Page 1

OCT-DEC 2016

T H

E

H

O

M

E

D

E

S

I

G

N

M

A G A

Z I

N

E

O

F

M

E

T R O

P

O

L I T A

N

N

E

W

Y O

R

DAVID SALLE'S BROOKLYN HOME GRAMERCY PARK COLLECTOR QUEENS MUSEUM LOWER EAST SIDE CHIC

NEWYORKSPACES.COM

ARTISSUE

K


ĂŠditionspĂŠciale $9,890*

French Art de Vivre

Symbole. Modular seating, design Sacha Lakic.

instead of $13,610

Photo Michel Gibert. Special thanks : TASCHEN. *Edition Speciale prices valid in the USA until 12.31.16, not to be used in conjunction with any other offer.


*$ 9,890 instead of $ 13,610 until 12.31.16 for composition as shown including three elements upholstered in Symbole fabric: 1 lounge chair, 1 armless 3 seat unit including wooden tray and 1 corner meridienne. Dimensions: 166.5”L / 88.2”L x 34.6”H x 40.5”D / 41.7”D. Price includes 3 large rectangular back cushions in Symbole fabric and 3 medium square back cushions in Jean Paul Gaultier fabric and 3 medium square back cushions in Cabaret velvet. Price excludes ottoman, upholstered in Jean Paul Gaultier fabric. Completely removable slipcovers. Metal legs, black nickel finish. Optional wooden tray. Other elements and dimensions available. Radian high and low pedestal tables, design Cédric Ragot. Basket cocktail table, design Renaud Thiry. Robin floor lamps, design Carlo Zerbaro. Manufactured in Europe.

Trade & Contract Division – tradeusa@roche-bobois.com

www.roche-bobois.com


TA K E A C L O S E R L O O K AT Luxury.


greenwich table & goldie chair - designed by manzoni & tapinassi oompa-loompa lamp - designed by g. carollo glory console - designed by manzoni & tapinassi showroom - two hundred lexington avenue, new york, ny 10016 +1 (212) 696 0211 www.atelier-nyc.com info@atelier-nyc.com


exclusively at


FEATURING: WHITLEY SOFA AND CHAIR, ANSEL CHAIR, ASTOR NESTING COCKTAIL TABLE, BEVERLY SIDE TABLE, CECE PULL-UP TABLE, MILA LAMPS, CHERRY BLOSSOM WALL ART, PEDESTAL DISH, AGATE TRIVET, SYMMETRY RUG


OUR MODERN EVOLUTION FA L L 2 016 CO L L E C T I O N

NEW YORK CITY | MANHASSET | PARAMUS | GREENWICH | MGBWHOME.COM


CONTENTS

OC TOBE R- DECE MBE R 2016 | VOLU M E 13 | N U M B ER 6 COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSHUA MCHUGH INTERIOR DESIGN BY VILLALOBOS DESIO

68 52

25

DEPARTMENTS 18 25 30

EDITOR'S SPACE

STATEMENTS Artful designs for your abode

PROFILE The Queens Museum's executive director, Laura Raicovich, is changing the way we view museums and the way they view us

32 38 43

CLIQUE Cultural adventures from river to river and beyond PLACES Top-tier properties made to showcase art REAL ESTATE Four of the top women in New York real estate talk trends, mentorship, and style

48

NEIGHBORHOOD The artsy, trendy, and historical neighborhood that is the Lower East Side

MIX MASTER Artist David Salle and Architect Christian Hubert create a multihyphenate live/work complex in Brooklyn

76

CHELSEA MORNING Neil Beckstedt helps a couple find an elegant home for their art and family on Gotham's West Side

82

A SENSE OF GRACE The Extraordinary Beauty of Birds by photographer Deborah Samuel captures nature's powerful essence

86

98 104

SHELTERING SKY Photographer Seton Smith creates a home reflective of her artististry

FINAL TAKE Roméo et Juliette returns to the Metropolitan Opera N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

68

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Spanish artist Lluis Lleo invites us into his pedigreed East Village home RESOURCES

8

DIVERSIONARY TACTICS Juan Montoya's magic touch makes a low-ceilinged Park Avenue apartment feel grand

SARTORIAL SOPHISTICATE Villalobos Desio ushers Emery Roth's prewar aesthetic into a new modern era

52

25

FEATURES 60

92


CLAUDIA 03

From $8,500 to $175,000


The world’s most comfortable bed, hand made in London

Downtown - 54 Greene Street, NY 10013 - 212 226 3640 Uptown - 223 East 59th Street, NY 10022 - 646 767 9935

London

Paris

Düsseldorf

St Petersburg

Beijing

Shanghai

Hong Kong

Seoul

Taipei

New York


CLEAN AND CONTEMPORARY Most-Selected Kitchen Design Style “Clean and contemporary, now considered a classic design, is the most requested kitchen style in New York,” says Ellen Elias, Owner of Elgot, a family-run business that has been designing and installing kitchens and baths since 1945. Elgot features a wide variety of cabinetry from high-quality manufacturers including Craft-Maid, Ultracraft, and Canada’s Irpinia Kitchens, that capture the very essence of today’s contemporary style. Cabinetry made in North America allows Elgot to ensure quality control, reduces lead times and permits flexibility in design. Irpinia cabinetry (pictured here), with maximized storage always at the forefront, comes in a variety of styles with uncluttered lines—from a traditional soft white finish to the more cutting-edge aluminum-edged doors with recessed pulls. CraftMaid cabinetry (also shown here) features luxurious, clean designs with a flare for tradition. “More clients have been requesting quartz or porcelain countertops today,” Elias adds, so Elgot offers Neolith, a thin and extremely durable porcelain slab known for even coloration that allows for longer and slimmer surfaces. Elgot’s beautifully-designed kitchens can be seen at elgot.com or in their showroom on Third Avenue (between 74th and 75th streets).


Showroom 1296 Third Avenue, NY, NY • 212-879-1200 • elgot.com Between 74th and 75th Streets

For over 70 years, Manhattan’s Premier Kitchen & Bath Designers

www.true-residential.com


OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2016

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR DECORATING EDITOR DESIGN EDITOR STYLE EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

DIGITAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

G. JASON KONTOS JIYON SON DEBORAH L. MARTIN BETSY MARX NICOLE HADDAD ROBIN LONG MAYER JACQUELINE GONNET LINDA SHERIDAN JILL SIERACKI ROBERT REYNOLDS

DAVLER MEDIA GROUP CEO MANAGEMENT

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

EDITORIAL INQUIRIES

DAVID L. MILLER JANET Z. BARBASH LISA BEN-ISVY DAVID FRIEDMAN HEATHER GAMBARO THOMAS K. HANLON MICHAEL KRESS JACQUELINE MAJERS LACHMAN SHERI LAPIDUS ELI MARCUS REBECCA STOLCZ ELIZABETH TEAGARDEN VINCENT TIMPONE RAY WINN To subscribe, change an address, or purchase a back copy, please call 917-720-5764, email nyspaces@davlermedia.com or visit our website newyorkspaces.com NEW YORK SPACES 498 Seventh Avenue 10th Floor New York, NY 10018 212.315.0800

FOR THE LATEST NEWS AND DESIGN INFORMATION FROM NEW YORK SPACES: ONLINE: newyorkspaces.com FACEBOOK: facebook.com/newyorkspacesmagazine TWITTER: @nyspacesmag PINTEREST: nyspacesmag INSTAGRAM: nyspacesmag

460 years of combined creative heritage SAMUEL-HEATH.COM MADE IN ENGLAND

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: NEWYORKSPACES.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Davler Media Group www.davlermedia.com


Sign up for the FREE

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2016

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER ฀฀interviews with top designers ฀฀design highlights and projects ฀฀design news ฀events & happenings

newyorkspaces.com/newsletter

PUBLISHER

HEAD OF MARKETING

MARKETING MANAGER

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, EVENTS

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

OPERATIONS COORDINATORS

DIRECTOR OF TRAFFIC TRAFFIC MANAGER

LISA BEN-ISVY

JACQUELINE MAJERS LACHMAN

JAIME GRAHAM

REBECCA STOLCZ

RAY WINN

LEONARD PORTER RAY GUEDEZ CHRISTOPHER REGALADO

HEATHER GAMBARO ALEXIS BROWER

WEB EDITOR

NICOLE HADDAD

CONTROLLER

DAVID FRIEDMAN

CREDIT MANAGER

CREDIT

ADMINISTRATIVE

ADVERTISING OFFICE

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES

ELIZABETH TEAGARDEN

ROSA MEINHOFER DIEDRA SMITH

BARBARA BYRD ERIN JORDAN

NEW YORK SPACES DAVLER MEDIA GROUP 498 Seventh Avenue New York, NY 10018 212.315.0800

Please contact LISA BEN-ISVY 917.338.2211

DAVLER MEDIA GROUP, LLC PUBLISHERS OF NEW YORK SPACES MITZVAH MARKET CITY GUIDE NY METRO PARENTS

NEWYORKSPACES.COM MITZVAHMARKET.COM CITYGUIDENY.COM NYMETROPARENTS.COM

Davler Media Group www.davlermedia.com No portion of this magazine, including without limitation, articles, listings, may be reproduced without the expressed written permission of the publishers Copyright: 2016 by Davler Media Group LLC (212) 315-0800. All rights reserved.


arclinea.com


EDITOR'S SPACE

EVERY YEAR,

the art issue is one of our favorites to put together. We feature homes that show how artworks are part of a major design statement, and look for people who are making art and objects and displaying them in interesting ways. It’s an investment, but art should not be a perfect match with design. As always, sensitive blending is key. We are focused on New York, which is especially appropriate since our city is still one of the major art centers in the United States, indeed, the world. In this issue we peek into the Brooklyn home of renowned contemporary artist David Salle, and the Lower East Side minimalist chic apartment of photographer Seton Smith. Worldfamous designer Juan Montoya mixes it up in an apartment where, in his usual elegant style, old and new combine to create a work of art, holding works of art. And we head out to Queens to visit Laura Raicovich, the new Executive Director of the Queens Museum—a place where public space and intensely personal art is redefining the modern museum. As always, we encourage you to let your eye wander, and consider how to use art to amp up the wow factor in your own personal space.

Jason Kontos Editorial Director FOR THE LATEST NEWS AND DESIGN INFORMATION FROM NEW YORK SPACES: ONLINE: newyorkspaces.com · INSTAGRAM: nyspaces FACEBOOK: facebook.com/nyspacesmag TWITTER: @nyspacesmag · PINTEREST: nyspacesmag

18

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

Juan Montoya plays with scale in a lush Park Avenue apartment; Art for everyone in the Queens Museum’s renovated spaces; The elegant Marlow chair from Kelly Hoppen in lemon velvet; Modern True Colour vases by Lex Pott from Suite NY; Art takes center stage in David Salle’s Brooklyn home and studio.

FOR ART'S SAKE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP:


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

1

2

NEW YORK CITY IS

a playground for the creative: artists, designers, and architects from all over the world enhance the canvas we call home. And in our annual art issue, we celebrate and pay special homage to the people who make our city such an intoxicating visual feast. From the new independent galleries popping up all over the Lower East Side, to the Queens Museum’s new powerhouse president, Laura Raicovich, the great mix of beautiful minds that shape the art and architecture in our lives and homes is astounding. From the ultra-chic East Village home of Spanish artist LLuis Lleo, to contemporary master David Salle’s live-work complex in Brooklyn, we explore great design and style in every corner of Manhattan. Art is everywhere, and this issue is truly a staff favorite. New York Spaces also recently celebrated the talent of the Top 50 Designers at Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams—our ever-gracious host for the event. The night was a fantastic success with over 1,000 of the industry’s most influential and stylish tastemakers in full festive mode, swaying to the tunes of our resident DJ for the night, Lady Bunny. A special thanks goes out to our partners, Pirch and Benjamin Moore, for making it all possible. Recently we spent an inspiring morning at 498 West End Avenue, in a wide-ranging panel discussion with some of the most powerful women in real estate. Our panelists included Louise Phillips Forbes, of Halstead, Nikki Field of Sotheby’s International Realty, Suzanne Miller of Empire State Properties, and Anjali Pollack from Anjali Pollack design. It was an empowering showcase of the influential and passionate women who continue to shape today’s real estate market, and you can read their sharp insights in this issue. We wouldn’t be able to do all of this without our readers, advertising partners, and the design community, and we thank you for making this issue possible. Here’s to an artand design-filled life in New York City!

3

4

6

5

Warm regards,

Lisa Ben-Isvy Publisher New York Spaces

1: Lee Mindel of SheltonMindel; DJ Lady Bunny 2. Anishka Clarke and Niya Bascom of Ishka Designs 3. Jason Kontos and Lisa Ben-Isvy, New York Spaces; Jeffrey Beers of Jeffrey Beers International 4. John Eason of John Douglas Eason Interiors; Stacy Garcia of Stacy Garcia New York;

Damon Crain of Culture Object; Alexandra Polier of DNA; Martin Kesselman of Colours by Martin 5. Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams of Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams 6. Nikki Field, Sotheby’s International Realty; Suzanne Miller, Empire State Properties;

Anjali Pollack, Anjali Pollack Design; Louise Phillips Forbes, Halstead Property 22

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


STATEMENTS

1

2

3

ARTISTICALLY INCLINED ADD STYLE TO YOUR ABODE WITH THESE ARTFUL DESIGNS

4

PRODUCED BY NICOLE HADDAD

1

DECO LOVE Kelly Wearstler's chic tile designs for Ann Sacks include Crescent Deco from the Tableau collection (top left) and Palm from the Liaison collection. ANNSACKS.COM

2

THE GOLDEN TOUCH The Fisher Weisman collection at Dennis Miller Associates includes the Midas Classic chandelier, a design handcrafted of steel and papier mâché. 36"D x 36"H. DENNISMILLER.COM 5

3

TRUE LOVE Lex Pott's True Colour collection of seven varying vases each showcases a different metal in both oxidized and polished states. SUITENY.COM

4 BALANCING ACTS Luca Nichetto's Laurel coffee table balances a seemingly weightless lacquered cone over a cylindrical base. 35 2/3"W. DELAESPADA.COM

5

CARIBBEAN BEAT Malene B.'s sea-inspired Ocean rug is hand-knotted in Nepal with Tibetan wool and Indian silk. Custom colors and sizes available. KRAVET.COM

6 PURPLE HAZE The Sterling sofa from BESPOKE by Luigi offers stylish details, generous sizing, and diamond tufting. Custom sizes and details are available. BESPOKEBYLG.COM

7

GREEN WITH ENVY Kate Spade New York's Syrie coffee table features a striking green marble top and a polished brass base. KATESPADE.COM CONTINUED

7 6

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

25


STATEMENTS

8

9

10

8 PARTY UNDERFOOT Kate Spade New York's Freesia Confetti rug features an embroidered, confetticolored streamer pattern. KATESPADE.COM

9

MONDRIAN-ESQUE Anna Karlin's wool Pattern Rug C is hand-looped in Turkey. Cotton-backed. ANNAKARLIN.COM

10

FLORAL-INSPIRED Barry Goralnick's Norma cocktail table for Vanguard Furniture melds a French brass base with an inlaid Agaria marble top. 18"H. VANGUARDFURNITURE.COM

11

11

LEMONADE Kelly Hoppen's Marlow chair for Resource Decor features a lemon velvet upholstery and a base finished in black maple. RESOURCEDECOR.COM

12

MOD SQUAD Konekt's Pause lounge chair features a curvaceous fiberglass shell with luxurious padding and a down/feather cushion. 42"H. KONEKTFURNITURE.COM

13

SIZE MATTERS The Plurimo table has a patented hidden mechanism that allows for extensions in both width and length! Available in 29 lacquer and wood veneers. RESOURCEFURNITURE.COM

12

14

PAINTERLY PATTERN Tiles from the Aqua Forte collection are created using artisanal techniques to etch patterns into natural stone, and are then hand-colored, gilded, or glazed. MARBLESYSTEMS.COM CONTINUED

13

26

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

14


WESTBROOK INTERIORS

SPANISH GREY AND WHITE MARBLE

BOSTON CHICAGO CONNECTICUT NAPLES PALM BEACH LOS ANGELES

NEW YORK SHOWROOM A&D BUILDING

150 EAST 58TH STREET

7TH FLOOR, SUITE 701 212.644.2782

888.845.3487

www.parisceramicsusa.com


STATEMENTS

17

15

18

16

15 LIGHTNING Hollis+Morris's Bolt sconce features a dramatic shape highlighted by a burst of illuminating light through LEDs recessed into the wood and diffused with frosted acrylic. HOLLISMORRIS.COM

16 GRAPHIC ARTISTRY Elegantly engineered hardware and optical, artful marquetry define the Stella cabinet's handcrafted oversized doors. 48"L x 34"H. TOKENNYC.COM

17

TEXTURAL Stepevi's fully-customizable Dérangé rug offers a deconstructed take on a traditional flatweave. Shown in Ink blue and Apple Green and Ink Blue and Euclyptus Green. STEPEVI.COM

18 GLASSWARE Atlas Homewares' eye-catching hardware includes the Dream Glass Galaxy round knob (top) and the Tangeres glass knob (bottom). ATLASHOMEWARES.COM

19

19 TREND REPORT The DGD dining chair mixes various materials to create layers of texture, colors, and pattern within a modern framework. DAVIDGAYNORDESIGN.COM

20

OVER THE RAINBOW Danish artist Tal R created nine new vibrant colors for the stackable Series 7 chair from Fritz Hansen. FRITZHANSEN.COM SEE RESOURCES

20

28

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


PHOTO ANDREA FERRARI | AD GARCIA CUMINI

Maxima 2.2 Design GV Plazzogna - Cesar CESAR FLAGSHIP STORE 50 West 23rd St New York – NY 10010 Tel. 001 212 505 2000 www.cesarnyc.com info@cesarnyc.com

cesar.it


QUEEN OF CORONA THE QUEENS MUSEUM’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LAURA RAICOVICH, IS CHANGING THE WAY WE VIEW MUSEUMS, AND THE WAY MUSEUMS VIEW US TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN

DIVERSITY IS SOMETHING New Yorkers cherish, and nowhere is that more true than in Queens. Laura Raicovich, the president and executive director of the Queens Museum, says, “What’s special about the Queens Museum is that it is in Queens. There are over 165 languages spoken here, and when you walk around Corona or Flushing, people are skyping with friends in their hometowns, which could be Sri Lanka, Eastern Europe, or upstate New York.” The Queens Museum, in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, has been through several iterations—it was the New York Pavilion for the both the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs, and in between it housed the UN General Assembly—before becoming a museum in 1972. In 2013, a massive renovation enabled the institution to double its size. Raicovich says, “For me our clear calling is about connectivity to the diverse communities that surround us.” To that end, Raicovich has expanded on a program begun 12 years ago by her predecessor. “Tom [Finkelpearl] had a vision that started with one community organizer, and today we have three full-time organizers on staff.” Raicovich knows that this might seem like a stretch. “[Community organizing] seems tenuously related to a cultural program but my argument is we should act as an entry point for participation in the civic life of the city. In an area where there is a large immigrant population that is an important stance for a museum to take.” She continues, “A big part of our cultural need is to get those voices heard. A museum can be a frame for that.” The museum sponsors programs that include art education and studio grants for working artists and art students; public art, cultural, and civic programs beyond the museum’s walls; and their extensive programs for adults and children with disabilities. Raicovich is keenly aware that she is the shepherd of a truly public institution. “The city owns this building, so if you pay taxes here, this is your space.” In approximately two years it will be the first museum in the country to incorporate a branch of the public library. “We already partner with the library in our education programs, now it will be physically housed inside the museum.” She envisions the museum as a “third space,” a safe place between home and work or school where one can do research, use Wi-Fi, or appreciate art. For her, this represents the democratic ideal. Sitting in the museum café, looking out at the Unisphere, she says, “A public park, a public museum, and now, a public library. Is there anything more democratic?” queensmuseum.org SEE RESOURCES

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF QUEENS MUSEUM.

PROFILE

PUBLIC ART TOP TO BOTTOM: In 2013 the museum underwent a massive renovation, opening up the center space and doubling its square footage. The welcoming main room opens out to the Unisphere and Flushing Meadows Corona Park; The panorama of the city of New York was created for the 1964 World’s Fair, and is often incorporated into current art exhibits; Currently on display, Mierle Laderman Ukeles: Maintenance Art, spans five decades of Ukeles’ work celebrating the hidden, yet essential, work of New York’s Department of Sanitation.


CLIQUE

PRODUCED BY DE BOR AH L . MARTIN

LIVE FROM NEW YORK THE AIR IS CRISP, THE LIGHT IS GOLDEN, AND THE CITY IS BRIMMING WITH CULTURAL ADVENTURES FROM RIVER TO RIVER AND BEYOND This month at Brooklyn Academy of Music, director Robert Wilson and legendary performer Mikhail Baryshnikov team up to produce Letter to a Man, a new work based on the diary of iconic Russian dancer Vaslav Nijinsky. Once the most celebrated dancers in the world, he began to descend into schizophrenia shortly after World War I. His diary—an extraordinary document created over the course of six weeks—conveys his struggle with madness, his tormented sexuality, and his profound love of dance. This production includes music by Tom Waits, Henry Mancini, and Soviet futurist composer Alexander Mosolov. OCTOBER 15-30; BAM.ORG

MARSHALL PLAN The Met Breuer will launch a retrospective of the work of American artist Kerry James Marshall. The exhibit includes 80 of the artist’s works, while a parallel exhibit, curated by Marshall, includes works from the Met collection that inspire him. Marshall was born before the civil rights movement in Birmingham, Alabama, and as a child growing up in Los Angeles he witnessed the Watts Rebellion of 1965. He is widely regarded as a chronicler of the African American experience. The exhibit will include Untitled (Studio) 2014 (above, bottom) and Untitled, Painter (above, top), referencing Old Masters, trompe l’oeil, portraiture, and other genres. Sheena Wagstaff, chairman of The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art noted, “Marshall’s career is based on the central concern of redressing the absence of the black figure in Western art. Through a deep knowledge of art history, he finds his place in it.” KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY, OCTOBER 25-JANUARY 29, 2017; METMUSEUM.ORG

32

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

ARCHITECTURAL EXPLORATION On October 15-16, Open House New York flings open the doors of more than 250 architectural masterpieces across all five boroughs. Tours are lead by architects, designers, and urban planners. To celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service, there will be special events including a sunrise tour of Ellis Island and a visit to the recently restored Theodore Roosevelt home in Gramercy Park. Also included will be the Philip Johnson New York State Pavilion in Flushing Meadows Corona Park (top), and the Westbeth Artists Housing Community in Greenwich Village (bottom). OHNY.ORG CONTINUED

COURTESY METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART (MARSHALL); COURTESY BROOKLYN ACADEMY OF MUSIC (BARYSHNIKOV); BEN HELMER (NEW YORK PAVILION); ROGER BRAIMON (WESTBETH).

DIARY OF A MADMAN


Photos by Mekko Harjo

302 square feet of fabulous

Penelope Sofa/Queen Wall Bed Clei Wardrobe & Storage System

day

X night

Ollie™ at Carmel Place Micro-Studio NYC Living room + kitchen + bedroom + dining for four in 302 beautiful square feet? That’s one powerfully functional space. : 60+ customizable solutions effortlessly multiply any space, large or small, day or night. Designed and made in Italy by the global leader in transformable furniture design for more than 50 years. Lifetime warranty on all mechanisms. Available exclusively from Resource Furniture. Many items available for immediate delivery. 969 Third Avenue @ 58th Street | 4th Floor | NYC | 212.753.2039 314 North Crescent Heights Blvd. @ Beverly Blvd. | LA | 323.655.0115 300 Kansas Street | Suite 105 | 16th Street Entrance | SF | 415.872.9350 3340 Cady’s Alley NW | Georgetown | DC | 202.750.6327 resourcefurniture.com New York | Los Angeles | San Francisco | Washington, D.C. | Toronto | Vancouver | Calgary | Montreal | Mexico City


CLIQUE

For the first time, The European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF), held annually in Maastricht, comes to the Park Avenue Armory on October 21 through 26. The Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering will host the opening night, with proceeds going to patient care, research, and education programs, as well as to cultural programs hosted by the Park Avenue Armory. Exhibitors (like Christophe de Quénetain, above) will show fine art, sculpture, jewelry, manuscripts, and more. Highlights include an Art Deco Cartier “Le Ciel” clock (left, from Siegelson New York), jade carvings from Hong Kong, and early works by Swedish artist Carl Larsson. TEFAF.COM

HAUTE DESIGN Roche Bobois presents their collaboration with Maison Christian Lacroix, for the Nouveaux Classiques collection. Lacroix creative director Sacha Walckhoff brings the haute couture fashion house’s signature luxury and sophistication to a line including dining table and chairs, cabinets, lighting, and rugs. Silk-screen printing of lush garden collage and vintage photographs of Arles decorate a doublesided screen as well as a tall bar cabinet (below) and sideboard. Ivory and jet black stripes adorn dining chairs (above), and jewel-toned velvets and satins cover poufs and elegantly curved armchairs. Vive la France! ROCHE-BOBOIS.COM

CINEMA PARADISO The 54th Annual New York Film Festival, sponsored by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, runs through October 13. The main slate includes the Cannes Palme d’Or winner, I, Daniel Blake by Ken Loach, as well as veteran festival participants such as Pedro Almodóvar, Kelly Reichardt, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, and Hong Sang-soo. Strong female performances again dominate—a standout last year was Cate Blanchett in Carol (top) —including Brazilian legend Sônia Braga in Aquarius, and Kristen Stewart, Michelle Williams, and Laura Dern in Certain Women, directed by Reichardt. Director Jim Jarmusch will present two films, Paterson, and Gimme Danger, a documentary about Iggy Pop and The Stooges, which debuted at Cannes this year. FILMLINC.ORG CONTINUED 34

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

PHOTO BY GODLIS (BLANCHETT); COURTESY AMAZON STUDIOS & MAGNOLIA PICTURES (IGGY POP); COURTESY ROCHE BOBOIS (CHAIRS AND CABINET); LORAINE BODEWES (QSÉNETAIN).

ART DEBUT


Ira BARKOFF "Mindscapes"

October 2016 Exhibit

48x60 - Oil on canvas

Summer Day

44x60 - Oil on canvas

Sun Forest

3 9 M a i n S t r e e t , Tar r y t own, N e w Yor k 1 0591

Tel. 91 4 332 4554

www.CanfinGallery.co m


CLIQUE Autumn is the perfect time to visit Wave Hill in the Bronx. A 28-acre public garden and cultural center overlooking the Hudson River, Wave Hill was originally the home of William Lewis Morris, as well as New York notables such as 12-year-old Teddy Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and conductor Arturo Toscanini. Beginning October 4, tour the galleries at Wave Hill and see the exhibit Jackie Brookner: Of Nature (above right, I’m You, 2000). Enjoy fall finery on a Garden Highlights walk, or learn how to create a seasonal centerpiece in time for Thanksgiving. WAVEHILL.ORG

CIRCULATORY SYSTEM Artist Irene Mamiye shifts between objects, images, and digital space to create her intensely colored abstractions. “I seek to widen the gaps between physical and virtual reality, and to expose the ways in which images circulate between the two.” Mamiye works across multiple platforms, shooting objects with a camera, constructing virtual environments using 3D-technology, and collecting images from social media. She says, “I am deeply engaged with the tradition of abstraction, and the relationships between components such as color, rhythm, and edge.” Mamiye’s work (such as Celerity, below) may be viewed at her TriBeCa studio, by appointment. IRENEMAMIYE.COM; 646.669.8348

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE The Nicholas Roerich Museum is devoted to one of Russia’s most wellknown artists. Roerich (1874–1947) was a painter, an intellectual, and a spiritualist, who explored Eastern religions with wife, Helena. He was an archeologist, a theater designer for the Ballets Russes, and the founder of the Master Institute of United Arts in New York. Alarmed by the wartime destruction of artworks, he authored the Roerich Pact, signed in 1935 and still in effect today, which says that the defense of cultural objects takes precedence over their destruction for military purposes. ROERICH.ORG

36

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

COURTESY IRENE MAMIYE (CELERITY ); COURTESY OF WAVE HILL; COURTESY NICHOLAS ROERICH MUSEUM (REMEMBER, 1924).

A BRONX TALE


PLACES

257 BERRY ST., BROOKLYN 4 BR; 2 FULL / 2 HALF BATHS; 4,624 SQ. FT.

In addition to being one of the largest single-family townhouses in Williamsburg, this artist-in-residenceready home has a double-height art studio gallery with a dedicated loading dock. Designed by Standard Architects, it is open and spacious inside with the added bonus of four green terraces outside, each with exceptional city views. The entryway opens to a skylit central area with structural steel staircase and floor-to-ceiling windows. In what constitutes a genuine urban fantasy, the property boasts a grandfathered curb cut for private parking. LISTED AT $4,500,000 CONTACT: ROBERTA GOLUBOCK, SOTHEBY’S, 212.606.7704; JONATHAN BANKS, SOTHEBY’S, 212.606.7781; SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

ARTFUL LODGINGS WHETHER YOU SEEK A SHOWCASE FOR YOUR RARE ART COLLECTION OR A LIVE/WORK SPACE IN WHICH TO CREATE YOUR OWN MASTERPIECES, THESE TOP TIER PROPERTIES ARE NOTHING SHORT OF IDEAL

543 BROADWAY, SOHO, #5L 1.5 BATHS; APPROX. 2,300 SQ. FT.

SoHo is known for its artist lofts, but few these days come with an actual pedigree. This Broadway studio has been the headquarters of the Italian artist, designer, and architect Gaetano Pesce since 1993. The authentic home with 11-foot barrel-vaulted ceilings is in the 10-story neoclassical building by architect John W. Stevens, built in 1903 in the heart of the area’s cast iron historic district. As part of the sale, the buyer will have the opportunity to have Mr. Pesce create a design to transform his studio into a highly unique home. LISTED AT $2,995,000 CONTACT: CHARLIE MILLER, CORCORAN, 917.447.8444; OR EILEEN ROBERT, CORCORAN, 212.444.7808; CORCORAN.COM

THE WEST VILLAGE ARTHOUSE, 230 WEST 10TH ST.

LISTED AT $14,500,000 CONTACT: MARTINE D. CAPDEVIELLE, SOTHEBY’S, 212.400.8702; OR VANNESSA KAUFMAN, SOTHEBY’S, 212.606.7639; SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM 38

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

CONTINUED

PHOTOGRAPHY BY V.KAUFMAN.

5 BR; 3 FULL / 2 HALF BATHS; 6,700 SQ. FT.

An unassuming carriage house façade in the heart of the West Village disguises this airy and monumentally scaled home. High ceilings, double-height living areas, and cleverly positioned staircases throughout the house provide an open, loft-like feeling. A glass atrium and expansive walls provide the perfect light and space to show off largescale artworks. Upstairs from the entrance gallery, media room, living, and dining areas are additional bedrooms and a full-floor master suite, dressing area, balcony, and office.


PLACES

4 BR, 4.5 BATHS; APPROX. 6,954 SQ. FT.

This innovative Jean Novel-designed building, which soars directly above The Museum of Modern Art, is itself a sculpture, its exposed structural system creating an almost organic mesh that both supports and decorates it. Inside, floor-to-ceiling windows provide views of Central Park, both rivers, and downtown. The generously scaled spaces, including a massive living/dining and master suite, feature interior decoration by Thierry Despont. Artful finishes throughout include statuary marble countertops in the kitchen plus heated Verona limestone slab floors and Peruvian golden travertine walls in the master bath. LISTED AT $50,750,000 CONTACT: 53W53 SALES GALLERY, 212.688.5300; INFO@53W53.COM

THE CHARLES, 1355 FIRST AVENUE, #1901 4 BR, 4 BATHS; APPROX. 3,451 SQ. FT.

A private elevator entryway leads to the foyer of this airy full-floor residence, the perfect home from which to display your collection. Floor-to-ceiling windows throughout bathe the great room and kitchen in natural light, while a super-quiet A/C system and soundproofing keep the place as quiet as a museum. The master suite is also flooded with light and includes a corner seating area, dressing area, and huge walk-in closets. Interiors by Londonbased David Collins include sublime surfaces and top-of-the-line fixtures and appliances. LISTED AT $7,995,000 CONTACT: FRANCES KATZEN, DOUGLAS ELLIMAN, 212.350.8575; ELLIMAN.COM

63 EAST 82ND STREET 6 BR, 6 BATHS, 3 HALF BATHS; 9,035 SQ. FT. (PLUS 1,360 SQ. FT. IN CELLAR)

While some prefer a plain space with expansive, lightwashed walls for their paintings and photographs, others are drawn to something with a bit more charm and character. This turn-of-the-century townhouse has old-world elegance and details in abundance, including decorative moldings and trim, a grand staircase, and pocket doors. There’s also a 35-foot landscaped garden outside the large eat-in kitchen. Oh, and nine wood-burning fireplaces. Modern amenities include an elevator, temperature-controlled wine room, and custom lighting, audio, A/C, and security systems. PRICE UPON REQUEST CONTACT: LOUISE PHILLIPS FORBES, HALSTEAD PROPERTY, 212.381.3329; LOUISEPHILLIPSFORBES.COM 40

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY 53W53_CREDIT HAYES DAVIDSON. 1355_1ST_AVE_23_FKATZEN.

53 W 53RD, #62


#1 TEAM COMPANYWIDE Your home is the base upon which the rest of your life is built. To see these exceptional properties, call to schedule a private appointment today.

63 East 82nd Street

58 West 85th Street

Halstead Property, LLC; We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin. All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. No representation is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate and all information should be confirmed by customer. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker.

498 West End Avenue


REAL ESTATE

EXCLUSIVE

POWER GENERATION IN THE HIGH-RISK, HIGH-RETURN MANHATTAN REAL ESTATE MARKET, WOMEN ARE A POWERFUL—AND HISTORIC—FORCE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY THE SPARK GROUP (75 WALL); RYARMO PHOTOGRAPHY (PANEL).

MODER ATED BY DE BOR AH L . MARTIN

· INTERIOR DESIG N ROBIN LONG MAYE R

· PHOTOG R APHY GREG MORRIS

THE NEW YORK luxury real estate market is one of the most competitive in the world, and women have long had a hand in shaping it. At a luxury apartment on West End Avenue, New York Spaces sat down with industry leaders Louise Phillips Forbes, Senior Associate Broker, Halstead Property; Nikki Field, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Sotheby’s International Realty; Suzanne Miller, Founder/President, Empire State Properties; and Anjali Pollack, owner, Anjali Pollack Design. Louise Phillips Forbes is a 27-year veteran of the real estate industry. She is a five-time winner of Halstead Property’s Broker of the Year award, and has frequently been listed as the number one listing broker companywide. She specializes in both luxury residential sales and development projects, and is recognized as a dependable advocate for her clients. Frequently quoted in publications such as The Real Deal, The New York Times, and Real Estate Weekly, Forbes is recognized as an industry leader.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

NYS: Real estate has long been dominated by women who head many of the top brokerage firms and teams. How do you explain this? Louise Phillips Forbes: Women are traditionally the nesters, and as the definition of family and home has evolved, there is an acute connection to what we bring to the table. Having that awareness, understanding, and intuitive nature has been a great tool for me. CONTINUED

Our panel, (left to right) Suzanne Miller, Nikki Field, Louise Phillips Forbes, and Anjali Pollack, in the living room of 498 West End Avenue. LEFT: Sculptural Masters chairs by Philippe Starck surround the dining table.

FACETIME ABOVE:

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

43


REAL ESTATE

EXCLUSIVE

ELEGANT APPOINTMENT ABOVE:

The inviting living room of 498 West End Avenue incorporates a mix of shapes and textures; Suzanne Miller and Nikki Field. OPPOSITE: Anjali Pollack and Louise Phillips Forbes; Art adds color to the entry (middle); The kitchen is finished in marble and chic dark wood surfaces.

Nikki Field: Residential real estate in particular has always been a stronghold of talented, articulate, educated women. In fact, 80% of the established brokers nationwide are women. So we reign in this industry. Why? Because this is such a unique purchase. People buy all sorts of items throughout their economic life but they look at the purchase of a home in a personal way. Suzanne Miller: My business is a little different because I own a furnished rental company. So we sell income-producing properties to investors all over the world and rent them out to corporations. Most of the people that we deal with are women, both on an executive level and as international buyers. Whether it's an executive or the wife of an executive, the women are making the decisions on investment properties.

Suzanne Miller is the founder of Empire State Properties, a boutique real estate firm located in Midtown Manhattan, with a portfolio of more than 500 properties. Specializing in sales, rentals, and management of Manhattan properties for domestic and international investors, Empire State Properties is sought after by individual buyers as well as corporations and developers. Miller has been featured in publications such as The New York Times, and Crains among others.

44

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

Anjali Pollack: My perspective is different because I'm an interior designer and when there is a woman selling or buying an apartment there's more of an understanding of necessary things like closet space. Men walk through a space differently than women. A woman understands that people really live in their kitchens. Men want to know where the big TV can go, whereas women are thinking about the family’s needs. NYS: Is it still about the “ladies who lunch”? NF: We are an evolution of those women. If you are selling something, it almost always starts with a social relationship. We started as parttimers, with white gloves, and little Rolodex cards on who was moving, and who was divorcing, and since then, real estate has become a very

big business. The social aspect is transferred into a highly sophisticated business skill set. LPF: Real estate is the business of people and we are entrepreneurs by nature. Ninety % of my business is driven through personal relationships. Understanding what clients are looking for and what makes them tick is something that women are connected to—that matchmaking process and synergy. I don't really sell my clients, I educate them. NYS: How much of your business is from women buying property in their own name? NF: Hallelujah. Women are no longer waiting to get married for financial security. LPF: I didn't get married until I was 40. When I was younger I was finding people these beautiful homes with their partners and I had this epiphany of "What am I waiting for?" When I was 26 years old, I began building my business targeted towards individuals like myself. My connection with women is strong.


NF: It is a growing number. In 2015, 27% of our buyers were single women. That's up from 19% in 2014. Of our sellers in Manhattan, 31% were women and that's one third of our market. Women aren’t just buying one apartment and waiting for Mr. Right. They have significant jobs, significant careers, they're making decisions sometimes not to be married but to continue in their careers. AP: I have a lot of single women clients and they are very educated in the design market, and real estate, and they are also willing to go to that next level in terms of spending. They want what they want and they're not waiting for anybody to make any decisions. They have powerful jobs and their homes reflect that. I’m working on multiple residences with art collections and the whole gamut. Nikki Field has been with Sotheby's International Realty since 1998. She leads one of the strongest teams in the luxury real estate market, and since 2008 has been focusing on emerging markets in Asia. Field is a regular industry speaker, featured in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the New York Observer, among others. The Field Team, ranked number one for 2015, specializes in Manhattan's luxury co-op, condo, townhouse, and new deveolpment markets.

NYS: Let’s talk about staging, design, and art. How do these things impact your business? LPF: Staging completes a story visually. For the last 20 years I've worked with the developer of this apartment (498 West End Avenue) and this is probably my 13th conversion of a rental building to a condominium. We now have eight full apartments of furniture and you can select what you want, working with a designer and someone from my team. Additionally, I am a collector of Cuban art and that journey has been a benefit to my business. I just listed a townhouse with the most substantial collection that I have experienced in

my career and it's fun too, because I was with her when she bought a number of those pieces. SM: Just on a strict numbers point, you probably get about 20-25% more per month on a furnished rental than you'd get on an unfurnished. So I can tell you how important furniture and staging is in apartments. People want turn-key. The way the apartment looks, down to the art and the linens, is key to my business. AP: Most people don't want to come in and redo the kitchen or the bathrooms. So it makes a big difference when you have a developer who has done all of that, and it helps if an apartment is staged because then the client has an idea of how it could look. I come in and add the extra layers: wall textures, light fixtures, really making it personal. But most people don't want to have to do a gut renovation. When it comes to art, it’s an interesting factor in a new development where people are thinking about larger entrances and corridors. It’s hard to get large art collections in and then have them hung properly. NF: It's actually been a challenge for our architects, particularly as they are building more glass-walled buildings. There was an ongoing discussion at our marketing meetings where we said, “We need walls for the art collection!” NYS: Let's talk about broader trends. In January The New York Times published an CONTINUED N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

45


The master bedroom's cool neutrals are soothing to the eye. BELOW: Suzanne Miller, Nikki Field, and Louise Phillips Forbes; The view from the living and dining rooms of 498 West End Avenue includes a glimpse of the Hudson River, and the treetops of Riverside Park. NEW HEIGHTS LEFT:

article about dropping prices in the market and over the past six to eight months we've been seeing articles about a luxury housing glut. The Daily News predicted that the inventory of luxury condos $10 million and up will continue to grow and the demand for entry-level luxury, priced from $1 million to $3 million, will increase.

NYS: This year we have our first female presidential candidate, and we are witnessing an exciting chapter in American history. Women are growing stronger in every sector: real estate, finance, interior design, media, and politics. What does this mean to you?

SM: From January to September, I closed 28 properties between $1 million and $3 million. That's the sweet spot. New clients are coming in from China, the Philippines, and Brazil. New York City is still cheap, compared to the rest of the world. If you go to Shanghai, or London, or France, the prices are much higher.

LPF: We’ve worked on breaking these glass ceilings for many years. The heart and the soul of it is a journey, and the result is something we've all been waiting for. We'll continue to lead and support in business, I'm certain.

LPF: There was a trend that was happening at the end of 2014, where the pre-construction sales drove numbers. The attitude became, well, I'll just list it high and if I can get it, great. There was a tremendous amount of inventory floating on the market throughout '15.

NF: I'm particularly excited for our daughters. Less of their time will be spent pushing on that glass ceiling, and more of their efforts will be used for performance. If they have the talent and the work ethic, they are going to succeed. We didn't know if there was any opportunity, we just had to keep pushing down those doors until we were taken seriously.

NF: We are in an overpriced market, not overvalued. There's a big difference. Sellers were pushing the price until the bubble burst in June 2015. That was the highest average price per square foot sale in the current bull market. Once the press became aware of the declining prices and started reporting it, sellers finally had a dose of reality. We reset our prices to a fair and very healthy return. Just like Wall Street, there's a bull market in real estate. This is the time to buy something, because we have a flattening. The smart consumer understands this is their opportunity. SM: Unlike the '80s, all my buyers, particularly since the price range is $1 to $3 million, are cash buyers. There's not as much leverage. This will secure the market. People won't walk away.

SM: I think about the number one producer in my company. She recently had a child. I helped her get an apartment and she brings her son to work when she needs to. The loyalty that we've gotten, and the team effort, just by embracing her and appreciating the job that she does, this has just been fantastic. It’s a different conversation with women. AP: There is a big trickle down effect. Thanks to women who have forged the path ahead of me, there's a lot of mentorship, and your mentor can finally be a woman. Hillary Clinton is tangible evidence that a woman can really be anybody she wants to be. It’s a very different conversation than it used to be, because women are now in positions of power to help and guide the next generation.

To read more of this panel discussion, please visit newyorkspaces.com 46

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

Anjali Pollack opened her New York based design firm, Anjali Pollack Design, in 2004. She offers full-service design, and is often involved in a project from the time clients are scouting properties. The firm’s design aesthetic is global, using vibrant colors and exotic fabrics and textures inspired by Pollack’s childhood in India, as well as projects all over the world. The firm prides itself on its close personal relationships with clients, and blends traditional and modern styles to create luxurious and livable spaces.

MW STUDIO (BEDROOM, EXTERIOR).

REAL ESTATE

EXCLUSIVE


STATE PROPERTIES

The Single Source for Real Estate Services

. Pioneer in establishing the furnished corporate rental market in NYC . Sold thousands of income producing properties to domestic and international investors . Founded model to increase income to investors in excess of 20 percent . Exclusive management/brokerage contracts for over 500 individual condominium owners around the globe . Preferred housing agreements with numerous fortune 500 corporations with headquarters in NYC . Personally instrumental in working with Hillary Clinton to rebuild lower Manhattan

Suzanne Miller President 150 W. 51st Street New York City, NY 10019 (212) 262-1755 info@esp-ny.com

www. empirestateproperties.com

www.executiveplazanyc.com


NEIGHBORHOOD

NEW YORK HOME

AROUND TOWN CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Views of Lower Manhattan. Life is Beautiful, a sculpture by street artist Mr. Brainwash, greets guests walking into Hotel Indigo. The New Museum; Katz's Deli is known for its legendary corned beef and pastrami sandwiches; The Clinton St. Baking Co. opened in 2001 and has been a neighborhood brunch staple ever since; The Henry Street Settlement is a not-for-profit social service agency founded in the 19th century by a nurse; The neighborhood is laden with hip boutiques; The Tenement Museum offers walking tours; The vibrant and colorful murals on the façade of the Essex Street Market were done by artist Gera Lozano.

LOWER EAST SIDE FOR A NEIGHBORHOOD with a history as varied as its occupants, the Lower East Side (LES), is becoming quite the trendy place to visit—or live for that matter. From its pre-revolutionary days as a farm, to a haven for a diverse group of immigrants with its many tenements spanning from the late 19th century to the early 20th century, to its days as an artistic and politically-inclined neighborhood at the turn of the 20th century, the neighborhood is a historical hot spot. Today, the area where influencers such as Eddie Cantor, the Marx Brothers, and George and Ira Gershwin grew up and which the Beat poets immortalized, is chock-full of popular bars, restaurants and cafes, avant-garde boutiques, chic new hotels, and art galleries galore.

GETTING THERE

The Lower East Side is bounded by Bowery to the west, Houston Street to the north, the FDR Drive to the east, and Canal Street to the south. The easiest way to get there is the J, M, or Z trains to the Essex Street Station or the F train to the 2nd Avenue or Delancey Street Station.

MARKETS

The Essex Street Market is a historic culinary destination that began in 1940 and now offers everything from gourmet cheeses, to fresh fish and more—it even has an art gallery. The seasonal Hester Street Fair’s outdoor marketplace, which runs through October 29th, hosts a variety of food vendors, festivals, live music, and more. CONTINUED

48

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICOLE HADDAD. COURTESY NEW MUSEUM, NEW YORK. PHOTO: DEAN KAUFMAN

PRODUCED BY NICOLE HADDAD


NEIGHBORHOOD

SNAPSHOTS CLOCKWISE FROM

A private garden adds some greenspace to the neighborhood; The view from Mr. Purple, a rooftop bar in Hotel Indigo; Artistic expression is everywhere. The stylishly hip Orchard Street Hotel; Mr. Purple, designed by Crème Design, offers craft cocktails and food. TOP LEFT:

MUSEUMS

The Tenement Museum tells the history of the neighborhood’s immigrants and particularly of 97 Orchard Street—a tenement building built in 1863 that was home to nearly 7000 working-class immigrants. In 2007, the New Museum relocated to 235 Bowery and solidified the rise and move of major art galleries and artists to the Lower East Side. The building’s Tokyo-based architects, Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA, were awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2010 for their work.

Some of our favorites include Clinton St. Baking Co. (especially for brunch); The vegetablefocused Dirt Candy headed by chef Amanda Cohen; Casa Mezcal for authentic Oaxacan cuisine; Balvanera, which is the first project by Argentine Chef Fernando Navas, formerly of Nobu Miami and the recipient of an externship at world-renowned El Bulli; Schiller’s (Chef Shane McBride, also of Balthazar, helms the kitchen); The charmingly laidback Café Katja; Russ & Daughters (go for the lox); Dirty French in the Ludlow Hotel. And of course, Katz’s Deli, a neighborhood staple since 1888.

THE LIQUID CURE

For a more relaxed speakeasy-type atmosphere, visit The Back Room or Attaboy. Bar Goto serves Japanese-inspired cocktails and bites, and for those who love the taste of mezcal, visit Casa Mezcal and then descend down to the Botanic Lab (underneath) for innovative cocktails with appealing names such as the Cucumber Rumbo. Subject offers highbrow cocktails with a convivial atmostphere. Looking for a hip basement lounge with craft cocktails? Chloe 81 is your bar.

THE ART SCENE

The Lower East Side's art scene, old and new, is exploding: Galleries to watch include: CANADA; Sperone Westwater; Lehmann Maupin; Cuevas Tilleard; Muriel Guepin; Rachel Uffner; Nicelle Beauchene; Miguel Abreu; James Fuentes; Sargent’s Daughters. SEE RESOURCES

ARTFUL NATURE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP

The lobby at Hotel Indigo; Muriel Guepin Gallery on Orchard Street; A bathroom in the Ludlow Hotel has superb views while the garden area exudes charm. Café Medi is a Mediterranean restaurant on Rivington Street; Staring at the Sky by Gary Peterson at McKenzie Fine Art Inc.; Monoliths II by Emily Kiacz at Cuevas Tilleard, a contemporary art gallery located on Henry Street. LEFT:

50

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

LOBBY PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF HOTEL INDIGO LOWER EAST SIDE. MR. PURPLE IMAGE COURTESY OF GERBER GROUP. PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE LUDLOW HOTEL BY ANNIE SCHLECHTER.

FOODIE NATION


ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

ART HISTORY BARCELONA-BORN ARTIST LLUIS LLEO KEPT HIS EAST VILLAGE DUPLEX APARTMENT PURE TO LET ITS PERIOD DETAILS SHINE TE X T JILL SIE R ACKI

PHOTOG R APHY COSTAS PICADAS

"IT’S AN INTERESTING BUILDING," says artist Lluis Lleo. He spent more than a decade moving up and down East 10th Street before a casual acquaintance with the owner of his current five-story brownstone helped secure Lleo and his family the Tompkins Square Park-facing duplex. “For some reason it has good energy and it’s always been full of creative people.” After taking up residence, Lleo discovered he wasn’t the first artist to call this East Village apartCONTINUED ment home. “A very good art dealer from Madrid, Guillermo de Osma, who was

52

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


PARK VIEW THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Artist Lluis Lleo suggests this doorway was once an exterior window before the next room was enclosed to create the kitchen; Next to the door hangs a piece called Green Viewer (2013), which was a gift for the artist's wife; Lluis in front of a grouping of Works on Bhutan Paper, in his Red Hook studio; A massive living room was divided to create a top-floor master bedroom with doors that open to a park-facing balcony. OPPOSITE: The apartment’s two non-working fireplaces are show-stopping focal points. Next to the fireplace, two frescoes by Lleo, entitled Cancer (2008).

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

53


ARTIST IN RESIDENCE ART SCHOOL

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE

Una Acuarela, a 1991 sculpture from Mali sits on the fireplace; The Faces of Painting (2006), hangs over one of the original fireplace mantels. A wooden floating sculpture by Tom Shannon; A.S. (2013), a painting dedicated to Portuguese Architect Álvaro Siza; Between two circular fresco paintings called The Perfect Year (2009); a model of Lleo's studio made by his son Noah in 2009. FROM TOP LEFT:

in New York told me, ‘I’m doing a show of an artist [Waldo Balart]; he used to live in Manhattan in the Lower East Side and he shared an apartment with [Fernando] Botero,” recalls Lleo. “He sent me a picture of Botero and this artist sitting in front of the house and it happened to be our house.” The apartment’s high ceilings and period details—like ornate, non-working fireplaces—plus access to a garden from both levels instantly captivated Lleo, who only painted the walls before taking up residence. The former owner offered the family several pieces of furniture, which the artist combined with pieces he’d acquired over the years. “The CONTINUED style is no style, that’s how I

54

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


This dance should belong to you. DreamDancer BY KIM

EXQUISITE TIMEPIECES & JEWELRY · ESTABLISHED 1878 700 FIFTH AVENUE & 55TH STREET NEW YORK 212.397-9000 OPEN SUNDAYS 12 TO 5

At the best Addresses in Germany and in London, Paris, Madrid, Vienna, New York and Beijing. www.wempe.com DreamDancer BY KIM transcends the boundaries between dream and reality. Although the ring is cast in one single piece, it forms a mobile structure that constantly reinvents itself. A revolution in ring design. In 18 k rose gold, from $5,265. With brilliant-cut diamonds, from $8,282.


ARTIST IN RESIDENCE define it,” Lleo says of his interior. “It has to be an organic thing. I don’t have an idea in my head, but I don’t have an idea in my head when I do my work, usually. It changes; it evolves. I like my brain to be as free as possible when I create and also when I choose things. If I like something, I get it. I think beautiful things belong together, that’s basically the rule for me.” SEE RESOURCES

KITCHEN GARDEN TOP LEFT AND RIGHT: The kitchen offers access to a lower-level garden, which is also accessible from the children’s lower-level bedrooms. CENTER: Lluis’s daughter’s room features exposed brick as well as bright blue walls, which she selected when she asked for a room that “looked up at the sky.” BOTTOM ROW: The artist works in Red Hook. “It’s very important to commute for an artist because you have to clear your head,” says Lleo. “If you live and work in the same place, it becomes too much sometimes.”

56


Ph: Tommaso Sartori AD: Graph x

EXTRASOFT THE MODULAR SOFA CREATED FOR COMFORT INDOOR | OUTDOOR AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT

west nyc home LIVE WELL. LIVE MODERN. west | nyc home west | out east

1ĆIWKDYHQXH#WKVWUHHWQ\F 25 newtown lane, east hampton, ny

212.529.3636 631.324.3103

contact@westnyc-home.com contact@westouteast.com

www.westnyc-home.com www.westouteast.com


Talk about Style

ŠWilliam Wegman

knows how to put it together

mosaic, stone, porcelain and other fine surfaces

150 East 58th Street, 7th Floor, NYC | 212.486.1811 | www.studiumnyc.com


INTERIOR DESIGN: JUAN MONTOYA PHOTOGRAPHY: MIGUEL FLORES-VIANNA

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2016

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

59


60

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


WHITE OUT In a long corridor, Juan Montoya designed Serge Roche-like plaster pendants and sconces, all fabricated by artist Nina Helms. The iron console, by Metalworks, is also his design. Above it is a work by Swedish artist Rune Hagberg.

DIVERSIONARY TACTICS JUAN MONTOYA DEPLOYS A SERIES OF MASTERFUL SLEIGHTS OF HAND TO MAKE A LOW-CEILINGED PARK AVENUE APARTMENT FEEL GRANDLY EXPANSIVE INTERIOR DESIG N J UAN MONTOYA

· TE X T JORG E S . AR ANGO

· PHOTOG R APHY MIGU E L FLORES -VIANNA

AT SOCIAL GATHERINGS sprinkled across decades, Juan Montoya would occasionally run into the owner of a well-known Latin American cosmetics company. A fellow Colombian, this elegant woman had followed Montoya’s work for years and, he recalls, “She would always say that when she sold her company, she was going to hire me to design a home for her.” When this eventually came to pass, the mogul, true to her word, invited Montoya to decorate a Park Avenue piedà-terre she had purchased with her husband. At 2,500 square feet, and boasting three bedrooms and four baths, the apartment was comfortably proportioned. But, recalls Montoya, “Although it was a lovely prewar building, the apartments had low ceilings.” Additionally, during its recent conversion to condominiums, the spaces had lost the characteristic architectural detail of this period. Montoya was driven—literally—to distraction. “Every ceiling has been addressed to allow for your eye to feel you’re in a taller space,” Montoya explains of his response to this conundrum, CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

61


62

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


OBJECT LESSON Montoya focused attention away from ceiling height with groupings that bring together disparate styles. OPPOSITE: Below the gilded Linden chandelier is a Biedermeier-inspired table (both from Iliad Design) surrounded by deco-style Dessin Fournir chairs in Romo fabric and, atop the table, a vessel by Swedish ceramist Mia Göransson and candlesticks from Gerard Bland THIS PAGE: SilverLining executed the library’s millwork and paneling, which envelops a custom Chesterfield sofa in Zoffany silk velvet, a photo by Frederic Ohringer and Philippe Anthonioz’s chandelier from Galerie Jean-Jacques Dutko in Paris.

essentially a tour de force of optical trickery. Almost every room now sports coffered ceilings. In a long white corridor, five-stepped moldings give importance to the coffers’ recesses, and plaster relief work—designed by Montoya and executed by Nina Helms—adds sculptural interest. In the library, now richly paneled in cerused oak, dentil moldings introduce the coffers. In the dining room, Montoya designed a shallow circular dome that pulls one’s gaze aloft. And in the master bedroom he made right angles disappear, curving the space’s Douglas Fir paneling gracefully inward at the point where walls met ceiling. “I wanted to make it feel like you were in a train or a ship from the 1920s,” he says. CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

63


64

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


LAYER CAKE OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: WOKA’S reproductions of Josef Hoffmann chandeliers for Stoclet Palace in Brussels illuminate Olga de Amaral’s tapestry, a neoclassical sculpture, and an 18th-century Japanese maquette; Alexandra Athanassiades’s metal torse on Van Den Akker’s Macassar and bronze credenza; Around a Midcentury coffee table from Van Den Akker are a sofa fabricated by Guido De Angelis, Anthony Lawrence Belfair armchairs in Romo blue velvet, and Christian Badin fauteuils. THIS PAGE: A David Roth painting hangs above a custom Chinese red lacquer credenza fabricated by CQ Design Studio. The sconces are from Galerie des Lampes, Paris.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

65


FIRST CLASS CABIN ABOVE: An Arteriors chandelier hangs over a bed with a custom headboard upholstered in Armani Casa. Between the windows, a Manolo Valdés work. RIGHT: A bedside vignette includes a lamp from Phoenix Gallery, a work by Lucio Fontana, and a Scandinavian vase. BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT: A trio of sculptures on a Jansen chest below a Rufino Tamayo work; Arno Rafael Minkkinen’s photograph hangs above an Absolute Black marble bath against Phillip Jeffries wallpaper; Deco-style sconces from Terzani flank the custom vanity made by SilverLining.

66

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


DETAIL WORK Decorative treatments and touches bring dimension to areas of white. BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT: In the powder room, a Dornbracht faucet empties into a Vitraform sink below a Paul Stamati mirror. A black-and-white Jesús Soto work hangs by a custom-designed door. Nina Helms executed plaster relief work designed by Montoya in a hall that features Italian lacquer chairs from Theron Ware Antiques.

There are plenty of distractions at wall and ground level, too. “We played with all kinds of materials and textures to make it warm and inviting,” Montoya observes. Silk—on window treatments and upholstery—abounds throughout. The entry hall features Brazilian rosewood paneling and an attention-grabbing black-and-white marble houndstooth floor. In the master bath, subtly shimmering wallpaper adds understated glamour and contrasts with the Absolute Black marble and beautifully figured wood of the custom vanity. And art by the likes of Olga de Amaral, Manolo Valdés, Rufino Tamayo, and Lucio Fontana, among others, keeps the attention at eye level. Custom furnishings and intriguing assemblages of objects do the rest. Montoya’s dissimulation is so effective that no one—save, perhaps, for a New York Knicks cager—would be the wiser. SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

67


SALON MODERNE David Salle’s studio takes up the entire first floor of two buildings. “I think most art comes out of other art, or at least sets its compass points from what came before.”

CELEBRATED ARTIST DAVID SALLE AND ARCHITECT CHRISTIAN HUBERT CREATE A LIVE/WORK COMPLEX FROM TWO DERELICT BUILDINGS IN BROOKLYN ARCHITEC TU RE CHRISTIAN H U B E RT STU DIO TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN PHOTOG R APHY COSTAS PICADAS

DAVID SALLE IS a multi-hyphenate. To call him a contemporary artist, while true, doesn’t fully describe him. Salle is a painter whose work has been exhibited at museums including New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and Guggenheim Bilbao; a prolific writer who has recently compiled his essays, reviews, and new work into a 300-page book called How to See; a set and costume designer as well as a director who has worked in both cinema and ballet. It is no surprise then, that Salle’s home is a multi-hyphenate as well—the 5-storey, live/work space in Brooklyn’s Fort Greene section was created out of two separate and very distinct buildings dating to the late 1800s. Architect Christian Hubert—who designed the 10,000-square-foot residence in association with David Fratianne—says, “The buildings sustained a lot of water damage in the joint between them and they weren’t in good shape. To David’s credit, this was quite an ambitious project to take on.” All together it took two years to complete, and is Hubert’s biggest project to date. The south building (the more damaged of the two) is now surfaced in glazed concrete, stucco, and zinc, CONTINUED

68

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

69

ART © DAVID SALLE, LICENSED BY VAGA, COURTESY SKARSTEDT, NY.


PRIVATE LIFE OPPOSITE: In the master bedroom, Testigos by Juan UslÊ hangs over a Jens Risom lounge chair and stool. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The double-height master bath looks out onto the private terrace; The south building contains the private rooms at the top level. Behind it, the restored brick façade of the north building is visible through the trees. Le Corbusier lounge chairs in the sitting room look out on the south terrace; On the fourth floor, the bedroom opens to the north terrace; A mixed media work by Donald Baechler (2001) hangs in the master bedroom.

70

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


and the north building is a complete restoration that preserved the original terra cotta façade, however the interiors are unified in design, and indeed are connected at the first and second floors. “The building was the right scale and had the right proportions,” says Salle, “and it was a total wreck so I could start from scratch.” Although he lived in TriBeCa since

the 1980s, the artist says, “I knew very little about Brooklyn when I moved there 11 years ago. I like living in the city in a way that’s kind of removed at the same time.” The second story includes the kitchen (Salle’s favorite room), the dining room, library, and the massive living room. “We divided the living room into more intimate spaces because it felt too big for CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

71


72

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


LIVING LARGE The living room, in the north building, was divided into two more manageable spaces. A pair of rare Gio Ponti armchairs faces the unglazed brick fireplace that runs the length of the large room. Over the fireplace is a work by Isabel Barber and Threesome (2004) by Salle. On the exposed brick wall, Tiger Lily (2006) by Alexis Rockman.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

73


OPEN SPACE OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A small study on the second floor; Salle’s favorite room in the house is the kitchen; The master bedroom opens onto the north terrace; The second floor powder room. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: A section of the living area is used as a smaller studio; A grouping of artworks in the artist’s collection; A work by Francesco Clemente hangs in the stairwell.

74

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


David,” says Hubert. “The area near the fireplace became a smaller work/study area.” The living room includes exposed beams original to the north building. The third and fourth floors are contained in the south building, and house the bedroom, a dramatic double-height bath paneled in Hinoki wood, and a top floor study/sitting room. Hubert says, “One of the things David wanted was outdoor space. In joining the two structures we created a terrace between them at the bedroom level, and at the other end, a smaller garden that we took back from the original square footage of the building. So now the bedroom floor has light and open space at both ends.” The mix of styles, both architecturally and in the interiors, suits Salle well. “Everything is important in a general sort of way. I wouldn’t want the house to look overly designed—if anything it looks under-designed. The building is kind of self-contained.” SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

75


CHELSEA MORNING ON MANHATTAN’S FAR WEST SIDE A COUPLE FINDS AN ELEGANT SANCTUARY FOR THEIR EXTENSIVE ART COLLECTIONS AND THEIR NEW FAMILY MEMBERS INTERIOR DESIG N N E AL B ECKSTE DT TE X T ARLE NE HIRST PHOTOG R APHY MARILI FOR ASTIE RI

76

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


GRAPHIC ARTS LEFT: Chairs and table by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia play the leading role in the dining room; Philippe Starck's chandelier illuminates the space, while a vase by Grayson Perry brightens one niche. ABOVE: On the opposite wall, a walnut and bronze sideboard from Regeneration is surrounded with the work of several artists and a Bill Henson photograph.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

77


EYE CANDY THIS PAGE: A photograph by Miwa Yanagi greets visitors in the apartment’s entry; Additional visual treats await guests in the hallway-cum-picture gallery with a painting by Ross Bleckner, installed over a Christian Liaigre console, holding court at the hall’s end. OPPOSITE: The casual dining area, which looks out over the terrace and the seminary garden below is furnished with a table from Julian Chichester and flanked with Cherner dining chairs. Beckstedt designed the tufted banquette, which is upholstered in Romo fabric. A pendant from Niche Modern brightens the space.

78

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


WHEN TWO MANHATTAN businessmen were looking for a designer for their new West Chelsea apartment, they didn’t have to go farther than their then current London Terrace dwelling where architect Neal Beckstedt was a neighbor as well as a friend. Beckstedt, who formerly worked with S. Russell Groves, has had his own studio since 2010 and came to prominence with his work for fashion designer Derek Lam. The new space, just a few blocks away in the recently built Chelsea Enclave, has three bedrooms and feels perfect for their newly-expanded family (the men recently adopted two baby girls,

one just a few months old). The apartment—on the grounds of the 19th-century landmark General Theological Seminary—has terrace views of the seminary garden. “It feels like you’re in a tree house,” says Beckstedt, who can’t praise the visual delights of the landscape enough. The Ohio-born designer, an avowed modernist who loves to introduce traditional elements, didn’t need to make any major structural changes to the apartment. However, “The apartment needed structure,” he explains. To add character to the all-white, dry-wall environment he installed ebonized rift white oak CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

79


gridded paneling of his own design in strategic spaces throughout the rooms. He also treated the floors with an ebony stain to create a more urban sensibility. His major design problem was dealing with his clients’ vast and ever-expanding art collection. A 15-footlong central hallway offered the perfect space to install a gallery. “It’s old-world style there,” he says, referring to the artwork massed together, as in a gallery. Using the artworks that way allowed for quiet spaces in the rest of the apartment. The owners frequently add to their collection and wanted to make sure that

80

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

all the works would always be beautifully illuminated. Beckstedt installed a flexible track lighting system so that they could easily accommodate changing configurations of art. The furnishings in the space are a sophisticated mix of antiques and cutting-edge contemporary design as well as custom pieces designed by Beckstedt himself. The windows in the 12-foot-high living and dining rooms are simply dressed with sheer fabric from Holly Hunt to allow the landscape to become an integral part of the home. SEE RESOURCES


URBAN ZEN OPPOSITE: Beckstedt designed the lacquered bed and walnut nightstands. An Hermès blanket adds an exclamation point to the Calvin Klein bedding. The art above the windows is by Alfredo Jaar. Collages by Kehinde Wiley and Anthony Goicolea add more art fire power. THIS PAGE: In the living room, Buildings Made of Sky, a photograph by Peter Wegner sits above a Robsjohn-Gibbings sofa that faces two antique Louis XVI chairs. A vintage Malayer rug grounds the group. An ancestor’s portrait is installed above one of the Louis XVI chairs; to its right is an oil by Hernan Bas. The crowning touch above it: Tom Sachs' Chanel Surf board.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

81


82

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


EYE OF THE BEHOLDER OPPOSITE: The Indian Peafowl is native to India and Sri Lanka. The colors of a peacock's tail and the angle in which it is displayed influence a peahen's choice of mate. THIS PAGE: The Himalayan Monal, the national bird of Nepal, showcases an iridescent metallic green crest.

DEBORAH SAMUEL'S THE EXTRAORDINARY BEAUTY OF BIRDS TAKES FLIGHT WITH NATURE'S MOST BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED CREATURES TE X T NICOLE HADDAD PHOTOG R APHY DE BOR AH SAM U E L

"CREATIVITY IS NOT limited to a certain subject matter,” says photographer Deborah Samuel. And she can prove it—less than twenty years ago Samuel was recognized for her unique fashion photography, distinctive music video direction, and intuitive portraits of musicians and writers such as Leonard Cohen. Today, with the release of her new book The Extraordinary Beauty of Birds: Designs, Patterns and Details, Samuel continues on a path that explores the beauty and grace in nature. “Previous to my work on Birds, I had just done a show called Elegy,” says Samuel. “It was initiated by the Gulf Oil Spill and the pivotal horror of what happened to the pelicans.” The current book, says Samuel, came out of the darkness of Elegy. “I was watching birds swoop and fly into the thermals one day, and I realized I had lost something in my own life I needed to find again—beauty.” After an insular period of reflection during her focus on Elegy and its examination of the fragility of life, she shifted her focus to creatures that soar to the heavens. Birds serve as a poignant reminder of another sphere we cannot reach—so much so that their connection to heaven and earth has inspired folklore and myths in cultures across the world. “Part of the fascination,” reflects Samuel, “is their freedom in flight. How often would we like to have that freedom in our own lives?” CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

83


84

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


NATURE'S BOUNTY OPPOSITE, ROWS TOP TO Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock; Mourning Dove; Black Sicklebill; Superb Lyrebird; Reeve's Pheasant; King of Holland, Bird-of-Paradise; Resplendent Quetzal; Red Knot; Wilson's Bird-ofParadise; Cedar Waxwing; Superb Bird-of-Paradise; Bald Eagle. THIS PAGE: An American Robin egg and nest. BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT:

Once the idea germinated, Samuel began working with the Royal Ontario Museum’s Ornithology Department. Mark Peck, who oversees the department at the museum, was thrilled—and so it all began. Samuel spent an intense six weeks documenting various birds and their feathers, eggs, and nests. The end result of the fouryear venture is an impressive photographic odyssey with 135 images of everything from Birds-of-Paradise to the Western Crested Guineafowl—each accompanied by text by Mark Peck. While the intricate perfection of the Sicklebill and Guatemala's Resplendent Quetzal is easily conveyed, Samuel also captures the essence of overlooked species such as the crow. "They have a certain liquidity that doesn't exist in all birds," she says. The book is an optic tour de force that challenges the viewer to reevaluate the inherent beauty in nature and the aviary world. “We have apps for everything but how to live,” says Samuel. “They know how to live, we’ve lost that.” SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

85


TIES THAT BIND Tiger-print Fortuny pillows pull hot pink from Takashi Murakami’s whimsical canvas, lightening the moody blues of a B&B Italia sofa and Bensen chairs (through Modernlink). JeanLouis Marc’s artwork at right shares earthy textures with Patterson Flynn Martin’s jute sisal rug and Christian Astuguevieille’s rope sidetable.

86

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


THE DESIGN FIRM VILLALOBOS DESIO USHERS ARCHITECT EMERY ROTH’S PREWAR AESTHETIC INTO A NEW ERA INTERIOR DESIG N VILL ALOBOS DESIO TE X T JORG E S . AR ANGO PHOTOG R APHY JOSH UA MCH UG H

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

87


HIGH CONTRAST ABOVE: The foyer introduces the juxtaposition of natural tones and materials—Stark’s chevron-patterned cowhide rug, vintage Le Corbusier chairs in ecru leather—with colorful contemporary art (Damien Hirst’s rose window butterfly print). OPPOSITE: In the dining room, the designers went for graphic impact. A wall hung with Marc Valesella’s arresting “Guns” series photos, through Holly Hunt, pairs a machine aesthetic with more sensual textures of pink leather on chairs by Christophe Delcourt for Avenue Road. They surround a B&B Italia dining table, which is illuminated by Castiglioni’s iconic Arco lamp.

88

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


THE REASONS TO seek out a residence designed by Emery Roth—one of New York’s preeminent apartment house architects in the 1920s and 1930s—were clear to designers Mercedes Desio and Alberto Villalobos of the eponymous firm Villalobos Desio. “There were already a lot of architectural details,” says Desio of the Gramercy Park three-bedroom she and Villalobos outfitted for a young artcollecting couple. These included handsome moldings and trim, an elegant marble fireplace and a tray ceiling extending inside from the entry hall. Desio and Villalobos emphasized Emery’s

characteristic trims by painting them a sultry dark gray. But to avoid overwhelming the art, Desio adds, “We wanted to make the walls like a white box.” The contrast resulted in a more modern, boldly tailored aesthetic. Less felicitous were the 9½-foot ceilings, probably a restriction placed on Emery by the developer in 1928, when the building went up. Rather than ignore it, Villalobos says they embraced it in the living room, applying a gray grasscloth with silvery fibers woven into it for subtle shimmer. “That was our disco moment,” laughs Desio. But it also brought more texture and reflectivity to a north-facing CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

89


90

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


MACHINE AGE OPPOSITE: Claudia Terstappen’s photo of multiple prayers tied to branches encouraged the family room’s freer mix of colors and textures, where a CB2 sofa is strewn with D. Bryant Archie alpaca pillows and a Vivienne Westwood Flag cushion for The Rug Co. (also the source of Kelly Wearstler’s carpet). Machine aesthetics reappear in Harold Reddicliffe’s painting. THIS PAGE, LEFT: A vintage Stilnovo chandelier over a Maxalto bed flanked by Porta Romana lamps. BELOW: A Candida Höfer photo above a Barcelona chair.

room with good, but not generous, natural light. With the envelope complete, explains Villalobos, they sought lower-slung furnishings that “emphasized the horizontal middle line of the room.” Going against tradition, they ditched the expected furniture grouping around the fireplace, using it instead as a device to separate the living and dining spaces into distinct areas. The graphic impact of the painted moldings and trim was ramped up considerably by a grouping of black-and-white gun photos by Marc Valesella. “They’re all old guns that reference a point in history,” notes Villalobos. Desio adds, “It’s about the machine aesthetic, not the purpose.”

That machine aesthetic shows up again in the family room’s Harold Reddicliffe painting and in vintage metal light fixtures. But the designers also wanted to make every room comfortable so they would all be used, so they balanced the hard metal vibe with an inviting textural mix— sisal and hide carpets, warm woods, velvet upholstery. They also leavened the moody grays and indigo blues with playful splashes of color pulled from various artworks. It’s definitely not Roth’s New York. But his sense of sophistication comes through by providing a classical prewar frame for interiors suited to a more contemporary lifestyle. SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

91


SHELTERING SKY PHOTOGRAPHER SETON SMITH’S HOME ON THE LOWER EAST SIDE IS A REFLECTION OF HER ARTISTIC POINT OF VIEW TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN PHOTOG R APHY COSTAS PICADAS

92

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


SETON SMITH IS an artist born into a family of artists. Her father, Tony Smith, was an architect, visual artist, and pioneering minimalist sculptor. Her mother, Jane Lawrence, was an opera singer and actress who posed for Jackson Pollack’s painting, No. 7, now owned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Seton’s sister, Kiki, is an acclaimed artist and sculptor, and their sister Bebe was an underground actress who died of AIDS in 1988. Seton’s distinctly visual point of view was formed at an early age. She divides her time between a Hausmannian/ modernist apartment in Paris and an apartment on the Lower East Side where her sister Kiki lived and worked for 20 years. “When Kiki moved out in 2000, my friends and I bought the building. I gutted the apartment and started with an empty shell,” says Smith. It is both her living space and studio. “I use CONTINUED LIGHT PLAY OPPOSITE: In the gallery area of the apartment, the minimalist white creates a background for the photographer’s powerful imagery. Smith designed the low file cabinets that line the room. THIS PAGE: Smith continually explores images of home in her photography.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

93


TRANSPARENCY ABOVE: A translucent glass wall divides the workspace from the living area in the sparsely furnished apartment. Chair and ottoman by Damian Williamson. OPPOSITE: The minimalist dining table by Williamson is surrounded by vintage Paul McCobb chairs. The photographer at home.

94

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


the walls in all the rooms to hang the prints that I make here, as well as final full-scale images that are made in a lab.” The spare interior functions as a neutral space. “I didn’t want to have any color or extra objects influence my work. I bought new furniture, mostly designed by Damian Williamson, and saved the Paul McCobb chairs [in the dining area].” Smith continues, “Coincidentally, around 5 years ago I started making elemental black and white horizontal photographs of exteriors.” To

separate the living and studio space she added a translucent wall with doors allowing light to flow through the space. “I follow the sun. I have east and west exposures with a skylight in the middle, so I end up with the late afternoon sun in my bedroom where I spend time reading.” Shelter is a deeply important subject for Smith. She says, “Different building types have been a significant theme in my work, as they provide a language for how we read architec- CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

95


ture and analyze its emotional and psychological effects.” She is often attracted to historical house museums in the United States and abroad. “I love the Ford Mansion where George Washington stayed during a harsh winter in Morristown, New Jersey. Its rooms are very sparse and I can remember the windows and campaign beds.” She is currently focused on photographing the exteriors of vernacular houses in the United States. “Houses propose a questioning as to how we are formed and influenced in the spaces where we live, socioeconomically, as places of nurturing and safety, of repression, growth, and aging.” SEE RESOURCES

96

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


MASTERFUL MINIMALISM OPPOSITE: In the studio, the Hex table, designed by Smith, reminds her of the modular components in her father’s sculpture. THIS PAGE: The stark minimalism continues throughout the space. Says Smith, “I wanted to strip everything down and make it as neutral as possible, which makes it more conducive for working.”

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

97


RESOURCES

bar design by Crème Design, cremedesign.com. Dirt Candy, 86 Allen St., NYC 10002; 212.228.7732; dirtcandynyc.com. Casa Mezcal, 86 Orchard St., NYC 10002; 212.777.2661; casamezcalny.com. Balvanera, 152 Stanton St., NYC 10002; 212.533.3348; balvaneranyc.com. Schiller's, 131 Rivington St., NYC 10002; 212.260.4555; schillersny.com. Café Katja, 79 Orchard St., NYC 10002; 212.219.9545; cafekatja.com. Russ & Daughters, 127 Orchard St., NYC 10002; 212.475.4880 X 2; russanddaughters.com. Dirty French in the Ludlow Hotel, 180 Ludlow St., NYC 10002; 646.692.4732; dirtyfrench.com. The Back Room, 102 Norfolk St., NYC 10002; 212.228.5098; backroomnyc.com. Attaboy, 134 Eldridge St., NYC 10002; punchdrink.com/venues/attaboy/. Bar Goto, 245 Eldridge St., NYC 10002;

mandyvahabzadeh.com. (pages 54) African

bargoto.com. Botanic Lab, botaniclabny.com.

sculpture from Mali is Una Acuarela 1991. Painting

CANADA, 333 Broome St., NYC 10002;

over fireplace is The Faces of Painting (2006).

212.925.4631; canadanewyork.com. Sperone

Wooden floating sculpture below the artwork is by

Westwater, 257 Bowery, NYC 10002; 212.999.7337;

artist Tom Shannon, tomshannon.com. Artwork to

speronewestwater.com/gallery. Lehmann Maupin,

the left of the fireplace is a model of Lleo's studio

201 Chrystie St., NYC 10002; 212.254.0054;

made by his son Noah in 2009. Below, A .S. (2013),

lehmannmaupin.com. Cuevas Tilleard,

dedicated to Portugese architect Álvaro Siza,

142 Henry St., NYC 10002; info@cuevastilleard.com;

sits between two circular fresco paintings called

cuevastilleard.com. Muriel Guepin, 83 Orchard St.,

The Perfect Year (2009). (pages 56) Dining table

NYC 10002; 347.244.1052; murielguepingallery.com.

sculpture from the Extraordinary Frescoes, (2002)

Rachel Uffner, 170 Suffolk St., NYC 10002;

series. In bedroom: A Painting (1997). Bottom, left

212.274.0064; racheluffnergallery.com. Nicelle

to right: Home (2013), oil on Japanese silk. Small

Beauchene, 327 Broome St., NYC 10002;

fresco from the series Extraordinary Frescoes.

212.375.8043; nicellebeauchene.com. Miguel

Detail from Lleo's work in progress, In Paradisum,

STATEMENTS (Pages 25–28): Ann Sacks,

Abreu Gallery, miguelabreugallery.com. James

365 Frescoes on concrete and steel, forming a

annsacks.com. Fisher Weisman Collection at

Fuentes, 55 Delancey St., NYC 10002; 212.577.1201;

10-foot-diameter circle, started in 2008, to be

Dennis Miller, dennismiller.com. Suite NY,

jamesfuentes.com. Sargent's Daughters,

finished soon.

suiteny.com. De La Espada, delaespada.com.

179 E. Broadway, NYC 10002; 917.463.3901;

Malene B. for Kravet (T), kravet.com. BESPOKE

sargentsdaughters.com. Café Medi, 107 Rivington

DIVERSIONARY TACTICS (Pages 60–67): Interior

(T), bespokebylg.com. Kate Spade New York,

St., NYC 10002; cafemedinyc.com. McKenzie Fine

design: Juan Montoya Design, 330 E. 59th St., NYC

katespade.com. Anna Karlin, annakarlin.com.

Art Inc., 55 Orchard St., NYC 10002; 212.989.5467;

10022; 2121.421.2400; juanmontoyadesign.com.

Barry Goralnick for Vanguard Furniture,

mckenziefineart.com.

General contractor: SilverLining Interiors, 2091 Broadway, 3rd Fl., NYC 10023; 212.496.7800;

vanguardfurniture.com. Kelly Hoppen for

silverlininginteriors.com. (pages 60–61) Plaster

Resource Decor, resourcedecor.com. Konekt,

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE (Pages 52–56): Artist Lluis

konektfurniture.com. Resource Furniture

Lleo, lluis3lleo@gmail.com; lluislleo.com. (pages

chandeliers and sconces designed by Juan Montoya

(T), resourcefurniture.com. Marble Systems,

52–53) Two frescoes by the artist near fireplace,

and fabricated by Nina Helms, ninahelms.com. Artwork by Rune Hagberg. Metal console table

marblesystems.com. Hollis+Morris, hollismorris.com.

Cancer 2008. Artwork by Lleo over small chair is

Token, tokennyc.com. Stepevi, stepevi.com. Atlas

Green Viewer (2013). Lleo in front of his grouping

designed by Juan Montoya and fabricated by

Homewares, atlashomewares.com. David Gaynor

of Works on Bhutan Paper. Next to window,

Metalworks. African mask on console. (pages

Design, davidgaynordesign.com. Fritz Hansen,

black-and-white photo by Mandy Vahabzadeh,

62–63) Dining chair from Dessin Fournir (T),

fritzhansen.com.

dessinfournir.com. Chair

PROFILE (Page 30): Laura Raicovich is the

(T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 1703,

President and Executive Director of the Queens

NYC 10022; 212.319.7666;

upholstered in fabric from Romo

Museum, New York City Building, Flushing Meadows

romo.com. Sculptural pot by

Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368; 718.592.9700;

Mia Göransson. Curtain fabric

info@queensmuseum.org; queensmuseum.org.

from Robert Allen (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 305,

98

NEIGHBORHOOD (Pages 48–50): Hotel Indigo,

NYC 10022; 212.421.1200;

171 Ludlow St., NYC 10002; 212.237.1776;

robertallendesign.com.

hotelindigolowereastside.com. Sculpture in Hotel

Candlesticks from Gerald

Indigo by Mr. Brainwash, mrbrainwash.com.

Bland (T), 232 E. 59th St., 6th

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC 10002;

Fl., NYC 10022; 212.987.8505;

212.219.1222; newmuseum.org. Katz's Delicatessen,

geraldblandinc.com. Library:

205 E. Houston St., NYC 10002; 212.254.2246;

Pair of glass cylinder lamps from

katzsdelicatessen.com. The Clinton St. Baking

Arteriors (T), 200 Lexington

Co., 4 Clinton St., NYC 10002; 646.602.6263;

Ave., Suite 608, NYC 10022;

clintonstreetbaking.com. Henry Street Settlement,

646.797.3620; arteriorshome.com.

265 Henry St., NYC 10002; 212.766.9200;

Painting: Gelatin silver print

info@henrystreet.org; henrystreet.org. The

by Frederic Ohringer,

Tenement Museum, 103 Orchard St., NYC 10002;

ohringerart.com. Plaster chandelier

877.975.3786; tenement.org. Essex Street Market,

by Philippe Anthonioz from

120 Essex St., NYC 10002; essexstreetmarket.com.

Galerie Jean-Jacques Dutko,

Mural by Gera Lozano, geralozano.com. Hester

dutko.com. Cerused oak paneling

Street Fair, hesterstreetfair.com.Rooftop bar at

with ebony details designed by

Hotel Indigo, Mr. Purple, mrpurplenyc.com. Rooftop

Juan Montoya and

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

CONTINUED


Hot Water (Hydronic)

Steam

Electric

The Fine Art of Radiators From baseboards to wall panels, to elegant curves and towel radiators, Runtal manufactures the perfect welded steel radiators for hot water (hydronic), electric and steam heating systems. For more information or a dealer near you, please call 1-800-526-2621 or visit us online at: www.runtalnorthamerica.com


RESOURCES

executed by SilverLining, silverlininginteriors.com.

Mixed media work in

(pages 64–65) Chandeliers from WOKA,

master bedroom by

woka.com. Walls: Brazilian rosewood by Juan

Donald Baechler, 129

Montoya and executed by SilverLining Interiors,

W. 27th St., 2nd Fl, NYC

silverlininginteriors.com. Roman statue. Sculpture

10001; 212.337.0743;

on Dutch 18th-century table from Gerald Bland

donaldbaechler.com.

(T), geraldblandinc.com. On table: 18th-century

Testigos by artist Juan

Japanese model. Floor: Custom by Juan

Uslé. (pages 72–73) Over

Montoya and executed by SilverLining Interiors.

the fireplace: Artwork

On wall: 18th-century map of Ireland. Metal

by Isabel Barber,

torso sculpture by Alexandra Athanassiades,

isabelbarber.com.

alexandraathanassiades.com. Rug from Tai Ping

Threesome (2004)

Carpets, taipingcarpets.com. Living area: Sconces

by David Salle,

from Galerie des Lampes, galeriedeslampes.com.

davidsallestudio.net.

Sofa from DeAngelis upholstered in fabric from

Tiger Lily (2006) by

Beacon Hill (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 305, NYC

Alexis Rockman,

10022; 212.421.1200; robertallendesign.com.

alexisrockman.net.

Drum accent table with gold leaf base from Baker

(pages 74–75) Brown

Furniture (T), 200 Lexington Ave., Suite 300,

wall, clockwise from

NYC 10016; 212.779.8810; bakerfurniture.com.

top left: Bay of Angels

Silk/wook rug from Marc Phillips (T),

(1994) by Malcolm Morley.

979 Third Ave., Suite 211, NYC 10022; 212.752.4275;

Untitled [Mask} (2004)

marcphillipsrugs.com. Pair of charis by Christian

by Adam Fuss. Pastel and charcoal on paper by

Badin. Pair of brass-and-glass two-tiered tables

Wallpaper from Phillip Jeffries at Holly Hunt (T),

Georg Baselitz. Charcoal on paper by Terry Winters,

from BK Antiques, bkantiques.com. Painting by

phillipjeffries.com. Custom vanity designed by

terrywinters.org. Black-and-white photograph

David Roth. Red lacquer credenza and hardware

Juan Montoya and fabricated by SilverLinings

by Louise Dahl-Wolfe. Artwork on stairwell by

designed by Juan Montoya. Credenza executed

Interiors. Photograph by Arno Rafael Minkkinen,

Francesco Clemente, francescoclemente.net.

by CQ Design Studio, cq-designstudio.com.

arno-rafael-minkkinen.com. Vignette:

Powder room, left to right: Black-and-white

Hardware executed by Pivot. Sculpture on

Contemporary Geisha sculptures from Brussels.

photograph by an unknown artist. Artwork by

coffee table by Manuela Zervudachi,

Artwork by Rufino Tamayo. Powder room:

Miroslav Tichý.

manuelazervudachi.com. Sculpture on credenza

Plumbing fixtures from Dornbracht,

by Stig Lindberg. Artwork by Elli Hemberg.

dornbracht.com. Sconces from Jean Karajian,

(pages 66–67) Bedroom: Artwork by Manolo

jeankarajiancollection.com. Pedestal sink from

and Architecture: Neal Beckstedt Studio,

Valdés. Benches from Holly Hunt (T), 979 Third

Vitraform, vitraform.com. Checkered table by Jim

134 W. 26th St., Suite 1140; NYC 10001;

Ave., Suite 503/605, NYC 10022; 212.755.6555;

Amaral. Mirror from Paul Stamati, stamati.com.

212.924.0700; info@nbeckstedtstudio.com;

hollyhunt.com. Window bench designed by Juan

Custom door by Juan Montoya and fabricated by

nbeckstedtstudio.com. (pages 76–77) Chandelier

Montoya and executed by Anthony Morris. Window

SilverLinings Interiors. Artwork by Jesus Soto,

by Philippe Starck. Ebonized rift white oak gridded

bench in fabric from Romo (T), romo.com.

jr-soto.com. Plaster relief work designed by Juan

paneling millwork was custom by Neal Beckstedt

Desk chair from Iliad, iliad.nyc. Desk is a custom

Montoya and executed by Nina Helms.

design by Juan Montoya fabricated by CQ Design

CHELSEA MORNING (Pages 76–81): Interior design

Studio, nbeckstedtstudio.com. Antonio Citteriodesigned dining table and chairs from B&B Italia,

Studio with the top in Dualoy Leather (T),

MIX MASTER (Pages 68–75): Artist: David Salle,

dualoy.com. Bed frame and panels designed

davidsallestudio.net. Architecture: Christian

Chairs upholstered in a glazed linen from Rogers &

by Juan Montoya and fabricated by Anthony

Hubert Studio, 131 Essex Street 2nd Fl., NYC

Goffigon (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 1718, NYC

Lawrence Belfair, anthonylawrence.com.

10002; 212.349.2752; christianhubert.com.

10022; 212.888.3242; rogersandgoffigon.com.

Upholstery is from Armani Casa, armanicasa.com.

Architect Christian Hubert designed the residence

Vase sculpture, Pot Based on 20 Year Old Collage

Lamps from Phoenix Gallery, phoenixgalleryny.

in association with David Fratianne Architect,

by Grayson Perry. Walnut and bronze sideboard

com. Silk pillow fabric from Pierre Frey (T),

153 W. 27th St., NYC 10001; 212.691.9494;

by Regeneration, regenerationfurniture.com. Desk

979 Third Ave., Suite 1611, NYC 10022;

dfratiannearch.com. (pages 68–69) How to See by

chair from A. Rudin (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 1201;

212.421.0534; pierrefrey.com. Vignette with

David Salle can be purchased at Barnes & Noble,

NYC 10022; 212.644.3766; arudin.com.

green vase: Artwork by Lucio Fontana. Powder

barnesandnoble.com. (pages 70–71) Artwork

Chair upholstered in fabric from Rogers & Goffigon

room: Wall sconce from Terzani, terzani.com.

in sitting room: Silkscreens by Larry Zox.

(T), rogersandgoffigon.com. (pages 78–79) Foyer:

150 E. 58th St., 10016; 212.758.4046; bebitalia.com.

Black cowhide rug from Restoration Hardware, 935 Broadway, NYC 10010; 212.260.9479; restorationhardware.com. Sheer drapery fabric from Kravet (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 324, NYC 10022; 212.421.6363; kravet.com. Drapery installation by Distinctive Windows, distinctivewindows. com. Millwork was custom by CONTINUED

100

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


PROTECT YOUR FURNISHINGS AND ART COLLECTION FROM FADING Applied to the interior surface of your windows, Sunshield Energy Control Systems’ invisible coating offers the state-of-the-art in protecting your fine furnishings, fabrics and artwork from the destructive effects of sunlight. Their proprietary preservation products have been utilized in the world’s finest homes as well as the most prestigious museum environments. Energy conservation benefits are additionally realized through solar heat and glare reduction. Sunshield’s knowledge and expertise will ensure that your valuable investments will be kept safe for future generations to enjoy.

Sunshield Energy Control Systems

www.sunshieldusa.com 914.633.5853

SPECIAL PROMOTION

selects

SE CS

C&L PLUMBING SUPPLY INC. DXV by American Standard Established in 1980, C&L Plumbing Supply is a retail destination representing a wide variety of kitchen and bath brands. Trusted by professionals and homeowners for over 30 years, C&L is proud to announce the opening of its newly renovated kitchen and bath showroom. New to C&L is DXV by American Standard, a flagship luxury bathroom and kitchen brand that celebrates and draws on the storied plumbing company’s rich history. The Lyndon Suite by DXV is an elegant and restrained style of contemporary furniture, perfect for today’s transitional bathroom. Visit C&L’s exciting new showroom to see the Lyndon Collection by DXV firsthand. 516-599-6655. candlplumbingsupply.com.

KRAVET There’s smart...and then there’s Simply Smart Kravet Furniture introduces a new collection of perfectly priced, stylishly paired dining chairs, bar and counter seating. Choose from an extensive selection of Kravet free fabrics, graded-in fabrics or value leathers. Constructed of solid maple frames available in 6 finishes: 3 paints and 3 wood stains. COM and COL available. Available in Kravet Showrooms and at kravet.com


RESOURCES

above window is Chanel Surfboard, signed and

Jean-Marc Louis,

dated by Tom Sachs, tomsachs.com. Art on wall

jeanmarclouis.com.

to right, is an oil painting of owner's ancestor. Art

(pages 88–89) Foyer:

to left of chair: Blooming at Just the Right Time by

Cowhide runner from

Hernan Bas. Living room: Linen sheer drapery

Stark, starkcarpet.com.

from Holly Hunt (T) installed by Distinctive

Vintage Le Courbusier

Windwos, distinctivewindows.com. Vintage sofa

chairs from

by T. H. Robsjohn-Gibbings upholstered in a

Stéphane Olivier,

chocolate vintage velvet from Pollack (T),

stephaneolivier.fr.

979 Third Ave., Suite 1722, NYC 10022;

Vintage chandelier

212.421.8755; pollackassociates.com. Side table

from 1stdibs,

next to sofa was custom-designed by Neal

1stdibs.com. Mirror

Beckstedt Studio.

from J. Pocker, jpocker.com. Artwork

A SENSE OF GRACE (Pages 82–85): The

at end of hall:

Extraordinary Beauty of Birds: Designs, Patterns

Rose window print

and Details, by photographer Deborah Samuel

by Damien Hirst,

was published by Prestel and can be purchased

damienhirst.com.

through: prestelpublishing.randomhouse.de.

Dining room: Table

SARTORIAL SOPHISTICATE (Pages 86–91):

Christophe Delcourt for Avenue Road,

Interior design: Mercedes Desio and Alberto

avenue-road.com. Reissued Castiglioni Arco lamp

from B&B Italia, bebitalia.com. Chairs are by

Villalobos of Villalobos Desio, 325 Lexington

from Flos, flos.com. Photographs: Guns series by

Neal Beckstedt Studio, nbeckstedtstudio.com.

Ave., 10D, NYC 10016; 212.673.3056;

Marc Valesella, marcvalesella.com. (pages 90–91)

Photograph, My Grandmothers by Miwa Yanagi,

studio@villalobosdesio.com; villalobosdesio.com.

Family room: Rug by Kelly Wearstler from The Rug

yanagimiwa.net. Foyer hall: Art in foreground

(pages 86–87) Sofa from B&B Italia (T),

Co., 88 Wooster St., NYC 10012; 212.274.0444;

is Dresden AltMarkt by Stephane Couturier,

bebitalia.com. Upholstered chairs are by Bensen

therugcompany.com. Sofa from CB2, cb2.com.

stephanecouturier.fr. Forged metal and parchment

through Modernlink, modernlink.com. Vintage

Alpaca sofa pillows from D. Bryant Archie,

console at end of hallway from Christian Liaigre,

wood chairs from Maison Gerard, 53 E. 10th St.,

dbryantarchie.com. Reissued Eames lounge chair

christian-liaigre.fr. Art above console is Untitled,

NYC 10003; 212.674.7611; maisongerard.com.

and ottoman from Herman Miller, hermanmiller.com.

2008 by Ross Bleckner, rbleckner.com. Informal

Coffee table from Holly Hunt (T), hollyhunt.com.

Chandelier is by Jason Miller for Roll & Hill,

dining area: Dining table from Julian Chichester,

Small round side table with stone top from Caste

purchased through Design Within Reach, dwr.com.

julianchichester.com. Cherner side chairs.

Design, castedesign.com. Rope side table by

Photo above sofa by Claudia Terstappen,

Banquette is a custom design by Neal Beckstedt

Christian Astuguevieille. Art framing by J. Pocker,

claudiaterstappen.com. Painting at right by Harold

Studio with tufted upholstery fabric from Romo

jpocker.com. Jute sisal carpet from Patterson

Reddicliffe. Master bedroom: Rug from The Rug Co.,

(T), romo.com. Pendant from Niche Modern,

Flynn Martin (T), pattersonflynnmartin.com. Floor

therugcompany.com. Tall cabinet and bed are from

nichemodern.com. (pages 80–81) Master bedroom:

lamp from 1stdibs, 1stdibs.com. Ceiling wallpaper

Maxalto. Vintage Stilnovo chandelier. Nightstands

Lacquered bed, headboard, and nightstands

from Phillip Jeffries (T), phillipjeffries.com. Zebra

are from Holly Hunt (T), hollyhunt.com. Lamps

custom-designed by Neal Beckstedt Studio.

pillow fabric from Fortuny (T), 979 Third Ave.,

from Porta Romana, portaromana.com. Reissued

Bedding from Calvin Klein (calvinklein.com) and

Suite 1632, NYC 10022; 212.753.7153; fortuny.com.

Barcelona chairs are from Knoll (T), knoll.com.

Hermès (hermes.com). Chocolate wool

Yellow wall lamp from Magen H. Gallery,

Photo above Barcelona is chair is by Candida Höfer.

rug by Stark (T), starkcarpet.com.

magenxxcentury.com. Painting on left by Takashi

Gouache above bed is by Christian Astuguevieille.

Artwork above windows: Things Fall Apart by

Murakami. Easel is custom from Maison Gerard,

All framing of art by J. Pocker, jpocker.com.

Alfredo Jaar, alfredojaar.net. Art on wall to

maisongerard.com. Painting on right by

the right of the bed is My

SHELTERING SKY (Pages 92–97): Seton Smith,

Grandmothers by Miwa Yanagi,

setonsmith.com. Damian Williamson,

yanagimiwa.net. Bench: Untitled by

office@damianwilliamson.com; damianwilliamson.com.

Tom Sachs, tomsachs.org. Throw on bed from Hermès, hermes.com. Art collage on right by Kehinde Wiley, kehindewiley.com. Photograph by Anthony Goicolea, anthonygoicoleastudio.com. Study area in bedroom: Art above desk is Past Presence by Kent Henricksen, kenthenricksen.com. Floor lamp from Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Espresso-stained desk chair from

FOR THE LATEST NEWS AND DESIGN INFORMATION FROM NEW YORK SPACES: ONLINE: newyorkspaces.com FACEBOOK: facebook.com/nyspacesmag TWITTER: @nyspacesmag PINTEREST: nyspacesmag INSTAGRAM: nyspaces

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: NEWYORKSPACES.COM/SUBSCRIBE

A. Rudin (T) upholstered in wool fabric from Rogers & Goffigon (T). Built-in cabinetry and wall were custom-designed by Neal Beckstedt

A (T) indicates “to the trade” companies usually located in design center buildings with concierges available to assist the public in locating a designer or designer product.

Studio and painted in Espresso Bean lacquer from Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Living room vignette: Antique Louis XVI club chair upholstered in brushed linen fabric from Romo (T), romo.com. Side table Design and purchased through

New York Spaces (ISSN 1552-9762 and USPS 023-365) is published 5 times a year plus two Special Issues by Davler Media Group, 498 Seventh Avenue, 10th Fl., New York, NY 10018.

Design Within Reach, dwr.com.

postmaster

designed by One & Co. | Council

Vintage Malayer area rug from Galerie Shabab, galerieshabab.com. Art

102

This is Volume 13, Issue 6 ©2016 by Davler Media Group. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.95 per year for 7 issues. Canadian and Foreign Subscriptions: US $45. Single copies, $6.99. Newsstand distribution by Comag Marketing Group. Printed in Canada.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

/ Send address changes to Subscription Department, Davler Media Group, 498 Seventh Avenue, 10th Fl., New York, NY 10018. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices.


home design in pixels

Read NEW YORK SPACES anywhere, anytime, on your iPad, Mac and PC.

www.zinio.com/ipad powered by


PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRESCIA/AMISANO; TEXT BY DEBORAH L. MARTIN.

FINAL TAKE

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S

star-crossed lovers, Romeo and Juliet, are perhaps the most relatable characters in his entire canon. The evidence of this is how many times his play, written in 1595, has been re-created and reinvented for the stage and screen. There are ten fi lms alone, to say nothing of the plays, artworks, and ballet. Roméo et Juliette, the opera written by Charles Gounod with a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré made its Paris debut at Théâtre-Lyrique in 1867, and this season it returns to the Metropolitan Opera. Directed by Tony-winner Bartlett Sher, and starring Diana Damrau and Vittorio Grigolo, the Met’s production opens on December 31st after debuting in Salzburg and at La Scala in Milan. The period set, created by award-winning set designer Michael Yeargan, and the lush extravagant costumes by Catherine Zuber, combine to evoke a slightly surreal vision of decadent 18th-century Verona. Says Sher, “The very tall, imposing structures with high walls and windows give you the sense of being in an Italian piazza so that you can feel the social nature of the story.” He continues, “The clothing was influenced by Fellini’s Casanova and designed to feel very extreme in terms of decadence, richness, and wealth.” metopera.org SEE RESOURCES

104

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


The simple elegance and restrained style of contemporary furniture design re-imagined for today’s bathroom.

(212) 876-0100 | 1254 Park Avenue | New York, NY 10029 (212) 588-1997 | 141 East 56th Street | New York, NY 10022 (212) 777-7984 | 19 Bond Street | New York, NY 10012 (914) 968-9200 | 550 Saw Mill River Road | Yonkers, NY 10701 (845) 573-0080 | 575 Chestnut Ridge Road | Spring Valley, NY 10977

www.CentralPlumbingSpec.com

TO THE TRADE & HOMEOWNER COME BROWSE OUR SHOWROOMS


O DY S S E Y C O L L E C T I O N

Lee Jofa © 2016 leejfoa.com fabric - Orion in Indigo

13dfvdfv  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you