Page 1

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IF THIS IS THE YEAR YOU

FORGE A NEW YOU, KATHERINE AMPOLINI

REGISTERED NURSE ANESTHETIST | IFBB BIKINI PRO

#IAmAnAthlete Share what the New Year means to you!


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contents

JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2017

66

Yoga for Strength Improve your performance in the gym or on the field with Stephanie Ring’s yoga program.

70

Your Meal-Prep Game Plan Prep these five foods on Sunday to have the healthiest, easiest, tastiest meal week, ever!

74

The Hips Have It Your hips are in control when it comes to core strength, so train them the right way.

82

The Science of Sleep The secret to getting the results you want in the gym might be as close as your bedroom.

features

40

Unstoppable We have a winner! 2016 Oxygen Challenge champ Patricia Arredondo talks to us about how she tackled the 90-day program and how it feels to earn the cover of Oxygen. Plus, we share stories from five inspirational honorable mentions.

10

oxygenma g. com

50

HIIT Your Goals Want to lose some holiday pounds? This eight-week, HIIT-based workout is just what you need.

58

Power Plants Try this meal plan, designed to go with our “HIIT Your Goals” workout plan, to feel and look your best.

70


TM

AVAILABLE AT POWERED BY:

IRISINXD® is a registered trademark of FINAFLEX.


contents 26

JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2017

28 Form and Function

34

Treat your shoulders right for strength and beauty.

30 Mobility Stretch your muscles in new ways with partner-assisted PNF moves.

Maximize your muscle by eating right after your workout.

31 Burn

23

INHALE Let Oxygen be your personal trainer.

24 By the Numbers

If you don’t have all the latest high-end gym equipment, these simple swaps are for you.

32 Research Says

move

34 Recovery

27 Fast Fitness Try this 20-minute TRX workout for back and core.

94 How She Fuels

We feed your need to know what to eat.

33 One Food, Five Ways

News from the world of exercise physiology.

Pro race-car driver Danica Patrick knows how to make the most of her workout time.

fuel

Stats and facts about fitness this winter.

26 The Latest

92 Spotlight On

Lexi Berriman follows a pragmatic approach to training.

How to get the most from the humble peanut. What you eat right after a workout (and when you eat it) is crucial to recovery. Here’s how to maximize your results.

35 Eat Smart Quick bites of nutrition news.

boost thrive

96 Supplements

36 Mind & Body

A look at some of the latest products.

Feeling blue this winter? Work out intensely to beat seasonal affective disorder.

37 Health The latest research on the benefits of staying fit.

27

87

EXHALE

88 Success Stories Kaseedee Pilarz and Ginger Lynn McGuinness

fit factor 90 Future of Fitness We hear from the rising stars in fitness. oxygenma g. com

INSPIRE

Find your fitspiration here.

transform

12

98


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fit feed

oxygenmag.com Cover Girl Confidential: PATRICIA ARREDONDO Watch behind-the-scenes footage of our cover shoot with 2016 Oxygen Challenge winner Patricia Arredondo and hear her emotional testimony on how fitness inspires her to never give up.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OXYGEN?

Sign up for our free weekly newsletter and have workouts and nutrition tips sent directly to your inbox.

KEEP IN TOUCH Tell us what you like about this issue and let us know what we can do better. Tag us in your posts @oxygenmag and you could be featured here!

Peanut power

Now that you know the different ways to enjoy

These little legumes this power food (Page 33), try tasty additional recipes like Almost-Guiltless Peanut Butter Cups pack a serious and Best-Ever Veggie Stir-Fry. nutrition punch.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @oxygenmagazine JOIN US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/oxygenmag HASHTAG US ON INSTAGRAM #oxygenmagazine VISIT US ONLINE oxygenmag.com or youtube.com/oxymagazine VISIT US ON PINTEREST /oxygenmag EMAIL US editorial@oxygenmag.com

14

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Photo by Peter Lueders / Sports Bra: VSX Sport / Shorts: Elisabetta Rogiani

LET’S GET SOCIAL: Post, pin, tag and tweet us. We want to connect with you online!


#OXYGEN EXHALE What is your fitness inspiration? Whether it’s your favorite workout, a run through the neighborhood or your yoga mat, we want to see what inspires you. Share it with us on Instagram or tweet us using the hashtag #oxygenexhale and your photo could be featured in an upcoming issue of Oxygen!

1. @inemesitg If you’ve got it, flaunt it!

6

2. @ashlypannell Nothing better than a good smoothie bowl.

1

3. @pamelafitfashionable One word: burpees. 4. @jess.glazer Oh you know, just hangin’ out.

2 5

5. @mindylouambrose Gotta look good to feel good! 6. foodprepprincess Now that’s what you call meal prep!

3 4


R

TRAIN BETTER

TM

oxygen Group Publisher Cheryl Angelheart

Brand and New Media Director Alexander Norouzi

Editor-in-Chief Maureen Farrar PROUDLY MADE IN THE USA

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Maura Weber Fitness Editor Lara McGlashan Copy Chief Jeannine Santiago Special Projects Editor Vicki Baker

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ART Art Director Tara Thompson Art Director Claudia Monje PRODU CTION Production Manager Patrick Sternkopf Video and Photo Editor Richard Alexander Video and Photo Editor Josh Brumfield D I G I TA L & M A R K E T I N G Online Editor Michael Nystrom Marketing Manager Laureen O’Brien ADVERTISING SALES Group Advertising Director Donna Diamond Riekenberg Advertising Account Manager BJ Ghiglione A/R Manager Alice C. Negrete CONTRIBUTORS Michael Berg, Todd Bumgardner, Erin Calderone, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Donna Gast, Ronnda Hamilton, Nancy J, Matthew Kadey, Jerry Kindela, Susan M. Kleiner, Peter Lueders, Linda Melone, Myatt Murphy, Virginia Pelley, Shoshana Pritzker, Robert Reiff, Tosca Reno, Elisabetta Rogiani, Jessie R. Shafer, Cory Sorensen, Michelle Basta Speers, Steven Stiefel, Eric Velazquez, Joe Wuebben, Allison Young

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Executive Chairman Efrem Zimbalist III President & CEO Andrew W. Clurman Executive Vice President & CFO Brian J. Sellstrom Executive Vice President of Operations Patricia B. Fox Vice President, General Manager Kim Paulsen Vice President, Information Technology Nelson Saenz Vice President, Research Kristy Kaus

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Oxygen is printed in the U.S.A. © 2017 by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. The information in Oxygen is for educational purposes only. It’s not intended to replace the advice or attention of health care professionals. Consult your physician before making changes in your diet, supplement and/or exercise program. OXYGEN, 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E, Santa Clarita, CA 91355. Toll Free: (800) 951-2259 Oxygen (USPS 015-783, ISSN 1095-7073) is published monthly except February and April by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc., an Active Interest Media company. Advertising and editorial offices at 24900 Anza Drive, Unit E, Santa Clarita, California 91355. The known office of publication is 5720 Flatiron Pkwy, Boulder CO 80301. Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, CO and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Oxygen, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. Subscription rates in the United States are one year $24.97. Canada: $39.97. Foreign: $54.97 (US funds only). The publisher and editors will not be responsible for unsolicited material. Manuscripts and photographs must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Vol. 20, No. 1. Printed in the United States by RR Donnelley, Strasburg, VA. Copyright © 2017 by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced, either in whole or part, in any form without written permission from the publisher. To remove your name from promotional lists write to: Oxygen, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235.


contributors Virginia Pelley

Model for Move exercises, Pages 27-29

Author of Thrive: Health, Page 37

Author of “HIIT Your Goals,” Page 50

Virginia P el

SNX-SMART CH EESE PIZZA

CI N N A M O N B U N

zq ela Eric V

Darlen e

Sa lva d

or

Fitness cred: Eric Velazquez, CSCS, a graduate of Concordia University (Irvine), is a veteran writer/editor of several fitness industry magazines. He is also co-author of The PrayFit Diet (Touchstone, 2014). Police squad: Velazquez is currently a sponsored academy recruit for an Orange County, California, police department, where he says they do some sort of physical training every hour. “My CSCS comes in handy here as I get to share training info with recruits who need help,” he says.

Versatile writer: Virginia Pelley is a freelance writer in Tampa, Florida. She earned a journalism degree at San Francisco State University, was a magazine editor in Los Angeles and has written for Cosmopolitan, TheAtlantic.com, WashingtonPost.com, Vice, Details and Men’s Health. Beach lover: Pelley recently bought a home in Tampa after living in several cities where it’s prohibitively expensive to buy, and she says she’s looking forward to her first holiday season where it will be 80 degrees out.

y le

Secret skill: This mother of two is a fitness model, personal trainer and yoga instructor, and she’s also a national Brazilian jiu-jitsu medalist. Based in Redondo Beach, California, she says her goal is to inspire clients to live healthier lives through instilling enjoyable physical movement and meditation. Current project: Salvador is developing a yoga program specific for bodybuilders based in the vinyasa style of movement synchronized with breath to build strength, flexibility and focus.

Eric Velazquez

ue z

Darlene Salvador

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Photo by Peter Lueders

editor's note

Transformations n 2015 when we launched the first Oxygen Challenge, we tried to manage our expectations. We were so excited to share the programs that we created along with our coaches, and we hoped you would sign up, but we honestly didn’t know how many would. Needless to say, we were completely blown away when thousands of you joined, entered the cover contest and followed through with the 90-day program. We were stunned by the commitment, focus and hard work every participant put in, whether they were aiming for the cover or setting the groundwork for a lifestyle transformation. For this year’s Challenge, we paired our incredible coaches — Ashley Kaltwasser and Christmas Abbott — to deliver two new comprehensive training and nutrition programs, designed to get you stronger and leaner. And for the second year in a row, there were thousands of entries to comb through, and we are so impressed with your transformations. Collectively, you lost hundreds of pounds and shed tons of body fat. Many of you made life-changing transformations, making narrowing down the list to just 20 nearly impossible. There were so many worthy candidates, which is why we’re glad we left the task to you to choose the winner.

A behindthe-scenes peek at our shoot with OC2 winner Patricia Arredondo. 18

oxygenma g. com

You will meet our Oxygen Challenge 2 winner on Page 40, and you’ll be impressed with her dedication and be inspired by her drive and humility. We have also profiled five standouts who are living proof that we have the ability to change our bodies and our lives. Each of their stories is different, but they have one thing in common: They are an inspiration to all of us. Speaking of transformations, you may have noticed Oxygen looks very different this issue. For the past couple of months, our amazing art directors have been transforming this magazine, making the changes you’ve asked for. We’re excited about our new, improved quality and trim size, which allow our photography to pop off the page. You asked for better legibility, so we are using new, cleaner fonts in a larger type size to give your eyes a break. We’ve also fine-tuned the design of the magazine to highlight the content, bringing the focus back to the physiques and to technique. What hasn’t changed is our dedication to delivering the best information on training and nutrition to help you reach your goals. We will continue to tell you about the latest in fitness research; we will provide you with a broad mix of workouts for strength, fat loss and cardiovascular endurance; and we will include more meal plans and info

on meal prep to take the guesswork out of eating clean. I am so excited to present this new issue to you and can’t wait to hear what you think. Share your thoughts on social media or email us at editorial@oxygenmag.com.

Train hard,

Maureen Farrar Editor-in-Chief @mofarrar


CLA

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GETTING LEANER WITH

WHY YOU NEED CLA You train. You eat smart. You supplement. Yet you still want a leaner body.That’s when a healthy fat that reduces the number and size of fat cells in your body and improves the ratio of lean body mass to fat may be worth checking out: conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and specifically Tonalin CLA.

WHERE YOU GET CLA

Drink 1 gallon

Eat 18.7 pounds

of grass-fed whole milk

(precooked weight) of grass-fed

We used to get CLA naturally from diets rich in beef

(about 2,400 calories

steak (about 11,200 calories

and dairy from grass-fed cows. Today, cows are

and 128 grams of fat)

and 416 grams of fat)

typically grain-fed. Meat and dairy from grass-fed cows has three to five times more CLA. Still, it would be impossible to get the recommended CLA dosage from food. That’s why scientists suggest you consume at least 3 grams of supplemental CLA daily — the amount proven for you to reduce fat and improve body composition. To get that amount from food, you would need to do one of the following every day:

HOW CLA WORKS

Drink 6.5 gallons of conventional whole milk (about 15,500 calories and 825 grams of fat)

Without Tonalin CLA

Extra calories cause fat cells to grow in size and double or triple in become 80 to 160 billion) But Tonalin reduces body fat and builds lean muscle by helping to:

Fat

x x

Reduce the Number of Fat Cells in Muscle Promote the Death of Immature Fat Cells

Why choose Tonalin (Tone-alin) over other brands? Because Tonalin is

made in Western Europe from safflowers grown in the Americas for sustainably sourced non-GMO oil the result of a patented purification process that yields a composition that is unique in structure compared to other CLA products

Reduce the Growth of New Fat Cells

x

of conventional 1 percent milk (about 32,800 calories and 760 grams of fat)

the only CLA brand clinically proven to deliver results safely longterm

number (40 billion fat cells can

Reduce the Deposition of Fat in Fat Cells

Drink 20 gallons

With Tonalin CLA

Learn more at Tonalin.com

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LETTERS

4-6 sets/6-8 reps at 80-85% 1RM or 6-8RM

inbox

Strong & Confident!

WEEK 4: HEAVY-OVERREACHING DAY 1

DAY 2

Legs + Abs

EXERCISE

SETS

REPS

WT

EXERCISE

SETS

REPS

WT

EXERCISE

FLAT-BENCH DUMBBELL PRESS

6

6-8

8085%

BARBELL BACK SQUAT

6

6-8

8085%

INCLINE-BENCH DUMBBELL PRESS

6

6-8

8085%

BARBELL ROMANIAN DEADLIFT

SETS

REPS

WT

LAT PULLDOWN

6

6-8

8085%

6

6-8

8085%

CABLE ROW

5

6-8

8085%

4

6-8

8085%

BULGARIAN SPLIT SQUAT 4

6-8

8085%

DUMBBELL SINGLE-ARM BENT-OVER ROW

5

6-8

8085%

FRONT DELT RAISE

5

6-8

8085%

ABDUCTOR MACHINE

4

6-8

8085%

REAR DELT FLYE

4

6-8

8085%

LATERAL DELT RAISE

5

6-8

8085%

ADDUCTOR MACHINE

4

6-8

8085%

PREACHER CURL

5

6-8

8085%

OVERHEAD DUMBBELL TRICEPS EXTENSION

4

6-8

8085%

LEG EXTENSION

5

6-8

8085%

HAMMER CURL

5

6-8

8085%

ROPE TRICEPS PRESSDOWN

4

6-8

8085%

LEG CURL

5

6-8

8085%

SINGLE-LEGGED BRIDGE

6

10

BW

Thank you for the fourweek total-body plan in the August issue of Oxygen. I’m on the third week and have never felt so strong or have never seen so many changes before. It has totally changed my life. I wasn’t sure if I was ready for the challenge that started in June [2016 Oxygen Challenge], but after doing this, I’m confident I can do it. Can’t wait to start Part 2. I can’t thank you enough.

ROMAN CHAIR KNEE RAISE

6

10

BW

OBLIQUE V-UP

6

10

BW

REVERSE CRUNCH

6

10

BW

DAY 4

DAY 5

Chest + Shoulders + Triceps + Abs

Legs

DAY 6 Back + Biceps + Abs Cardio: 20 to 30 minutes steadystate – light intensity

EXERCISE

SETS

REPS

WT

EXERCISE

SETS

REPS

WT

EXERCISE

SETS

REPS

WT

FLAT-BENCH DUMBBELL PRESS

6

6-8

8085%

BARBELL BACK SQUAT

6

6-8

8085%

LAT PULLDOWN

6

6-8

8085%

INCLINE-BENCH DUMBBELL PRESS

6

6-8

8085%

BARBELL ROMANIAN DEADLIFT

6

6-8

8085%

CABLE ROW

5

6-8

8085%

CABLE CHEST FLYE

4

6-8

8085%

BULGARIAN SPLIT SQUAT

4

6-8

8085%

DUMBBELL SINGLE-ARM BENT-OVER ROW

5

6-8

8085%

FRONT DELT RAISE

4

6-8

8085%

ABDUCTOR MACHINE

4

6-8

8085%

REAR DELT FLYE

4

6-8

8085%

LATERAL DELT RAISE

4

6-8

8085%

ADDUCTOR MACHINE

4

6-8

8085%

PREACHER CURL

4

6-8

8085%

OVERHEAD DUMBBELL TRICEPS EXTENSION

4

6-8

8085%

LEG EXTENSION

4

6-8

8085%

HAMMER CURL

4

6-8

8085%

ROPE TRICEPS PRESSDOWN

4

6-8

8085%

LEG CURL

4

6-8

8085%

ROMAN CHAIR KNEE RAISE

6

10

BW

BW

SINGLE-LEGGED BRIDGE

4

10

BW

OBLIQUE V-UP

6

10

BW

REVERSE CRUNCH 6

10

BW

ROMAN CHAIR KNEE RAISE

4

10

OBLIQUE V-UP

4

10

BW

REVERSE CRUNCH

4

10

BW

54

UP NEXT MONTH: PART 2 — THE UNDULATING MICROCYCLE Buckle in: Next month, we’re swapping the stairs for a roller coaster! Undulating periodization, in which volume-load is varied from weekto-week in a rising and falling pattern, is another way to push your limits and get better gains.

Rest/Yoga

› OXYGENMAG.COM . AUGUST 2016

— rosie, toronto

My Daughter Is My “Why”

Casey Ruthardt, 33 Minco, Oklahoma

Back + Biceps Cardio: 30 to 40 minutes steadystate – moderate intensity

CABLE CHEST FLYE

DAY 7

Amy Kuntzman, 39 San Diego

DAY 3

Chest + Shoulders + Triceps Cardio: 15 to 20 minutes – intervals or HIIT

My reason for working out is that it makes me better for my daughter. I am a single mom to a daughter with special needs and a rare brain/spinal condition. It isn’t just to live longer for her but to LIVE right here, right now with her. When I work out, I am fit, in shape and happy from the endorphin rush. She sees it, and though she is contraindicated from heavy lifting or doing most plyo moves, we do heaps of yoga together. My daughter is always so proud of me. My workouts all come from a place of love.

AUGUST 2016

. OXYGENMAG.COM ‹

healthy and attractive woman looks like. I am very selective about what enters our home and believe that everything that touches my daughters’ senses has an effect on them. Your magazine provides a healthy contrast to the worldly self-images that seem to find their way into our family TV nights. Thank you for helping me teach that a strong, fit young lady is more desirable than some lingerie model. Keep up the good work!

— j. kyle, via email

— jayna’, via email

Time for a Change

Paula Vas, 53 Coppell, Texas

You showed us

Oxygen women share photos of their guns. Look for our next request for submissions on our Facebook page and you could be featured here!

20

oxygenma g. com

I read your magazine on Texture and noticed that you are publishing the magazine once every two months. You truly have the best fitness magazine, so I was disappointed in the change but grateful that you are at least still publishing.

— lorraine, via facebook Editor’s Note: Yes, we moved to a bimonthly format, beginning with our September/October 2016 issue. However, we will continue to provide you with the same great training and nutrition information each issue. And don’t forget to visit us at oxygenmag .com for even more content!

Healthy Example As a father of two teenage daughters, I just want to thank you for providing good examples and commentary of what a

55

All content submitted to Oxygen will be considered for publication. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity.


WHY NOT YOU? Ever dream of becoming a personal trainer? Turn your dreams into reality with ISSA education.

Meet Uepati & Kristi “Being ISSA Certified brought freedom to our lives. Pati was able to quit his full time job and focus solely on training his clients and athletes. He is an ISSA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. I have been training for fifteen years and after earning my Professional Status as an IFBB Figure Athlete, I decided to dive into the nutrition aspect of fitness. My business took off when I got my ISSA certification as a Specialist in Sports Nutrition and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition. Through our ISSA credentials we are able to grow our company iPhysique and work together coaching our team of athletes in Figure and Bikini competitions, Spartan and other outdoor racing, and Powerlifting team. We enjoy running all aspects of business together including photo shoots, traveling to team events, and making appearances for supplement companies. The tools and resources that ISSA provides are invaluable and will set you apart from the rest of the fitness industry.”

—Uepati Tauti, ISSA SSC —Kristi Tauti, ISSA SSN, SFN iphysiquegym.com

The ISSA Your Trusted Source for Fitness Education Since 1988 ISSA’s nationally accredited distance education programs provide the education you need to become a Personal Trainer, Elite Trainer, or Master Trainer. Take your certification courses even higher and earn an Associate’s Degree in Exercise Science with an Emphasis in Personal Training. TA, MyCAA, and GI Bill approved.

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inhale

LET OXYGEN BE YOUR PERSONAL TRAINER

TRY IT!

The following pages have new training ideas from the worlds of functional ďŹ tness, Pilates, TRX and even old-school bodybuilding. Use them to breathe new life into your workouts!

BY THE NUMBERS MOVE FUEL THRIVE

24 26 32 36

january / february 2017

23


by the numbers

HAPPY NEW YEAR! 3 most popular resolutions:

Lose weight

45 PERCENT

Amount of Americans who make New Year’s resolutions

92 PERCENT A whopping number of people who set resolutions and don’t succeed

Quit smoking

Exercise regularly

TO SUCCEED, KEEP YOUR RESOLUTIONS TO YOURSELF.

Winter Blues

1020 PERCENT

of the population is affected by seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

SAD is more common in women than men. Working out can relieve depressive symptoms. Movement increases blood flow to the brain, allowing it to function better, making you feel more focused.

24

oxygenma g. com

COLDWEATHER TRAINING FOR FAT LOSS Glycogen stores are depleted faster in cold weather. During exercise in the cold, muscles may require more energy at a faster rate, forcing muscles to turn to fat as a source of energy. Shivering, which is meant to offset heat loss, causes muscles to empty glycogen stores at five to six times the normal rate. Glycogen depletion is also caused by increased blood levels of epinephrine (adrenaline), enhancing fat metabolism. There’s some evidence that insulin levels are lower in the winter, which could spur fat breakdown. Cold increases your resting metabolic rate (the sum total of calories your body burns when completely at rest).

We the heart A woman’s average heartbeat is faster than a man’s by about eight beats per minute. Your heart beats about 100,000 times per day and about 3 billion times during your life. Each minute, your heart pumps 1.5 gallons of blood (about 2,500 gallons daily) through 60,000 miles of blood vessels. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women. More than half the deaths due to heart disease in 2009 were in men.


ASLIHAN KORUYAN SABANCI

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NATURAL DRINK RECIPES

Honey Ginger Tea

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND FREE RECIPES, VISIT www.aslihansab a n c i. c o m

Ingredients

Preparation

3-4 sliced fresh ginger 1 cup water 2 tablespoons honey 1 stick cinnamon

Boil the ginger and the cinnamon with the water for 10 minutes. Strain and mix your tea with the honey. Drink hot.


move

THE LATEST

By Lara McGlashan, MFA, CPT

MOVE OF THE MONTH It’s time to turn the push-up on its head — literally. “This Pilates pike push-up helps strengthen the upper body and core while stretching the spine and lengthening the backs of your legs,” says Liz Hilliard, creator and coowner of Hilliard Studio Method in Charlotte, North Carolina (hilliardstudio method.com).

HOWTO

Motivate from within

Get into plank position with your head, hips and heels in line. Lift your hips toward the sky and walk your hands toward your feet. When your torso is nearly vertical, place your hands wider than your shoulders and come up onto your toes, shifting your weight more into your hands, and focus on your toes to keep your head neutral. From here, bend your elbows and slowly lower your head toward the floor, as far as you can, then press back up to the start. Do three sets of eight to 10 reps.

• With this workout, I move one step closer to my goal. • I love to train [insert bodypart], and with each rep, I get stronger. • Today, I will test my limits and prove my inner and outer strength. • In only one short hour, I will feel lighter, happier and more energized.

Save Your Mitochondria Anyone who has taken a biology class probably remembers a little about mitochondria — the powerhouses of the body. These organelles reside within your cells and convert carbohydrates and fatty acids into ATP (energy) to power your activities and bodily functions. The majority of mitochondria are found in your muscle tissue, and in true use-it-or-lose-it fashion, if you are sedentary, your mitochondrial popula-

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tion and function decreases, leading to cellular aging, the onset of age-related diseases and muscle wasting. Regular exercise helps increase and replicate our mitochondria, improving endurance, energy and metabolic efficiency. That said, there are a couple of ways to optimize your mitochondrial health and beat Father Time while you’re at it: Do two to three high-intensity interval training workouts per week. HIIT has been

shown in several studies to promote the growth and function of mitochondria. Foam-roll regularly. Massaging your muscles releases PGC-1a, a protein that fuels mitochondrial growth. Get plenty of sleep. Sleep deprivation triggers inflammation, which can damage mitochondria and render them less efficient.* * For more on the benefits of sleep, turn to Page 82!

Photos by Peter Lueders / Model: Tawny Macias / Pants: Skins / Top: Wear It to Heart

It’s the new year and many people have vowed to make a habit of exercise. But as the novelty of a fresh start wears off, motivation lags. However, new research indicates that a conditioned cue (such as your alarm clock) plus an intrinsic, or inner, reward should get you going. To help support your intrinsic motivation, formulate a positive affirmation. New research from the University of Freiburg’s Department of Sport Science in Germany found that when people believed they would benefit from the activity they were doing, they enjoyed it more, it improved their mood, and it reduced their overall level of anxiety. Try one of these mood-altering affirmations to boost motivation:


move

By Todd Bumgardner, MS, CSCS

FAST FITNESS

Posture perfect minute workout: TRX back and core

Blast your back and core with this express TRX workout.

Photos by Peter Lueders /Model: Darlene Salvador / Shoes: Nike Flywire / Pants: Beyond Yoga / Top: Lucy

itting, slouching, texting — all these modern-day postural annihilators come with a price: inactive abs, tight hips, stiff necks and rounded shoulders. Fortunately, this posture-perfect TRX workout can straighten you out. These moves target the upper back and core — two regions paramount for maintaining good posture — while deftly counteracting the negative effects of sitting. These functional superstars also create long, lean muscle in your abs and back, building optimal shape and the intrinsic strength that leads to healthier joints, improved exercise longevity and sustained results. After a dynamic warm-up, perform each move for 30 seconds at a moderate to high intensity. Rest 30 seconds between moves and go through the routine three to four times.

Exercise Work/Rest TRX Strap (seconds) Length Pull-Up

30/30

Shortened all the way up

Face Pull

30/30

Shortened all the way up

30/30 (each side)

Midshin level

30/30

Midshin level

Side Plank Mountain Climber

Note: Do the moves in the order suggested above to minimize equipment adjustments and save time.

1

2

3

4

1. PULLUP

2. FACE PULL

3. SIDE PLANK

Hang directly underneath the anchor so your spine is vertical with the straps, arms extended. Place your feet flat on the floor, knees bent. Drive your elbows down and back to pull yourself up, using your legs to assist, if needed. Lower slowly to the start and repeat right away.

Stand and lean away from the TRX, walking your feet out until your body is at an angle to the floor; the more horizontal you are, the more challenging the move becomes. Pull the handles toward your ears, driving your elbows out and back so that at peak contraction, they make 90-degree angles beside your head. Slowly return to the start.

Set the TRX to midshin and place a foot in each cradle. Turn onto your side with your top foot slightly in front of your bottom, and place your elbow underneath your shoulder on the floor. Lift your hips to align with your head and heels. Hold and breathe.

4. MOUNTAIN CLIMBER Get into plank position with your feet in the cradles. Lift your hips to align with your head and heels and press through your palms to stabilize your shoulders. Keep your hips low as you alternately drive your knees toward your elbows, maintaining a brisk pace.

To see ese moves in acon — plus two bonus moves to add to e program — go to oxygenmag.com. Plus, to win your own set of TRX bands, go to oxygenmag.com/TRX-Giveaway.

january / february 2017

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FORM  FUNCTION

Target: shoulders For shapely delts, use this traditional muscle-sculpting move.

ant a more balanced physique? Rounder glutes? The illusion of a smaller waist? Fully developing your shoulders can work this magic, and incorporating compound moves such as this Arnold overhead dumbbell press are imperative for facilitating this development. As opposed to a standard overhead press that relies mostly on the anterior (front) delts, Arnold’s version calls on all three heads of the shoulder muscles to play a role in performing the lift. (Bonus: This move also calls your triceps into play.) Here’s the play-by-play.

ARNOLD OVERHEAD DUMBBELL PRESS

Note: If you are new to training, build up your strength with a standard overhead press first before attempting this move.

Sit on a bench with a back with your feet flat on the floor. This allows you to focus exclusively on your shoulders as you perform the lift. It’s helpful to imagine the floor as the initiation point for your power: As you execute the lift, actively press through your feet to send energy from the floor through your torso and up to the weights. Hold a set of dumbbells at your shoulders with your palms facing rearward. This lower starting point offers a longer range of motion, which translates into more time under tension and faster gains. Your forearms should be perpendicular to the ground. This stabilizes the dumbbells. Inhale to create stability in your core and spine, then start to extend your arms, driving the weights upward and rotating your wrists so that at the top, your hands face forward. Your elbows might flare out a little bit as you extend, which is natural.

SAMPLE PHYSIQUE SHOULDER WORKOUT Your shoulders have a lot of moving parts, so before doing this workout, make sure you warm up your rotator cuffs, wrists and shoulder muscles with some dynamic stretching so everything is ready to go.

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At full extension, your arms should be straight up over your shoulders, elbows by your ears. Slowly reverse the steps to return to the start and, without bouncing or using momentum, repeat right away. This move can be done standing: Place your feet hip-width apart, knees soft, and tuck your tailbone to prevent overarching your back. Brace your core and squeeze your glutes as you press the weights to keep your spine in the optimal position.

TROUBLESHOOTING If you feel unsteady with the weights overhead, you may be overarching your back, throwing your pelvis and spine out of alignment, and breaking the upward energy transfer from your feet to the weights. Reposition your body so your core is braced, your spine is neutral and your torso is solid. Don’t whack the weights together over your head like cymbals; you could drop them on yourself or someone else.

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Arnold Overhead Dumbbell Press

4

8-10

Lateral Dumbbell Raise

4

10-12

Rear Delt Flye

3

10-12

Alternating Dumbbell Front Raise

3

10 (each arm)

Photos by Peter Lueders / Model: Darlene Salvador / Shoes: Nike Flywire / Pants: Beyond Yoga / Top: Lucy

move


By Lara McGlashan, MFA, CPT

Target: shoulders For functional fitness, learn how to do the barbell push jerk. houlders are one of your most important joints, and just about every upper-body strength move engages them to an extent. They’re also integral in sports. Developing explosive power and strength in your shoulders and traps using compound moves such as the push jerk is imperative for functional conditioning and could mean the difference between winning the game and going home empty-handed.

SAMPLE FUNCTIONAL SHOULDER WORKOUT Exercise

Sets

Reps

Scapular Push-Up

2

15

Hanging Shrug

2

10

Alternating Kettlebell Swing

3

10 (each arm)

Waiter’s Walk

3

50 yards (each arm)

Hang Clean

2

5

Barbell Push Jerk

6*

10, 9, 7, 6, 4, 3

*Build in weight as you progress through the sets, shooting for your three-rep max for the final set.

BARBELL PUSH JERK Take a hip-width stance with your feet rotated outward slightly, as with a squat. This helps maintain a stacked spine and solid core to improve force while protecting your back. Load a barbell with a moderately heavy weight, and hold it across your front delts and clavicle, shoulder blades retracted, chin drawn back. This is the ideal position for the bar to travel straight upward without clipping your chin or nose. Hold the bar just outside your shoulders and lift your elbows. The exact degree of the lift will vary from person to person as mobility dictates; it should be greater than perpendicular but less than parallel to the floor. Wrap your thumb around the bar for a more stable grip. When you’re ready to perform the lift, take a large breath in to stabilize your spine and help transfer the energy of your legs through your torso to the barbell. Flex your knees and hips, keeping your feet flat and pushing your knees outward slightly to travel over your toes, dropping down quickly a couple of inches for the dip. During the dip, your torso should stay erect and your weight should be in your heels. Don’t lean forward.

The dip is brief — drop down, then immediately and powerfully extend your knees, ankles and hips to direct the force straight upward. You may even come up onto your toes if you’re generating enough power; just avoid leaning forward. When done correctly, the barbell should shoot up off your shoulders and become momentarily weightless. During this weightless phase, aggressively drop underneath the bar by hopping your feet apart about a foot and punching your arms straight up overhead to full extension. At the top, the bar should be directly above or slightly behind your ears when viewed from the side. This protects your shoulders and back. Avoid arching your back as you stabilize the load overhead, then step your feet back together before lowering the bar to midthigh and then to the floor with control.

TROUBLESHOOTING

If the bar travels forward as you drive up, you’re probably on your toes. Correct your body position to prevent this.

If your bar never feels “weightless,” you might be too loose in your core. Brace your abs before initiating the dip. If you can’t lift your elbows forward properly, work on thoracic mobility with some dynamic stretching beforehand, focusing on your triceps and lats.

january / february 2017

29


MOBILITY

By Erin Calderone, MS, CSCS

Mobility magic Is it possible to improve my range of motion quickly? Yes! Try proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. PNF basically plays a trick on your nervous system: By first contracting the muscle to be stretched, you activate a sensory neuron called the Golgi tendon organ (GTO). This spawns a protective reflex from your spinal cord that tells your muscle to relax, and voilà! Your flexibility instantly improves. PNF stretching can be done using two techniques: contract relax or contract-relax-antagonist contract: Contract relax: Move your limb to your end range of motion, then isometrically contract the muscle against the resistance of a partner for up to 10 seconds. Your partner should provide enough resistance during the contractile phase to hold your limb in place. Relax and have your partner move the limb a little farther using gentle but firm pressure. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds. Contract-relax-antagonist contract: Move the limb to your end range of motion and isometrically contract the muscle to be stretched for up to 10 seconds as your partner holds your limb in place. Then relax that muscle and contract the antagonist (opposite) muscle. This has the benefit of reciprocal inhibition: When the antagonist (opposing) is firing, the neuromuscular input to the muscle being stretched is inhibited, furthering your stretch. Hold this contraction for up to 10 seconds. For both techniques, your contraction against your partner’s resistance should be about 65 percent of your maximum, according to recent research; anything more may actually activate another protective reflex.

Tight traps? Loosen up with our neck/ trapezius stretch at right.

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Make like Gumby with these partner-assisted PNF stretches.

Repeat each stretch two to four times. CHEST Hold your arm to the side at shoulder height, elbow bent 90 degrees. Draw your arm back as far as you can. Have your partner place one hand on your shoulder and the other on the front of your elbow and provide resistance as you press forward with your arm. Then relax as your partner gently moves your limb farther into the stretch.

HIP FLEXORS Lie faceup on a tall bench or high table with your hips at the edge. Hug one knee to your chest and let the other hang off the bench. Have your partner apply gentle downward pressure just above the hanging knee as you lift your leg upward to activate your hip flexors. Then relax your leg as your partner applies some gentle downward pressure.

QUADRICEPS Lie facedown on the edge of a high bench and drop one leg off the side, placing that foot on the ground for stability. Extend the other leg along the table and bring your heel toward your glutes. Have your partner hold your leg at your ankle as you try to extend your leg, then relax and have your partner move your ankle closer to your glute. Note: If you aren’t feeling a stretch, walk the opposite foot forward.

INNER THIGH Lie faceup with the soles of your feet together, knees open. Have your partner gently press downward on your knees as you squeeze them together. Then relax and let the weight of your knees open up your hips, with your partner offering light pressure.

HAMSTRINGS

NECK/TRAPEZIUS

Lie faceup on the ground and lift one leg straight up in the air. Have your partner hold this leg at the knee and ankle and keep your hips on the ground as you tighten the hamstrings and try to drive your heel toward the ground. Then relax and have your partner gently press your leg a little farther into the stretch.

Sit tall with a neutral spine with your partner standing behind you. Drop one ear to your shoulder and have your partner place one hand on your opposite shoulder and the other on the side of your head. Lift your head up against his or her hand, then relax and try to drop your ear closer to your shoulder as your partner holds the opposite shoulder down.

To view ese retes, go to oxygenmag.com.

Photos by Peter Lueders / Model: Tawny Macias / Pants: Skins / Top: Wear It to Heart

move


move

By Lara McGlashan, MFA, CPT

Smart swaps Not every gym is equipped with the latest, greatest fitness gear, and while NBC’s The Biggest Loser contestants enjoy a bank of Jacobs Ladders for their cardio workouts, the only ladder your gym might offer is of the aluminum type, which is only hauled out of the closet twice a year to change the lightbulbs. Use one of these alternatives to sub for equipment your gym is lacking, and you’ll be able to do any workout you find in this magazine or online and get the same results.

BURN

Who needs fancy cardio equipment or commercial gym gear? These simple substitutions work just as well as the latest, greatest machines in a pinch.

MISSING EQUIPMENT:

MISSING EQUIPMENT:

MISSING EQUIPMENT:

MISSING EQUIPMENT:

MISSING EQUIPMENT:

MISSING EQUIPMENT:

Airdyne Bike

Battling Ropes

Rowing Machine

Sled/Prowler Sled

StepMill

VersaClimber

SMART SWAP:

SMART SWAP:

SMART SWAP:

SMART SWAP:

SMART SWAP:

SMART SWAP:

Battling Ropes

Kettlebells

Banded Squat Row

Plate Push

Jump Rope

Burpees

While the Airdyne bike is a tremendous tool, it tends to be in short supply in most commercial gyms. Battling ropes can offer similar benefits, especially when the workout calls for sprints or Tabata format high-intensity interval training: A recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that working with ropes produced physiological results similar to sprinting. At a cost of 10.3 calories per minute of work, these ropes are fun fat burners.

The main draw of the battling ropes is that they offer a different type of dynamic resistance movement, which engages your body from head to toe. Kettlebells offer the same sort of total-body synergy when used correctly, so substitute rope waves and slams with kettlebell swings, and side-to-side rope movements with kettlebell seated Russian twists, windmills or Turkish get-ups.

No rowing machine? No problem. Recreate the same type of rowing motion with a resistance band: Secure it around a squat rack at about hip height, hold it with both hands and step back to create tension, arms straight. From here, squat down quickly, then drive back up to the start as you row the band toward your upper chest, pulling your elbows out and back as if rowing. Move quickly, alternating between the movements and blending the moves seamlessly as you would on a rower.

Some gyms lack the real estate or artificial turf for sleds and Prowlers. No sweat: Instead, grab a 45-pound weight plate, set it on the floor in an open area, place a hand on either side and push it forward. Keep your hips low and drive with your glutes to mimic the leg activity you’d get from using a traditional sled. And since you can’t safely stack the plates to create more resistance, increase the intensity instead by doing sprint intervals.

Many gyms have the pedal-pushing type of climbers but not as many boast a StepMill, which has a continually rotating staircase. Outside of finding some actual stairs on which to perform drills, jumping rope is a good sub in a pinch: It engages the whole lower body as well as the core and trains timing and coordination as well as speed, much in the same way as stair running does. Jump a minute and rest a minute, alternating between the two for 10 to 15 minutes, and you should be spent.

VersaClimbers and Jacobs Ladders are similar in that they both use your whole body as a unit in order to power the equipment. Your own body is the perfect substitute for these expensive gadgets, and burpees offer a similar total-body stimulus with no pricey mechanical parts. Increase the intensity of standard burpees by taking them on the move — leaping forward or laterally instead of upward — or by doubling the number of push-ups you do at the bottom to increase upperbody activity.

If your gym lacks some gear, we’ve got your solution.

january / february 2017

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fuel

RESEARCH SAYS

By Jessie R. Shafer, RD

Fortified milk is a great source of vitamin D.

O“MEGA” MOOD BOOSTER

Vitamin D = Stronger Athletes

D deficient? A new line of studies conducted by University of Tulsa researchers suggests that low levels of vitamin D is linked to slower recovery among athletes. Researchers analyzed vitamin D levels in more than 100 athletes and found that 68 percent had adequate levels, 23 percent were insufficient and 9 percent were deficient (below 50 nmol/L). Athletes

who had lower vitamin D displayed significantly poorer performance in four physical tests: a vertical jump, shuttle run, triple hop and onerep squat max, showing that their strength, explosiveness, speed, agility and recovery were affected. Take-away: The Endocrine Society recommends consuming 1,500 and 2,000 IU of vitamin D a day.

IT’S NOT THE GLUTEN According to research published in the online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine, the number of people who follow a glutenfree diet has tripled in five years; however, the number of people being diagnosed with celiac disease (an immune reaction to eating gluten that results in inflammation) remains the same.  BY LARA M GLASHAN C

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Omega-3 fatty acids may alleviate depression, according to a recent analysis of 13 nutrition studies. Major depressive disorder is one of the most common mental disorders in the U.S., affecting nearly 16 million adults each year, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The research showed that two omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had a depression-reducing effect on participants, especially those who took higher doses of EPA. Fish and seafood, including fishoil supplements, contain the highest amounts of EPA and DHA.

1.76 MILLION Approximate number of Americans with celiac disease

2.7 MILLION

Approximate number of Americans who follow a gluten-free diet


fuel

By Lara McGlashan, MFA, CPT

Peanuts

1 FOOD, 5 WAYS

1. As a spread. Stir a tablespoon of all-natural, unsalted peanut butter into your morning oats and get an extra 4 grams of quality protein as well as all-day satisfaction: A study from Purdue University showed that consuming peanuts for breakfast increased the hormone peptide YY, which promotes satiety and helps control appetite for up to 12 hours.

Your heart and brain will go nuts for peanuts. Plus, they help lower your risk of weight gain. Here are five ways to enjoy them. BESTEVER VEGGIE STIRFRY MAKES 2 SERVINGS 1 tbsp sesame seeds, toasted 2 tbsp peanut oil ½ pound fresh asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced 1 cup broccoli florets 1 large yellow onion, sliced 2 cups mushrooms, sliced 2 tsp fresh ginger, minced 1 tsp fresh garlic, minced 1 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce (or to taste) 1 tbsp sesame oil (optional)

2. As a flour. Swap peanut flour for traditional wheat flour to create a gluten-free, highprotein, high-fiber treat.

Heat peanut oil in wok or large skillet until very hot. Add veggies, ginger and garlic and stir-fry until veggies are tender but still crisp, about five minutes. Add soy sauce and stir for a minute. Remove from heat and add sesame seeds and sesame oil, if desired. Serve over rice with chicken, shrimp, scallops or beef. Nutrition Facts (per serving, without sesame oil): calories 245, fat 17 g, saturated fat 3 g, sodium 290 mg, carbs 22 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 9 g, protein 8 g With sesame oil, add 20 calories, 2 grams of fat (0.3 grams of saturated fat) per serving.

For more peanut recipes, go to oxygenmag.com.

4. Powdered.

5. As an oil. Peanut oil contains the same healthy components as olive oil (monounsaturated fatty acids) as well as niacin, both of which help decrease LDL cholesterol and increase HDL cholesterol and combat heart disease. Peanut oil adds a sweet, nutty flavor to any dish and has a high smoke point (450 degrees), making it ideal for stir-fry dishes.

Throwing a tablespoon of powdered peanut butter — PB which has been pressed to remove the oils and stickiness — into your postworkout shake assimilates like a dream, delivering a big hit of glutamine to restore nitrogen balance and phosphorous to help synthesize protein, repair cells and tissues, and make ATP for energy.

3. Dry-roasted. Dryroasting peanuts means no added fat or sodium, and having a handful in the afternoon can combat the sleepies as well as that urge to hit the vending machine: Peanuts contain high levels of arginine, an amino acid that promotes production of nitric oxide, opening blood vessels and improving blood flow while also prompting the body to release insulin, helping stabilize blood sugar. Plus, peanut skins contain resveratrol, the same phytochemical found in red wine, which is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and cancer, antiaging and fat burning.

january / february 2017

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fuel

RECOVERY

By Steve Downs, CSCS

What you eat right after a workout (and when you eat it) is crucial to recovery. Here’s how to maximize your results.

Eating to recover There’s an old fitness adage that says, “You don’t build your body in the gym. It’s what you do after training that causes physical improvement.” So even if you exercise religiously, you’re selling yourself short if you’re not following the correct steps the moment you leave the gym. When you finish a tough workout, your body is starving for nutrition. Intense training breaks down muscle tissue (which catabolizes protein), depletes muscle glycogen (which is critical for energy) and reduces muscular ATP stores (the cellular fuel that drives muscular contractions). Your body requires the replenishment of glycogen first and foremost. This storage form of carbohydrate is found in muscles (about 400 grams) and the liver (about 100 grams) and is critical for brain function, as well as fueling physical activity. It’s also used during training to replenish ATP in the muscles. In addition, in the absence of carbs, amino acids are stripped away from muscle to be reassembled as glycogen molecules — a catabolic process you want to avoid.

The Carb Connection The great thing about postworkout feeding is that you can eat a lot of carbohydrates, even on a restricted-carb diet. This is because carbs are protein sparing, which means they’ll go to work immediately to replenish glycogen stores and prevent muscular breakdown. Even on a low-carb diet, you can consume up to a quarter of your total daily intake in your postworkout meal. So if you’re eating 160 grams of carbs a day, you should take in 40 to 50 immediately after training. (A good recommendation is .3 to .5 grams per pound of bodyweight.)

Power Up With Protein Muscle tissue requires amino acids for growth to occur. Research shows a combination of fast-, medium- and slow-digesting proteins speeds this process and ensures recuperation. Complete proteins from food and/or supplements supply a range of essential aminos to

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Timing is everything for postworkout feeding. Be conscious of your refueling window: Simple carbs are essential within minutes after you finish your last set.

promote muscle building. Aim for eating 20 to 40 grams of protein, depending on how it fits into your daily intake. (A good rule of thumb is consuming up to .25 grams per pound of bodyweight postworkout.) The final piece of the puzzle is ATP regeneration. As long as you consume ample carbs after training, your body should be able to replace the missing phosphocreatine in ATP in muscle cells. In addition, creatine can be found in red meat and fish, as well as supplements.

Restoration Time Timing is everything for postworkout feeding. Be conscious of your refueling window: Simple carbs are essential within minutes after you finish your last set. Protein and creatine should be consumed within the next hour. You also can include a few grams of carbs and a creatine supplement, if desired, with the latter meal to enhance absorption. What are some examples of what to eat? Replacing glycogen is easiest — any carb will do. Lower-glycemic carbs such as fruit or juices may not be as optimal as candy for speed of glycogen replenishment, but they’re healthier. High-glycemic carbs such as sweet potatoes, rice and white potatoes are great options. Honey is another good choice; research shows combining it with protein helps maintain optimal blood-sugar levels to enhance uptake. For protein, supplements are superior to whole food because of convenience, digestive speed and specific benefits. However, you can enhance amino-acid absorption by eating egg whites, Greek yogurt, low-fat cottage cheese and low-fat milk (regular or lactosefree) after training. Certain protein-rich foods provide the double benefit as sources of creatine. However, because appetite is not always the best following a workout, you might want to try creatine supplements. To speed recovery and get the most out of your training, be conscious of the small window postworkout when you can refuel your body and start the recuperation process. Remember, it’s the 23 hours outside the gym when your body improves. Make the most of it.


fuel

By Jessie R. Shafer, RD

EAT SMART

Food myths busted

Ask the Nutritionist Q: What’s a great postworkout recovery food? A: Your blood is circulating very well in the 30 minutes

Quick Bites

after a workout, which is key for nutrient absorption. Boost recovery in this time period (and avoid hunger binges and extreme fatigue later) by downing a combination of protein and carbohydrates that will help restore hydration and repair and build muscles. But you don’t need to overdo it. A pint of water and a 200-calorie snack that combines complex carbohydrates and protein will hold you over until your next meal. Some good options are 6 ounces of no-sugar-added yogurt topped with nuts, or an apple and low-fat mozzarella string cheese.

1 string cheese

+

2 slices deli turkey

1 slice toasted whole-grain English muffin 2 hard-cooked eggs

+

+ +

1 cup raspberries

True or false? Eating late at night will make you fat. False. What you eat — and how much — is far more important than when you eat. There is no magic time of day (or night) for when your body decides to store food as fat. Calories are calories, no matter what time of day or night they’re eaten. If you often overindulge late at night, however, it’s the extra calories that can sabotage your weight-control efforts, not the hour they’re consumed. For some people, eating late at night also can interfere with good sleep. If you train in the evenings, however, it’s important to replenish nutrients you’ve lost before bed.

6 cherry tomatoes

2 tbsp hummus

+

+

½ cup almonds

THE BUZZ ON ...

TURMERIC

What is it? Turmeric is a plant in the rhizome family, meaning, just like ginger, the root is the valuable part. The root of turmeric is orange and used as a spice and natural food dye. You may know turmeric as the main spice in yellow curry. It has a warming and somewhat bitter taste. What’s all the buzz about? Highly regarded for its antiinflammatory compound curcumin, turmeric is used to treat arthritis, joint pain, headaches, depression and bloating, to name a few. Turmeric has long been used in ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine, and it’s catching on fast in America. In 2016, hundreds of new products, from beverages to snacks to supplements, appeared on store shelves touting turmeric as a functional ingredient. What to know: Curcumin is a powerful antioxidant that lowers the body enzymes that cause inflammation. Studies of turmeric show that results were most effective at doses of 1 to 4 grams (½ to 2 teaspoons) daily. Talk with your health-care provider before starting a turmeric supplement because it can have a blood-thinning effect and may interact with some medications.

=

midday snack

½ tbsp flaxseed

=

=

brain fuel

macros lunch


thrive

MIND  BODY

By Sarah Tuff Dunn

Sweat out SAD

Working out intensely can help you overcome seasonal affective disorder.

pedal a bike at 75 percent of their maximal heart rate for 10 minutes after a warm-up “showed comparable improvements in depression.” Even better? Taking high-intensity interval training outside around sunrise, if you can. Rohan adds that in a nonrandomized SAD trial, those who went outside as early in the morning as possible “showed greater improvements in depression” than those who received artificial light therapy.

Lighten Up

ou’re a mean one, Mr. Grinch — and we understand exactly why. Your heart’s an empty hole because you’ve been living in cold solitude, just like many of us during the winter months. According to Psychology Today, seasonal affective disorder (SAD) hits some 10 million Americans, with 55 percent suffering from depression and 6 percent requiring hospitalization. But there’s a better way to beat SAD and it’s better for you than popping a pill. Recent studies show that working out intensely can stave off SAD symptoms, including fatigue, depression, social withdrawal and weight gain. “Aerobic activity is a powerful antidepressant,” says Kelly Rohan, Ph.D., a psychologist who recently wrote a chapter on SAD for the Oxford Handbook of Mood Disorders (oxfordhandbooks.com, 2015). “And the simple act of going to the gym, getting around other people and being social is helpful.” As Rohan cites, one study has found that women with SAD who

If northern climates rule out an outdoor workout in the wintertime, hitting the bright lights of the gym is the next best thing. A study in Psychiatry reveals that “aerobic exercise performed under bright (2,500- to 4,000lux) lights appears to be more beneficial than either exercise under typical indoor lighting or no exercise for atypical symptoms and vitality.” Erin Altemus, a fitness competitor from Vermont, was diagnosed with clinical depression and SAD a few months after moving to the Green Mountain State. “In Vermont, our winters are longer, darker and colder,” she says. “It got pretty bad, and I wanted to get off the medication and change my mental health, so I started exercising intensely.” That meant bumping up her fitness routine to an hour of lifting four to five days a week, plus 30 minutes of steady-state cardio. “Soon, my lows weren’t as low and the sadness and the fatigue and depression weren’t as bad,” she says. “This will be my third winter with exercise as my main medication for SAD, and every day I’ve noticed it getting better. It’s something to do, something to focus on and somewhere to be. I’ve learned that exercise is my medication if I want to be off the medication.” The bottom line? Movement may be the best therapy for winter moods. “At the end of the day,” Rohan says, “being on the treadmill for 10 minutes is certainly better than sitting on the couch quietly for 10 minutes, wondering why you are feeling in a negative mood, ruminating, brewing and going to hibernation mode.”

WORKING OUT INTENSELY CAN STAVE OFF SAD SYMPTOMS FROM FATIGUE AND DEPRESSION TO SOCIAL WITHDRAWAL AND WEIGHT GAIN. 36

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By Virginia Pelley

thrive

HEALTH

DON’T LET YOUR JOB KILL YOU

New research suggests cardiovascular disease has less to do with aging than it has to do with modern industrialized society — i.e., our jobs. Work stressors keep us in “fight or flight” mode, a physiological response to perceived threats. When our bodies are flooded with stress hormones that they aren’t able to discharge, it has a prolonged effect on our health, explains Peter Schnall, M.D., MPH, a professor of medicine at the University of California, Irvine, professor of public health at UCLA and lead author of the study published in the International Journal of Health Services. “If this goes on for years, the body eventually resets the thermostat, or raises blood pressure, to manage all that stress,” Schnall says. “This can lead to thickening of arterial blood vessels, which contributes to heart disease risk.” To learn more about preventing and managing job stress, check out the site for the government’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, cdc.gov/niosh.

Sweet heart

Is sugar worse for your heart than fat?

We’ve been told for decades to avoid foods high in saturated fat to reduce our risk of heart disease. But it turns out that sugar might also pose a significant risk to the heart. In fact, the sugar industry encouraged scientists to downplay the risk, suggests a paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine. A review of internal documents revealed that the sugar industry paid scientists to highlight research linking saturated fat to heart disease in research published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1967. At the same time, this new paper suggests, the sugar industry urged scientists to de-emphasize research that supported sugar’s negative effects on heart health. When you eat sugar, your fat cells release leptin, a hormone that tells you that you’re full and to burn fat, explains Holly Andersen, M.D., director of education and outreach at the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center. “Eat too much sugar, and your body becomes leptin resistant,” Andersen says. Bottom line? Minimizing both sugar and saturated fat is your best bet for staying healthy longer.

Fold Your Way Fitter Columbia University researchers concluded that every $1,300 New York City spent on bike lanes correlated with benefits equal to one quality-adjusted life year for each of the city’s residents, according to a study in Injury Prevention. Get in on the lifeimproving action with the FIT folding bike from Montague. montague bikes.com, $640 and up

PERCENT

That’s how many of us wish we got more rest, according to a worldwide survey of 18,000 people conducted by Durham University researchers in the U.K. If you find it hard to quit scrolling through your phone before bed, enable Night Shift on your phone to cut the blue light emitted by electronics that keep you awake. Visit support.apple.com to find out how.

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Available at 15

stores nationwide vitaminshoppe.com


STOPPABL Patricia Arredondo, winner of the 2016 Oxygen Challenge, talks to us about her determination, avoiding cheat days and what it means to be on the cover of Oxygen magazine! BY Maureen Farrar PHOTOGRAPHY BY Peter Lueders


LE


anging on the wall in front of her treadmill is a sign that says, “I Am Fucking Unstoppable!” She stares at it while grinding away at her cardio, a reminder to believe in herself and stay focused. Next to it hangs another sign that says simply, “Believe.” Always active in sports — she participated in everything from kickboxing to basketball and track — nothing beat weight training for Patricia. In fact, she started reading Oxygen when she was 14 and was motivated to do her first figure competition when she was 18. Last year, Patricia signed up for the first Oxygen Challenge, but personal reasons had forced her to quit without finishing. She was determined that she wouldn’t let that happen twice. “I was keeping my eye on my email, waiting for the announcement of the second Challenge,” she says. “I was ready for it before it even started!” Fitness is an important component in Patricia’s life. Getting and staying in shape requires discipline, focus and a desire to always improve yourself, which plays into her belief that you must always keep challenging yourself. “I believe in taking care of your health and your soul,” she says. “I knew I could look and feel better. I wanted to push my limits.” Training wasn’t new to Patricia, but she was surprised by the level of discipline she developed over the 90-day program. “My heart was in it from Day One to Day 90.” Patricia chose Ashley Kaltwasser’s team for OC2. “She is absolutely amazing and has a winner’s

From top: Patricia before and after; behind the scenes of our photo shoot; Patricia’s campaign to get votes; her 90-day calendar.

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Hair & Makeup: Nancy J / Styling: Julia Perry / Sports Bra: Varley / Pants: Elisabetta Rogiani / Shoes: Nike

BOTH THOSE MANTRAS perfectly sum up the ambition, focus and motivation of 21-year-old Patricia Arredondo. The outgoing winner of the 2016 Oxygen Challenge is passionate about staying healthy, fit and active, and when it comes to reaching her goals — whether it’s landing the cover of Oxygen magazine or starting a new real estate business — “ I won’t let anyone step on me,” she says with a laugh. Patricia, or “Trish” as friends and family call her, admits she developed her outgoing personality out of necessity. “Growing up, I constantly switched schools. I can’t even remember how many elementary, middle and high schools I attended,” she says. “I was always the ‘new girl.’” Originally from Irapuato, Guanajuato, Mexico, the raven-haired beauty moved to Colorado with her mom and two older brothers when she was 5. Patricia’s mom brought them to the U.S. to make sure her kids had every opportunity. “She wanted to give us the world, and she did,” Patricia says. Her mom’s ambition rubbed off on Patricia, who immediately immersed herself in school and in learning English. Improving herself was always a high priority for her. “I remember being in elementary school, pondering my future, my goals and my expectations,” she says.


Patricia Arredondo GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO Age: 21 Height: 5’3” Old weight: 142 lb New weight: 147 lb Team: AshleyK

“MY HEART WAS IN IT FROM DAY ONE TO DAY

90.”

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Ashley K’s workout plan was pretty tough, but Patricia pushed herself to do even more!

mentality,” she explains. “She’s been on plenty of magazine covers and competes. There was no question about who I should pick!” Patricia followed Ashley’s program pretty closely, but she did add heavier weights and more cardio. “I was at 24 percent body fat, so I knew I had to push to see those numbers drop,” she says. Patricia also followed the meal plan closely, substituting a few foods that didn’t agree with her and only allowing

one cheat meal during the entire program. “I knew diet would be key, so I only allowed myself one cheat meal,” she says. Support was definitely not in short supply during the 90-day program. Her boyfriend of two years, Austin Imes, helped prep her food, pushed her to do her cardio and constantly reminded her of her “why.” “He’s always there for me no matter what,” she says. So were her mom, her brothers and even people she’s never met. “The private Facebook group helped a lot because everyone was constantly pushing each other. Even though we were all competing for the same thing, everyone was respectful and supportive of one another,” she says. So what does winning The Oxygen Challenge mean to Patricia? “Winning the cover gives me an abundance of hope!” she says. “I proved to myself that I’m capable of doing anything I set my mind to.” Next up? “This is just the beginning for me. I’m 21 and on the cover of Oxygen!” she says enthusiastically. Although she and Austin are starting a real estate business, Patricia remains laser-focused on continu-

“BY WINNING THE COVER, I PROVED TO MYSELF THAT I’M CAPABLE OF DOING ANYTHING I SET MY MIND TO.” 44

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PATRICIA’S ULTIMATE SHOULDER WORKOUT Sculpt shapely shoulders (and create that sexy V-taper) with Patricia Arredondo’s favorite delt workout. Exercise

Sets

Reps/Time

4

8-10

Dumbbell Lateral Raise

4

8-10

Close-Grip Upright Row

3

10-12

Bent-Over Reverse Dumbbell Flye*

2

6-8

Rope Whips**

3

30 seconds

Shoulder Press — superset with —

*Drop the weight and then complete two sets of 15 reps each. **Rest 15 seconds between sets.

ing this momentum on her path in fitness. She will be competing in her first WBFF show in early 2017 and wants to help other people reach their own fitness goals. She has felt so blessed in her life and wants to give back to others, volunteering with a local hospital to deliver meals to seniors, and hopes to become a motivational speaker. Patricia’s mom worked two jobs to support her family, so Patricia’s ultimate goal is to be able to support her mother in return. “She deserves that!” she says. We don’t doubt that Patricia will do that and more!

Oxygen, in partnership with Gaspari Nutrition, brought you the 2016 Oxygen Challenge. In addition to being featured on the cover and winning a one-year supply of Gaspari Nutrition products, Patricia Arredondo also has the opportunity to become a Gaspari Nutrition brand ambassador/spokesmodel.

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They KILLED it! These five 2016 Oxygen Challenge standouts met the workouts head-on and provided lots of online encouragement to fellow competitors, too. Here’s a look at how they did it and what they learned along the way. By Maura Weber

AS A VETERAN OF THE FIRST Oxygen Challenge, Stephanie Lewis-Vance knew what to expect when she signed up for OC2. “The success I achieved during that Challenge reassured me that OC2 was just what I needed,” she says. She made the most of the online support, participating in both groups for OC2 and staying active with the Facebook pages from the first Challenge. “Not only do I appreciate the support from others, I love to provide the support,” she says. “I can only hope that I was able to do for others as they did for me.” Lewis-Vance has a history of weight issues and weighed 250 WOODBRIDGE, pounds at her heaviest. Then her father’s death changed her VIRGINIA life. “It was his obesity that Age: 47 killed him,” she says. When Occupation: Department of she’s tired or feeling weak, she Defense program analyst thinks about what he went Height: 5’3” through. “His memory always Old weight: 184 lb pushes me to do better.” New weight: 171 lb A long-distance runner, Team: Christmas Lewis-Vance enjoyed the variety offered by Christmas Abbott’s training program. “I chose TeamChristmas because it was a style of working out that I had never tried before. I worked muscles in a very different way, which I feel allowed my body to perform at an optimal level,” she says. “I’m proud to say that just after the end of the OC2 program, I completed two half marathons, and I finished my races strong. Here’s to the next chapter: OC3?”

Stephanie Lewis-Vance

Stephanie before

“THIS CHALLENGE MADE ME push myself harder than I ever have,” Tammy Schroeder says. “For the first month, there were many STEINBACH, times I felt like crying but I knew I MANITOBA, had to push through. Knowing others were going through the same CANADA thing helped.” With support from Age: 36 friends, family and her students, Occupation: Voice and Schroeder stuck it out. “I wanted piano lesson teacher to encourage others by being an Height: 5’10” example,” she says. Old weight: 270 lb Though Schroeder, a longtime New weight: 250 lb Oxygen reader, was no stranger Team: Christmas to exercise before she started the program, she had never tested her limits to such an extent. “I was in OK shape, and I would regularly work out,” she says. “But I realized that we need to renew our minds to push ourselves harder. The human body is an amazing thing.” Positive feedback wasn’t just limited to the online groups that Schroeder participated in, either. “People at my gym congratulated me, and I even had some younger guys ask me what I was doing to get results,” she says. She shares that her favorite bodypart to train is glutes, with squats, lunges and sprints being her top exercises. The Challenge lasted 12 weeks, but Schroeder plans to keep her new lifestyle. “When you are healthier, it encourages everyone around you. If you take care of yourself first, you can help others better,” she says. “I’m so thankful for this opportunity, and this is only the beginning of better things.”

Tammy Schroeder

Stephanie after

Tammy before

Honorable Mentions

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Tammy after


FOR SHYERENE FISHER, a mother of five, the OC2 experience stimulated a part of her that she had almost forgotten about. “The Challenge woke up the fighter I used to be,” she says. “I feel so good now.” When she signed up for the Challenge, Fisher spread the word about it so her friends and family knew what she was doing. “Telling people was completely not me. I think subconsciously I was telling people to keep me accountable so there was no going back,” she says. “For the most part, people were surprised but supportive.” CALGARY, ALBERTA, Some people believe in having a dietary “cheat” day, and the OC2 plan CANADA included room for them, but Fisher stayed Age: 48 on the straight-and-narrow path. “I didn’t Occupation: Self-employed have any cheat days,” she says. “I knew if Height: 5’4” I did that, I would fall off the wagon.” Old weight: 163 lb The Challenge took place in the summer, New weight: 130 lb and Fisher says she avoided some getTeam: Both togethers because of the food and drink she knew would be available. These days, she’s feeling more confident in her ability to be around those foods. “Since completing the Challenge and being so successful, I could go to functions now and not feel compelled to explain why I choose not to eat or drink something that is not part of my new healthy lifestyle,” she says.

Shyerene Fisher

Shyerene before

JENNY SEWELL TOOK NOTE when the first Oxygen Challenge was announced in 2015, but at the time, she had just given birth to her second baby and wasn’t ready. By the time the second Challenge was announced, though, she was all in. “My whole life I was overweight and always munching away on snack foods while planning my next big diet plan,” she says. “I finally woke up and made a step in the right direction when my dearest friend Stacey Byrd introduced me to the Oxygen Challenge.” Sewell admits that the Challenge was just that: a challenging program. “There were times when I felt so tired or just felt like, How am I going to do this? But by having the support of my Oxy sisters on Facebook, we motivated each other,” she says. The groups tackled all sorts of topics, from training tips to cooking advice. “The support group assisted so much in the consistency of my meal LAS VEGAS planning,” Sewell says. Her favorite recipe on the program was the peanut Age: 28 butter jelly muffins, she adds. Occupation: Concierge “I just want to motivate people to supervisor understand that your fitness journey Height: 5’6” is not about the size of your body, it is Old weight: 241 lb about the size of your heart and where New weight: 224 lb you are willing to take your mind to Team: AshleyK succeed in being happy,” she says.

Jenny Sewell

Jenny before

Shyerene after

Jenny after

Honorable Mentions JENNY LINDSAY DID LAST YEAR’S Oxygen Challenge, so she approached OC2 with a take-noprisoners attitude: “You did it once, now do it again even bigger and better,” she says. Lindsay knew going SAVANNAH, into it what the biggest hurdles would be. “There are days when just putting my feet in my shoes and getGEORGIA ting out the door can be difficult,” she says. “But the Age: 34 Facebook group really helped me. It’s such a good way Occupation: Artist to communicate with other women going through the Height: 5’10” same thing. And I was very appreciative of Christmas Old weight: 145 lb posting regularly. It seemed like she was really New weight: 137 lb invested in our success.” Team: Christmas Lindsay’s boyfriend, John McGuire, was another secret to Lindsay’s success. “I am very lucky that John has been 110 percent supportive through both Challenges. He unofficially did the Challenges, too, so it was fun to have a workout buddy,” she explains. Lindsay says they enjoyed the meal plans, as well, with the chicken fajitas recipe being a favorite. Losing weight wasn’t Lindsay’s main goal. “The scale lies, but my times

Jenny Lindsay

and numbers don’t,” she says. Her rewards come in the form of confidence. “I hold my head higher in the gym, stand a little taller, wear a few more tank tops, and smile on the inside and outside,” she says. “And you better believe I’ll be back for OC3!”

Jenny before

Jenny after

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Congratulations! Oxygen would like to congratulate our OC2 winner Patricia Arredondo and all the strong women of the Oxygen Challenge! Your hard work and determination is an inspiration. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for OC3!

#OC2 #OxyChallenge


8-week TOTALBODY PROGRAM

HIIT

Whether you’re eager to shed your holiday pounds or just redefine your relationship with the gym, this eight-week, HIIT-based routine has you covered.

January 1. With the turn of the calendar comes a renewed focus on fitness — an annual rededication to the kind of high-octane training designed to get you back into pre-turkey-and-stuffing condition. But as you may have learned once or thrice, far too many wellintentioned gym-goers charge the gates in January only to vanish from the gymscape a month later. The key to training longevity and ultimate success is adopting a routine that ramps up your metabolism and sends fat to the furnace while keeping the fun factor in play. This HIIT-based program is time efficient, effective and ever-changing — the ideal foray into the new year and the perfect way to break in all that sweet workout swag you found under the tree last month. Interval Training — Yeah, Not a Fad Countless studies and thousands of happy subjects maintain that high-intensity interval training is one of the most effective methods for burning fat. The intensity of the work means a huge energy deficit and dramatic metabolic disturbance, and the recovery and repair process can take up to three days. Because that process requires scads of energy, your body is still torching fat long after the exercise itself has finished. This phenomenon is unique to high-intensity work, and going for a leisurely one-mile run on the local highschool track will not proffer the same benefits. Here’s the deal: If you run that mile in eight minutes flat, you’ll burn about 100 calories, total. But if you run 16 all-out 100-meter sprints, with each sprint taking 15

seconds, you’ll still cover a mile but will have only spent four minutes working and your metabolic fire will burn white hot for days afterward. Does lower-intensity work done for longer periods have its place? Sure. But Justin Grinnell, CSCS, founder of Grinnell Training Systems and owner of State of Fitness (mystateoffitness.com) is a much bigger fan of HIIT in the conditioning continuum. “A study by McMasters University in Canada showed that high-intensity interval training is a potent, time-efficient strategy to induce numerous metabolic adaptations usually associated with traditional endurance training,” Grinnell says. Subjects of this study adopted HIIT as their primary mode of cardio and experienced an increased ability to use oxygen to perform and a better ability to shift between energy systems during exercise.

Get HIIT Started With HIIT, it’s more about the work intensity than the mode of exercise, and you can apply the protocol to nearly any activity. In terms of weight training, Grinnell recommends focusing on compound exercises with a big payoff, such as those that have you pressing, pushing, pulling, dragging, throwing or swinging. “A hamstring curl has its place, but it does not increase the metabolism or produce the same kind of favorable hormonal response as compound, multi-joint moves,” Grinnell says. “To burn fat and build or preserve lean muscle tissue, you need to perform large movements.” Grinnell created this eight-week plan that blends fullbody metcons with dedicated strength work and highdemand ladder workouts. “You can only do straight sets and boring cardio for so long before your body won’t make changes anymore,” Grinnell says. “Constantly challenging yourself will keep your workouts fresh and give you something to look forward to.”


BY ERIC VELAZQUEZ, CSCS PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER LUEDERS

GOALS

KETTLEBELL SWING Hold the kettlebell with both hands in front of you, arms extended, and stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Keeping your back ďŹ&#x201A;at and arms straight, swing the kettlebell through your legs and behind you, then snap your hips forward to generate momentum to swing the kettlebell up in an arc to shoulder height or above. Shift your weight back into your heels and allow the kettlebell to swing back down and through your knees, loading your hams and glutes again for the next rep.


8-week TOTALBODY PROGRAM THE 8WEEK HIITYOURGOALS WORKOUT This program is divided into two four-week phases. In each phase, you’ll perform the same exercises and workouts, but the stakes will rise: more reps, more rounds, more weight. Here’s how they break down:

Phase 1: Weeks 1–4 These weeks are designed to lay the groundwork for your 2017 physique. Approach this first phase with as much intensity as you can muster while also being mindful of any limitations you might have. As noble as it seems to “push yourself” on January 1, it’s better to wade in and test the depth rather than diving in and obliterating yourself.

Phase 2: Weeks 5–8 Now that you’ve got a solid base of conditioning, it’s time to chisel away that additional layer of fat. Because your body has adapted to the work, it will respond rapidly to the additional volume here, so keep a close eye on the mirror as your body transforms.

In both Phases, you’ll find these programming formats:

AMRAP. Perform as many rounds as possible of the listed moves in a predetermined amount of time, usually 10 to 20 minutes. This keeps the focus on max work in minimum time while providing easy benchmarks for progression, according to Grinnell. For example, in Week 1, you’ll log your total number of completed rounds plus reps for the full-body 15-minute AMRAP. In Week 2, you’ll try to best that number in the same amount of time. Ladders. Grinnell’s ladder has a descending-rep scheme that keeps you working at a high rate from start to finish. Your focus is on getting the work done as efficiently as possible, pouring max effort into each rep to trigger the best metabolic response. Strength Circuits. Moving quickly between exercises denies your body the luxury of full recovery, adding a cardiovascular component to the workout and increasing your burn. Choose loads slightly heavier than normal here to engage more fast-twitch muscle fibers — the kind most responsible for the shape and appearance of your physique.

SLED PUSH Load a sled in an open area and take a high grip on the posts with your arms straight. Push the sled forward deliberately, driving forward with your knees and keeping your hips low until you’ve gone the requisite distance. Turn the sled around to get ready for your next round.

No sled? A weight plate works in a pinch: Place it on the floor in front of you, bend over and push it forward with both hands.


DAY 1: FULLBODY AMRAP Perform as many rounds and reps as possible in the prescribed time. Rest only as needed, and try to better your numbers each week. PHASE 1

PHASE 2

Weeks 1+2: 15 minutes / Weeks 3+4: 20 minutes

Weeks 5+6: 25 minutes / Weeks 7+8: 30 minutes

Exercise

Reps/Distance

Exercise

Reps/Distance

Dumbbell Thruster Sled Push Dumbbell Renegade Row Sled Push Dumbbell Walking Lunge Sled Push

10 30 meters 5 (each arm) 30 meters 10 (each leg) 30 meters

Dumbbell Thruster Sled Push Dumbbell Renegade Row Sled Push Dumbbell Walking Lunge Sled Push

15 40 meters 10 (each arm) 40 meters 12 (each leg) 40 meters

DUMBBELL THRUSTER

Hair & Makeup: Nancy J / Model: Danielle Lipski / Pants: Aptitude Apparel / Top: Morena / Shoes: Nike Air Max

Stand with your feet shoulderwidth apart, toes turned out slightly, and hold a set of dumbbells at your shoulders, elbows down. Kick your hips back and lower into a deep squat, then extend your legs and hips and stand quickly, using that upward momentum to push the weights overhead to full extension of your arms. Lower the weights to your shoulders and go right into the next rep.

DUMBBELL RENEGADE ROW Get into a plank position with your hands on top of a set of dumbbells, placed parallel on the floor underneath your shoulders. Keep your head, hips and heels in line and your hips square as you alternately row the dumbbells up into your rib cage, keeping your elbows in close to your sides and your head neutral.

DAYS 2  4: ACTIVE RECOVERY As you start the new year, the inclination will be to work out as often as possible to incinerate that unwanted fat. However, Grinnell recommends two days of active recovery per week, ideally situated between your training days. Mild activity can actually help accelerate your progress by getting your blood flowing, moving nutrients into and wastes out of cells, and burn a couple of calories while you’re at it, according to Grinnell. Stretching and foam rolling on these days also can facilitate recovery while improving flexibility and range of motion. Here are some examples of great Active Recovery day activities. These should be done at an easy to moderate pace for 30 to 60 minutes, max. Walking Hiking Bike Riding Yoga Pilates

Tai Chi Swimming Paddleboarding Canoeing

DUMBBELL WALKING LUNGE Hold a set of dumbbells at your sides and take a large step forward, bending both knees and lowering straight down toward the floor, knee over your toes. Push off your trailing foot, extend both legs and bring the trail leg through to the front, going right into the next lunge. Continue, alternating legs.

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8-week TOTALBODY PROGRAM DAY 3: STRENGTH  CONDITIONING LADDERS Perform the exercises in each ladder in the order listed. Rest as little as possible in between moves and up to 90 seconds between ladders. PHASE 1

PHASE 2

For Ladder 1 and Ladder 2, do 10 reps of each exercise the first time through. The next round, perform eight of each. Repeat this sequence in a descending pattern (10-8-6-4-2), reducing by two reps each time.

For Ladder 1 and Ladder 2, do 12 reps of each exercise the first time through. The next round, perform 10 of each. Repeat this sequence in a descending pattern (12-10-8-6-4-2), reducing by two reps each time.

Ladder 1

Ladder 1

Push-Up, Goblet Squat Assisted Pull-Up (or Pulldown)

Push-Up Goblet Squat Assisted Pull-Up (or Pulldown)

Ladder 2

Ladder 2

Kettlebell Swing Burpee Medicine-Ball Slam

Kettlebell Swing Burpee Medicine-Ball Slam

Ladder 3: Rower Sprints

Ladder 3: Rower Sprints

Row 30 calories Rest 1 minute Row 20 calories Rest 1 minute Row 10 calories Rest 1 minute

Row 40 calories Rest 1 minute Row 30 calories Rest 1 minute Row 20 calories Rest 1 minute Row 10 calories

PUSHUP Place your hands outside shoulder-width apart on the floor and extend your legs behind you so your head, hips and heels are in line. Keeping your body stiff, slowly lower your chest until your elbows make 90-degree angles. Press forcefully back to the start.

GOBLET SQUAT Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell at your chest with your elbows down, chest lifted. Bend your knees and squat down to parallel or below if you can, then push through your heels and extend your legs and hips to return to standing.

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ASSISTED PULLUP Stand on a box and loop a superband around a pull-up bar. Take an overhand grip on the bar and step into the band with one foot. Step off the box completely with your other leg and hang from the bar. Contract your shoulder blades, then drive your elbows down and back to pull your chest up to the bar and pause briefly, then lower to the start.

BURPEE From standing, crouch down and place your hands on the floor, then jump your legs behind you into a plank. Do a push-up, hop your feet back underneath you, then extend your legs and hips and leap into the air as high as you can, reaching your hands overhead. Land and go immediately into the next rep.


Weekly Split Day / Workout 1 / Full-Body AMRAP 2 / Active Recovery 3 / Strength & Conditioning Ladders 4 / Active Recovery 5 / Strength Circuits & HIIT 6 / Rest 7 / Rest

MEDICINEBALL SLAM Hold a nonreactive medicine ball with both hands in front of you. In one movement, lift the ball overhead, extending your arms as high as you can while coming up onto your toes, then use your whole body to slam it down â&#x20AC;&#x201D; dropping your hips, contracting your abs and using your arms to slam the ball into the ground. Pick it up and repeat right away.


8-week TOTALBODY PROGRAM DAY 5: STRENGTH CIRCUITS  HIIT Rest as little as possible between moves and up to 90 seconds between circuits. Strive to use incrementally more weight each week. PHASE 1

PHASE 2

Do five rounds of the Strength Circuit, followed immediately by the HIIT workout.

Do six rounds of the Strength Circuit, followed immediately by the HIIT workout.

Strength Circuit Exercise

Reps/Distance

Strength Circuit Exercise

Reps/Distance

Barbell Deadlift Dumbbell Bench Press Inverted Row Farmer’s Carry

5 5 5 30 meters

Barbell Deadlift Dumbbell Bench Press Inverted Row Farmer’s Carry

6 6 6 40 meters

HIIT: Airdyne Bike (4 minutes) Perform eight rounds in which you work as hard as possible for 30 seconds, then follow with 30 seconds of complete rest.

HIIT: Airdyne Bike (5 minutes) Perform 10 rounds in which you work as hard as possible for 30 seconds, then follow with 30 seconds of complete rest.

BARBELL DEADLIFT Stand behind a barbell with your feet hip-width apart, toes underneath the bar. Keeping a flat back, kick your hips back, then bend your knees until you can grasp the bar outside your legs in an alternating grip. Brace your core, retract your shoulder blades and then stand up, extending your knees and hips at the same rate to pull the bar in a straight line up along the front of your body to full extension. Slowly return to the start, touch down briefly and repeat right away.

DUMBBELL BENCH PRESS Hold a set of dumbbells with your arms extended straight up over your chest, palms facing away from you. Bend your elbows and lower the weights down slowly until your arms make 90-degree angles and your elbows are in line with your shoulders. Forcefully extend your arms to the start, squeezing your chest at the top.

INVERTED ROW Position a barbell in a rack at thigh height or lower. Take a shoulder-width underhand grip on the bar and extend your legs. Lift your hips and brace your core so your body forms a straight line. Drive your elbows back, keeping your arms in close to your sides and your body rigid, and pull yourself up. Lower slowly to the start and repeat right away.

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FARMER’S CARRY Grab a heavy set of dumbbells or kettlebells and hold them at your sides with your shoulder blades retracted and packed. Take small steps forward with your knees slightly bent to prevent swinging of the weights and walk quickly until you cover the required distance.

AIRDYNE BIKE Adjust the bike to a moderate tension and pedal and pull as hard and as fast as you can for the time allotted. During the rest intervals, pick your feet up off the pedals and let go of the handles until it is time to go again (or get hit in the calf).

No Airdyne? If your gym doesn’t have an Airdyne, use a rower, stationary bike or even a stair stepper instead. The machine does not matter as much as the intensity of the intervals.


ROWING MACHINE Adjust the foot straps across your instep and take an overhand grip on the handle. Keeping your heels planted and your arms and back straight, use your legs to push back hard to full extension, then use your arms to pull the handle in toward your chest, driving your elbows rearward and leaning back from your hips. Reverse the steps and slide forward to return to the start.


HIIT

MEAL PLAN

POWER plant(s) Flex your protein power and boost results with this companion meal plan to our “HIIT Your Goals” program. By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD


ost Oxygen readers are dedicated clean eaters, investing lots of time and energy into creating healthy, balanced meals and snacks, and most likely the majority of your protein comes from animal sources like chicken, fish, eggs and yogurt. But recent research indicates that shaking up your protein demographic to include more plant-based proteins could be the key to longevity as well as improved performance. Enter the flexitarian meal plan. Flexitarian is basically a word-meld of “vegetarian” and “flexible,” and while hardcore vegetarians might insist that flexitarians are simply noncommittal vegetarians who “cheat” (by occasionally eating poultry, meat and fish), we counter that being more flexible when sourcing your protein could add another layer to your healthy meal programming. There are a host of reasons to make a shift toward plantbased foods, and research heavily supports adding them to your diet to improve long-term health: A large JAMA Internal Medicine study found that people who obtained higher amounts of their protein from plant sources like beans and lentils experienced a lower risk of early death, particularly from heart disease. A four-week study also found that participants who followed a flexitarian diet had a 20-point drop in cholesterol, since plant-based proteins have less saturated fat, more fiber and more phytochemicals than animal proteins, discouraging fat storage and filling you up so you’re less likely to nibble your way out of that bikini.

Macro Management This two-week flexitarian meal plan is the companion piece to our “HIIT Your Goals” training program in this issue, and it can help you lean out quickly and efficiently just in time for spring. And don’t worry — you won’t be giving up your favorite protein sources: Being protein-flexible simply means adding more options to your program, boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants, keeping you in tiptop shape and promoting better body transformation.

Here’s how the macronutrients in this plan can work for you:

Protein To build muscle and burn fat, you’ll include clean, animal-based fare regularly, but you will also add plant-based options such as beans, lentils, tofu and nuts. Try subbing one meal or snack a day with a meatless option, or go full-bore and try a Meatless Monday on which you eat plant-based foods all day long.

Build Tweak: If you’re trying to gain muscle, add a few extra grams of protein to a meal or snack postworkout — one more egg white in your omelet, a handful of garbanzo beans in a salad or an extra spoonful of yogurt in your smoothie.

Carbohydrates To power your kick-ass high-intensity interval training workouts, you’ll need quality carbohydrates. This plan focuses on less-processed, whole-food options like brown rice, vegetables and fruit, as well as beans, lentils and quinoa.

Lean Tweak: If your goal is to get lean, serve up slightly smaller portions of carbohydrates, such as ½ cup of brown rice instead of ¾ cup for a meal. Note: Make sure you add those deleted calories back into your meal with some extra protein and/or fat to stay on track. Fat Dietary fat is a crucial part of any get-lean diet, promoting satiety and improving metabolism. Here, you’ll eat better-body sources such as avocados, nuts, seeds and fatty fish like salmon. You also can use 2 percent dairy products instead of fat-free options to add a little extra fat to your plan.

Strength Tweak: After an intense HIIT session, whip up a shake with some plant-based protein and some avocado to make it creamy-dreamy to replenish energy stores and facilitate muscle-building hormone production.


HIIT

MEAL PLAN

FLEXITARIAN meal plan This sample two-week meal plan corresponds to the “HIIT Your Goals” workout program. Use this as a guideline when creating your own eight-week meal plan!

DAY 1 FULLBODY AMRAP

Dinner 4 oz broiled boneless pork loin

Breakfast Breakfast Tacos

chop + 2 cups roasted baby potatoes + 1 cup steamed asparagus with 1 tsp olive oil

Lunch ½ block extra-firm tofu (cubed) sauteed (in 2 tsp oil) with 1 cup mushrooms, 1 cup red bell pepper, 1 cup asparagus, 1 scallion and ¼ cup low-sugar teriyaki sauce (Serve with ¾ cup cooked brown rice.)

Nutrition facts: calories 469, total fat 16 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 40 g, carbs 42 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 5 g

1-2 Snacks 1⁄3 cup hummus + 1 sliced red bell pepper

Nutrition facts: calories 577, total fat 27 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 35 g, carbs 52 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 8 g

Nutrition facts: calories 186, total fat 9 g, saturated fat 1 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 8 g, carbs 20 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 5 g

Dinner 6 oz pan-seared tilapia + 1 baked small sweet potato + 2 cups steamed broccoli with 2 tsp olive oil

Nutrition facts: calories 139, total fat 6 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 7 g, carbs 16 g, fiber 1 g, sugar 16 g

Nutrition facts: calories 387, total fat 13 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 40 g, carbs 32 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 7 g

DAY 4 ACTIVE RECOVERY

1-2 Snacks

Breakfast 1 whole-grain toaster waffle with

1 hard-boiled egg + 1 cup grapes

Trail Mix (recipe, Page 65) 2⁄3 cup low-fat Greek yogurt + ½ cup blueberries Nutrition facts: calories 141, total fat 3 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 14 g, carbs 17 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 13 g

DAY 2 ACTIVE RECOVERY

2 tsp almond butter, ½ cup reduced-fat ricotta cheese, ½ cup strawberries + 1 hard-boiled egg

Lunch 1 can (3 oz) water-packed tuna (drained) + 2 tbsp olive oil mayonnaise + sliced celery, chopped parsley and curry powder, to taste (Scoop into a couple of Boston lettuce leaves and top with 1⁄3 canned navy beans.) Nutrition facts: calories 428, total fat 28 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 25 g, carbs 18 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 1 g

Dinner 1 slab (about 4 oz) grilled tempeh + 1 roasted, cubed sweet potato topped with ½ cup salsa + 2 cups steamed Swiss chard with 2 tsp olive oil

1 Snack (Optional) ½ cup baby carrots +

(recipe, Page 63)

Nutrition facts: calories 550, total fat 26 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 33 g, carbs 44 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 1 g

1 Snack 2 Pumpkin Pie Energy Balls (recipe,

pineapple + 2 tbsp dry-roasted sunflower seeds Nutrition facts: calories 216, total fat 9 g, satu-

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rated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 18 g, carbs 18 g, fiber 3 g, sugar 12 g

DAY 5 STRENGTH CIRCUITS + HIIT Breakfast Nuked Granola and Yogurt

CONDITIONING LADDERS

Lunch Chicken Satay Wrap (recipe, Page 63)

Breakfast Overnight Apple Pie Oats

Dinner Caprese Chicken Pasta (recipe,

Lunch ¾ cup black beans + ½ cup quinoa

Nutrition facts: calories 335, total fat 19 g, saturated fat 10 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 22 g, carbs 20 g, fiber 3g, sugar 4 g

Lunch Tomato, Beans and Greens Soup

Lunch Pesto Steak Sandwich (recipe, Page 63)

DAY 3 STRENGTH 

cheese + 2 rye crackers + 3 oz smoked salmon

Nutrition facts: calories 450, total fat 22 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 26 g, carbs 45 g, fiber 12 g, sugar 7 g

Dinner 4 oz grilled salmon + 1 cup cooked quinoa + 2 cups baby spinach + 1 tbsp vinaigrette

1 Snack ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese + ½ cup

Breakfast ¼ cup whipped cream

Nutrition facts: calories 407, total fat 21 g, saturated fat 6 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 20 g, carbs 38 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 12 g

Breakfast Chocolate Fudge Smoothie Dinner Black Bean Tacos (recipe, Page 64)

DAY 6 REST

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+ ½ cup avocado + ½ cup chopped red bell pepper + ½ cup halved cherry tomatoes + ¼ cup cilantro + 2 tsp olive oil + juice of ½ lime

1-2 Snacks

Nutrition facts: calories 513, total fat 24 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 18 g, carbs 61 g, fiber 19 g, sugar 6 g

Nutrition facts: calories 143, total fat 4 g, saturated fat 0 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 7 g, carbs 21 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 2 g

Mango Chia Pudding (recipe, Page 65) ¼ cup roasted chickpeas + ½ cup tomatoes

1 string cheese Nutrition facts: calories 88, total fat 5 g, saturated fat 0 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 6 g, carbs 8 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 4 g

DAY 7 REST Breakfast 1 cup cottage cheese topped with 1⁄3 cup low-sugar granola, ½ cup raspberries and 1 tbsp pumpkin seeds Nutrition facts: calories 406, total fat 12 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 36 g, carbs 41 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 13 g

Lunch 2 slices toasted rye bread topped with 1 tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 tin (3 oz) waterpacked sardines, 1 slice roasted red pepper and ½ cup arugula + ½ cup grape tomatoes Nutrition facts: calories 436, total fat 12 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 22 g, carbs 37 g, fiber 5 g, sugar 6 g

Dinner 6 oz pan-seared tilapia + 1 baked small sweet potato + 2 cups steamed broccoli with 2 tsp olive oil (continued on Page 62) Æ


BREAKFAST RECIPES

HIIT

OVERNIGHT APPLE PIE OATS PREP TIME: 10 MINUTES MAKES 1 SERVING ½ cup rolled oats ¼ cup plain or vanilla protein powder 2 tsp chia seeds ¼ tsp cinnamon 2⁄3 cup low-fat milk or unsweetened nondairy milk 1 small apple, chopped 1 tbsp walnuts, chopped 1-2 tsp pure maple syrup

In a wide-mouthed, half-pint glass jar, layer oats, protein powder, chia seeds and cinnamon. Stir in milk until everything is moist. Top with apple, walnuts and maple syrup. Seal shut and chill overnight. Nutrition Facts: calories 444, total fat 10 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 27 g, carbs 65 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 29 g

NUKED GRANOLA AND YOGURT PREP TIME: 10 MINUTES MAKES 1 SERVING

BREAKFAST TACOS

1 tbsp honey 2 tsp coconut oil ¼ cup rolled oats 2 tbsp chopped almonds ½ tsp vanilla extract ¼ tsp ginger powder ¼ tsp cinnamon ¾ cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt 1⁄3 cup blueberries

Top 2 small corn tortillas with 2 scrambled eggs, 1⁄3 cup pinto or black beans, 1⁄3 cup salsa and ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt and serve with an orange. Nutrition Facts: calories 469, total fat 16 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 28 g, carbs 55 g, fiber 11 g, sugar 16 g

Place honey and coconut oil in microwavesafe bowl, cover with paper towel and heat on high for 10 to 20 seconds, until liquefied. Stir in rolled oats, almonds, vanilla, cinnamon, ginger powder and small pinch salt. Heat on medium (50 percent) for three minutes, stirring once halfway, until oats are toasted. Stir in Greek yogurt and blueberries. Nutrition Facts: calories 439, total fat 19 g, saturated fat 9 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 22 g, carbs 45 g, fiber 9 g, sugar 30 g

CHOCOLATE FUDGE SMOOTHIE Blend 1 cup plain almond milk, ½ cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt, ½ small avocado, 1 tablespoon cocoa powder, 2 teaspoons almond or peanut butter, ¼ teaspoon cinnamon and 1 chopped frozen banana.

Overnight Apple Pie Oats

Nutrition Facts: calories 375, total fat 21 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 16 g, carbs 41 g, fiber 10 g, sugar 17 g

january / february 2017

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MEAL PLAN

Nutrition facts: calories 387, total fat 13 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 40 g, carbs 32 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 7 g

DAY 10 STRENGTH 

CONDITIONING LADDERS

Nutrition facts: calories 513, total fat 24 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 18 g, carbs 61 g, fiber 19 g, sugar 6 g

1 Snack (Optional) 2 tbsp dried tart

Breakfast Breakfast Tacos

Dinner Tex-Mex Chicken Pizza (recipe,

cherries + 2 tbsp almonds Nutrition facts: calories 205, total fat 9 g, saturated fat 1 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 4 g, carbs 28 g, fiber 3 g, sugar 20 g

DAY 8 FULLBODY AMRAP Breakfast 1 whole-grain English muffin topped with 1 tbsp almond butter and 1 pear (sliced) + 2 hard-boiled eggs Nutrition facts: calories 476, total fat 22 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 21 g, carbs 54 g, fiber 10 g, sugar 21 g

Lunch ¾ cup chickpeas + ½ cup cooked millet + ½ cup chopped cucumber + 1 small shredded carrot + ½ cup sliced red bell pepper + ½ cup cherry tomatoes + ½ cup cubed mango + 1 tbsp pumpkin seeds + 2 tbsp lime dressing (lime juice + olive oil)

Lunch Layered Chicken and Rice With Almond Sauce

Dinner 4 oz sauteed or steamed shrimp + ¾

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1-2 Snacks Mango Chia Pudding 1 hard-boiled egg + 1 cup grapes

cup cooked brown rice + 2 cups steamed baby Nutrition facts: calories 139, total fat 6 g, bok choy + 2 tbsp orange dressing (fresh orange saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 7 g, juice + olive oil + low-sodium soy sauce) carbs 16 g, fiber 1 g, sugar 16 g Nutrition facts: calories 388, total fat 12 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 30 g, carbs 40 g, fiber 4 g, sugar 4 g

1-2 Snacks 2⁄3 cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt + ½ cup blueberries Nutrition facts: calories 141, total fat 3 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 14 g, carbs 17 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 13 g

Trail Mix

DAY 11 ACTIVE RECOVERY

DAY 13 REST Breakfast 1 frozen whole-grain toaster waffle topped with 2 tsp almond butter, ½ cup reduced-fat ricotta cheese and ½ cup sliced strawberries + 1 hard-boiled egg Nutrition facts: calories 407, total fat 21 g, saturated fat 6 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 20 g, carbs 38 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 12 g

Lunch Tomato, Beans and Greens Soup

Nutrition facts: calories 517, total fat 16 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 17 g, carbs 81 g, fiber 16 g, sugar 19 g

Breakfast 1 cup cottage cheese topped

Dinner Tofu Collard Stir-Fry (recipe,

with 1⁄3 cup low-sugar granola, ½ cup raspberries and 1 tbsp pumpkin seeds

Dinner 1 slab (about 4 oz) grilled tempeh + 1 roasted, cubed sweet potato topped with ½ cup salsa + 2 cups steamed Swiss chard with 2 tsp olive oil

1-2 Snacks

Nutrition facts: calories 406, total fat 12 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 36 g, carbs 41 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 13 g

Nutrition facts: calories 450, total fat 22 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 26 g, carbs 45 g, fiber 12 g, sugar 7 g

¼ cup roasted chickpeas + ½ cup cherry tomatoes

Lunch 2 slices toasted rye bread topped with 1 tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 tin (3 oz) waterpacked sardines, 1 sliced roasted red pepper and ½ cup arugula + ½ cup grape tomatoes

1 Snack (Optional) ½ cup baby carrots + 1

Nutrition facts: calories 143, total fat 4 g, saturated fat 0 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 7 g, carbs 21 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 2 g

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2 tbsp dried tart cherries + 2 tbsp almonds Nutrition facts: calories 205, total fat 9 g, saturated fat 1 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 4 g, carbs 28 g, fiber 3 g, sugar 20 g

DAY 9 ACTIVE RECOVERY Breakfast Chocolate Fudge Smoothie Lunch ½ cup cooked or canned lentils + 2 cups salad greens + ½ cup cherry tomatoes + ½ cup chopped cucumber + 1 oz crumbled feta + 2 tbsp walnuts + 2 tbsp olive oil vinaigrette

Nutrition facts: calories 436, total fat 12 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 22 g, carbs 37 g, fiber 5 g, sugar 6 g

Dinner 1 cup canned chickpeas sauteed with 1 chopped medium zucchini, 2 chopped shallots and ½ bunch spinach (Stir 2 tsp garam masala and 1 tsp lemon zest into ¾ cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt; serve on top of chickpea mixture with 2 tbsp sliced almonds.) Nutrition facts: calories 440, total fat 6 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 34 g, carbs 68 g, fiber 17 g, sugar 12 g

1 Snack 2 Pumpkin Pie Energy Balls

Nutrition facts: calories 420, total fat 26 g, saturated fat 6 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 18 g, carbs 33 g, fiber 12 g, sugar 7 g

DAY 12 STRENGTH CIRCUITS + HIIT

Dinner Black Bean Tacos

Breakfast Overnight Apple Pie Oats

1 Snack ½ cup baby carrots + 1 string cheese

Lunch ¾ cup black beans + ½ cup quinoa +

Nutrition facts: calories 88, total fat 5 g, saturated fat 0 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 6 g, carbs 8 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 4 g

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½ cup cubed avocado + ½ cup chopped red bell pepper + ½ cup halved cherry tomatoes + ¼ cup cilantro + 2 tsp olive oil + juice of ½ lime

string cheese Nutrition facts: calories 88, total fat 5 g, saturated fat 0 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 6 g, carbs 8 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 4 g

DAY 14 REST Breakfast ¼ cup whipped cream cheese + 2 rye crackers + 3 oz smoked salmon Nutrition facts: calories 335, total fat 19 g, saturated fat 10 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 22 g, carbs 20 g, fiber 3g, sugar 4 g

Lunch Pesto Steak Sandwich Dinner 4 oz broiled boneless pork loin chop + 2 cups roasted baby potatoes + 1 cup steamed asparagus with 1 tsp olive oil Nutrition facts: calories 469, total fat 16 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 40 g, carbs 42 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 5 g

1 Snack (Optional) 1⁄3 cup hummus + 1 sliced red bell pepper Nutrition facts: calories 186, total fat 9 g, saturated fat 1 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 8 g, carbs 20 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 5 g


LUNCH RECIPES

THINGS TO NOTE On HIIT workout days, eat plenty of protein and carbs to fuel your workouts and facilitate recovery. These days you can have up to two snacks to round out your energy requirements. On your Active Recovery and Rest days, consume fewer calories and only one snack per day to reflect reduced activity levels. This snack is optional on compete Rest days. If you train in the morning, make sure your dinner the night before contains a few more calories and carbs. Space your meals and snacks out evenly throughout the day. Drink plenty of water all day long, consuming more during and after your workouts.

TOMATO, BEANS AND GREENS SOUP PREP TIME: 30 MINUTES MAKES 4 SERVINGS 1 tbsp canola oil 1 yellow onion, diced 1 medium zucchini, chopped 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tsp dried thyme ½ tsp red chili flakes ¼ tsp black pepper 2 (14.5 oz) cans diced fire-roasted tomatoes 2 (14 oz) cans navy or cannellini beans, drained and rinsed 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth 1 tbsp red wine vinegar 6 cups kale, chopped 8 tbsp hemp seeds salt, to taste

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and dash salt. Heat six minutes, stirring frequently. Add zucchini, garlic, thyme, chili flakes and black pepper; heat one minute. Add tomatoes and juice from can. Bring to boil and maintain strong boil for five minutes. Add beans, broth and vinegar. Simmer gently for 15 minutes. Stir in kale and cook until wilted. Serve garnished with hemp seeds. Nutrition Facts: calories 413, total fat 14 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 23 g, carbs 56 g, fiber 18 g, sugar 9 g

LAYERED CHICKEN AND RICE WITH ALMOND SAUCE PREP TIME: 40 MINUTES MAKES 4 SERVINGS 2 cups brown rice, cooked 4 cups frozen broccoli florets 2 medium carrots, shredded ¼ cup unsalted almond butter 2 tbsp rice vinegar 2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce 1½ tsp Sriracha sauce 2 cups sliced rotisserie chicken (skin removed)

Prepare broccoli according to package directions and set aside. In bowl, whisk together almond butter, 1 tablespoon water, vinegar, soy sauce and hot sauce until smooth. In four large wide-mouthed jars, layer rice, chicken and vegetables, in that order. Top each with almond sauce and seal shut. Chill for up to five days. To serve, pour contents of jar onto serving plate or into bowl and serve. Nutrition Facts: calories 455, total fat 14 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 33 g, carbs 53 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 4 g

HIIT

PESTO STEAK SANDWICH Mix 1 tablespoon olive oil mayonnaise with 2 teaspoons store-bought pesto. Spread on 1 slice whole-grain toasted bread and top with 3 ounces cooked sirloin steak, 1 roasted red pepper, ½ cup arugula and another slice of bread. Nutrition Facts: calories 483, total fat 26 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 33 g, carbs 26 g, fiber 5 g, sugar 5 g

CHICKEN SATAY WRAP Mix 1 tablespoon peanut butter, 2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce and ½ teaspoon Sriracha sauce. Spread on medium-size whole-wheat tortilla. Top with ½ cup sliced cooked chicken, shredded carrots, shredded red cabbage, sliced mango and cilantro. Squirt with lime juice, to taste, and roll tightly. Nutrition Facts: calories 540, total fat 24 g, saturated fat 5 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 27 g, carbs 56 g, fiber 7 g, sugar 17 g

Pesto Steak Sandwich


HIIT

DINNER RECIPES

TEXMEX CHICKEN PIZZA

TOFU COLLARD STIRFRY

PREP TIME: 15 MINUTES MAKES 1 SERVINGS

PREP TIME: 20 MINUTES MAKES 4 SERVINGS

1 large whole-grain pita 1⁄3 cup fat-free refried beans 1⁄3 cup jarred salsa ¼ cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese ½ cup sliced rotisserie chicken (skin removed) ¼ cup thawed frozen corn ¼ avocado, sliced

2 cups cooked brown rice 1 block extra-firm tofu juice of ½ large orange 2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce 2 tsp sesame oil 1 tbsp minced fresh ginger ¼ tsp red chili flakes 2 tbsp grapeseed, peanut or canola oil 1 red or orange bell pepper, thinly sliced 2 scallions (green onions), thinly sliced 1 bunch collard greens, stems and ribs removed, roughly chopped 2 tbsp sesame seeds

Preheat broiler. Brush top of pita with little oil, place on baking sheet and broil until golden brown, about two minutes. Spread refried beans over pita and top with salsa, cheese, chicken and corn. Broil one minute, or until cheese has melted. Serve topped with sliced avocado. Nutrition Facts: calories 621, total fat 20 g, saturated fat 6 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 45 g, carbs 69 g, fiber 12 g, sugar 6 g

BLACK BEAN TACOS Top two corn tortillas with ¾ cup canned black beans, ½ sliced avocado, 1⁄3 cup thawed frozen corn, ½ cup salsa, 2 tablespoons low-fat sour cream and fresh lime juice, to taste. Nutrition Facts: calories 491, total fat 15 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 19 g, carbs 77 g, fiber 19 g, sugar 8 g

CAPRESE CHICKEN PASTA Toss together 1 cup cooked whole-grain penne, ½ cup chopped rotisserie chicken (skin removed), ½ cup halved grape tomatoes, ¼ cup mini mozzarella pearls, ¼ cup torn fresh basil and 2 teaspoons olive oil. Serve with 2 cups steamed kale. Nutrition Facts: calories 495, total fat 17 g, saturated fat 4 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 36 g, carbs 54 g, fiber 10 g, sugar 3 g

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Tofu Collard Stir-Fry

Sandwich tofu between paper towels and press gently to extract excess liquid. Slice into ½-inch cubes and set aside. In small bowl, whisk together orange juice, soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger and chili flakes. Heat grapeseed oil in large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Place tofu in pan and cook, stirring often, until golden. Remove and set aside. Add red pepper and scallions to pan; cook one minute. In batches, add collards and cook until slightly wilted. Return tofu to pan along with orange sauce and cook one minute. Serve over rice and garnish with sesame seeds. Nutrition Facts: calories 453, total fat 21 g, saturated fat 3 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 20 g, carbs 48 g, fiber 6 g, sugar 4 g


SNACK RECIPES

TRAIL MIX Mix 1 cup plain air-popped or bagged popcorn (such as SkinnyPop), 1 tablespoon unsalted dry-roasted peanuts, 2 tablespoons sliced dried apricots and 1 ounce sliced jerky. Nutrition Facts: calories 210, total fat 6 g, saturated fat 0 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 19 g, carbs 23 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 3 g

Mango Chia Pudding

PUMPKIN PIE ENERGY BALLS

MANGO CHIA PUDDING

PREP TIME: 20 MINUTES MAKES 8 SERVINGS (2 BALLS)

PREP TIME: 10 MINUTES MAKES 2 SERVINGS

½ cup pecans, almonds or walnuts ½ cup pitted dates ½ cup dried cranberries 1⁄3 cup pumpkin puree 1 scoop plain or vanilla protein powder ¼ cup unsweetened dried coconut flakes 2 tbsp ground flaxseed 2 tsp vanilla extract (omit if using vanilla protein) 1½ tsp pumpkin pie spice pinch salt

1 mango, peeled ¾ cup plain almond milk ¾ cup plain yogurt 2 tsp honey 1 tsp lime zest ½ tsp ginger powder ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tbsp almonds, chopped

Place nuts in food processor container and pulse until pulverized. Add remaining ingredients and blend until mixture clumps together. Using damp hands, form into 1-inch balls. You should get about 16 balls. Chill in airtight container to firm up. Nutrition Facts: calories 116, total fat 6 g, saturated fat 2 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 3 g, carbs 15 g, fiber 2 g, sugar 11 g

HIIT

Place mango, milk, yogurt, honey, lime zest, ginger powder and pinch salt in blender and blend until smooth. Divide mixture between two jars and top each with half chia seeds; stir to combine. Sprinkle on almonds. Seal shut and chill for at least three hours and up to three days. Nutrition Facts: calories 256, total fat 9 g, saturated fat 1 g, trans fat 0 g, protein 10 g, carbs 38 g, fiber 8 g, sugar 28 g


yoga

for Stephanie Ring is turning this age-old practice on its head and using it to benefit athletes in a new way. You can’t throw a rock in a grocery store without hitting someone in yoga pants, but though the world has adopted this cling-wear as everyday fashion, not everyone wants to be a bona-fide yogi. In fact, those who have been around the gym a while probably blend with yoga about as well as Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton with one another. But just like gym clothes have been rebranded as “athleisure,” so has the standard yoga practice become an accessible tool that athletes can use to improve performance. Enter Stephanie Ring, a yoga instructor in Northern California who created this unique style of yoga to satisfy her own needs. “I started going to yoga in college at a time when I was not doing a lot of sports,” Ring says. “I soon realized it was helpful physically and mentally, but I also realized it was not something I could do on its own. I needed strength work and other activities like triathlons, rock climbing and CrossFit, and I realized that yoga could play a supporting role to these other pursuits.” A relocation from Los Angeles to San Francisco also meant a change in yogic culture for Ring, and what was once a very physical practice with lots of tricks became, in her words, about chanting, singing and feelings. “I could not find a place that understood that I didn’t want to get my leg behind my head. That did not help me as an athlete,” Ring says. “I wanted a more functional flexibility, flexibility that would help me perform better as an athlete, not take me to a place of extreme mobility.” So where there was a void, Ring simply created a style of yoga that fit her lifestyle. Here’s her take on how yoga can work to your benefit as an athlete, no matter what your sport.


strength By Lara McGlashan, MFA, CPT â&#x20AC;¢ Photography by Cory Sorensen


While the goal of many yogis is to effortlessly fold in half, Ring steers clear of hypermobility when programming for athletes. “I want balance,” she states simply. “I want to be as strong as possible and as mobile as possible to supplement that strength. Personally, I am not the most flexible yoga teacher you’ll ever see — I can’t get my leg behind my head, and that’s OK. My practice is not about extreme flexibility — it’s about using yoga to improve your performance.” When doing a move, Ring recommends getting into the pose as best you can, modifying it to be easier or harder according to your level, and once you feel the stretch, that’s it. “Once you feel it, stay there,” she says. “That will help prevent overstretching and hyperflexibility. In about 30 seconds, the body begins to accept the stretch and the intensity lowers, and you can slowly get into it a little deeper.”

TRY IT! Standing Forward Fold Stand with your feet hip-width apart, legs straight but not locked. Fold forward from your hips and reach your hands toward the floor. Breathe and relax. You should be able to stretch a little farther after 30 seconds or so.

Hone Your Focus A big component of traditional yoga is breath work, timing your breathing to correlate to different stages in a pose, helping

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sharpen your mental focus. This mindfulness tenet also can work to your advantage as an athlete. “The reason we get out of position when lifting is focus; our mind goes into the clouds and we forget what we’re doing,” Ring says. “Using yoga to help you focus translates to a better, safer performance, improved lifts and faster running times. The more you focus on your breath, the more present you become and the easier it is to feel the things you’re doing. By learning to control it, we can rein in our mind and become more focused on the movement.”

TRY IT! Breathing Exercise Take two minutes before starting your warm-up and focus on your breathing. Inhale slowly for a count of two, pause briefly, then exhale for a count of four. As you get into the rhythm, try for deeper, slower breaths, and try to take longer and fewer breaths in minute two than you did in minute one.

Improve Your Warm-Up Gone are the days of walking dully on a treadmill for five minutes to warm up. Rather, Ring recommends 15 to 20 minutes of yoga preworkout for muscle activation and movement prep. “This helps teach your body to get into the positions you’re going to ask it to be in during the workout, like presses and pulls and deadlifts,” she says. “It activates the muscles that need to be working while also exposing weaknesses in your movement patterns.”

TRY IT! Scapular Push-Up Get into a push-up position with your hands beneath your shoulders and your head, heels and hips aligned. Actively press down into the floor with your palms and spread your shoulder blades apart, rounding slightly through your thoracic spine as you come to the top of your range of motion. Then depress your shoulders into the sockets as you draw your shoulder blades together and return to neutral.

Build a Bulletproof Core It’s rare to see a yogi with a sixpack, but Ring (who sports one herself) insists that yoga can be a killer core workout. “Again, it goes back to stability, and a hyperflexible yogi is not going to be as stable with an overhead lift as an athlete with a solid core,” Ring says. “If your core is strong, you will be able to lift heavy overhead or off the ground and run with good posture.” Ring prescribes yoga for core work anytime during your workout — as a warm-up, posttraining, even on your active rest days. Her suggestion: Select moves that target your core 360-degrees around, including moves for your six-pack, as well as for your back and sides.

TRY IT! Hollow Hold Lie faceup with your arms extended overhead and your legs together along the floor. Brace

your core and keep your head neutral as you lift your arms and legs off the floor and make a banana shape with your body. Hold and breathe. Superman Lift Lie facedown with your arms extended overhead, legs straight, head neutral. Exhale and lift your arms and legs as high as you can and hold for 30 seconds. Lower slowly, take a breath and repeat.

To Improve Recovery In addition to activities such as hiking and easy cycling, yoga can be done on your active rest days to help get blood flowing and give your body some lowintensity muscle activation. “A flow is a good way to get some strength and stability through yoga and is a time when you can slow down and focus on precise movements, which then translate into a more focused workout,” Ring says. She also recommends keeping your sessions short and to the point. “I don’t want you spending hours doing this,” she says frankly. “I want you to spend the hours you have to train in the gym or on the sport you love. This is a supplement to improve your experience as an athlete.”

TRY IT! Slow Flow Start in a push-up position. Shift your hips upward toward the ceiling to come into Downward-Facing Dog. Inhale, lift your right leg up as high as you can, then exhale and step your right foot forward between your hands. Inhale and come into a high lunge position with your arms extended overhead. Exhale, place your hands on the floor and step back into plank. Inhale slowly, then exhale and push back into Downward-Facing Dog. Inhale to bring your left foot up, and repeat the sequence on your left side. Go through this flow three times total on each side.

Hair & Makeup: Nancy J / Model: Stephanie Ring / Clothing: Model's Own

Develops Functional Flexibility

A move she uses regularly in warm-ups is the scapular pushup. “This exposes if you are able to move your shoulder blades properly,” she says. “If they are immobile, your overhead and pushing positions will be compromised and other muscles will take over, creating imbalances and improper movement patterns.” The move also acts as a correctional technique, and over time as you practice, you’ll better be able to move your shoulder blades and will improve that weakness.


YOGA FOR YOU Want to try Stephanie Ring’s brand of athletic yoga for yourself? Go to oxygenmag .com/yogastrength. You’ll get four hours of exclusive content, including four modules of warm-up and muscle activation for specific bodyparts, four modules of core strength and stability workouts, and five modules of power yoga for strength and body awareness to do on your active rest days. This program is for all athletes, and you don’t need any equipment or previous yoga experience. All the workouts can be done anywhere, by anyone at any level. Check it out and start today — you could be on your way to the best lifts of your life.

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your

MEALPREP GAME PLAN Turn these ďŹ ve foods into 26 meals to have the healthiest, easiest, tastiest meal week, ever! By Allison Young

Black Bean Burger

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BE PREPARED! The Boy

Scouts were onto something, and we’re not just talking camping. When you have a food plan, as in a meal map for the week, you’re more likely to opt for healthier bites rather than deep-fried, cheesetopped cheats. Not preparing is like going to the grocery store on an empty stomach: a recipe for diet disaster! “Meal planning and bulk prep streamline your cooking process by ensuring you have ingredients on hand for quick meals,” says Carolina Guizar, MS, RD, a registered dietitian nutritionist in New York. “They also give you more incentive to eat at home, saving you money and giving you control over what goes into your food.” So we rounded up five prep-ahead foods you can whip up on a Sunday afternoon for a week’s worth of wholesome meals that taste gourmet. Take that, takeout!

EAT IT! STARTER DISH

Black Bean Soup

SLOWCOOKER BLACK BEANS

Puree black beans + 1 can crushed tomatoes + salt and pepper and top with pico de gallo (recipe on Page 73) + avocado

HANDS ON TIME: 2 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 6 HOURS Black beans are badass! Loaded with protein and fiber (1 cup has 15 grams of each), the power-packed pulses have been linked to greater satiety and nutrient intake as well as weight loss. The inexpensive little legumes are also loaded with mood-boosting folate and flavonoids to fend off disease. Sure, the canned kind are convenient, but they’re no comparison to homemade: “When you cook up dried beans, they have a firmer texture and way less sodium,” says Wendy Jo Peterson, MS, RD, a sports dietitian and culinary nutritionist in Texas and author of Born to Eat (Skyhorse Publishing, 2017). She suggests adding them to meatloaf, spaghetti sauce, tacos and burgers. PREP IT (1 TO 2 CUPS DRIED BEANS): First, rinse and sort out the oddballs, add to the slow cooker and top with enough water to cover beans by 2 inches (toss in a ½ onion, salt and bay leaf for flavor), and cook on low for six hours, or until tender yet firm. Store beans in their cooking liquid in the fridge for up to a week or drain and toss with 1 to 2 teaspoons olive oil and salt and pepper.

Black Bean Burger (makes 4) Mash 2 cups black beans + grated onion + breadcrumbs + 1 egg + garlic powder + salt and pepper (Cook four to five minutes per side.)

Black Bean Dip In food processor, combine black beans + garlic powder + cumin powder + olive oil + fresh lime juice + salt and pepper

Black Bean Salsa Black beans + pico de gallo + corn + diced red pepper + salt and pepper

Squash Black Bean Skillet Saute onion + red pepper + butternut squash (recipe on Page 72) + black beans

Black Bean Truffles Process 1 cup black beans + 6 dates + 1 tbsp coconut oil + ¼ cup cocoa powder and roll into balls in cocoa powder

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STARTER DISH

EAT IT!

STARTER DISH

EAT IT!

SHREDDED PURPLE CABBAGE

Cabbage Stir-Fry

ROASTED BUTTERNUT SQUASH

Butternut Squash Soup

HANDS ON TIME: 5 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 5 MINUTES Cabbage has a leg up on kale. Yes, the cruciferous cruncher also contains glucosinolates, compounds to help prevent cancer cells from multiplying, plus the purple stuff is bursting with anthocyanins, “the same anti-inflammatory antioxidant found in blueberries that may help repair damaged cells and prevent disease,” Peterson says. It’s also a surprising source of vitamin C, an antioxidant that enhances collagen production for plumper skin — all for only 22 calories per cup. “Spruce up your favorite tacos, pulled pork sandwiches or vegetable soup with it,” Peterson adds. PREP IT (1 HEAD): Perfect for tossing into slaws, salads and stir-fries, cabbage is easy to shred. Remove the loose outermost leaves, quarter the cabbage, cut out the core and then slice into thin ribbons. If you’ve got a food processor, slap on the slicing disc and feed in wedges for an even quicker shred. Store in a resealable plastic bag in the crisper for up to a week.

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Sesame oil + soy sauce + ginger + cabbage + julienned carrot + short ribs (recipe on Page 73)

Apple Cabbage Slaw Lime juice + apple cider vinegar + apple + jicama + cabbage

Winter Salad Cabbage + carrots + dried figs + chopped parsley + sunflower seeds

Quick Pickled Cabbage Pour brine (vinegar + sugar + celery seed + salt + water) over cabbage, cover and refrigerate one hour

Cabbage Soup Vegetable broth + canned diced tomatoes + diced onion + cabbage + carrots + black beans

HANDS ON TIME: 5 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 45 MINUTES More comfort food than standard veggie, the nutrient-dense gourd roasts up into caramelized cubes of yumminess with a slightly sweet finish you can toss into soups, salads, side dishes, smoothies and desserts. “One cup of cooked butternut squash covers 40 percent of your daily vitamin C needs and over 100 percent of vitamin A, two powerful antioxidants crucial for immunity,” Guizar says. The versatile veg is also full of supersatisfying fiber and packs in more potassium than a banana, a mineral essential for muscle strength and immune function. PREP IT (1 BUTTERNUT SQUASH): Don’t be intimidated by the tough outer skin. Cut off the ends and peel the skin with a sharp vegetable peeler or knife. Cut in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and chop into 1-inch cubes. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes, or until squash is tender, tossing occasionally. Store covered in the fridge for five to seven days.

Puree butternut squash + lowsodium vegetable broth and top with short ribs + pico de gallo (recipe on Page 73)

Butternut Squash Salad Butternut squash + kale + feta + pine nuts

Squash Hash Saute butternut squash + grated carrot + grated zucchini + diced onion

Curried Squash Dip Puree butternut squash + goat cheese + olive oil + turmeric + salt and pepper

Squash Protein Pudding Blend butternut squash + coconut milk + vanilla protein powder + maple syrup + ground cinnamon


STARTER DISH

EAT IT!

STARTER DISH

EAT IT!

SLOWCOOKER BEEF SHORT RIBS

Short Rib Tacos

PICO DE GALLO

Salsa Fresca Frittata

Top with shredded cabbage + pico de gallo

HANDS ON TIME: 10 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 10 MINUTES

HANDS ON TIME: 20 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 8 HOURS The reason to shortlist short ribs is simple: “Beef short ribs are an inexpensive meat packed with nutrition,” Peterson says. A 3-ounce serving delivers 25 grams of muscle-building protein to keep you sated, plus more than your daily recommended dose of immuneboosting zinc and vitamin B12, a tough-to-get nutrient that can affect everything from your energy to your mood. Beef is also a great source of iron and selenium, crucial minerals for mental and physical energy. PREP IT (3 POUNDS SHORT RIBS, BONE-IN): The quintessential caveman cut makes for amazing leftovers. Heat a large pan over medium-high heat, season ribs with salt and pepper and brown on all sides, about 10 minutes total. Transfer meat to a slow cooker and add ½ cup apple cider vinegar, ¼ cup ketchup, ¼ cup molasses and 1 cup water. Cook on low six to eight hours until meat is tender and falling off the bone. Let cool slightly, remove bones and gristle, and skim off extra fat. Shred meat with your fingers or fork. Store covered in the fridge for up to a week.

Short Rib Chili Canned diced tomatoes + black beans + short ribs + chili powder

Savory Oatmeal Sauteed mushrooms + short ribs + avocado over steel-cut oats

Breakfast Sandwich Short ribs + egg + cheese + whole-wheat English muffin

Short Rib Shepherd’s Pie Short ribs + peas + carrots topped with mashed sweet potato (Bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees.)

Salsa’s not just for chips. Fresh and vibrant pico de gallo, also known as salsa fresca, livens up everything from scrambled eggs to flank steak, and it delivers a tasty dose of nutrition. Tomatoes serve up a major dose of lycopene, a cancer-fighting antioxidant that also can lower heart attack risk, as well as wrinkle-reducing vitamin C and bloat-beating potassium. Onions also get superfood status: “Quercetin, a phytochemical in onion, has antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, important in heart and brain health,” Guizar adds. PREP IT (MAKES 4 CUPS): Pico de gallo is a cinch to make: Dice up seven to eight plum tomatoes, ½ white onion, two to three seeded jalapeno peppers and ¼ cup fresh cilantro topped with fresh lime juice and salt and pepper. Keep in a sealed container in the fridge for up to a week.

6 eggs + ½ cup whole milk + pico de gallo (drained) + diced ham (Bake 20 to 30 minutes at 350 degrees until top is golden brown.)

Salsa Ceviche Shrimp (peeled, deveined) + pico de gallo + lime juice

Farm Chop Salsa Salad Chopped cucumber + carrots + corn + edamame + avocado + pico de gallo

Quinoa Tabbouleh Cooked quinoa + diced cucumber + chopped parsley + pico de gallo + lime juice + olive oil

Pico Guacamole Avocado + pico de gallo + lime juice + salt

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By Erin Calderone, MS, CSCS Photography by Peter Lueders

]


THE HIPS HAVE IT MOVE OVER, ABS: WHEN IT COMES TO CORE STRENGTH, YOUR HIPS ARE IN CONTROL.


I

f you were asked to ID your core muscles, what would you name? Probably the rectus abdominis, the obliques, the lower back, maybe even the glutes. Sure, those are the glamour players that get the most press, but when it comes to primary core function, there are some other very important muscles to consider — those in your hips. In actuality, the pelvis and hips are your seat of postural power, and this central region is responsible not only for propelling you forward, backward or sideways but also for keeping your back and knees happy when standing or sitting. And since the primary functions of your core are to transfer force from one extremity to another and to act as a stabilizer/initiator of a movement, the hips should absolutely be included when programming your core training.

Chain Reaction More than 20 muscles cross, insert into or originate in your hips, all pulling, pushing relaxing and contracting at any given time. With all this kinetic activity around a single, central location, it’s no wonder your hips can become problematic. Most issues stem from an imbalance between opposing muscle groups, and if one muscle is out of balance — either too tight or too lax — it causes a chain reaction that can affect you from head to toe. Sedentary jobs and lifestyles have a lot to do with this problem. For example, if you sit all day, your hips are continually flexed, causing the fibers of the psoas and iliacus (hip flexors) to shorten while the abdominals and glutes relax. When you finally stand, those tightened muscles pull your pelvis forward and the abs and glutes — whose job it is to correct this shift — are caught sleeping on

the job. The muscles in your posterior chain then have to support your entire upper body, causing tightness and pain in your lumbar area, shoulders and neck. But hip issues aren’t relegated to the sedentary sect, and athletic women might have the opposite problem: Since many femalecentric exercises focus on posterior-chain development, the muscles in the glutes and hamstrings are overstimulated and tight, pulling the pelvis rearward and causing it to tuck when standing. Now the lower back is completely flat, which over time could lead to bulging disks. The list of push-me-pull-you examples could go on for pages, but the simple takeaway is this: Implementing programs like this one, which includes strength and mobility work, can balance out your hips and once again make your core a nuclear powerhouse both in the gym and out of it.

THE MOVES STRENGTHEN Begin your leg workout with these moves, focusing on quality over quantity. Once your hips are responding, add a couple of these moves to your workout for maintenance.

MOVE

MUSCLES TARGETED

SETS

REPS

WEIGHT

TEMPO

Stability-Ball Hip Series

gluteal complex, hamstrings, deep rotators

3-5

10-15 each move per side

bodyweight or 1- to 3-pound ankle weights

4 counts each rep

Standing Single-Legged Knee Drive

hip flexors, opposing leg hip stabilizers

3-5

10-15 each side

light/moderate band or 5- to 20-pound cable resistance

slow until stability is established, then increase tempo

Band-Assisted Single-Legged Squat

gluteus medius, deep external rotators

3-5

10-15 each side

bodyweight + moderate resistance band

4 counts down, 2 counts up

Rotating Airplane

internal/ external rotators, stabilizers, abdominals

3

8 each side

bodyweight

4 to 6 counts

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GET TO KNOW YOUR HIPS PSOAS

RECTUS FEMORIS

ILIACUS

GLUTEUS MEDIUS GLUTEUS MINIMUS

PIRIFORMIS the most superior of the deep muscles

Hair & Makeup: Nancy J / Model: Tawny Macias / Pants: Wear It to Heart / Sports Bra: VSX Sport / Shoes: Nike

GEMELLI superior and inferior GLUTEUS MAXIMUS OBTURATORS deep under the glutes

GRACILIS AND PECTINEUS

TENSOR FASCIA LATAE ILIOTIBIAL BAND

ADDUCTOR LONGUS

ADDUCTOR MAGNUS

ADDUCTOR BREVIS

QUADRATUS FEMORIS the most inferior of the deep gluteal muscles

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B

C

! If you get a cramp in the stabilizing hip, stop and stretch using a figure-4 or pigeon stretch before switching sides.

D

A

E

STABILITYBALL HIP SERIES Lie on your side on a stability ball and extend your top leg so it’s straight. Bend your bottom leg, place your knee down and hug the ball with your bottom arm for stability (A). Keep your hips stacked and brace your core to prevent rolling as you perform this sequence slowly and deliberately: z Lift your top leg as high as possible without bending at the waist (B). Lower it to touch the ground briefly, then raise back up. z Lift and hold your leg at hip level, rotating it outward and inward slowly from the hip (C). z Lift and hold your leg at hip level, then bring it forward (D) and rearward (E) as far as possible while keeping your hips stacked.

STANDING SINGLELEGGED KNEE DRIVE

! Your arms help activate your core and prevent rotation at the pelvis.

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Attach an ankle strap to a cable machine (or secure a band with an ankle strap to a stationary object). Stand on one foot facing away from the anchor and find your balance, then extend your working leg behind you. Drive your working knee up to hip height while driving your same-side elbow back, as if sprinting. Slowly return to the start and repeat right away. Do all reps on one side before switching.


BANDASSISTED SINGLELEGGED SQUAT Stand sideways to a stable object and anchor a band at knee height. Step inside the loop with your outside leg and position the band just above your knee, lifting your inside foot off the floor. Squat down as far as you can while keeping your chest lifted. Return to the start. Do all reps on one side before switching.

ROTATING AIRPLANE Stand on one leg, knee soft, and extend your arms to the sides at shoulder height. Hinge at the hips and lower your torso and raise your opposite leg simultaneously until both are parallel to the ground, hips level. Find your balance, then slowly rotate your entire body away from the standing leg until your hips are open and stacked and your arms are perpendicular to the floor. Rotate back to airplane and repeat. Do all reps on one side before switching.

! Press outward with your working leg to keep your knee properly aligned as the band tries to pull it inward.

! Move your body as a single unit; don’t let your shoulders and hips disengage and rotate separately.

What the heck is a labrum … and how can I prevent injuring it? The acetabular labrum is a connective tissue cushion in the “cup” of the pelvis that creates a snug fit for the head of the femur, kind of like a gasket. Athletic tears most often occur on the front of the labrum and are common in sports like golf, baseball, hockey, soccer and football, where rotation of the hip is often combined with hyperextension. A tear to the back of the labrum is less common but can be accomplished with weighted hyperflexion of the hips, such as when doing a heavy, deep squat. Prevent injuries like these by ensuring the muscles on all sides of the joint are strong and extensible: Stretch both your quads and hamstrings, strengthen weak glutes and/or hip flexors, and train both internal and external rotators in the hips.

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MOBILIZE Integrate these moves into your warm-up, or do the routine as a stand-alone to release some end-of-day tension. When foam rolling, pause on each tender spot for 20 to 30 seconds, and when doing static stretching, hold and breathe for 30 seconds each side.

MOVE

MUSCLES TARGETED

REPS/TIME

Foam Rolling: Hip Flexors

hip flexors

2-3 minutes per side

Foam Rolling: Gluteals and Piriformis

gluteal complex, piriformis and deep hip rotators

2-3 minutes per side

Supine Adductor Stretch

adductors

repeat 2-3 times per side

Dynamic Stretch: Reverse Lunge and Reach to Standing Figure-4

total hip complex

8-10 reps each side

! Hit your rectus femoris, which also helps flex the hip, by rolling all the way down the front of your thigh until just above the knee.

! If you find a tender area deep in your hip joint, that’s your piriformis.

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FOAM ROLLING: HIP FLEXORS Lie facedown and position the foam roller underneath one hip, extending that leg behind you. Bend your other knee to the side for support. Keeping your hips level, roll slowly back and forth over the hip flexor, pausing on any tight or painful areas.

FOAM ROLLING: GLUTEALS AND PIRIFORMIS Sit on the roller and cross your left ankle over your right knee. Lean toward the left side and roll back and forth, side to side, to hit your entire gluteal group.


Happy hips = kick-ass performance

! This is a passive stretch; use the strap, not your muscles, to raise and lower your leg.

SUPINE ADDUCTOR STRETCH Lie on your back and wrap a strap or band around one foot, then extend that leg over your hip, foot flexed. Ground your glutes and open your leg to the side until you feel a stretch in your inner thigh. Hold and breathe, then return to the start. Do all reps on one side before switching.

DYNAMIC STRETCH: REVERSE LUNGE AND REACH TO STANDING FIGURE4 Lunge back with your right leg, then reach up and over your body with your right arm and reach back to touch your hamstring with your left hand. Return to the start, then lift your right leg into a figure-4 position at hip height, grabbing your knee and foot and pulling gently upward and inward. Do all reps on one side, then switch.

! As you improve, challenge your core and balance further by performing this move hands-free: Place your ankle above your opposite knee and drop down into a standing figure-4 with your hands on your hips.

Research backs a hip-healthy program for sports performance and strength. One recent Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research study done on female volleyball players showed that those who did integrated hip/core exercises (similar to the rotating airplane in this workout) as part of their training increased their hip abductor strength by almost 17 percent. Another study published in the same journal showed that stretching alone does not increase your hip range of motion during functional movements and that in fact you need to ingrain a new movement pattern into your regular training in order for it to become second nature. This can be done during the dynamic warm-up, by taking your joints actively through their full range of motion (for example: reverse lunge and reach to standing figure-4) while activating your core and priming the nervous system to control a new movement pattern.

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THE SCIENCE OF The secret to lasting weight loss and optimal performance could be as close as the bedroom. BY LARA MCGLASHAN, MFA, CPT


HOW DID YOU SLEEP LAST NIGHT? That simple question can make or break your day. When you get a good night’s sleep, you feel like you can take on the world, and getting your fair share means enjoying a host of energizing benefits, including improved memory and creativity, decreased inflammation and improved immune function. But of particular note for athletes is the effect of sleep on weight loss, performance and recovery, and more and more research indicates that the hours you sleep are as important — if not more so — than the time you spend training. “Sleep is foundational and, in my opinion, is even a little more important on the scale than things like nutrition and hydration,” says Dr. W. Christopher Winter, Ph.D., president of Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine, pro sports team consultant and author of The Sleep Solution (Penguin Random House, April 2017). “Sleep has its fingers in everything from mood to mental capacity to physical well-being. And some studies show that just a couple of days of restricted sleep — four to five hours — result in a measurable reduction in performance.”

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DETRIMENTAL DEFICIT Sleep deficit does a number of egregious things to your physical performance, causing a decrease in max power, velocity and force, slower reaction times and greater perceived work effort. Surprisingly, however, these effects are not completely because of physiological impairment but rather from a decrease in cognitive ability and function as a result of that deprivation. Case in point: A 30-year study of National Football League game data indicates that teams who traveled across three time zones to play night games were 67 percent more likely to lose, even when the point spread was factored in. Since sleep debt negatively impacts an athlete’s mood, drive and fatigue level, the sports and skills that require accuracy and focus will be those most impacted. “The scientific evidence indicates pretty clearly that sleep loss or disruption causes slower reaction times and diminishes both cognitive and emotional capacity,” says Dr. Benjamin Smarr, Ph.D., a Reverie sleep research expert at the University of California, Berkeley. “Even if your muscles are ready to fire after sleep deprivation, if your self-doubt and ability to react are offkilter, your performance is at risk.” Fatigue also can impair reaction time when playing a sport, potentially increasing your risk for injury.

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“Athletes are constantly working on and improving their training and performance programs, but honestly, the secret weapon for success is sleep,” says Jack Dell’Accio, CEO and founder of Essentia mattresses. “Athletes push their bodies to the extreme, and the only time they really have to repair themselves is at night, during sleep.”

THE FAT FACTOR When it comes to body composition, sleep debt scrambles up your hormones and makes fat loss a problematic endeavor. “Ghrelin [the hunger hormone] rises and creates cravings for carbs and fast energy, and leptin [the satiety hormone] decreases, reducing the feeling of satiety you get when you do eat,” Winter says. This imbalance makes you more likely to reach for high-fat or high-calorie foods when it’s time to nosh, and one study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition even showed that wellrested people ate on average 300 fewer calories per day than those who were sleepdeprived. “Also, if you’re not sleeping well, cortisol rises to help keep you alert,” Winter adds. “Essentially, we stress ourselves awake.” Cortisol is associated with fat storage and retention, and a recent study published in the journal Sleep found that sleep restriction boosts a chemical signal that increases the pleasure and satisfaction

gained from eating. This means that not only are you more likely to eat more because of your hormone imbalance, but that the experience will be so pleasurable that you’ll also want to eat more. Double whammy.

THE NATIONAL DEBT How much sleep you actually need is a matter of eternal debate, and while some people get away with six hours a night, others need 10 or more. “Sleep need is as genetic as eye color, so when you ask how much sleep you need, the only true answer is ‘enough,’” Winter says. There are actually dozens of genes associated with sleep quality and quantity, and these differ from person to person, so truthfully there is no one-size-fits-all Rx for the number of hours of sleep you should get. The rule of thumb from Winter and other researchers is that if you feel wellrested and energized during the day, you’re probably getting enough. If you’re falling asleep on the way to work or crashing out before Modern Family begins, you probably need more. That being said, it’s not that simple in practice, since many of us have a terminal case of social jet lag — where the demands of life and social activities continually interfere with the amount of sleep we get. Often, our innate needs are not met, and in fact, according to the Centers for Disease


Control and Prevention, most Americans get less than seven hours of sleep per night. If you’re someone who needs eight or nine or 10 hours to fully recuperate and recover, you’re probably in trouble.

QUALITY CONTROL Though there are varying opinions on this, most experts agree that it’s best that your sleep cycles be contiguous. “Our brains don’t do a great job of getting into a deep-sleep state if we keep waking up,” Winter says. “If you subdivide your sleeping hours into four or five at night and take a nap during the day, you’ll benefit less than you would with six or eight straight hours of sleep.” A typical sleep cycle lasts about 90 minutes, with approximately one hour dedicated to non-REM, slow-wave sleep and 30 minutes to REM dream-state sleep, and ideally you’ll experience several individual sleep cycles during the course of a good night’s sleep. During non-REM sleep, your pituitary gland is super active, releasing growth hormone to stimulate tissue repair and restoration, boost metabolism and increase aerobic capacity. This is also when you build bones, increase blood supply to muscles, restore energy and bolster your immune system. Age can make you sleep less soundly, leading to poor non-REM sleep, and of particular note to athletes, a large increase in training volume can cause a disruption in sleep patterns here, prohibiting your body from properly repairing itself. During REM sleep, you focus on the brain, improving function, facilitating memory consolidation and experiencing dreams. Sleep that lacks a REM phase is non-restorative, meaning you’ll feel fatigued and will have impaired memory and a reduced ability to learn. “It also affects your perception of pain, meaning that if two athletes incur the same injury, the lessrested one will feel it more intensely than the one who got enough sleep,” Winter explains. Poor REM sleep also can lead to overtraining over the long term because your central nervous system — led by the brain — does not get a full reboot.

REVERSE AND MITIGATE YOUR DEBT The good news is that any damage — mental or physical — caused by lack of sleep is easily reversible by simply logging more zzz’s. “The very first night you get eight hours instead of five or six you’ll feel

BENEFITS OF SLEEP

1. Improves memory 2. Curbs inflammation 3. Improves immune function 4. Encourages creativity 5. Reduces your risk for heart disease, heart attack, obesity and diabetes 6. Reduces stress 7. Sharpens focus and attention 8. Decreases susceptibility to illness 9. Promotes weight loss better and will have significant mental and physical benefits,” Winter says. “The real question is how long will it take you to repay the debt? Likely several days to several weeks before you’re peaking in performance once more.” There are many non-pharmaceutical ways to develop good “sleep hygiene” and increase your sleep quality and quantity, starting today. Implement them into your daily routine and be on your way to a leaner body, more intense workouts, heavier lifts and improved mental performance, on and off the field.

Stick to a Schedule. According to the National Sleep Foundation, going to bed and getting up at the same time helps regulate your circadian rhythm, or sleep/ wake cycle. Set a realistic bedtime that fits with your schedule and try to stick to it, even on the weekends, Winter advises. If you’re still wide awake when bedtime comes, don’t stress; do something relaxing such as reading a book or taking a bath. Contrarily, if you’re nodding off before your prescribed sack time, get up and do something mildly stimulating, such as folding laundry or tidying up. Power Down. The blue light emanating from computers, phones, televisions and tablets increases brain activity at a time

when you’re supposed to be winding down, reducing the production of the sleep hormone melatonin, disrupting sleep patterns and decreasing the amount of REM sleep you get, according to a Harvard Medical School study. And while reading is an excellent option for relaxation, choose a good old-fashioned book rather than a backlit e-reader, which can be just as disruptive as a tablet or phone.

Mattress Mayhem. Even the best mattress has a life span of about 10 years before it gets lumpy, bumpy and frumpy. If yours has exceeded its useful life span, it’s time to shop for a new one. Control Your Environment. A cooler bedroom — in the range of 60 to 67 degrees — is the ideal temperature for sleeping. Your bedroom also should be quiet and relaxing and, aside from your significant other, no one else should inhabit your bed. Sure, it’s lovely to snuggle with your pets and kids, but all those extra arms and legs (and tails!) could ultimately prevent you from getting a restful sleep. Learn to Relax. Ruminating, worrying and planning at night when you should be sleeping can cause insomnia. End your day with deep breathing, which has been shown to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, promoting relaxation and calm. To practice, inhale slowly for two seconds, hold for two seconds, then exhale slowly for four seconds. Repeat. Rein in Your Vices. Smoking, caffeine and alcohol are the three most notorious sleep vampires: Nicotine and caffeine are stimulants, preventing you from falling asleep or sleeping soundly, and should be curtailed in the early afternoon. Smokers are also four times as likely to report feeling tired when they wake up as nonsmokers, and even though a cocktail before bed might initially help you relax, it suppresses certain neurotransmitters, preventing you from entering REM sleep and leading to poor sleep quality. Make Your Bed. A poll from the National Sleep Foundation found that those who make their beds in the morning are more likely to report getting a good night’s sleep. Though uncertain why, they theorize that perhaps making your bed restores order and reduces clutter, which helps reduce stress.

SLEEP DEBT NEGATIVELY IMPACTS AN ATHLETE’S MOOD, DRIVE AND FATIGUE LEVEL. january / february 2017

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To learn more visit us at www.Tonalin.com © 2016 All Rights Reserved. Tonalin® CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) is now an exclusively licensed product of BASF Personal Care and Nutrition GmbH. This product is to be used in conjunction with a healthy calorie reduction and exercise program. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. If you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or lactating, please consult a health care professional before taking this or any other dietary supplement.


WORDS OF WISDOM FROM THOSE IN THE KNOW

exhale

CAN DO

When you were a kid, where did your imagination take you? Today, tap into that same creative energy to envision becoming your strongest self, whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the gym or facing the challenges of daily life.

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SUCCESS STORIES

Work in progress Kaseedee Pilarz went from being the sideline mom to a kick-ass kettlebell competitor. rom the minute she discovered she was pregnant, Kaseedee Pilarz took the phrase “eating for two” literally. “I lost control,” she admits. “I stopped being active, saying I needed my ‘rest,’ and ate whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted. I thought I had a get-out-of-jail-free card.” Even after giving birth, Pilarz, 5 feet 2 inches tall, was a size 22/24 and weighed in at 275 pounds. She could not make it up a flight of stairs without being winded, and when she saw the photos of herself from her son’s baptism — game over. First Steps Pilarz confided in her husband about wanting to get into shape, and together they researched gyms and made a plan that helped her feel supported. Still, she panicked her first day. “Everyone there looked fit, and [I wondered] how I fit in at almost 300 pounds,” she says. “Were they laugh-

ing at me? Were they judging me? It was terrifying!” She persisted, however, buoyed by the support of her husband and her trainer. “[My coach] showed me that I am so much stronger than I thought,” Pilarz says. Slowly, she began to transform her shape. She also had a professional draw up a nutrition plan, for which she was immediately grateful. “My plan told me to eat 2,000 calories a day, and I was confused! How was I supposed to eat this much and lose weight?” she says. But she soon understood that by changing the types of food she was eating to better options, she could still be satisfied and lose weight. “If it had been up to me, I would have cut my caloric intake, which would have caused more problems,” she says.

Goal Getter Throughout her weight-loss journey, Pilarz continually made goals, and each time she hit one, she immediately made another. “I started with the goal to be fit for my son, then to lose 10 pounds, then to go to the gym five days a week, to run a 5K, run a half marathon, compete in a kettlebell competition and become a fitness professional,” she says. Each new goal renewed her purpose. Today, Pilarz is a seasoned competitor in kettlebell sport in the snatch event, which she describes as “a highly challenging, power-endurance feat of cyclical nature.” The technical sport requires flexibility, strength, power, breathing techniques, aerobic capacity and mental focus, all of which Pilarz has developed over the years. She has also become a well-heeled distance runner, and her best marathon to date was in Buffalo, New York, where she finished with a time of 4:57. “Every day I am a work in progress with ups and downs,” she says. “But every step I take backward helps me take five steps forward. If my story can help just one woman going through a tough time, then I’m happy.”

stats Kaseedee Pilarz/ Jersey City, New Jersey age: 35 height: 5’2’’ old weight: 275 lb current weight: 165 lb occupation: Pilates instructor 5 Things Kaseedee Learned Along the Way Food is not about all or nothing. If you go for ice cream, get a small and share it. Deprivation only makes you want more. If you have a lot of weight to lose, break it into manageable chunks. Get your family on board with healthy living. My husband cooks, and he and my son have started running. In fact, my son finished a half marathon at age 12! Get a training partner. Just knowing my partner, Diana, is planning on meeting me at the gym gets me there some days! Train at home. I love taking Spin classes, but getting there on time can be hard. So I bought a Spin bike for the house and I take a live or prerecorded class.

Before photo of Kaseedee

Want to share your ory? Email us at successories@oxygenmag.com!

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After Photo by Natural Photography by Barb Parzych

transform


By Lara McGlashan, MFA, CPT

Rethinking life

Faced with a cancer diagnosis, Ginger Lynn McGuinness embraced a healthy lifestyle and went from pitiful to powerful.

McGuinness also adopted clean-eating habits and became a dedicated label reader. “I am by no means an expert on nutrition, but it makes sense that poor nutrition leads to poor health,” she says. “It’s wellknown that a poor diet leads to heart disease and diabetes, and I believe the same can be said of cancer. Food has the power to fortify as well as destroy. If I could go back in time, I would certainly rethink my eating habits and gravitate more toward whole foods rather than packaged foods, which were staples in my youth.”

From Stage I to Stageworthy

’m sorry, can you please repeat that? I think I heard you wrong.” No one expects a cancer diagnosis, and when Ginger Lynn McGuinness received hers in 2011 after an annual mammogram, she was understandably shocked. “I lost three family members to cancer, and faced with my diagnosis and what lay ahead, I was overwhelmed,” she says. McGuinness made the decision to have a bilateral mastectomy, followed by four months of chemotherapy and finally reconstruction. “The effects of treatment on my body were devastating, and mentally I felt defeated due to the loss of my breasts,” she says. “But then I had to rethink what was happening: I was given a second chance at life. My battle with cancer was behind me, and I was ready to get back on track with my health.”

After Photo by James Patrick

The Missing Link McGuinness had struggled with her weight and diet for years, and at her heaviest, she weighed 215 pounds. She tried on and off to lose the weight but would eventually fall back into her old habits. Her second husband got her into the gym, and McGuinness discovered that strength training was the missing link in her programming. “I had always walked on the treadmill and went from fat flabby to skinny flabby and back again,” she says. Strength training gave her body the shape she was wanting and built her confidence in the process.

McGuinness enjoyed such great results that in 2016, after being cancer-free for five years, she decided to enter a bikini competition. “I wanted to prove to myself that I could transform my body into a stageworthy physique,” she says. “I took third place, and in 2017, I want to compete in a figure competition, where the women are a bit leaner and more muscular. That will push me out of my comfort zone and encourage me to pursue something that makes me stretch. We tend to be more appreciative of those things that we have to really dig in and work hard for. “It has taken me years to embrace who I am, and I love where I am in my life. You can choose to be pitiful or powerful, and as painful as some of the twists and turns were while going through them, I would not change my life at all. My life has made me who I am today, and I know how strong I truly am. I am a survivor!”

stats Ginger Lynn McGuinness/ Sacramento, California age: 48 height: 5’6’’ old weight: 215 lb current weight: 140 lb occupation: Health-care supervisor of pharmacy benefits Ginger’s Top 5 Tips for Breast Cancer Patients Take time for things you really enjoy doing. Find little things each day to be thankful for. Eat. Some days the last thing you’ll want to do is eat due to nausea, but now more than ever, your body needs nutrients. Make yourself a “to-do” list each day. It’s satisfying to have some structure. Remember that this is all temporary: Life will go back to normal.

Before photos of Ginger

Go to oxygenmag.com to see Ginger’s favorite healy recipe!

january / february 2017

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INSPIRATION Curvy start: Jacquelyn Kankam always had a curvy physique, but then one day, she stopped liking how she looked. “In 2010, I went to Costa Rica for Christmas and couldn’t recognize myself in the pictures when I got back. I realized I had migrated from curvy to overweight,” she says. So on January 1, 2011, she made a resolution to change. Her father inspired her to get a trainer by saying, “If you’re going to spend money on anything in life, your health is No. 1,” and she began a whole new way of life.

Future of fitness

Meet 4 women who’ve got the fit factor.

CALLING ALL FIT WOMEN Think you have what it takes? Send your story to futureoffitness@ oxygenmag.com.

Julie Vidinovski Markham, Ontario, Canada Stats: 38 • 110 lb • 5’2” Gig: Provincial government employee

Busy schedule: Julie Vidinovski has two daughters, ages 8 and 5, and she works full time. “It’s hard to find balance,” Vidinovski says. “Once the girls are asleep at around 8:30 p.m., I head out for my workout. I try to do my workouts on weekdays so my weekends are free for family time. Our lives are hectic!” Her husband of 13 years, Tony Vidinovski, is her secret to success. “He has never once made me feel guilty about doing what I want to do,” she says.

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New life: Working out is a natural part of Kankam’s routine now. “There is no better feeling than starting off your day right with a great workout,” she says. She enjoys cooking her healthy meals at night, with steamed fish cooked in parchment paper with tomatoes and herbs as her favorite meal.

Her reason why: “I don’t work out because I’m obsessed with my body,” Vidinovski explains. “I work out because I truly love it. I have more energy, more confidence and I feel I am a great role model for my daughters.” She enjoys sharing her fit philosophy: “In our house, we never use the terms ‘skinny’ or ‘diet.’ We always say ‘strong’ and ‘healthy.’ I want my daughters to know they have to work for something they aspire to be.” Making progress: Vidinovski stresses the importance of taking progress photos on a fitness journey. “Most people don’t see the early progress until they capture it,” she says. “And don’t get obsessed with the world of Instagram. The most inspiring woman is the average everyday mom.”

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From scared to serious: “I’ll never forget my first workout,” Kankam says. “I cried and debated giving up, but I realized that the next workout would get easier.” She stuck with it, and now she says deadlifts are her favorite exercise. “I feel like a beast when doing them.” Her weekly training routine consists of two runs, one sprint, three boot-camp days and two powerlifting/ Olympic-lifting days.

Jacquelyn Kankam Toronto Stats: 33 • 162 lb • 5’9” Gig: Sustainability manager

Photo by Paul Buceta / Photo by Brian Reilly / Photo by Cameron Nardolillo / Photo by Jennifer Bennett

fit factor


By Maura Weber

Game changer: Christa Brown joined a gym with modest goals to get healthy. “What I didn’t know is that when I walked into that gym, I would find love and passion for life I never knew I could have,” she says. “Fast-forward to four years later and fitness is who I am. I live and breathe a healthy life. My love of health is a part of my daily movements, thoughts, actions and conversation.” A bit of everything: Brown, who has what she calls her dream job at Nike World Headquarters, trains every morning. She does 45 minutes of weight training followed by an hour group exercise class. “Yes, I work out every day,” she says. “Do I recommend this to everyone? No. But I just love it too much to take a break!” She eats six times a day to fuel all that exercise.

Jennifer Nardolillo Yorba Linda, California Stats: 40 • 114 lb • 5’3” Gig: Payroll manager

Training partner: “My husband, Anthony, has always worked out and would try to get me to go with him,” Jennifer Nardolillo says. “One day, I was finally ready.” They train together most days, starting off with 45 minutes of high-intensity interval training and then weight training one bodypart. “Because fitness is a priority to me, I make sure I get it done early in the morning before my kids wake up,” says the mother of four.

Inspiration: Surrounding herself with the right people was another positive step that Brown took to improve her life. “There have been relationships that were causing me to lose sight of my health. Letting them go was tough but necessary for my personal growth,” she says. Her mother, Vivian Mohr, is Brown’s biggest supporter. “My mother is my best friend and my biggest inspiration,” she says.

Fit at 40: “At age 40, I look better than when I was 21 and, more important, I feel better,” Nardolillo says. “Anthony and I like to show our kids that we take care of our bodies and do what it takes to achieve our goals.” Don’t let the outside world distract you from what you’re working toward in the gym, she says. “Not everyone is in the same mind frame and might not understand those kinds of goals.” Favorites: Nardolillo does food prep on Sundays, and she says her favorite healthy meal is turkey patties with grilled onions and Brussels sprouts. She looks forward to leg- and glute-training day. “That is the hardest area for me, and I love to see improvement,” she says.

Christa Brown Beaverton, Oregon Stats: 26 • 106 lb • 5’3” Gig: Executive assistant


spotlight

DANICA PATRICK

By Maura Weber

Speed demon Racer Danica Patrick is driven to compete and achieve her best.

rare female in a male-dominated field, and not only has she racked up impressive finishes in IndyCar and stock car racing, she has earned the respect of those in the know. How did she accomplish that? With a real love of racing and a dedication to push herself, both on the track and in the gym. Patrick, who is sponsored by Six Star Pro Nutrition, has a hectic travel schedule racing her No. 10 car in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, but just because she’s on the road a lot doesn’t mean she lowers her personal standards for fitness. “You have to plan your workouts,” she says. “It’s just like anything else in life — if you don’t plan it, it doesn’t happen. I’m good at making up my own

workouts and know what type of workouts I can do on the road.” Outdoor interval training is her go-to favorite, not surprising for a competitive spirit who loves speed. “The best workouts to get the most impact with the least amount of equipment are intervals, whether that be 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off of running or 20-second sprints with 40 seconds of rest,” she says. “Those are really good for getting your heart rate up. Intervals are great whether it’s air squats, push-ups, sit-ups or whatever you choose. You’ll for sure feel the burn.” Patrick also keeps a realistic attitude about squeezing in fitness. “I try to work out as much as I can when I have time because you don’t know when you’re not going to,” she says.

WHY DANICA LOVES SIX STAR WHEY PROTEIN PLUS FOR HER PRODUCTS: “First and foremost, it tastes really good. That’s definitely important. After that, I look at the other benefits they have, like added vitamins, nutrients and probiotics that help make their products have one of the more complete formulas available. Those are great ways to add a little boost to your drink.”

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DANICA’S WORKOUT SCHEDULE: “Every day that

I’m home, I try to do two workouts in a day. I’ll do a short interval cardio workout and then something with weights for the other one. I break it up by upper body, lower body and abs, and I try to get in one of each a week. I do yoga once or twice a week. Sometimes I’m really good and I do three twoa-days in a row, and sometimes I don’t work out for the whole week because I’m busy.”

Photo by Michael Alberstat

ace-car driver Danica Patrick is a


how she fuels

LEXI BERRIMAN

Keeping it real

By Maura Weber

Lexi Berriman brings a pragmatic approach to her training and diet.

hould you force yourself

Lexi’s favorite Dymatize products: “I love the Dymatize Glutamine because I train so much that I need all the recovery I can get. Along with that, I use the Amino Pro religiously and all day long! This helps me recover and drink more water, and it keeps my electrolytes balanced. The ISO100 RTD is so convenient for my schedule, and the Elite Protein Bar in coconut creme saves my butt if I don’t have time to grab a meal. My favorite is still the Dymatize ISO100 in birthday cake. I love sweet stuff, and this hits the spot!”

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Lexi’s favorite Dymatize products

LEXI’S SAMPLE ONEDAY MEAL PLAN: Breakfast: 6 egg whites, ½ cup oats with cinnamon Snack: 4 ounces chicken, 5 asparagus spears Lunch: 4 ounces ground turkey, 1 cup rice Snack: 4 ounces nonfat yogurt, ½ cup low-fat granola, ½ cup berries During workout: 2 scoops Dymatize ISO100 cinnamon bun mixed with ½ cup oats and water Dinner: 5 ounces cod, 5 asparagus spears, 1 cup rice Bedtime: 1 cup hot water blended with Dymatize ISO100 fudge brownie “I keep my meals very simple Monday to Friday as I don’t have time to try to figure out variations. I do allow for cheat days because I love some nights of pizza and movie popcorn, but I try to limit myself.”

“I KNOW I CANNOT GIVE 100 PERCENT IF I AM NOT DEDICATED TO MY NUTRITION.”

Photo by Omar Foster

to train when you’re exhausted? No way, says Las Vegas–based Lexi Berriman, CrossFit coach and competitor and self-described “real person.” She explains, “If I had to give one piece of advice, it would be to live. If you’re happy training every day, then do it. If your body is tired, then rest.” A similarly sensible approach to nutrition keeps the Dymatize athlete on a healthy diet that supports her high-energy life. She doesn’t pretend to be perfect. “Sometimes I just don’t want to eat more chicken,” she says. The trick to avoiding caving in to dietary temptation is preparation, she says. “I have found for myself that if I keep a couple of staple items on hand, it can save me from bad decisions. I always have yogurt, granola, oats, cream of rice and, most important, dark chocolate baking chips available.” Keeping busy is Berriman’s style. She works as a coach during the day at CAC CrossFit inside City Athletic Club (where a number of notable physique competitors can be found pumping iron), then meets up with her boyfriend, Santino DeWreede. “We train with our coaches together in the evenings at CrossFit Apollo,” she says. “He works graveyards as a police officer while I work 5 a.m. until afternoons, so we try to make our time together count!” For Berriman, the right nutrition choices form a building block for elite physical achievement. “I stay motivated knowing I am doing my best,” she says. “I know I’ll have good days and bad. I train nightly for hours with my team at CFA, and I know I cannot give 100 percent if I am not dedicated to my nutrition.”


U.S. Postal Service

ADVERTISING PROMOTION

Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation

product talk

(Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685) 1. Title of publication: Oxygen 2. Publication number: 1095-7073 3. Date of filing: September 14, 2015 4. Frequency of issue: Monthly except Oct+Dec 5. Number of issues published annually: 10 6. Annual subscription price: $24.97 7. Location of known office of publication: 5720 Flatiron Pkwy Boulder, CO 80301 8. Location of headquarters or general business offices at publishers: 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E, Valencia, CA 91355

Gripad

9. Names and complete address of publisher, editor and managing editor

Get a grip on your workout!

Publisher: Cheryl Angelheart, 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E, Valencia, CA 91355 Editor: Maureen Farrar, 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E, Valencia, CA 91355 Managing Editor: Maura Weber, 24900 Anza Dr., Unit E, Valencia, CA 91355 10. Owner: Cruz Bay Publishing Inc., 300 N. Continental Blvd., Ste. 650, El Segundo, CA 90245 11. Known bondholders, mortgages and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages and securities: None 12. Tax Status: Has not changed 13. Publication title: Oxygen 14. Issue date for circulation data below: Nov/Dec 2016 15. Extent and nature of circulation: Average No. of copies of each issue during preceding 12 months A. Total No. of copies printed224,906

No. of copies of single issue published nearest to filing date. 193,844

B. Paid circulation 1. Mail subscription

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84,149

G. Copies not distributed 131.926

F. Total distribution

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H. Total

193,844

224,906

84.12% I. Percent paid and/or requested 83.80% Total Circulation does not include electronic copies 17. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Circulation Director: Jenny Desjean Date: September 14, 2016 For completion by publishers mailing at the regular rates (Section 132.121, Postal Service Manual): 39 U.S.C. 3626 provides in pertinent part: â&#x20AC;&#x153;No person who would have been entitled to mail matter under former section 4359 of this title shall mail such matter at the rates provided under this subsection unless he files annually with the Postal Service a written request for permission to mail matter at such rates.â&#x20AC;? In accordance with the provisions of this statute, I hereby request permission to mail the publication named in item 1 at the phased postage rates presently authorized by 39 U.S.C. 3626.

Body by Brazil Fitness Wear


boost

TRAINING

By Adam Gonzalez

The ultimate whey Whey Gold provides the nutrients you need to accomplish your physique goals.

b

uilding lean muscle

tissue is a 24-hour-a-day proposition. While your focus is often on intense workouts, you also have to provide your body with the crucial nutrients for repairing muscle tissue damaged during workouts. While your workouts are the most challenging aspect of the equation, your nutrition is the easiest part of the process to overlook. To get the most from your workouts, it’s essential that you consume the proper amount and types of protein to maximize your results. Whey Gold from Ultimate Nutrition provides exactly what you need before and after workouts. Here’s more about this product’s multiple benefits.

Fuels Your Muscles When you train with intensity — performing cardio, weight training or a combination — your body needs fast-digesting whey protein to fuel the recovery and repair the damage that occurs to muscle tissue. It’s important to consume plenty of fast-digesting protein before and after workouts, as well as at other times of day to ensure you have amino acids in your system. When you don’t, your body turns to other lean muscle tissue, breaking it down to support recovery and growth. And this can be a zero-sum game: Taking from one muscle group for another undercuts your long-term progress. Getting in protein immediately before and after workouts helps assure that you’ll have protein in your system. Your body will be able to use the protein provided by Whey Gold to protect all your lean tissue while supporting recovery and long-term gains.

Reduces Muscle Breakdown

Go for the Gold

All protein is constituted of amino acids, but every protein provides a unique range of these building blocks. Whey Gold is high in branched-chain amino acids, a unique group that includes leucine, isoleucine and valine. You’ve probably heard about BCAAs because of their role in creating gains. These amino acids stimulate protein synthesis, spurring the growth of muscles. BCAAs also encourage the release of insulin, an effect you want around your workouts to support the recovery process by driving amino acids and other nutrients to your muscle tissue. In addition, BCAAs blunt the release of cortisol, the stress hormone that tears down muscle tissue. Each serving of Whey Gold provides more than 4 grams of BCAAs, an ideal dose for recovery and growth.

Whey Gold from Ultimate Nutrition is an affordable and tasty protein product. Each one-scoop serving of Delicious Vanilla flavor provides 20 grams of protein with only 140 calories. The product mixes easily in water, and you can consume multiple servings throughout the day, including when you awake, as a snack, before and after workouts, and before bed.

Supports Recovery Amino acids are divided into two groups — essential and nonessential. Nonessential amino acids are the crucial ones that you need for basic survival and function. They are so critical that your body can make them from other amino acids, meaning that you do not need to get them from your food or supplements. Essential amino acids, though, cannot be made by the body and need to be consumed. And many of these essential amino acids are crucial for supporting accretion of lean muscle tissue and secondary functions that support training and recovery. This means you need to consume a high amount of these amino acids. Whey Gold is rich in essential amino acids such as arginine, threonine and phenylalanine, in addition to BCAAs.

24k Gold The right protein gets you great results.

Your body will be able to use the protein provided by Whey Gold to protect all your lean tissue while supporting recovery and longterm gains.

EACH SERVING OF WHEY GOLD PROVIDES MORE THAN 4 GRAMS OF BCAAS, AN IDEAL DOSE FOR RECOVERY AND GROWTH.

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ADVERTISING PROMOTION

product talk Zeropoint Kill Cliff Clean Recovery & Hydration These drinks are perfect after a long workout, long night out or whenever you need to get back to full speed. It’s a tasty and lightly carbonated blend of B vitamins, ginger extract, greentea extract, plant enzymes, electrolytes and other functional ingredients. No artificial colors or flavors. Sugar-free, glutenfree and only 15 to 20 calories per can. killcliff.com

Versa Gripps Gotta have these! These are absolutely the best grips in the world. Get girl power in the gym with new Versa Gripps Fit Pink! The same great style is now in super-sexy pink. They are the key to the mind-muscle connection and the secret to a lean and fabulously fit body. Patented SelfSupporting Grip Assist is proven to eliminate grip fatigue while protecting hands from calluses. Train better. Patent # 5813950. versagripps.com 207-422-2051

Limited Edition Pink Stingray Otomix creates bodybuilding shoes that feature awesome performance and incredible good looks! Best of all, we listen to our customers and now have a pink Stingray for women! Our thin soles enable athletes to move easily, feel the surface beneath their feet, assist with balance and facilitate correct positioning during lifts. With our heritage of experience in martial arts to the world of wrestling, bodybuilding, MMA and grappling, we introduced the Stingray Escape shoe. These ultralight shoes provide superior support and stability with an unlimited range of motion. Ideal for all grappling sports, bodybuilding, jujitsu, judo, boxing, wrestling and mixed martial arts. F3000 • Colors: pink, black, white, grey, red, yellow, camo, blue, purple • Sizes: Female 6-10 otomix.com

Compression socks and sleeves are used for preventing swollenness and tiredness of legs after training, traveling and long days on your feet. Zeropoint compression products offer support, prevent cramps and help legs recover faster. This is because compression increases pressure in the leg tissue, enhancing blood flow and removing metabolic waste. It also helps with varicose problems during and after pregnancy! Not only do they look good, but Zeropoint products are also proven to help! zpcompression.us


What will you accomplish? “It’s not about ‘what can I accomplish?’ but ‘what do I want to accomplish?’ Paradigm shift.” — BRENE BROWN

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Photo by Cory Sorensen / Model: Alyssa Germeroth

inspire


UNutrition www.ultimatenutrition.com

)S\L9HZWILYY` -Y\P[7\UJO .YHWL 3LTVU3PTL 3LTVUHKL 6YHUNL 7PUR3LTVUHKL >H[LYTLSVU Ultimate Nutrition® Flavored BCAA Powder 12,000

THE ULTIMATE WAY TO A LEANER BODY The BCAA Advantage The branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine are a must-have supplement and for good reason. BCAAs make up approximately 50% of skeletal muscle and can be used to either build new proteins (e.g. muscle tissue) or be burned as fuel to produce energy. In fact, BCAAs are the only amino acids that can be oxidized (burned) for energy in muscle tissue. Therefore, your body requires higher amounts of BCAAs during and following exercise.

6,000mg high-quality 100% crystalline U.S.P. BCAAs 2:1:1 ratio Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine 60 servings 457g in every bottle Ultimate Nutrition products are available at fine retailers worldwide.

© Copyright 2016 Ultimate Nutrition. All Rights Reserved. *These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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