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T HE B E A U T Y E X P E R T

JA JJAN AN

Z ENDAYA An Icon in The Mak ing

THE SECRET WEAPON

Already in Your Medicine Cabinet

+Gorgeous Spring

Makeup

Reinventing the Classics

For Better Skin?

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AMAZING PRODUCTS You’ve Never Heard of Before Zap, Freeze, Or Recycle

THE NEW FAT FRONTIER


JANUARY 76 BLURRED LINES Lose the lip line—and other tips for fresh, fun, unexpected twists on classic makeup looks.

FROM LEFT: NICOLAS KANTOR; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Top by Céline. Bikini top by Alexander Wang. Necklace by Efva Attling. Infallible Paints lip color in DIY Red by L’Oréal Paris. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017


NEWS & TRENDS 18 My Look. Talking Beauty With Zoey Deutch. The actress on the product she hoards, her surprising shampoo secret, and her unbreakable style rule.

22 Hair Inspiration. Head Games. Simple hair accessories get a quirky makeover—you’ve never seen barrettes or hair ties quite like this. 24 Beauty School. Sparkly lips,

IN THIS ISSUE BEAUTY REPORTER 29 Look We Love: Pink-and-Red Lips 30 Editors’ Favorites 32 Orange Theory • A Supercharged Spot-Fading Serum • No Appointment, No Problem: The New Drop-In Massage Boutique

33 The Secret to Gorgeous Skin and Hair Could Be in Your Blood

36 The Cold Truth About Cold Rinses • Pantene Reinvents Shampoo • How to Become Blonde in Seconds

high-wattage cheeks, and more ways to banish the winter blahs.

50 Skin News. Glow All In. Hyaluronic acid has been a skincare star for a while, but doctors are using it in fresh new ways.

REGULARS

56 Beauty Passport. Italian Lessons. Tuscany is as heavenly as the cliché suggests, especially if you spend your time soaking in a thermal pool looking over the rolling hills of the Val d’Orcia.

62 The Evolution of a Child Star. She’s 20 years old, famous, and a Disney star—by all rights, Zendaya should be a train wreck. Instead, she’s home on the couch. But what’s behind that squeaky-clean image? By Elizabeth Siegel

Heilbrunner wears a lacy yellow dress in all the right ways (usually with sneakers).

off its stiff, staid reputation, getting flirty and playful in airy silk dresses, cozy knits, and, OK, yes, some boxy blazers.

12 Cover Look 16 Editor’s Letter 20 Beauty by Numbers 98 Shopping Guide 100 Autobiography.

39 Feeling Frisky. A showstopping pair of Balenciaga boots

45 Elements of Style. Veronika

88 Off the Grid. Tartan tosses

Products You’ve Never Heard Of. We got the pros to tell us their secret weapons for radiant skin, ultraglossy waves, and more.

FEATURES

director Nicole Chapoteau suits up in rainbow-striped leggings and gold-accented sneakers.

If 40 sounds like a laughably low number of beauty products to own, you’re right there with Una LaMarche, who ponders the pros and cons of paring down.

52 Insiders’ Guide. 9 Amazing

FASHION 43 Good Sport. Allure accessories

84 The Tyranny of Choice.

70 Fat Chance. If you’re so inclined, you can now freeze it, suck it, or melt it off your body. We’re talking about everyone’s favorite cell type: fat. By Jessica Chia 76 The New Classics. Red lips, black eyeliner, and smoky shadow like you’ve never seen them before. By Liana Schaffner

ON THE COVER

Zendaya’s look can be re-created with the following: TruNaked eye-shadow palette in Goldens, TruNaked Eyeliner Duo in Cashmere/Espresso, LashBlast Volume Mascara in Black, and Lipstick in Spellbound by CoverGirl. Silk satin dress by Dior. Photographed by Jason Kibbler. Hair: Kim Kimble. Makeup: Frankie Boyd. Manicure: Ashlie Johnson. Prop stylist: Bette Adams of Mary Howard Studio. Fashion stylist: Patrick Mackie. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Rita Ora fills in the blanks.

Allure Regrets In “Happy Merry” [December], we mistakenly included a photo of the Miami Beach Edition hotel instead of the Standard Miami Beach. In “Off and Running” [December], we misspelled the name of the makeup artist for the shoot. Her name is Sally Branka. Allure regrets the errors.


ALLURE .COM Straight Talk

Scent and the City One of New York City’s most Instagrammable spots is also a mecca for fragrance lovers. Join us on a beauty sightseeing adventure at allure.com/instagram-nyc.

The Bling Ring There is nothing subtle about glitter nai s, and that’s precisely the point. See our favorite ways to shine— and one totally out-of-this-world manicure—at allure.com/mirror-nails. Clockwise from top: Deborah Lippmann nail polish in Whatever Lola Wants, Jinsoon Nail Lacquer in Melange, Deborah Lippmann nail polish in 12th St Rag, and Tenoverten nail polish in Grand.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ANNE LAYMOND; COURTESY OF AEDES; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

For many, they’re a dream come true (smoother, frizzfree hair). For others, they’re still a source of confusion (potential health risks, inconsistent results). Get the facts on keratin treatments at allure.com/keratin-treatments.


EDITOR IN CHIEF MICHELLE LEE EXECUTIVE EDITOR DANIELLE PERGAMENT

DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR ELIZABETH SIEGEL SENIOR BEAUT Y EDITOR JESSICA CHIA

How long has your longest resolution lasted?

BEAUT Y EDITOR LEXI NOVAK BEAUT Y ASSISTANT KATHLEEN SUICO

P H OTO PHOTO DIRECTOR STEPHANIE HUGHES BOOKINGS DIRECTOR RO PENULIAR

EXECUTIVE PHOTO EDITOR BETH GARRABRANT SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS AMBER VENERABLE, HOLLY WATSON ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR HANNAH CHOI

R E S E A RC H RESEARCH DIRECTOR LORI SEGAL RESEARCH EDITOR AMBER ANGELLE

ASSOCIATE RESEARCH EDITOR CRISTINA RIVERA

My longest resolution was to make a resolution—it lasted 43 seconds.

FAS H I O N FASHION DIRECTOR RACHAEL WANG ACCESSORIES DIRECTOR NICOLE CHAPOTEAU ASSOCIATE FASHION EDITOR JENNA WOJCIECHOWSKI

A RT I C L E S DEPUT Y EDITOR PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ ASSOCIATE EDITOR LOREN SAVINI

A RT SENIOR ART DIRECTOR NICOLE ARGENTO ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR MEGAN MAQUERA JUNIOR DESIGNER BRIANA MARSHALL

P RO D U CT I O N PRODUCTION DIRECTOR HEATHER TUMA NAPOLITANO PRODUCTION MANAGER VALERIE THOMAS PRODUCTION ASSISTANT EMMA LOUISE JOSLYN

Four crueltyfree years of being a vegan.

C O PY COPY CHIEF CATHERINE GAMBRELL COPY EDITOR AURA DAVIES

A L LU R E .C O M DIGITAL DIRECTOR SIMONE OLIVER DEPUT Y DIGITAL EDITOR RACHEL JACOBY ZOLDAN DIGITAL DEPUT Y BEAUT Y DIRECTOR SOPHIA PANYCH SENIOR DIGITAL EDITOR DEENA CAMPBELL SENIOR SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR GERILYN MANAGO DIGITAL EDITORS ELIZABETH DENTON, SEUNGHEE SUH DIGITAL PRODUCTION MANAGER MONICA PERRY

VIDEO PRODUCER MAYA MARGOLINA

In 2010, I resolved to stop sharing my resolutions with other people—haven’t broken it yet.

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER REBECCA SHINNERS ASSOCIATE DIGITAL BEAUT Y EDITOR SARAH KINONEN ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR DEVON ABELMAN

B E AU T Y EXECUTIVE BEAUT Y DIRECTOR JENNY BAILLY

MANAGING EDITOR AMANDA MEIGHER

DESIGN DIRECTOR RENEE RUPCICH

ASSOCIATE SOCIAL MEDIA PRODUCER ARIBA ALVI ASSOCIATE DIGITAL RESEARCH AND COPY EDITOR JANELL HAZELWOOD ASSOCIATE DIGITAL PRODUCER LARA ADEKOLA ASSOCIATE PREDITOR ANNA ST YPKO ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR CHANTEL MOREL SENIOR PRODUCT MANAGER RANDI EICHENBAUM ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT LINDSAY SANSONE ANALY TICS MANAGER TULIKA SINGH

CONTRIBUTING PRODUCTION DIRECTOR GRETCHEN VITAMVAS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JILLIAN DEMPSEY, DAVID DENICOLO, MEIRAV DEVASH, JOLENE EDGAR, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN, BROOKE LE POER TRENCH, CHRIS McMILLAN, JUDITH NEWMAN, LIANA SCHAFFNER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS ERIN KAPLAN SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR MEGAN SALERNO ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER TAYLOR SHEA ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF KRISTEN NICHOLS

FO U N D I N G E D I TO R LINDA WELLS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR ANNA WINTOUR

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR PATRICIA ALFONSO TORTOLANI


PUBLISHER, CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER AGNES BOGDAN CHAPSKI

A DV E RT I S I N G EXECUTIVE INTEGRATED DIRECTORS MARIA GARCIA, KIM CONWAY HALEY, LAUREN DECKER LERMAN, SANDRA MAURIELLO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR– FASHION, JEWELRY, AND WATCH SARAH YORK RICHARDS

DIGITAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES HARRIET KADAR, ALISON WOOD DIGITAL SALES DEVELOPMENT MANAGER SAMANTHA DANA DIGITAL CAMPAIGN MANAGER ERICA CHEUNG

INTEGRATED MANAGER ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY

DIGITAL SALES PLANNER ELIZABETH MILLER

EXECUTIVE MIDWEST DIRECTORS CHRISTINA KROLOPP 312-649-6731 ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST 312-649-3509 PACIFIC NORTHWEST DIRECTOR NATALIE BANKER TAQUINO 415-955-8280 NEW ENGLAND/DETROIT KRISTIN HAVENS 585-255-0207 DIRECT RESPONSE REBECCA VOLK 800-753-5370 EXT. 489 ITALY ELENA DE GIULI 011-39-02-655-84223 U.K./FRANCE SELIM MATARACI 011-33-1-44-78-00-62 SENIOR BUSINESS DIRECTOR SHERRI GINSBERG EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER VINCENT KEEGAN

D I G I TA L HEAD OF DIGITAL REVENUE NICOLE AMICO SMITH

INTEGRATED DIRECTOR CARLY GRESH

EXECUTIVE SOUTHWEST DIRECTOR EZRA SEAN ALVAREZ 323-965-3564

SALES ASSOCIATES JULIA BROKAW, CAROLINE GRANGER INTEGRATED ASSISTANTS ZUIE BILLINGS, ALEXANDRA KELIKIAN, CARA KURICA, STEPHANIE TILLISON

I lasted six months cooking healthier meals.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE & OPERATIONS KEVIN DONOVAN

CONTENT MARKETING & PA RT N E RS H I P S CONTENT MARKETING DIRECTOR ALEXIS WALL BEAUT Y BOX MANAGER NICOLE SAFIR

I N T EG R AT E D M A R K E T I N G & C R E AT I V E S E RV I C E S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ERIN BRENNAN DESIGN DIRECTOR MARIS BODELL SENIOR DIRECTOR STEFENI BELLOCK

“ “

HEAD OF BRAND MARKETING & STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON

No cheese...for three weeks.

DIRECTOR JUSTIN REIS SENIOR MANAGER MALLORY MILLER

M A R K E T I N G S E RV I C E S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR GERARD FARRELL SENIOR DIRECTOR, MARKETING INTELLIGENCE JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ

P U B L I S H E D BY C O N D É N AST CHAIRMAN EMERITUS S. I. NEWHOUSE , JR. CHAIRMAN CHARLES H. TOWNSEND PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER ROBERT A . SAUERBERG, JR. CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID E . GEITHNER

CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER & PRESIDENT OF REVENUE , CONDÉ NAST JAMES M. NORTON EVP & CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER FRED SANTARPIA CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER JOANN MURRAY CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER CAMERON R. BLANCHARD CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER EDWARD CUDAHY EVP–CONSUMER MARKETING MONICA RAY SVP–BUSINESS OPERATIONS DAVID ORLIN SVP–MANAGING DIRECTOR, 23 STORIES JOSH STINCHCOMB SVP–NET WORK SALES & PARTNERSHIPS, CONDÉ NAST & CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER, CNÉ LISA VALENTINO SVP–FINANCIAL PLANNING & ANALYSIS SUZANNE REINHARDT SVP–STRATEGY, 23 STORIES PADRAIG CONNOLLY SVP–AD PRODUCTS & MONETIZATION DAVID ADAMS SVP–LICENSING CATHY HOFFMAN GLOSSER SVP–RESEARCH & ANALY TICS STEPHANIE FRIED SVP–DIGITAL OPERATIONS LARRY BAACH SVP–HUMAN RESOURCES NICOLE ZUSSMAN GENERAL MANAGER–DIGITAL MATTHEW STARKER

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

C O N D É N AST E N T E RTA I N M E N T PRESIDENT DAWN OSTROFF EVP/GENERAL MANAGER, DIGITAL VIDEO JOY MARCUS EVP & CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER SAHAR ELHABASHI EVP–MOTION PICTURES JEREMY STECKLER EVP–ALTERNATIVE T V JOE LABRACIO EVP–CNÉ STUDIOS AL EDGINGTON SVP–MARKETING & PARTNER MANAGEMENT TEAL NEWLAND

C O N D É N AST I N T E R N AT I O N A L CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE JONATHAN NEWHOUSE PRESIDENT NICHOLAS COLERIDGE

Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. CONDENAST.COM CONDENASTINTERNATIONAL .COM


COVER LOOK

ZENDAYA Behind the scenes at Allure’s cover shoot.

Mugler dress. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Between serious shots, Zendaya was all smiles. Versace dress. Details, see Shopping Guide.

12 ALLURE JANUARY 2017

—REPORTING BY PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ

Watch a behind-the-scenes video of Zendaya’s photo shoot at allure.com/zendaya-bts.

NATHANIEL WOOD (2)

R

ule one for living like Zendaya: Close your eyes. The singeractress squeezes in shut-eye whenever she can—like during the car ride to her first Allure cover shoot. Fresh from her power nap, the Disney star skipped coffee, buzzed past the breakfast table, and announced to the crew, “I am ready to go. Let’s do this!” Rule two: Skip lunch; go straight to dessert. At 3:40 P.M., after posing in colorful gowns under the beaming California sun, Zendaya was ready to take a break. But instead of starting with her main course, the vegetarian with a sweet tooth went straight for a chocolate tart before heading back for a plate of farro, green beans, and tortilla chips. Rule three: Dance. Whether she was up on the rooftop of a Malibu beach house or down in the sand, Zendaya brought her moves for photographer Jason Kibbler. She swayed to Snoop Dogg’s “Drop It Like It’s Hot” and Jay Z’s “Hard Knock Life” before entertaining the crew with her best running man, moonwalk, and King Tut. Once the ten-hour shoot wrapped, Zendaya slipped into the backseat of her car. It was time for another nap.


Dior dress. Details, see Shopping Guide.

BEAUTY LESSON

Makeup Makeup artist Frankie Boyd first emphasized the singer’s skin with subtle highlighting and contouring. He then blended taupe eyeliner and shadow on her lids and wiggled the mascara wand at the base of her top lashes. As for the bottom rows: Boyd used a small angled brush dipped in mascara to paint each individual lash before swiping hot-pink lipstick on her lips. FROM TOP: NATHANIEL WOOD; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Zendaya’s look can be re-created with the following (clockwise from top): Lipstick in Spellbound, TruNaked eye-shadow palette in Goldens, TruNaked Eyeliner Duo in Cashmere/Espresso, and LashBlast Volume Mascara in Black by CoverGirl.

Hair To get Zendaya’s slicked-back look, her longtime hairstylist Kim Kimble raked leave-in conditioner through her damp hair and used a paddle brush while blow-drying it straight. Then she parted it to one side and smoothed it with gel for a wet look.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

What’s the

I just spent the last hour rewatching Steve Jobs’s groundbreaking, highly entertaining January 2007 keynote introducing the first iPhone. In hindsight, the device’s debut—ten years ago this month—was spectacular in its simplicity. Today, a gesture like scrolling feels so, well, elementary. But a decade ago, Jobs’s big-screen demonstration of the upward flick prompted a collective “ooohh” from the crowd. A billion (yes...whoa) iPhones later, I’m struck by how much our world has evolved since the day Jobs promised that this “revolutionary” device was going to change everything. And then it did. Anyone remember what we did before apps? Or how we ever waited in line at the DMV without catching up on our Instagram? With the new year upon us, it feels like a particularly fitting time to immerse myself in Jobsian big thinking and the concept that one— albeit one superinnovative—shift can have a monumental effect. So this year I’m not making a New Year’s resolution. I’m making five: 1) I will get a trip to the Amalfi Coast and Majorca on the calendar. 2) I will exercise four days a week (including days I have cramps or a cold or my sports bras are in the wash). 3) I will be diligent about full-body skin care. I never skip a beat when it comes to my face, but the rest of my body gets woefully ignored. Ashy knees and elbows, begone in 2017. And, yes, that includes shaving my legs regularly, even in the winter. 4) I will learn enough Italian to get through Milan fashion week without Google Translate. 5) I will designate two hours every Tuesday for innovative futurethinking. Black turtleneck and jeans potentially required. Once I do all this, I will obviously achieve enlightenment, profound joy, and world peace. Oh, wait. One more: 6) I won’t beat myself up if I don’t exactly stick to every last one. Now that would be revolutionary.

Michelle Lee, Editor in Chief @heymichellelee

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@PHOTOM.STUDIO/INSTAGRAM

BIG IDEA


MY LOOK

Talking Beauty WITH ZOEY DEUTCH Growing up in Hollywood doesn’t mean you’re exempt from an awkward adolescence, but it does give you an in to some pretty awesome beauty tricks. “If I wear a bright lip, I don’t wear much else,” says Deutch. Left: Cotton top by Theory. Silver earrings by Veronika Borchers x Pearl Collective. Lasting Finish by Kate Lipstick in Muse Red by Rimmel London. These pages: Hair, Ramsell Martinez; makeup, Mai Quynh. Fashion stylist: Sean Knight. Details, see Shopping Guide. PHOTOGRAPHED BY DARIA KOBAYASHI RITCH

M

y job definitely doesn’t suck.” Truer words have never been spoken. In this case, by Zoey Deutch. The star of the comedy Why Him? has been paid to kiss James Franco and Zac Efron, attends parties dressed in only Chanel, and uses her celebrity to champion causes like Planned Parenthood. An actress of a previous generation might simply say that she is “blessed,” but Deutch has the refreshing honesty of a 22-year-old who grew up in Hollywood (her mom is actress Lea Thompson from Back to the Future, and her dad, Howard Deutch, directed Pretty in Pink)—and on social media. Lucky for us, she is just as candid about her beauty routine, including the person whose style she shamelessly copies and the unexpected way she keeps her gorgeous honey-colored hair healthy.

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017

Above: Cotton top by Caroline Constas. Jeans by Re/Done. Leather shoes by Alexander Wang. Ring, stylist’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide.

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (EYE SHADOW AND NAIL POLISH)

Reporting by Patty Adams Martinez


“I have about ten of them in my bathroom drawer, so I’m sure to never run out,” says Deutch of her favorite brown shadow, Maybelline New York eye-shadow palette in Chai Latte. Right: Deutch likes to layer Le Labo Lys 41 (a blend of jasmine and tuberose absolute) with Le Labo Ambrette 9. Below: Makeup colors: Gimme Brow in 01 and They’re Real Big Sexy Lip Kit in Flame Game by Benefit.

did winged liquid liner; so did I. When [Duwop] Venom lip gloss was big—you know the kind that made your lips sting as it plumped them up?—I stole hers. And it hasn’t stopped. She uses cream eye shadows now, so I do, too.” On a very bad idea: “For my bat mitzvah at 13, I wanted to wax my brows for the special occasion. Bad idea! Not only did I ask for the most grotesque thin shape, but the wax made me break out, too, and it was the day of the party. I also wore a silver glitter dress, which was my second mistake. Weirdly, those photos don’t exist anymore. I have no idea what happened to them.” On unintentional ombré: “I never color my hair for myself, just for jobs, because I hate sitting in a salon for hours. So in between movies I have halfgrown-out color. The funny thing is that’s when I get the most compliments.”

Deutch’s go-to manicure shade is Essie nail polish in Ballet Slippers.

On why she always checks her luggage: “I have really healthy hair, and my secret is simple: Costco shampoo and conditioner, the Kirkland brand. Even when I only need a carry-on suitcase, I check my bag because I have to travel with it. No #ad here, but it truly is my best secret.”

On being a beauty copycat: “I’m a younger sister, so I copy things from my big sister, Maddie. She’s almost four years older. When she did the thick black eyeliner à la Avril Lavigne, I did. She

On her behavior at 35,000 feet: “I am absolutely that psycho-looking person who is wearing a hydrating mask on the plane. I had to take 13-hour flights from L.A. to Europe three times this month, and all that travel really messes up your skin. Right now I’m into the SCBI Superba Stem Cell Hydrating & Firming Mask. To make it even worse on my fellow passengers, I leave it on for, like, two hours. But I don’t care, because it fixes acne and acne scars and helps you not look exhausted—the stuff is magic.” On how everything she needs to know she learned in kindergarten: “In kindergarten, I had all my hair chopped off. I guess I didn’t have a feminine look at age six, because everyone thought I was a little boy, which is hard to take as a little girl. Thanks to that slight identity crisis, I haven’t cut my hair even remotely short since.” On the style rule she never breaks: “You can’t show your boobs and legs. Choose one or the other if you want to keep it classy.”


BEAUT Y BY NUMBERS

’Tis the season we’re all going to be healthier people who go to barre class every day and survive on kale and sunlight. A look at the endless quest to detoxify mind and body. —REPORTING BY JESA CALAOR

One Love Organics The Cleansing Sponge in Bamboo Charcoal Heart

THE YEAR STANLEY BURROUGHS published a pamphlet called “The Master Cleanser” that paved the way for future juice-cleansing trends. APPROXIMATE AMOUNT U.S. consumers spent on bottled juice cleanses in 2015.

NUMBER OF POUNDS Beyoncé dropped by drinking cayenne-pepper lemonade on a two-week Master Cleanse in 2006.

PERCENTAGE INCREASE IN THE number of beauty products that contained detoxifying charcoal as an ingredient between 2015 and 2016.

THE COST OF A TUBE OF CURAPROX, a black toothpaste that uses activated charcoal to whiten teeth. Bioré Pore Penetrating Charcoal Bar

Youth to the People Age Prevention Moisture Cream

THE NUMBER OF CUPS OF black tea it takes to equal the detoxifying benefits in one cup of matcha tea.

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017

LIAM GOODMAN

E OF ho a on their .


H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N

Head

Games There’s classic with a twist—and then there’s classic with a legit sense of humor. Our favorite hair accessories right now are quirky, cheeky, and irreverent. And the only thing more unexpected than the pieces themselves? How they’re being worn. By Lexi Novak

Adam Selman x Chris Habana clips

FROM TOP: PAUL TERRIE; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; LIAM GOODMAN

CLIP ART

At some point, the barrette got a reputation it couldn’t shake— for being either totally sweet or totally boring or totally both. But for Adam Selman’s spring show, jewelry designer Chris Habana transformed the misunderstood hair accessory. First, Habana blew them up in size. Next, he made them neon metallic—the hottest pinks and most Day-Glo oranges. And then hairstylist James Pecis stepped in. He twisted models’ hair into knots anchored at the hairline and attached the vivid accessories so close to the forehead, they almost looked wrong. And that’s exactly what made them look oh so right.


PIN POINTS

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

Imagine the ’80s: Women are crimping their hair and jamming to Cyndi Lauper. Ashley Williams’s spring show brought us right back there. (Lauper actually provided inspiration for the show’s youthful, playful hair.) But instead of using crimping irons on the models, hairstylist Indira Schauwecker wove and flatironed hair around wire and adorned it with pins spelling out “girls” and “boys” in rhinestone letters. They’re a cheeky way to pull layers off the face or decorate the back of a topknot.

Tibi belt hair ties, $65 each (tibi.com).

Ashley Williams hairpins, $79 for a set of two (ashleywilliamslondon.com).

BELT WAY

A belt around your waist? Practical. A belt around your ponytail? Sexy and more than a little subversive. Swapping out the typical hair ribbon for a buckled strap makes an already sleek ponytail seem even more controlled (or perhaps we should say dominated?). Backstage at Tibi, hairstylist Frank Rizzieri dried and flatironed hair and secured it at the nape of the neck with two clear elastics. Then he wrapped it with one of the belts made specifically for the show. To play up the crispness of the look and get an obsessively neat finish, mist a toothbrush with hair spray to smooth down frizz.

JANUARY 2017 ALLURE

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BY JESA CALAOR

Beauty School

T H E T I P S , T H E S H O R T C U T S , A N D A L L T H E S T E P - B Y- S T E P S

The right highlighter will perk up your skin, give your cheeks a glow, and maybe make you happier than anything that plugs in.

1

Wearing highlighter on bare skin is like stepping out in a tank top when it’s snowing— you need layers, people. Swirl a coral-pink cream blush on the apples and along your cheekbones.

2

Grab two highlighters: a champagne powder and a peachy-gold cream. Dust the powder over your cheekbones and up around the temples. Then tap the cream on top to intensify the shine.

3

While a face full of bronzer can look ridiculous in subzero temperatures, a few strategic sweeps helps give definition to your glow. Make a fish face and blend bronzer into the hollows of your cheeks.

Above: Viscose cotton sweater by Max Mara. Earrings by Annelise Michelson. Makeup colors: Healthy Skin Blends powder in Clean and MoistureSmooth Color Stick lip crayon in Sweet Watermelon by Neutrogena. These pages: Makeup, Stevie Huynh; hair, Jordan M; manicure, Gina Viviano. Model: Hannah Holman. Fashion stylist: Lotte Elisa. Details, see Shopping Guide.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAUL MAFFI

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE)

LIGHT THERAPY


BEAUT Y SCHOOL

GILT TRIP

Glitter lips aren’t for the timid—or the thirsty, for that matter. But they are crazy fun.

1

Bare lips aren’t holding onto anything, so you’ll want to build a base for the glitter to cling to. Brush on a matte nude lipstick, then top it with clear lip gloss.

2

Select your glitter. It can be any color (we like rose gold), but the smaller the pieces, the easier it is to spread evenly. Use your lip brush to dab the flecks onto your lips.

3

Clean up any glitter that may have fallen outside your lip line with a piece of tape. Now sip your cocktail through a straw and enjoy the night.

Sparkle Removal Glitter is tricky to apply, but once it’s on, it won’t budge. Like, at all. Eventually, though, you’ll need to go to bed. Here’s how to clean up every last fleck. WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Scotch tape, oil-based liquid makeup remover, and cotton pads. WHAT TO DO: Freeze. Before you reach for the makeup remover, first use tape to lift off the glitter layer by layer until you’re left with just a few of the reflective pieces. Now go ahead and douse a cotton pad with the oil-based makeup remover and wipe off the rest of the glitter, gloss, and lipstick. Good night.

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE)

Left: Cotton jacket by Stella McCartney. Gold-and-diamond earrings from Venus by Maria Tash. Makeup colors: Pigment in Tan, Pro Longwear Paint Pot in Clearwater, and Water Base Mixing Medium by M.A.C. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Wool jacket and brooch by Gucci. Gold earrings by Melissa Joy Manning. Makeup colors: Artist Shadow in Violet, Glitter in Pink Multicolored, and Artist Plexi-Gloss Lip Lacquer in Transparent by Make Up For Ever. Details, see Shopping Guide.

ULTRA VIOLET JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE)

Purple eye shadow looks festive, not bruised, when layered with a swipe of gloss and a dash of sparkle.

1

Sweep a vibrant purple shadow from the lash line to the brow bone. Then, with a wet brush, use it as an eyeliner on the outer edge of the upper and lower lashes.

2

On the back of your hand, combine that same purple shadow with clear lip gloss and purple glitter. Blend it all together with a dense shadow brush and smooth it over your lid.

3

Brushed-up brows, curled lashes, and a sweep of mascara pull the look together. If you want to intensify the shine, add an extra dab of gloss to the center of your lid.

JANUARY 2017 ALLURE

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On models and at bottom right, from left: M.A.C. Lip Pencil in Cherry and M.A.C. Chromagraphic Pencil in Process Magenta.

FROM LEFT: JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

LOOK WE LOVE

Hot Damn Red lipstick on top, pink on bottom. Sounds like one of those things makeup artists do at fashion shows that inspires a lot of talk, little action. But do you see the magic that’s happening here? When makeup artist Sammy Mourabit created fiery cherryon-magenta lips at Cushnie et Ochs’s spring show, the lighter shade on the lower lip reflected more light, sneakily making the bottom lip look poutier than the top. The effect is sexy, polished, and—if you’re doing it right—elegant all at once. —JESSICA CHIA

Beauty Reporter

T H E B E AU T Y N E W S YO U N E E D T O K N O W N O W


BE AUT Y REPO RTER L’Oréall P Paris ari a ar rris IInfallible nfalli nfa nf falli llible ble b e Pa P Paints ain iint n nts ntts lip lip p color in Fea ea e arle le s le ss sF Fu Fus u chi h a an nd d Domi min ne n ee errriin eri in ng g Tea Te Teal. e l. Bo old d and a d ut utte tter e errly y unsm mud mud udg gea ge ea e ab ble l (w le whic i h is is a alwa lwa lw lwa ways yss the th he h e best kind ind nd o off bo b ld) ld).. $9 9.9 99 each eac ach ch.

Giorgio Armani Power Fabric Longwear Foundation (shown in 2, 6, and 13). It’s a highcoverage unicorn: a matte-all-day finish that never looks like a matteall-day mask. $64.

St. St S tt. IIv ve es sE Ex Exf xfol oli oli la att & ate No No Nou ou uris ris ri sh Apri pricot co O cot co Oiil Sc Scr crrub c ub. u b T The he he ssa atis ttiis isfy fyi yiing y ng sc scr sc crrubb ubb bbine ne n ess ss iiss bro b br rro ough ght tto gh o yo ou u by by fine ine ne fle llec e ks ec ks off wal wa w aln al nu nut utt-sh u ssh he ell llll pow po p ow o wd de der er; th he e rres re essu e ullltiin ult ing ng n g silk si sil ky y sk sk n comes ski ome me es co cou c ourt ou rte tte esy sy off emo em molli mo llllient llie en ent ntt gra g gr rrape pe-ssee peee ed and nd ap apr a p ico ic co ot oils oils illlss. $6.9 6.99 9..

EDITORS’ FAVORITES THE STUFF WE PLAN TO STEAL FROM THE BEAUTY CLOSET WHEN NO ONE’S LOOKING.

Le Petit Marseillais Extra Gentle Shower Crème Lavender Honey. A star in French pharmacies for decades, this body wash (with skin-softening g glycerin) gy has arrived ed a att lle ec corner orn orner ner e drugstore. drugst drugst dru sto Bienv venue venue ve nue!! $ $4 4.9 4.9 4.99. 99. 9

Mugler Angel Etoile des Reves. The gourmand original is so sweet it might actually spike your blood sugar. This fresh iteration cuts the cotton candy with sparkly citrus and a sexy white musk. $135 for 100 milliliters. H2O+ Teak Rose On the Move Body Butter Stick. Our best lotionskipping excuses (too greasy, too time-consuming, too forgettable) were re re foiled by this coconut-seed-butter-and-sunflower-seed-oil roll-on. $15.

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017

(STILL LIFES)

Oui Shave ha ave av ve Carrie ve Carr Ca rrri rriie 14k 14k 4k Gold Go Go Gol ollld d Razor Set. The world’s wo w orld ld d’s ’s chi c ch chicest ces c est razor raz raz az clear ears stubble with th o one n swe ne sw sweep we w eep of o iits solo blade. e. (Yes, (Ye (Y esss,, es, it’s t’ss sspendy, t’ pen en e nd dy dy, y, y bu butt the he razor lasts tss ffo for ore eve ve er an and a nd d won’t wo w on’t ’t add ’t add to the 29.5 29 29. 9.5 mil 9.5 9. iill ll lli lio io ion on n to onss off plla pla p assti tiic toss osss sssed ed e d eac eac ea ch ye ear. Also ear so o: It It com come om me es wit wi w iith a sh shave ve o ve oiil and nd ext ex xttra r bl ra bla lla ades de d e ess). ). $ $8 $85 85 5.


BE AUT Y REPORTER

COLOR OF THE MOMENT

LADY Marmalade It’s the color of rubber cones and prison jumpsuits. Orange has never been the standardbearer of chic. But then: the spring runways. Orange became the color of cropped eyelet tops, crushed-velvet skirts, and so many manicures. The best of them were nails the color of freshly peeled carrots at Tibi (left). The effect is traffic-stopping in the best possible way.

—JESSICA CHIA

PRODUCT REVIEW

Olay Luminous Miracle Boost Concentrate It’s a... Lightweight concentrate (a hybrid of a watery, splash-on essence and a serum) meant to be layered under your regular moisturizer day and night. It promises to… Fade spots and even tone in two weeks. The key ingredients are… Vitamin E, which buffers against free radicals (and ensuing skin roughness and lines), and niacinamide and n-undecylenoyl phenylalanine, which brighten and help reduce the appearance of dark spots. The first thing I noticed was… The smell—fresh as clean laundry, without soapiness or the sour tinge that some heavy-duty serums can have. Also, the stuff is very cool-looking: icy white with a slight iridescence. When I wore it… I couldn’t stop stroking my silky face. The concentrate slid over my skin like the most featherweight slip and didn’t make my makeup pill or crease. Now I… Am sticking with it. I smooth on a dropperful under my sunscreen in the morning and my night cream before bed. After two weeks of using it twice daily, the dark spots that litter my cheeks are less noticeable, and I have a soft-focus glow I haven’t seen in years. —LIZ KRIEGER

DIRECTORY

F

The Now

or most of us, a trip to Tulum might foster a new fondness for mezcal and cliff-jumping. For Amy Krofchick, Erica Malbon, and Gara Post, it inspired a Los Angeles massage boutique. The Now makes it possible to drop in anytime, get a Swedish massage, and pay $35 for 25 minutes of expert de-stressing—perfect for fitting into the squeeziest of agendas (Gigi and Kendall find time). The Now’s second location, in Santa Monica (there are plans for a third in Silver Lake), is appropriately transportive. There’s the cactus terrarium. There’s the reclaimed-wood table and the homemade wall hangings. Sturdy canvas drop cloths act as the cabana-like walls. You’d swear you were in the Yucatán. That is, until you check out the add-ons, like a chakra-balancing crystal treatment and a spiritually minded aromatherapy menu. Ah, nope. We’re definitely in L.A. —KRISTEN NICHOLS 2407 Main St., Santa Monica, and 7611 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles (thenowmassage.com)

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; IMAXTREE; TESSA NEUSTADT/THE NOW; LIAM GOODMAN

Clockwise from top left: Yves Saint Laurent La Laque Couture The Mats in Le Orange, Essie nail polish in Sunshine State of Mind, and Sally Hansen Insta-Dri Nail Color in Orange Zest.


THERE WILL BE BLOOD

S FROM TOP: JAMIE CHUNG/TRUNK ARCHIVE; LIAM GOODMAN

The newest skin-care ingredient is not for the squeamish. kin care has taken a decidedly macabre turn. Take Barbara Sturm, a German physician with a skin-care line, who has come up with a very unorthodox way to boost skin’s radiance. And I happily guinea-pigged myself. Here’s what happened: After drawing two vials of my blood, Sturm separated out the plasma using a centrifuge, incubated it for four hours to multiply its healing agents—interleukin-1-antagonist and growth factors—and mixed it into a shea-butter-based cream. Sturm’s cream, MC1 (we’re hoping for a more exciting name down the road), is the only one that makes plasma available for topical at-home use. (And although the rest of Sturm’s paraben-, fragrance-, and mineral-oilfree products are now available in the U.S., you’ll have to travel to Germany to get this one—so add a round-trip ticket to the cream’s $1,400 price tag.) Sturm says her plasma cream will

stimulate collagen and reduce inflammation, but no independent trials have proven those claims. Reputable studies do show, however, that platelet-rich plasma (PRP)—plasma processed to retain a high concentration of the body’s natural growth factors—can help tissue heal faster when injected. It’s now used to help with postsurgical wound healing, chronic tendinitis, and osteoarthritis, explains Raja Sivamani, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology at the University of California, Davis. Many dermatologists also inject PRP into the scalp to stimulate follicles and grow hair. “I use PRP in concert with at-home topical minoxidil, and patients start seeing more hair after three to six months,” says Doris Day, a New York City dermatologist. “You need three to four monthly treatments initially, but only [one] every six months or even less often after that. The growth factors stimulate the hair’s growth cycles, and

those positive effects can last months and even years after treatment.” Then, of course, there’s the “vampire facial”—a term trademarked by internist Charles Runels (and made famous by Kim Kardashian West). It describes a treatment in which PRP is injected into the dermis to stimulate collagen and elastin growth. Many dermatologists now use the technique regularly (without the Transylvania references). “We offer facial PRP treatments to treat sun damage and acne scars. Patients have smoother, more even skin in as little as two weeks,” says Neil Sadick, a New York City dermatologist. “We’re just beginning to tap into plasma’s possibilities, particularly when we apply it topically right after using fractional lasers and needling devices, which help get it to the lower layers of the skin more effectively.” —SARAH BRUNING

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BE AUT Y REPORTER

FINAL ANSWER

CLEAN SLATE Like nail-polish remover and charity scams, shampoo has always seemed to take away more than it gives back. Sure, its main job is to cleanse. But along with dirt and oil, it can also strip away the natural fats that make hair shampoocommercial shiny. Pantene’s Pantene decided to change that—and Pro-V is reformulating the majority Moisture of its shampoos. The brand Renewal Shampoo spent about 15 years figuring out how to infuse shampoo with tiny lipids that slip under the cuticle as you rinse to replace fats lost to suds (the new formulas still contain detergent). “The lipid-based ingredient is the standout here—I’ve never seen it in hair care before,” says cosmetic chemist Ron Robinson. “Chemically, it should offer the best of both worlds: cleansing well while keeping hair’s moisture.” And we can attest to the difference: Even our most highlighted testers noticed that their hair felt softer and less snarled (before conditioner) after a single wash. —LEXI NOVAK

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017

In a word: No. Nope. Nein. The rationale behind this one has been that icy water closes the cuticle of your hair so it’s flat (and more light-reflective). Now a study has arrived to finally, well, pour cold water on that theory. Chemists at TRI Princeton, an independent research facility in New Jersey, rinsed hair in water that was at least 98 degrees Fahrenheit or below 65. They found that cold water had zero shine-enhancing effects and— wait for it—warm water actually made hair look glossier. “Cold water may not rinse residue off strands as well as warm water can,” says cosmetic chemist Joel Coret, one of the researchers. So next time you’re at the shampoo bowl and hear “Do you want a cold-water rinse?” you know the answer: Nein. —JESA CALAOR

Lightening Fast Being blonde is lovely. Going blonde is a total drag. But the new Pravana Blonde Wand can speed up the process by 97 percent. That means lightening the hair by up to seven shades (light brown to golden blonde) in ten seconds, as opposed to about 40 minutes, according to independent tests. The drill: Colorists apply Pravana’s low-concentration persulfate lightening solution to small sections of hair and cover it in foil as they normally would. After they run the tool over each section, the foil is removed immediately and the hair rinsed. “Because the process is so fast, it’s less damaging than typical lightening techniques,” says hairstylist Justin Anderson of the Chris McMillan Salon in Los Angeles. The Blonde Wand is available only to professional colorists (go to pravana.com to find salons)—and do not get any creative at-home ideas. This may look like your everyday flatiron, but the plates don’t completely close (they radiate heat around the foil but never actually touch it), and they always stay below 300 degrees. —J. C.

FROM TOP: ARTHUR BELEBEAU/TRUNK ARCHIVE; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; COURTESY OF PANTENE

Will a Cold Rinse Make Your Hair Shinier?


Feeling Frisky

LIAM GOODMAN

Take a regal floral brocade. Add an unlikely curved heel. And throw on handfuls of sequins. The result: A pair of boots that practically purr.

Fashion Notes

CULT OBJECT

Balenciaga silk-and-leather boots, $3,450, at Balenciaga, N.Y.C. (212-206-0872).

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NOTES: EDITOR’S OBSESSIONS

M LLE MI MIE LL LE L E OR ORGA GA GAN A ICS C BAB AB BAS ASS A SSU O OIL IL L MINT MINT DEEP DEEP CON ND DIT IT TIO IONER. ION ER. “Am ER “Amazi a ngl az ngly y hy rat hyd atting in ng.”” $14 $1 .99 9 (miel (mi ell e e ell eor eo orrg o ga a ics.co an cs.co c m).

JEREMY ALLEN (CHAPOTEAU AP POT OTE OTEA O TE U); PIETRO D’APRANO/GETTY IMAGES (RUNWAY); LIAM GOODMAN (STILL LIFES)

ALEXANDER WANG NECKLACE. “Beca Because I’m notorious ffor losing keys.” $250, at Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. (212-977-9683).

Good Sport

IVY PARK POLYESTER TOP. “Looks equally great in warrior pose and happy-hour-drinks pose.“ $30 (topshop.com).

NIKE MESH SHOES. “I love gold on sneakers—it’s so unexpected.” $100 (nike.com).

TORY SPORT NYLON SPANDEX PANTS. “The perfect layering piece under a sh sheer skirt.” $135, at Tory Sport stores.

Allure accessories director Nicole Chapoteau is drawn to rainbow colors, energetic prints, and one surprisingly utilitarian jacket. THE BEAUTY CHEF HYDRATION INNER BEAUTY BOOST. “Loaded d with probiotics—it makes my skin glow.” $39.95 (thebeautychef.com).

Louis Vuitton uitton Resort 2017 R

SEE E BY CHLOÉ POLYESTER BAG. “Bright, fun, and makes me e want to go to a Jazzercise class from the ’80s.” $225 for sim milar styles (shopbop.com).

GYPSY SPORT NYLON JACKET. “It zips up so you can wear it like a cross-body bag instead of tied around your waist.” $220 (gypsysportny.com). JANUARY 2017 ALLURE

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NOTES

Style

ELEMENTS OF

1 DRESS, 4 WAYS Veronika Heilbrunner appreciates a swath of lace as much as the next person, “but the German in me is practical and needs to be comfortable so I can run around,” says the cofounder of the lifestyle website Hey Woman. By the way, she means that literally. No matter how fancy the dress, Heilbrunner wears it almost exclusively with what she calls “cool street elements”—or what we call sneakers. —Reporting by Patty Adams Martinez Lace dress by Erdem. Belt by Gucci. Jewelry throughout, Heilbrunner’s own. Makeup colors: Argan Wear Blush in Natural and Shimmer Strips Shadow & Liner in Nude Eyes by Physicians Formula. These pages: Hair, Jerome Cultrera; makeup, Fumiaki Nakagawa. Fashion stylist: Ye Young Kim. Details, see Shopping Guide. PHOTOGRAPHED BY SILJA MAGG

Watch Veronika Heilbrunner share her favorite style essentials at allure.com/veronika.


NOTES: ELEMENTS OF STYLE

“White is an amazing color, especially on gray, wintry Berlin days. It makes everything look fresher and gives the right dose of chic to sporty items.”

Above: Suede shoes by Adidas Originals. Right: Cotton jacket by DKNY. Viscose pants by Protagonist. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Above: Leather bag by Gucci. Left: Cotton silk bustier by Brock Collection. Jeans by Nehera. Canvas shoes by Vans. Details, see Shopping Guide.

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017

COURTESY OF ADIDAS (SNEAKER); COURTESY OF GUCCI (BAG)

“Layering a bustier over it and denim underneath transforms the dress into something really funky.”


“I love the contrast of a shiny, sporty little raincoat with the lace.”

FAVORITE THINGS

JEWELRY: “I always wear rings from my mom and grandma, a mini hoop earring with a cross, and my star-sign necklace that I was given when I was born.” BAG: “Gucci GG Marmont.” DENIM: “Levi’s vintage 501s and Citizens of Humanity’s wide-leg jeans.” SNEAKERS: “Nikes, Converse AllStar Chucks high- and low-tops, Vans, and Adidas Gazelles.” SKINCARE BRAND: “Lancer.” FRAGRANCE: “Chanel No. 5 L’Eau.” WINTER GEAR: “Uniqlo turtlenecks, long-sleeved T-shirts, and Heattech leggings.”

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (RING)

Left: Eel-skin coat by Nina Ricci. Makeup colors: Lash Power Mascara and Lip Colour + Primer in Blushing Pop by Clinique. Below: Goldand-diamond ring by Louis Vuitton. Details, see Shopping Guide.


SKIN NEWS

GLOW The more hyaluronic acid you can get into your skin, the younger and fresher you’ll look—and now there are newer, and better, ways to load up. By Jillian Mackenzie

Hyaluronic acid is a little complicated. First, it’s not actually an acid. It’s a sugar. Also, it’s a sponge. Every molecule can hold 1,000 times its weight in water. But one thing about hyaluronic acid has always been 100 percent straightforward: It’s a skin-care star. In serums and creams, it smooths and plumps (temporarily); as an injectable, it erases wrinkles (for months). Let’s be honest, though: We’ve taken hyaluronic acid for granted for a while. Sure, it’s great stuff, always welcome at the party. But when’s the last time you were like, “Guys, hyaluronic acid is here!” That’s about to change. A fresh crop of innovations has us taking a new look at the old standby. Chemists and dermatologists are using hyaluronic acid in unprecedented ways to make skin dewier, firmer, and a whole lot awesomer.

BAARD LUND/TRUNK ARCHIVE

All In


THE HOT SHOTS

New treatments prove that hyaluronic is way more than a tricky string of vowels. The Face-lift Lite. “We used to use hyaluronic acid only to fill wrinkles,” says Neil Sadick, a dermatologist in New York City. But now doctors are also injecting it deeper, near fat pads in the face. “Those fat pads hold up the skin but shrink with age, causing sagging and wrinkles,” says Sadick. “By replacing them with a hyaluronic acid filler, you can lift the skin and smooth lines for 9 to 12 months.” The Bright Side. Something called “skin boosting” is popular in Europe, and now doctors here are adapting the technique. It involves getting shallow injections

of hyaluronic acid—up to 50 shots!— all over your face. If you’re thinking, Why would anyone do that? (fair question), the appeal is twofold. Each treatment disperses hyaluronic acid evenly through the skin so “you look brighter and dewier for weeks,” says Jessica Wu, a dermatologist in Los Angeles. And regular treatments every few months “stimulate collagen to smooth fine lines and firm mild sagging,” says Whitney Bowe, a dermatologist in New York City. Wu expects the popularity of the treatment to rise soon if a hyaluronic acid filler from a company called Teoxane gets FDA approval (the flexible gel is ideal for this technique).

THE HOME GOODS

LIAM GOODMAN

Hyaluronic acid innovations that don’t require an appointment—or a needle. Downsizing. The hyaluronic acid in serums and creams used to be too big to sink into skin. But chemists have figured out how to make “small molecules that can penetrate between skin cells to draw in moisture at a deeper level to hydrate better,” says cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson. We like Pestle & Mortar Pure Hyaluronic Serum and Kane NY Serum Savant. Making It Last. “There are enzymes that naturally break down hyaluronic acid on the skin’s surface,” says Wilson.

“But cross-linking the molecules gives them more lasting power.” Try SkinMedica HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator with both cross-linked and miniature hyaluronic acid. The varying shapes and sizes mean that the skin retains its moisture longer, says Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York City. Plumping It Up. There’s a lot to be said for traditional hyaluronic acid, which sits on the skin and expands to plump wrinkles (typically for three hours, says Wilson). Our favorite old-school hyaluronic acids: Glossier Super Bounce, Neutrogena Hydro Boost

The Superpowered Serum. Most doctors use needles to get hyaluronic acid into the skin, but some are also just using their hands. They’ll break open a vial of an injectable, like Belotero, then spread it on like a face mask. “It pulls water into the skin for several weeks to a month,” says Robert Anolik, a dermatologist in New York City. “It makes fine lines less visible but won’t do much for deep wrinkles.” It works only if the hyaluronic acid penetrates skin, so dermatologists apply this medicalgrade mask for at least three hours after doing another treatment (like microneedling or Fraxel) that pokes microscopic holes in the skin.

From left: Fillerina Lip Plumping Gel, Dr. Dennis Gross Hyaluronic Marine Infusion Modeling Mask, Pestle & Mortar Pure Hyaluronic Serum, Glossier Super Bounce, SkinMedica HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator, and Neutrogena Hydro Boost Hydrating Serum.

serum, and Michael Todd Beauty Hyaluronic Complex Hydrating Serum. Getting Creative. You’ve got your creams. You’ve got your serums. And then you’ve got your uncharacterizables. Fillerina Lip Plumping Gel delivers high doses of hyaluronic acid through a rollerball to make lips subtly fuller. And then there’s the science experiment that is the Dr. Dennis Gross Hyaluronic Marine Infusion Modeling Mask. Mix hyaluronic acid gel with powder to get a bright blue mask that turns rubbery on your face. Peel it off after 15 minutes for smoother, more glow-y skin. —ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY ELIZABETH SIEGEL

JANUARY 2017 ALLURE 51


INSIDERS’ GUIDE

AMAZING Products You’ve NEVER Heard Of

Su e, yo Sure you u ca can n sp spel elll “e “exf xfol olia ati tio on”— on o ”—i —in Korean. You ou can cite cit ite e th the e RPM RP M of the Dys yson on hai air-dr drye yer. r. And when whe h someo meon me one e sa says she likes her Feti Fe tish sh wit ith h a to touc uch h of Org rgas asm m? You kno now w th the statement is enti en tire rely ly PG. But fri r en ends ds,, yo you u do not kno now w it all. And we’re about to pro ove it. t. Our edi dito tors rs con nvi vinc nced ed bea eauty-world icons to tell us about the th e pr prod oduc ucts ts tha hatt th they ey did dn’ n’tt wa want ntt to t tell us about. Their secret weap we apon ons. s The heir ir hol oly y gr grai ails ils ls. We guarantee gu you’ve never used the hese prod pr oduc ucts ts bef efor ore* e*—a —and nd now you ou’ u’ll never stop p. By Lexi Novak

REFA S CARAT ROLLER

If a makeup rule exists, Garland is backstage breaking it. Lipstick gets smudged. Eyeliner gets blurry. And flowers are more likely to end up on the face than in the hair. But underneath all the creativity, Garland’s real gift is perfecting skin—which h is where this roller (that’s it above) comes in. “I plunge it into ice or stick it in the fridge, and then just go up and down [on the face],” she says. “It feels like a facial, and it’s a great way to depuff the skin—especially around the eyes. When I’m working on a celebrity or a nervous client, it’s also a great way of making them feel relaxed.” *And if you have: We’re calling you next time.

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ALLURE JANUARY 2017

MOLLY CRANNA

RECOMMENDED BY: VAL GARLAND, MAKEUP ARTIST


INSIDERS’ GUIDE

KRYOLAN SUPRACOLOR PALETTE

RECOMMENDED BY: DIANE KENDAL, MAKEUP ARTIST

Don’t let Kendal’s knack for neutrals fool you. She’s as comfortable with cobalt as she is with taupe. Take the spring shows. Glossy Crayola eyes at Nina Ricci, canary ear makeup at Proenza Schouler, silver cheek paint at Tome: all Kendal. “I like playing up the eyes, but powders can drag or don’t smudge right,” she says. “These greasepaints are malleable and come in all different colors.” To create those Nina Ricci eyes, Kendal used a brush to buff vivid blue and purple Kryolan creams into lustrous washes of color.

PIL’ATEN SUCTION BLACK MASK

RECOMMENDED BY: FULVIA FAROLFI, MAKEUP ARTIST Farolfi has worked with almost every ridiculously radiant single-name model out there: Gisele, Kendall, Imaan, Gigi. But this is the product behind her own glowing skin: “Once a week, I apply an even layer [of this mask] on my T-zone after a shower, making sure the edges are neat and not thin so it’s easy to remove. When it’s dry— in about 30 minutes—I peel off the mask in one quick motion. It helps smooth the skin and keep pores clean between facials.”

COCK GREASE XXX WATER TYPE POMADE

RECOMMENDED BY: SAM MCKNIGHT, HAIRSTYLIST

McKnight has done the hair for big shows (Fendi, Chanel) and big names (Princess Diana, Lady Gaga). But we’re most awed by his ability to make neon faux-fur extensions and braids woven with plastic bags somehow chic. One of his most trusted tools: “an old-fashioned petroleum jelly—I first saw it in Ricky’s years ago,” he says. “It weighs down hair and gets it really flat but doesn’t dry hard. It’s more malleable than a wax or a typical pomade but still supershiny. And unlike most pomades, it’s watersoluble, so it washes out with shampoo.”

CARUSO STEAM SETTER ROLLERS

This tatted California cool guy is a former skateboarder turned punk rocker turned braid savant. He’s created styles that involve sewing needles, gardening wire, and acid dye. Yet one of the go-tos in his kit is 100 percent old-school. “The first guy I ever assisted, Max Pinnell, always used these rollers,” he says. “They heat with steam. You put water in the box, plug it in, then heat one roller at a time. The steam makes the hair really glossy and gives it waves that last.”

MOLLY CRANNA (4)

RECOMMENDED BY: JAMES PECIS, HAIRSTYLIST


BUTTER ELIXIR FACE OIL

RECOMMENDED BY: TOM PECHEUX, MAKEUP ARTIST

Pecheux could teach a class in seduction. Maybe that’s because he’s French. Or because he’s known for what he calls “naughty black eyes” and lips that look as though they’ve been kissing. (Or both.) Either way, when he has a secret to glowing skin, we listen. “I love the smell [of this oil],” he says. “I love that it’s oily but it doesn’t feel like there’s much left over on the skin after application. You know how when you put on oil, it’s hard for it to absorb and for makeup to stick? This doesn’t do that. I discovered it about a year ago and have been loyal ever since.”

DAISO JAPAN STICKY HEAD COTTON BUDS

RECOMMENDED BY: ROBIN BLACK, MAKEUP ARTIST

Lipstick so bright it’s acidic, an eyeliner flick that looks like calligraphy—the Beauty Is Boring founder plays it anything but safe. Which means she’s also damn good at undoing mistakes. “These are genius for makeup fixes,” she says. “One side is like a normal Q-tip, great for lipstick fixes, and the other is sticky, so it picks up loose eye shadow and crumbly mascara. They’re individually wrapped, so you can stash them in your clutch for touch-ups.”

ROOTS HAIR CLUB HYDROBRUSH

RECOMMENDED BY: KRISTIN ESS, HAIRSTYLIST Do your daydreams feature the Pacific Ocean and beach volleyball? Do you own four different-size curling rods to get the ideal beachy waves? Consider Ess your #hairinspo guru. And consider this brush the #hairinspo guru’s secret weapon. “Fill the well inside the brush with hair oil and run the brush over your scalp and hair to condition without making a mess. I use coconut oil and run it through my dry hair before I go to sleep.”

ZODACA NAIL SOAKERS

MOLLY CRANNA (4)

RECOMMENDED BY: TRACYLEE, NAIL ARTIST

Yes, she makes the nails of Cate Blanchett, Zosia Mamet, and Olivia Munn glossy and flawless. But it’s the mirrored finishes and glittery cuticles Tracylee dreams up for the runway that we are all copying…or at least trying to copy. Her trick for nail-polish removal, though, we can totally manage: “I use these to soak off gels, acrylics, and temporary tips. They work faster and are cleaner than the cotton-and-foil method. Fill each pod with acetone and pop it on your finger. They cut the removal time in half.”

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Passport Beauty

NEWS, TREATMENTS, AND OUR LATEST

OBSESSIONS FROM ABROAD

The artists’ retreat that is Villa Lena in Palaia

ITALIAN LESSONS

TOM CRAIG/TRUNK ARCHIVE

Danielle Pergament heads to a Tuscan spa and finds that la vita is very dolce indeed.


B E AU T Y PAS S P O RT

N

Tuscany’s Less Famous Cousin

From top: A sunflower field in Castagneto Carducci; inside the thermal spa at Castello di Velona in Montalcino; a stroll on one of Tuscany’s classic cobblestone streets.

Just over the border, in Umbria, you’ll find the Eremito Hotelito del Alma—a centuries-old monastery turned hotel. The rooms all look like monks’ cells, the sauna is made from stone, and there’s no talking allowed at dinner. Odd? Maybe. Trippy? Probably. Peaceful, beautiful, and serene? Assolutamente si. Eremito.com

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ot all clichés are so bad. Take the one about Tuscany: the endlessly rolling vistas painted the color of flax, the ancient stone villages perched on top of every hill, and the dreamy, hazy sunlight that makes the landscape look like it’s always golden hour. It’s a cliché that makes you want to let your long, wavy hair fly loose, slip into a sexy chiffon Dolce & Gabbana number, and change your name to Sofia. Or maybe that’s just me. To go to Tuscany is to be inspired by it. It’s how the world ended up with 478 million calendars of the same dirt road climbing up the same beautiful hillside lined with the same sharp cypress trees. It’s also how Tuscany came to be a spa destination over 2,000 years ago. Ancient Romans with means came to the Val d’Orcia (whether or not you’ve heard of it, this is the area you picture when you picture Tuscany) for the thermal baths. In the Middle Ages, the baths were a famous stop for pilgrims. And villages like San Casciano dei Bagni, Bagni San Filippo, and Bagno Vignoni are actually named for their healing waters. (Google Translate if you don’t believe me.) But I was here for none of that. I was here for Monteverdi Tuscany. Monteverdi Tuscany is a hotel/spa/enoteca/restaurant encompassing pretty much the entire 900-year-old village of Castiglioncello del Trinoro. From the outside, imagine a beautiful stone hamlet covered in flowers and nestled on a hilltop overlooking the expanse of the Val d’Orcia. Then imagine the inside of those stone buildings—every modern amenity, rough-hewed wooden beams, insanely plush beds, and the pervasive smell of rosemary


Run for the Hills

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To visit a spa in Tuscany is to take an odyssey in rosemary, lavender, olive oil, and of course, a little vino rosso along the way. Castello di Velona. The big draw here is the outdoor thermal pools, with views of the vineyards, the patchwork farms, and the rolling hills of the Val d’Orcia. Castellodivelona.it The Spa at Monteverdi. You can get a hot-stone massage—or you can step outside of your comfort zone. The Santa Maria Novella Candlewax uses hot oil from a candle (kinda kinky, totally amazing). Monteverdituscany.com Rosewood Castiglion del Bosco. The spa embraces Tuscany’s farmto-table approach to massage, with flower scrubs and grape detoxes. End the day with the resort’s own Brunello di Montalcino, plus a stroll through the vineyards at sunset. Castigliondelbosco.com A Very Relaxing Room. Yep, there’s just one (amazingly restorative) room for treatments at La Bandita Townhouse, and it’s the perfect excuse to visit Pienza, Tuscany’s loveliest town. La-bandita.com

A lovely blonde woman scrubbed my body of its dry, scaly, touristy patches. (that’s outside, too, actually). The place is heaven. And I was dreaming about every last thread count from the balcony of my treatment room. I had come for something called the Full Monteverdi. First, a lovely blonde woman used salt infused with lavender, rosemary, and lemon to scrub my body of its dry, scaly, touristy patches, revealing the skin tone of an Italian siren underneath (let me pretend). Then she brought me to the bathtub—huge, stone, and very much outdoors—and sprinkled in little handfuls of lavender. Lying in a tub that big with a view that big is surreal. How often are you truly naked in the great wide open? This is what celebrities must feel like when they buy the rights to the airspace above their mansions. Then finally it was time for the hour-long massage—it came with grape-seed oil or olive oil or some other kind of oil that I can’t remember because at that point I could barely remember my own name. By the time I left Monteverdi, I had fully embraced the cliché that is Tuscany. The sun was golden. My skin was glowing. It was time to meet my husband for a dinner of pasta and red wine. And I had the perfect Dolce & Gabbana dress for the occasion.

From top: Taking in Palaia at sunset; a treatment room at the Spa at Monteverdi in the Val d’Orcia.

JANUARY 2017 ALLURE

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JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

A portrait of the artist, the singer, the rising beauty icon—because nothing conveys who we are quite like the bottles we spritz, the wands we twirl, and the jars we twist open every day. For product details, see Shopping Guide.


The Evolution She doesn’t drink. She doesn’t do drugs. And until very recently Zendaya still lived with her mom and dad. But make no mistake, when the actress wants to turn heads, well, let’s just say she can stir a controversy. BY ELIZ AB E TH SIEG EL PHOTO G R APH ED BY JASO N KIB B LER

Viscose jersey dress and leather shoes by Versace. Makeup colors: The Super Sizer Fibers Mascara in Black and Oh Sugar Vitamin Infused Balm in Jelly by CoverGirl. These pages: Hair, Kim Kimble; makeup, Frankie Boyd; manicure, Ashlie Johnson. Prop stylist: Bette Adams of Mary Howard Studio. Fashion stylist: Patrick Mackie. Details, see Shopping Guide.


of a Child Star


he first thing you need to know about Zendaya is that you’re saying her name wrong. It is not zen-DIE-uh. It’s zen-DAY-uh. Maybe you could be forgiven when you consider the fact that she just turned 20 and you’re probably rusty on your Disney Channel cast members. Then again, she’s a legit red-carpet favorite, an accomplished musician, and oh my God, she just turned 20. Before we met, I had my theory about Zendaya all fleshed out and ready to prove. First of all, she is one of the rarest breeds of celebrity—the kind who find their way through the public eye while smack in the middle of the public eye. We didn’t meet Zendaya as a woman; we’re watching

obnoxious Hollywood demeanor makes you root for her. It makes you want your daughter to listen to her music. It makes you happy that she’s on the cusp of something really big. Figuratively, yes, but literally, too. Zendaya just moved into a house with three balconies, five bedrooms, five bathrooms, a three-car garage, and one truly massive kitchen. This is where I met her recently on one of those very sunny, very optimistic, very California type of days. “Sorry, he’s putting up my security camera,” says Zendaya, nodding toward the man installing a device on the side of her house. We settle down on the ledge of her hot tub, having come outside for purely practical reasons (“I don’t have any furniture yet”). But even over the sound of drilling and construction, she isn’t shouting to be heard. On the contrary, her voice is calm and steady. Zendaya, born Zendaya Coleman, is poised and measured, almost serious. She’s not like any 20-year-old I’ve ever met. “I [dropped my last name because

SHE IS POISED AND MEASURED, ALMOST SERIOUS. SHE’S NOT LIKE ANY 20-YEAR-OLD I’VE EVER MET. her become a woman. Being famous invites scrutiny, and growing up as you’re getting really famous invites the most intense kind of scrutiny. It’s got to be a little jarring for the celebrities being watched. Or so you’d think. But so far, from everything I’ve read about her, Zendaya is handling her fame and newfound adulthood with dignity and grace and a distinct lack of DUIs. Look for a paparazzi picture of Zendaya giving someone the finger—it doesn’t exist. Her lack of a privileged,

I] just thought it was cool, like Cher or Prince.” The woman, you could say, is driven, ambitious, precocious—and she has very specific plans. A lot of them. She tells me that she might also want to be a teacher. Or possibly the next Oprah (“Zoprah!”). As we sit overlooking her pool, an inflatable frosted doughnut and a giant white swan drift by. “It’s the ghetto off-brand swan, not the fancy one that was all over Snapchat and Instagram. I don’t have the Rihanna swan—but I’m getting there!” she says, almost apologizing. Zendaya’s wearing her high school sweatshirt, basketball shorts, and socks that read “Team Fuck You” in big black letters. On second thought, maybe the kid

inside isn’t all that hidden. In case it’s not clear, Zendaya is going through a transition in her life. There’s the no-furniture thing. There is the framed artwork waiting to be hung and the front door standing wide open. The windows have no signs of curtains, the walls haven’t been painted, and the kitchen reminds me of a model home where the sink isn’t actually connected to plumbing and the refrigerator isn’t plugged in (for the record, I’m sure it is; it just looks really unused). It’s exactly the kind of house—down to the floating doughnut and sterile white walls—you’d use in a movie about a young star just starting to learn about the trappings of superstardom. This is the blank-slate house. So it’s especially fitting that Zendaya is making her major big-screen debut in a little production you may have heard of, Spider-Man: Homecoming. Sony and Marvel are keeping the details of her role secret, but it’s rumored to be a good one. “Plenty of people are like, ‘Why is she still on Disney Channel?’ ” says Zendaya, who stars in K.C. Undercover. “Well, I waited and waited for the right part, and now I get to be in SpiderMan.” She leans forward in case I didn’t totally catch that. Spider-Man. She gives me an arch look. Doesn’t get any bigger than that. “Everything has been a climb,” says Zendaya. “And I’ve been able to take my family and friends with me. I came from humble beginnings.” Her eyes go wide and she looks around her backyard, at the pomegranate and lemon trees, the wooden swing, the inflatable toys. “I’ve never had a pool before,” she says, making a grand, sweeping gesture with her arm that takes in the newly planted baby palm trees and all of the unfurnished rooms inside. “I’ve never lived in a house this beautiful. I appreciate everything so much more because everything I have has been worked for.”


Cotton dress by Mugler. Makeup colors: Shape & Define Brow Mascara in Black and Colorlicious Lipstick in Caramel Kiss by CoverGirl. Details, see Shopping Guide.


“The tomboy with the plastic heels. That’s me 24/7. It just sums up my entire life. My mom actually had this picture in her phone. This is a throwback.”

Circa 1999

2013 “I like when my hair gets big— it looked really cool that day. And people don’t get to see my natural hair all that often because I’m always wearing wigs.”

2013

2013

On Dancing With the Stars “The most stressful, terrifying thing I ever did in my life. But it was a lot of fun. No, that’s a lie. I didn’t have a lot of fun.”

At Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles “I sang the national anthem. I used to wear leather pants every day, in any heat. Leather pants at the beach. Leather pants everywhere. It was ridiculous.”

2015 At the Met Gala in New York City “My first Met Ball was real scary. It was my first time going to an event without a parent, a friend, my stylist—somebody! I went with the designer [Fausto Puglisi].”

2014 At the BET Awards in Los Angeles “It’s still one of my favorite looks. It was very 1990s, very early 2000s. [The Emanuel Ungaro outfit] was just cool.”

2015 With the Zendaya Barbie in Los Angeles “This was a great day—the unveiling of my Barbie. It was a big moment. It is the first Barbie I know of to have locs.”

2015 With Gigi Hadid and Kendall Jenner “I walked into the party and they popped up beside me. I was like, ‘Oh, snap! Instant photo shoot right now.’ They were supersweet.”

2016 At the Met Gala with Michael Kors in New York City “The dress [by Michael Kors] was very Cher, but very futuristic. I looked like an android. The theme was fashion in the age of technology.”

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2016 At the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles “The mullet! It was a Bowie tribute, but it was also a confidence thing, because there’s no right or wrong way to do fashion.”


hen she was a regular kid with two names, Zendaya Coleman lived in Oakland in a “not-so-amazing neighborhood.” She was the youngest in a big, happy family (“my support system”): two sisters, two brothers, and her parents, both teachers. She played basketball. She coordinated clothes with her niece. “The shirts with graffiti [Alexander] Wang just did? We had those made for us in the hood. Mine was pink and had ‘Daya’ on the back.” In other words, she was a good kid. During the summers, she was dragged to her mom’s second job at a local theater. Sounds miserable. But not for Zendaya—she was paid in

wanted. I think they saw that.” They did. The audition was for a show called Shake It Up, and she landed one of the leads, Rocky Blue. Zendaya packed up her 12-year-old belongings, said good-bye to her big, happy family, and moved with her dad to Los Angeles to enter one of the most bizarre professions in the world: child acting. “It was really difficult,” she says, “and I was used to having my mom.” (Two years later, Zendaya was making enough that her mom could join them in L.A.) Zendaya never went to high school in the traditional sense. Though you could argue she grew up in a place where the cliques are much worse. “I’m nice and cool with everybody, but not a lot of people know me very well,” she says. She keeps to herself—a defense mechanism in a town where everyone wants something. “I have a very tight-knit circle.” You won’t find her out spraying Dom with models or crashing at

“I APPRECIATE EVERYTHING SO MUCH MORE BECAUSE EVERYTHING I HAVE HAS BEEN WORKED FOR.” chocolate-chip cookies and Snapple. She watched every play from the wings. The vast majority of the performances were Shakespeare— and most of the lines sailed over her four-year-old head. Didn’t matter. Zendaya knew she wanted to be a part of this world. Eight years later, the desire was still very much there, and Zendaya’s parents drove her to a Disney audition. “I just popped up out of nowhere,” she says. “And I was kicking ass. I came. I knew what I

Taylor’s for the night. And— amazingly—her goodness has been a point of some controversy. “I’m just not a social butterfly,” she insists. It’s been suggested that Zendaya has manufactured a squeaky-clean image that panders to her fans’ parents (and their wallets) and Disney’s vision for her as a wholesome role model. Her defense? “I’d rather be home with my family,” she says, adding, “I’ve never had a desire to drink.” That’s not to say she pretends to be perfect. “There is so much stress in my life,” she says. “I’ve got family, a lot of people that depend on me and need me. I try to take care of everybody and sometimes that drives you crazy—you want everybody to be OK, and you’re like, Jesus, am I OK?”

Being a 20-year-old breadwinner is exciting—and stressful. Sometimes she feels “like an old lady.” And talking to her, I have to wonder: Does she even want to be famous? “Eh, I don’t know. Sometimes I do; sometimes I don’t.” And then in a characteristically honest moment: “You just see so many people who are miserable here. It’s like, Why?” She leans forward so her hair falls in her face—a habit of hers—and plays with her curls while she talks. “It’s OK to be focused, but I can’t get to a point where I don’t like what I’m doing. It’s gotta be fun and creative and good.” Plus there are real upsides. “I love to slay a red carpet. When I step on one, I’m a different person,” she says, “like Sasha Fierce and Beyoncé.” She pops up from the ledge of the hot tub and starts clomping around, shoulders hunched. “Honestly, I walk like an old man—the Coleman Trudge.” A second later, Zendaya’s smiling, strutting, and waving coolly for imaginary cameras. She’s five foot nine and rail thin. If she weren’t already an actress, she’d be a supermodel. “On the red carpet, I’m this dainty, slow, elegant gazelle.” She’s enamored with her stylist, Law Roach (“we’re family”), and they have their own mantra of sorts: “We don’t do pretty. Pretty is boring.” And pretty isn’t getting Zendaya the kind of attention she’s after. “When young women see me go out, with an entire world to criticize what I put on, and do whatever the hell I want? It’s empowering [for them],” she says. “It’s not just about clothes. It’s never been just about clothes.” She stops talking for a second to push the hair out of her face. “We do what we want,” she says slowly, emphatically pausing between every word.

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ase in point: the incident of February 2015. It was Zendaya’s first major red carpet. She wore an off-the-shoulder Vivienne Westwood gown and her hair in locs. She arrived at the Oscars looking like a million bucks. And then this happened: “Like, I feel like she smells like patchouli oil. Or weed,” said E!’s Giuliana Rancic. Many saw it as a moment of casual racism—one that shocked the country. “This is way bigger than a beef between us,” says Zendaya. “I heard about the comment through Twitter, and my first reaction was angry—I got really mad. Then I realized this has nothing to do with us. It was one small look into an overall misconception about a large group of people.” Zendaya sat in her room and fought the urge to post an angry tweet right away. She mulled things over, wrote about prejudice, and posted it on her Twitter and Instagram pages. It was heartfelt. It was well researched. It was the opposite of Rancic’s off-the-cuff remark. “I gave it to my mom to proofread—I literally can’t spell to save my life—and that was it.” Up it went. And by the next morning, everyone was talking about Zendaya, and The Washington Post was asking the question on all of our minds: “Who is Zendaya?” A relative unknown, Zendaya was steering a national dialogue about

Watch Zendaya share her thoughts on how she would change the world at allure.com/zendaya.

race with poise and tact. “I got all of these pictures from women wearing locs. I made it my Twitter header, and that became empowering,” she says. “It became something very positive. It allowed us to talk about things that make us uncomfortable.” Rancic issued an apology. “There was a little girl for Halloween last year that was me from the Oscars,” Zendaya says proudly. And the world got Zendaya Barbie. “I think that was a big moment not just for me but for women of color,” she says. “It’s a step in the right direction. But we have a long way to go.” Even now, Zendaya is grappling with guilt about her fame and has mixed feelings about her success. “I ask myself, Would I get the same opportunities—would I have this role

or that role—if I were a darkerskinned black women? And the answer is no,” she says. “But the real thing is how do you take what you’ve been given and use it to better the situations of people that are your peers, your brothers and sisters?” Right now, Zendaya is filming a second movie, The Greatest Showman on Earth, about a circus, with Hugh Jackman and Zac Efron. She has a new clothing line called Daya by Zendaya. She’s a face of CoverGirl. And she’s recording a second album. “I want people to be impressed.” One thing’s for sure. We’ll all know how to say her name.

CORNER Zendaya’s done the impossible: She made a mullet look chic. Her secret involves risk-taking and a whole lot of confidence. Holy cow, puberty in the public eye—you must still have nightmares. “I had my rough patch—everyone has an awkward phase, but I don’t think it was extreme. It was just my dad and me in L.A. When I got my period, he was more stressed than I was, like, ‘My daughter’s becoming a woman!’ He didn’t know how to deal with the stuff that I [dealt] with as a young woman. Oh, I’ve had hair nightmares. When I was 14 or 15, a hairstylist on a show didn’t understand AfricanAmerican hair. She ended up burning a lot of it off. It was baaad. It took me a long time to grow it back, and now I’m like, ‘Don’t touch it!’ People don’t get to see my natural hair that often because I’m always wearing wigs.” Like taking a mullet for a spin? “That was one of my favorites. There are a gazillion different styles. Do whatever makes you feel good.”

Still, it takes guts. “I feel a responsibility to showcase different kinds of beauty through hair—every woman should be able to see herself in me in some way. I love when I get to wear my cornrows, because it’s surprising. So many people are like, ‘Wow! What a fresh, new, fun hairstyle!’ But no. It’s been around for a long time. I’m just whipping it out.” What about makeup? “If I’m in L.A. and there’s an event here, I do my own makeup. I just use a taupe shade on my eyes, thin cat-eye liner, and natural everything else. And I’ve been really into clear lip gloss, which I think is so underrated.” I love your orange nail polish— what is it? “We mixed 3,000 colors to get this color! It’s, like, four different pinks, a neon orange, and a yellow. Nails are my thing. I’ve had crazy, intricate, ridiculous stuff that I designed on a piece of paper. I’ve had Michael Jackson on my nails—Michael Jackson as a zombie, as a regular person.”


Cotton top and skirt and mesh shoes by Emilio Pucci. Makeup colors: Easy Breezy Brow Fill + Shape + Define Brow Powder in Rich Brown and Outlast All-Day Color & Gloss in Vivid Violet by CoverGirl. Details, see Shopping Guide.


fat

We’ve banned it from dinner. We battle to keep it off our stomachs (and thighs). We even avoid clothing that possibly approximates the look of it. But is fat all bad? New science and procedures are making it easier than ever to get rid of fat— or in some cases, use it to our advantage. By Jessica Chia

chance


MAISIE COUSINS

There are more ways to manipulate fat than ever before.


fat.

The way we acquire it, the way we store it, and the effort it takes to lose it are encoded in our genes. The way we think about it, however, is beyond science—and sometimes beyond reason. The dynamic forces of culture, media, personality, and upbringing within each of us make the issue completely subjective. Fat defies generalization.

But it is nonetheless familiar, intimate. After all, it is literally a part of us. Sometimes fat is a sympathetic old friend, sometimes a mocking bully, sometimes a ghost (George W. Bush, according to one family member, has said there is a fat person inside him trying to get out, a sentiment that anyone who has lost weight can recognize). There were times in the not-so-distant human past when those who were too thin might not even survive a harsh winter or a prolonged drought. A few extra pounds, especially around the hips and butt, signaled health and fertility to our primate brains. Is it any wonder that men find a voluptuous booty and large breasts irresistible? Fat has saved us from extinction. Respect. Few people in contemporary pop culture have explored the nature of fat as insightfully as Girls creator Lena Dunham. Fat is a character in her drama, right out there in the open, and Dunham, who plays Hannah, dares you to look away. It’s shocking not because of a few extra rolls, but because Hannah accepts them without shame. And in a time when minor weight gain can derail the self-esteem of a Miss Universe (Miss Universe!), that is a healthy message to take to heart. Nevertheless, an entire industry has grown up around the goals of reducing and managing fat. In the last few years alone, we have found ways to burn it off and freeze it off. That is, when we’re not trying to just move it to another place on our body. (No one accused humanity of not being fickle.) In 2017, there are more ways to manipulate fat than ever before. And that’s all well and good—hell, great—as long as you don’t lose your identity in an effort to change some minor contours. Let’s remember one thing: Fat doesn’t define us. But the way we think about it can. —DAVID DENICOLO

THE DEEP FREEZE You’ve got to love 2010. “Before that, there were no effective noninvasive ways to contour the body,” says Robert Anolik, a dermatologist in New York City. Then the world got cryolipolysis—don’t worry about pronouncing it; just know that it means freezing fat to death by suctioning it into a rectangular (and very chilly) handpiece. When Zeltiq’s CoolSculpting device (currently the only one offering this technology) was approved by the FDA to dissolve belly fat, it sounded like a dream: 25 percent less fat, zapped away during your lunch break. And it’s lived up to the hype. Provided you’re spot-treating on a relatively fit frame, it really works. And now it works on more places than ever—and faster. “New software allows us to operate one degree cooler than before, so we can treat an area in 35 minutes instead of an hour,” Anolik says. And a flat applicator, about the size of a Ping-Pong paddle, can slim areas that can’t be squished between the original machine’s plates—specifically the outer thighs. Thinking even smaller? The CoolMini (a shrunken version of the original handpiece) can treat even more diminutive pockets of fat. Officially, it’s approved for use under the chin. Unofficially, plastic surgeons such as Glenn Vallecillos in Beverly Hills are testing it out on bulges above the knees and next to the armpits. Cost: $400 to $1,800 per treatment; two or three treatments yield maximum results.

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Right now, my most exciting work is sculpting the stomach’s six-pack with Kybella.

THE HEAT WAVE Cold isn’t the only game in town; treatments that use heat also cause fat cells to rupture, says Roy Geronemus, a dermatologist in New York City. There are several devices in this class: the infrared light– and radio frequency–fueled VelaShape III, the radio frequency–leveraging Vanquish, and SculpSure, which uses laser energy. Regardless of the technology behind each one, the aim is consistent across the board: to create a high enough temperature to destroy fat. And while they don’t have the years of solid data that stand behind CoolSculpting, these fat-heating options are gaining ground among some doctors, like New York City dermatologist Dennis Gross, who favors SculpSure. “It has given my patients great results, and the new, smaller applicators that came out last year have made it possible to contour really tricky areas, such as the arms,” he says. The applicators—which lie flat on the skin and are about the size of a Kit Kat—allow the device the flexibility to treat areas that are too bony (hips, upper abdomen) for other devices to get at, explains Gross. Like CoolSculpting, the treatment has moments of some discomfort but is considered quite tolerable.

A FINE POINT

If you’ve heard of Kybella—and if you’re reading this magazine, we’re going to go ahead and assume you have—you probably know that it dissolves fat. Here’s Cost: $600 to $2,500 per treatment; two or three where we get all geeky about it: Kybella employs treatments are recommended. deoxycholic acid, a synthetic form of the acid that breaks down fat in the gut, to remove fat from the chin, explains Jeannette Graf, a dermatologist in Great Neck, New York. It’s delivered in a series of injections. But not as many as it once was: In the nearly two years since its arrival, many dermatologists have noticed that by spacing Kybella treatments six to eight weeks apart, instead of the previously accepted four, they can get the same results in Even with a new generation of no-scalpel fixes two or three appointments rather than four, says San available, liposuction is alive and well. It was the most Francisco dermatologist Richard Glogau. And popular cosmetic surgery procedure in the U.S. in 2015, up 15 though technically it’s FDA-approved only for use percent from the previous year, according to the American under the chin, some dermatologists are Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Yes, noninvasive fat reducers experimenting with Kybella on other areas, like do a bang-up job killing fat cells, but they don’t remove them, so the fat that sits above your knees or hangs you’re left with the detritus of your dead fat cells sloshing around—and over your bra. In fact, since it’s such a targeted causing swelling—for days, even weeks, until your body can metabolize treatment, some doctors are even using Kybella it. Techniques like CoolSculpting and SculpSure are a great option for to create muscle definition. “Right now my shrinking stubborn pockets of fat, but they require multiple sessions and most exciting work is sculpting the stomach’s aren’t efficient at removing a large amount of weight, says Joubin six-pack with Kybella,” says S. Manjula Jegasothy, Gabbay, a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills. And while no surgery is a dermatologist in Miami. “For patients who without risks, liposuction is safer and more effective than ever, says are within 10 to 15 percent of their ideal body Payam Jarrah-Nejad, a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills. One type, weight, I’m seeing an 80 to 90 percent reduction called Vaser, uses an ultrasonic cannula (a stainless steel tube) to in fat when I use Kybella on the stomach or loosen fat so a greater volume can be removed. And evidence back,” Jegasothy says. Whatever area you treat, has shown that laser-assisted liposuction, such as SmartLipo, though, expect it to be tender and puffy for may offer tighter skin as well as fat removal because of up to a week. “Swelling is very much a part of the healing response it can trigger, Gabbay says. the process,” Graf says. Cost: $2,500 to $8,000 depending on Cost: $1,000 to $2,000 per treatment; two to four the level of treatment needed treatments are often necessary.

Lipo: The OG

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MAISIE COUSINS

Liposuction remains the most popular plastic surgery procedure.


Looking Back A brief recap of our complicated history with fat.

1926 A French woman asks her doctor to cut fat out of her knees and calves. The complications lead to amputation.

1950s Surgeons develop a way to inhibit the body’s absorption of food. Weight loss is significant, but so are nutritional deficiencies.

1964 A German surgeon performs lipexeresis, removing fat with a scraping instrument. The practice never becomes popular.

1969 A Brazilian surgeon gets attention for an operation that removes unwanted fat from the buttocks (and leaves large scars behind).

1970s Doctors in Europe experiment with suctioning fat out of the body through incisions, pioneering liposuction.

1997 Liposuction becomes the most popular plastic surgery procedure in the country.

2010 The FDA approves CoolSculpting, a fat-freezing device that can quickly shrink a belly pooch.

2015 Buh-bye, double chin. Kybella is FDAapproved to shrink fat under the jawline. —ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY JOAN KRON

THE DREAM CREAM Rub on a cream and watch as the unwanted fat simply disappears from your body? Nope, this is not a dispatch from the Pulling My Leg department. Allergan (the company that owns Botox, Kybella, and Juvéderm) recently shelled out $85 million for the company behind an ointment called XAF5. Like lashgrowing Latisse, its active ingredient was originally designed to help glaucoma patients. Only this time, the welcome side effect appears to be dissolving undereye fat pads. The active ingredient in XAF5 (and yes, we’re waiting for a sexier name, too), a prostaglandin known as latanoprost, binds to fatcell receptors and triggers the release of their oil contents, causing the fat cells to shrink. Hold off on your happy dance for a minute, though: What may work for the thin skin under the eyes won’t necessarily work elsewhere on the body, where the skin is much thicker and less permeable, says Anolik. Cost: It’s anyone’s guess because the cream isn’t available yet. When it is, though, you’ll need a prescription to get it.

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE If you’ve ever dreamed your extra pounds would do the polite thing and migrate from your hips to your breasts, well, you’re in luck. Fat transplants can make that particular dream come true. Early attempts by unskilled practitioners earned the practice a complicated reputation, but in recent years, a more measured approach has made playing Mother Nature with your figure more popular. “The techniques for fat preparation have really evolved,” says Jarrah-Nejad. “We wash the fat, take out the grease, take out the debris, and make sure it’s the quality we know will survive. That way we will get a much more predictable result.” Another breakthrough in the process: doctors’ understanding that sometimes the less fat that is injected, the greater the chance that the surrounding network of blood vessels will accept it. That’s why doctors like Justin Yovino, a cosmetic surgeon in Beverly Hills, use as little as 10 milliliters of fat to smooth the back of a hand or 20 milliliters to lift cheekbones. (As a point of reference, a coughsyrup cup is about 15 milliliters.) Yovino also uses fat to round breast contours or to render a derriere just ever so slightly perkier. The idea is to make tweaks, not dramatic transformations. And though the fat must be procured via liposuction (often from the inner knees, though any area the patient wants slimmed down will work), the transplant doesn’t require general anesthesia. “I give my patients a little Xanax or laughing gas before the procedure,” Yovino says. “They’ll just feel a tiny prick when I inject the anesthetic and after that light pressure and vibrations where I’m removing the fat. Then I’ll inject it back in.” But couldn’t a synthetic filler (like, say, Restylane) achieve similar results without invasive liposuction? Not necessarily. Because it’s living tissue, fat won’t wear off and won’t need refilling every six months. And since it came from you in the first place, your body can’t have a reaction to it (though it’s rare, some people are allergic to other fillers). As with any procedure, researching a reputable cosmetic surgeon (and you will need a surgeon, since the process involves liposuction) is critical: If fat transfer is done incorrectly, the body can reject the fat and create a cyst or calcification that requires surgical removal. Cost: $2,500 to $30,000 depending on the amount of fat you need transferred

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Makeup in 2017 is taking an unexpected turn, with classic looks veering intentionally off-track. Potent red lips become blurry around the edges, rosy blush travels toward the temples, and black liner wanders aimlessly over the lids, like a GPS with no signal. The result is fresh, nervy, and strangely liberating. Here, makeup artist Susie Sobol and model Lindsey Wixson demonstrate the art of the detour. By Liana Schaffner

THE NEW RED LIPSTICK: BLURRY For the softest, most natural effect, lose the lip pencil and tap on a creamy red bullet, rolling a cotton swab along the outer edges to diffuse any sharp lines. Lip Oil-Balm in Punch Pop by BareMinerals. These pages: Makeup, Susie Sobol; hair, Diego Da Silva; manicure, Typhaine Kersual. Model: Lindsey Wixson. Fashion stylist: Catherine Newell-Hanson.

Photographed by Nicolas Kantor


THE NEW BLACK EYELINER: SQUIGGLY Hugging the curve of your lash line is safe and precise. A wavy, undulating wing that extends past the outer corner is playful and chic. Lace top by Ellery. Earring by Eshvi. Makeup colors: Master Precise Curvy Liquid Liner in Black and Color Sensational lipstick in Honey Pink by Maybelline New York. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW NUDE: GLOSSY After applying a thin coat of nude gloss to your lips, head north. Dabbed on cheekbones and slicked over lids, a sheer, shimmer-free formula creates a spare, uniform glow. Viscose coat by Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh. Wool top by Helmut Lang. Silver earring by Shikama. Lacquer Gloss in BE 102 by Shiseido. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW BLUE: THICK, BOLD, AND OUT-THERE This cool turquoise shadow floats far above the creases, highlighting perfectly arched eyebrows in a totally new way. Knit top by Dior. Silver earring by Efva Attling. Colour Gradient Eyeshadow Palette in Blue Gradation by Dior. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW BLUSH: HIGHER THAN EVER Swirling powder blush from the cheekbones to the temples creates a bold, sculptural effect. Wool top by Topshop Unique. Satin top by Tibi. Gold earring by Kathleen Whitaker. Makeup colors: Infallible Paints blush palette and Infallible Paints lip color in Nude Star by L’Oréal Paris. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW METALLIC: OVER AND UNDER Move silver shadow from your lids to your lashes, rimming the eyes and saturating the tips. Skip mascara entirely for a cool, metallic flash every time you blink. Razor Sharp Liquid Eyeliner in Cuff by Urban Decay.


THE NEW SMOKY EYES: COLORFUL Leave the safety of browns and grays for just a second. Bright, bold peachy-pink shadow is as energizing as a Malibu sunrise. Wool sweater by Max Mara. MetalMatte Eyeshadow Palette by Kat Von D. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE TYRANNY


PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: MATTHIEU BOUREL (ARTWORK); ANAIRAM (PHOTOGRAPH)

OF CHOICE In a world where a single click pulls up 3,000 different shades of lipstick or a few hundred eye creams, is it possible to find your perfect match? Una LaMarche asks herself that question. And then one more: Does she even want to?


to one beauty routine, choose my perfect matches, and move on? I’m 36 now, with a child and an apartment full of clutter that would make Marie Kondo stress-vomit. What I want more than anything is to be the kind of woman who owns two or three products that will never fail to make her look like she has just gone on a brisk walk in good lighting while eating a Popsicle. A woman who can run into Rite Aid for tampons without stopping to check out at least half of the 400 tubes and jars on the skin-care shelf (that’s an actual number, by the way—the average drugstore now offers 400 different skin-care products). You know those celebrities with creamy, poreless skin who claim to wash their faces with Ivory soap once a week or who wear only some ravishing discontinued cult lipstick that they had the foresight to stockpile in the early aughts? I want to be them. But I am me. I have the same blemish-prone complexion I had in high school (it has never been reliably tamed, sort of like the frustratingly lovable bad boy in a ’90s romantic comedy). I’m a sucker for cute nail-polish names and any anti-aging cream that promises to make my eye folds look less like Dumbo’s mom’s. I mistakenly think I can pull off things like contouring.

THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE PAGE: LIAM GOODMAN

i

can’t find any numerical data on how many beauty products exist in the world right now, so I’m going to make a conservative estimate and say…39 bazillion. This is based on extremely scientific research: tipsy online shopping trips in which I fall headfirst into an existential crisis about whether anyone really needs brow gel and the Sephora Mensa Admission Test that is telling the difference between a lip gloss, a lip glass, and a lip glacé. According to one recent survey, the average woman owns 40 beauty products. The headlines announcing these findings expressed delighted shock across the board, as if that number were patently ridiculous; I digested it with a shame that turned my face redder than any cheek stain I ever had, suddenly feeling like the Wilt Chamberlain of the cosmetics industry. There is zero chance, if one were to conduct an impromptu audit of my home and/or purse, that I have ever had fewer than 40 beautyrelated items in my possession since approximately Y2K. I have coveted, sampled, and subsequently discarded thousands of formulas in pursuit of a nebulous goal that falls somewhere between “looking like myself but better” and “looking like Beyoncé in front of a wind machine.” It all started in 1992. Clinique had relaunched its best-selling Black

Honey as an Almost Lipstick a few years earlier, and every preteen worth her “Mysterious Ways” cassingle was dead set on wearing the rich, raisiny shade to the first middle-school dance. Since my seventh-grade allowance wasn’t enough to buy the real thing, I was forced to create my own “almost” formula from my mother’s off-brand burgundy lipstick and a thick layer of Carmex medicated balm. I set up a makeshift vanity in my closet, papering the walls with how-to pages torn from magazines and scenting them liberally with Love’s Fresh Lemon Body Mist before I set to work attempting to transform my 12-year-old visage—pale, freckled, thickly unibrowed—into something that I hoped would approximate Linda Evangelista. (Incidentally, I sat in the bleachers at the dance while everyone else slow-danced to “November Rain.”) But that didn’t stop me from trying again. And again. And again. With each passing year, there have been so many more salves and glosses and concealers at my disposal, so many more paths to the transformation I craved. Just how many more, you ask? Well, Black Honey is now also available as a Sweet Pot Sugar Scrub & Lip Balm, a Pop Oil Lip & Cheek Glow, a Superbalm Moisturizing Gloss, an eyeliner, something called a Cheek Pop, and even a mascara. Psychologists have posited the theory that having more choices actually makes us less happy, since an abundance of options suggests the possibility that a better match could always be out there. And I can get on board with that—I totally see the joy in commitment. I mean, I locked down my husband at 23, back when my benzoyl peroxide cleansers left tie-dye prints on all of his towels. So why can’t I be faithful


The fallen beauty soldiers in my wake include not only designer and drugstore brands but also tubs of pure manuka honey and coconut oil, jars of pungent vinegars, and a number of ripe avocados that would have made a nice guacamole had I not been hell-bent on using them as a face mask. And with each season’s influx of seductive new recruits, photographed in lush tableaux under clickable headlines like “75 New Beauty Products You Need to Snag This Spring,” the cycle continues. I’m conflicted about this. On the one hand, yes, I yearn for the ascetic simplicity of a parallel world in which my makeup bag contains a handful of essentials as opposed to looking like it belongs to Mary Poppins moonlighting for Mary Kay. On the other, it’s fun to experiment and virtually risk-free—unless you factor in the slim chance of an allergic reaction and/or a terrible photo that will haunt you on Instagram. The seemingly endless array of products can feel oppressive, but so would a strict limit. I mean, you don’t have to have emotional adolescent memories tied to Guns N’ Roses ballads to recognize that “nothin’ lasts forever” and “hearts can change” are truth bombs of the highest order. So if I never find The One—or, really, The Few—among the 39 bazillion, screw it. At the end of the day, it truly does not matter if a mascara sparks joy. An embarrassment of choices means more options for every sensitivity, skin tone, and price point. And we’re not likely to encounter a worldwide shortage of BB cream anytime soon or a vanity-based Hunger Games in which we are dropped on a threatening terrain, forced to survive using only our most essential beauty staples. Although, for the sake of argument, if we were, I would have you totally covered with my 40-plus-plus product stash. It includes a battery-operated pore-cleansing device that could prove crucial in scaring off predators. Just a thought.

THE BEAUTY COUNTER

1

We tallied it all up. Let’s just say: You have options. —JESA CALAOR

110

NUMBER OF NAIL-POLISH shades Revlon made in 1932.

NUMBER OF NAIL-POLISH shades Revlon offers today.

THE NUMBER OF prestige fragrance launches in the U.S. last year.

181

600

NUMBER OF PRODUCTS in the average drugstore hair-care aisle.

365 3,000 NUMBER OF LIPSTICK shades at Sephora in 1999.

NUMBER OF LIPSTICK shades at Sephora today.

87


Off the Grid Tartan has been REAWAKENED—and REIMAGINED. Gone is the stiff, parochial past. In its place: JOYFUL LIGHTNESS, PLAYFUL irreverence, and MOST unexpected of ALL, flirty SEX APPEAL. Photographed by Nathaniel Goldberg


CHECK MATE Black-and-white woolblend top (around waist) by Christopher Kane. White cottonblend sweater by Hilfiger Collection. Blue-and-red silk dress by Hermès. Earring, model’s own. These pages: Hair, Vi Sapyyapy; makeup, Georgi Sandev. Model: Jamilla Hoogenboom. Fashion stylist: Michael Philouze. Details, see Shopping Guide.


NAVY EXCHANGE Wool-and-silk jacket by Dior. Cotton top by American Eagle Outfitters. Cottonblend bodysuit by Wolford. Viscose skirt by Public School. Polyester shoes and earring by Stella McCartney. Details, see Shopping Guide.


GOSSAMER BLUES Mohair dress by Michael Michael Kors. Silk dress by Marni. Earring by Stella McCartney. Details, see Shopping Guide.


CLASSIC ARCHITECTURE Coat by Christopher Kane. Wool top and skirt by Prada. Boots, stylist’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide.


RUSSET GLOW Wool-blend jacket by Paul Smith. Knit top by Dior. Makeup colors: Les 4 Ombres Quadra Eyeshadow in Codes Subtils and Rouge Coco Stylo Lipshine in Lettre by Chanel. Details, see Shopping Guide.


CREATURE COMFORTS Wool-blend sweater by Christopher Kane. Tweed top and skirt by Proenza Schouler. Plastic shoes by Stella McCartney. Details, see Shopping Guide.


POWER LINES Wool jacket, jersey top, and wool shorts by Balenciaga. Details, see Shopping Guide.


FRINGE ELEMENT Cotton top by Coach 1941. Jacquard pants by Dior. Nylonand-elastane shoes and earring by Stella McCartney. Makeup colors: Color Design 5 Shadow & Liner Palette in Beige Brulée and Blush Subtil in Cedar Rose by Lancôme. Details, see Shopping Guide.


SHOPPING GUIDE Cover: Dior silk satin dress, $4,200. Dior stores. Table of Contents, page 6: Céline viscose top, $1,950. Céline, N.YC. 212-535-3703. Alexander Wang bikini top, $325 for similar styles. Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. 212-977-9683. Efva Attling silver necklace, $235. Efvaattling.com. Cover Look, page 12: Mugler cotton dress, $3,300. Neiman Marcus stores. Versace viscose jersey dress, $1,975. Select Versace stores. Page 14: Dior silk satin dress, $4,200. Dior stores. Talking Beauty With Zoey Deutch, page 18: Theory cotton top, $265. Theory stores. Veronika Borchers x Pearl Collective silver earrings, $515. Pearlcollective.com. Caroline Constas cotton top, $395. Matchesfashion .com. Re/Done jeans, $325. Shopredone.com. Alexander Wang leather shoes, $575. Alexander Wang, N.Y.C. 212977-9683. Beauty School, page 24: Max Mara viscose cotton sweater, $895. Max Mara, N.Y.C. 212-879-6100. Annelise Michelson earrings, $280. Annelisemichelson.com. Page 26: Stella McCartney cotton jacket, $1,335. Stella McCartney, Los Angeles. 310273-7051. Venus by Maria Tash gold-and-diamond earrings, $455 each. Venus by Maria Tash, N.Y.C. 212-253-0921. Page 27: Gucci wool jacket, $2,900, and brooch, $450. Select Gucci stores. Melissa Joy Manning gold earrings, $100. Melissajoymanning .com. Elements of Style, page 45: Erdem lace dress, price available upon request. Erdem.com. Gucci belt, $1,100. Select Gucci stores. Page 46: Adidas Originals suede shoes, $80. Adidas.com. DKNY cotton jacket, $998. Select DKNY stores. Protagonist viscose pants, $550. Net-aporter.com. Gucci leather bag, $2,500. Select Gucci stores. Brock Collection cotton silk bustier, $1,450. A’maree’s, Newport Beach, California. 949-642-4423. Nehera jeans, $450. Nehera.com. Vans canvas shoes, $50. Vans.com. Page 47: Nina Ricci eel-skin coat, $7,390. By special order at Barneys New York. 888-222-7639. Louis Vuitton gold-and-diamond ring, $4,100. Select Louis Vuitton stores. Zendaya, page 61, clockwise from top: CoverGirl Outlast All-Day Lipcolor in

98

ALLURE JANUARY 2017

Pink Cashmere, CoverGirl So Lashy Mascara in Very Black, Dior Hydra Life Pro-Youth Silk Creme, Ardell Wispies Black lashes, and Tom Ford Jasmin Rouge. The Evolution of a Child Star, page 62: Versace viscose jersey dress, $1,975, and leather shoes, price available upon request for similar styles. Select Versace stores. Page 65: Mugler cotton dress, $3,300. Neiman Marcus stores. Page 69: Emilio Pucci cotton top, $265; cotton skirt, $790; and mesh shoes, $1,125. Emilio Pucci stores. The New Classics, page 77: Ellery lace top, $1,220. Ellery.com. Eshvi earrings, $193. Eshvi, London. 44-020-3399-9303. Page 78: Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh, $2,224. Off---white .com. Helmut Lang wool top, $195. Helmutlang.com. Shikama silver earrings, $175. Lascruxes.com. Page 79: Dior knit top, $1,550. Dior stores. Efva Attling silver earrings, $275. Efvaattling.com. Page 81: Topshop Unique wool top, $300. Topshop.com. Tibi satin top, $295. Tibi.com. Kathleen Whitaker gold earring, $240. Kathleenwhitaker.com. Page 83: Max Mara wool sweater, $550. Max Mara, N.Y.C. 212879-6100. Off the Grid, page 89: Christopher Kane woolblend top, $995. Christopher kane.com. Hilfiger Collection cotton-blend sweater, $430. Select Tommy Hilfiger stores. Hermès silk dress, $5,550. Hermès stores. Page 90: Dior wool-and-silk jacket, $4,300 for similar styles. Dior stores. American Eagle Outfitters cotton top, $29.95. Ae.com. Wolford cotton-blend bodysuit, $260. Wolford.com. Public School viscose skirt, $525 for similar styles. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Stella McCartney polyester shoes, $995. Stella McCartney, N.YC. 212-255-1556. Stella McCartney earring, $650 for similar styles. Stellamccartney .com. Page 91: Michael Michael Kors mohair dress, $195. Select Michael Kors Lifestyle stores. Marni silk dress, $2,870. Maryam Nassir Zadeh, N.Y.C. 212-673-6405. Stella McCartney earring, $650 for similar styles. Stella McCartney, N.Y.C. 212-2551556. Page 92: Prada wool top, $840, and skirt, $1,060. Select Prada stores. Page 94: Paul Smith wool-blend jacket, price available upon request. Paul Smith, N.Y.C.

646-613-3060. Dior knit top, $1,550. Dior stores. Page 95: Christopher Kane wool-blend sweater, $1,495. Christopher kane.com. Proenza Schouler tweed top, $1,250, and skirt, $1,650. Similar styles at Proenza Schouler, N.Y.C. 212420-7300. Stella McCartney plastic shoes, $880. Chuckies stores. Page 96: Balenciaga wool jacket, $2,050; jersey top, $375 for similar styles; and wool shorts, $695. Balenciaga, N.Y.C. 212-2060872. Page 97: Coach 1941 cotton top, $295. Select Coach stores. Dior Jacquard pants, price available upon request for similar styles. Dior stores. Stella McCartney nylon-and-elastane shoes, $685. Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Autobiography, page 100, clockwise from top: Elizabeth Arden The Original Eight Hour Cream Skin Protectant, Rimmel London Wonder’Lash Mascara with Argan Oil in Black, and Le Labo Santal 33.

PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS Head Games, page 23: David M. Benett/Getty Images for Burberry (model with updo

and “girls” pin); gorunway .com (two models at Ashley Williams); Jason LloydEvans (model with “boys” pin and model with white belt); courtesy of Aveda (model with black belt); Liam Goodman (still lifes). Italian Lessons, page 58, from top: John Huba/Art + Commerce; Marco Besana; John Huba/Art + Commerce. Page 59, from top: Tom Craig/Trunk Archive; Bernard Touillon/courtesy of Monteverdi Tuscany. The Evolution of a Child Star, page 66, clockwise from top left: courtesy of subject (circa 1999 and in 2013 with natural hair); Mark Sullivan/WireImage (at Dodger Stadium); Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic (with Zendaya Barbie); Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images (with Michael Kors); Jason Merritt/Getty Images (at the Grammy Awards); Pierre Suu/Getty Images (with Hadid and Jenner); Kevin Mazur/BET/Getty Images for BET (at the BET Awards); Adam Taylor/ABC via Getty Images (on Dancing With the Stars); Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images (at the 2015 Met Gala).

ALLURE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2017 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 27, NO. 1. JANUARY 2017 ISSUE. ALLURE (ISSN 1054-7771) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Charles H. Townsend, Chairman; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; James M. Norton, Chief Business Officer & President of Revenue. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617, call 800-678-1825, or email subscriptions@ allure.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to ALLURE Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please email reprints@ condenast.com or call 717-505-9701, ext 101. For reuse permissions, please email permissions@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at www.allure.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit www.condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617 or call 800678-1825. ALLURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY ALLURE IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELFADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.


AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Rita Ora

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE); AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC (ORA)

FILLS IN THE BLANKS.

Ora is a spokeswoman for Rimmel London. For details on a few of her favorite products (shown here), see Shopping Guide.


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