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2017 MARATHON GUIDE

FAST COURSES STUNNING VIEWS NEWBIE-FRIENDLY FREE BEER!

Street Style!

Get Fit Faster

Supercool High-Tech Apparel

The Ultimate 30-Minute Workout

NEW Amanda Butler, NYC runner and personal trainer

Better Meals, Better Miles A 7-Day Healthy Eating Plan JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNERSWORLD.COM

YOU! Run Your First Race Drop 5 Pounds (Or More) Injury-Proof Your Body Nail A Fast Half


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CONTENTS

JANUARY/ FEBRUARY 2017

RAVE RUN

EDITOR’S LETTER

THE LOOP

10

14

17

76

RUN THIS CITY: NEW ORLEANS Don’t mistake a laissez-faire attitude for laziness. A budding running scene in the Crescent City is building a playground for people on the move. BY NICK WELDON

ON THE COVER

66 NEW YEAR, NEW YOU

82 2017 AWARDS

90 RW TESTED

Marathon Guide ...........................97 Warm, Dry, and Stylish ................ 62 Get Fit Faster............................... 58 New Year, New You ..................... 66 Better Meals, Better Miles .......... 52

START WHERE YOU ARE

HEROES OF RUNNING

INSIDER TRAINING

Do you know how fit you are right now? Test yourself at the beginning of the year to figure out the best ways to reach your 2017 running goals.

From an Olympic gold medalist to an ultrarunning activist, these seven runners faced challenges with uncommon grace.

Investing in a quality treadmill can pay dividends for years. We found 10 of the best machines to power your indoor runs.

BY KELLY BASTONE

BY THE EDITORS OF RW

BY JEFF DENGATE

PHOTOGRAPH BY CLAIRE BANGSER

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 3


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CONTENTS

21

WE’RE ALWAYS RUNNING AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM

56

Our online “What to Wear” tool advises you on the proper running gear for any weather. Test it out at runners world.com/whattowear.

HUMAN RACE 21

22

24

PERSONAL BEST

Quick Study Alia Gray’s breakout year is fueled by pickles and her four-legged recovery partner.

TRAINING

Social Movement Atlanta-based Black Men Run offers group runs and cultural connections. Remy’s World On the many benefits of a gear purge. BY MARK REMY

“I think that black men were looking for a way to get healthy and connect, and it snowballed,” says Roland Woodson, leader of BMR’s Memphis chapter.

40

Perpetual Motion Keep moving throughout the day to make the most of your miles.

42

The Starting Line Stage a healthy comeback no matter how long you’ve been away from running.

44

Race Prep Your training log offers clues on how you might run better in the upcoming year.

46

The Fast Lane A smart formula to help ramp up your training without getting hurt.

26

Intersection Tom Cruise runs through the years.

28

Street Style Fast friends with a weakness for fashion.

30

The Newbie Chronicles The best motivation while training for a 5K? For one runner, it’s zombies.

48

Next Level Noah Droddy describes how he became more than a mustachioed meme.

BY KATHRYN ARNOLD

50

32

Ask Miles Should you run errands in your sweaty workout clothes?

Ask the Experts Can you train for an ultra while working full-time?

34

What It Takes To… This father and son team ran 13 Ragnar Relays in one year—and they’re still not sick of each other.

52

The Week Ahead Prep for seven days of healthy eating.

54

The Athlete’s Palate You haven’t tried Brussels sprouts like this.

56

Fridge Wisdom Four proteinpacked breakfasts to jump-start your day.

2017 Marathon Guide Find a race that caters to any part of the pack.

I’M A RUNNER 112

Jon Glaser The comedian ran his first half marathon last fall.

6 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

Watch two exclusive 10-minute online workouts from the brand new IronStrength DVD with Dr. Jordan Metzl (on sale January 3) at runnersworld.com/ ironstrengthdvd.

FUEL

RACES+PLACES 97

STRONG SEQUEL

MIND+BODY “I try to run on weekends, but that’s also when I try to catch up on sleep,” says Glaser, who is currently working on his new show, Jon Glaser Loves Gear. “I’ve always pushed a little harder than maybe I should.”

58

The Body Shop High-intensity strength moves to build muscle.

60

Fast Fixes Injured? These tips will help you quickly bounce back.

GEAR 62

Winter Wear Clothes to keep you warm when cold weather arrives.

TRAINING TRACKS Curated by the editors of Runner’s World, our monthly 90-minute running playlist will help you jam out during cold winter miles. Have a listen at runners world.com/music.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T T R A P P E (G R AY ); M AT T R A I N E Y ( B R E A K FAS T ); TO B I AS M AC P H E E / TA N D E M S TO C K .CO M ( R U N N E R, TO P R I G H T ); W E S T E N D 61 /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( R U N N E R W I T H P H O N E ) ; M E R E D I T H J E N KS (G L A S E R )

WARDROBE WORRIES


David Willey EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Jessica Ni Murphy

BENJAMEN PURVIS Design Director CLARE LISSAMAN Photo Director ERIN BENNER Art Director RENEE KEITH Photo Editor TARA MAIDA Art Production Manager KAREN MATTHES Designer KRISTEN PARKER Assistant Photo Editor

DIGITAL CHRIS KRAFT Site Director ROBERT JAMES REESE Executive Producer BRIAN DALEK, CHRISTOPHER MICHEL Digital Editors HANNAH MCGOLDRICK Social Media Editor DAVID E. GRAF Senior Multimedia Producer DEREK CALL Junior Video Producer GINA OLD Web Producer JENNIFER GIANDOMENICO Tablet Producer

BRAND DEVELOPMENT BUDD COATES Training Director LORI ADAMS Senior Projects Coordinator

ADVERTISING New York 212-573-0300

What is your best hack to make treadmill running more enjoyable? • “It’s all about intervals! Quarter- or halfmile changes in pace will keep you engaged and make the run way more interesting.”

Southeast Sales Manager MARY ELLEN MORELLI maryellen.morelli@rodale.com New England Sales Manager NICOLE RAGUCCI nicole.ragucci@rodale.com Sales Representative SARA D E SIMINE Sales & Marketing Coordinator JUSTINE CHUN

Chicago 312-726-0365 Midwest Sales Representative JORDAN SCHEIBE Sales Assistant ZACHARY MACKOWIAK

Detroit 248-637-1352 Detroit Advertising Manager KATHY THORPE kathy.thorpe@rodale.com Sales Assistant SUE MARINELLI

Los Angeles 310-252-7518 Southwest Sales Representative MARK MASERO mark.masero@rodale.com Sales Assistant RENETT YOUNG

Northern California 707-775-3376 Northwest Sales Representative NICHOLAS FREEDMAN nick@mediahoundsinc.com Account Manager DARLENE GAMBONINI-MCGINNIS darlene@mediahoundsinc.com

MARKETING

• “A Lifetime movie, but don’t forget your headphones.”

Director of Integrated Marketing LAUREN BREWER Integrated Marketing Director KATHLEEN JOBES Art Director TRACI CONRAD HAFNER Associate Marketing Manager SARAH HEMSTOCK Research Director PAUL BAUMEISTER

WRITERS AT LARGE JONATHAN BEVERLY, AMBY BURFOOT, JOHN BRANT, CHARLES BUTLER, BENJAMIN H. CHEEVER, SARA CORBETT, STEVE FRIEDMAN, CYNTHIA GORNEY, MICHAEL HEALD, KENNY MOORE, MARC PARENT, MARK REMY, PETER SAGAL, ROBERT SULLIVAN, NICK WELDON

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LIZ APPLEGATE, KRISTIN ARMSTRONG, CHRISTIE ASCHWANDEN, TODD BALF, SARAH LORGE BUTLER, ADAM BUCKLEY COHEN, BOB COOPER, CALEB DANILOFF, SCOTT DOUGLAS, LAUREN FLESHMAN, JEFF GALLOWAY, PETER GAMBACCINI, MICHELLE HAMILTON, JOHN HANC, HAL HIGDON, ALEX HUTCHINSON, LISA JHUNG, CINDY KUZMA, YISHANE LEE, DIMITY McDOWELL, JANICE McLEOD (Research), SARAH BOWEN SHEA, MARTYN SHORTEN (Shoe Lab), CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON, ERIN STROUT, BARBARA WEBB (Copy)

EVENTS

• “Netflix and chill. (And by ‘chill,’ I mean, ‘point a fan directly at myself.’)”

CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PAUL McGINLEY EVP, General Counsel, Chief Administrative Officer STEPHEN TWILLIGER EVP, Chief Financial Officer BETH BUEHLER Chief Operating Officer MIRANDA DeSANTIS SVP, Human Resources LAURA FRERER-SCHMIDT SVP, Corporate Sales & Women’s Health MICHAEL LAFAVORE Editorial Director ROBERT NOVICK Head of Global Business Development JOYCEANN SHIRER SVP, Marketing HEIDI CHO VP, Digital Content GAIL GONZALES VP, Publisher, Rodale Books

J.I. Rodale FOUNDER, 1942–1971 RODALE INTERNATIONAL KEVIN LABONGE Executive Director of Business Development & Global Licensing JOHN VILLE Editorial Director ANGELA KIM Director of Business Development & Global Licensing VERONIKA RUFF TAYLOR Editorial Director, Runner’s World International TARA SWANSEN Director of Global Marketing KARL ROZEMEYER Senior Content Manager NATANYA SPIES Editorial & Content Coordinator

We inspire health, healing, happiness, and love in the world. Starting with you.

PRODUCTION Print Production Manager KELLY McDONALD kelly.mcdonald@rodale.com; 610-967-7615 Production Specialist LYNN LAUDENSLAGER lynn.laudenslager@rodale.com; 610-967-8143

BUSINESS OFFICE

• “A great playlist of music videos! Beyoncé has a video for everyone.”

Vice President, Finance LAURIE JACKSON Finance Manager JACKIE BAUM Advertising Finance Manager SUSAN G. SNYDER

CONSUMER MARKETING Vice President, Retail Sales MICHELLE TAUBER Executive Director SUSAN K. HARTMAN Senior Manager HEATHER COX

Rodale Inc. • 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098-0099 rodaleinc.com

RODALE FOOD Test Kitchen Manager JULISSA ROBERTS Test Kitchen Senior Associate Editor JENNIFER KUSHNIER Test Kitchen Associate Editor AMY FRITCH

ADVISORY BOARD PAM ANDERSON, NATE APPLEMAN, PAMELA NISEVICH BEDE, R.D., MARK BITTMAN, WALTER M. BORTZ, M.D., RICHARD T. BRAVER, D.P.M., JEFFREY L. BROWN, PSY.D., DAVID COSTILL, PH.D., JACK DANIELS, PH.D., LAURA DUNNE, M.D., MICHAEL FREDERICSON, M.D., JANET HAMILTON, R.C.E.P., CINDRA KAMPHOFF, PH.D., NIKKI KIMBALL, M.S.P.T., JORDAN METZL, M.D., REBECCA PACHECO, DANIEL J. PERELES, M.D., GESINE BULLOCK PRADO, STEPHEN M. PRIBUT, D.P.M., SAGE ROUNTREE, PH.D., JOAN BENOIT SAMUELSON, FRANK SHORTER, CRAIG SOUDERS, M.P.T., PAUL D. THOMPSON, M.D., CLINT VERRAN, P.T., PATRICIA WELLS

Director of Events and Programs ALISON BROWN Associate Director of Operations WARREN GREENE Associate Marketing Manager SUZANNE ALLAIRE

Maria Rodale

• “I do the same thing I did in high school calculus: imagine that I’m anywhere else but there.”

• “Place a towel over the display to avoid staring at the distance.”

INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS EDITORS-IN-CHIEF ARGENTINA GERMAN PITTELLI, AUSTRALIA LISA HOLMES, BRAZIL ANDREA ESTEVAM, CHINA YAN YI, FRANCE GUILLAUME DEPASSE, GERMANY MARTIN GRUENING, HUNGARY MATE PÁSZTOR, ITALY MARCO MARCHEI, LATIN AMERICA CESAR PEREZ COTA, NETHERLANDS OLIVIER HEIMEL, NORWAY EIVIND BYE, POLAND MAREK DUDZINSKI, SOUTH AFRICA MIKE FINCH, SPAIN ALEJANDRO CALABUIG, SWEDEN STEFAN LARSEN, TURKEY FATIH BUYUKBAYRAK, UNITED KINGDOM ANDY DIXON

RUNNER’S WORLD is a proud member of

CUSTOMER SERVICE 800-666-2828 Email rwdcustserv@rodale.com Online runnersworld.com/customer-service Mail Runner’s World Customer Service P.O. Box 26299, Lehigh Valley, PA 18002-6299 Absolute satisfaction guaranteed. We occasionally make our subscribers’ names available to companies whose products or services may be of interest to you. You may request your name be removed from these promotion lists; call 800-666-2828 or go to rodaleinc .com/privacy-policy.

Licensing Contact Wyndell Hamilton at Wright’s and Reprints Media, 281-419-5725 x152, whamilton@ wrightsmedia.com. Printed in USA

Attention, Specialty Running Stores: Sell Runner’s World in your store, risk-free. Call 800-845-8050 for details.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I TC H M A N D E L ( H E A D P H O N E S ); CO R B I S ( FA N ); T I M OT H Y A . C L A RY/A F P/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( B E YO N C É ) ; K . L . H OWA R D/A L A M Y (CA LC U L ATO R ); M _ H AU S E R /A L A M Y ( TOW E L )

ART + PHOTOGRAPHY

VP/PUBLISHER

Associate Publisher PAUL COLLINS paul.collins@rodale.com Chief Running Officer BART YASSO bart.yasso@rodale.com

EDITORIAL JOHN ATWOOD Editor TISH HAMILTON Executive Editor SUZANNE PERREAULT Senior Managing Editor CHRISTINE FENNESSY Multimedia Features Editor JEFF DENGATE Articles Editor (Shoes+Gear) KATRIN M C DONALD NEITZ Articles Editor (Mind+Body, Human Race) MEGHAN KITA Senior Editor (Training, Races+Places) HEATHER MAYER IRVINE Senior Editor (Food+Nutrition) LINDSAY BENDER Assistant Managing Editor ALI NOLAN Associate Editor KIT FOX Reporter

Molly O’Keefe Corcoran

MANAGING DIRECTOR


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RAVE RUN

MOSCOW, IDAHO RUNNERS Jeremiah Akin and Olga Kozhar THE EXPERIENCE Hello Walk is one of the best-known pathways on the University of Idaho campus. Lined with Camperdown elms, the paved halfmile stretch links to the steep arboretum trail. “Running here gives you so much energy,” says Kozhar. “It helps get you through those winter days.” FAST FACTS Hello Walk was named when Alfred Upham, the school’s president in the 1920s, insisted on saying hello to everyone he passed and wanted students and staff to do the same. While greetings are no longer mandatory, Akin always likes to wave. LOCAL FARE Chow down at the Moscow Food Co-op—just a half mile away from campus— for a locally sourced, organic meal. You can’t go wrong with the popular kale salad and curry chicken, but Akin’s favorite is the pulled pork sandwich. RACE NEARBY Snake River Canyon Half Marathon March 4, 2017 PHOTOGRAPHER Ben Herndon/ Tandemstock.com

FOR DIRECTIONS, RESOURCE INFORMATION, AND DOWNLOADABLE WALLPAPER IMAGES, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/ RAVERUN.


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 11


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EDITOR’S LETTER

UNITED WE RUN

to put one year behind us and set some goals for the next one (or resolve to do them, if that’s how you roll). I’m guessing we can agree that there’s one thing in particular—one media-dominating, taboo-shattering, anxiety-inducing thing—that we’re especially glad to put behind us. I have a brief (politically neutral!) post-election point to make below, but first I have a loose end to tie up. In last year’s “New Year, New You” issue, I resolved to “finally enter an obstacle course race” in 2016. More than 6.5 million people had finished Tough Mudders, Spartan Races, and Warrior Dashes in the prior six years, and I wanted to see firsthand what this craze was about and challenge myself in a new way. So I did one, it was great, and I totally get it. True, I eased into it. I did not do a race with the words “Beast” or “World’s Toughest” in its name. As a lifelong Red Sox fan whose only OCR-specific training was a dozen weekly pullups, I chose my event strategically: the Spartan Race Fenway Park Stadium Sprint in Boston on November 12. It was about three miles of running up and down steps, through narrow rows of bleacher seats, around the perimeter of the upper deck 14 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

Elkhereiji and McCracken join forces in Chicago. Left: Willey after finishing at Fenway.

For more on my Fenway race and on the Spartan phenomenon, check out episode #34 of the Runner’s World Show. Want to Spartan Up yourself? Go to spartan.com and use the promo code RUN26 for a 26% discount.

In episode #35 of the Runner’s World Show, we’ll be doing a New Year, New You roundtable. Tweet your 2017 goals and questions about training, nutrition, and injury prevention to @rwaudio, and perhaps we’ll include them in the podcast.

You loved the T-shirt. Now you can get an I LOVE RUNNING hoodie. $55, runnersworld .com/shop.

communities, wherever those are and however we define them. And lots of people are doing it. You just don’t hear about them enough. Their stories get obscured by the conflict and negativity that typically saturate the media (especially this year). But turn to “Heroes of Running” on page 82. You’ll meet people who turn away from adversity and despair to make their own lives meaningful, their own corners of the world better, and the lives of imperiled or less fortunate people more bearable. Forget divide and conquer—they connect and conquer. In October, Khalid Elkhereiji, a partially blind runner from Saudi Arabia, finished the Chicago Marathon with help from two guides. One of them, Amanda McCracken, had taught English to Elkhereiji 12 years ago in Colorado, where she lives. They met up in Chicago and, along with a local guide, Kyle Larson, finished the race in 3:35, a 36-minute PR for Khalid. (McCracken’s account of the race and its significance is at runnersworld.com/khalid.) In Elkhereiji’s country, women aren’t even allowed to drive. In ours, anti-Muslim rhetoric is alarmingly common. But on a recent fall Sunday, a nearly blind Muslim was led through the streets of a city he’d never visited by two Americans, one of them a Christian woman. It’s not just that they did it. More than 40,000 runners finished Chicago that day, and thousands of them ran faster. It’s that they did it together. DAVID WILLEY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

@DWilleyRW

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F S PA R TA N ( TO P L E F T ); CO U R T E SY O F DA N W I L L E Y (C L I M B I N G R O P E ); CO U R T E SY M A R AT H O N F OTO ( E L K H E R E I J I & M C C R AC K E N )

YEP, IT’S THAT TIME of year again. Time

and the famed Green Monster, and through myriad tunnels of this 104-year-old cathedral. Sprinkled throughout those three miles were more than 20 obstacles and deviously conceived cross-training stations. I scaled walls up to eight feet tall. I climbed a 20-foot rope. I lugged sandbags, cement blocks, and other heavy objects. I did pushups and burpees and box jumps. I threw a spear, missed the target, and had to do 30 more burpees. I did all that (and more) in just under 51 minutes, and I finished feeling humbled yet elated. The toughest part? Accumulated fatigue, which by the end of the race made it hard to lift my arms, let alone climb a rope. The best parts? First, there were more payoff moments than you get in a road race, where the sense of completion doesn’t come until the finish line. But every time I rang the bell at the end of an obstacle, I got a mental boost. Another one done. I got this. It’s not better than, say, a marathon, just different, the way quick social-media dopamine hits differ from the sweeping sense of closure you get at the end of an epic movie. The other cool thing was the camaraderie. Although Spartan Races exude a militaristic ethos, the people running, climbing, and jumping around Fenway Park came in all ages, races, sizes, and, undoubtedly, political affiliations. Some competed on teams, others solo. But we pushed ourselves and each other through difficulty, so no one felt alone. This sense of common purpose felt especially good just four days after the election. The race, at least for me, was an antidote to the dissension and divisiveness permeating our national mood, and a timely reminder that presidential politics cannot create true and lasting unity. We have to do that ourselves, in our own


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THE LOOP THE LATEST

Senior Editor Meghan Kita relished her Guinness World Record for fastest marathon dressed as a fast food item (female) for more than a year. But in November, RW reader Kati Keenan unofficially beat the mark by more than 20 minutes, running 3:33:50 while donning a hot dog costume at the 2016 Indianapolis Monumental Marathon.

THE INBOX

CALLING OUT HARASSMENT It is frightening and disorienting and happens way too often (“Running While Female,” December 2016). I am someone’s sister, wife, and mother out to enjoy exercise and stay strong and healthy. I am not an object and am certainly not there for anyone’s “entertainment.” NATALIE CLINE HOVIK, VIA FACEBOOK

I run with my 11-year-old son and I’m teaching him proper running etiquette. First and foremost, all runners are worthy of respect. End of discussion. ERIK M. WEBER, VIA FACEBOOK

When I got serious about running and started doing lots of runs on my own, my husband made sure I got my concealed-carry license and we found a secure way that I can carry my handgun when I run. It definitely makes me feel safer, as I’ve experienced some scenarios as well. It’s sad that women feel that they even have to protect themselves while trying to do something they enjoy!

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S T E FA N KU N E R T/A L A M Y ( P E P P E R S P R AY ) ; P H OTO D I S C ( W H I S T L E , K N I F E )

MARCI WEXLER SUMMERS, VIA FACEBOOK

HEART FOR HART Best issue ever! I Kevin Hart [the comedian was on November’s cover] and how he is impacting the running world.

Feel good about feeling well.

THE STATS

THE THINGS SHE CARRIES

RW asked 2,542 women what they run with to stay safe.

85%

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of female runners report that they sometimes or always carry a cell phone.

ANTONIA TRENISE, VIA FACEBOOK

Love it!!! He is great at encouraging people to get out there and move! #HustleHart!! AIDA MADRID, VIA FACEBOOK

I always see and hear good things about Kevin Hart. I’d like to run with him sometime.

21%

7%

sometimes or always carry pepper spray.

sometimes or always carry a whistle.

KEVIN PORTER, VIA FACEBOOK

Send comments about Runner’s World to letters@runnersworld.com. RUNNER’S WORLD reserves the right to

edit readers’ submissions. All readers’ submissions become the sole property of RUNNER’S WORLD and may be published in any medium and for any use worldwide.

5%

1%

sometimes or always carry a knife.

sometimes or always carry a gun.

160724


THE LOOP

THE GALLERY

#EPICTREADMILLSETUP Show us where you log indoor miles!

THE POLL

Along with running, which of these do you do regularly?

39%

Stretch

16% Yoga

“Runs toward the past inspire hard work.” —@karisinspired

THE TWEET

40%

Nothing—I just run. Based on 2,910 responses via Twitter

5%

Meditate

“@RUNNERSWORLD FOLKS AND FRIENDS WON A BUNCH OF TURKEY VOUCHERS AT @LVROADRUNNERS 5K (WHICH WAS ONLY 2.97 MILES) AND 10 MILER (9.93)”

—Food and Nutrition Editor Heather Mayer Irvine, along with RW staffers Ali Nolan and Lori Adams, earned the birds at a local race on November 6.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y G L AS S H O U S E I M AG E S /A L A M Y ( T U R K E Y )

“Winter is coming and the gym is ready!” —@watchmaegtriandrun

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THE GUIDE

How to pull off the viral look of rising elite Noah Droddy (“Cool Dude Running,” page 48).

I L LU S T R AT I O N B Y C H A R L I E L AY TO N ; P H OTO G R A P H B Y V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N ( D R O D DY )

The Shades “Some people have lucky socks or shorts,” Droddy says. He has his Native Eyewear sunglasses. “Wearing them, that’s how I feel comfortable.”

The Hat Always wear it backward. The brim keeps the flowing locks at bay. Plus, “It just looks way cooler to have a backward hat,” Droddy says.

THE COVER

Cover model Amanda Butler, 31, is a personal trainer in New York City. She was an accomplished hurdler in high school, but has since become a gym junkie and road runner—logging up to five miles in Central Park and along the Hudson River. Working with clients to reach their own goals, she knows all about New Year’s resolutions. “A lot of people just say they want to be in better shape, and I always ask, ‘What does that mean?’ ” she says. “You have to be very specific and list the things you are struggling with to make a plan.”

The ’Stache Grow a full beard during training. “It’s cool because it shows how long and how hard you have been working,” Droddy says. Shave it all except the mustache right before race day.

Butler, competing for St. Cecilia High School in Hastings, Nebraska.

The Hair Grow it for at least three years. Leave it down on race day. “There’s a fierceness to it,” he says. “I like the way it flows when I run.”


Can a simple sheet of paper renew your faith in humanity? Putting thoughts on paper can be a powerful way to express feelings, heal and inspire. We asked five people whose lives have been touched by violence or cruelty to write Letters of Peace that reflect their enduring faith in humanity. Meet the authors, read their letters and learn more about the power of paper. Visit howlifeunfolds.com/lettersofpeace | #lettersofpeace

A charitable donation was made on behalf of the author of this letter. Š 2016 Paper and Packaging Board.

From the Makers of Paper and Packaging


A YEAR OF RAGNARS p34

STYLE FROM MUNICH TO MALIBU p28

HUMAN( )RACE p28

NEWS, TRENDS, and REGULAR RUNNERS doing AMAZING THINGS

QUICK STUDY

ALIA GRAY 29, BOULDER, COLORADO

Gray had the 2016 Olympic Marathon Trials on her calendar when she rolled her ankle and fractured her fibula in November 2015. With guidance from her coach, Joe Vigil, and her fiancé, Richard Hansen, a sports chiropractor, she shifted her 90-mile training weeks to an AlterG anti-gravity treadmill. The care paid off: On the warm day of the trials in Los Angeles last February, she ran a personalbest 2:35:47 and placed 10th. Gray— who launched the Boulder-based Roots Running Project with Hansen last year (see page 48)—trained on solid ground for the Chicago Marathon in October, where she finished 10th and lowered her PR to 2:34:00.

SHE BELIEVES IN #SQUADGOALS “I saw a jump in my performance when we started building a team. There’s a shared load. Even when your training doesn’t go the way you want on certain days, your team lifts you up.” SHE EMBRACES AGING “I’m a big believer in lifetime miles. The older you get, the more mature and experienced you are. That all adds up.”

@aliatgray, self-described wordsmith and coffeeholic

One more, and then one more, and then one more. #Intervaldaymantra

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT TRAPPE

SHE SIPS CIDER “I got hooked on Wild Cider’s seasonal lemon basil. It’s crisp, refreshing, and not too sweet.” SHE HAS A FURRY RECOVERY BUDDY “We got our Great Dane puppy, Norman Dale, when he was 8 weeks old. If I work out in the morning and go home to rest, he’ll climb into bed with me.” SHE NEEDS JOE “Coffee is my safe place. I give myself at least 15 minutes of uninterrupted time to drink a cup. Then, I’m off and running.” SHE ROCKS OUT “The day we got back from Chicago, we had concert tickets to see Cold War Kids. Music is my escape and my mental break.” SHE PICKLES LIKE A PRO “During marathon training, I crave salt, so I make refrigerator pickles—just combine pickles, vinegar, water, and sugar, then add spices and garlic.”

—CINDY KUZMA

ALIA’S TWEETS

SHE WALKS IN WATER “There’s a community center nearby with a lazy river that’s really nice to walk in. It helps flush the legs out.”

Nothing like some postrace debriefing on FaceTime with your 94-year-old grandfather. #technology #nosehairs

A very serious Sunday problem: no donut shops open past 3pm. Please send help. And an apple fritter.

Naps + blackout blinds + zero alarm set. #trainhardrecoverharder #droolonmypillowcase

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 21


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SOCIAL T N MOVEME

HEALTHY BROTHERHOOD A shared culture brings members of Black Men Run together to change lives. in Atlanta, had taken up running in 2010. He started with a half mile but soon moved up to half marathons. “Every race I went to, I saw the same AfricanAmerican men,” he says. “There weren’t a lot of us, but the ones I saw were consistently there. I thought, It would be great to run with those guys.” Six men showed up in response to Russell’s first invitation. “We all wanted the same thing—people to train

22 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

with,” he says. There were two reasons he wanted to connect male AfricanAmerican runners. First, he hoped to address the health problems that plague the black community. In 2007, Russell himself received a diagnosis of high blood pressure and cholesterol. Through running and a healthy diet, he was able to reverse the diseases. He felt he could show others like him how to do the same. He was also inspired by his father, who had run throughout the 1980s, when the black running community was even smaller than it is today. “I realized my dad had always run by himself,” he says. “I wanted that to be different for a new generation.” The original six grew to 40 in three months. Now, the Atlanta club is made up of 100 run-

Brian Roberson, 40, an iOS developer in Atlanta, built a running app for BMR in 2014 to promote the club’s mission. With BMR App, members can track their runs and find nearby club events. Some other features: Leaderboard Runners with the most miles in a week get to post five-second videos challenging other members to catch up. BMR Radio Streams HBCU stations, mixes by popular DJs, and playlists curated by members. Get Social Users can share their mileage and selfies instantly on BMR’s Facebook page and Twitter feed from the app.

— MYLES WORTHINGTON

Jason Russell (left, center) leads his crew in Atlanta’s Grant Park (top) with his dad (blue sunglasses).

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRYAN MELTZ

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E SY O F KOVO N F LOW E R S ( TO P C E N T E R ) ; C H R I S H O P E ( TO P R I G H T )

When Jason Russell posted a status on Facebook in July 2013 inviting AfricanAmerican men to join him for a group run, he didn’t know it would be the first step in organizing an international club that is now more than 6,000 members strong. He did know that black men were underrepresented in American distance running, and he wanted that to change. Russell, 42, a digital marketing manager

CONNECT

ners and meets every Monday at 6:30 p.m. After success in his city, Russell wanted to open a second chapter in Memphis—his hometown, where his father, now 75, still runs. In July 2013, he called an old friend, Roland Woodson, to see if he could start a group there. “I had just started running, trying to prevent middle-age weight gain,” says Woodson, 42, an assistant principal and father of three. “He wanted me to help other black men on that path.” Woodson posted on Facebook, asking all black men in Memphis to meet him for a run. “Some guys were college athletes,” he says. “Some were even sprinters. One thought anything beyond 400 meters was crazy. Well, now he’s run five marathons.” Today, BMR is represented in 50 cities. “This is our golf course—our time to talk business and politics,” says Russell. “It’s grown into a movement so that black men will never have to run alone again.”


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Remy’s World BY MARK REMY

Speaking of which: Do I have Fight Club on DVD? I think I do. I have so many DVDs, although I can’t remember the last time I watched any of them. I really should just give those things away… I bring all of this up because I recently

BEWARE WARDROBE FAT Don’t let mindless consumption leave you feeling bloated.

Q

uick—how many pairs of running shoes do you own? ¶ If you have a ready answer for that, you probably own what most reasonable people would agree is a “normal” number. If you have to stop and think about it, you’re probably in the danger zone. ¶ If you honestly have no clue—I dunno, 30? 40? 53?—then you just might have a gear problem. ¶ I say “gear problem” and not “shoe problem” because I’m using shoes here as a proxy. If you own so many shoes that you can’t track them all, it’s very likely that you also own more running stuff in general than you need. Maybe even more than you want, if you’re being honest with yourself. Still not sure if this describes you? Here are a few more questions: • At registration or packet pickup for a race, do you automatically accept the shirt, even if you already have a hundred race shirts at home, and this particular specimen isn’t all that attractive? • Do you have at least 10 items of running apparel that you haven’t worn even once in the past 12 months? • When you dress for a run, do you often struggle to find a certain shirt or pair of gloves amid your collection? • Do you sometimes purchase running apparel clandestinely, fearing your significant other’s reaction upon learning that you’ve bought yet another jacket or pair of socks? If you answered “yes” to more than a couple of these, you may want to rethink your relationship with running gear—to ask, as Tyler Durden does in Fight Club, whether the things you own have ended up owning you. 24 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

did a big gear purge. I’m not sure what prompted it. Maybe I was inspired subconsciously by Marie Kondo. She’s the best-selling author of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, a book that’s been on my wife’s nightstand, and the de facto leader of a movement to declutter, streamline, and simplify. She urges readers to look at each thing around and ask themselves, Does this spark joy? If it does, you keep it. Otherwise, you load it into a catapult and let it fly. Or something like that. Before we go on, bear in mind that I am not, nor have I ever been, a gear addict or a hoarder. Really. As far as gear ownership goes, I consider myself fairly average for a guy who’s been running regularly, several days a week, for 20-some years. Also bear in mind that I did a fairly major purge before we moved across the country two years ago, plus other, smaller ones since then, giving away items a few at a time. Even so, for whatever reason, I felt it was time for a good cull. So I got a notebook and a pen, to record everything for charity receipt purposes, and started sifting. The results were eye-opening. For one thing, I had somehow wound up with 18 pairs of running gloves. Eighteen. After selecting a dozen pairs for donation, I still had six left, which seems more than enough to me. Among my other piles were 2 jackets, 9 long-sleeve tech shirts, 9 short-sleeve tech shirts, 3 singlets, 5 beanie-style hats, 3 caps, 2 hooded pullovers, 2 pairs of shoes, and 6 pairs of undershorts/wind briefs. Even postpurge I am in no danger of missing a run for lack of clothing. I still have, at last count, 10 pairs of shorts and 24 tech shirts—12 longsleeve, 12 short-sleeve. I won’t ILLUSTRATION BY JANNE IIVONEN


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THE INTERSECTION Where running and culture collide MOMENTOUS

Paralympic 1500-meter gold medalist Mikey Brannigan (page 88) is among the athletes who appear in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in NYC.

Will Reeve, son of the late Christopher (Superman) Reeve, runs the NYC Marathon in 4:36:15 to raise more than $35,000 for his parents’ foundation. A Cuban discus thrower is ordered to return her Olympic silver after it’s revealed she doped during the 2008 Games—but the medal was allegedly already sold on eBay for $11,655.

GO!

STOP!

Nev Schulman, host of MTV’s Catfish, finishes NYCM in 3:21:58.

Family members of Abebe Bikila try to get $15 million from Vibram, the foot-glove-style running shoe, which used the famous barefoot marathoner’s name without permission. A judge dismissed the lawsuit.

I Am Bolt, a documentary about Usain Bolt’s career and life, is October 18, 2016, is declared available on DVD Shannon Rowbury day in San December 6. Francisco for the two-time Olympian and SF-native.

Brooks’s Gray Lady shoe pays homage to The New York Times with a newsprint pattern and crossword puzzle insole.

An 18-minute YouTube montage shows every movie scene of Tom Cruise running— At Game 7 of the World starting with 1981’s Endless Series, Cubs fan Bill Murray bought beers for his section, Love. including RW contributor Liam Boylan-Pett.

Hilary Swank launches an athleisure line for women who have “ambition and focus” and $$$. The goods range in price from $125 for a sports bra to $1,150 for a jacket.

FRIVOLOUS

26 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

Mark Remy is a Runner’s World writer at large and the mastermind of dumbrunner.com. For more, go to runnersworld.com/remysworld.

DAV I D C L U G S TO N ( V I B R A M S H O E ); K E YS TO N E- F R A N C E /G A M M A- K E YS TO N E V I A G E T T Y I M AG E S ( B I K I L A ); S T U F O R S T E R /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( D I S C U S T H R OW E R ) ; CO U R T E SY O F C L A R I S E CO L E M A N ( T E E N AG E R )

Traffickers are busted for replacing the gel in sports shoes with liquid cocaine valued at $2.2 million.

An autistic, nonverbal teenager who got lost while running a 5K was assaulted by a man who feared the runner was after his wife’s purse.

even get into my sock drawer. It felt good to jettison this stuff. Good to have it out of my life, good to know that someone else might be happy to have it. Best of all, it made me think. I found myself asking, How did I wind up with so much junk? And, Why did I cling to it for so long? And, perhaps most important, How can I end, or at least slow, this constant accretion of stuff I just don’t need? The short answer to the first question is that I just wasn’t paying attention. I would run a race, get a shirt, toss it on the pile. See a pair of shorts on sale, figure, Hey, I can always use another pair of shorts, and whip out my credit card. Attend an event, get a free jacket, stuff it into my bag. It’s sneaky, like mindless eating. Gradually, steadily, you consume a bit here and a bit there—tech shirts, tees, hats, tights, vests—until one day you wake up and realize your closet is 50 pounds overweight. Why did I cling to this much stuff for so long ? That’s a tougher one. Inertia? Sentimentality? Laziness? Some hardwired impulse to gorge while I can, as a hedge against future scarcity? Probably it’s a little bit of each. As for ways I can end or slow this problem, there’s a simple answer for that, I think—be more mindful. Stop getting stuff just because I can. Stop accepting stuff just because it’s free. Start asking myself, Do I really need this? Do I really want it? Really? I’m already making progress. When signing up for a race, for instance, I used to automatically check “Medium” under “Shirt Size.” No more. Today I opt not to take a shirt at all, unless it’s exceptionally high quality or the event itself holds some special meaning for me. I used that same rule in my recent purge, by the way, so I still have my Boston Marathon shirts but no longer possess my (not really) hard-earned Tinsel Town Turkey Trot T’s. Oh, and by the way, to answer my own question: I own just one pair of running shoes. Well, one pair that I actually use for running. I’ll admit I have been thinking lately about springing for a second pair. No more socks, though. Unless of course they’re buy-oneget-one. I mean, I’m only human.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B U DA M E N D E S /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( B R A N N I G A N ); I M AG E S O U R C E /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( BAG ); CO U R T E SY O F N Y R R ( R E E V E ); S T E V E M AC K /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( S C H U L M A N ) ; M A R K R A L S TO N /A F P/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( R OW B U R Y ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F B R O O K S (G R AY

R

L A DY S H O E ) ; I A N J O H N S O N / I C O N S P O R T S W I R E V I A G E T T Y I M AG E S ( M U R R AY ); C O U R T E SY U N I V E R S A L P I C T U R E S ( DV D); M A RY E VA N S / PA R A M O U N T P I C T U R E S / R O N A L D G R A N T/ E V E R E T T CO L L E C T I O N (C R U I S E ); C O U R T E S Y M I S S I O N S TAT E M E N T (C LOT H I N G ) ;

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Polly Bäumler and Jessica White are featured in this issue’s HR logo.

STREET STYLE

TRENDING FRIENDS

“This Oiselle tank is one of my favorites. The print is very subtle, but the birds inspire me to visualize myself flying when I’m running. It’s an unknown brand in Munich, so it feels special.”

Munich’s Polly Bäumler

POLLY BÄUMLER, 43, AND JESSICA WHITE, 41, MOMS, COFOUNDERS OF SUPAFEMME.COM

White and Bäumler became running partners in 1993 on Pepperdine University’s cross-country team, where Bäumler says she was the slowest runner while White was the fastest. Despite the difference in pace, the two developed a strong friendship, one that has endured tests of time and distance. Today, White is raising two kids in Malibu (where this photo was shot), while Bäumler, a mom of three, is a fashion designer in Munich, Germany. To keep up with each other, the duo launched a blog called supafemme, where the “runners at heart with a weakness for fashion” chronicle their adventure and showcase their favorite running gear. “Although we live in different places, our running connects us,” Bäumler says. “Working on supafemme connects us even more.” Their wardrobes coordinate (both describe their styles as clean and simple), and Bäumler, a three-time marathoner, is working to get their training to mesh, too. She talked White into running a marathon with her in 2017. —KATIE NEITZ

“I love everything Icebreaker. Their stuff is amazing quality and truly anti-stink. I usually wear sports bras from the teen section at Target, so this bra was a splurge.”

“My knee started hurting in June. I found YouTube videos on how to use kinesio tape, so I tried it for the first time for a half marathon in September and my knee felt fine! So I wear it now every time I run or work out. I need KT tape more than I need a sports bra.”

“I’m willing to try anything that makes me faster, so when I started seeing elites wearing compression socks, I decided to give this ultralight pair from CEP a go. Who knows if they help, but I love the geeky look.”

“I got these New Balance Fresh Foams from my local running store. I have flat feet, so I wear them with CurrexSole RunPro insoles because I refuse to wear a chunkier shoe.”

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RENNIE SOLIS


“My husband took our two older boys on a surf trip in Mexico and they each got a hand-painted hat. They got one for me, too, but it’s hot pink, so I’m always stealing theirs. I don’t surf—I hate the water. It terrifies me.”

“I’m always cold, and so I love this Uniqlo down vest because it’s lightweight—you hardly feel it—but it keeps you warm. I do love black, it’s classic. I feel like if I’m in all black, I look put-together.”

“These Oiselle arm warmers are perfect on cool days when you need something between a short- and long-sleeve tee. I scrunch them down to my wrists when I get too hot. I love the way they look.”

“I used to run in really thin socks, but I tried these thicker socks from Old Navy and realized I preferred them. They’re cheap, so I can buy gazillions of them. I only ever wear no-show socks, because I’m always running in the sun and want to keep tan lines minimal.”

Malibu’s Jessica White

“I needed a new bra. H&M is amazing for workout gear at low prices. I hate sports bras with padding—I don’t want any extra weight—so this is perfect.”

“This Garmin was a gift from a friend. I have to wear it for every run now. I’m so competitive with myself. The Garmin pushes me; it makes my runs fast and fun. It’s my favorite accessory.”

“I recently became obsessed with Lululemon after resisting for so long. These pants from their Naked Sensation line are stylish and comfortable. They are full pants, but I pull them up a little bit on the bottom so they look like capris. They’re a good crossover piece; I love wearing them for plane rides.”

“I discovered these Adidas Adizero Adios Boosts about seven years ago. After years of switching around, I found my soulmate with these. I have an extremely narrow foot and I don’t like cushion; I like to feel the ground.”

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 29


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The Newbie Chronicles BY KATHRYN ARNOLD

run those three miles without pause. Well, that freewheeling attitude just isn’t going to cut it down Disney way, folks. Especially considering that my goal for this race is to go all the way without stopping. But even I know that’s a low bar to clear for someone running as often as I do, so I have also added a time goal: 40 minutes, start to finish line. Once I get going beneath that midwinter Florida sun, I vow, I won’t stop to walk, or drink water, or hug Goofy. No. I’ll hoof it all the way to Epcot’s finish line at a respectable clip, and then, so help me, I’ll buy a bunch of cool candy in Little Japan and maybe do the Frozen ride. With two goals on the line, this was now a serious endeavor that required serious preparation. So I decided to employ the services of a training app. Now, I should explain something

THE RUNNING DEAD Never underestimate what—or who—will motivate you.

I

believe a celebration is in order. This column marks one year of my tenure as your newbie—a year I spent being someone who runs. And while January is typically a time for looking forward, I’m going to buck the system and get a little retrospective for a moment, if you don’t mind. ¶ Let’s recap: A year ago, I hated running. Hated it! Then, a few months later, I hated it less. Then, a little while after that, I kind of liked it. Now I kind of like it a lot. And I’m ready to take this thing to the next level. Which brings me to the not-unrelated subjects of Orlando and zombies. ¶ Back in October, I realized that Disney’s 5K was rather a short time away. (I’ll be running it—my first-ever race—on January 5; how’s that for a grand one-year celebration?) Five kilometers is 3.1 miles (for the two or three of you who, like me, didn’t always know that), which is roughly the distance I run about four times a week. But, just as important, it was also farther than I’d been running without stopping—to let a cyclist pass, or pause at a crosswalk, or change the song in my headphones, or sip from the water bottle cinched to my waist. Mind you, I can actually run for quite a while without stopping; it’s just that on my typical weeknight workout, there’s no pressure, just a pretty park and an inviting water bottle and a Beatles song I’ve played out so thoroughly I can’t hear the opening bars without cringing. The stakes are low. So too, then, has been my willingness to push myself to 30 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

about my relationship to apps. I suffer from a condition that makes me believe that every new one I encounter will be The Answer, the one missing piece that finally makes me whole and realized; someone who eats better, saves money, speaks Italian. Never mind that I’m halfway through a s’mores cookie as I type this, and— like you even need to ask—Io non parlo Italiano. But this time, the app had to work. This race may not wind up being the longest one I ever run—I’ve got my eye on a 10K for next year; stay tuned, rapt hordes!—but it will be my first, and I want to kill it. I needed a great motivator, a way of pushing through my low-stakes approach and into the land of trying hard. What would that motivator be? I went with “fear of wandering the earth as one of the undead.” Allow me to introduce you to Johnny Dead. Johnny is one of a handful of coaches in the Couch to 5K app— coaches who include perky Claudia, less-perky Billie, your average sadistic drill sergeant, and an unnervingly upbeat unicorn—and I found him to be by far the most useful of the bunch. Not because I fear zombies, but because Johnny gave me a target ILLUSTRATION BY LEO ESPINOSA


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ASK MILES He’s been around the block a few times— and he’s got answers.

I like to do errands after my long run, but I worry that I stink. Should I go home and take a shower first? —Stacy T., Fredericksburg, TX

Ah, Stacy. I am all too familiar with this scenario. It’s impossible to rule on this definitively, since I have no idea just how bad you smell postrun. (Mildly malodorous? Eyewateringly putrid? Somewhere in between?) I will tell you that I made peace some time ago with being out and about in stinky running clothes. I try to clean up as best I can (thank you, baby wipes!), and I might put on a dry shirt. Bear in mind that this works for short supermarket trips and ducking into the drugstore—not so much when you’re shopping for a business suit or meeting nonrunner friends for brunch. At times like those, hit the showers first. Smell ya later!

MILE S AS

KS

My friend is running her first marathon and I’d like to join her for the last few miles of the race. Is it okay for me to jump in? —Jen S., Wichita, KS First of all, know that by running on the course, you’ll almost certainly be breaking the event’s rules. So, technically, it’s not proper etiquette. HOWEVER. Even I cannot bring myself to tell you not to do this for your friend.

And I am as curmudgeonly as they come. Just be discreet; stay out of everyone else’s way and hop off the course before the finish line is in sight. One final thing: If the race is very crowded, abandon this idea and cheer from the sidelines. Supporting your friend is fine—but not at the expense of other paying entrants. Have a question for Miles? Email it to askmiles@ runnersworld.com and follow @askmiles on Twitter.

If you had to describe your running life with a movie title, what would it be? Crazy Stupid Love. @briandavid918

for my greatest strength: derisive mockery. I’d be in the park after work, panting through the run portion of the app’s run/walk plan, and right around the time I was itching for a water break or getting distracted wondering if I should take the path toward the boathouse or the one that encircles the baseball fields, Johnny would say, “I can taste the sweat… from your braaaaaaaaaain.” While I was snickering, I’d complete the run portion without even noticing, foregoing the water and staying focused. I was at peace in my snide amusement, Zen-like in my footfalls. Other people experience a runner’s high; with Johnny, I cultivated a runner’s sneer. Soon, I was up to 22 minutes without stopping. Then 25. Then 28. All the while, Johnny was pushing me in his special way: “Run hard, be strong, think big, and carry a big pitchfork,” he growled. I remember hearing that somewhere near a crowd of fellow runners, and scoffing loudly enough (what does it even mean? Zombies don’t carry pitchforks...!) that they turned to stare. One day, as I passed the reservoir in Central Park during my 28-minute nonstop run (tiny little dance in celebration of me), Johnny revealed something personal: “Ever wonder how I became a zombie? By moving too slow.” I appreciated his candor, and sped up. Another time, I noticed a nasty wind was picking up, and almost without thinking, I pivoted my body toward my apartment. Then Johnny forgot he was a zombie, I guess, because he started rambling about how I have “major skillz,” forgetting to insert his customary joke about being, you know, dead. I was so befuddled by this departure that I just kept going. By the time I gave up trying to comprehend Johnny’s lapse, I was done with my run. I have now managed to run 45 minutes without pausing. So I know I’ll pretty much crush my first goal. I’m still pushing to cover three miles in 40 minutes, and thanks to Johnny and Disney, I’m determined to do it. But I know the tenacity that’s actually making it happen is all mine. It comes from a wellspring of resolve—a determination that lives deep in my own delicious braaaaaaaaaain.

Apocalypse Now. @mparsch23 There Will Be Blood. (We are talking trail running, right?) @MaryLeeS The Fast and the Furious. @leeshmc88

32 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

Kathryn Arnold is a writer in New York City. She’s written for Time, New York, Slate, and Wired, and is the author of the novel Bright Before Us (2011). Read about her first 5K in March.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDY REMENTER


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RUN RELAYS ALL YEAR A father and son duo fielded teams and rented vans for 13 Ragnar Road Relays.

Nothing brings people together—or drives them apart—like a road trip. Especially one that involves running about 200 miles over some 33 hours, and sharing a passenger van and motel room with new friends (a.k.a. strangers). But Randall Ryan, 60, and Randy Ryan, 40, decided to do just that—13 times over a span of nine months. The father and son were on a mission to finish the most Ragnar Road Relays— the long-distance, overnight team race series— possible in a single year. (In 2016, there were 18 Ragnar road events, but several were held on the same dates.) The Ohio pair completed their first Ragnar in 2011, and went on to do eight more over the next five years. In 2015, Randall retired from his career as a nurse anesthetist and the pair hatched a plan. Randy used vacation time from his management job at JC Penney, and they started with the Ragnar Del Sol in Arizona. In November, they ended their journey with Ragnar Las Vegas and were each awarded the Immortal Medal, a four-pound square that measures 15 inches from corner to corner. —NICK WELDON

Randall Ryan (left) and his son, Randy (right), during the Hawaii Ragnar Relay, which took them from Hilo to Hapuna Bay on the Big Island. Inset: Their decorated team van.

34 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

THE TAB Between registration, food, the vans (rental plus fuel), motels, and travel, the Ryans estimate they each spent about $800 per race, or more than $20,000 total for all of their races. (Their teammates paid for themselves.) “I was fortunate to have worked for a very generous doctor, so I had a lot of money saved,” Randall says. FAMILY AFFAIR The Ryans turned the Hawaii Ragnar in October into a vacation and brought their wives and Randy’s three children. “Our wives don’t run,” Randall says.

“But getting to go to Hawaii made them very happy.” Randy’s 19-year-old daughter, Michaela, joined her father and grandfather for the Hawaii Ragnar as well as four others. WORKLOAD Each Ragnar team member is expected to run three separate legs that can range in total mileage from 11 miles to nearly a marathon over the course of the Friday-to-Saturday race. “We tried to let everybody else choose the legs they wanted, then we took whatever was left,” Randy says. “Sometimes new people preferred shorter legs. There’s no leg Dad and I wouldn’t take on.” Randall adds, “One thing Randy and I made clear is that we’re here to challenge ourselves, but the major goal is to get to the finish line.” RECHARGING Ragnar teams split up into two six-person vans; one van alternates with the other after all of its members have run one leg each. So while one van is on the road, the other gets a break of roughly five or six hours. Some teams opt to sleep in the van after their first leg to prepare for the rest of the relay, but experience has taught the Ryans better. “You don’t feel good after sleeping in the van,” Randall says. “So we would find a motel in the middle of the course that was easy to get to after the first set of legs and book a couple of rooms to allow the resting members to relax and lie down.”

O P P O S I T E PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M A R K BA I G E N T L I F E S T Y L E /A L A M Y (C LO C K ); J U D I T H C O L L I N S /A L A M Y (G AS CA N ); D I G I F OTO D I A M O N D/A L A M Y ( M A P ) ; M AT T R A I N E Y ( WATC H )

WHAT IT TAKES TO...

RECRUITMENT In 2013, Randall and a former coworker launched a Facebook group, “Dead by Dawn Ragnar Running Club,” to help them stay connected with the friends and friends-of-friends they’d shared Ragnar vans with in the past. The Ryans recruited teams for each of their races last year by posting call-outs in the group, which now counts 58 members. When that wasn’t enough, they turned to Ragnar’s official Facebook page. “We meet somebody new every race and bring them into the group,” Randy says. “Our goal is to make people want to do it again.”


BY THE NUMBERS

THE RYANS’ RUN FATHER AND SON PUT UP SOME IMPRESSIVE STATS DURING THEIR YEARLONG RAGNAR ROAD RACE CHALLENGE.

HEALTH CHECK Randall has type 1 diabetes and must monitor his glucose closely. He checks his blood sugar 15 times a day during a race. If it dropped too low—as it did in the last mile of his first leg of the Del Sol Ragnar, when his legs started feeling “rubbery”—he would eat something, usually glucose tablets with Gatorade. BUMPS IN THE ROAD? “The only headache was when runners pulled out at the last minute,” Randall says. “In some cases, we had to make do with four in a van instead of six. That meant some teammates had to run extra miles. But other than that, the only disagreement was over where to eat.” MALE BONDING “There was a point in the So Cal Ragnar after the first leg where my dad was ill to the point of almost vomiting,” Randy says. “He got some sleep and ran the next leg. He’s tougher than I ever thought.” Randall adds: “To see my son willing to take on whatever—a 21-mile leg, why not?—I just have to say, ‘Wow.’ Plus, I think, How many men get to do something this great with their son? ” MORE IN STORE After their Vegas finale, they weren’t sure what they would do next. “But we have several Ragnars planned for next year,” Randall says. “And our wives might join us.” From top: Randy and Randall along the Kona coast; the Hawaii team; Randy’s daughter, Michaela, who took part in five van adventures; Randall on his way to the Ragnar finish.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY TONY NOVAK-CLIFFORD

2,534.6 TOTAL MILES THE RYANS’ RAGNAR TEAMS RAN

35,917 Miles the Ryans accumulated traveling to and from the races (30,590 flying, 5,327 driving)

HOURS, AVERAGE FINISH TIME (STARTING MOST RACES AT 8 A.M. ON FRIDAY AND FINISHING AROUND 5 P.M. ON SATURDAY)

TWENTY-SIX Tanks of gas required, about two per van for each race

450 MILES THE RYANS RAN THEMSELVES, SPLIT EVENLY

15

States, plus Washington, D.C., that they ran through

ninety-two DIFFERENT PEOPLE WHO JOINED ONE OF THEIR TEAMS ALONG THE WAY

8 TEN

Races that friend Paul Dickinson ran with them—more than anyone else

MINUTES PER MILE, THE AVERAGE PACE KEPT BY BOTH RANDALL AND RANDY ON MOST LEGS


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40 52 58 62 TRAINING

FUEL

MIND+BODY

LIGHT THE WAY

GEAR

PERSONAL BEST GET FIT, EAT SMART, RUN STRONG

When the sun rises at 7:25 and sets at 4:47—as it does in January at RW headquarters in eastern PA— we often find ourselves running in the dark. That’s why Gear Editor Jeff Dengate (pictured here) is always on the lookout for ways to see and be seen. Reflective stripes on clothing and shoes increase the distance from which drivers can see you to 500 feet. Because a car’s headlights are angled slightly down, runners are smart to accentuate the lower leg. But when you are wearing shorts, as Dengate does, handheld flashlights serve dual purposes: They light your path and they alert drivers to your presence. Studies show that moving, flashing lights are more eye-catching than solid, steady beams. See page 62 for more winter gear and safety products.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 37


TRAINING

PERPETUAL MOTION

You get more benefits from your miles if you move a little all day. By Kristen Dold

SITTING KILLS. We’ve heard the message loud and clear—but recent studies suggest it’s not the whole truth. “Stagnicity, or remaining in a fixed position for a long period of time, is the health hazard,” says chiropractor and physiotherapist A.J. Gregg of Flagstaff, Arizona’s High Performance Sport Center. The seated-in-a-chair position is simply where most of us clock all that motionless time. And while runners may not think they are all that sedentary, research shows exercisers are parked almost as much as their inactive pals—about nine hours a day. “The body is meant to move,” says Gregg. When you’re motionless, the hamstrings, lower-back muscles, and hip flexors can become tight—conditions that can hinder running performance and leave you hurt. Sitting allows your glutes to sleep all day, too. When that major muscle group is weak or underutilized, you bring less power and stability into your workouts, and you overwork smaller nearby muscles in ways that could lead to injury. Meanwhile, sitting slows your circulation and turns off fat burners, upping your odds for heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Ready for some good news? There’s a relatively simple fix: “By bringing more movement into your non-exercise time, you can engage forgotten muscles and offset some of those sitting effects,” says biomechanist Katy Bowman, author of Move Your DNA. “It doesn’t have to be intense, it just has to change your geometry.”

40 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

MOVE MORE

When You’re at the Office Stand, sit, or balance on a ball? The best move is to alternate between whatever positions are available, says Gregg. If you’re chair-bound, perch at the edge of your seat to roll your pelvis forward, or rest the ankle of one leg atop the thigh of the other for a piriformis stretch, says Bowman. Set an app (such as Stand Up! The Work Break Timer) to remind you to take two- to three-minute breaks every half hour to do a lap around the office or some desk stretches. Try ones that work your upper body: Arm and shoulder strength and flexibility help propel you forward as you run. “Wall angels” are good (align your back and the backs of your hands against a wall and move your arms in a snow-angel motion), or you can put your hands on your desk and drop your chest for a thoracic stretch. MOVE MORE

Away From Your Desk Take walks during coffee or lunch breaks, and make

ILLUSTRATIONS BY KIRSTEN ULVE


the most of your time in the salad line: Instead of resting on your hip flexors (the go-to stance for most of us), try practicing pelvic lists. Shift your weight back to your heels, then push your right hip toward the floor to lift your left foot slightly off the ground. Switch sides and repeat. This move engages your glutes and lateral hip muscles, says Bowman, and activating them throughout the day can make using them on a run feel more natural.

MOVE MORE

Even on a Long-Run Day A 20- to 30-minute nap and/ or a cup of coffee should be about the most you need to avoid dragging after a long run, so if you find yourself couch-bound (or desperately wishing you could be), you may need to cut back on mileage or pace, says Ian Torrence, lead ultrarunning coach for McMillan Running. Upgrade the downtime you do have by hitting the floor instead of the sofa—you can speed up recovery by using your foam roller, performing hip-opening yoga moves (try pigeon pose or happy baby),

or cycling through a number of seated floor positions (see “Exercise Hacks,” right) every 15 minutes.

Exercise Hacks

Small changes to your routine engage muscles that don’t see much action.

MOVE SOME

On Your Days of Rest On your non-long-run weekend day, you might go for a quick jog, but it’s easy to get your limbs in motion without lacing up. Lift your kids at the park, garden on your hands and knees, or call friends while tidying up the house. A hike on steep and/or uneven terrain will engage your glutes as well as the stabilizing muscles in your feet and ankles that keep you upright while running. Just be careful, especially if you have a race coming up—seemingly low-key activities (like raking leaves) could leave you sore if the motions are unfamiliar. Finally, hit the hay early: A solid night of sleep is one time that being sedentary works in your favor, says Gregg.

SIT ON THE FLOOR With a pillow under your rear, try sitting on the ground while tackling a basket of laundry, reading, or eating lunch. “There are loads of ways you can position your joints—sitting cross-legged, sole to sole, with your legs out in a V, with your knees tucked up—that encourage mobility we don’t get from a chair,” says Bowman. STRETCH YOUR CALVES Give TLC to tight calves by placing a rolled-up towel on the floor where you stand during the day, such as in front of the kitchen or bathroom sink. When doing dishes or brushing your teeth, put the ball of your foot on the towel and your heel on the floor for a gentle stretch. HANG OUT It’s rare for adults to support their weight with just their upper bodies, which leads to weak shoulders. Try hanging from a horizontal bar for 15 seconds to a minute (put a chin-up bar in your doorway or swing by a park to hit the monkey bars). If that’s too hard, grasp a vertical pole and lean away from it.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 41


TRAINING

FIND YOUR WAY BACK

How to return to regular running after weeks (or even months) away from exercise

It happens to almost every runner at some point: You get busy, or sick, or hurt, and you don’t run for a few weeks. A body at rest tends to stay at rest, and a few weeks turns into a month—or longer. But when you’re ready to return, beware of New Year gusto. Ease back in slowly and cautiously to avoid another break—this time, due to injury. Here’s how to restart your routine.

WALK FIRST If you’ve been away from running for more than a few weeks (or if your break came just a few months after you began running consistently), your first goal is to work up to feeling strong throughout a 30-minute walk. If that’s not something you can do right now, start with a gentle 10- to 15-minute walk and increase by three to five minutes every other day. Adjust your pace to avoid feeling short of breath.

EASE IN Next, add running: Walk for five minutes, alternate between a 10-second run and a 50-second walk for five minutes, then walk for three minutes. If you feel good, continue with five minutes of run 10 seconds/walk 40 seconds. Walk for three minutes, then decide whether to add five minutes of run 10 seconds/walk 30 seconds. Every other day, add three to five minutes of run 10 seconds/walk 30 seconds

42

JOIN OUR ONLINE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR BEGINNERS AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/THESTARTINGLINE.

ESTABLISH A ROUTINE If you stopped running because other obligations got in the way of your workouts, rethink your schedule. Many people find it easiest to stay consistent when they run first thing in the morning. Evening runners might tote their running clothes to work and change before they leave—it’s one less thing to do before heading out upon your return home. Do all you can to make running an easy choice. HEED YOUR BODY Your body will tell you if it’s overwhelmed during your comeback—you just need to listen. If you’re huffing and puffing during a workout, slow down. Shorten your running time and lengthen your walking time to keep your breathing steady and controlled.

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. How can I tell if I’m hurt or just sore? It’s normal to experience some aches and pains as you get used to running again. If your discomfort affects your gait or does not subside with three to five minutes of walking, cut your workout short and take a few days to recover before attempting another run-walk. How can I stage a comeback when it’s so dark outside? If you can’t find an indoor track or treadmill, seek out well-lit, low-traffic streets and make those your go-to spots. Wear reflective gear, carry a light, and take care if winter weather has made surfaces slippery.

Fact or Fiction It’s possible to rebuild fitness in less time than it took to first build it. FACT While this is true, you still must be gentle during the start of a comeback. After a layoff, your heart and lungs may be able to handle a level of running your legs cannot (at least at first), so spend your initial weeks back doing less than you think you can.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y DA N H O L Z / TA N D E M S TO C K .C O M

Reboot your running by adding 10-second jogging segments to a 30-minute walk.

until your total time is 30 minutes.


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TRAINING

RACE PREP

CASE STUDY: YOU

Examine last year’s training log and plan how to run stronger this year. By Michelle Hamilton

LOOK AT MILE AGE When it comes to performance at any distance, your weekly volume is the most important factor, says Koch. Every run you do increases your blood volume and the number of mitochondria and capillaries in your muscles, which improves aerobic capacity. The more miles you log, the greater your stamina. To assess if you’re running enough for your racing goals, compare the average weekly mileage you ran the last time you trained for your target distance against these minimums:

IF THE NEW YEAR has you dreaming of a fast finish, you’re likely pondering which race you’ll run and how you’ll train. Start by analyzing your past: “Your previous races and training cycles are filled with clues that can help you get to the next level,” says Andrew Kastor, head coach of the California-based Mammoth Track Club. Kastor and head coach of Chicago Endurance Sports, Lori McGee Koch, can help you learn from past efforts to make your next ones the best they can be.

25 to 30 miles for 5K, 30 to 35 for 10K, 35 to 40 for a half marathon, and 40 to 45 for a marathon. If you were below, bring your volume up to these baselines. (“Formula for Success,” page 46, explains how to do so safely.) If you were at or over the minimums—and not injured—a small increase might still help, says Kastor. Do this by adding one 20- to 45-minute run to your week—if you run four or fewer days, make it another day; if you run five or six days, make it a second run on an easy day. And be on the lookout for grumpiness, excessive fatigue, or recurring aches and pains— all potential signs that you need to back off. LOOK AT PACES While most of your mileage should be done at an easy pace, each week should also

44 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

include time at a comfortably hard (“tempo”) pace as well as a hard (5K or faster) pace. “Running a variety of paces ensures you’re hitting the specific training zones that lead to becoming a faster runner,” says Kastor. Fast intervals boost the cardiovascular system, and tempo miles work the metabolic system. Both paces improve your biomechanics, while easy days allow recovery. If you weren’t doing any speed variation, start by adding four to six strides (30-second pickups) after easy runs for two to three weeks. Then, do a weekly workout of 6 x 400 meters at goal race pace with equal time for recovery. (If you’re aiming for eightminute average pace, run two minutes for the 400s with a two-minute recovery jog.) If you were logging speedy miles, make sure you hit all three paces. “Some marathoners do tempo and

long runs but miss tapping into a faster pace, while some 5K runners think all they need is intervals when tempo work helps sustain 5K pace, too,” says Kastor. The ideal week: one goal-specific workout (intervals like 8 to 16 x 400 at slightly faster than goal race pace for 5K or 10K runners; 30- to 60-minute tempo runs for half- and fullmarathoners); one long run at a comfortable pace; one grab-bag workout that introduces the missing pace (3 x 5-minute repeats at tempo effort for 5K or 10K runners; 800s at 5K pace or strides after an easy run for halfand full-marathoners); and a couple short, easy runs. LOOK AT R ACES Study past race splits to see whether your pace was especially off in the early, middle, or late miles, says Koch. Explore why, and create strategies for addressing those issues in training. If fear of bonking made you start too slow, focus on getting on pace during the first repeat in workouts. If miles eight and nine in the half marathon were slow due to negative thoughts or simply a wandering mind, use long runs and tempo workouts to practice staying focused and upbeat. Late-race fatigue? Try taking walk breaks or running negative-split long runs to sustain energy.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY RAMI NIEMI


TRAINING

FORMULA FOR SUCCESS

The scientific way to go farther without getting hurt If you get injured, you must have been running too much, right? Recently, sports scientists have been rethinking this belief. In some cases, hard training may act as a “vaccine” against injuries by toughening up your body—so doing too little can be as risky as doing too much. That doesn’t mean you should crank up your mileage immediately. Instead, focus on the balance between how much you’re running now and how much running you’ve done over the past month. By tracking this “acute-to-chronic” ratio, you guard against the twin perils of too much and too little. CALCULATE THE RATIO The acute-to-chronic training ratio compares your mileage for the last week to your average weekly mileage for the last four weeks. If you’ve run 50, 40, 50, and 60 miles in the past four weeks, your ratio is 60 (last week’s mileage) divided by 50 (average of last four weeks). That’s 1.2. In recent studies with athletes from various sports, injury risk climbs when this ratio exceeds 1.2, and increases significantly

when it exceeds 1.5. This is a more sophisticated version of the old 10 percent rule: If you increased your mileage by 10 percent each week for four weeks, you would end up with a “safe” acute-to-chronic ratio of 1.15. But by looking back for four weeks instead of one, the ratio protects you from overdoing it after periods of missed or reduced training, which leave you more vulnerable when you resume your normal routine.

ACUTE-TO-CHRONIC CALCULATOR

50

40

+

50

+

+

60

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

TOTAL MILEAGE

TOTAL MILEAGE

TOTAL MILEAGE

TOTAL MILEAGE

200

÷

4

=

200

50

4-WEEK AVERAGE MILEAGE

60 WEEK 4 TOTAL MILEAGE

46

÷

50 4-WEEK AVERAGE MILEAGE

=

1.2

ACUTE-TO-CHRONIC TRAINING RATIO

FOR MORE FROM ALEX, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/SWEATSCIENCE.

PERSONALIZE IT You can think of a ratio of 1.2 as a yellow light and 1.5 as a red light. But every runner is different, so what applies to the mythical “average” runner may not apply to you. This approach will be most valuable if you keep track of your changing ratios over several seasons while making note of injuries—not just major ones, but also minor aches and nagging pains. Eventually, you’ll discern patterns that tell you which ratios your body can tolerate and which ratios trigger problems. The obvious time to be careful is when you’re pushing your mileage or intensity to new heights; keeping the ratio low will help you do it safely. But be alert for patterns at the low end, too. You might find, for example, that whenever you let your mileage drop below 20 miles for two weeks in a row, your acuteto-chronic ratio spikes a few weeks later when you get back to normal training—and that you often get injured as a result. You can’t always avoid injuries, but by looking for patterns, you can at least avoid making the same mistake twice.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y DA N E C R O N I N / TA N D E M S TO C K .CO M

Week 1

=

CONSIDER INTENSITY How much you run isn’t the only factor that affects injury risk, because races and hard workouts take a greater toll on your body than easy runs do. You can account for this by calculating a training load ratio. After each run or workout, rate the overall intensity of the session on a scale from 1 to 10. Then multiply that rating by the total duration of the run in minutes to get a more comprehensive measure of training load. For example, a 40-minute run at an effort level of 6 would produce a training load score of 240. Now calculate your acuteto-chronic ratio but using weekly totals of training load instead of miles. Alternatively, some GPS watches and heart-rate monitors calculate a training score for each workout based on duration and average heart rate or speed instead of subjective effort. These are also good options for monitoring acute-tochronic ratio, as long as you stick to one measure for consistency.


TRAINING Key Workout

NEXT LEVEL

WHAT An up-tempo long run

COOL (DUDE) RUNNING

WHY To add extra stress to the legs and mimic the physical and mental fatigue of a longer race

Fan favorite Noah Droddy goes from heartbreak to a breakthrough 10-mile performance. By Cindy Kuzma

TIPS FROM THE TOP

Indianapolis, where he worked two jobs while training solo. In search of structure, he emailed several coaches but heard back from only one: Richard Hansen, a Boulder-based chiropractor whose Roots Running Project welcomes quirky athletes with untapped potential. Droddy was a perfect fit. The Roots Running protocol—based on the theories of legendary coach Joe Vigil— is tough, with up to five quality workouts per week. But it works for Droddy: Since joining, he has run a 13:49 for 5,000 meters and dropped his half marathon two minutes to 1:04:08. “In my training life I’m relatively young; I just hit 80 miles per week,” he says. “Let’s say we build up to 100 miles over the next three years. I think I can keep getting better.”

MAINTAIN PERSPECTIVE Don’t let bad races rattle you—or great ones turn you complacent. “Staying humble through the process is important for longterm success,” Droddy says.

48 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

FIND YOUR TRIBE Droddy credits much of his success to his training group. “Having a support system that believes in you and knows when to push you is huge,” he says.

WHEN Every Sunday during a training cycle, after a hard workout on Saturday HOW Depending on the distance he’s training for, Droddy runs 13 to 20 miles at a tough pace just slightly slower than a tempo effort (for Droddy, about 5:40 to 5:45 per mile). “You’re immediately thrown into that middle section of the race, where you’re already hurting,” he says.

RECHARGE Droddy believes “robot runners” who never stray from strict diets and schedules burn out. He relaxes with hiking, nonrunning friends, and a brewski (or two).

P H OTO G R A P H B Y V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N

NOAH DRODDY’S long hair and dude shades rocketed him to online stardom during the 2016 Olympic Track Trials, but his performance didn’t match the hype: He placed last in the 10,000 meters, three minutes behind winner Galen Rupp. Yet three months after that “bad day,” Droddy, 26, took second in October’s USATF 10 Mile Championships. His time (47:28) put him three seconds behind Sam Chelanga, who holds the NCAA 10,000-meter record of 27:08.49. “It proves that I belong in a conversation with those guys,” Droddy says. He didn’t photobomb the running scene out of nowhere: He competed for Division III DePauw University, where he earned All-American honors in cross country his junior and senior years. After graduating in 2013, he returned home to


TRAINING

ASK THE EXPERTS

Is it possible to train for an ultra while working full-time? Yes, especially if you target a “short” ultra. For a 50K (31-miler), apply the 10/10/10 rule to a marathon plan: Lengthen long runs by 10 percent, slow long-run pace by 10 percent, and recover with 10 percent more rest or cross-training days. For a 50-miler, the formula is 20/20/20. —Ann Trason, a 14-time Western States 100-mile champion, coaches at trasonrunning.com.

Do long runs on terrain similar to that of your goal ultra, and use hike breaks on climbs to save energy.

I run to stay fit and healthy. Can I do all my runs at an easy pace? Sure! For health and wellness, aim for 20 to 60 minutes of exercise three to five times a week at 80 percent of your maximum effort. Think: If I can chatter, pace doesn’t matter. You should be breathing harder than when you’re strolling through the grocery store, without losing the ability to speak in complete sentences. No one to talk to? Gauge it by reciting the Pledge of Allegiance or song lyrics. —Janet Hamilton is a coach and owner of Running Strong (runningstrong.com).

Along with sweating and daydreaming, you’re constantly doing something else when you run: gauging your speed relative to your surroundings, a process called “optical flow.” But darkness distorts this process, creating an optical illusion as you seemingly cover ground at breakneck speed. “Retinas, the light receptors in our eyes, are responsible for our detection of moving objects,” says Gary Fletcher, a physics teacher and high school cross-country coach in Schertz, Texas. “Nearby and faraway objects are perceived differently because the angle of sight changes quickly for nearby objects, but slowly for faraway objects.” Our perceptions change in low-light runs because faraway objects are invisible or less visible, while street or headlamp lighting ensures that nearby objects are easier to see.

50 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

P H OTO G R A P H B Y LO U I S A R E VA LO/ TA N D E M S TO C K .C O M

The Explainer Why does the same pace seem faster in the dark?

How important is it to monitor my heart rate? You may choose to track your heart rate while running to target different intensity levels, ensuring easy runs aren’t too taxing and hard runs are taxing enough. You can also check your resting heart rate daily, right after you wake up: A higher-than-usual rate may indicate you’re overtraining or getting sick, so take it easy or rest. Palpitations or an irregular heartbeat are reasons to see your doctor. —James Beckerman, M.D., is a runner and the author of Heart to Start, a book about exercising for heart health.


FUEL THE WEEK AHEAD Make (and store) these dishes when you have extra time, to power your runs and recovery.

Winter Quinoa Salad with Dressing

By Elyse Kopecky

TUSCAN RED LENTIL SOUP

Lentils are high in fiber, iron, and folate. Makes 8 servings HEAT 2 Tbsp. olive oil in large pot over medium. Cook 4 chopped carrots, 2 chopped onions, 2 tsp. dried oregano until soft, about 6 minutes. ADD 2 qt. low-sodium veggie broth, 1 ½ cup red lentils, 2 tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. pepper, and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, until lentils are soft, 30 minutes. Stir in 5 to 6 oz. baby spinach to wilt. TOP with shaved Parmesan.

WINTER QUINOA SALAD WITH DRESSING

Tuscan Red Lentil Soup

Quinoa is the only plantbased food that provides a complete protein. Makes 6 servings TRANSFER 1 cup cooked quinoa to large bowl to cool. ADD 2 cups each shredded kale and carrots, 1 chopped pear, 1/3 cup each feta, chopped almonds, and raisins. TO MAKE the apple cider

dressing, in a jar shake together 1⁄3 cup olive oil, ¼ cup apple cider vinegar, 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard, ½ minced shallot, ¼ tsp. each salt and black pepper. TOSS with salad and serve.

Sage Roasted Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash and Caramelized Onion Frittata

Research from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that more time prepping meals led to healthier diets.

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y BA R R E T T WA S H B U R N E

52 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY


Freezing cookies in snack-size bags will allow you to control portion size and calories.

PUMPKIN COCONUT BREAKFAST COOKIES

BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND ONION FRITTATA

These are packed with complex carbs and healthy fats. Makes 20 cookies COMBINE 2 cups almond flour, 1 ½ cups rolled oats, 1 cup shredded coconut, 2 tsp. cinnamon, ½ tsp. salt. Separately, combine 1 cup pumpkin puree, ½ cup maple syrup, ½ cup melted coconut oil. STIR wet ingredients into dry. Spoon dough onto baking sheet and gently press. BAKE at 350°F until golden, 25 to 30 minutes. (For a sweet treat, mix in ½ cup raisins, chocolate chips, chopped dates, or walnuts before baking.)

This vitamin A– and protein-packed dish is perfect post–long run. Makes 6 servings HEAT 1 Tbsp. olive oil in oven-safe skillet over medium. Sauté 1 sliced onion and cook, stirring until brown and soft, 10 minutes. In bowl, whisk together 9 eggs, ¼ tsp. each salt and pepper. Stir in ½ cup feta and 2 cups roasted, cubed butternut squash. POUR into skillet with onions and stir gently. TRANSFER to oven and bake at 350°F until eggs have set, 30 minutes.

Pumpkin Coconut Breakfast Cookies

ROASTED CHICKEN SAGE ROASTED BUTTERNUT SQUASH

Pair with roasted chicken for a protein and vitamin C–packed meal. Makes 6 servings PREHEAT oven to 425°F. PLACE 2 lbs. cubed butternut squash on baking sheet and toss with 3 Tbsp. olive oil, ¼ cup chopped fresh sage, ½ tsp. each garlic and salt. ROAST for 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes.

Serve for dinner and add leftovers to salads and soup to boost protein. Makes 6 servings RINSE, dry, and place 5-lb. chicken on pan. PREHEAT oven to 425°F. STUFF with 1 onion and 1 lemon, cut into wedges, and ½ bunch parsley. COMBINE 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 2 tsp. each dried oregano, salt, and pepper. Rub mixture over chicken. COOK for 1 ½ hours, or until meat thermometer reads 165°F.

Roasted Chicken

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FUEL

THE ATHLETE’S PALATE

EVERY DAY I’M BRUSSELIN’ Popular chef and runner Mark Bittman shares his favorite sprouts recipes.

One cup of raw sprouts has 38 calories, 3 grams of both protein and fiber, and nearly double your daily need of vitamin K.

immunity-boosting vitamin C and cancer-fighting glucosinolates, Brussels sprouts are among the most powerful cold-weather superfoods. And because they produce sugar in reaction to frost, they taste less bitter now. “We’ve gone from turning them into gray mush to treating them well—slicing, browning, and cooking them perfectly,” says cookbook author Mark Bittman, a five-time New York City marathoner (PR: 3:41). His latest, How to Bake Everything, was published in October. For more, see markbittman.com. —YISHANE LEE

PACKED WITH

about 7 minutes. ROAST in oven, shaking pan every 5 minutes, until sprouts are browned and tender, about 10 minutes. Season to taste with more salt and pepper. STIR IN 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar, top with ½ cup toasted and chopped walnuts, and serve hot or warm.

SLAW WITH PEANUTS Peanuts are a great source of plant protein. Makes 8 servings

SPROUTS WITH GARLIC AND WALNUTS Nuts are packed with healthy fat. Makes 4 servings HEAT oven to 400°F. Heat ¼ cup olive oil in pan over medium-high heat until it shimmers. LAYER 1 lb. trimmed and halved sprouts, cut-side down, in pan. ADD 5 peeled garlic cloves, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook until sprouts begin to brown on bottom,

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FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA, BONUS RECIPES, AND PREP VIDEOS, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/BRUSSELSSPROUTS.

SPROUTS AND SAGE Stay full with this fiberrich dish. Makes 6 to 8 servings MELT 4 Tbsp. butter in saucepan over medium heat. When melted, add 1 lb. cored, diced apples and 1 lb. trimmed and quartered sprouts. Stir, cover, and cook on low until apples are tender, 10 minutes. Uncover and add 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh sage. COOK on high, stirring, until sprouts darken, another 10 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. GARNISH with Parmesan.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT RAINEY

FOOD STYLING BY ED GABRIELS FOR HALLEY RESOURCES

When they’re in season (late August through March), purchase Brussels sprouts on the stalk—they’ll last longer.

WHISK together ½ cup mayonnaise, ¼ cup fresh lime juice, 1 to 2 Tbsp. fish sauce, and 2 tsp. sugar. TOSS with 1 ½ lb. shredded sprouts, ½ cup sliced scallions, ½ cup chopped, roasted peanuts, and ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro. GARNISH with more scallions.


FUEL

FEAST FIRST

Protein-packed breakfasts can trim your waistline and power your day.

Meat-Lover Plate

IF YOU WERE GIFTED a few pounds this holiday season, Tofu Scramble

skipping your morning meal is not the way to get rid of them. In fact, 78 percent of people who lost weight and kept it off ate breakfast every day, according to the National Weight Control Registry. To fuel your run and recovery, and stay full, you need the right breakfast—one that has protein. When you wake up, your body needs the power-building nutrient because your muscles are breaking down protein, according to research from McMaster University. “You want 30 grams at breakfast,” says researcher Stuart Phillips. CURB YOUR APPETITE A breakfast with at least 30 grams of protein slows the release of the hormone ghrelin, which triggers feelings of hunger. Consuming protein at breakfast also increases the release of satiety hormones, helping you feel fuller for longer.

A 2016 report recommends runners increase their protein intake around hard workouts. Reach for high-quality sources like fish, chicken, and eggs.

Short Stack

Super Bowl

MANAGE BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS Experts theorize that regularly break56 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

BOOST PERFORMANCE Eating breakfast before a workout (especially one that lasts 60 minutes or more) energizes your muscles and prevents your body from tapping into protein stores meant for recovery. Research shows that protein at breakfast helps build new muscle, as well as immune and bone cells.

These meals pack 30 grams each. MEAT-LOVER PLATE Lightly sauté 2 slices premade polenta and top with 2 poached eggs and 2 oz. Canadian bacon. Serve with 1 cup kefir mixed with ½ cup mashed berries. TOFU SCRAMBLE In 1 Tbsp. olive oil, sauté ½ cup each sliced zucchini and mushrooms, and ½ small diced onion. Add 2⁄3 cup cubed, firm tofu, allowing excess water to burn off. Add 2 cups baby spinach and let wilt. Top with ¼ cup dairyfree cheese and let melt. Serve with slice of wholegrain bread and 8 oz. soy milk. SHORT STACK Cook 2 six-inch protein pancakes, like Kodiak Power Cakes, or add ½ scoop protein powder to your pancake mix. Top with ½ cup yogurt, ¼ cup chopped walnuts, ½ cup strawberries. Serve with 2 turkey sausage links. SUPER BOWL Top 1 cup cottage cheese with ½ oz. almonds, ½ cup granola (made with seeds or quinoa), ¾ cup blueberries.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y BA R R E T T WA S H B U R N E

DROP POUNDS AND KEEP ’EM OFF Routinely eating breakfast is associated with maintaining a healthy body weight over time. Phillips’s research found that 30 grams of protein at breakfast may help you lose weight, thanks to its ability to curb your appetite.

ing a fast with refined carbs and no protein (think doughnut or scone) could lead to spikes in blood sugar, which can stress the pancreas and may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Crunched for time? It’s better to have a doughnut for breakfast than nothing at all: The calories will jumpstart your metabolism and keep you from feeling sluggish. Just don’t make it a habit.

Protein Power


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MIND+BODY

Time It

3 MINUTES: Dynamic warmup 1 MINUTE: Rest

THE BODY SHOP

HIIT PLAN

This high-intensity strength routine boosts metabolism and builds total-body fitness. By Jordan Metzl, M.D.

isn’t new to runners. The concept is simple: Instead of exercising at one pace for an extended time, you alternate between short, high-intensity bursts and longer recovery periods. While steady-state cardio trains your muscles to be more efficient—an important adaptation for distance runners—occasionally working at the high-intensity level can lead to burning more calories for hours after the session has ended. Exactly how many more is difficult to calculate because every person’s body is different, but it can be as high as 25 to 30 percent more than steady-state workouts, according to the American College of Sports Medicine. And high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that incorporates strength moves helps build total-body fitness in a way that interval running does not. Do the following routine once or twice a week on nonrunning days to reap huge benefits in just 30 minutes—without even leaving home.

INTERVAL TRAINING

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6 MINUTES: Exercises 1 to 3 each for 1 minute. Cycle through them 2 times. 1 MINUTE: Rest 9 MINUTES: Exercises 4 to 6 each for 1 minute. Cycle through them 3 times. 1 MINUTE: Rest 9 MINUTES: Exercises 7 to 9 each for 1 minute. Cycle through them 3 times.

Explosive movements like jumps work muscles in a way that long-distance training doesn’t.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL


DYNAMIC WARMUP

THE WORKOUT

Do each exercise for 30 seconds. JUMPING JACK Jump up just enough to spread your feet wide, then jump back. Bounce on the balls of your feet. POGO HOP Using your arms to help propel you, hop up and down, allowing your feet to move only inches off the floor. GATE SWING With your toes pointing out and your back straight, push your hips back and lower into a squat. Gently press on your inner thighs to open your knees. Return to standing and repeat. HIP SWING Brace your core and glutes as you swing your right leg forward and backward as far as you comfortably can. After 15 seconds, switch sides. LUNGE AND REACH BACK Step your left leg back into a lunge. Reach your arms up and back, then lower. Press through your right foot to stand. Switch sides. INCHWORMS Bend forward to touch the floor. Keeping your legs straight, walk your hands forward without letting your hips sag. Then, take tiny steps to walk your feet to your hands. Repeat.

1 / THREE-POINT BALANCE TOUCH Do a quarter squat on your left leg. Then, reach your right foot as far forward as you can, tap the floor, and return to starting position. Do the same reaching to the right and to the rear. Alternate legs.

2 / SINGLE-LEG PUSHUP Assume a pushup position. While descending, lift your right leg eight to 10 inches off the floor. Return to the starting position and descend again, this time raising your left leg. Repeat.

3 / REVERSE LUNGE WITH TOE TOUCH Step your right leg back and lower until your knee nears the floor. Push through your left foot to stand, swing your right leg up, and reach for your toes with your left hand. Alternate sides.

4 / BURPEE WITH PUSHUP Squat deeply and place your hands on the floor. Hop back into a pushup position and do one pushup. Hop back to a squat and jump up, throwing your hands above your head. Land and repeat.

5 / DUMBBELL ROW Holding two dumbbells at arms’ length, bend at your hips and knees and lower your torso forward. Pull the dumbbells up to the sides of your chest, pause, and slowly lower. Repeat.

6 / THE RUNNER Lie on your back, elbows at your sides and arms bent. Lift your shoulders and upper back off the floor as you bring your right knee toward your chest and drive your left arm forward, then lower. Alternate sides.

7 / DUMBBELL SWING Hold one end of a dumbbell in both hands. Bend your knees and push the weight back between your legs, then explode forward with your hips to propel the weight up. Swing back down and repeat.

8 / COMPASS LUNGE Lunge forward (or “north”) with your right leg. Push through your front foot to stand and repeat to hit all points—northeast, east, southeast, and south. Then, switch sides to continue the circular motion.

9 / SINGLE-LEG, SINGLE-ARM PLANK From the plank position, raise your left leg and extend your right arm out in front of you. Hold for five seconds. Then lower your arm and leg and raise your right leg and left arm for five seconds. Alternate.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 59


MIND+BODY

FAST FIXES

Injured? These strategies help speed your healing. By Jessica Migala

60 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

KEEP MOVING You may continue to run if slowing down allows you to log miles without pain and with proper form, says Lewis Maharam, M.D., a sports-medicine doctor in New York City. “Running while recovering from muscle strains or tears brings bloodflow to the area and helps the muscle heal properly,” he says. However, don’t run if an injury changes your gait, or if you have a stress reaction or fracture. In those cases, keep up a routine with no-impact cross-training, such as pool running or swimming. If you were running four times per week, having something to do instead will help you maintain fitness and sanity.

MANAGE PAIN Should you pop a pill? Some studies have found that NSAIDs like ibuprofen can inhibit healing by interfering with the process that causes both inflammation and tissue repair. Others, including a 2012 review, say that occasional use won’t hinder muscle regeneration. Illinoisbased sports medicine doctor Nathaniel S. Jones, M.D., says the takeaway lies in the middle: Because pain disrupts sleep, over-thecounter meds may help you log the Z’s required to stimulate the overnight healing process needed for muscle repair. Limit the use of anti-inflammatories at other times—taking them long-term can lead to stomach and/or kidney damage.

STAY FLEXIBLE Foam rolling and dynamic stretches will pump healing blood to injured tissues and improve range of motion, says Michael Conlon, physical therapist and owner of Finish Line Physical Therapy in New York City. “Many times runners think, I’m not running! I don’t need to keep doing these things!—but it’s almost more important to make them part of your daily routine now,” he says. Roll then stretch, before and after a workout. Skip any stretches that aggravate your injury or feel painful.

BEWARE OF BOOZE Though you might want to drown your sorrows: “Avoid drinking alcohol in the 48 hours after your injury,” says Matthew Barnes, Ph.D., author of a study about alcohol’s effect on recovery, published in 2014. Alcohol can lead to more swelling and slower recovery. Once two full days have passed, your body’s healing process is well under way, so you may imbibe per the CDC’s recommendations: no more than one drink per day for women and two for men.

EAT UP If you’re logging fewer miles, you should scale back on dietary indulgences such as pizza, ice cream, and fries to avoid weight gain. But don’t crash-diet: Your body burns calories in order to heal, so you may need more than you think, according to a 2015 study. Taking in enough protein is especially important: “Protein is broken down into amino acids, which are your body’s building blocks to repair muscle tissue,” says Maharam. Include a healthy protein source, such as eggs, fish, or beans, in every meal.

LESSEN STRESS If you run to blow off steam, you’ll likely need to find another form of physical activity to manage your stress. “Not only does stress cause the body to release hormones that affect healing and recovery,” says Jones, “but having an injury in itself can cause stress.” Try yoga, meditation, or gentle hiking in a quiet, scenic setting— a 2015 Stanford University study found that a 90minute nature walk reduced negative thinking more effectively than a walk in an urban area. ILLUSTRATION BY ROSE BLAKE


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1 / SAUCONY RUN STRONG HOODIE $88 Soft and fleecy with a slightly relaxed shape, this women’s top works as either a base layer or mid/outer layer. The top’s interior feels buttery against skin while breathing well and wicking sweat— but also providing almost sweatshirt-like warmth—and the hood is about as comfy as hoods get. (The men’s Sportop, $80, has a deep chest zip that allows even more ventilation.) Bonus: thumbholes and extralong sleeves.

PICK OF THE LAYERS

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Thin and thicker tops and bottoms help you deal with whatever winter throws at you—from chilly rain to epic snowstorms. By Lisa Jhung

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4

62 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

3 / ALTRA ZONED HEAT JACKET $130 For cold and blustery runs, the Zoned Heat Jacket provides warmth without bulk. Smartly placed insulating panels cover the parts of the body that tend to get coldest, like the front of the torso and tops of the arms. Stretchy, breathable fabric with a water-resistant coating covers high-sweat areas, like the back, underarms, and elbows. This performanceoriented jacket is your new cold-weather running buddy. 4 / BROOKS LSD THERMAL RUNNING VEST $110 Lightweight polyfill insulation fights wind and cold, and the merino wool backside manages your body heat. Reflective details and pockets with cord management for headphones add to its functionality. But the greatest thing about this vest is its ability to cross over into casual wear—you’ll likely reach for it all winter long. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

PROP STYLING BY STEPHANIE HANES

For Women The Brooks LSD vest features a high collar. Except for the Oiselle tights, these items also come in men’s versions.

2 / OISELLE KC TIGHTS $84 These mostly polyester (with some spandex) women-only tights work in cool conditions but are ideal on a rainy day—they don’t get soggy and droopy when wet. A flat, wide waistband means no irritating pressure on the stomach, and a hidden zippered pocket on the back holds a phone without too much bounce (it sits horizontally at the small of the back). These sleek tights fit seamlessly underneath loose pants, should you need to add a layer on frigid days.


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GEAR

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1 / SMARTWOOL PHD ULTRA LIGHT LONGSLEEVE SHIRT $80 This stretchy top feels like pajamas but performs like a champ on the run. Lightweight merino blended with polyester breathes well and regulates body temperature, yet dries quickly and retains its shape.

For Men The apparel shown here is also available in women’s colors and styling—like a wider, comfortable waistband on the Adidas tights.

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3 / ADIDAS MEN’S CLIMAHEAT TIGHTS $130 On the coldest days, insulated tights will keep your legs warmer than insulated pants (read: no room for air to circulate). The fleece lining of these tights works in conjunction with a smooth outer face—the fleece traps air to keep legs warm and the smooth exterior sheds snow. Extra-long ankle zips make them easier to get on and off, especially over shoes.

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Stayin’ Alive 4 WAYS TO BE SAFE ON THE ROAD By Jeff Dengate

2 / ASICS THERMOPOLIS PANTS $80 These bottoms fit and function like classic track pants: They’re loose enough to pull over tights (or shorts), but are tapered just enough at the ankles to not trip you up on the run. A vast improvement over old-school nylon track pants, however, is the soft, sweat-wicking and breathable Thermopolis fabric.

ROADNOISE LONG HAUL VEST Speakers in the shoulder straps let you rock out without blocking sounds from the world around you. ($90)

64 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

NATHAN SPORTS NEUTRON FIRE Cranking out 115 lumens on two AAA batteries, this lamp also has side lights that can be turned red, green, or blue. ($35)

STRAVA BEACON A premium membership feature, Beacon lets up to three emergency contacts see your real-time location on a map. ($59/year)

4 / PATAGONIA AIRSHED PULLOVER $119 The Airshed cuts wind like a heavy-duty jacket but is as wonderfully thin and stretchy as a shirt. Made with a ripstop nylon and stretchy panels at the wrist cuffs and lower back, it’s easy to get on and off midrun.

KNUCKLE LIGHTS These USB rechargeable lights slip over your fingers to light up the path in front of you, making trip hazards easier to spot. ($60)


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How fit are you—right now? Take these tests and use the results to reach this year’s goals. By Kelly Bastone Photograph by Sam Robles

YOU WOULDN’T TRY to book a

plane ticket without first identifying your departure airport. Yet many runners make New Year’s resolutions without first taking an honest look at their current fitness levels or health habits. “We live in a ‘Keep up with the Joneses’ culture where every-


NEW

YEAR YOU! NEW

body wants to get noticed and be the best,” says licensed psychologist and certified sports psychology consultant Christine Selby, Ph.D. When we see other people’s workout data, healthy meals, and race-day triumphs posted on Instagram, we may think we should be running just as far, fueling just as well, and finishing just as fast. Runners may crowd-source their goals instead of relying on motivation from within, an approach that can lead to training struggles, dashed hopes, and injury. “Not being honest about where you are now sets you up for the ‘Three

Toos: too much, too fast, too soon,’” says Strength Running founder and coach Jason Fitzgerald. That’s why you must take stock of the runner you are—not the one you were before you had kids or started school or gained a few pounds—before you can pinpoint an achievable goal for Current You.

It also makes running more fun, says exercise physiologist and coach Greg McMillan, M.S. “By being honest with yourself, you give yourself the chance to enjoy your running more,” he says. Instead of failing at unachievable goals, you’re conquering appropriate challenges. It all starts with these self-tests. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 67


YOUR TEST

After warming up with a one-mile jog and a few 30-second pickups, run a fast mile. YOUR RESULTS

Aiming for a 5K? Add 33 seconds to your time to estimate your per-mile pace. For a 10K, multiply your time by 1.15. YOUR MISSION

This “Magic Mile” test from Olympian and running coach Jeff Galloway helps you guess how long your first 5K or 10K might take, which helps you determine how to prepare. For example, a 12-minute Magic Mile equates to a 38:59 5K or a 1:25:44 10K. For these distances, you’ll want to work up to a long run that keeps you on your feet for about as long as you will be on race day. So if your longest run to date has been 30 minutes, start with a 5K. If you’re already running more than an hour, you could target a 10K. To train, run for at least 20 minutes every other day, with a longer run on the weekend. Add a half mile to your long run each week until you’re out there as

YOUR GOAL

To Run Your First Race long as you expect the race will take you, with your longest run a week before your 5K or two weeks before your 10K. Repeat the Magic Mile every other week to track how you’re improving. “How you complete the mile is just as telling as your time,” says Elizabeth Corkum, a New York City–based coach. Starting like a hare and ending like a tortoise means you need to work on pacing; the next time you run the mile, try reining

YOUR GOAL

TO RUN CONSISTENTLY YOUR TEST Keep a training log for a month—and include missed or abbreviated runs. YOUR RESULTS Identify your problematic patterns: When you skipped runs, was it because you hit “snooze” too many times or because you often had to work later than planned? Did you bail on hard workouts

more than easy jogs, or vice versa? YOUR MISSION Solve frequency issues first. For example, if you intended to get in four runs per week but usually only managed three, analyze the cause and build a fix for 2017. If schedule is the culprit, reassign your workouts to more reliable time slots (for most people, that

68 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

it in for the first lap and picking up your pace by a few seconds on each consecutive lap. “That teaches you how to push yourself when you’re no longer fresh, but also how to be patient when you’re feeling good,” says Corkum. Also note changes in breathing or form: Ragged, irregular gasps and clenched muscles during your test miles indicate that you’re pushing harder than you ought to. Aim for a challenging but sustainable effort.

means mornings). It helps to be honest about how many runs you can manage: “Ask yourself what you’re likely to fit in during an average busy week, not the best-case week where everything goes perfectly,” says McMillan. Aim to run at least every other day, which maintains consistency and run-specific fitness. “If your week is going great, you can add in a bonus run, which feels so much more positive, mentally, than constantly fall-

ing short,” he says. Then, if you notice you avoid running hard or long, you can analyze why—but unless you’re already knee-deep in training for a spring race, don’t fret about it. Those types of workouts aren’t critical in the off-season, but consistent running is. To maintain speed, throw in postrun pickups when you have the time, and save your drive to nail every planned workout for when you’re actively preparing for an event.


PHOTOGRAPH BY LARSEN & TALBERT


you go (within reason), the better you’ll build the aerobic capacity and mental toughness you need to extend speedy running for more than a few minutes, Fitzgerald says. YOUR MISSION

To Clock a Fast 5K or 10K

YOUR TEST

Look back on your last month or two of training to determine how long your longest runs tend to be. YOUR RESULTS

If your “long runs” last between 45 and 90 minutes, ramp them up: The longer

YOUR GOAL

TO RACE A FAST HALF OR FULL MARATHON YOUR TEST Assess how your body responds to workouts. YOUR RESULTS If speedwork feels harder than hours of slow miles, you likely have more slowtwitch muscle fibers. If you feel energized by short, fast sessions—and drained by long, steady ones—you have more fast-twitch. YOUR MISSION Your body’s unique ratio of muscle fibers affects how

difficult certain workouts feel. And though it sounds counterintuitive, McMillan recommends tailoring your training to your strengths rather than your weaknesses. “A plan that suits you boosts your motivation and makes you feel excited,” says McMillan. Endurance aces will want a program with lots of steady-pace long runs and tempo workouts. Speedsters, however, will do more intervals, with shorter long runs that they start slow and finish fast.

70 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

So, an endurance-focused runner might do a 30- to 40-minute tempo run and a 2.5-hour steady-effort long run one week, while a speed-focused runner will log four or five mile repeats (at 30-minuterace pace) and a two-hour long run that ends with 20 minutes of tempo running. Both athletes will do some running that doesn’t come naturally, but by adapting most of their training to suit their “type,” they’ll enjoy it more.

TO FINISH YOUR FIRST FULL MARATHON YOUR TEST Add up your usual weekly mileage and note how much of it comes from a long run. YOUR RESULTS If you’re already running 25 to 30 miles per week, including a long run of at least 10 miles, you’re ready to begin a marathon-training plan for a race 16 to 20 weeks out. (See “A Race for Every Pace,” page 97, and find a plan at runnersworld.com/training plans.) If you’re running less, you need a base-building phase first. YOUR MISSION Building to 25 to 30 weekly miles with a double-digit long run will allow you to complete the first few weeks of a 26.2 plan with relative ease. “Many marathon first-timers don’t realize that their daily three-milers don’t qualify them for marathon training,” Fitzgerald says. These runners will struggle to build up mileage and long runs, and while they may complete the race, they likely won’t enjoy it. Instead of setting yourself up to finish limping and delirious, build a strong base before you even select a goal race. To do that, add one mile to your long run every two weeks, and add a mile to one or two midweek runs. That way, you’ll increase by 10-plus weekly miles over the course of a couple months—a gradual build that will strengthen your body without increasing injury risk. When you’re marathon-training ready, find a plan and choose an event at least 16 weeks away. Research before you register: Check out online reviews (like those on marathon guide.com) and your intended race’s elevation chart to know what to expect in terms of amenities, crowd support, and difficulty.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JORDAN SIEMENS

O P E N I N G S P R E A D : H A I R & M A K E U P B Y S TACY S K I N N E R F O R C E L E S T I N E AG E N CY; S T Y L I N G B Y A R GY KO U T S OT H A N AS I S ; C LOT H I N G : A S I C S JAC K E T & S H O E S , S P L I T S 5 9 CA P R I S , S U U N TO WATC H

Your Goal

You likely already know that speedwork is critical to running a short, fast race, and you need to continue to do it once or twice per week. That said, appropriately long, steady weekend efforts can mean the difference between a good performance and a great one. Long runs build slow-twitch muscle fibers while speedwork builds fast-twitch, and you’ll use both types in a 5K or 10K—especially as you start to fatigue. A six-mile long run indicates that you’re ready to graduate from simply running a 5K to racing one, but Fitzgerald recommends long runs of up to 15 miles for experienced runners with 5K or 10K time goals. You can lengthen your long run while doing speedwork, as long as increases in both happen gradually, says Fitzgerald. Add a mile or two to your long run every other week, and build up to your longest two weeks before race day. Speedwork should be event-specific and happen once or twice per week (once when you’re also adding to your long run, twice when you’re holding steady). Runners targeting a 5K might run 200-meter mile-pace bursts or intervals at race pace from 400 meters to a mile. Those aiming for a 10K might begin their season with three- to five-mile tempo runs and shift toward mile-long race-pace intervals as the season progresses.

YOUR GOAL


YOUR TEST

For one month, log all your food and drink intake in real time. YOUR RESULTS

You’ll know what, when, and how much you’ve consumed, which will help you identify unhealthy patterns.

H A I R & M A K E U P B Y E L L E ( T H I S PAG E & N E X T ); C LOT H I N G : G A P F I T S H I R T ( T H I S PAG E ); C 9 C H A M P I O N F O R TA R G E T CA P R I S , N I K E S H I R T & S H O E S ( N E X T PAG E )

YOUR MISSION

First, assess and improve what you routinely eat and drink at home. Fill your kitchen with perishables. “The healthiest foods tend to be found along the supermarket perimeter, where you’ll find the poultry, fish, beef, dairy, fruits, and vegetables that should make up the bulk of our diet,” says Tara Gidus Collingwood, R.D., C.S.S.D. Eating these foods doesn’t just promote optimal athletic performance; it also reduces your risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and cancer. If your diet is fairly healthy, see if there’s a pattern in your lapses. Do you stress-eat chocolate from a coworker’s candy dish? Do you overdose on almonds

while you’re preparing dinner? Do you dine out multiple times per week, and do your healthy-eating rules go out the window at restaurants? Simply identifying your times of weakness may help you do better in the future, especially if you continue to log your eating long-term. When you’re tracking—with a smartphone app or just pen and paper—“everything you eat becomes real, so you can’t pretend it didn’t happen,” says Corkum. Once you’ve managed the damage of your worst dietary habits, examine the foods you eat regularly to see what you might trade out for healthier options. For example, you might choose to dress your morning toast with natural peanut butter (with no added sugar) instead of the traditional kind, or to swap a side of white rice for black beans on taco night.

YOUR GOAL

To Eat Better PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS SEMBROT


YOUR TEST

Hop on the scale first thing in the morning, repeat on a daily basis, and track your results. YOUR RESULTS

“There’s no optimal weight for everybody,” says Gary Foster, Ph.D., Weight Watchers’ chief scientific officer. Chasing an idealized number—what you weighed when you finished high school or before you had kids—is more likely to end in frustration than success. However, if you’re not happy with how your clothes fit or your overall energy level, start with the goal of losing 5 percent of your current body weight. “That’s been scientifically proven to confer significant medical, psychological, and quality-of-life benefits, and it’s achievable for most people,” he says. YOUR MISSION

While it’s true that logging miles at any pace will help you shed pounds, logging miles at all kinds of paces is best: “A mix of various exercise intensities is most effective for weight loss,” Fitzgerald says. Slow, steady runs—which should account for about 80 percent of your weekly volume—help develop your fat-burning aerobic system and build up your bones, joints, and muscles so you can run harder without getting hurt. The other 20 percent of your volume should include a variety of other paces: a few miles at comfortably hard “tempo” pace,

Your Goal

To Lose Weight track intervals at 5K or 10K pace, or short uphill sprints at a hard effort. Such workouts burn a lot of calories in a short amount of time, says exercise physiologist Steve Ball, Ph.D. “The higher intensity also produces a higher after-burn effect, so you’ll burn some extra calories after the exercise bout,” he says. Of course, the scale may not budge if you don’t lay off foods and drinks that are high in calories but low in nutrition. “Unused glucose gets stored as fat,” says author and coach Phil Maffetone. So, to burn flab, limit the quantities of refined carbohydrates you eat (including added sugars), and prioritize high-fiber fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Once you’ve lost 5 percent of your weight, reevaluate: “Are you ready to lose more? And what do you expect to get from that?” says Foster. Continue to monitor yourself: Research published last fall found that study participants who adhered closely to a daily weigh-in protocol lost more weight and kept it off better than those who avoided the scale.

72 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017


YOUR TEST

Sitting cross-legged on the floor, try to stand up using your feet only—with no help from your knees or hands.

To Develop Overall Health YOUR GOAL

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS SEMBROT

YOUR RESULTS

If you can’t do it—or if it’s difficult—that’s a red flag. A 2012 study involving more than 2,000 subjects found that people who can stand from the floor using just their feet ultimately live longer, healthier lives. YOUR MISSION

Cardiovascular fitness is just one measure of health: Muscular strength and flexibility matter, too. “They lower our heart rate and blood pressure, allow us to perform our daily activities, and reduce the risk of developing common running injuries that can occur from the repetitive movement patterns,” says coach Jenny Hadfield. Dedicate at least 15 minutes after two easy runs per week to strength and flexibility work. Your program should include foam-rolling, static and dynamic stretches, and strength moves such as planks, lunges, and squats. Making this postrun routine a habit won’t just make the stand-up test feel easier: Having stronger muscles and a better range of motion can reduce everyday aches and pains and “make you feel confident in your skin,” says Hadfield.


To Build an Injury-Proof Body YOUR GOAL

YOUR TEST

Watch your beltline while you run on a treadmill facing a mirror. YOUR RESULTS

If your hips remain level as you run, congrats—your glutes are facilitating a strong, balanced stride, and you’re likely to remain healthy. But a beltline that dips to one side or the other indicates weak or disengaged gluteal muscles, the culprit behind a host of running injuries, says Heather Milton, M.S., clinical exercise physiologist at NYU’s Langone’s Sports Performance Center. Although some hip drop is expected in healthy runners, it’s not discernible to the naked eye. “If you can see a significant drop without measuring it,” says Milton, “it probably is outside of the norm.” YOUR MISSION

Invite your glutes to the running party— and don’t take “we can’t make it” for an answer. If you think that means doing an infinite number of squats and lunges, think again: Developing buns of steel doesn’t necessarily make you less injury-

prone, says Milton. That’s because even powerhouse glutes sometimes remain disengaged. Therefore, Milton says, “It’s important that runners reeducate those muscles to access their gluteal strength.” Use the beltline test as training: Once a week, run on a treadmill while trying to keep your waistband level. “That’s been shown to improve glute activation,” says Milton, who also recommends developing muscle engagement and strength with a weekly hill session. Find a hill that takes you 30 seconds to climb, and use it to log 10 to 15 minutes of hard-effort repeats: Sprint uphill using short, glute-recruiting strides—think about pushing the ground away behind you with each push-off—then walk or jog downhill to fully recover. “You’ll start to feel changes in strength and neuromuscular education in just four to eight weeks,” says Milton.

PHOTOGRAPH BY LARSEN & TALBERT


A Year of Running Joyfully

AUGUST 4–13

Key dates to celebrate in 2017 1 JANUARY 22

Play the Rose Bowl (2) At the inaugural Pasadena Half Marathon and 5K, runners wind among palmlined streets and verdant golf courses before crossing the finish line located on the field of the famous Rose Bowl, the 11th-largest stadium in the country. pasadena half.com

who’ve been running their whole lives. Find it at runners world.com/store. APRIL 17

Celebrate Women’s Running Kathrine Switzer, the woman the Boston Marathon race director attempted to remove from the course in 1967, returns to run the race 50 years after that iconic moment.

JANUARY 23–29

MAY 6–7

Track Jet-Setting Runners Two-time Olympian Ryan Hall and prolific ultrarunner Mike Wardian are among those attempting the 2017 World Marathon Challenge (seven marathons in seven days on seven continents). The stage race kicks off in Antarctica and concludes in Australia. worldmarathon challenge.com

Hit Hayward Field If you want to see the University of Oregon stadium in its current state, get there before June, when a renovation is set to begin. Go for Eugene Marathon weekend—the 5K, half marathon, and full marathon all end on the iconic track. eugenemarathon.com

MARCH 12

G I A N CA R LO C O LO M B O/ P H OTO R U N (6 )

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y O F R AG N A R R E L AY (1 ) ; D S ZC/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( 2 ) ; J O S H E D E L S O N / Z U M A P R E S S .C O M (3); K E N N Y L I U/CO U R T E S Y O F T H E CA LG A R Y M A R AT H O N (4 ) ; A P PA L AC H I A N V I E W S /G E T T Y I M AG E S (5);

on the sofa sabotages running form by tightening key muscle groups. In Your Best Stride: How to Optimize Your Natural Running Form to Run Easier, Farther, and Faster— with Fewer Injuries, Jonathan Beverly explains how to reverse those effects. Find it at runnersworld.com/store.

Feel Small in SoCal The two blimp hangars in Tustin, California (3), which are rarely open to the public, rank among the largest wooden structures ever built—and racers in the inaugural Tustin Hangar Half Marathon and 5K get to run through one of these 17-story behemoths. tustin hangarhalf.com APRIL 4

Run for Life Bill Pierce and Scott Murr— the creators of the Run Less, Run Faster training philosophy—release their latest book, Train Smart, Run Forever: How to Become a Fit and Healthy Lifelong Runner by Following the Innovative 7-Hour Workout Week. In it, they share the secrets of still-active masters athletes

2

SEPTEMBER 2

3

MAY 28

Run Canada Runners will celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial at the Calgary Marathon (4), which is commemorating the 150-year milestone with an additional race distance (a 150K solo or relay race), flag bearers from all provinces and territories, and maple syrup waffles at the aid stations. calgarymarathon.com

4

Speed by Scenery Let views of the verdant Appalachian Mountains inspire you through the new Shenandoah Half Marathon (5), which plots a mostly uphill course along Shenandoah National Park’s western boundary in Virginia. shenan doahhalfmarathon.com SEPTEMBER 4

5

APRIL 21–22

Relay in Paradise A new Ragnar Trail relay at Turtle Bay (1), on the north shore of the Hawaiian island Oahu, weaves through lush tropical jungle and past white sand beaches. It’s one of three new trail relays that Ragnar debuts this year. runragnar.com

Race Colorado’s Newest 10K The organizers of Bolder Boulder 10K, the fourthlargest race in the country, are adding an end-of-summer sister race in Fort Collins called the FORTitude Labor Day 10K Classic. Like the famous Memorial Day event, this race winds through college-town neighborhoods and ends at a stadium (Colorado State University’s brand-new, $220 million pride). fortitude10k.com NOVEMBER 5

JUNE 13

Find Perfect Form Sitting in cars, at desks, or

Watch the World Championships London’s former Olympic Stadium is where 2,000 athletes from more than 200 nations will converge for the IAAF World Championships. Distance nerds, flag these dates: August 4 for the men’s 10,000 meters (the women’s is August 6); August 8 for the men’s 3,000-meter steeplechase (the women’s is August 11); and August 12 for the men’s 5,000 meters (the women’s is August 13). Usain Bolt fans should tune in August 5 (for the men’s 100 meters) and August 12 (for the men’s 4 × 100-meter relay)—the Jamaican track superstar says he’ll retire after those events. london 2017athletics.com

6

Bid Farewell to Meb Four-time Olympian and American marathon legend Meb Keflezighi (6) runs his 26th and final 26.2 today at the New York City Marathon, a race he won in 2009.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 75


RUN THIS CITY

Mark Berger, of Happy’s Running Club NOLA, leads runners under a canopy of ancient live oaks in New Orleans’s historic Audubon Park.


Don’t confuse the Crescent City’s laissez-faire vibe with laziness. There’s a budding running scene here transforming the town into a runner’s bon temps rouler playground. By Nick Weldon

N

ew Orleans lures many a tourist with its perpetually festive atmosphere, but that doesn’t mean a serious runner can’t find what he or she needs during a visit here, too. As much as New Orleans is known for its music, food, and architecture, it also maintains an impressive network of urban parks anchored by two belles that date back to the 1800s: the sprawling, 1,300-acre City Park and the lush, immaculate Audubon Park, which offers a popular 1.8-mile loop trail. Folks staying near the hotel-dense French Quarter now have better choices than ever, too. “Make your way to Woldenberg Riverfront Park and Crescent Park to run along the Mississippi River,” says Mike Jackson, founder of the Virtual Runners Club, a group that meets out of Igor’s Bar in the Lower Garden District. Certainly, runners here know how to party: Travel in May for the organized chaos known as the Tchoupitoulas Barathon, which for 35 years has functioned as a six-mile running bar crawl. It’s traditionally held two weeks after Jazz Fest (because everything here revolves around music). But NOLA’s running scene isn’t entirely debauched. The Rock ’n’ Roll New Orleans races, which include a marathon, half, and 10K (all on February 5), appeal to many out-of-towners because of the mild winter weather and skillet-flat courses (to say nothing of the coveted Mardi Gras–beaded medals). During the city’s idyllic fall season, the Jazz Half Marathon takes runners under St. Charles Avenue’s majestic live oaks and showcases the city’s renowned local music scene at its postrace party. Truthfully, though, there’s no bad time for a runner to visit The Big Easy (okay, maybe August, when it’s a sauna). New Orleans pulses with a rhythm all its own. Here’s how runners can catch the beat.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 77


2 / MERCEDES-BENZ SUPERDOME

Named a federal historic site in January 2016, the largest fixed-dome structure on earth and home to the New Orleans Saints and seven past Super Bowls has been co-opted by the local November Project as a great place to work out. Former leader Cameron Gilly says the group draws as many as 140 people. The runners started meeting in early 2014, and as more people joined, Gilly says, “we needed to get permission to use the Superdome, and now we have a good relationship with them. We leave the place cleaner than we found it, other than a little sweat left behind.” Meet them Wednesday mornings at 6 a.m. for a free group session that incorporates laps around the dome, stair workouts, and more. The group convenes at Champions Square, next to the dome on Lasalle St.

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VARSITY SPORTS Operating out of a New Orleans shotgun-style house along a buzzing stretch of restaurants, thrift shops, and antiques dealers, this specialty store (which has two other locations in Louisiana) is known for its friendly

Originally built for the 1992 Olympic Trials, the outdoor, lighted track is free and open to the public. It’s busiest between 3 and 6 p.m. on weekdays and on weekend mornings, but, says local runner Wilfredo Aguirre, “if you use common courtesy for other runners, there are usually no problems getting a workout in regardless of time.” Varsity Sports (below) organizes a Monday 6:15 p.m. track session during the winter months, and Aguirre, a Move Ya Brass captain (opposite page), leads group speedwork every other Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. For off-track running, City Park offers more than 20 combined miles of pedestrian paths, sidewalks, and roadways. 1 Palm Dr., City Park

neighborhood feel. “We have out-of-towners pop in all the time asking where to run,” says manager Jimmy Wiggins. And Varsity would know. It organizes several group runs throughout the week. We recommend the Thursday beer runs rotating among popular bars. varsityrun ning.com; 3450 Magazine St. PHOTOGRAPHS BY CLAIRE BANGSER

R E B E L S ( S O U L R E B E L S ); R U S H JAG O E ( H A P P Y ’ S R U N N I N G C L U B ); G E O R G E H . LO N G ( L A F I T T E G R E E N WAY )

Many places in New Orleans make the city’s famous po’ boy sandwiches, but few do them as well—or pile on the goods as generously—as Parkway. You can walk there after a run in City Park and dry off out on the covered patio without offending your fellow patrons. The roast beef (sinfully smothered in gravy) and fried shrimp are infallible, but local runner Mike Jackson also recommends the catfish, which he says “has more fish than bread.” Get ’em “dressed”—that’s NOLA parlance for adding lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayo. Open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily, closed on Tuesdays. parkwaypoorboys.com; 538 Hagan St.

PRACTICE TRACK

P R E V I O U S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H B Y R U S H JAG O E ; T H I S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y K R I S DAV I D S O N ( S U P E R D O M E ) ; CO U R T E SY O F T H E S O U L

1 /Parkway Bakery & Tavern

3/ CITY PARK


5 /Le Bon Temps Roulé For over 30 years, this neighborhood bar and music venue has served as the start and finish point for the legendary Tchoupitoulas Barathon, a six-bar/six-beer/six-mile romp through the Uptown neighborhood that happens every May, which some runners do in fact take seriously. (Last year’s winner broke 34 minutes.) Le Bon Temps Roulé is iconic in its own right. Beloved local acts take the stage in its cozy back room most nights of the week, including, most Thursdays, The Soul Rebels, a globe-trotting brass band that has shared stages with everyone from Metallica to Nas. Oh—they also perform during packet pickup the night before the Barathon. 4801 Magazine St.

6/

VOODOO MASSAGE

Yes, this is a thing, and at a place no less esteemed than the Ritz-Carlton New Orleans. No actual spells are cast, but the Voodoo Massage does create a ceremonial atmosphere with red candles, a soundtrack of rhythmic drums and chanting, and massage oil scented with absinthe, bourbon, cypress, and incense. One 80-minute session costs $240. Want something more straightforward? “Our deep-muscle massage and stress-relief massage are two popular treatments for postrace recovery,” says Kristen Barnes, a hotel spokesperson. ritzcarlton.com/ neworleans; 921 Canal St.

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9 / HAPPY’S RUNNING CLUB NOLA

DISTRICT DONUTS

New Orleans is well known for its chicoryspiced coffee served au lait style alongside beignets—it’s the staple pairing at worldfamous Café Du Monde (800 Decatur St.). But District Donuts, an inventive coffee/donut/slider shop, takes the concept even further in the form of a powdered sugar–dusted beignet donut filled with au lait cream. And if you’re in town to run during Mardi Gras, celebrate with the seasonal King Cake donut bedazzled with gold, green, and purple sprinkles—plus the plastic toy baby typically found in the popular Carnival cake. donutsandsliders.com; 2209 Magazine St.

Every Wednesday, this group gathers at Happy’s Irish Pub at 5:48 p.m. to prepare for a 6:16 p.m. three-miler through the Central Business District. Why those times? “You’ll always remember something a little off-kilter,” says organizer Mark Berger. The run is free and open to anyone—specifically “ya mama n dem plus all your people.” hrcnola.eventbrite .com; 1009 Poydras St.

10/ LAFITTE

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This 2.6-mile trail opened in November 2015 to link the French Quarter with the historic Treme and Mid-City neighborhoods all the way to the recreational hot spot Bayou St. John. Access the trail at Basin and St. Louis Streets.

7 /Move Ya Brass Krewe This beginner-friendly running club launched by local musician Robin Barnes in July 2015 hosts a free shakeout run every Monday at 6 p.m. From roughly November to March, the group meets at Crescent Park in the trendy Bywater neighborhood (see page 80) for a three-mile run that traces the riverfront to the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas and back. (The rest of the year they meet at the New Orleans Museum of Art in City Park.) “Nobody finishes alone,” Barnes says. “It’s our Southern hospitality.” The group offers a free dance cardio class at Mandeville Wharf on Tuesdays at 5:45 p.m. moveyabrass.com; @MYBKrewe on Instagram and Twitter JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 79


RUN THE RIVERFRONT From Crescent Park to the Aquarium

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Mile Marker 0 1) Bartholomew Lot

Park here for free to access Crescent Park’s 1.4-mile running path, which hugs the Mississippi River. Mile Marker .25 2) The Rusty Rainbow

Formally the Piety Street Bridge, this oxidized arch will burn your quads if you step off the path and march to its peak.

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Here marks the western end of Crescent Park (and a restroom). The shaded space is popular for groups, like Move Ya Brass’s cardio dance class on Tuesdays. From here, take the stairs over the flood wall.

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um of the Americas The trail ends at the azure facade of the aquarium. Cool off with a pass through the splash fountain before heading back the way you came.

RUN MORE CITIES 7

80 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

Go to runnersworld.com/NOLA for an interactive tour of the Riverfront. And check out other great running cities (like L.A., Austin, and Philly) at runnersworld.com/ runningcities. Next up: running getaways. PHOTOGRAPHS BY CLAIRE BANGSER

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R U S H JAG O E ( M A N D E V I L L E W H A R F ) ; K R I S DAV I D S O N ( JAC KS O N S Q UA R E )

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RUNNING PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS HORNBECKER


THE FOLLOWING RUNNERS HAVE FACED DOUBT, ADVERSITY, AND UNIMAGINABLY LONG ODDS. YET THEY ALL FOUND THE GRIT, GRACE, AND HUMILITY TO SUCCEED—AND INSPIRE.

WHEN MATTHEW CENTROWITZ CROSSED THE FINISH LINE

Centrowitz on his home training track in Portland, Oregon. His immediate goals now? Breaking his own personal records.

of the men’s 1500-meter final at the Rio Olympics, he was in shock. And so was the rest of the world. The 27-year-old from Portland, Oregon, had just won gold—the first for an American in that distance in 108 years. “I was thinking, Are you kidding me?” he says. “It was surreal. A lifelong dream accomplished already? It’s hard to put into words.” His gold was part of a historic haul of 32 medals by the U.S. track-and-field team—the most Americans have won during a non-boycotted Games since 1932. It was Centrowitz’s second Olympics—he was fourth in the 1500 in 2012—and capped a year in which he won the 1500-meter world indoor championships, the Millrose Games indoor mile, and the 1500 at the U.S. Olympic Trials. The final in Rio was slow and tactical, with Centrowitz in full control of a high-caliber field that included two past Olympic champions. He won in 3:50.00. By comparison, his best time in the event is 3:30.40. “To make it the race that I wanted and take it by the horns, that’s what I really liked about it,” he says. His father, Matt Centrowitz, a two-time Olympian (1976 in the 1500 meters and 1980 in the 5,000 meters) and head cross-country and track coach at American University, was watching from the stands that night. “I was in a little

The Gold Medalist

MATTHEW CENTROWITZ

bit of shock that the race went that slow after the first lap,” he says. “It was the first I’ve ever seen a guy lead from start to finish. He was the best on the given day.” But what accounted for such a breakthrough in 2016? Good health and extreme focus for sure, and maybe a little growing up, too. Centrowitz, who has been training with the Nike Oregon Project under coach Alberto Salazar since 2011, finally committed to his plan. “Alberto mentioned that he noticed I was doing all the right things—coming to practice early and things like that,” says Centrowitz. “In the past, I’d be a few minutes late and maybe skip a couple of massages. But this year, I was focused and locked into this program.” As for his medal—which reportedly has bite marks that don’t belong to him—it’s been to a friend’s wedding and worn by the bride, and over the neck of Steph Curry, star of the NBA’s Golden State Warriors, whom Centrowitz says he met on a flight. For now, it’s in a safe. “I don’t trust myself to put it anywhere else,” Centrowitz says. It’s not going to be easy to top 2016, but Centrowitz is targeting another medal at the 2017 world championships in London and hoping to break the 1500-meter American record of 3:29.30, set by Bernard Lagat in 2005. But first, he has a score to settle. When Centrowitz got Like father like son tattooed across his chest, his dad wasn’t pleased. So they made a wager: Centrowitz wins a medal and his dad gets inked—with what is unclear, but the elder Centrowitz is considering Rio de Janeiro’s iconic Christ the Redeemer statue. “A bet is a bet and even though I hate it, I’ll do what I said,” the senior Centrowitz says. “I think Jesus is going to be wearing a gold medal on my tattoo.” —ERIN STROUT

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 83


PERHAPS

it’s not surprising that he’s a runner. Not when you consider his birthplace. “This is Congo,” says Makorobondo “Dee” Salukombo, 28. “People run to save their lives.” Since 1996, civil wars have killed nearly 6 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo— more than any other conflict since World War II. The central African country is infamous for sexual violence and its estimated 30,000 child soldiers. Salukombo and his family fled their village of Kirotshe, near the Rwandan border, in 2001, and eventually ended up in Cleveland, Ohio. There, Salukombo ran both in high school and at Denison University, a Division III school for which he was a six-time All-American in cross country and track. After graduating in 2012, Salukombo started ProjectKirotshe, a youth running program with an educational focus based in his former village. With a $10,000 grant from Davis Projects for Peace and donations from institutions and individuals, he shipped 13,000 textbooks, 55 computers, and athletic equipment to supply the village’s new community learning center and running team. Then he returned home for the first time, to launch his vision of turning kids into students and runners. Through donations, ProjectKirotshe pays their school expenses, roughly $50 for primary school, $100 for secondary, and $500 for college—steep fees in a country where the per capita income is $442. At press time, the organization, now called

“What if we can create runners who can do even greater things than I did?” asks Salukombo. Inset: a group photo of his student-athletes in Kirotshe.

The Long-Distance Savior

MAKOROBONDO “DEE” SALUKOMBO

84 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS LANGER


THE ULTRA-ACTIVIST

C O U R T E SY O F S T E P H A N I E CA S E (CAS E W I T H R U N N E R S )

FOR STEPHANIE CASE, running in

the Kirotshe Foundation, had provided funds for approximately 64 students in 2016. In a country where militants lure kids with guns and money, education is critical, says Salukombo. The kids simultaneously participate in running groups and compete in local- and national-level events. “By running together, they’re creating a family that most never had” after war left them orphans, says Salukombo. His top runners log about 80 miles a week, and Salukombo spent much of the last year training with them as well as coaching them. In August, he and his best runner, 5,000-meter ace Beatrice Kamuchanga, 18, went to Rio to represent DR Congo in the Olympics. Kamuchanga didn’t advance out of her heat, and Salukombo finished 113th in the marathon (in 2:28:54), but it was being there that mattered most, he says. “The Games gave the youth confidence to believe they can get that first Olympic medal for Congo.” Salukombo is now back in Cleveland, fundraising and coaching his runners remotely. He is determined to help as many kids as he can. “Why not use my strength to try to inspire them?” —NICK WELDON

Afghanistan usually meant logging laps inside the United Nations compound in Kabul, where she worked as a human rights lawyer. One day, the competitive ultrarunner— with wins at the Vermont 100 Endurance Race and podium finishes internationally— hitched a U.N. helicopter ride to the Koh-e Baba Mountains in the western Hindu Kush for a day of unrestricted running. During that workout, she thought, I’d love for the Afghan women to experience this sense of freedom. When Case floated the idea of a running club for women, other organizations dismissed it as impossible—too dangerous, they said. To her surprise, it was Afghan women who pushed for the idea. “I thought, If they’re interested and brave enough to try this, I should be brave enough to help them,” she says. So in 2014, Case founded Free to Run. Its goal: to use sports to empower women and girls afflicted by conflict in their countries. Twelve women from Bamiyan, a town about 80 miles northwest of Kabul, joined her for two days in the mountains; after that inaugural outing,

Case (far left) with some of her runners in Afghanistan. “Sports are a great way to break down barriers,” she says. “On the mountain, everyone is equal.”

STEPHANIE CASE the group met once or twice a month for alpine hikes, runs, and other activities. In 2015, a Free to Run member became the first female Afghan to complete a 26.2 in her own country, the Marathon of Afghanistan in Bamiyan, and in February 2016, the country’s first coed team—trained and supported by Free to Run— finished RacingThePlanet, a 155-mile ultra in Sri Lanka. Today, there are teams in three Afghan provinces who meet for weekly workouts, and Case has expanded her initiative to Hong Kong (that territory’s program is targeted to refugees). In November, more than 100 women and girls from Free to Run programs ran either the 10K or the 26.2 at the second annual Marathon of Afghanistan. Case, 34, now lives in Geneva, Switzerland, but keeps in contact with her teams, coordinates their training, and visits often. She’s hoping to expand her refugee and mix-gendered programs. “Changing the perception of women’s role in society is a way to achieve peace,” she says. “It’s not something you put on the to-do list after there’s peace.” —A.C. SHILTON


THE ROCK-STEADY MOTIVATOR

IT WAS 2012, and freshman Justin Gallegos was about to run his first cross-country meet. Nervous, he followed his father’s advice and lined up in the back. They both knew that when the gun went off and boys started jostling for position, it wouldn’t take much to knock Gallegos down. Gallegos has cerebral palsy (CP), a neurological disorder that affects body movement and muscle coordination, and ranges in severity. Gallegos has a speech impairment and lacks muscle control, which means that while he can walk and run unaided, his feet often drag and cause him to fall. When he first started running, he fell a lot. But he didn’t quit, and at that first cross-country meet, he stayed upright and crushed his goal of running a sub-30-minute three-miler by 35 seconds. For the next four years, Gallegos rarely missed a day of practice at Hart High School in Santa Clarita, California, and his work ethic rubbed off on his teammates. “The effort

JUSTIN GALLEGOS he put into training just gave everyone a sense of, ‘I’ve got nothing to complain about,’ ” says his head coach, Larry David. “Everyone loved Justin. At meets, everyone would root for him.” And he just kept getting better. As a senior, he set a cross-country, three-mile PR of 23:58 and a mile PR of 7:08 (down from 8:50). In June, he won gold in the 400 meters in the Paralympics-Ambulatory division at the California State Track & Field Championships. Most impressive of all? Gallegos barely drags his feet and he hardly ever falls anymore. While his doctors can’t definitely say that running has improved his CP, they certainly don’t want him to stop. Gallegos, 18, doesn’t plan to. Now a freshman at the University of Oregon, he’s joined the school’s running club and is targeting spring road races. “I want to show people that you should live your life without limits,” he says. “Don’t let people who question you get in your way.” —A.C.S.

Gallegos on campus at the University of Oregon. He hopes to become a motivational speaker spreading this idea: “No such thing as a disability.”

TATYANA

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS HORNBECKER

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y N A M E G O E S H E R E

McFadden is a force. A 17-time medalist in the Paralympics and multiple Para world record holder, McFadden, 27, has dominated every wheelchair race distance from 100 meters to 26.2 miles over the last decade. She’s known as the “Beast,” and her rigorous training includes 100-mile weeks on the road and the track as well as gym workouts that feature stair climbs—while in a handstand. It pays off: In September, she won six medals—four gold, two silver—in Rio, then three weeks later won the Bank of America Chicago Marathon wheelchair division. In November, she claimed her fourth consecutive World Marathon Majors Grand Slam (winning Boston, London, Chicago, and New York in a single year)—an unheard-of feat for any runner. That’s right, runner. “I’ve never seen myself as a person with a disability, and I’ve always identified as a runner,” she says. “Being a runner means putting in hard work and learning from your failures.” Born with spina bifida, a condition where the spinal column fails to close all the way, McFadden was paralyzed from the waist down. She spent her first five years at an orphanage in St. Petersburg, Russia, and taught herself to walk on her hands. When she was 6, her mother, Deborah, adopted her, moved her to Clarksville, Maryland, and enrolled her in an adaptive sports program. “I tried a lot of sports, and I really fell in love with wheelchair racing,” she says. “It made me feel so fast and free.”


McFadden regularly hits the roads near University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she trains. “The competition is always tough, so I have to stay on my game.”

The Unbeatable Advocate I L LU S T R AT I O N B Y N A M E G O E S H E R E

TATYANA MCFADDEN

At 15, McFadden became the youngest member of the U.S. Paralympics Team and medaled in both the 100 and 200 meters in Athens, Greece. The following year, she tried to join her high school track team; when she was instructed to race separately from the other students, she and her mother filed a lawsuit against the school system— and won. Today, no child in the U.S. can legally be denied the right to participate in interscholastic and intramural athletics. “It was important for me that others understand it’s not okay to exclude people with disabilities and treat them differently,” she says. As an adult, McFadden has continued her advocacy. She’s spoken to Congress, schools, and clubs about the power of sport and the need for equal access, treatment, and pay for athletes with disabilities. Last year, she created the Tatyana McFadden Foundation, “to create a world where people with disabilities can achieve their dreams, live healthy lives, and be equal participants in a global society.” On top of all that—and while training for Rio— McFadden released a kid’s book last spring, titled Ya Sama! Moments From My Life. The Russian phrase means “I can do it.” The book includes lessons about community, acceptance, and setting goals. “I knew I could do anything if I just set my mind to it. I always figure out ways to do things, even if they’re a bit different.” —LINDSEY EMERY

PHOTOGRAPH BY RUDY ARCHULETA

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 87


HE’S

been profiled on ESPN, on NBC News, and in the Wall Street Journal in the last year alone. But perhaps the apogee of Mikey Brannigan’s career came in September, when he got his first fan letter. It was from a 13-year-old boy in Kentucky. In the letter, the boy said that he was trying to play baseball, despite “difficulties.” “I was moved and motivated to work hard,” the boy wrote. “You are the perfect example of determination.” When asked how he felt about the letter, Brannigan, 20, smiles. “Like a professional athlete.” Brannigan was diagnosed with autism at 18 months, was nonverbal until age 5, and has a severe learning disability and a speech impediment. But as a runner, he is unstoppable. The six-time high school All-American has been attracting attention since he ran a 38:36 10K at age 12. In 2014, he became national champion in the 3200 meters after running 8:53.59. In 2015, he set a world record in the T20 (intellectual impairment) category when he ran 3:48.85 in the 1500 at the U.S. Paralympics Track & Field National Championships. And in August, he became the first person with autism to break four minutes in the mile, when he ran 3:57.58 in Raleigh, North Carolina. While more than 200 colleges courted Brannigan, he couldn’t meet the NCAA educational requirements to compete at the college level. Instead, after graduating high school in 2015, he accepted an offer to run and train with the New York Athletic Club, which pays some

After returning from Rio, Brannigan spoke to a group of middle school students. “I gave them a pep talk,” he says. His message? “Follow your passion.”

The Unstoppable Star

MIKEY BRANNIGAN

PHOTOGRAPH BY DOROTHY HONG


THE PASSIONATE VOICE of his travel and training expenses (he’ll attend community college in January). With Team USA’s help, he trained for the Paralympics at the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, California. In preparing for the Games, Brannigan studied Matthew Centrowitz’s brilliant Olympic gold performance in the 1500 meters just a few weeks earlier (see page 83). “I saw it, like, a hundred times,” Brannigan says. “I was thinking, Run like Matt did. Run like Matt did.” And he did: Competing in the category for intellectually impaired athletes, Brannigan led wire to wire, finishing in 3:51.73. “I was delighted that he won gold in the Paralympics,” Centrowitz—who ran 3:50—wrote in an email. “I’m honored that Mikey looks at me for inspiration, but I’m also inspired by his accomplishments. At 20 he has a great future ahead.” Indeed, after returning from Rio, Brannigan was greeted like a conquering hero during halftime at a football game at Northport High School, on Long Island, New York, his alma mater. “That was very special to me,” he says. After reading the letter from the 13-year-old, Brannigan wrote the boy back. He thanked him and sympathized with his challenges. “I also struggle to overcome difficulties,” he wrote. “Keep working hard in school and playing baseball. Go out there and give it your all!” He finished with a single line: “Look for me in the Tokyo Olympics in 2020!” —JOHN HANC

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS SEMBROT

AMANDA CHARNEY

“Marc would be so proud of the time and love we’ve put into these [speechimpaired] kids,” says Charney, who races with groups like Team Red, White & Blue.

IT WAS A CRAPPY BENCH in a beautiful

spot. It sat beneath a couple of weeping willow trees alongside the Cooper River, and from it, Amanda Charney and her fiancé, U.S. Army Special Forces Staff Sgt. Marc Small, could watch the sun set above the Philadelphia skyline. They’d sit and talk and work out the plan for their life together. After a few minutes, they’d get up and finish their run or their walk. After Small was killed in Afghanistan, Charney ran all the time, and whenever she ran up to the bench, she’d sit and she’d cry and sometimes she’d think about how she was weeping beneath the weeping willows. It was 2009. She was 29 years old. Today, the crappy bench on the river has been replaced with a beautiful black iron one, and there’s a stone memorial on the ground nearby honoring Small. And Charney, a speech and language pathologist, is implementing the plan she made with a man she will always love. She is the founder and executive director of Small Steps in Speech, a nonprofit that provides grants to families of kids with communication disorders; the grants cover therapy when insurance falls short. Charney formed the organization just days after Small’s death on February 12, asking for donations in lieu of flowers. When she and Small had talked about their plans, Small Steps in Speech—the name was his idea—was going to be her private practice. But after he died, Charney wanted every dollar raised to go to kids with

speech and language disorders like autism or childhood apraxia of speech (when the brain fumbles signals to the mouth) that silence their voices. Since 2009, the organization has raised more than $1 million, and by far, its biggest fundraiser is the annual On Your Marc 5K. Held every August around Small’s birthday near his hometown of Collegeville, Pennsylvania, the event raised more than $35,000 this year in its eighth consecutive running. Charney runs the event every year and she used to cry when she crossed the finish line. Now, there is more happiness and much gratitude—for the family and friends and hundreds of supporters who run to honor Small and support the cause that bears his name. Thanks in very large part to these runners, the nonverbal kid who used to throw a tantrum and bang his head on the floor because he couldn’t say he was hungry can now use visual communication to convey what he needs. The boy who once sat in a self-contained class for kids with severe limitations is now in a general classroom. And some kids have improved so much that they’ve left speech therapy for good. “Marc loved kids, and we never got to have them together,” says Charney, who is now a marathoner and triathlete and is looking to expand the On Your Marc 5K into more communities. “But when I look at the hundreds of children we’ve helped, it gives me hope and joy. Maybe these kids, in some way, are our kids.” —CHRISTINE FENNESSY

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 89


DO THE MATH! WHILE A SOLID TREADMILL WITH A VARIETY OF PROGRAMMING AND INTERACTIVE FEATURES CAN SET YOU BACK $1,000 OR MORE, THE INVESTMENT WILL PAY DIVIDENDS FOR MANY YEARS AS YOU BANK MILES AND WORKOUTS YOU MIGHT OTHERWISE HAVE MISSED. WE PUT 20 OF THE NEWEST MODELS THROUGH THEIR PACES TO FIND THE TOP 10 SMART-MONEY PICKS. BY JEFF DENGATE

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WORLD 91


NordicTrack C990 ($999)

RUNNING SURFACE 20"W x 60"L MAXIMUM SPEED 12 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 12% PROGRAMS 32 MOTOR 3.0 HP BUY nordictrack.com

($1,999) BEST FOR A household of runners—of all sizes THE GOOD Testers, like RW Associate Editor Ali Nolan, loved all the bells and whistles found on this reasonably priced treadmill. “Tours! TV! Fans!” she says. “I love it. I would use this all the time.” In addition to the same kind of iFit programming found on the C990 (left) but with a larger, 10-inch screen, this treadmill’s console can be raised or lowered with the push of a button to comfortably suit runners of any height. The cushioning can also be adjusted with the twist of a handle, going from springy to pavementfirm. All testers loved the three fans, especially the low-mounted one pointed at your chest and stomach, and the machine’s ability to dip to –3 percent incline for downhill intervals. THE GRIPE “I had to press the touchscreen several times for some functions to work, which is frustrating when you’re running,” says Chris Kraft, RW’s digital director. RUNNING SURFACE 22"W x 60"L MAXIMUM SPEED 12 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 15% MAXIMUM DECLINE 3% PROGRAMS 40 MOTOR 4.25 HP BUY nordictrack.com

92 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

BH Fitness S7Ti

Landice L8 Cardio

($2,999)

($5,450)

BEST FOR Enjoying your own entertainment THE GOOD Testers liked the simplicity of the machine—hop on, mash the “Quick Start” button, and run. It has very few added features, but you can pair it via Bluetooth to the BH Trainer iOS or Android app for realtime coaching, workout stats, and prompts when you need to alter your pace or incline (you have to push buttons on the console). An “eco” function reduces power consumption by adjusting the incline—you run at the same effort but put less strain on the motor and cut your electric bill. The high-quality steel frame with black powder-coating finish proved sturdy even at higher speeds. THE GRIPE Distance is displayed to a tenth of a mile—example, 4.39 miles reads as 4.3. Every other machine displays a second decimal of precision. Strangely, it also shows calories burned to the tenth—372.8 calories. Who needs to know they burned a fraction of a calorie?

BEST FOR Houses with

es on what’s important: the feel of the run,” raves RW Reporter Kit Fox. In testing, it proved to be the quietest, and the thick four-ply belt made for ninja-like footfalls. The L8 is also fast to respond to speed and incline changes; runners were shocked at how quickly it reacted to big variations when doing intervals. They also liked how the display flashed until the belt reached its destination, so you know when you’ve reached your desired speed or slope. Unlike other machines, the L8 lets you hit top speed and incline at the same time—the potentially dangerous combo would tax even the world’s best mountain runners in just minutes. Our test model came with the “cardio console” (four setups are available), which prioritizes heart-rate-based training programs. THE GRIPE The tiny fan is all but useless. You have to stand right above the console to even feel it.

RUNNING SURFACE 22"W x 62"L MAXIMUM SPEED 13.5 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 12% PROGRAMS 15 MOTOR 4.0 HP BUY bhfitnessusa.com

RUNNING SURFACE 22"W x 63"L MAXIMUM SPEED 12 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 15% PROGRAMS 20 MOTOR 4.0 HP BUY landice.com

sleeping babies THE GOOD “This thing focus-

P R E V I O U S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P H O N L A M A I P H OTO/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( W I N D OW F R A M E ) ; I M AG E S O U R C E /A L A M Y ( S N OW )

BEST FOR Runners on a tight budget THE GOOD While treadmills under $1,000 may be good for walking, they often get squirrelly under the stress of running. But the orange shocks on the C990 can go from a soft surface ideal for walking and easy jogging to road-like hard when you want to run fast with just a halfturn of each shock. “It’s a solid treadmill with a lot of options and variety to choose from,” says Kristen Parker, assistant photo editor at Runner’s World. Those options come in the form of a seven-inch web-enabled touchscreen that leverages the company’s iFit platform. Wish you were running in South Africa? Hong Kong? If Google Street View has mapped it, you can virtually run it, and the machine will automatically adjust its incline to match the terrain. THE GRIPE Because of the 20-inch-wide belt, most testers felt a little cramped and had to focus to stay centered on the machine.

NordicTrack Commercial 2950


True Fitness Alpine Runner ($8,399) BEST FOR Trail and

T H I S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y ( T R E A D M I L L S T I L L S ) ; E R I K T H A M /A L A M Y ( R A I N )

Speed and incline can be adjusted on the vertical hand grips, which you’ll need to use at max incline.

Should I wear different shoes on the ’mill? “Generally, it’s good to wear your usual road shoes,” says Martyn R. Shorten, Ph.D., who heads up the Runner’s World Shoe Lab. “A treadmill’s springs and bumpers attenuate shock, but don’t contribute much to in-shoe comfort, because they don’t change the pressure distribution on the foot. So it’s best to stick with your normal level of cushioning. Also, avoid ‘low drop’ shoes if you’re not used to them because some treadmills, especially less expensive ones intended for home use, have a slight uphill slope that increases stress on your Achilles.”

mountain runners THE GOOD “This is a mountain runner’s dream machine,” says me (Jeff), RW gear editor and frequent Mt. Washington competitor. The obvious reason to buy this is because it tops out at 30 percent incline, but all testers were wowed by its rock-solid build: The nearly 600-pound frame doesn’t wobble a bit, whether on the level or fully raised. The incline motor cranks out enough power to travel from one extreme to the other in as little time as machines with half the incline, yet it did so smoothly. Our test model came with the Transcend 16 touchscreen console with a built-in HDTV tuner and a bunch of workouts, including climbs up famous monuments like the Eiffel Tower and the St. Louis Arch. THE GRIPE With the deck raised to 30 percent, your feet will be nearly level with the console and your head will be in the rafters—you need at least 10-foot ceilings. RUNNING SURFACE 22"W x 60"L MAXIMUM SPEED 12 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 30% MAXIMUM DECLINE 3% PROGRAMS 38 MOTOR 4.0 HP BUY truefitness.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 93


TrueForm Runner ($5,495) BEST FOR Competitive run-

ners and track racers THE GOOD The TrueForm

Runner looks much like the Woodway Curve (opposite page), and is powered the same way—you are the motor that drives the belt by engaging your backside muscles. It’s hand-built in the USA with a rock-solid frame and realistic running surface that lasts far longer than a typical treadmill belt. Plus, with no motor or electrical components, there are fewer parts to break down over the life of the machine. Our test model had a running track surface, which allowed us to train in spikes for a mile race, but it’s also available with a rubberized belt or a turf surface (football and soccer players can warm up in cleats rather than by pedaling a bike). THE GRIPE Testers found the 17-inch running surface a touch too narrow. RUNNING SURFACE 17"W x 64"L MAXIMUM SPEED N/A MAXIMUM INCLINE None PROGRAMS None MOTOR None BUY trueformrunner.com

94 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

The curved surface requires good form—a slight lean and landing with your feet below you.


LifeSpan TR5500i ($1,499)

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y ( T R E A D M I L L S T I L L S ); T U N A R T/G E T T Y I M AG E S ( T R E E S )

BEST FOR Hitting your daily step-counting goals THE GOOD Buried beneath a plain-Jane console is a powerful training tool with 46 preconfigured workouts. Using the free Active Trac smartphone app, you can save your session data and share it to sites like Endomondo and Strava. The machine counts your steps (based on the strain each footfall places on the motor) so you get credit in fitness apps like Apple Health and Google Fit. Its max speed of 13.5 mph is uncommon at this price. THE GRIPE The deck raises and lowers slower than other models, and gets shaky at top speed. RUNNING SURFACE 22"W x 60"L MAXIMUM SPEED 13.5 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 13% MAXIMUM DECLINE 2% PROGRAMS 46 MOTOR 4.0 HP BUY lifespanfitness.com

’Mill in the House Before you buy, be sure you have room in your home. Norm Morrison, chief product officer at Gym Source, a fitness equipment retailer with 32 stores, shared five common pitfalls.

Precor TRM 223

Woodway Curve Trainer

($2,699)

Life Fitness Platinum Club Series

($4,995)

($8,999)

BEST FOR Those who like to

BEST FOR Working on

BEST FOR Keeping you

hit “start” and just go design,” says RW Junior Video Producer Derek Call. “It doesn’t have an overwhelming number of options—just what you need, like hill and interval workouts.” That impression comes from the sleek, black console, free of clutter and extra buttons. An LCD screen with a Tetris-like display of blocks shows you the workout underway, while the most important metrics like time, distance, and pace are always displayed in big, easy-to-see digits. THE GRIPE The belt can feel a bit too narrow when running quick.

proper form THE GOOD We’ve long been fans of Woodway’s slatted running surface, which delivers a realistic ground feel, but speed on the previous Curve (nonmotorized treadmill) was hard to control—its steep arc let you speed up and slow down quickly, making it best suited for intervals. The new Curve Trainer has a shallower lift at the ends, making it better for steady-pace longer jogs. THE GRIPE Testers, without guidance, found it taxing and often gave up after a mile or so. Form is key—you have to lean slightly and engage your posterior chain.

entertained THE GOOD This health-club quality ’mill weighs a ton and won’t shake no matter how hard you’re stomping—it’s rated for users up to 400 pounds. The 19-inch Discover SE3 console is just as impressive in size, with cool interactive courses—you can chase virtual runners in places like Monterey, California—and the ability to stream Netflix and Hulu. THE GRIPE Did we mention it’s massive? Unless you have a few weightlifter friends and are willing to spend many hours screwing in small bolts, pay for the professional delivery and installation.

RUNNING SURFACE 20"W x 57"L MAXIMUM SPEED 12 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 15% PROGRAMS 9 MOTOR 3.0 HP BUY precor.com

RUNNING SURFACE 17"W x 59"L MAXIMUM SPEED N/A MAXIMUM INCLINE None PROGRAMS None MOTOR None BUY woodway.com

RUNNING SURFACE 22"W x 60"L MAXIMUM SPEED 12 mph MAXIMUM INCLINE 15% PROGRAMS 42 MOTOR 4.0 HP BUY lifefitness.com

THE GOOD “It has a simple

Electrical Wiring Do you have the electrical requirements for a treadmill? We recommend a 20-amp dedicated circuit for any treadmill. Every treadmill—cheap or expensive—will respond better and last longer if it has more power.

Safety Space Make sure you have two to three feet behind you, because you need room to fall off the treadmill. The safety key doesn’t stop you from falling off; it stops the belt from moving. Most major injuries come from falling back on a moving treadmill.

Max Headroom People put treadmills in the basement all the time, but it’s horrible if you have a 6'6" ceiling and you’re 6' tall. Plus, some of these get way off the ground. So have somebody measure you in the showroom at your maximum incline.

Sight Lines If you plan to watch TV, be sure you can look over the console at the TV directly. When you’re running, you’ll run in the direction your head is facing. If your head is turned to face a TV, you will literally run off your treadmill.

Good Housekeeping Put it where you can clean underneath. Static charges will shorten the lifespan of the belt, so put it on a rubber surface instead of carpet. And clean underneath it every six months—use a towel under the belt, too, to clean out debris.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 95


THE HEROIC 153-MILE RUN FROM ATHENS TO SPARTA THAT INSPIRED THE MARATHON AND SAVED DEMOCRACY

WWW.ULTRAMARATHONMAN.COM Available wherever books & e-books are sold

RodaleBooks.com • Follow us @rodalebooks on

202944202

As told—and experienced—by ultramarathoner and New York Times best-selling author Dean Karnazes


RACES+PLACES

TIPS, TRENDS, and MUST-RUN EVENTS

A RACE FOR EVERY PACE

2017ON

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E S Y O F H O N O LU L U M A R AT H O N AS S O C I AT I O N

M A R AT H GUIDE

Everyone likes to feel special, so some marathons go the (nonliteral) extra mile to please all parts of the pack. Special prerace amenities and rewards for swift finishes entice faster folks. Finish-line cheering sections that stay put buoy back-ofthe-packers. Wide boulevards and long water stops ease the congestion felt by midpackers. Such details matter—and can spell the difference between a race-day experience to remember and one you’d rather forget. On the following pages, find your perfect marathon match.

BY A.C. SHILTON

Runners enjoy the Pacific Ocean sunrise during the Honolulu Marathon.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY OSCAR BOLTON GREEN

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017 RUNNER’S WORLD 97


RACES + PLACES

A R A C E F O R E V E R Y PA C E

PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME MARATHON Set a new age-group record and you’ll score $100. Since the race is relatively small (3,000 marathoners) and fairly new (four years old), fast-for-their-age entrants vie for cash. “I created the concept to encourage the really good agegroupers who no longer compete for overall money,” says executive race director Jim Chaney. Participants run an out-and-back course through Canton and past the Football Hall of Fame (which gives exclusive runner access during race weekend). Finish with a tailgate-style postrace party, replete with burgers, brats, wings, and beer. April 30, Canton, Ohio, hofmarathon.com

BELLINGHAM BAY MARATHON Runners just shy of super-fast can qualify for elite status (2:35 for men and 3:05 for women last year), which comes with free entry and lodging. The race starts with singers, dancers, and drummers from the Lummi Nation, a local Native American tribe, followed by six miles on Lummi land and stunning views of 10,781-foot Mount Baker. September 24, Bellingham, Washington, bellinghambaymarathon.org

SAN FRANCISCO MARATHON For more than two decades, the City on the Bay’s namesake marathon has included a “sub-seed” category. Men and women under age 40 must qualify with a sub-2:55 marathon and a sub-3:20, respectively. (Athletes over 40 have more generous standards.) Sub-seed entrants start directly behind the pros and receive discounted entry. The course passes through several of the city’s green spaces and climbs—a lot. In conquering San Francisco’s legendary hills, runners rack up 900 feet of elevation gain. The scenery takes a bit of the sting out: The field of 9,500 marathoners runs along the Embarcadero, over the Golden Gate Bridge, through the lively Haight-Ashbury neighborhood, and past the home field for the San Francisco Giants. July 23, San Francisco, thesfmarathon.com

98 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E SY O F P R O F O OT BA L L H A L L O F FA M E M A R AT H O N ; M I C H I G A N B LU F F P H OTO G R A P H Y/CO U R T E SY O F T H E S A N F R A N C I S CO M A R AT H O N ; K AT R I N A LYO N /C O U R T E S Y O F B E L L I N G H A M BAY M A R AT H O N ; I M AG E C L U B G R A P H I C S ( F O OT BA L L )

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A R A C E F O R E V E R Y PA C E

RACES + PLACES

SHAMROCK MARATHON

March 19, Virginia Beach, Virginia, shamrockmarathon.com

HOUSTON MARATHON The only bottleneck you’ll encounter is the one created on purpose: Volunteers check every bib as runners enter the corrals to ensure that the 27,000 half- and full-marathoners who begin together are arranged fastest first, so after the start, traffic jams aren’t an issue. The course, which follows the widest roads in and around the city, avoids aid-station chaos by including 850 feet of fluid tables at every stop in the early miles, and 400 feet of hydration after the 13,500 half-marathoners peel off at mile eight. Enjoy a flat and fast trip (the overpasses are the only real hills in Houston), and keep an eye out for belly dancers, Elvis impersonators, and cheerleaders along the way.

FOR MIDPACKERS

January 15, Houston, chevronhoustonmarathon.com

JACKSONVILLE MARATHON

BAYSHORE MARATHON With more than 1,000 volunteers turning out to support 2,550 runners, Traverse City shows its marathoners some love. Participants enjoy 18 miles along Grand Traverse Bay, filled with boats and shorebirds. Expect a sweet treat at the finish. The Old Mission Women’s Club bakes cookies, and a local ice cream shop dishes out scoops. May 27, Traverse City, Michigan, bayshoremarathon.org

Billed as the fastest marathon in the South, Jacksonville has a grand total of 20 feet of elevation gain from start to finish. Fewer than 1,000 runners tackle the full, but 1,000 half-marathoners will keep you company during the first eight miles. The lollipop-shaped course winds through shady neighborhoods lined with magnolia and oak trees for much of the race. Average temps are in the mid-50s, but since this is Florida, prep for warmer, humid conditions. December 16 or 17, Jacksonville, Florida, 1stplacesports.com

100 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E SY O F T H E H O U S TO N M A R AT H O N ; CO U R T E SY O F T H E S H A M R O C K M A R AT H O N ; CO U R T E SY O F BAYS H O R E M A R AT H O N ; A L A M Y (CO O K I E S ): C O U R T E S Y O F JAC K S O N V I L L E M A R AT H O N

While 30,000 runners descend on Virginia Beach for race weekend, only 3,500 do the full 26.2. That means midpackers get the best of both worlds—a bumpin’ postrace party and a congestion-free route that includes six miles of oceanfront, 10 miles through neighborhoods, and another five through a military base. You’ll pass several historic sites, including the spot where John Smith and other Jamestown colonists landed in 1607, and the Cape Henry Lighthouse, one of the country’s oldest.


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RACES + PLACES

A R A C E F O R E V E R Y PA C E

MISSOULA MARATHON

FOR BACK-OF-THEPACKERS

July 9, Missoula, Montana, missoulamarathon.org

TORONTO WATERFRONT MARATHON If you’re struggling in the final 10K of the Toronto Waterfront Marathon, look for the red shirts lining the streets. Volunteers known as Bonnie’s Dream Team will run with you as far as necessary, offering encouragement and much-needed distraction. Bonnie Fowler started the group in 2013 after a friend jumped in to help her complete her first marathon; after that, she vowed to give back to help other runners. The 5,000-strong field weaves through downtown Toronto before following the Lake Ontario waterfront, where fall colors are on full display. October 22, Toronto, Ontario, torontowaterfrontmarathon.com

HONOLULU MARATHON Take 14 hours to finish (people have!) and there will still be volunteers around. “The no cutoff time is in the spirit of Aloha [the Hawaiian word for ‘love’ or ‘kindness’],” says Valerie Lawson, a representative for the race. All 16 aid stations stay open until the final participant passes. December 10, Honolulu, honolulumarathon.org

RUNNER’S WORLD (ISSN 0897-1706) IS PUBLISHED 11 TIMES A YEAR, MONTHLY EXCEPT BI-MONTHLY IN JANUARY/FEBRUARY, BY RODALE INC. VOLUME 52 NUMBER 1, EDITORIAL OFFICES 400 SOUTH 10TH ST, EMMAUS, PA 18049 (610-967-5171). ©2017 RODALE INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, P.O. BOX 26299, LEHIGH VALLEY, PA 18022-6299. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT EMMAUS, PA, AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. IN CANADA POSTAGE PAID AT GATEWAY MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO. CANADA POST PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 40063752. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADA ADDRESSES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, 2930 14TH AVE, MARKHAM, ONTARIO L3R 5Z8. GST #R122988611. SUBSCRIBERS: IF THE POSTAL AUTHORITIES ALERT US THAT YOUR MAGAZINE IS UNDELIVERABLE, PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. WE HAVE NO FURTHER OBLIGATION UNLESS WE RECEIVE A CORRECTED ADDRESS WITHIN 18 MONTHS.

102 RUNNER’S WORLD JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TO M R O B E R T S O N P H OTO G R A P H Y/CO U R T E SY O F M I S S O U L A M A R AT H O N ; A . AS T E S /A L A M Y ( F LOW E R ); CO U R T E S Y CA N A DA R U N N I N G S E R I E S

Not only does this course have a generous 7.5-hour cutoff time, but back-ofthe-packers are guaranteed a boisterous, rowdy cheering section. Members of Run Wild Missoula, a local running club, line the finish area and ring their cowbells and bang their clappers until the bitter end. The 1,100 marathoners run by alfalfa fields, through pine forests, and over the Clark Fork and Bitterroot River as they navigate the point-to-point course. And although the northern Rockies are visible from the entire course, there’s only one noticeable climb, right at the halfway point—and it’s only 400 meters long.


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RACING AHEAD

ADVERTISING SECTION

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Contact: Jason Altman PO Box 53442, Knoxville, TN 37950 (865) 684-4294 knoxvillemarathon@gmail.com

29525 Chagrin Blvd., Suite 215, Pepper Pike, OH 44122. (216) 464-5510 info@clevelandmarathon.com

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NORTH ATLANTIC

JUN 25, 2017 - Bay of Fundy International Marathon, Half Marathon, 52K Ultramarathon & 10K Lubec, ME & Campobello Island, NB Contact: Barbara Frazier, PO Box 101, Lubec, ME 04652. PO Box 801, Welshpool, NB E5E 1Y3. (207) 619-1887 info@bayoffundymarathon.com www.bayoffundymarathon.com

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SOUTH ATLANTIC

“Run With A Purpose”

Publix Florida Marathon & Half Marathon Weekend

Bataan Memorial Death March 26.2 Mile & 14.2 Mile

FEBRUARY 4&5, 2017 MELBOURNE, FL

MARCH 19, 2017 WHITE SANDS MISSLE RANGE, NM www.bataanmarch.com

Contact: Mitch Varnes P.O. Box 33100, Indialantic, FL 32903 (321) 759-7200

www.thefloridamarathon.com

FEB 3-4, 2017 - Critz Tybee Run Fest 2017, 5K, 10K, Half Marathon, 2.8 Mile Beach Run, 1 Mile & Kids Fun Run Tybee Island, GA Contact: Emily Dover, 7000 Abercorn Street, P.O. Box 22999, Savannah, GA 31403. (912) 629-7031 runfest@critz.com www.critztybeerun.com

Run one, Run them all = 26.2 Miles

FEB 5, 2017 - Daytona Beach Half Marathon,

TWO BAD ASS CHICKS ON THE RUN!

Half Relay, 5K & Speedway Challenge 13.1+5K Daytona Beach, FL Contact: Joann Magley, 123 W Indiana Avenue, Deland, FL 32720-4612. (386) 561-7185 jmagley@volusia.org www.daytonabeachhalf.com

FEB 10-12, 2017 - 10th Anniversary DONNA

Avenue of the Giants Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K MAY 7, 2017 WEOTT, CA

Thelma & Louise Half Marathon & 2-Person Relay

Contact: Cynthia Timek

JUNE 3, 2017 MOAB, UT

P.O. Box 214, Arcata, CA 95518 (707) 822-1861 ctimek@aol.com

Get your cowgirl on and make a run for Moab! info@moabhalfmarathon

www.theave.org

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Marathon Weekend The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer Marathon, Half Marathon, Ultra, Team Relay, 10K, 5K & Challenge Events Jacksonville Beach, FL Contact: DONNA Headquarters, 11762 Marco Beach Drive, Suite 6, Jacksonville, FL 32224. (904) 355-PINK (7465) info@breastcancermarathon.com www.breastcancermarathon.com

FEB 11, 2017 - Hilton Head Island Marathon, Half Marathon & 8K Hilton Head Island, SC Contact: Bear Foot Sports, 20 Towne Drive, PMB #200, Bluffton, SC 29910. (843) 757-8520 bfs@hargray.com www.bearfootsports.com

C LO S I NG DAT E FO R T H E APR IL 2017 ISSUE IS J AN UAR Y 13, 2017

105


ADVERTISING SECTION FEB 25-26, 2017 - Publix Gasparilla Distance Classic

SOUTH CENTRAL

Race Weekend

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MAR 18-19, 2017 - Yuengling Shamrock Marathon Weekend, Marathon, Half Marathon, 8K & 1M Virginia Beach, VA Contact: J&A Racing, 3601 Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23455. (757) 412-1056 info@shamrockmarathon.com

FEB 4, 2017 - 35th Annual All-America City 10K Run/ Walk & Fun Run Edinburg, TX Contact: Parks & Recreation Department, 315 E. Palm Dr., Edinburg, TX 78539. (956) 381-5631 www.cityofedinburg.com

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APR 8, 2017 - Hogeye Marathon & Relays, Marathon, Half Marathon, & 4-Person Marathon Relay Springdale, AR Contact: Tabby Holmes, P.O. Box 8012, Fayetteville, AR 72703. rd@hogeyemarathon.com www.hogeyemarathon.com

www.shamrockmarathon.com

APR 23, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in

APR 29, 2017 - Park to Park Half Marathon

Galveston Galveston, TX Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com

Waynesboro, VA Contact: Ben Lancaster (540) 942-6735 RTV@ci.waynesboro.va.us www.runthevalley.com

Mountain Vistas and Beautiful River Crossings.

MAY 7, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in North Myrtle Beach North Myrtle Beach, SC Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

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SEP 16, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in DC’s Wine Country Leesburg, VA Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 561154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

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NORTH CENTRAL

APR 21-22, 2017 - Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon, Half Marathon, Marathon Relay, 10K, 5K & Youth Run Champaign-Urbana, IL Contact: Jan Seeley, P.O. Box 262, Champaign, IL 61824. (217) 369-8553 director@illinoismarathon.com www.illinoismarathon.com

APR 30, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in Chicagoland

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MOUNTAIN PACIFIC

JAN 15, 2017 - Maui OceanFront Marathon, Half Marathon, 15K, 10K & 5K Lahaina, HI Contact: Les Wright, P.O. Box 20000, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96151. (530) 559-2261 runmaui@gmail.com www.runmaui.com

FEB 18, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon in Temecula Special Edition Temecula, CA Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

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JUN 4, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in San Francisco Bay Burlingame, CA

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Lake Zurich, IL Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com

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MAY 7, 2017 - GoodLife Fitness Toronto Marathon,

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MAY 6, 2017 - OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon (13.1 Miles) Indianapolis, IN Contact: 500 Festival, 21 Virginia Ave., Suite 500, Indianapolis, IN 46204. (317) 927-3378 raceinfo@500festival.com www.indymini.com

Includes a lap around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway!

MAY 7, 2017 - Flying Pig Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K, 5K & 2-Mile Dog Race Cincinnati, OH Contact: Sarah Pelfrey, 644 Linn Street, Suite 626, Cincinnati, OH 45203. (513) 721-7447 sarah@flyingpigmarathon.com

INTERNATIONAL Half Marathon, 10K, 5K Run and Walk & Relay Toronto, ON, Canada Contact: Jay Glassman, PO Box 1240, Stn Main, Uxbridge, ON L9P 1N5. (416) 920-3466 info@torontomarathon.com www.torontomarathon.com

MAY 26-28, 2017 - Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, Scotiabank Half Marathon, 10K, 5K & 2K Ottawa, ON, Canada Contact: 5450 Canotek Road, Unit 45, Ottawa, ON K1J 9G2. (613) 234-2221 questions@runottawa.ca www.runottawa.ca

www.flyingpigmarathon.com

Be here. Run here. Celebrate Canada’s 150th at Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon.

SEP 16, 2017 - Air Force Marathon, Half Marathon,

NOV 12, 2017 - Athens Marathon, 10K & 5K,

10K & 5K Dayton, OH Contact: Race Director, 5030 Pearson Rd., Building 219, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433. (937) 257-4350 usaf.marathon@us.af.mil

Original Historical Course Athens, Greece Contact: Apostolos Greek Tours Inc., 2685 S. Dayton Way #14, Denver, CO 80231. (303) 755-2888

www.usafmarathon.com

www.athensmarathon.com

Various Support Packages.

106 F O R A D V ERTI SI N G RATE S CONTACT SARA DESIM INE AT 212-808-1607 o r sara.d e si m i ne @ ro d al e .co m


RACE SPOTLIGHT ADVERTISING SECTION

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MAY 27-28, 2017

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NEW YORK, NEW YORK

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1 3

4

5

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RUNNER’S WORLD amped up fall marathon season in New York leading up to the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon. The International Shoe Summit welcomed many RUNNER’S WORLD international partners to hear the marketing and product plans of 14 shoe and apparel companies. Editor-in-Chief David Willey also held a Q&A panel luncheon with Olympian Shalane Flanagan and chef Elyse Kopecky to discuss running and nutrition topics as well as their new cookbook, Run Fast. Eat Slow. RUNNER’S WORLD was everywhere in NYC during marathon weekend. Chief Running Officer Bart Yasso hosted a 50th Anniversary Shakeout Run with NYRR. RW also participated in a KT Tape Shakeout Run with Olympian Meb Keflezighi. At the Marathon Pavilion, RUNNER’S WORLD Cover Search presented by Toyota and supported by Brooks also unveiled the covers to winners Eileen Moon, a NY Philharmonic cellist and breast cancer survivor, and Josh LaJaunie, an ultrarunner who lost more than 200 pounds with running and a vegan diet. The winners were also interviewed marathon morning by WABC-TV's Amy Freeze to discuss their experience with RUNNER’S WORLD. Throughout the week, RUNNER’S WORLD participated in the TCS New York City Marathon Health and Wellness Expo at the Jacob Javits Center in Manhattan, including numerous book signings with notable authors, such as Flanagan and Kopecky, ultramarathoner Dean Karnazes, and sports-medicine physician Dr. Jordan Metzl. The RUNNER'S WORLD booth also featured free head and neck gaiters provided by Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine, samples of Advocare Rehydrate electrolyte drink mix, as well as an opportunity for runners to see themselves on the cover of RUNNER’S WORLD, compliments of Cover Search presenting sponsor Toyota. RUNNER’S WORLD welcomed international partners and industry VIPs to Robert at the Museum of Art and Design on the west side of Manhattan for its 50th Anniversary celebration, which also featured the announcement of the International Shoe Awards voted on by RUNNER’S WORLD’s 20 international partners. Congratulations to all of the winners and all who finished the 2016 NYC Marathon! 1) Runners celebrate with RUNNER'S WORLD and NYRR at our 50th Anniversary Shakeout Run. 2) (left to right) David Willey, Shalane Flanagan, Elyse Kopecky, RUNNER'S WORLD Managing Director Jessica Murphy, RUNNER'S WORLD VP/Publisher Molly O’Keefe, and Rodale SVP of Global Business Development Rob Novick at the International Shoe Summit. 3) Runners join Meb Keflezighi and Bart Yasso at Jack Rabbit for the KT Tape Shakeout Run. 4) (left to right) Bart Yasso, Cover Search winner Josh LaJaunie, David Willey, Cover Search winner Eileen Moon, and RUNNER'S WORLD Executive Editor Tish Hamilton at the cover unveiling. 5) A runner getting her photo taken at the RUNNER'S WORLD Cover Search photo experience at the Expo. 6) (left to right) New Balance Global Marketing Manager for NYRR Kristen MacKenzie, Jessica Murphy, New Balance Senior Apparel Design Manager Evie Moe, New Balance Global Marketing Manager for Running Keith Kelly, New Balance Senior Product Manager for Performance Running Claire Wood, New Balance Senior Product Manager for Performance Running Colin Ingram, Molly O'Keefe, David Willey, and New Balance Global PR Manager Mary Lawton at the RUNNER'S WORLD 50th Anniversary Celebration.

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FOUR-TIME ADWEEK HOT LIST WINNER 14 BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING SELECTIONS PEOPLE’S CHOICE WEBBY WINNER 2016 MIN'S BEST OF THE WEB AWARD


I’M A RUNNER

Interview by Nick Weldon

JON GLASER

ACTOR/WRITER/COMEDIAN, 48, BROOKLYN we’re both in our underwear. I thought it’d be funny if my character was ripped. There wasn’t enough time for that, so I still had a flabby dad body, but that got me back into running again. I LIVE NEAR the seven-mile mark of the New York City Marathon. I used to think, I can’t imagine running seven miles.

“I have a strong opinion about this shorts over tights debate. Have some courtesy and cover yourself!”

I’LL NEVER FORGET the first time I did. I was at Cape Cod and ran this picturesque route along country roads and rocky beaches. From there I started doing more and more long runs. I RAN MY FIRST HALF in Brooklyn last fall in 2:07 with a negative split. Like, my last mile was eight minutes. I couldn’t believe it. I felt like I was flying at the end. WHENEVER I TRAVEL for work, I bring my shoes and gear. I really enjoy running somewhere I’ve never run before. AT THIS COMEDY EVENT in Seattle, I found out Kristen Schaal (The Last Man on Earth, Bob’s Burgers) is a runner. We went for a run and talked about this idea for a Comedy 5K tour where we do shows and then do group runs. If we could figure out the logistics, it would be fun as hell.

SEEING The Second City as a kid was a revelation that I wanted to be in comedy. I got my start with it in Chicago before moving to New York to write for The Dana Carvey Show in 1996. I DIDN’T DO cross country or track, but I ran a lot as a kid. I have this strange, specific memory of a pair of Asics I bought: khaki-colored

112

with maroon stripes, really comfortable. I ran around our apartment complex in them. MY RUNNING fell off until about five years ago, when I decided to get in shape for the finale of my Adult Swim show Delocated. I HAD A FIGHT SCENE with this muscle-y Russian tough guy where

GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/IMARUNNER FOR A VIDEO INTERVIEW.

Glaser is the creator and star of Adult Swim’s Neon Joe, Werewolf Hunter and TruTV’s Jon Glaser Loves Gear, currently in its first season. He’s well known as Councilman Jamm on NBC’s Parks and Recreation.

I DON’T VIEW running as my comedy creative think tank. I set out focusing on the run. Do I want to push myself today? How far am I running? Those kinds of things. YOU HAVE TO TREAT RUNNING like anything else: You’re not just gonna start and be great. Find your pace. Find what works for you. Talk to people who know more than you. And find the right pair of shoes.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MEREDITH JENKS


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