serve

custard with stewed apple rather than sponge pudding, and rice pudding with banana, not jam.

CONFECTIONERY AND BISCUITS These are full of sugar, often high in fat and offer virtually no nutrients. Rule of thumb: the plainer the biccie, the lower the sugar.

BE SUGAR SMART Swap

that chocolate Hobnob (1½tsp) for a Rich Tea biscuit (½tsp sugar).

CEREAL BARS AND ENERGY BALLS Check for honey, fruit concentrates and those healthy-sounding syrups, such as agave, date and coconut, which are just as bad as sugar.

BE SUGAR SMART A 50g

health bar can have 4tsp sugar (some natural). Find lower-sugar energy balls to make at healthyfood.co.uk.

28 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

FRUIT JUICE New health guidelines put fruit juice in the same category as sugars, honey and syrups because the natural sugars in it damage teeth: 150ml orange juice has 3¼tsp sugar. Plus juice doesn’t fill us up as it lacks the fibre of whole fruit.

BE SUGAR SMART Have

no more than 150ml pure fruit juice a day. It counts as one of your five-a-day, but only one, no matter how much you have.

HOT DRINKS A simple brew of tea or coffee with water and milk is free from added sugar. But sugar is usually added to instant sachets of latte, cappuccino and mocha. Powdered chocolate drinks also contain lots of sugar (it’s often the main ingredient) – even low-calorie ones.

BE SUGAR SMART Cocoa

is sugar free – mix with hot milk and sweeten to taste with calorie-free sweetener to make a less sugary hot chocolate.

SMOOTHIES AND MILKSHAKES A 250ml smoothie bottle has 7¼tsp sugar – if it’s 100% whole fruit, you don’t need to worry, but if it’s mixed with juice, the juice counts as the sugar type you need to cut down on. Milkshakes contain natural sugars from milk in the form of lactose – but they usually have added sugar, too. This may be labelled as glucose or fructose.

BE SUGAR SMART As with juice (see left), you should stick to a 150ml smoothie serving. Even if you drink more, it will still only count as one portion of your five-aday. Shame they tend to come in a 250ml bottle!

ALCOHOL Lager, cider and beer count for a significant amount of the sugar in an adult’s diet (8%), with wine providing smaller quantities. A pint of dry cider has 3¾tsp sugar; a 175ml glass medium white wine has 1¼tsp.

BE SUGAR SMART As well

as hitting the high notes for sugar, alcohol also stacks up the calories, so limit your intake.

PHOTOS: ISTOCK, GETTY IMAGES

worry too much about sugar in bread, but go for high fibre and watch what you put on it – use reduced-sugar jam, etc.


S H O PPI N G

CHIEF SUGAR SUSPECTS The main sources in your trolley

GREEN LIGHT for SUGAR

SUGAR AND PRESERVES

17%

SOFT DRINKS

15%

SWEETS AND CHOC

9%

Fill up on these staples, all free from added sugar:

ALCOHOL

9%

l EGGS

CAKES AND PASTRIES

8%

FRUIT JUICE

8%

BISCUITS

7%

BREAKFAST CEREALS

5%

PUDDINGS AND ICE CREAM

4%

SOUPS AND SAUCES

4%

YOGURTS

3%

l MEAT l FISH l CHICKEN l SOYA l NUTS AND SEEDS l PLAIN PASTA l RICE AND GRAINS l MILK AND CHEESE Dairy contains lactose, a naturally occurring sugar that doesn’t need to be limited. Choose low-fat varieties, though.

l FRUIT AND VEG The sugar they contain is naturally occurring so it’s not a cause for concern.

OTHER

11%

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 29


S H O PPI N G

EN

IT

TC GET KI

H

HP HIL

How to eat healthier: PART 8

CLE V E R

W

YOUR HANDY FREEZER GUIDE There are so many reasons to make better use of your freezer at the start of a new year, and top of the list is the craving for cheap, warming meals that are quick to serve up on dark winter nights. I’m going to show you how a little get-ahead shopping and batch cooking can make healthy eating easier

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 31


F

ROM THE BOX OF FISH FINGERS AND bag of garden peas ready to feed the kids on busy weeknights, to that emergency loaf of bread and the ice cubes awaiting Friday night’s gin and tonic, most of us would be lost without our freezer. But it’s good for more than just-in-case supplies. With purse strings tightening after Christmas, now’s the ideal time to rethink the way you use your freezer, to make it work harder for you, your bank balance and your health.

Stock up to save money UNLIKE YOUR FRIDGE, which needs space and airflow to make it work efficiently, a well-stocked freezer is cheaper to run. That’s because frozen products help to keep their neighbours frozen. Too much free space in a freezer leaves air around the contents, which can lead to what’s known as freezer burn. This especially affects food that’s incorrectly wrapped. It occurs when moisture in the food evaporates into the freezer air, leaving dry pockets in the food that are visible as white splotches or discolouration – not harmful to eat, but not particularly tasty, either. So if you’ve just had a big kitchen clear-out, buy a few extra loaves of bread or bags of frozen veg to keep your freezer in good nick.

HERBS AND CHILLIES

No need to chop fresh herbs – just freeze whole and crumble straight into your dish. Chillies can be sliced before freezing, ready to add to anything you’re cooking.

What about eggs and dairy? l EGGS If you’re left with a clutch of egg whites after making mayo or an egg wash, pop them in a freezer bag, seal and label with the date and the number of egg whites. Freeze for up to three months, then thaw and use to make meringues or add to bakes. Whole eggs can be frozen, too (beat them first). See our omelette recipes on p78 for ways to use them up. l MILK Freeze milk upright in the carton, ensuring there’s a little space at the top for it to expand as

32 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

it freezes. Thaw in the fridge for a day, then shake well before use. l CHEESE Keep a tub of grated parmesan handy to use (from frozen) for sprinkling or adding to sauces. Crumble harder-to-grate cheeses, such as stilton, before freezing. l YOGURT Greek yogurt freezes well due to its high protein content – just give it a good stir once thawed. Low-fat natural yogurt will separate if frozen in the tub, but if transferred to ice cube trays, it freezes well. Ideal for adding to smoothies.

What NOT to freeze Not all food likes to be kept in the cold SALAD LEAVES, RADISHES AND CUCUMBER have a very high water content, so they don’t thaw well. COURGETTES can be frozen if roasted or chargrilled first, but they’re best reheated in a sauce rather than served on their own. POTATOES take on a spongy texture once thawed, especially if frozen raw, but they do freeze well if mashed. SUMMER BERRIES will freeze well, but turn pretty mushy once thawed, so are best used in smoothies and cooked dishes only.

APPLE SAUCE

Make a big batch and freeze in portions, ready to serve with oily fish or roasted meats, to use in crumbles and pies, or to dollop on top of yogurt. Find a recipe at healthyfood.co.uk/ 3-ways-to-use-upyour-apple-glut.


S H O PPI N G

PUT IT ON ICE

WAITROSE COOKS’ INGREDIENTS SOFFRITTO MIX

ICELAND FISH MARKET 4 ATLANTIC SALMON FILLETS

(£1.20/500g) Save yourself a load of chopping for your next soup or sauce base. Sauté from frozen.

(£6/520g) Tastes as good as fresh. Cook from frozen or thaw to add to your favourite salmon recipes.

TESCO ORIENTAL VEGETABLE STIR FRY

JUS-ROL FILO 6 PASTRY SHEETS

(£1.20/600g) Add to the wok with some lean meat strips, or drop into a simmering spicy miso broth for a super speedy supper.

(£1.50/270g, widely available) Thaw, scrunch up and use to cover a sweet or savoury pie filling with minimal effort. Spray with oil and bake.

ASDA SCRATCH COOK CHOPPED GARLIC (£1.50/150g) Add instant oomph to your savoury dishes without peeling, chopping or smelly fingers!

PUT LEFTOVER VEG TO GOOD USE

How long do things keep?

Cooked carrots and parsnips make a great addition to stews or soups.

The timings below apply to products frozen at home from fresh only. For shop-bought frozen items, follow the on-pack dates. MILK AND YOGURT Up to 1 month CHEESE 4 months RAW FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 3–6 months STEWED FRUIT 6–12 months RAW MINCE, BURGERS AND DICED MEAT 4 months STEAKS AND MEAT JOINTS 6–12 months WHOLE CHICKEN/POULTRY Up to 1 year COOKED MEATS Up to 3 months BREAD, CAKES, BISCUITS AND SCONES Up to 3 months COOKED STEWS, SOUPS, STOCK AND CASSEROLES Up to 3 months

scenarios guaranteed to cause Freezer 101 Five meltdown in the kitchen…

1

FOOD BEING THAWED because you’ve put warm items in the freezer. Items need to be cooled to room temperature or chilled before freezing.

2

NOT HAVING THE RIGHT SIZE BAG. Keep a variety of strong freezer bags and airtight, freezerproof containers at the ready. Plus lots of labels.

3

FREEZER BURN. Expel as much air as possible from freezer bags when packing and fill containers so there’s little air space between the food and the lid.

4

THE MYSTERY PARCEL. Label the contents before freezing, and add the date and quantity using a waterproof pen or freezer marker.

5

FOOD TAKING TOO LONG TO FREEZE. Put items at the top of the freezer (or in the quick freeze drawer) until frozen – then transfer to another section.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 33


IN

FI

IL

XE

S

PH

S

STA-FO O D

5

EASY RECIPES FOR THE

freezer

SPICED SWEET POTATO AND APPLE SOUP serves 6

SLOW-COOKER BEEF AND BUTTERBEAN CASSEROLE serves 8

Spray a large saucepan with oil, add 2 leeks, sliced, 800g sweet potatoes and 3 dessert apples, all peeled and diced, then fry for 5 min over a medium heat. Add 2tsp ground coriander, ½tsp chilli powder and 1tsp ground cinnamon, then fry for 1 min. Add 800ml unsweetened almond milk and 1 very low salt vegetable stock cube dissolved in 150ml boiling water. Bring to a simmer, then cook for 20 min or until the veg are very soft. Blend until smooth. Garnish with dairy-free yogurt and chopped apple before serving. Per serving l 175kcal l 3.8g fat l 0.7g saturates l 14.4g sugars l 0.4g salt

Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Fry 1kg lean braising steak, diced, until browned. Transfer to a slow cooker. Spray the pan with oil; fry 150g smoked bacon medallions, sliced, 3 onions and 3 carrots, peeled and chopped, 3 celery sticks and 1½tbsp fresh rosemary leaves, chopped, for 5 min. Add 250ml very low salt beef stock, 300ml red wine, 1 bay leaf, 2tbsp reduced-salt gravy granules, 2tbsp wholegrain mustard and 2 x 400g cans butterbeans, drained. Bring to a boil. Put in the slow cooker; cook on high for 4 hr. Per serving l 340kcal l 9.6g fat l 3.8g saturates l 8g sugars l 1.3g salt

The dietitian’s view Tomatoes too ripe for your sandwiches? Chop and freeze, then thaw and use as you would canned tomatoes. Halved cherry tomatoes can be frozen, too, and make a great addition to casseroles and savoury bakes. 34 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

There’s no need to think of freezer food as inferior, as long as you stick to health guidelines, says Jennifer Low FROZEN FRUIT AND VEGETABLES count towards your five-a-day as they contain just as many nutrients, or even more, than fresh. Basically, freezing is a way of preserving food without additives. When fruit and veg are destined for the freezer, they tend to be picked when ripe and are frozen rapidly after harvest. Fresh vegetables and fruit, on the other hand, often have a long way to travel before they reach your kitchen, so they may lose nutrients along the way. AN EXTRA BONUS: using frozen products tends to be more economical – they’re generally cheaper and, because they don’t spoil, they’re less likely to get thrown away.

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

TOMATOES


S H O PPI N G

ALL-PURPOSE VEGETABLE RAGÙ serves 6 Heat 1tbsp olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan set over a medium heat. Add 1 large onion and 1 large carrot, both peeled and chopped, 2 celery sticks, 2 peppers and 4 garlic cloves, all chopped, and a pinch of chilli flakes. Cook gently for 10 min. Add 2 x 400g cans chopped tomatoes and simmer for 15 min. Add 3tbsp fresh basil, chopped, and season with black pepper. Serve with pasta or gnocchi, spoon over meat or fish before baking, or mix with cannellini beans for a jacket potato topper. Per serving (ragù only) l 75kcal l 2.3g fat l 0.3g saturates l 10.9g sugars l 1g salt

COTTAGE PIE serves 5 Heat oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and fry 3 leeks and 300g mushrooms, all sliced, for 5 min. Add 350g 5% fat beef mince, 1tbsp fresh thyme, chopped, 1tbsp dijon mustard and fry for 2 min. Add 350ml very low salt veg stock, 300g frozen peas and 2tbsp reduced-salt gravy granules. Simmer for 5 min. Peel and slice 700g each potatoes and parsnips, steam for 15 min, then mash and season with black pepper. Add mince to a 2 litre baking dish, top with mash, sprinkle with 40g reduced-fat cheddar, grated, and bake for 20 min or until golden. Per serving l 379kcal l 9.3g fat l 4g saturates l 14.3g sugars l 1.1g salt

LENTIL AND CHICKPEA DHAL serves 4 Spray a large pan with oil and set over a low-medium heat, then add 2 red onions, peeled and chopped, and 1 green or red chilli, sliced. Fry gently for 8 min, adding 2tbsp garam masala for the final 2 min. Add 150g dried red lentils, rinsed and drained, 400g can chickpeas, drained, 250g fresh tomatoes, chopped, and 500ml very low salt vegetable stock. Bring to a simmer, stir, cover and cook gently for 15–18 min. To serve, stir in 200g baby leaf spinach and 2tbsp mango chutney and heat until wilted. Per serving l 282kcal l 4.5g fat l 0.8g saturates l 12.5g sugars l 0.5g salt

The safe way to thaw food

Four rules to reduce the chance of food poisoning

1

THE WARMER THE FOOD, the more bacteria will grow. Thaw food as slowly as possible, preferably overnight in the fridge.

2

DON’T REFREEZE THAWED FOOD. When food is thawed, bacteria can grow, particularly if left at room temperature. If refrozen, these bacteria will survive and, when thawed again, it’s more likely that they’ll reach harmful levels.

3

IF YOU DO WANT TO REFREEZE thawed food, cook it first. For example, take out your chicken and make it into a casserole before refreezing it. Don’t thaw and reheat it more than once.

4

STORE THAWED FOOD for a maximum of two days in the fridge and make sure it’s reheated to piping hot to kill off any bacteria.

COOKED PASTA

No need to thaw – just drop into boiling water for a minute until hot and it’s ready to use. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 35


NUTRITION

HYBRID FRUIT AND VEG

NOVELTY OR NUTRITION BOOST?

The trend for crossing fruits and veg to get new varieties is growing, but is it healthy? HFG editor Melanie Leyshon investigates

B

IANCOLI, KIWI BERRY, CUCAMELON? Power coupling isn’t just for celebs – it’s taking the world of fruit and vegetables by storm. Maybe it’s the rise of plant-based and Mediterranean diets, but there’s been new interest in unusual fruit and veg. We’re not just talking about bringing back heritage varieties. Retailers are developing crossbreeds that are visually appealing, sweeter and easier to prep. Not that creating hybrids is a new

idea. Most fruit and vegetables have been cross-pollinated over years to produce varieties that can withstand wicked weather and pests. And, from a nutrition point of view, that’s not such a bad thing. ‘Hybrid vegetables are cross-bred to maximise yield, size and taste,’ says Sara Stanner from the British Nutrition Foundation. ‘As part of a diet, they can increase variety, provide important vitamins and minerals and contribute to your five-a-day.’

The super hybrids THIS LATEST TREND is slightly different, though – the new cross-breeds should really be called ‘super hybrids’, according to Stuart Cox of Sakata UK. He should know, as his company was behind the daddy of all hybrid veg – tenderstem (a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale). Tenderstem launched in the UK in 2000, but it was originally developed for the Japanese market because of a preference for less bitter, quicker-cook greens. ‘Strongflavoured brassicas are not to the Japanese taste,’ says Stuart. ‘They like softer greens such as pak choi much more than brussels sprouts, kale and savoy cabbage.’ So why the current obsession with super hybrids in the UK? ‘Unlike some more conservative countries, we like to try new and unique products, and retailers are now into the health and nutritional benefits,’ says Stuart. Development can take years, however – tenderstem took 10 years from seed to finished product.

A retailers’ dream GROWERS ARE CONSTANTLY experimenting (currently, cauliflowers and radishes are big) and the retailers insist the trend is positive. It’s about better flavour, texture and nutrition. One food giant that’s had a lot of success so far with new varieties is Marks & Spencer. ‘We read so much about what we shouldn’t eat, but this is about eating more of the good things,’ says M&S nutritionist Helen Seward. ‘Many of us struggle with meeting our five-a-day, so anything that makes vegetables more interesting is helpful. We launched a lot of hybrid fruit and veg in September, as over the past two years they’ve really taken off.’ Star of the M&S show is biancoli, JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 37


NUTRITION

an elegant long-stemmed cross between cauliflower and broccoli. It takes just minutes to cook, so fewer nutrients are lost, and comes ready prepared. ‘Biancoli took only 18 months from seed to the finished variety, and is grown for flavour and colour,’ says Helen. And it’s a particularly appealing looking veg, which is half the battle. There are also sweeter, longer grapes, plus M&S introduced some new types of squash this autumn. ‘They’re visually exciting and interesting – another way to encourage more people to try them,’ says Helen.

So what about nutrition?

something new. Edward Scott, who manages plants grown in the company’s polytunnels, says, ‘We’ve been putting an Italian brassica, cime di rapa (a cross between purple sprouting broccoli and broccoli), in our boxes since last year. Customers are open to new veg as long as they know what to do with it. Cime di rapa is easier to prep and quick to cook. The plant itself is more frost-resistant, so it extends the broccoli season.’ Then there are nature’s own cross-breeds. The pineberry (looks like a strawberry, tastes like a pineapple), pictured on previous page, appeared in UK stores a couple of years ago while newer

‘THE VITAMINS and minerals in our hybrids are on a par with existing varieties,’ says Helen. ‘We want to help people eat more healthily and this is one way to do it. The paler the vegetable, the more palatable.’ Could the fact that they’re paler mean there are fewer antioxidants than there are in veg with darker pigments? The nutrition world has no answer for this. Many of us struggle What is known, though, is that the with meeting our vitamin and mineral five-a-day, so anything content is not that makes vegetables reduced. So, the argument goes, we’re more interesting surely better off eating is helpful the milder varieties of kale, for example, for the vitamins and fibre they provide than abstaining because we find them too bitter. ‘Paler kale is sweeter and will definitely appeal more to children,’ says Helen. Even better, despite being less bitter, the sugar levels in these new veg remain the same.

arrival the cucamelon looks like the result of a marriage between a miniature cucumber and a grape, with an acidic taste. Both were found growing in the wild in South America. If you haven’t yet come across a cucamelon (I only found them recently, at my local farmers’ market), they’re about the size of a large grape. At first, I found them too sharp for my taste – but then I tried dropping them into Pimm’s, as recommended by Edward. ‘No doubt, in a few years they’ll be cross-bred to be sweeter,’ he says. We’ll probably also be eating softer kale and lots of other curiously attractive spin-offs. Can’t wait!

MY FAB FOUR

KALETTES 15 years of hybridisation has resulted in this cross between a brussels sprout and kale. Simply rinse and cook!

KIWI BERRY Originally from

BIANCOLI This quick-cook cauli-meets-broccoli looks and tastes good (it still has that cabbagey smell when it’s cooking, though).

CUCAMELON A sour-tasting

New Zealand, this kiwi/ berry cross is now grown in France. Eat the whole thing, peel and all.

Consumers say yes Riverford, the organic veg box delivery company, is also finding consumers are keen to try

38 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

cross with cucumber, watermelon and lime attributes. Eat as a snack or pop into cocktails.

PHOTOS: ISTOCK


Change a little, enjoy a lot Add a plant-based twist to breakfast with Alpro this new year for a delicious change DO YOU HAVE the same quick cereal at your desk every day? Or are you an early riser who likes a bowl of porridge at home? No matter what your breakfast style, Alpro’s tasty and healthy* plant-based range has it covered. From its deliciously healthy** Alpro

Almond Unsweetened drink with a subtle nutty taste, to its smooth and creamy plantprotein-rich Alpro Plain with Almond soya alternative to yogurt, it can help inspire a more creative breakfast every day. Try it in the easy recipe below, ideal to take to work.

Peach melba bircher muesli PREP 5 MIN + OVERNIGHT CHILLING SERVES 2 100ml Alpro Almond Unsweetened drink 80g Alpro Plain with Almond soya alternative to yogurt 1tsp honey 80g jumbo oats 30g almonds, roughly chopped Handful raspberries 1 peach, stoned and cut into cubes (or use canned when not in season) 1 Combine the Alpro Almond Unsweetened, Alpro Plain With Almond and the honey in a bowl. Stir through the oats and half the almonds, then fold in the raspberries and peach, taking care not to break up the fruit too much. 2 Divide the mixture between 2 jars with lids, put the lids on and chill in the fridge overnight. In the morning, top with the remaining almonds and serve (replace the lids if not eating straightaway). PER SERVING ● 313kcal ● 13.4g fat ● 1.4g saturates ● 35g carbs ● 7.7g sugars ● 5g fibre ● 10.8g protein ● 0.2g salt TIPS Try this with Alpro Coconut Original drink or Alpro Plain with Coconut soya alternative to yogurt. Or try swapping peach for mango. *Source of calcium, which as part of a balanced diet and lifestyle, is needed for strong bones. ** Source of calcium and Vitamin E. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress.

For more simple breakfast recipes, visit alpro.com/uk or AlproUK on Facebook


H E A LT H

LOOK AFTER YOUR LIVER and your liver will look after YOU

40 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

Considering a January detox? Hold that thought– your liver is already doing it. We reveal how to keep this vital organ healthy and avoid the toxic pseudoscience


H E A LT H

T

HE URGE WE GET TO DETOX with extreme diets isn’t based on fact, say health experts. Yet every year, come January, ‘cleansing’ and ‘detoxing’ become the norm. In truth, our body is busy detoxing long before the new year sets in, thanks to several of our major organs filtering out the ‘bad’ bits we don’t want in our system and removing them. Our lungs, kidneys, colon, and even our skin are vital in the detox processes our bodies go through every single second of every single day. But in January – often after a boozefuelled few weeks – it’s one particular detox organ that needs our full attention: the liver. Few of us understand what our liver really does. Sure, we’re aware that regularly drinking too much is bad news and can eventually lead to cirrhosis. But if you’re not sure about the stages in between, here’s what you should know…

LIVER FUNCTION FACTS IT’S THE SECOND LARGEST ORGAN IN THE BODY, FOUND ON YOUR RIGHT-HAND SIDE, UNDERNEATH THE RIBS IT’S ABLE TO REPAIR AND REGENERATE ITSELF

IT’S RESPONSIBLE FOR AROUND 500 FUNCTIONS IN THE BODY

25%

The increase in deaths in England from liver disease in the past decade caused by excess alcohol consumption. When all deaths from liver disease are considered, well over a third of them – 37% – result THE MAIN FUNCTIONS from the alcohol related form of the disease. OF THE LIVER

l Filtering and removing toxins A natural detoxer, the liver

removes waste products from the blood and turns toxins into less harmful substances that can then be excreted from the body.

l Producing proteins to help blood clot It produces proteins

that have other functions, too, such as transporting substances like cholesterol or iron around the body. l Fighting infections It produces substances that destroy any bacteria they come into contact with. l Providing energy During digestion, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is then used to supply the body with energy. If there’s an excess of glucose, it’s stored in the liver and muscles in the form of glycogen. When our blood sugar levels drop, the liver quickly turns this glycogen

back into glucose to sustain blood sugar levels and provide energy. l Producing bile The liver makes up to a litre of bile a day, which is used to break down the fat in our food, enabling it to be digested. l Storing nutrients As well as storing glycogen, the liver keeps hold of triglycerides (a type of fat) and important vitamins and minerals such as iron, copper and vitamins A, D, K and B12, which are released as needed. l Controlling cholesterol levels Our liver makes cholesterol

from saturated fats. Cholesterol isn’t always bad – it’s the building block for many hormones such as testosterone and progesterone, and is needed to make vitamin D and bile acids. Cholesterol is transported from the liver to the cells and tissues

that need it and any excess is carried back, where the liver gets rid of it. Problems occur if intakes of saturated fat are high and the liver makes more cholesterol than is needed. This can be deposited in the damaged arteries, which may narrow and harden.

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG In the past 40 years, the incidence of liver disease has increased by 400%, making it the only major cause of death that’s still on the rise. This means one in three of us are now at risk of the disease and one in five will develop it. And it���s affecting more and more young people, too, due to our changing lifestyles, say experts. ‘Worryingly, we’re seeing more people in JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 41


H E A LT H

their late 20s and early 30s being diagnosed with end-stage liver disease because of the changes to drinking habits and the obesity epidemic,’ says Andrew Langford, CEO of the British Liver Trust. Recent research looking at alcohol consumption in four million adults over more than a century has highlighted the fact that women are no longer lagging behind men when it comes to boozing – with the resulting health concerns. ‘Unfortunately, the increasing trend for after-work drinks and/or drinking at home is leading to an increase in alcoholrelated disease caused by habitual harmful drinking,’ says Andrew.

IT ISN’T ALWAYS LINKED TO ALCOHOL The incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also an increasing problem and, according to the British Liver Trust, it’s recognised as one of the most common forms of liver disease in

the world, resulting in serious liver damage. Around one in five people in the UK are in the early stages of the condition, which affects more men than women, predominantly in their 50s. As the name suggests, NAFLD occurs when there’s a build-up of triglycerides (fats) in the liver. In the long run this can lead to inflammation, which causes scarring and cirrhosis. The following all increase the risk: l being

overweight or obese type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure l smoking l having

‘Most people know drinking to excess puts a strain on the liver, but I don’t think many people realise the risks associated with being overweight,’ says HFG expert and GP Dr Dawn Harper. ‘After alcohol, fat is probably the most common lifestyle issue affecting our livers, because people who are overweight are more likely to have fat deposited in the liver.’

TYPES OF LIVER DISEASE

There are over 100 types of liver disease, some inherited, some rare. Three specific types are:

l Alcohol related liver disease

This occurs when the liver is damaged due to drinking excessive amounts of alcohol over time.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

Hepatitis

l

l

This occurs when fat builds up in the liver cells, and is most common in people who are obese.

Damage occurs when the liver becomes inflamed after a viral infection (for example Hepatitis A, B or C), or exposure to harmful substances like alcohol.

42 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

KNOW YOUR RISK Symptoms include jaundice, bruising easily, dark urine and swelling in the lower tummy – but these may not appear until significant damage has been done. ‘There are very few early signs and symptoms of liver disease,’ confirms Andrew. ‘The liver doesn’t have any nerves, so even if there is swelling, you may not feel any pain.’ This, he says, makes it essential to reflect honestly on our lifestyle and ask ourselves, ‘Am I at risk and should I get tested?’ If the answer is yes, you can take the anonymous screener at loveyourliver.org.uk. You’ll receive a printable risk assessment, which you can take to your GP, who may

8%

The increase in your risk of liver cancer with every 5cm increase in your waistline.

refer you for a liver function test. Try not to attach stigma – it doesn’t mean you’re an alcoholic. ‘This misconception can cause people to avoid having honest conversations with the doctor,’ says Andrew.

HOW TO KEEP YOUR LIVER HEALTHY l Reduce

your alcohol intake

Drinking regularly and to excess can reduce the liver’s ability to regenerate, leading to cirrhosis and permanent damage. Both men and women should keep their intake to a maximum of 14 units a week (see What does 1 unit look like?, right), with at least two to three consecutive alcohol-free days a week, too. l

Maintain a healthy weight

Being overweight increases the chance of fatty deposits building up

WORDS: LAURA DAY, CLAIRE TURNBULL. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

2

million people in the UK have a liver problem at any one time. It’s now the fifth largest cause of death, according to the British Liver Trust.


H E A LT H

4

in your liver. Losing excess weight (particularly if your waist exceeds 80cm for women or 94cm for men) will reduce your risk – and don’t forget, drinking alcohol adds a lot of empty calories to your diet. l

Eat a healthy, balanced diet

or 5 cups of coffee a day (ie moderate amounts) may actually help to protect you from developing liver disease, according to research.

ARE YOU DRINKING TOO MUCH?

on reducing calorie-laden fatty and sugary foods, cutting back on booze, eating more fruit and veg and making water your go-to drink for staying hydrated.

In the first instance, this will help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Keep your diet varied with plenty of fruit, vegetables and wholegrains, and keep fatty and sugary foods to a minimum. l Be active Regular exercise has been shown to reduce liver fat and visceral fat (the fat around the organs). Guidelines say we should do 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week.

BUT DO TRY DRY JANUARY This annual campaign (dryjanuary. org.uk), which encourages 31 consecutive alcohol-free days, is the only detox HFG recommends because it gets people thinking about their drinking habits and experiencing the benefits of going booze-free. According to Alcohol Concern, those who complete Dry January often report weight loss, better sleeping patterns, more energy and clearer skin. But remember: Dry January isn’t an excuse to start bingeing in February; in fact, you may find your alcohol tolerance is lower as a result. If you’re going to reintroduce alcohol, do it gradually, stick to drinking sensibly and take two to three consecutive days off a week.

NO NEED TO DETOX Detox diets claim to cleanse and flush your body of toxins, but that’s exactly what your liver (and other detox organs) are doing every day – they don’t need an extreme juice diet to help them. In fact, such diets will potentially make you feel unwell. They’re low in calories and cut out major food groups, depriving us of energy and nutrients our bodies need to keep us functioning properly. Where detoxing does make sense, however, is in its focus

You don’t have to be drinking to extremes to become dependent on alcohol. Signs to look out for include: l Worrying about where your next drink is coming from or planning events around alcohol. l A compulsive need to drink or finding it hard to stop once you start. l Feeling the need to drink in the morning. l Withdrawal symptoms such as sweating, shaking and nausea, which stop once you drink alcohol. l Feelings of anxiety and alcohol-related depression. If you’re worried, speak to your GP or contact any of the following: l Alcoholics

Anonymous UK

0800 9177 650, alcoholicsanonymous.org.uk l Al-Anon (for family and friends), 020 7403 0888, al-anonuk.org.uk l Alcohol Concern 0300 123 1110, alcoholconcern.org.uk l Mental

Health Foundation

020 7803 1100, mentalhealth.org.uk

WHAT DOES 1 UNIT LOOK LIKE? There’s no ‘safe’ level of alcohol, but stick to the government’s recommended intake of no more than 14 units a week to minimise your risk of cancer and other diseases.

218ml

76ml

250ml

250ml

25ml

Standard 4.5% cider

Standard 13% wine

Standard 40% whisky

Standard 4% beer

Standard 4% alcopop (275ml)

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 43


Looking for a new fitness plan? Here’s what’s going to be big this year – find an activity to suit and your 150 min a week is in the bag

THE FITNESS TRENDS Crawl to your fitness goals PRIMAL FLOW

10 ways to make

2017 your fit year

Classes nationwide, or find home workouts and classes at facebook.com/ PrimalFlow and instagram.com/ primalflow WHAT IS IT? Kim Tomlin, a personal trainer who specialises in Primal Flow, explains: ‘It’s a bodyweight exercise that taps into our primal moves, such as crawling, walking, pushing, pulling, twisting and turning. It’s about using the body as one unit and working through all planes of movement. The “flow” comes from doing one move after the other in a sequence.’ What does that look like in practice? Think squats with a twist or lunges with arm reaches. Regular practice will make you stronger, more supple and co-ordinated, with an increased range of movement. GOOD FOR people of all fitness levels who want a fun new full-body challenge.

THE KIT Show off seamless good looks SEAMLESS LEGGINGS IN ON-TREND TEAL £48, and seamless bra top, £30, Manuka Life (manukalife.com) WHY? If you’re a little bit over all the fluoro pinks and oranges of the past years and dull black does nothing to lift your spirits, get kitted out in gorgeous teal. Manuka Life’s luxe yoga collection looks good and feels super comfortable, with lightweight, seamless stretch fabric. Mix it up with black or grey pieces or go head-to-toe teal for maximum impact. GOOD FOR a flattering, stylish transition from yoga class to lunch with friends.


F I T N E SS

Power up your swim

Burn fat online

HYDRO POWERED BY SPEEDO

JULIA BUCKLEY FITNESS

Classes at Virgin Active gyms nationwide (virginactive.co.uk/ hydro). Membership from £55 a month WHAT IS IT? A high-intensity interval training (HIIT) class that provides a full-body cardiovascular, fat-burning workout, which will also improve your swimming technique. You combine longer-distance, low-intensity swims with shorter, high-intensity sprints. Easy on the joints since you’re in water, it’s particularly good for developing strong shoulder, pectoral and core muscles. Research from Speedo found a 30-minute swim is worth an hour of land-based exercise, so this really gives results for the time you invest. GOOD FOR water babes tired of counting off the lengths, who want to take swimming to the next level.

Online workouts (juliabuckleyfitness. com), from £6.50 a month WHAT IS IT? A set of routines by trainer Julia Buckley, author of The Fat Burn Revolution. The workouts mix weights to sculpt muscle, fat-torching HIIT, explosive power moves and a type of training Julia calls Unified Strength and Metabolic Conditioning, which is ‘a bit like power yoga but more functional’. This month, she’s launching The 4-week Breakthrough. ‘You’ll see and feel results within a month and be motivated to stay in shape all year,’ promises Julia. And if you want to try before you buy, there’s a free five-day package. GOOD FOR those who don’t like the gym – or want a cheaper option – but need motivation to get working out at home.

Try gamechanging undies

Get a carryall for your waistband

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MAGNETIC POUCH

From £15, runderwear.co.uk Had enough of underwear riding up? You need to try this brilliant range. Runderwear has functional flatlock edges (so no seams or labels to chafe) and the excellent cut means it doesn’t dig in or ride up under your Lycra. The fabric wicks moisture away to keep you cool and there are micro-perforations to control airflow. We recommend the warm but breathable merino-wool range, new this winter. And there’s a supportive crop top option, too. GOOD FOR finally solving that ‘should I just go commando?’ dilemma.

Buddy pouch, from £19.99, thebuddy pouch.co.uk Move over, belts and armbands – there’s a new way to keep your essentials with you as you exercise. The Buddy Pouch flaps over your waistband and holds in place with strong magnets. Inside, there are two pockets with a waterproof lining, large enough to hold a few items (smartphone, earphones, energy gels or a snack, coins, keys… you name it). Ideal for hiking or cycling, it’s also handy for keeping valuables safe while travelling. GOOD FOR finally being free to ditch the backpack. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 45


F I T N E SS

THE GADGETS Use a new generation tracker

Get to grips with your body stats

FITBIT FLEX 2

TANITA

£79.99, and Charge 2, £129.99, fitbit.com/uk Consistently good as far as activity trackers go, Fitbit has two new launches to keep you moving in 2017. The Flex 2 is a slim tracker (30% smaller than the Flex mark 1) that now works in the pool to log your swims. Plus, it can be worn inside a new range of silver or gold bangles or pendants. The Charge 2 has continuous heart rate tracking and connected GPS, so you can link it with your smartphone to log pace and distance on runs and cycles. There’s also a larger display, interchangeable wristband and a guided-breathing relaxation option. Both models have a Reminder To Move feature, handy as a prompt if you’re deskbound all day. GOOD FOR fans of activity trackers looking for reliability, versatility and latest features.

RD-901 Body Composition Monitor with Bluetooth £149.79, tanita.eu Stepping on an oldfashioned pair of scales isn’t always the best fitness motivation. If you’ve embarked on a strength-training programme, for example, you could be looking and feeling much trimmer, yet still weigh more because muscle is heavier than fat. But these Tanita scales measure weight, BMI, body-fat percentage, visceral fat, muscle mass, muscle quality, bone mass and more. All readings are sent via bluetooth to Tanita’s Health Planet app on your phone, which helps you monitor and evaluate your progress. There are cheaper models if you don’t need quite so much information, but these are a good investment if you do! GOOD FOR data geeks who need the detail…

Play your way to 10,000+ steps

Pick an ‘insane’ workout on demand

THE WALK GAME

BEACHBODY ON-DEMAND

£2.99, thewalkgame.com A bomb explodes in Inverness station and you’re given a package that could save the world. To stay alive, you’ll need to walk the length of the UK. Intrigued? That’s the idea! From the makers of Zombies, Run!, the bestselling running app, The Walk was created for the NHS and funded by the Department of Health. As you play the app, a thriller unfolds on your phone and you need to take more steps to unlock each episode. GOOD FOR putting fun (and suspense) into walking.

Free for 30 days, then £3.99 a month (beach bodyondemand.co.uk) Over the past few years, the hugely popular US workout crazes Insanity and P90X have got people around the globe working up a lot of sweat to transform their bodies. This latest incarnation can be accessed from your TV, computer or smartphone to stream classic and new video offerings from Beachbody ‘super trainers’ like Shaun T and Tony Horton. New workouts are added each month so you never get bored. GOOD FOR trend-led exercisers who love a challenge.

46 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

WORDS: HANNAH EBELTHITE. PHOTOS: GRANT PRITCHARD, ISTOCK

THE APPS


actionforcharity

LONDON TO PARIS

women V cancer BIKE

RIDE 6-9 SEPTEMBER 2018

Join the first women-only London to Paris cycle challenge and raise funds to fight breast, cervical and ovarian cancers For more information and to register online:

www.actionforcharity.co.uk

Tel: 01590 677854 email: info@actionforcharity.co.uk

PLACES LIMITED

TO TA K E PA R T YO U A R E R E Q U I R E D TO PAY A R E G I S T R AT I O N FEE O F £14 9 A N D R A IS E M I N I M U M S P O NSO R S H I P O F £1, 6 0 0 Registered Charity Nos: Breast Cancer Care: 1017658/ SC038104, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust: 1133542/SC041236, Ovarian Cancer Action: 1109743/SC043478. Women V Cancer is established under the Charities Aid Foundation Charity No. 268369

ction for charity

lifechangingevents


R EC I PE S

JANUARY

WHAT TO COOK THIS MONTH Our recipe consultant Phil Mundy uses everyday ingredients to create easy, tasty recipes. Each dish is analysed by nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow

IF YOU ONLY MAKE ONE THING... We’ve made pizza ❛night healthier – and over 300kcal per portion lighter – but every bit as delicious (p57).

melanie leyshon editor

ALL RECIPaEndS tried d teste


R EC I PE S

FREEZER GUIDE 34 Spiced sweet potato and apple soup 175kcal 34 Slow-cooker beef and butterbean casserole 340kcal 35 All-purpose vegetable ragù 75kcal 35 Cottage pie 379kcal 35 Lentil and chickpea dhal 282kcal THE ULTIMATE MAKEOVER 54 Lasagne 410kcal 56 Hot pot 303kcal 57 Pizza 449kcal 58 Chicken curry 441kcal 59 Macaroni cheese 420kcal 60 Apple crumble 194kcal WEEKNIGHT DINNERS 62 Pancakes with hoisin chicken 337kcal 63 Spicy beef pizzas 381kcal 64 Miso aubergine and tofu stir-fry 315kcal 64 Spiced fish with bean medley 422kcal 65 Pesto gnocchi and chicken bake 447kcal HIT REFRESH 66 Trifle smoothie bowl 214kcal 67 Minted green smoothie bowl 203kcal 68 Red velvet smoothie bowl 148kcal

RECIPE INDEX

68 Carrot cake smoothie bowl 242kcal

PUT IT ON THE MENU: ALMONDS 70 Wake-up almond smoothie 272kcal 70 Almond and red pepper spaghetti 446kcal 70 Banana and almond flapjack 128kcal MORE PIE FOR YOUR CALORIES 72 Spicy mushroom and lentil pie 299kcal 73 Shepherd’s pie with swede and carrot mash 415kcal 74 Fish pie with potato and cauliflower topping 318kcal 75 Chicken, leek and mushroom pie 398kcal 76 Country beef and vegetable pie 331kcal

4 WAYS TO OMELETTE 78 Mushroom and spinach omelette 278kcal 79 Smoked salmon omelette 331kcal 79 Ham and cheese omelette 389kcal 79 Mixed berries soufflé omelette 299kcal DESTINATION: TASTE 80 Cajun salmon with garlicky greens 401kcal 81 Chicken, fig and sweet potato tagine 329kcal 82 Lentil, squash and spinach dhal 410kcal 83 Mussels in smoky tomato broth with garlic toast 363kcal SPEEDY DINNER FOR ONE 85 Speedy laksa 572kcal TURN THE PAGE for dietitian Juliette Kellow’s monthly diet plan

SAVE TIME SHOPPING Find hundreds more recipes at healthyfood.co.uk. Did you know you can order your shopping straight from the website? Just choose your recipes, then at the bottom of the ingredients list pick your favoured retailer and click on ‘add to shopping list’. The ingredients will automatically go into your shopping basket (you can edit it if you already have any items in your storecupboard or fridge). Prefer to shop in store? You can create a shopping list to print out and take with you – or have it emailed.

Guide to recipe symbols & nutrition analysis vegetarian gluten free dairy free suitable for freezing

0.3g salt or less per 100g At least 6g fibre per 100g or 3g fibre per 100kcal

450kcal or less for a main course; 300kcal or less for breakfast; and 150kcal or less for a starter, snack, drink or dessert

At least 20% of the calories come from protein At least 30% of the RDA per serving

PHOTO: ISTOCK

3g fat or less per 100g 1.5g saturates or less per 100g 5g total sugars or less per 100g

At least 30% of the RDA per serving

1

The number of portions of fruit and/or veg contained in a serving

l Nutrition is calculated using McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods, Seventh Edition, but may vary slightly depending on your ingredients. l All recipes are approved by Diabetes UK as suitable for people with diabetes. l We use standard UK measurements, where 1tbsp is 15ml and 1tsp is 5ml. l For gluten and dairy-free recipes, we recommend you check all product labels. l In vegetarian recipes with cheese, use a vegetarian substitute if you avoid animal rennet. l Our freezing symbol means a recipe can be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw and reheat until piping hot. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 49


LOSE WEIGHT the Juliette Kellow

HFG NUTRITION CONSULTANT

❛The key

to healthy eating is to enjoy it!❜

WEEKDAY MEALS p64

OUR MENU PLAN is designed to help you MEAT lose around 1lb a week FREE MONDAY (and more if you have BREAKFAST 338kcal a lot to lose). It includes 1 serving mushroom and spinach omelette (p78). Plus 1 orange at least five portions of fruit and veg a day, and SNACK 220kcal 1 toasted teacake with 2tsp two portions of fish low-fat spread each week, one of them oil rich. We also make LUNCH 483kcal 1 panini filled with ½ ball reducedsure you get enough fat mozzarella, 1 ripe tomato, ½ small vital nutrients, such as avocado and fresh basil leaves, calcium. And, as we use toasted, then served with salad and fat-free dressing many of the delicious SNACK 92kcal recipes in this issue, 15g unsalted almonds there’s no deprivation involved. Over the DINNER 315kcal 1 serving miso aubergine and tofu page, you’ll find stir-fry (p64) suggestions for the TOTAL weekend and the kcal following weeks…

1,448

50 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

p68

TUESDAY BREAKFAST 286kcal 1 serving red velvet smoothie bowl (p68). Plus 1 slice wholegrain toast with 2tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter

SNACK 150kcal 1 skinny cappuccino and 1 banana

LUNCH 390kcal 1 wholemeal pitta filled with 3tbsp reduced-fat hummus and 1 grated carrot. Plus 1 apple and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

SNACK 180kcal 3 rye crispbreads topped with 1 boiled egg and cucumber slices

DINNER 422kcal 1 serving spiced fish with bean medley (p64)

TOTAL kcal

1,428


R EC I PE S

HEALTHY WAY

W DIETEPEKLY from L AN dietit our ian

p80

p73

p58

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST 332kcal

BREAKFAST 333kcal

BREAKFAST 203kcal

Porridge made from 4tbsp oats and 275ml skimmed milk, topped with 1 chopped banana and 1 handful blueberries

6tbsp bran flakes with 4 stewed plums and a 175g pot fat-free Greek yogurt

1 serving minted green smoothie bowl (p67)

SNACK 160kcal

SNACK 150kcal 6 walnut halves

1 skinny cappuccino and 1 slice wholegrain toast with 2tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter

2 reduced-fat digestive biscuits

LUNCH 475kcal Salad made from mixed leaves, ½ can kidney beans in water and 1 small can tuna in water (both drained), 5tbsp prepared couscous, 1 tomato, cucumber, parsley, lemon juice and 2tsp olive oil

SNACK 91kcal 2 celery sticks dipped in 1tbsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter

DINNER 415kcal 1 serving shepherd’s pie with swede and carrot mash (p73)

TOTAL kcal

1,473

LUNCH 516kcal 1 bowl fresh vegetable soup with 1 granary bagel filled with 3tbsp grated reduced-fat cheese. Plus 1 apple and 1 satsuma

SNACK 80kcal 3tbsp tzatziki with 1 carrot cut into crudités

DINNER 401kcal 1 serving Cajun salmon with garlicky greens (p80)

TOTAL kcal

1,480

SNACK 208kcal

LUNCH 470kcal Pasta salad made from 6tbsp cooked wholewheat pasta, 2 slices lean ham, 3tbsp sweetcorn, 2 spring onions, 5 cherry tomatoes, ½ green pepper and 1tbsp red pesto

SNACK 155kcal 2 rye crackers topped with ½ small avocado

DINNER 441kcal 1 serving chicken curry (p58)

TOTAL kcal

1,477

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 51


WEEKEND MEALS

NOW KEEP GOING...

p57

p76

p68

AROUND 300kcal EACH

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFASTS

BREAKFAST 391kcal

BREAKFAST 349kcal

Smoothie bowl

1 serving smoked salmon omelette (p79). Plus 1 orange

2 grilled lean bacon rashers, 1 scrambled egg, 1 grilled tomato, grilled mushrooms and 1 slice wholegrain toast with 1tsp low-fat spread

1 serving carrot cake smoothie bowl (p68). Plus 1 apple

SNACK 184kcal 1 skinny cappuccino and 1 thin slice malt loaf with 1tsp low-fat spread

SNACK 50kcal LUNCH 412kcal 1 large jacket potato with a filling made from 1 tomato, ½ small avocado, ½ red pepper and 2tbsp grated reduced-fat cheese, served with lettuce

Handful grapes

Poached eggs on toast 1 slice wholegrain toast with 1tsp low-fat spread, 2 poached eggs and 2 grilled tomatoes

LUNCH 525kcal

Smoked salmon and cream cheese bagel

1 serving country beef and vegetable pie (p76), followed by 1 serving apple crumble (p60)

1 toasted granary bagel filled with 1tbsp low-fat soft cheese, 1 slice smoked salmon and a handful rocket

SNACK 50kcal

SNACK 102kcal

Date and raisin muesli

1 apple

3tbsp reduced-fat hummus and ½ green pepper cut into crudités

Homemade museli made from 2tbsp each toasted oats and bran flakes, 1tbsp raisins, 2 dried dates and 1tsp chopped almonds with skimmed milk

DINNER 449kcal 1 serving pizza (p57)

DINNER 424kcal

TOTAL kcal

1,486

2 slices wholegrain toast with 4tbsp grated reduced-fat cheese, melted. Plus 1 orange and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

TOTAL kcal

1,450

AFTER YOU’VE FOLLOWED our menu planner for a week, create your own using the ideas on the right. Choose ONE breakfast, ONE lunch, ONE dinner and TWO snacks each day. Plus have an extra 300ml skimmed milk in skinny coffees or shakes. 52 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

Toast with peanut butter and apple 2 slices wholegrain toast with 1tbsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter and 1 apple

Fruit salad with yogurt Fruit salad made from 1 satsuma, 2 plums and 1 apple with a 175g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 1tbsp chopped almonds


R EC I PE S

p81

LUNCHES Chicken tagine

AROUND 400kcal EACH

DINNERS Lasagne

AROUND 500kcal EACH

1 serving chicken, fig and sweet potato tagine (p81). Plus 1 pear

1 serving lasagne (p54) with salad. Plus 1 pear

Ham and cheese omelette

Roasted chicken and veg with feta

1 ham and cheese omelette (p79). Plus 1 apple

1 large jacket potato with a 100g pack cooked prawns mixed with 3tbsp tzatziki, served with salad and fat-free dressing. Plus 1 kiwi

2 handfuls butternut squash chunks and 1 small red onion cut into wedges, roasted in 2tsp olive oil and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. Top with 50g crumbled reduced-fat feta and serve with 1 roasted skinless chicken breast. Plus 1 kiwi and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

Salmon sandwich

Grilled seabass and vegetables

2 slices wholegrain bread filled with 2tsp low-fat spread, ½ can pink salmon and cucumber. Plus 1 orange

1 grilled seabass fillet with 4 new potatoes boiled in their skins, tossed in 1tsp low-fat spread, and steamed green beans and broccoli. Plus 1 bowl of fruit salad topped with a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

Jacket potato with prawn tzatziki

PHOTOS: ISTOCK. *A SMALL (125ML) GLASS OF 12% ABV WINE IS 1.5 UNITS.

p54

Cheesy waldorf salad Salad made from 3tbsp grated reduced-fat cheese, 1 apple, a handful grapes, 2 celery sticks, 4 walnut halves and 1tbsp reduced-fat mayo, served with mixed leaves and 2 rye crispbreads

Chicken and pesto panini 1 toasted panini filled with 2tsp red pesto, baby spinach, 1 tomato and 2 slices cooked chicken breast, served with salad

Spaghetti with tomato sauce 200g cooked wholewheat spaghetti mixed with tomato sauce made from 1tsp olive oil, crushed garlic, 1 small chopped onion, ½ large tin chopped tomatoes, 1tsp tomato purée and mixed herbs. Serve with 1tbsp grated parmesan and salad with fat-free dressing. Plus a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 2 plums

SNACKS

AROUND 100kcal EACH

Vary your two snacks each day to keep it interesting l 2 rye crispbreads with 2tbsp

low-fat soft cheese and cucumber

l 1 chopped banana set in ¼ pack

made up sugar-free jelly

l 1 apple, 1 kiwi and 1 satsuma l Bowl of salad leaves topped with

100g cooked prawns mixed with lemon juice, black pepper and 2tsp light mayo l 1 slice wholegrain toast topped with 1tsp low-fat spread and a scraping of Marmite l 30g reduced-fat cheddar with 3 celery sticks l 4tbsp tzatziki with ½ green pepper cut into strips l 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt with a handful of blueberries l 3 dried dates l 1 slice wholegrain toast with 1tsp peanut butter l 1 small (125ml) glass of red or dry white wine* l 1 single measure (25ml) of spirit, such as gin, vodka, rum or whisky, with a calorie-free mixer, such as diet cola or slimline tonic, and 2 sesame breadsticks l 3tbsp reduced-fat hummus with 3 celery sticks JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 53


COMFORT FOOD SPECIAL

THE ULTIMATE MAKEOVER We asked you on healthyfood.co.uk to vote for the dishes you’d most like us to make over, then we got busy in the test kitchen creating lighter versions. The results: six hearty favourites you can now file under ‘healthy’

Lasagne prep 25 min cook 1 hr 25 min serves 6 Cooking oil spray 500g mixed mushrooms, ½ sliced and ½ chopped 2 red onions, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely sliced 2tbsp chopped fresh sage 400g 5% fat pork mince 2tbsp tomato purée 125ml white wine 6 parma ham slices 4 fresh lasagne sheets or 6 dried 50g fresh white breadcrumbs 2tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley For the white sauce 2tbsp low-fat spread 3tbsp plain flour 425ml skimmed milk 1tbsp dijon mustard Freshly grated nutmeg, to taste 70g parmesan, grated

54 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

1 Spray a large non-stick sauté pan with oil and set over a high heat. Fry the mushrooms for 6–8 min until golden, then remove and set aside. Spray the pan again with oil, then gently fry the onions for 5 min or until soft. Add the garlic and sage and cook for a further 2 min. 2 Add the mince and tomato purée to the pan and cook for 5 min or until the meat is cooked. Return the mushrooms to the pan, then pour in the wine and simmer for 20 min. 3 Meanwhile, heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. To make the sauce, melt the spread in a pan over a medium heat, then mix in the flour with a wooden spoon to make a paste. Cook for a few min, stirring, then gradually stir in the milk until combined. Add the mustard and stir until smooth. Season with black pepper and nutmeg to taste. Add all but 3tbsp of the parmesan and mix well. 4 Spread half the mince mixture over the base of a 1.75–2 litre ovenproof dish (about the size of 2 fresh lasagne sheets set side

by side). Cover with half the parma ham, then half the lasagne sheets. Spoon over half the white sauce, then repeat the layers with the remaining ingredients, ending with the last of the white sauce. 5 Mix the reserved parmesan with the breadcrumbs and parsley, season with black pepper, then sprinkle over the lasagne. Spray with oil, then bake in the oven for 30–40 min until golden on top and piping hot throughout.

1 HFG LASAGNE PER SERVING

CLASSIC LASAGNE PER SERVING

410kcal 11.9g fat 4.7g saturates 41.5g carbs 9.2g sugars 3.7g fibre 33g protein 1.4g salt 268mg calcium 2.4mg iron

675kcal 36g fat 15.7g saturates 57g carbs 10.5g sugars 3.8g fibre 36g protein 2.2g salt 390mg calcium 3mg iron


R EC I PE S

Lasagne

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l SWAPPED beef for lean pork. l BOOSTED fibre with mushrooms (which also count towards our five-a-day). l MADE a lower-fat sauce by using low-fat spread instead of butter and skimmed instead of full-fat milk. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 55


Hot pot prep 20 min cook 2 hr 30 min serves 6 dairy free 800g lean braising steak, cut into 2cm cubes 3tbsp plain flour Cooking oil spray 2 onions, sliced 4 celery sticks, thinly sliced 50g pitted black olives, roughly chopped 1tsp ground allspice 2 heaped tbsp roughly chopped fresh tarragon 2tbsp tomato purée 2tbsp white wine vinegar

Hot pot

250g floury potatoes, scrubbed and very finely sliced 250ml very low salt beef stock 500g mix tenderstem broccoli and green beans 1 Heat the oven to 160°C/fan 140°C/ gas 3. Toss the steak in the flour in a bowl. Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a mediumhigh heat, then brown the steak all over in batches (reserve the flour in the bowl). Remove and set aside, leaving the juices in the pan. 2 Spray the pan again with a little more oil, then add the onions and celery and cook gently for 5–10 min until softened but not coloured. Add the olives, allspice, tarragon, tomato purée, vinegar and reserved flour, then cook for 2 min.

3 Transfer half the onion mixture to a 1.25 litre baking dish. Top with half the beef, then cover evenly with half the potatoes. Pour over half the stock, then repeat the layers. Cover with a sheet of oil-sprayed foil, then cook for 1 hr 30 min. 4 Remove the foil, then cook the hot pot for a further 30–40 min until the potato topping is crisp. Leave to stand for 5 min. Meanwhile, steam the tenderstem broccoli and green beans until just tender. 5 Divide the hotpot among 6 plates and serve with the steamed veg.

2 HFG HOT POT PER SERVING

CLASSIC HOT POT PER SERVING

303kcal 9.5g fat 3.6g saturates 20.6g carbs 6.3g sugars 5.8g fibre 34g protein 0.6g salt 101mg calcium 3.4mg iron

476kcal 27.6g fat 11.8g saturates 29.6g carbs 5.6g sugars 4.4g fibre 29.2g protein 1.2g salt 48mg calcium 2.4mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l CHOSE LEAN BEEF rather than the fatty cuts that are often used for slow cooking, and swapped butter with spray oil for frying. l KEPT THE SKIN on our potatoes to help boost fibre. l DITCHED THE SALT POT and instead lifted the flavour with herbs, tomato purée and spices.


R EC I PE S

Pizza prep 15 min cook 15 min serves 2 vegetarian

*BASED ON MEAT TOPPINGS

Cooking oil spray 1 small leek, trimmed and thinly sliced 2tbsp petit pois 70g broccoli, chopped into small pieces ½ x 440g pack frozen pizza dough (we used The Northern Dough Co. Original Pizza Dough, available from Waitrose, Ocado and Booths), thawed; or use the equivalent quantity of fresh dough Flour, for dusting 100g passata 70g ricotta 2 small eggs 2tsp extra-virgin olive oil, to drizzle (optional) 10g parmesan shavings and fresh basil leaves, to serve 1 Heat the oven to 240°C/fan 220°C/gas 9 and line 2 baking sheets with non-stick baking paper. Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil, then add the leek and cook for 2 min. Add the petit pois and broccoli and cook, stirring, for 2–3 min. 2 Turn out the pizza dough on to a lightly floured surface and cut in half. Roll each half out to a 20–22cm diameter circle, then put them on the prepared baking sheets. Spread each base with the passata, then top with the veg and crumble over the ricotta. Bake for 4–5 min, then remove the pizzas from the oven and crack an egg on to the centre of each. Return to the oven for another 4–5 min until the bases are golden and crisp and the egg whites are cooked. 3 To serve, drizzle the oil over the pizzas, if using, then scatter with the parmesan and basil leaves.

hfg

COVEPRE RECI

Pizza

2 HFG PIZZA PER SERVING

449kcal 12.8g fat 5g saturates 58g carbs 8.4g sugars 7.5g fibre 25.2g protein 2.5g salt 210mg calcium 2.9mg iron

CLASSIC PIZZA* PER SERVING

790kcal 31.9g fat 12.2g saturates 90.2g carbs 5.6g sugars 6.2g fibre 40.9g protein 3.5g salt 629mg calcium 3.7mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l USED LESS DOUGH but rolled it out thinly to keep regular size bases. l REPLACED MEAT TOPPINGS, such as ham, pepperoni and sausage, with vegetables, and added an egg to boost protein and iron. l SWAPPED MOZZARELLA FOR RICOTTA, which is lower in fat and saturates. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 57


prep 15 min cook 35 min serves 2 Cooking oil spray 1 onion, sliced 1tbsp medium curry powder 1 mild fresh red or green chilli, sliced 250g fresh vine tomatoes, chopped 125ml chicken stock (made using ½ very low salt stock cube) 250g skinless chicken breasts, cut into chunks 100g baby spinach 150g fat-free Greek yogurt 250g pack ready-to-heat basmati rice ½ x 25g bunch fresh coriander leaves, to garnish

1 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 min or until soft. Add the curry powder, chilli and tomatoes and cook for a further 5 min or until the tomatoes have cooked down. Carefully transfer the mixture to a food processor with the stock and blend until smooth. 2 Clean the pan, then return it to a medium-high heat and spray with oil. Add the chicken and cook for 6–8 min until golden and almost cooked through. Add the blended sauce and simmer for 15 min. Stir in the spinach and 100g of the yogurt, then simmer for 2–3 min until the spinach has wilted. Meanwhile, heat the rice according to the pack instructions.

Chicken curry

3 Stir most of the coriander into the curry. Serve with the rice, topped with the remaining yogurt and the rest of the coriander.

3 HFG CHICKEN CURRY PER SERVING

CLASSIC CHICKEN CURRY* PER SERVING

441kcal 5.3g fat 0.9g saturates 54.1g carbs 11.8g sugars 5.6g fibre 44.3g protein 0.6g salt 218mg calcium 5.4mg iron

914kcal 32.4g fat 14.3g saturates 112.2g carbs 15.4g sugars 6.8g fibre 50.8g protein 2.2g salt 171mg calcium 8.2mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l USED A SPRAY OIL rather than ghee or lots of vegetable oil. l KEPT SALT DOWN with a very low salt stock. l REDUCED THE AMOUNT OF CHICKEN

and added plenty of vegetables for a filling, low-fat dish.

58 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

*BASED ON SERVING WITH RICE

Chicken curry


R EC I PE S

Macaroni cheese prep 15 min cook 35 min serves 4 vegetarian ½ butternut squash (about 400g), peeled, deseeded and chopped (or a 350g pack prepared butternut squash) 300ml skimmed milk 2 bay leaves Freshly grated nutmeg to taste 275g macaroni Cooking oil spray 1 onion, chopped 2tsp mustard powder 1 garlic clove, crushed 120g reduced-fat mature cheddar, grated 2tbsp grated parmesan-style vegetarian cheese 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Put the squash and milk in a microwave-proof bowl. Add the bay leaves, cover with heatproof clingfilm and cook on full power for 8–10 min until soft. Uncover, then remove the bay leaves and whiz the squash and milk together with a stick blender to make a purée. Add the nutmeg and some black pepper to taste. 2 Meanwhile, cook the macaroni in a pan of unsalted boiling water for 6–7 min until al dente, then drain. Spray a non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium heat, then fry the onion for 5 min or until softened but not coloured. Stir in the mustard powder and garlic, then cook for 1 min more. 3 Add the onion mixture to the squash purée, then stir in all but 3tbsp of the grated cheddar. Toss the mixture with the drained macaroni and season to taste, then transfer to a 1.25 litre ovenproof dish. Top with the remaining cheeses, then bake for 15–20 min until golden and bubbling. 4 Leave to stand for a few min before dividing among 4 plates to serve.

Macaroni cheese

1 HFG MACARONI CHEESE PER SERVING

CLASSIC MACARONI CHEESE PER SERVING

420kcal 9.5g fat 4.9g saturates 66.5g carbs 11.4g sugars 6.1g fibre 21.5g protein 0.7g salt 446mg calcium 2.1mg iron

686kcal 32.2g fat 16.8g saturates 74.2g carbs 10.5g sugars 4.1g fibre 29.2g protein 1.4g salt 645mg calcium 1.6mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l REPLACED THE WHITE SAUCE with a low-fat, high-fibre mix of squash, onions and skimmed milk. l USED REDUCED-FAT MATURE

CHEDDAR, so we needed less for

a strong taste, to cut fat. favour of garlic, nutmeg and mustard powder for flavour. l DITCHED SALT in


R EC I PE S

prep 20 min cook 30 min serves 6 vegetarian gluten free Cooking oil spray 1kg mix bramley and dessert apples, peeled and sliced into thin wedges 4 wide strips orange zest 1tsp vanilla paste 1tsp ground cinnamon 75g dried figs, chopped For the topping 30g flaked almonds 80g quinoa flakes 1tbsp chia seeds

1½tbsp granulated sweetener ¼tsp ground ginger or allspice 1½tbsp low-fat spread 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt, to serve 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4 and spray a 1 litre round ovenproof dish with oil. 2 Put the apples, orange zest, vanilla paste, cinnamon and figs in a large pan with 5tbsp water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, then cover the pan with a lid and simmer for 10 min. Remove the lid and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, for 4–5 min until the apples have softened and the water has evaporated. Spoon the mixture into the prepared baking dish. 3 To make the crumble topping, put the almonds, quinoa flakes, chia seeds, sweetener and ginger or allspice in a mixing bowl. Using clean fingers, rub the low-fat spread into the mixture to form large clumps. Sprinkle the topping

Apple crumble

evenly over the apple mixture. 4 Bake for 15 min or until the crumble is golden on top, then serve with the yogurt.

1 HFG APPLE CRUMBLE PER SERVING

194kcal 6.2g fat 0.8g saturates 33.5g carbs 20.3g sugars 5.4g fibre 6.5g protein 0.4g salt 101mg calcium 1.3mg iron

CLASSIC APPLE CRUMBLE PER SERVING

372kcal 14.1g fat 6.7g saturates 61.2g carbs 37.4g sugars 3.9g fibre 4.1g protein 0.3g salt 70mg calcium 0.4mg iron

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l ADDED FIGS to boost fibre. l INCLUDED EATING APPLES, which are sweeter than cooking apples, so there was no need to add sugar. l USED NUTRITIOUS GRAINS, NUTS

AND SEEDS for the topping, and a

little sweetener instead of sugar. RECIPES: LIZZIE KAMENETZKY, LUCY JESSOP, REBECCA WOOLLARD, ROSIE RAMSDEN, MONIQUE LANE, CHRISSY FREER. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA, CHARLIE RICHARDS, CLARE WINFIELD, GARETH MORGANS, MIKE ENGLISH, DAN JONES

Apple crumble


actionforcharity

Cycle India women V cancer 3–13 November 2018

Visit the Taj Mahal | Sleep in Indian Palaces | Finish in the Pink City of Jaipur

Join the next Women V Cancer cycle challenge in India and raise funds to fight breast, cervical and ovarian cancers For more information and to register online:

www.actionforcharity.co.uk

01590 677854

|

info@actionforcharity.co.uk

Registered Charity Nos: Breast Cancer Care: 1017658/SC038104, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust: 1133542/SC041236, Ovarian Cancer Action: 1109743/ SC043478. Women V Cancer is established under the Charities Aid Foundation Charity No. 268369. ATOL protected No 10456. To take part you need to pay a registration fee of £299 and raise minimum sponsorship funds of £3,200.

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Pancakes with hoisin chicken prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 dairy free

Pancakes with hoisin chicken

WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

FAMILY MEALS orted! s

Each month, we bring you a batch of healthy, quick and easy midweek suppers, with meat, chicken, fish and veggie options to please everyone

62 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

4 eggs 150g wholemeal plain flour Cooking oil spray 1 cos lettuce, shredded 100g white cabbage, shredded 100g red cabbage, shredded 1 carrot, shredded or grated 2 cooked skinless chicken breasts, heated and shredded 4 spring onions, sliced 4tsp hoisin sauce mixed with 2tbsp water 1–2tsp chilli flakes (optional) 1 Whisk the eggs, flour and 225ml water in a medium bowl to make a thin, smooth batter. 2 Spray a 20cm non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Add about 4tbsp of the batter to the pan and swirl gently to form a thin layer covering the base. Cook for 1–2 min, then flip and cook on the other side until the pancake is set and golden. Transfer to a plate and cover to keep warm. Repeat with the remaining batter to make a total of 8 pancakes. 3 Top the pancakes with the lettuce, white and red cabbage, carrot,


chicken and spring onions. Drizzle with the diluted hoisin sauce and sprinkle with the chilli flakes (if using), then fold or roll up to serve.

1 PER SERVING

337kcal 8.7g fat 2.1g saturates 33.4g carbs 7g sugars

6.8g fibre 33.2g protein 0.6g salt 90mg calcium 2.8mg iron

Spicy beef pizzas prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 dairy free 2 large thin-crust pizza bases 125g passata Cooking oil spray ½ red onion, finely diced 1 garlic clove, crushed 2tsp paprika 1½–2tsp chilli flakes (optional) 250g 5% fat beef mince 1 red pepper, finely diced 2 tomatoes, finely chopped 2tbsp pine nuts 100g rocket Lemon wedges, to serve

Spicy beef pizzas

1 Put 2 large baking sheets in the oven and heat to 220°C/fan 200°C/ gas 7. Put each pizza base on a piece of non-stick baking paper, then spread each base with 3tbsp of the passata (set the rest aside). 2 Spray a non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Fry the onion and garlic for 5 min or until soft. Add the paprika and chilli flakes (if using) and cook for 30 sec. Add the mince and cook, breaking it up with a spoon, for 5 min or until browned. Add the remaining passata, half the pepper and half the tomatoes. Simmer for 5 min. 3 Spread the pizza bases evenly with the mince mixture, then top with the remaining pepper

and tomatoes, and the pine nuts. 4 Transfer the pizzas on the baking paper to the hot baking sheets in the oven. Bake for 10–15 min until golden and cooked through. Top the pizzas with the rocket and serve with the lemon wedges.

1 PER ½ PIZZA

381kcal 12.5g fat 2.7g saturates 49.2g carbs 8g sugars

4.8g fibre 21.7g protein 1g salt 140mg calcium 3.7mg iron

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 63


R EC I PE S Spiced fish with bean medley

Miso aubergine and tofu stir-fry

prep 15 min cook 20 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 2tbsp red or white miso paste 2tbsp Chinese rice wine or dry sherry 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1tbsp runny honey 250g firm tofu, cut into cubes 1 large aubergine, cut into cubes Cooking oil spray Large pinch chilli flakes (optional) 350g tenderstem broccoli 2 x 250g packs ready to heat brown rice 1tbsp toasted sesame seeds 1 Combine the miso paste, rice wine or sherry, garlic and honey in a medium bowl with 100ml water. Add the tofu and aubergine and turn to coat. 2 Spray a non-stick frying pan or wok with oil and set over a high heat. Drain the tofu and aubergine, reserving the sauce, then stir-fry in 2 batches for 7 min or until tender and golden. 3 Return all the aubergine and tofu to the pan, then add the chilli flakes

64 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

(if using). Reduce the heat to medium, then add the reserved sauce and simmer for 1–2 min until the sauce reduces and thickens. Meanwhile, steam the broccoli until tender-crisp and heat the rice according to the pack instructions. 4 Divide the rice among 4 bowls. Top with the broccoli and stir-fry, then sprinkle over the sesame seeds to serve.

2 PER SERVING

315kcal 6.7g fat 1.3g saturates 47.3g carbs 8.8g sugars

8.5g fibre 15.5g protein 1.6g salt 183mg calcium 2.9mg iron

Spiced fish with bean medley prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 dairy free 205g can kidney beans in chilli sauce ½ x 400g can black beans in water, rinsed and drained 1 carrot, shredded or grated 100g frozen sweetcorn 250g pack ready to eat quinoa

Cooking oil spray 4 x 150g firm white skinless fish fillets, such as cod or tilapia 2tsp Cajun seasoning 150g mixed salad leaves 1tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 large, ripe avocado, flesh sliced into wedges Lemon wedges, to serve 1 Put the kidney beans, black beans, carrot and sweetcorn in a pan and heat gently for 5 min. Add the quinoa and heat for 3–4 min. 2 Meanwhile, spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Sprinkle the fish fillets with the Cajun seasoning, then cook for 2–3 min on each side until cooked through. 3 Toss the salad leaves with the olive oil, then top with the bean mixture, fish, avocado and a grind of black pepper. Serve with lemon wedges to squeeze over.

2 PER SERVING

422kcal 15.9g fat 2.9g saturates 33g carbs 7.3g sugars

12g fibre 37.4g protein 1.5g salt 83mg calcium 2.6mg iron

RECIPES: MEGAN CAMERON-LEE. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

Miso aubergine and tofu stir-fry


R EC I PE S

Pesto gnocchi and chicken bake prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 Cooking oil spray 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 2 courgettes, chopped 500g pack gnocchi 4tbsp fresh basil pesto 400g cooked skinless chicken breast, shredded 100g baby spinach 2tbsp grated parmesan

1 Heat the oven to 210°C/fan 190°C/ gas 6½. Spray a 25x30cm baking dish with oil. Gently toss the tomatoes and courgettes together in the prepared dish, then spray with oil and season with black pepper. Bake for 10–15 min until softened. 2 Meanwhile, cook the gnocchi in unsalted water according to the pack instructions. Drain, reserving 4tbsp of the cooking water, then return the gnocchi to the pan and set aside. 3 Mix the pesto with the reserved gnocchi cooking water, then add to the gnocchi in the pan and toss

gently to coat. Stir in the chicken and spinach. 4 Remove the dish with the tomatoes and courgettes from the oven. Add the gnocchi mixture and parmesan, then gently stir to combine. Spray with oil and bake for a further 10–15 min until golden and piping hot.

1 PER SERVING

447kcal 10.8g fat 2.3g saturates 46.5g carbs 4.7g sugars

Pesto gnocchi and chicken bake

4.2g fibre 41.4g protein 1.8g salt 124mg calcium 2.1mg iron


Hit refresh

Brighten up your Trifle smoothie bowl breakfast routine prep 5 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free with these easy, fruity smoothie bowls. Winter 160g frozen raspberries mornings never 2tbsp unsalted whole or flaked almonds looked so beautiful 1tbsp chia seeds

ERYE EVC P RE IW

LO L CA

200ml skimmed milk (or dairy alternative) 2tbsp low-fat natural yogurt 1tsp vanilla extract A few drops almond extract 1 Set aside a few raspberries, almonds and chia seeds for decoration. Put all the remaining ingredients in a blender and pulse until smooth. 2 Pour into 2 chilled bowls, then decorate with the reserved ingredients.

1 PER SERVING

214kcal 11.6g fat 1.4g saturates 16.4g carbs 12.7g sugars

Trifle smoothie bowl

5.5g fibre 10.8g protein 0.2g salt 296mg calcium 1.7mg iron


R EC I PE S

Minted green smoothie bowl

Minted green smoothie bowl prep 10 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free 2 kiwis, peeled and sliced 1 large pear, sliced Handful fresh mint leaves 100g frozen pineapple chunks 25g frozen spinach (approx 1 pellet) or 25g fresh 200ml coconut water 4tbsp low-fat coconut flavour yogurt 2tsp toasted sesame seeds, to serve 1 Set aside some slices of kiwi and pear, plus a few mint leaves. Put all the remaining ingredients, except the sesame seeds, in a blender and pulse to mix. 2 Pour the smoothie into 2 chilled bowls, then scatter over the reserved kiwi, pear and mint, and the sesame seeds.

2 PER SERVING

203kcal 4.4g fat 1.1g saturates 37.3g carbs 36g sugars

5.8g fibre 6g protein 0.2g salt 205mg calcium 1.8mg iron

FROZEN ON TAP Frozen fruit and veg help smoothies stay deliciously thick, so don’t thaw them before making these recipes. In fact, it’s a good idea to keep a stash of fruit and veg in your freezer, including berries, bananas, pineapple and spinach. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 67


R EC I PE S

Red velvet smoothie bowl prep 10 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free 1 large raw beetroot, peeled and finely chopped 120g frozen blueberries 1 small or ½ large ripe banana, peeled Flesh ½ small avocado 1tbsp cacao powder, plus extra to dust ½tsp vanilla extract 200ml unsweetened almond or skimmed milk Fresh mint sprigs, to garnish (optional) 1 Put all the ingredients, except 1tbsp each of the beetroot and blueberries and the mint sprigs (if using) in a blender and pulse until smooth. Pour into 2 chilled bowls. 2 Scatter the reserved beetroot and blueberries on top of the smoothie. Dust with the extra cacao powder and garnish with mint sprigs, if you like.

PER SERVING

148kcal 6.7g fat 1.4g saturates 19.2g carbs 15.8g sugars

5g fibre 3.6g protein 0.2g salt 144mg calcium 1.3mg iron

Carrot cake smoothie bowl prep 10 min serves 2

vegetarian

2 small carrots, grated 2tbsp desiccated coconut ½tsp ground cinnamon ¼tsp ground mixed spice 1 frozen banana, peeled 2tbsp rolled oats 250ml skimmed milk (or dairy alternative) 6 walnut halves, to serve 1 Set aside 2tbsp of the carrot, a little of the coconut and a pinch of the spices. Put all the remaining ingredients, except the walnuts, in a blender and pulse to combine. 2 Pour the smoothie into 2 chilled bowls, then scatter over the reserved ingredients and the walnuts.

1 PER SERVING

242kcal 11.1g fat 4.7g saturates 30.1g carbs 21.5g sugars

Red velvet smoothie bowl

68 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

6.6g fibre 8g protein 0.2g salt 205mg calcium 1.3mg iron

RECIPES: CLAIRE TURNBULL. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART

2

Carrot cake smoothie bowl


PUT IT ON THE MENU

ALMONDS

TURN 4 INGREDIENTS TAKES

WAKE-UP ALMOND SMOOTHIE

5

MIN

They’re the smart snacking choice and a handy ingredient for cooking

LoveLife Almonds £2.25/150g

LoveLife Gorgeous Green Smoothie Mix, £2.30/480g

ALMOND AND RED PEPPER SPAGHETTI

TAKES

15

MIN

T

HEY’RE GOOD FOR ALL OF US, but almonds are a particularly valuable food for those who don’t eat much dairy, meat or fish, or who follow a vegan diet – they’re a source of protein, are rich in heart-friendly monounsaturated fat and provide calcium. Almonds are also full of potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, manganese and vitamins B2 and E, and they’re a source of B vitamin folate. Plus, they provide plant sterols, which help to maintain healthy cholesterol levels. Try roasting them in paprika, turmeric and chilli powder as a tasty alternative to salted nuts (limit portion sizes, though – like all nuts, almonds are high in calories). But don’t save them for snacking. Ground almonds make a gluten-free coating for chicken and fish, and can also be used to thicken a sauce. Almond flour is a good wheat-free baking alternative, while flaked and chopped almonds add texture to couscous, salads and granola.

Wholewheat Spaghetti, 61p/500g

Almonds, £2.16/200g

BANANA AND ALMOND FLAPJACK

TAKES

35

MIN

GET THEM IN A JAR

Meridian Crunchy Almond Butter £3.50/170g, widely available Spread on apple slices or oat cakes for a protein-rich snack. Per 1tbsp (15g) l 98kcal l 8.4g fat l 0.7g saturates l 0.6g sugars l 0g salt

70 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

2 large bananas (approx 300g), 68p/kg

Make It Your Own Multigrain Muesli, £2/700g


R EC I PE S

INTO NOURISHING NUTTY TREATS Selected from

272kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min serves 1 Tip 25g almonds into a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add 80g frozen green smoothie mix, 200ml almond drink and 1tsp honey. Blend until smooth, then pour into a glass.

Almond Drink Original, £1.49/1 litre

Essential Squeezy Honey, £2.14/454g Selected from

446kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min cook 10 min serves 4

Grana Padano, £2.36/185g

Cook 300g wholewheat spaghetti in a large pan of unsalted boiling water for 10 min or until just tender. Meanwhile, heat 100g almonds in a dry non-stick frying pan for 2 min or until toasted, stirring continuously and taking care not to let them burn. Tip into a food processor and pulse until chopped. Transfer half the chopped almonds to a bowl and set aside. Chop 20g grana padano and add to the food processor with half the drained jar of red peppers, then blitz to make a sauce. Drain the spaghetti, then return to the pan and toss with the sauce. Season with black pepper and heat through. Serve scattered with Roasted Red Peppers, remaining almonds and 20g grated grana padano. £1.73/350g Selected from

128kcal PER BAR

Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4 and grease a 25x15cm shallow baking tin with spray oil. Mash 2 large ripe bananas in a mixing bowl with a fork until smooth. Stir in 150g muesli, 75g chopped prunes and 100g chopped almonds with a wooden spoon until combined. Tip the mixture into the prepared baking tin and level with the back of the spoon. Bake for 25 min or until golden and firm to touch. Cut into 12 bars while still warm, then leave to cool completely in the tin. Soft Prunes, £2.50/220g

Almonds, £2.50/150g JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 71

WORDS: NICHOLA PALMER. PHOTO: ISTOCK

prep 10 min cook 25 min serves 12


R EC I PE S

MORE PIE

for your calories Good news: pie can be part of your weight-loss regime! With a choice of pastry, potato or veg toppings, you’ll find one here with your name on it

RYE EV E IP REC W

LOAL C

Spicy mushroom and lentil pie

Spicy mushroom and lentil pie prep 20 min + cooling cook 1 hr 15 min serves 6 vegetarian dairy free For the pastry 225g wholemeal flour, plus extra for dusting 1½tsp baking powder 4tbsp olive oil For the filling Cooking oil spray 1 onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, crushed 2 carrots, diced 450g mushrooms, sliced 1½tsp ground cumin 1tsp ground cinnamon 2tsp chipotle chilli paste or to taste 2 x 400g cans brown lentils in water (undrained) 400g can chopped tomatoes


1 To make the pastry, combine the flour with the baking powder, then add the olive oil slowly and mix through. Add 6–7tbsp cold water, a little at a time, and keep mixing until the mixture clumps together (it’s easiest to do this in a food processor, if you have one). 2 Transfer the dough to a floured surface. Flour your hands, then form the dough into a ball. Knead it gently until it’s just smooth, then flatten slightly into a disc and wrap in clingfilm. Chill for 10–15 min. 3 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. While the pastry is chilling, make the filling: spray a large non-stick pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, carrots and mushrooms, then cook for 8–10 min until tender. Reduce the heat to medium, stir in the remaining filling ingredients, then simmer for another 15 min. Spoon the filling into a 27cm round pie dish or 1.5–1.75 litre baking dish and leave to cool for at least 15 min. 4 Unwrap the chilled pastry and roll out on a lightly floured surface into a large round to cover the pie (or the shape of the dish you’re using). 5 Cover the cooled pie filling with the pastry, trimming it to fit. Score with a sharp knife, making 2 or 3 small slits in the centre to let steam escape. Spray the top with oil, then bake for 45–50 min until the pastry is golden and the filling is piping hot. 6 Remove the pie from the oven and leave to cool for 5 min, then serve.

3 PER SERVING

299kcal 9.4g fat 1.6g saturates 44.8g carbs 8.1g sugars

11.7g fibre 11.5g protein 0.4g salt 80mg calcium 5.1mg iron

Shepherd’s pie with swede and carrot mash

Shepherd’s pie with swede and carrot mash prep 25 min + cooling cook 1 hr serves 4 Cooking oil spray 1 large onion, finely diced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 bay leaf 2tsp chopped fresh thyme 3 celery sticks, diced 600g lean lamb mince 300g passata 150ml very low salt beef stock 2tsp wholegrain mustard 1tbsp worcestershire sauce 1 small swede (about 450g), peeled and diced 375g carrots, sliced 150g frozen peas 25g parmesan, grated 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Heat a large non-stick pan set over a medium heat and spray with oil. Add the onion, garlic, bay leaf, thyme and celery and cook for 6–8 min until soft. Add the mince and cook, breaking it up with a wooden spoon, for 5 min or until browned. Add the passata, stock, mustard and worcestershire

sauce. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 25 min. 2 While the filling is cooking, add the swede and carrots to a large saucepan of water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 20 min or until soft. Drain, then return to the pan and turn off the heat. Using a stick blender, blitz the vegetables into a purée, then season with black pepper. 3 Stir the peas into the filling, then spoon the mixture into 4 x 450ml pie dishes or 1 x 1.75–2 litre baking dish. Cover evenly with the swede and carrot topping, then scatter with the parmesan and spray with oil. Bake for 20 min or until the topping is golden. 4 Remove from the oven and leave to cool for 5 min before serving.

4 PER SERVING

415kcal 18.8g fat 9.1g saturates 27.4g carbs 22g sugars

10.7g fibre 35.5g protein 1.1g salt 233mg calcium 4.5mg iron

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 73


Fish pie with potato and cauliflower topping prep 15 min + cooling cook 55 min serves 6 400g potatoes, peeled and sliced in ½cm thick pieces 1 small cauliflower (about 600g), cut into small florets 1½tbsp olive oil 3tbsp plain flour 1tsp ground fennel seeds 450ml skimmed milk 1tsp English mustard powder Zest 1 lemon and juice ½ 250g tenderstem broccoli, trimmed and cut into 4cm lengths 300g frozen sweetcorn 500g fish pie mix (or a combination of white fish, salmon and smoked fish) 150g raw peeled and deveined prawns

Fish pie with potato and cauliflower topping

2 PER SERVING

318kcal 8.8g fat 1.7g saturates 30.5g carbs 11.8g sugars

74 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

5.5g fibre 30.3g protein 0.6g salt 183mg calcium 1.8mg iron

1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Steam the potatoes and cauliflower for 12–15 min or until tender. 2 Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large pan set over a medium heat on the hob. Add the flour and fennel seeds and stir continuously for 2 min. Using a balloon whisk, beat the milk into the flour, a little at a time, to make a smooth sauce. Add the mustard and lemon zest and juice, whisking continuously. Add the broccoli and sweetcorn and cook for 2 min. Stir well and season with black pepper. Turn off the heat, then stir in the fish pie mix and prawns. Transfer to a 1.5–2 litre baking dish. 3 Blitz the steamed potato and cauliflower in a food processor (or use a stick blender) until smooth. Spoon the mixture over the fish filling to cover, then bake for 40 min or until golden. 4 Remove the pie from the oven and leave to cool for 5 min before serving.


R EC I PE S

Chicken, leek and mushroom pie prep 30 min cook 1 hr 10 min serves 6 For the pastry 225g wholemeal flour, plus extra for dusting 1½tsp baking powder 4tbsp olive oil For the filling Cooking oil spray 2 leeks, sliced 2 garlic cloves, chopped 700g skinless chicken breasts, diced 450g mushrooms, sliced 2tbsp plain flour 200ml very low salt chicken stock 125g low-fat soured cream (we used Yeo Valley) 2tbsp dijon mustard Good grating nutmeg 2tbsp skimmed milk 500g green beans

1 To make the pastry, combine the wholemeal flour with the baking powder, then add the olive oil slowly and mix through. Add 6–7tbsp cold water, a little at a time, and keep mixing until the mixture clumps together (it’s easiest to do this in a food processor, if you have one). 2 Transfer the dough to a floured surface. Flour your hands, then form the dough into a ball. Knead it gently until just smooth, then flatten slightly into a disc and wrap in clingfilm. Chill for 10–15 min. 3 While the pastry is chilling, heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5 and prepare the filling. Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Add the leeks, garlic and chicken, then cook for 5–6 min. Add the mushrooms and cook for 5 min or until golden. Sprinkle in the plain flour and stir well. Gradually add

the stock, stirring continuously until the sauce thickens, then simmer for 5 min. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the soured cream, mustard and nutmeg. Season with black pepper, then spoon the filling into a 27cm round pie dish or a 1.5 litre (approx) baking dish. 4 Transfer the chilled pastry to a clean, lightly floured surface and roll out into a large round to cover the pie (or the shape of the dish you are using). Cover the filling with the pastry, trimming off any excess to fit. Score with a sharp knife, making 2 or 3 small slits in the centre to let the steam escape. Brush the pastry with the milk and bake for 50 min or until golden. 5 Remove the pie from the oven and leave to cool for 5 min. Meanwhile, steam the green beans, then serve with the pie.

2 PER SERVING

Chicken, leek and mushroom pie

398kcal 11.5g fat 2.1g saturates 37.1g carbs 6.1g sugars

9.3g fibre 38.4g protein 0.9g salt 124mg calcium 3.6mg iron


R EC I PE S

Country beef and vegetable pie prep 25 min + cooling cook 2 hr 25 min serves 4 dairy free

Country beef and vegetable pie

4 PER SERVING

331kcal 10g fat 2.8g saturates 32.4g carbs 9.9g sugars

76 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

6.9g fibre 29.5g protein 0.5g salt 74mg calcium 4.2mg iron

1 Heat ½tbsp of the oil in a large, deep saucepan set over a medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 2–3 min until soft. 2 Add the diced steak and cook for 5 min, turning, until browned on all sides. Add the mushrooms and rosemary and cook for 5 min. Dissolve the stock cube in 200ml freshly boiled water, then add to the pan with the passata. Simmer over a gentle heat for 1 hr. 3 Add the courgettes and potatoes and simmer for a further 30 min. Remove the pan from the heat and leave to cool for 15 min. 4 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Blitz the cauliflower in a food processor until the texture resembles fine rice (do this in batches if necessary). Transfer to a bowl, then add the remaining olive oil and stir until combined. 5 Grease 4 x 450ml (approx) pie dishes or a 1.5–2 litre dish with a spray of oil. Divide the beef filling among the 4 dishes or spoon into the large dish. Spoon the cauliflower evenly over the filling and spray with oil. Bake for 40 min or until golden. 6 Remove from the oven and leave to cool for 5 min before serving.

RECIPES: JUDY DAVIE. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

1½tbsp olive oil 1 onion, finely diced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 400g lean rump steak, diced 300g mushrooms, chopped 2tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary 1 very low salt beef stock cube 200g passata 2 courgettes, chopped 400g unpeeled potatoes, cut into 1.5cm dice 300g cauliflower florets Cooking oil spray


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Mushroom and spinach omelette prep 10 min cook 10 min serves 1 vegetarian gluten free 2tsp sunflower oil 100g mushrooms, sliced 2 large eggs, lightly beaten A few fresh basil sprigs, torn Handful baby spinach 2tbsp grated parmesan-style vegetarian cheese

LOW CAL

ways to 4OMELETTE Forgotten how quick, easy and satisfying an eggy supper can be? Our healthy ideas will rekindle the love How to make it perfect l MAKE SURE you have a good

non-stick frying pan – 18–20cm diameter is perfect for a two-egg omelette to serve one person. l USE EGGS at room temperature (not chilled) and don’t overbeat. l COAT THE PAN in a thin layer of oil, especially around the edge. l DON’T OVERCOOK the eggs. If they’re completely firm the omelette will be rubbery.

1 Heat 1tsp of the oil in a medium non-stick frying pan, then add the mushrooms and fry over a high heat for 4–5 min until golden. Transfer to a plate and set aside. 2 Heat the remaining oil in the pan over a medium-high heat. Add the beaten eggs and leave for a few moments. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, draw the cooked egg from around the outside towards the middle, then tilt the pan, allowing the uncooked egg to flood into the gaps and cover the base. 3 While the egg is still runny on top, add the fried mushrooms with the basil, spinach and cheese. Cook for 1 min or until the egg is almost set. Fold the omelette in half, then slide on to a plate and serve.

1 PER SERVING

278kcal 21.1g fat 6g saturates 0.5g carbs 0.4g sugars

1g fibre 21.8g protein 0.7g salt 204mg calcium 3.2mg iron

RECIPES: PHIL MUNDY. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

EVERY RECIPE


R EC I PE S

Smoked salmon omelette

Ham and cheese omelette

Mixed berries soufflĂŠ omelette

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 1 gluten free

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 1 gluten free

prep 10 min cook 5 min serves 1 vegetarian gluten free

2tsp sunflower oil 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1tbsp chopped fresh dill 2tbsp low-fat soft cheese 40g smoked salmon, torn 1tsp capers, chopped Lemon zest and juice to taste

2tsp sunflower oil 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 2 slices parma ham, torn 3tbsp grated reduced-fat mature cheddar 1tbsp roughly chopped fresh parsley 1tsp dijon mustard, to serve

100g mixed frozen berries ½tsp vanilla extract 2tsp granulated sweetener 2 large eggs, separated 2tsp sunflower oil 2tbsp fat-free Greek yogurt

1 Heat the oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the eggs and leave for a few moments. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, draw the cooked egg from around the outside towards the middle, then tilt the pan, allowing the uncooked egg to flood into the gaps and cover the base. 2 While the egg is still runny on top, add the dill, soft cheese, salmon and capers. Cook for 1 min or until the egg is almost set. Season with pepper and sprinkle with lemon zest, then fold the omelette in half, slide on to a plate and serve with a squeeze of lemon juice.

1 Heat the oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the eggs and leave for a few moments. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, draw the cooked egg from around the outside towards the middle, then tilt the pan, allowing the uncooked egg to flood into the gaps and cover the base. 2 While the egg is still runny on top, add the ham, cheese and parsley. Cook for 1 min or until the egg is almost set. Fold the omelette in half, then slide on to a plate and serve with the mustard.

PER SERVING PER SERVING

331kcal 22.9g fat 5.6g saturates 2.3g carbs 1.8g sugars

0.3g fibre 29.3g protein 2.3g salt 110mg calcium 2.4mg iron

389kcal 28.3g fat 9.4g saturates 0.8g carbs 0.5g sugars

0.2g fibre 32.8g protein 2.8g salt 321mg calcium 2.7mg iron

1 Heat the grill to medium-high. Put the berries in a pan with the vanilla and half the sweetener, then gently warm until the berries thaw. 2 Whisk the egg whites in a clean bowl using an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Beat the yolks in a separate bowl, then fold into the whites with the rest of the sweetener. 3 Heat the oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the eggs and leave for a few moments. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, draw the cooked egg from around the outside into the middle, then tilt the pan, allowing the uncooked egg to flood into the gaps and cover the base. 4 Leave for a few min until just set, then grill for 30 sec to puff up. Top with the berries, then fold over and serve with the yogurt.

1 PER SERVING

299kcal 17.8g fat 4g saturates 15.7g carbs 8.8g sugars

3.2g fibre 24.6g protein 0.5g salt 184mg calcium 3.1mg iron

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 79


Cajun salmon with garlicky greens prep 15 min cook 10 min serves 4 gluten free dairy free

RYE EV E IP REC W

LOAL C

From the Bayou to Morocco via India and France, these full-flavoured recipes add a touch of the exotic to waistline-friendly fare

300g broccoli, cut into florets 150g green beans, cut into 4cm lengths 4 x 125g skinless salmon fillets 2–3tsp gluten-free Cajun seasoning Cooking oil spray 1tbsp olive oil 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced Zest 1 lemon and juice to taste, plus wedges to serve 400g can cannellini beans in water, drained 250g chard, coarsely chopped 1 Steam the broccoli and green beans for 2 min or until just tender. Drain and set aside. 2 Sprinkle the salmon fillets with the Cajun seasoning. Heat a large non-stick griddle or frying pan over a high heat and spray with oil, then cook the salmon for 2 min on each side or until cooked to your liking. 3 Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 min or until fragrant. Add the lemon zest, cannellini beans and steamed veg, then cook, stirring gently, for 1 min. Add the chard and stir-fry for 3 min or until just wilted. Squeeze in the lemon juice, then season with ground black pepper. 4 Divide the vegetables among 4 plates, top each with a Cajun salmon fillet, then serve with lemon wedges to squeeze over.

2 PER SERVING

Cajun salmon with garlicky greens

80 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

401kcal 22.9g fat 4.2g saturates 13.6g carbs 3.3g sugars

9.7g fibre 35.2g protein 1.4g salt 143mg calcium 4mg iron


R EC I PE S

Chicken, fig and sweet potato tagine

Chicken, fig and sweet potato tagine prep 15 min cook 35 min serves 4 dairy free Cooking oil spray 500g skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets, diced 1 large red onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2tsp finely grated fresh ginger 2tbsp tomato purée 1½tsp ground cumin 1tsp ground coriander 1 cinnamon stick or 1tsp ground cinnamon 350ml very low salt chicken stock 50g dried figs, chopped 500g sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into cubes 500g tenderstem broccoli and courgette, sliced Fresh coriander leaves, to garnish (optional) 1 Spray a large lidded pan or flameproof casserole with oil and set over a medium-high heat. When the pan is hot, cook the chicken, in 2 batches, for 2–3 min until golden,

then transfer to a bowl and set aside. 2 Return the pan to a medium-low heat and spray again with oil. Fry the onion for 3–4 min until soft. Add the garlic, ginger, tomato purée, cumin, ground coriander and cinnamon. Cook, stirring, for 2 min or until fragrant. 3 Return the chicken to the pan and stir to coat in the spice mixture. Add the stock, figs and sweet potatoes, then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low and partially cover the tagine with a lid, then simmer gently for 15–20 min until the sweet potatoes are tender. Remove the lid and simmer for a further 5 min or

until the sauce is slightly thickened. Meanwhile, steam the vegetables until tender-crisp. 4 Garnish the tagine with fresh coriander leaves, if using, then serve with the steamed vegetables.

4 PER SERVING

329kcal 6g fat 1.5g saturates 38.1g carbs 19.5g sugars

9.5g fibre 32.9g protein 0.5g salt 158mg calcium 4.4mg iron

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 81


Lentil, squash and spinach dhal

prep 10 min cook 30 min serves 4 vegetarian 1tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2tsp finely grated fresh ginger 1 small red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped 2tsp brown mustard seeds ½tsp ground turmeric 350g vine-ripened tomatoes, diced 350g pack diced butternut squash and sweet potato 150g dried red lentils, rinsed and drained

82 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

450ml very low salt vegetable stock 150g baby spinach 4 small reduced-fat naan breads 4tbsp low-fat natural yogurt, to serve 1 Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Sauté the onion for 5 min or until softened. Add the garlic, ginger, chilli, mustard seeds and turmeric, then cook, stirring, for 1 min or until fragrant. 2 Add the tomatoes to the pan and cook, stirring, for 1 min. Add the squash and sweet potato, lentils and stock to the pan, then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 15–20 min until

the lentils are tender and the dhal is thick. 3 Add the spinach and cook, stirring, for 2 min or until wilted. Season with ground black pepper. Meanwhile, warm the naan breads. 4 Serve the dhal with the yogurt and warmed naan breads.

4 PER SERVING

410kcal 6.8g fat 1.4g saturates 71.9g carbs 16.5g sugars

8.9g fibre 18.8g protein 0.7g salt 297mg calcium 6mg iron

RECIPES: CHRISSY FREER. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

Lentil, squash and spinach dhal


R EC I PE S

Mussels in smoky tomato broth with garlic toast prep 20 min cook 20 min serves 4 dairy free 1.5kg fresh mussels in their shells 1tbsp olive oil 1 onion, chopped 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced, plus 1 extra clove, halved 1tsp smoked paprika 125ml white wine 3 large vine-ripened tomatoes, diced 120g rocket 1 fennel bulb, trimmed and thinly sliced, fronds reserved 2 courgettes, cut into ribbons 2tsp balsamic vinegar 8 slices wholemeal bread 1 Rinse the mussels in cold water to remove any grit, scrub to remove any barnacles, then remove their beards. Discard any cracked mussels and any open mussels that don’t close when tapped lightly on a worksurface (they’re not safe to eat). 2 Heat half the oil in a very large, heavy-based pan or stockpot (that has a tight-fitting lid) over a medium-low heat. Add the onion and

Mussels in smoky tomato broth with garlic toast

sauté for 5 min or until softened. Add the sliced garlic and smoked paprika, then cook, stirring, for a further 1 min. 3 Increase the heat to high, then add the wine and simmer until the liquid has reduced by half. Add the tomatoes and simmer for 1 min. Add the mussels to the pan, then cover with the lid and simmer for 6–7 min, shaking the pan occasionally, until all the mussels are opened. Discard any mussels that don’t open. 4 Meanwhile, combine the rocket, fennel and courgettes in a large bowl, then drizzle with the remaining olive oil and the balsamic vinegar. Toast the bread until golden, then rub with the cut sides of the halved garlic clove. 5 Season the broth with ground black pepper, then ladle with the mussels into 4 serving bowls, scatter with the fennel fronds and serve with the fennel salad and garlic toasts.

3 PER SERVING

363kcal 7.6g fat 1.4g saturates 45.6g carbs 10.4g sugars

11g fibre 25.6g protein 1.7g salt 253mg calcium 6.8mg iron


R EC I PE S

DINNER FOR ONE A low-fat, high-protein supper that uses up leftover chicken plus a few ingredients picked up on the way home… A perfect 15-minute solution

Speedy laksa prep 5 min cook 10 min serves 1 dairy free

RECIPE: KERRY RAY. PHOTO: MARK O’MEARA

150g straight to wok udon noodles 100ml reduced-fat coconut milk 125ml very low salt chicken stock (or water) 2tsp Thai red curry paste 200g frozen stir-fry vegetables 100g shredded cooked skinless chicken breast 2 spring onions, sliced A few fresh coriander sprigs, to garnish (optional)

1 Put the noodles in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Stir, then leave for 5 min. 2 Meanwhile, combine the coconut milk and chicken stock with the curry paste in a small pan, then simmer for 3 min. Stir in the frozen vegetables and shredded chicken. Cook for 3–4 min until the vegetables are tender. 3 Drain the noodles and put in a bowl. Pour the soup over the noodles, then top with the spring onions and garnish with coriander (if using) to serve.

2 PER SERVING

572kcal 16.9g fat 8.1g saturates 62g carbs 9.2g sugars

7.9g fibre 41.8g protein 1.3g salt 131mg calcium 3.6mg iron

Speedy laksa


LO R E M

IN FEBRUARY’S

TRENDING in HEALTHÉ EAT MORE & LOSE WEIGHT Our dietitian shows how!

T NEXUE ISSSALE ON EB 1F

THE VEGAN DIET Make it healthy (and tips for meat eaters to pinch) GUT FRIENDLY Specially designed eating plan SPIRALIZE! Latest models on test COMFORT FOOD COLLECTION H Stunning ideas for winter greens H Lower-calorie sticky toffee pud H Freezer-friendly pizzas

Lighter vanilla rice pudding

Plus H valentine’s swaps H raw cacao H protein powders H 86 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017


IS GREEN TEA THE WONDER BREW? It’s of ten billed as a cure for many of life’s ills, but is green tea really any more than a fragrant alternative to a standard cuppa? HFG investigates

88 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017


NUTRITION

I

F WE’RE TO BELIEVE the hype, we should be drinking green tea by the gallon. It’s been reported that it can help us lose weight and look younger, and reduce our risk of cancer. So where’s the evidence? There’s certainly some persuasive research. One study, carried out by Japan’s National Cancer Centre and the University of Tokyo, found that out of 90,000 participants, those who drank the most green tea were less likely to suffer from stroke, heart disease and respiratory disease. Women, in particular, were 17% less likely to succumb. It’s reports like these that make green tea the UK’s fastest growing drink, with 54 boxes bought every minute. Some claims, however, are yet to be quantified by science. ‘In the Far East, green tea has been used as a treatment for conditions ranging from arthritis to weight loss, as well as a preventive measure for diseases such as cancer,’ says dietitian and BDA spokesperson Alison Hornby. But, she insists, ‘Evidence for the majority of these is lacking or weak.’

GREEN AND BLACK Green tea and the more common black tea come from the same plant (Camellia sinensis) – the difference is in the way they’re processed. ‘The leaves of black tea undergo a withering and oxidation process,’ explains HFG dietitian Helen Bond. ‘But for green tea, using more mature leaves and steaming them, rather than allowing them to oxidise, protects more anti-inflammatory polyphenols called catechins. ‘There’s a lot of emerging evidence that catechins can benefit diabetes, cardiovascular health, inflammation and high cholesterol,’ adds Helen, ‘although there’s no conclusive evidence that it combats each of these things individually. So enjoy your green tea – but don’t expect it to be some kind of elixir.’

BEYOND THE MUG

Green tea can be used for more than a hot drink. Add it to a breakfast smoothie for an extra wake-up kick. Or steep a green teabag, then use the water for cooking porridge oats, or cool it and use in marinades. Our easy green tea and yogurt ice cream is a winner, too Find the recipe at healthyfood.co.uk.

HOW DO YOU TAKE YOURS? While some people can’t get past the unique, slightly bitter taste of the green stuff (brewing it for a shorter time will reduce this), there are plenty of variations to try. A green tea blend with lemon, jasmine or cranberry might be more to your taste. Matcha green tea, made using a fine powder of the leaves, has a purer taste. It’s a common misconception that green tea doesn’t contain caffeine – but while it doesn’t have quite as much as black tea, which has around 50mg a cup, and a good deal less than coffee (around 80–100mg), it still has 40mg per brew. So, like all caffeinated beverages, it’s best to avoid drinking it in the evening if you struggle with sleep problems. On the plus side, drinking any type of tea goes towards your total daily intake of fluids. ‘Caffeine was always thought to be a diuretic, but trials now say that’s not the case,’ says Helen. ‘Tea is the most consumed drink in the world after water. Staying hydrated not only helps brain function but can also combat tiredness, fatigue and headaches.’


THE CASE FOR GOING GREEN THEY SAY…

THEY SAY…

IT BURNS FAT

IT’S HEART FRIENDLY

A study in The American Journal of Nutrition found that green tea extract can result in an increase in energy expenditure. This may give a metabolic boost, aiding fat oxidation and thermogenesis (the rate at which your body burns calories). Don’t expect miracles, though – in a small study of overweight people, three to four cups of green tea a day increased fat burning by just one-third.

‘The high flavonoid content in tea can be protective against damaging free radicals and this may be helpful in terms of heart disease,’ says Helen. Indeed, a Japanese study showed that women who drank green tea regularly had a 31% reduced risk of dying from heart disease. Another study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, showed catechins could lower stroke risk by a fifth by preventing cell damage, reducing abnormal blood clotting and managing blood pressure.

‘Small reductions in blood cholesterol and blood pressure have been noted in a limited number of intervention studies,’ says nutrition scientist Dr Rosalind Miller. ‘However, further studies are required to confirm these findings.’ In another study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, antioxidants in green tea were found to lower harmful total cholesterol by up to 11% and harmful LDL cholesterol by 16%.

THEY SAY…

IT FIGHTS TOOTH DECAY ‘Green tea has a high fluoride content, which makes it highly beneficial to teeth,’ confirms Helen. It also has anti-bacterial properties – a study found that rinsing your mouth with green tea significantly cuts down the risk of gum disease and tackles the origins of bad breath.

THEY SAY…

IT’S ANTI-AGEING The British Journal of Nutrition found the antioxidants in green tea help to make skin more resistant to ultraviolet radiation. It’s a useful insurance policy, but be warned: it’s no substitute for wearing high-SPF sun cream.

WHAT IS MATCHA?

It’s a green tea powder made from tea leaves. Ceremony or premium matcha is intended for drinking, but you can also buy cheaper varieties for adding to lattes or smoothies or to use in cooking. 90 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

THEY SAY…

IT REDUCES DIABETES RISK Drinking six cups of green tea daily has been found to lower the risk of diabetes by 33%. It’s thought those trusty catechins improve our body’s response to insulin, which, along with managing our body weight, reduces our diabetes risk. Helen recommends caution. ‘The

WORDS: HANNAH EBELTHITE. PHOTOS: ISTOCK. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS. FIND COMPETITION TERMS AND CONDITIONS AT HEALTHYFOOD.CO.UK

THEY SAY…

IT REDUCES HIGH CHOLESTEROL


S H O PPI N G

European Food Safety Authority has no approved health claims for green tea at the moment,’ she says. ‘So while there have been some positive studies, we can’t say drinking green tea will help prevent diabetes.’

THEY SAY…

IT PROTECTS AGAINST CANCER Caution definitely needs to be applied here. ‘While there have been small studies that suggest a lowered risk in prostate and breast cancers, at the moment there is no conclusive evidence,’ says Helen. ‘It may well have protective effects, but there’s no proof it fights any cancers specifically. Remember, what goes on in a test tube isn’t necessarily what goes on in the body.’

WE SAY… It’s clear that green tea isn’t a cure-all. But all the potential benefits (even if small) add up to a brew worth trying. And, if you find one you enjoy, it’s a fantastic way to stay hydrated without taking in the extra calories that come with many other drinks.

HFG FAVOURITES l PUKKA SUPREME MATCHA GREEN

£2.80/20 sachets, widely available A blend of three types of green tea, plus matcha powder for a pick-me-up.

l TEAPIGS MATCHA

ON-THE-GO £12/14 sachets, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Ocado Pure matcha powder in single serve sachets.

l TETLEY SUPER GREEN

TEA DETOX MINT £1.59/ 20 bags, widely available A pleasing blend with added antioxidant selenium.

l TEAPIGS JASMINE

PEARLS TEA TEMPLES £5.15/15 sachets, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Waitrose, Ocado A luxury blend with floral notes for treat-time.

WIN a set of award-winning teas

H

OW ABOUT PUSHING the boat out further and trying some truly exotic flavours? New on the tea round, but already a winner of the esteemed Great Taste Awards, Nauteas pyramids are filled with zippy flavours from around the world. We’ve teamed up with Nauteas to give away five sets of beautifully packaged blends. All the winners will receive 18 silk pyramid tea bags of each gourmet flavour: Pina Colada On The Beach, Cherry Loves Rose, Beauty Queen, Don’t Make Me Cycle To India and The Sanctuary. For more information on the range, visit nauteas.com.

SETS5t be WO o wor th N each£32

TO ENTER go to healthyfood.co.uk/competitions by 31 January 2017 and answer the simple question. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 91


S U B SC R I P T I O N O F F E R

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JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 93


HEALTHY Dr Xand van Tulleken, doctor and TV presenter

Unlike his identical twin brother, Xand has struggled with his weight. His new book explains how he lost over 6st by tackling the reasons for putting it on

Y

ou went from 12½st to 19st in 2009 – what was the reason? I was having a child with somebody and it was unexpected. Back then, I was doing my degree and it was a time of uncertainty – I wasn’t sure how my medical career was going to change. I love my son very much and was worried he was going to be living too far away. All those things added up to a great deal of worry, which translated into overeating, as these things do for lots of people.

Which foods contributed the most to your weight gain? I was just eating constantly! I can remember feeling full all the time. I’d say half my calories that year came from ordering Chinese food online. I could see in the app how much I’d been having. That was one of the shocking things for me. What was the trigger to getting healthy? Realising the health consequences of gaining so much weight. My shoes had gone up an entire size, and my feet were squished out and painful. I couldn’t go for a run

THREE THINGS I LOVE

CYCLING It’s quite joyful being on a bike.

BUILDING Doing stuff outdoors with my son. We’re building a tree house, which is going to take years, but it’s the most fun thing I get to do.

94 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

PETS Sitting in bed with my girlfriend and her cat and her dog at weekends.

AS TOLD TO MELANIE LEYSHON. PHOTOS: COLIN BELL, GETTY IMAGES, ISTOCK

HOW I STAY

without my thighs getting raw from chafing and I was getting quite severe indigestion most of the time, too. My blood-sugar levels and cholesterol were disordered and my blood pressure was high. All this was happening quite gradually, but there was one particular day when my mother and brother pointed out that I had gained a lot of weight and nagged me about it. Did being a doctor make you more blasé about your health? Yes – if you sit on the opposite side of the desk, you never think about yourself as a sick person. I was 30, but in my mind I was still 20 years old and 11 stone. But it’s hard not to do a medical degree and degree in public health and not know about what you should and should not be eating. I had an advantage when I decided to lose weight, in that I knew how to do it. I wasn’t afraid of eating vegetables. What’s the key to weight loss? Being overweight tells a story about the rest of your life, about your priorities and your ability to plan and organise. I was doing lots of things wrong. So, for me, weight loss involved tidying up the sources of stress, difficulties and worry. You need to find your motivation – for some people, it could be an upcoming wedding or party. But after the event, the motivation goes away. If you’re in a relationship that’s making you miserable, you’ll eat that tub of ice cream. The other thing is planning – it helps to keep a detailed food diary of what you eat, or at least be meticulously honest in your head. Have you added any on-trend ingredients to your diet? No. If you like kombucha, drink it. But if you want to eat healthy, ask your grandmother. Which means eating what? Don’t eat processed food. Cook meals yourself from scratch, eat lots of veg, decent-quality protein and


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

don’t put too much white stuff on your plate. I don’t believe in low-carb dieting, but if you eat too many, it’s easy to take in too many calories. I use the MyFitnessPal app to count calories and I weigh out portions of meat, etc. Everyone digests food differently and burns calories differently, but roughly knowing is pretty important. Is the gym the answer? Most people can put any calories they worked off at the gym right

❛Cook meals yourself.

Eat lots of veg and decent-quality protein, and not too much white stuff

back on before they leave the gym. The reason you put on weight isn’t that you weren’t going to the gym, so it won’t fix the problem. It’s a very expensive way of not fixing the problem. In fact, it can be difficult to do any exercise when

you’re really overweight, apart from cycling. What’s so great about cycling? It doesn’t matter how heavy you are. In fact, I would recommend – and even evangelise about – people getting a bike. If you can commute or do anything you possibly can by bike, it will make losing weight easier. Exercise is one of the key things you can do for your health throughout your entire life, but that means doing something you love. Everything that gets you out and moving around is important. What’s the secret of keeping weight off? Understand there will be times when you have a run of reunions or holidays, and try to anticipate stressful situations – a looming work meeting or too many social engagements for the week ahead. Set aside 15 minutes of planning on a Sunday night to make some snacks beforehand, or cancel one of those events. Or just think, ‘This is going to be a bad week and I’m going to be a bit heavier at the end of it.’ Don’t spiral into self-loathing. Next week will be better. How do you feel about your health now? I had some blood tests done on television and I remember Tim Spector [Professor of Genetics] saying, ‘You are a disgrace to your genes.’ My identical twin brother, Chris, has never had weight problems. It’s not just down to lucky genes – his life is organised in a different way. Fat people don’t have less willpower and they’re not less good. It’s just easier for some to organise aspects of their life better. l How to Lose Weight Well by Dr Xand van Tulleken (Quadrille, £15), is out now. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 95


REFERENCES Your guide to the research behind this month’s stories and features

HEALTH NOTES p10 l Oja, P et al (2016) Associations of specific types of sports and exercise with all-cause and cardiovascular-disease mortality: a cohort study of 80 306 British adults. British Journal of Sports Medicine. First published online 28 November 2016. DOI:10.1136/ bjsports-2016-096822 l Thaiss, C A et al (2016) Persistent microbiome alterations modulate the rate of post-dieting weight regain. Nature. First published online 24 November 2016. DOI: 10.1038/nature20796

GET WAISTED p15 l Lee, J J et al (2016) Association of Changes in Abdominal Fat Quantity and Quality With Incident Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 68 (14), 1509-1521. DOI: 10.1016/j. jacc.2016.06.067 l Public Health England (2014) Adult obesity and type 2 diabetes. www.gov.uk l Singh, P (2014) Small weight gain can raise blood pressure in healthy adults. American Heart Association Meeting Report Abstract 29. Published online 10 September 2014. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/ small-weight-gain-can-raise-blood-pressurein-healthy-adults l Sahakyan, K R et al (2015) Normal-Weight Central Obesity: Implications for Total and Cardiovascular Mortality. Annals of Internal Medicine 163 (11), 827-835. DOI: 10.7326/ M14-2525 l Fourkala, E (2014) Association of skirt size and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in older women: a cohort study within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS). BMJ Open 4 (9). DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005400 l Harada, Y et al (2014) Gender Differences In Associations Between Visceral Fat Accumulation And Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Annals of the American Thoracic 11 (3). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/ AnnalsATS.201306-182OC l Kritikou, I (2013) Sleep apnoea and visceral adiposity in middle-aged male and female subjects. European Respiratory Journal 41 (3), 601-609. DOI: 10.1183/09031936.00183411 l Khoo, J et al (2011) Comparing Effects of a Low-energy Diet and a High-protein Low-fat Diet on Sexual and Endothelial Function, Urinary Tract Symptoms, and Inflammation in Obese Diabetic Men. The Journal of Sexual Medicine 8 (10), 2868-2875. DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2011.02417.x

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HOW TO STICK WITH WEIGHT LOSS p22 l American Psychological Association. How social support can help you lose weight. http:// www.apa.org/topics/obesity/support.aspx l Wing, R R and Jeffery, R W (1999) Benefits of recruiting participants with friends and increasing social support for weight loss and maintenance. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 67 (1), 132-138 l Slimpod. 95% lose weight in our clinical trials. http://www.thinkingslimmer.com/ clinical-trials/ l Hollis, J F et al (2008) Weight loss during the intensive intervention phase of the weight-loss maintenance trial. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 35 (2), 118-126. DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.04.013

LOOK AFTER YOUR LIVER p40 l British Liver Trust. Facts about liver disease. https://www.britishlivertrust.org.uk/about-us/ media-centre/facts-about-liver-disease/ l British Liver Trust. About the Liver. https:// www.britishlivertrust.org.uk/liver-information/ l NHS Choices. Liver Disease. http://www. nhs.uk/conditions/liver-disease/pages/ introduction.aspx l Drinkaware.co.uk Alcohol and Liver Disease. https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/ alcohol-facts/health-effects-of-alcohol/ effects-on-the-body/alcohol-and-liver-disease/ l British Liver Trust. Non-alcohol Related Fatty Liver Disease. https://www. britishlivertrust.org.uk/liver-information/ liver-conditions/non-alcohol-related-fattyliver-disease/ l McCarthy, E (2014) Non alcoholic fatty liver disease. Today’s Dietitian 16 (1), 48. www.todaysdietitian.com/ newarchives/010614p48.shtml l Journal of Hepatology (2015) New Study Indicates that Exercise Improves NonAlcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Press release published 8 April 2015. http://www. journal-of-hepatology.eu/pb/assets/raw/ Health%20Advance/journals/jhepat/ JHEPATJul15Keating-Loomba.pdf l www.britishlivertrust.org.uk/wp-content/ uploads/The-health-benefits-of-coffee-BLTreport-June-2016.pdf http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/tiredness-andfatigue/documents/truthdetoxdiets.pdf l Slade, T et al (2016) Birth cohort trends in the global epidemiology of alcohol use an alcohol related harms in men and women: systematic review and metaregression. BMJ Open. Published online 24 October 2016. DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011827 l Campbell, P T et al (2016) Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, Diabetes, and Risk of Liver Cancer for U.S. Adults. Cancer

Research 76 (20), 6076-6083. DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-0787 l Cancer Research UK. Liver Cancer Statistics. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/ health-professional/cancer-statistics/ statistics-by-cancer-type/livercancer#heading-Zero

IS GREEN TEA THE WONDER BREW? p88 l Saito, E et al (2015) Association of green tea consumption with mortality due to all causes and major causes of death in a Japanese population: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (JPHC Study). Annals of Epidemiology 25 (7), 512-518. DOI: 10.1016/j. annepidem.2015.03.007 l Pukka. Is green tea good for me and good for the planet? www.pukkaherbs. com/pukka-planet/stories/pukka/ conscious-consumerism l Dulloo, A G et al (1999) Efficacy of a green tea extract rich in catechin polyphenols and caffeine in increasing 24-h energy expenditure and fat oxidation in humans. The American Journal of Nutrition 70 (6), 1040-1045 l Thielecke, F et al (2010) Epigallocatechin3-gallate and postprandial fat oxidation in overweight/obese male volunteers: a pilot study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 64 (7), 704-713. DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2010.47 l Maron, D J et al (2003) CholesterolLowering Effect of a Theaflavin-Enriched Green Tea Extract: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Archives of Internal Medicine 163 (12), 1448-1453. DOI: 10.1001/ archinte.163.12.1448 l Kuriyama, S (2008) The relation between green tea consumption and cardiovascular disease as evidenced by epidemiological studies. Journal of Nutrition 138 (8), 1548S–1553S l Hollman, P C et al (2010) Dietary flavonol intake may lower stroke risk in men and women. Journal of Nutrition 140 (3), 600-604. DOI: 10.3945/jn.109.116632 l Sarin, S et al (2015) Preliminary Clinical Evidence of the Antiplaque, Antigingivitis Efficacy of a Mouthwash Containing 2% Green Tea – A Randomised Clinical Trial. Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry 13 (3), 197-203. DOI: 10.3290/j.ohpd.a33447 l Morin, M P et al (2015) Green tea extract and its major constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibit growth and halitosis-related properties of Solobacterium moorei. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15, 48. DOI: 10.1186/s12906-015-0557-z l Rhodes, L E (2013) Oral green tea catechin metabolites are incorporated into human skin and protect against UV radiationinduced cutaneous inflammation in association with reduced production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. British Journal of Nutrition 110 (5), 891-900. DOI: 10.1017/S0007114512006071 l Iso, H et al (2006) JACC Study Group. The relationship between green tea and total caffeine intake and risk for self-reported type 2 diabetes among Japanese adults. Annals of Internal Medicine, 144 (8), 554–562


T H E FAC T S

NUTRITION LOWDOWN We cut through the science to help you work out how our recipes – and the foods you buy in the supermarket – fit into a balanced, healthy diet

JUST LIKE PRE-PACKED FOODS, all our recipes provide detailed nutrition information for a typical serving. But how does that compare with your total daily needs for energy, protein, fat, carbs and certain vitamins and minerals? Provided you stick to the serving size we recommend for each recipe, the easiest way is to compare the nutrition information for each recipe with the Reference Intake (RI). You’ll gradually see this term being used on food labels in place of Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs). The RIs are benchmarks for the amount of energy (kilocalories), fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt we should have each day. The RIs for fat, saturates, sugars and salt are the maximum amount you should have each day, while you should aim to meet the values for carbs and protein each day. There is no RI for fibre but health experts recommend we have 30g a day. Although everyone is different and has different needs for energy and nutrients, the RIs are designed for an average adult, so there’s only one set of values. See the table, right, for the figures. We also analyse our recipes for calcium and iron – this is because these two nutrients are often low in people’s diets in the UK. We can see how much a recipe contributes to our daily needs for calcium and iron by comparing

WHAT IF I WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT? The only way to shed the pounds is to take in fewer calories than you use up, so your body draws on its fat stores to supply it with enough energy. To lose 1lb (0.5kg) of fat you need to create a calorie deficit of 3,500kcal. This means cutting your calorie intake by just 500kcal a day should help you lose 1lb (0.5kg) a week – so, for example, women should lose this amount of weight each week on 1,500kcal and men on 2,000kcal. If you’re also more active, you can expect it to be a little more. However, nutrition experts agree that for good health in the long term, you shouldn’t lose more than 2lb (1kg) a week. REFERENCE INTAKE

it with Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs), which are starting to appear on food labels in place of Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) – again, there is just one set of values.

ENERGY (kcal) FAT (g)

2,000 70

SATURATES (g)

20

CARBOHYDRATES (g)

260

SUGARS (g)

90

PER SERVING

PROTEIN (g)

50

All our recipes come with nutrition information per serving, so as long as you stick to the serving sizes we recommend, the nutrition information we provide will be accurate.

SALT (g)

6

NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE

CALCIUM (mg)

800

IRON (mg)

14

l Individual needs vary considerably, so use this as a general guide only. Ask your GP or doctor to refer you to a registered dietitian if you feel you would benefit from personalised advice. Nutrition is calculated accurately, but may vary, depending on the ingredients used. Only listed ingredients are included in the calculations. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 97


T H E L A S T WO R D

Our favourite healthy snippets and tips from the experts in this month’s issue THE SECRET TO A LONGER LIFE? Discover your inner Andy Murray: playing racket sports could cut your risk of premature death by as much as 47% p10

LOSING WEIGHT could improve life in the bedroom – both from the point of view of sleeping and sex! p16

98 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017

CUCAMELON is a cucumber, watermelon and lime hybrid. Snack on that! p38

IF YOU’RE VEGGIE, vegan, or looking for a meat-free source of vital nutrients, stock up on almonds. Protein, calcium, iron, zinc… The list goes on p70

THE LIVER is caretaker of around 500 bodily functions – reason enough to take the utmost care of it p41

COMPILED BY REBECCA ALMOND. PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES, ISTOCK

5 TOP FACTS to TAKE AWAY


Le t

k l i a n t g e ! h t o d t i u r f e h t

Why add lots of sugar to something that is deliciously sweet already? Our loyalties lie with the natural avour of the fruit. That’s why we use 30% less sugar than standard jams and pack in 40% more fruit. Visit www.streamlinefoods.co.uk for more information and tasty recipes.


Crafted with care & packed with the goodness of whole foods, our delicious bars are bursting with nutritious energy & fibre, rich in Vitamin E and omega 3 with a whopping 5g protein per bar!

Go Cuckoo for Cacao! Caca Our cacao is cold pressed to retain vital nutrients including antioxidants your body needs to thrive every day.

Grab one to munch on the go from tthe he free-from aisle of Sainsburys, Tesco, ASDA, Morrisons, in health foods shops, Wholefoods Market and online with Holland & Barrett and Amazon.

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