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JANUARY 2017 Style 46 Design details An expert guide to wood panelling, plus the very best places to buy skirting and architraves that will suit all styles 49 Design hero Witty Italian artist Alessandro Mendini, whose creations are inspired by modern art 51 My cultural life UK Esquire’s Editor-in-Chief Alex Bilmes talks books, music and exhibitions 53 In conversation with Jasper Morrison The ever-relevant British designer discusses minimalism, luxury and his recent range for Vitra

WINTER WA R M E R S

Hunker down with our ultimate winter wellbeing wish list, packed with 34 ways to get cosy. Discover the softest accessories, comforting scents and practical tips on how to draught-proof your home. Plus, the definitive guide to hygge

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57 Architectural icon How the gothic façade of St Pancras Station became an icon of the railway age 58 Colour Elegant or evil? We explore the history of black, all the way from the dawn of time to the end of days

COVER IMAGE: SUSANNA BLAVARG/TAVERNE AGENCY

35 ON THE COVER We have been inspired by Swedish stylist Sanna Fyring Liedgren’s enchanting lantern-lit feast. See her tips for stylish entertaining on p98.

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Home

Tabletop

62 Heart of darkness The owner of this dramatic apartment shares her tips for decorating with black 76 The tastemaker An opulent mix of period features and graffiti art combines in this unique apartment 92 Luxury lounging Plush velvets and jewel tones rule this season 98 Some enchanted evening Lit by lanterns, this winter garden makes a magical setting for a soirée

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72 Feast Eat, drink and be merry with bold pattern and gilt finishes 74 Indulge Bring Bohemian grandeur to your table setting with luxurious mismatched pieces

Escape

88 Delight Liven up any meal with an arrangement that celebrates nature

129 Cultural calendar The best venues #TeamED has visited this year and what they have in store for 2017

90 Charm Choose texture and muted tones for pared-back entertaining 106 Relax Use simple decorations to set a table that’s effortlessly elegant

110 Shadow play Cork, concrete and brass bring understated glamour to this Italian apartment

108 Comfort Combine wood and rugged ceramics for cosy dining

120 Winter’s harvest This idyllic barn is the setting for a fine family feast

126 Celebrate Statement florals and fine china create a dramatic table

Finally 14 Subscribe Fabulous offers for our most loyal readers 135 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 136 Christmas A gift subscription makes the ideal present

THE WORLD OF ELLE DECORATION Find even more interiors inspiration online at elledecoration.co.uk and sign up to our newsletter for the best of ELLE Decoration direct to your inbox

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Instagram @littlerew Profession Illustrator Feature Winter warmers, p17 Likes Dancing, cinnamon buns, Ebay Dislikes Rats, rude people, whistling Interiors style Mid-century meets print clash and colour. But in an organised way! Dream buy The perfect reading chair. I’m always on the lookout for it, but have yet to find it Design heroes Charles and Ray Eames – I love how their work crossed over and combined so many fields Dream destination Next on my list is India – I’m excited about the food, the colours and the jewellery

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ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active  Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benqué CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi Brand Management of ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée SVP/International Director of ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickaël Berret Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Flora Régibier Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

FEBRUARY ISSUE ON SALE JANUARY 5 2017

T H I S MON T H ’ S CON T R I BU TOR S Nicola Rew

T R A DEM A R K NO T ICE

Sanna Fyring Liedgren Website homegrownswedes.com Profession Cook and stylist Feature Some enchanted evening, p98 Home I live in a turn-of-the-century house, very much influenced by the English and American Arts and Crafts movement. The garden is very big, and is planted with lots of fruit trees and bushes full of berries Most precious possessions Paintings by my father, who was an artist, and drawings by my children Dream buy I grew up by the sea, and often went sailing. If money were no object, I would buy a beautiful wooden sail boat for my family

Karen Mordechai Twitter/Instagram @sundaysuppers Profession Photographer and founder of food and design community Sunday Suppers Likes Great food, desert landscapes and spending time with my daughter Dislikes A cluttered fridge, dill, stress Interiors style Clean, minimal and light Design heroes Right now I am really interested in mid-century Californian homes, like the Kaufmann house by Richard Neutra. I also love the seeming simplicity of Tadao Ando’s work

INTERVIEWS: SARAH MORGAN PICTURE: ANNA KERN

PU BL I SH I NG & A DV E RT I SI NG


’TIS THE SEASON TO BE COSY Winter, brrr, even the word sounds cold. And, I confess, I am someone who needs to be warm at all times. The only reason I survive this season is because it’s when home really comes into its own. Nothing quite beats the glorious feeling of warmth that envelops you as you step over your threshold, the pleasure of curling up on the sofa (assuming you get a spare moment) snuggled up in a blanket with a mug of hot chocolate, or the simple gratitude I feel to be safely indoors when rain or gales storm outside (assuming my roof is no longer leaking). But, terrifying fact, the average home is thought to be more polluted than a busy street corner, with The Royal College of Physicians estimating 99,000 deaths in Europe each year due to indoor air pollution. The cause? A surfeit of chemical household cleaning products, dry-cleaning evaporations and, conversely, air fresheners. Add in all the stuff thought to be emitted from our electronic gadgets and gizmos and it’s a wonder any of us are alive at all! The thing is, it’s all less of a deal when you’re routinely flinging open windows, but in the winter this potent cocktail of nastiness can really contribute to stuffy, unhealthy atmospheres, exacerbating lethargy and allergies. So, even when it’s cold, it’s crucial to air your home to keep everyone perky.

‘In the winter, nothing beats the feeling of warmth that envelops you as you step over your threshold, or the pleasure of curling up with a mug of hot chocolate’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

Especially, as this issue explores, because winter is generally a time for entertaining. Not elaborate festivals of intricacy and complication, but (hopefully) gentle familial gatherings and casual suppers with friends. It’s ‘come on over’ time, rather than ‘let’s go out’ time. So, this month we pop in on those who’ve dedicated their homes to fun and play, from a glorious apartment in Copenhagen with glossy ‘almost black’ walls and ceilings and a centrepiece green velvet sofa from Meridiani that just compels lazy lounging, to probably my favourite home in this issue, a house in Italy, which has the effortless hosting of dinner parties as its raison d’etre. Interspersed between these exemplary statements of laid-back winter living, we proffer tabletop inspiration for every occasion — from relaxing neutral settings to seasonal, bright centrepieces — ideas on how to party in a barn, how to evoke a Narnia-esque winter’s tale outside, and the most gorgeous lounge sets we could dream of, dressed in jewel brights and more velvets (spot the enduring theme. Trust me, velvet is here to stay). All in all, it’s everything we think you might need to enjoy your home this season. Just remember to chuck in a few houseplants – apparently even a humble pot plant can clean air within a radius of about 30 feet. Result.

Editor-in-Chief Follow me on Twitter: @ELLEDecoED

Follow us on Instagram: @elledecorationuk

Visit elledecoration.co.uk

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34 WINTER

ILLUSTRATION: NICOLA REW

WARMERS Hunker down with our bumper guide to all things cosy. From the softest cushions and blankets to our favourite scents and coffee-table books, plus practical tips to draught-proof your home, here’s everything you need to embrace winter wellbeing

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LIVE THE HYGGE LIFE In the spirit of comfort and joy, we take a closer look at hygge, the Danish philosophy that’s captured the zeitgeist Words AMY BRADFORD Illustration NICOLA REW

‘Hygge’ is the biggest buzzword around right now, but what Danes began to look inward, celebrating the simpler things in can we tell you about it that’s new? Firstly, the word’s meaning life (it’s difficult to imagine hygge thriving in a country hellbent is so fluid that lots of people get confused about what it actually on imperial expansion). The pastor and philosopher Nikolaj is. It’s almost impossible to translate succinctly, encompassing Grundtvig (1783–1872) promoted his own brand of enlightenment the idea of cosiness, safety, togetherness, contentment, relaxation values, focusing on national identity as a sense of belonging, and and being kind to yourself. You can enjoy hygge quality of life. This belief that social cohesion while having a good meal with friends and family, and individual wellbeing are intimately linked Hygge is about or on your own, doing very little at all. It’s about remains deeply felt in modern Denmark. taking pleasure in life, or ‘being, not having,’ cosiness, safety, So how do us Brits ‘have it hyggelig’, as they says Danish author Louisa Thomsen Brits. in Denmark? The ELLE Decoration take togetherness, and say on hygge might involve gardening (proven to I can’t pronounce it! Danish can be a tongue -twisting language for English speakers. Hygge promote contentment); drinking coffee by an generally being is pronounced ‘hue-gah’ – ‘hue’ as in colour, fire while wearing sheepskin slippers; or kind to yourself open ‘gah’ almost like the first three letters of ‘girl’. lighting up darker days with a good scented candle, while reading an even better book. It Where does the word come from? It has its roots in the Old Norse word ‘hyggja’ (to think) and the Middle would mean taking a healthy interest in material things for the Danish word ‘hygge’ (to comfort). You might think of it as an pleasure that they can bestow without being acquisitive for the ancient form of mindfulness. sake of it: for instance, cooking a winter stew in a beautiful Why are the Danes so good at it? Hygge has been the backdrop casserole dish. All of Danish designer Ilse Crawford’s books, such of the nation’s life for over a century. Its rise coincided with as Sensual Home and A Frame for Life (both out of print but a gradual decline of the Danish Empire, which once stretched available on Amazon; amazon.co.uk), are intensely ‘hyggelig’: from Greenland to the Baltic. As their territory shrank, so the she talks about creating spaces that boost health and happiness.

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WA R M E R S

FOUR NEW BOOKS FOR THOSE IN SEARCH OF HYGGE

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How to Hygge: The Secrets of Nordic Living by Signe Johansen (Bluebird, £14.99). Norwegian cook Johansen takes a foodie’s approach to the subject: the book contains comforting recipes as well as listing the ideals of hygge. Norway and Denmark were one kingdom until the 19th century and still understand each other’s languages and customs, so you don’t have to be Danish to be an expert in hygge.

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Hygge: The Danish Art of Happiness by Marie Tourell Søderberg (Michael Joseph, £12.99). Penned by a Danish actress, this book contains tips on how to do hygge in every room of your home; how to make your workspace more enjoyable; and how to extend hygge through the seasons. There’s even a hygge music playlist and an exploration of the Danish obsession with candles (apparently, they use more than any other country in the EU).

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The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well by Meik Wiking (Penguin Life, £9.99). Wiking is CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen (yes, there really is one) and believes that hygge is the reason that Danes are happier than most. His beautifully illustrated book contains everything from a handy hygge dictionary to emergency hygge kit and details about his favourite hygge activity: drinking cocoa by candlelight.

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The Book of Hygge: The Danish Art of Living Well by Louisa Thomsen Brits (Ebury Press, £12.99). Half Danish and half English, writer Thomsen Brits is perfectly positioned to translate the nuances of hygge for a British audience. This is the book to buy if you want to read more deeply on hygge and its origins; it also makes the ultimate hyggelig gesture of donating part of the cover price to a charity for homeless people. JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 19


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SOFT TOUCHES This month’s wish list is our hottest yet, packed with tactile buys and things to keep you cosy

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PICTURE: GETTY

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1 Habitat’s ‘Gus’ rug is made from soft wool and has a deep pile that will be super-cosy underfoot. £400 (habitat.co.uk) 2 Take your lead from the Scandinavians and make sheepskins your winter staple. ‘Herdwick’ sheepskin by Toast. £129 (toa.st) 3 Wrap up post-soak with this set of ‘Hydrocotton’ towels. From £5 for a face cloth, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com) 4 Chilly toes? Get yourself a pair of cashmere bed socks. Our favourites are these ivory ones from Brit brand Celtic + Co. £69 (celticandco.com) 5 Could this be the ultimate fireside chair? We think so. ‘The Tired Man’ lounge chair by By Lassen, from £2,599, Skandium (skandium.com) 6 In steel, leather and brass, this ‘Emma’ log basket by Eldvarm is an elegant storage option. £354, Amara (amara.com) 7 Made in Sweden and lined with sheepskin, these ‘Chestnut’ slippers by Plümo are the ultimate house boots. £79 (plumo.com) 8 Sink your feet into this ‘Dark Diamond’ vintage Beni Ourain rug. £495, Yonder Living (yonderliving.com)

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BOOKS TO CURL UP WITH

PICTURE: GETTY

Winter is the time to hunker down and seek inspiration. Here are our all-time favourite design books that every home lover must have

Sensual Home by Ilse Crawford (Quadrille, £9.99)

The Iconic House by Dominic Bradbury and Richard Powers (Thames & Hudson, £35)

Billy Baldwin: The Great American Decorator by Albert Hadley (Rizzoli, £52)

Farrow & Ball: How to Decorate by Joa Studholme and Charlotte Cosby (Mitchell Beazley, £30)

The Natural Home by Hans Blomquist (Ryland Peters & Small, £19.99)

Design Masterclass by Kelly Hoppen (Jacqui Small, £26)

Plain Simple Useful: The Essence of Conran Style by Terence Conran (Conran, £25)

David Hicks: A Life of Design by Ashley Hicks (Rizzoli, £53)

Axel Vervoordt: Wabi Inspirations (Flammarion, £45)

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KEEP THE HEAT

Make your home toasty with our ten easy fixes for banishing draughts

• Despite being best associated with warm roaring fires, more

often than not chimneys suck in cold air and let heat escape. A chimney balloon prevents this. ‘You inflate it with a pump about 30 centimetres above the fire opening until it fits snugly, then turn a hand-grip tap to lock it in place,’ says inventor David Woodman. You do need to temporarily remove it if you want to light a fire, but if you forget to it will just shrivel harmlessly. From £20 (chimneyballoon.co.uk). Fit Radflek reflectors to radiators. Laminated aluminium foil panels that hang from the brackets at the back, they reflect warmth back into the room and reduce heat loss through the walls by up to 45 per cent. From £21.99 for a three sheet pack, which fits up to six radiators (radflek.com). Install Duette energy-saving blinds, which can reduce heat loss by up to 46 per cent according to the brand. Their honeycomb structure improves insulation by trapping hot air. £150 for a 60x40-centimetre blind (duette.co.uk). Make your wood-burning stove more efficient with a Firemizer, a flexible metal grid that reduces the burn rate of your fuel. Place it at the base of your stove; it works by slowing the air flow and conducting heat evenly across the fire to ensure all fuel is fully combusted. £19.99 (firemizer.com). Stop heat escaping If you have sash windows, you can magnetically attach a made-tothrough your measure, lightweight clear membrane floors, roof and to the frames during the winter. It forms an airtight seal in the same way windows with as double glazing. Fitted by proper insulation London-based company Window Skins, it’s also easy to remove yourself in warmer weather. From £130 per square metre (windowskins.co.uk). Live in an old house? Take this sage advice from Patrick McCool, founder of Make My Home Green, which specialises in period properties. ‘Stop heat escaping through the floor by insulating suspended timber floors with a a sealant such as ‘Draught Ex Standard’ to fill in any gaps between vapour-control layer to the floorboards. £28.99 for a 40-metre roll, suitable for two to prevent condensation, seven-millimetre gaps (draughtex.co.uk). 15 centimetres of flexible wool ‘When draught-proofing a loft, many people ignore the hatch,’ insulation, and a windproof says Russell Smith, founder of Parity Projects, which specialises breathable membrane on top’. in low-energy refurbishment. ‘By packing insulation around it and From £95 per metre on the back, you’ll stop heat escaping into the roof.’ (makemyhomegreen.com). ‘A metal keyhole cover, a letterbox brush and draught excluders ‘There are around seven million properties in the UK that don’t for the gap at the bottom of exterior doors are all quick ways to have thick enough loft insulation,’ says Neil Marshall, who is chief protect your home from draughts,’ says Aled Stephens of the executive of the National Insulation Association (nia-uk.org). Energy Saving Trust (energysavingtrust.org.uk). ‘It should be a depth of 27 centimetres; the simplest and most If you have a pale carpet and it turns dark at the sides, cost-effective type to use is rolls of mineral wool, which you fit it indicates a draught underneath. Lift the edges and use between the eaves and across the joists.’

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WORDS: EMMA LOVE ILLUSTRATION: NICOLA REW

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The Slaughters Manor House

SEEK SOME SANCTUARY Check out of the chaos of Christmas preparations at home and into one of these heavenly hideaways, for a city break or country retreat T O W N O R C O U N T RY

The Culpeper in Spitalfields defines itself as a London pub, but it’s much more. Considered a fine restaurant (whole Dover sole with cockles, fennel and Pernod is a star dish), it has a rooftop garden and now, on the second storey, a hotel. Five beautiful rooms are available to book on a B&B basis. Unpainted walls are offset by textiles from The Hackney Draper, Donna Wilson accessories and throws by Mandal Veveri. Double rooms, £120 per night (right; theculpeper.com). You only have to look at the lustrous gunmetal grey Italian velvets and mirrored walls, tables and even beds to know that a night at The Franklin in Knightsbridge is a deluxe way to escape from it all. It’s housed in a red-brick row of Victorian houses and the queen of sultry interiors, Anoushka Hempel, has added her magic touch with Frette bedlinen and sandstone bathrooms. Double rooms from £360 per night (right; thefranklinlondon.com). 26 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2017

Housed in a 17th-century manor in Gloucestershire, The Slaughters Manor House is a cool, colourful take on the country house hotel. Artisan gin brand Sipsmith’s master distiller lives in the idyllic village of Lower Slaughter, and so its small-batch London gin is served in the new bar. Painted dove grey and palest pink, the lounge has midcentury-style wing armchairs for cocktails by the fire. Double rooms from £195 per night (left and above; slaughtersmanor.co.uk). The Pig hotel group’s self-confessed ‘scruffy’ approach translates as wellies in the hall and eccentric interiors, both of which can be found in its newest outpost in Devon, The Pig At Combe. Jewelcoloured goblets and martini glasses line the mullioned windows, and the dining room is in a restored garden folly. Dishes are made using produce from the kitchen garden. Double rooms from £145 per night (left; thepighotel.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: MARK BOLTON PHOTOGRAPHY

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NEW BREW

Fine tea specialist Prince & Sons has an excellent collection of warming blends. Try the ‘Blood Orange’ with a dash of manuka honey if you’re feeling under the weather, or indulge in the antioxidant-rich ‘Caramel Vanilla Rooibos’. For a twist on the delicious Indian masala chai, try ‘Chocolate Cinnamon Chai’ and add a dash of almond milk. £4.65 for 15 teabags (princeandsonstea.com).

BRIGHTEN UP THE BLUES

There’s nothing like a splash of colour or pattern to cheer up dull days, and these new designs made from vintage sari fabrics are brimming with both. London-based homeware brand Lulu & Nat’s ‘Kanta’ quilts are hand-stitched from antique textiles, so each one is unique. The company also makes cosy throws for snuggling by the fireside (above, £160 each; luluandnat.com). We also love Decorator’s Notebook’s Christmas stockings. Handmade by a social enterprise that helps vulnerable women in Bangladesh, they’ll add a vibrant feel to any fireplace (£23.95 each; decoratorsnotebook.co.uk).

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‘When it’s cold outside, nothing beats coming home to the smell of dinner, so my top winter tip is to invest in a slow cooker – or find your oven manual and learn how to use the timer function. Roast chicken in a bag is a ridiculously easy win!’ Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin (@ELLEDecoED)

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MAKE THE D O G ’ S D AY

Pets deserve their winter comforts too, so why not indulge your four-legged friend with Lovemydog’s new duvet beds? Covered in a 1930s Liberty print, it’s so much more stylish than your average fleecy blanket. Plus, for especially chilly days and walks, the brand also sells jumpers in a variety of lovely colours. Note: both of these are just as good for cats as they are for dogs! Duvet, £85; jumper, £69 (lovemydog.co.uk).

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COMFORT FOOD

Slow-cooked one-pot dishes have the advantage of being both warming and easy to prepare. We love the recipes in Australian cook Louise Franc’s new book Low & Slow (Smith Street Books, £20). Highlights include duck and pork sausage cassoulet and beef, stout and black pepper stew. Cook them up in RCA graduate Barnaby Tuke’s mattblack cast-iron ‘C1’ casserole (below) for Crane Cookware, which is made in one of France’s oldest foundries. £135 (crane cookware.com). JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 29


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INDULGE IN FINE WINE

In the spirit of making merry, we round up the very best places to find presents for discerning wine fans. If you only buy a bottle from Berry Bros & Rudd (above), Britain’s oldest family-owned wine and spirit merchant, once a year, it should be at Christmas. Having barely changed since opening in 1698, the Georgian shop on London’s St James’ Street is like a museum, while the contemporary Basingstoke warehouse store, which sells ‘bin-end’ bottles, is as close to being a bargain basement as the royal warrant holder will ever come. Pick up stocking fillers such as a miniature of ‘The Kings’ Ginger’ liqueur, originally formulated to revivify King Edward VII on his morning rides (£7.50; bbr. com). Modern merchant The Humble Grape’s ‘12 Wines of Christmas’ (right) is a box of a dozen wines, each with a carol motif: the first has ‘notes’ of sweet pear (of the partridge’s tree) and the third (French hens) comes from one of France’s oldest vineyards (£246; humblegrape.co.uk). Fantastic wine magazine Noble Rot (right), which has three issues a year, has featured Keira Knightley and artist David Shrigley talking wining and dining alongside St John’s Bread & Wine chef Fergus Henderson. An annual subscription would make an excellent present for a serial sipper, and the publication’s year-old bar on London’s Lamb’s Conduit Street is a great pit stop (noblerot.co.uk).

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‘For me, three things are essential to make winter bearable: warmth, candlelight and hot, tasty food. Accordingly you will find me with a hearty casserole and a really good scented candle diffusing spicy fragrance as it lights my living room.’ Features Director Amy Bradford (@ELLEDecoAmy)

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T H E U LT I M AT E HOTTIE

Is it a knitted sceptre? Or just a very elegant Christmas stocking? In fact, this is the world’s first long hot-water bottle, slotted into a cashmere case. YuYu bottles are found in The Dorchester and Mandarin Oriental hotels, and as well as the cashmere version (from £159), there are also affordable options in fleece and modal fabric (right; £40). Sling it around your shoulders or use it to warm up the length of your bed (they are even recommended by doctors to treat chronic pain). Yuyu is soon to launch a collaboration with Liberty, taking four of the store’s archive prints to make new covers (yuyubottle.com).

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WA R M T H O N WHEELS

It’s not always practical to have an open fire or stove in every room, but what to do in deepest winter when a radiator’s not enough? Portable heaters have thus far had little to offer in the design stakes – in fact, most of them are positively ugly. But we think Calor is onto something with its sleek black ‘Manhattan’ design. Resembling a contemporary stove (it even has a convincing flame/coals effect), the heater operates using a handy gas canister. It warms rooms quickly, and sits on castors, so it can easily be moved to wherever you need it most. £200 (calor.co.uk).


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STOP WHILE YOU SHOP Soothe tired feet and shopping stress with a well-deserved break at one of these new eateries. Beautifully designed, they are all a stone’s throw from London’s retail hotspots

Shopping requires serious sustenance, especially at Christmas, and there are plenty of newly opened places to welcome you in from the cold. Gear up for a Westfield shopathon with a breakfast of rainbow chard, poached eggs and woodland mushrooms at Mustard (1), a brasserie housed in a former Victorian grocery in Shepherd’s Bush. Sussex studio Design LSM kept the building’s original glossy mint-green tiles, subtly updating the space with mustard-yellow leather seats and contemporary lighting (mustardrestaurants.co.uk). Convenient for Clerkenwell’s design stores is Anglo (2), a restaurant opened by former Le Manoir chef Mark Jarvis, where cod with cucumber followed by black figs with hay ice cream would make an excellent lunch. We love the pared-back interior, which is furnished with reclaimed chairs, hand-thrown tableware and Tom Dixon lighting (anglorestaurant.com). Originally a coaching inn, Hatchett’s Hotel and White Horse Cellar on Piccadilly was a favourite haunt of famous Brits from Charles Dickens to the Rolling Stones. It has now moved deeper into the heart of Mayfair, and operates as a bar and restaurant (3). Sip a ‘May Fair Lady’ (vodka, mint and grapefruit) upstairs, and head downstairs for wild sea bass and Pink Fir potatoes in the scarlet dining room (hatchetts.london).

PICTURE: PAUL WINCH-FURNESS

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H O T C H O C O L AT E

These gorgeous chocolate bars by small-batch Los Angeles chocolatier Compartés are the ultimate luxury treat for any design fan. With intriguing flavour combinations including blueberry quinoa and a super-decadent dark chocolate coated in 24-carat gold leaf, the bars’ packaging has been created by interior designer Kelly Wearstler, who is famous for her bold, maximalist style. From left: chilli mango and coconut; blueberry quinoa; dark chocolate and 24-carat gold leaf; salted pistachio, all £10.50 each (kellywearstler.com).

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GET FIRED UP

If you’re lucky enough to have an open fire, it’s important to have the right tools to maintain it. Best known for its cutlery, British stainless steel specialist Robert Welch also produces this great set of fire tools and log basket, which bring a modern, polished feel to your fireside lounging. There are also wine racks and coffee tables in the same range if you like the look. ‘Brunel’ stainless-steel log basket, £50; fire irons set with log tongs, £260 (robertwelch.co.uk).

A GOOD SOAK

A hot bath improves circulation, lowers blood pressure and helps you sleep by relaxing the muscles. Enhance its effects with a bath oil made using warming essential oils: Austrian spa brand Susanne Kaufmann’s ‘Oil Bath Winter’ contains cinnamon, clove and orange and is as comforting as a hot toddy (£44, Liberty; liberty.co.uk). Lie back for at least 20 minutes and make your soak more comfortable with The Body Shop’s white waffle cotton bath pillow (£8; thebodyshop.com). When you get out, wrap up in Linen Me’s wonderfully springy bath towels, which come in a range of restful colours (£24.99 each; linenme.com).

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‘To me there is nothing more special at Christmas than the smell of a real pine tree. I also spritz my “Christmas Trees” room fragrance (£50; joloves.com) over table linens and onto gift wrapping to make everything come alive with the scent of fresh pine, lavender, incense and amber.’ Jo Malone, perfumer (@JoMaloneMBE)

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T H E H O M E LY E AT E RY

Local restaurants are a blessing when the weather takes a turn, and we’re all off to new Marylebone joint Jikoni, a short walk from ED headquarters. ‘Jikoni means kitchen in Swahili, and I hope this place feels like an extension of my own kitchen,’ says founder Ravinder Boghal. The cook and journalist draws on her East African, Northern Indian and British heritage for inspiration for the deliciously soothing recipes and décor. The blush-coloured interior glows thanks to copious lamps, while block-printed tablecloths and embroidered cushions abound. Try one of the delightfully presented quail scotch egg dishes (jikonilondon.com).

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SCENTS OF THE SEASON Laced with spices, these fragrances will bring winter cheer

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIO, NATALIA SLEPOKUR, GETTY

‘Christmas Eve’ candle, £95 , Roja Dove (rojaparfums.com)

‘Strawberry Thief ’ candle by Morris & Co, £22, Heathcote & Ivory (heathcote-ivory.com)

‘Art Deco’ candle by Vilhelm Parfumerie, £60, Liberty (liberty.co.uk)

‘The Snug’ diffuser, £160, By Appointment Only (byappoint mentonlydesignperfumes.com)

‘Orange Bitters’ candle, £120, Jo Malone ( jomalone.co.uk)

‘Bethléem’ candle by Cire Trudon, £70, Selfridges (selfridges.com)

‘Epices et Délices’ mini candle, £28, Diptyque (diptyqueparis.co.uk)

Bergamot & Sage candle, £25, Heal’s (heals.com)

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A GUIDE TO HOUSE SITTING

Going away for Christmas? Allay fears of houseplants perishing and beloved pets going missing by getting in a trusted house sitter, says Charlotte Brook Illustration BABETH LAFON

Not for the first time, this December will see me pack a suitcase and head from my natural Brixton habitat up to north London, where I will take up residence in a Georgian townhouse for five days while the wine-buyer owner goes to Bergerac on business. It is the ultimate fun and functional exchange: the proprietor (a distant relative) returns to contented cats and an immaculate house; I experience the joys of pruning a winter garden and living in a different (and rather more sophisticated) neighbourhood. There is a term for this arrangement: house sitting. As the biggest holiday season of the year, Christmas is a risky time to leave a home noticeably empty for a long period. In the name of keeping your property secure and in tip-top condition when you are out of town, here is everything you need to know about house sitting. How does it work? Owners hand over their keys to a person or couple who keep their property, belongings, garden and pets safe while they are away. What’s the cost? Normally nothing. The idea is that it is a mutually beneficial, non-monetary exchange. If it is a very posh house or has a menagerie of animals that demands extra duties, fees are sometimes negotiated. Sounds excellent. How can I set it up? As often applies, word of mouth brings the best recommendations. Play caretaker Cupid: if you know of a responsible free spirit who might be up for the job – adventurous young couples, retirees seeking a change of scene, ‘digital nomads’ who can work

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anywhere with wi-fi – suggest them to a friend. Alternatively, websites such as mindmyhouse.com operate as a cross between Airbnb and Match.com, where owners can search for suitable sitters and free rangers can apply to look after houses. I’d like to try my hand at house-sitting! Am I suitable? House sitting suits you if you are a dependable person and excel at keeping house. You will be expected to keep things shipshape so that, on returning, the owner finds it exactly as they left it. Extra tasks (watering plants, caring for pets, signing for deliveries) are discussed and agreed on in advance. Is it safe? While trust and a benign attitude are the cornerstones of most house-sitting success stories, professional organisations do advise homeowners to vet applicants: a Skype interview and background checks are recommended before booking, as is introducing them to a neighbour and/or family when they arrive. Brighton-based company Trustedhousesitters.com is well equipped to help you: it charges £89 for a year’s membership, offers 24-hour live online support and members can earn a ‘Trust Badge’ for their online profile once they have undergone ID checks, address verification and provided third-party references. Most sites also provide draft agreements that can be downloaded, edited and signed by both sides. But what will the dog think? Dr Scott Miller, Channel 4’s ‘Vet on the Hill’, endorses the concept of house sitting, saying it’s a better option for pets than moving them out. ‘Most pets are bonded to their home: animals respond to a new carer better than a new environment,’ he says.


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RITUAL PLEASURES

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK ILLUSTRATION: NICOLA REW

As the season of slowing down and heading home to hibernate is upon us, take the opportunity to revive one of these leisurely pastimes

B R E A K FA S T I N B E D

TA K I N G T E A

C O C K TA I L H O U R

Long before it became the preserve of the cosseted English aristocracy, breakfast in bed was the normal way to start the day. ‘Breakfasts taken in bed were simple,’ says Heather Arndt Anderson, author of Breakfast: A History (Altamira, £29.95), of the 17th-century practice. ‘Think possets of ale [spiced and mixed with curdled hot milk], tea and toast.’ Clearly, the morning meal has changed: a survey by cutlery specialist Robert Welch has found that 73 per cent of Brits eat breakfast in less than 10 minutes; Ikea announced in 2015 that 50 per cent of Brits had never had breakfast in bed. A combination of busy lives and the annoyance of crumbs in the bed might help to explain this. Give this timehonoured tradition a modern makeover, set your alarm 15 minutes earlier, and reap the benefits of a day started slowly.

Since its origins as a medicinal tonic in China over 3,000 years ago, tea has become the most popular drink in the world after water. It is iced in America; taken with lemon in Hungary; and simmered with cardamom and condensed milk in India. Builders’ tea – a strong brew with a splash of milk – is the infamous British breed of the beverage, but the art of making and taking tea properly is enjoying a much deserved resurgence. Embrace leaves, a proper pot, a strainer and porcelain cups and saucers.

‘What one needs is some kind of a party that starts at half-past five...That lasts ninety minutes, at which alcohol is served, but not too much food,’ declared Evelyn Waugh’s brother and fellow writer Alec, in a 1974 Esquire magazine column. Today, with craft breweries and cocktail joints popping up everywhere, it’s easy to forget the pleasure of hosting preprandials at home. So tonight, cancel the cab: a lit fire, your own playlist and sparkling aperitifs served in glamorous glasses is surely still the stuff that Sinatra’s swellegant, elegant parties were made of.

The essential kit Standing tray The White Company’s simple, sturdy ‘Breakfast in Bed’ tray has high sides to contain crumbs (below left, £50; thewhitecompany.com). Toast rack To celebrate its 60th birthday, Robert Welch’s ‘Campden’ stainless steel design has been reissued (below right, £40; robertwelch.com). We also love ceramicist Charlotte Storrs’ handmade design (from £46, Maison Numen; maisonnu men.com).

The essential kit Storage Milanese brand Toncelli’s ‘Tea Tall Unit’ is made from Ziricote wood and comprises a pull-out table, a steel facility for tea-leaf washing and a myriad of compartments. Given the price, it’s an indulgence for the most discerning of tea drinkers (below left; £29,142; toncelli.it). Brewing equipment Put Kinto’s ‘Unitea’ range on your wishlist (teapot, below; from £25; kinto.jp). Tea Visit Kanuka’s St Albans tea house or buy exotic infusions online (below; kanuka tea.com).

The essential kit Cocktail glass Soho House’s homeware range, Soho Home, includes the perfect old-school glass: a Champagne coup (below right; £28; sohohome.com). Ideal for bellinis are Jochen Holz’s coloured flutes, (below right, £150 for two, The New Craftsmen; thenewcraftsmen.com). Drinks trolley A requisite for the retro host. Our top pick is Atkin and Thyme’s sturdy ‘Oriental’ (below, £279; atkinandthyme.co.uk). Ice bucket We love Brit designer Richard Brendon’s sparkling, heavyweight ‘Diamond’ bucket (below, £140; with decanter, £200; richard brendon.com).

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WINTER GARDENS

Unearth your woolliest jumper and brave the chill in the air, because fairweather horticulturalists miss out on some of the most atmospheric months in British gardens. The Royal Horticultural Society’s landmark plots richly reward those who venture out: one of the oldest concentrations of winter planting in England, Yorkshire’s Harlow Carr will be resplendent with daphnes, witch hazel and – for this year only – 5,000 specially planted irises. Further south, of particular wonder is Wisley in Surrey, where the steamy glasshouses will be bursting at the seams with exotic butterflies in December. The national collection of hollies make Devon’s Rosemoor well worth a midwinter visit, too – more than 150 varieties will be in full bristly bloom this season (rhs.org.uk).

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TWILIGHT ZONE

This cosy pairing will keep you toasty in style as the nights draw in. With its comforting hood, velour outer and towelling lining the ‘Sati’ bathrobe by Coze Linen is a cossetting option post-soak. It’s available in four colourways, but our favourite is the deep grey ‘Mist’ (from £70; cozelinen.com). If you want a hot-water bottle, make it a cashmere-covered one like this ‘Damen’ design by Scottish cashmere specialist Johnston’s of Elgin (£100, Amara; amara.com).

‘My favourite winter comfort is lighting our two log-burning stoves and curling up with a soft lambswool blanket and a cup of hot chocolate. I love the slight smoky smell from the stoves, especially if you burn lavender or sage clippings from the garden. I’ve also discovered the best hot chocolate – ‘Chocolate de Oaxaca’ (£12.95, SCP; scp.co.uk) – which has vanilla and a bit of spice in it.’

Donna Wilson, designer (@DonnaWilsonLtd)

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CUSHIONS TO PILE HIGH

ILLUSTRATION: NICOLA REW PICTURE: GETTY

You can never have too many cushions! Here are our current favourites

‘Talvitarina’ cushion by Marimekko, £39.50, Skandium (skandium.com)

‘Arya Woven Kilim’ cushion, £38, Urban Outfitters (urbanoutfitters.com)

‘Moss Knit’ cushion cover, £14.99, H&M (hm.com)

‘Gili’ cushion, £45, Happy + Co (happyandco.com)

‘Mey Meh’ velvet cushion, from £80, House of Hackney (houseofhackney.com)

‘Pom Pom’ cushion by Genevieve Bennett, £40, John Lewis ( johnlewis.com)

‘Banderole’ cushion, £68, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com)

‘Luxe Lodge’ cushion by Ugg, £178, Amara (amara.com)

‘Dove’ cushion by Donna Wilson, £95, SCP (scp.co.uk)

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D E E P LY F E LT There’s a reason Scandinavians love felt homewares: few materials are quite as tactile, or offer such powerful insulating and sound-buffering qualities. San Francisco felt rug specialist Peace Industry has teamed up with California pottery Heath Ceramics to create a modern collection of felt rugs, storage baskets and ottomans. Handmade from lambswool at Peace Industry’s workshop in Iran, they will take you through winter in style. ‘Slice’ rug, £1,612; ‘Choob’ ottomans, £540 each; basket, £282 ( heathceramics.com).

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GOURMET TO GO

If things get busy over the Christmas period, worry not: the takeaway has had an upgrade. JKS Restaurants, the group behind the critically acclaimed Gymkhana, Trishna and Hoppers, has launched a London-based home delivery service called Motu Indian Kitchen (motuindiankitchen.com). It offers an à la carte menu, but we like the feast box – a fragrant main course plus kachumber raita, homemade naan and chutneys. Wine is taken care of, too, thanks to Covent Garden bistro 10 Cases’ new wine-delivery app, Drop. The electric bike service couriers carefully chosen bottles of vino to anywhere in zones 1 or 2. The reasoning behind the launch? ‘People are taking a greater interest in what they’re drinking, but don’t want to spend a fortune or waste money on hangover-inducing wine from the corner shop,’ says co-founder Will Palmer. Hear, hear! With no minimum order, you can have a chilled bottle of Riesling delivered pronto (dropwine.co.uk).

THREE OF THE BEST MODERN STOVES Traditional warmth with a contemporary design twist

Best for a shot of colour Italian brand Palazzetti’s ‘Anna’ stove features glossy ceramic cladding, and its automatic fire-stoking system means it can be pre-programmed. £2,373 (palazzetti.it).

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Best for street cred British brand Charnwood’s ‘Cove 1’ stove recently made an appearance as part of an art installation at White Cube gallery in London. £1,218 (charnwood.com).

Best for cosy corners The ‘6643’ stove by Danish brand Morsø has an elliptical shape that makes it perfect for corner spaces and a 180-degree window for a wide view of the flames. £1,890 (morso.co.uk). E D


D E S I G N D E TA I L S

WOODWORK Aside from many practical purposes, wood panelling and skirting can add interest to an otherwise featureless room. Here’s our guide to getting it right Wood panelling has been around for centuries, and was originally installed to insulate rooms and to make stone buildings feel more comfortable. Now equally at home in a modern space as in a period property, panelling can help to soundproof a room, while skirting boards can be used to hide all manner of imperfections, including uneven or damaged walls, cabling or even pipework. If you’re restoring or adding woodwork, there are a couple of factors to bear in mind. ‘Interestingly, not all homes in the UK have details that match an exact build date,’ says Mark Cant from Period Mouldings (periodmouldings.co.uk). ‘Big cities were quick to pick up on trends but ideas took time to travel, so woodwork in homes further out could be from later than expected – something to remember if you’re looking for authenticity. But if you’re interested purely in aesthetics, you could mix and match or choose a design from a different period.’ Traditionally, deeper 46 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2017

skirting and bolder features were found downstairs, in rooms that were used to entertain, and these would have become less prevalent as you moved up towards the top-floor servants’ quarters, which would have had little or no detail at all. ‘Deep skirting can look fantastic, but it can overpower the room,’ says Cant. ‘A simple trick when installing any new woodwork is to stick decorator’s tape on the wall where it will be first, to gauge proportions.’ Paint can have an impact too. ‘Using a pale colour on walls and a dramatic shade on woodwork can make a room feel spacious,’ says Joa Studholme, international colour consultant at Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com). ‘Alternatively, use the same colour on walls, woodwork and ceiling. A decorating method used by the Georgians, this has a calming effect yet looks powerful and modern. It also makes the edges of the room harder to read, which exaggerates its size’.

‘Using the same colour on the walls, woodwork and ceiling has a calming effect yet looks powerful and modern,’ says Farrow & Ball’s Joa Studholme


Style | D E C O R A T I N G SIX OF THE BEST C O M PA N I E S S E L L I N G STYLISH WOODWORK

Best for DIY Finepanel Complete MDF panels that are easy to install by a confident DIY-er and come primed and ready to paint (finepanel.co.uk).

Best for salvage Lassco Architectural antiques specialist. Recent stock includes this early 20thcentury French parcel-gilt oak panelling (lassco.co.uk).

CASE STUDY: PANELLING

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: BEN ANDERS, MIKKEL RAHR MORTENSEN, P NAVEY

Photographer Ben Anders has used wood panelling to blend his new kitchen extension (above) with the rest of his Victorian property (below). Here, we take a closer look at the project

Best for bespoke The Wall Panelling Company Well-made classic and modern designs to your exact specification (thewall panellingcompany.co.uk).

Best for open-backed The English Panelling Company Frameworks suitable for smooth walls that do not need evening out (theenglish panellingcompany.co.uk).

Best for deep skirting The Victorian Emporium An expert in accurate restoration. Look out for its 300mm skirting (the victorianemporium.com).

Best for historic properties Period Mouldings Faithful reproduction architraves and skirting (periodmouldings.co.uk).

The idea London-based photographer Ben Anders bought his Victorian house in 2013 and refurbished the entire property, adding a loft conversion and a kitchen extension. ‘About a year after the work was finished, we added the panelling,’ he says. ‘The kitchen felt stark compared to the rest of the house, and just didn’t gel. There was panelling in the hallway (below) that we had restored and painted dark grey during the refurbishment, so we decided to link the spaces by fitting panelling in the kitchen too. It adds interest and colour to what was otherwise just a blank wall.’ The planning Ben enlisted the help of a professional carpenter friend to do the work. ‘We spent a long time deciding the size of the panelling by sketching out the squares. I wanted it to fit the wall perfectly rather than having squares dissected at the edges,’ he says. They also matched the beading to the existing woodwork throughout the rest of the house for continuity. The fitting As with most modern panelling, Ben’s is made using MDF, which is stable and doesn’t expand and contract like wood. The wall was freshly plastered, so they were able to create a panelled look by attaching frameworks (known as open-backed panels) to the wall, rather than using solid panels. The benefits Panelling can hide a multitude of sins, and can also help to balance out the proportions of an awkward or unusually shaped space. Full height, slim panels can make a ceiling appear higher, while horizontal panels up to a dado – used in Ben’s hallway – will visually elongate a space. JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


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DESIGN HERO ALESSANDRO MENDINI

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: RICCARDO BIANCHI, YDO SOL

The Italian Postmodernist whose witty designs are inspired by art Decades before the phrase ‘designart’ became ubiquitous, Alessandro Mendini (1931–) was doing his own version of the idea. In the late 1970s and early 80s, when Milan was emerging as the new design centre of the world, he put forward a Postmodernist vision that borrowed from disparate sources, such as the art world, kitsch products, massproduced pieces and historical styles. The Milanese native, who studied architecture at the Politecnico di Milano during the 1950s, cofounded the design group Studio Alchimia with fellow designers, including Ettore Sottsass, in 1976. A forerunner of the Memphis Group, it created experimental pieces characterised by bright colours and discordant forms. It was during this era that Mendini created his most iconic design, the ‘Proust’ chair (1978). Described by the designer as ‘an intellectual exercise’, it is a synthesis of several ideas: an 18th-century chair that Mendini imagined the author Marcel Proust might have used; a Pointillist-style pattern reflecting the Impressionist artists that Proust wrote about (the detail is inspired by a painting by Paul Signac); and a fake-antique chair. Subsequently produced by Cappellini and Mendini’s own studio, vintage examples now fetch fine art-level prices at auction. It has also been reproduced in marble, ceramic, bronze and plastic. Art is a recurring motif in Mendini’s work – he’s also created furniture inspired by Giotto and van Gogh – and several of his

pieces have a Surrealist feel. Take, for instance, his 1994 ‘Anna G’ corkscrew for Alessi. Inspired by Anna Gili, an artist friend, it’s modelled on the shape of a smiling woman whose head you have to turn to work the object, and whose arms rise upwards above her dress as the corkscrew turns. It was followed by a male version – ‘Alessandro M’ is undoubtedly a self portrait – and by a series of playful accessories, including a cake stand that folds up to reveal Anna’s face. The collection reflects not just Mendini’s wit, but also his thoughtfulness: ‘An object is something that tells a tale,’ he told Architonic in 2011. ‘You can almost read it, as if it were literature.’ It’s hardly surprising to learn that he also edited design magazines Casabella, Modo and Domus in the 1970s and 80s. Mendini’s exuberance comes through most strongly in his many architectural projects, which include the 1994 Groninger Museum in the Netherlands, with its geometric patterned exterior, and the Byblos Art Hotel in Verona, where he installed a fun and colourful Postmodernist scheme inside the walls of the 16th-century villa. Today, Mendini runs design studio Atelier Mendini with his brother Francesco. His most enduring legacy, though, will be the Domus Academy in Milan, Italy’s first postgraduate design school, which he co-founded in 1982 (ateliermendini.it).

‘An object is something that tells a tale. You can almost read it’

Clockwise from top left Byblos Art Hotel, Verona. Groninger Museum, the Netherlands. ‘Amuleto’ lamp for Ramun. ‘Proust’ chair (1978). ‘Oggetto Banale’ cafetiere (1980). ‘Anna G’ and ‘Alessandro M’ corkscrews for Alessi

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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E ALEX BILMES

We ask a tastemaker what they are reading, watching, listening to and downloading

PICTURES: ALAMY, VICTOR MARA LTD ARTWORK/JEFF KOONS, GETTY

Alex Bilmes is Editor-in-Chief of UK Esquire magazine, the self-described ‘sharp, funny and entertaining read for educated, intelligent, ambitious and adventurous British men’ (@Alex_Bilmes; esquire.co.uk). My favourite piece of music is… Impossible! It changes all the time. But I always go back to Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks, as do all men I know who fancy themselves soulful and somewhat disgruntled. The music I am currently listening to 3 is Kanye West’s (2) The Life of Pablo. He’s maddening, of course, and off-putting and insufferable and all the rest of it, but I’ve been fascinated by everything he’s done. This is a tremendous album, dark and angry, funny, filthy. And you can dance to it, or some of it. The song that makes me feel instantly happy is Ten City’s That’s The Way Love Is. I’m a handbag house man. (It’s actually a sad song, but I find those make me happiest.) The books that influenced me most are all the usual canonical ones that impressionable young men read, so I’ll say one that is less widely 4 known: Burning the Days (5) by the great James Salter (Picador, £9.99). It is my favourite memoir by a writer. I got to interview him a few years ago for Esquire, over two days at his house in Colorado, and it was one of the high points of my career so far. At the moment I’m reading Elena Ferrante’s The Days of Abandonment (6, Europa Editions, £9.99). Like everyone else I spent last summer devouring her Neapolitan quartet as if it were a series of delicious pizzas and I hadn’t eaten 5 for days, and now I’ve turned to this earlier novel, which is less digestible: it’s so raw and angry. Still a remarkable piece of writing, though. Her honesty is breathtaking and I think any man who pretends an interest in women should read her.

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My favourite film is The Sweet Smell of Success by Alexander Mackendrick (3). New York in the 1950s, at the peak of its dubious swagger. Machine-gun script by Clifford Odets and Ernest Lehman. Blaring jazz score. And career-best performances by Burt Lancaster as sociopathic gossip columnist JJ Hunsecker and Tony Curtis as his creature, Sidney Falco. I must have seen it close to 100 times. I know almost every word. And actually I liked it before I became a ruthless journalist who hangs out with amoral PRs, so I blame it entirely for my poor choice of lifestyle. The last exhibition/theatre production I saw was the Jeff Koons show at Damien Hirst’s Newport Street Gallery (7). I took my kids and they loved it: when you’re three years 6 old, a shiny blue balloon dog the height of a double-decker bus is pretty freaky and cool. The last play I saw was Ralph Fiennes – an actor of genius – in Ibsen’s The Master Builder at the Old Vic. No one does male midlife crisis quite like a Norwegian. My favourite place for a good night out? I’m a restaurant person these days, rather than a disco diva. Currently I like the Colony Grill Room (4) at The Beaumont hotel in Mayfair. I sometimes end up in the Groucho if I’m feeling squiffy and don’t want to go home. But equally I’m very much at home in a pub. If I had a free day in London, I would spend it in my garden. (Really more of a terrace, but it does the job.) My favourite destination in the world is Los Angeles (1). For the simple reason that it’s the foreign city I’ve visited more often than any other, so I feel oddly at home there. I have a love/hate relationship with it. It’s the most jolie laide of destinations.

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Style | D E S I G N

In conversation with

Jasper Morrison The eternally relevant British designer’s body of work is as broad as his patience for frivolous design is short. We caught up with him at his east London headquarters to chat career past, present and future

PICTURES: FLORIAN BÖHM (PHOTOGRAPHY), ANNAHITA KAMALI, LEONIE VON ARX (STYLING), TERESTCHENKO IVAN

Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

A

mid the buzz surrounding the opening of Tate Modern’s new Switch House this summer was a quieter tribute to design, that of the work of Jasper Morrison. And as far as he’s concerned, the smaller the number of column inches devoted to his furniture fit-out of the ten-floor edifice – and the recent corresponding exhibition of his designs in a corner of the ground floor – the greater the project’s success. Morrison’s designs strive for, and invariably achieve, beauty in discretion. Indeed, when playing a supporting role, as at London’s new Design Museum, which has furnished its galleries with the ‘Hal’ chair he designed for Vitra, they provide a flawless foil to more provocative works. This is because Morrison’s signature is ‘Super Normal’, a design concept that took root when he saw a stool by the Japanese industrial designer Naoto Fukasawa exhibited at the Milan Furniture Fair in 2005. In Morrison’s words, the piece was ‘so discreet that nobody was paying it much attention’; yet it inspired the two men, together, to create a whole new genre of everyday objects.

But the British designer’s style is not just about utilitarian reductions: Morrison is keen on pushing the boundaries of design. This summer his studio launched its first kitchen, designed for Italian brand Schiffini. Fashioned from oak, Douglas fir, melamine and stainless steel, it comes in colours informed by different cities: white for Tokyo, beige for Stockholm and black for Milan. The intention is to facilitate a lifestyle that is both modest and indulgent, and it is claimed that the laminate worktops can ‘self-fix’ minor scratches. Often described as a minimalist, Morrison talks in the same way he designs, with a certain economy, but it would take a tin ear to miss the wit and warmth that lie close to the surface. Here, he discusses his new collection for Vitra and what luxury means to him. I’ve traced my interest in design back to an experience I had when I was about four years old in England. I went into a room that my grandfather had made for himself. The rest of his house was all antiques, heavy upholstery and carpets, with walls painted ➤ JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 53


dark red or dark green. It was very oppressive. But this room was I had originally been light and airy with a wooden floor; he had worked with a company thinking of calling from Denmark to bring a Danish interior to England. When I went the ‘Thinking Man’s into this room for the first time, I remember feeling so good. After Chair’ the ‘Drinking Man’s Chair’, but I went out to buy some pipe cleaners to make that, I noticed whether I felt good or bad in different spaces. I would describe myself as a chair designer who does a lot of a model of it, and as I was taking them back to the studio, I saw on other things too. I think chairs maybe just fit my wiring, my brain. the packet that they were called ‘The Thinking Man’s Smoke’ and But I also like the cutlery and tableware I’ve designed for Alessi; I thought, ‘Oh, that’s much more sophisticated’. And anyway, you the ceramics for Rosenthal and my pieces for Muji [Morrison has can still be drinking while you’re thinking. This gives you an idea created a collection of saucepans and a clock for of what a ridiculously impractical person I can ‘We can support the Japanese brand]. be. I mean, nobody would choose pipe cleaners My goals were a little less professional in to make a model of a chair. sustainability by the early days than they are now. The ‘Plywood Once my products have launched, I typically Chair’ [1988; later produced by Vitra], was just designing things that keep them around in my studio. That’s a very a sort of structure; the ‘Thinking Man’s Chair’ will have a long life’ important phase of their development: over the [1986; Cappellini] was just steel. At the time next year I use them, look at them in different I thought, ‘These are good pieces.’ But they were not that practical. ways and see how they affect the atmosphere of the room. It’s a way Of all the companies I’ve worked for, Vitra is the most advanced to find out what you did right and what you did wrong. It can get in terms of product development and rigorous testing. It’s nice a bit crowded in my house after a while, but if a product lasts more to work with the Italians too, but on engineering… let’s say they are than a year, it’s a seal of approval. a bit more, ‘Yes, it’s gonna be fine!’ The process of design for Vitra I have always felt an affinity with Japanese design. When the takes longer, but when the product comes on the market, you can first Muji store arrived in London, I liked it immediately. I think be fairly relaxed – about the functional side, at least. its design philosophy is sort of parallel to what I do.

JASPER MORRISON THE HITS From marble tables to mobile phones, we take a look at the best of Morrison’s product archive

1986 ‘TH I N K I N G M AN’S C HAI R’ FO R C APPE LLI N I

1998 ‘GLO BALLS’ LIGHT FOR FLOS

1 9 9 9 ‘ L O W PA D ’ CHAIR FOR CAPPELLINI

2004 ‘BRUNCH SET’ APPLIANCES F O R R O W E N TA

A voluptuous structure presented at a show by Zeev Aram and spotted by Giulio Cappellini – the pair became the designer’s first retailer and producer.

A squashed sphere with a layer of white opal glass between two layers of transparent glass, this glowing orb continues to be a bestseller at Flos 18 years on.

A utilitarian-looking but extremely comfortable lounge chair with a bent birch plywood body, stainless steel frame and rubber feet.

Now sadly discontinued, this streamlined toaster, filter-coffee machine and kettle show Morrison’s minimalist aesthetic.

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Style | D E S I G N

PICTURES: MARC EGGIMANN, SANTI CALECA/ PHOTOFOYER, NICOLA TREE, CHRISTOPH LICHERER, ANDRÉ HUBER, PETER GUENZEL, MIRO ZAGNOLI

Super Normal as a concept and a phrase came about at the Milan Furniture Fair in 2005. For a while I had had a feeling that there was a different way of designing, a way that was less personal and more anonymous. I had started creating cutlery for Alessi that was ‘formally reduced’: not overly expressive, but made to be good in an everyday sense. At the fair, I noticed that Naoto Fukasawa had designed a stool for Magis that was a similar kind of thing. I said to him, ‘That’s a great stool, Naoto,’ and he was really moved because nobody had really said anything to him about it. And I was discussing these objects that are a bit more normal, a bit more everyday, but still have something fresh about them with Takashi Okutani, who runs Muji’s online business. He said, ‘Ah, like super-normal.’ And I said, that’s it. That’s the name. Do I ever design something other than Super Normal? Like super-flashy? Not often, but occasionally I surprise myself. I designed a sofa recently for Cappellini called ‘Orla’, which is very curvy. Super Normal doesn’t have to be super dry. It can also be quite appealing. It can also apply to disciplines other than design. I’m sure it could apply to fashion, or car design. You can have a Super Normal restaurant. It would be St John in London’s Spitalfields. Technology? I don’t pay it much attention, actually. I think 3D printing is a useful tool for prototyping, but the idea of it being the future of all mass production is crazy.

2 0 0 6 ‘ T H E C R AT E ’ S I D E TA B L E F O R E S TA B L I S H E D & SONS

This tongue-in-cheek piece took pared-back design to the limit. It was inspired by an old wine crate that Morrison had and used as a table.

The best way we can support sustainability is to make things that will have a long life. By being a bit less trendy and designing things that will survive and not suddenly look out of tune. If you took the ‘APC’ chair from my new collection for Vitra back to its source of oil, I don’t know how far it would get you in a car – maybe to the supermarket and back. I think the chair is a much better use of our resources. If I designed my own house, my architectural style would probably be rather Modernist. I had the good fortune of visiting a private house by Le Corbusier in Ahmedabad, India. It was quite exotic, with black shiny floors, and so beautiful. The studio by Josep Lluís Sert for Joan Miró in Majorca is also very beautiful inside. Luxury to me is a good atmosphere. That doesn’t necessarily come from expensive materials. You can fill a fantastic space with awful things and it would be an awful place. Likewise, you can put beautiful things into a horrible space, and it still isn’t nice. I do like other colours as well as white. The ‘APC’ chair for Vitra comes in yellow, which is quite bright. I think one of those is okay. To have six of them would be a disaster. jaspermorrison.com Pictured above, from left The exterior and interior of Morrison’s London studio; Morrison values the art of display, and neat arrangements of products and accessories are a signature in his store and studio; cork tables for Vitra (2007); clock for Muji (2007); ‘APC’ chair for Vitra (2016); ‘Superloon’ floor lamp for Flos (2015); kitchen for Schiffini (2016)

2010–2014 MARBLE PIECES FOR MARSOTTO EDIZIONI

2015 ‘MP01’ MOBILE PHONE FOR PUNKT

Leaping at the chance to work with his friend and esteemed designer, the late James Irvine, Morrison contributed to a collection of modern furniture carved from Carrara marble.

Only texting and calling are possible on this basic handset, which was designed to present a liberating alternative to all-consuming smartphones. It recently launched in white and brown, too.

2016 ‘JASPER MORRISON COLLECTION’ FURNITURE FOR VITRA

Some new, some ‘new and improved’ re-editions: the latest, Super Normalinfluenced collection of chairs, sofas and tables in Morrison’s long-standing relationship with the Swiss brand. E D

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Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

ARCHITECTURAL ICON S T PA N C R A S S TAT I O N B Y G E O R G E G I L B E RT S C O T T

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: ALAMY

A 19th-century Gothic masterpiece and icon of the railway age Exit London’s King’s Cross Station and immediately you will be drawn to the spectacular Gothic cathedral-like complex next door: St Pancras Station. It was built in 1868 by British architect Sir George Gilbert Scott, the man responsible for some of the UK’s most famous public buildings, including the Albert Memorial in Hyde Park. Inspired by the Palace of Westminster, St Pancras Station was intended as a grand statement of industrial power for the Midland Railway Company. The terminal included decadent details for its time: beautiful ruby-red carpets, elaborately sweeping staircases, vaulted ceilings, gold-leafed walls, decorative architraves, pointed arched windows and gargoyle pinnacles typical of the Gothic Revival movement. Innovative features such as hydraulic lifts and revolving doors were also included in the design; once complete, Scott himself said his masterpiece was ‘too good for its purpose’. Not only a station, the building also doubled as the Midland Grand Hotel, a 300-room luxury retreat for the well-travelled, which opened in 1873. Towards the end of the 19th century reservations at the hotel began to

dwindle, as travellers’ expectations changed. Fashionable Victorians had come to expect en-suites in every room; the Grand Midland Hotel only offered communal baths. Scott’s flamboyant creation later closed and fell into neglect – only the working station and the famous Booking Hall remained open. The whole terminal was threatened with demolition until, in 1966, Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman led a high-profile campaign to save it. One of the founding members of the Victorian Society, which championed the worth of Victorian and Edwardian architecture, Betjeman described the move to knock down the complex as ‘criminal folly’. A year later his campaign succeeded and St Pancras Station was granted Grade I* status, but the historic building was still in desperate need of restoration, and lay totally empty until renovation work began in 2004. The hotel reopened as the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel in 2011 and, in the meantime, the station was given a huge overhaul. The Eurostar terminal was added in 2007, connecting the capital to mainland Europe and cementing Scott’s design as a stylish destination for years to come (stpancraslondon.com). JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 57


Style | C O L O U R

BLACK

Elegant or evil? This darkest of hues has divided opinion since the dawn of time

The opening of the Book of Genesis outlines the first moments of creation. The bit that everyone remembers, ‘And God said “Let there be light”,’ comes three lines in; before the light, there is darkness. Christians are not the only group to place black at the moment of inception; from the Aztecs’ cave of creation to modern astrophysicists’ dark matter, black is there at the beginning or, rather, just before. It is also, because humans are fond of symmetry, there at the end. Most of the gods associated with death are linked with black. Anubis, the jackalheaded god of the Egyptian underworld, usually has black flesh. For Greeks, the kingdom of Hades lay across the dark, silted waters of the river Acheron. In the farthermost reaches of Tartarus – the part of the underworld reserved for the vilest sinners – Hades ruled the dead from his ebony throne. Hindus had Kali, the goddess of creation and destruction, also known as ‘the black one’. Scandinavians had Nótt, the goddess of the night, who dressed in black and flew across the sky in a chariot drawn by sleek, black horses. But this depiction of blackness isn’t necessarily bad or evil. As Michel Pastoureau points out in his brilliant monograph Black: The History of a Colour (Princeton University Press, £24.95), black was often seen as fertile and expectant: a mother of life and light. The colour black Even Christians didn’t think that is often seen black was all bad. It was associated with monks and then, by association, as fertile and piety. It was probably this link with expectant: a mother religiosity that black has to thank for its first period as the colour of chic, of life and light which lasted from the final years of the 14th century ( just after the end of the Black Death, incidentally) until the middle of the 17th century. A 15th-century treatise on colour praises its ‘high standing and great virtue’. Many of the attributes for which it was celebrated then still hold true for fans now: it is simple, elegant, classic. More often than not, though, the Western Christian tradition has sheared black of its redeeming qualities. A few chapters further on in Genesis, humanity is nearly wiped out by The Flood. It is at this point that the white dove, bearing the olive branch of hope and peace, makes its star turn. Less frequently remembered is the fact that the dove was Noah’s second choice as his envoy; his first was a raven, who did not return, but remained on the loose, feasting on the flesh of the dead. The opposition was set up between good/white and evil/black. But perhaps, now the nights are at their fullest, we should spend these extra darkened hours re-evaluating the colour black and the meaning of darkness. Black sends us back home a little earlier during the winter months, and encourages a few more snatched hours of sleep. (Surely no bad thing in the modern world, filled with tyrannically glowing screens.) It is also, as the Bible noted, fecund. Just as seedlings quicken under the soil, so our most vivid ideas spring to life from darkness.

Paints to try ‘Jet Black’ gloss, £18.99 for 750ml, Crown (crownpaints.co.uk). ‘Jack Black’ emulsion, £19.25 for one litre, Little Greene (littlegreene.com). ‘Charcoal’ emulsion, £37 for 2.5 litres, Neptune (neptune.com)

58 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2017

WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR PICTURE: GETTY

PANTONE ® Black C


FEAST CELEBR ATE

How to enjoy your home this season

LOUNGE SHARE


HEART OF

DARKNESS


A little black magic has been used to conjure up a luxurious cosmopolitan look in this Copenhagen apartment Words ALI MORRIS Photography BIRGITTA WOLFGANG/SISTERS AGENCY Styling PERNILLE VEST


B

efore I painted this apartment it was white and light-drenched, like so many Danish homes, but I felt like I was living in a greenhouse. I went with my instinct and decided to go for a dark, dramatic scheme instead,’ says interior designer Michala Jessen of her Copenhagen home’s striking interior. Perched on the fifth floor of an apartment block in the heart of the city, it is the flat’s penthouse location that affords it so much natural light. The space is wrapped by a 120-square-metre terrace, with sweeping views of the city skyline, including the glittering dome of Frederik’s Church (right). Michala, who lives here with her 11-year-old son, Elton, painted the entire apartment in two shades of black – a blue-black for the bedroom, and a green-black elsewhere – using paint from Swedish brand Flügger. She chose matt walls and added coats of lacquer to the ceiling to achieve its reflective finish. ‘The colours are almost black, rather than true black. They are much softer and warmer – an all-black space would have been too much,’ she says. The inky palette is reversed underfoot, with a light oak floor in the living area. A block of floorboards at the far end of the open-plan space is painted black, visually dividing the kitchen from the rest of the room.

Michala, who has run her interiors store and design studio Rue Verte for 22 years, has a refined aesthetic. ‘I like to layer textures – soft fabrics, rugs and curtains – and add something colder or clinical against it,’ she explains. For instance, her kitchen includes stainlesssteel cabinetry that gleams against the home’s charcoal backdrop – ‘Copper and brass are very in fashion at the moment, but stainless steel is timeless,’ she says. ‘I always choose shades that combine easily – there has to be a linking thread, and for me that’s the colour palette rather than the materials.’ The emerald velvet Meridiani sofa in the living room echoes the undertone of green in the nearly black walls, but also reflects the hues of the rooftop vista. Throughout the apartment, curated displays of cherished objects twinkle like jewels in the darkness. ‘I choose pieces that I think I will keep for many years,’ says Michala. rueverte.dk

Details, from top The dome of Frederik’s Church in Copenhagen. Homeowner Michala Jessen sits beside a large fashion poster taken from a shop window – ‘I just walked in and asked what they were going to do with it, and they said I could have it,’ she says. Living room The velvet sofa is by Meridiani (available from Staffan Tollgård in the UK). The cushions and ‘Cubistic’ table lamps by Gauxs (on the windowsill) are from Michala’s shop, Rue Verte, in Copenhagen Stockist details on p135 ➤

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Kitchen The stainless-steel units are from Ikea. For a similar suspended matt-black extractor hood, try Faber. The stool is by Overgaard & Dyrman Dining room A ‘Dakota’ table by Julian Chichester is teamed with chairs by Overgaard & Dyrman. The ‘Celestial Pebble’ pendant light is by Ochre Stockist details on p135 ➤


‘COPPER AND BRASS ARE VERY IN FASHION AT THE MOMENT, BUT STAINLESS STEEL IS TIMELESS’


CURATED DISPLAYS OF CHERISHED OBJECTS TWINKLE LIKE JEWELS IN THE DARKNESS

Above The gazelle head was made by the homeowner Michala’s boyfriend –‘The paint he uses makes it look like leather’. Inside the Chinese dresser by Green Square (try 1st Dibs) there’s a collection of black ceramics, and copper and brass tableware Opposite The leather console table is by Arrondissement Copenhagen and the glass globe table light with a brass base is by Massimo Castagna for Gallotti & Radice Stockist details on p135


I N S I D E R G U I D E D E C O R AT I N G W I T H B L A C K

Homeowner Michala shares her tips for making dark look dreamy Don’t use pure black! Pick shades of black that are softer and warmer. Where sunlight floods the apartment, I chose a green-black to enhance the warm light. In the bedroom, where there is no light, I selected a deeper blue-black. Paint the woodwork either glossy or very matt to create layers of texture within a scheme. It’s often worth embracing a lack of light in smaller, cramped rooms – taking them even darker transforms a problem area into a feature. Place black furniture against a dark wall: the contrast is too stark against white. Add shiny surfaces to lift the darkness. I’m a magpie – I love anything reflective. Think carefully about lighting. A layered approach, with different types of lights (both direct and indirect sources), will make a dark room appear cosy. Choose hidden spotlights that wash light up and down the walls. Add layers of fabrics. I used rugs and curtains to soften the space, while my sofa injects luxury and a vibrant shot of colour. The emerald shade works because it is unexpected. ➤


‘THE PAINT COLOURS ARE ALMOST BLACK, RATHER THAN TRUE BLACK. THEY ARE MUCH SOFTER AND WARMER’


Bedroom A golden velvet armchair from Rue Verte is overlooked by a ‘Globe’ floor lamp by Atelier Areti. Beside the bed, which is dressed with a throw from Maia, is a brass table lamp by Restart Milano. The silk ceiling lamp is by Gong Stockist details on p135 E D


S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

FEAST

Eat, drink and be merry with a mix of bold pattern, gilt finishes and platters piled high Make sure you’re ready for any number of guests to descend by investing in simple, foldaway furniture – try Manufactum’s ‘Robinia’ wood set. Add style and warmth with layers of narrow rugs (we love Ikea’s ‘Valby Ruta’ design). Gilt cutlery brings an easy hit of glamour (Habitat’s ‘Turini’ 16-piece set is similar to this set) and trays make great platters and centrepieces. Find dark ‘Scape’ tableware at West Elm. Stockist details on p135

PAIR THE ABUNDANCE OF COLOUR ON YOUR


PICTURES: ADEL FERREIRA, GETTY PRODUCTION: ILANA SWAREPOEL FLORAL DESIGN: THE HOLLOWAY SHOP

PLATE WITH BRIGHT PRINTS AND PATTERNS


S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

INDULGE

This table setting is a banquet for the senses. Gather your friends, pull up a chair, grab a knife and fork and get stuck in Nothing much in life compares to the joy of a meal with your nearest and dearest. In such situations formality should be as far from the table as those you don’t like, so mismatch furniture, glass and tableware – this selection includes chairs from Gervasoni and Ton, plates and bowls from Astier De Villatte and candlesticks by Chapman and La Loupe, all of which can be sourced from Swedish interiors store Artilleriet. Drape your table generously with linen, such as Society Limonta’s ‘Bon’ tablecloths, in different shades of grey. Stockist details on p135

BRING SOME BOHEMIAN GRANDEUR TO YOUR


PICTURE: FANNY HANSSON

TABLE WITH LUXURIOUS MISMATCHED PIECES


THE

TA STEM A K ER The epitome of elegant seasonal splendour, this Italian apartment inspired its owner to turn her home into an exclusive restaurant Words JO FROUDE Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


Living area The cabinet that dominates the room is from a Tibetan temple, and the wall lights and sofa are bespoke designs by the architect. The ornate armchair and ottoman are 18th-century antiques, while the cane ‘Pavo Real’ chair is by Patricia Urquiola for Driade Stockist details on p135


a amilla Lusuardi’s guests chat animatedly at her dining table as they pass around baskets of bread and d fill their glasses with wine. It’s a typical evening at one fi of her dinner parties, but this is not a gathering of o cclose friends: the guests are savouring the delights of her intimate home restaurant. Camilla had not h cconsidered the venture when she first discovered her aapartment in Reggio Emilia, northern Italy, five years ago. She already ran a thriving catering business (co-owned with chef Licia Cagnoni), and was in search of breathing space when she snapped up the 95-square-metre residence. It was its subsequent renovation that opened her eyes to its potential. The apartment resides in an 18th-century building that was once home to the ancient city’s eminent bishop. It is endowed with the kind of architectural details that one would expect of a fine house of its time, including four-metre-high beamed ceilings decorated with hand-painted panels. Camilla and her architect, Maurizio Di Mauro, have added the interior’s more contemporary touches. There is a mural by graffiti artist Psyko in the bedroom (he also painted the quote along the top of the walls in the hallway) and the oak parquet floors and walls are painted a dark shade of grey to create a sense of theatre. ‘The colour was custom-mixed by local artisans who used natural pigments, as I am allergic to chemicals,’ says Camilla. The intense hue accentuates the plasterwork, which has a rough finish that recreates a sense of history. ‘My home reflects my personality. It is not a coherent collection, but rather a mosaic of things I’ve fallen in love with,’ she says. The décor creates an intimate setting for Camilla’s restaurant, which serves traditional fare. ‘Travelling is one of my big passions, and is a constant influence, but the food served in my home is rooted in my grandmother’s traditional cooking,’ she explains. ‘It’s about recreating childhood memories.’ Her enthusiasm for seasonal produce is echoed in the table settings, which change throughout the year. The dining room is dressed with crisp linens and fresh colours during spring and summer, and switches to warmer shades, textured fabrics and ceramics in autumn and winter. ‘I also use a lot of fruit and vegetables for my table decorations to reflect the time of year,’ she adds. By opening up her home to guests, Camilla has found the perfect outlet for her creativity. ‘The advantage of meeting new and interesting people always outweighs any inconvenience,’ she says. mauriziodimauroarchitetto.com ➤

JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 79


TA BL E TA L K Camilla Lusuardi shares her tips for creating seasonal table settings Have, as the French say, a fil rouge [main theme]. For instance, if I serve a wintery, rustic menu, I set the table accordingly with ceramic plates, adding accessories in dark hues. Select linens based on your theme. I love heavy, natural linens in classical white and grey/ stone tones, but sometimes use more unusual fabrics like paisley wool plaid. I occasionally discover beautiful old fabrics at local antique fairs – I have had some of them dyed in more modern colours, such as purple, plum and grey. Use mismatched pieces. If I want to create a rustic look, I might use my ceramic plates from Ceramiche Estensi [an Italian brand that creates traditional designs, many of which replicate the shape of fruit and vegetables]. If the mood is more classic and elegant, I select simple bone china [Wedgwood has some beautiful pieces]. I also have old Murano crystal glasses, all in different shapes and heights. They look stunning. Add lots of candles. This produces a soft, dim light during dinner – although never use perfumed candles, as they would overpower the food. Create centrepieces with seasonal flowers, fruit and vegetables. Right now, there are some beautiful fruit varieties at the local markets in Reggio Emilia, such as quinces, pumpkins and pomegranates. The colours work perfectly when mixed with winter blooms.


Dining area Antique silvered mirrors (try Rough Old Glass for similar) and large bespoke lights designed by the architect decorate the wall behind the table. The chairs are 1940s designs from Mavi Lizan in Barcelona. The black studded vessel (opposite page, far left) is by Baccarat and the red-topped vase is a design by Ettore Sottsass for Venini (sold by Harlequin in the UK) Stockist details on p135 ➤


‘The food served in my home is rooted in my grandmother’s traditional cooking. It’s about recreating childhood memories’

Dining area Homeowner and cook Camilla Lusuardi changes her table settings to suit the seasons. For autumn and winter, her guests are treated to rustic ceramic plates (for similar try Habitat) and dark grey linens (Society Limonta has a beautiful selection) Stockist details on p135 ➤

82 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2017


‘My home reflects my personality. It is not a coherent collection, but rather a mosaic of things I’ve fallen in love with’

Hallway The dark walls are decorated with a quote from Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa – ‘What was in me that could predict a triumph? I had neither the blind force of winners, nor the exact vision of the mad man.’ It was painted by graffiti artist Psyko. The 18th-century chandelier is from a local market and the iron safe is a 17th-century design from Lombardy Details, clockwise from top left Artwork by Milan-based photographer Cesare Cicardini. A carved skull from the Masai Gallery in Belgium. Ornaments depicting duck heads made by a local artisan. A decorative panel from the Tibetan cabinet in the living room ➤

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Bedroom A warrior mural by graffiti artist Psyko decorates the wall beneath the original 18th-century hand-painted ceiling. The silk-covered headboard is a bespoke piece by a Milanese artist E D


Dark grey walls, contemporary graffiti and original hand-painted ceilings all add to this home’s sense of theatre


S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

DELIGHT Liven up your table with a cheerful arrangement that makes the most of nature’s beauty

The nights may be drawing in, but that doesn’t mean you have to keep everything sombre when you entertain. This vibrant setting uses vintage wallpaper as a runner to add a hit of pattern – Sandberg’s ‘Rosenholm Turquoise’ wallpaper (available at Jane Clayton) is a similar match. Alongside such a bold statement, everything else can be kept simple. These plain white ‘Organic Shaped’ plates and ‘Bormioli Bodega’ modern wine tumblers are both from West Elm. Pair with unfussy cutlery (try Robert Welch) and lightweight linen napkins by Once Milano. Stockist details on p135


PICTURES: KAREN MORDECHAI/SUNDAY SUPPERS


S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

CHARM Embrace texture, muted tones and organic materials for pared-back perfection

PICTURES: RIIKKA KANTINKOSKI, LINE THIT KLEIN, SIDSEL RUDOLPH (STYLING)

At this time of year, plain white china on an undressed table can feel far too chilly. Plump instead for soft colours and tactility. Ferm Living’s pale grey ‘Neu’ tableware (available at Amara) is ideal. Or go for crackle-glaze plates (those opposite are by Danish designer Gurli Elbækgaard, but try Habitat for similar) mixed with terracotta pieces by Sue Pryke. Pair with a hemp tablecloth – Couleur Chanvre has a good selection. Stockist details on p135

CALMING COLOURS AND TEXTURES PREVENT


SIMPLE TABLE SETTINGS FROM FEELING STARK


From left ‘Chester Moon’ sofa by Paola Navone, £13,644, Baxter (baxter.it). ‘Marbelous’ side table by Naoto Fukasawa for Marsotto Edizioni, £2,928, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘TS’ tables (two pictured) by Gam Fratesi, from £399 each, Gubi (gubi.dk). Vintage Berber rugs, sourced from Spotti Milano (spotti.com). ‘Vertical 1’ light, £917, Atelier Areti (atelierareti.com). ‘Beetle’ side chairs by Gam Fratesi, from £629 each, Gubi (gubi. dk). ‘Bellevue’ floor lamp by Arne Jacobsen, £749, &Tradition (andtradition.com). Wall clad in ‘Silk Georgette Chevron’ tiles, £245 per square metre, Salvatori (salvatori.it). ‘Adamo & Eva’ velvet curtains, £109 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) ➤


LUXURY LOUNGING From left Low sculpture by A Pizzo Greco, sourced from Compasso Gallery (compasso-design.it). ‘Lucrezia’ sofa by Antonio Citterio, from £5,853, Maxalto (bebitalia.com). Cushion covered in ‘Sonar 2’ fabric by Raf Simons, £237 per metre, Kvadrat (kvadrat.dk). ‘Khama’ rug, from £918, Carpet Edition (carpetedition.com). ‘Bell’ side table by Sebastian Herkner for Classicon, £1,729, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘Tulip Low’ coffee table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, from £1,096, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Koine’ vase by Studiopepe, £173, Spotti Edizioni (spotti.com). Floor light by Serge Mouille, £4,810, Tanguy Rolin (sergemouille.co.uk ). ‘Febo’ chaise longue by Antonio Citterio, from £2,688, Maxalto (bebitalia.com). ‘LC3’ armchair by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, from £3,060, Cassina (cassina.com/london). Wall clad in ‘Silk Georgette Chevron’ tiles, £245 per square metre, Salvatori (salvatori.it). Adamo & Eva’ velvet curtain, £109 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) ➤


LUXURY LOUNGING From left Vintage rugs sourced from Spotti Milano (spotti.com). ‘Febo’ armchair by Antonio Citterio, from £1,865, Maxalto (bebitalia.com). ‘Michel’ sofa by Antonio Citterio, from £9,797, B&B Italia (bebitalia.com). Cushions covered in ‘Sonar 2’ fabric by Raf Simons, £237 per metre, Kvadrat (kvadrat.dk). ‘Tube’ pendant light, £2,995, Michael Anastassiades (michaelanastassiades.com). Wall panels covered in ‘Quai Branly’ fabric, £88 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com). ‘780/783’ coffee tables by Gianfranco Frattini, from £1,614 each, Cassina (cassina.com/london). ‘Grashoppa’ floor light by Greta Grossman for Gubi, £579, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Adamo & Eva’ velvet curtain, £109 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) E D


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Words JACKIE DALY Photography SUSANNA BLAVARG/ TAVERNE AGENCY

Styling CHARLOTTA NORLÉN


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anna Fyring Liedgren’s home is nestled in scenic countryside on the outskirts of Stockholm, Sweden. In winter, her garden becomes a dramatic snowscape; an idyllic backdrop for her dinner parties, which she enjoys with friends, family, and her dog, Mymlan. Here, Sanna (above) shares her secrets for creating an atmospheric feast with minimal fuss. Cook in advance. A casserole is perfect, as you can do almost all of the work beforehand (even a day ahead), leaving you free to enjoy the company of your guests once the evening begins. Think practically when dressing the table. Apart from floral arrangements, the items I choose for the table all have a clear purpose. The food should always be the centrepiece! I like to place as many dishes on the table as possible, rather than producing plates from the kitchen – it’s a more homely way of serving guests. Use simple table linen. My tablecloth is from the Stockholm-based store Garbo Interiors [try The Linen Works for similar in the UK]. The store’s owners go treasure hunting several times a year, often in France, and return with the most beautiful pieces. Mix materials and textures. I love the combination of metal and ceramic tableware, but would definitely advise restraint; the table setting should not be overwhelming. I always choose muted colours – the decoration should never be louder than the food! Hang lanterns from the branches of trees. Here I have mixed new and secondhand lanterns, as well as one that I picked up at a bazaar in Istanbul [try Moroccan Bazaar in the UK]. Light a fire for warmth and comfort. Nordic winters are very dark, so light and heat is essential for a winter celebration. We serve the starters outside, then head indoors for the main course. Ensure guests feel comfortable enough to serve themselves. I put plenty of water carafes and wine bottles on the table. It’s only when the dishes have been passed around and the wine is half drunk that a table really comes alive. homegrownswedes.com ➤


‘ALL OF THE ITEMS I CHOOSE FOR MY TABLE HAVE A CLEAR PURPOSE. THE FOOD SHOULD ALWAYS BE THE CENTREPIECE’

Opposite Onion tartlets with anchovies and celeriac salad dressed with French wholegrain mustard This page Cook and food stylist Sanna pours tea warmed over the garden fire. For fire baskets in the UK try East2Eden. Labour And Wait sells similar enamel mugs and kettles Stockist details on p135 ➤


‘I LOVE THE MIXTURE OF METAL AND CERAMIC TABLEWARE, ALWAYS IN SOFT, MUTED COLOURS’

This page, from top Candied almonds. Chicken liver parfait with green pepper, orange and thyme, and a jar of quick-pickled vegetables. A hot apple drink made with calvados and honey Opposite French beef casserole with orange, olives and tomato, served alongside a mushroom salad E D Find recipes for all of Sanna’s dishes at elledecoration.co.uk


S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

RELAX

Simplicity is key at this busy time of year. Here’s how to set a table that’s chic and calming Create a delicate yet impactful table setting with a few charming details to delight your guests. Here, a rugged wooden table is draped with sheer cheesecloth – why cover up beautiful furniture completely? As a centrepiece, add tall tapered candles in copper caps, the type normally used to close copper pipes (they should be available from your local DIY store), or place bud vases (try ‘Morandi’ vases by Canvas Home, available at Trouva) in informal clusters. For tableware with a similarly utilitarian feel, we suggest Ian McIntyre’s range for Another Country. Stockist details on p135

SHEER FABRICS AND PARED-BACK DECORATIONS CREATE A SCHEME THAT IS EFFORTLESSLY ELEGANT


PICTURE: KAREN MORDECHAI/SUNDAY SUPPERS


S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

COMFORT Wooden sharing boards and rugged ceramics make for a laid-back, modern table setting

PICTURE: SANDBERG WALLPAPER

Meal times are not just about eating; they are about people coming together and connecting. As such, honest materials that feel good to the touch rule. Go for hand-thrown ceramic pots and jugs, paired with wooden platters and boards. Winchcombe Pottery has similar tall black ceramic cups, while Svend Bayer’s wood-fired stoneware (stocked at David Mellor) is the perfect centrepiece in which to display seasonal foliage. Jamie Oliver sells similar acacia boards (available at Debenhams). Finally, add sleek glassware, such as this decanter by Eva Solo, and ‘Gio’ tumblers from LSA. Stockist details on p135


SCHEME. CHOOSE WOOD AND THROWN CERAMICS


P L AY


Previous spread Next to the Cassina sofa stands a ‘Toio’ floor lamp by Achille Castiglioni for Flos. On the right, there’s a vintage chair and black floor lamp from a flea market in Mantua. Behind, you can see the dining table, surrounded by ‘Medea’ chairs by Vittorio Nobili (try 1st Dibs for originals). A ceiling lamp by Italian designer Nicola Pianori hangs above Opposite The kitchen island is one piece of concrete, poured on site. Try Miele for stainless-steel appliances. The black table lamp is a 1970s design (try Ruby in the Dust) Details, above Homeowner Alberto sits on a vintage barstool, purchased at a local flea market. The leather chair was bought in New York. The artwork is from Piedmont Stockist details on p135


‘THE CEMENT WALLS ARE BRUSHED WITH A PIGMENTED RESIN TO CREATE A SWIRLED EFFECT’


Hallway Downstairs, the cement wall conceals a second bathroom and closet. The bench is a vintage find – try Retrouvius. At the top of the stairs stands a 1950s floor lamp bought in an antiques shop in Copenhagen Stockist details on p135 ➤


A R C H I T E C T ’ S G U I D E I N D U S T R I A L WA R M T H

Monica Vincenzi discusses the tricks that soften this home’s aesthetic TEXTURED CONCRETE I used La Calce Del Brenta (lacalcedelbrenta.it),

a brand of plaster with a particularly attractive grainy texture, on the walls. It is made from stone sourced from the River Brenta in Italy. You work it on to the walls with a spatula, in the same way that you would apply Venetian plaster. I used the same grey finish on the doorways on the ground floor to create a continuous surface – it makes the doors seem almost invisible. CORK CLADDING I wanted to experiment with new materials, but keep an authentic industrial palette. For example, the cork panels I’ve used to decorate the large columns in the open-plan space are typically used as insulation for roofs and external walls. They look wonderful when applied decoratively to an interior [try Thermacork for cork cladding in the UK; thermacork.com]. DIFFUSED LIGHTING Alberto wanted to have soft lighting that would break up the strong lines of the apartment. That’s why we incorporated recessed lights in the kitchen, and on the side of the staircase – they spread light across the adjacent walls and create a warm, ethereal glow.


Bedroom The bed is dressed with leather cushions, and bedlinen from Ralph Lauren Home. The homeowner discovered the 1950s Scandinavian wooden chair at a ea market in Mantua Stockist details on p135 ➤


SOFT LIGHTING BRINGS WARMTH TO THE HOME’S RIGOROUS INDUSTRIAL LINES

Bathroom Separated from the bedroom by smoked glass, this shower space has the same dark oak flooring as the rest of the room – it has been treated to make it waterproof E D


Winter’s harvest We show how a barn, dressed with warming sheepskins and throws, can become the perfect setting for cosy family gatherings Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography STEFANIA GIORGI/LIVING INSIDE Styling SARA FARINA Food styling ALESSANDRA AVALLONE

The rustic table takes centre stage; try the ‘Vintage Walnut’ table at The Conran Shop for similar. The ‘Bellavista’ garland lights by Seletti from Heal’s are an exact match for these, and Mee Mee London sells a good selection of ride-on toy cars Stockist details on p135 ➤


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LLE Decoration first met Italian chef Riccardo Gaspari and his wife Ludovica Rubbini at El Brite de Larieto, their family restaurant in northern Italy, last summer. It was during this trip that the couple captivated us with tales of their farmyard barn, which they decorate every winter for gatherings with friends and loved ones. We liked their ideas so much that we had to return to join them for a family feast. Nestled beside their house, just a few miles from the beautiful village and fashionable ski resort of Cortina, the barn is surrounded by pine trees and larch forest. ‘It’s a simple shelter where we spend time around the dinner table on wintery Sundays,’ says Ludovica. The setting couldn’t be cosier: the timber walls acting as a rustic backdrop to the long, communal table. Hay bales, redolent of the recent harvest, are used as seating, as are simple wooden benches, all illuminated from above by strings of twinkling lights. ‘I love the tactile pleasure of natural wood and hay, and the way that they bring the outdoors in. But I also try to create a modern, elegant and intimate space,’ says Ludovica. The contrast between rusticity and design-led luxury is striking. The china and glassware is sourced from brands such as Fiorira un Giardino, and the table linen is from high-end label Society Limonta. Sheepskins and rugs further soften the look. ‘Fluffy wool blankets are really important, as they make every guest feel warm and welcome,’ says Ludovica. ‘I always put down more chairs than guests – everyone is then free to change seats during dinner, which helps to create new conversations.’ elbritedelarieto.it Riccardo’s dishes – including beetroot dumplings with horseradish flakes (this page) – are simple yet beautiful. The table linen is by Society Limonta; for similar placemats, try Hay Stockist details on p135 ➤

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‘The barn is a simple shelter where we spend time around the dinner table on wintery Sundays’


TA BL E TA L K We take a closer look at Riccardo and Ludovica’s mix of rustic charm and luxury The dining table is the centrepiece of the barn, and is prepared with great care. First, it is dressed with runners and napkins in heavy linens – all in muted, earthy tones, such as browns and greys, that reflect the natural landscape around the farm. It’s laid with simple stoneware and white ceramic plates and dishes, then goblets, carafes and wine glasses, before being finished with elegant silver cutlery. Everybody helps, from Ludovica and Riccardo’s two young daughters, Cecilia (four) and Clementina (one) to friends and colleagues. The colours of the table setting are mirrored in the dishes served, particularly during winter when mushrooms, beetroots and pumpkins are in season. Riccardo’s trademark canederli (bread dumplings) share the table with gnocchi, poached pears in red wine and crumb cake.


The dining table is dressed with heavy linens in earthy tones that reflect the surrounding landscape

Seasonal sweet treats often served up at the barn include poached pears in wine (above) and crumb cake (opposite; for a similar cake stand, try John Lewis). The couple’s daughter Cecilia, four (opposite), loves helping to forage in the forest for ingredients Stockist details on p135 Find recipes for all of Riccardo and Ludovica’s dishes at elledecoration.co.uk E D

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S T Y L I S H E N T E R TA I N I N G

C E L E B R AT E Give seasonal entertaining some understated glamour, with artistic floral displays and burnished brass

Gold and green are the colours of the festive season, but don’t go overboard. Restrict verdant tones to some carefully arranged foliage – think ivy and eucalyptus leaves – and then add tasteful gilt accessories. Antiqued brass candlesticks (try Etsy) work well alongside contemporary glassware – these Duralex tumblers can be found at John Lewis. For similar white glazed tableware, try Barber Osgerby’s ‘Olio’ range for Royal Doulton. Amber apothecary jars work well as vases and can be found at Balineum. Stockist details on p135

TEAM ANTIQUED BRASS PIECES WITH FINE WHITE


CHINA FOR A REFINED FESTIVE GATHERING

PICTURES: KAREN MORDECHAI/SUNDAY SUPPERS, LAURA MUTHESIUS AND NORA EISERMANN/OUR FOOD STORIES


WISH YOU WERE HERE?

NEW ISSUE ON SALE NOW @ELLEDecoCountry #EDCountry


Escape | C A L E N D A R

T H E 2 017 C U LT U R A L CALENDAR

Once a month, the ELLE Decoration team decamp from our headquarters for ED Culture Club, an exploration of the UK’s most fascinating historic houses, exhibitions and architectural gems. Here’s the lowdown on the venues we’ve visited so far and a preview of what they have in store for the year ahead Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

JAN

This neo-gothic house was built in 1895 for businessman William Waldorf Astor. Made entirely from luminous Portland stone, it was acquired in 1999 by The Bulldog Trust, which funds and advises charities, and became its headquarters. Since 2011, the Trust has let the public take a look inside – but only when there is an exhibition on. This spring, you can enjoy an unexpected sighting of the surrealist ‘Mae West’ lips sofa by Salvador Dalí

TWO TEMPLE PLACE

VISITORS ARE ONLY ALLOWED INTO THE NEO-GOTHIC MANSION DURING EXHIBITIONS and Edward James, along with the sublime Venus and Adonis painting by Duncan Grant, as part of the ‘Sussex Modernism: Retreat and Rebellion’ exhibition, which explores why artists and writers migrated to Sussex in the early 20th century. Free admission, 28 January–23 April; 2 Temple Place, London WC2 (twotempleplace.org).

Ornate mosaics dazzle underfoot, 16th-century painted Islamic tiles line the walls and a golden dome glitters overhead in this amazing mansion. Out LEIGHTON on the street, however, it’s business as usual in bustling Kensington. Leighton HOUSE House was built for 19th-century artist M USEUM and president of the Royal Academy Frederic Leighton; today, it still houses his ‘orientalist’ and Arts & Crafts furniture, as well as the exceptional collection of Victorian art that it was originally designed to show off. Visit in spring, because Lord Leighton’s most famous work, the glowing Pre-Raphaelite painting Flaming June has been lent to its place of birth for a short residency. ‘Flaming June: The Making Of An Icon’, admission £12, until 2 April; 12 Holland Park Road, London W1 (rbkc.gov.uk). ➤

PICTURES: WILL PRYCE, PETER DAZELEY, JULIAN NIEMAN

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MAR FA S H I O N AND TEXTILE MUSEUM

Founded by famously fuchsia-haired British designer Zandra Rhodes, and located in an unmistakeable pink and orange building in Bermondsey, this museum’s temporary exhibitions never fail to inspire both fashion students and enthusiasts. In 2017, it will be hosting the UK’s first solo retrospective of architect-turned-designer Josef Frank’s work. Frank was a believer in the positive power of colour and pattern: he once said that ‘the monochromatic surface appears uneasy, while patterns are calming.’ His prolific output ranged from housing estates to lamps, but textiles were his forte. The colourful designs (‘Hawai’, inset) famously involved leaves, butterflies, birds and plants, and often started as watercolours, several of which are on display for the exhibition. ‘Josef Frank: Patterns-Furniture-Painting ’, admission £9.90, 28 January–7 May; 83 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 (ftmlondon.org).

This extraordinary townhouse, designed by Dennis Severs (who died in 2000), is a recreation of the home of an imaginary Huguenot silk-weaving DENNIS family. Through its evocative room sets, it tracks the changing styles of two SEVERS’ hundred years of history. Expect to find HOUSE the smell of perfume just spritzed before heading down for dinner, the floury chaos left behind by a cook called away from the kitchen, and the sense that a member of the family has swept out of the room moments before you enter. A soundscape of Victorian street life reverberates in the distance. Daytime private group visits, £12 per person; 18 Folgate Street, London E1 (dennissevershouse.co.uk).

APR

THE SPITALFIELDS TOWNHOUSE RECREATES THE HOME OF 18TH-CENTURY SILK WEAVERS

From 1875, satirical magazine Punch’s one-time illustrator Linley Sambourne lived in this terraced townhouse in Kensington with his 18 wife and family. Seventy years after his death, the typical Victorian middleS TA F F O R D class home was opened to the public TERRACE as a fine surviving example of the celebrated style of the 19th-century Aesthetic Movement, which championed art and beauty in the home. The house’s richly decorative spaces include a William Morris-wallpapered morning room, a table laid for dinner with Chinese plates and ornate silver, walls groaning with Sambourne’s madcap cartoons, and glass cases installed on the front of the bay windows – miniature greenhouses that allow plants to thrive in the otherwise dimly lit space. Admission from £7; 18 Stafford Terrace, London W8 (rbkc.gov.uk).

M AY

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Escape | C A L E N D A R

As bountiful as it is educational, Chelsea Physic Garden was established in 1673 as the Apothecaries’ Garden, and is now a registered charity, open to the public since 1983. There is plenty to ‘ooh’ and ‘aah’ CHELSEA over: pomegranates, eucalyptus and ginkgos, as well as tropical shrubs kept in a Victorian fernery PHYSIC (designed to keep plants cool), not to mention the GARDEN world’s most northerly outdoor grapefruit tree, Britain’s largest olive tree, and 5,000 other edible, useful or medicinal plants. Ancient Greeks swore by some, while others, such as the Madagascan periwinkle, have been the subject of more recent discoveries – it has been extracted to treat childhood leukaemia. In 2017, the Garden is studying and celebrating ‘weaves and leaves’ – the relationship between plants and fabrics such as cotton, hemp and sisal – and has ambitious plans to ‘grow an outfit’ from the garden. If you can’t wait until summer, the garden opens on 31 January to showcase its famous snowdrops, which blanket the floor before the rest of the country’s bloom. Admission £10.50; 66 Royal Hospital Road, London SW3 (chelseaphysicgarden.co.uk).

JUN

THE GARDEN IS HOME TO THE UK’S LARGEST OLIVE TREE AND 5,000 OTHER USEFUL PLANTS As flats in Brutalist London blocks Trellick Tower and Balfron Tower soar in popularity, this is an interesting time to visit the Modernist home that 2 their creator, Ernö Goldfinger, built for himself in 1939. Rubbing shoulders WILLOW with handsome Georgian mansions, ROAD the concrete-and-red brick terrace was greeted with horror in some quarters (local resident Ian Fleming named his famous Bond villain after the architect, such was his disenchantment with the new arrival); in others, it was revered as visionary. Now managed by the National Trust, it is inspiring to visit for its functional furniture and many artworks – Goldfinger’s wife Ursula was a talented painter. Admission £6.50; 2 Willow Road, London NW3 (nationaltrust.org.uk). ➤

PICTURES: KEVIN MORAN, NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/AMHEL DE SERRA, CHARLIE HOPKINSON, DENNIS GILBERT

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AUG

This fascinating townhouse museum has never been bigger, or better. After a seven-year, £7 million restoration dubbed ‘Opening Up The Soane’, the Georgian home of architect extraordinaire John Soane has been restored to his original design. The highlights? The revival of Soane’s private apartments and the Model Room, which displays over 40 intricate architectural models. There is now wheelchair access to almost the entire site, which is miraculous given the house’s labyrinthine layout. As 2017 marks the 200th anniversary of Soane’s acquisition of the King Seti I sarcophagus, expect an Egyptology extravaganza. Free admission; 13 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2 (soane.org).

SIR JOHN SOANE’S MUSEUM

When the Thames Tunnel opened in 1843, the public queued up to pay a penny each to visit this civil engineering miracle: it was the first tunnel ever to pass under a river and was nicknamed the Eighth Wonder of the World. Due to lack of funding, access for wheeled vehicles never materialised, and so it became wildly popular for Victorians to promenade along it. 160 years later, the tunnel still mixes business with leisure: most of the shaft has been modernised and is used by London Overground trains, but due to its Grade II listing, TFL and planners were obliged to leave the South entrance in its original form. It is now home to a bijou history museum and the Grand Entrance Hall is used as performance space thanks to its brilliant acoustics. Follow an afternoon visit with a botanical aperitif on the tunnel’s ‘roof garden’. Admission £6; Railway Avenue, London SE16 (brunel-museum.org.uk).

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SEP THE BRUNEL MUSEUM

THE FIRST TUNNEL TO PASS UNDER A RIVER, BRUNEL’S WAS DUBBED THE EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD


Escape | C A L E N D A R

OCT UK L I T E R A RY F E S T I VA L S

This is the month for bookworms, as the calendar is littered with literary festivals across Britain. Henley Literary Festival (2–8 October, tickets from £7; henleyliteraryfestival.co.uk) takes place over a week in the pretty riverside Oxfordshire town; while over in the Sussex Downs, Charleston will be hosting its annual Short Story festival in the romantic farmhouse that was once the countryside escape of the bohemian Bloomsbury Group (4–8 October, tickets from £8; charleston.org.uk). The venerable Cheltenham Literature Festival lasts a fortnight and has dynamic talks ranging from light-hearted lunches to bookish bigwigs engaging in debates (6–15 October, tickets from £5; cheltenhamfestivals.com). Finally, for a grand cultural weekend out, there is also Blenheim Palace Festival of Literature, Film and Music, held in the grounds of the English Baroque stately home (right; 12–15 October, tickets from £6; blenheimpalaceliteraryfestival.com).

On the other side of a theatre’s red rope – or, in the Brutalist National Theatre’s case, its concrete impediments – lies the THE magical world of props, dressing rooms and set design studios N AT I O N A L that will captivate even the most T H E AT R E seasoned theatre-goer. The National Theatre welcomes visitors behind the scenes via various guided tours; TAKE A GUIDED our pick would be the architecture special (£12.50), in which an expert takes visitors through the details TOUR OF DENYS of Denys Lasdun’s famously controversial 1976 building, or a Backstage Tour (£9.50), which allows LASDUN’S the public to watch play rehearsals in motion, FAMOUSLY costumes being sewn and backdrops being painted CONTROVERSIAL in a 75-minute whistle-stop adventure. South Bank, London SE1 (nationaltheatre.org.uk).

NOV

1976 BUILDING

There is surely no better way to send winter blues flying than a lunch at Bob Bob Ricard in Soho. Opened by Russian entrepreneur Leonid Shutov BOB in 2008, it has since gained fame for its opulent interiors, its vodka (served at BOB precisely -18°C) and, most thrillingly, RICARD the ‘Press for Champagne’ buttons next to every table. A restaurant may not, strictly-speaking, be a cultural destination, but this one is special: designed by David Collins Studio, the Art Deco-inspired space has hand-printed Japanese wallpaper, intricately patterned terrazzo flooring and mirrored ceilings that reference the Orient Express’ 1882 precursor, the Train Éclair de Luxe. Spring 2017 sees the menu receiving an update, though it will continue the British/Russian theme. Go for lunch and leave with a Slavic spring in your step. 1 Upper James Street, London W1 (bobbobricard.com). E D

PICTURES: PAUL RAFTERY, DAN LOWE, DERRY MOORE, GETTY/SSPL, GARETH GARDNER, ALAMY, LUDO DES COGNETS, PAUL WINCH-FURNESS, PHILIP VILE

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PICTURE: MICHAEL DE PASQUALE AND MARTINA MAFFINI (PHOTOGRAPHY), CORA VOHWINKEL (STYLING). NOTE: COLOURS MAY APPEAR DIFFERENT IN PRINT. ALWAYS CHECK SWATCH CARDS

Stockists

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Design your home this month

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JANUARY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 145


THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal the one design icon that’s on all our wish lists as we head towards the new year

Don’t miss! The ELLE Decoration Trend Book, packed with everything you need to know for the next six months, from design dates for your diary to this season’s must-buys – on sale 5 January. E D

146 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JANUARY 2017

PICTURES: MICHAEL GOMEZ, GETTY

‘Stendig’ calendar by Massimo Vignelli If you buy one thing this month, make it the design world’s favourite wall calendar. First created in 1966 by Italian polymath Massimo Vignelli, who moved to the United States in the 1950s and designed everything from packaging to furniture, the ‘Stendig’ features a bold Helvetica typeface – one of only a select few that Vignelli used in his work. Useful and beautiful, it measures an impressive 121x91 centimetres and is the only calendar in New York’s Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection. It sells out fast, so buy now – and make the first date you mark on it 5 January, the day our biannual Trend Book hits the shops. £49, Aram Store (aram.co.uk).



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