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HELPING YOU MAKE EVERY MEAL HEALTHIER PRACTICAL IDEAS FROM THE EXPERTS

AUSTRALIAN

JANUARY 2017 $6.20 (incl

healthyfoodguide com au

GST)

Be smarter about

SUGAR

Plus sugar-wise meal plan EXPERT ADVICE

Eat well on

holidays

Help for food allergies

BEST CHOICES

for healthier BBQs Is your pet overweight? Top food choices

HIGH

PROTEIN

Fresh fruit tart p82

etitian proved!

meals Easy summer 9 771832 875005

01

Plus …

• Which chip has less salt? • Tomato sauce vs mustard • Your guide to buying bagged salads

74 BBQ makeover

69 Ginger pork stir fry

61 Leftover turkey salad

contents JANUARY 2017

ON THE COVER 36 BE SMARTER ABOUT SUGAR plus sugar-wise meal plan. Too much sugar is bad for you. But how much is too much? 42 EAT WELL ON HOLIDAYS: HELP FOR FOOD ALLERGIES Follow our 10-step guide and enjoy a happy and healthy trip 30 BEST CHOICES FOR HEALTHIER BBQs Sizzle your way to a light and balanced meal 46 IS YOUR PET OVERWEIGHT? TOP FOOD CHOICES Health tips for feeding your four-legged pal 51 EASY SUMMER MEALS: DIETITIAN APPROVED! Every recipe has a nutrition analysis PLUS ... 28 WHICH CHIP HAS LESS SALT? We show you the best 26 TOMATO SAUCE vs MUSTARD Battle of the bottles 25 YOUR GUIDE TO BUYING BAGGED SALADS

Spicy chicken tacos with slaw & avocado dressing

RECIPES

52 CROWD PLEASERS Feeding an army? These tasty and healthy meals will keep everyone happy 58 MEAL FOR ONE Enjoy an easy meal of Spanish-style beans 59 REV UP YOUR LEFTOVERS Try our creative ways with leftover Christmas ham, turkey and veg 66 5PM PANIC Break out of your midweek rut with these fresh ideas for family meals 74 HFG MAKEOVER: FIRE UP A BETTER BBQ Be inspired this summer by our lighter grill 76 DIY DRESSING Make a big splash with our salad dressings! 81 STUNNING WAYS WITH SUMMER FRUIT These fresh and delicious fruity desserts are ideal for special occasions 86 FROZEN IN TIME Cool off with our delicate yoghurt bark 89 FOOD FOR TINY TUMMIES Kids love these bite-sized tacos!

53

FEATURES

HOW TO BE SMARTER ABOUT SUGAR We all know that eating too much sugar can be bad for our health, so do we need to cut sugar from our diets completely? Our experts debunk the myths about sugar

36

10 TRAVEL TIPS FOR RESTRICTED DIETS Don’t let your special dietary requirements get in the way of a great holiday. We show you how a little forward planning will ensure a safe getaway

42

PAWESOME DIET TIPS FOR PETS The link between obesity and disease is the same for dogs and cats as it is for us. Now vets are saying we should rethink the way we feed them in order to avoid serious health problems down the track

46

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

3


Ham tortilla with tomato salad

64

SHOPPING

21 BACK TO BASICS Wary of foods with a long ingredients list? You’re not alone — find out more! 22 SHOPPING NEWS Our dietitian finds the healthiest new foods and in-season ingredients 25 SHORTCUT SALADS! Tips for choosing the best bagged salads 26 THIS vs THAT Is tomato sauce or mustard the better choice? 27 HOW I STAY HEALTHY Professor Manny Noakes shares her hints for eating well each day 28 HOW MUCH SALT IS IN THAT CRISP? We uncover the less salty versions of these snacks 30 SIZZLING SWAPS … AT YOUR NEXT BBQ Try our easy options for a lighter and tastier summer barbecue experience 32 10 OF THE BEST ICE-CREAM SCOOPS Summer screams for ice cream, so we dig deep into the freezer to find the healthiest spoonfuls

4

healthyfoodguide.com.au

Grilled fish with chilli-lime corn & asparagus

74

REGULARS

8 WELCOME A word from our editor, plus prizes to WIN! 11 YOUR SAY Tune into what everyone’s saying this month 14 NEWS BITES Get all of the freshest health and food news, plus what’s trending in 2017! 16 ASK THE EXPERT Holidays messing with your eating habits? Our dietitian shares tips to help 19 CATHERINE SAXELBY’S HEALTHY HABITS: 5 WAYS TO EASE A HANGOVER Here’s how to lift the fog after a few too many 90 YOUR LOW-SUGAR MEAL PLAN Enjoy our 7-day menu 92 SUBSCRIPTION SPECIAL OFFER Subscribe today and you could win a stay worth $3,440! 95 HOW MUCH DO I NEED TO EAT? A guide to help you estimate your daily requirements 96 REFERENCES 98 10 THINGS in this issue! 99 RECIPE INDEX

WIN

a 5-night Billabong Retreat valued at $3,440!

Subscribe today for your chance to WIN! Six lucky subscribers will win a 5–night stay at Billabong Retreat. This rejuvenating getaway for two includes wellness workshops and classes, plus all meals. Turn to p92 to subscribe. Healthy Food Guide is packed with easy recipes approved by dietitians, plus expert advice and practical tips for healthy eating.


W FAT SOURCE OF S

OTEIN

GO OD SOURCE O F DIETARY

IBR E OW IN

FOR GREAT RECIPE IDEAS, VISIT:

facebook.com/missionfoodsau


AUSTRALIAN

EDITORIAL TEAM Editor Andrea Duvall editor@healthyfoodguide.com.au Dietitian Brooke Longfield, BSc (Nutrition) (Hons), APD, BAppSc (Ex&SpSc) Art Director Brydie Noonan Subeditor Carolin Wun Editorial/Digital Coordinator Kelly Mullinger Contributors Julz Beresford, Alice Brodie, Hannah Ebeltithe, Chrissy Freer, Devin Hart, Jenny Hulme, Bronwen King, Liz Macri, Mark O’Meara, Kerrie Ray, Jennifer Soo, Sarah Swain, Yvonne Walus Contributing dietitian Catherine Saxelby ADVERTISING SALES National Advertising Manager Melissa Fernley, phone (02) 9901 6191 mfernley@nextmedia.com.au Advertising Manager Bianca Preston, phone (02) 9901 6327 bpreston@nextmedia.com.au Victorian Advertising Manager Georgia Falcke, phone (03) 9804 3418 gfalcke@nextmedia.com.au Circulation Director Carole Jones Production Manager Peter Ryman Production & Digital Services Manager Jonathan Bishop Subscription Enquiries Toll Free: 1300 361 146 or +612 9901 6111 Email: subscribe@mymagazines.com.au or go to mymagazines.com.au International Licensing and Syndication Phil Ryan phil.ryan@hlmedia.co.nz

nextmedia Pty Limited Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590 Phone (02) 9901 6100 Chief Executive Officer David Gardiner Commercial Director Bruce Duncan

can do for you! Healthy Food Guide (HFG) magazine is your complete guide to healthy eating. Our recipes use easy-to-find, affordable ingredients. Cook with HFG, and you’ll always enjoy a nutritious meal.

We give unbiased opinions and are not affiliated with any food manufacturers. All branded food in HFG has been approved by our dietitians. Advertisers cannot influence editorial content.

You can trust our advice. All our health information is supported by solid scientific evidence, not media fanfare. We smooth out any confusion caused by ‘pseudoscientists’.

Dietitians review all our articles so that they’re always accurate and up-to-date. We also publish our references in the magazine and online at healthyfoodguide.com.au.

Every recipe in Healthy Food Guide is healthy hfg RECIPES

5pm PANIC

healthyfoodguide.com.au

you’ll need

Serves 4 Cost per serve $3 60 Time to make 30 min

9dairy free 9diabetes friendly

Moroccan chicken skewers w th warm eggplant salad

500g chicken breast fi lets cut into 2 5cm pieces 1 tablespoon Moroccan seasoning 2 medium eggplants chopped in o 1cm pieces 1 large red onion thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves thinly sliced 3 vine- ipened tomatoes chopped ½ cup coriander leaves chopped 2 wholemeal Lebanese bread rounds halved

HIGH

PROT IN

PER SERVE 2 s ewe s + sa ad + bread) 1556k /372cal P ote n 33 4g To al Fat 12 8g Sat F t 3 1g Ca bs 26 3g

66

healthy oo

Sugars 9 2g F b e 8 2g Sodium 336mg Calc um 80mg I on 2 7mg

1 Coat chicken with seasoning Thread onto 8 wooden or me al skewers 2 Preheat a gr ll pan to medium-high heat Sp ay chicken with olive o l and cook for 3–4 minu es each side or unt l browned and cooked through 3 Meanwhile heat 1 ablespoon of o l in a large non-s ick frying pan over medium-high heat Sauté eggplant for 5–10 minutes or unt l golden and oftened Transfer o a plate set aside 4 Spray the same pan with oil cook onion for 5 minutes or unt l softened Add gar ic and tomatoes and cook s ir ing for 5 minutes or until just sof ened Add eserved eggplant to pan and cook for 2 minutes or un il warmed through Top wi h co iander 5 Heat bread on the gr ll pan for 1 minu e each side or until cha red and warmed through Serve chicken wi h eggplant salad and torn bread Note Uncooked marinated chicken is sui able to f eeze

+ eggp ant

+ e onion

+ + Lebane e bread

plus + Moroccan seasoning + ga lic + coriander

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

67

Our recipe writers work with qualified dietitians to develop all our meals. A nutritional analysis is provided for every recipe. We test each meal twice to ensure it works and tastes great! Turn to p99 to read about our recipe badges. HIGH

PROTEIN

9dairy free 9diabetes friendly 9gluten free 9vegetarian

Editorial Advisory Board Professor Jennie Brand-Miller, Professor of Human Nutrition, The University of Sydney; Catherine Saxelby, Accredited Practising Dietitian and nutritionist at Foodwatch Nutrition Centre; Dr Helen O’Connor, Accredited Practising Dietitian; Glenn Cardwell, Accredited Practising Dietitian; Dr Janet Franklin, Senior Clinical Dietitian at Metabolism and Obesity Services, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney; Dr Tim Crowe, Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian; Dr Sue Shepherd, Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and Senior Lecturer, Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at La Trobe University, Melbourne Note: The advisory-board members do not necessarily review every article in Healthy Food Guide magazine and make no warranty as to the scientific accuracy of the magazine. Healthy Life Media Pty Ltd and the Editorial Advisory Board do not necessarily endorse advertised products.

Healthy Food Guide is a Programme Partner of the Dietitians Association of Australia. To find an Accredited Practising Dietitian, visit daa.asn.au

6

MONDAY Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad

Feed your fam ly someth ng tasty and di ferent in under 30 minutes!

Rec pes L z Macr Photography Ma k O Mea a S y ng Ju z Beresford Food prep Ke r e R y

What

Healthy Food Guide is a partner of Nutrition Australia, which provides nutrition information, education and advisory services in community settings across Australia. Visit nutritionaustralia.org


EDITOR’S TOP PICKS

IN THIS ISSUE

welcome I’d like to introduce our new editor, Brooke (left)

1

p64 Transform leftover turkey from Christmas into light and summery rice paper rolls. Yum!

2 p55 Abra-kebab-ra! These chilli prawn skewers will be a hit with guests at backyard barbecues.

O

n the first day I met our dietitian Brooke Longfield, she told me she was just 16 years old when her mum brought home a new little food magazine called Healthy Food Guide. It was our first issue, and Brooke was soon hooked. Fast forward some years, and now she is an experienced dietitian and a key member of the HFG team. Brooke’s recall of every story we have ever run is remarkable. She is also passionate about you, and about inspiring you with simple, practical advice and great recipes. So, it is with great pleasure that I hand her the reigns as the new editor of Healthy Food Guide.

hfg

I’m moving on to helm Prevention, which is joining our publishing stable. It makes sense that those of us seeking a healthy life do so in all facets, from health and fitness to food, so the two mags will be sister titles. A massive thank you to all of our regular readers. It’s been a privilege to be welcomed into your lives, and kitchens, each month. I know that Brooke will bring you more great food and fabulous reads in future issues. Best wishes,

Andrea Duvall, Editor

Join our Subs Club to club WIN prizes every month! subs

3 p85 Refresh your taste buds on hot days with this fruity watermelon and mint granita!

8

healthyfoodguide.com.au

Subscribe to HFG mag today and you’ll go in the draw to win great prizes every month! SUBSCRIBE NOW and you could WIN TWO great recipe books plus TWO Aladdin flasks — a prize pack worth more than $108!


Positively Nourish.

Chia. Positively Simple.


Blueberries, vanilla & teff gourmet protein muesli Food for Health’s gourmet protein muesli was created by our founder and naturopath, Narelle… so it is not only made with healthy nutritious ingredients, but it is also made with passion and plenty of love! This muesli is filled with superfoods teff, chia & blueberries, is gluten free and is a good source of protein, which keeps you fuller for longer. We love to call it a crunchy bowl of deliciousness. Enjoy! Find this muesli in the health food aisle of your local supermarket.

Telephone 1300 881 277 hello@foodforhealth.com.au www.foodforhealth.com.au


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Got something to share? Connect with us …

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Australian Healthy Food Guide

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SPECIAL hfg FEATURES

What’s your

IBS TRIGGER:

diet OR stress? If you know what sets off IBS symptoms, you can relieve and manage it

38

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39

Sue Keating, NSW hfg RECIPES

Note: ‘Your say’ letters may be edited for length and content.

Colour your meals Thank you for the fabulous recipes in the November, 2016 issue. Getting kids to eat healthily is as simple as encouraging them to ‘eat a rainbow’ of foods. And your recipes really tweaked my ‘rainbow’ appetite. The spicy prawn stir-fry (p56), and tomato and chickpea salad (p68) are family favourites! Judith Caine, VIC

PRIZEH WORT

$267

grain

HIGH

PROTEIN

Tomato & chickpea salad

PER SERVE 689kJ/165cal Protein 7 3g Total Fat 6 7g Sat Fat 1 0g Carbs 15 8g

Serves 4 (as a side) Cost per serve $2 50 Time to make 15 min

9gluten free 9vegetarian 9diabetes friendly 9dairy

Tomato & chickpea salad

68

healthyfoodguide

com au

1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice ½ teaspoon ground cumin 60g baby sp nach 2 arge tomatoe s sliced 1 x 400g can no added salt chickpeas rinsed drained 200g mixed baby tomatoe s halved

free

Sugars 4 0g F bre 6 5g Sodium 26mg Calcium 74mg Iron 2 9mg

1 eschalot thinly sliced ¼ cup small mint leaves 1 Combine olive oil juice and cumin in a small bowl 2 Arrange spinach on a platter or serving plates Top with sliced tomato chickpeas baby tomatoes eschalot and mint 3 Drizzle salad with dressing and season with cracked black pepper; and serve

Rec pes Chr ssy F eer Photography Mark O Meara Sty ng Ju z Beresford Food prep Ke r e Ray

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Duva Pho os Stock Text Kerry Fow er Andrea

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My daughter has been iagnosed with IBS. Luckily, I keep all my opies of HFG, as you published a wonderful article ‘What’s your IBS trigger: diet or stress?’ in September, 2016. Your article gave her so much information, plus a low-FODMAP meal plan. This is a great starting point so she can get back to enjoying food again. have IBS If you suspect you may Your ask your GP for a d agnosis at least two doctor w ll then ook for

Do I have IBS? of IBS causes a spectrum symptoms ranging from abdominal pain diarrhoea an urgent and constipation to need to go to the toilet t s known as a ‘functional wh ch disorder’ of the bowel may means that while you experience even severe damage symptoms there is no Pain is to your intest nal tract eased by a bowel movement a “People with IBS have

hfg RECIPES

Barley

Signs and symptoms

may even avoid distressing and you It’s uncomfortable and off your Irritable it Discover what sets situations because of to ease the pain can develop strategies Bowel Syndrome so you

us are l kely round one n five of Bowel to suffer from Irritable our lives Syndrome (IBS) during are m ld and For some the symptoms short lived; for others IBS can be a chronic deb litating and painful their ng affect condition confidence and general life of enjoyment The actual causes are unclear although a bout of gastroenterit s and are issues with digestion the condition thought to help k ckstart two main We do know there are stress and triggers for IBS symptoms: The good news diet (‘mood and food’) what bring is that by recognising ca people symptoms many both relieve and mana

Fresh start

Symptoms range from ea and abdominal pain, diarrho need constipation, to an urgent to use the toilet

check

Tri-colour quinoa

Eating more heart-healthy grains is simple with our delicious recipes …

T

hese days carbs are getting a bad rap But whole grains are valuable carbs which provide us with important nutr ents as well as fibre Most of us can benefit from eating more whole grains each day So if your repertoire only ncludes pasta and rice find mea t me inspiration on the following pages You’ll find two delicious recipes using qu noa and another two using barley so buying a whole pack of each nutrit ous whole gra n s better va ue So go on go with the grain!

How grains protect you A recent review found that peop e with higher intakes of wholegrain foods are less likely to

Wh te quinoa

Ř gain weight Ř have heart disease Ř suffer bowel cancer Ř have type 2 d abetes or develop it later

Ř have low grade inflammation

Ř die prematurely Source Grains & Legumes Nutri ion Counc l 2016

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALT

OOD

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61

Waste not As a single working mum with two active teenagers, I was especially grateful for the ‘Grain check’ article (Nov, 2016). Buying and cooking the whole packet of grains, then using it in a few different and delicious ways was fabulous. We tried something new that could prepare ahead, and there was no waste! Thanks so much! Tania Weekes, NSW

WIN a Décor prize pack

Congratulations to this month’s ❋ winner – Sue Keating – who has won a Victorinox Chef’s Knife worth $259!

Share your news, views and photos of HFG recipes by mail, email or social media and be in the running to win a Décor prize pack. The whole family’s lunch and hydration needs will be covered with this Décor pack. The prize pack includes the new Glass Lunch range, Lunch Break range and a variety of drink bottles and coolers — just perfect for summer! Valued at $267.

Have your say at healthyfoodguide.com.au and click WIN, or send to Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

11


Australian Healthy Food Guide

@hfgaustralia #cookwithhfg

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Talk to us on FACEBO

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WE ASKED: Peter FitzSimons recently lost 40kg by quitting all sugar and alcohol. Do you think you need to ‘quit’ certain foods in order to lose weight?

YOU REPLIED: Ř No, but it does help.

Ř Quit sugar and then

All quitting certain foods does is lower your overall calorie intake.

went hard at the gym — that’s the real reason he lost the weight … not just giving up sugar.

Konrad Goulding

via Facebook Your cover recipe (Oct, 2016) was delicious! Felicity Corey French

Sharmayne Mitchell

Ř If you can learn how to moderate you can enjoy absolutely everything!!

Ellie Cooke

Ř No quitting for me. Replacing discretionary food with vegies, though.

Jess Hogg

Ř Balance is the key. Ř I quit sugar too and

Bailee Jane

Lori Nilsson

lost weight. However, it’s not for everyone. Weight loss is not one-size-fits-all. It should be tailored to your specific needs.

via Instagram Chinese-style pancakes with hoisin chicken (Oct, 2016) inspired by Australian Healthy Food Guide. @sarahjessicairwin

Bro ght to you by

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Don’t miss next month ...

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via Instagram Strawberry yoghurt cake (Oct, 2014) #hfgaustralia @kazworld82

Photos: iStock. Lunch box poster image depicts an example only.

The problem is that sugar is really addictive, even more than cocaine. I’m trying to cut sugar, but it’s tricky because it’s in pretty much everything.


hfg NEWS

newsb

Keep up-to-date with th in health and food news

Scanning scandals

More milk?

Bagging your own groceries at the self-serve scanner is proving risky business for Aussie supermarkets. It’s been found that almost a third of all shoplifting at Coles is done at self-serve checkouts. How scan-dalous!

Are you a soggy cereal or a crunchy kind of breakfast person? It turns out that men are more likely than women to love soggy cereal, say researchers. They also found that 13 million Aussies fuss to get the perfect ratio of milk to cereal so it’s not too soggy – it’s just right!

Australian Food News, 2016

Galaxy Research, 2016

Who said healthy eating is expensive? Livelighter, 2016

Potato chips

$20

per kg

14

healthyfoodguide.com.au

VS


ing nuts! w that a handful of nuts (about 30g) each day is a great source of heart-healthy fats, and fibre, yet few of us eat this amount to reach our daily target. But did you know blespoon of peanut butter is equivalent to a handful of nuts? So, crack open a jar!

Think before you drink Sugary soft drinks may be in the spotlight, but a study has found that up to four times more kilojoules are consumed through alcohol. We might worry that festive eating leads to weight gain, but drinking could be the culprit! Euromonitor International, 2016

Text: Carolin Wun. Photos: iStock.

MUSCLE MEMORY Building up muscle strength has an ad ed benefit – it improves your brain function. A new study into older people with reduced memory found that exercising to develop physical strength also improved their brain function. Grab some light weights next time you go out walking. Journal of American Geriatrics, 2016 JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

15


hfg NEWS

newsbites ASK THE EXPERT Brooke Longfield Healthy Food Guide Accredited Practising Dietitian

Goodbye to flying saucers Toddler meal times can be messy, so we’re loving the Gizmotots range of silicone plates that grip to a highchair table or any flat surface through suction. They’re dishwasher and microwave safe, too. No more plate-throwing games! Visit gizmotots.com.au

Elixir of youth South Korean scientists have discovered that a diet high in vitamins and minerals in early adulthood can help delay ageing. So, just as you should invest money in your 20s and 30s for later, investing in fruit and vegies as well will see you reap rich dividends in years to come — start young and stay young! Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 2016

16

healthyfoodguide.com.au

O

Being busy in the holidays, I just snack during the day then eat a huge dinner. How can I keep a healthier eating routine?

Q

– Kate K, via email

ver the Christmas with yoghurt will provide holidays, we tend you with a good balance to relax our eating of satisfying protein and habits, so this is a very energising carbohydrates. common trap to fall into. This should reduce your While it might not seem need to snack on biscuits like you’re eating much, and other unhealthy treats. nibbling on the odd biscuit Next, pack some healthy here and there, along with on-the-go snacks in your drinking a couple of milky bag or glovebox just in coffees can quickly add case hunger strikes: try up. If you keep a record nuts, trail mix, high-fibre of what you snack on, all muesli bars and fruit, such that grazing could be the as apples and grapes. This kilojoule equivalent of a will ensure you have the breakfast and lunch. energy and nourishment Holidays are a time when to enjoy your holidays. you want plenty of energy. Finally, avoid getting an So, start the morning energy fix from a juice, with a nutritious iced tea or takeaway breakfast befo thie. These your busy day be high in begins. Eggs ugar, lack Send your on wholegrain satisfying questions to toast, or a big fibre, and editor@healthy lso add a ew holiday ojoules nwanted nirs. With ning, you’ll ur eating — and health — t on track ummer g. Enjoy!


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

Awards showcase

Our annual awards give a thumbs up to the healthiest, tastiest foods in-store. Here are some of the best!

YOU’LL BE RAISING THE BAR Le Granola Bar French Vanilla is handmade by Wallaby Foods in their world-class facility located in idyllic Byron Bay, NSW. This delicious snack bar is made from a blend of roasted nuts and seeds folded together with coconut nectar, fruit, vanilla and spices, plus a hint of roasted chilli. It’s then delicately cold-pressed to retain its enchanting flavour. Enjoy the natural chewy goodness of this award-winning bar that also has a 5 Health Star Rating. It’s rich in fibre – and even richer in flavour. Available in the health food aisle of Woolworths, Coles and independent supermarkets.

START

E NEWS

Mayver’s Cacao Super Spread has absolutely no added sugar, making it nature’s guilt-free, dairy-free, all-natural choccie fix bottled in a resealable jar. Perfect for making smoothies, spreading on your favourite snack or just eating straight from the jar with a spoon!

WRAP YOUR HEAD AROUND THESE BFree Quinoa & Chia Seed wraps are delicious, light and healthy, and made with super seeds. Why not fill a BFree wrap – available in Multigrain, Sweet Potato or Quinoa & Chia – for a great allergen-free snack on-the-go? Available in Woolworths.


hfg NEWS

#trending in 2017 We look at some of the new food trends making headlines this year.

unctional foods

are the new superfoods Everything from coconut oil to bacon has been touted as a ‘superfood’. Now we know that this was SAVE marketing hype not science Expect to see talk about functional foods with proven benefits – oats, ferm These all deserve a pl

Souping

is the new juic

Sweet potato toast

is the new smashed avo We’re moving on to a new way with vegies for brekkie: sweet potato toast. Thin slices of sweet potato are cooked in the toaster, just like regular toast. Try topping it with peanut butter or eggs – or even avo!

Move over green j ‘souping’ is the late to use high-power blenders. Unlike ju no part of the vege is thrown away whe make soup, so you more healthy fibre i h li i

Vegan eating If 2016 was all about paleo and protein, this year the spotlight is on humble vegetables. Aussies Google the term ‘vegan’ more than any country in the world, as we explore the health benefits of plant-based eating.

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Turmeric latte

is the new matcha tea Lattes spiked with the anti-inflammatory spice, turmeric, are frothing up in cafés, replacing matcha tea as the hottest hot drink of 2017.

Text: Brooke Longfield. Photos: iStock.

is the new paleo


CATHERIN E SAXELBY ’S

ays to HHEAABLITTHY S A OVER

Chill out! A bag of ice can help ease a headache

2 e .

Eat something light

Try eating small mouthfuls of plain rice, or a bite of toast smeared with spread or Vegemite. Or opt for a spoonful of grated or puréed apple, some canned fruit, custard or plain yoghurt. If it stays down, eat a little more.

Sipping on wate r& bling to ast or gs can e a your pain se

3

Go for eggs

If you’re able to eat, cook up some eggs. The yolks are rich in cysteine, an amino acid that is thought to break down acetaldehyde. This

is produced when the liver processes alcohol, and it causes some hangover symptoms.

4

Rest and sleep

5

Ice your head

If you can, stay in bed and ‘sleep it off’. Alcohol interferes with a good night’s sleep.

Yes, it’s old-fashioned, but it works. Place a bag of frozen peas on your head or forehead for a minute or two. This reduces the swelling and inflammation that is triggering your sore head.

The bottom line During the holiday season, it can be easy to overindulge. So next time, alternate alcoholic drinks with water or a non-alcoholic drink. And always eat beforehand. But if you do arrive home a little tipsy, drinking a big glass of water before you sleep will help reduce your symptoms.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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Exp perts say y, gs are OK every day. day eggs Egg lovers rejoice! Eggs are a healthy, natural, whole food that the Australian Dietary Guidelines say you can enjoy every day. eggs.org.au/OKeveryday


SHOPPING

stay healthy at BBQs

guide to bagged salads

how salty are those chips?

BACK TO BASICS Does a long list of ingredients you can’t pronounce turn you off buying certain foods? You’re not alone. Almost half of Aussies wish there were more natural foods on the shelves, and are even willing to pay more for products that don’t contain unwanted ingredients.

Text: Brooke Longfield. Sources: Nielsen Global Health, 2016; Better Health Channel, 2014. Photo: iStock.

The top 10 ingredients and foods that Aussies want to avoid are:

Ř Antibiotics/hormones Ř Artificial colours in animal products Ř Sugar Ř MSG Ř Genetically modified foods Ř Artificial preservatives Ř Artificial flavours Ř Sodium Ř Foods with BPA Ř Artificial packaging

sweeteners

Some of these are easy to spot, but others, like sugar and salt, have a range of different names, making it tricky. Turn to p28 to find out how much salt is in one of the saltiest snacks — potato chips. And learn how to be savvy about sugar in our cover story on p36.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg SHOPPING

EAT FRESH NOW!

Aussie mangoes

✓

ITIAN HFG DIET

D APPROVE

SHOPPING NEWS Ripe mangoes are perfect for summer smoothies

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Shelf watch

I

s there any fruit that says Aussie summer better than a sweet and juicy mango? Buy them by the tray and, if there’s any leftover, freeze their juicy cheeks of flesh for smoothies or refreshing desserts.

Bounce off hunger Bounce Maple Pecan Ener Ball ($3.29) is the latest varie in this range of high-protein and high-fibre snacks. Per ball: 714kJ (171cal), 8g protein, 6.5g sugar, 4g fibre

3 OF THE BEST

Fill ’em up!

Kensington Pride

Wholey Foods Breakfast Smoothie ($15.95 per 500g) is a protein-boosted blend of oats, nuts and seeds — simply add milk! Per 50g (Vanilla):

Easily the most popular variety, this juicy, plump fruit tastes sweet and slightly tangy with a strong mango flavour.

Calypso

905kJ (217cal), 13.7g protein, 2.3g sugar, 3.9g fibre

These blush-coloured fruits were specially developed to have the best of both worlds — a smaller seed and soft flesh, so the fibrous bits don’t get stuck in your teeth.

R2E2

Text: Brooke Longfield. Photos: Getty Images & iStock.

Big and bold-flavoured, these mangoes have more flesh than any other variety and a long shelf life. Just store them away from bananas — they’ll over-ripen your mangoes very quickl

Yoghurt with a fruity twist Mangoes with firm flesh and unbruised skin are best

FAST FACTS Ř Buy with your nose — a fresh, ripe mango has a fragrant, tropical fruity aroma. Ř Never store mangoes in plastic bags; they need air! And only refrigerate them for 2–3 days once they have ripened.

Ř A large mango has around 400kJ (95cal) and is packed with your whole day’s worth of vitamin C. How sweet!

With less than 500kJ (120cal per tub, Twisted Frozen Yoghurt ($7.99 per 4-pack) is a light summer treat. Per tub (Strawberry): 418kJ (100cal), 0.5g sat fat, 17.2g sugar

A bit nutty

Wallaby Forager fruit and nut snacks ($3.29) are a high-fibre blend of nuts, coconut and dried fruit. Per 35g (Cacao Banana): 658kJ (157cal), 3.1g protein, 9g sugar, 4g fibre

Plant-powered breakfast Good for brekkie or a snack, Be Natural Organics Golden Whole Grain Bites ($5.99) are pillows of wheat. Per 45g serve (Original): 660kJ (158cal), 3.9g sugar, 5.4g fibre, 5 Health Star Rating

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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re o m t Ge T

GRE A PES I C E R

visit us at

h

hyfoodguide.com.au

for health news, nutritious recipes and great prizes!


hfg SHOPPING

Shortcut salads! When you’re time poor, bagged salads are an easy way to give your summer barbecues a fresh and healthy spin. Here’s how to pick the best.

1

High five

Reach your five daily serves of vegies by adding salad to your plate, with a cupful counting as one serve. The more varied the colours in your salad are, the more variety of vitamins and antioxidants there are.

Text: Brooke Longfield. Photos: iStock.

2

Dark vs light

As a general rule, the darker the leaves, the higher they are in antioxidants, natural compounds in plants that protect your body against stress and pollution, and slow the ageing process.

3

Pre-washed

Most pre-packaged salad leaves have already been washed to kill any harmful bacteria and also to help avoid browning.

4

Cost of convenience

5

Dress it up

While bagged leaves cost about 30 per cent more compared to a whole lettuce, you’re getting a variety of lettuce leaves in the one bag. This is easier than buying three or four different types of lettuces and only tearing off a handful of each lettuce at a time.

Some pre-packaged salads come with a sachet of dressing, but watch the creamy ones which can be high in saturated fat, or Asian dressings, which use high-salt soy sauce. Try adding half the sachet, or drizzle with extra virgin olive oil — the healthy fat actually helps you absorb the nutrients in your salad. Bonus!

1 cup of salad cou leafy 1 out of ynts as o daily se ur 5

✓HFG TOP PICKS These combine fibre-rich vegies with a dressing that isn’t loaded with fat or salt

Salad Kit, $5

y

Per serve: 198kJ (47cal), <1g sat fat, 2.1g fibre, 132mg sodium

Coles Beetroot & Puffed Quinoa Salad Bowl, $5 Per bowl: 313kJ (75cal), 0.4g sat fat, 3.1g fibre, 204mg sodium

Coles Kaleslaw Kit, $5 Per serve: 409kJ (98cal), 0.9g sat fat, 3.1g fibre, 140mg sodium

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg SHOPPING

VS Tomato sauce

Mustard (1 tablespoon)

(1 tablespoon)

The meat is sizzling on the barbie, but which condiment comes out on top?

91kJ (22cal)

KILOJOULES

76kJ (18cal)

195mg

SODIUM

312mg

Both mustard and tomato sauce are high in added salt. Because typical barbecue foods like sausages and bread are also high in salt, it’s important to use these store-bought condiments sparingly.

4.4g

SUGAR

<1g

This is where tomato sauce really should hang its head in shame: Every tablespoon has a full teaspoon of sugar! The good news is you can now find no-added-sugar varieties of tomato sauce.

BETTER CHOICE = MUSTARD 26

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Text: Brooke Longfield. Nutrition values from FoodWorks nutrition software, 2012. Photos: iStock.

Both are low in kilojoules, but it’s easier to go overboard and smother your steak with tomato sauce — quickly loading on the kilojoules! Mustard has a strong flavour, so a little goes a long way.


Professor Manny Noakes tells ...

How I stay healthy Professor Manny Noakes developed the best-selling CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet. Her personal journey to better health began as a chubby teenager. As a kid, I was overweight, which in those days put me in the minority. I went on a high-protein plan in my later teenage years, and felt more in control of my eating and weight. I can’t get over how obsessed we are with having to eat all the time. If your meal has plenty of protein and low-GI carbs, it will take you through for many hours. So, I don’t often have energy slumps, but if I do, I’ll grab a pick-me-up skim latte. There’s nothing like a little caffeine — it’s the Italian in me!

had to put out a book. (It has now sold more than a million copies worldwide.) At the CSIRO, we surveyed ove 80,000 people. We found that older people eat 21 per cent fewe eggs than younger people. The way we used to measure cholesterol was less sophisticated than it is today, and the effect of eating eggs was greatly exaggerated years ago. We now know that having two eggs a day doesn’t budge cholesterol by much.

My mother taught me how to make pasta – using eggs

The Total Wellbeing Diet took two to three years of clinical research. We never intended to publish our findings, but we found there were so many people interested in it that we

For breakfast, I often have eggs with wholegrain toast, or a slice of cheese or avocado on toast. Lunch is a wrap or sushi.

NNY ENJOYS THESE … s s t

A little caffeine helps me through an e erg l

Professor Manny Noakes’ created this high-protein, low-GI eating plan. A digital version is also available.

For dinner, we start with soup. Eating five serves of vegetables a day can be a challenge, so a vegie soup helps, and it takes the edge off your appetite. Mains will be meat, chicken or fish with a lot of vegies. We sometimes have pasta, but I prefer to make my own. My mother taught me how: It’s made with eggs so it’s much nicer and also higher in protein. I travel a lot and when I order room service, I’ll have steamed vegetables on the side. I try to avoid anything served with chips. But when there are only less healthy options available, I’ll keep the serving sizes small.

My indulgence foods are white wine — I have a glass of

great way to e serves of vegies

sauvignon blanc almost every day — and sometimes a gelato. Physical fitness is a constant issue for me because a lot of what I do is sedentary. I do have a little under-desk cycle, though. And I try to get off my backside and walk whenever I can.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

27


hfg SHOPPING

How much 167mg per serve

is in that crisp?

Doritos Cheese Supreme Corn Chips

Dietitian Brooke Longfield finds the healthier versions of these crispy, moreish snacks.

L

et’s look at how chips are made. You take a potato, peel it, slice it and deep-fry it. Then, shake salt or another savoury flavour over it. What’s left is a salty, fatty sliver of potato with little of its fibre left. Most of us know that it’s not a healthy snack, but with new types of chips suggesting they’re better, it pays to take a closer look. You’ll find chips made out of sweet potato, beetroot, lentils and kale in the health food aisle. But they’re not necessarily healthier. Here’s what you should look for when choosing a crunchy snack. Ř LESS SALT You can now find no-added-salt chips out there. This is your best choice, as salt overrides your hunger and fullness signals, causing you to overeat. Try to avoid the saltiest varieties which are salt and vinegar, and cheese-flavoured

chips. Then, check the label and choose one with less than 400mg sodium per 100g. Ř LESS FAT Most chips contain around one-third total fat. Even vegie chips are cooked in oil, making them a high-kilojoule snack compared to plain vegies. The good news is that many chips are now being cooked in healthier oils, such as canola or sunflower, which cuts down the saturated fat significantly. Select a pack that contains less than 5g sat fat per 100g. Ř SMALL, PORTIONED PACKS In a healthy diet, no food is ever off limits, but we do need to keep our portions in check. Buying small, individual packs is the smartest way to do this. A ‘snack-sized’ portion is a small handful (about 10–15 chips). At parties, just grab one handful and step away from the chip bowl!

The combination of salt & crunch makes chips easy to overeat

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95mg

per serve

Beanfields Sea Salt Bean & Rice Chips

243mg per serve

Natural Chip Company Sea Salt & Vinegar


HFG TO PICKS a gre A ‘serv 10–

50mg

per serve

Tyrrell’s Hand-Cooked Crisps Lightly Sea Salted

109mg Nutritional values correct as of October 2016, based on manufacturers’ recommended serving size, ranging from 25–28g. Bowl of chips photo: iStock.

per serve

Vege Deli Crisps Original

108mg per serve

Grain Waves Sour Cream & Chives

235mg per serve

SunRice Brown Rice Chips Parmesan & Sundried Tomato

58mg

per serve

Thomas Chipman Sweet Potato Chips

per serve

Simply 7 Quinoa Chips Cheddar

150mg per serve

Smith’s Original Potato Chips

290mg

4mg

per serve

Freedom Foods No Added Salt Potato Chips JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

29


hfg SHOPPING

✓ SIZZLING SWAPS... at your next BBQ TITIAN HFG DIE ED

APPROV

Ditch the meat-fest at your backyard barbie this summer. Dietitian Brooke Longfield shows how to sizzle your way to a healthy, balanced meal.

Swap hamburger patties for LEAN STEAK Why it’s be Pre-made bu are usually h saturated fat equivalent a lean steak. K small — abo which is the palm. Better skinless chic fish fillets, su

RAISING THE STEAKS: 3 tips to a healthier BBQ

1 2 3

Turn down the heat

Black, charred, overcooked meat creates by-products that can harm your health.

Choose lean cuts

DIY marinade

Acidic lemon juice or vinegar breaks down tough fibres in meat, keeping it tender.

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Photos: iStock.

Rump steaks and eye-fillets are good choices; just trim away any visible fat.


Healthy BBQ bites Avocado Grill half an avo, flesh-side down, then carefully scoop out the warm and smoky flesh. Stone fruit Caramelise peach and nectarine halve and add them to salads. Asparagus Drizzle crisp spears with olive oil and chargrill until tender. Cos lettuce Pop a wedge of cos lettuce on the hotplate until grill marks appear. Pineapple Dust pineapple wedges with cinnamon, and then barbecue for a sweet end to the

Swap potato salad for GARDEN SALAD Why it’s better … The creamy dressing in a potato salad is high in fat and kilojoules! Instead, try filling half your plate with a garden salad of mixed leaves, tomato, cucumber and carrot — and stick to a simple olive oil and vinegar dressing.

Swap barbecue sauce for CARAMELISED ONIONS Why it’s better … Cooked onions provide a sweet flavour without the added sugar and salt that you’ll find in a bottled sauce. (A spoonful of bottled sauce is half sugar.) Plus, the onion will boost your vegie intake. Bonus!

Swap white bread for GRILLED CORN

Swap for PR Why it’ Prawns h kilojoule of the sa sausage your sea fresh ga than usin which ca JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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TITIAN E I D G F H D

E APPROV

1 2

Bulla Frozen Greek Style Yoghurt Blueberry

10 of the best

Per 2 level scoops: 267kJ (64cal), 1.1g sat fat, 10.4g sugar 9gluten free

ice-cream SCOOPS 34

Proud & Punch Frozen Greek Style Yoghurt with

Blood Orange & Mango

Per 2 level scoops: 360kJ (87cal), 1.4g sat fat, 10.6g sugar

FroPro Green Tea & Mint

Per 2 level scoops: 299kJ (71cal), 1.0g sat fat, 0.3g sugar 9gluten free

Streets Blue Ribbon

Summer screams for ice cream, so we’ve delved into the deep freeze for the healthiest spoonfuls.

Light Vanilla Per 2 level scoops:

3 1

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2

4

5

Text: Brooke Longfield. Photography: Jennifer Soo. Serving size of two level scoops based on the average recommended serve ranging from 45–72g, depending on brand.

305kJ (73cal), 0.9g sat fat, 9.2g sugar


5 6

Peters Light & Creamy

Cookies & Cream

Per 2 level scoops: 330kJ (79cal), 0.7g sat fat, 9.7g sugar

8

So Good

For a healthier scoop Ř Just two small scoops

Chocolate Bliss

Per 2 level scoops: 313kJ (75cal), 0.4g sat fat, 8.6g sugar

is the right size for a healthy snack — 600kJ (144cal).

9dairy free 9gluten free

Twisted Frozen Yoghurt

Classic Vanilla Bean & Strawberries

Per 2 level scoops: 351kJ (84cal), 0.4g sat fat, 14.5g sugar

9

Strawberry Sorbet

9dairy free 9gluten free

7

10

Mango Sorbet

Per 2 level scoops: 334kJ (80cal), 0g sat fat, 18.4g sugar

9dairy free 9gluten free

Ř Reduce saturated fat by picking one with less than 4g sat fat per 100g.

Per 2 level scoops: 308kJ (74cal), 0g sat fat, 15g sugar

9gluten free

Weis Australian

Ř Add fresh fruit to your bowl for satisfying fibre.

Gelativo

Ř Sorbets may be fat-free, but watch the added sugar!

Peters No Sugar Added

Creamy Vanilla

Ř Can’t eat dairy? Choose tasty fruit or soy options.

Per 2 level scoops: 255kJ (61cal), 0.9g sat fat, 4.3g sugar

9gluten free

9

6 8 7

10

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

33


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FEATURES

the truth about sugar

• travel

tips for food allergies

• feeding

your pet

Text: Brooke Longfield. Photo: iStock.

BITE INTO GOOD HEALTH Summer holidays bring a clear change of rhythm. As you recover from Christmas, you’ll likely have some spare time to spend on, well, you. Warm summer days make it more pleasant to be active and outdoors. And you lean towards lighter meals, like salads, and fresh fruit. But if, like many Aussies, you’re going away over the summer break, you’ll know that travel can disrupt your normal healthy eating routine, and it can be especially tricky if you have a food allergy or intolerance (see p42). In fact, even your pet’s food habits can be disrupted over the holiday break (p46)! So, read on to be the happiest, healthiest version of yourself this summer.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

35


hfg FEATURES

How to be

smarter about We know that too much sugar is bad for us. But how much is too much? With so much misinformation out there, our nutrition for you.

M

ost of us think of sugar as the white stuff we add to our coffee or baking. But sugar is found in essential healthy foods as well. With so much ‘noise’ out there about sugar, it can be confusing. This guide is based on science, not amateur blog posts, which we’ve compiled to help you to be smarter about sugar in 2017.

Q

sugar?

Milk

Corn

Grapes

36

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Not all sugars are created equal

It’s the added sugar, in very concentrated forms, that is the problem (think white sugar, honey, syrups and even fruit juice). These are called ‘free’ sugars and they have no cell walls to slow the digestion of them, so they freely gush into our blood stream. These sugars also lack nutrients, which is why they’re known as ‘empty’ kilojoules. Some people believe that ‘natural’ sugars like rice malt syrup, coconut sugar and agave nectar are better, but our bodies treat them the same as white sugar. So these, too, are classified as ‘free’ sugars that should be limited, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Sugar is a carbohydrate. So carbohydrate-rich foods, like fruit, milk and even some vegetables (corn, potatoes and even peas), all contain natural sugars. Fruit, vegies and whole grains are an important part of a healthy diet. The sugars in these foods are not the ones that we need to be worried about. The distinguishing difference is that these sugars are enclosed by a plant cell wall. So they tend to be digested more slowly, since the cell wall must be broken down first. Thus, these sugars take longer to enter the blood stream, and are less likely to cause blood sugar spikes and slumps that make us seek out a high-kilojoule snack. While whole natural foods contain sugar, they also provide us with valuable vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre. Also, these foods do not promote tooth decay like other sugars do.

Sugars in whole foods are different to added sugars like white sugar & honey

Soft drink

Potato

JANUA

HY FOOD GUIDE

37


hfg FEATURES

BE SAVVY ABOUT

SUGAR CLAIMS How much is too much? On average, Aussies are now consuming 60g of added (free) sugar every day. That’s roughly 14 teaspoons. The health ramifications are obvious: sugar causes tooth decay. And the foods where high concentrations of sugar are found, such as chocolate, biscuits, soft drinks and cakes, are also high in kilojoules, leading to weight gain. Alarmingly, over half of the added sugar in our diet comes from sweet drinks. Further, both sugary food and drinks are high in kilojoules, but have very little nutritional value or satiety (which means they’re easy to overeat). And this is why sugar is a major culprit in the obesity problem. The WHO dietary guidelines recommend that we limit added sugar to six teaspoons for adults and three teaspoons for children per day. Given that a standard 600ml bottle of soft drink has around 16 teaspoons of sugar, this recommendation may be a big ask for many Aussies!

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100% NATURAL SUGAR This is a confusing claim since all sugars (unless they’re artificial sweeteners) are made from plant extracts, so are ‘natural’. For instance, white sugar comes from sugar cane, but this doesn’t mean it’s healthy. So, it’s a marketing tool rather than a source of useful information.

NO ADDED SUGAR Over half the added sugar in our diet comes from drinks

This usually means no refined/white sugar has been added. It does not mean there is no sugar naturally occurring in the product (as with fruit juice), or that other forms of sugar, such as rice malt syrup or honey haven’t been added.

100% SUGAR FREE The term is often used for foods that have added artificial sweeteners, such as sugar-free gum. It could also mean food is sweetened with dried fruit, rice malt syrup or honey, so check the ingredients.

50% LESS SUGAR This simply means that it has half the sugar than a standard product. Since this claim is usually used for products that are high in sugar (e.g. cordial, jelly and flavoured milk), halving it does not necessarily mean it’s low in sugar.

NO ADDED CANE SUGAR This tells you there is no added sugar (white sugar) in the food. But it does not necessarily mean the product has no sugar. And remember, free-from-sugar doesn’t mean free-from-kilojoules.


Sugar is the second ingredient in this sweet chilli sauce

Sugar, sugar everywher Most people have no idea how much sugar they are eating every day, because most of it is hidden in processed and packaged foods. In an ideal world, you would be able to look at a food label and spot the specific amount of added sugar. Unfortunately, many foods contain a added and natural sugars — for example, a And the current labelling laws only require total sugars be provided, so there’s no way the label how much added sugar there is Reading the ingredients list is the best how much added sugar there is, because have to be listed in order of quantity. This if sugar appears in the first three ingredie that the food is high in added sugar. However beware the cunning tactics

We spotted seven types of added sugar in this cereal!

Five ingredients in this muesli bar are added sugars

Manufacturers can then put these sugars towards the end of the ingredients list. To help you recognise the many names that sugar hides behind, we’ve come up with a list on p40. And pictured on this page are some examples of just how common added sugar is in our food supply and how easily it hides. One popular breafast cereal has seven different types of added sugar in its ingredients! The ingredients list for a muesli bar also belies the healthy marketing claims on the pack; sugar appears five times under names such as raw sugar, invert sugar and maple syrup. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

39


hfg FEATURES

Spot the sugar in your food Sugar is often hiding behind several different names. Here are a few to look out for.

Agave nectar Brown sugar Caramel Coconut sugar Fructose Fruit juice concentrate Glucose Golden syrup High fructose corn syrup Honey Invert sugar Maltodext Maple sy Palm sug Raw sug Rice ma

40

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SUGAR MYTHS MY TH Sugar causes diabetes If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes, you need to monitor the sugar and carbohydrates you eat in order to manage your blood sugar levels. However, if you don’t have diabetes, sugar intake alone won’t cause you to develop it. The main risk factors for type 2 diabetes are being overweight, inactivity and having a diet high in kilojoules.

MY TH It is the sugar in alcohol that is making me fat It is actually the alcohol in drinks that puts on the weight, as alcohol is very high in kilojoules (at 29 kilojoules per gram compared to 17 kilojoules per gram for sugar).

MY TH Eating too much fruit is bad Fruit contains natural sugars, but it also contains fibre, which acts as a brake on digestion, slowing down the delivery of sugar to our blood stream. The amount of sugar in a piece of fresh fruit is small compared with its filling power — think how full you’d feel after eating four oranges compared to drinking a glass of juice (made from about four orange )

9

8

Eating whole fruit fills you up more than drinking the juice


FIVE EASY WAYS TO CUT BACK

MY TH

fruit for sweetness 1Use

Brown sugar is better for you than white sugar Brown sugar is just white sugar with molasses added back in. We would have to eat a massive amount of brown sugar to benefit from the tiny amounts of minerals in the molasses.

2Minimise sugary drinks and lollies

These provide no nutrients. If you add sugar to tea and coffee, cut back slowly so you don’t notice it.

3Break the habit of daily cake Choose unsweetened varieties 4

Replace it with nutritious sweet foods such as fruit.

MY TH Sugar only adds sweetness Sugar doesn’t just add taste. It’s a natural preservative used in jams, jellies, chutneys and relishes. Sugar is a key ingredient in baking, tenderising the gluten in cakes and biscuits to create a soft, melt-in-the-mouth crumb. It caramelises to create crispness and a golden colour. It also feeds the yeast used in bread-making and alcohol production.

MY TH Text: Bronwen King & Brooke Longfield. Photos: iStock.

Add fresh or frozen fruit to cereal, desserts and baked goods. Leave the skin on where po to increase fibre content.

Sugar causes hyperactivity The science doesn’t support this. Lollies, cakes and sugary drinks are normally eaten at celebrations when lots of other things get kids excited. In one study, parents who were told their children had consumed sugar were more likely to classify their child’s behaviour as ‘hyper’, when in fact none of the children had eaten sugar.

Opt for plain yoghurt and add fruit for sweetness. Drink plain milk, and look for breakfast cereals with the lowest amount of added sugar — if any.

5Skip bottled sauces and dressings

Drizzle balsamic vinegar and olive oil over salads, and use lemon, garlic and herbs to flavour meals. (See recipes for easy dressings on p76.)

Do I need to quit sugar? While we should be mindful of our sugar intake, there is no need to completely avoid sugar for good. As we know, the more deprived you feel, the more likely you will cave in and overeat the food that you’re missing out on. The key here is moderation. Eating a slice of cake on a special occasion is not going to ruin an otherwise healthy diet. This is why we at Healthy Food Guide occasionally use small amounts of sugar in our recipes, such as cakes or biscuits. The goal is to ensure that sweet treats are enjoyed in modest portions on special occasions, not every day. But it’s sensible to cut back on sugar and focus on making minimally processed whole foods the basis of your everyday diet. Our 7–day low-sugar meal plan on p90 includes healthy and delicious meals you can try.

Enjoying a treat on occasion won’t ruin an otherwise healthy diet

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hfg FEATURES

10 travel tips for

restricted diets Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let your special dietary needs get in the way of a great holiday. Follow our 10-step guide for a happy, healthy trip â&#x20AC;&#x201D; while eating well and safely.

with Travelling s can ie rg e ll food a anaged be easily m ard rw with fo planning

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1

Warn your hotel

If you’re staying in a hotel or an all-inclusive resort, ask if they’re able to deal with your dietary needs when you book. But if you’ve already booked, call and notify them of your allergies or intolerances — or perhaps ask to speak to their catering manager.

2

RESEARCH THE DINING OPTIONS

Text: Hannah Ebeltithe & Brooke Longfield. Photos: iStock.

When booking your accommodation, consider the severity of your food-related challenges. For example, if you’re on a very restricted diet, you may want to find self-catering accommodation. Also, research the restaurants and cafés nearby the area you’re visiting. Many display their menus on their websites, so you can check for suitability (or email them). Social media can also be handy, so try asking on Twitter or TripAdvisor for tips on eating out in new places. It’ll save time and trouble when you arrive — leaving more time for, well, holidaying.

3

DIY snacks

Don’t rely on finding sn to suit your diet at servi stations and other stops along the way. And chances are that you’ll fork out a premium for whatever you do find. So, carry snacks with you, even if you’re on a short journey. Traffic delays are often unavoidable if travelling by car, so pack a small Esky with a supply of suitable food such as gluten-free bread or dairy-fre milk, in case the shops are close when you arrive at your destina

Traces of peanuts may be found on tray tables & seat belts

Book in-flight food Check with your airline to see if they cater for your specific needs. Many will offer ptions such as diabetic, intolerant, low salt, low vegetarian and vegan, but u’ll need to book it at the me of ticket purchase. This can often be done online. Despite the growing incidence of nut allergies, some airlines still serve peanuts as snacks. If you have a particularly severe lergy, where even traces peanut on tray tables and belts pose a problem, our airline’s policy on peanuts well in advance.

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hfg FEATURES

5

CHECK THE FOOD LABELS

Always read the labels on packaged foods (if you’re travelling overseas, it’s useful to be able to translate key words). Most major allergens, such as milk, egg, nuts and soy, will be highlighted in the ingredients list. If you have coeliac disease, keep in mind the UK, US and Europe have different food standards to Australia. In these countries, a product can be called gluten free if it contains less than 20 milligrams of gluten per kilogram. Australia is much stricter: A food must have no detectable traces of gluten to be labelled gluten free. Oats are also marketed as being gluten free in some countries, but they can trigger symptoms in some people with coeliac disease. Find out more by visiting coeliac.org.au.

Use word cards Consider buying foreign language travel cards that warn others about your allergy, to show to food service staff. Check out selectwisely.com or dietarycard.com for their range of cards. Alternatively, you could make your own cards with large colour photos of the foods that you can’t eat with a large ‘X’ (or circle with a slash) over them to indicate that you can’t eat this food.

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7

Be vigilant

Be aware that a favourite dish that was ‘safe’ to eat in restaurants at home may be prepared with a number of different ingredients in another city or country, so it’s always important to ask what’s in it. Asian dishes are usually free from dairy and will offer several vegetarian options. But watch out for peanut oil which is often used in Asian restaurants. And be mindful that peanuts are commonly used in traditional dishes like pad Thai and curries. Indian meals can be ideal if you’re gluten free or vegan, as most meals are based on rice, legumes and vegetables. And, many Italian restaurants also cater for gluten-free diets. Finally, take care at bakeries, ice-cream shops and self-serve salad bars as they present the risk of cross-contamination. Ask the manager about the handling methods and equipment used.


Stabilise your blood sugar If you have diabetes and need snacks t keep your blood glucose levels stable, pack extra when travelling. Muesli bars crackers and trail mix will see you throug long journeys, stopovers and any delay If you’re taking insulin or diabetes medication, always carry a quick-acting carbohydrate, such as jelly beans or gluc tablets, in case of hypos. Diabetes Aust has a handy travel guide that you can download at diabetesaustralia.com.au.

A dis safely e ferent may be dif d in ke when coo y another cit

Before travelling to a foreign country, look up the local words for terms such as gluten, lactose, vegetarian, vegan, allergic as well as the food you’re allergic to. If you know a native speaker, ask them to write down some useful sentences you can show in restaurants and shops.

10

Take recipes

Self-catering doesn’t have to be a chore. Instead, use your holiday to try as many new foods and flavours as you can. Read up on local specialties, so you know what’s in them, then try out some new recipes. Pack an issue of Healthy Food Guide for go-to meals that suit your dietary needs. Or, visit healthyfoodguide.com.au (print a few recipes or make a digital file of your favourites to access on your smartphone or tablet).

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hfg FEATURES

Text: Jenny Hulme. Additional reporting: Andrea Duvall. Photos: iStock.

Our pets su ffe a huge stre r ss on their join ts from being overweigh t

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es

et t or pe nd cats have the same risk of disease with obesity s are now saying we should rethink the way we feed t eakfast time, does the family dog sit at your feet, looking longingly at that half slice of toast you left on your plate? And when you come home at the end of the day, does your cat wind herself around your legs, in the hope that you’ll produce her favourite fatty snack? The trouble is, when we feed our pets, very few of us count

A

the kilojoules. That half slice of lefto r toast given to a 5kg dog, for instance, is equivalent to us popping an extra five slices of bread on our plate after we’ve finished our usual meal. One in three Aussie cats and dogs are overweight, according to national studies. So, while millions of us are resolving to have a healthier life in 2017, we should also, say vets, review our pets’ daily diet. Why worry about it? “They don’t live as long,” says Dr Richard Malik of the Centre for Veterinary Education, the University of Sydney. In fact, another study has found that being overweight can shave two years off your pet’s life. Meanwhile, carrying excess weight puts animals at risk of the same lifestyle diseases as humans; a higher risk of diabetes and heart disease, for example, a lack of stamina, and joint problems. Cats and dogs are capable of ‘ballistic movements’, explains Dr Malik. That is, they like to run and jump to great heights. “So, being overweight puts an enormous stress on the bones and joints.” But how can you tell whether or not your pet has a weight problem? Here is a guide on what you should look out for.

Carrying extra weight can shave two years off your pet’s life

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hfg FEATURES

Weigh it up at home The ideal weight for a dog or cat depends on their breed, lifestyle, age and condition, medications they’re on or treatments they’ve had. When a dog or cat is desexed, for example, their metabolic rate decreases, so they’re much more likely to put on weight. The first thing to check is your pet’s ‘body condition score’. You can do this yourself simply by looking at or touching your pet.

Signs that your dog is overweight Ř The ribs aren’t seen clearly and are hard to feel. Ř The waist isn’t easily visible behind their ribs when viewed from above. Ř You can feel fat over their spine and base o Ř The abdomen i up when seen fro

Signs that you cat is overwe Ř The ribs are ha Ř There is a mode layer of fat cover that are near the Ř There is a pend (bulge under the with no waist. If it is clear that your dog or cat is overweight, o if you’re not sure your local vet to your pet assesse

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Treats can be a problem when your pet regularly expects them

What’s a good diet? What constitutes a healthier diet for your dog or cat? “In my experience, most cats need 85g of meat or wet food, two times a day,” says Dr Malik. Dogs’ needs vary with their size, so check the back of the pack or tin where serving sizes are displayed according to a dog’s weight. At the same time, Dr Malik also recommends ensuring that your dog or cat’s diet has a healthy portion of wet food or raw meat, which are higher in protein than dry pellets. Dried food tends to be based on carbohydrates such as wheat and corn. There’s a growing movement around the world ng a diet exclusively of dry pellets is wrong. plementing it with wet food or fresh meat is a od thing, especially if it comes on a bone which ssages the gums,” says Dr Malik.

Keep tabs on treats We often use treats to bond with and interact with our pets. It becomes a problem when pets expect this, and we give in to them. Try to keep treats to a minimum and switch to healthy snacks — just as we do when trying to lose weight. Dr Malik suggests giving pets, “a little sliver of ham, a frankfurt cut into very thin slices, or even cheese cut into little pieces.” Just keep in mind that the size of a treat for a 60kg human will be extremely different in size for a 5kg dog.


Pets at party time With all that festive food around at this time of year, it can be tempting to feed leftovers to our four-legged friends. And yet these ‘treats’ may be downright dangerous to them. Watch out for these:

Don’t forget daily walkies

Chocolate can lead to hyperactivity and h k

Onions & garlic can lead to anaemia in dogs.

are deadly to cats. Don’t put lilies in vases within their reach.

Macadamia nuts can be poisonous.

Grapes & sultanas

Fatty foods

may lead to kidney failure in dogs.

like sausages or the fat from your steak can

You’ll also benefit from wa fam

Sitting curled up on the sofa or lying in bed all day is no better for pets than it is for you. Encourage your cat to go out. Make time to walk the dog each day — even a short walk around the block after dinner, as well as longer walks whenever you can. Increase exercise if they’ve eaten more than usual, as any significant weight gain will reduce your pet’s quality of life and make the exercise they need less enjoyable (due to lack of stamina). It also means they’ll suffer more in the summer heat than their slimmer friends. “In the end, we want our pets to be really healthy and live a long life,” says Dr Malik.

Xylitol is an artificial sweet used in mints, and can be deadly to dogs.

bone can splinter inside dogs.

s g r tying meat and the pads in the plastic tray under meat, can all be lodged in your pet’s intestines if eaten.

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61 Leftover turkey salad

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RECIPES

cooking for a crowd

DIY dressings

summer fruit desserts A HEALTHY START Celebrate the new year by sharing our crowd-pleasing meals with good friends. Plus, we show you creative ways to use your Christmas leftovers. And try our light fruity desserts on p81. Enjoy!

We’ve done the hard work for you! Our recipes are based on fresh and nutrient-rich ingredients that are easy to find and affordable. Every main meal contains at least two serves of vegies for optimal health benefits, and our recipes are based on ideal portion sizes.

Jalapeño hotcakes with lime sour cream, p73

Every recipe meets our dietitians’ nutrition criteria to ensure it doesn’t contain too much energy, saturated fat, sodium or sugar. Every dish is tried and tested at least twice so we know it’s a reliable recipe that tastes great. Every recipe has a complete nutrition analysis for your benefit. The table on p95 helps you determine how each recipe works as part of your daily nutrition and energy needs.

Our food writers work with qualified dietitians to develop these recipes for maximum health benefits. For more detail on our recipe badges, see p99.

HIGH

PROTEIN

9dairy free 9diabetes friendly 9gluten free 9vegetarian

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hfg RECIPES

Crowd

pl

Need some easy and healthy recipes to feed a crowd? Read on â&#x20AC;¦ these tasty meals will keep everyone happy.

Spicy chicken tacos with slaw & avocado dressing

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Spicy chicken tacos with slaw & avocado dressing Serves 8 Cost per serve $3.20 Time to make 30 min, plus 2–3 hours marinating

9gluten free 9diabetes friendly

Recipes: Chrissy Freer. Photography: Mark O’Meara. Styling: Julz Beresford. Food prep: Kerrie Ray

2 teaspoons cumin 2 teaspoons paprika ½ teaspoon chilli flakes ¼ cup lime juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 1kg (about 4 large) chicken breast fillets, halved horizontally ½ red cabbage (450g), finely shredded

2 Preheat barbecue or large 3 large carrots, peeled, grated chargrill pan on medium-high. 1 cup coriander leaves, Grill chicken for 3–4 minutes coarsely chopped each side, or until golden and 1 medium red oni cooked through. Place on a thinly sliced t i Nutr ion TIP large plate, loosely cover 1 large avocado, The ‘good’ fats with foil and set aside to mashed in avocado make rest for 5 minutes. Thinly ½ cup reduced-fa a healthy creamy slice the chicken. plain yoghurt dressing 3 Meanwhile, combine 16 small gluten-f cabbage, carrot, coriander corn tortillas, and red onion in a large bowl. warmed, to serve Combine avocado, yoghurt and remaining lime juice in a small 1 Combine spices, 2 tablespoons bowl until smooth. Season with of lime juice and the olive oil in a cracked black pepper. large glass or ceramic dish. Add 4 Fill tortillas with chicken, chicken and turn to coat. Cover slaw and avocado dressing. and refrigerate for 2–3 hours.

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (2 tortillas) 1576kJ/377cal Protein 32.4g Total Fat 17.2g Sat Fat 4.2g Carbs 19.6g

Sugars 5.0g Fibre 6.5g Sodium 399mg Calcium 120mg Iron 2.4mg

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hfg RECIPES

Chilli prawn skewers with mango & mint salad

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Chilli prawn skewers with mango & mint salad

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (3 skewers + salad) 838kJ/201cal Protein 28.7g Total Fat 3.5g Sat Fat 0.6g Carbs 10.9g

Sugars 9.9g Fibre 4.2g Sodium 801mg Calcium 223mg Iron 2.4mg

1 Combine 2 tablespoons of the lime juice, 1 tablespoon fish sauce, half the chilli, 3 teaspoons Serve 8 Cost per serve $5.60 ginger and the peanut oil in a Time to make 40 min, shallow glass or ceramic dish. plus 30 min marinating Add the peeled prawns; stir to coat well. Cover and refrigerate 9gluten free 9dairy free for 30 minutes to marinate. ¹⁄³ cup lime juice, 2 Thread 3 prawns onto each plus lime wedges, to serve skewer. Preheat barbecue or 1½ tablespoons chargrill pan on medium-high. gluten-free fish sauce Grill the skewers for 2 minutes 2 long red chillies, each side, or until prawns have seeded, finely chopped nged colour and are tion i r t 1 tablespoon grated ooked through. u N TIP fresh ginger 3 Meanwhile, Serving prawns 1 tablespoon peanut oil combine carrot, on skewers is a 1kg peeled medium capsicum, snow clever way to green prawns peas, bok choy, keep portions 24 wooden skewers, mint and mango in check soaked (see Cook’s tip) a large salad bowl. 3 large carrots, cut into Whisk the remaining thin matchsticks lime juice, fish sauce, chilli, 2 large red capsicums, ginger and sugar together seeded, thinly sliced in a small bowl. Add dressing 250g snow peas, to salad, and gently toss. trimmed, thinly sliced 4 Serve prawn skewers with 1 large bunch bok choy, salad and lime wedges. trimmed, shredded Cook’s tip Soak wooden 1 cup mint leaves, torn skewers in cold water for 2 mangoes, peeled, thinly sliced 30 minutes before using to 2 teaspoons brown sugar prevent them from burning. JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

Kale, vegie & pepita slice

1 Heat the oil in a large, deep non-stick frying pan over Serves 8 Cost per serve $3.70 medium heat. SautĂŠ onion for Hands-on time 20 min 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 minutes, or until softened. Cooking time 35 min Add garlic, carrot and capsicum Suitable to freeze and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add the kale and cook, stirring, 9gluten free 9vegetarian for 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2 minutes, or until just 1 tablespoon olive oil wilted. Set aside to cool. 1 large red onion, 2 Whisk the eggs and milk in ďŹ nely chopped a large bowl. Stir through the 2 garlic cloves, herbs and half of the parmesan. peeled, crushed Season with black pepper. 3 large carrots, grated 3 Preheat oven to 160ÂşC. Lightly 2 large red capsicums, spray a 6cm-deep x 22cm x 32cm seeded, thinly sliced rectangular baking dish with oil 150g trimmed kale, h d d line the base and 2 long (see Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tip) des with baking paper. ition r t u N TIP 18 eggs Scatter the vegetables Adding herbs šâ &#x201E;Âł cup reduced-fat m into the dish, then pour gives plenty of Âź cup chopped over the egg mixture. flavour without fresh herbs (such Sprinkle evenly with loading on as parsley, thyme emaining parmesan the salt and oregano) d the pepitas. ½ cup (40g) grated 4 Bake for 35â&#x20AC;&#x201C;40 minutes, parmesan or until golden, puffed and set. 1 tablespoon pepitas Meanwhile, place tomatoes on 1 x 250g punnet small a lined tray, spray with oil and cherry tomatoes on the vine roast for 10 minutes, or until just

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Healthy ideas for entertaining Ĺ&#x2DC;)LQJHUIRRGVVXFKDVPLQL tacos, sliders and skewers, are great for kids and adults. Ĺ&#x2DC;)HHGLQJDQDUP\"$OO of these recipes can easily be doubled (or tripled!). Ĺ&#x2DC;7U\WRJHWDKHDGVWDUWE\ chopping veg and making marinades the night before. wilted. Cut slice into 8 wedges and top with roasted tomatoes. Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tip 1 large bunch of kale equals 150g trimmed kale. Note For a more substantial meal, serve slice with a slice of wholegrain bread and salad. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (šâ&#x2C6;&#x2022;8 slice) 1049kJ/251cal Protein 18.9g Total Fat 16.3g Sat Fat 5.1g Carbs 5.9g

Sugars 5.6g Fibre 3.5g Sodium 253mg Calcium 147mg Iron 2.9mg


Kale, vegie & pepita slice

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hfg RECIPES

Meal for one

These beans are bursting with flavour with just a few ingredients!

Serves 1 Cost per serve $4.10 Time to make 15 min

9dairy free 9diabetes friendly 2 teaspoons olive oil ½ small onion, diced 6 mushrooms, sliced 1 garlic clove, crushed ½ x 420g can Spanish-style beans (see Note) 1½ cups baby spinach, chopped

Smokin’ Spanish beans

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1½ cups kale, stalks removed, roughly chopped Flat-leaf parsley, to garnish 1 Heat oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Sauté onion for 1–2 minutes, or until soft. Add mushrooms and garlic, and cook for 5 minutes, or until lightly browned. 2 Add beans to pan and bring to a simmer, then reduce heat to low. Add the spinach and kale,

and season with cracked black pepper. Cover pan and cook for 2–3 minutes, or until greens wilt. 3 Remove lid and stir gently. Place beans in a serving bowl and scatter with torn parsley. Note Find Spanish-style beans in the baked beans aisle. We used Heinz which contains chorizo, so is not suitable for vegetarians. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 1734kJ/415cal Protein 26.4g Total Fat 6.0g Sat Fat 1.0g Carbs 49.3g

Sugars 14.2g Fibre 26.1g Sodium 593mg Calcium 166mg Iron 4.8mg

Recipe: Alice Brodie & Brooke Longfield. Photography: Devin Hart. Styling & food prep: Sarah Swain.

Smokin’ Spanish beans


Rev up your

Recipes: Chrissy Freer. Photography: Mark Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Meara. Styling: Julz Beresford. Food prep: Kerrie Ray.

leftovers

Make the most out of leftover Christmas turkey, ham and roasted vegies with our creative recipes.

t Nutri ion TIP Store leftovers in the same portions that you would eat them

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hfg RECIPES

HEALTHY TIPS FOR USING LEFTOVERS • Store food in transparent

Turkey & vegie rice paper rolls with peanut dipping sauce (See recipe on p64)

Roll up leftover turkey in these healthy rice paper rolls

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containers so it doesn’t get lost in the back of the fridge. • Freeze cold meat in healthy portions, eg, 50–100g of turkey or ham in each bag. It’s quicker to defrost as well. • Leftover meat should keep for 3–4 days, but do the sniff


Turkey, sweet potato & pecan salad Serves 4 Cost per serve $4.75 Time to make 15 min

9gluten free 9diabetes friendly

Transform leftover turkey & roasted veg into a light salad

Âź cup reduced-fat plain yoghurt 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard 3 celery stalks, thinly sliced diagonally 1 large red apple, cored, thinly sliced 2 cups (250g) leftover roasted sweet potato, cut into chunks 400g leftover skinless roast turkey breast, coarsely chopped 4 cups mixed salad leaves 1 Lebanese cucumber, halved lengthways, sliced 2 tablespoons dried cranberries 2 tablespoons toasted pecans, chopped 1 Mix yoghurt, lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl until smooth. Set aside. 2 Combine the celery, apple, sweet potato, chopped turkey, salad leaves, cucumber and cranberries in a large bowl. Toss gently to combine, drizzle with the yoghurt dressing and sprinkle with pecans. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 1543kJ/369cal Protein 34.5g Total Fat 11.7g Sat Fat 1.6g Carbs 28.6g

Sugars 18.7g Fibre 5.8g Sodium 332mg Calcium 125mg Iron 2.0mg

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hfg RECIPES

A little leftover ham gives loads of flavour to this salad

Ham, couscous & lentil salad

Ham, couscous & lentil salad Serves 4 Cost per serve $2.30 Time to make 15 min

100g baby rocket leaves 2 tablespoons orange juice 2 teaspoons olive oil 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar

9dairy free ²⁄³ cup (135g) wholemeal couscous 1 x 400g can no-added-salt lentils, rinsed, drained 150g leftover lean ham off-the-bone, chopped 2 medium carrots, peeled, grated 1 large red capsicum, seeded, diced 4 shallots, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons currants

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1 Place couscous in a large heatproof bowl. Add ²⁄³ cup of boiling water and stir to combine. Cover, set aside for 4 minutes. Fluff and separate grains with a fork. 2 Add the lentils, ham, carrot, capsicum, shallots, currants and rocket to couscous. Season with cracked black pepper. 3 Combine the orange juice, olive oil and vinegar in a small bowl. Add to salad, gently toss to combine. Serve.

PER SERVE 1267kJ/303cal Protein 19.1g Total Fat 4.5g Sat Fat 1.0g Carbs 42.7g

Sugars 8.7g Fibre 6.4g Sodium 710mg Calcium 72mg Iron 3.7mg


Use up your leftover ham & roasted vegies in this easy tortilla

Ham tortilla with tomato salad (See recipe on p64)

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (2 wedges + salad) 1058kJ/253cal Protein 20.0g Total Fat 13.2g Sat Fat 3.5g Carbs 11.5g

Sugars 7.5g Fibre 4.2g Sodium 726mg Calcium 94mg Iron 2.9mg

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

Ham tortilla with tomato salad (p63) Serves 4 Cost per serve $4.05 Time to make 35 min

9gluten free 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 large zucchini, coarsely grated 2 cups (250g) leftover roasted vegetables, cut into 2cm cubes (see Cook’s tip) 150g leftover lean ham off-the-bone, diced 6 eggs ¼ cup reduced-fat milk 1 x 250g punnet cherry tomatoes, halved 2 tablespoons chopped basil leaves 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 4 cups mixed salad leaves 1 Heat oil in a medium (24cm base diameter) non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Cook onion, stirring, for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add garlic and zucchini, and cook, stirring, for 1–2 minutes, or until wilted. Add leftover vegies and ham, stir; spread mixture around the pan. 2 Whisk eggs and milk together in a large jug. Season with black

64

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pepper. Pour egg mixture over 3 cups shredded wombok vegies. Reduce heat to low, cover 250g leftover skinless and cook for 10 minutes, or until roast turkey breast, base is golden and set. shredded 3 Place frying pan 1 large carrot, t Nutri ion under a grill heated peeled, grated TIP to medium-high, and 100g snow peas, Use skinless cuts of turkey to cook for 3–4 minutes, trimmed, thinly sliced reduce fat & or until top is set and 1 small avocado, sliced kilojoules golden. Leave to cool 12 large mint leaves for 5 minutes in the pan. 1½ tablespoons 4 Meanwhile, combine no-added-salt crunchy tomatoes, basil and vinegar. peanut butter Carefully invert tortilla onto 2 teaspoons mirin a clean board and cut into 2 teaspoons reduced-salt 8 wedges. Serve with tomato soy sauce salad and mixed salad leaves. 1 small red chilli, seeded, Cook’s tip Roasted potato, finely chopped sweet potato, pumpkin, carrot or parsnip work well in this recipe. 1 Fill a wide, shallow bowl Serving suggestion For a with warm water. Dip 1 rice more substantial meal, serve paper sheet into the water for with a slice of fresh wholegrain 5–10 seconds, or until just soft. bread or gluten-free bread. Place on a clean work surface. Lightly pat with paper towel to remove excess moisture. 2 Place a little of the wombok down the centre of the sheet. Top with some turkey, carrot, snow peas, avocado and a mint leaf. Fold up the sides and roll to enclose the filling. Repeat process to make 12 rolls. 3 Place the peanut butter and 3 teaspoons of boiling water in a small bowl, and mix until smooth. Stir in mirin, soy sauce and chilli. Serve rice paper rolls with the dipping sauce.

Turkey & vegie rice paper rolls with peanut dipping sauce (p60)

Serves 4 Cost per serve $3.89 Time to make 25 min

9dairy free 12 rice paper rounds (22cm diameter)

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (3 rolls + sauce) 1614kJ/386cal Protein 26.0g Total Fat 17.2g Sat Fat 3.6g Carbs 28.4g

Sugars 4.5g Fibre 5.7g Sodium 657mg Calcium 81mg Iron 1.8mg


Roasted vegetable, feta & herb patties

1 tablespoon olive oil ¹⁄³ cup reduced-fat plain yoghurt 4 cups baby rocket leaves, to serve

Serves 4 Cost per serve $3.65 Time to make 35 min

9diabetes friendly 9vegetarian 2½ cups (310g) leftover roasted vegetables (such as sweet potato, potato, carrot) 1 large zucchini, grated, squeezed of excess moisture 1 medium red capsicum, seeded, finely chopped 60g reduced-fat feta, crumbled 1 egg, lightly beaten ¼ cup wholemeal plain flour ¼ cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped ¼ cup mint leaves, chopped

1 Place roasted vegetables in a large bowl and mash, leaving some texture. Add zucchini, capsicum, feta, egg, flour, and 2 tablespoons each of the parsley and mint. Stir until well combined; season with cracked black pepper. 2 Using clean hands, shape the mixture into 12 patties. 3 Heat half the olive oil in a large non-stick

Roasted vegetable, feta & herb patties

frying pan over medium-high heat. Place 3 patties in the pan and cook for 2–3 minutes each side, or until golden and cooked through. Repeat with remaining patties, adding a little of the remaining oil as required. 4 Meanwhile, combine yoghurt with remaining parsley and mint. Serve the patties with a dollop of herb yoghurt and the baby rocket leaves.

PER SERVE (3 patties + salad) 939kJ/225cal Protein 12.0g Total Fat 9.1g Sat Fat 12.6g Carbs 20.8g

Sugars 6.8g Fibre 5.8g Sodium 239mg Calcium 259mg Iron 3.0mg

These patties are a great way to use leftover roasted veg

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hfg RECIPES

5pm PANIC Feed your family something tasty and different in under 30 minutes!

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (2 skewers + salad + bread) 1556kJ/372cal Protein 33.4g Total Fat 12.8g Sat Fat 3.1g Carbs 26.3g

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Sugars 9.2g Fibre 8.2g Sodium 336mg Calcium 80mg Iron 2.7mg

Recipes: Liz Macri. Photography: Mark Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Meara. Styling: Julz Beresford. Food prep: Kerrie Ray.

Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad


MONDAY

you’ll need

Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad Serves 4 Cost per serve $3.60 Time to make 30 min

9dairy free 9diabetes friendly chicken breast

500g chicken breast fillets, cut into 2.5cm pieces 1 tablespoon Moroccan seasoning 2 medium eggplants, chopped into 1cm pieces 1 large red onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 3 vine-ripened tomatoes, chopped ½ cup coriander leaves, chopped 2 wholemeal Lebanese bread rounds, halved 1 Coat chicken with seasoning. Thread onto 8 wooden or metal skewers. 2 Preheat a grill pan to medium-high heat. Spray chicken with olive oil and cook for 3–4 minutes each side, or until browned and cooked through. 3 Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Sauté eggplant for 5–10 minutes, or until golden and softened. Transfer to a plate; set aside. 4 Spray the same pan with oil; cook onion for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add garlic and tomatoes, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes, or until just softened. Add reserved eggplant to pan and cook for 2 minutes, or until warmed through. Top with coriander. 5 Heat bread on the grill pan for 1 minute each side, or until charred and warmed through. Serve chicken with eggplant salad and torn bread. Note Uncooked, marinated chicken is suitable to freeze.

eggplant

+ red onion

+ tomatoes

+ Lebanese bread

plus + Moroccan seasoning + garlic + coriander

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hfg RECIPES

2 x 250g pouches microwavable 7 ancient grains (see Note) 2 oranges, peeled 2 bunches broccolini ¼ cup mint leaves, plus extra, to garnish 1 Lebanese cucumber, halved lengthways, thinly sliced 80g mixed baby spinach & red beetroot leaves

TUESDAY Grilled fish with orange & ancient grain salad Serves 4 Cost per serve $7.55 Time to make 20 min

9gluten free 9dairy free 9diabetes friendly

1 Sprinkle fish with paprika. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook fish,

4 x 150g boneless firm white fish fillets 2 teaspoons paprika

turning once, for 2 minutes each side, or until cooked through. 2 Meanwhile, heat ancient grains according to packet instructions. Transfer to a large salad bowl. Segment oranges carefully over the grains to catch any juice. 3 Boil or steam broccolini for 2–3 minutes, or until just tender. Add mint leaves, cucumber and salad leaves to grains and orange segments, and toss to combine. 4 Serve the fish with grain salad, extra mint and broccolini. Note Microwavable 7 ancient grains can be found in the rice section at Coles supermarkets.

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 1991kJ/476cal Protein 38.1g Total Fat 9.8g Sat Fat 1.5g Carbs 51.9g

Grilled fish with orange & ancient grain salad

you’ll need …

plus

+ white fish fillets

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Sugars 9.8g Fibre 10.7g Sodium 171mg Calcium 102mg Iron 3.0mg

+ paprika

+ microwavable grains + mint + Lebanese cucumber + mixed salad leaves

+ oranges

broccolini


Ginger pork & cashew stir-fry

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 2247kJ/538cal Protein 38.0g Total Fat 9.8g Sat Fat 2.5g Carbs 64.6g

WEDNESDAY Ginger pork & cashew stir-fry Serves 4 Cost per serve $5.80 Time to make 25 min

9dairy free 500g thinly sliced pork stir-fry strips 1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger 800g fresh or frozen stir-fry vegetables (thawed if frozen) ¾ cup reduced-salt chicken stock

¼ cup store-bought plum sauce ¼ cup roasted cashews 1 x 450g packet microwavable brown rice 3 shallots, thinly sliced 1 Combine pork and grated ginger in a bowl; set aside. 2 Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a wok over high heat. Stir-fry pork for 3–5 minutes, or until browned and just cooked through. Transfer to a plate and set aside.

3 Return wok to heat; spray with oil. Stir-fry vegetables, adding stock and plum sauce, for 2 minutes, or until sauce thickens and vegetables are tender. Return pork to the wok with cashews and stir-fry for 1 minute, or until heated through and coated in sauce. 4 Meanwhile, heat brown rice according to packet directions. Serve pork stir-fry with rice and garnish with sliced shallots. Note Uncooked marinated pork is suitable to freeze.

you’ll need …

plus

+ pork strips

Sugars 17.4g Fibre 16.7g Sodium 528mg Calcium 77mg Iron 3.6mg

+ stir-fry vegetables

+ plum sauce

cashews

+ ginger + chicken stock + microwavable brown rice + shallots

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hfg RECIPES

you’ll need …

white potatoes

Veal involtini with currants & pine nuts

+ THURSDAY veal escalopes

+

Veal involtini with currants & pine nuts Serves 4 Cost per serve $5.95 Time to make 30 min

9gluten free 9dairy free 9diabetes friendly lemon

+ asparagus

+ pine nuts

plus + currants + flat-leaf parsley + green beans

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500g white potatoes, cut into 1.5cm pieces 8 thin (500g) veal escalopes Zest and juice of 1 lemon, plus extra lemon wedges, to serve 1 tablespoon currants 1½ tablespoons pine nuts ¼ cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley 200g steamed green beans, to serve 2 bunches steamed asparagus, to serve 1 Boil potatoes for 6–8 minutes, or until just tender. Drain well. 2 Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan over high heat. Sauté potatoes for 10 minutes, or until tender, golden and crisp. Transfer to

a serving plate and cover with a sheet of foil to keep warm. 3 Place the veal on a clean work surface. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the lemon juice, then scatter with the lemon zest, currants, pine nuts and 2 tablespoons of the parsley. Carefully roll up to enclose filling. Secure with string or a toothpick, if needed. 4 Heat 2 teaspoons of oil in the same large frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook veal, turning, for 4–5 minutes, or until browned and cooked as desired. 5 Drizzle the steamed greens with the remaining lemon juice. Slice the veal rolls, and serve with potatoes, greens, remaining parsley and lemon wedges. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 1444kJ/346cal Protein 36.9g Total Fat 10.9g Sat Fat 1.7g Carbs 21.0g

Sugars 4.4g Fibre 5.6g Sodium 83mg Calcium 67mg Iron 4.5mg


t Nutri ion TIP Get 3 of your 5 serves of vegies in this balanced family meal

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hfg RECIPES

PER SERVE 2103kJ/503cal Protein 12.5g Total Fat 18.7g Sat Fat 5.1g Carbs 67.8g

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Sugars 27.1g Fibre 6.9g Sodium 654mg Calcium 278mg Iron 2.5mg


you’ll need …

pancake mixture

+ Jalapeño hotcakes with lime sour cream

pickled jalapeño slices

+ FRIDAY Jalapeño hotcakes with lime sour cream Serves 4 Cost per serve $3.05 Time to make 30 min

9vegetarian 350g store-bought dry pancake mixture 1 cup corn kernels (see Note) 1 tablespoon finely chopped pickled jalapeño slices, plus extra, to garnish (optional) 1–2 tablespoons lime juice, plus 1 teaspoon lime zest ¼ cup reduced-fat sour cream 1 large ripe avocado, sliced 1 Lebanese cucumber, thinly sliced 1 x 250g punnet cherry tomatoes, quartered

1 Place the pancake mixture in a large bowl. Whisk in 1¾ cups of water until smooth. Stir in corn kernels and jalapeños. 2 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with olive oil and set over medium heat. Cook ¼ cupfuls of batter for 2 minutes, or until bubbles appear on the surface. Turn pancakes over and cook for a further 1 minute, or until golden and cooked through. Repeat with remaining batter to make 12 pancakes. 3 Combine the sour cream, lime juice and zest in a small bowl. Serve pancakes topped with avocado, cucumber and tomatoes. Drizzle with the lime sour cream, and garnish with extra jalapeños, if using. Note You can use fresh, frozen (thawed) or canned (drained) corn in this recipe.

avocado

+ cherry tomatoes

+ lime

plus + corn kernels + sour cream + Lebanese cucumber

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hfg RECIPES

HFG

fire up a better BBQ VER MAKEO

The heat’s on and you need scorching inspiration for a healthier BBQ meal. Look no further than our delicious catch of the day!

Grilled fish with chilli-lime corn & asparagus Serves 4 Cost per serve $5.85 Time to make 25 min

9gluten free 9dairy free 9diabetes friendly 2 teaspoons lime zest 2 small red chillies, seeded, finely chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil 4 small corn cobs, husks and silks removed 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon mirin 2 shallots, white part only, finely chopped 2 bunches asparagus, trimmed 4 x 150g firm, white fish fillets 2 baby cos, trimmed, cut into long wedges 1 Combine lime zest, half the chilli and 3 teaspoons of the olive oil in a bowl. Brush lime mixture over corn cobs. Wrap each cob in a 30cm piece of foil.

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2 Combine remaining chilli and olive oil, lime juice, mirin and shallots in a bowl. Set aside. 3 Preheat barbecue or large chargrill pan over medium-high heat. Cook corn, turning, for 8–10 minutes, or until lightly charred and tender. Set aside. 4 Spray the fish and asparagus with olive oil. Cook the fish for 2–3 minutes each side, or until cooked through. Sauté the asparagus for 2–3 minutes, turning, or until spears are lightly charred and just tender. 5 Serve fish with asparagus, corn and cos wedges. Drizzle with the reserved chilli-lime dressing. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 1512kJ/362cal Protein 36.1g Total Fat 7.9g Sat Fat 1.1g Carbs 30.3g

Sugars 6.1g Fibre 9.6g Sodium 186mg Calcium 74mg Iron 5.6mg


✓Swap red meat

Recipe: Chrissy Freer. Photography: Mark O’Meara. Styling: Julz Beresford. Food prep: Kerrie Ray.

for fish to slash saturated fat

Grilled fish with chilli-lime corn & asparagus

✓Toss vegies on

the grill for that smoky flavour! JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

DIY dressing e hes â&#x20AC;Ś t s i n ur o th t n

Miso lime dressing

i

T

Making your own salad dressings is as easy as shaking a bottle. Here are some fresh ideas you can splash onto any salad.

Miso lime dressing Makes 125ml Cost to make $1.70 Time to make 5 min

ice

50ml vegetable oil or other ďŹ&#x201A;avourless oil 50ml rice wine vinegar 3 tablespoons miso paste 1 tablespoon lime juice

Lime

ju

9dairy free 9vegetarian

1 Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl until well combined and miso has dissolved. PER 1 TABLESPOON (20ml) 274kJ/66cal Protein 0.9g Total Fat 5.5g Sat Fat 0.7g Carbs 1.9g

Sugars 0.8g Fibre 0.4g Sodium 284mg Calcium 5.1mg Iron 0.2mg

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as te

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oi

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Citrus dressing

ha Esc

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Citrus dressing 9gluten free 9dairy free 9vegetarian

2 teaspoons honey 1 eschalot, finely chopped 125ml olive oil ¼ teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon lemon zest 1 teaspoon orange zest 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons orange juice

1 Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl until well combined. Store in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Makes 200ml Cost to make $3.80 Time to make 10 min

PER 1 TABLESPOON (20ml) 545kJ/130cal Protein 0.0g Total Fat 14.0g Sat Fat 2.2g Carbs 1.6g

Sugars 1.6g Fibre 0.1g Sodium 75mg Calcium 2.3mg Iron 0.0mg

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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e hes … t s i n ur o th nt

Chimichurri Chimichurri

C

25g coriander, chopped 25g flat-leaf parsley, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 150ml olive oil ¾ teaspoon crushed red chilli flakes 1 teaspoon sea salt

iander or

1 Mix all ingredients together in a bowl until well combined.

Red chi lli

Red w ine

Garl ic

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78

Makes 250ml Cost to make $5.10 Time to make 10 min

9gluten free 9dairy free 9vegetarian

i

T

hfg RECIPES

oil

healthyfoodguide.com.au

PER 1 TABLESPOON (20ml) 391kJ/94cal Protein 0.2g Total Fat 10.3g Sat Fat 1.6g Carbs 0.2g

Sugars 0.1g Fibre 0.3g Sodium 183mg Calcium 6.1mg Iron 0.3mg

gar ne vi

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Soy dressing

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Soy dressing Makes 150ml Cost to make $3.60 Time to make 10 min

9dairy free 9vegetarian 125ml reduced-salt soy sauce 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon sesame oil 3 red chillies, thinly sliced 1 garlic clove, grated 2 teaspoons grated ginger

1 Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl until well incorporated. Store in a sealed jar or container in the refridgerator. PER 1 TABLESPOON (20ml) 218kJ/52cal Protein 0.7g Total Fat 5.2g Sat Fat 0.8g Carbs 0.5g

Sugars 0.3g Fibre 0.3g Sodium 382mg Calcium 2.5mg Iron 0.3mg

This is an edited extract from Grain Bowls by Anna Shillinglaw Hampton, published by Hardie Grant Books (RRP $19.99) and is available in book stores nationally.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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/HDUQWRFRRN ZLWK6SURXWLQ $GHODLGH Win a private cooking lesson n from APD, Themis Chryssidis, and celebrity cook Callum Hann. 7KLV DZHVRPH SUL]H LQFOXGHV UHWXUQ ȵLJKWV WR $GHODLGH, and RQH QLJKWȇV DFFRPPRGDWLRQ IRU \RX DQG D IULHQG

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hfg RECIPES

Stunning ways with

summer fruit

Recipes: Liz Macri. Photography: Mark Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Meara. Styling: Julz Beresford. Food prep: Kerrie Ray.

Our deliciously light and refreshing fruity desserts are ideal for special occasions.

Show us your style on

@hfgaustralia

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

Share our fresh-tasting seasonal fruit desserts with your family & friends Summer fruit tart with spelt & chia pastry Serves 8 Cost per serve $1.75 Hands-on time 45 min, plus overnight chilling Cooking time 25 min 2 cups reduced-fat Greek-style yoghurt 1 tablespoon honey (optional) 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1½ cups wholemeal spelt flour 100g reduced-fat table spread 2 tablespoons caster sugar 1 tablespoon black chia seeds 1 firm, ripe mango, thinly sliced 3 firm, ripe plums, thinly sliced 1 firm, ripe white peach, thinly sliced 1 Combine yoghurt, honey (if using) and vanilla extract in a bowl. Line a sieve with muslin,

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or a clean chux, and set over a clean bowl. Spoon yoghurt mixture into the muslin, then draw up the edges to make a tight parcel and secure with kitchen string. Refrigerate overnight until firm; discard liquid in the bowl. 2 Process flour, table spread and caster sugar in a food processor until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Add chia seeds and 2 tablespoons chilled water; process until dough just comes together, adding more chilled water, if necessary. Turn pastry onto a lightly floured surface. Knead until smooth. Shape pastry into a disc. Cover with cling wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes. 3 Preheat oven to 160°C. Spray a 2cm-deep x 12.5cm x 35cm loose-based rectangular tart tin with oil. Roll out pastry between 2 sheets of baking paper until

5mm thick. Line tin with pastry. Trim off the excess with a sharp knife. Refrigerate for 10 minutes. 4 Place tart tin on a baking tray. Line pastry case with baking paper. Fill with ceramic pie weights or uncooked rice and bake for 15 minutes, or until edges are light golden. Remove weights and paper. Bake for a further 10 minutes, or until the base is golden. Set the pastry case aside to cool completely. 5 Spread yoghurt mixture over base of the pastry case. Arrange the fruit slices on top. Serve. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE 1078kJ/258cal Protein 8.1g Total Fat 8.2g Sat Fat 1.7g Carbs 34.6g

Sugars 18.3g Fibre 4.9g Sodium 92mg Calcium 156mg Iron 1.2mg


â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

COVER

recipe

Summer fruit tart with spelt & chia pastry

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

Fruity frozen yoghurt Serves 10 Cost per serve $1.20 Time to make 20 min, plus overnight freezing

9gluten free 1kg reduced-fat vanilla yoghurt 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons lemon zest ¼ cup pure icing sugar, sifted (see Cook’s tip) 10 canned apricot halves in juice, drained, thinly sliced 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries ¼ cup finely chopped pistachios 1 kiwifruit, peeled, finely chopped Extra blueberries and chopped pistachios, to decorate

HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE

Fruity frozen yoghurt 84

healthyfoodguide.com.au

555kJ/133cal Protein 7.0g Total Fat 1.8g Sat Fat 0.3g Carbs 20.4g

Sugars 19.8g Fibre 1.5g Sodium 80mg Calcium 196mg Iron 0.4mg

1 Grease and line a 7cm-deep, 9cm x 25cm loaf pan with baking paper, allowing an overhang of 5cm on the 2 long sides. 2 Combine yoghurt, lemon juice and zest, and icing sugar in a large bowl. Fold in the sliced apricots, blueberries, pistachios and chopped kiwifruit. Pour into prepared pan. Smooth the top. Cover and freeze overnight. 3 Remove loaf pan from freezer 20 minutes prior to serving to allow yoghurt to soften slightly. Serve topped with chopped pistachios and extra blueberries. Cook’s tip You can omit the icing sugar in this recipe, but the frozen yoghurt will have a slightly icy texture.


Watermelon & peppermint tea granita

Watermelon & peppermint tea granita Serves 6 Cost per serve $0.45 Time to make 20 min, plus over 2 hours freezing

9gluten free 9dairy free ¹⁄³ cup caster sugar 2 peppermint tea bags 1.5kg seedless watermelon, rind removed, chopped, plus small wedges, to garnish 2 tablespoons finely shredded mint leaves

1 Combine sugar and ¹⁄³ cup of water in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil. Remove from heat. Add the tea bags and stand for 5 minutes. Discard the tea bags. 2 Meanwhile, blend watermelon in a food processor until smooth. Add tea mixture. Strain mixture with a sieve into a 20cm x 30cm slice pan or freezer-proof dish. Discard the watermelon pulp. Freeze mixture for 2 hours. 3 Using a fork, scrape granita into flakes in the slice pan. Return to the freezer. Repeat freezing and scraping process

every hour, or until set. Spoon the granita into chilled serving glasses and top with a wedge of watermelon. Garnish with the shredded mint. Serve the granita immediately. Cook’s tip Chill glasses in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.

PER SERVE 440kJ/105cal Protein 0.8g Total Fat 0.5g Sat Fat 0.0g Carbs 24.1g

Sugars 24.1g Fibre 1.6g Sodium 5.3mg Calcium 18mg Iron 1.1mg

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

Frozen in time

These delicate shards of frozen yoghurt are the perfect way to finish off a wonderful meal.

Yoghurt bark Serves 6 Cost per serve $0.70 Time to make 25 min, plus overnight freezing

9gluten free ½ cup reduced-fat Greek-style yoghurt ½ cup coconut yoghurt 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste or extract 3 teaspoons white chia seeds 1 tablespoon desiccated coconut 2 tablespoons reduced-sugar raspberry jam or fruit spread (see Cook’s tips) 2 tablespoons pistachios, coarsely chopped 1 tablespoon dried cranberries, thinly sliced Dried culinary rose petals (optional) (see Cook’s tips)

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1 Line a 30cm x 20cm tray with baking paper. Combine both yoghurts with vanilla and chia seeds in a bowl, mix well. Stir in the dessicated coconut. 2 Spread the yoghurt mixture evenly over prepared tray. 3 Microwave the jam or fruit spread in a small bowl on high for 20 seconds, or until just runny. Pour jam into a plastic piping bag (or zip-lock bag). Snip the tip off and pipe the jam in swirls or rows over yoghurt. 4 Use a skewer or thin blade of a knife and lightly drag it through the yoghurt and jam to create a swirl or feathering effect. Tap the tray gently on the benchtop a couple of times to flatten the yoghurt mixture. Scatter with the pistachios, cranberries and petals, if using. Freeze overnight.

5 Break or cut the yoghurt bark into pieces. Serve immediately. Cook’s tips Ř Use fruit purée in place of the jam, if you prefer. Ř Dried culinary rose petals are available from specialty grocers, fruit shops and delicatessens. Ř For a slightly sweeter taste, use vanilla yoghurt instead of plain. Ř Place yoghurt bark on a cold or frozen serving platter set over a bowl of ice to stop it melting. Ř Are you feeding a crowd? Simply double this recipe.

PER SERVE 425kJ/102cal Protein 2.7g Total Fat 6.9g Sat Fat 3.6g Carbs 7.0g

Sugars 5.7g Fibre 1.2g Sodium 18mg Calcium 54mg Iron 0.3mg


Recipe: Kerrie Ray. Photography: Mark Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Meara. Styling: Julz Beresford. Food prep: Kerrie Ray.

Yoghurt bark

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hfg RECIPES

lunch box HEROES Share your healthy lunch box with us to become a certified HFG Lunch Box He

lunch into Skye cuts this r Riley, 8. cute shapes fo Brett makes a fresh lunch for Zhealthy and achary, 2½.

WIN

a SIGG drink bottle! Calling all kids! Let us feature your healthy lunch box, and you’ll receive an HFG Lunch Box Hero certificate to stick on your fridge, along with a fantastic prize! If your photo appears here next month, you’ll WIN a kid’s 600ml water bottle valued at $46.95 from SIGG. This leak-proof, BPA-free, aluminium drink bottle is for kids who want to have fun! Light and strong, it’s the easy way to make sure kids stay hydrated — with SIGG.

To enter Visit healthyfoodguide.com.au/win or mail

colourful Louie, 5, loves his Tom. lunch packed by 88

healthyfoodguide.com.au

pictures to Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards, NSW 1590 (Each of this month’s Lunch Box Heroes has won a Mission Foods & Trolls prize pack worth $75 — well done!)


Muffin tin tacos

Recipe: Yvonne Walus. Photography: Devin Hart. Styling & food prep: Sarah Swain.

Show us your style on

ti

Bite-sized tacos

@hfgaustralia

mmi

are a healthy lunch or snack for pint-sized appetites!

Muffin tin tacos Makes 12 mini tacos Cost per taco $0.85 Hands-on time 15 min Cooking time 15 min 6 soft wholegrain tortillas or wraps 1 teaspoon olive oil 200g lean beef mince 1 x 420g can Mexican-style beans ½ cup reduced-fat grated cheese Garden salad, to serve

1 Preheat oven to 180°C. Spray a 12-hole muffin tin with olive oil. 2 Warm tortillas in microwave for 30 seconds. Use a cookie cutter (8–10cm diameter) to cut 2 circles from each tortilla. Press each into a muffin tin hole (don’t worry if the edges poke out). 3 Heat oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Stir-fry mince until brown. Add beans and cook to heat through. Divide mince and bean mixture between 12 muffin holes. Sprinkle with grated cheese.

4 Bake for 15 minutes, or until cheese is melted. Serve tacos with a large garden salad. Cook’s tip Store leftover tacos in an airtight container kept in the fridge and pop them into school lunch boxes. HIGH

PROTEIN

PER SERVE (3 tacos + 1 cup salad) 1435kJ/343cal Protein 25.7g Total Fat 9.3g Sat Fat 4.1g Carbs 33.1g

Sugars 5.4g Fibre 10.8g Sodium 624mg Calcium 161mg Iron 1.9mg

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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hfg RECIPES

Your low-sugar Compiled by HFG dietitian Brooke Longfield

Each day’s menu gives you … Ř 6300kJ (about 1500cal) for weight loss Ř 30g fibre to keep you feeling full all day long Ř 5 serves veg so you get a variety of vitamins & antioxidants Ř 2 serves fruit for sweetness without the added sugar Ř all your daily

calcium needs for strong bones Learn more about your individual nutrition needs on p95.

See our How to be smarter about sugar feature on p36.

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast Ř Weet-Bix & fruit 2 Weet-Bix with 200ml milk, 1 sliced banana & ½ cup mixed berries (1500kJ/360cal total)

Breakfast Ř Berry parfait 200g reduced-fat plain yoghurt layered with 1 cup mixed berries & ¼ cup untoasted muesli (1100kJ/260cal total)

Breakfast Ř Weet-Bix & fruit 2 Weet-Bix with 200ml milk, 1 sliced banana & ½ cup mixed berries (1500kJ/360cal total)

Lunch Ř Salmon & avo crackers 4 Ryvita crispbreads topped with 100g smoked salmon, ¼ small avocado, sliced red onion, tomato & salad leaves (2100kJ/500cal total) Dinner Ř Roasted vegetable, feta & herb patties (p65) Ř 170g tub reduced-fat plain yoghurt with the pulp of 1 passionfruit (1600kJ/380cal total) Snacks Ř 1 peach Ř 2 celery stalks filled with 1 tbs peanut butter (1100kJ/260cal total)

Daily total: 6300kJ (1500cal) 90

healthyfoodguide.com.au

Lunch Ř Leftover Roasted vegetable, feta & herb patties (p65) Ř 1 banana (1300kJ/310cal total) Dinner Ř Grilled fish with chilli-lime corn & asparagus (p74) Ř 2 frozen pineapple rings (2100kJ/500cal total) Snacks Ř 2 Ryvita crispbreads with 2 slices reduced-fat cheese & sliced tomato Ř 30g mixed nuts (1700kJ/410cal total)

Daily total: 6200kJ (1480cal)

Lunch Ř Kale, vegie & pepita slice (p56) plus 2 Ryvita crispbreads with 2 tbs reduced-fat hoummos (1700kJ/410cal total) Dinner Ř Veal involtini with currants & pine nuts (p70) Ř 170g tub reduced-fat fruit yoghurt (2100kJ/500cal total) Snacks Ř 1 green apple with 1 slice reduced-fat cheese Ř 1 cup plain popcorn Ř 10 almonds (1100kJ/260cal total)

Daily total: 6400kJ (1530cal)


the New Year in top health â?&#x203A;Start meal plan with this light & tasty menu!â?&#x153; Brooke Longfield, +)* dietitian

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Breakfast Ĺ&#x2DC; Summer smoothie PO PLON  WVS KRQH\  WEV UHGXFHGIDW SODLQ \RJKXUW  SHDFK  WEV FKLD VHHGV  EDQDQD (1500kJ/360cal total)

Breakfast Ĺ&#x2DC; Weet-Bix & fruit  :HHW%L[ ZLWK PO PLON  VOLFHG EDQDQD ½ FXS PL[HG EHUULHV (1500kJ/360cal total)

Breakfast Ĺ&#x2DC; Berry parfait J UHGXFHGIDW SODLQ \RJKXUW OD\HUHG ZLWK  FXS PL[HG EHUULHV Âź FXS XQWRDVWHG PXHVOL (1100kJ/260cal total)

Breakfast Ĺ&#x2DC; Banana & ricotta toast  VOLFHV VR\Ĺ&#x17D;OLQVHHG WRDVW ZLWK  WEV ULFRWWD  VOLFHG EDQDQD  WVS KRQH\ (1500kJ/360cal total)

Lunch Ĺ&#x2DC; Egg & salad roll  KDUGERLOHG HJJV EDE\ VSLQDFK WRPDWR JUDWHG FDUURW  WVS PD\R RQ D VRXUGRXJK UROO (1600kJ/380cal total) Dinner Ĺ&#x2DC; Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad (p67) Ĺ&#x2DC; J WXE UHGXFHGIDW IUXLW \RJKXUW (2200kJ/530cal total) Snacks Ĺ&#x2DC; 2 5\YLWD FULVSEUHDGV ZLWK Âź VPDOO DYRFDGR VOLFHG WRPDWR Ĺ&#x2DC;  PDQJR (1200kJ/290cal total)

Daily total: 6500kJ (1560cal)

Lunch Ĺ&#x2DC; Kale, vegie & pepita slice (p56) (1100kJ/260cal total) Dinner Ĺ&#x2DC; Grilled ďŹ sh with orange & ancient grain salad (p68) Ĺ&#x2DC;  VTXDUHV GDUN FKRFRODWH (2500kJ/600cal total) Snacks Ĺ&#x2DC;  SHDFK Ĺ&#x2DC;  FHOHU\ VWDONV ILOOHG ZLWK  WEV SHDQXW EXWWHU (1100kJ/260cal total)

Daily total: 6200kJ (1480cal)

Lunch Ĺ&#x2DC; Smoked salmon & avo crackers  &RUQ 7KLQV ZLWK J VPRNHG VDOPRQ Âź DYRFDGR UHG RQLRQ WRPDWR EDE\ VSLQDFK (2200kJ/530cal total) Dinner Ĺ&#x2DC; Turkey & vegie rice paper rolls with peanut dipping sauce (p64) Ĺ&#x2DC;  IUR]HQ SLQHDSSOH ULQJV (2200kJ/530cal total) Snacks Ĺ&#x2DC;  FXS FDUURW VWLFNV ZLWK  WEV KRXPPRV Ĺ&#x2DC;  SHDFK Ĺ&#x2DC;  DOPRQGV (1000kJ/240cal total)

Daily total: 6500kJ (1560cal)

Lunch Ĺ&#x2DC; Ham, couscous & lentil salad (p62) Ĺ&#x2DC; J WXE UHGXFHGIDW SODLQ \RJKXUW ZLWK  FKRSSHG PDQJR (2100kJ/500cal total) Dinner Ĺ&#x2DC; Spicy chicken tacos with slaw & avocado dressing (p53) (1600kJ/380cal total) Snacks Ĺ&#x2DC; 2 5\YLWD FULVSEUHDGV ZLWK  VOLFH UHGXFHGIDW FKHHVH VOLFHG WRPDWR Ĺ&#x2DC;  FXSV SODLQ SRSFRUQ (1000kJ/240cal total)

Daily total: 6200kJ (1480cal)

JANUARY 2017 +($/7+< )22' *8,'(

91


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How much do I need to eat? Every recipe in HFG has a complete nutrition analysis, so you can match your eating plan to your body’s needs. Here’s how to estimate your daily dietary requirements.

Average daily intake

hfg RECIPES

5pm PANIC

MONDAY

you’ll need

Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad

ng tasty Feed your family somethi 30 minutes! and different in under

Serves 4 Cost per serve Time to make 30 min

9dairy free 9diab

+

fillets, 500g chicken breast cut into 2.5cm pieces seasoning 1 tablespoon Moroccan chopped 2 medium eggplants,

Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad

into 1cm pieces sliced 1 large red onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, thinly chopped 3 vine-ripened tomatoes, chopped ½ cup coriander leaves, bread 2 wholemeal Lebanese rounds, halved

Kerrie Ray. Julz Beresford. Food prep: ng: Styling: Meara. Styl O’Meara. Mark O PER SERVE (2 skewers

+ salad + bread)

1556kJ/372cal Protein 33 4g Total Fat 12 8g Sat Fat 3 1g Carbs 26 3g

Sugars 9 2g Fibre 8 2g Sodium 336mg Calcium 80mg ron 2 7mg

eggplant

+

Thread 1 Coat chicken with seasoning. skewers. onto 8 wooden or metal medium-high 2 Preheat a grill pan to olive oil and heat. Spray chicken with each side, or cook for 3–4 minutes through. cooked and until browned of 3 Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon frying pan over oil in a large non-stick eggplant medium-high heat. Sauté golden and for 5–10 minutes, or until plate; set aside. softened. Transfer to a cook oil; with 4 Spray the same pan until softened. onion for 5 minutes, or and cook, Add garlic and tomatoes, or until just stirring, for 5 minutes, eggplant to softened. Add reserved or until pan and cook for 2 minutes, with coriander. warmed through. Top pan for 5 Heat bread on the grill until charred 1 minute each side, or Serve chicken and warmed through. torn bread. with eggplant salad and chicken Note Uncooked, marinated is suitable to freeze.

es: Liz Macri. Photography: Recipes:

HIGH

PROTEIN

health

+ to

oes

+

1556kJ/372cal Protein 33.4g Total Fat 12.8g Sat Fat 3.1g Carbs 26.3g

Sugars 9.2g Fibre 8.2g Sodium 336mg Calcium 80mg Iron 2.7mg

Your individual intake will vary depending on your age, gender, height, weight and physical activity level. We use 8700kJ (2100cal) as an average daily intake, as this is the value prescribed by the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. You’ll find this on food labelling. While these numbers are one way of tracking healthy

Calories (cal)

2100cal

Protein (g) 15–25% of energy

78–130g

Total Fat (g) 20–35% of energy

47–82g

Saturated Fat (g) Less than 10% of energy

Lebanese bread

plus

+ Moroccan seasoning + garlic + coriander

FOOD GUIDE JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY

67

guide com au

PER SERVE (2 skewers + salad + bread)

8700kJ

red onion

24/11/2016 9:24:45 PM

6

Kilojoules (kJ)

$3.60

etes friendly

Look for these nutrition panels (left) which appear on all our recipes!

eating, it’s important to focus on the quality of the foods we eat. Eating a wide variety of healthy, real foods makes it easy to meet all our daily nutrition needs, as well as balancing energy intake. Use these recommended daily intakes as a general guide only. For personalised advice, visit daa.asn.au to find an Accredited Practising Dietitian.

Carbohydrate (g) 45–65% of energy Free sugar (g) Less than 10% of energy

<24g 230–310g

50g

Fibre (g)

25–30g

Sodium (mg)

2300mg

Calcium (mg)

1000mg

Iron (mg)

8mg

SODIUM If you have heart disease or are at high risk of this condition, aim to consume no more than 1600mg of sodium per day. CALCIUM Women over 50 years, and men over 70 years, should increase their intake to 1300mg of calcium per day. IRON Women under 50 years should aim for 18mg of iron each day. If pregnant, your iron intake should increase to 27mg each day.

Healthy Food Guide is printed by Bluestar WEB Sydney and distributed in Australia and NZ by Gordon & Gotch. Healthy Food Guide (ISSN 1832-875X) is published by nextmedia Pty Limited (ABN 84 128 805 970) under licence from Healthy Life Media Pty Limited and is subject to copyright in its entirety. The contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or part, without written permission from the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication unless specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labelled not for publication. Text, photographs and illustrations must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope stamped to the appropriate value (including registered or certified mail if required). Healthy Life Media Pty Limited does not accept responsibility for damage to, or loss of, submitted material. Opinions expressed in Healthy Food Guide are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of Healthy Life Media Pty Limited. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. No liability is accepted by Healthy Life Media Pty Limited, the publisher, nor the authors or members of the editorial advisory board for any information contained herein. All endeavours are made to ensure accuracy and veracity of all content and advice herein, but neither Healthy Food Guide nor its publisher, contributors or editorial advisory board is responsible for damage or harm, of whatever description, resulting from persons undertaking any advice or consuming any product mentioned or advertised in Healthy Food Guide or its website. Any person with health issues or medical concerns should first take advice from a health professional. If you have any questions about which products are suitable for your specific needs, Healthy Food Guide recommends you consult an Accredited Practising Dietitian or Accredited Nutritionist. PRIVACY POLICY We value the integrity of your personal information. If you provide personal information through your participation in any competitions, surveys or offers featured in this issue of Healthy Food Guide, this will be used to provide the products or services that you have requested and to improve the content of our magazines. Your details may be provided to third parties who assist us in this purpose. In the event of organisations providing prizes or offers to our readers, we may pass your details on to them. From time to time, we may use the information you provide us to inform you of other products, services and events our company has to offer. We may also give your information to other organisations, which may use it to inform you about their products, services and events, unless you tell us not to do so. You are welcome to access the information that we hold about you by getting in touch with our privacy officer, who can be contacted at nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards, NSW 1590.

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

95


References CATHER NE

ways to HABIT Y S EASE A OVER

SAXELBY’S

Chill out! A bag of ice can he p ease a headache

2

Eat something light

Try eating sma l mouthfuls of plain rice or a bite of toast smea ed with sp ead or Vegemite Or opt for a spoonful of grated or puréed apple some canned fru t custa d or pla n yoghurt If it stays down eat a l ttle more

Sipping n water & ling toast

3

Go for eggs

If you’re able to eat cook up some eggs The yolks are rich in cysteine an am no acid that s thought to break down acetaldehyde This

s can easeor our pain

is produced when he l ver p ocesses alcohol and t causes some hangover symptoms

4

Rest and sleep

5

Ice your head

If you can stay in bed and ‘sleep t o f’ Alcohol interferes wi h a good n ght’s sleep

Yes it’s old fashioned but it works Place a bag of f ozen peas on your head or forehead for a minute or two Th s reduces the swell ng and n lammation that is trigger ng your sore head

The bottom line During the holiday season it can be easy to overindulge So next t me a ternate alcoholic dr nks wi h water or a non alcoholic d ink And always eat beforehand But f you do arrive home a l ttle t psy drinking a big glass of water before you sleep wi l help reduce your symptoms

JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GU DE

19

5 WAYS TO EASE A HANGOVER, p19 DrinkWise Australia. 2016. Alcohol and your health. Available at www.drinkwise.org. au Accessed Nov 2016. NHMRC. 2009. Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol. Available at www.alcohol.gov.au Accessed Nov 2016. hfg FEATURES

How to be

smarter about We know that too much sugar is bad for us But how much s too much? Wi h so much m s nformat on o t there our nutr tion for you

M

ost of us think of sugar as the white stuff we add to our co fee or baking But sugar is found in essen ial heal hy foods as well With so much ‘noise’ out the e about sugar it can be confusing This guide is based on science not amateur blog pos s which we’ve comp led to help you o be smar er about sugar in 2017

Q

Not all sugars are created equal Sugar is a carbohydrate So carbohyd ate rich foods ike f uit mi k and even some vegetables (corn potatoes and even peas) all contain natural sugars Fruit vegies and whole grains a e an important part of a healthy diet The sugars in hese foods are not the ones that we need o be worried about The distinguishing diffe ence is that these sugars a e enclosed by a plant cell wa l So they tend to be digested more slowly since the cell wa l must be broken down first Thus these sugars take longer to en er the blood s ream and are less l kely to cause blood sugar spikes and slumps hat make us seek out a high-k lojoule snack Wh le whole natural foods contain sugar they also provide us with valuable vi amins mine als an ioxidan s and fibre Also hese foods do not promote ooth decay l ke o her sugars do

It’s the added sugar in very concent ated forms that is the problem (think whi e sugar honey sy ups and even fruit juice) These are ca led ‘free’ sugars and they have no ce l walls to slow he diges ion of hem so hey freely gush into our blood stream These sugars also lack nutrien s which is why hey’re known as ‘empty’ kilojoules Some people be ieve that ‘natural’ sugars l ke rice malt sy up coconut sugar and agave nectar are be ter but our bodies treat hem the same as whi e sugar So these oo are classified as ‘free’ suga s that should be limited according to he World Health O ganization (WHO)

Sugars in whole foods are different to added sugars like white sugar & honey

sugar?

Blum et al. 2014. Dopamine and glucose, obesity, and reward deficiency syndrome. Front Psychol. 17(5): 919. Dickinson, K & Matwiejcyk, L. 2016. Health Check: How much sugar is it okay to eat? The Conversation, May 23, 2016. Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ). 2013. Ingredient Labelling of Foods. Available at www.foodstandards. govt.nz Accessed Oct 2016. Palmer, S. 2012. The Real Scoop on Sugar, Today’s Dietitian. 13(10): 28. World Health Organization (WHO). 2014. The science behind the sweetness in our diets. Bull World Health Organ. 92: 780–1. World Health Organization (WHO). 2015. Guideline: Sugars intake for adults and children. Available at www.who.int Accessed Oct 2016.

Soft d ink Mi k

Potato

hfg FEATURES

Grapes

36

hea thyfoodgu de com au

UIDE

37

HOW TO BE SMARTER ABOUT SUGAR, p36 Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2014. Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results — Foods and Nutrients, 2011–12. Available at www.abs.gov.au Accessed Oct 2016. Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2016. Australian Health Survey: Consumption of added sugars, 2011–12. Available at www.abs. gov.au Accessed Oct 2016.

10 travel tips for restricted diets 1

Warn your hotel

If you’re staying in a hotel or an all-inclusive esort ask if they’re able to deal with your dietary needs when you book But if you’ve already booked ca l and notify them of your a lergies or intolerances — or pe haps ask o speak to heir catering manager

Don’t let your spec al d etary needs get in the way of a great holiday Fo low our 10 step guide for a happy healthy trip whi e eating well and safely

2 with Travelling s can food allergie d be easily manage with forward plann ng

42

hea thyfoodgu de com au

RESEARCH THE DINING OPTIONS

When booking your accommodation consider the severity of your food related cha lenges For example if you’re on a very restric ed diet you may want to find self-catering accommodation Also resea ch the restauran s and ca és nearby the area you’re visiting Many display their menus on heir websi es so you can check for suitabi ity (or email them) Social media can also be handy so try asking on Twitter or TripAdvisor for tips on eating out in new places It ll save time and trouble when you ar ive — leaving more ime for we l holidaying

Text Hannah Ebe t the & Brooke Longfie d Photos S o k

Co n

3

DIY snacks

Don’t rely on finding sn o suit your diet at serv stations and other stops along the way And chances are hat you ll fo k out a premium for whatever you do find So carry snacks wi h you even f you’re on a hort journey Traffic delays are often unavoidable if t avel ing by car so pack a small Esky with a supply of suitable food such as glu en-free bread or dairy-f m lk in case he shops are clos when you arrive at your destina

T aces of peanuts may be found on ray tables & seat belts

4

Book in-flight food

Check with your airline to see f he cater for your spec fic needs Many wi l o fer ions such as diabe ic ntolerant low salt low getarian and vegan but ’ l need to book it at the me of ticket pu chase This an of en be done online Despite he growing ncidence of nut alle gies ome air ines st ll serve eanuts as snacks If you ve a par icularly severe gy where even traces eanut on t ay tables and el s pose a p oblem our air ine’s policy on peanu s we l in advance JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GU DE

43

TRAVEL TIPS FOR RESTRICTED DIETS, p42 Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia. 2012. Nuts on Planes: myths, media and facts. Available at www.allergyfacts.org.au Accessed Nov 2016.

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia. 2016. Travel Information. Available at www.allergyfacts. org.au Accessed Nov 2016. Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia. 2016. Travelling with Allergies. Available at www.allergyfacts. org.au Accessed Nov 2016. Coeliac Australia. 2015. Oats and the gluten free diet. Available at www.coeliac.org.au Accessed Nov 2016. hfg FEATURES

weso

iet tip for pets d cats have the same r sk of disease with obesi s are now saying we should rethink the way we fee Our pets suffer a huge stress

46

kfast time does he amily dog sit at your feet looking longingly at that ha f s ice of toast you left on your plate? And when you come home at the end of the day does your cat wind herself around your legs in the hope hat you’ l produce her favourite fat y snack? The t ouble is when we feed our pets very few of us count

A

on their joints from being overweight

Te t Jenny Hu me Add t ona report ng Andrea Duva Pho os Stock

5

heal hyfoodgu de com au

the kilojoules That half slice of lefto oast given to a 5kg dog for ins ance is equivalent to us popping an ex ra five s ices of bread on our plate after we’ve finished our usual meal One in three Aussie cats and dogs are overweight according to national studies So wh le m l ions of us a e resolving to have a healthier ife in 2017 we should also say vets review our pets’ daily diet Why wo ry about it? “They don’t live as long ” says Dr Richard Ma ik of the Centre for Veterinary Educa ion he University of Sydney In fact another study has found hat being overweight can shave wo yea s off your pet’s ife Meanwhile ca rying excess weight puts animals at isk of the same l festyle diseases as humans a higher risk of diabetes and hea t disease for example a lack of s amina and joint problems Cats and dogs a e capable of ba listic movements’ explains Dr Mal k That is they ike o run and jump to great heigh s “So being overweight puts an enormous stress on he bones and join s ” But how can you tell whe her or not your pet has a weight problem? Here is a guide on what you should look out for

Carrying extra weight can shave two years off your pet’s life

JANUARY 2017 HEA THY FOOD GU DE

47

PAWESOME DIET TIPS FOR PETS, p46 British Veterinary Association. 2014. Get tough on pooches’ paunches in 2015 vets warn, as 95% say better weight control would significantly impact dogs’ health. Available at www.bva.co. uk Accessed Nov 2016. Pet Food Industry Association of Australia (PFIAA). 2016. Incidence, Risk Factors and Managing Obesity in Dogs and Cats. Available at www.pfiaa. com.au Accessed Nov 2016. RSPCA Australia Knowledgebase. 2016. What should I feed my dog? Available at www.kb.rspca.org. au Accessed Nov 2016. All references are abridged.

)To view all of our references, visit healthyfoodguide.com.au


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3

2

A bag of ice is an old-fashioned remedy for headaches, but it works! (5 ways to ease a hangover, p19)

1 Got milk? More men prefer soggy cereal than women. (News bites, p14)

Hide the garlic bread! Garlic can make your pet dog anaemic! (Pawesome diet tips

10

u know hol is er in oules J per ) than (17kJ ram)? bites,

THINGS you’ll discover in this issue

5 Finish a special summer meal on a cool note with our frozen yoghurt bark. (Frozen in time, p86)

6 Hold the salt! Vegie chips can be saltier than regular potato chips. (How much salt is in that crisp? p28)

Go easy the sauc A tablesp of toma sauce ha full teasp of suga (This vs t p26)

7

8 The more colour you toss into your salad, the greater the variety of vitamins and antioxidants you’ll eat. (Shortcut salads! p25)

9 Trend alert: Sweet potato will be the new slice popping out of your toaster this year! (Trending in 2017, p18)

Swap greasy burgers for grilled fish at your next barbecue and slash the saturated fat. (HFG makeover, p74)

Don’t miss our February issue – on sale Monday 23 January

Photos: iStock.

10


Get to know our recipe badges

RECIPE INDEX

Recipes contain no more than: Å&#x2DC;N-SHUPDLQPHDO Å&#x2DC;N-SHUGHVVHUW Å&#x2DC;N-SHUVLGHGLVK Å&#x2DC;N-SHUPOIOXLG HIGH

PROTEIN

SEAFOOD Grilled fish with chilli-lime corn & asparagus GF...................... 74 Grilled fish with orange & ancient grain salad GF ...... 68 Chilli prawn skewers with mango & mint salad GF........ 55

VEGETARIAN

BEEF, PORK & VEAL Ginger pork & cashew stir-fry......................... 69 Ham, couscous & lentil salad ........................... 62 Ham tortilla with tomato salad GF..................... 64 Muffin tin tacos........................... 89 Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Spanish beans............. 58 Veal involtini with currants & pine nuts GF........................ 70

CHICKEN & TURKEY Moroccan chicken skewers with warm eggplant salad ... 67 Spicy chicken tacos with slaw & avocado dressing GF ............................. 53 Turkey & vegie rice paper rolls with peanut dipping sauce ........... 64 Turkey, sweet potato & pecan salad GF................... 61

Kale, vegie & pepita slice GF... 56 JalapeÅ&#x2C6;o hotcakes with lime sour cream...................... 73 Roasted vegetable, feta & herb patties ......................... 65

CONDIMENTS

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9gluten free 9dairy free &RQWDLQV QRLQJUHGLHQWVWKDWXVXDOO\ FRQWDLQ JOXWHQRUGDLU\EXWDOZD\V FKHFN WKH LQJUHGLHQWV\RXDUHXVLQJ

9vegetarian

SWEET TREATS Fruity frozen yoghurt GF .......... 84 Summer fruit tart with spelt & chia pastry ................. 82 Watermelon & peppermint tea granita GF......................... 85 Yoghurt bark GF......................... 86

You can make many recipes gluten free if you replace bread, pastry and pasta with gluten-free varieties, and use gluten-free stocks and sauces.

Recipes contain no more than: Å&#x2DC; JIDWSHUPDLQPHDO Å&#x2DC; JIDWSHUGHVVHUW Å&#x2DC; JIDWSHUVLGHGLVK Å&#x2DC; JIDWSHUPOIOXLG

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Chimichurri GF ........................... 78 Citrus dressing GF ..................... 77 Miso lime dressing ................... 76 Soy dressing ............................... 79

GF indicates that a recipe is gluten free.

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Standard measurements  FXS POÅ&#x2DC;WDEOHVSRRQ PO  WHDVSRRQ POÅ&#x2DC;(JJVDUHJ 7HPSHUDWXUHVDUHIRUIDQIRUFHGRYHQV )RU EDNLQJUHFLSHVXVHDWDEOHVSUHDG WKDWÅ&#x2018;V DW OHDVWSHUFHQWIDW JANUARY 2017 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

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