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Garden and Museum Christian Dior in Granville, Birthtown of Mr Dior, Normandy.

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E s t a b l i s h e d 1 7 0 9 Vo l . 3 1 2 N o . 1 t a t l e r. c o m

ON THE COVER

44 T R E N D A L E RT Modern denim rules

CO N T E N T S

58 K E E P I T C L E A N , G I R L S

Suki Waterhouse and Poppy Jamie get naked. By Luciana Bellini Page

60 THE NEW SNOBBERY

Tatler’s guide to whether it’s OK to say ‘toilet’ in the 21st century

70 W O N D E R W O M A N

SPECTRUM CHILD BECOME A SUCCESS

Once written off as difficult, children with neurodiverse conditions such as dyslexia are getting the attention they need in today’s private schools. By Charlotte Edwardes

FA S H I O N

39 H E R E ’ S LO O K I N G AT. . . Attico: retro-inspired Italian street-style glamour. By Luciana Bellini

Russian (Instagram) icon Elena Perminova wearing Dior at Blenheim, by Sophie Goodwin; and talking charity, childhood and life with Lebedev Snr to Gavanndra Hodge

40 D O N ’ T YO U W I S H YO U ’ D W O R N T H AT Naughty and very nice: PVC

78 T H I S A RT I C L E CO U L D

42 T R E N D A L E RT

What to do in the event of a kidnapping. By John Walsh and Luciana Bellini

46 LESS DOSH, STILL POSH

96 L I LY !

51 H A N D S O F F

S AV E YO U R L I F E

Folk heroes

The perfect party slip MY JEWELS!

Lily Aldridge in Bulgari and not much else. By Sophie Pera

106 I S E E A TA L L , DA R K ST R A N G E R . . .

What’s with the kilt? By Philippa Durell

Your 2017 horoscope – complete with canines. By Clare Bennett

helped future duchess Jemma Wellesley reboot (literally). By Gavanndra Hodge

F E AT U R E S

88 JO E’S G IR L

84 FAI RY TAL E

MARCHIONESS PHOTOGRAPHS: ALEX CAYLEY, CHARLIE MORTIMER

70

‘WONDER WOMAN’: ELENA P E R M I N O VA

92 HOW TO HELP YOUR

How learning to trust her instincts

Meet Gigi Ettedgui, high-style heiress to the genius of her fashion-legend father, Joseph. By Christa D’Souza

The Cover LILY A LDR IDGE Photographed by DAVID ROEMER Styled by SOPHIE PER A Lily Aldridge wears white-gold and diamond necklace, POA, by Bulgari. For stockist, see Address Book. Hair by Keith Carpenter at the Wall Group, using Kérastase: Bain Chroma Riche, L’Incroyable BlowDry and Laque Couture. Make-up by Eric Polito at Art Department, using Dior Addict: 5 Couleurs Designer Tutorial Palette in 208 Designer Navy, Diorshow Mascara in 090 Pro Black, Rouge Dior in Rouge 999 Matte, Diorskin Forever Foundation in 030 and All-in-Brow 3D

CONTINUED on page 27

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118

C H A R L I E M O RT I M E R : LIVING WITH HIV

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E s t a b l i s h e d 1 7 0 9 Vo l . 3 1 2 N o . 1 t a t l e r. c o m

TAT L E R A B O U T TOWN

55 T H E RO W I N G B OYS Four (nude) men in a boat – with a bucket. By Sophia Money-Coutts

56 T H E LO U D E ST

S E X YO U H AV E E V E R HEARD

The earth-shaking shagathons that stirred Stuart Heritage out of his stupor. PS They weren’t his

61 Q U E N T I N L E T T S

The curious rise of our first-ever female Lord Chancellor, Liz Truss

64 B O O K S

117 A MA K E- U P

R EVO LU T IO N

Charlie Mortimer on living for 30 years with HIV

122 T R E AT M E N T S . . .

...that protect your privacy

124 B E A U T Y F L A S H

Lavender. No, wait, come back!

E V E RY T H I N G E L S E

31 O N TAT L E R .CO M Where we’re at online

65 A RT F O R S A L E

Karen Deeks’s hot stuff

The London underground stop that’s a hit with Spanish royalty. By Jeremy Wayne

67 G A D G E T S

Comfort, Scandi-style. By Emma Freud

58

‘KEEP IT CLEAN, GIRLS’

118 T H E F U N N Y T H I N G ABOUT AIDS...

52 I T L I ST

66 R E STA U R A N T S

Page

Real face value. By Francesca White

The most rollicking reads of the year. By Sebastian Shakespeare Hot lips and hammocks, by Josh Spero

PHOTOGRAPHS: SARAH LEE, GETTY IMAGES, HANA KNIZOVA

BEAUTY

125 A D D R E S S B O O K ‘Stockists’ to its friends

127 BYSTA N D E R

The best of times. By Tibbs Jenkins

B A C K PA G E W H AT ’S I T L I K E TO B E . . .

...Benzene, Charlie Gilmour’s charming magpie, below

68 H E RO P I E C E ; & T H E G A M E S M I ST R E S S Jack Wills gives camo some cool, by Annabel Rivkin; and ancestral antics with Emma Kennedy

HOME

111 ‘ I E N J OY P U T T I N G BEAUTIFUL THINGS I N TO T H E W O R L D. . .’

How fashion tycoon Leon Max brought Easton Neston back to life. By Sophia Money-Coutts

Page

60

THE NEW S N O B B E RY

S u b s c r i b e t o Ta t l e r a n d w e ’ l l g i v e y o u a p r e s e n t . . . t u r n t o p a g e 1 1 6

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G A L O P D ’ H E R M È S , PA R F U M S E L L I E R .


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La la la la la la la la la la

GENIUS GIFT GUIDE

O Come, All Ye Social Find the very best carol services – on Tatler.com.

The finest, funniest and cleverest presents in the universe

THIS MONTH O N TAT L E R . C O M

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, PIXELEYES

It’s the site for sore eyes that just keeps giving

TOO SMART TO SKI? Quite right. Skiing is for lunatics. We suggest all the other things you can do in the snow.

YO U R ROYA L CHRISTMAS TREE Many more Queenly decorations for you to cut out and create on Tatler.com.

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®

CHARLIE MORTIMER

CHRISTA D’SOUZA

Charlie on living with HIV (page 118)

Christa meets Joseph’s girl, Gigi Ettedgui (page 88)

What’s your favourite joke? The indignities of old age.

What would be your death-row meal? A Fray Bentos steak and kidney pie with mash and peas.

MATTHEW SHAVE Matthew (seen here with Hector) gets very close to a kilt-wearer’s jewels (page 51)

What’s your signature dance move? The Pogo.

What would be your death-row meal? Jean-Paul Hévin’s Roquefort chocolates and a can of Welch’s grape soda.

What’s your worst habit?

What’s your best memory?

What’s the phrase or word you overuse the most?

A rather casual use of blue language.

My son getting into Cambridge.

What would be your death-row meal?

‘Well, there you go, pet.’

Christmas pudding.

If you could get away with one crime, what would it be?

What’s your go-to fancy-dress costume? Sid Vicious.

What never fails to make you laugh? Being tickled.

Having it off with John Terry – although is that a crime?

CONTRIBUTORS W h a t ’s o n t h e i r m i n d s t h i s m o n t h ?

DAVID TITLOW

STUART HERITAGE

David photographs the Marchioness of Douro (page 84)

Stuart tells you how to deal with noisy neighbours (page 56)

Eating biscuits in bed – it drives my husband up the wall.

Candice bonds with fashion’s coolest duo (page 39)

What’s your worst habit?

An all-you-can-eat buffet.

What would be your death-row meal?

What’s the phrase or word you overuse the most?

Truffle tagliatelle, champagne and salted-caramel truffles.

‘Not now, Bernard!’

What’s your go-to fancy-dress costume?

What’s the phrase or word you overuse the most? ‘Oh darling!’ What’s your go-to fancy-dress costume?

Pee-wee Herman.

A Björk-style swan.

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

TATLER.COM

What’s your signature dance move? Two steps forward, two steps back, overbite.

What would be your death-row meal? This question stinks of entrapment. I didn’t kill anybody, and you can’t prove I did.

Which super-power would you most like to have? The ability to earn money without doing anything.

PHOTOGRAPH: GETTY IMAGES

CANDICE LAKE

What’s your signature dance move? The Robot. What would be your death-row meal?


®

EDITOR KATE REARDON Editor’s assistant and events co-ordinator ELLA BALDWIN

Deputy editor GAVANNDRA HODGE Managing editor BEATRIZ CHOI Associate editor GERRI GALLAGHER Editor-at-large ANNABEL RIVKIN Senior editor DAVID JENKINS

ART Art consultant PHILIPPA WILLIAMS Art editor CAROLYN JONES Junior designer LAUREN BANISTER Picture editor HANNAH BRENCHLEY Deputy picture editor EVE JONES

FEATURES Features director SOPHIA MONEYCOUTTS Travel editor FRANCISCA KELLETT Assistant editor LUCIANA BELLINI Restaurant critic JEREMY WAYNE Books critic SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE Art critic JOSH SPERO Gadgets critic EMMA FREUD Fun editor EMMA KENNEDY

COPY Copy chief IAN RAMSEY Deputy copy chief JOHN HANEY Senior sub-editor KATHARINA HAHN

FASHION Fashion director SOPHIE GOODWIN Style director SOPHIE PERA Shopping editor AILSA MILLER Watches and jewellery editor PHILIPPA DURELL Bookings editor AYSHA SURSOCK Executive fashion and retail editor MARIELLA TANDY Acting fashion and retail editor KAREN DEEKS Senior fashion assistant XUXA MILROSE Fashion assistant LYDIE HARRISON

BEAUTY Health and beauty director FRANCESCA WHITE Health and beauty associate JENNIFER GEORGE

BYSTANDER Social editor TIBBS JENKINS Photographer HUGO BURNAND

TATLER.COM Digital editor ANNABELLE SPRANKLEN Digital picture co-ordinator CHARLOTTE MAYHEW Digital editorial assistant HANNAH STACPOOLE Digital Godmother SARAH BALL

SUPPLEMENTS Art director TARDEO AJODHA Assistant editor, supplements CELIA THURSFIELD Editorial co-ordinator, supplements TEDDY WOLSTENHOLME

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Chief contributing editors ANNA SCOTT CARTER, NICOLA FORMBY Explorer CIARA PARKES

RUVEN AFANADOR, MATTHEW BELL, CLARE BENNETT, DEBONNAIRE VON BISMARCK, MARK BOLLAND, ANNA BROMILOW, ALICE COCKERELL, CRESSIDA CONNOLLY, GILES COREN, FRAN CUTLER, KEITH DOVKANTS, SUZANNE DUCKETT, CHARLOTTE EDWARDES, BEN ELLIOT, DEBORAH FELDMAN, ASTRID HARBORD, NICKY HASLAM, DAFYDD JONES, MARY KILLEN, EMILIE M CMEEKAN, PHILIP TREACY, CLAUDIA WINKLEMAN, TOM WOLFE, TOBY YOUNG Editorial business manager KITTY MACPHERSON Syndication enquiries syndication@condenast.co.uk Director of editorial administration and rights HARRIET WILSON Tatler is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice (www.ipso.co.uk/editors-code-of-practice) and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, please see our Editorial Complaints Policy on the Contact Us page of our website, or contact us at complaints@condenast.co.uk or by post to Complaints, Editorial Business Department, The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR PATRICIA STEVENSON Assistant to publishing director OLIVIA BENNETT

Associate publisher CLARE SCHIFANO Projects director EMMA SAMUEL Account director EMMA HEUSER Brand strategy director NICKI SINGH Advertising manager LUCIE BURTON Senior advertising executive VICTORIA BARLEY Promotions director SOPHIE FAIRCLOUGH Senior promotions executive SOPHIE WILSON Creative director, promotions GAVIN SHAW Art director, promotions SAMANTHA BROWNSTEIN Senior promotions copywriter ANNA TIMONEY Regional sales director KAREN ALLGOOD Regional account director HEATHER MITCHELL Senior sales executive KRYSTINA GARNETT New York SHANNON TOLAR TCHKOTOUA (tel: 001 212 630 4913) US account manager KERYN HOWARTH Milan VALENTINA DONINI (tel: 00 39 02 805 1422) Paris HELENA KAWALEC (tel: 00 33 1 44 11 78 83) Hong Kong MATTHEW FARRAR (tel: 00 852 2581 2991)

CLASSIFIED Classified director SHELAGH CROFTS Classified advertisement manager VANESSA DAWSON Classified senior sales executives JENNIFER BATTING, ALEXANDRA COX

PROPERTY Group property director FIONA FORSYTH

RESEARCH Marketing director JEAN FAULKNER Deputy marketing and research director GARY READ Associate director, digital marketing SUSIE BROWN Research executive NATALIE LOVELESS Senior marketing executive CELESTE BUCKLEY Senior data manager TIM WESTCOTT

CIRCULATION Circulation director RICHARD KINGERLEE Newstrade circulation manager ELLIOTT SPAULDING Newstrade promotions manager ANNA PETTINGER Subscriptions director PATRICK FOILLERET Marketing and promotions manager MICHELLE VELAN Assistant marketing and promotions manager CLAUDIA LONG Creative design manager ANTHEA DENNING

PRODUCTION Production director SARAH JENSON Commercial production manager XENIA DILNOT Production controller ALICE AHLBERG Acting production coordinator KATE WIGHTMAN Commercial senior production controller LOUISE LAWSON Commercial production coordinator JESSICA BEEBY Commercial and paper production controller MARTIN MACMILLAN Finance director PAM RAYNOR Financial control director PENNY SCOTTBAYFIELD HR director HAZEL M C INTYRE Head of digital WIL HARRIS Condé Nast International director of communications NICKY EATON Deputy publicity director HARRIET ROBERTSON Publicity manager RICHARD PICKARD DIRECTORS Jonathan Newhouse, Nicholas Coleridge, Stephen Quinn, Annie Holcroft, Pam Raynor, Jamie Bill, Jean Faulkner, Shelagh Crofts, Albert Read, Patricia Stevenson

Deputy managing director ALBERT READ MANAGING DIRECTOR

NICHOLAS COLERIDGE

CHAIRMAN, CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL

JONATHAN NEWHOUSE

Published by Tatler Publishing Company Ltd (a subsidiary of the Condé Nast Publications Ltd) TATLER and BYSTANDER and the Georgian figure with spyglass are registered trademarks belonging to Tatler Publishing Company Limited, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Tel: 020 7499 9080; fax: 020 7493 1962. Printed in the UK

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© 2017 CHLOE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

152-153 sloane street - london swix 9bx

chloe.com


FA S H I O N

GIORGIA TORDINI WEARS SILK DRESS, £1,535; GILDA AMBROSIO WEARS SILK TOP, £845; & SEQUIN ROBE, £2,506, ALL BY ATTICO. JEWELLERY, THEIR OWN. FOR STOCKIST, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR & MAKE-UP BY SANDRINE GARCIA AT L’ATELIER(68). STYLED BY SOPHIE GOODWIN

Photographed by CANDICE LAKE

HERE’S LOOK ING AT... ATTICO You need stamina to go shopping with Giorgia Tordini, 31, above left, and Gilda Ambrosio, 24. Their regular fleamarket trips start at 6am and don’t finish until lunchtime. ‘When we go, no one can come with us,’ says Giorgia. ‘They just don’t understand.’ It was their love of vintage that led the Italian street-style stars to launch their retro-inspired label, Attico, in February. Their starting point was the robe – a jewel-coloured, heavily embroidered sort that glamorous Milanese women lounge around in – only these ones were made to be worn outside, over jeans.

People went nuts for them: when they launched on Net-a-Porter earlier this year, the pieces sold out within 24 hours. For their second collection, they’ve branched out into separates, accessories and denim, creating the ideal pair of jeans to wear with those robes – high-waisted, cropped and flared. Giorgia lives in New York and Gilda in Milan, but they’re in touch ‘night and day’, either via Skype, WhatsApp or their shared Pinterest account. Their ideal Attico woman? ‘Cher – Gilda loves her,’ says Giorgia. ‘Can’t you tell from her hair?’ LB

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TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017


Fa sh ion

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, GETTY IMAGES

DYLAN PENN IN FRAME

LEANDRA MEDINE IN CALVIN KLEIN

JESSICA CHASTAIN IN CHANEL

DAKOTA FANNING IN CHANEL

KIERNAN SHIPKA IN DIOR

DON’T YOU WISH YOU’D WORN THAT?

PVC

There’s something so silly about PVC. So silly that the wearing of it is almost witty. Which is counterintuitive for an eroto-waterproof fabric. Clearly this little joke has tickled Karl, because Chanel is all over PVC – or, rather, PVC is all over Chanel, which means it’s all over Dakota Fanning, Olympia Scarry, Carine Roitfeld (see how she bends the classic Chanel style) and Jessica Chastain. There are neat little pencil skirts, which are the easy entry point; widelegged trousers, which must squeak a bit; and coats for that Pretty Woman vibe, but the real way forward – the righteous fashion path – is a PVC suit. The whole shebang. Something that would be full-on corporate and dull in wool but is genuinely edgy and maintenant in PVC. Make like Anna Dello Russo and go head-to-toe sou’wester style for both high-fashion intensity and a proper laugh. AR

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

TATLER.COM

CARINE ROITFELD IN CHANEL

OLYMPIA SCARRY IN CHANEL

ANNA DELLO RUSSO IN LOEWE


Fa sh ion

PIN-UP

‘Help me!’ LACE & HESSIAN TOP, £425, BY HUISHAN ZHANG

SUEDE HEELS, £1,170, BY CHLOE

DRESS, £650, BY PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

SILK-JACQUARD DRESS, £930, BY RED VALENTINO COTTON TOP, £687, BY MISSONI

ALEXANDER McQUEEN RESORT 17

SONIA RYKIEL RESORT 17 TATLER.COM

COTTON COLLAR, £160, BY MARNI

ETRO RESORT 17

EMBROIDERED LINEN JACKET, £8,040, BY ROBERTO CAVALLI

This is folk that has dumped the boring guy with the guitar. There’s colour and texture and tassels and sticky-outy parts. Embroidered Cavalli jackets and strapless, printed ra-ra Rykiel-dress things. Smock meets dirndl meets Russian doll meets McQueen. And, of course, it’s Etro’s season – all those exquisitely bohemian prints exploding across the fashion landscape. This incarnation of folk is rather less floppy than old folks we have known and loved. It has decided to be the girl everyone notices. For fucking once. Thanks very much. Folk, my friends, has grown a pair of attitudes. AR

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

SILK DRESS, £595, BY COACH

VALENTINO RESORT 17

Folk

COTTON TROUSERS, £894, BY MISSONI

STILL-LIFES: PIXELEYES. PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID REDFERN/REDFERNS/GETTY IMAGES

EMBROIDERED LEATHER CLUTCH, £895, BY HILLIER BARTLEY, AT MATCHES

COTTON TROUSERS, £3,170, BY MOSCHINO


Fa sh ion

PIN-UP

Fashion yoga! COAT, £830, BY BLUMARINE

JACKET, £1,600, BY HERMES

JEANS, £69, BY WAREHOUSE

DRESS, £295, BY MARQUES’ ALMEIDA, AT NET-APORTER

SKIRT, £535, BY MICHAEL KORS

BLOUSE, £375, BY CHLOE, AT MATCHES

TATLER.COM

LEATHER & DENIM BOOTS, £630, BY LAURENCE DACADE

STILL-LIFES: PIXELEYES. PHOTOGRAPH: CAMERA PRESS/ FIGAROPHOTO/NAOMI YANG

It’s the day of the denim. And denim has got some big ideas in terms of detail. Bows, radical stripes, pleats, gold hardware and, bien sûr, the not-so-humble jumpsuit. Wear it with anything. Denim jacket with your ballgown? Vast tick. Crazy denim boots with your skirt suit? Most def. Slightly orthopaedic sandals with your denim patchwork? Make mine a double. Denim is the new leather. But cheaper. And – for now at least – chicer. And washable. Which is not nothing, fellow fashion mavens. Not nothing at all. AR

SILK-CREPE SCARF, £140, BY ROCKINS, AT NET-A-PORTER

CREATURES OF THE WIND RESORT 17

TROUSERS, £209, BY SANDRO

Denim

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

LEATHER BAG, £1,160, BY SAINT LAURENT

CAROLINA HERRERA RESORT 17

PAUL & JOE RESORT 17

DIESEL BLACK GOLD RESORT 17

JUMPSUIT, £210, BY DONNA IDA


CARRINGTON COLLEC TION

Mappin & Webb pays homage to its original identity, Carrington, with an array of coloured gemstones. Founded in 1780, Carrington held Royal Warrants and was the jeweller of choice. mappinandwebb.com


Fa sh ion

LESS DOSH STILL POSH!

Lucky slip

Photographed by ANDREW WOFFINDEN

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

TATLER.COM

DRESS, £65, BY RIVER ISLAND. WOOL JUMPER, £60, BY JACK WILLS. GOLD EAR CUFF, £98, BY MARIA BLACK. SILVER EARRINGS, £75, BY IVY & LIV, AT OTIUMBERG. FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR, MAKE-UP & NAILS BY HILA KARMAND, USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE, STILA COSMETICS & BARRY M. STYLED BY AILSA MILLER

We know that slips are quite the thing, but so chilly, no? So layer up this sumptuous pink proposition (£65 – thank you, River Island) with a woolly jumper (£60, from Jack Wills) for luxe fash points and general dog-walking, nonhypothermic good sense.


Andreea Diaconu by Terry Richardson – messika.com

Romane Collection

NOTHING BUT DIAMONDS

%ZEMPEFPIEX,EVVSHWERHWIPIGXIHÁRINI[IPPIVWREXMSR[MHI


Je w el l ery

HANDS OFF MY JEWELS! FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. EDITED BY PHILIPPA DURELL

All of them...

WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BROOCH, POA, BY CHANEL WOOL KILT IN KINLOCH ANDERSON HEATHER TARTAN, FROM £575; SOCKS, £20, BOTH BY KINLOCH ANDERSON

Photographed by MATTHEW SHAVE

TATLER.COM

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017


Karen Deeks rounds up the month’s most splendid stuff

WRISTY BUSINESS

CAROLINA HERRERA NEW YORK RESORT 17

I

BOUND FOR SUCCESS

£910, BY MARCO BICEGO

Go mad for Carolina Herrera’s anniversary with Carolina Herrera – 35 Years of Fashion (£50), a lovely big book packed with glorious photos, then plunder her latest, gorgeous Resort collection at Harrods. harrods.com

C

alling all jewelleryloving creatures: these exceedingly beautiful white-gold and white-sapphire earrings by clever old William & Son have been designed so that they can be transformed into simple studs. Brilliant in literally every sense. williamandson.com

£62, BY CHANEL

L

et us continue to build our Chanel collections, for we must aim for perfection like they do. This is No. 5 The Body Oil – a gentler, more subtle cousin of the famous fragrance, for the softest, angel-scented skin. chanel.com

NICE PEAR

M

ore jewels. MORE. NOW. Yes, this gold, morganite and lemon-beryl necklace with a morganite pear drop by Kiki McDonough will do very nicely. Don’t try and eat the pear drop, though, as tempting as it looks. kiki.co.uk

£25,000, BY KIKI MCDONOUGH

TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017

TATLER.COM

t’s not until you spend time with your wrists, questioning them and yourself, that you realise what is missing from your life – what could improve it in every way. And then it comes to you. What you need is the Marco Bicego gold bangle with topaz, amethyst and rose tourmaline, a new addition to the Jaipur collection. harveynichols.com

£64, BY ELEMIS X HUSH

PICK ’N’ MIX

H

E

lemis and Hush hold hands for a limited-edition set that includes the Nourishing Omega-Rich Cleansing Oil and lush Hush cashmere socks. elemis.com

£35, BY PAUL SMITH X CARAN D’ACHE

C

£15,120, BY WILLIAM & SON

ollaboration fever grips Caran d’Ache and Paul Smith again with eight new shades of the 849 ballpoint pen, inspired by the Paul Smith A/W 16/17 collection (limited edition). Comes with a case. Look sharp. carandache.com

ave some crafty shoe fun with Jimmy Choo’s capsule Cruise collection: each shoe and bag comes with interchangeable buttons, brooches or pom-poms for increased style LOLZ. These suede heels are kindly demonstrating the Swarovski-crystal floral and vintage star-button charms. Get mixing! jimmychoo.com

£1,250, BY JIMMY CHOO


It Li s t £165, BY GUERLAIN

POA, BY ADLER

BLACK MAGIC

SUPERSIZE ME

Marvel at this Jack Wills Witney bucket bag , made by leather experts Pittards. A plethora of leather pull-cord and strap possibilities awaits. jackwills.com

T

JACK WILLS

REED DIFFUSER, £37; CERAMIC DIFFUSER, £48, BOTH BY ESPA

£179, BY JACK WILLS

TRIPLE TOAST One for every occasion... £39.50, BY GIN MARE

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SALUD, GIN MARE AND THE CHEERFUL LANTERN YOU COME IN, WHICH CAN BE USED IN THE PURCHASER’S HOUSE OR GARDEN. WHAT A JOLLY, LIMITED-EDITION IDEA. WAITROSE.COM

CHIN-CHIN, SIXYEAR-OLD CHAMPAGNE VIRGINIE T GRANDE CUVEE, FROM VIRGINIE TAITTINGER, WITH PINOT NOIR, PINOT MEUNIER AND CHARDONNAY VIBES. CHAMPAGNE VIRGINIET.COM

POSH SPICE

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he ESPA Winter Spice reed diffuser is so Christmassy (orange, clove, cinnamon) you’ll be frantically writing letters to Santa – until you open the Restorative ceramic diffuser (lavender, palmarosa, orange) and calm down again. espaskincare.com

Welcome to the Elizabeth Arden facial-services room at Debenhams, Oxford Street, the London cousin of New York’s Red Door Spa. Treatments include microdermabrasion, enzyme-exfoliation, hot stones and LED facials – plus (available nationwide) a handy 15-minute menu for busy types. elizabetharden.co.uk

SANTÉ, GREY GOOSE VODKA AND THE TERRIBLY SMART, BLUEAND-SILVER METALLIC, LIMITED-EDITION BOX YOU’LL BE WEARING FOR THE PARTY SEASON. OCADO.COM

ome, Néroli Outrenoir from Guerlain’s L’ Art & La Matière collection. Let us inhale your blend of neroli, bergamot, smoky tea, myrrh and dark wood, and admire your pretty bottle. harrods.com

POA, BY HARRY WINSTON

PLAY IT BY EAR

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T £49, BY CHAMPAGNE VIRGINIE T

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arry Winston on Bond Street is prettier than ever after a major facelift. Thoroughly examine the bridal and high-jewellery collections, and don’t leave without these cluster earrings with marquise- and pear-shaped diamonds set in platinum. harrywinston.com

PLUMAGE POWER his Kate Spade Valerie blazer makes for a really fun and feathery look – and you don’t even need to catch your own private bird to achieve it. Sorry, but HOW excellent? katespade.co.uk

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he Double Baguette with plexi studs and gold chain-detail strap is the disco diva of the Fendi Gold Edition capsule collection of bags, designed to celebrate Hollywood. Good-looking enough to star in the film of its own life. fendi.com ( £1,070, BY KATE SPADE £1,160, BY FENDI

3 £38, BY GREY GOOSE

here are rings. And then there are RINGS. This white-gold and mother-of-pearl Shinsei ring by Adler is set with a big, ovalcut ruby and 276 diamonds. It is the CEO of rings. The boss. Email adlerukqueries@ adler.ch or call 020 7409 2237 for details.

SHINE ON

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£7,000, BY NIQUESA

his sparkle-tastic Niquesa gold ring boasts rubies, diamonds, an amethyst... it’ll be shrieking its credentials from the rooftops of their new boutique in the revamped Harvey Nichols jewellery hall. niquesafinejewellery.com

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TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017


A B O U T T OW N

TOBY FENWICKE-CLENNELL, SAM GREENLY, RORY BUCHANAN & HARRY WENTWORTH-STANLEY WEAR POLYAMIDE SWIM SHORTS, £145 EACH, BY ORLEBAR BROWN. SHIRTS, THEIR OWN. FOR STOCKIST, SEE ADDRESS BOOK

Photographed by JEAN GOLDSMITH

THE ROWING BOYS Would you get naked in front of your three best friends? You would? Well done, you. How about performing your ablutions in front of them while squatting on a bucket? Not so uninhibited now, are we? But this hardy, handsome quartet will have to do just that this month while rowing nearly 3,000 miles from La Gomera in the Canaries to English Harbour in Antigua. Toby Fenwicke-Clennell, Sam Greenly and Rory Buchanan, all 28, and Harry Wentworth-Stanley, 27, are aiming to cross the ocean in under 40 days to raise £300,000 for a mental-health charity set up in memory of Harry’s late brother, James Wentworth-Stanley. The boat itself measures a cramped 22 by

6.5 feet and has a small hatch in which they’ll stash their freeze-dried food. ‘Heartburn chilli con carne is the favourite,’ says Harry. ‘You have to wash it down with a hefty dose of Gaviscon.’ They’ll take turns to sleep in the hatch, but they only get a maximum of 105 minutes each before taking over an oar again. Their supplies will include a few beers to celebrate on Christmas Day, a fishing rod and a tube of wasabi to eat with anything they catch. Also, a new bucket, because Harry has already broken theirs by sitting on it too heavily. ‘It was from Poundland, so probably not that sturdy. We’ll upgrade for the actual trip.’ SM-C To find out more, visit rowforjames.com

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The loudest sex you have ever heard... ...and it is coming from your neighbours. How this can be a good thing, by Stuart Heritage

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his is a story about consequences – and unexpected silver linings. The first time we heard our neighbour having sex, we turned our TV down and listened. That sounds creepy, but let me put it in context. He is in a terrible band, and until recently he spent every evening thwonking his dumb ham hands against his stupid guitar for hours. We’d have welcomed any respite from the guitar. If an Ocado truck had pulled up at his house and unloaded crates of bestiality videos and heroin every night, we’d have been just as thankful. Instead, a girl turned up. And, yes, when we first heard them having sex, we stopped everything and listened. My wife and I sat there in silence for the duration of the act, raising our eyebrows and mouthing ‘Is this weird?’ to each other. Two strangers were having sex, and we were listening with the distant appreciation that most people reserve for classical

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recitals. It wasn’t titillating, but it was a little furtive and exciting. I think they know. They must know that we were listening, because ever since then they’ve ramped up the volume incalculably. Now we don’t need to turn the TV down when they have sex. In fact, it doesn’t matter how far we turn the TV up, because the noise they make rattles the walls. These, in roughly chronological order, are the noises they make during sex: 1. The noise that the Duchess of Cambridge would make during a charity firewalk. 2. The noise that you would make if you were presented with a delicious pudding at a restaurant, quickly followed by the noise you’d make if that pudding morphed into a bleeding animal foetus as soon as you touched it with your spoon. 3. The noise of Björk, trapped in a suitcase, being thrown down an escalator travelling at high speed in the opposite direction.

4. The sound of every wild animal giving birth in every nature documentary you have ever seen, playing at the same time through a megaphone in a refraction chamber. They’re so loud that they’ve started to cause our 18-monthold to wake up in distress whenever they start going at it. On more than one occasion, we’ve had to cope simultaneously with the noise of two strangers hammering away at each other and the sound of a crying baby. I can’t state this for a fact, but I’m pretty sure this combined noise is what the CIA plays to Guantánamo Bay inmates whenever they want them to confess to things they haven’t done. It doesn’t even sound as if they’re having fun. Their sex noises are so performative and overcompensatory that it’s like listening to someone laugh too hard at a joke. It’s like when your English teacher took everyone to see A Midsummer Night’s Dream and slapped his thigh at all the

ribald wordplay. It feels like they’re doing it for our benefit, as if they’re somehow trying to give us what we want. We don’t want it, though. And they know that too. My wife, at her wits’ end after weeks of being subjected to two people approximating the sound of Dame Kiri Te Kanawa being rabbit-punched in the kidneys, slipped a polite note through their letter box. It asked them if they could maybe tone it down so our son could sleep. (It left out the bit where the baby now goes ‘Uh, uh, uh’ whenever he hears them shagging.) Nevertheless, the note only exacerbated things. The following night they came back harder than ever, opening all their windows and screaming like they were trying to vomit out their own spines in a show of extravagant vengeance. So now it’s war. And let me tell you, nothing focuses the mind quite like wanting to destroy the life of your sexually active neighbour. I’m consumed by it. It’s eating up my every waking moment. Do we call the council? The police? Do we source an industrial quantity of bromide and leak it into their water supply? Can we split them up somehow? Should we set up a honey trap? The other day, I genuinely had to talk my wife down from looking up the name of my neighbour’s estranged son and screaming it through their bedroom window at the point of ejaculation. This is how bad things have got. It should be terrible, but here’s the silver lining: I’ve never felt so energised. I have an enemy now, my first since school. I’m permanently geared up for a fight. I’m a walking surge of adrenalin, and it’s all because I’m determined to make this man as unhappy as I possibly can. It’s made me feel alive. Should I have made such a big deal of listening to him first time around? Probably not. Would I recommend involuntarily listening to thoroughly gruesome sex noises to anyone who feels they need to be shaken out of a stupor? Absolutely. (

PHOTOGRAPH: OWEN FRANKLIN/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

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Photographed by HANA KNIZOVA

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POPPY & SUKI WEAR NECKLACES, FROM A SELECTION BY POP & SUKI. FOR STOCKIST, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR BY DORA ROBERTI AT CLOSE UP, USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP BY ALEX BABSKY AT JED ROOT, USING LANCOME. WITH THANKS TO THE WELLESLEY (THE WELLESLEY.CO.UK). STYLED BY AILSA MILLER. PROPS STYLIST, OLIVIA BENNETT

KEEP IT CLEAN, GIRLS Poppy Jamie and Suki Waterhouse love each other so much that not only do they have baths together, they have also collaborated on a range of accessories


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emale friendship can be a grand amour, intensely intimate; a bond that precludes all others – and very often hugely intimidating to interlopers, especially male ones. ‘Suki would be the perfect husband,’ says Poppy Jamie, far left, looking lovingly at her friend Suki Waterhouse. They are sitting next to each other in bed, wearing matching white fluffy dressing gowns, and are a little soggy after spending the past three and a half hours in a bath full of pink milk. Do boys find that level of connection daunting? ‘Yes,’ says Suki. ‘They don’t understand it at all.’ Suki grew up in Chiswick, the daughter of Norman, a top cosmetic surgeon, and Elizabeth, a cancer-care nurse. She was scouted in a pub at 16 and has modelled ever since, fronting campaigns for Burberry and Tommy Hilfiger. Poppy was raised in Leamington Spa and read politics at LSE while working as an entertainment correspondent for ITN. She has presented for MTV, ITV2 and Sky1 and launched Snapchat’s first talk show, Pillow Talk with Poppy, last year. The pair met at Teddy’s club in Hollywood three years ago while they were both living in Los Angeles; Poppy, 25, was working as a TV presenter; Suki, 24, was trying to make the move from modelling to acting. ‘Suki was wearing the most amazing outfit – a pink, floor-length Emilia Wickstead dress,’ says Poppy. ‘We ended up dancing together and then left in my beaten-up Peugeot 206. The skirt of her dress was quite full, so I just remember shovelling this pink trifle into the back of my car...’ Now that they’re back in London, they have started their own accessories brand, Pop & Suki, mainly as an excuse to spend more time together. The collection includes jewellery, charms and the two bags they’ve designed: a tote and a camera bag. Suki’s favourite is the tote, made of soft pink suede; she uses it to stash her ‘survival kit – laptop, gym kit, everything. Also, it doubles up as a pillow on planes.’ Poppy loves her maroon camera bag, which can be transformed into a ‘fanny pack’ or backpack for hands-free dancing, something the girls do a lot – most mornings you’ll find them at the 5Rhythms freestyle dance classes in Notting Hill, or downward-dogging. ‘We love doing hippie-dippy stuff together,’ says Poppy. And Pop & Suki? ‘It’s our baby – we can’t procreate together, so we’ve made this instead,’ says Suki. LB

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59


The elephant in the room... What can we be talking about?

THE NEW SNOBBERY Everything changes, that is one thing we have learnt over the past 300 years at Tatler. So herewith, we bring you a comprehensive, completely updated guide to snobbery

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S nob Speci a l

TOILET, TOILET, TOILET

AND ANOTHER THING!

There, we said it. Why the prejudice against this one, small, slightly smelly word must stop. An important essay, by Annabel Rivkin

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t’s the smallest room in the house. It may or may not have prints on the walls. Photographs. Framed letters from famous people or royalty. An Oscar: the original humblebrag. It may be smart wallpaper and surround sound and vintage linen hand towels. It may have a selection of very stale scents and a load of horribly thumbed ‘loo books’ and a shuddering washing machine behind a curtain. But lowly or lofty, it remains the most socially contentious room in the universe. Let’s contextualise: I’m not a snob. You’re not a snob. We do not feel the need for superiority. We do not see the world in terms of an index of acceptable names and words and practices – a matrix to show how smart, well informed, patrician or just downright posh we are. How in-the-know we are. How getting-it-right. But not too right. Not arriviste right. Mitford right. No. You and I are human beings – fully formed and fleshed out. We see that life has texture and undulations, that people add colour and magic with all their glorious differences. We bend like the bamboo, you and I. We pride ourselves on our fluidity... But what would you do if your child started saying toilet? Just that. Not fuck or shit or bollocks but toilet. As in ‘Mummy, I need to go to the toilet.’ Aah... So that just happened. The Toilet Bomb. Maybe you didn’t notice anything amiss. Perhaps you inwardly clenched but then realised – in time – that the problem was, and should remain, yours. Or, conceivably, you heard yourself saying, ‘Darling, we don’t say toilet.’ Because toilet is still the big one. The elephant in the we’re-not-snobs room. And it’s all a bit

embarrassing, continuing to mind so much about this one word. Telling ourselves it’s a tribal thing – a dialect, if you like, rather than an anachronism. A slightly shameful tribal thing. We have relaxed slightly about other words. ‘Scent’ over ‘perfume’ sounds affected. Only bores bang on about ‘writing paper’. And nobody checks their teeth for spinach in a ‘looking glass’. But toilet remains the eye of the storm. Some people will attempt to explain that their disdain – which sometimes manifests as a physical shudder or an internal tummy twist – is because toilet is inaccurate. It is derived from the French (that in itself makes it a bit non-U), where it originated to describe the act of going about one’s toilet. Not going to the toilet. But do not allow these expert etymological historians to blur the issue. They are groping around for justification. Language evolves. And yet toilets, it seems, do not. I have had to write toilet a lot for this meditation. Have had to think toilet and – when asking people’s opinions – I have had to say toilet. Which has neutralised the toiletness. I said toilet. Nobody died. Or vomited. Or punched me. The worst thing that happened was a raised eyebrow, which made the other person look like an arse. Toilet, toilet, toilet. How do you feel? Poorer? Commoner? Stupider? Uglier? Is it time to reclaim toilet? To toilet the toilet into the modern world. To teach our children that people are more than toileters and non-toileters. To practise so much aversion therapy that the toilet finally comes out of the closet?

PHOTOGRAPHS: JONATHAN KIRN/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, GETTY IMAGES

I said toilet. Nobody died. The worst thing that happened was a raised eyebrow

F ro m T h e N ew B o o k o f S n o b s , by D J Tay l o r ‘A snob may pay a visit to the bogs, the jakes or the rears, or, in the case of elderly snobs with naval experience, take the opportunity to pump ship. Old-style girls’ boarding schools offer an even more exotic vocabulary – the aunt, the potting shed, etc. The old upper-class formulation “to spend a penny” is now practically obsolete and in any case conflicted, the pleasant sense of using a phrase that lost its original meaning half a century ago balanced by the memory that it involved the use of a public lavatory.’ (Constable, £16.99)

VISCOUNTESS GLENAPP I am really snobby about people who won’t read Jilly &RRSHU7KH¿UVWWLPH,PHW my husband he was reading Appassionata. Sexy!

S I R DAV I D TA N G I totally abhor the use of ‘God bless’ at a sneeze and ‘Bon appétit’ just before eating.

SCARLETT SPENCER-CHURCHILL Wellies in London. Just no.

S A N TA M O N T E F I O R E What really grates when I hear it is: ‘Sit YOURSELF down’ or ‘Have YOURSELF a good day.’ :K\μ\RXUVHOI¶":K\UHÀH[LYH" Where does it come from? Can’t they just say sit down and have a good day? I hear it on the radio all the time.

BEN ELLIOT I don’t like ‘breaking wind’. What is wrong with ‘farting’? ]

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TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017


S nob Speci a l AND ANOTHER THING PT 2

GREAT SNOBS OF HISTORY! A celebration. By Sophia Money-Coutts and DJ Taylor

I cannot abide the clinking of glasses, whether it is to the accompaniment of ‘Cheers!’ or not, and I can’t think what makes some people think that it demonstrates their ‘trendiness’. Confusing a glass with a dodgem is just crass. On the few occasions when my every effort to move my glass out of the path of collision has failed and my glass is smashed into – invariably to the wellintentioned but pointless accompaniment of ‘Cheers!’ – I resort to a pun and respond ‘...and tables’ – or, if I am in a less benevolent mood, ‘Clinking glasses. What fun!’, delivered with as much irony as good manners will allow.

MARY KILLEN People putting glasses down on polished surfaces and leaving rings. It’s annoying rather than something to be snobbish about, but on the other hand it clearly signals they have not grown up in a house with polished furniture.

L A DY L AT Y M E R ,ÀLQFKDWWKHSKUDVHμ:HKDG a roast’. Roast WHAT? Worse still: ‘We had a very tasty roast.’ I think ‘tasty’ came from North America. ‘Guest book’ brings me mild discomfort. I have given in on ‘phone’.

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Beau Brummell

Alan Clark

V i r g i n i a Wo o l f

The Regency dandy left the Army when his regiment was ordered north. ‘I really could not go – think, your Royal Highness, Manchester!’ He also once remarked that he could not keep up his association with a certain Lady Mary after discovering that she ate cabbage.

The Tory politician immortalised the phrase ‘the kind of man who has to buy his own furniture’ about Michael Heseltine. And, when told that the American mafia boss John Gotti wore $2,000 suits, Clark casually remarked, ‘I didn’t know it was possible to buy one so cheaply.’

The self-confessed snob called Katherine Mansfield a ‘civet cat’ and sneered at Ulysses: ‘An illiterate, underbred book it seems to me; the book of a self-taught working man, and we all know how distressing they are, how egotistic, insistent, raw, striking and ultimately nauseating.’

Ja m e s L e e s - M i l n e

To m D r i b e r g

The writer abhorred the word ‘garage’ and referred to it as a ‘motor house’ instead. He once noted in his diary that he and a female friend had decided they preferred ‘the company of stupid, well-bred people to that of intelligent, common people’.

In 1958, this leading Labour politician wrote to the manager of Labour’s conference hotel, the Grand in Scarborough, demanding an assurance that there would be no sauce bottles or other condiments on the dining tables during his stay.

The 7th Duke of We l l i n g t o n

Pr i n c e s s M a r g a re t Referred to Buckingham Palace as a ‘terribly cosy “hice”’ on Desert Island Discs in 1981. ‘I have no intention of telling people what I have for breakfast,’ she tartly declared on another occasion.

E d w a rd S a c k v i l l e -We s t ‘I’ve never come across anyone who wouldn’t rather have an inherited title than one bestowed by the Queen,’ the music critic and novelist once remarked.

On someone referred to as smart: ‘[The duke] drew his breath in slightly,’ recalled Anthony Powell in his journals. ‘“A nice woman, certainly. But smart? I don’t ever recollect having seen her at the Sutherlands or the Ancasters.”’

Ev e l y n Wa u g h As a teenager, the writer habitually walked down the road from his parents’ house in Golders Green, NW11, to post his letters in Hampstead, where they would carry the NW3 Post Office frank.

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, SERGE LEMOINE/STRINGER/GETTY IMAGES, PHILIPPE LE TELLIER/ GETTY IMAGES, WIREIMAGE, BETTMANN, GETTY IMAGES, DAFYDD JONES, SHUTTERSTOCK

L ADY COLIN CAMPBELL


Liz Truss’s appearance here should absolutely NOT be taken as an indication that she’s a snob. She isn’t. It’s merely a matter of pagination...

O K TO B E SNOBBISH ABOUT Cold houses There’s nothing smart about freezing your arse off any more Sticks in vases Very dentist’s waiting room

LIZ TRUSS

Visible bra straps Unless done deliberately

Frisky, first-ever female Lord Chancellor

Talking in lifts Main Instead of ‘main course’ Sunglasses inside Coloured loo paper Those who fail to walk through doors last When faced with a group of people all wishing to use one door, any split second where at least three men are not on the verge of a pansy fight to be the last through the door is not a split second we like Talking about money High heels at a polo match Eating on the Tube Saying ‘lounge’ instead of ‘sitting room’ You are not at the airport Brushing your hair on the bus Vulgar celebrities Precocious children Ghastly Fake Christmas trees French manicures People who don’t have any books in their house Red cars Cleaning your knife with your fork in midair Baby showers The concept

N OT O K TO B E SNOBBISH ABOUT Piercings Carnations They’re back Paper napkins Some say they’re only for breakfast – we disagree Applying make-up on the bus Cheap chocolates Where you go on holiday Saying ‘mirror’ instead of ‘looking glass’ The fact that you went to Eton And please don’t refer to it as ‘school’ Saying ‘Pleased to meet you’ instead of ‘How do you do?’ Everyone needs to get over themselves on this one Saying ‘perfume’ instead of ‘scent’ Using liquid soap instead of a bar of soap to wash your hands

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antomime season arrived early at the Royal Courts of Justice last July when the new Lord Chancellor was paraded before the burbling old poots of the legal establishment and they realised – gasp! – that she was a woman. Liz Truss wore the goldembroidered robes with wonderfully slinky aplomb. The sight of her, with her slender ankles and big-ruff collar and cuffs and blonde hair framing that elfin face with its cheeky smirk, was pure panto principal boy. And it was all the choicer by virtue of the fact that the legal world is stuffed with so many male walruses, many of whom profess to be small-l liberals devoted to feminism. Gosh, they were cross! ‘The Trussette’, as fellow MPs call her, was one of Theresa May’s more startling appointments when the Government changed hands last summer. She had previously been environment secretary – minister for cowpats, tourism and sausages. Her only legal experience, if we can dignify it as that, was a brief spell as a junior member of the justice select committee. Suddenly, thanks to Mrs May (who has a suspicion of judges), the youthful Member for South West Norfolk – good on telly and popular with floating voters – found herself in charge of our courts and prisons. Not a lifelong Tory, our Truss. She was born to a family of lefties, her dad then being a maths lecturer at Leeds University and her mum a CND-supporting nurse who took young Liz to the women’s peace camp at RAF Greenham Common in the Eighties. She once sang anti-Thatcher songs but now regards the late Mrs T as a heroine. The change in her politics came after she read PPE at Oxford (where she was a republican

Illustrated by GERALD SCARFE

and a Lib Dem) and later worked in industry as an accountant. She is history’s first female Lord Chancellor. The role goes back to the Norman Conquest, and past holders include Geoffrey the Bastard, Cardinal Wolsey and the shimmeringly boozy Lord Irvine of Lairg. Now we have lustrous-maned Liz, who doesn’t know her a posteriori from her ab initio. By the way, she may be Liz to most of us, but officially she is called Elizabeth. Buckingham Palace let it be known that ‘Liz’ was a bit infra dig. Still only 41, mother-oftwo Truss has risen faster than a showgirl’s nightie. She became an MP in 2010 and a minister two years later, when she was an understrapper at the Department for Education. She did a couple of years at Environment and gained a reputation for visiting agricultural shows and seeking out photo opportunities with the owners of the bulls with the lowest, dangliest knackers. There is something just a little frisky about our Liz, as the South West Norfolk Tories discovered after they selected her as a candidate and then learned that she and a male Tory MP had had an extramarital affair. Disapproving locals – the ‘Turnip Taliban’ – tried to deselect her but were overcome. She needed to be tough to overcome that difficulty, and she will need to be tough now, for she faces a devilish time with the lawyers. They scoff at her legal ignorance and speak nostalgically of the days under her predecessor, Michael Gove. Will she continue Gove’s good work on prison reforms? How will she steer the Ministry of Justice through the small print of Brexit? Questions, questions. How can this panto possibly have a happy ending? Quentin Letts writes for the Dail

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Books

Glamour, dancing, drinking and, of course, horses = our kind of fun. By Sebastian Shakespeare SWING TIME BY ZADIE SMITH

(Hamish Hamilton, £18.99) The author’s exuberant fifth novel chronicles the friendship between two mixed-race girls who meet at a dance class in north-west London – Tracey has real talent, but the narrator has flat feet. As Smith criss-crosses time and continents, riffing on identity, music, family and class, her rhythmic prose sweeps the reader along. What a gifted and musical writer she is. HORSES BY DERRY MOORE

THE PIGEON TUNNEL BY JOHN LE CARRÉ (Penguin, £20)

THE VOYEUR’S MOTEL BY GAY TALESE

(Grove Press, £14.99) Here is Gay Talese’s sensational and creepy account of a man who bought a 21-room motel near Denver to spy on guests and secretly study how people conduct themselves sexually in the privacy of their bedroom. Every predilection passes through his portals – lesbians, swingers, threesomes – and he witnesses changing sexual habits, rape, robbery and even murder. Or so he claims. Peeping Tom or pioneering sex researcher? You decide.

A POEM FOR EVERY NIGHT OF THE YEAR BY ALLIE ESIRI (Pan Macmillan, £16.99)

Where else would you find William Shakespeare rubbing shoulders with Tim Burton? Allie Esiri’s delightfully eclectic anthology takes you on a poetic journey through every night of the calendar year. Subjects range from the solemn to the screwball, and old favourites are spliced with offerings from the likes of Spike Milligan and JK Rowling. A fun book for all the family to enjoy.

THE RIVIERA SET BY MARY S LOVELL

THE VIRGINITY OF FAMOUS MEN BY CHRISTINE SNEED (Bloomsbury, £18.99)

(Little, Brown, £25) The author of The Mitford Girls now turns her eye on the Riviera Set, the socialites whose parties and affairs at the Château de l’Horizon, near Cannes, became legend. Less a biography of a group than of a place that played host to everyone from Rita Hayworth to Lady Diana Cooper via Prince Aly Khan, it teems with glitz and glamour. Prepare to be seduced.

Sneed’s title is hard to resist, and her short stories are even better. This impressive collection is about human longing and desire: the title story documents a famous father and his son’s attraction to the same women, while in ‘Five Rooms’ a teenage girl befriends a lonely, blind elderly man and escorts him to see his old lover. Sharply observed and very well written.

THE GIRLS BY EMMA CLINE

ORDER, ORDER! THE RISE AND FALL OF POLITICAL DRINKING BY BEN WRIGHT

(Vintage, £12.99) Undeniably the dazzling fiction debut of the year, this brilliant American novel is a vivid evocation of California in 1969. The teenage Evie Boyd falls under the spell of 19-year-old Suzanne and is sucked into a Charles Manson-type cult. This is at once a coming-of-age novel and a story of female friendship with dark, murderous undertones – but it is the author’s luminous prose style that excels. Exhilarating.

(Duckworth Overlook, £16.99) A lively canter around a sozzled subject that’s both informative and entertaining. Wright’s survey features all the usual suspects, from Roy Jenkins, a ‘two bottles of claret at lunch’ man, to Sir Winston Churchill, who survived on a drip-feed of alcohol. It contains quite a few sobering facts, eg: all three foreign secretaries between 1964 and 1970 were convicted of drink-driving after they left office. Watch out, Boris!

GOD’S WOLF: THE LIFE OF THE MOST NOTORIOUS OF ALL CRUSADERS BY JEFFREY LEE (Atlantic, £20)

You won’t learn much about Le Carré’s private life (nothing on his two wives or children) or his brief career as a spy (Official Secrets Act, old boy), but this episodic memoir is still a rattling good read – as you would expect from one of our best living novelists. It contains memorable encounters with Rupert Murdoch, Margaret Thatcher, Yasser Arafat, Stephen Ward, fellow spooks and Russian defectors, and details his intrepid travels abroad. And he’s not afraid to settle old scores.

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A swashbuckling yet scholarly biography of the infamous 12th-century crusader Reynald de Châtillon. What a life! He became Prince of Antioch by marriage, spent 16 years in prison and ended up being beheaded by his arch-enemy Saladin. Old memories die hard: in 2010, al-Qaeda tried to blow up a plane over America by concealing a bomb in a box addressed to... Reynald de Châtillon. (

STILL-LIFE: PIXELEYES

(Rizzoli, £45) Giddy up! This is a glorious celebration of equestrian culture and those who live and work with horses by photographer Derry Moore, aka the 12th Earl of Drogheda. His ravishing photos feature jockeys, cavalrymen, riding schools and stables from around the world (he even finds space for the miniature donkeys at Martha Stewart’s barn). While Moore captures his subjects’ speed and grace, his best portraits are of horses in repose – he has an eye for a well-groomed hindquarter.


Art for sale

A snoggable sofa, washing machines with attitude and MC Hammock. By Josh Spero SW I N G LOW (£5,500) HAMMOCK (2015-16) BY CATHERINE GOODMAN WHY BUY As winter closes in, many Tatler readers are no

doubt heading for a hammock in a sunny clime. Goodman, though, appears to have put hers up in some forest grove where fireflies furiously flit; the rapidity of her background lines leaves the calmly drawn hammock suspended in time as well as space. With her careful, colourful yet characterful style, Goodman, artistic director of the Royal Drawing School, is her own best advocate for the drawn line. WHEN Until 14 January. WHERE Marlborough Fine Art, 6 Albemarle Street, W1 (marlboroughfineart.com).

LI P O S U C TI O N (£250,000–£400,000 EST.)

PHOTOGRAPHS: HA , PASTEL ON PAPER (63 X 48CM), © CATHERINE GOODMAN, COURTESY MARLBOROUGH FINE ART, LONDON. CHRISTIE’S IMAGES LTD 2016

A SOFA IN THE FORM OF MAE WEST’S LIPS (1938) BY SALVADOR DALÍ AND EDWARD JAMES WHY BUY When Mae West said, ‘Why don’t you come up

and see me sometime?’, audiences swooned. Artists fell for it too: Dalí and James must have found her lips the embodiment of eroticism to render them in oversized fabric. Simmering sexuality was a key part of surrealism, as was absurdity. But think how thrilling it would have been to ascend West’s stairs and find her sitting seductively on her own mouth. WHEN 15 December. WHERE Christie’s, 8 King Street, SW1 (christies.com).

S PI N C YC L E (£300) WASH N DRY (2015) BY TAMEKA JENEAN NORRIS WHY BUY This picture looks like a pop-video still – a good

jumping-off point into Norris’s career. An aspiring rapper turned Ivy League student turned artist, Norris highlights the expectations (and limitations) these worlds put on her as a black woman. You see here how she subverts those clichés: she has a rapper’s swagger, yet her sweatshirt says ‘Yale’. The same is true of her YouTube videos, which combine tripping rhythms, blazing social commentary and an entertaining parody of Marina Abramović brushing her hair. WHEN Until 21 January. WHERE Ronchini Gallery, 22 Dering Street, W1 (ronchinigallery.com). Josh Spero writes for the Financial Times.

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Restaurants

BURRATA AT NAUGHTY PIGLETS

Basque in the glory of this saucy newcomer, says Jeremy Wayne

HOW MUCH About £200 for two, incl. wine WHAT TO EAT Anchovy tempura, hake, seared duck WHO GOES Queen Sofía of Spain, right, Eva Green, Colin and Livia Firth

Azurmendi, near Bilbao, has three Michelin stars, and he apparently has grand cuisine in mind for his next opening, in Tbilisi. But he doesn’t appear to be chasing stars in London, at least not overtly. This is a blessing. It means a short, accessible menu, with only the occasional silliness. You don’t need to come armed with a Larousse Gastronomique to enjoy Eneko; descriptions, as offered by the waiters, are limited to 10-second soundbites per dish. A starter of tempura of anchovies with aioli is a wolf in sheep’s

ANCHOVY TEMPURA AT ENEKO

SIDE ORDERS NAUGHTY PIGLETS 28 Brixton Water Lane, SW2 (naughtypiglets.co.uk)

One heck of a restaurant, with Lyon-born Margaux Aubry front of house and husband Joe Sharratt wearing the whites. He does almost ethereal burrata with black olives and a knock-your-socks-andtrousers-off pork belly with sriracha. True, Naughty Piglets looks a little like the inside of a sauna, but with food like this – no sweat.

SALON 18 Market Row, Coldharbour Lane, SW9 (salonbrixton.co.uk) I wouldn’t say this 26-seater in Brixton Market is déclassé (I’m far too polite), but a salon it most definitely isn’t. Ah, yes – I get it: the name’s ironic. Salon does have a schoolroom charm, though. Cheeses and charcuterie are excellent here, and if the no-choice set menu includes ’nduja ajo blanco or grilled cuttlefish with monk’s beard, go for it.

DIP & FLIP 64–68 Atlantic Road, SW9 (dipandflip.co.uk) Love it or loathe it, burgermania shows little sign of slowing down, which is why Dip & Flip has opened a fourth south London branch. Choose a burger in a brioche bun, or topside of beef or shoulder of lamb in a roll, and dip it into the signature house gravy. An acquired taste all right – but oodles of south Londoners seem to have acquired it.

THE BARFLY Cottons Rhum Shack Jerk chicken, curried mutton, ackee and saltfish – yada yada yada! I mean, I love these things, but when push comes to shove, it’s rum I’m after, and I’m after it in large amounts. So where better to drink it than at the new Cottons Rhum Shack, in Notting Hill? They say they

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PICK ME!

have the largest collection of rums in the UK – around 375 varieties – and I believe them. My recommendation? Jamaica’s Wray and Nephew Overproof, used in the Reggae Rum Punch. You’ll be jammin’ too. 157–159 Notting Hill Gate, W11 (cottons-restaurant.co.uk).

PHOTOGRAPH: GETTY IMAGES

‘T

he pig is made for us by a lady in Bilbao,’ says Vincent Déridet, assistant general manager at Eneko at One Aldwych, still one of London’s most stylish boutique hotels. He’s pointing at a carved pig’s head on the lid of a wooden box holding the signature dish, ‘Txerri Boda Pork Festival’. Its trio of Ibérico, chorizo and blackpudding buns is good, if not exactly a festival. No matter – some parties take a while to get going. Eneko occupies the space that was formerly Axis, a basement so deep that after stopping for oxygen, you half expect to find yourself in Australia by the time you emerge from the dramatic, copper-clad staircase. What you find instead is a saucy room, with white-leather armchairs, amoeba-shaped booths and speakeasy lighting – just made for bad behaviour. Basque chef-patron Eneko Atxa’s best-known restaurant,

clothing, a batter of innocent airiness hiding a big, salty bite within. A fish soup of grouper, clams and hake has you right there by the sea – maritime Basque Country summed up in a bowl. There’s hake – that strapping fish we think of as rather luxurious but is actually a staple in northern Spain – in the mains too, with confit vegetables and a red-pepper sauce; it is as satisfying as it is essentially unsophisticated. If a chicken-liver parfait has not quite set, the slow-cooked oxtail hits the mark. Seared duck breast with oyster mushrooms scores a bullseye. Txakolí (‘cha-koh-LEE’), the sulphury white wine of the Basque country, is heavily promoted (all from the winery Eneko runs with his uncle), but if you’re eating meat, I recommend the Guelbenzu, a plummy Zaragoza red that’s surprisingly light on the wallet. Eneko is getting there – already fun and soon, perhaps, to be fabulous. The building, by the way, was once home to – would you believe – Tatler, so I feel a connection, even if it’s not yet entirely parfait. One Aldwych, WC2 (eneko.london).


Gadgets Electrical devices to make you more hygge. By Emma Freud COSY CENTRAL

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his month I’ve discovered gadgets that embrace hygge – the Danish concept of ‘cosiness’, ‘well-being’, ‘contentment’, ‘snuggles’ or – as it has been described by John Crace – ‘retreating to a space where you feel safe, and not bothering about anyone you don’t know. A bit like what Brexit meant to many people.’

BUNNY-BOTTOM LIGHT Bunny-bottom light

iKettle

Lighting is hugely important to feeling hyggely (actual word, not even made up). When preparing for a hygge evening, you need to get the look just right – warm, gentle, inviting, unthreatening and nurturing. What could possibly do that more than a rabbit’s arse? Nothing, that’s what. Illuminated bunny’s arses are the definition of cosy Danish joy. £60 at rockettstgeorge.co.uk

iKETTLE

Pie-maker

You can’t really do hygge without a hot drink. Picture a world where your kettle wakes you up in the morning by messaging you to ask if you’re ready for your tea and then turns itself on when you click ‘yes’. Imagine a future where your kettle texts you on your way home and asks if you want it to get itself ready for your arrival? This utopia has happened – it’s called the iKettle, it creates unlimited toasty beverages at the touch of an app and means you will never again stand in the kitchen waiting for the bastard to boil. £99.99 at currys.co.uk

PIE-MAKER Speaker blanket

Electric scent-diffuser

Hot dog (and cat) bed

What do you eat for the perfect hygge meal? Kale? Quinoa? Seaweed? Nope, we’re all about carbs, and a golden, steaming pie is the perfect dish for experiencing the type of well-being we like to call ‘fullstomachness’. This rather brilliant little gadget aids the path between ‘pie-plan’ and ‘pie-arrival’. To celebrate, here’s my best recipe for the world’s greatest cherry pie: 1) Buy some ready-rolled shortcrust pastry. 2) Put half of it in the bottom of this pie machine. 3) Into the middle of the pastry put 400g of stoned cherries mixed with a teaspoon of cornflour, the juice of a lemon, a splash of amaretto and a tablespoon of brown sugar. 4) Put the other half of the pastry on top. 5) Close the lid and inhale for 20 fragrant minutes. 6) Stuff your gorgeous face. £23.99 at wayfair.co.uk

Heated duvet

This one is brilliant – a big, fleecy, washable blanket, with arms, that has a built-in 3.5mm jack to connect to your phone and two removable speakers neatly sewn into the hood. My suggestions for the best sounds to listen to while hyggeling (yes, definitely made that one up): Sigur Rós (atmospheric, trippy, beautiful), Rufus Wainwright (genius, soulful, melodic), The Archers (earthy, community), Teach Yourself Danish (on brand, on point, on hygge). £33.99 at soundasleeppillow.co.uk

ELECTRIC SCENT-DIFFUSER I completely love scented candles. I’d been going out with my boyfriend for 23 years when he admitted he hated them and I had to choose... them or him. It was a long, arduous decision, but ultimately I elected not to leave the father of our four children and instead opted to settle for this gadget: a little machine that gently puffs aromatherapy oils into your room while glowing in a nice, soft hygge way. Smells super, looks sweet and is probably cheaper than divorce. £50 at johnlewis.com

HOT DOG BED There’s little that enhances a cosy evening more than a happy pet. But for pets to be properly looked after, they need their own little gadget. Say hello to the heated dog bed. It’s a bed. It’s for dogs (or cats). It’s heated. Doggehygge. £17.95 at amazon.co.uk

HEATED DUVET Finally, here’s the full story... It’s 7pm and nobody is coming over, you’ve found the box set of Friday Night Lights, there’s a rabbit’s-arse light on the go, you’ve made a massive cherry pie and rustled up some hot chocolate into which you’ve put a huge glugge (yup) of Baileys, plus there’s some excellent Nordic Piney Scent wafting from the aromatherapy-oil burner, and your cat has curled up in the heated bed with the dog, which you’ve photographed and Instagrammed and it’s already had over 50 likes, so you’re feeling very smugge. So you get into bed, turn on your HEATED DUVET and you realise that all is actually right with the world. At least for tonight. £116 at iwantoneofthose.com

The iKettle: never again will you stand in the kitchen waiting for the bastard to boil

N E X T M O N T H G A D G E T S O F T H E F U T U R E – T H E B E S T O F K IC K S TA R T E R

This is me on the web – emmafreud.com

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HERO PIECE

Meet the jacket that looks great and does good – cunning!

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all us shallow, but frankly it’s a relief when something worthy is also something cool. When goodness and desirability blend in one perfect storm. Like a brave and hot soldier. Or a hip and beautifully made jacket by Jack Wills, with 40 per cent of the sale price donated to Help for Heroes. Listen, guys – the price of this good-looking Carrington flak jacket (there’s also a backpack and a tote, but the jacket is our hero piece) is £249, which is less than you might pay to go to a single posh charity ball. The difference is that this item won’t give you a hangover, but it might just get you laid. It’s that good. And apart from anything else, its design heritage means that this camouflage number will be with

‘Just pretend I’m not here...’

CARRINGTON PRINTED CAMO JACKET, £249, BY JACK WILLS

you for life. Just like the support that Help for Heroes offers to sick and injured military personnel and veterans: lifelong support for them and their families. Just think of what we owe them. Camouflage fabric is actually known as DPM – that’s disruptive pattern material to you and me. It

went into production in the late Sixties and revolutionised modern warfare, disguising and protecting soldiers. This collaboration between Jack Wills and Help for Heroes was woven in Adlington, Lancashire, at 125-year-old Carrington Workwear, and then tailored at Cookson & Clegg, in Blackburn. The bags were made in Walsall, by Brady Bags, founded in 1887. Now that, people, is what you call heritage. And heritage, blended with heroism, is pretty much as good as it gets. AR

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ue the music, tilt your head and look off into the middle distance. Yes, you may lift a trembling finger to your bottom lip. No, you may not break wind. It is time, dearest Tatler reader, to take on a board game based on a TV series. ‘Ooh!’ you cry. ‘Is it a vintage edition of On The Buses or that

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

doll with a rubber foreskin on his right arm? Roll it up. Roll it down. Roll it up...’ Be quiet. No, it is neither. This month’s game is the utterly respectable Who Do You Think You Are? For this game you need: 1. An ingrained nosiness for any and all things ancestral.

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2. An ability to go ‘Reeeeeaaallly? Well, I never knew thaaaaat’ at strategic moments. 3. The gift of instant tears (just think Cheryl Cole – channel her).

So it isn’t complicated. You’ve got a spangle of celebrities. Mysteries surrounding their ancestry are hidden all over the world. It’s your job to piece together clues about their family trees and come up with an answer like ‘I’m delighted to tell you you’re related to Billy McBobbins, the man who invented the question mark.’

For those of you who think it sounds a bit ‘extra prep’, don’t worry. There’s an ancestry book rammed with all manner of clues, and who knows – you might find out who you are too. (You are ‘dearest Tatler reader’ – FACT.) Suitable for ages nine and up; £20 from all good retailers.

PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID HURN/MAGNUM PHOTOS

There’s more to you than meets the eye. By Emma Kennedy


THE HOME OF COUNTRY CLOTHING YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING IN ONE

THE HOUSE OF BRUAR IS SCOTLANDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST PRESTIGIOUS COUNTRY STORE INCORPORATING LADIES CLOTHING HALLS 6+2( +$1'%$*'(3$570(17Â&#x2021;815,9$//('0(16:($5+$//$1'),6+,1*7$&./(6+23Â&#x2021;)22'+$// '(/,&$7(66(1:,7+%87&+(5<Â&#x2021;6($7(55(67$85$17 &28175</,9,1**,)7'(3$570(17$1'35(6(176+23Â&#x2021;&217(0325$5<585$/$57*$//(5<Â&#x2021;6&27/$1'¶6/$5*(67&$6+0(5(+$//Â&#x2021;7+(6$/(6+23

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WONDER

ELENA PERMINOVA WEARS EMBROIDERED SILK DRESS, £5,100; LAMBSKIN BOOTS, £1,150, BOTH BY DIOR

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WOMAN Elena Perminova, Blenheim Palace and Dior. Dream team

Styled by SOPHIE GOODWIN

Photographed by ALEX CAYLEY TATLER.COM

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THIS PAGE, WOOL COAT, £3,500; SILK & COTTON DRESS, £3,300; LEATHER SHORTS, £1,900; GOLD & PALLADIUM NECKLACE, £1,250; GOLD, PALLADIUM & PYRITE BRACELET WITH SILK TIES (JUST SEEN), £1,650, ALL BY DIOR OPPOSITE PAGE, EMBROIDERED SILK TOP, £7,100; WOOL PEPLUM, £1,300; COTTON SKIRT, £1,300; NECKLACE, BRACELET & BOOTS, AS BEFORE, ALL BY DIOR

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SILK DRESS, £5,900; BOOTS, AS BEFORE, BOTH BY DIOR FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR BY STEPHEN LOW AT ELSL MANAGEMENT FOR NEVILLE SALON. MAKE-UP BY ANITA KEELING AT JED ROOT, USING DIOR CHRISTMAS COLLECTION & CAPTURE TOTALE DREAMSKIN CUSHION. NAILS BY AMI STREETS AT LMC WORLDWIDE, USING CHANEL LE VERNIS IN BALLERINA & BODY EXCELLENCE HAND CREAM. WITH THANKS TO BLENHEIM PALACE. PRODUCTION, ELLE KORHALILLER

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Elena Perminova in Dior at the Dior show, Paris Couture Fashion Week, July 2016

I n s t a - h e ro ! W

hat is the point of influence? What is the point of 1.3m Instagram followers? This is the current tally – it’ll be more by the time you read this – of Elena (Lena) Perminova, model and wife of the Russian newspaper owner and potato billionaire Alexander Lebedev: 1.3m people looking at photographs and short videos of her doing unfathomable pilates moves in a fleshcoloured Lycra all-in-one; dancing in a bikini in front of a dream pool in Ibiza; nuzzling her gorgeous children, wearing vast couture gowns that bust the edges of the screen; living the extraordinary life of an oligarch’s wife, with her extraordinary body and wardrobe and face, with her palazzos and private jets. It is compelling, like an airport novel, but real, and I can see why people want to look at the pictures to get a glimpse of her life. But is this all there is to it, I wonder; adulation that requires no discernible talent other than being good at pointing a phone at yourself? I think that Elena is aware of the complications of this new kind of celebrity. She is self-aware; her life hasn’t always been so glorious, although when we meet at the gold and pastel Le Bristol hotel in Paris during Couture Fashion Week, she is dressed in Dior – short skirt, lace top and a dinky little

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rucksack – having just come from the Dior show. And so a year ago she set up her charity, SOS by Lena Perminova, hosting Instagram auctions once or twice a month and offering her fashion booty – pieces from her own wardrobe and those she has persuaded fashion houses and high-profile friends to donate – to the highest bidder, with no costly balls or events, and all the money going directly to seriously ill children in places like Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. Children who would most likely die, were it not for the money she raises in this very modern, socially connected way. ‘We are the last chance for them,’ she explains. The charity has raised over £1.5m so far; celebrities who have given money include Miranda Kerr and Jared Leto, and brands that have donated to the auctions include Dior and Louis Vuitton. The result is that 58 children’s lives have been saved. Elena pulls out her iPhone to show me a picture of a pale-looking boy with a tube Sellotaped to his upper lip and going into his nose. ‘You see, he has this straw here; he couldn’t breathe normally and he didn’t have a voice because everything went through there, and then we helped him.’ She scrolls through her photos to find a later picture of the same boy, grinning over a huge plate of spaghetti. ‘Now he is eating pasta and he can say “Mum”.’

One of the most time-consuming parts of running the charity, which employs four people, is checking the credentials of all the many different cases that come to them, but once all the hurdles have been jumped, Elena takes a personal interest in each child. ‘Yes, I meet them. It breaks my heart when I meet them, it’s like your own kids. I have to help them. And we are helping them two or three times, the same kids, because they are very seriously ill. Once, there was this little girl who needed a liver transplant – we raised the money, but while we were doing her visa to go to the hospital in Israel, before the operation, she died. I remember thinking, “I can’t continue because this is just too much.’” Her grey-blue eyes go glossy with tears and she sniffs and slips the phone back into her Dior rucksack. Elena was born and raised in suburban Siberia with her sister, who is four years older than her and is now a make-up artist. ‘I was happy girl, it was happy childhood. I am from just a normal family. It made me happy when my father brought me chewing gum.’ Her father was a businessman, but the family were not rich. Elena made her own patches for her jeans and always wanted to be a model, ‘because we didn’t have a lot of money’. She started modelling aged 14, and by the time she was 16, she was on the cover of a Russian

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, ELENA PERMINOVA/INSTAGRAM

She has over a million followers, all gripped by the opulence of her oligarch life, but Elena Perminova has chosen to use her power for good, discovers Gavanndra Hodge


fashion magazine, the title of which translates as Guilty Pleasures. She had also fallen in love with a man who was 16 years older than her, a small-town drug dealer – although she did not realise this at first. ‘I absolutely fell in love. I couldn’t live without him. He was my life.’ Soon enough he was asking her to deliver drugs to people. ‘He was just, “Can you bring this to my friend” – it was every day, and then I started selling things like ecstasy, and then one day I said, “I can’t do it any more.” So he said, “OK, bye.” You can’t imagine what that was like for me. I spent two days crying, and then I said, “Please, I have to be with you, I am coming back.” I was 16. I thought I was so grown up. But I was a child. I didn’t even understand who was good, who was not good. I feel still awful about it.’ Elena was selling ecstasy in the nightclubs of Novosibirsk and was soon arrested by the police, sentenced and beaten because they wanted to topple the criminals who were supplying the city with drugs. ‘I was in jail for one day. [My boyfriend] went to jail for five years.’ At this time, Alexander Lebedev, former KGB man, was in the Duma (the lower house in the Russian parliament) and campaigning for witness-protection laws. Elena’s father got in touch, and the family went to visit him to bring Elena’s case to his attention and ask for his help. ‘I was with my father, and I saw him and he was super-nice, super-gentleman, and we saw each other many, many times. He’s superhandsome, really talented; just like a real man. He was like an angel to me.’ Lebedev chose to help the 16-year-old Elena, not because she was long-limbed and beautiful, according to Elena, but because ‘he loves when everything is right, correct, democracy. He helps even now, to the families.’ She pauses, laughs.

Core asset: Elena pole-dancing

From left, Alexander Lebedev, Natalia Vodianova, Elena Perminova and Justin Portman, 2009. Below, one of Elena’s Instagram holiday snaps

‘Sorry, my English is shit – Hugh Grant always goes, “Lena, your English is shit.”’ She got police protection, but that ran out after 10 days, so she left Novosibirsk and the criminals with whom she had become embroiled. By the time she was 18, she was studying economics at university in Moscow and dating Lebedev, who’s 27 years older than her. At 22, she’d had their first child, Nikita; two years later Egor arrived; and in 2014 she had her daughter, Arina, famously going to the gym two weeks after the Caesarean birth and appearing on the cover of Russian Vogue 60 days later. It’s one of the reasons her Instagram feed is so popular – celebrating the incredible body of a woman who has had three children. But it’s not as if she doesn’t work for it: ‘I do a lot of sports: I do pilates, I go to the gym, I work with the weights. Two months ago, I started pole-dancing, which is crazy – the training is so hard. I do it every day, and it’s so painful, but I think for me my body is the most beautiful in my life now, because I do different things. The pole-dancing makes your body very strong. I am happy; I have energy after this, everything is good.’ As well as training, she loves the films of Brigitte Bardot, the novels of Mikhail Bulgakov and English

cottage gardens – she created one for herself in their house in the countryside outside Moscow. ‘Gardening is my passion, my hobby. One year I went to Milan, and I came back at five in the morning and I went into the garden and found this peony with these droplets of water on it. I spent an hour looking at it and taking photographs and my husband was, like, “Where have you been?’’’ The family have constant security while in Russia: ‘I can’t even imagine life without bodyguards in Russia because, you know, there are all the crazy people.’ Lebedev has a complex relationship with the Kremlin, but the couple often travel to their chateau outside Paris or the Lebedev palazzo in Italy, and they are frequently in London, where Alexander’s son Evgeny, who owns the Evening Standard, is based; he lives in a grand estate near Hampton Court. Elena has a good relationship with Evgeny and likes to joke with him about being his stepmother, even though he is six years older than her. ‘One time we were sitting next to Kate Beckinsale at a fashion show and I said to her, “Do you know I am his stepmother?” She could not believe it!’ She seems happy, slightly manic in the way that people who are prolific and powerful on social media often are, but she is charming and well aware that she is living the life that most 16-year-old girls in Siberia can only dream about, finding herself sitting between Kevin Spacey and John Malkovich at a fashion show – her two favourite actors when she was a girl – and seeing the sights of the world. ‘We were travelling a lot before kids. We liked really unusual places – Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, Galapagos.’ Documenting this life for the world to see, and then working out a way to make this ceaseless documentation make sense, make a difference, back in the real world. ‘My charity, it is so important to me – it’s like a fourth kid to me. Seventy per cent of my life is spent doing this; even my husband, he says, “It’s good, but we need you too!”’ ( TATLER.COM

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THIS ARTICLE COULD SAVE

YOUR LIFE

PHOTOGRAPHS: HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES, REUTERS, XPOSURE PHOTOS

So, you’ve been kidnapped, which is one of the most terrifying things that can happen to a human. Here is everything you need to know about how to be prepared, how to negotiate and how to escape – with examples of daring types who have foiled their assailants. By John Walsh and Luciana Bellini

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Vitor Oliveira Amorim, a suspect in the kidnapping of Formula One chief Bernie Ecclestoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother-in-law, being taken into detention by a masked policeman in SĂŁo Paulo, 2016. Below, Bernie Ecclestone with his wife Fabiana Flosi in Monte Carlo, 2013. Opposite page, the aftermath of the failed attempt to kidnap Princess Anne, 1974

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Aparecida Schunk’s house in São Paulo

Around midnight on 22 July 2016, Aparecida Schunk was at home in the smart Jardim Santa Helena district of São Paulo when the front-gate buzzer sounded. Two men were there; they said they had a box to deliver. When a maid let them through, they barged into the house, seized Schunk, ordered her into her car and drove her away. The car was later found abandoned. Schunk is the mother of Fabiana Flosi, third wife of Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone, who, with an estimated fortune of £3.2bn, is Britain’s fourth richest person. The ransom demand came quickly: Schunk’s captors wanted £28m, divided into four bags. The sum was soon raised to £40m – but police tracked the kidnappers to a house in São Paulo where they found Schunk tied up. She was released without any money being paid. Ecclestone’s helicopter pilot was arrested on suspicion of being the ‘mastermind’ behind the kidnapping. The investigation continues. This was an unusually happy ending for a nasty crime. The classic kidnap is a unique combination of violent seizure and intensely personal disruption. Its protocols have become enshrined in film: seizing the victim at home or in the street; the domestic ‘prison’ where he or she is held; the ransom note, its letters cut from newspapers; the family trying to raise money; the telephone negotiations; the handover details; the threats; the possibility of death. But a kidnapping should not be confused with an abduction, in which someone is taken away by force. The classic kidnap is a financial affair, involving a demand for money in exchange for the victim’s safe return. The first recorded one took place in May 1865. William John Möens, an English antiquarian, was holidaying in Naples with his wife and the Reverend and Mrs John Aynsley, when the two men were seized by Italian brigands. John Aynsley was released to go and arrange a ransom payment of £8,000 (roughly £355,000 in today’s money). It took him ages. Möens was forced to travel the hills with the brigands for four months, sharing their rations and being shot at by soldiers before his friend raised £5,000 and he was released.

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The first kidnap to receive widespread media attention in the United States was that of four-year-old Charley Ross in 1874. He was playing with his brother Walter near their home in Philadelphia when two men in a horsedrawn carriage suggested they go to buy ‘candy and fireworks’. Walter was sent into a store to get them; when he emerged, the carriage was gone – and so was his brother. Charley’s father, Christian, received ransom demands asking for $20,000. But Christian had no money. Five months later, two career criminals called Bill Mosher and Joe Douglas were shot while burgling a house in Brooklyn. As he lay dying, Douglas confessed to the kidnap – and Walter later identified Douglas and Mosher as the men in the carriage. Charley was never found. The sage advice ‘Never take candy from strangers’ derives from this case. Since then, hundreds of kidnaps have spawned sensational news stories, and the basic model has been given umpteen refinements. The youngest-ever victim was 20-month-old Charles Lindbergh III, son of the aviator who won international fame in 1927 for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic. The oldest (before Aparecida Schunk, at 67, broke the record) would probably have been Queen Victoria – if the plans of a gang of Salford-based Irish militants had come off in 1867. They intended to seize her at Balmoral Castle, and keep her imprisoned in a ‘shabby cottage’ until the government released Republican prisoners in Britain and Ireland. But the plot was discovered, armed police began patrolling trains to Scotland and the plotters wisely abandoned their project. Other noisome prisons have included boxes, closets, caves and open woodland. Nine-year-old George Weyerhaeuser, the son of a well-to-do lumberman, was kidnapped ]

SE C U R ITY T IPS

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From consultants AnotherDay

Do plenty of research before travelling to an at-risk country. Familiarise yourself with embassy locations, keep emergency numbers to hand and give several copies of your itinerary to friends and family. If in doubt, don’t go. Make sure everyone with access to you and your family – drivers, nannies, gardeners – is fully vetted and trustworthy. The more staffers have access to your private information, the more endangered you are. Secure your social-media accounts and pay special attention to your childrens’ – these provide a source of information about your assets, pattern of life and location. Trust your instincts, especially if you sense something abnormal – it could be a sign you are being watched. Also, many kidnappings occur on roads. Criminals rely on victims using similar routes every day. To throw them off the scent, change your routes to work or regular social events. If you believe you could be at risk, get a security-risk-management specialist to conduct a review. Consider buying kidnap and ransom insurance.

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W H AT I S E X P R E S S KIDNAPPING?

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xpress kidnapping is quite common with tourists in Central and South America. Perpetrators will kidnap someone for a few hours, take them to ATMs around the city, make them empty their accounts and then set them free. This happens in London too.


MR S SCHU NK’S C A P TOR S WA N TED

£28 MILLION IN STER LING, DI V IDED IN TO FOU R BAGS

Aparecida Schunk after her rescue, 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: REUTERS, ALAMY

You can now summon private special forces at the touch of a button with the new OVERWATCH app, developed by Bristol-based security group DS-48. It tracks your movements every three minutes to within 25 feet, so if you find yourself in trouble, one of their emergencyresponse teams can be deployed immediately wherever you are in the world. Prices start at £45 a month.

SSeveral O kidnappings C I A have L taken Mplace ED IA specifically as a result of poor social-media O

security – an Al-Qaeda handbook explicitly mentions using social media to find information about where targets live and work. OFacebook, Twitter and Instagram all allow you to geotag your posts, which means anyone can see your whereabouts as soon as you post. O Common sense goes a long way when it comes to protecting yourself on social media. Don’t post information that you don’t want to become public; familiarise yourself with your privacy settings and geotagging preferences.

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H O W V I C TI MS A R E P I C KED

Random- or direct-snatch victims, who can be found at ATMs and petrol stations (these are more likely to be victims of express kidnapping). Entrapment victims, who can be kidnapped after close surveillance or with the criminals disguising themselves as police officers. Kidnap victims seized through a tipster – informants (such as household employees, family friends or relatives) are usually close to the victim. Victims with fixed routines and accessible information – people who conduct business or real-estate transactions or who own and drive luxury cars in high-risk areas.

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Princess Anne in 1974

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H O W TO H O L D YO U R H A N D S I F YO U A R E TO B E T I E D U P

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he more loosely your hands are tied, the more likely it is that you will be able to slip your hands out of your bonds. Appear to offer your hands to be tied together by the wrists, but keep your elbows tucked into the sides of your waist, rather than extending your arms straight out in front of you. This should create more slack so that – when the moment comes – you should then be able to slide your hands out of the ropes.

PHOTOGRAPHS: CENTRAL PRESS/GETTY IMAGES, KEYSTONE/GETTY IMAGES, JOHN FROST NEWSPAPERS, BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES. *GLOBAL TERRORISM DATABASE/STUDY OF TERRORISM AND RESPONSES TO TERRORISM (UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND). **STATISTA.COM

[in May 1935 in Tacoma, TO P TA RG E T failed, they changed their demands Washington, and spent a miserable and insisted that the Hearsts G RO U P S few days either in the boot of his distribute $70 worth of food to G LO B A L LY kidnappers’ car or in a freshly dug 2 0 0 0 – 2 0 1 5 * every needy Californian – an hole in the ground, surrounded by operation that would have cost 1 Private citizens and roughly $400m. Instead, Patty’s poisonous lizards and covered their property 2,381 by a lid of tar paper. father, Randolph Hearst, donated 2 Government Even worse was the plight of $2m worth of food to the needy of (general) 832 Barbara Mackle, 20, daughter San Francisco’s Bay Area. But, in a 3 Business 581 of a rich Florida property farcical twist, the SLA declared the 4 Police 455 developer, who was buried alive food substandard and refused to 5 Military 440 in a fibreglass box fitted with an let Patty go. air pump and plastic hoses that She famously made friends with reached the surface, along with some food, the SLA and joined them in bank heists. It was sedative-laced water and a battery-powered a version of Stockholm Syndrome, a term lamp. She was found after three days and coined in 1973 when four bank employees in the Swedish capital forged close ties with lived to write a memoir, 83 Hours ’Til Dawn. the robbers holding them hostage. Perhaps the Ransom demands vary widely, as if no most touching example of this condition was two kidnappers can agree on how to compute seen in the case of Mary McElroy, 25, the value of a human life or how much a daughter of a judge in Kansas millionaire might feel like paying. There are, after all, no rules. When Ian Ball climbed into City, Missouri. On 27 May 1933, Mary was a royal limousine in the Mall in March 1974 enjoying a bubble bath when four and attempted to kidnap Princess Anne, he masked men, led by former told her: ‘I want you to come with me for a convict Walter McGee and day or two, because I want two million. Will you get out of the car?’ (To which the Queen’s his brother George, broke into daughter retorted: ‘Not bloody likely!’) Eleven her house. Instead of panicking, Mary chaffed the men about years earlier, when Frank Sinatra Jr, another whether they’d allow her to child of a famous parent, was kidnapped by get dressed. On being told the Barry Keenan, the ransom amount proposed ransom they were seeking was to the victim’s scarily Mob-connected papa $60,000, she promptly protested: was $240,000. Six years before the Princess ‘I’m worth more than that!’ Anne debacle, the buried-alive Barbara She was chained to a wall in Mackle was released for a measly $500,000. a farmhouse basement until the ransom (now reduced to $30,000) hen John Paul Getty III, the was paid. But when her abductors 16-year-old grandson of the oil magnate J Paul Getty, was grabbed appeared in court, her behaviour suggested a woman more beguiled in Italy in July 1973 and chained to a stake than wronged. She said she in a Calabrian mountain cave, his kidnappers couldn’t identify the men and first asked for 10bn lire ($95m today), then insisted they had treated her well changed it to 300m lire, then to 3bn lire. To and brought her flowers. expedite matters, they cut off one of John Mary knew that McGee, if Paul’s ears and posted it to a Rome newspaper. found guilty, would be hanged. The Getty family creaked into action. J Paul agreed to pay a tax-deductible $2.2m and lent She felt, in consequence, like a potential murderer, and one with a tendresse his son John Paul Getty Jr (the earless one’s for her victim. Unable to cope with her father) the remaining $800,000, to be repaid conflicted feelings, she ran away from home, to at four per cent interest. The boy was finally be discovered the next day hiding – rather released in December 1973. aptly – in the town of Normal, Illinois. When The most ridiculous ransom demand came Walter McGee was sentenced to death, she only weeks later, when, in February 1974, pleaded for his life ‘and for my own peace of Patty Hearst, the 19-year-old granddaughter mind’. His sentence was reduced to life in of William Randolph Hearst – the early 20th century’s leading newspaper-and-movie mogul prison, where she visited him and the other kidnappers, bringing gifts. – was kidnapped in Berkeley, California. Her Later, Mary suffered from depression and captors were a tinpot urban-guerrilla collective called the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), killed herself, at 32, with a pistol shot to the head. She left a note saying: ‘My kidnappers which hoped to use the leverage of Patty are probably the four people on earth who Hearst’s family to spring two SLA members don’t consider me an utter fool.’ ( convicted of murder from prison. When this


WHAT TO DO IF YOU’RE KIDNAPPED A stage-by-stage guide

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PRINCESS ANNE CHATS WITH PC MICHAEL HILLS, WHO WAS SHOT BY HER WOULDBE KIDNAPPER,

This is by far the most dangerous phase – and the best opportunity for escape. Create as much confusion and noise as you can. If you are in a public place, scream and shout things about the kidnapper’s appearance. Above all, you must draw attention to yourself. OIf possible, run in the opposite direction to the way the kidnap vehicle is facing.

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a rapport. Family, sport and hobbies are all good things to talk about. Or get them to teach you their language. They are less likely to kill someone who knows their favourite colour. ODon’t be aggressive, but don’t be feeble either – striking the right balance is vital. Aim to become the ‘grey’ person, but have them call you by your name – above all, let them know that you are human. OAlways eat the food you’re given, no matter how unpleasant it is – you’ll need the calories. OKeep busy by exercising and stretching if you can. For longer periods, imaginary friends can keep you from losing the plot (think Wilson in the Tom Hanks film Cast Away).

Depending on how your kidnappers stow you during transport, there will be different options available. If you’re in the boot of a car, look for an emergency lever. If there’s no lever, peel away the internal panelling, punch out the brake lights and signal for help. OIf you’re inside a car, try to jam the ignition or roll out of the vehicle. OIf all else fails, gather as much There are four possible outcomes: A The kidnappers recognise they information about the route as possible are in a no-win situation and simply – how long the journey takes, landmarks, hand over the hostage. street names. If you’ve been blindfolded, B A rescue attempt is made; these try to remember sounds and smells, vary in degrees of success. and make a mental note of which way C The kidnappers’ demands are met the car is turning. OTry to keep your phone on you and the hostage is released. D The hostage is executed. for as long as you possibly can – it If a rescue attempt is made, get down will help with tracking your location. and stay down. If possible, find some sort Before you travel, download the Panic of cover; bathtubs are good for this. The Button app, which transforms your rescue team will be tense smartphone into a secret when they get inside and are alarm when you press the COUNTRIES WITH likely to handcuff or power button five times. THE HIGHEST It sends a message asking manhandle you – do not NUMBER OF for help to three take this personally. KIDNAPPING emergency contacts and INCIDENTS gives them regular updates (TOURISTS/HIGH on your location. This phase isn’t NET WORTH often talked about, but you INDIVIDUALS) will, once released, have to 2000–2015* come to terms with what Start making 1 India 792 happened. The authorities observations as soon as you 2 Afghanistan 740 may put extra pressure on arrive at the site where 3 Iraq 683 you’ll be kept – be aware of you to try to gain as much 4 Pakistan 659 sounds, layouts and smells.  information as possible 5 Nigeria 322 OTry to get a feel for your about your kidnappers. 6 Philippines 297 captors – their rank, Cooperate fully with them. 7 Yemen 280 OIt helps to find someone to hierarchy, accents, habits, 8 Colombia 263 confide in about the ordeal – names. As hard as it may 9 Libya 253 always consider seeking be, try to engage them in 10 Somalia 232 professional counselling. ( conversation and establish

4 CONCLUSION

THERE WERE 3,012 POLICE-RECORDED KIDNAPPING/ABDUCTION OFFENCES IN ENGLAND AND WALES IN 2015-16 – AN INCREASE OF 818 OVER THE PREVIOUS YEAR AND THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF RECORDED INCIDENTS IN OVER A DECADE**

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Frank Sinatra talks to the press following the kidnapping of his son, Frank Sinatra Jr, 1963

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Photographed by DAVID TITLOW

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OVERLEAF, TOP LEFT, JEMMA WEARS COTTON SHIRT, £230, BY EQUIPMENT. LEATHER BELT, £2,065, BY RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION. RUBBER RIDING BOOTS, £175, BY DUKE OF WELLINGTON X PHOTOGRAPHS: TKTKTKTKTK HUNTER FIELD. STYLED BY PHILIPPA DURELL. FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR & MAKE-UP BY ADELE SANDERSON AT FRANK AGENCY, USING ORIBE & BY TERRY

JEMMA WEARS WOOL JACKET, £575, BY DUKE OF WELLINGTON X HUNTER FIELD. COTTON BLOUSE, £290, BY ISABEL MARANT. EARRINGS, HER OWN


FAIRYTALE MARCHIONESS Jemma Wellesley seems to have it all – titles, horses, houses, beautiful children, a handsome future duke of a husband. But, she tells Gavanndra Hodge, she has only recently found the confidence to fully enjoy her life

PHOTOGRAPHS: TKTKTKTKTK

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e still love fairytales, even though we know that their gender politics are dreadful and we really should not be telling them to our daughters, all those stories that basically boil down to one story: the beautiful girl who marries a prince after various hurdles and hardships and is happy ever after with the lovely house, the lovely children, the lovely life, as if all she needed was the right (regal) man to make all this magic happen. The lovely girl with the long blonde hair, the slender limbs, with whom the prince falls in love at first sight. It is hard not to think of fairytales when you meet Jemma Wellesley, Marchioness of Douro and future Duchess of Wellington. She is beautiful, long and languid, a former model and an accomplished rider. Her husband is Arthur Wellesley, surprisingly handsome for a future duke, and surprisingly clever too – he studied PPE at Oxford and now works in private equity. They live at the Wellington family estate, Stratfield Saye, and there are three beautiful blonde children, six-yearold twins Arthur Darcy and Mae Madeleine, as well as 24-month-old Alfred. But fairytales tend to finish at the wedding, before the real business of life begins; fairytales don’t deal with the rigours of marriage and motherhood. ‘Look, it all fell out when I had children,’ Jemma says as she is having her hair done for the photoshoot, showing me the golden postnatal fluff around her hairline. Before she was Marchioness of Douro (she upgraded from being Countess of Mornington after the death of the 8th Duke, in 2014), Jemma was Jemma Kidd, one of three siblings, Jack, Jemma and Jodie (there are two older siblings as well, from their mother Wendy’s first marriage) – all gorgeous, tanned and blonde, raised between Barbados and Surrey, as happy on a beach as they were on a horse. Their father, Johnny Kidd, had been a professional showjumper and Wendy was once a house model for Hardy Amies. Jodie became a successful model, Jack a polo player and Jemma, just as dazzling as her sister but less comfortable in front of the camera, became a make-up artist, eventually founding her own line of cosmetics, running a make-up school and writing two books about make-up. She married Arthur in 2005 in Barbados, at Holders, the 17th-century plantation house that her ] TATLER.COM

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[grandmother bought, which has five acres and a polo field, and has been a focal point for the family for the past 50 years. But once they had children, four years later, she decided she wanted to concentrate on her family, rather than her career. ‘I worked all my life, really hard. I did the best I could do, and now I just want to do that for my kids. Women who can work, and have children, and be a wife... I think they are amazing. It is so overwhelming. We have to do so much – we have to be a good wife, a good mother, good at our work, we have to look good – it is just unbelievable.’

Jemma at Wellington Riding school, wearing boots from her collaboration with Hunter Field

LEFT, JEMMA’S PARENTS WENDY & JOHNNY WITH JEMMA & HER SISTER JODIE IN BARBADOS, 1985. RIGHT, JEMMA, HER BROTHER JACK & JODIE IN TATLER, 1991

‘I REALISED THAT I AM NOT INVINCIBLE... THAT TOOK ME YEARS TO UNDERSTAND’

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As a teenager Jemma’s whole existence was focused on her dressage riding. ‘I thought I was going to go to the Olympics – I thought that was my career path. I spent all my time and energy on riding, family holidays I would be training, I would just be in my horsebox every weekend.’ Although there were occasional naughty expeditions to Crazy Larry’s nightclub on the King’s Road: ‘I used to sneak out of school, go via Harrow to pick up my brother, sneak him out, drive to Chelsea and then drop him back at, like, six in the morning.’ Which might explain why, when Jemma turned 18, she decided to take a detour from riding. She did a Prue Leith cookery course in London. ‘I was staying with my grandmother in her house in Knightsbridge, right in the heart of the action, and just had the best time. It was way more exciting than training. I did not want to go back to riding.’ She also did a Lucie Clayton secretarial course

PHOTOGRAPHS: DAVID TITLOW, REX FEATURES, ROBERT FAIRER, AVI MEROZ, SILVERHUB, GETTY IMAGES, SIMON UPTON

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he twins are at a local school and Alfred is still at home. Jemma has a vegetable garden, makes her own juices, loves foraging for medicinal herbs and brings her children to the Wellington Riding school every Wednesday for a riding lesson; at weekends the family go for pub lunches, walks, have friends to stay. But, she says, despite this idyll and all the joy that her children bring, she does miss the creative side of work ‘terribly’ and has kept her hand in, most notably with a collaboration with Hunter Field, creating the Duke of Wellington equestrian collection, which includes good-looking and technically advanced riding boots, jodhpur boots, jackets and cosy midlayers (enthusiastically worn by Arthur, who arrives halfway through the shoot to see how it’s going). It all started with the 200th anniversary of the battle of Waterloo, won by the 1st Duke of Wellington. ‘We were approached by Hunter to do something for the anniversary, and as a collaboration it felt like a no-brainer because it was basically about Wellington boots. They wanted to do an equestrian line, which I was thrilled about because I have spent my life on horses.’ Jemma was on the junior British dressage team, and still rides all the time – she has a small yard at Stratfield Saye, where she keeps four horses, and has other horses at the Wellington school. She also hunts with the Beaufort, although she says she can generally be found lurking at the back with her friend Plum Sykes. ‘The hero product for me is the long rubber boots. I honestly believe they are the best rubber riding boots on the market. I had a lot of input in the design. I brought in a lot of boots that I really liked, and we took a lot of inspiration from the first duke’s boots, which are at Apsley House, in a little glass cabinet.’ Apsley House, otherwise known as Number One London, is the Wellington family’s London house (‘It’s a real family home for them’), as well as being a museum with some incredible art by Velázquez and Canova. Jemma and Arthur also have a house in Notting Hill, which they bought when they got married, and a holiday house in Ibiza. They visit Barbados less often now; Wendy, who is divorced from Jemma’s father, still spends some of the year there, and puts on a Holders festival, ‘a sort of Barbados Glyndebourne’, but also has a home very close to Jemma. ‘It was an amazing upbringing in Barbados,’ explains Jemma. ‘Free and outdoorsy, running around – I could go down to the beach. It was completely safe.’ It was also a glamorous scene in the Eighties, when the Kidds would host parties attended by Princess Margaret, the Duke of York and John Cleese, who got married at Holders in 1992. But the house is up for sale now. ‘It has been a bolthole for everyone, but everyone has grown up now, so we all go to different places for our holidays.’


The Old Rectory, Stratfield Saye

LEFT, JEMMA & HER HUSBAND ARTHUR, AKA MARCHIONESS & MARQUESS OF DOURO. RIGHT, AT THEIR WEDDING, 2005. BELOW LEFT, HOLDERS, BARBADOS

RIGHT, JEMMA & ARTHUR WITH THEIR CHILDREN, FR LEFT, (LORD) ALFRED, (LADY) MAE MADELEINE & ARTHUR DARCY (EARL OF MORNINGTON), 2016

and then fell into modelling because her sister was doing it, but quickly decided she was more interested in becoming a make-up artist. This was also the period in her life when she began to experience severe panic attacks, something she has talked about extensively, even appearing on Lorraine. ‘Going on television to talk about my panic attacks was one of the best things I have ever done. I still get people thanking me, like a policeman who got in touch to say that he had panic attacks and that my story had really helped him. When I stopped riding, I went from being so secure in knowing who I was to suddenly feeling like I didn’t know who I was, and that created a vulnerability in me. It started with me having just one or two full panic attacks – dizziness, feeling like I was going to faint, sweaty palms – but I was too scared to tell anyone because I just thought I was going bonkers. I would be in the cinema and my heart would be going and I would have to leave. It was always around crowds. And then they just escalated, because when you’ve had one, you become scared of the next one, and then you will be, like, “Well, I had one on the motorway, so I’m not going on the motorway again.” Then I had one in the supermarket, so I couldn’t go to a supermarket again. Your life, your world, becomes really small. Then I met this incredible man, Charles Linden, who was so knowledgeable about every sort of phobia and anxiety and really helped me.’ Jemma no longer has panic attacks, but she does know that she has to be careful with herself, and has strategies for coping when things become overwhelming. ‘I can’t do anything to excess, so I don’t really drink to excess any more. I have also learnt to stop saying yes when I mean no. I think it is about being really true to who you are, figuring out who you are and what you want. Of course you can’t do everything in life, you have to compromise, especially in marriage, in work – whatever you do. You just have to balance it all out. I just realised I was not invincible. I am the kind of person who really pushes herself. But now I know I can’t do certain things. I know that if I am overtired, I can’t keep pushing myself, because that will trigger slight anxiety, so I have to take myself to bed for an hour. That took years for me to understand. Putting yourself first sometimes feels really weird, especially when you have kids.’ People might look at Jemma Wellesley and see a perfect life, an unattainable life, something out of a fairy story. The beautiful girl who married the handsome (as near as) prince. The houses, the titles, the horses, the husband, the children. But I see a modern woman juggling all that implies, trying to make as near a perfect existence as possible for her family, trying to be an alluring wife, a brilliant mother, but needing to hold something back for herself as well. ‘I do feel more confident now, I really know who I am. I just don’t think about the assumptions people make about me any more, I don’t care if people like me or dislike me. It is an amazing feeling, because for so long I was a real pleaser, and was always thinking, “Oh, am I doing the right thing?” Life is one big lesson. It’s amazing, and the older you get the more you get it. Figure out who you are and be true to that. I am instilling that into my children as much as I can.’ ( TATLER.COM

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Joseph Ettedgui in the South of France, 1997

JOE’S GIRL

Joseph Ettedgui invented the way we dressed in the Eighties, and now his daughter Gigi is thrilling fashion insiders with her own style. Christa D’Souza meets the future TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017

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PHOTOGRAPHS: DAVID MONTGOMERY, BILLAL TARIGHT

GIGI ETTEDGUI WEARS TOP BY THIERRY COLSON

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lavish multigenerational birthday weekend in Marrakesh, awash with tall, skinny blondes and boys with Abercrombie & Fitch bodies. But who is the pint-sized brunette with the divine Audrey Tautou bob and the slight cast in her eye? The one killing it on the dancefloor in goat-hair slippers bought that day in the souk and with a white rose tucked behind her ear? Let me present Gigi Ettedgui, 23, daughter of Joseph – the Moroccan-born fashion-retail legend who changed the way London shopped, ate, lived and dressed in the late 20th century – and his widow, Isabel, the genius behind the recently revived luxury-leather label Connolly. In other words, genes will out, duh, but still. As us grown-ups watching from the sidelines wistfully murmured amongst ourselves: it’s amazing that proper old-school cool like this still exists. If you are as old as me, you will remember Joseph from the early Seventies, when he had a shop under his hairdressing salon on the King’s Road selling sweaters by this fabulous Japanese person called Kenzo. That was the era that was, of Kenzo, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac and Emmanuelle Khanh (remember her signature lunettes? How it all comes rushing back). Unknowns such as Katharine Hamnett, Azzedine Alaïa, and Margaret Howell – he introduced us to them in the Eighties. And then came his own line of knitwear, Joseph Tricot – what a trope of the late Eighties/early Nineties was the thick-rib Sloppy Joe with leggings, and what about those signature low-cut, narrow-legged black trousers that fit so well that you (well, I) bought five pairs? Joseph, my callow millennials, was the be-all-and-end-all of cool back then; Brompton Cross, where he opened his first multibrand boutique with Joe’s Café

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PHOTOGRAPHS: BILLAL TARIGHT, SILVERHUB/ALAN DAVIDSON

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DRESS & HEADSCARF BY THIERRY COLSON


(pronounced ‘Caff’, obvs) and L’Express across the way, was the centre of the universe. And then there was the man himself, a benign whirlwind of crumpled linen and cigar smoke constantly zigzagging across Draycott Avenue to tend to his homes away from home. With little Gigi, who was born in 1992 in the Portland, and named after the 1958 film starring Leslie Caron, evidently taking it all in: ‘I remember going to Joe’s Café every Saturday with my mum and my grandmother [Joseph’s mother] for lunch and getting banned for drawing on the walls. Actually, I’d get banned on a weekly basis. I was a pretty obnoxious kid back then...’ Gigi and I (and Babette, the family’s French bulldog) are having a coffee on Clifford Street, in Mayfair, right opposite the brand new Gilles & Boissier-designed premises of Connolly, which had closed after Joseph’s death from pancreatic cancer, in 2010. Still in the process of ‘unwrapping’ the stock is Isabel, who bought the premises two years ago to rehouse the brand and to live in herself. Last summer, while it was being renovated, Isabel allowed Gigi and two friends from Edinburgh University to ‘squat’ on the first floor with their pop-up shop, Rail. That’s right: while she was writing her dissertation on Yves Saint Laurent’s controversial Liberation collection of 1971 and the effect of Nazi-occupied France on fashion, Gigi was designing a collection of clothes and planning the opening of her first store. ‘How we managed to fit everything into our third year, I don’t quite know,’ she giggles. ‘It was completely mad. Thank God we had a dry run in Edinburgh first.’ As a fresher, Gigi and the same friends opened a pop-up shop on their local high street, a fashion space cum art gallery featuring utilitarian clothing by Gigi herself: ‘It was about selling a context, really, more than actual products.’ Over from Paris for the weekend, where she works for Hermès and lives by the Pompidou, Gigi is wearing a velvety rabbit-fur coat from ‘old’ Connolly (note to Isabel: please redo for next autumn), oversized grey flannels from Isabel Marant and raspberry Charvet socks (‘I have this kind of Proustian relationship with Charvet. My dad always got his shirts from there’). She looks as immaculately offbeat and ‘right’ as ever. Think Wes Anderson by way of the Beaubourg. So Wes Anderson, in fact, that she spent last summer on a yacht her mother has just done up and is called The Life Aquatic. Small wonder that she has been enveloped into the Hermès fold (where she was employed during her gap year – in addition to a spell at APC – and during summer holidays from Edinburgh), working under Bali Barret, creative director of the brand’s univers femme,

‘as a kind of cultural correspondent, I suppose’, she says, adding with genuine hesitancy: ‘I think they quite like my eye.’ An ebullient, imaginative child who oscillated between wanting to be prime minister ‘or a librarian’, Gigi cannot remember a time when style wasn’t an integral part of her life. ‘I have this family photo burned into my brain of me as a newborn, my parents all in black and me in a black-and-white-striped babygro. Monochrome from the year dot... ‘There was a kind of porosity between the way Mum and Dad designed and ran their shops and the way they lived their lives,’ she goes on. ‘Clichéd as it sounds, it was one and all and that really had a huge influence on me.’ Back to the future, though, and how does it bode for this Tiggerish young woman who clocked up 300 absences in her last year at Godolphin & Latymer, studying for her A-levels in the British Library instead; who took tea with Azzedine Alaïa (one of her father’s best friends) on her gap year; who shyly describes herself as ‘a bit of a megalomaniac sometimes’? Will there one day be a House of Gigi here, next to Connolly? Will Clifford Street become the next Brompton Cross? A Joseph’s-girls-assume-the-mantle sort of thing? Who knows, but goodness, would her father be proud. (

Above, Joseph and his wife Isabel at a Cartier dinner at the Chelsea Physic Garden, 2007. Left, Isabel’s new Connolly shop, in Mayfair. Below, Gigi and her parents, 1992: ‘Monochrome from the year dot.’


HOW TO HELP YOUR

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE

L O R D H E S E LT I N E

JO MALONE

NEURODIVERSE CHILD

CHER

KEIRA KNIGHTLEY

A L B E RT E I N S T E I N

BECOME A SUCCESS*

SIR RICHARD BRANSON

AA GILL

SIR CHARLES DUNSTONE


*

Every one of these superhigh-achievers has been diagnosed with a neurodiverse condition

*NAMES HAVE BEEN CHANGED. PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES/SHUTTERSTOCK, JOHN COLE/CAMBRIDGE JONES/TIME & LIFE/JOHN STODDART/BLOOMBERG, ONE: ORY IS PUBLISHED BY SIMON & SCHUSTER AT £20) BETTMAN/FINE ART IMAGES/AFP/VENTRELLI: ALL AT GETTY IMAGES, JO MALONE (JO

R O RY B R E M N E R

ALAN TURING

MICHAEL PHELPS

From autism to ADHD, neurodiverse children present all sorts of challenges to parents and teachers, but with the right support they can flourish. Charlotte Edwardes on how private schools are wising up to the potential of pupils who are ‘wired differently’

W

illiam*, eight, went undiagnosed as dyslexic at his starry, high-achieving prep in west London, where ‘peer marking’ was routine for spelling tests. Fine, unless you can’t spell. Or write. William’s letters were two inches tall. Words like ‘superfluous’ and ‘loquacious’ were included in one test and his classmate duly gave him nought out of 16. William was teased for being thick. He did what he always did: tried to ignore them by watching the sparrows and starlings outside the window. Not long after, his mother drove past the school and saw him sitting alone, an open plastic snack-box on his lap, staring at the ground. ‘Stop worrying,’ the school told her. ‘He’ll have a breakthrough by Year Six.’ When he was just shy of nine – still a good year off Year Six – he began to eat his uniform. First he sucked and chewed his shirt cuffs, then bit into his jerseys and overcoat. At night his fear of homework became so overwhelming he gnawed at the bed. His mother despaired. William has an IQ of 135. Many schools, both private and state, struggle with profoundly dyslexic pupils like William, or indeed those with conditions such as dyspraxia (coordination disorder), dyscalculia (aka ‘numerical dyslexia’), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), all of which come under the umbrella terms ‘neurodiversity’ or ‘specific neuro-developmental disorders’. Although these conditions are very different, they are deliberately grouped together: for example, it is estimated that 30–40 per cent of people with ASD also have ADHD. Doctors now believe these disorders rarely occur in isolation – and there is a long list of potential co-morbidities, such as obsessive-compulsive and oppositional-defiant disorders, or social-communication and sensory-processing disorders. Once, quirky children were thought ‘eccentric’, ‘naughty’, ‘a handful’, ‘a fidget’, ‘bone idle’, ‘clumsy’ or ‘stubborn’. Often they were left behind if they weren’t ‘academic’ in the conventional sense and struggled with the rigid examination format. Even recently, a report commissioned by the charity Ambitious about Autism found that nearly ] TATLER.COM

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[half of children with ASD had been excluded illegally in the UK because schools struggle to cope with their conditions. But there is some hope – the problems of these children are now understood better than ever. A common description is that they are ‘wired differently’ from their ‘neurotypical’ classmates. They may have extraordinary abilities in music, art or with feats of memory. Dyslexics, for instance, often have a confounding aptitude for deciphering facts from patterns or events. ‘When I look back at my 25 years in teaching,’ says the head of one Hampstead prep school, ‘I realise there were many unusual and eccentric children who were probably “something”. It just wasn’t diagnosed.’ Those supported and encouraged ‘and who felt part of the family’, he says, were very successful, ‘their talents recognised and admired’. He adds: ‘But we didn’t always get it right.’ Today, a number of fictional role models – such as Percy Jackson, the hero of Rick Riordan’s children’s fantasy books – are depicted as having ADHD, which helps to reduce its stigma. And so do their real-life counterparts, from Justin Timberlake and Olympian swimmer Michael Phelps to

Duke of Devonshire), the 18th-century chemist who discovered hydrogen. Dyslexia is believed to affect 10 per cent of the population and ADHD three per cent, ‘which is pretty common, when you think diabetes or epilepsy are each about one per cent’, says Stephen Scott, a professor of child health and behaviour at King’s College and consultant child/adolescent psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital. ‘And ADHD is still underdiagnosed in the UK.’ The rate of ASD is 1.1 per cent in adults (after a leap in the Nineties – ‘When I started out, it was two to four in every 10,000,’ says Scott, although the increase ‘is mostly because we are better at recognising ASD. There hasn’t been an increase in prevalence’). With both ASD and ADHD comes social anxiety too – often misread as ‘naughtiness’. ‘Disentangling the naughty child from the child who, say, refuses to go into Byron because they are used to a different burger and it’s a change in routine, can be difficult,’ says Scott. In the state sector, funding for neurodiverse pupils has been available since the Education Act of 1981, which required schools to support those with ‘a statement of special educational needs (SEN)’, as initially

Before his diagnosis, the school had been ‘happy with him’, says Diana. But afterwards, they ‘threw up their hands and ran’, saying that they could no longer cope with him. He was then shunned by four other private schools once they became aware of his statement. ‘One even refused to meet him,’ says Diana – despite the fact that the school had already taken a registration payment for Tom. However, many private schools do a magnificent job with complicated children. Those hampered by severe dyslexia need more than just ‘an hour a week in a broom cupboard to catch up’, says John Floyd, headmaster of Bruern Abbey, an innovative boys’ prep in Oxfordshire, which prepares dyslexic pupils – as well as those with ASD, ADD, ADHD and dyspraxia – for exams. His 137 boys have come from 97 schools, and the fees – £7,654 a term for day pupils, £9,209 for boarders – reflect the intensive specialist teaching. ‘Our entire curriculum is structured in a dyslexia-friendly way: 11 or 12 children or fewer per class, and two teachers per class in English and maths, which [together] make up half the timetable,’ explains Floyd. ‘They should be able to make eight times the progress. ‘Also, these kids need to be able to talk.

THE STIGMA STILL MEANS, SADLY, THAT SOME PARENTS ARE RELUCTANT TO GET THEIR CHILD TESTED comedian Rory Bremner, who campaigns for a better understanding of the disorder. To overcome his dyslexia, Michael Heseltine invented an entirely new system for collating information in his government department (which is still used); the writer/critic AA Gill dictates his copy over the phone because few can decipher it on the page. The list of dyslexic entrepreneurs is impressive, from Sir Richard Branson to Sir Charles Dunstone, of Carphone Warehouse. It also helps that films have been made about intellectually brilliant dyslexics such as Alan Turing (The Imitation Game), who cracked the Germans’ Enigma code during the Second World War, and the American mathematician Dr John Nash (A Beautiful Mind). Retrospective diagnoses of dyslexia have been applied to Mozart, Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein. In his book NeuroTribes, published last year, science writer Steve Silberman argues that some of the greatest leaps in scientific knowledge have been made by those with neurodiversity – not least Henry Cavendish (a grandson of the 2nd

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recommended in a 1978 report by the educationalist/philosopher Mary (now Baroness) Warnock. While this statement (now known as an ‘education, health and care plan’) can take as long as two agonising years to get, it prompts the machinery of support to rumble into action. Commonly, boys are diagnosed at primary-school age, where state-school provision is ‘on the whole good’, says Professor Peter Hill, a child psychologist on Harley Street. ‘But it can vary dramatically between local education authorities.’ So what about private schools? The picture is more complicated, especially at nursery and prep-school level, because each school has its own approach – some less than reassuring. Diana*’s seven-year-old son Tom* was at a north-London prep where fees are £6,000 a term. She says Tom is not a boisterous child, not a ‘handful’. But he was recently ‘diagnosed – through the NHS – with ADHD and high-functioning autism, which means that he can read and write and is sociable but he is a little bit unusual compared to some other children’.

A child being taught in a classroom with a one-to-five [teacher-pupil] ratio can ask for clarification, reassurance and re-explanation, and that makes an enormous difference.’ Among the innovative teaching methods are acting out historical events such as 1066 in a field, complete with full costume and special effects. ‘Elsewhere, bright dyslexic children go to class, lose the thread in the first minute and then spend the next 39 minutes at sea,’ says Floyd. Last year, Bruern sent an academically able boy of 13 to Winchester after just 18 months of intensive specialist learning. Like most of Bruern’s intake, he could barely write when he first arrived. It’s not unusual for boys to win scholarships from the school in academic subjects, as well as in art and music. It seems that once the 11+ or 13+ is out of the way, the private-school landscape improves hugely in terms of provision. Floyd says there are excellent SEN departments at places such as Brighton College – ‘the best support for super-intelligent dyslexics. We had a boy who just left there with 9 A*s and an A. When he came to us he couldn’t write.’


He also enthuses about Millfield (co-ed), Milton Abbey (‘very entrepreneurial after 16’) and Glenalmond in Scotland (‘brilliant’). Of Winchester, he says: ‘If one of my [four] sons was very bright and quirky, or even ASD, I would love him to go there.’ At Eton too there is space for ‘quirkiness’. ‘There are a lot of complete boffins [there] – the archetypal brilliant scientist,’ says Floyd. ‘They have one of the best physics departments in the country.’

*NAMES HAVE BEEN CHANGED. PHOTOGRAPH: SHERBORNE SCHOOL ARCHIVES

F

or a long time, girls were thought to be less likely to have neurodevelopmental conditions, but doctors are now realising not only that they ‘present’ differently, but that they are also ‘overcompensating for any difficulties’, says Dr Lucy Brown-Wright, a leading children’s and young people’s psychologist who works privately and at Great Ormond Street in London, ‘which makes them harder to spot.’ She has seen girls who were on their way to Oxbridge ‘with an impeccable academic career, and things suddenly start to fall apart once the stakes get very high. Those girls were working so incredibly hard to overcome [their difficulties] and their application and industry camouflaged it. [The learning difficulties] can be quite profound, particularly with ASD.’ Professor Scott is a fan of co-ed Latymer Upper, in west London, for its progressive approach to neurodiversity. ‘It’s a regular school but has a number of kids with ADHD and autism, and they look after them really well.’ An additional challenge with ADHD children is that their behaviour can be ‘oppositional’ (ie, lashing out or angry outbursts). They also have trouble sitting still and impulsive tendencies, and are easily distracted (although with a subject they love, they might concentrate for hours). ‘Medication can be very effective,’ says Scott. He tells of a nine-year-old on the verge of being expelled from a ‘posh’ London day school ‘for calling out and jabbing the person next to him in the ribs, and he was bottom of the class. He was copying negativity from the teacher, who said he should pull himself together.’ Within three months of being on Ritalin, he jumped to fourth out of 20 in the class. He started writing very good stories, instead of jumbling a knot of ideas on the page. His parents said he’d been transformed. ‘Those with neurodiversity are not freakily abnormal,’ adds Scott. ‘They’re just zipped up a bit differently.’ Brown-Wright says the first step to helping a

child who is struggling and whose parents have had ‘longstanding concerns’ is to get ‘an incredibly decent, comprehensive assessment at the outset’, from either a private educational psychologist or through their GP (although be prepared for a wait). These test a range of abilities – verbal, non-verbal, processing, spatial and so on – and can last three hours or more. But they pinpoint ‘the key areas that are having an impact on the child’s learning and their acquisition of skills’. A major obstacle, explains Brown-Wright, is the assumption that children with specific learning difficulties are ‘less cognitively able’ – ie, not bright – an assumption that angers her, ‘because that is absolutely not the case whatsoever’. (As demonstrated by the fact that GCHQ, the British intelligence agency based in Cheltenham, employs 120 neurodiverse spies, all of whom have extraordinary skills.)

educational psychologist and author of The Parent’s Guide to Specific Learning Difficulties, would like to see is more training of teaching staff in how to recognise and cope with neurodiversity. ‘That it is not covered in training is a quite serious problem,’ says Hill. ‘Everyone blames league tables too – and I think they are probably right. It takes teachers’ focus off the child and onto the results.’ But Floyd has some sympathy with mainstream preps. ‘Teachers might be expected to push a fast-paced curriculum, and if one of the 15 kids is dyslexic or dyspraxic, can you devote more than a fifteenth of your time to them if everyone is paying the same fees? To differentiate fully, you’d probably need to turn most of the lesson on its head.’ While William is now at Bruern, Tom’s mother Diana didn’t opt for it – in

Alan Turing at his school, Sherborne, 1927

The stigma still means, sadly, that some parents are reluctant to get their child tested or to accept the results. But Brown-Wright says she sees children in a broad range of settings, including highly selective academic schools. Yet it’s also true that there is a higher than normal prevalence of dyslexia and ADHD in prisons – in part, doctors argue, because society often fails children who are ‘wired differently’. What Hill, Scott, Brown-Wright and other professionals, such as Veronica Bidwell,

part because ‘if you have a funny little child, you don’t necessarily want to send them to boarding school’. Instead, Tom attends a state primary. ‘With private schools,’ says Diana, ‘although you are paying, the sense can be that it’s your duty to present them with a perfect child. ‘It’s often said that in our changing world, the jobs our children will do are not yet invented,’ she adds. ‘Yet there is still a cultural prejudice against children who are different.’ ( TATLER.COM

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THIS PAGE, LILY ALDRIDGE WEAR SILK & COTTON DRESS, £510, BY ISABEL MARANT. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & EMERALD BRACELET, TOP; WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & SAPPHIRE BRACELET, BOTH POA, BY BULGARI OPPOSITE PAGE, HOODED SEQUIN DRESS, £1,375, BY VERONIQUE BRANQUINHO

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Lily The ultimate rock ’n’ roll model, Lily Aldridge, in shiny, sexy clothes and LOTS of Bulgari diamonds

Styled by SOPHIE PERA

Photographed by DAVID ROEMER

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THIS PAGE, WOOL, FELT & SEQUIN JACKET, £1,285, BY DIESEL BLACK GOLD. DRESS, £2,384, BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY BULGARI OPPOSITE PAGE, WOOL JACKET, £1,470; WOOL TROUSERS, £650; BRA, £400, ALL BY BOTTEGA VENETA. WHITEGOLD & DIAMOND PENDANT NECKLACE; WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, BOTH POA, BY BULGARI

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L

ily Aldridge is the woman who inspired the lyrics for the Kings of Leon song ‘Sex on Fire’. So it makes total sense that Bulgari have signed her up as their latest brand ambassador – you’d buy any piece of jewellery that would make you look more like her, wouldn’t you? The 31-yearold Victoria’s Secret model is half-sister to Saffron Aldridge (their father is the British illustrator Alan Aldridge, who designed album covers for Elton John and The Rolling Stones) and is married to Caleb Followill, the frontman of Kings of Leon. Her 4.3m Instagram followers get daily updates of their life in Nashville and photos of their football-loving four-year-old daughter, Dixie Pearl. Lily has loved jewellery ever since she was little and her mother, the Playboy playmate Laura Lyons, would buy her fake gems. Now Lily’s more interested in getting her hands on Bulgari’s Serpenti choker: ‘I’ve always wanted it – maybe my husband will read this and get it for me for Christmas...’ LB

SPANDEX DRESS, £53, BY DAANG GOODMAN X TRIPP NYC. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BRACELET, POA, BY BULGARI

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THIS PAGE, LAMÉ TROUSERS, £790, BY ROBERTO CAVALLI. WHITEGOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY BULGARI OPPOSITE PAGE, WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY BULGARI

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THIS PAGE, WOOL TROUSERS; VELVET & SATIN TUXEDO JACKET; WOOL WAISTCOAT; ALL POA, BY DOLCE & GABBANA. WHITE-GOLD, GOLD, DIAMOND & RUBY BRACELET, POA, BY BULGARI OPPOSITE PAGE, SEQUIN & SATIN BLAZER, £3,910, BY SAINT LAURENT. WOOL TROUSERS, £650, BY BOTTEGA VENETA. PLATINUM, DIAMOND & EMERALD NECKLACE, POA, BY BULGARI FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR BY KEITH CARPENTER AT THE WALL GROUP, USING KERASTASE. MAKE-UP BY ERIC POLITO AT ART DEPARTMENT, USING DIOR ADDICT. NAILS BY JULIE KANDALEC AT BRYAN BANTRY AGENCY, USING CHANEL LE VERNIS. FASHION ASSISTANT, DYLAN HAWKINSON

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I S E E A TA L L , DA R K ST R A N G E R . . .

Tatlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s star astrologer, Clare Bennett, analyses the solar system to help you navigate a year of gold leggings, trips to Amalfi and mysterious men in tweed...

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Th e F u t u r e ...

Capricorn 22 December –19 January

Zz

THE DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE

JACK RUSSELL

zzzz

...

CAN BE OVERBEARING WHEN TIRED

With Saturn in your 12th house, you may find yourself asking a lot of questions of those around you. And of yourself. Is now the time to start thinking about some changes? Perhaps making decisions about things you’ve been putting off would help you stop going round in circles? Ask yourself: ‘Do I *really* need to give up gluten when I don’t actually know what it does?’/‘That picture of a Burberry coat I have stuck to my fridge door and stroke every morning and think about instead of my work – perhaps I should just buy it and stop living a fantasy?’ You know you’ve got the determination to make things happen for yourself – you’re a Capricorn. You people are ludicrously dogged. Keep butting those horns of yours at the problem until you get what you want. If anyone can do it, you can. Famous Capricorns The Duchess of Cambridge, Suki Waterhouse, Mary Beard. Capricorn characteristics Very good with small children and dogs. Can be overbearing when tired. Capricorn dog Jack Russell. One more thing for 2017 Where you would say organised, others would say bossy. Just bear that in mind...

PHOTOGRAPHS: DAN BURN-FORTI, SHUTTERSTOCK, REX FEATURES

Aquarius 20 January –18 February

TOM HIDDLESTON

TIBETAN TERRIER

HAPPIEST IN THE BATH WITH A BIG DRINK

Listen, Aquarius. Just because you’re not good with broken promises doesn’t mean you have to get all temperamental with people who said they’d give up fags for New Year and are now smoking in your house. Get used to it – because you’ve got a year of relentless socialising ahead and it’s meant to be fun, not

draining. Try not to revert to your usual habit of sitting in a corner alone, playing with deer filters on Snapchat. Talk, mingle, engage. Late May could prove to be significant for you. Someone will need to tell you something important; it probably has to do with dogs. The deeper the meaning you read into this the better the result will be for you (and the dog). Romance will flourish in September when a mysterious stranger in tweed asks you for directions. Famous Aquarians Tom Hiddleston, the Duke of Westminster, Amal Clooney, Clare Balding. Aquarian characteristics A good listener, cries easily, complains on long walks, happiest in the bath with a big drink. Aquarian dog Tibetan terrier. One more thing for 2017 Ring your mother more often before it turns into a ‘thing’. Drink more filtered water.

Pisces 19 February–20 March

JILLY COOPER

IRISH WOLFHOUND

TENDENCY TO AIR DIRTY LAUNDRY

Oh, Pisces. You’re so over-trusting. Yes, you want to share and connect with others, but that doesn’t mean sitting down with your plumber/ nanny/Ocado delivery man to discuss your problems. Think before you speak. Does the person currently working on your basement conversion really want to hear your worries about where to go skiing this year? The good news is, you will experience a financial surge in early spring. Castle-owning Pisces should pay particular attention to their artwork. That painting in the hall above the fireplace – IS IT the worthless fake your stepmother told you it was? Does she really only want it for sentimental reasons? It’s time to take a good, hard look at the person who says they have your best interests at heart. Proceed with caution. Go on holiday in June. And wear a higher-factor suncream, lobster face. Famous Pisces Brooklyn Beckham, Jilly Cooper. Pisces characteristics Tendency to air dirty laundry and then look guilty. Likes explaining dreams. Pisces dog Irish wolfhound. One more thing for 2017 Wear more navy. And stop sleeping so much.

Aries 21 March –19 April

LILY JAMES

ALWAYS THE LAST TO LEAVE A PARTY

BULLDOG

If anyone’s going to jump into the fountain at a party or come dressed as a unicorn to a christening, it’s you. You love nothing more than channelling all that energy into amusing others, but your penchant for spontaneity might not always pay off. Putting ice down the bride’s back at a wedding or pretending to fellow guests that you’re descended from a scandalous secret child of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, which really makes you heir to the throne, may be funny to you, but be careful. Some people might not share your sense of humour. Taking up a new sport – something civilised, like tennis – will work well for you this year. Thrash your sense of impatience with the world out on a court. As for March, actual wow. YOU HAVE NO IDEA. The rest of the year may feel like a bit of a comedown in comparison. Sorry. Except for 17 August – take a phone call when you think you shouldn’t. It could lead to an unexpected romance on a superyacht. Famous Aries Victoria Beckham, Lily James. Aries characteristics Always the last to leave a party. Vile when hungover, adorable when talking about boarding school. Aries dog Bulldog. One more thing for 2017 Take fewer selfies. You know why.

Ta u r u s 20 April –20 May

SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH

PUG

TERRIBLE IN HIGH HEELS

Creative Taureans need to pull their finger out and crack on with their endeavours. That book you’ve been working on – why haven’t you finished it? Stop fooling about and Googling funny pictures of otters with suspiciously human expressions and just get on with it. February ] TATLER.COM

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Th e F u t u r e ...

Gemini 21 May –21 June

BORIS JOHNSON

DACHSHUND

VERY BAD AT LAYING TABLES

Gemini, Gemini, Gemini. You’re a puzzle, aren’t you? Cheerful and hilarious one minute, contrary and belligerent the next. That curiosity of yours needs channelling, and you’d do well to stop poking your nose into other people’s business (checking your partner’s texts? Have some dignity). Your possessiveness will only get you into trouble. Emotional or financial investments will bring big returns mid-August, so hang on to your knickers because things are going to get a little bit cray-cray. Be wary of strangers on shooting weekends offering to teach you about Cuban cigars and the laws of the cosmos in January. They’re not what they seem to be. Being bewitched by their big, blue eyes is not going to save you from heartbreak if you decide to proceed without extreme caution. Famous Geminis The Duke of Edinburgh, Heston Blumenthal, Boris Johnson. Gemini characteristics Very good at dancing. Very bad at laying tables. Gemini dog Dachshund. One more thing for 2017 If you think turning down invitations is going to help you save money, you’re barking up the wrong tree.

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Cancer 22 June –22 July

THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE

MALTESE CHIHUAHUA

ENJOY GETTING DRUNK WITH THEIR CHILDREN

Cancerians, you’re generous to a fault. If you had your way, no one would ever pay for anything ever again because you’d foot the bill every time. It’s an admirable quality to have, but there’s no need to put everyone else to shame ALL THE TIME. Let them pay every now and then – you deserve it. Don’t avoid tricky family situations with your characteristic sideways swerve. Family birthdays around October or November will provide an opportunity for you to settle scores. That brother who has always beaten you at ping-pong; that sister who never let you win at backgammon – now is the time to put right those wrongs of old. You are not the oppressed, insecure people-pleaser they always accused you of being. Show them who the boss is. And THEN buy them all dinner (you know you want to). Famous Cancerians The Duke of Cambridge, the Duchess of Cornwall, Tom Burke. Cancer characteristics Excellent barbecuers who enjoy getting drunk with their children. Cancerian dog Maltese chihuahua. One more thing for 2017 Say yes to that unexpected offer you get on a rainy Thursday morning. Share your cigarettes.

Leo 23 July –22 August

CARA DELEVINGNE

HUSKY

WOULD EAT SWEETS FOR BREAKFAST

Everyone knows not to cross a cross Leo. Fiery when provoked, Leos are wildly protective of their loved ones and will take down any potential threat with a swipe of their claws. Unless they are the super-chilled Leos, who wouldn’t dream of getting into a fight and would rather lie dozing in the long

grass of impartiality while someone else does all the shouting. It’s important to remember, though, that you may not know as much as you think you do. No one expects you to have all the answers. The opportunity to visit the desert may present itself around the end of summer or beginning of autumn, and you should consider it carefully. Maybe you’ll find yourself at Burning Man, wearing gold leggings, an Indian-chief headdress and a cape... and that’s no bad thing. Famous Leos Cara Delevingne, Kate Beckinsale, Ben Elliot, Jimmy Wales. Leo characteristics Very obsessed with their own birthdays. Would eat sweets for breakfast if left to their own devices. Leo dog Husky. One more thing for 2017 Wear more turquoise, the colour of communication.

Virgo 23 August –22 September

PRINCE HARRY

CHOCOLATE LABRADOR

SPORTY BUT MOODY

So you were the most drunk person at the party last weekend – we’ve all been there. You made a pass at the host – it could be worse. And whatever you smashed – it can be replaced. Everyone will get over it. The real question is: what’s going on with you? The new moon is going to help clear some of this, frankly, very dull, negative behaviour, and with that may come some challenging dreams. If you dream you can see your nanny with a chrysalis formed around her, hanging from the ceiling of your old nursery but still telling you to tidy your room in a muffled voice from within the cocoon – remember, it’s all a metaphor. A cosmic dress rehearsal. It’s time for you to take your power back. Change is on the horizon. The whole of February may feel unsettling to you, but it’s important you don’t bury your head in the sand. Nanny wouldn’t like that. Famous Virgos Pippa Middleton, Prince Harry, Hugh Grant. Virgo characteristics An absolute texting liability. Surprisingly good at impressions. Sporty but moody. Virgo dog Labrador (only the chocolate type). One more thing for 2017 Self-deprecation is cute until it’s annoying, so be better at taking compliments about your hair.

PHOTOGRAPHS: ISTOCK, GETTY IMAGES, DAN BURN-FORTI

[is going to be an interesting month for you, romantically speaking. Watch for the stranger carrying a broadsheet, possibly the New York Times. They may be from a foreign country; their understanding of the rules in cricket will help you decipher that. Suffice to say, you are in for a TREAT. Try and let go of the notion that people aren’t as clever as you – yes, it’s probably true, but your competitiveness can be a bit, you know, boring to the point of madness. As for that stubborn streak, please put it to good use. Look at fellow Taurean Sir David Attenborough – he’s still hustling up trees in the jungle despite being 90 and having bad knees. What’s your excuse? Famous Taureans Sir David Attenborough, the Queen, Poppy Delevingne, George Clooney. Taurean characteristics Hopeless with electronic equipment. Terrible in high heels. Brilliant at fancy dress. Taurean dog Pug. One more things for 2017 Stop talking about it – just get that tattoo you want.


but things will evolve as they are meant to. Mid-April may be frantic, but keep your head down and that famous charm of yours flowing, and you’ll have people eating out of the palm of your hand like you always do. Keep your eyes open for a blonde who wants to be spanked. This person will make themselves very apparent to you some time around the Glorious Twelfth. It’s an opportunity not to be missed. Famous Scorpios The Prince of Wales, Emilia Clarke, Baroness Trumpington. Scorpio characteristics Loves smoking, can’t cook, extremely talented kissers. Scorpio dog Whippet. One more thing for 2017 Be honest about who you love and then buy them something from Cartier. They’d like that.

If you dream your nanny is hanging from the ceiling in a chrysalis – remember, it’s all a metaphor

Libra 23 September–22 October

SIMON COWELL

COCKER SPANIEL

stationery cupboard like you did last year. Famous Librans Sadiq Khan, Theresa May, Simon Cowell. Libran characteristics Better with horses than people. Libran dog Cocker spaniel. One more thing for 2017 If you’re not doing crosswords, start. If you are doing crosswords, try harder ones.

Scorpio

BETTER WITH HORSES THAN PEOPLE

The world is a place of perfect balance when it comes to Librans. Except no, it isn’t – and that fight you’ve had with your cousin over the family tiara is not going to go away overnight. Diamonds can bring out the worst in people, so perhaps now is the time to start building bridges before anyone mentions the word ‘lawyer’. Other relationships could do with your attention. Having a new romantic involvement is exciting, but it doesn’t mean you should take your eye off the ball. Early February will give you a strong indication why. Read the signs. The universe is screaming them at you at the top of its lungs and it’s up to you to act. Work-wise, you may well find your name being bandied about for a promotion this summer – so probably don’t photocopy inappropriate parts of your body and leave the paper pinned up in the

23 October –21 November

THE PRINCE OF WALES

WHIPPET

EXTREMELY TALENTED KISSERS

There is such a thing as too sexy, you know. How is anyone supposed to get anything done with you around, Scorpio? That smouldering gaze. Those suggestive comments – you make a conversation about boarding-school fees sound like a sex fantasy. How do you DO that? If you are currently feeling held back by circumstances at work, try not to force the issue – we all know how ambitious you are,

Sagittarius 22 November –21 December

WENDI DENG

LURCHER

TERRIBLE AT DIRECTIONS

It’s not you. It’s Mercury in retrograde, so try not to panic. That house in the country you’ve had your eye on – the sale will probably fall through, but don’t be disheartened. A better one is round the corner; one that doesn’t have dry rot in the wine cellar (due to start forming in late October). Sagittarians love to travel – which is why you should think about a house abroad instead. Preferably with a view of the sea. St Tropez or the Amalfi coast are worth considering – in fact, it will be during a card game taking place around early June that the answer will come to you about where to look next. Trust that gut instinct. You’re naturally curious and energetic, and this can sometimes tip slightly over into *said in a tiny voice* showing off, can’t it? Try to remember more often that rapturous but devastating night you spent on your gap year with a mystic who hadn’t spoken for 25 years, and everything it taught you. Famous Sagittarians Viscount Rothermere, Wendi Deng, the Duke of Norfolk. Sagittarian characteristics Good at driving, terrible at directions. Sagittarian dog Lurcher. One more thing for 2017 Make an effort to avoid red vegetables this year. You’ll feel calmer for it. ( TATLER.COM

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HOME Edited by GERRI GALLAGHER

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‘I ENJOY PUTTING BEAUTIFUL THINGS INTO THE WORLD – THAT’S MY CALLING’

LEON & YANA MAX'S CLOTHES, THEIR OWN. STYLED BY SOPHIE GOODWIN

When Leon Max bought Easton Neston from Lord Hesketh, it was in a state of genteel decline – so the Russian fashion tycoon spent over £25m transforming his ‘summer house’ into an aesthete’s paradise. By Sophia Money-Coutts

Leon Max and his wife Yana at Easton Neston

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I

f Leon Max wasn’t a multi-millionaire clothing tycoon, he’d make a fine spy. And I’m not just saying that because he speaks Russian. It’s because he’s inscrutable. You ask him a question and there will be a pause – sometimes quite an unnerving pause – while he looks you directly in the eye before answering in a careful, measured way. We are sitting in his library, a room on the ground floor of Easton Neston, the stunning baroque house in Northamptonshire he bought from Lord Hesketh in 2005 for a reported £15m. He is miffed because one of the maids has recently rearranged the books (old editions of Shakespeare, Molière and Tolstoy among them) according to the colour of their spines, when he had previously spent a whole week arranging them alphabetically. Gazing out from the top of the bookshelves are stone busts of bearded men. ‘Who are they?’ I ask. ‘Oh, just philosophers,’ he says, pausing. ‘The usual.’ Because Leon Max, 62, can also be funny. And knowing. ‘This is a small house,’ he says, smiling, even though Nicholas Hawksmoor’s 1702 masterpiece is often cited as one of Britain’s finest country houses.

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PICTURE PERFECT: THE DRAWING ROOM, ABOVE, WITH A RUBENS ABOVE THE FIREPLACE. LITTLE LORD HESKETH, BELOW, AGED SEVEN, WITH HIS HORSE BLOSSOM, 1957


The garden hall, with a marble bust, leading to the yellow dining room

PHOTOGRAPHS: HENRY GUTTMAN/STRINGER/GETTY IMAGES, SLIM AARONS/STRINGER/GETTY IMAGES

Green goddess: Yana, above, in a Leon Max dress. Come dine with me: the 1st Lord Hesketh, right, at far end, in the yellow dining room, bottom right, 1940

It was, though, looking a bit sad when Max bought it, a combination of damp, fire damage and being patched up by Lord Hesketh over the years. Hesketh’s family had owned the house for nearly 470 years, but he was struggling with the annual maintenance. His attempts to revive the family fortunes weren’t helped by his efforts to turn the stable block into a Formula One team office in the Seventies, with racing playboy James Hunt driving his cars. ‘In a good year, the estate loses £500,000 and in a bad year it could lose £1.5m,’ Lord Hesketh said when the sale was announced. Today it is gloriously restored. There are 36 rooms in total (Max took out several bedrooms to make 13 new ones with ensuite bathrooms), including a pale-yellow dining room and a high-ceilinged drawing room with a Rubens of a boar hunt on the walls and floor-to-ceiling damask curtains. Max is especially proud of the latter, because he had the fabric woven by his clothes factories in China, despite the initial scepticism of his interior designer, Henrietta Spencer-Churchill. In a long picture gallery, portraits of Charles I and Charles II try to out-wig each other, and above the stairs there’s a vast glass chandelier, an exact replica of the one that used to hang there before it was sold at a three-day Sotheby’s sale of the house’s contents in 2005, a week before Max bought the place. He picked every single item, because the house was empty when he moved in. ‘I’m not a ]

Hom e


[professional decorator, but I think if one is a professional aesthete, it’s possible to do it.’ Was there a budget he had in mind before starting out, I ask, wondering about the rumoured £25m he spent on doing it up. ‘No, there was no budget.’ Max resents paying a lot of money for chairs and sofas, however, ‘because I don’t want to sit on it and for it to break. Some chairs, where it’s just the frame and simplistic carving, go for £50,000 because of provenance. I don’t believe in that. Instead of an 18thcentury chair you can get a 19th-century one, and it looks just as good. ‘We use every single room,’ he adds. ‘I have breakfast in the red dining room, come in here [the library] for the morning sun to read the papers, then there’s a sitting room upstairs. We use the drawing room and the yellow dining room when we have guests.’ The ‘we’ refers to Max and his wife, Yana, a 35-year-old former model from Ukraine, who was introduced to him via their mutual friend, the Russian model Katia Elizarova. (He has been married twice before, first to the model Kim Adams, then to the American model and stylist Ame Austin. His daughter Sophie is 28.) He refers to Yana – quiet, slim, cheekbones you could slice ice with – as his muse, and the pair are sweet together. Yana loyally checks with him about the right clothes to wear for each photograph; Max stands by his wife’s shoulder to check her hair as the stylist preps it for another shot. Their first child, a boy, is due in January, and Leon says he will grow up between America and Britain but be educated here and ‘probably’ go to Stowe: ‘There’s plenty of room [there] for him to get into trouble.’ The couple married in 2014 and celebrated with a summer party for 80 friends at Easton Neston, with Yana wearing a grey silk dress

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designed (naturally) by her husband. Later that night, fireworks exploded over the lake so loudly that guests – the likes of Earl Spencer, Orlando and Miranda Rock, Lohralee Astor and Philippa Cadogan – were nervous that the 18th-century windows would shatter. They didn’t – which was fortunate because the restoration process had taken three years (‘in China, it’s something that could have been done in six months’), during which time some labelled Leon an arriviste Russian oligarch. He shrugs off the tag. ‘Russian and rich go together very easily in a sentence – it’s the old connotations of ill-gotten wealth and, possibly, lack of culture,’ he says. ‘But I’m not an oligarch.’ In fact, he’s a naturalised American citizen. He was born in St Petersburg (then Leningrad) as Leonid Maksovich Rodovinsky, the son of a playwright father and an engineer mother, both members of the Soviet intelligentsia. But he wanted to go abroad as a teenager, so obtained a Jewish visa for Israel and, instead of changing planes in Vienna, claimed political asylum there. The trouble was, he didn’t speak German, so his next stop was New York, where he worked as a personal trainer, and then Los Angeles, where he ended up working for a fashion start-up. It didn’t take long before Max decided he could do business himself, so he founded his own, mid-range clothing company, Max Studio. By 25, he was a millionaire. The Sunday Times Rich List now puts his fortune at £400m and his empire is still largely based in LA, where he and Yana live for most of the year, in a house in the Hollywood Hills previously owned by Madonna. He has 30 stores across America and one in Westbourne Grove. One wing of Easton Neston, built by Sir Christopher Wren, has been transformed into a design studio, where

PHOTOGRAPHS: NEALE HAYNES, MARCUS DAWES

Yana and Leon in the drawing room


Hom e graduates from Central Saint Martins with specialities like knitting toil over pieces made of wool and tweed. His office is near this studio, and it contains a mannequin dressed in a spiked, metallic Alexander McQueen dress that he bought at an auction and plans to donate to the V&A. ‘I really enjoy putting beautiful things into the world – I think that’s my calling.’ Leon, Yana and their French bulldog Mishka (it means ‘little bear’ in Russian) spend three months of the year in England, and he calls Easton Neston his ‘summer house’. ‘Sometimes people come and stay and we play tennis, and we have a beautiful pool.’ He also shoots with his friends, like Lord Spencer and Richard Caring. The latter, he tells me, amused, blasted Queen from speakers behind the guns during one of the drives. Work isn’t finished at Easton Neston, though. The stable block is currently being overhauled to create more office space and one section of the garden is being landscaped to make way for a substantial vegetable patch. Sometimes the couple escape the country and go to London for parties (on the train from Milton Keynes, because it’s quicker), but they don’t own a house there: ‘I don’t spend enough time in London, so I’m better off staying in the swishest suite in the hotel, and it’s still cheaper.’ Lately, they’ve favoured the Bulgari. And yet, despite all this – the clothing empire, the houses, the art, the customised Range Rovers on the drive, the hotel suites – Leon considers himself idle. ‘I’ve been in business for 36 years, but it could have been much bigger, if I was really ambitious. But I don’t really apply myself. I’m just lazy.’ ‘You’re not remotely ambitious?’ I double-check. ‘No, not at all. I just want a nice, happy life,’ he says, looking proudly through the library window towards his lake and the parkland. (

AND THE BRIDE WORE... LEON MAX: CLOCKWISE, FR RIGHT, EARL SPENCER; LEON & YANA; THE EARL OF ALBEMARLE; SERENA & PEREGRINE HOOD AT THE MAXES’ WEDDING, 2014

The landscaped gardens at Easton Neston

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B E AU T Y

PHOTOGRAPHS: STEPHANIE COLGAN

Edited by FR ANCESCA WHITE

Y

A M A K E -U P R E VOLU T ION

ou might not know the woman in these pictures, but Diane Kendal is the reason it is OK for you to go out still wearing last night’s mascara. That’s because the British-born make-up artist was the one who made grunge cool – way before the rest of us began doing our eyeliner on the bus and putting concealer on our lips. She started working in London in the Eighties, doing the big-name shows and partying at the Mud Club and Heaven with hairstylist Guido Palau and photographer David Sims, but now she lives and works in Brooklyn, where she reads, drinks almond lattes and goes spinning. Her make-up

is more grown-up, more about looking ‘groomed’ – and she’s made it into a collection for MAC, so we can look the same. There’s an eye pencil, mascara, a chubby stick-highlighter – but best are the palettes of sheer-but-creamy colour (like brown, fuchsia and a punchy poppy red). You can use them to stain your lips, add shine to your eyelids or contour your face, but they’re playful, so don’t get too hung up on what goes where. Diane doesn’t. ‘I might wear some tinted moisturiser or curl my lashes, but that’s about it. I’m so used to doing make-up on other people that I’ve basically forgotten how to put it on myself.’ FW

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H e a lt h

THE FUNNY THING A BO U T AI DS . . . Charlie Mortimer has had HIV for 30 years, watching so many of his friends die of AIDS that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;at times it felt like being in the trenchesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. But he has survived, thanks to a salutary cocktail of humour, luck, love and the NHS

Tim Partington and Charlie Mortimer, 1997

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I

n May 1984, I was an inmate of Broadway Lodge, a no-nonsense alcohol- and drug-treatment centre where I’d not surprisingly ended up. Due to its uncompromising stance and exceptional success rate, it was very popular with the seriously affluent as well as with local authorities, which meant that you were just as likely to be paired up with the teenage heiress of a banking dynasty as you were with a Scouser on remand for robbery with violence. There wasn’t all that much side-splitting about the place, but one thing that did make me laugh was when the offspring of super-rich parents or minor European royalty pitched up in a chauffeur-driven limo packed with sets of golf clubs, tennis rackets and, on one occasion, polo sticks, and asked where the swimming pool was. In reality, it made the average borstal look comfortable, and when you weren’t being shouted at, peeling spuds or baring your soul, you dossed down in dormitories. And it was at a lecture there that I first heard about ‘Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome’, or ‘AIDS’ – whereupon I recall thinking, ‘Well, I’ve managed to have every other bloody illness known to mankind that’s associated with having fun, so it’s a no-brainer that I’m sure to have this one.’ Fast forward 18 months and, still clinging to my version of sobriety by the skin of my teeth, I started getting a series of unexplained and Charlie at the top debilitating illnesses. My concerned GP packed of the Empire State me off to an eye-wateringly expensive VIP Building, 2011 lounge to the afterlife masquerading as a private hospital. I had barely got to grips with the à la carte menu when a particularly arrogant young registrar breezed into my room. After a brief interview, he managed to establish that I had been an intravenous drug user, had had sex with a number of female prostitutes in East Africa and that I habitually frequented gay saunas. This clearly ticked all the boxes for him, and, without anything so mundane as a physical examination or a blood test, he announced that he thought I had AIDS, then promptly left the room. In those heady days, it was almost de rigueur to smoke in hospital and about 30 Lucky Strikes and numerous animated phone calls later, I made a decision to fly to Bangkok pronto to see my dying days out in a haze of heroin, surrounded by a harem of ladyboys. Sadly, common sense kicked in, and a week later, accompanied by my younger sister Lumpy, I was back in my GP’s surgery in Basil Street awaiting the results of the blood test he’d done a few days earlier. After a certain amount of throat-clearing and paper-shuffling, Doctor Michael got to the point – I did indeed have what was then called ARC (AIDS-Related Complex) and, at most, I probably had two or three years left to live, since there was not a cure or even a hint of a cure in sight. At this, his nurse, Rosie, started crying, and I remember thinking, ‘That’s very nice of you, pet.’ To be absolutely honest, all the anticipation had been such that had the results been fine it would have been something of an anticlimax, not to say disappointment. I had, of course, an overwhelming feeling

of fright (actually, abject terror) but also of liberation. On the plus side, for example, having to get a mortgage and a well-overdue career going was well off the cards. On the downside, in 1985, any association at all with AIDS was social suicide – the word ‘pariah’ comes to mind. (When Diana, Princess of Wales, ‘willingly and knowingly’ hugged an AIDS victim two years later, it promptly earned her the title ‘Princess of Sodomy’ from one national newspaper.) Thanks largely to the tabloid press, there was a lot of fear and blame knocking around, and, let’s face it, you don’t get AIDS from watching telly. I was acutely aware that had my Parsons Green launderette got to hear about my status, they wouldn’t have washed my sheets but burnt them. On top of all that, the government launched a massive information campaign, drumming home the message: ‘AIDS: Don’t Die of Ignorance’ – which was all very well unless you were, as I apparently was, already dying of ignorance. And there was a lot of ignorance about. One particularly neurotic aristo friend even refused to speak with me on the phone as he thought the virus might travel down the wires. Another friend, the now infamous and sadly deceased society antiques dealer John Hobbs, admitted to me after the funeral of our close buddy, the seriously wild man Charlie Shearer, that he thought I’d infected half the congregation by kissing Charlie’s mother, who had then gone on to kiss his brother and so on. I had an additional hurdle to overcome in that the majority of my friends and family had no idea I shagged blokes. I went about setting the record straight, for want of a better pun, as best I could. ‘You know that girl I’ve been banging on about for months,’ I confided to my close friend Caroline Brooman-White. ‘Well, she’s actually a boy.’ ‘Oh my God, how awful,’ she exclaimed in response. ‘How did you find out?’

If my local launderette had known about my status, they’d have burnt my sheets, not washed them

B

ut coming out as gay was a walk in the park compared to broaching the subject that I had a killer virus on board. My mother and I were once lunching with her first cousin, Robin Denison-Pender, at the Turf Club, Robin being a dead ringer for PG Wodehouse’s character Gussie Fink-Nottle. At the end of the meal, my mother turned to Robin and said, ‘You do know that Charlie’s got HIV, don’t you?’ There was a brief pause before pinstripe-suited Robin gave a huge guffaw, slapped his thigh and shouted ‘Well done, you’ several times. I think he was under the impression that it was some sort of civil award. We hadn’t the heart to tell him otherwise. One of the more agonising experiences was watching my good friend Nicky die of AIDS. Nicky was a 13-stone wide boy who always encapsulated health and joie de vivre. He had loads of girlfriends and an entertaining disrespect for authority. However, he had once been an intravenous drug abuser. I wrote to a friend at the time: ‘He completely disintegrated from the inside out. It was as if he had dry rot or something; the day he died he can’t have weighed any more than five stone.’ Attendees at an NA meeting specifically catering for those with HIV were at one point dying so fast that it felt more like being in the trenches. Thirty years on I feel beyond grateful to still be here. Many others were not so lucky. I am often asked how come I survived when so ] TATLER.COM

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CLOCKWISE FR LEFT, CHARLIE IN LOS ANGELES, 1977; IN KENYA, 1981; IN ST TROPEZ, 1979

[many didn’t. Well, the simple answer is luck and the NHS. Maybe my attitude helped. On the way back home from the arrogant registrar’s first rather casual diagnosis, I just happened to pick up a video about the National Hunt jockey Bob Champion, who got serious testicular cancer, overcame it and went on to win the Grand National. Not normally my cup of tea, but under these new circumstances it proved to be a game-changer. Inspired by the film, I decided that if I really had got AIDS, then rather than zip myself up in a self-pity bag, I’d better man up and face the music.

I decided that rather than zip myself into a self-pity bag, I’d better man up and face the music

H

umour played a part too, the sicker and darker the better. Over coffee, my then business partner and good friend Robin Grant-Sturgis said to me, ‘Christ, I think I’ve drunk out of your mug, I might have caught AIDS.’ I replied: ‘Look, mate – that’s all very well, but I’m far more frightened that I’ve drunk out of your mug and caught some of your pomposity, you c**t!’ To keep myself amused, I set about learning the entire King James I burial service off by heart, bought a matte-black and rubber pump-action shotgun with collapsible stock, and acquired, free of charge thanks to a young Johnny Vaughan working there, a platinum membership at my local video store. Well-meaning people were always trying to foist advice on me, from suggesting macrobiotic diets to much more drastic treatments and regimes. Years earlier, when I’d had liver problems, I’d tried all sorts of

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quirky stuff, including being massaged while naked by an 80-year-old white witch in Devonshire (she was fully clothed, I hasten to add) and paying her in fresh vegetables. (Robin G-S was convinced something beyond kinky was going on and was utterly appalled.) This time around, I took a conscious decision to shun all that and stuck to a rigid diet of egg and chips; or, as a special treat, a tinned Fray Bentos steak and kidney pie with Cadbury’s Smash and frozen peas, more often than not washed down with God’s own tonic in the form of soluble Solpadeine in ice-cold Perrier. While shunning less conventional treatment, I did try a month on AZT (Zidovudine), the only available treatment at the time. It helped some people but was, for me, a hideously memorable experience during which I felt violently seasick 24/7. I was, though, very fortunate when Dr Mark Nelson became my NHS consultant in 1993. Then a very young genius doctor and now a professor, he’s adored by his patients, if not always by the administration, and I have been with him ever since. But everything changed big time in 1996. First, I met my partner, Tim, in possibly the seediest sauna in town – and we have been together ever since. Not an hour goes by that I don’t thank my lucky stars for him. We practise a mutual survival pact that takes codependency to unprecedented levels. Secondly, in the nick of time (for me at least), a new treatment came along in the form of triple combination therapy, which, despite sometimes seriously debilitating side effects, actually works. Which is, of course, great. But AIDS is still not a disease that you want to get and, to be honest, is easy enough to avoid these days with a few simple precautions – pretty rich advice coming from me, I know. Treatment in the UK is world-class too. Tragically, in sub-Saharan Africa and other developing countries it’s not, and millions of adults and children continue to die of AIDS. A sobering fact, well worth reflecting on from time to time. ( Charlie Mortimer’s memoir, Lucky Lupin, is published by Constable at £20. World AIDS Day is on 1 December.

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No one need ever know

THE SKIN CLINIC

PICK What Sarah Chapman ME! The lowdown The clinic on Pavilion Road is really something: all slinky mesh curtains and an LED ‘light pod’, plus seven treatment rooms upstairs for facials with Sarah and her team, What Nataliya Robinson threading and tinting with brow genius Sophie Thorpe, or some The lowdown If you’re a first-timer, cosmetic ‘tweaking’ with Alison Telfer. But what you might not don’t worry when facialist Nataliya notice is the unmarked white door, leading to a lift, which deposits initially refuses to give you her you neatly at the loading bay once you’re done. Yes, it’s not the address. Her new situation in a most glamorous departure, but who wants to be spotted in full mews just off the Fulham Road is face-mask-and-headband combo, hailing a cab on Sloane perfectly lovely (and easy to find) – Square after an aggressive but highly effective Cosmelan peel? and she’ll email you the location a Our verdict Sarah’s been dealing with high-profile types day or so before. When you turn up, for years, so she knows all about squirrelling clients away from it’ll be just the two of you: Nataliya prying eyes. Just ask Victoria Beckham. staggers appointments so you never Details Bespoke facial, £125 for 60 minutes. At 259 Pavilion see another soul, and she will have Road, SW1 (sarahchapman.net; 020 7589 9585). you ensconced under a duvet upstairs before she gets busy mixing exfoliants and serums from natural What The Cadogan Clinic ingredients (her ‘green peel’, made The lowdown It’s the busiest waiting room in all of Chelsea, from nettles, could give your average crammed with patients wanting moles mapped, pigmentation lactic-acid peel a run for its money). blasted or a stealthy bit of nip and tuck. So no wonder women Nataliya’s clients have followed her (and men) are requesting to be slipped in (or out) through the from her previous space in Chelsea, private entrance on the corner of Cadogan Gardens. Once and she’s already gained a staunch inside, it’s a quick trip down in the elevator to the theatres, where local following – so getting an Bryan Mayou is busy performing routine lipo (he introduced it appointment might be tricky. to the UK); for minor excisions, pay a visit to Dr Susan Mayou Our verdict Professional, discreet upstairs, or see Dr Maryam Zamani to get your eyes done. and an utter perfectionist – no pore Our verdict Slick, yes; highly trained and experts in their is left unsqueezed. respective fields, yes. And they’re jolly good fun too. You’ll want Details Facial, from £160. In to invite the whole gang over for supper. Fulham, SW3 (nataliyarobinson. Details Consultation with Dr Mayou, £250. At 120 Sloane co.uk; 07774 544455). Street, SW1 (cadoganclinic.com; 0808 250 4204).

THE CONSULTING ROOMS

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THE HOME FROM HOME

THE DEPARTMENT STORE What Daniel Galvin at Selfridges The lowdown For those who thought Selfridges couldn’t get any better – think again. Not only is there a shiny new Daniel Galvin salon, with an even shinier VIP room in which you can get blowdried, manicured and have your brows ‘microbladed’ with Sian Dellar (semi-permanent make-up, using natural-looking pigment) – but there’s also a private stairwell that takes you directly there. From the car park, a friendly security man will escort you up to the third floor, where the team will be waiting for you. Easy as. Our verdict Useful when you want to go without make-up and speak to no one. Even more useful when it’s raining. Details Private-room hire, £100 for 60 minutes. At Selfridges, Oxford Street, W1 (daniel galvin.com; 020 7318 3663).

PHOTOGRAPH: EXPRESS/STRINGER/GETTY IMAGES

Treatments

What Jo Hansford The lowdown Jo and her team see some big names – film stars, models, royalty – most of whom use the tradesmen’s entrance on Adam’s Row. That’s because your driver can wait outside in the mews, while you creep down the (slightly steep – choose your footwear carefully) ramp, feeling like Nancy Drew, along a narrow tunnel and up through a door into the lower ground floor. If a blanket ban on humans is what you need, hire the whole place on a Monday, when the salon is closed. Though not all big names need privacy. The Duchess of Cornwall is quite happy to trot in through the front door with the rest of us. Our verdict An ego-free environment, home to some of the nicest folks in hairdressing. (Book in with Dee Stanford – her aromatherapy is magical.) Details Treatment with Dee, £100 for 60 minutes. At 48 South Audley Street, W1 (johansford. com; 020 7495 7774).


TATLER • PROMOTION

SKIN WORKOUT A

s January beckons, you find yourself full of good intentions for the year ahead. A new you! A fitter you! A more mindful you! But some resolutions are easier to keep than others. Frankly, we’ll take benchpressing serums over weights any day. Dr Sebagh, world-renowned

SERUM REPAIR You wouldn’t drive a car without getting it serviced, would you? Well, you need to think about your skin the same way. It needs constant repairs in order to stay hydrated, plump and fresh. That’s where this serum comes in. The intensive formula works to maximise your collagen levels and lock in moisture so you can keep your glow. ROSE DE VIE SERUM Calming, healing and endlessly soothing, this sweet-smelling rose serum is the ultimate nourishing elixir. It sinks into the skin, creating a protective, long-lasting barrier against external aggressors. We like the sound of that. Skin is left youthfully bright, smooth and glowing with health.

cosmetic doctor and skincare expert, has distilled his expertise into his Serum Bar – a selection of tailored serums that can be used separately or in unison. There is no better way to get your skin in fighting-fit condition. Take a look at the dream team and prepare to achieve your personal best.

PLATINUM GOLD ELIXIR Go for gold with this game-changing, antiageing serum concentrate. A whopping 15 active compounds and two original peptides are blended together in this formula. Talk about being match-fit on ageing-maintenance! It firms, plumps, protects and conditions, to reveal your best complexion yet.

SUPREME MAINTENANCE YOUTH SERUM As far as youth serums go, this one definitely reigns supreme. It’s bursting with age-defying goodness like resveratrol (aka the youth molecule), as well as plumping peptides and smoothing hyaluronic acid. This serum will give your radiance a complete overhaul, improving skin elasticity and bounce.

SIGNATURE SERUM This decadent serum is enriched with moisturising properties designed to give thirsty skin some intense hydration. A luxurious, silky formula, it glides on easily to leave skin soft and supple. The result is a nourished complexion that radiates a youthful luminosity. This is your revitalising secret weapon.

PURE VITAMIN C POWDER CREAM It’s no surprise that vitamin C is good for your skin and it’s even more powerful when applied topically. This powder cream harnesses all the antioxidant properties of vitamin C – so you get the greatest skin defence. It helps to reduce the appearance of pigmentation and really spruces up the skin. Pure perfection.

Dr Sebagh is at 25 Wimpole Street, London W1. For further details, please call 020 7637 0548 or visit drsebagh.com


Be au t y

Beauty f lash

LAVENDER

It’s come in from the old, sorry, cold. By Francesca White DS & DURGA

ILIA

Burning Barbershop EDP, £158 for 100ml They say ‘A fire broke out in the Curling Bros. barbershop in Westlake, N.Y. in 1891. All the shaving tonics with their spearmint, lime, vanilla and lavender burned. A charred bottle was found half-full. It smelled like this.’ We say Think woodsmoke, whisky haze, sexy people.

B U LY Lavender remover lotion, £6 They say ‘Less noxious for the nail and free from any unpleasant smell.’ We say French pharmacy Buly’s nail-polish remover is the most elegant thing we’ve EVER come across – it’s put a stop to all splitting and flaking. Nails everywhere are grateful.

S A N TA M A R I A NOVELL A Shampoo Lavanda, £60 They say ‘Recommended for all hair types and for frequent use.’ We say Wash your hair with this sebumbalancing shampoo and not only will greasy roots be a thing of the past, you’ll also be forever wondering what is it that smells so damn good. Not for sharing. Not at this price, anyway.

CHRISTOPHE ROBIN Moisturising Hair Oil with Lavender, £34 They say ‘A cult product for deeply repairing sensitive hair.’ We say It’s so versatile, this stuff. Apply it to dry ends, use it as a mask or slap it all over before a dip in the pool. Your hair will smell like it’s been on holiday in Provence. Lucky hair.

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RODIN Lavender Absolute Luxury Face Oil, £105, at Liberty They say ‘Experience an extraordinary sense of calm.’ We say Its sedative powers are amazing. Apply at night within stumbling distance of the nearest bed (preferably your own).

Lavender Goat Milk Soap, £6.50, at the Conran Shop They say ‘Ideal for delicate skins.’ We say Ignore the goat reference – this soap suds up beautifully, and the lavender oil will mask any farmyardy whiffs. Keep it in the guest bathroom if you’re still not sure – they’ll find the packaging ever so cheerful.

STILL-LIFES: PIXELEYES

JOSE GOURMET

C O M PAG N I E D E PROVENCE Hand Balm Incense Lavender, £13 They say ‘A relaxing aromatherapy experience.’ We say Which – as well as making your skin soft and fragrant – is absolutely what you want from your hand cream.

Radiant Beauty Balm SPF 20, £35, at panachecosmetics.com They say ‘Offers natural UVA and UVB protection.’ We say Fabulously glowy, wrinkle-free skin can be yours. All you need to do is REMEMBER TO WEAR SUNSCREEN. Like this one. It’s really not that hard.


‘It’s exhausting being this sexy’

‘LILY’, PAGE 96 LAMBSKIN JACKET, £510, BY SCHOTT NYC. WOOL TROUSERS, POA, BY DOLCE & GABBANA. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & SAPPHIRE EARRINGS, POA, BY BULGARI

Alexander McQueen at Harvey Nichols Anthony Vaccarello at Net-a-Porter Attico theattico.com Blumarine blumarine.com Bottega Veneta bottegaveneta.com Bulgari bulgari.com Chanel chanel.com

Chloé at Matches Coach uk.coach.com Daang Goodman for Tripp NYC trippnyc.com Diesel Black Gold dieselblack gold.com Dior dior.com Dolce & Gabbana dolcegabbana.com Donna Ida donnaida.com

PHOTOGRAPH: FRANCO RUBARTELLI/ CONDÉ NAST – GETTY IMAGES

A ddr e s s Book DSquared2 dsquared2.com Equipment at Net-a-Porter Harvey Nichols harveynichols.com Hermès hermes.com Hillier Bartley at Matches Huishan Zhang huishanzhang.com Hunter Boots hunterboots.com Isabel Marant at Harvey Nichols Ivy & Liv at Otiumberg Jack Wills jackwills.com Kinloch Anderson kinlochanderson.com Laurence Dacade laurence-dacade.com Levi’s levis.com Maria Black maria-black.com Marni marni.com Marques’ Almeida at Net-a-Porter Matches matchesfashion.com Michael Kors michaelkors.co.uk Missoni missoni.com Moschino moschino.com

Anya Hindmarch anyahindmarch.com Bally bally.com Bottega Veneta bottegaveneta.com Canon canon.co.uk Carolina Herrera carolinaherrera.com Cartier cartier.com Céline celine.com Chanel chanel.com Dior dior.com Dolce & Gabbana dolcegabbana.com; and at Matches and Net a Porter Duskii at Net-a-Porter Elizabeth Arden elizabetharden.co.uk Elizabeth Scarlett elizabethscarlett.com Gandys gandyslondon.com Grayl thegrayl.com Gucci gucci.com

Net-a-Porter net-a-porter.com Otiumberg otiumberg.com Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini philosophyofficial.com Pop & Suki popandsuki.com Ralph Lauren Collection ralphlauren.co.uk Red Valentino redvalentino.com River Island riverisland.com Roberto Cavalli robertocavalli.com Rockins at Net-a-Porter Saint Laurent ysl.com Sandro sandro-paris.com Schott NYC schottnyc.com Selfridges selfridges.com Tory Burch toryburch.co.uk Tripp NYC trippnyc.com Veronique Branquinho veronique branquinho.com Warehouse warehouse.co.uk

Hartmann hartmannluggage. co.uk Harvey Nichols harveynichols.com Herb Lester Associates herblester.com Hermès hermes.com I Like Paper i-like-paper.com Jessops jessops.com JW Anderson j-w-anderson.com Lapuan Kankurit lapuankankurit.fi Loewe loewe.com Louis Vuitton louisvuitton.com M/M World x Toshiki at JW Anderson Mara Hoffman marahoffman.com Margaret Howell margarethowell.co.uk Marni marni.com

Matches matchesfashion.com Michael Kors michaelkors.co.uk MVM Papercuts at I Like Paper Net-a-Porter net-a-porter.com Nikon at Jessops Papier papier.com Reclaim Mallorca reclaimsl.com Rimowa rimowa.com Rolex rolex.com Sisley sisley-paris.com Suvi Kankkonen at Lapuan Kankurit The Travelwrap Company thetravel wrapcompany.com UMA Oils umaoils.co.uk W&P Design at Harvey Nichols Yosuzi at Net-a-Porter

IN THE USA: Condé Nast CHAIRMAN EMERITUS S. I. Newhouse, Jr CHAIRMAN Charles H. Townsend PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Anna Wintour IN OTHER COUNTRIES: Condé Nast International CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE Jonathan Newhouse PRESIDENT Nicholas Coleridge VICE PRESIDENTS Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Laffert, Elizabeth Schimel CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER Wolfgang Blau PRESIDENT, ASIA-PACIFIC James Woolhouse PRESIDENT, NEW MARKETS AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, BRAND DEVELOPMENT Karina Dobrotvorskaya DIRECTOR OF PLANNING Jason Miles DIRECTOR OF ACQUISITIONS AND INVESTMENTS Moritz von Laffert GLOBAL PRESIDENT, CONDÉ NAST E-COMMERCE Franck Zayan EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONDÉ NAST GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT Jamie Bill THE CONDÉ NAST GROUP OF BRANDS INCLUDES US Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, Condé Nast Entertainment, The Scene, Pitchfork UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica FRANCE Vogue, Vogue Hommes International, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, Vogue Travel in France, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style ITALY Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, Vogue Bambini, Glamour, Vogue Sposa, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, Vogue Accessory, La Cucina Italiana, CNLive GERMANY Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Myself, Wired SPAIN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair JAPAN Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding TAIWAN Vogue, GQ MEXICO AND LATIN AMERICA Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico and Latin America, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico INDIA Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD PUBLISHED UNDER JOINT VENTURE BRAZIL Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour, GQ Style RUSSIA Vogue, GQ, GQ Style, AD, Glamour, Tatler, Condé Nast Traveller, Allure PUBLISHED UNDER LICENCE OR COPYRIGHT COOPERATION AUSTRALIA Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ BULGARIA Glamour CHINA Vogue, Vogue Collections, Self, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA La Cucina Italiana HUNGARY Glamour ICELAND Glamour KOREA Vogue, GQ, Allure, W, GQ Style MIDDLE EAST Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall, GQ Bar Dubai POLAND Glamour

PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID ROEMER

PORTUGAL Vogue, GQ

Copyright 2017 Tatler Publishing Company Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU (020 7499 9080). Regional office, Suite 1, Second Floor, Merchant Exchange, Waters Green, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK11 6JX (01625 548008; fax: 01625 539730). Colour origination by Tag: Response. Printed in the UK by Wyndeham Roche Ltd. Published monthly. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All prices correct at time of going to press but subject to change. Subscriptions – 12 issues of Tatler delivered direct to your address for: UK £54; overseas airmail €99 to the EU; £90 to the rest of Europe; £119 to the rest of the world; $99 for Airspeed. USPS Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica NY 11431. Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Customer enquiries, change of address and orders payable to Tatler, Subscriptions Department, Lathkill Street, Market Harborough, Leics LE16 9EF, United Kingdom. Subscriptions hotline: 0844 848 5202, Mon to Fri, 8am to 9.30pm, Sat 8am to 4pm, fax +44 (0) 1858 461739 or manage your subscription online 24 hours a day at www.magazineboutique.co.uk/youraccount. In the US call 888 737 9456, or email tatler@ subscription.co.uk. The paper used for this publication is based on renewable wood fibre. The wood these fibres are derived from is sourced from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. The producing mills are EMAS-registered and operate according to highest environmental and health and safety standards. This magazine is fully recyclable – please log on to www.recyclenow.com for your local recycling options for paper and board.

ROMANIA Glamour RUSSIA Vogue Café Moscow, Tatler Club Moscow SOUTH AFRICA House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style THE NETHERLANDS Glamour, Vogue THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok TURKEY Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, La Cucina Italiana, GQ Style, Glamour UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev

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BYS TA N D E R Social editor TIBBS JENKINS

Photographer HUGO BURNAND

PHOTOGRAPH: DAFYDD JONES

MORE SILKEN FOPS AT PLAY OVER THE PAGE!

RACY WEDGIES, EH? SEE HOW THEY SET OFF AN EQUALLY SPLENDID LOOK ON PAGE 129 RHYS JONES, CAVAN MCCARTHY & FRED MACPHERSON

To see thousands more joyous bystander photographs, go to tatler.com TATLER.COM

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127


B ysta n der

SNOG! SNOG!

ROBBIE SPENCER & ISAAC LOCK

MARGARET CROW, JOSEPH TURNBALL & GEOFFREY R FINCH OLIVER DOWNIE

BILLIE JD PORTER OSCAR BELLVILLE & BELLA HOWARD

CELESTINE COONEY & SARAH PEARSON

CASTLE FUN Bella Howard’s frisky 30th hat makes a jolly good party? Gallons of booze? Helps. Castle Howard for the setting? Ish. Will Hunter spontaneously doing an interpretative-dance rendition of Sia’s ‘Chandelier’? Now we’re talking. At least five hook-ups by the end of the night? Nailed it. All of which happened at Bella Howard’s Flower Fairies and Prince Charming-themed 30th-birthday bash. Belter.

W

BELLA HOWARD

Photographed by DAFYDD JONES

SEAN FRANK & JOLYON VARLEY

ABBY BUCK & BLANCHE HOWARD

ALEX SAINSBURY TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

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JAMES BALMONT

Morgan O’Donovan


WILLIAM GORDON LENNOX & LADY ELOISE GORDON LENNOX

COUNTESS OF MARCH AND KINRARA

TAMARA WARHURST & ZARA LEGGE-BOURKE IZZY TAYLOR & ROBERT TAYLOR

FAST & GLORIOUS It’s a family affair at Goodwood nce your children have left school, it is rare to find yourself cheering them on in a race. Yet at this year’s Qatar Goodwood Festival, Zara Legge-Bourke was again hollering away as her daughter Tamara Warhurst took part in the Ladies’ Day charity race, the Magnolia Cup. Fortunately for Zara, there was no parents’ race to follow – just nice food, good booze and a large round of applause for Tamara’s debut. She didn’t win (she’d only started riding racehorses at the beginning of the year), but the competition was tough: Izzy Taylor, who had had to withdraw from the Rio Olympics after her horse was injured, romped to victory. Like Tamara, she had family rooting for her – her proud dad, Robert Taylor.

O BEN & LUCY SANGSTER

LADY CAROLYN WARREN & THE DUKE OF ROXBURGHE

THE DUCHESS OF RICHMOND EARL OF MARCH AND KINRARA & DARCEY BUSSELL

Lies to tell lefties

PHOTOGRAPH: SHUTTERSTOCK

ton Eleonore Decaux and Lord Settring SUSIE FLORY & ELEANOR LAMBERT

The Normans had cat ears Shut up, you knew this already. Didn’t you? You can see it from the helmets. They had a second set of pointy ears right up on top, and quite a lot of their descendants still have notable bumps there. This is why the Windsors get so upset about going bald – it shows they’re not properly posh, because they don’t.

By Hugo Rifkind, who writes for The Times REMEMBER THESE FROM PAGE 127?

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CATHERINE PREVOST, KATE REARDON & DAME NATALIE MASSENET

Shelly Berger JOSH BERGER & DANNA HARMAN

CAROLINE MICHEL & JEREMY KING

A NIFTY FIFTY Celebrate with a tasty Berger t’s not good party etiquette to heckle your host – yet at Josh Berger’s two-day-long 50th-birthday bonanza – which consisted of a surprise dinner, put together by his girlfriend Danna Harman and Lady Rogers, and a garden party in Fitzroy Square the following day – Jemima Goldsmith did just that. Banging on the table as Josh addressed the room, she yelled, ‘When are you getting married?’ To which he replied, ‘Watch this space.’ The answer came sooner than any of them expected – they got engaged and married all within an hour later that summer, with Max Kennedy presiding on his boat in Hyannis Port. Photographed by LARA ARNOTT & DAFYDD JONES

I

CAROLINE & WILL GREENWOOD BINA & PHILIPPE VON STAUFFENBERG & CATHERINE PREVOST

LADY ROGERS

PABLO KELLER

OZWALD BOATENG, NICK LOVE & GUY RITCHIE NADER MOUSAVIZADEH

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ASHLEY SHAW-SCOTT & DAVID ADJAYE

KIM NEWMAN SMULDERS


JO MALONE

ELIZABETH SHEINKMAN & JASMINE DELLAL

ASHLEY SHAW-SCOTT & ROO ROGERS

ick Jonathan Newhouse, Max Mutchn and Erik Hyman

NADIA BILBASSY-CHARTERS, CAROL SOPHER, LAIKA, AMIR FARMAN-FARMA & RICK SOPHER

VASSI CHAMBERLAIN

JEMIMA GOLDSMITH & MATTHEW FREUD

MATIAS ROJAS & MELINA GRIFFITHS

GUY RITCHIE & COCO

CAROLINE MICHEL & ALAN YENTOB

JAMES RUBIN

AARON HILL & SUSAN FALES-HILL

JACQUI RITCHIE & JOSH BERGER

Ebs Burnough and Pierre Lagran ge


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LOUIS LONGFIELD, MILLY LANKESTER & LOTTIE BAGSHAW

SOFA SHAME Naughty ‘Evian’ causes trouble at teen ball here’s no pulling a fast one on Big Alan, the friendly bouncer at the Cameo & Vinyl club in Andover. He’s accustomed to dealing with rowdy 25-year-olds, so it was child’s play for him to confront the mischievous young chap and his questionable bottle of ‘Evian’ at the Austin Powers-themed bash for 13-to-16-year-olds in aid of the Ufton Court Educational Trust. He was duly popped on the ‘naughty step’, otherwise known as the sofa in the foyer, until it was time to go home at 12.30, missing out on all the good times dancing to DJ Hugo Rolls.

Alice Reeves and Millie Potter

T CHARLOTTE BLANDFORD & EMILIA MOMEN ARABELLA SEYMOUR, JO MACINTOSH & FRANK BARLOW

Photographed by LARA ARNOTT MAIA GARDNER & OLLIE LETHBRIDGE

PHOEBE FLOOD & JEMIMA WRIGHT

DAISY PARKER & SCARLETT SEABROOK

N AT U R A L CO N T R AC E P T I V E M E T H O D S A mouthguard for night-time grinding A baby, crying, in a cot next to your bed. Or anywhere, really

Enthusiastic Instagramming

Roleplay, gone wrong

Worming pills falling out of your handbag

Socks in bed

Said worming pills by your bed

An unflushed loo Your mouldy teddy bear by your pillow

TAT L ER JAN UARY 2017

Having a pet name for your willy Typing ‘U’ instead of ‘you’

Flip-flops on men, except in Deia. It seems OK there, somehow...

TATLER.COM

Squid-ink risotto (stained black teeth – so very witchy)

Reality TV resulting in acute sofa-itis A bowl of condoms on the bedside table. Naff AND presumptuous. Bringing your dog on the date. Time/place – this is not it

Earnestly discussing the compatibility of your horoscopes. We have two words: Uranus rising And, as John Waters said: ‘If you go home with somebody, and they don’t have books – don’t fuck ’em!’

PHOTOGRAPH: ISTOCK

Please bear in mind that these are only effective 99 per cent of the time. Tatler does not take any responsibility for unwanted pregnancies as a result of the methods suggested below


BEN & SPERONELLA MARSH

SIMPLY THE BEST... CHARLOTTE RADFORD & CHARLES DEAN

Lady Laura and William Cash

...Tina Turner tribute act wows Shropshire t was huge news for Shropshire: Tina Turner would be singing at William Cash’s 50th-birthday party! Guests excitedly discussed their favourite tracks on the lawn in front of the pre-dinner entertainment – dancers in Elizabethan garb – then moved to the drawing room... where a Turner impersonator, Keri Whip, was belting out ‘Simply the Best’ in a spangly dress. But she was so faultless that nobody noticed the difference. Least of all Ed Taylor.

I

Photographed by RUSSELL DAVIES

COSIMA CASH VIOLET FRASER & NICK CRAYSON

ELIZABETH HURLEY & HENRY DENTBROCKLEHURST

GERALD LEGGE & THE EARL OF DARTMOUTH

ARIZONA GUNN, LADY LAURA CASH, CHARLOTTE RADFORD, HARRY TYSER, LAETITIA CASH, CHRISTOPHER COURAGE & AUGUSTIN HOCHSCHILD

STAR TURN(ER)

GEORGIA & NICHOLAS COLERIDGE

ED TAYLOR & KERI WHIP

My hips don’t lie...

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B ysta n der

FLORA OGILVY

LADY TATIANA MOUNTBATTEN & EARL OF MEDINA

FRANCIS HUTLEY, EMILY STEEL & PRINCESS EUGENIE EARL & COUNTESS CAWDOR

HENRY WYNDHAM & LULU HUTLEY

POPPY VERE NICOLL & FRANKIE HERBERT

ge India Clevely and Freddie Colerid

ANGIE RUTHERFORD, EDWARD HUTLEY & PENNY SMITH

THE MARQUESS & MARCHIONESS OF MILFORD HAVEN

SAM FIDDIAN-GREEN & ANNIE-ROSE FIDDIAN-GREEN

TIGERLILY TAYLOR

W H AT YO U R PA RT Y G A M E O F C H O I C E S AY S A B O U T YO U For highly competitive types. Likely to say: ‘Shall we make this interesting?’ And there goes your house.

‘left hand red, right boob green’. They may never have actually had sex. And if they have, it’s been a while...

A R M - W R E ST L I N G T W I ST E R Frisky sorts who no doubt once had a sex dream that involved

TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017

Potentially incredibly flirty. The flirtiest of them all – so much to prove...

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SARDINES Intimacy and trust issues here. Speaks the language of abandonment. If they didn’t go away to school at six, then they went at eight. Will probably say: ‘And it never did me any

harm.’ Do NOT marry someone with a tendresse for Sardines.

ANYTHING WITH A T E A M C A P TA I N ‘There needs to be order; without it the world would quickly crumble – civil unrest, matinees starting at the wrong time and

trains inexplicably cancelled. No, it just won’t do.’ Deeply controlling empirebuilders. Run while you can.

LIMBO Ever the optimist. Not much kit? Only a broomstick? LIMBO!!!!!

ANYTHING WHERE YO U C A N W R I T E NORKS OR WILLIES (eg. Scrabble, Boggle, dominoes). This person will never, ever be bored. They are human Labradors. Some may sneer at their humour – but they don’t care. Because #COCKfosters.

PHOTOGRAPH: SHUTTERSTOCK

B AC KG A M M O N


SAM GUINNESS & BELLA HUTLEY GEORGE BAILEY & DANNY HIGGINS

ROCKING GOOD TIMES Snogs and celebrities at Wintershall ith Roger Taylor, Mike Rutherford and Jeff Beck in the line-up for the seventh Wintershall Rock Charity Concert at the Hutley family estate, in Surrey, raising money for HASTE and the James Wentworth-Stanley Memorial Fund, it was always going to be a big one. But there were also rumours that Brad Pitt had arrived in a stretch limo; Demi Moore was definitely seen buying wellies from Countess Debonnaire von Bismarck’s pop-up; and, most excitingly, Rufus Taylor (Roger’s son) was caught in a passionate clinch with... nope, we’re not telling. At the end of the night, DJ Francis Hutley gathered up the 400 stragglers and – like a modern Pied Piper – led the merry gang off to the Holly Barn for an afterparty that went on till Sunday lunch.

LORD PORCHESTER

W

PIERS DE LASZLO & RUFUS TAYLOR

HARRY WILLIAM & THOMAS SPENCER

KATE & LILY BARTON

CHARLIE FROST & AMY HILL

Mick May

MORITZ FLICK & COUNTESS MAYA VON SCHONBURG

IONA HUTLEY

LADY NAOMI GORDON LENNOX

ERIC BUTERBAUGH & COUNTESS DEBONNAIRE VON BISMARCK

TATLER.COM

TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017


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The spectacular view from the balcony at Chesa Futura in St Moritz

The cosy sitting room at Fleurettes in Verbier

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A chalet in the Austrian Alps offered by First Kitzbühel

The curvaceous exterior of Chesa Futura in St Moritz

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The wellness area in the Megève chalet

Six Senses Residences Courchevel

A sitting room with a view in Aspen, Colorado


THE GREAT ESCAPE The chartering of a superyacht is one of the most alluring experiences imaginable. Splendid views, unparalleled comfort and absolute privacy are assured. Contact Cecil Wright & Partners for an introduction to superyacht living at its finest. chris@cecilwright.com

cecilwright.com


INTERNATIONAL PROPERTY AWARD WINNER 2016

EXPERIENCE THE ULTIMATE COURCHEVEL THE ONLY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IN COURCHEVEL 1850 SERVICED BY THE AWARDWINNING HOTEL AND SPA MANAGEMENT COMPANY, SIX SENSES. These 53 beautifully appointed apartments for sale are located in the heart of Courchevel. Built to the highest standards, every aspect of the apartments and penthouses has been methodically and tirelessly crafted. The development features a Spa by world renowned Six Senses, 24 hr concierge and private ski-in, ski-out service. Prices start from €1.5 million.

SHOW APARTMENTS OPEN Contact Savills on +33 (0) 619 8329 45 +44 (0) 207 016 3744 www.one-courchevel.com


condenastjohansens.com Iniala Beach House, Thailand


8:78-:<A 8:757<176

•Š’—ž– ™›˜™Ž›¢ $ QHZ GHYHORSPHQW RI VXSHUVL]HG KRXVHV GLUHFWO\ RQ WKH EHDFK RQ WKH JODPRURXV ZHVW FRDVW RI %DUEDGRV KDV MXVW FRPH RQ WKH PDUNHW -HVVLH +HZLWVRQ WDNHV D ORRN For at least 20 years it has been almost impossible to buy a new house directly on the beach on the west coast of Barbados. Which makes the launch of Beachlands, a development of four high-end homes located right by the sea on the Platinum Coast, an extremely rare set of properties to come to the market. ‘I have not seen such a superb property come to the market before, located directly on this stretch of coast, in 20 years of selling property in the Caribbean,’ says James Burdess, director of the Caribbean office for Savills estate agency, who is in charge of sales for the project. ‘The developers, UK & European, have taken their time with this project and hired the top people in the industry.’ The west coast’s popularity is down to the fact that it has some of the best restaurants in the Caribbean, as well as the best swimming beaches on the island. Here, the houses are big and the hotels well known – most notably Sandy Lane, the salmon-pink home-fromhome for the business community, which is a 10-minute walk down the beach from Beachlands. Also within easy reach is the island’s most famous restaurant, The Cliff, its sister restaurant The Cliff Beach Club, and the

boutique hotel and restaurant The Lone Star. Beachlands is also just 100 metres south of Limegrove, with high-end shops including Cartier and Burberry, as well as a cinema, bars and a night club. The villas at Beachlands are sizeable, each measuring about 14,000 square feet, with plot sizes of an acre. The properties are spaced out from one another, set away from the road and raised above the beach – high enough for privacy but low enough to see the sea from a sofa in your living room. One of the villas, Villa Tamarindo, is under construction and expected to complete by May 2017. The owners of the three others will be able to adapt the design and size. Each villa comes with a luxurious pool, shaded by the mature mahogany trees, some 75 years old, which run parallel to the beach. The architect Larry Warren, who built the ‘new’ Sandy Lane in 1998, designed the contemporary colonial exteriors for Villa Tamarindo. He chose shingle roofs, covered terraces outside the rooms to control the temperature within, and exteriors made of coral stone. The interiors have been designed by Elena Korach of AQA Studio, who also oversaw the interiors at the Raffles Resort on

Canouan Island. The distinction between indoors and outdoors is blurred in the living room, thanks to doors that divide it from the terrace, which disappear into the wall when shut, allowing the terrace to become an extension of the interior. Barbados, which measures 21 miles by 14 miles, is a stable island, both politically and economically. On November 30, it celebrates 50 years of independence from Britain. At the top end of the market, the large homes on the west coast are still sought after and there is strong demand for such properties on the rental market. The island has two marinas, on the north-west coast, and seven golf courses, and also offers deep-sea fishing, surfing along the choppier east Atlantic coast, and a tennis centre. ‘This development is the best in class,’ says Burdess. ‘Instead of the 60 apartments that could have been built on the site, we have four homes. It’s likely you’ll have to wait another 20 years to find a similar project come on to the market again.’ For further information, please contact James Burdess, director of the Caribbean and Latin America department at Savills, on 020 7016 3740 | www.beachlandsbarbados.com


Accommodation and Amenities The main accommodation includes:

ST JOHN’S WOOD NW8 A beautifully proportioned mid terraced family home of the highest quality. The property has accommodation which spans over 5,697 square feet, offering bright and spacious family living, including a wonderful lower floor entertainment area incorporating a cinema room, family room and a separate gym. The property is offered in excellent condition throughout, and has been subject to various refurbishment projects over the years.

Location Hamilton Terrace is conveniently located for the shops and cafés of both St. John's Wood High Street and Clifton Road, W9. It has excellent transport links, including St. John’s Wood Underground Station (Jubilee Line) and Warwick Avenue Underground Station (Bakerloo Line), both of which provide easy access to the West End, the City, Canary Wharf, and the Heathrow Express.

Drawing Room • Kitchen/Breakfast Room • Family Room • Master Bedroom Suite with His & Hers Dressing Rooms and En Suite Bathroom • Four Further Bedrooms • Three Further Bathrooms • Playroom/Cinema Room • Gym with En Suite Shower Room • Self-Contained Guest/Staff Flat • Utility Room & Boot Room • Office Area • Storage Room • Wine Room/Cellar • Part Air Conditioning • 130ft Rear Garden • Secure Off Street Parking for Two Cars

Price On Application

Joint Sole Agent


The Tower House Carlton Hill St. John’s Wood NW8

An iconic detached St. John’s Wood villa built c 1850 which has been fully refurbished and redesigned to suit modern day life. Entrance Hall • Drawing Room • Dining Room • Study • Open Plan Kitchen/Breakfast Room • Family Room • Cinema • Master Bedroom with Ensuite Bathroom, Two Dressing Rooms and a Private Terrace • Four Further Bedrooms, Two with Ensuite Shower Rooms and Two with Ensuite Bathrooms • Two Cloakrooms • Leisure Facilities: Large Swimming Pool, Gym, Sauna, Steam Room and Two Shower Rooms • Strong Room Wine Cellar • Upper Terrace • Lower Terrace • Landscaped Rear Garden • Private Parking for four cars behind Electric Gates Staff/Nanny Flat: Sitting Room/Bedroom, Shower Room and Kitchen • EPC Rating F

FR E E HOLD

JS A Sav i l l s 020 3043 3600

020-7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk

P R IC E ON A P P L I C AT I O N


St Luke’s Street Chelsea SW3

A meticulously refurbished three bedroom house in the heart of Chelsea. This house offers excellent space for a purchaser to move into immediately whilst benefiting from fantastic volume with a southern, easterly and western aspect. Drawing Room • Kitchen/Dining Area • Master Bedroom Suite with Dressing Area and Ensuite Bathroom Two Further Bedrooms • Bathroom • Utility Room • Cloakroom • Patio • Terrace • EPC Rating C

FR E E HOLD

P R IC E O N A P P L I C AT I O N

020-7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk


Petersham Place South Kensington SW7

An immaculately designed and exceptionally well-appointed double fronted mews house within moments of Kensington Gardens and benefitting from a sizeable garage. Entrance Hall • Drawing Room • Master Bedroom with Bathroom and Dressing Area Ensuite • Bedroom Two with Bathroom Ensuite Bedroom Three/Study • Kitchen • Utility Room • Garage • EPC Rating D

FR E E HOLD

P R IC E O N A P P L I C AT I O N

020-7225 0277 www.russellsimpson.co.uk


Pavilion Road

Dove Mews

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One Hyde Park

Hyde Park Gate


UNVEILING OUR LUXURIOUS DUPLE X APARTMENT FEATURING A CINEMA ROOM

The Ridge is a truly stunning piece of architecture and has been designed with the utmost care and attention to detail, quality and lifestyle requirements. Set on one of Sunningdale’s most prestigious roads, a stone’s throw from Sunningdale golf course, local shops and the train station. With only ten stunning mansion apartments, this development affords the comfort and security of apartment living but with exclusivity. Each apartment offers the luxury, style and spaciousness of a large family residence, but with the added welcome addition of a concierge service, security and the ease of the ‘lock up and go’ lifestyle. Striking duplex apartment with 3 bedrooms, all en-suite, study, cinema room and garden terrace G Concierge Service G Lift access to all floors G Secure basement parking with large lockable storage unit

G Private outside space to all apartments G Bespoke Italian kitchens G Share of Freehold

Showhome open 7 days a week 10:00-16:00 CALL NOW FOR AN APPOINTMENT TO VIEW 01344 875593

T H E

R I D G E

R I D G E M O U N T

R OA D

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION - PLEASE CONTACT theridge@savills.com 01344 295375 savills.com

tony.walker@struttandparker.com 01344 623411 struttandparker.com

S U N N I N G D A L E


NOW OVER

70% SOLD

SIMPLY SPECTACULAR A spectacular leisure suite, Harrods concierge, private cinema, glorious gardens, breathtaking views of the Thames, and Richmond’s exclusive shops and restaurants at your fingertips. The ultimate lifestyle can be found exclusively at The Star and Garter, the iconic Grade II listed landmark beautifully restored by London Square.

Exceptional two bedroom apartments from £1,750,000 Viewing by appointment only, please call 0333 666 0102 to confirm. The Sales Suite and Show Apartments are open daily. The Star and Garter Sales Suite, Richmond Hill, TW10 6RR.

Selling agents

www.thestarandgarterlondon.co.uk Computer generated image depicts The Star and Garter and is indicative only. Details and prices are correct at time of going to press. December 2016.


Setting The Residential Standard Octagon has been setting the standard in residential new build throughout London and the Home Counties since 1980. Our reputation for building magnificent, contemporary styled homes is unrivalled. We have become a leader in our field by specifying the finest materials, fi xtures and fittings. Add to this a truly bespoke approach to design and fi nish, and a customer service that is second to none and it is easy to understand why a home by Octagon is always cherished.

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FIND YOUR NEW LONDON HOME WITH CREST NICHOLSON Crest Nicholson has been building new homes for over 50 years and is firmly established as a leading developer with a passion for not just building homes, but creating vibrant sustainable communities. Dedicated to excellence in design and innovation, sustainability and customer service.

A boutique collection of 28 highly specified 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments & penthouses, with a concierge, roof terrace and all with outside space. Minutes from London Bridge station in the heart of vibrant Bermondsey.

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To register your interest please contact us on 0800 088 6421 or visit www.crestnicholson.com

Computer generated images for illustrative purposes only. Pricing correct on 17.10.16. Crest Nicholson London 7th Floor, New Fetter Place, 8-10 New Fetter Lane, EC4A 1AZ. Crest Nicholson London is a division of Crest Nicholson Operations Limited, Crest House, Pyrcroft Road, Chertsey, Surrey KT16 9GN. Registered in England under Company No. 1168311.


G S I I H L G HT H GREAT DAYS AND LATE NIGHTS COME WITH THE TERRITORY WHEN YOU LIVE AT CARLOW HOUSE, NW1. FOR A START, YOU’RE IN CAMDEN – WHICH MEANS GREAT BARS, RESTAURANTS, PUBS AND INDEPENDENT SHOPS TO TEMPT YOU 24-7, ALONG WITH CELEBRATED LONDON TREASURES SUCH AS THE ROUNDHOUSE AND CAMDEN LOCK MARKET. AND IF YOU FANCY A GREAT ESCAPE TO SOME GREENERY, CYCLE THE REGENT’S CANAL OR STROLL OVER TO PRIMROSE HILL AND THE REGENT’S PARK. THIS IS YOUR LEGACY, YOUR CAMDEN – YOUR HOME.

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What’s it like to be...

C HAR LI E G I L M O U R’S M AG PI E , B ENZEN E

I

stole my human’s wedding ring. And his glasses. He doesn’t know this yet because he’s still sleeping. It’s true what they say: the early bird does a roaring trade. I’ve put them in my treasure box along with a beautifully ripe piece of mutton. Later, I’ll help my human with his work-play balance. He wants to work. I want to play. I think I’ll steal his pen and jam something sticky into his keyboard. That game always seems to excite him. We’re staying on Granny and Grandpa’s farm at the moment. They keep going on about something called ‘rewilding’. I think it’s an exercise craze of some sort, and I’m perfectly happy to go for afternoon walks, but I’m a Londoner at heart.

The humans insist on trying to get me to make friends with worm-brained rural magpies, who’ve been showing me their so-called treasures: bits of broken glass and acorn husks. Pah. Bumpkins. Miniature banquets served on a doll’s best silver are fine, but in my opinion, food tastes better when it’s stolen from someone else’s plate. Forbidden fruit. My favourite meal is roast chicken, closely followed by maggots. As told to Charlie Gilmour As Benzene tucked into a crispy drumstick, Charlie thought that, perhaps, crime does pay when you’re a magpie. Follow Benzene’s adventures at instagram.com/magpie_daily

Photographed by SARAH LEE

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2017

TRAVEL GUIDE

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KEEMALA, THAILAND

Where to go if you only have.... 2 D AY S

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Swift, slick stops

Get your safari fix

A very smart week indeed

Pack plenty of sunscreen

18 C I T Y Urban flings

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ST Y L I S H

B E AC H Just coasting

So chic! So quick!

R E M OT E

Find the furthest reaches

26 O L D FAV O U R I T E S

78 S K I Stay in the swishest spots on the slopes

92 ST Y L I S H

Explore some more

59 F O O D & W I N E

82 R E M OT E

94 FA M I LY

A little time to graze

Secluded stretches

Take the brood for a big break

Fast food – of the superior sort

60 A RT Y PA RT Y

84 ‘ H E Y, C O M E B AC K . . .’

34 L I S B O N Two days in the Portuguese capital

Where to hang out on the hippie isle of Hydra, Greece

Costa Rica’s really wild show (complete with crisps-robbing racoons)

36 C A P I TA L !

62 G O B O H O

86 H OT ST U F F

H E AV E N

Lovely looks for Lisbon

How to wow Hydra

Cool kit for Costa Rica

Island-hopping in the Aeolians

Short but ALWAYS sweet

52 C U LT U R E

HOT – you’ll want to linger

31 C U LT U R E Catch some local colour

PHOTOGRAPH: BRENT T MADISON

32 F O O D & W I N E

97 O L D FAV O U R I T E S We’d like to stay forever...

102 P I E C E S O F

PLUS

108 T H E I T L I ST Frankly fabulous things 114

INDEX

116 YOU SHOULDN’ T HAVE The art of the thank-you present TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


T

TRAVEL GUIDE

2017

Travel editor Francisca Kellett Associate editor Gerri Gallagher Art director, supplements Tardeo Ajodha Sub-editors Kate Lauer, Steve Fletcher Assistant editor, supplements Celia Thursfield Editorial coordinator Teddy Wolstenholme Picture editor, supplements Francisco Ludovico Contributors Sarah Ball, Leo Bear, Matthew Bell, Ralph Bestic, Abigail Blasi, Nicola Brady, Chris Caldicott, Deborah Cicurel, Lee Cobaj, Sarah Gilbert, Pamela Goodman, Lisa Grainger, Graeme Greene, Matthew Hancock, Martin Hemming, Lauren Ho, Andy Isaacson, Michelle Jana Chan, Teresa Levonian Cole, Mary Lussiana, Emilie McMeekan, Felix Milns, Devanshi Mody, Adrian Mourby, Gabriel O’Rorke, Benjamin Parker, Alex Reardon, Alice Rose, Anthea Rowan, Charlotte Sinclair, Jonathan Thomson, Nigel Tisdall, Amanda Tomlinson, Jeremy Wayne, Claudia Winkleman Managing editor Beatriz Choi Copy chief Ian Ramsey Picture editor Hannah Brenchley Fashion and retail editor Mariella Tandy Digital editor Annabelle Spranklen Associate publisher Clare Schifano Projects director Emma Samuel Account director Emma Heuser Brand strategy director Nicki Singh Advertising manager Lucie Burton Senior advertising executive Victoria Barley Regional sales director Karen Allgood Regional account director Heather Mitchell Regional account manager Krystina Garnett Regional sales & administrative executive Sally Lynn Promotions director Sophie Fairclough Senior promotions executive Sophie Wilson Creative director, promotions Gavin Shaw Art director, promotions Samantha Brownstein Senior promotions copywriter Anna Timoney New York Shannon Tolar Tchkotoua Milan Valentina Donini Paris Helena Kawalec Production controller Alice Ahlberg Production coordinator Kate Wightman

imekeeping. It’s one of those things – like playing polo or waxing your own bikini line – that sounds dead easy in principle, but is fiendishly difficult in practice. Messier than expected, maybe, and way more painful. Timekeeping on holiday? Worse. Not the practical stuff, like being on time for a flight, although that’s bad enough. I’m talking about making the most of every second you’re away. That’s tricky. There’s the worry that you’ll make the wrong decision. Stay by the pool and order another Aperol spritz, or hike up that massive volcano? (The answer, by the way, is yes of COURSE you should order another drink, and sure, do climb that volcano, but tomorrow is fine too.) Don’t worry, we’ve got all the answers, because this year we’ve organised our pick of the world’s splashiest, most gorgeous hotels in the most useful way imaginable: by time. Only got a weekend? We’ll tell you where to go. Flying to the other side of the world? Here’s where to stay, and what to tag on for the odd day or two. And, because we love you, each hotel has a little bit on the side saying what to do while you’re there, so you won’t miss a thing (while still having time to order another Aperol). On you go. Get out, explore! Or don’t. But maybe leave the polo to Prince Harry, and for heaven’s sake get yourself a good beauty therapist. All package prices are per person based on two people sharing, unless otherwise stated. The tour operators have provided Tatler with their most competitive rates. Any prices stated for a number of nights as part of a multi-hotel trip are for the whole trip. All prices for flights are return, from London.

Francisca Kellett TRAVEL

EDI TOR

Editor in chief Kate Reardon Publishing director Patricia Stevenson Managing director Nicholas Coleridge Copyright 2017 TATLER PUBLISHING COMPANY LTD, Vogue House, 1 Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU (tel: 020 7499 9080). Printed in the UK by Wyndeham Roche Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Not to be sold separately from the January 2017 issue of Tatler. Tatler has tried to ensure that all information is correct at the time of going to press, but the publishers cannot accept responsibility for any errors and omissions.


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IT T A K ES TW O You’ve a weekend to spare? Make the most of it with one of these snappy numbers

H OT E L E M M A

SA N A N TONIO, USA

T

he Hotel Emma’s signature cocktail is the Three Emmas, named after the three women in the life of the building’s creator, Otto Koehler: his wife Emma and his two younger mistresses, Emma and Emma. While this scenario invited bewilderment back in the 19th century, Otto himself would be just as surprised by what became of his beloved brewery, opened on the San Antonio River in 1894. A groovy synthesis of raw industrial chic and polished Southern charm, it is a vision of painted pipes, soaring high ceilings and bare brickwork. There’s a laidback rooftop pool, a full-time culinary concierge and a cosy library off the main lobby, with both deep leather armchairs and 3,700 books to sink into. At dinner time, opt for an outdoor table at Supper, and order the Three Emmas while ogling the brilliant farm-to-table menu. Three elements of the cocktail, by the way, represent the Emmas: gin for the first one, Otto’s long-suffering wife who continued to run the brewery after his death; sweet apricot brandy for the second – the Emma he truly loved. Finally, absinthe for the third Emma, who eventually shot and killed him... BOOK IT Double, from £285 (thehotelemma.com; 001 210 448 8300).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Check out La Fonda on Main, the finest Tex-Mex restaurant in San Antonio – the food’s spiritual home.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


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EL FENN

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PHOTOGRAPHS: NICOLE FRANZEN, DAVID LOFTUS/EL FENN, DESIGNHOTELS.COM, JASON RISNER, CORRY ARNOLD, GIOVANNI SIMEONE/4CORNERS IMAGES

rooftop is a thing of wonder. When it’s done right. When it has dreamy views over Marrakesh, say, and sofas set in cooling shade, and charming staff to bring you tiny cups of mint tea. El Fenn, Vanessa Branson’s place, has all this and more. Tree-filled courtyards, alive with the chirrup of birds. Nooks stuffed with colourful poufs and thick Berber rugs and vast sunloungers big enough for a threesome. Dusky rooms (bring your lover, not your family) with freestanding baths and polished-leather floors. Saunter from the shady pool to the fabulous concept store, and back to the rooftop. You can treat the place like your own. How wondrous. BOOK IT Double, from £190, including breakfast (mrandmrssmith.com; 0330 100 3180).

SCARLETT CURTIS’S N E W YO R K

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Mooch around Jardin Majorelle, restored by Yves Saint Laurent. A museum dedicated to the fashion maestro opens this autumn.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Try out New York’s latest dining trend with the best Hawaiian poké bowl in town at Chikarashi.

1 1 H O WA R D

N E W YOR K , USA

A

neon sign winks at you as you arrive on 11 Howard’s all-important first floor: ‘We are just complicated animals.’ This is the hub of NYC’s hippest new property, opened last April by developer turned hotelier-dujour Aby Rosen and already a major hotspot for the city’s creative types. It’s on the first floor that you’ll find the Library, part local hipster workspace, part Scandi-style café. It’s also home to the Blond, a bar/lounge with one of the most soughtafter guest lists in town (say hello, Leonardo DiCaprio, Drake and Rihanna), and styled as what one staff member describes as ‘enchanted forest meets New York sex party’. Bedrooms are low-key and unassuming, with oak floors and Danish furniture and cool ceramic wall hangings. Throw in Le Coucou, the chilled (yet fabulous) brasserie, and you have the perfect understated statement hotel bang in the midst of crackling, trendsetting SoHo. Enchanted forest or not, even the most complicated animals will thrive here. BOOK IT Double, from £210 (designhotels.com; 001 212 235 1111).

FIRST THING I DO Go for a walk around wherever I’m staying. New York can seem overwhelming and loud and very big, but in reality it’s filled with small areas that can quickly feel like home. MUST-PACK ITEM I’ve been known to take a loaf of bread. The American stuff is disgusting. PERFECT DAY Take the train to Rockaway Beach, just an hour outside the city, where you can swim and sunbathe. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT Drinks and dinner at Acme in NoHo, and dancing at Happy Ending on the Lower East Side. At the end of the night, I always head to Marie’s Crisis Cafe, a tiny underground bar in the West Village with a piano and a packed crowd of professional Broadway singers doing show tunes till 4am. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME Sephora make-up for my friends and a few Reformation dresses for me. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR A visit to the water. It’s easy to forget that Manhattan is an island, but a short walk east or west to the Hudson can be the grounding you need in this crazy city. LAST THING I DO Washington Square Park is my favourite spot in New York – I always try to end up there before heading to JFK. Scarlett Curtis is a writer and blogger who is currently studying in New York

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


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Award-winner NEW CITY ICON

THE BEEKMAN N E W YOR K , USA

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

The 9/11 Memorial – intensely moving despite the droves of selfie-snapping tourists – is a few blocks away.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

PHOTOGRAPH: BJORN WALLANDER, RICHARD BARNES, LUIZ RUIZ, GETTY IMAGES

F

iDi (Financial District) is the hottest hood in Manhattan right now, bar none. And in FiDi, nowhere’s hotter than the Beekman. Modelled on a Queen Anne London townhouse and originally opened in 1881 as one of Manhattan’s first ‘skyscrapers’, it has been brought stunningly back to life by Martin Brudnizki, and everything that could be preserved has been. There is filigree, fretwork, bas-relief, even tooled leather in the elevators, alongside Persian rugs, boudoir chandeliers and silk-tasselled lampshades. It’s Brud at his most beguiling. And he gets the basics right too: in the rooms, lights go on or off with old-fashioned dolly switches; plugs and USB ports are where you want them; and the minibar is more like a pantry. Oh, and proper wastepaper baskets too (adios, horrid pedal bins). Plus you don’t have to be Einstein to operate the shower. Then there’s the art throughout the hotel, with works by the likes of Cathy Cone and Patrick Jacobs, the library with first editions of Edgar Allan Poe, who once wrote on the site, and the smoochiest jazz in the bar. Add in restaurants Fowler & Wells from Tom Colicchio (formerly of Gramercy Tavern), and Augustine, with Keith McNally (of Balthazar fame) at the helm and, well... this place is off the scale. BOOK IT Double, from £510 (thebeekman.com; 001 212 233 2300).


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A L M A L U S A B A I X A /C H I A D O

C A S T E L B R AC

LISBON, PORTUGA L

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eace and quiet are not your usual city-break accoutrements, but AlmaLusa, away from the bustle on Lisbon’s discreet Praça do Município, breaks the rules. The 18th-century building, once the site of an army arsenal and more recently a bank, is bursting at the seams with original features. Moss-green tiles line the way on the creaky wooden staircase; weathered flagstones and vaultstyle concrete walls frame the reception area. The rooms are as serene as the square they look onto – ogle the creamy façade of the city hall and snap away at the spookily silent passing trams. Eat brasserie fare at Delfina, which spills out onto the cobbled terrace. And look out for owner Miguel Simões de Almeida (he of the coiffured blond locks): he has THE best shopping tips in town. BOOK IT Double, from £130, including breakfast (almalusahotels.com; 00 351 21 269 7440).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Amble around the city’s antique shops filled to the rafters (literally) with 18th-century tiles and eyecatching Bordallo Pinheiro cabbage pottery.

5 D AY S

DI NA R D, F R A NCE

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rriving in Dinard feels a bit like stepping into a bygone era. An era of wholesome seaside pleasures, of cheery candy-striped beach huts, cliff-hugging mansions and blustery, sail-dotted bays. The jewel in its delightfully unglitzy crown is brand new Castelbrac, once a marine research centre, now a smart-as-a-pin retreat right on the sea. The pallet is straight-up ocean, with pleasing nautical touches in every nook and cranny, porthole windows and chic art-deco tiles. Bag a room with an absurdly big terrace – although you won’t want to leave your enormous freestanding bath, or the lose-yourselfin-it bed, for that matter. If you can summon the will, there’s laps to be swum in the pretty stone pool and lungfuls of sea air to be sucked in while zipping around in the hotel’s handsome vintage motorboat (with an insanely dishy skipper, FYI). Or just stay put, being pummelled into a stupor in the spa, feasting on sublime seafood and then drifting back to that terrace to gaze at the dreamy, time-travelly view. BOOK IT Double, from £235 (castelbrac.com; 00 33 2 99 80 30 00).

PULITZER

A M S T E R DA M , T H E N E T H E R L A N D S

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Meander along De Negen Straatjes (or Nine Streets), an area of boutiques, cafés and restaurants a hop, skip and jump from the hotel.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

The pretty walled city of St Malo is a 15-minute zoom across the bay: pop over one afternoon to stroll around the ramparts and gaze at the ragged Emerald Coast.

PHOTOGRAPHS: JOAO TRINDADE, ALAMY, SANDERBACK.COM

B

ehind every really clever hotel revamp is a really clever designer, and creative best-in-class Jacu Strauss, below left, is just that man (he worked on the Mondrian London). When tasked with sprucing one of Amsterdam’s most iconic hotels, spanning 25 canal houses with hundreds of higgledy-piggledy bedrooms, he had the genius idea of spending a night in each of the 225 rooms. The result of his extensive sleeping research is an eccentric mish-mash of old and new – Persian rugs, vintage phones (‘hotel phones are ugly,’ he says) and jewel-toned textiles. Glass greenhousey tunnels link the 400-yearold buildings, and we love the Music Collector’s Suite with its wall of trumpets and private canal entrance. The restaurant, Jansz, is a haze of sugar-pink curtains, crushed velvet booths and copper curios – a nod to the 17th-century coppersmelter who once lived here. The much-loved Pulitzer’s bar (a neighborhood gem) escaped a complete overhaul – it just got a lick of paint. If it ain’t broke... BOOK IT Double, from £235 (pulitzeramsterdam.com; 00 31 20 523 5235).


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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

A short stroll away is the Sagrada Familia, Gaudí’s gaudy (unfinished) masterpiece.

F O U R S E A S O N S B O G O TA BOGOTA , COLOM BI A

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t’s a sign of Colombia’s radical rehab – and Bogotá’s in particular, where you must linger for a couple of days – that Four Seasons has opened two hotels here in the past year: Casa Medina, a colonial number in the financial district, and the more recent, contemporary Four Seasons Bogotá, in happening downtown. This one is all about calming, minimalist interiors with a smattering of lovely local stuff, like curtains embroidered by craftsmen. Top pick is the penthouse with its views of the verdant Andes. Speaking of green, Colombia is famous for its emeralds, and the colour pops up all over the place, as in the bubble lights of the cleverly lit spa, with its strokeable stone walls. There’s nothing local about Kuru, the signature Japanese restaurant, but who cares when there are glass-enclosed terraces (airy yet private) front and back, soft-shell crab maki from chef Diego Soriano and wall-mounted origami carp ogling you? Not us. BOOK IT The Ultimate Travel Company (theultimatetravelcompany.co.uk; 020 3051 8098) offers three nights from £1,865, including breakfast, flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

For sheer exuberant joy, check out the chubby figures in the Botero Museum, artist Fernando Botero’s gift to the nation.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: NACHO ALEGRE, MERITXELL ARJALAGUER, SIMON BROWN, CHRIS SANCHEZ

n a city groaning under the weight of big, brassy five-stars (18 and counting), it warms our cockles when a hot new property is as much about the locals as it is the tourists. Say hola to Casa Bonay, brainchild of Barcelonian chica, Inés Miró-Sans and her ‘house of friends’ – a collaborative melting pot of local fashion designers, craftspeople, foodies and a coffee roaster. This creative crew has transformed a 19th-century mansion into a 67-room hipster hub, preserving the original mosaic floors and marble staircase. Trendy neighbours can grab an espresso at Satan’s Coffee Corner or settle in and surf at Libertine, the all-day restaurant-cum-lobby. And you (the equally hip hotel guest) can mooch up to the rooftop herb garden for a spot of yoga, or try Argentinianinspired food at the oddly named Elephant Crocodile Monkey (it’s delicious, we promise). The next stop should definitely be Shoreditch. BOOK IT Double, from £110 (casabonay.com; 00 34 93 545 8070).


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W WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Discover Powerscourt Centre, a Georgian townhouse filled with Dublin’s best vintage, antiques and interiors boutiques.

MEMMO PRINCIPE R E AL LISBON, PORTUGA L

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nce the stomping ground of Lisbon’s primped princes, Príncipe Real is now where the cool kids roam. Have a roam yourself, down the main cobbled drag, and duck through a narrow archway to the spaceship-like Memmo Príncipe Real. Those fashionable kids are hot on your heels, because the surf-dude owner, Rodrigo Machaz, loves attracting (rather than upsetting) the locals. There they are, all chic and glossy-haired, dining at Café Colonial and sipping cocktails by the emerald pool. The bedrooms act as cushy viewing platforms for the smashing cityscape – church spires spiking out from a patchwork of terracotta roofs – with wall-to-wall, floor-toceiling glass. It’s tough peeling yourself away from that view, but do, or dishy Rodrigo will wonder where you are. BOOK IT Double, from £220 (memmohotels.com; 00 351 21 049 5660).

hen a bar menu has two pages dedicated to G&Ts alone, you know you’re on to a good thing. When the space itself is filled with moodily lit booths, tarnished-mirror walls and marble tables? You’ve struck gold. The Sidecar bar is just one of the new touches at the Westbury, the hotel that lures Dublin’s hippest cats. Sink into a velvet armchair and peruse the classics or have your martini made tableside from the art-deco trolley. The Thirties vibe continues in Wilde, the restaurant, now home to an indoor terrace where ivy snakes up the walls and over the whitewashed rafters. But the food is the real showstopper – think Carlingford oysters, delicate crab tempura and steaks as soft as butter. Upstairs, the revamped rooms and suites cut an elegant figure with their kitten-soft linen and period flourishes. BOOK IT Double, from £230, including breakfast (doylecollection.com; 00 353 1 679 1122).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Hail a tuk-tuk for a spin round the city. They’re pimped to the nines with soft leather and are surprisingly comfortable.

Walk around Souq Waqif for an eyeful of the falcon market. And, yes, it sells everything you’ll ever need for your falcon.

SHAN G R I - L A D O HA DOH A , QATA R

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avourite food? Lobster, you say? That’s brunch sorted at the Shangri-La’s Yabby seafood restaurant. It’s not your average brunch, though. It’s a Gulf brunch – an all-you-can-eat-and-drink affair, starting at midday and stretching on through the afternoon, with lobster served in every way imaginable and free-flowing champagne to complete the deal. After that, you’ll probably want to cool off in the pool beneath the palms or have a little doze in your room, with an eyeful of the Doha skyline. But not before checking out the chandelier in the lobby, which, we’re told, weighs as much eight pandas. Or four camels... whatever measurement you work in. BOOK IT Double, from £170 (shangri-la.com; 0800 028 3337).

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H O S H I N OYA TO K YO T O K YO , JA PA N

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Splash some cash in nearby Ginza, home to great shops, including the huge Mitsukoshi department store.

ANOUSKA BECKWITH’S PA R I S

FIRST THING I DO

Take my dog Gigi for a walk along the Seine, past Notre Dame, to go to Shakespeare and Company’s new cafe, which makes delicious vegetarian food. PERFECT DAY?

I love nature, so I’ll go to a park – Parc des ButtesChaumont is one of my favourites because of its waterfall and amazing views of Paris. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT?

A club called La Mano, where they play great Latin music. BEST HOLIDAY BUD?

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ew kid on the block Nolinski is a cut above your common-or garden Parisian pied à terre. Behind it is the creative flair of Jean-Louis Deniot, who was entrusted with transforming an ex-office building into a peaceful, intimate city bolthole more akin to a kooky private members’ club. It’s a mishmash of eras; a haze of plush velvet, distressed mirrors, wingback chairs, vintage radios and art-deco flourishes, with floor-to-ceiling tiles and polished brass in the vast bathrooms. And despite the brouhaha of tourist-clogged Avenue de l’Opéra below, there’s a strangely ethereal feel to the place, helped along by the cloud-frescoed staircase, the twinkly-starred ceiling in the spa – and perhaps the dreamy cocktails in the brasserie. Just what you need to set you up before clip-clopping through the Carrara-marble lobby to head out into the bright lights of Paris. BOOK IT Double, from £400, including breakfast (nolinskiparis.com; 00 33 142 86 1010). WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Have a nose round the just-opened Grand Musée du Parfum on Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, which covers the history of all things scent, back to the age of the pharaohs.

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My best friend Flo Morrissey [a singer and daughter of fund manager Helena Morrissey] moved to Paris last year and we love going out to Nanashi, Café Pinson and Wild & The Moon bar together. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME

Chakra crystals from La Roche Mère and Palo Santo incense sticks from L’univers d’Esther. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR

Seeing my friends. We often do fullor new-moon ceremonies at my apartment in Le Marais. LAST THING I DO

Dinner with friends at a Japanese restaurant such as You, Isse or Soma. Anouska is a fine-art photographer

PHOTOGRAPHS: NACASA & PARTNERS INC, GETTY IMAGES, GUILLAUME DE LAUBIER

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oshinoya Tokyo is a head-turner. It’s located in the capital’s strait-laced financial hub, with its sexy, black-latticed façade – inspired by an ancient kimono motif – a tip-off that this gem isn’t just your bog-standard urban stopover. Inside, hushed tones, soft lighting, a gentle instrumental soundtrack and minimal aesthetics have you walking about barefoot in minutes, to pad across your room’s tactile tatami flooring before diving into the cushiony softness of the low-lying bed. It is the city’s first tower ryokan, so each floor is set up to resemble the homeliness of this type of traditional Japanese inn, where six guest rooms surround a central lounge area. Here, you are encouraged to kick back on the cushionscattered day beds and let the obliging staff take the strain. For the full shebang, visit the 17th floor and soak away your troubles in the outdoor onsen. BOOK IT Double, from £615 (hoshinoresorts.com; 00 81 50 3786 1144). Air France (airfrance.co.uk) flies to Tokyo via Paris from £510.


AUTUMN 2017


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I N K AT E R R A L A C A S O N A CUS CO, PE RU

Whizz over to the northern outskirts of Cusco to Saksaywaman, the ancient capital of the Incas, with its huge, mysterious stone walls. How anyone could ever move those slabs, let alone stack them up so neatly, remains a mystery.

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he huge wooden door at La Casona is always locked. No doorbell, either, so the only way in is by knocking, which is probably the same way that former resident Simón Bolívar got in (he kicked the Spanish out of Peru, FYI, and Bolivia is named after him. You’re welcome). Smiley staff open up and if you’re not already breathless thanks to the altitude – Cusco is 10,800 feet above sea level, so you’ll need a couple of days here to acclimatise en route to Machu Picchu – a look inside this restored 16th-century mansion will quickly change that. Don’t worry – the hotel provides an oxygen tank and mask for 10 minutes, and it works a treat. There are just 11 rooms, spread over two floors around a courtyard – bagsy one of the suites overlooking the pretty Plaza de las Nazarenas. Then book some downtime at the spa before a very Peruvian supper of quinoa soup and crispy guinea-pig confit. It tastes like chicken, trust us. BOOK IT Audley Travel (audleytravel.com; 01993 838 620) offers three nights, as part of a seven-night trip, from £3,930, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

ZU R ICH, SW ITZER L A N D

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urich? Boring bankers and cuckoo clocks, right? Actually, no. Zurich is cool. No, really. It’s small, yes, and as neat as a starched, ironed shirt. But it has a strong artsy and creative side too – and, in the Marktgasse Hotel, a new, very happening place to stay. The building, in the middle of the Old Town, dates from the 15th century, and it has kept its quirks: a sloping floor here; a tiled stove there. Stuccoed ceilings, panelled walls and polished-oak parquet are paired with industrial-chic bits and pieces and splats of colour from groovy designer chairs. The all-day deli, Delish, has become a local hipster hangout, while buzzy, brasserie-style Baltho’s does a decently fiery bangbang chicken. The adjoining bar, seductively draped in dark green, is the place to go Dada over a cocktail or two. BOOK IT Double, from £215 (marktgassehotel.ch; 00 41 44 266 10 10). WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Explore Zurich West, the city’s industrial quarter turned hub of chic boutiques and restaurants – eat at LaSalle, housed in a former engine factory.

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Make time for the newly developed Georgetown Waterfront – think South Bank with superyachts and better weather.

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WA S H I N G T O N D C , U S A

he Watergate Hotel, which fell into disrepair after the infamous 1972 break-in at an adjoining office complex, was snapped up for a bargain £37m in 2007. The new hotel, in Washington’s Foggy Bottom district, has emerged after a nine-year, Ron Arad redesign – one that’s stayed true to architect Luigi Moretti’s original Sixties curvy lines. It’s a bit kitsch, a bit camp and even, dare we say it, a bit cheesy. But it’s pretty fabulous too, with its Moroso chairs, a maze-like whiskey bar, a long, sexy library overlooking the Potomac River and juicy staff uniforms by Mad Men costume-designer Janie Bryant. Guest rooms, many with balconies, are monochrome and functional – and there’s no shame in that. They have great lighting and plug and USB points everywhere. Meanwhile, in the Kingbird restaurant, ex-Fat Duck chef Michael Santoro does amazing short ribs in malt with the best pommes purée we have ever tasted. BOOK IT Double, from £290 (thewatergatehotel.com; 00 1 844 617 1972).

PHOTOGRAPHS: HENRRY MORENO, CONOR HARRIGAN

M AR K TGASS E H OT E L

WHILE YOU’RE THERE


AUTHENTIC TRAVEL CHANGES US. It is when we travel farthest from home that we learn the most about ourselves. On the edge of

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For more information, visit africatravel.com or call 020 7843 3580


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Award-winner ENDURING EXCELLENCE

M AN DAR I N O R I E N TA L , B A N G K O K BA NGKOK , T H A IL A N D

WHILE YOU'RE THERE

Hire a private longtail boat and spend the morning gliding up the river between the Temple of Dawn, the Grand Palace and the serene Thonburi canals.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, JAMIE MCGREGOR SMITH

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oël Coward, Somerset Maugham, Joseph Conrad, Norman Mailer, William Golding, Graham Greene... the literati have been gushing about this old girl for decades. Fourteen decades to be precise – the Mandarin Oriental Bangkok blew out 140 candles in 2016. And to mark the occasion she did just what any sensible lady would do: she quietly rejuvenated her original Author’s Wing with a fabulous £13m nip and tuck. The white marble now sparkles, the imperial staircase begs to be swanned around on and the French doors are thrown open onto a manicured lawn backed by the mesmerising Chao Phraya River. Upstairs, the Grand Royal Suite is fit for a king (and half his court), while 12 new suites have been added to the adjacent Garden Wing. They are fresh, elegant, comfortable; a beautiful mash-up of exotic wood and pale silks. And the staff, some of whom have been with the hotel for over 50 years, are faultless: they will greet you and treat you like a long-lost family member, only with far better manners. Do pull on some fancy gear for dinner at the gloriously camp, newly revamped La Normandie, before promptly disrobing for a before-bed QMS facial at the sultry new spa. To paraphrase Noël Coward: ‘It is a lovely place and we are fonder of it than ever.’ BOOK IT Cleveland Collection (clevelandcollection. co.uk; 020 7843 3596) offers two nights from £1,130, including breakfast, flights and transfers.


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LONDON, ENGLA ND

Settle in with popcorn and fizz for a flick at the weekly cinema club held in the rooftop secret garden.

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tar power. A force field of glamour and charisma that hits you like a (very pleasant) shock wherever you encounter it. The Berkeley has it in buckets – especially after its recent rather fabulous refurb. A gleaming glass pavilion (architect: one Richard Rogers) now emerges from its sandstone façade, while inside are gobsmacking new suites. We love the 900-square-foot Grand Terrace designed by John ‘Aman’ Heah – a zen-cool fantasia of creamy marble, Arne Jacobsen-like furniture and a balcony big enough to straddle two time zones. Float from hula-hoop classes (yes!) by the rooftop pool, to the Bamford spa, to the afternoon Prêt-à-Portea in the Collins Room, to cocktails in the sceney Blue Bar, followed by a feast in Marcus Wareing’s joint across the lobby. As we said: star power. Which is why it draws real-life megastars, like the madly famous (and private) Hollywood actress who bounced into the Blue Bar during our visit, raving that she was ‘blown away’ by the Berkeley’s new look. Us too. BOOK IT Double, from £480 (the-berkeley.co.uk; 020 7107 8927).

VILLA D’ESTE

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xquisite. Elegant. Incomparable. Old-fashioned in the dreamiest way, this 16th-century grande dame has it all: pole position on Lake Como, a mosaic nymphaeum at the top of the Italian Renaissance gardens, Michelin-starred dining at the Veranda restaurant, a gem-box of a spa, and a floating swimming pool where waiters proffer silver trays of Aperol spritz at high noon. The villas, suites and rooms are bedecked with damask silks, linen sheets, antique heirlooms and 17th-century paintings. The guest list over the ages is frankly ridiculous: Greta Garbo, Bette Davis, Cary Grant, Madonna, Marlene Dietrich. Do an Ingrid Bergman and swan about in your turban and diamonds – no chance of being overdressed here, unless you’re near George Clooney, a neighbour, who always goes tieless. Park yourself on the terrace under the canopy of a 500-year-old plane tree, soak up the grandiose views and people-watch as motorboats nip in and out depositing the great and the good. They just don’t make them like they used to. BOOK IT Double, from £395, including breakfast (villadeste.com; 00 39 031 3481). WHILE YOU’RE THERE

A short boat ride away is Villa del Balbianello. This restored 18thcentury villa (now a private museum) has a very rare, and very beautiful, collection of Venetian paintings on glass, and magnificent terraced gardens.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

The giant Beverly Center is getting a £400m spruce-up: it'll be the swishest mall in Southern California.

T H E B E V E R LY H I L L S H OT E L LOS A NGELES, USA

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ungalows? Well, yes, but we’re not exactly talking Frintonon-Sea. The covers have been whipped off at three of the Beverly Hills Hotel’s 23 historic bungalow suites, and these new-look beauties are bliss. Take Bungalow 5 (where Liz Taylor, above right, honeymooned with six of her seven husbands), with its pool, frothy bouganvillia and shades of pink, gold and rust. Or you might fancy Bungalow 22, inspired by Frank Sinatra, which has a grand piano and a dressing room the size of New Jersey. You needn’t take the whole deal, just a room or two – you can rent rooms individually at most of the three- or fourbedroom bungalows. And the hotel itself? Its four-year makeover is nearly complete, with a primped poolside Cabana Café and new juice bar added, so you can go clean and lean beneath those cerulean skies and spindly California palms. BOOK IT Double, from £505 (dorchestercollection.com; 001 310 276 2251).

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


Turns out the grass is greener on the Emerald Isle. As for the castles? Well, just look at this place. Ashford Castle is turreted perfection and ripe for a visit

KING OF THE CASTLES Not all castles are created equal, you know. Ashford Castle, with its imposingly grand facade and antique-packed interior, certainly enters the realm of fairy tale. Situated in County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland, the five-star hotel presides over 350 acres and hugs the shores of Lough Corrib. The gardens are manicured to a toytown level of symmetry. The library houses over 800 antiquarian books. And the wine cellar is expansive, to say the least. There are two resident Irish wolfhounds, a 19th-century suit of armour and a custom-made silver-gilt dinner service. To put it simply? This place can out-castle the best of them. After all,

it has been working on its gasp-inducing, impressive appearance for the best part of 800 years. A star-studded history has seen the castle in various incarnations as the Guinness family home, film location for T and stomping ground for umpteen visiting celebrities and dignitaries. Now, Ashford Castle has entered a new chapter in its story. The Red Carnation Hotel Collection (no stranger to stunningly beautiful properties) acquired Ashford Castle in 2013. One restoring face-lift â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to the tune of $100 million â&#x20AC;&#x201C; later and the castle is the poster child for


TATLER • PROMOTION

CLOCKWISE FR AR LEFT, AERIAL VIEW OF ASHFORD CASTLE. THE OAK HALL. THE SPA. FALCONRY. THE KENNEDY SUITE

ye olde modern glamour. Think period drama but with all the mod cons. This is serious luxury. Ashford Castle boasts 83 bedrooms and suites, all lavishly decorated with antiques and original artworks. Thick brocaded quilts, sumptuous fabrics and dark-wood furniture have all been curated with meticulous attention to detail. The high ceilings, festooned with chandeliers, will only serve to heighten your notions of grandeur. In fact, the bedrooms are so plush and delightful, the temptation is to remain ensconced there for the duration of your stay. But then you'd miss out on the myriad fresh-air-androsy-cheeks activities the estate has to offer. The castle is home to Ireland's very first school of falconry and also offers riding at its fully equipped equestrian centre. For the beast-averse, there is year-round golf, tennis, clay-pigeon shooting, boating, archery, ziplining...the list goes on and on. After a day outside in the bracing Irish air, you'll really have earned some hearty fare at one of Ashford Castle's restaurants. Executive chef Philippe Farineau rustles up gourmet food in the elegantly regal George V dining room (decked out not unlike the Orient Express). Meanwhile, Cullens at the Cottage, The Dungeon and the Prince of Wales bar offer more informal options with plenty of fresh, local Irish produce. And, true to

expectation, you're never far from a wellpoured Guinness or fortifying whisky on this estate! Skip along to the Billiards room or Cigar terrace – three cheers for that. Now you have a picture of the sort of opulence you're dealing with, it probably goes without saying that the spa is incredible. But we're going to say it anyway. It's brand-spanking new and houses five treatment rooms, a Hammam, steam room, swimming pool and terrace area overlooking the tranquil waters of Lough Corrib. In a word? Sublime. The spa menu is brimming with pampering and beautifying treatments designed to help you unwind and recharge. If you’re not already scrabbling for your suitcase, you should be. This castle retreat is the perfect destination for lovebirds and families alike, whether for weekend jaunts or drawn-out holidays. Ashford Castle’s Hideaway Cottage – private lakeside accommodation with breath-taking views of the grounds – provides perfect romantic seclusion for loved-up couples. A large number of the castle’s bedrooms are interconnecting, making it equally suitable for those with little ones in tow. There is plenty to amuse them, from movie matinees in the 32-seat cinema to treasure hunts on the grounds. Just try and prise them away! They say that a man’s home is his castle. Ashford Castle is home and so much more.

CAPTURE THE CASTLE GETTING THERE

There are daily flights to Knock airport in Mayo, Ireland from Gatwick. From here, Ashford Castle is just a 45-minute drive away. State-of-the-art chauffeured vehicles are available for airport transfers and private excursions throughout your stay. —

ACTIVITIES There's certainly no shortage of things to do at Ashford Castle. The estate lends itself well to outdoorsy pursuits. Try your hand at falconry or clay-pigeon shooting. Spend a day riding or fishing. Or how about rowing, tree climbing or cycling? —

WHAT'S NEARBY? Plenty. Explore the ruins of the Royal Abbey of Cong, be part of the jigs and the reels with some traditional music in Galway (just 50 minutes away) or venture further to the unspoilt Aran Islands (yes, home of the jumper), situated just at the mouth of Galway Bay.

For more information, visit ashfordcastle.com or redcarnationhotels.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

MAGICAL MILESTONE

CLOCKWISE FR , OUTSIDE VIEW OF THE MILESTONE HOTEL. THE PRINCE ALBERT SUITE. 24-HOUR CONCIERGE AND BUTLER SERVICE. AFTERNOON TEA IN THE PARK LOUNGE

The Milestone Hotel is an iconic mansion house right in the heart of Kensington. Steeped in history and bursting with personality, it’s the perfect destination for those seeking old-school charm Not cottoned on to the whole staycation thing yet? You're really missing out. Think about it: no tropical disease jabs, no airport security queues, no lost luggage. Staying put has never looked so attractive. And where better to hole up than the Milestone Hotel, slap-bang in the middle of London's chic Kensington. An illustrious history has seen this house serve as a home to barons, counts and dignitaries before blooming into hotel life in 1922. The Red Carnation Hotel Collection has quite an eye for exceptional properties – in 1998, the Milestone Hotel was added to its portfolio. Some careful restoration later and the Milestone is back to its original grandeur. What can you expect today? Five-star luxury and tip-top service. The 44 deluxe bedrooms, 12 suites and six long-stay apartments (really, why leave unless you have to?) have all been lavishly decorated with bespoke furniture and furnishings. And, as you would imagine, all of them are positively bursting with antiques. Many have private balconies with fantastic views of Kensington Palace. It's not just the bedrooms that get an A* in interiors. An eclectic collection of original art features works by Picasso, Dali and Miro throughout the house. Of course, you can't have a traditional English hotel without a traditional afternoon tea – and the Milestone doesn't disappoint. Enjoy Scottish salmon and cream cheese sandwiches and scones thick with cream in the sumptuous

setting of the Park Lounge. Meanwhile, Cheneston's restaurant offers an elegant dining option, highlighting the very best of British cuisine. After a day spent trotting around the V&A and the Natural History Museum (the Milestone is a stone's throw from some of London's best attractions), why not allow yourself to be pampered in the spa? Renowned spa therapist Fiona Keane heads up the whole panoply of beauty services here – from manicures to facials and bouncy blowdries. All dolled up and seeking a nightcap? The Old Fashioned cocktail at the Stables bar is one of the best you'll ever try. The Milestone also happens to be one of the only hotels in London licensed to perform the art of sabrage. Yes, opening champagne with a sword. You can't get more authentic than that. If you're looking for a fun, sophisticated London retreat – look no further. The Milestone is one special place.

For more information, visit milestonehotel.com or redcarnationhotels.com


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FOUR SE ASONS CASABL ANCA CA SA BL A NCA , MOROCCO

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ver since Rick put Ilsa on the plane in Casablanca, the appeal of Morocco’s main city and commercial hub has been diminishing. But Casa is hotting up. The two-mile-long Corniche has been given a makeover, the astonishing art-deco district is being painstakingly restored, a new opera house and arts centre will open this year, and 2018 will see the start of Morocco’s new high-speed train, which will whisk you from Tangier to Casablanca in two hours. And at the heart of the action is the swish new oceanfront Four Seasons: 186 ergonomically perfect, white-and-taupe rooms; 29 suites the size of football pitches; a handsome pool with snappy poolside service; a stretch of beach with its own miniature sand dunes; and the beautiful spa for rhassoul wraps and Biologique Recherche skin treatments. Mint, one of the four restaurants, serves breakfast viennoiserie to equal anything in Paris, while Bleu has Dakhla oysters and sashimi of fantastically fresh sea bream with a drop-dead gorgeous view of the breakers and the Pointe d’El Hank lighthouse. Here’s looking at you, kid... and here’s to a shiny new reason to visit Morocco. BOOK IT Double, from £255 (fourseasons.com; 00 212 529 073700).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Stuff yourself with Florentine specialities on a four-hour foodie walking tour of the city with Eating Europe. (eatingeurope tours.com)

LEON E BLU

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his Renaissance palazzo has been the Ricasoli family’s city pad for centuries. Now Baroness Maria Teresa Ricasoli Firdolfi has opened her piano nobile to paying guests, creating a stylish boutique bolthole named after the blue lion on the family crest. The nine suites – Bindaccio, Ugo and Rinieri have mezzanines and duomo-high ceilings – may salute her illustrious ancestors and be scattered with heirlooms, but this is no museum piece. The art-loving Tuscan aristo has paired the building’s ancient architecture with contemporary design, and she is on hand with insider tips, including visits to her brother’s award-winning winery – Italy’s oldest – at Brolio, the family castle in Chianti. Or just try a glass or two in your own room, with its view over the Arno. BOOK IT Double, from £270, including breakfast (leoneblu.com; 00 39 055 290270).

NEWSF L ASH ROM E ’ S IC ON IC HO T E L E DE N R E OPE N S I N A PR I L

O T RY T H E A F T E R A FAC E L I F T – W E WA N T T S PI F F Y N E W S PA . ( D ORCH E S T E RCOL L E C T ION .COM )

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

The jaw-droppingly vast and ornate Hassan II Mosque, the largest in Morocco, is one of only a handful of mosques in the Arab world open to non-Muslims.

THE PENINSULA BEIJING BEIJING, CHINA

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ast year, the Peninsula waved its magic wand and – bibbidy-bobbidy-boo – a new hotel. Well, practically a new hotel. Its Beijing outpost has been glamorised to the tune of £90m, and is barely recognisable from its old, austere self. Gone are the red marble floors, gilded pillars and the imperial staircase that haunted the lobby. Instead we have sparkling sunlight, pearl-white walls and contemporary art. Flanking either side of a new backlit staircase (perfect for flashing those red soles) are branches of Chanel, Harry Winston and Graff. The new rooms are double the size, and mix muted greys and China blue with monochrome bathrooms. Don’t expect anything as passé as iPads here – the in-room technology is worthy of a NASA launch. The limb-loosening, candlelit spa will have you kowtowing with gratitude, while May, the concierge, is somehow always on hand to make the magic happen. BOOK IT Double, from £415 (peninsula.com; 00 86 10 8516 2888).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Ask the concierge to secure you a table at the hard-to-find (and harder to book) Temple Restaurant Beijing, an artsy number secreted in the courtyard of a 600-year-old former temple.


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t is a rare pleasure, the Pig. A delight to stroll through kitchen gardens fragrant with 11 types of mint, past squabbling quails and neat rows of leeks and beds of big, blousy kale. A thrill to swing on a swing made for two beneath a centuries-old cedar tree, the Devonshire hills rolling away from your toes. A joy to slouch on jewel-coloured sofas in the old drawing room, papers in one hand, perfect little homemade ham-hock Scotch egg in the other. The newest Pig is in a fiercely grand Elizabethan mansion, but the grandness stops there; inside is so relaxed it’s basically horizontal. Kids can run around and trainers at supper are just fine. There are still plenty of original features to keep old-timers happy, though: soaring ceilings, sweeping staircases, elaborate cornicing and original family portraits. The feel is very outside-in, plants everywhere – pots of herbs fill the bright restaurant, where food is local and scrumptious (you will want to fall face first into the Chioggia-beetroot-and-blue-cheese risotto). Over in the old, part-restored folly, there are fancy flatbreads to be eaten in the shade of the cedars or beneath enormous straw lampshades at shared scrubbed-wood tables. In fact, the whole place has a scrubbed feel to it. It’s a pink-cheeked, garden-fresh lungful of Devonshire air. BOOK IT Double, from £145 (thepighotel.com; 01404 540400).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Wildwood park on the Escot estate, owned by the Kennaway family, has animals to spot, a maze to get lost in and a brilliant play barn to while away a rainy afternoon.

NEWSF L ASH F E A S T YOU R WAY T H ROUG H N I N E R E S TAU R A N T S AT

T P O S T I N A F OR M E R T H E N E D, S OHO HOU S E ’ S N E W OU B A N K HQ I N T H E CI T Y OF L ON D ON . ( T H E N E D.C OM )

THYME

T H E COTS WOLDS, ENGL A N D

32 T A T L E R T R A V E L G U I D E 2 0 1 7

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Thyme also runs the divine Swan pub at Southrop – they’ll give you lanterns to amble down there for supper after dark.

PHOTOGRAPHS: COLIN PAGE

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oney-coloured Cotswold cottages? Check. Views of bucolic loveliness? Check. A strong his ’n’ hers matching Le Chameau vibe? Checkity-check. Thyme has that quintessentially country-house-bolthole feel down to a T. But hang on, what’s this? The mini estate also has a cooking school churning out the next Michelinstarred chefs, no less. And, next door, a new house has been given over to cosy-yet-smart bedrooms. And look! There’s now a wellness space for yoga and offering Aurelia Probiotic Skincare treatments. Caryn Hibbert, who has slowly transformed her family home into this shiny, feast-and-flop haven, has big plans for Thyme. But first and foremost is the food, much of it is grown in the kitchen gardens and sprawling grounds or sourced nearby. Best bit: take over the whole joint, throw a party, drink too many rum and rosemary muddles and stuff yourselves silly. Next morning, get your guests to learn how to make perfect rhubarb tarts. Win win. BOOK IT Double, from £260, including breakfast. Cookery classes, from £145 (thyme.co.uk; 01367 850174).


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T H E L O D G E AT CR AGGY R AN G E

COPE N H AGE N , DE N M A R K

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he Hotel d’Angleterre is so elegant and shimmering that she feels like a dream. A really good one. An extremely comfortable one. The couple who owned the hotel in the Nineties sold her for millions in 2007 – only to buy her back in 2011 because they missed her so much. You catch our drift. And drift you will, from the underground pool, all columns and steps (very Aphrodite), to the Michelin-starred Marchal restaurant, where the head chef is so handsome and the chateâubriand en croûte so delicious you will spend lunch emitting involuntary moans and blushing. Then you can drift out into Copenhagen itself, as the d’Angleterre is brilliantly located close to the action. And when you are tired of canals and cinnamon buns, drift back to Balthazaar, the champagne bar, and then up to your room, where the pastel/silver/white decor is entirely soothing. But not as soothing as you each having your own individual duvet. Copenheaven. BOOK IT Double, from £360 (dangleterre.com; 00 45 33 12 00 95).

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op tip for the new digs at Craggy Range winery: book the head chef from its award-winning restaurant, Terrôir. Andrew Saxon will show guests the kitchen garden and then prepare a bespoke menu in the four-bed, exclusive-hire lodge. And there’s a lot to love about the lodge. Like the supersized everything (rooms, beds, soaring ceilings). The decor: country casual, cool as anything, lots of white wood and light. Then there’s the location, beneath impressive Te Mata Peak and surrounded by vineyards. But the very best bit? The fully stocked kitchen, complete with resident sommelier for private wine tastings. BOOK IT Austravel (austravel.com; 0800 988 4834) offers three nights, as part of an 11-night trip, from £1,800, including flights and car hire.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Yes, it is 45 minutes out of Copenhagen, but don’t miss the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Make your way to Hawke’s Bay’s main town, Napier, home to Mister D, the hottest new restaurant in NZ, for pulled pork with white polenta, a glass of very local pinot gris and fab live music.

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BI R R E GU R R A , AUS T R A L I A

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Get a blast of sea air in nearby Lorne. The gumtree-filled streets are pretty (and busy), but the water is the pull: fishing, surfing and splashing in the sapphire waves of Louttit Bay.

rae, two hours from Melbourne – a good bolt-on to your big Aussie trip – is essentially an organic farm. No, wait, it’s a restaurant. Or, hang on, is it a hotel? OK, let’s start with the gardens – they’re stuffed full of vegetable patches and orchards sprouting olives, stone fruits and berries. Now, the restaurant – it’s been lauded as one of Australia’s finest since Dan Hunter opened it in 2013. Lunches last for HOURS, each course paired with wine. Highlight: iced oyster, beef tendon and mountain pepper. Next, finally, and what a relief: it’s added rooms, fusing the rustic feel of an Aussie country pad – slate floors, recycled bricks, corrugated iron – with a contemporary zig-a-zig-ah. All is open plan, with a snazzy wall mural, a kitchen, and stargazing windows above your pillow. A record player and parts of Dan’s own vinyl collection are in each room; open the windows and let the breeze roll in and the Joni Mitchell roll out. BOOK IT Double, from £265, including breakfast (braerestaurant.com; 00 61 3 5236 2226).

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EAT Lisbon, birthplace of the pastél de nata custard tart, is tearing up the foodie scene. Opened in 2014, Time Out Mercado da Ribeira is a gastronomical wonderland, with 40 stalls from the city’s best chefs. Stop at Croqueteria for a partridge croquette, or get stuck in to a steak tartare at Tartar-ia, run by the team behind the first restaurant in Portugal to win two Michelin stars, Vila Joya. Wear elasticated trousers.

SHOP

Play

The city’s ornate kiosks, handily close to all the hotspots, have been given a major spruce and now do cocktails, ice cream and, one claims, the best chocolate cake in the world (we tried it, and it is). At weekends, live music and DJs draw a civilised crowd, young and old, till late. Keep those caipirinhas coming and you’ve got yourself an alfresco club. WORTH A MENTION

Portas do Sol, in Alfama, a chic bar with squidgy sofas from which to gaze down to the Tagus River, is a pictureperfect perch for sipping a glass of icy vinho verde, the Portuguese ‘green wine’ (not actually green, FYI).

LISBON

Portugal’s elegantly faded city of seven hills is riding high right now, says Celia Thursfield

LISBON HAS A HOST OF CONCEPT STORES SELLING 100 PER CENT LOCAL LOVELINESS. A VIDA PORTUGUESA IS A HIGHLIGHT: WITH FOUR SHOPS AROUND THE CITY, IT HAS EVERYTHING FROM DIVINE SOAPS AND CUTESY CERAMICS TO, ER, TINNED FISH. AND DON’T MISS BERTRAND, IN CHIADO, THE WORLD’S OLDEST BOOKSHOP (FOUNDED IN 1732). WORTH A MENTION

Lisbon’s fleamarket (Feira da Ladra) spans the narrow streets of Alfama. Expect smiles, throngs of locals and stalls crammed with everything from intricate Azulejo tiles to old teddies.

WORTH A MENTION

A Cevicheria, above, in up-and-coming Príncipe Real, is a masterclass in ceviche from Brazil-born chef Kiko Martins.

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Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara is a serene garden with views across to the crumbling castle and the pretty patchwork of terracotta roofs.

And chill...

WORTH A MENTION

An hour up the coast from Lisbon Hit the surf. is Areias do Seixo, a hotel so Grand Areias do Seixo Designs-esque you half expect runs a school, Kevin McCloud to jump out from Noah, in nearby behind a tree. Right on the sea Santa Cruz, with a meandering path to the where you can beach, it’s fabulously eco and rooms learn the basics or sharpen up your have fireplaces, driftwood features carving skills. and a side order of rolling Atlantic.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

Red Savannah (redsavannah.com; 01242 787800) offers two nights at Santiago de Alfama and two at Areias do Seixo from £780, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

PHOTOGRAPHS: ALAMY, SHUTTERSTOCK

SPARKLY NEW HOTELS ARE POPPING UP QUICKER THAN YOU CAN SAY OBRIGADA! BEAUTIFULLY BOUTIQUE SANTIAGO DE ALFAMA IS HOUSED IN A 15TH-CENTURY FORMER GARMENT FACTORY; ALMALUSA (PAGE 16) IS CLOSE TO THE ACTION BUT DELIGHTFULLY QUIET; AND MEMMO PRINCIPE REAL (PAGE 19) IS A BOLTHOLE IN THE BOOMIEST PART OF TOWN.

When you’ve had enough of tackling Lisbon’s seven hills (even your Fitbit will be on its last legs), hop on a tram and grab a window seat. No. 28 glides past all the sights. Peer out at the Sé Cathedral, built in 1150, and jump off at Baixa to zoom up the neo-gothic Santa Justa lift.


TATLER • PROMOTION

LIVE THE DREAM This summer, enjoy a relaxing beach break in Sani Resort’s elegant new adult-friendly property. Private, stylish and exclusively for couples and families with children aged over 12, Sani Dunes offers a more grown-up holiday

It's hard to improve on perfection but the family behind Sani Resort, the immaculate slice of beachside paradise on Greece’s sundrenched Kassandra peninsula, have managed it. Responding to requests from guests for more adult-friendly areas across the resort, the clever things have opened a brandspanking new five-star hotel that welcomes couples and families with children aged 12 and above. Think of it as the older sister of the four fabulous sibling hotels that dot the resort’s 1,000 acres of pristine forest and nearly five miles of spotless sandy beaches. An older, sophisticated sister, that is. Expect chic low-rise accommodation made up of 136 luxurious rooms, including 80 open-plan suites, all decorated in a contemporary style with sublime touches of Mediterranean elegance. Think handcrafted furniture, gorgeous fabrics and natural woods that enhance the peaceful water’s-edge ambience. And you couldn’t be closer to the water. Every room overlooks either the shimmering Aegean and private beach or one of the inviting heated outdoor freeform pools. As you’d expect from a resort famed for its knockout cuisine, Sani Dunes offers an incredible choice of dining options, including the main adults-only restaurant headed by Michelinstarred chef Ettore Botrini, and two other à la carte options, right on the beach. Enjoy a postprandial cocktail at one of the three swanky bars, then stroll around nearby Sani Marina to ogle the impressive yachts moored there. Of course, you can access the myriad of other excellent bars, restaurants and pools throughout the expansive resort. But you probably won’t want to leave Sani Dunes. The chic destination also boasts an exclusive spa by Anne Semonin, which offers a slew of pampering treatments. And if you’re worried older children may be overlooked, don’t be. The hotel offers a range of activities and spaces specifically for teenagers, including a dedicated teen chill-out lounge, allowing you to really relax. Enjoy up to 20% off when you book before 28 February 2017. For more information, please visit sani-dunes.com

TATLER OFFER Tatler readers can get the most out of the Sani Resort spa with €150 spa credit to spend. Simply quote TATLER16 when booking to redeem the offer

CL


WHAT TO PACK

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Warning: graphic content

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Because it’s always vodka o’clock

CALFSKIN BAG, £7,850, BY HERMES

THE CARRY ON COCKTAIL KIT, £15.95, BY W&P DESIGN, AT HARVEY NICHOLS

Liberate yourself from the selfie-stick POWERSHOT G9 DIGITAL CAMERA, £405, BY CANON

Upgraded braid LEATHER BRACELET, £185, BY BOTTEGA VENETA

Instant urbanbrightener SUBLIMAGE LA BRUME & LA CREME, £380, BY CHANEL

Join the dots Stand out at Heathrow

SILK TWILL BANDANAS, £65 EACH, BY MARGARET HOWELL

LEATHER PASSPORT CASE, £165, BY ANYA HINDMARCH

C A P I TA L ! How to look as stylish as the Lisbon natives

Smooth operator Look sharp SUNGLASSES, £150, BY BALLY

A hug in a rug CASHMERE WRAP, £245, BY THE TRAVELWRAP COMPANY

Cotton is for wimps LEATHER ESPADRILLES, £340, BY GUCCI

No water neccessary YACHT-MASTER 40, £10,350, BY ROLEX

If NASA made cases... Here’s how LISBON: HERE’S WHY CITY GUIDE, £4, BY HERB LESTER ASSOCIATES

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

7R MASTER DUCORD SUITCASE, FROM £625, BY HARTMANN

EDITED BY BEATRIZ CHOI. FOR STOCKISTS SEE ADDRESS BOOK IN MAIN MAGAZINE

EXPRESS FLOWER GEL MASK, £80, BY SISLEY


C A R L I S L E B AY ANTIGUA

LU XU R Y AWA IT S EXPLORE • ADVENTURE • RELAX W W W. C A R L I S L E - B AY. C O M


Discover more at Cunard.com


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BR I E F E NC O U NT ER S Expand your horizons on a short, action-packed escape

N O M A D E N TA M A N U N G O R O N G O R O N G O R O N G O R O C O N S E R VA T I O N A R E A , T A N Z A N I A

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here are a gazillion safari camps for watching elephants wallow and hearing lions moaning in the moonlight. But with views like this? Not so much. At Loisaba’s smart new Tented Camp, you feel like you’re on top of Africa. Wherever you are – tucked up in soft cotton sheets, wallowing in the infinity pool or slumped in a curvaceous wicker chair on the deck – there are two million acres of private wilderness rolling away below you, like an empty, rough-weave carpet. Not that you’ll be sitting around much. As well as game drives, there are horses and camels to ride out on, fine telescopes for learning about the stars (the night sky is bejellewed with a billion of them; you’ll be dumbfounded), mountain bikes to take out and even bloodhounds to visit – lovely, long-eared creatures who can sniff out a poacher the other side of Mount Kenya. Stay a week and you won’t be bored. BOOK IT Double, from £800, full board, including transfers, game drives and activities (elewanacollection.com; 00 254 713 474171). Kenya Airways (kenya-airways.com) flies to Nairobi from £725 return. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Spend a couple of nights at Loisaba Star Beds – four-poster beds that are rolled out onto a deck where there’s nothing but a mosquito net between you and the Milky Way. Double, from £420.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Visit Nomad’s very own boma, or traditional village – no conveyor-belt tourism here, thank you – for barbecued goat and an authentic insight into everyday Maasai life.

PHOTOGRAPHS: NOMAD-TANZANIA.COM, ALAMY, ALLSTAR

omad’s newest camp – clinging to the the rim of a caldera and sheltered by a forest of oh-so African, flat-topped acacias – showcases another side to the ever-popular Ngorongoro Crater. At Entamanu (the Maasai word for ‘circle’), the style is as understated as it gets – the canvas-andwood structures are sustainable, local and removable. Understated, yes, but still chic: lampshades made of beaded tribal hats and wild sisal, hand-knitted cushions and cowhide rugs. It can get a bit breezy up here (the upside: no pesky mosquitoes), but the fat-as-a-stack-of-pancakes duvets will keep you snug at night. Spend the day in the crater, that wildlife super-bowl home to pretty much everything (and, yes, most of it IS warbling ‘Hakuna Matata’), then escape the 4x4 herds and explore the sun-scorched savannah with a long-limbed Maasai – you in head-to-toe khaki, him wrapped in dazzling red – watched over by curious, long-lashed giraffes. By evening, you’ll be ready to relax on a sheepskin-swathed sofa by a fire and take your cocoa African-style – with a generous slug of Amarula liqueur. BOOK IT Yellow Zebra Safaris (yellowzebrasafaris.com; 020 8547 2305) offers three nights, full board, as part of a seven-night trip, from £3,945, including transfers and safari activities.


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s befits the former royal hunting grounds of Chief Moremi of the BaTawana, Sanctuary Retreat’s flagship has reopened with much ceremony. No gold or glitz in the new pavilions, though. All is sleek and chic: blond wood, bold patterns and tactile materials, and vast terraces and plunge pools for sunbaked afternoons. The gorgeous, family-friendly Geoffrey Kent Suite has its own fire pit, kitchen and bar. It’s tempting to soak up the dreamy delta views from the made-for-sharing bathtub, glug a G&T and watch elephants yomping across the floodplains, or zone out in the spa with an Africology pummelling. But out you must go, for this is THE place in Botswana to tick off the Big Five. BOOK IT Yellow Zebra Safaris (yellowzebra safaris.com; 020 8547 2305) offers four nights, full board, as part of a sevennight trip, from £5,355, including flights, transfers and safari activities. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Take to the skies in a helicopter for an unforgettable swoop over the wild floodplains of the Okavango Delta.

NEWSF L ASH BE S T BR AG GI NG R IG H T S F OR 2 0 1 7: BI S AT E , OPE N I NG I N J U N E I N RWA N DA , W H E R E YOU CA N C OM E FAC E T O FAC E W I T H MO U N TA I N G OR I L L A S . ( W I L DE R N E S S - S A FA R I S .C OM )

ROVI N G B U S H TO PS SER ENGETI, TA NZA NI A

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here is glamping – and then there is Roving Bushtops. which combines the joys of a mobile camp (lost in the bush, under canvas, lions roaring jolly close) with the comfort of a five-star hotel. These six stylish, Swiss-designed tents fit into a trailer that gets towed around the Serengeti, ensuring guests see the very best of its wildlife. They are filled with treats that include a butler, a king-size bed with soft sheets, a double hot tub, a minibar, Bulgari amenities and, hallelujah, a hairdryer. There’s a panoramic deck big enough for yoga (mat provided), and you’ll get complimentary massages and your own private open-sided game vehicle with expert guide. Dinner – spicy Swahili dishes, lobster tail – is served in a mess tent with a ‘wine wall’. They call these ‘the most luxurious safari tents in the world’. They may have a point. BOOK IT Carrier (carrier.co.uk; 0161 492 1353) offers three nights, full board, as part of a four-night trip, from £4,005, including flights, transfers and a private vehicle for all game drives. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Don’t miss the dawn trip to the Retina watering pool, where a hundred-plus hippos wallow like sausages sizzling in a pan.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


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here is a time and a place for a tent, and Botswana’s watery wilderness is it. The just-reopened Nxabega, specifically, is it. This scrumptious bush camp is now lighter and brighter – and while the walls may still be canvas, that’s where any similarity to camping ends. Beds are enormous and clad in crisp white linens, and your room peels open for outrageous views over the delta. The new sweeping terraces are just the spot for observing the comings and goings from a swing seat made for two. Or cool off in the swimming pool, watched over by the resident hippo, harrumphing happily in his own pond. You’ll hardly need your guide on game drives; wild things pretty much fling themselves in front of you. After cocktails and campfire tales in the lofty-ceilinged main lodge, it’s out onto the deck for supper, surrounded by the hum of the bush. BOOK IT Yellow Zebra Safaris (yellowzebrasafaris. com; 020 8547 2305) offers four nights, full board, as part of a seven-night trip, from £4,725, including flights, transfers and safari activities. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Swish through the reeds and waterlilies on a mokoro-canoe trip, for wildlife watching at hippo’s-eye level.

CHENA HUTS

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Visit Bundala National Park, one hour away – it’s the wintering ground for 200 species of birds, including the greater flamingo.

t’s the dream: a five-star, family-friendly hideaway on the edge of Yala National Park – steps from the crashing surf and rocky outcrops – where peacocks, monkeys, wild boar and the occasional water buffalo vie for their patch of paradise. Chena Huts is the standout in a crop of new eco-lodges in Sri Lanka, with 14 cushy thatched cabins that are perfect for kids (but not tinies). Apart from the flat screens, mammoth baths and private plunge pools, it’s the smiley staff that make this place so good for families. The 4.30am wake-up call is brutal (especially for teens) but essential if you want to be in the park for when it opens at dawn. Never mind all the other vehicles (brace yourself: as many as 800 in peak season) – Chena’s safari team will find the wildlife. And, yes, we’re talking leopard – perhaps even six in a day. After adventures in the bush, dispatch the kids to the jade-coloured pool with its own waterfall, take yourself off to the spa for a Sun Soother Body Wrap and then order a sundowner to see the day out. BOOK IT Scott Dunn (scottdunn. com; 020 8682 5060) offers three nights, as part of an 11-night trip, from £3,250, including flights, transfers and breakfast.

PHOTOGRAPHS: DOOK PHOTOGRAPHY, ALAMY, MARY-ANNE VAN DER BYE

YA L A N A T I O N A L PA R K , S R I L A N K A


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ittle Ruckomechi, on the Zambezi River, is Wild with a capital W: remote, secluded, where big herds of elephants and buffaloes still roam, where lions hunt, where pods of hippos snort alongside giant crocodiles. The eight-bed contemporary camp is as big on comfort as it is on creatures: mesh-walled rooms with muslin-curtained beds and solar-heated rainshowers, and a private chef who serves up decadent dinners under the stars (how on earth do they make crème brûlée on a fire?). When you aren’t out with a super-smart guide walking, kayaking, fishing or cruising the river with an icy drink in hand, you’ll be watching, from your room, elephant calves learning to use their trunks. Yes, really. There’s also an open-fronted canvas living room where you can kick back with a book, and a plunge pool to cool off in as wildlife saunters by. Wild. BOOK IT Expert Africa (expertafrica.com; 020 8232 9777) offers three nights, full board, as part of an eight-night trip, from £5,100, including flights, transfers and activities.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Hop in a little aeroplane with Wilderness Air (wilderness-air.com) and head to the magnificent Victoria Falls, just over an hour away.

ASILIA THE HIGHL ANDS N G O R O N G O R O C O N S E R VA T I O N A R E A , T A N Z A N I A

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e agree that the Ngorongoro Crater is a wonder of Tanzania that has to be seen – but parts of it can get rather crowded. Big hurrahs, then, for Asilia’s new mouldbreaking camp, which is at the crater’s much less hectic Lemala entrance. Eight spacious and family-friendly geodesic domes are set on a remote hillside framed by an austere landscape of Maasai grasslands, where zebras chomp and wildebeest grunt. With abundant wildflowers, solar lanterns and star-speckled skies, the camp feels like an enchanted garden, while at night wood-burning stoves, faux-fur throws and a good stock of malt whiskies make perfect sense when you’re at a chilly altitude of 8,700 feet. Another lure is the chance to go hiking in the huge Empakaai Crater, where flamingos strut across a shimmering lake and there’s not a soul around. BOOK IT Africa Travel (africatravel.co.uk; 0845 450 1535) offers three nights, full board, as part of a seven-night trip, from £3,275, including flights, transfers and game drives.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Asilia’s private hot lunch, served at a ‘special site’ in the Ngorongoro Crater, is a great way to escape the hordes.

TAT L E R T R AVE L G U I D E 201 7


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Award-winner WILD & WONDERFUL

M AT E T S I R I V E R LO D G E V IC T O R I A FA L L S , Z I M B A BW E

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Follow an exhilarating, hair-raising helicopter flight over the Falls with old-school afternoon tea on the veranda of the refurbished Victoria Falls Hotel.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

PHOTOGRAPHS: DOOK PHOTOGRAPHY, JEZ BENNETT, JONATHAN HOOD

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atetsi is a rare beast. The lodge itself – brand new, brilliantly run, hip as anything – is rare in itself, especially as it is &Beyond’s first foray into Zimbabwe. But what makes it properly, jaw-droppingly extraordinary is its location, offering access to two whoppers. First, there’s the wildlife (all sorts, and plenty of it), but the ace in the pack is its proximity to one of the world’s seven natural wonders, Victoria Falls. Wowee. But back to the base, which owner John Gardiner has spent a tidy sum on developing, so as well as waterholes and anti-poaching units to protect wildlife, you’ll find a fine-wine cellar, a spa and a 66ft lap pool to cosset humans. The rooms are pared back and elephant-grey, and filled with perky abstract art and Danish-cool furniture, while the bar is covered in decorative copper scales and giant makoro canoes hang over the entrance. Let’s call it hipster-in-the-hinterland. The food is as fine as you’ll get anywhere in Africa: fluffy passionfruit cakes in the afternoons, and tender rump steak and risotto at suppertime. But the real stars are the staff: from guides who have spent decades in the bush to charming barmen who can concoct a mean espresso cocktail. All highly educated, all highly dedicated. All thrilled, like us, to see Zimbabwe back on the tourist map. BOOK IT Expert Africa (expertafrica.com; 020 8232 9777) offers three nights, full board, as part of an eight-night trip, from £5,100 including flights, transfers and activities.


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TA J M EG H AU L I S E R A I C H I T WA N N A T I O N A L PA R K , N E PA L

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epal, that magical land of high Himalayan peaks, has secrets lurking in its depths. Specifically, the vast tranches of green jungle at Chitwan National Park, where Bengal tigers stalk the shadows and one-horned rhinos lumber as ungainly as articulated lorries (but far rarer and more lovely). Who knew there were tigers in Nepal? Or rhinos? The place to see this animal spectacular is from the comfort of a liveried 4x4 as a guest of Taj’s first safari lodge in Nepal, Meghauli Serai. Your room is a smart thatched villa overlooking the pretty Rapti River. There are cashmere throws in muddy hues and breezy bathrooms and, in the main lodge, a vast sparkling pool. Tigers are famously difficult to spot, but who cares when there are sloth bears, crocodiles and thousands of birds, from the tiniest, darting hummingbirds to fish eagles and enormous hooting hornbills, all in full carnival feather. BOOK IT Greaves India (greavesindia.com; 020 7487 9111) offers three nights, full board, as part of a seven-night trip, from £2,850, including flights, transfers and excursions.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Volunteer to give the lodge’s elephant a river bath. Expect to get very wet.

L I M A L I M O LO D G E

SIMIEN MOU N TA I NS N A T IO N A L PA R K , E T H IO PI A

E

arthy is a term that gets thrown around a bit, but nothing else fits the new Limalimo Lodge, in the Ethiopian Highlands, quite so well. The 12 rooms of this boutique hotel, only the second in the wildlife-rich Simien Mountains National Park, have been constructed from local soil that’s been compacted into a smart – but decidedly earthy – material, and all have big west-facing windows that look out to the forest. Set up by two Ethiopian guides and a British woman, Limalimo aims to be sustainable and part of the community, employing almost 100 per cent of its staff from the surrounding area. The cherry on the cake? The remarkable views of the Simien Mountains from the main terrace. At breakfast or with an evening glass of Rift Valley wine, you’re likely to see geladas monkeys grazing and grooming on the escarpment, while dinner might be interrupted by news that there’s a leopard bellowing outside as it passes through the grounds, just to let you know it’s there. BOOK IT cazenove+loyd (cazloyd.com, 020 7384 2332) offers four nights, full board, from £3,485, including flights with Ethiopian Airlines, transfers and private guides (ethiopianairlines.com). WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Take a trek into the Simien Mountains, through gorges filled with juniper, olive and acacia trees.


TATLER • PROMOTION CLOCKWISE FR GE, ITC MAURYA, NEW DELHI. THE POOL COURTYARD AT ITC GRAND BHARAT, GURGAON. KAYA KALP – THE ROYAL SPA, ITC MUGHAL, AGRA

THE HEIGHT OF LUXURY Travel to India with ITC Hotels and experience warm hospitality, sumptuous grandeur and impossibly beautiful scenery

ITC Hotels, in association with The Luxury Collection, offers 11 unique properties across India, each inspired by the history and culture of the region in which they are located. These are opulent residences with roots: every hotel celebrates India through its architecture and cuisine, while upholding the highest standards of sustainability. This, after all, is responsible luxury. The Golden Triangle Start your adventure in bustling New Delhi, where you can marvel at the vibrancy of colour and the heady aroma of spices before retreating to ITC Maurya. Its instantly recognisable stupa design pays tribute to the Mauryan dynasty, plus it’s home to Bukhara and Dum Pukht, two of the country’s most sought-after restaurants. Next stop Agra and the Taj Mahal, where ITC Mughal offers a regal welcome. Winner of the Aga Khan Award for its representation of Mughal

architecture, this is a retreat in the truest sense of the word. A must-visit on any Rajasthani journey is the ‘pink city’ of Jaipur, home to palaces, forts and bazaars. Here, ITC Rajputana, designed to echo the region’s havelis, embraces the spirit of royal Rajasthan. To complete the Golden Triangle with ITC Hotels, check into ITC Grand Bharat back in New Delhi, India’s first all-suite luxury retreat. In an idyllic spot, it offers super-plush interiors, creative cuisine, a vast spa and a 27-hole Jack Nicklaus-designed golf course. Southern Splendour Beyond the Golden Triangle, ITC Hotels brings other parts of India alive. In southern India, ITC Grand Chola is a landmark in Chennai. From here, you can stroll on Marina Beach or soak up the sights and sounds of the city before retreating for rejuvenation at the spa. Travel on to

Bangalore and check in at either ITC Gardenia (inspired by the city’s flourishing gardens) or aristocratic ITC Windsor. Sign off your southern sojourn in Hyderabad with a stay at ITC Kakatiya, overlooking Hussain Sagar Lake. Bright Lights, Big Cities For those heading to either Mumbai or Kolkata, ITC Hotels has properties in both. There’s the vintage ITC Maratha or super-stylish ITC Grand Central for anyone Mumbai-bound and Kolkata is home to ITC Sonar, India’s first business resort, nestled in lush greenery and trees. For further information or to book, visit itchotels.in/luxurysojourns


©2016 Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Preferred Guest, SPG, The Luxury Collection and their logos are the trademarks of Marriott International, Inc., or its affiliates.

H O T E L S T H AT D E F I N E T H E D E S T I N AT I O N ™ Evoking the enchanting majesty of eras past, ITC Grand Bharat is a palatial retreat in the heart of the Golden Triangle. Experience the true essence of each destination at The Luxury Collection, a curated ensemble of the world’s most iconic hotels. Explore the collection at theluxurycollection.com

I T C G R A N D B H A R AT

A L U X U R Y C O L L E C T I O N R E T R E AT GURGAON, INDIA RANKE D #1 RES ORT IN AS IA AND AMO NG ST THE TO P HOTEL S AND R ESO R TS IN THE WO R L D C OND É NAST T R AVEL ER U SA R EADER S’ CHO ICE AWAR DS 201 6

ITCH OTE LS . I N / LU X U RYCOLLECTI ON ITC GARDE NIA, BE NGALURU I TC G R A N D B H A R AT, G U R GAON , N E W D E LH I CA PI TA L R EG I ON ITC GRAND CEN TR A L, M U M BA I I TC G R A N D CH OLA , CH E N N A I ITC K AK ATI YA , H Y D E R A BA D I TC M A R ATH A , M U M BA I ITC MAURYA, NE W D E LH I I TC M U G H A L, AG R A I TC R A J PU TA N A , J A I PU R ITC S ONA R , KOLKATA I TC W I N D S OR , B E N GA LU R U


CAYMAN BRAC LITTLE CAYMAN GRAND CAYMAN

3 of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little luxuries

ca ymanislands.co.uk

In the Cayman Islands, drinks really do grow on trees.


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KEEMALA

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t’s slightly In The Night Garden, the new Keemala. A bit trippy, but in a good way, like a bird’s-nest village with crazy-curvy treehouses on liggy-leggy stilts. There’s nothing else like it on Phuket. It’s inland, a 10-minute drive from the Andaman Sea, but you won’t mind. The offbeat villas make good use of natural dark wood, and have colossal baths, private pools and beds big enough for a thousand Pontipines. The Su Tha restaurant plays laidback pre-clubbing tunes and serves everything from pasta to massaman curry. There’s a chance to try Thailand’s national sport, Muay Thai kickboxing, or you can kick back with a book in the library built into one of the tree towers. But the centre of chillaxing is the Mala spa, set inside teepee-esque huts, with kindly, expert therapists; we liked the satisfyingly firm Thai Massage. No Igglepiggle, no Makka Pakka, no Upsy Daisy... this is grown-up playtime. BOOK IT Double, from £525, including breakfast (keemala.com; 00 66 76 358 777). Thai Airways (thaiairways.co.uk) flies to Phuket via Bangkok, from £485.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

A walk around old Phuket Town takes in Buddhist and Taoist shrines and the historical red-light district of Phuket’s tin-trading period.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

The city’s Arts District (formerly the Warehouse District) with its galleries and restaurants, is known as the SoHo of the South and is on your doorstep.

ACE H OT E L

PHOTOGRAPHS: OBERTO GILI, FRAN PARENTE, BRENT T MADISON

NEW OR LEA NS, USA

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f you’re coming to New Orleans to carouse in the French Quarter like all the other tourists, don’t stay at the new Ace – this is NOT your average Bourbon Street guesthouse. For one thing, the rooms are seriously black – black linen, black bathtubs, black ceilings and a single black condom by the bed, saying ‘Use in Case of Fire’. It’s almost spartan, but gosh is it cool. The only splash of colour is a huge, acid-green Smeg fridge, crammed with five kinds of whiskey, 10 kinds of housedistilled vermouth and bitters and about two tons of chocolate. Up on the roof, the pool is so cool it makes other cool pools look like the municipal baths. And the hotel’s restaurant, Josephine Estelle (named after the daughters of the two head chefs), where the (male) maître d’ welcomes you in full make-up and fabulous, four-inch chandelier earrings, is already one of the hottest restaurants in a hot, hot town. BOOK IT Double, from £120 (acehotel.com; 001 504 900 1180).

PA L A Z ZO D A M A R O M E , I T A LY

Sometimes even the Eternal City needs a shake-up. Palazzo Dama does just that. Rome’s freshest five-star is located in an elegant 19th-century mansion, right next to Piazza del Popolo, and is as grand as you’d hope (it was the home of the aristo Malaspina family), but refreshingly lacking in the pomp found in so many of the city’s hotels. Antonio Girardi is the local architectural brains behind it all, and has made the most of the mile-high ceilings and old features – extravagant cornicing, tiled floors, HUGE windows – but whizzed them up to date with a glamorous flair that is drawing in a fashionable crowd. Rooms are pretty, with parquet floors, powder-blue velvet curtains and marble-mosaic bathrooms with chic dark walls. The restaurant has sofas to sink into, potted palms to gaze up at and gorgeous gold lamps and art-deco knick-knacks. Outside: an olive-treefilled courtyard with a turquoise pool and smart bar, all twinkly in the evenings. Quite the scene, as it happens, so bring earplugs as those fashion types do like to be heard. BOOK IT Double, from £310, including breakfast (palazzodama.com; 00 39 068 956 5272). British Airways (ba.com) flies to Rome from £90. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Scoot over to the up-andcoming, bohemian Monti neighbourhood to cruise its cool boutiques and hipster bars.

00


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Award-winner MOST FUN EVER

SOHO HOUSE BA RCE LO N A

B A RC E L O N A , S PA I N

I

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Take a stroll along the waterfront, past the cute beach shacks at Barceloneta, until you end up at Xiringuito Escribà, which does the best paella in Barcelona.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

f there’s one thing Soho House is really, really good at, it’s detail. Take the new Barcelona blowout from Mr SH, Nick Jones, right. You will want to steal EVERYTHING in the bedrooms, from the fringed lampshades to the custom-made iron bedheads. In the Club too, which has that usual bang-on flair that is somehow both sensationally stylish and as comfortable as a cuddle with a puppy. How do they do that? There’s the sprinkling of local flourishes – arched Catalan-brick ceilings, sky-blue Spanish tiles, brasspetal lights. They’re good at minibars too. You’ll find the smartest in the world in your room, complete with a bartender who’ll turn up to mix a cocktail while you get ready for dinner. Pools! They’re good at pools. There are two: one in the dusky underground Cowshed spa and one on the roof terrace, where you’ll also find stripy sunloungers, a juice (and beer) bar, pretty locals and equally pretty views of yachts bobbing below. That’s another thing: location. It’s ace, right in the happening Gothic Quarter but with marina views to give you that breathe-easy sense of space (rare in a city hotel). We nearly forgot food: Cecconi’s, with its retractable glass roof and Italian eats, or House favourites (flat-iron chicken, please) in the Club. Oh, but it goes on: a cosy cinema for indie flicks; a ludicrously swanky gym; a speakeasy-style bar, the Green Room, where Barcelona’s beautiful gather for late-night naughtiness. Soho House Barcelona, in fact, is really, really good at an awful lot of things – and that’s why we love it. BOOK IT Double, from £195 (sohohousebarcelona.com; 00 34 93 220 4600).

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TATLER • PROMOTION

DIVINE INTERVENTION We've come to believe in a higher power. One that bestows azure seas, scrummy gourmet cuisine and indulgent wellness treatments as standard. Discover why we're putting our faith in Divani Apollon Palace & Thalasso

If Greek mythology is anything to go by, the gods and goddesses had a pretty nice time of it. Lots of lounging about, bathing in tranquil waters and languidly munching on delicious food. Luckily for us, Divani Apollon Palace & Thalasso is keeping the legend alive with its chilled out haven of luxury. Divani is perched on the Athenian Riviera, overlooking picture-perfect Kavouri Beach in south-west Greece – only 25 minutes from central Athens. If the location alone isn't enough to convert you, just wait till you see all the relaxation bells and whistles this heavenly spot houses. For a start, there's the thalassotherapy centre itself. The spa (an expansive 3,500 square metres) has a whopping 25 treatment rooms, all kitted out to the highest specifications and full of sumptuous skincare from the likes of Ligne St Barth and Thalgo. Why not try an oxygen facial or an Indian massage? Everything on the long list of indulgent therapies is guaranteed to help you look and feel amazing. Or you could just go

for a dip. At 270 square metres, the thalassotherapy pool is the largest in Greece. Here, 16 different water jets will pummel achy joints and stubborn cellulite into submission. Allow the daily grind to just wash away! Divani's dedicated wellness programme, #DivineYou, aims to address everything from weight loss and detoxing to stress management. You'll find a team of nutritionists and medical experts on hand to help you achieve your goals. And, your efforts will also be supported by some of the best body-sculpting, facial rejuvenation technology in the industry – VelaShape, i-Lipo and LPG. A 360-degree take on serenity means that everything at Divani is designed to help you breathe a little deeper and smile a little wider. All bedrooms come with a breathtaking sea view. The Mythos of the Sea restaurant rustles up the very finest Mediterranean cuisine. And staff everywhere are bend-over-backwards helpful. Check into cloud nine, and live like a goddess.

For more information, visit divaniapollonhotel.com


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E X P L O R A VA L L E S A G R A D O CUS CO, PE RU

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he problem with Machu Picchu is having to share it with a few thousand other people. Time to find the Inca road less travelled. Enter Explora, the Chilean outfit that’s bagged the choicest spots in Patagonia, Atacama and Easter Island, and has now opened up a far-flung corner of Peru’s Sacred Valley. Set among fields of red quinoa and golden corn and flanked by evergreen slopes, the long, low building takes its cue from the surroundings – stone, adobe and wood, with blasts of colour from handwoven blankets. It’s less hotel, more luxe base camp – 20 ‘explorations’, most on two feet or two wheels, will take you to Inca ruins and up snow-tipped peaks for views of turquoise lagoons and sparkling glaciers, startling doe-eyed llamas on the way. Knock back that local altitude-sickness-busting coca tea before you set out, though. You’re going where the air is rarefied. BOOK IT Aracari (aracari.com; 00 51 1 651 2424) offers four nights, full board, as part of an eightnight trip, from £4,280, including domestic flights, transfers and tours.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Swing by the 17th-century Pumacahua Bath House for a well-earned massage and to take in the views from the pool.

S VAT M A

T H A N J AV U R , I N D I A

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et an atlas (we’re old school here). Look up Thanjavur (tip: it’s in southern India). Commit it to memory. Because Indophiles will be flocking to the subcontinent’s newest hub of revived arts. And in tune with the city’s renaissance is Svatma, an immaculate hotel in a restored colonial mansion. Just dipping into its menu of brilliantly curated cultural activities will make your head spin. Fancy a spot of Vedic chanting with Hindu priests, or an afternoon making musical instruments out of jackfruit wood? Or how about learning how to cook a proper Tamil thali? You’ll be wanting a nap after all that – make sure you’re up in time for the hotel’s evening classical-music recital, followed by an 11-course supper in the rooftop restaurant. Highbrow bragging rights: off the chart. BOOK IT The Ultimate Travel Company (theultimatetravelcompany.co.uk; 020 3051 8098) offers three nights, as part of a 14-night trip, from £3,295, including flights, transfers and private driver.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Watch the mighty tower of the 1,000year-old Brihadeeswara Temple turn the colour of golden syrup in the setting sun.


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LUX* TE A HORSE ROAD B E NZI L AN BENZILAN, CHINA

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orth of the mythical Shangri-La, embraced by a curve of the great Yangtze River, lies one of the newest Lux* properties. It’s on the ancient Tea Horse Road, for centuries a route along which mules and muleteers carried their precious cargo of Pu’er tea from the mountains of Yunnan to the heights of Lhasa. Today, people come to Benzilan to explore this sun-drenched valley, visit local monasteries or gaze up at the surrounding peaks, dusted with snow. Locally sourced materials – pinewood, copper, black earthenware – abound at Lux* in the very Tibetan design, and the 30 bedrooms have a proper sense of place, with balconies overlooking the Yangtze. It’s all very mellowing, very spiritual, jollied up with a sprinkling of colour from the woven red throws and cushions. Food is sensational, from the signature fried rice to the Tibetan-style yak pot and the moreish deep-fried kidney beans with chilli – hot, hot, hot in all senses. BOOK IT Cox & Kings (coxandkings.co.uk; 020 3642 0861) offers three nights, as part of a seven-night trip, from £2,295, including breakfast, flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Visit the nearby 16th-century Buddhist monastery of Dongzhulin, famous for the monks’ elaborate, butter-yellow headgear.

In-house experts will show you the highlights, such as where the kings kept their 16,000 consorts, the palaces for pet elephants and the rose-perfumed pools in which the queens would bathe.

O R A N G E CO U N T Y, H A M P I PHOTOGRAPHS: PEDRO IBANEZ, GETTY IMAGES, APU SISTA, ALAMY

H A M PI, I N DI A

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his is Hampi, once the seat of the Vijayanagara Empire, now a World Heritage Site. Why should you care? Because it’s a wonder, a sprawling 10-square-mile expanse of temples and palaces and stone ruins, punctuated by banana plantations and rice paddies. A place to explore and marvel at what was, until the 16th century, a major Hindu capital. And, until now, it was backpacker central. But the just-opened Orange County resort has created somewhere properly smart to stay: a grand hotel built to mirror the stone structures you’re there to see. So there is stone, stone, everywhere, from the hulking boulders thrusting from the pool to the cool corridors and the giant villas, where you sleep beneath crimson canopies. And sleep you shall, as Hampi is all about exploring – head out with one of the resort’s guides and yomp among the remains in all their glory. BOOK IT Steppes Travel (steppestravel.co.uk; 0843 778 9926) offers three nights, as part of a nine-night trip, from £2,195, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


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t Sri Lanka’s Castlereagh Lake, it’s always teatime – any excuse will do to whip out the fine bone china for a cuppa. In 2005, Ceylon Tea Trails delivered a masterstroke by turning a handful of former tea planter’s houses into small hotels; Dunkeld is the new kid on the block, sitting serenely 900 feet up from the lake’s shore, with mesmerising views of tea-plant-covered hillsides. It has four bedrooms in the main bungalow and the exclusive one-bedroom Owner’s Cottage, and is all about days gone by – think dreamy four-poster beds, whirring ceiling fans and drinks trolleys. There’s a wraparound veranda, a croquet lawn, and an orange-blossomed African tulip tree – sit beneath it and eat cucumber sandwiches, sink into that vista and sip another cuppa. BOOK IT Audley Travel (audley travel.com; 01993 838335) offers three nights, as part of a nine-night trip, from £3,230, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

LEONORA BAMFORD’S PUGLIA

FIRST THING I DO

Eat a huge plate of pasta. MUST-PACK ITEMS

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Take a walk on the wild side. There’s a teeny chance you might see a cobra or a leopard, but an amble through the tea plantations is nonetheless nothing short of a scenic extravaganza.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

A Lemlem cover-up, a Peter Pilotto dress, Ancient Greek Sandals, plenty of Ultrasun and a Bamford straw clutch. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT

The Lido Bianco restaurant, in Monopoli, is wonderful for a night out without the kids. En famille, I love Borgo Egnazia, a family hotel with great restaurants – especially La Frasca, a traditional trattoria. PERFECT DAY

Don’t miss Lecce – and if you get the chance to try the local hoppity-skip folk dance, the pizzica, leap at it.

A trip to Torre Coccaro Beach Club in Capitolo, a few miles down the road from Monopoli, for lunch and beach fun. It also has a fab beach shop. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME

P U G L I A , I T A LY

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ocked behind their huge limestone walls, the masserias of Apulia have been fashionable since the Nineties. Dame Helen Mirren has a holiday home down here, as does Princess Olga of Greece (who moonlights as the Duchess of Apulia). The latest of these hip, fortified farmhouses is Masseria Trapanà. Rescuing it from a jungle of overgrown olive trees has been a two-year labour of love for Australian hotelier Rob Potter-Sanders, who has broken with tradition by leaving the warm limestone walls unplastered. He’s also brought an eclectic style of decor to the nine suites: giant cushions round a communal fire pit, outdoor baths and metal-framed four-posters – an idea he copied from Princess Olga’s place. Food is cucina povera, which means you eat what the chef feels like cooking. The staff could not be friendlier. It’s impossible to sit down without being offered a glass of prosecco, and if you ask nicely, they’ll light the fireplace in your suite while you’re at dinner. Nothing is too much trouble down in the sizzling, stiletto heel of Italy. BOOK IT Double, from £210, including breakfast (trapana.com; 00 39 0832 1832101).

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR

Martina Franca, a mini version of Lecce, the capital of baroque. It is best visited in June, when the houses are filled with opera singers practising for the 20-day Festival della Valle d’Itria. LAST THING I DO

Pick up an ice cream on the way to the airport. Leonora Bamford is the founder of mybaba.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: ALESSANDRO COLAZZO, ALAMY

M A S S E R I A T R A PA N A

We have a wonderful guy called Alessandro who helps us when we’re in Italy, and his mother makes a mean hot sauce. We get a tiny jar of it, but it lasts all year.


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ho’d expect beautifully appliquéd bed linen and fashion-forward lamps in the middle of a Vietnamese rice paddy? Not us. Yet here are both, and a whole lot more, hidden away at this charmingly rustic gem of a place. The 16 spacious bedrooms are dotted through eight Tonkinese stone-and-wood cabins, jazzed up with funky geometric floor tiles – and the ambient trill of birdsong. Some have shaded terraces overlooking the surrounding limestone mountains. Heaven. Eat lunch around the pool, beneath the waxy leaves of banana plants (if you don’t order the shrimp and pomelo salad at every sitting, there’s something wrong with you), then hop on a bike and pedal through the countryside. Creative types can get arty with a range of eclectic classes: sign us up for bamboo basket-weaving. BOOK IT Journeys to the East (journeysto-the-east.com; 00 84 4 3719 7371;) offers three nights, full board, from £820 per person, including transfers and activities. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Buy a conical hat, hire a sampan, and row through the region’s many caves carved out by the river.

D O A S K AT E & W I L L S DI D A N D PE E K I N T O T H E A N CI E N T K I NG D OM OF BH U TA N: SI X S E N S E S A R E S E T T O OP E N F I V E L OD G E S – E X PE C T E C O -LU XE A N D LU NG -BUS T I NG V I E W S . (SI X S E N S E S .C OM )

BA N YA N T R E E TA M O U DA BAY T E T OUA N , MORO CCO

Marrakesh, it’s been great. But we’ve been, we’ve seen, we want a change of scene. Our affections have moved to Tamouda Bay in north-east Morocco, on the Med. We’re in good company – the King of Morocco has a villa nearby. The first Banyan Tree in the country has 92 villas, all low-key and pleasingly Moroccan, with little private gardens and lapis-hued plunge pools. It’s very much a resort, so there are all sorts of bells and whistles (three restaurants, a kids’ club, that sort of thing) and a stonking Banyan spa. But get off that sunlounger and explore – to pretty Tetouan or on a quad bike through the hills and around Smir Lake. BOOK IT Double, from £385, including breakfast (banyantree.com; 00 212 539 669 999). For more information, visit muchmorocco.com. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Discover the beautiful town of Chefchaouen, where everything is painted blue. Why? Blue cools the walls and is said to keep the mozzies away.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

PHOTOGRAPHS: JAREK N PHTOGRAPHY

NEWSF L ASH


TATLER â&#x20AC;˘ PROMOTION

MEET ME IN MALTA... With its splendid old-world architecture and Mediterranean climate, the island of Malta exudes an easy romance. Discover why it's the perfect place to say 'I do'

CLOCKWISE FR VE, SEA VIEWS AT URSULINO BOUTIQUE HOTEL. THE GARDENS AT PALAZZO PARISIO. FIREWORKS AT PALAZZO PARISIO. THE VALLETTA SKYLINE. PALAZZO CONSIGLIA BOUTIQUE HOTEL

Picture this: you're standing on the sundrenched terrace of a palazzo (a palazzo) in all your bridal finery, champagne in hand, gazing out at magnificent manicured gardens. Somewhere out there, beyond the gently yellowed stone walls and over a rolling landscape, a yacht bobs on an azure sea, waiting to whisk you away on honeymoon. Is this a fairy tale? Quite possibly. Can you make it a reality? Most definitely. Malta is magical. Weddings abroad have become increasingly popular and Malta really is a much-overlooked gem. It's only a three-hour flight away from the UK and boasts over 300 days of sunshine a year. Everything here carries a degree of pomp and ceremony â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this is an island with a royal heritage, after all. And, with a thriving hospitality industry that is English-speaking, you'll find planning your special day is easier than you think. Malta is an island brimming with history, culture and postcard-perfect scenery. Here, we take a look at three sumptuously beautiful venues...

PALAZZO CONSIGLIA, VALLETTA The capital Valletta is a UNESCO World Heritage site (thanks to its abundance of megalithic temples and monuments) and is set to be European Capital of Culture in 2018. Put simply? You'd be hard pushed to find a more beautiful place to get hitched. The Palazzo Consiglia is princess-style luxury (vaulted ceilings, marbled floors) and just a stone's throw from a whole host of churches and cathedrals. URSULINO, VALLETTA This boutique, five-star hotel boasts sea views, walls thronged with impressive art by local artists and an extremely knowledgeable concierge. With just seven bedrooms, this is the perfect destination for a smaller wedding celebration. PALAZZO PARISIO, NAXXAR Further inland and to the north, lies this incredible stately home. Think Versailles-esque gardens, gilded walls and no-holds-barred ornateness. Oh, and did we mention they can arrange yacht charters?

For information on planning your trip to Malta, see visitmalta.com


UNMISTAKABLY LONDON. DISTINCTIVELY JUMEIRAH.

Experience the ultimate London stay at Jumeirah Carlton Tower, Knightsbridge. Indulge yourself at The Peak Health Club & Spa with our range of new beauty treatments. Relax in the luxurious rooms and suites with stunning views over London and dine in style at the awardwinning Rib Room Bar & Restaurant. Visit jumeirah.com or call 020 7235 1234 to find out more.


FOOD & WINE

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

In less than half an hour you could be on ivory-sand Mediterranean beaches, treasurehunting in local antiques-centre Pézenas, or Tarbouriech oyster-tasting on the Thau Lagoon.

t’s all sunshine, oysters and knockout wines in the Languedoc, which is a damn good start. Chuck in this sumptuous conversion of a 200-acre, 19th-century wine estate, and you’ve got something rare: a chic retreat that’s as laidback as your local. There’s everything a done-up chateau should have: antique mirrors, polished-steel baths, original frescos, chalky-pale stone walls, undulating vineyards and whopping beds with brilliantwhite linen, which you won’t want to leave. Sprogs in tow? Some of the self-catering apartments (smart as a pin yet still comfy enough to wrestle in) are in wood-beamed outhouses, with pools for splashing about in or sipping rosé next to. Although first you should sip on a Serjac, the signature cocktail (tastes as summery as freshly mown grass), on the Gatsby-esque terrace. Then graduate to wine from the swooningly good list, best glugged with seasonal fare at the restaurant – the Pyrenean lamb is a winner. There’s more: a 100ft infinity pool, Cinq Mondes spa treatments, bike rides, games of tennis or boules. And the kids’ club goes above and beyond: den-building and archaeological digs, anyone? BOOK IT Double, from £200 (serjac.com; 00 33 4 67 93 12 34).

L E E U E S TAT E S

F R A NSCH HOEK , SOU T H A F R ICA

PHOTOGRAPHS: HAZEL MATHIAS, GILLES COULON, JON KOPE, GETTY IMAGES

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s you gaze out from the wide veranda, it’s obvious why Indian billionaire Analjit Singh fell in love with the place. The view is nothing short of monumental, with its rolling fields of grapevines and ancient oak trees backed by jagged Lord of the Rings mountains. Every manicured inch of Singh’s 168-acre estate has been tamed and polished: the gardens neatly pruned, the South African art meticulously curated, the creamy rooms fitted with flawless marble bathrooms. Grown-ups will love the Ila spa with its mini pool to laze by, the Mullineux winery in which to retox and the restaurant serving crayfish open omelette and pressed-pork terrine with still-warm brioche. Families might prefer the charming thatched Cape Dutch cottages and a hike into the mountains, or a bike into Franschhoek village for a craft beer and tapas at Mr Singh’s colourful Tuk Tuk microbrewery. BOOK IT Africa Travel (africatravel.co.uk; 0845 450 1535) offers four nights from £1,975, including breakfast, flights and car hire. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Ramble around the huge kitchen gardens at nearby Babylonstoren Farm Hotel before porking out with a farm-to-fork lunch at its light-filled restaurant, Bable.

CHELSY DAVY’S CAPE TOWN

FIRST THING I DO Take a stroll along Sea Point promenade. PERFECT DAY A drive over to the wine region of Franschhoek. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME Merchants on Long is one of my favourite shops – I always pop in when I’m in town. They stock my jewellery brand, AYA, below, and they sell cool African products, like the Yemaja Okapi bag I have. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT The Grand Café & Beach, in Granger Bay, is my absolute top place in Cape Town. It’s got it all: delicious food, great people, a beautiful location and it’s always such fun. Pacha does the most amazing party there on New Year’s Day – it’s probably my best day of the year. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR A climb up Lion’s Head mountain – the view is incredible. And you can paraglide off it, which is pretty awesome. LAST THING I DO Grab a coffee at Sotano, in Mouille Point. Chelsy is the founder of AYA jewellery (aya.co.uk)


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here are 6,000 Greek islands, 99.9 per cent of them ravishing. So what makes Kate Moss, Jon Snow, Sigrid Rausing, Annabel Brooks, Mariella Frostrup, Juergen Teller and Alexandra Shulman choose to worship at the shrine of Hydra? It’s the vibe, man – a vibe that suffuses an island that has no cars, but throngs of donkeys; no motorbikes, but fleets of boats; an island of peace, pines and Leonard Cohen, who bought a house there in the Sixties and proceeded to write some of his most memorable songs (‘So Long, Marianne’, ‘Bird on the Wire’). An island that’s lured rock stars (Mick ’n’ Keith, David Gilmour); painters (Brice Marden, Matthew Barney, Nikos Ghika); designers (Erdem, Valentino); photographers (Derry Moore); art collectors (James Brett, Dakis Joannou and his Jeff Koons razzledazzle-painted boat, Guilty); authors (Paddy Leigh-Fermor); and Oscar-winning producers (Eric Abraham) to gaze out at the fishing smacks, superyachts and wine-dark waters of its entrancing harbour. Only 2,000 people live on Hydra and, bar the cobbled streets that wind up to the highest mansions of a town that rises like an amphitheatre from the sea, the island is roadless and the hills bare, brown and great to hike in – though not perhaps in August’s broiling heat. Wiser, then, to swim off the rocks by the Sunset Bar or take a water taxi to Agios Nikolaos, where the water is gin-clear and the bay blissful, though there’s only a snack bar to cater to your rumbling stomach. Best of all, of course, would be to rent (or have) a boat of your own from which to plunge into the heaven that is the Saronic Gulf... Have a boat? Well, Hydra is a fashionable island, but it’s a coolly fashionable one, bohemian at heart. Yes, Sir David Tang was there on a mega-yacht the same evening as Olivia Palermo stepped off Valentino’s 152-foot TM; yes, Queen Silvia of Sweden has sailed in. But it’s not bling-city, as Mykonos is, nor is it buffeted by the fierce winds that bedevil the Cyclades. It’s got an open-air cinema, with a summer festival of film; it’s got a cutting edge, contemporaryart space in a former slaughterhouse; it’s got those donkeys, ferrying grand pianos up to even grander homes; it’s got artists, drawn by the serenity and light; and it’s got legions of attractive folk, lolling around the harbourside cafés, people-watching, reading the International New York Times and having just the one more Aperol spritz. Best bars? Pappagallo’s, or the Pirate, for lounging with cocktails or full-on dancing into the small hours. Best ice cream? The Cool Mule, where the hydrofoils come in. Food? Eat at Techne or at Ostria, whose owner is pure theatre in herself – and if you’re bored with Greek cuisine, Il Casta has excellent Neapolitan food. And to rest your weary head? Well, the Hydrea is an eight-bedroom boutique pensione in an exquisitely restored, grand family mansion, right on the harbour. Check the soaring, wood-carved Ottoman ceilings in the two best (and vast) rooms; check the fresh figs from the garden; check the panoramic terrace for evening drinks. And check out Hydra – you’ll be hooked. Double at Hydrea, from £350; exclusive use (eight rooms), £4,510 per night (hydrea.gr; info@hydrea.gr).

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CLOCKWISE FR ABOVE: HYDRA’S PORT; LEONARD COHEN PLAYING GUITAR ON THE ISLAND, 1960; DAKIS JOANNOU’S JEFF KOONS-PAINTED BOAT GUILTY; OLIVIA PALERMO; VALENTINO; MARIELLA FROSTRUP; THE TERRACE AT HYDREA HOTEL

PHOTOGRAPHS: CHARLES BROWMAN/ROBERT HARDING, THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES, XCLUSIVEPIX, MAVRIXPHOTO/VANTAGENEWS.COM, KGC PHOTO AHENGY, GETTY IMAGES

Nick Powell goes in search of the boho vibe that for decades has drawn countless musicians, painters and writers to the Greek island of Hydra


WHAT TO PAC K

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Double the fun

Clutch, purse, passport holder... All-round good thing

Pimp my slide LEATHER SLIDES, £650, BY ANYA HINDMARCH

LEATHER PORTFOLIO, £550, BY LOEWE

REVERSIBLE COTTON & LEATHER TOTE, £410, BY RECLAIM MALLORCA

For shy and retiring types LACE & SWAROVSKICRYSTAL SUNGLASSES, POA, BY DOLCE & GABBANA

On the tiles SWIMSUIT, £395, BY DOLCE & GABBANA, AT NET-APORTER

GO BOHO Lose a long weekend on the Greek island of Hydra

Yes, you ARE a Greek goddess WOVEN STRAW SUN HAT, £260, BY YOSUZI, AT NET-A-PORTER

EDITED BY BEATRIZ CHOI. FOR STOCKISTS SEE ADDRESS BOOK IN MAIN MAGAZINE

CALFSKIN & BRASS BRACELET, £432, BY CELINE

You deserve pom-poms

Spraying is the new slathering DIOR BRONZE SPF 30 MIST, £31, BY DIOR

Precious prickles CACTUS DE CARTIER RING, £68,000, BY CARTIER

Om on the beach WELLNESS OILS, £39 EACH, BY UMA

We always travel like this

You’ve been Tangoed! LEATHER HORIZON 55 CABIN CASE, £2,560, BY LOUIS VUITTON

CANVAS WALLETS, £545 EACH, BY LOUIS VUITTON

You are the canvas COTTON TOP, £140; & SKIRT, £240, BOTH BY MARA HOFFMAN

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TATLER • PROMOTION

TO INFINITY & BEYOND Paradise is watching the sun set beyond your private infinity pool reaching over crystal-clear Maldivian water at LUX* South Ari Atoll

For indulgent beach holidays, the Maldives is nearly impossible to beat. You can’t argue with icing-sugar soft sand, clear, warm blue sea and year-round balmy weather. So how to improve upon perfection? By offering contemporary five-star luxury in chic beach-house style accommodation and delivering it with outstanding service and a playful twist, of course. That is exactly what worldrenowned LUX* Resorts & Hotels have done with their newest five-star resort, LUX* South Ari Atoll. Known for creating holidays that are lighter, brighter and downright celebratory, the brand has pulled out all the stops at this slice of paradise, making for a distinctive experience in the Maldives. Accommodation comes in the form of super-spacious pavilions and villas dotted along the water’s edge, stretching along two miles of pure-white sand and perched on stilts above the enticing lagoon. There are 46 Romantic Pool Villas, each with its own suspended infinity pool that appears to float above the Indian Ocean – the perfect spot from which to admire the magnificent sunset. For the ultimate intimate retreat, the resort’s adults-only sanctuary features three Temptation Pool Water Villas, complete with large private infinity pool, twin showers, private terraces incorporating a unique couples’ love nest, and a deck with steps down into the

turquoise-blue waters beneath. Foodies will appreciate the resort’s spectacular range of eight restaurants and five bars, including East Market – a sophisticated take on a bustling night market, with flavours from Vietnam, Thailand and Sichuan. Umami offers fine dining Japanese-style, complemented by the Maldives’ largest selection of sakés and Japanese whiskies, while Allegria, Senses and MIXE restaurants are bound to satisfy international palates with their Mediterranean to Maldivian specialities. For something different, head to Beach Rouge, the only fully fledged beach club in the Maldives. LUX* South Ari Atoll is undeniably luxurious and exquisitely beautiful but its appeal goes deeper. Staff are genuinely lovely and bend-over-backwards helpful. There are surprises and magical little extra touches (look out for ‘message in a bottle’ prizes around the resort!) and a series of Reasons to go LUX* experiences such as photographic tutorials and group cooking lessons under the watchful eye of a professional chef. There are also expert-led workshops throughout the year, giving guests a unique opportunity to be inspired by leading practitioners from diverse and creative disciplines, including painting, fitness and meditation. You’ll see the Maldives in a whole new light.

For more information, visit luxresorts.com, call (960) 668 0901 or email stay@luxmaldivesresort.com


Take me to Thailand... Want to escape it all? Thailand beckons with green-blue seas, white crescent beaches and a vibrant culture. Cleveland Collection can take you there. For over 25 years, they have been the go-to specialist for creating bespoke itineraries across South East Asia. Their team offer the very best deals at the very best hotels and uncover hidden gems along your route. Well versed in Thailand, they are travel gurus and are committed to making your once-in-a-lifetime dream a reality. Thailand offers the perfect blueprint for the ultimate holiday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it has the bright lights of Bangkok, with some of the best urban hotels on the planet, it has ancient ruins and temples, floating markets, pampering spas and delectable cuisine. This is a country that combines high-octane luxury with adrenalin-fuelled thrill-seeking. Go north for elephant trekking, head south for crystal clear waters. Thailand is also the gateway to Asia and makes a beautiful stepping stone to Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and Myanmar. With Cleveland Collection, the possibilities are endless.

For more information, visit clevelandcollection.co.uk or call 020 7843 3596


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imple ideas are often the smartest. Like doing away with the dullest part of a hotel, the check-in desk, and replacing it with a bar, as they’ve done at Katamama. This decidedly different boutique hotel in Bali’s hip Seminyak is the brainchild of Indonesian entrepreneur Ronald Akili, who owns the beachfront Potato Head Beach Club next door. The Potato Head good-times vibe is alive and well in the Akademi bar, which was created by London cocktail maestro Dre Masso and is lined with shelves full of colourful alcohol infusions and collectable vinyl. The hotel is sleek as an otter, each suite carrying on the boozy theme with its own ‘maxi-bar’ stocked with ice, tools and liquor. MoVida – the first international outpost of the Australian restaurant chain – serves up Spanish tapas such as buñuelos (salt-cod fritters), and there’s another cocktail bar next to the pool, but it’s often quiet: the cool kids are just across the road at ‘the Club’. BOOK IT Double, from £210, including breakfast (preferredhotels.com; 00800 7123 1030). Emirates (emirates.com) flies to Denpasar via Dubai from £799.

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Book in for a surf lesson and hit the waves down on Seminyak beach – very popular with all the buff Aussies – to make you feel like you’ve earned those end-of-the-day cocktails.


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VA L L A D O L I D , S PA I N

SA NTORINI, GR EECE

ool, calm and immaculately conceived, this converted abbey two hours north of Madrid is no doubt the smartest hotel in a part of Spain you’ve probably never heard of. Unless you’re really into wine, in which case you’ll know the Ribera del Duero, a paradise of rolling vineyards and stonking views. The hotel is spartan-chic, with stone walls draped in religious tapestries. You sleep where the monks slept (30 rooms), eat where the monks ate (the refectory is now a Michelin-star restaurant) and drink where the monks, um, read their scriptures. Explore the property’s own vineyard, thunder across pineclad terrain on mountain bikes or flop by the lavender-edged pool. The spa – an expansive subterranean space in fifty shades of cream – is a recent addition, where a ‘spa sommelier’ is on standby with, yes, a wine trolley. BOOK IT Double, from £380, including breakfast (ledomaine.es; 00 34 983 680 368).

o be honest, Santorini can get a bit much, what with the selfie-stick-wielding masses jostling for space to catch that famous sunset. Which is why the blissfully peaceful Vasilicos is such a godsend. Set in the sleepy town of Imerovigli, it has seven crisp, cool suites, with enormous beds and private terraces that have jaw-dropping views over the caldera – top pick is the Efta suite, with its own alfresco hot tub. There’s no restaurant, but that doesn’t matter because the brilliant chef Yannis will magic up something delicious and have it served on your candlelit terrace; do not leave without trying his baklava. Concierge Kostas will give you tips on how to avoid the madness in tourist-trap Oia – such as don’t even THINK about visiting if you can see more than two cruise ships in the port – and sort you out with reservations at the best restaurants when you do decide to venture out. But, frankly, when the hotel is this lovely, we suggest you stay exactly where you are. BOOK IT Double, from £360, including breakfast (mrandmrssmith.com; 0330 100 3180).

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Pop into roadside restaurant Entre Brasas y Sarmiento (15 minutes away), which has been flame-grilling suckling lamb on skewers made from vine branches for over 30 years.

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

M AC AKIZI

PHOTOGRAPHS: MR & MRS SMITH

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BODRU M , T U R K E Y

ucked away in a glittering corner of the Bodrum peninsula, Macakizi does the chic-seaside-scene thing to a T. Yes it’s glamorous and sexy and fabulous. But it’s also very laidback, which means the charming staff couldn’t give a monkeys if you’re Kate Moss (a regular) or just an average Joe. The beach deck is the hotel’s heartbeat: flop on a sunlounger, toes tickling the turquoise Aegean, and peer over your paperback as the bronzed and beautiful swan around clutching icy mojitos. Now put that book away and order a cocktail. Things get amped up at sundown as pit-stopping superyachts arrive to get their pre-dinner groove on (spot the DJ hidden in the hot-pink bougainvillea); the music and the drinks flow until the early hours. Snaffle up plates of ocean-fresh seabass in the restaurant (a foodie destination in itself), then float back up the hillside. Big, breezy bedrooms are spread around cottages with cooling stone floors and powder-white sofas: the perfect, head-clearing antidote to all that happens down by the water. BOOK IT Double, from £365, including breakfast (macakizi.com; 00 90 252 311 2400).

Charter Macakizi’s plush boat to whoosh over to the Greek islands for the day; there are miles of briny blue to dive into en route.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

To avoid Oia’s sunset crowds, head to the lighthouse in Akrotiri for incredible views at the opposite end of the island. Get there a little earlier to explore the nearby Minoan ruins.

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f you’re very lucky, once in your life you come across a hotel that is so special you want to keep it a closely guarded secret. Kahanda Kanda is such a place. Perched high in the hills overlooking Lake Koggala, this tea plantation was rescued, restored and reinvented by British designer George Cooper. It’s a total knockout: 10 suites with colonnaded verandas, canopied beds, Asian antiques, English oil paintings and Cooper family heirlooms. Snag the Dubu Suite, a Javanese cottage (with two outdoor bathrooms and 10 floor-to-ceiling windows, no less) secreted away in a vast garden with a towering Buddha at one end and a family of rambunctious monkeys in residence in the swathes of coconut, fragrant frangipani and mango trees all around. George is the most affable of hosts, and is expanding his particular brand of fabulousness with a pocket-sized beach bolthole down the road. Watch this space. And remember, it’s all a secret, so we’re only telling you. BOOK IT Scott Dunn (scottdunn.com; 020 8682 5060) offers six nights from £2,240, including breakfast, flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Get on your bike! George will organise an escorted cycle ride down the coast and through the paddy fields, ending up at Wijaya beach for a swim and a sundowner.

NEWSF L ASH OET K ER COLLEC T ION ’S PA L ACIO TA NGA R A , OPE N I NG I N SAO PAU LO T H IS SPR I NG , W I L L BE I T S F I R S T HO T E L I N T H E A M ER ICA S.

(OET K ERCOLLECT ION.COM )

THE MARK

N E W YOR K , USA

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Saunter two blocks south for brilliant temporary exhibitions in the new Met Breuer, the cutting-edge concrete extension of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: JIRI LIZLER, SPLASH NEWS, FRANCESCO TONELLI

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t’s unashamed, the Mark. Unashamedly smart, with its monochrome lobby and clickety-clack pinstriped marble floor (which demands serious heels). Unashamedly stylish, with large rooms, especially by New York standards, done up in soft greys and cream, with beds so comfortable you could spend all day in them and bathrooms awash with more marble. Unashamedly chic, drawing in delightfully nonchalant, stick-thin locals – Anna Wintour, left, is a fan – to the sultry bar, to the beauty salon and to the elegantly moody restaurant. You’ll want to move in and pretend it’s your home. There’s a congenial, fun side, too. The girls at reception will be your NBF, the bathroom goodies are cheery with their Manhattan caricatures by Jean-Philippe Delhomme, and the retro-bulky black-and-white bicycles are just the thing for zipping around Central Park, a mere lap-dog’s trot away. It’s utterly, unashamedly Upper East Side, all of it, and that’s why we love it. BOOK IT Double, from £610 (themarkhotel. com; 00 1 212 744 4300). British Airways (ba.com) flies to New York from £709.


TATLER • PROMOTION

BARBADOS ISLAND LIFE Looking for some winter sun? Look no further. Barbados boasts year round blue-sky weather, not to mention turquoise waters and white crescent beaches. And it’s only nine hours from the UK...

Situated on the eastern edge of the Caribbean’s sprawling archipelago, Barbados is every inch a tropical paradise. Impossibly soft sandy beaches extend for over 70 miles, the deliciously warm climate is offset by revitalising trade winds and the azure sea is positively teeming with exotic life. In a word? Perfection. But there is far more to this island than its postcard-perfect looks. Part of what makes Barbados so special, so memorable, are the locals. Friendly, chatty, helpful and enviably laid-back, they sum up everything that is wonderful about island life. Barbados is proud of its hospitable spirit and its impressive track record of safety – so don’t confine yourself to your resort. Oistins fish market is the place to be on a Friday or Saturday night. Calypso music thrums from a central dance hall and stalls dish up delicious (and authentic) Bajan fare like fish cakes and guinea corn. The market is a wonderful introduction to the bustling ambience of the island. Up for some full-throttle adventure? Jet-ski around the lively Mullins Beach, paddleboard at Pebbles Beach or hit the incredible surf

For more information, go to visitbarbados.org

at Atlantic Shores. Under the waves, there is yet more to explore. Barbados offers some of the best snorkelling and scuba-diving opportunities in the world. Swim with turtles, get up close and personal with Nemo-type fish and marvel at the kaleidoscopically colourful reefs. This magnificent island has the power to turn regular couch potatoes into active outdoorsy types. Elsewhere on the island, historical sites beckon. Make sure to visit Bridgetown and its garrison which was made a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2011. Also in Bridgetown, the 350-year-old Nidhe Israel Synagogue captivates with its pastel facade and gothic-style arches. Feeling a bit nosy? The Barbados National Trust’s Open House enables the public to visit Barbadian private homes, ranging from historic treasures and amusing abodes to lap-of-luxury mansions. Speaking of luxury, Barbados has a reputation for being one of the swankiest destinations, not only in the Caribbean but in the world. It has a plethora of pinch-me-I’m-dreaming five-star properties. From flashy villas with infinity pools

to super yachts ripe for chartering. There’s plenty of tip-top designer shopping too – bring an extra suitcase! From cocktails at sunset to private catamaran cruises and decadent spa treatments – Barbados has everything you need to fully unwind. Every Barbados holiday should be generously doused in rum. After all, this is the birthplace of Mount Gay Rum, one of the oldest rums in the world. Discover how the signature island drink is made at the local distillery. Put some island soul in your heart.


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ELLE MACPHERSON’S MALDIVES

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Bodysurf at the white-sand, castaway cove of Gouverneur, the island’s best beach.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Head out on a boat to snorkel with 30-foot whale sharks. The Ari Atoll is the only place in the world where these big, beautiful beasts cruise year round – they’ve even been given names, so do swim by to say hello.

L U X * S O U T H A R I AT O L L DH I DHOOFI NOLH U, M A LDI V ES

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s your holiday goal to make your Instagram followers sick with envy? Come to Lux* South Ari Atoll. Your life will never look more fun than it does here. The props alone are a winner – pizza-shaped pool floats dotted about, and enormous golden swan lilos to lounge on. There’s a proper beach club, where you can dance barefoot on pods scattered across the sea, and a disco loo with resident DJ. Body bores can snap their best warrior poses in the yoga grove at sunset. Beauty junkies can whang on about sound therapy in the pool, or the famous 10-handed massage, where five (yes, FIVE) therapists give your back a seeing to. You’ll want to photograph the ribbon-festooned wishing tree, the Panama hat-fitting stall, and the messages in bottles hidden around the island for lucky finders to claim a prize. If after all that you STILL can’t take a good pic (what’s wrong with you?), they have photography and social-media experts on hand to make your trip look as ridiculous as possible online. No filter necessary. BOOK IT Hayes & Jarvis (hayesandjarvis.co.uk; 01293 762456) offers seven nights from £1,649, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

FIRST THING I DO Drink water! Then I take half an hour for myself – no screens, no social media, just time to prepare for the day ahead. MUST-PACK ITEM A real camera. I’m still old-fashioned and like to take pictures with a camera, not just my iPhone. PERFECT DAY Riding my bike around the island of Villingili, home to the Shangri-La Resort & Spa, and snorkelling with my family. I grew up in Australia and now I live in Miami, so I’m happiest on the water. BEST HOLIDAY BUDS No one. That’s why we like it here. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME Your PADI dive licence. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR An ayurvedic treatment: Indian herbs rubbed all over your body followed by shirodhara, which is warm therapeutic oil poured in a continuous stream on the forehead. LAST THING I DO Eat a Maldivian breakfast called mas huni – it’s a dish of crushed tuna, coconut and spices on sweet bread. Delicious.

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOM FALLON, REX FEATURES, ALAMY

n the more rugged side of the island – the Côte Sauvage, as insiders know it – the once staid Le Toiny has gone cucumber-cool with an interiors makeover by Lady Bee Osborn. She’s bathed everything in a light, airy palette and layered on all sorts of natural, tactile materials such as figured sycamore and limed timber. The restaurant, beside the half-moon pool and bar covered with oyster shells and mother-of-pearl, has gone body-beautiful healthy – lots of omega-packed ceviche, tartare and grilled mahi mahi. All of the 14 very private rooms have a proper heated pool, but if you’re more of a flaunt-it-baby type, spend the day at the new beach club – a Caribbean riposte to Club 55 – for a toes-inthe-sand lunch, fashion shows by the boutique and siestas in hammocks strung beneath the palms. BOOK IT Double, from £555, including breakfast (letoiny.com; 00 59 0590 27 88 88).


MALLORCA LAS PALMERAS – THE EXQUISITELY DECORATED HOME This swish villa is our idea of heaven. It's elegant and stylish (the shabby-chic interiors are positively crammed with objets d’art) and it has the pool of our dreams. Really. Turquoise water stretches out into an alluring rectangle framed by palm trees. It's the sort of dip-inducing haven you'll struggle to peel yourself away from. You could stroll around the expansive private estate, admiring the awesome mountain views and relishing all that tranquillity. But more tempting still is the prospect of frolicking with abandon in the Instagram-worthy pool, then flopping onto the sun-warmed deck while a private villa host serves up perfectly mixed cocktails. Bliss.

Las Palmeras

CAN QUENEILLES – THE CHILD-PROOF HAVEN Holidaying with small children? It really doesn’t have to be a contradiction in terms if you make this luxuriously spacious villa your destination. Set in almost four acres of serene countryside (pretty much guaranteeing peace and quiet), glorious Can Queneilles comes fully staffed with a private chef, a host and, crucially, a fully qualified nanny. It is the nanny who – happily – will ensure even the youngest guests are entertained, leaving you alone to unwind. Think about it: the kids will spend fun-filled mornings splashing in the large pool and leisurely afternoons playing in the garden and grounds under the watchful eye of a professional while you get to just relax. What will you do with all this free time? You could enjoy drinks on the terrace poured by your attentive host and a mouth-watering lunch cooked just as you like it by your private chef. The only drawback? The staff can’t come home with you.

VIVA LES VILLAS At Scott Dunn, the emphasis is on giving unparalleled luxury a personal touch. With a private chef, host and nanny on hand, you won’t need to lift a finger

CANACATI – THE TEEN-APPROVED PAD Even the surliest teenagers will enjoy staying with their parents at this large, freshly renovated villa, right on the edge of the old town of behaved) friends along. There’s plenty of space for hanging out thanks to a huge terrace, beautiful gardens and a separate games room/gym. If tempers fray, get out of the house – it’s a short walk to the historic town centre and a little further to some lovely sandy beaches that offer all kinds of diversions. Better still, encourage the teens to explore – they're bound to find suitable fodder for their Snapchat story. You, meanwhile, can stretch out by the magnificent pool enjoying a delicious meal prepared by your own chef in the outdoor kitchen. And at sunset, the beauty of the illuminated pool will chase any bad moods away.

Canacati

La SamantinaLA SAMANTINA – THE MORE-THE-MERRIER DESTINATION Gather 11 of your nearest and dearest and host your own retreat at this exceptionally pretty finca-style villa, set in spacious grounds in one of rural Mallorca’s loveliest areas. Whether you’re a gang of friends, a collection of families or an assortment of both, you’ll love the manicured gardens, enormous pool and 360-degree views of the surrounding mountains on offer here. There may be many of you, but a sense of seclusion and privacy prevails, making it easy to unwind. You could split into teams and hold a mini-Olympics, practice naked yoga or stage a Monopoly tournament. We won’t judge. But however you decide to collectively kick back, the staff at this impressive luxury bolthole will ensure each and every whim is catered to – so you can focus on chilling out.

For more information, visit scottdunn.com or call 020 3603 4723


TATLER • PROMOTION

SOUTH OF FR ANCE LA MAISON BLANCHE – THE ULTIMATE PARTY HOUSE near Opio, a small village in the heart of the hilly region just above Cannes. This magnificent property is the ideal place to host a soirée, with capacious indoor and outdoor wining and dining spaces. Oh, and did we mention the infinity pool? Stunning to say the least. Let the music play as the sun sets on panoramic views over the French Riviera and you tuck into splendid food expertly whizzed up by your own chef. As the night goes on, hang out on one of the many terraces, dance wildly through the gardens or take a midnight dip in the pool. Well, it is your party.

Bastide des Virettes BASTIDE DES VIRETTES – THE PROVENÇAL DREAM Stay at this sumptuous villa and be prepared to drool over its lavish Baroque-style interior. In fact, if you wanted to don a Rococo costume and flit about these sumptuous rooms à la Madame de Pompadour, we’d quite understand. That’s the effect this elegant and lovingly restored bastide has on its occupants – it’s utterly enchanting. artfully furnished, with handpicked antique wooden furniture, frescoes and regional artefacts adorning the pastel living spaces. Outside is no less marvellous, so pick up your skirts and meander outside to swoon over the freeform heated swimming pool and Jacuzzi hewn into the rocks.

Bastide de L'Ormee

La Maison Blanche BASTIDE DE L'ORMEE – THE LAWN-GAME HOTSPOT Anyone for croquet? It really is a delightful game. The gentle swish of the mallet, the dull thud of wood striking wood, the graceful curve of the ball rolling under the hoop. We believe the gentle sport is even more enjoyable played in the sunshine on the manicured lawn of your charming luxury bastide, close to the Côte d'Azur. At L’Ormee, the lovingly tended grass is clean and clipped enough to eat your chefprepared meals off – but frankly croquet and cured trout do not mix. Between strikes, drink in the astonishing views of the landscape, with the Med in the distance. Play on while the brilliant nanny amuses the kids, the chef knocks up a scrummy lunch from locally sourced ingredients and your villa host glides around with refreshments.


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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Breakfast at sunrise on a pile of cushions scattered over the private, S-shaped sandbar connecting two of Jani’s five islands. From tide to tide, it’s never exactly the same.

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ike a circle of fairytale mushrooms rising out of the sea, glittery with ocean dew and twisting with vine-like waterslides, comes the magnificent Soneva Jani, the hyped new sister to Maldivian mainstay Soneva Fushi. And what, dear reader, a mushroom trip it is. No other resort combines the treehouse fantasy, the honeymooner’s overwater villa and the pluses of a ski-in-ski-out chalet – only, make that windsurf in and solar-powered-pontoon out. It’s pure, unmitigated fantasy, and all sustainably sourced, built and operated. Those slides plunge you from your roof deck right into the sea. A cheekily primitive Flintstones-esque remote control makes the roof retract, revealing ludicrously bright stars. There’s a fleet of kayaks that you can use to paddle to the huge overwater cinema. (Bluetooth headphones ensure the migratory birds in the island’s heaving jungle are not disturbed. It’s a thoughtful sort of place.) Getting to dinner (of, say, Maldivian tuna curry) in the main clubhouse involves bouncing over the aerial rope bridge, its planks island-made out of recycled bottle glass – another clue that Soneva is ahead of the eco-curve. And it’s all set around a giant aquamarine lagoon, which hosts a wealth of watery activities. Guides know the best snorkelling spots – where you’re most likely to find sea turtles, perhaps, or a leaping fleet of yard-long sailfish. It’s a dream. BOOK IT Cazenove+Loyd (cazloyd. com; 020 7384 2332) offers seven nights from £5,660, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

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yblos, which turns 50 this year, is one of those places. Everyone knows it. Everyone’s been. Everyone’s partied here, at the almost mythical Caves du Roy. Or posed around the blissful pool, overlooked by those pink-grapefruit and sunflower-yellow houses that hold the suites. Or eaten in Rivea, Alain Ducasse’s chic joint that serves scallops caught by Ariel Volland – one of the last two remaining fishermen in St Tropez – and the very best tarte Tropézienne in town. Change is afoot, but only in the lightest sense – the Caves du Roy is having a gentle refurb, making it merely a more fabulous version of itself. Nothing too drastic. Everyone will keep coming, as they always have: the families who stay every summer, often for a month at a time; the celebrities, from Jack Nicholson and Cher, far right, in the Seventies, to George Clooney and the Beckhams, who come to throw shapes on the dancefloor. It’s one of those places. BOOK IT Double, from £380 (byblos.com; 00 33 4 94 56 68 00).

AND ANOTHER THING

Tuesdays and Saturdays are market days. Get to the Place des Lices early – before 9am – to buy up armfuls of linen kaftans and smart panamas.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: RICHARD WAITE PHOTOGRAPHY, ALAMY, BOBI, GETTY IMAGES

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Head over to nearby Newrybar to browse the homeware, clothes, art and stationery in the fabulous Newrybar Merchants, a hipster concept store where you’ll want to buy EVERYTHING.

ere’s to the glamorous new Byron Bay. Just 10 minutes out of town, brand new Elements rambles across 55 acres, covering a pristine lagoon and rainforest walks that lead to silky Belongil Beach, where Chris Hemsworth, left, has been known to catch a wave or two. Chill in the lush grounds with a plate of crab doughnuts from Graze, or order the Hinterland Roadkill – sounds foul but is fab (there are even tiny tyre marks on the chicken pâté – those Aussies). There is a gargantuan pool, with lots of seats dangling above it, right next door to the lovely Osprey spa with its cracker iKOU range. And the villas – 103 of them, discreetly dotted around the lagoon – are split-level, slate-grey and white, filled with Appelles Apothecary goodies and books you actually want to read. Villa 33 has perfect beach access. Want to be in town? A new train will soon be chugging every 20 minutes along a restored line into still crazy-hot Byron. BOOK IT Bridge & Wickers (bridgeandwickers. co.uk; 020 3642 8551) offers seven nights, as part of a fourteen-night trip, from £4,080, including flights and transfers.

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inolhu is a hipster’s Gilligan’s Island. The year is 1967, as demonstrated by a sunbleached VW van, staff in faded-denim chambray, vintage turntables and an omnipresent Sixties-Seventies soundtrack (curated by a DJ in Paris). But villas, almost all over water, are where the Gilligan gimmicks fall away: gallery-sleek glass walls, infinity pools, bedside USB consoles and Arctic air-conditioning are pure 21st century. Food is a splashily art-directed affair, giving a sense of occasion back to resort suppers. CEO Mark Hehir’s start as a Dorchester chef shines through in an outstanding North African joint, Baahaa Grill, and Kanusan, a sort of Sexy Fish-by-the-sea, whose vampy blood-red bar is adorned with vintage Bruce Lee posters and dishes out exuberant cocktails using guava pulp, yuzu foam and Thai basil. Nightly poolside parties throng around a live band – sourced in Europe and rotated every three months – and some very bendy circus acts. And the service? As friendly as the cast of a sitcom. You almost expect to hear a laughter track. BOOK IT Cazenove+Loyd (cazloyd.com; 020 7384 2332) offers seven nights, half board, from £2,925, including flights and transfers.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Along a spindly sandbar is the Crab Shack. Snorkel off the shore then drip-dry over a garlicky, crab-studded Caesar.

BAHIA VIK

MARTIN SUMMERS’ U R U G U AY

FIRST THING I DO Have a glass of clerico, a South American drink of white wine, fruit and soda water. MUST-PACK ITEM Skippy peanut butter – the local variety isn’t anywhere near as good. PERFECT DAY Birdwatching near Pueblo Garzón – I’ve seen fabulous birds like the roseate spoonbill, below. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT Lucia Soria’s charming restaurant Lucifer in Pueblo Garzón. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME Uruguayan clothes from the delightful Alium boutique in Pueblo Garzón. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR A visit to the Bodega Garzón winery and a meal at Francis Mallmann’s Garzón. Martin Summers is the owner of Martin Summers Fine Art

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Head to Estancia Vik to ride with gauchos or hit a ball on the Vik polo ponies.

Cork, marble, zinc or gold leaf – you choose. Each room is differently, gorgeously, lined at Bahia Vik, the fourth and youngest in the artsy Vik clan. These hotels have something of a star quality to them: Katy Perry had just checked out of Playa Vik along the beach when we arrived; Estancia Vik (10 minutes inland, past what was until recently Shakira’s ranch) was being taken over for a month by the Rockefellers; and it’s just another day at Viña Vik in Chile when the pool is lined with giraffelike models. The group is basically a micro art movement too, with each room snazzed up by a different artist: oversized portraits, bits of driftwood, a sculpture of a reclining nude inspired by Mrs Vik (with a typewriter representing her nether regions), that sort of thing. Days are spent munching fresh seafood with quinoa salad, local beef and homemade chocolate ice cream before surfing, paddleboarding and wandering along the beach into José Ignacio, where the bold and beautiful summer. BOOK IT The Explorations Company (explorationscompany.com; 01367 850566) offers seven nights from £2,375, including breakfast and transfers.

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, VIK RETREATS

JO S E IG N A Z IO, U RUGUAY


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here’s a reason why everyone who goes to Muscat stays at the Chedi. It’s because it has everything you’d expect of a lavish, styled-up beach resort – but bang in the city. A vast stretch of pristine beach? Check. Tennis courts and three swimming pools, one of them, at 340 feet, the longest in the Middle East? Yep. Spacious private villas with ocean views set in 21 acres of luscious gardens? You bet. Then there’s the food: eight restaurants and bars, one with the lengthiest menu imaginable, stretching through Arabic, Far Eastern and Indian via Modern European, each prepared in front of you in a separate glass-box kitchen. The Long Pool restaurant is for the hip crowd, who chill poolside late into the night. But the Beach – run by a Nobu-trained chef – wins, having been rated the best in all Oman for four out of five years. Whose restaurant won the other time? Only that of the Sultan himself. BOOK IT Western & Oriental (westernoriental.com; 020 3588 6130) offers seven nights from £1,460, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

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ore country club than glitzy-ritzy Dubai hotel, this beguiling beach retreat is one of the leafiest places to flop in the city. The sandstone villas, with rooms that are smart, grown up and just the right side of plush, peep out from behind lemon and tangerine trees. Zest, with its pretty terrace of ziggety-zag peppermint tiles, is the place to eat; a huge, heavenly pool is flanked by air-conditioned cabanas; and there’s a temple-like Guerlain spa. Throw in a state-of-the-art Bastien Gonzalez nail salon and there really is no better place for a sun-blasted top-to-toe polish. BOOK IT Turquoise Holidays (turquoiseholidays.co.uk; 01494 678400) offers seven nights, half board, from £2,950, including flights and transfers.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Only one mosque in Oman is open to non-Muslims: the vast Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque, with its 45ft Swarovski chandelier and room for 20,000.

NEWSF L ASH

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Spend a few hours in Dubai’s Empty Quarter desert, bouncing around in a vintage Land Rover against a backdrop of rippling sandscapes and prancing Arabian oryx. (platinum-heritage.com)

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rrive by helicopter, a quick 20-minute jaunt from Mahé airport, and put on your sunglasses. No ifs, no buts, just do it. Because – you wait – the COLOURS. Winking, twinkling acid-blue sea. Giant soot-coloured boulders fringing luminous white sand. Oversized flora hiding twisty-twirly paths. This was once a coconut plantation, and it’s taken nine years to regenerate. But, boy, was it worth the wait. Why? First, the indigenous species are back: magpie robins and paradise flycatchers chirp away, fairy terns sweep overhead, hawksbill turtles trundle ashore to lay their eggs. Then there are the handful of villas, so well hidden you’ll barely notice them, with private infinity pools, gobsmacking views of neighbouring islands and swings. Yes, actual swings. Dinner at Ocean Kitchen is low-key and glorious: curry of just-caught fish beneath stars as bright as headlights. Next up is the spa, opening this month. It’s a beauty in the making. BOOK IT ITC Luxury Travel (itcluxurytravel.co.uk; 01244 355 527) offers seven nights from £5,130 including breakfast, flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Go for a sunrise hike with Steve the permaculturist to learn more about his ongoing re-wilding mission.

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Show off your parallel turns on the Tiger Run, a 1.5-mile black with the steepest slope in the region and spectacular views.

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he Alpina has that very clever knack of basically being perfect without ever saying, ‘Hey, aren’t I PERFECT?’ It is charming and beautiful and just works, and the staff are warm and wonderful. But the real seller is the location. The hotel is cushioned against the mountains, which means the views from anywhere – even the tiniest room at the back (note: none of the rooms are tiny) – are astonishing. But turn your gaze inwards, to the cosy, styled-up interiors with their cowbell lights and timber cladding and thick woollen throws just made for swaddling yourself in while drinking hot chocolate. Which is the best in the world, by the way, like much of the food – breakfast will move you to tears and the fondue alone will mean you insist on coming back every year. And that spa; if you didn’t want to spend all day splashing about in the indoor and outdoor pools, we’d be shocked. Make sure you have the new Six Senses integrated wellness programme, where they’ll tell you if you need more kale (highly likely) and if you drink too much Aperol spritz (almost definitely). The Alpina should come with a warning – after a stay here, other mountain hotels will feel a tiny bit... blah. BOOK IT Double, from £660, including £80 per person per day for food and drink (thealpinagstaad.ch; 00 41 33 888 9888).


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rlberg Hospiz is all about the wine. It’s an obsession. The hotel has an outstanding collection, and to save you clomping down the steep steps in your ski boots, the cellars are accessible by a slide. Yes, you can whoosh down to choose a bottle. But beware: some of the Cheval Blancs down there will cost you more than a new Land Rover. No joke. When you’ve recovered from the shock, stagger over to one of the brand new Arlberg1800 Suites – a redefinition of what a ski chalet should look like. There’s lots of distressed wood, along with double-height ceilings, giant chandeliers, marble-topped bars, sultry saunas and proper art on the walls. All but one of the suites are named after musicians, because they’re built on top of a new concert hall, the patron’s pride and joy, dug deep into the mountainside. At 6,000 feet above sea level, the Steinway is the highest piano in Europe. There are evening concerts, but if classical music isn’t your bag, just leap on the slide and hit that wine cellar. BOOK IT Kaluma Travel (kalumatravel.co.uk; 01730 887633) offers seven nights from £2,390, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Try heli-skiing – the Arlberg is the only region in Austria where you can leap out of a chopper straight onto the mountain.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

House salad, salty pommes frites and a glass of rosé on the terrace of the Bel Air restaurant at 1650 is as good as a mountain lunch gets.

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kiing with young children is a faff. But not when you are staying at the astonishingly lavish les Airelles in Courchevel. They will drive you to the splendidly well-run ESF ski school, where you can leave the snotty ones for the day. The hotel is right on a fir-lined slope, which means you can watch the graceful royals and black-clad oligarchs without moving from your balcony. Inside, it’s like a perfect mountain palace (think five-star Frozen), with fireplaces and red-velvet nooks and handpainted furniture, as well as a sleek swimming pool and a spa with its own ‘snow cave’. After a day on the slopes, there are homemade cookies and hot chocolate in the kids’ club, while you opt for elegant cakes and tea in the salon. No wonder the Cambridges, above, (allegedly) chose it for their first family ski holiday. BOOK IT Oxford Ski (oxfordski.com; 01993 899422) offers seven nights, half board, from £3,435, including flights and transfers.

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azy skiers, take note. Le Yule neatly removes the most maddening aspects of skiing – dealing with boots, lugging around skis, the lot. Val d’Isère’s newest ski-in, ski-out hotel has it all covered, with its own ski shop so you can trot straight over from breakfast in your slippers to rent all your gear. And then there are the charming Frenchmen, who lay out your skis on the snow, warm up your mittens and even put your boots on for you. The 41 rooms have glorious views of either the mountains or the village, with understated Scandi-style decor and cosy bits and pieces (sheepskin rugs, plush throws). Dinner in the restaurant is all quite hushed and haute, but lunchtime gets lively in the sun-filled brasserie amid the stomping of ski boots. Which, don’t forget, someone else will take off for you later. BOOK IT Carrier (carrier.co.uk; 0161 492 1359) offers seven nights from £1,720, including breakfast and flights. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

You’ve got to do La Folie Douce. It’s obligatory. Ditch the skis, loosen your boots, climb up on the tables and get down on it.

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e love that old-school dirndls-and-stag-heads-and-wood-panelling thing, we do. But sometimes we want to shake it up a bit. To forgo the glühwein and heartiness and instead sink into a velvet sofa for a sexy snifter of Hibisco gin fizz. To gorge slopeside on cheese for lunch, but opt for an astonishingly good – and astonishingly light – seven-course seasonal tasting menu at dinner time. To stroke a pet llama before heading to a cosseting room of pale wood and monochrome prints and a slinky bathroom with a bath big enough for six. Service is sharp: they remember how you take your coffee and bring back that half-finished bottle of Seeberg riesling from the night before. But they don’t fuss. There’s a sumptuous boot room, for example, which you’d happily sleep in, but they leave you to it – none of that ‘ski butler’ stuff. You’re left to glide in and out (it’s right on the slopes) and treat the place like your own. BOOK IT Double, from £790, half board (aureliolech.com; 00 43 5583 2214).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

A raft of new lifts on the Arlberg has created the mammoth Run of Fame, which will let skiers cover 40 miles of pistes.That’s a lot of schussing.

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kiing in southern Spain? Not as weird as it sounds. Sierra Nevada is as high as Val Thorens (fun fact!), and the newly rebuilt El Lodge is the very summit of mountain cool. The supersized Finnish-style log cabin is terrifically Alpine but in no way chocolate box – think antler chandeliers, mirrored trunks and cowhide-covered Louis XIV armchairs. Be smart and book a piste-facing room with a private hot tub on the balcony. The hotel is run by the team behind the Marbella Club, which means zippy service and awesome cocktails at the zinc-topped bar or out on the sceney sun terrace. And the skiing? Surprisingly good: lots of long, well-groomed reds and enough hair-raising blacks to show off on. BOOK IT Double, from £260, including breakfast (ellodge. com; 00 34 958 480 600). British Airways (ba.com) flies to Malaga daily and to Granada twice a week from £76. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Have lunch on the sun terrace of La Lonja, the highest seafood restaurant in Europe. There’s a fresh delivery of sea bounty brought up from nearby Granada every day.

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Wrap up, saddle up and ride the local breed of blond-haired Haflinger horses through the surrounding forest’s snowy trails.

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ith its dreamy treehouses, San Luis appeals to your inner child. Who doesn’t want to sleep in a treehouse? And then there’s the frozen lake for ice-skating, or for splashing about in come summertime. But look closer and the polished-concrete indoor/outdoor infinity pool, cathedrallike glass poolhouse and steel hot tubs will have you feverishly Pinteresting mood boards. Let’s call it elemental-Alpine meets urban-industrial. The monumental main building has fires crackling in six-foot-tall fireplaces, and the black walls, sofas and spa-loungers are in crisp contrast to the snowy boughs outside. The nearby mountains, by the way, are just made for exploring by ski, foot or snowshoe. Back inside, it’s a perfect combination of private and public: breakfast is laid out in your own kitchen, while pick ’n’ mix six-course suppers happen in the clubhouse. Nothing childish about that. BOOK IT Double, from £185, including breakfast (sanluis-hotel.com; 00 39 0473 279570). Easyjet (easyjet.com) flies to Innsbruck from £53.

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, STEFANO SCATA

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TATLER â&#x20AC;¢ PROMOTION

LIFE THROUGH A LENS

Heading away on the trip of a lifetime? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to pack your camera. Holidays start with Nikon

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get philosophical for a minute: if you have an amazing holiday and there are no photos to show people, is it still an amazing holiday? After all, the post-gallivant brag is half the fun, right? Well, then. Leave no moment uncaptured. Snap with abandon. Take photos of balsamic drizzling down your fresher-than-fresh salad, photos of palm trees bowing their heads against clear skies, photos of champagne glasses clinking on a deserted beach. You get the gist. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need a top-of-the range piece of kit, of course, to make sure all that saturated colour and dramatic scenery is realised to full effect. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where Nikon comes LQ$QGVSHFL¿FDOO\WKH'1LNRQ¶VQHZHVWHQWU\ OHYHO'6/5FDPHUD Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trekking in outer Mongolia, swanning around the South of France or raving at Burning Man, WKLV1LNRQ'6/5VKRXOGEH\RXU¿UVWFKRLFHLQ VQDSKDSS\HTXLSPHQW,I\RX¶UHORRNLQJWRPRYHRQ IURPVPDUWSKRQHSLFWXUHVDQGWDNHWKH¿UVWWHQWDWLYH steps into real photography, this is the camera for you. Nikonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative Guide Mode means you can learn as you go and really get creative with your shots. /RZOLJKWDQGPRYLQJVXEMHFWVSRVHQRGLI¿FXOW\WR this cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful image sensor. And, because \RXZRQ¶WZDQWWRJLYHXSWKHMR\VRI\RXU smartphone entirely, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nikonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SnapBridge app. This allows instant sharing so you can upload magazineZRUWK\VKRWVWR,QVWDJUDPLQDQLQVWDQW3HUIHFWIRUWUDYHO bloggers (or would-be travel bloggers). Handily, this camera is also super-small and lightweight so you can take LWDQ\ZKHUHZLWKHDVH'RQ¶WOHDYHKRPHZLWKRXW1LNRQ

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; A camera that is utterly useable, pictures that are instantly shareable; the Nikon D3400 upgrades your photo cred in a ï¬&#x201A;ashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; NIKON SNAPBRIDGE Using a combination of Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy technology, Nikon SnapBridge makes automatic upload of your images possible. Which means your pictures are instantly ready to share on social media â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in piercing highGH¿QLWLRQ:KDWDMR\%HFDXVH really, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an incredible snap ZLWKRXWDÃ&#x20AC;XUU\RI,QVWDJUDP likes to back it up... snapbridge.nikon.com

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R A JA ST H A N, I N DI A

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hen we heard that Shatrunjay Singh and Bhavna Kumari, a couple of notable pedigree (the family is behind the fairytale fort Deogarh Mahal), had returned to their roots to build a dreamy haveli hugging the banks of Ragho Sagar Lake, bags were hastily packed. And we weren’t disappointed. Dev Shree is a regal Rajput retreat with five courtly yet cosy bedrooms, awash with vivid fabrics and cool marble. This is a place to stay a while, to doze in a rattan chair under the arches of the deep verandas, to slip into the saltwater pool, to totter out onto the sunny lawn bordered by sweet-scented roses, to take afternoon tea of homemade samosas and squidgy Victoria sponge as flocks of parakeets swoop overhead. But this is a rare corner of unexplored Rajasthan, and explore you must – on thoughtfully curated forays with Shatrunjay into the glorious Aravalli Hills, or through time-frozen villages for a cup of chai with the local farmers, returning for sundowners and home-cooked suppers in the graceful courtyard as stars make a spectacle of themselves overhead. BOOK IT Greaves India (greavesindia.com; 020 7487 9111) offers five nights, full board, as part of a seven-night trip, from £1,840, including flights and transfers.

Have your coca leaves read by a local shaman before giving an offering to Pachamama, the Inca goddess of fertility.

A M A N T I C A LO D G E L A K E T I T ICACA , PE RU

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oosting on a rocky shoulder of land in the Hockneyblue water of Lake Titicaca, Amantica is properly, wildly remote (a flight, a drive and then a boat from Lima). Benefits: an unambiguously tourist-free experience of one of the world’s loftiest lakes. The lodge is locally built, locally run and sustainable as anything – solar-powered and constructed from groovy adobe, totora reeds and island stone. There are only two glass-walled suites, run by the charming, fedora-clad Señor Osvaldo, who’ll show you island life, and Adeli, who turns just-caught/plucked ingredients into delightful dishes like zesty trout ceviche. Life on the island is simple. Villagers rise with the sun, farm pre-Inca terraces and make offerings to the goddess Pachamama. You come here to disconnect from your devices and reconnect with the elements. The deck is the perfect spot for, well, not doing much. Sit and watch the sunlight sparkle on the water, while fishermen bob past in their wooden boats. Then rouse yourself, huff and puff your way up one of the island’s peaks and catch one of the most glorious sunsets you’ve ever seen. BOOK IT Aracari (aracari.com; 00 51 1 651 2424) offers two nights, all-inclusive, as part of an eight-night trip, from £4,280, including domestic flights, transfers and tours.

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Shatrunjay will encourage you to sit, legs dangling, in the open doorway of an ancient train as you chug through the Aravalli Hills, feeding langur monkeys as you go.

NEWSF L ASH J US T- OPE N E D C H A BL E , DE E P I N M E X IC O ’ S

T T O A S AC R E D M AYA N J U NG L E , H A S A S PA N E X SI N K HOL E , A N D T H E WOR L D’ S L A RGE S T T E QU I L A ORT .C OM ) C OL L E C T ION . OL É ! (C H A BL E R E S

A N A N TA R A A L J A B A L AL AK H DAR N I Z WA , O M A N

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t’s been five years in the making, and the buzz around this mountaintop five-star was so feverish that they had an Omani royal turn up unannounced on day one. Now you can explore this isolated, craggy wilderness, where goats scamper and wolves roam, without skimping on in-room massages or Amouage lotions. The hotel sits on the edge of a sheer canyon, 6,500 feet above the heat of the desert, and the best rooms have infinity pools and full-frontal views. You can get out and about for archery and abseiling, or hide away in the spa for a pomegranate scrub or punchy (not literally) hammam. There are six restaurants, one with a private jetty over the canyon, where Sicilian chef Francesco will cook the best funghi risotto imaginable, with the lights of Muscat twinkling far below. BOOK IT Double, from £370, including breakfast (jabal-akhdar.anantara.com; 00 968 2521 8000). Oman Air (omanair.com) flies to Muscat from £599. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Hike through a secret wadi (ravine) known only to local guide Tariq and lots of wild goats. Then cool off with a swim in a luminous natural pond.

PHOTOGRAPHS: NICOLASVILLAUME.COM

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

WHILE YOU’RE THERE


TATLER • PROMOTION

LIKE A VIRGIN ISLAND?

We bloody love one. Especially when we can explore all those tucked-away swimming coves and deserted beaches from the comfort of our own yacht. Discover a personal paradise in the British Virgin Islands with The Moorings Sailing Holidays

‘No matter what your voyage, no matter what course you choose, a trip with The Moorings promises to be anything but boring’

CLOCKWISE FR OP, THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS. THE MOORINGS 5800 CATAMARAN. THE EXPANSIVE FLYBRIDGE OF THE MOORINGS 5800 CATAMARAN. VALLEY TRUNK BAY, VIRGIN GORDA. BITTER END YACHT CLUB, VIRGIN GORDA. THE WRECK OF. THE RMS RHONE

If you haven’t woken up to the sound of water gently lapping against the hull of a yacht, or tucked into fresh seafood on your own deck at sunset, then – we hate to break this to you – you haven’t really lived. Chartering an all-inclusive, crewed yacht with The Moorings offers all the trappings of luxury you’ve come to expect from a hotel stay but with an added dose of freedom. Not to mention a heady dollop of adventure! This is your opportunity to give your holiday a fresh perspective. Where better to set sail than the magnificent British Virgin Islands? After all, this incredible, azure-hued haven inspired Treasure Island. The British Virgin Islands is a sprawling archipelago that encompasses 60 islands and cays. The beaches are white and sandy, the vegetation is lush and tropical and the water is impossibly blue. Well protected from Atlantic swells, these islands also benefit from reliable trade winds and a year-round temperate climate. The perfect place, then, to test out your sea legs. Did we mention that only 15 of the islands are inhabited? Suddenly ‘leaving it all behind’ has new meaning. The Moorings 5800 Master edition is the latest catamaran to join The Moorings fleet. And it is beautiful. With five en-suite cabins and a large saloon, it has everything you could possibly need for an invigorating sailing holiday. Think hydraulic swim platform for easy dipping access, an expansive fly bridge designed to soak up those views and stylish fittings at every turn. As well as a knowledgeable and friendly captain, you also get your very own chef – so all your dining (even snacks and drinks) is taken care of. At The Moorings, the aim is to create your dream getaway – so everything is completely tailored to you. Perhaps you’ll partake in a spot of paddle-boarding, fishing or kayaking. All kit is stocked on board and the watersports come at no extra charge. Or you could sail to the North Sound – the waters surrounding the famous islands of Necker, Prickly Pear and Eustatia. The on-shore parties here are legendary. The British Virgin Islands offers some of the most remarkable snorkelling in the world – the reefs are an explosion of vibrant, eye-popping colour. Your crew can guide you towards the top spots with the most exotic fish-life. No matter what your voyage, no matter what course you choose, a trip with The Moorings promises to be anything but boring.

For more information, visit moorings.co.uk or bvitourism.co.uk


LEFT, THE BEACH AT MANUEL ANTONIO. ABOVE, ARENAL VOLCANO, IN THE CENTRE OF COSTA RICA’S ARENAL VOLCANO NATIONAL PARK. RIGHT, A THREE-TOED SLOTH

‘HEY, COME BACK... ...with those crisps!’ OK, so the raccoons will rob you blind, but then this is their turf. Francisca Kellett visits Costa Rica and discovers a place where the wild things rule

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he first thing you need to know about Costa Rica is that raccoons love crisps. They love crisps so much that they will push through your mosquito screen with their tiny hands. Then they will fling open every cupboard in your room (still with the hands – they have nimble little fingers). On locating your minibar, they will snatch the biggest bag of crisps they can find, then dash out onto your balcony to open and eat them (those hands, all covered in crumbs), watching you all the while with their innocent little faces. This happened in Arenas Del Mar, a sweet little eco-boutiquey place perched on a jungly headland overlooking the thrashing Pacific in Manuel Antonio. There was also a bright-orange-and-black land crab that clattered around in my bathroom for a while, and a three-toed sloth that didn’t move from the palm tree by my breakfast table for the entire weekend. And that’s the second thing you need to know about Costa Rica. It’s wild. Even though Yanks have been going for yonks (and now, thanks to a direct flight from British Airways, we’re joining them), even though it’s sanitised (good roads, drinkable tap water and brilliant, English-speaking service), it’s wild. Like, animals EVERYWHERE. Squirrel monkeys leaping overhead. Humpback whales rolling past on the horizon. Laughing falcons calling rudely from up high: ‘Cock! Cock! Cock!’ You can venture out at night with a guide, as I did, to see all that creeps and crawls in the dark – though it’s not for arachnophobes (spiders are the size of your palm, often with a nasty bite). Did you know that the dink tree frog is not only very tiny and very cute, but it also makes an almighty ‘dink’ sound? ‘DINK!’ it yells. The fer-de-lance snake is small and brown, and very poisonous, and likes to hide beneath the damp, waxy leaves.

That makes it all sound a bit scary, but it’s not: it’s riveting – like strolling through a David Attenborough documentary, with the advantage of grilled prawns and rum punch back at the hotel’s beach bar afterwards. Things get wilder on the Osa Peninsula, which is like a mini version of the Amazon – you should stay in Lapa Rios, an eco-lodge set in virgin rainforest. Or head to Pacuare Lodge, near the centre of the country, which is best approached by whitewater raft. What a way to arrive. Surfers should do Santa Teresa, the boho surf capital of Central America, populated entirely by buff bods in boardshorts. Or do as I did, and ride out on a handsome horse at Hacienda AltaGracia in the Pérez Zeledón mountains, with the even more handsome Juan, to visit lush farms of mango trees and sugar cane. At night the nearby town of San Isidro has salsa clubs filled with what locals claim are the world’s most beautiful women. And they’re right: they all look like Sofía Vergara and can dance like the knocked-up girlfriend in Dirty Dancing. It’s quite intimidating. And then there’s Arenal, a wildly verdant national park that’s home to the country’s most famous volcano, a perfect cone that rises to 5,437 feet. It last erupted in 1968 and is now dormant, but you can climb its lower flanks and I dare you not to be a little wary of the smoke drifting from its peak. You must also zip-line here – a thrilling, scream-till-you’re-hoarse experience through the forest canopy. Finish up at stylish Nayara Springs (see review, page 92), lie back in your own volcanic-heated plunge pool and gently poach while blue jays and hummingbirds flit about the trumpet-sized flowers around you. It’s wild. Just be sure to lock up your crisps. ( BOOK IT British Airways (ba.com) flies three times a week to San José, from £499. See visitcostarica.com for more information.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

PHOTOGRAPHS: ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES

Laughing falcons call rudely from up high: ‘Cock! Cock!’


W HAT TO PAC K

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Channel Attenborough

Much sexier than a wetsuit

1J5 DIGITAL CAMERA, £299, BY NIKON

NEOPRENE SWIMSUIT, £190, BY DUSKII, AT NET-A-PORTER

Rainforest trekking = awesome excuse for new trainers TRAINERS, £360, BY MARNI

Who can? YOU CAN!

Who said you’re not the adventurous type?

PVC TOUCAN BAG, £365, BY CH CAROLINA HERRERA

WATER PURIFIER, £49, BY GRAYL

Mad about the boy SWIM SHORTS, £40, BY GANDYS

HOT STUFF

A.N. EXPLORER

A trip to Costa Rica calls for totally tropical taste

We can’t wait to read your rainforest rhymes

Because who can be arsed with reapplying?

Parrot fashion

EIGHT HOUR CREAM TARGETED SUN DEFENSE STICK SPF50, £15, BY ELIZABETH ARDEN

LINED NOTEBOOK, £12.99, BY PAPIER

What marsupials would have, if they could COTTON POUCH, £20, BY ELIZABETH SCARLETT

SCHNABELVOGEL PAPPWATCH, £13, BY MVM PAPERCUTS

Monster magic CANVAS & LEATHER DUFFLE BAG, £1,060, BY WORLD OF M/M X TOSHIKI, AT JW ANDERSON

Avoid eye contact with raccoons ACETATE SUNGLASSES, £225, BY MICHAEL KORS

Plane pillow – sorted LINEN & COTTON PILLOW, £27, BY SUVI KANKKONEN

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

Jungle camouflage MULTI-WHEEL CABIN CASE, £805, BY RIMOWA

EDITED BY BEATRIZ CHOI. FOR STOCKISTS SEE ADDRESS BOOK IN MAIN MAGAZINE

Go bananas COTTON KAFTAN, £875, BY DOLCE & GABBANA, AT MATCHES


TATLER • PROMOTION

MAURITIAN MOMENTS With dramatic scenery that includes rainforests, waterfalls, botanical gardens and palm-tree sprinkled beaches, Mauritius has a photo op at every turn. This is an island brimming with once-in -a-lifetime experiences. No one knows the island better than Susie Freeman – the UK’s go-to Mauritian specialist

Susie Freeman has the enviable task of getting very well acquainted with Mauritius. To this end, she leaves no cocktail un-sipped and no pool un-dipped. She is a walking oracle of knowledge about where to go, what to eat, what to do and where to stay on this heavenly island paradise. Her top choice for 2017 is Royal Palm Beachcomber Luxury. When picking a sun-drenched, seaside bolthole, it’s all about location, location, location. The Royal Palm Beachcomber Luxury has this in spades. Widely considered to be the best address in Mauritius, this hotel presides over perhaps the most beautiful and unspoilt beach on the island. And, refreshingly, The Royal Palm Beachcomber Luxury is situated just a short walk away from the pretty coastal town of Grand-Baie so there’s plenty of local flora and fauna to discover on foot. Here you’ll find authentic local eateries, seaside bars,

some amazing retail therapy and much more to explore. But only if you can bear to drag yourself away from the comfort of Royal Palm Beachcomber Luxury, that is. Bedrooms are elegantly decked out in a calming palette of taupe and cream and almost all offer breathtaking sea views. But why just look at the sea when you can get right out there on a speed boat? A host of free water-based activities will appeal to adrenalin junkies and lazybones alike. Or you could just indulge in some R&R at the Clarins spa. A menu of facials, massages, manicures and pedicures will soothe weary muscles and beautify you for the whole holiday. There’s plenty to whet foodies’ appetites at the three award-winning restaurants led by renowned and decorated French chef Michel de Matteis. Think delicious, seasonal ingredients rustled up with real flair. Service everywhere at the hotel is gracious but unobtrusive – and no request is too big or too small.

The sea swimming is the best on the island but if you are a fresh-water fish and your idea of a break is just lounging by a pool with mimosa in hand, then you now have a choice of three and all of them are more inviting than ever before. The magic of Mauritius beckons but book nothing until you talk to Susie Freeman, the indisputable doyenne of travel to Mauritius.

CLOCKWISE FR TOP, AERIAL VIEW OF THE STUNNING ROYAL PALM BEACHCOMBER LUXURY BEACH. LE BAR PLAGE LUNCH RESTAURANT. THE ROYAL VILLA. A TROPICAL SUITE

SUSIE SUGGESTS

For more information, visit susiefreemantravel.com or call 01488 668821

an early morning swim followed by breakfast on your terrace; lunch at Le Bar Plage with a chilled bottle of rosé; a meander through Sunset Boulevard in GrandBaie; fresh crab and palm hearts with hollandaise sauce at Le Capitaine restaurant on the other side of the bay; a glass of champagne on the beach as the sun sets at dusk over La Pointe aux Canonniers and a relaxing massage at the Clarins spa.


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Far-flung or just flippin’ fabulous – these are places you’ll want to stay a while...

EDEN ROCK ST BARTH’S ST BA RTH’S, CA RIBBEA N

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n an island where hotel hype can be deafening, this cliff-dwelling stalwart carries on doing its thing: smoothly, professionally, quietly setting the standard. It’s owned by the Matthews family – Spencer, of Made in Chelsea fame, but also James, who’s marrying Pippa Middleton this year. The rooms are filled with modern art curated by Slade graduate Jane (the boys’ mum), and they’re a joy, from pretty cottages to villas that are laughout-loud enormous. They’ve cleverly put their newest suite, the Christopher Columbus, in the prime location once occupied by the lobby, with stop-and-stare sea views. The beach is a delight – for its apricot-hued sand and calm water, but also for the Sand Bar restaurant, which is as close to a slick St Tropez beach club as we’ve seen. And On the Rocks, the smart restaurant up on, um, the rocks, serves the best food on the island: sake-glazed black cod, praline millefeuille with Tahitian vanilla cream. But it’s the service that keeps us coming back. Staff are friendly without being obsequious, near psychic in their ability to bring icy glasses of something delicious when most needed, and all utterly gorgeous. BOOK IT Double, from £560, including breakfast (edenrockhotel.com; 00 590 590 29 79 99). WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Hitch a lift on a yacht and whizz over to Anse du Grand Colombier, the best beach on the island, with its eerily calm water, bone-white sand and barely a soul to be seen (as it’s so tricky to get to).

AMANER A

R IO S A N J UA N , DOMI NICA N R EPU BLIC

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magine Frank Lloyd Wright meets Blofeld, put the result on a forested hill above a pristine palm-fringed beach, and you have Amanera. This creation – of concrete, limestone, warm teak, local coral and Aguayo tiles – is a suitably alluring addition to Aman’s comely family. The 25 ocean-view casitas, half of which have their own pool, cluster around the main building, which is open-sided and offers spectacular eyefuls of Playa Grande. Here, you’ll find the informal Club de Playa, for cool cocktails and grilled local fish. This is Aman’s first golf resort, and the course holds bragging rights for the most ocean holes in the western hemisphere. Have a round, if you must, then unwind in the spa with treatments using the sacred Taíno ritual of burning palo santo, or holy wood. BOOK IT Double, from £730 (amanera.com; 001 809 589 2888).

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Explore the quieter side of the island with one of Aman’s ‘adventures’. We loved the dinner with master cigar-maker Juan Alberto Martinez.


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he only thing that was ever wrong with Nantucket, the laidback, quiet-money island off Cape Cod, was the drag of getting there. No more, because now you simply hop on the scheduled Tradewind Aviation flight that operates out of the private terminal at Westchester airport, a 45-minute drive from Manhattan. And, as if Nantucket didn’t have enough going for it anyway – those white-sand beaches, cool shops and a hipster-chic, non-Hamptons summer crowd – it now has Greydon House, an island game-changer. It’s been opened by the young heirs to the Gant clothing fortune, in a handsome 1850s Greek Revival house. While guest rooms are not vast, they’re gorgeous, with the snowiest linens and the softest throws. In the groundfloor bistro, British chef Marcus Gleadow-Ware cooks up a storm, with nearly all the produce local. The drinks alone, many made with island ingredients like beach plums, wild grapes and rosehips, are worth the – now very short – journey up from New York. A New England winner. BOOK IT Double, from £460, including breakfast (greydonhouse.com; 00 1 508 228 2468).

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futuristic Tardis appears on a winding mountain road. You enter and descend into an airy complex of glass, wood and stone that floats above the Adriatic. If you love the crash of waves, the twittering of swallows and the distant clang of a medieval clocktower, then it’s time to rejoice. Cool, crisp greys and whites fill the rooms. Then there’s the spa with its mosaic-clad pool, and a further descent to sunloungers perched on the rocks. Add in smiley service and the chef ’s inspired flights of fancy (pea soup with cuttlefish and tarragon) served on terraces shaded by cypress trees, and you might just grow roots on those rocks. BOOK IT Double, from £330, including breakfast (hiphotels.com).

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Don’t miss the newly reopened Whaling Museum, next door. Rollicking good fun for all the family, but also highly educational.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Take the hotel’s beautiful launch – a Venetian Vaporetto speedboat – to Dubrovnik, and walk the medieval walls of the old city at dusk, after the cruise ships and their crowds have left for the day.

GUANA ISL AN D

PHOTOGRAPHS: DOUG FRIEDMAN, SIMON LEWIS STUDIO

T NEWSF L ASH M A I S ON S & HO T E L S SI BU E T H A S L AU N C H E D

E N C H C H IC V I L L A M A R I E S A I N T-B A RT H : F R M E E T S T ROPICA L R A Z Z L E - DA Z Z L E , W I T H A I LL A M A R I E .F R) K I LLE R RU M BA R . (SA I N T-BA RT H.V

BR I T ISH V I RGI N ISL A N DS , CA RIBBEA N

his private island is a socking 850 acres but there are only ever 32 guests, so it feels – almost – like it’s all yours. Paddleboard in the calmest turquoise waters, hike through paths past cruising iguanas and visit Toliao’s Orchard, where you can pluck papayas straight from the trees (ask nicely and they’ll give you banana leaves for Jack, Jill and Jeremy, the island’s resident donkeys). Cottages have wooden shutters that swing open to those green, green views, but tear yourself away, because drinks are served on the dot of six each evening before chef Xavier Gili (of London’s Zuma and Nobu) does marvellous things with locally caught fish and homegrown veg. Then potter over to the Garden of Eden where they’ll set up an open-air cinema and you can sit back and watch Notting Hill to the sound of crickets crooning. BOOK IT ITC Luxury Travel (itcluxurytravel.co.uk; 01244 355527) offers 10 nights, full board, from £4,340, including flights and transfers. For more information, visit bvitourism.co.uk. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Charter a boat to explore the caves at nearby Norman Island – the inspiration for Treasure Island.

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


LUXURY

...THAT CAN’T BE IMITATED – ONLY EXPERIENCED!

KASBAH TAMADOT Morocco

THE ROOF GARDENS United Kingdom

MAHALI MZURI Kenya

THE LODGE Switzerland

NECKER BELLE British Virgin Islands

ULUSABA South Africa

NECKER ISLAND British Virgin Islands

MONT ROCHELLE South Africa

SON BUNYOLA Mallorca

GET TO KNOW VIRGIN LIMITED EDITION, Sir Richard Branson’s extraordinary collection of private retreats. From one of the world’s most exclusive private islands to thrilling safaris via a magical Moroccan kasbah, each location is designed to be your home away from home. This is your vacation with added personality! Reservations: +44 (0)208 600 0430 enquiries@virginlimitededition.com www.virginlimitededition.com


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till want some eye-widening, backpacker-style adventure with your four-poster and posh toiletries? Jalakara, which opened in 2015 on the Andaman island of Havelock, strikes the perfect balance. Getting there’s the start of the fun: it’s a budget-airline flight from mainland India, followed by a ferry ride – quite an experience if timings mean you’re on the slow, rusty government boat. The hotel, though, is swoonsome: six polished-concrete rooms and a villa, all filled with art and objects collected from around India by its British owner, Marko Hill, and his shoe-designer wife, Atalanta Weller. This is an enclosed hillside party pad, with an infinity pool well placed for sunset views over the jungle canopy, and a superb little Asian-fusion dining pavilion. Just when you’re thinking of giving up that backpack for ever, hop in an auto rickshaw and haggle your way to the village market – you’ll even find an internet café... BOOK IT Ampersand Travel (ampersandtravel.com; 020 7819 9770) offers 10 nights from £3,050, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Snorkel with turtles and rays off the poetically named Beach No. 7 – the greatest stretch of sand you’ve never heard of.

AMANEMU

D E P L A R FA R M

M I E P R E F E C T U R E , JA PA N

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nce the frenzied helicopter noise on the summit is replaced with silence, click into your skis and look around. Northern Iceland’s mountainous Troll Peninsula stretches out for miles before you. The untracked line of buttery, springtime snow below your skis peters out near the shore of a glistening fjord. This is the playground of Deplar Farm, which opened last spring on 3,000 secluded acres – a former sheep ranch – far from Iceland’s waterfall-touring crowds. The 12-room lodge’s plain wood façade and turf roof suggest a traditional farmhouse, but inside you’ll find Danish Modern-style furniture and artfully prepared scallops rather than utilitarian fittings and putrefied shark meat with schnapps. Airy and light, the unpretentious interior modestly refrains from upstaging the real show: that big wide-open outside, with its regal panorama of peaks. April and May are about heli-skiing; summers offer horseback rides and fishing under the midnight sun. In winter, the outdoor, geothermally heated pool with bar is the spot to take in the Northern Lights – or, for no lights at all, there’s always the minimalist spa’s sensorydeprivation flotation pods. There’s no wrong choice. BOOK IT Double, from £1,370, full board, including transfers, activities and guide (elevenexperience.com; 020 8102 9800).

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his is picture-book Japan. A Japan of fragrant cherry blossom and birdsong, of rippling sea, wooded mountains and holy Shinto shrines. With its unerring eye for perfect positions, Aman has placed its latest opening on a hill overlooking the cobalt blue of the Bay of Pearls. All is very Aman: muted tones and natural textures, with sliding wicker walls you can move to create your own space. There’s a long pool stretching towards the sea and a firepit for night-time gazing with a Mebuki (green tea with vodka, lime and champagne). But really, all you want to do is to steep gently in the warm waters of the huge, outdoor onsen as the stars come out and wink at you from the heavens. BOOK IT Cazenove+Loyd (cazloyd.com; 020 7384 2332) offers three nights as part of a nine-night trip from £8,200, including breakfast, three dinners, flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

A quick drive to the coast brings you to the ama hut – a place where female octogenarian freedivers sear scallops, hand-caught earlier, over charcoals.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

The Holkna river has some of the best salmon-fishing on the planet: 27 fishable pools stretching over six miles from sea to waterfall. And you’ll have it all to yourself.

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ake Como: its pleasures are wondrous, its vistas beauteous. If Milan is a teenager in biker boots, il lago is a duchess in pearls. Tradition is the thing. Il Sereno, though, is a whippersnapper set to shake the lake. Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola is famed for her use of colour and texture – here copper, wood and stone – and her furniture: the hotel’s lofty lounges and sundecks are crammed with her curvaceous sofas and wicker chairs, to glorious effect. Thirty woodpanelled suites are all muted hues and pillowy armchairs and take-10-years-off-you mood lighting. Each has a vast terrace from which to survey the water and the pontoon where three Riva boats bob. There’s a jade-green infinity pool, and shady cabanas in which to retreat from the sun with a plate of penne pomodoro and a glass of something crisp and cool. All afternoon, boats put-put past, their occupants rubbernecking the glorious building, with its vertical garden creeping up the wall. Finally, something to give George Clooney a run for his money as the most handsome thing in these parts. BOOK IT Elegant Resorts (elegantresorts.co.uk; 01244 897517) offers 10 nights from £3,825, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

ALEXANDER GILKES’S MIAMI

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Walk to nearby Il Vapore for a lakeside dinner alfresco, under trees strung with twinkling fairy lights.

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ou have a vision of Costa Rica. Of emerald rainforests, of flowers as big as satellite dishes and heat and volcanoes and misty, jungly mornings. That’s Nayara Springs. A treetop bridge leads from the main resort over enough lush tropical flumduggery to make a Kew Gardens employee weep. At the end is this, the newest, smartest addition to the Nayara brand. Villas are huge and eclectic: a Moroccan rug here; a Venetian mirror there; a floor of Mexican handpainted tiles. There are outdoor double showers and private terraces with plunge pools fed by the volcanic springs that bubble up from the ground. Oh yes – the volcano, Arenal, looms just far enough for comfort (it’s currently ‘resting’ and hasn’t erupted since 2010). Wind along the lush paths to Asia Luna, the Asian-Peruvian fusion restaurant, or to Nostalgia bar for wine-tasting. Visit the spa for the scratchy-soothing volcanic mud massage, then sink into its outdoor plunge pool – HOT, remember – and stare at hummingbirds flitting about the hibiscus. It’s a vision. BOOK IT British Airways Holidays (ba.com; 0344 493 0122) offers 10 nights from £2,050, including flights. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Go zip-lining – there is nothing like flying through the canopy at up to 25mph. A parrot’s-eye view of the jungle.

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FIRST THING I DO I head to Miami each year for the art fairs. As soon as I arrive, I pick up my scooter to help me weave through the bottlenecks. Then I get a coffee at one of the Cuban cafés, such as Enriqueta’s, and have a quick dip in the sea. MUST-PACK ITEM A linen jacket with ample pockets for passes and business cards. PERFECT DAY A visit to the Rubell Family Collection, the Bass Museum and Moca Miami. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT The rooftop bar at Soho House – and at Art Basel they build a marquee on the beach with sofas on the sand. I like to eat at Byblos for a colour-drenched, flashy Miami scene and take a mal-coordinated slip and slide around the ice rink at the Edition hotel. BEST HOLIDAY BUD One of my business partners, Rodman Primack. He is head of Design Miami, and one of the few locals I know. TOP THING TO TAKE HOME An item of clothing from the Webster boutique. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR A long morning walk down the beach. There are so many characters! LAST THING I DO Take a final dip and grab a bite at my favourite Greek restaurant, Mandolin. Alexander Gilkes is co-founder of online auction houses Auctionata and Paddle8


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Award-winner CULTURAL REVOLUTION

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Amble around the rest of the Faena District, including the new Faena Forum art centre and the Faena Bazaar, a mix of big-name labels, groovy pop-ups and bars and cafés.

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lan Faena doesn’t just create hotels. He magics up entire neighbourhoods around them. First he tackled his native Buenos Aires, and now he’s hit Miami, where the new Faena District takes up six blocks – yes, SIX – of prime Miami Beach oceanfront. And at its heart is the dazzling Faena Hotel (the former Saxony – the first smart hotel on Miami Beach), with its soaring, cathedral-like entrance, devoid of check-in desks and concierges – ‘a place of reflection,’ says Faena. You can also reflect under the Alberto Garutti chandeliers, linked by computer to flicker in time to the weather patterns of the Argentine pampas; or in the sumptuous oceanfront suites, resplendent with late-deco flair; or, best of all, on the widest, most utterly gorgeous beach in South Florida, bar none. Faena is no ordinary resort. It has a screening room (obviously), but also a full-blown theatre, where the sexy in-house review, C’est Rouge, plays at weekends. Then there are the three terrific restaurants: Francis Mallmann’s Los Fuegos, where meat is cooked over mesquite; the modern Asian Pao by Paul Qui, with its Damien Hirst Golden Myth horse sculpture; and Veranda, next to the pool. And in the Tierra Santa spa, treatments use Faena’s own range of blended oils, while Himalayan sound bowls, selected by the resident shaman, sort out your chakras. The whole package? Pure magic. BOOK IT British Airways Holidays (ba.com; 0344 493 0122) offers 10 nights from £2,900, including flights.

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Rum punch and live reggae at the Pumphouse in lively Sandy Ground make Saturday nights swing.

e’re head over heels for Anguilla: the people-spotting (oh look, there’s Robert De Niro over there, chatting to Uma Thurman); the ultimate laidback beaches; and now the new Zemi Beach House, the first resort to open in the secluded Shoal Bay East, where creamy white sand is lapped by sea the colour of a bottle of Bombay Sapphire. The rooms are big and beautiful, with marble bathrooms large enough for a cocktail party. Some have balconies overlooking the twinkling ocean; others across bushes bursting with chirping bananaquits. Then there’s the kids’ club, where small people are kept busy with coconut bowling, kayaking competitions and weekly movie nights. And the staff – devilishly handsome Jayden knocks up a honey mule like no other, and at dinner Bubbles makes you feel like the cat’s pyjamas. Snorkel out over coral teeming with marvellous marine life, paddleboard till you’re weak at the knees, dine on just-caught mahi-mahi curry at the toes-in-the-sand restaurant, then sink into a rocking chair on the beach at dusk, the stars winking above. BOOK IT ITC Luxury Travel offers 10 nights, from £2,910, including flights and transfers (itcluxurytravel.co.uk; 01244 355 527).

NEWSF L ASH

PA R K H YAT T M A L LO RC A

S U M M E R S TAYCAT ION S ORT E D : TA K E T H E T Y K E S

PL AC E , ON T H E T O JOL LY N E W HO T E L A N O T H E R

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S HOR E S OF BLUS T E RY A N D BE AU T I F U L U L L S WAT E R ,

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he setting: unspoilt foothills overlooking rural fields and Mediterranean forests. The theme: a huge, higgledy-piggledy Spanish village, with cobbled roads, squares, terracotta roofs and bursts of bougainvillea. The vibe: a five-star whizz-banger, with four restaurants, three pools, an ESPA spa with quartzsand massage bed (trust us: it’s awesome) and the Country Club for tennis and golf. Chilled Canyamel beach, and the hotel’s little beach club, are also a 10-minute cycle away. Big bedrooms are light and elegant, with wetrooms, walk-in wardrobes and shaded private patios for postseafood-feast siestas. What really gets us going: it’s equally fabulous for those with sprogs, thanks to the well-run kids’ club and family pool, or for a naughty getaway para dos, with its lavender cocktails and just-caught crayfish. BOOK IT Double, from £430, including breakfast (mallorca.park.hyatt.com; 00 34 871 81 1234). WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Take a private tour of the Caves of Arta. It’s a five-minute drive to this subterranean fantasy land of monster Middle Earth stalagmites.

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E R PL AC E .C O.U K ) I N T H E L A K E DI S T R IC T. (A NO T H


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e didn’t believe Singita Lebombo could get cooler. The refurb of the Kruger’s grooviest camp has proved us wrong. The bar makes you rethink going on that next game drive (another lion or another fireside martini?). In your bathroom, glass doors slide away so you can shower as birds flit by, the sun on your skin. There’s a wine studio with a roof terrace and tapas-style dishes (try the baby squid on ink semolina). If you’re a rock star – or have the cubs in tow – there’s a fourbedroom villa, with THREE pools and, down a path, there’s a dangerously delicious boutique. It’s all so sensational that you may just forget you’re on safari. BOOK IT Africa Travel (africatravel .co.uk; 0845 450 1535) offers three nights as part of a 10-night trip, from £5,900, including breakfast, flights, car hire and game drives. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Leave time for a body scrub and marulaoil Healing Earth massage in the spa.

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

For a perfect day trip, take the 40-minute train ride from Cascais to Lisbon, which trundles along a fabulous line hugging the Tagus estuary.

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t’s a dilemma choosing a holiday to suit the whole brood. Urban exploring or flopping on a beach? Cultural blast or hiking in the fresh air? Full-on resort or private villa? Martinhal Cascais has the lot. With smart designer villas and swanked-up hotel rooms, this classy family number sits near the beaches of Cascais and the mountains of Sintra and is a mere hop from Lisbon. And it’s from those Portuguese family stalwarts Marthinhal, which means you’re likely to find yourself just kicking back by the pool or slipping into the Finesterra spa, while an army of bright-eyed staff keeps the sprogs happy in the cracking kids’ club. The Italian trattoria does spot-on kiddie staples, while O Terraço might just get them eating local seafood. There’s a baby concierge so you can pre-book all your gear, but we’re most excited by the playgrounds – plural – dotted around. Inspired. BOOK IT Original Travel (originaltravel.co.uk; 020 7978 7333) offers 10 nights from £1,385, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

SHU NGI M BILI, TA NZA NI A

handa Island is the holiday home of Swedish entrepreneur and philanthropist Dan Olofsson, and if his island escape is anything to go by, we like him. A lot. Located in an archipelago a 30-minute flight from Dar es Salaam, this private island retreat feels like the happy lovechild of a breezy Maine beach house and a tropic-exotic beauty: salt-white sand, cobalt-blue sea and a house of sumptuous, airy bedrooms. We love the unexpected touches: a library of Hemingway titles; kikois instead of regulation robes; proper sustainability (electricity is solar-powered, water desalinated). And the gorgeous, on-the-nose hosts. Spotted an oyster bed on a reef? Oscar the manager will shoot out, extract them, and minutes later you’ll be slurping them back with a glass of champagne. BOOK IT Africa Travel (africatravel.co.uk; 0845 450 1535) offers 10 nights, exclusive use, full board, from £9,990 per person based on eight sharing, including flights and transfers.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Ask Oscar to arrange a jaunt to nearby Zanzibar or Mafia island, or spend the day on the water in a traditional dhow fishing boat.


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arlisle Bay is like a huge Caribbean hug. Reassuring. Soothing. No surprises. Everything is designed so that you don’t have to waste time thinking about what you want – it’s already on offer. The beach is exactly what you want: pale, soft sand lapped by warm, clear water, and cleverly split in two so kids can frolic at one end while couples canoodle at the other. Rooms are minimal but plush – cushions plumped to within an inch of their lives, that sort of thing. You don’t even have to think about the other guests – lots of regulars, lots of American families and Brit couples, all terribly polite and doing their own thing. And you don’t even have to bother deciding on your afternoon refreshment – traditional English tea is served right on the beach, along with fruit platters and bento boxes. All bases covered, in the most delightful way. BOOK IT Elegant Resorts (elegant resorts.co.uk; 01244 897537) offers 10 nights from £3,515, including breakfast, flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Head to Sheer Rocks at Cocobay for rum cocktails at sundown, Italian seafood and lashings of romance.

R OYA L PA L M ALICIA ROUNTREE’S

PHOTOGRAPH: RENAUD VANDERMEEREN.COM

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FIRST THING I DO Go straight to the market in Mahébourg to get dholl puri (a savoury pancake made from crushed dhal). MUST-PACK ITEM Bikinis, bikinis and more bikinis. I love Solid & Striped swimwear. PERFECT DAY A road trip to the south, which is full of deserted beaches. My favourite is Riambel – there’s an equestrian centre there, so I go riding on the beach. FAVOURITE NIGHTSPOT I’m part-owner of a pub, the Irish, and am proud to say it is one of the trendiest spots on the island right now. I’LL ALWAYS MAKE TIME FOR A visit to La Vanille Nature Park, where they have a worldclass insectarium.

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he first thing you should know about Royal Palm is that it has the best beach on Mauritius. It feels private without being small, and has the vanillacoloured sand and calm aquamarine water that you hope to find here but rarely do (and, big bonus, no sea urchins – again, quite rare). The second thing is that it has incredible food – everything from Club 55-style beach lunches at Le Bar Plage to the scrumptious tasting menu at candlelit La Goélette. Third: rooms are VAST, with lovely balconies between waving palm fronds and roomy stone bathrooms. What else? The guests are elegant and pleasingly French; the Clarins spa does stellar massages; and the gardens are lush, perfectly groomed and peppered with infinity pools. In fact, there are many things you need to know about Royal Palm, but only one that really matters: you’ll bloody love it. BOOK IT Susie Freeman Travel (susiefreemantravel.com; 01488 668821) offers 10 nights, half board, from £3,600, including flights and transfers. WHILE YOU’RE THERE

Cut out the arrival hassle with Yu Lounge (yulounge.com), a private bar/restaurant/chillout zone that will handle all the arrival and departure faff, so that you can, well, lounge, with a cocktail while they sort passports and get your luggage.

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WHILE YOU’RE THERE

You’re on Place Vêndome, so the Tuileries gardens are a mere hop away, and just the spot for a predinner stroll.

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e’re not often fast and free with words like ‘legendary’. But sometimes we... struggle. How else to describe César Ritz’s 1898 original, a hotel so famous for its glamour and opulence that it spawned a new set of adjectives: ritzy, ritzier, ritziest? How else to label the place that Coco Chanel, right, called home for more than 30 years, that Marcel Proust adored and where he wrote part of In Search of Lost Time (in bed), where Zelda and F Scott Fitzgerald hosted their most sparkling soirées? Where Ernest Hemingway not only propped up the bar (also a favourite of Wallis Simpson’s, left) but freed the hotel from Nazi occupation? True story. Legendary it is, and a four-year £175m makeover has made it only more so. Not much has changed, at least not to the casual observer: the gold swan taps, the peach-hued dressing gowns, the silk-damask walls and curtains thicker than your arm. The food is still astounding (the langoustine cannelloni is the best thing you’ll taste this year). The staff are still brilliant: charming, intuitive, proud to be there. It’s all just a little fresher. A little breezier. New windows have let in the light; a clever sliding glass roof has created a gorgeous indoor-outdoor terrace; and the world’s only Chanel spa has brought even more pedigree to the astonishingly lovely Ritz Club pool. ‘When I dream of afterlife in heaven,’ Ernest Hemingway wrote, ‘the action always takes place in the Paris Ritz.’ We couldn’t agree more. BOOK IT Double, from £860 (ritzparis.com; 00 33 1 43 16 30 30). Eurostar (eurostar.com) operates up to 21 services daily from London to Paris, from £29 one way.


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here’s much to be said for service that makes you feel like a star. Our Cabo favourite does just that, treating mere mortals like Hollywood celebrities (and there are plenty of those too, fyi). The whole place has a glossy new look, with that kind of haute hacienda style that makes you want to immediately rip out the interiors of your house when you get home. And Villa One – ay caramba! It is made for entourages, with four bedrooms, a paparazzi-proof garden and effortlessly discreet staff. There’s a shiny new ESPA spa, too – we insist you try the Baja Deep Tissue Pindas Ritual. If your hair is looking like when Monica from Friends went to the tropics (remember?), head to OBO Salon by Jonathan & George, two Beverly Hills stylists to the stars. You’ll be all set to swan into Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Seared restaurant, for slabs of wagyu, or for alfresco Mexicanmeets-Moroccan at Agua by Larbi, surrounded by twinkling lights and glittering stars – of every variety. BOOK IT Journey Latin America (journeylatinamerica.co.uk; 020 8600 1881) offers 10 nights, from £4,640, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

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Head out onto the waves to spot humpback whales. Between December and March you’re virtually guaranteed sightings.

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f hell is other people, heaven is Finca Cortesin: its 67 suites, three vast pools and super-chic beach club are spread across 532 glorious acres, so even in high season there’s plenty of space to breathe. Everything is supersized and generous: ceilings just that bit higher, beds that bit bigger, sofas that bit squishier than strictly necessary. Lots of nicely quirky details too – shells under bell jars, shelves lined with wooden hats – to make you feel as though you’re staying with mildly bonkers mates. The barman, Al, whips up a mean vodka martini (he’s made them for Sir Sean Connery), and the dégustation menu at Kabuki Raw, which has just won its first Michelin star, is an exhilarating, rollercoaster romp. And oh, the newly ramped-up spa! The best Thai massage we’ve had outside Thailand. The hotel has even coined its own term, ‘Cortesin-ed’, meaning a particularly blissed-out state. We were Cortesined within minutes. BOOK IT Abercrombie & Kent (abercrombiekent.co.uk; 01242 547703) offers 10 nights from £2,395, including breakfast, flights and transfers.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE

If it’s August, it has to be polo: Sotogrande is half an hour down the coast. Ronda’s spectacular views and bridges are only an hour’s drive away too.


TASTE OF THINGS TO COME

After a mighty facelift last year, The Lanesborough is firmly back on top as one of London's swankiest destinations. With a Michelin star for its restaurant Céleste in the bag and a jaw-droppingly amazing club & spa on the way, this luxury hotel is pulling out all the stops Scottish salmon with slow-cooked sautéed cabbage bathed in lemon ginger butter. Caraïbes chocolate cocoa sponge doused in diet-starts-tomorrow chocolate sauce. Is your stomach grumbling? Are you salivating, just a little? We don't blame you. See, even the very thought of dining at The Lanesborough has that effect on people. Its flagship restaurant Céleste has the power to turn even the staunchest calorie-counters into champagne-glugging foodies. What's more, everything is so delicious, you won't regret a thing. The brainchild of chef-patron Eric Frechon, Céleste serves up gourmet cuisine with a contemporary twist. Frechon heads up the restaurant with his protégé, executive chef Florian Favario. Together, they have five Michelin stars – including the one awarded for Céleste's innovative, flavoursome dishes this past year. While it could be argued that the incredible food at Céleste is an experience in

itself, the setting doesn't hurt either. The dining room is bedecked with chandeliers, ornate stucco and swirling pillars. Place settings are engineered so precisely on the impossiblywhite table linen, one would be forgiven for thinking a ruler had been used. But this isn't stuffy fine dining – the ambience is elegantly buzzy. The Lanesborough's quest to become the ultimate hotspot for gluttony doesn't end there. Oh no. The Library Bar, with its thick pile rugs, wooden panelling and exquisite paintings, beckons for a nightcap (or three). You'll find 300 years of cognac here, not to mention an expansive selection of beautiful-looking cocktails and plenty of cool vibes. For afternoon tea, Céleste is hard to beat. Think handcrafted pastries and freshly baked scones. All together now, 'Food, glorious food...' The Lanesborough hotel has ambience and sheer scrumminess by the trunkload.

JUST WAIT TILL YOU SEE THE MEMBERS' CLUB & SPA... Fluffy towels at the ready! The Lanesborough Club & Spa is set to launch in early 2017. This place will definitely raise the standard for rest and relaxation and is primed to continue The Lanesborough's winning streak. The ornate aesthetic of the hotel has been respected and embellished, with the spa adopting a Roman-bath feel. Expect a social area complete with restaurant, expansive fitness zone, manicure and pedicure suite and central spa lounge with umpteen treatment rooms. Plus, The Lanesborough will be filling this space with the biggest names in the business – Bodyism and La Prairie, to name but a few. This promises to be the hottest membership in town! Make sure you're part of this super-chic gym.

The Lanesborough, Hyde Park Corner, Belgravia, London SW1. For more information and to book, visit lanesborough.com or call 020 7259 5599


TATLER • PROMOTION

CLOCKWISE FR GE, OUTSIDE VIEW OF THE LANESBOROUGH. THE AWARD-WINNING CELESTE RESTAURANT. EXQUISITE AFTERNOON-TEA PASTRIES. COOL VIBES IN THE LIBRARY BAR. FIVE-MICHELIN STARRED CHEFS ERIC FRECHON AND FLORIAN FAVARIO. THE LANESBOROUGH'S FAMOUS DOORMEN

'We're delighted to be opening the new Lanesborough Club & Spa in the heart of Belgravia in March 2017, working with the finest brands in beauty, wellness and lifestyle to offer our members the most luxurious club experience' Geoffrey Gelardi, Managing Director


PIECES OF

PHOTOGRAPHS: TKTKTKTKTK

The Aeolian Islands have lured fashion titans and Euro is getting in on the act. Just watch out for the traditions

TAT L E R JAN UARY 2017

TATLER.COM

Photographed by GREG FUNNELL


HEAVEN

royals since the Sixties, but now a new wave of Sloanes of those Italian aristos, says Sophia Money-Coutts

, VIEW FROM PANAREA. INSET, MICHAEL VON FREYBERG, WITH MARGHERITA


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ook, the water, it is perfectly turkeys,’ says Pierre, my Italian boat captain. We are floating around the Aeolians, a cluster of volcanic islands just off the northeastern tip of Sicily. ‘Turkeys?’ I frown at him. ‘Turkeys, turkeys!’ he insists, flapping his hands at the sea beneath us. ‘Ohhh, turquoise,’ I reply. ‘Yes, turkeys. That is what I say,’ says Pierre, shaking his head sadly. ‘You English.’ You may not have heard much about the Aeolian Islands. For centuries they sat relatively undisturbed in the Tyrrhenian Sea, periodically belching smoke or bits of lava, with just a sprinkling of whitewashed villages between them. But tourism here has been on the up in the past couple of decades as word spread about their wild beauty – ‘the Bahamas of the Mediterranean’, proclaims one long-term visitor – and in 2000 they were declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. More recently, in 2015, Ben Goldsmith, together with Luca Del Bono, the Sicilian owner of the South Kensington Club, formed a preservation fund to protect the islands and the fish population. Ben, who proposed to his wife, Jemima, on one island, Stromboli, in 2014, calls them ‘magical’. The 19th-century French writer Guy de Maupassant called them ‘little pieces of heaven which have fallen into the sea’. There are seven little pieces of heaven. Panarea, the ‘party island’, is the best-known,

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but the others – Vulcano, Lipari, Salina, Stromboli, Alicudi and Filicudi – each have their own merits, as Pierre says with great enthusiasm over the course of several days aboard his 50ft motorboat, the Barca Jost. All the islands are served by brisk, hop-on, hop-off ferries, but this isn’t a romantic service. The vessels reek of diesel, and you jostle with Italian mammas and boxes of oranges for space. Better to board your own boat and drift between them, the sound of the Doors drifting from Pierre’s Bose speakers. Either just for the day or overnight; his boat sleeps four guests in three cabins. He had picked me up from Vulcano, a useful meeting point because it’s the closest island to the Sicilian ferry terminal of Milazzo. But the trouble with the place is that it stinks. Literally. Thick, yellow, sulphurous clouds smelling of rotten eggs waft from the top of the island. You can wallow in the warm, volcanic mud bath like a hippo (marvellous for rheumatism, they say), but we didn’t dally there. Just long enough to have a pistachio ice cream from Ritrovo Remigio – the best gelato in the archipelago, according to Pierre – and buy a branzino fish to cook onboard the Barca Jost for dinner. Twenty years ago, Como-born Pierre Zucchi, 58, was running a successful swimwear company called Domani, stocked in Harrods and Harvey Nichols. But then someone – ‘a man who was totally stupid’ – made a very good offer for it, so Pierre sold the business and took over the Barca Jost. Jost, Pierre explains, was a Dutch pirate, which is fitting because Pierre has an air of Captain Pugwash about him. Vast and bearded, he walks straight through huddles of tourists gathered on the dock of Lipari the following morning, shouting, ‘Sorry, sorry, sorry,’ while not sounding remotely apologetic. ‘Givenchy!’ he barks at a surprised woman posing for


FR AR LEFT, COUNT RUDOLPH VON FREYBERG’S CITRUS FARM. SUNRISE ON PANAREA. SOPHIA MONEY-COUTTS SWIMMING BESIDE A FORMER PUMICE FACTORY, LIPARI

to the sea and are hemmed in by 2,500 bougainvillea plants, but the major selling point is the view from the terrace – it overlooks the glassy sea, with a lighthouse that flickers across the water in the evening. Salina is also famous for being the island where the 1994 Oscar-winning film Il Postino was set. ‘I haven’t actually seen it,’ I admit to Pierre. ‘You are really completely ignorant,’ he replies. Panarea is an entirely different kettle of swordfish. It’s the smallest of the islands and there are no cars (only golf buggies), but every summer it transforms itself into a mini Ibiza, with rooftop dancing, bottoms bouncing in bikinis and the roar of helicopters overhead shuttling in European royals (Casiraghis, Monacos) and fashion titans (Kate Moss, Giorgio Armani, Dolce and Gabbana). Its transformation started when a couple of Italian hippies – artist Paolo Tilche and his girlfriend Myriam Beltrami – opened the Hotel Raya in the Sixties, with simple, white bedrooms. Boho babes flocked there in their tie-dye kaftans. The Raya remains the place to stay, and Myriam, a sprightly 84-year-old, still totters around the dining room at night calling ‘Buonasera!’ to her guests. Other visitors rent the various villas that dot the coastline. Sloanes have got in on the act, and fund manager Al Balfour married Martha Franklin here last May, watched by guests including Lord and Lady Lovat and Raffles partner Jake Parkinson-Smith. If you’re feeling energetic, you can nip over to nearby Stromboli for a march up and down its active volcano (five hours up, four down). The locals seem unbothered about the threat on their doorstep. According to Pierre, ‘it has ejaculated only a few times in the last years.’ Which just leaves Alicudi and Filicudi, two of the most remote islands. On Alicudi (population: 80, all of whom apparently hate one another), the air smells of wild fennel and oregano, and there aren’t even golf buggies, let alone cars, to get around. Instead there are donkeys. And if you want to simultaneously namedrop and feel good about yourself, consider renting the eco-house

EVERY SUMMER, PANAREA TURNS INTO A MINI IBIZA

PHOTOGRAPHS: SPREAD PICTURES, XPOSUREPHOTOS.COM

CLOCKWISE FR VE LEFT, HOTEL SIGNUM, SALINA. GIORGIO ARMANI. KATE MOSS. THE COAST OF LIPARI

a photograph in cut-off shorts as we climb some steps to the top of Lipari for endless views of the sea and the apricot-coloured church beneath us. ‘That is where they bury the deads,’ he explains solemnly, pointing at a nearby cemetery. Who needs a jaded tour guide waving an umbrella? Lipari, the biggest and most populated island, is busy. It’s pretty for a day trip and a stop at the Pasticceria d’Ambra bakery to eat what its devotees claim are the best cannoli (biscuit-and-ricotta pastries that contain nine

million calories each) in the world, or to Kasbah, a restaurant owned by Luca Del Bono’s brother, Alessandro, for pasta with prawns and pistachios. It’s also the favourite island of Carlo Carello, the co-founder of South Kensington club Albert’s, whose family has a house on the island. Tony and Cherie Blair stayed in it for a holiday in August. Hotel-wise, there isn’t much on offer. Instead, head to Salina, the greenest of the Aeolians, or to Panarea. Salina is quiet and covered with pine and chestnut trees and caper bushes. The two best options here are both family-owned: the Hotel Signum, or a vineyard and hotel called Capofaro. Signum has a Michelin-starred restaurant manned by Martina Caruso, the daughter of the owner, who doles out slivers of raw octopus and caper-flavoured ice cream. Plus there’s a proper spa (rare in these parts), with geothermal pools and what looks like a medieval torture rack but is actually a wooden bed of rose salt, used to draw out impurities. Once you feel like toxing yourself back up again, skip down the road to Capofaro – the hotel is owned by one of Sicily’s grandest families, the Tascas – for a few glasses of sweet local Malvasia wine. The vines slope down

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


CLOCKWISE FR FAR LEFT, PIERRE ZUCCHI, SKIPPER OF THE BARCA JOST. TRADITIONAL LIPARI PLATES; HOTEL CAPOFARO, SALINA. POOLSIDE AT CAPOFARO. LIPARI TOWN

– rainwater showers, solar electricity – on neighbouring Filicudi, recently restored by the granddaughter of the last king of Afghanistan, a jeweller called Belquis Zahir. Really, the only bore is getting to the islands in the first place, even now with two seasonal British Airways routes to Sicily: Heathrow to Palermo and Gatwick to Catania. From either destination, it’s at least a two-hour drive to Milazzo, the most convenient ferry port. But there are worse cities to hang out in. Catania has an ancient and rowdy fish market every day bar Sunday, which is worth visiting for a bowl of sea-urchin pasta. And should you wish to stay somewhere nearby, there’s a marvellous German count, Count Rudolf von Freyberg, who owns a 250-acre mandarin and lemon estate. In the middle is Villa Aranjaya, with its glistening infinity pool, which certain royals and British CEOs take for discreet summer holidays. Plus a pet goat called Margherita, who thinks she’s a dog. Rudolf is also the very best company. The day after I arrive, he and his handsome son, Michael, take me for a seven-hour lunch in a restaurant overlooking the bay of Syracuse. There we eat salmon tartare, prawns, seabass, cheese, more cannoli and little glasses of lemon granita, all washed down with prosecco, then white wine, then red wine. We head back to the count’s villa in his Mercedes SUV, singing Dire Straits. ‘Mafia money,’ Rudolf says airily as we swing past yet another hideous pink or bright-orange housing development. Or there’s Palermo, a magnificent city and a reminder that Sicily hasn’t been Italian for very long. It’s been variously Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Arab, Norman, French and Bourbon, and only became Italian when Giuseppe Garibaldi, he of the squashed-fly

106 T A T L E R T R A V E L G U I D E 2 0 1 7

biscuits, unified Italy in 1860. This means that Palermo’s architecture is a glorious mishmash – Islamic domes, Christian churches, Baroque palazzos, some of which are still in ruins, with creepers growing over them, after being bombed by the Allies in 1943. It was a foggy few days, the story goes, and the planes missed their German targets and managed to decimate much of the city instead. Sounds suspiciously Blackadder Goes Forth to me. It’s quite hard to focus on the buildings, though, when there’s the matter of Palermo’s food – it was recently declared the fifth-best street-food city in the world by Forbes. To see this for yourself, take a food tour with a chap called Giorgio, who looks like Luigi from Super Mario. It is not for the squeamish, I decide, as I bite down hard on a piece of calf penis (gristly) and chew on a lung-and-spleen sandwich (they’re big on offal here). But, thinking positively, it makes a nice change from all that pasta. If you want extra authenticity, you need to stay in one of the city’s 1,500 palazzos. As in Britain, Sicilian toffs have started opening up their big houses for extra euros. So there’s Villa Tasca, the sister palace to the vineyard on the island of Salina, where the owner will ply you with wine and liveried staff offer you pistachios from a silver bowl. Or there’s Villa Chiaramonte Bordonaro, owned by a super-glam Italian called Gaia Palma Bordonaro, who changes outfits five times a day and has a Van Dyck in her dining room.

Or Villa Lampedusa, a 100,000-sq-ft palazzo lived in by the adopted son of Sicily’s most famous author, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, who wrote The Leopard, an exquisite novel about the decline of Sicily’s aristocrats. It was published posthumously in 1958, and the villa has a copy of his manuscript in a glass case for Leopard nerds. There’s something you need to look out for when mingling with Sicilian poshos, however. One night, Gaia took me to a concert in a cathedral which was swarming with principesse and viscontesse. There, she introduced me to a doge – a nobleman of Venice. I stuck my hand out to shake his, whereupon he took it, bent down and did a little bow. How sweet of him to bow, I chuckled to myself. I mean, I know I’m English and work for Tatler, but I’m hardly royalty. And then it happened again with the doge’s son, who was about 10. ‘What is going on?’ I whispered to a music professor from Cambridge, who was over for the concert. ‘Why are they bowing to me?’ ‘They’re not bowing – they’re kissing your hand,’ he said, before explaining, quite slowly, as if talking to someone with learning difficulties, that this practice still goes on here. So whether you’re on the islands or mainland Sicily, there are glimpses of a very old world. You should go before it catches up with the new. Bellini Travel (bellinitravel.com; 020 7602 7602) offers two nights at Villa Tasca and five nights at either Capofaro Malvasia Resort or Hotel Signum, from £1,950, including a day’s cruise on Barca Jost with lunch. British Airways (ba.com) flies to Palermo from £126. Find out more about the Aeolian Islands Preservation Fund at aeolianpreservation fund.org. To book a Palermo street-food tour, visit palermostreetfood.com.


HAND-PICKED VILLAS

SOUGHT AFTER LOCATIONS

TAILOR MADE SERVICE

To book your luxury villa holiday call our travel experts on 020 7261 5478 or view our full portfolio at www.cvvillas.com


THAI ZEN

THE I T LIST LOOKING ROSY

T

ake your extremely lucky children to the new Pink Sands Club on Canouan Island, a treasure of a hideaway in St Vincent and the Grenadines. With ocean-facing suites and villas, watersports and kids’ clubs. Heaven. elegantresorts.com

The Dhyana self-realisation programme at Ananda’s retreat in Thailand, which combines yoga and meditation, is just the ticket after a manic Christmas and New Year. You’ll leave feeling like an HD version of yourself, with easy exercises to do at home too. anandaresort.com

The marvellous Emirates business class on the Airbus A380 includes such delightful details as a chauffeur to the airport and cocktails in the on-board lounge. How civilised. (emirates.com)

Wait. Why aren’t you drinking a cocktail? In fact, why aren’t you at the Bloomsbury Club Bar, lounging in a cosy chair in the pretty outdoor garden grotto as you examine the menu? What’s got into you? Sort yourself out! At 16-22 Great Russell Street. (doylecollection.com)

Opening soon, the Rosewood Phnom Penh will be at the top of a 39-storey tower, with views that will make your eyes water. (rosewoodhotels.com)

£249, BY MISSONI

BUSH CRAFT HATS OFF

W

e will probably discover one day that Missoni invented beaches. THAT’S how good they are at beachwear. Take this woven hat, for example. It wants you on a sunlounger. Feeling sleepy. Listening to the waves. Ordering a drink. Then a bottle. stylebop.com

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

SKIN DEEP

ON FIRE The Cayman Islands have flung open their arms to welcome the first Kimpton Hotel in the Caribbean. Behold, the Seafire Resort and Spa on Seven Mile Beach. It’s rather lovely. seafire resortandspa.com

N

amed as one of National Geographic’s Unique Lodges of the World, Bushmans Kloof in South Africa can arrange zebra game-drives, wine-tasting jaunts and incredible walks. Extra treats for those who book through National Geographic. nationalgeographicexpeditions.com

Travel insurance

1

THE CLUE’S IN THE TITLE: ESPA’S WONDERBALM IS EXACTLY THAT: AN ALL-ROUND, WHATEVER-YOUNEED SKIN SUPERHERO. ESPASKINCARE.COM £28, BY ESPA

2

IT’S PIZ BUIN’S ORIGINAL GLACIER CREAM WITH SPF30, IN A VINTAGE TIN. INFINITELY MORE APPEALING THAN SUNBURN. BOOTS.COM

£11, BY PIZ BUIN

3

MULTIACTIVE EYE, COMING SOON FROM CLARINS, HAS EXTRACTS OF TEASEL AND HORSE CHESTNUT, AND A NIFTY, DE-PUFF METAL TIP. CLARINS.CO.UK

£35, BY CLARINS

PHOTOGRAPH: DUANE LEWIS, SIMON BROWN

Places to go, potions to pack – near or far, Mariella Tandy knows what’s best


TATLER • PROMOTION

MARK OF GREATNESS

The Landmark London, situated in the heart of Marylebone, epitomises sophisticated glamour

There are many things the Victorians did well. Christmas decorations, steam trains and, of course, jaw-droppingly amazing hotels. Originally opened as The Great Central Hotel in 1899, The Landmark London is one of the last great Victorian railway hotels. And it shows. Just look at that incredible atrium (pictured right). Positively tropical isn’t it? The glass roof soars eight storeys high, flooding the space with light. We can see why The Landmark London is so proud of it. That kind of airiness is hard to come by in a city establishment. And this hotel has oodles more to boast about. A five-star luxury haven, it seamlessly blends old-world charm with modern sophistication. Think super-plush, elegant interiors alongside state-of-the-art amenities. Unwind in the tranquil spa with its aromatherapy experience showers, Jacuzzi and sanarium. Take a dip in the elegant 15-metre pool. Or work up a sweat in a gym chock-full of hi-tech equipment. You’re bound to build up an appetite which is good because dining here is tip-top. With four restaurants and bars, you’re spoilt for choice. Take afternoon tea in the atrium or savour a champagne-fuelled supper in the buzzy twotwentytwo restaurant and bar. And as for the bedrooms? Well, not only are they impressively large by the capital’s standards, they are also exceedingly pretty – thoughtfully chosen art, enormous beds and you-might-get-lost-in-there bathrooms. Soft, muted colour tones means the rooms are never chintzy or twee. To top it all off, the location really is hard to beat. Regent’s Park, The Wallace Collection and the retail delights of Bond Street are but a hop, skip and a jump away. So what are you waiting for? Get packing.

For more information, visit landmarklondon.co.uk or call 020 7631 8000


LOCATION INDEX ETH I O P IA

A USTRALIA 33 Brae Birregurra 75 Elements of Byron Byron Bay

FR A NC E

A USTRIA 79 Arlberg1800 Suites St Christoph 80 Aurelio Lech

B OTSWANA 42 &Beyond Nxabega Okavango

Tented Camp Okavango Delta 41 Sanctuary Chief’s Camp Okavango Delta

97 88 89 70 94

79 75 16 59 20 98 79

Les Airelles Courchevel Byblos St Tropez Castelbrac Dinard Château St Pierre de Serjac Languedoc Nolinski Paris The Ritz Paris Paris Le Yule Val d’Isère

GR EEC E

C A RIBBEAN

67 The Vasilicos Santorini

Carlisle Bay Antigua Eden Rock St Barth’s St Barth’s Guana Island British Virgin Islands Le Toiny St Barth’s Zemi Beach House Anguilla

91 Deplar Farm Fljot

CHINA 53 LUX* Tea Horse Road Benzilan

Benzilan 31 The Peninsula Beijing Beijing

COLOMBIA

I CEL AN D

CROATI A D ENMARK 33 The Hotel D’Angleterre Copenhagen

DOMIN IC AN REP UBL I C 88 Amanera Rio San Juan

ENGL AN D 27 The Berkeley London 32 The Pig at Combe Devon 32 Thyme The Cotswolds

Dev Shree Rajasthan Jalakara Andaman Islands Orange County, Hampi Hampi Svatma Thanjavur

I NDO NES IA 66 Katamama Bali

I R EL AND

56 Banyan Tree Tamouda Bay Tetouan 13 El Fenn Marrakesh 31 Four Seasons Casablanca Casablanca

I TALY 31 54 49 80 92 27

Leone Blu Florence Masseria Trapanà Puglia Palazzo Dama Rome San Luis Merano Il Sereno Lake Como Villa d’Este Lake Como

K EN YA 40 Loisaba Tented Camp Laikipia

M A LDI VES

TA N Z A N I A

N EPA L 45 Taj Meghauli Serai Chitwan National Park

Conservation Area 40 Nomad Entamanu Ngorongoro

Ngorongoro Conservation Area

N ETH ER L AN DS 16 Pulitzer Amsterdam

41 Roving Bushtops Serengeti 95 Thanda Island Shungi Mbili

N EW ZEAL AND 33 The Lodge at Craggy Range Hawke’s Bay

TH A I L AN D 49 Keemala Phuket 26 w Oriental Bangkok Bangkok

OM A N 82 Anantara Al Jabal Al Akhdar Nizwa 77 The Chedi Muscat

TU R K EY 67 Macakizi Bodrum

P ER U 82 Amantica Lodge Lake Titicaca 52 Explora Valle Sagrado Cusco 22 Inkaterra La Casona Cusco

UAE 77 One&Only The Palm Dubai

U R U G U AY 76 Bahia Vik José Ignazio

P O RTU G A L 16 AlmaLusa Baixa/Chiado Lisbon 95 Martinhal Cascais Cascais 19 Memmo Príncipe Real Lisbon

Q ATA R 19 Shangri-La Doha Doha

S EYC H EL L ES 77 Six Senses Zil Payson Felicite

USA 13 49 14 27 93 89 12 68 22

11 Howard New York Ace Hotel New Orleans The Beekman New York The Beverly Hills Hotel Los Angeles Faena Hotel Miami Greydon House Nantucket Hotel Emma San Antonio The Mark New York The Watergate Hotel Washington DC

SO U TH A FR I C A 59 Leeu Estates Franschhoek 95 Singita Lebombo Kruger National Park

J APA N 91 Amanemu Mie Prefecture 20 Hoshinoya Tokyo Tokyo

78 The Alpina Gstaad Gstaad 22 Marktgasse Hotel Zurich

43 Asilia The Highlands Ngorongoro

19 The Westbury Dublin

92 Nayara Springs Arenal

89 Villa Dubrovnik Dubrovnik

S W I TZER L AN D M O RO CCO

I NDI A 82 91 53 52

18 Four Seasons Bogota Bogota

COSTA RIC A

M EX I CO

42 Chena Huts Yala National Park 54 Dunkeld Bungalow Hatton 68 Kahanda Kanda Galle

99 One&Only Palmilla Los Cabos

45 Limalimo Lodge Simien Mountains

National Park

SRI LANKA

M A U R IT I U S 97 Royal Palm Grande Baie

S PA I N 67 18 99 80 94 50

Abadía Retuerta LeDomaine Valladolid Casa Bonay Barcelona Finca Cortesin Malaga El Lodge Sierra Nevada Park Hyatt Mallorca Mallorca Soho House Barcelona Barcelona

VI ETN A M 56 Tam Coc Garden Ninh Binh

Z I M BA BW E 43 Little Ruckomechi Mana Pools 44 Matesi River Lodge Victoria Falls

PHOTOGRAPH: FRANCO RUBARTELLI/GETTY IMAGES

76 Finolhu Baa Atoll 70 LUX* South Ari Atoll Dhidhoofinolhu 74 Soneva Jani Noonu Atoll

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


ALPHABETICAL INDEX 42 &Beyond Nxabega Okavango

Tented Camp Botswana 13 11 Howard USA

A 67 49 79 16 78 91 88 82 82 79 43 80

Abadía Retuerta LeDomaine Spain Ace Hotel USA Les Airelles France AlmaLusa Baixa/Chiado Portugal The Alpina Gstaad Switzerland Amanemu Japan Amanera Dominican Republic Amantica Lodge Peru Anantara Al Jabal Al Akhdar Oman Arlberg1800 Suites Austria Asilia The Highlands Tanzania Aurelio Austria

B 76 56 14 27 27 33 75

97 18 16 59 77 42

G 89 Greydon House USA 89 Guana Island Caribbean

H

Bahia Vik Uruguay Banyan Tree Tamouda Bay Morocco The Beekman USA The Berkeley England The Beverly Hills Hotel USA Brae Australia Byblos France

20 Hoshinoya Tokyo Japan 33 The Hotel D’Angleterre Denmark 12 Hotel Emma USA

C

91 Jalakara India

Carlisle Bay Caribbean Casa Bonay Spain Castelbrac France Château St Pierre de Serjac France The Chedi Oman Chena Huts Sri Lanka

68 Kahanda Kanda Sri Lanka 66 Katamama Indonesia 49 Keemala Thailand

D 91 Deplar Farm Iceland 82 Dev Shree India 54 Dunkeld Bungalow Sri Lanka

E 88 Eden Rock St Barth’s Caribbean 75 Elements of Byron Australia 52 Explora Valle Sagrado Peru

I 22 Inkaterra La Casona Peru

K

L Leeu Estates South Africa Leone Blu Italy Limalimo Lodge Ethiopia Little Ruckomechi Zimbabwe El Lodge Spain The Lodge at Craggy Range New Zealand 40 Loisaba Tented Camp Kenya 70 LUX* South Ari Atoll Maldives 53 LUX* Tea Horse Road Benzilan China

59 31 45 43 80 33

Faena Hotel USA El Fenn Morocco Finca Cortesin Spain Finolhu Maldives Four Seasons Bogota Colombia Four Seasons Casablanca Morocco

M 67 26 68 22 95 54 44 19

Macakizi Turkey Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok Thailand The Mark USA Marktgasse Hotel Switzerland Martinhal Cascais Portugal Masseria Trapanà Italy Matesi River Lodge Zimbabwe Memmo Príncipe Real Portugal

N 92 Nayara Springs Costa Rica 20 Nolinski France 40 Nomad Entamanu Ngorongoro

Tanzania

O 99 One&Only Palmilla Mexico 77 One&Only The Palm UAE 53 Orange County, Hampi India

Palazzo Dama Italy Park Hyatt Mallorca Spain The Peninsula Beijing China The Pig at Combe England Pulitzer Netherlands

R 98 The Ritz Paris France 41 Roving Bushtops Tanzania 97 Royal Palm Mauritius

J

F 93 13 99 76 18 31

P 49 94 31 32 16

S 80 41 92 19 95 77 50 74 52

San Luis Italy Sanctuary Chief’s Camp Botswana Il Sereno Italy Shangri-La Doha Qatar Singita Lebombo South Africa Six Senses Zil Payson Seychelles Soho House Barcelona Spain Soneva Jani Maldives Svatma India

T 45 56 95 32 70

Taj Meghauli Serai Nepal Tam Coc Garden Vietnam Thanda Island Tanzania Thyme England Le Toiny Caribbean

V 67 The Vasilicos Greece 27 Villa d’Este Italy 89 Villa Dubrovnik Croatia

W 22 The Watergate Hotel USA 19 The Westbury Ireland

Y 79 Le Yule France

Z 94 Zemi Beach House Caribbean

Want to see more? Find hundreds of ever-sorevealing hotel reviews at tatler.com/travel

TAT L ER T R AV EL G U I D E 2017


YOU SHOULDN’T HAVE They’ve invited you to stay at their fabulous villa/sail on their huge yacht/travel aboard their private jet. Some thank-you presents are just not appropriate... Sc e n te d ca n dl e

A book

COME ON. You’re not even trying.

Nice idea, but could go disastrously wrong. Are they your new boyfriend’s parents? Is it a coffee-table book of naked tribesmen with pierced penises? It’s been known to happen.

Ditto. Are you saying, ‘Thank you,’ or are you saying, ‘I’ve given this zero thought and couldn’t give a toss about your generous invitation?’ Or even: ‘You’ll be needing this once we’ve gone?’

Som e t h i n g a l i ve It seemed such a hoot when you were in the pet shop, pointing at the googly-eyed goldfish, thinking how hilarious it would look on your host’s mantelpiece. The reality: dead and flushed down the loo within a day.

Som e t h i n g yo u mad e It’s lovely that you’ve taken up pottery. We’re thrilled for you. But no one wants your wonky ashtray. Unless you’re incredibly famous and your hosts will be able to laugh about it with the next lot.

Som e t h i n g yo ur k i d s made

Music That CD of Peruvian pan-pipe music, which sounded so mystical and deep when you were in Peru? Here, it sounds like what they’d play in the Dignitas waiting room.

Anyt hing re- gift ed Risky. You might have missed a personal note tucked away somewhere, or an engraving of your initials. Or – worst scenario ever – your host may have given it to you in the first place.

Anyt hing t oo ex pensive A jet ski/a year’s school fees/a marble bust of your host = a bit desperate really.

Little Lucinda is SO handy with a Pritt Stick and some glitter. But the only person who thinks her ‘Me at the Seaside’ collage is worth hanging onto is you. Which way up does it go, anyway?

Anyt hing t oo cheap

A f r am ed pi cture

So wha t SHOULD you give?

Tricky one, this. Is it of you? In which case, please don’t. If it’s a witty/thoughtful/flattering picture of your host, then fine. Buy a decent frame, though. Not one of those £3 wooden ones from Ikea.

You can’t go wrong with a pair of monogrammed white cotton pyjamas from Desmond & Dempsey, £160 including monogramming (desmondanddempsey.com). You’re welcome.

TAT L E R T R AV EL G U I D E 2017

A box of Milk Tray won’t cut it. Unless it’s ironic and you know your host VERY well. Preferably by sharing the same parents.

WORDS: FRANCISCA KELLETT. PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES

B oo ze


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