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DECEMBER 2016 SOUTHERN AFRICAN EDITION

RSA R39.00 (VAT INCL) R41.50 (Foreign Countries) NAMIBIA N$41.50

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RUN LONG. RUN LIGHT. RUN.


WARM-UP CONTENTS

THE LOOP

62

06

RAVE RUN 10

DECEMBER 2016

EDITOR’S LETTER 14

THE 10 MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE IN SA RUNNING

In 2016, who has had the most profound effect on the state of running in SA? BY MIKE FINCH AND LISA NEVITT

47

GEAR OF THE YEAR

It’s been a great year for gear. Find the ideal gift for any runner in our top picks from 2016. BY RYAN SCOTT 58

THE SPF MENU

Protect yourself from the sun – and enjoy great food at the same time. BY VERONIKA RUFF TAYLOR 72

BREATHE

ON THE COVER Gear Of The Year.....................................47 Up Your Game.........................................35 The Shortest Run.....................................36 The Healthy Skin Diet.............................58 Are You Normal?....................................79 5 Ways To Beat Common Injuries.........38 SA Running’s Biggest Influencers.........62 Breathe Better!........................................72

PHOTOGRAPH BY CASEY CRAFFORD

Everybody breathes, right? But by training yourself to breathe better, you’ll be able to go longer and harder with less effort. BY LISA BUCKINGHAM 79

SURVEY 2016

HERE YOU ARE

Think you’re like other runners? Check out our poll results. BY PAUL BAUMEISTER, ALI NOLAN AND LISA NEVITT

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 3


CONTENTS WE’RE ALWAYS RUNNING AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA

44

P H OTO G R A P H B Y N E I L B U R TO N

WARM-UP

38 WEIGHT LOSS

34

HUMAN RACE 17

Chris Bertish Fearless ocean adventurer – and runner. 19  The Singlet He knows it all. 20  I Ran It Off! A Durbanite defeats diabetes. 25  By The Numbers 2016 – our running year in numbers

Run Your Belly Off! Belly fat is bad news. The good news is, you already own the best tool for shedding unwanted kilos: a pair of legs! For top tips, visit runnersworld.co.za/ bellyoff

40  The Body Shop Exercises to maintain strong and steady joints. FUEL 42  Expires Never Cake? Really? How mid-run nutrition has improved through the decades. 44  Fridge Wisdom Enduring rules of nutrition – from the expert. 45  Quick Bites Cool soups, packed with fruits and veggies.

PERSONAL BEST TRAINING 32  Race Prep Run your best at crowded big-city marathons. 34  The Starting Line Strategies to keep your running routine intact during the holidays. 35  The Fast Lane Boost your efficiency – with tactics inspired by an Olympian. 36  Ask The Experts Will social media help or hurt your training? 37 The Sport Scientist When will you reach your peak marathon performance? MIND+BODY 38  Joint Action How to keep your hips, knees, ankles, and feet happy and injury-free.

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RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

RACES+PLACES 85  Racing Ahead

COLUMNS 22  Planet Runner AFROH (Acronyms For Runners’ Other Halves) BY KELLY KIDGELL 24  The Road Scholar The Riddle BY BRUCE DU BOURG 26  Running The World Faraway Fjords BY WARREN KING 90  Back of the Pack Full Of... Running BY BRUCE PINNOCK

ON THE COVER

DECEMBER

2016 GEAR OF THE YEAR

Find The Best Shoes, ULTIM ATE Hot Tech, RUNN ER’S Cool Tights GIFT Here! p47

SA’S BEST-SELLING RUNNING MAGAZINE

Up Your Game!

Wayde van Niekerk, 24: world champion, Olympic champion, world-record holder

5

An Expert 3-Step Plan For Running Further & Faster p35

Easy Ways To Beat Common Injuries p38

The Shortest Run ...that’s worth

The Most Influential People in SA Running

doing p36

p62

The Healthy Skin Diet p58

Breathe Better!

A Simple 2-Step Technique p72

SPECIAL REPORT

Are You Normal?

The State Of The South African Runner

12270

DECEMBER 2016 SOUTHERN AFRICAN EDITION

RSA R39.00 (VAT INCL) R41.50 (Foreign Countries) NAMIBIA N$41.50

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Runner – Wayde van Niekerk wears adidas Production by Rob Cilliers Photographed by Sean Laurenz

9 771021 566004


PROMOTION

INSPIRING

AUTHENTIC

PASSIONATE

WE’RE SEARCHING FOR

AWESOME! SO CAST YOUR VOTE TODAY! COURAGEOUS

UNSTOPPABLE

These characteristics describe the 10 finalists in our Runner’s World Cover Search competition – but there can be only one winner!

VOTE NOW for your cover star of 2016, and you could see them on the cover of the February 2017 issue of Runner’s World!

VOTING CLOSES: 1 December 2016

PRESENTED BY

VOTE NOW AT COVERSEARCH.RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA SEE COVERSEARCH.RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA FOR TERMS AND CONDITIONS


WARM-UP

THE POLL

THE LOOP THE INBOX

WINNING LETTER

ME TIME

I hereby serve you, my family, with a notice of my intention to run races every Sunday. I regret having to inform you of this, as I know how much you dislike me making a noise when I try to find my shoes early on a Sunday morning. While it’s not my intention to disrupt your ‘family day’, owing to the fact I work very hard during the week – on my career, and cleaning up after you, doing homework, washing clothes, doing the dishes and preparing meals – I’m left with no choice but to go ahead with this plan. Now I know you might think this is selfish of me; but the truth of the matter is that this is actually a selfless act. I’m merely trying to remain as healthy as possible, so that I can continue being

your faithful servant. Love Mom. – SHANI HAYWARD, MUIZENBERG

A LIFE INSPIRED For me, Runner’s World has become a collector’s item. I file away motivational articles, and tips on training, goals, workouts and buying running shoes. I particularly enjoy the healthy recipes in your food section, because they show that both eating and cooking healthy food can be fun and delicious. Reading Runner’s World makes being a healthy runner easy. – CHANTEL FOUCHE, GEORGE

TWEET OF THE MONTH

“First @parkrun at @meerendalwine this morning. Was a breath of fresh air from the usual. Lungs hurting. Ha ha! - @RD_murray (Richard Murray, Olympic triathlete) Runner’s World reserves the right to edit readers’ submissions. All readers’ submissions become the sole property of Runner’s World and may be published in any medium and for any use worldwide.

ARE YOU BRANDLOYAL WHEN IT COMES TO RUNNING SHOES?

70% Yes!

This month’s winning letter will receive a pair of Budds By DJ Fresh Bluetooth Earbuds, valued at R699. Whether you’re road or trail running, hiking or at the gym, at home, at work or in between, BUDDS By DJ Fresh will give your life a soundtrack. Music and calls are transmitted to your earpiece wirelessly, allowing you freedom to move without the restrictions of being physically attached to your mobile. The rubber buds, ear-hoops and in-ear control panel all work together to give you a lightweight but firm in-ear grip. Write to: Runner’s World, PO Box 16368, Vlaeberg, 8018; Fax: 021 408 3811; or email: rwletters@media24.com (letters must be no longer than 100 words and must include your name, address and telephone number or email address).

30%

No. I buy shoes based on price.


THE GALLERY

#INSTARWRUN We asked runners to show off their running experiences. Here are four submissions that made us envious.

“#pb #21.1km #bagpipesmusic #awesomeday #instarwrun”

“Another 10-K race done. Best time, too: 1:06.46. #iloverunning #instarwrun #runnersworldsa” – @tara2silver

“Trail running at Northern Farms.”

“Happy Sunday fit fam. Chappies Challenge, a.k.a my first half marathon, done and dusted. Smashed 21.1km in 2:18.51.”

– @juanetliebenberg

– @lisamack360

– @jaxipop

READER COMMENTS

FINISH THE SENTENCE: MY BIGGEST PRE-RACE FOOD REGRET IS… “I ate a huge – I’m talking four slices of toast! – peanut butter, Nutella and banana sandwich, dangerously close to the start of my race. I almost hurled!” – Mary Kulik Mott

“Oats with milk. I learned the hard way not to consume dairy products before a race.”

THE POLL

How many days per week do you run?

16% 1-2 25% 5-7 59% 3-4

– Lebo Masike

“Coffee.”

– Karen du Plessis

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 7


RUNNER’S WORLD PROMOTION

SA’S BIGGEST ONLINE RUNNING PORTAL Training Programmes for Every Distance Complete Race Calendar Expert Tips, Workouts and Injury-Prevention Advice Everyday Motivation!

WARM-UP Southern African Edition. A joint venture between Rodale Press, Inc and Media24 Magazines.

EDITORIAL

Who inspired RW staffers to start running? Mike Finch The late Zithulele Sinqe. The former Two Oceans winner was simply majestic when he ran.

Mark Arendse Zola Budd. The day Mary Decker fell opened my eyes to the awesomeness that is running.

Andre Valentine Farwa Mentoor Rae Trew-Browne Rob Krar, American ultra runner and badass mountain man – mostly, because he had a huge beard and ran like the wind. Yentl Barros Ntando Mahlangu Penny Trevena Comrades runners who know they’re not going to make the cut-off, but soldier on anyway.

facebook/RunnersWorldSA

@ runnersworldza

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CONTRIBUTORS Nick Aldridge, Xavier Briel, Rob Cilliers, Theuns Coetzee, Casey Crafford, Bruce Du Bourg, James Garaghty, Tarryn Hatchett, Kelly Kidgell, Warren King, Craig Kolesky, Sean Laurenz, Jacques Marais, Craig Muller, Nick Muzik, Lindsey Parry, Bruce Pinnock, Ewald Sadie, Ryan Sandes, Liz Applegate, Kelly Bastone, Paul Baumeister, Paul Blow, Lisa Buckingham, Neil Burton, Ted Cavanaugh, Jenai Chin, Ed Gabriels, Jeff Galloway, Paul Grimes, Richard Hallman, Lisa Haney, Maleen Hoekstra, Alex Hutchinson, Andrew Joyce, Chris Lanier, Thomas Macdonald, Mitch Mandel, Andrea Manzati, Ali Nolan, Matt Rainey, Andy Rementer, Scott Serfas, AC Shilton, Veronika Ruff Taylor

PUBLISHING & MARKETING Lisa Nevitt Holly O’Connor. She left all the other runners in my high-school year group for dust – and she had killer abs!

Dave Buchanan Smith (character in The Loneliness of the LongDistance Runner, by Alan Sillitoe)

www.runnersworld.co.za

Editor MIKE FINCH (mike.finch@media24.com) Deputy Editor LISA NEVITT (lisa.nevitt@media24.com) Senior Designer MARK ARENDSE Chief Sub/Managing Editor DAVE BUCHANAN Editorial Assistant ANDRÉ VALENTINE (andre.valentine@media24.com) Online Editor RAE TREW-BROWNE (rae.browne@media24.com) Digital Content Manager YENTL BARROS (yentl.barros@media24.com) Digital Assistant PENNY TREVENA (penelope.cairns@media24.com) Picture Editor AMY MOSTERT Gear Editor RYAN SCOTT (madibapi@gmail.com) Scientific Editor DR ROSS TUCKER Editor-at-Large BRUCE FORDYCE

Amy Mostert Taylor Swift and her sick beats. Ryan Scott Vangelis Papathanassiou, composer of the music for Chariots of Fire.

Publishing Manager FRANCOIS MALAN 021 408 1228 (francois.malan@media24.com) Marketing Manager LISE COETSEE 021 443 9833 (lise.coetsee@media24.com) Marketing Assistant KELYN DONOUGH 021 443 9866 (kelyn.donough@media24.com)

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CIRCULATION SALES & SOLUTIONS Head of Circulation LEONI VOLSCHENK Head of Retail ANDRELINE VAN TONDER Circulation Manager RIAAN WEYERS 021 443 9964 Product Manager GEORGE VAN BILJON Subscription Manager JENNY MARINUS

SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES TEL 087 740 1041 FAX 086 457 5945 E-MAIL: runnersworld_subs@media24.com SMS ‘RUNNERSWORLDSUBS’ TO 32361 (R1 PER SMS) WEB www.my-mags.com CALL CENTRE OPERATING HOURS: MON-FRI 08:00 TO 17:00 ALL SUBSCRIPTION PAYMENTS TO: RUNNER’S WORLD, PO BOX 16428, VLAEBERG, 8018

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BOCO Sol

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WARM-UP

RAVE RUN

TANKWA KAROO NATIONAL PARK, CALVINIA, NORTHERN CAPE PHOTOGRAPHS & WORDS BY… Jacques Marais RUNNERS… Karyn Marais GPS LOCATION Roodewerf Office: 32°14’27.9”S 20°5’44.5”E GRADING Intermediate – advanced. TERRAIN Semi-desert. Expect sand – especially when passing through low-lying washes. Overall, the surface is pretty rocky; there are patches of shale and small boulder fields, amid widespread grassland tussocks. Keeping to the southern roads guarantees a relatively flat run, but Gannaga Pass and Leeuberg EcoTrail bristle with steep climbs and plunging descents. DURATION This 21-kilometre circular route pretty much circumnavigates Leeuberg, which is one of the higher outcrops in this section of the Tankwa Karoo National Park. The altitude gain on the run is in the region of 450 metres, and a relatively fit runner should be home in well under three hours (for more information, visit sanparks.org). BEST TIME TO RUN The Tankwa Karoo is a place of extremes; but that’s exactly what makes it such a truly immersive experience. In summer, the searing sun blasts down on flat-out badlands, and mirages shimmer in the heatwave rebound. Winter brings sleet storms and sub-zero deluges, and icy rain dogs your every step home. This is proper weather, so bring your kit, and go and test it out – and in the process, feel utterly alive. CONFIGURATION We were based at Varschfontein Cottage. A short run from there, along the entrance road, leads to the 10

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016


DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 11


WARM-UP

RAVE RUN TANKWA KAROO NATIONAL PARK, CALVINIA, NORTHERN CAPE

Leeuberg Eco-Trail turnoff (1.5km). Follow this dual-track to your left, along a gradual ascent towards the final, sharp summit ascent to the viewpoint (4km). What follows is a stony plunge into the valley below, and a few sandy stream crossings, until you reach the Blink Vlei road (12.5km). Turn right, and right again, onto the Prambergfontein road (19km). Then, relax along the final, flat 12-kilometre stretch that leads back to your cottage. That’s it – offroad half marathon done and dusted. You deserve a beer! OTHER ACTIVITIES 4x4; mountain biking; bird watching; game sighting; AfrikaBurn REFUEL AT There’s a basic shop at Roodewerf, where you can buy a cold drink. If you’re taking the R355 from Calvinia to Ceres, then on your return, stop at Tankwa Padstal (karoospace. co.za) for free Wi-Fi, a hearty redmeat breakfast, and a cold one. THE EXPERIENCE There’s something magical about Tankwa: maybe it’s the parabolic horizons that flood the skyline, seamlessly, from every conceivable angle; or perhaps it’s the fresh air billowing up from the plains, spiced with overtones of antediluvian dust, and a lemony-snicket of spiky succulents. Not to mention a lunar landscape, utterly devoid of overt signs of human footprints – except, that is, for those left by trail shoes. Infinite gravel roads and offroad tracks timeline through this remote national park, traversing scrubland vistas, circumnavigating sun-bleached pans, and orbiting rock-shocked outcrops. The full 146 000-hectare expanse is both tranquil and a remarkable conservation space. GETTING THERE Tankwa is a substantial drive from all major towns, and is reached mainly on gravel roads. Even Calvinia is a solid 110 kilometres away – and around two hours by car from Roodewerf Office. However, access is also possible via the N1, from Matjiesfontein (160km/2hrs 15min), Ceres (180km/2hrs 20min) or Sutherland (120km/1hr 40min). All routes will involve serious dirt-road surfing, so check your tyres and be sure to pack a spare.

FOR MORE AWESOME RUNNING PICS, VISIT WW W. MYRUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / INSTARWRUN.


DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 13


WARM-UP

EDITOR’S LETTER

THE SECOND BOOM A new wave of runners are starting to make their footsteps heard…

W

hen our US edition of Runner’s World produced a series of covers to celebrate their 50th Anniversary – featuring comedian and actor Kevin Hart – it signalled the official arrival of a new running boom. At the time of writing this I’d just spent a week in New York together with the other editors of the 19 global editions of Runner’s World, and it was clear that a resurgence in running is happening – The Rise Of The Millennials. No, it’s not the name of a new Transformers

matter who you are, where you come from or how fast you are. The Project runs are popping up almost weekly across the US, and attract a generation of runners for whom performance is less important than simply being active, and being part of a cool, new movement. As humans, we gravitate towards places that make us feel at home. Traditional running clubs can be intimidating to younger runners, and old-fashioned club garb can be offputting to a trendier generation that shares images on Instagram. This second boom is about a new

“…performance is less important than simply being active, and part of a cool, new movement.” movie. It’s the influx of a new generation of young runners, who are changing the face – and the look – of running worldwide. This is a wave of runners who have become the new cool: trendy, social-media-savvy, and not shy to use an app or two. It’s an exciting time. Already, running shoes and kit have been heavily influenced by street trends and gear, while mobile phones, apps, music and style all form part of this new generation’s wardrobe. In South Africa, the rise of run crews – some of which we’ve already featured (see ‘The Fringe’, RW September 2016) – already mirrors those that have emerged internationally. In the US, the explosion of the November Project has made running more accessible, because of their strong focus on inclusion – no

14

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

inclusivity. It’s about sharing. It’s about running being cool. It’s about turning a healthy activity into a social activity that drives motivation, fun and lifestyle. We’re glad to be part of it… MIKE FINCH EDITOR-IN-CHIEF @MikeFinchSA

8 WAYS TO BE A MILLENNIAL RUNNER 1. Share your runs on Instagram. 2. Long socks are back! 3. Load Snapchat. 4. String vests? No. 5. Start your own run crew. 6. Follow Kevin Hart on Twitter. 7. Enter one race a year. 8. Update your running playlist weekly on Apple Music.


“I RAN OFF 24% OF MY WEIGHT!” – A DURBANITE DEFEATS DIABETES.

HUMAN( )RACE p20

NEWS, TRENDS, and REGULAR RUNNERS doing AMAZING THINGS

Running On Water Chris Bertish is fearless. To prove it, he won the Mavericks Invitational Big Wave Surfing Competition – which features the highest waves ever recorded in the history of the sport – and in stand-up paddling (SUP), he holds the 24-hour Open Ocean Distance world record. Next, Bertish plans to become the first person to SUP across the Atlantic Ocean – alone, on a custom-built board. So what does running have to do with a daredevil who rides waves the size of four-storey buildings? Plenty, Bertish reveals. Back on dry land, it’s a large part of his training.

E MEET TH E V A W B IG R RUNNE

WORDS BY

Rae Trew-Browne

NAME: CHRIS BERTISH AGE: 42 PROFESSION: BUSINESS OWNER AND OCEAN-SPORTS ENTHUSIAST

PHOTOGRAPH BY CRAIG KOLESKY

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 17


HUMAN RACE I used to race half marathons, until I broke my patella in a bigwave surfing accident 10 years ago. I decided to start running again after an eight-year layoff, but first I had to change my biomechanics to accommodate my injury. Now I can run up to eight kilometres before my knee feels too sore to continue.

ability to force themselves past that point helps them to tap into another reserve that they didn’t even know existed. The same applies to open-water sports. For some, the open water can cause mental and emotional stress. But I’ve been chasing 40- to 60-foot waves all over the world

“If you stop in the ocean, you die. Our incentive to keep going is significantly higher. ” Running increases endurance. That’s useful for water-sports athletes, who don’t have the option of stopping at the side of the road and declaring, “I’m done!” If you stop in the ocean, you die. Our incentive to keep going is significantly higher.

For me, near-death experiences have become (relatively) normal. In 2000, I became the first person not to be towed in at Jaws by a jet-ski. I paddled into 50- to 60-foot monsters, and then pulled into a giant barrel that came down on me pretty hard. When I came up for air, I managed half a breath before I was hit by another 50-foot wave. I eventually made it out, but I

learned a valuable lesson that day: know your limits. When I stand-up paddle across the Atlantic Ocean in December, I will be mindful of this lesson. We’re building a custom-made craft; robust enough to take on the journey, and with enough space to store food and escape the elements during rest. Also on board will be a solar-powered water desalinator, along with all the navigational gear that I will need to paddle a marathon distance, every day, for 120 days straight. What started out as a personal challenge I set myself five years

ago has morphed into a charity drive. With the help of Carrick Wealth, we have set up three annuity funds, and hope to raise R20 million for Signature Of Hope, Operation Smile, and The Lunchbox Fund. By the time I reach halfway, we hope to have raised enough money to feed 11 000 children every month for next 25 years, through The Lunchbox Fund; and to fund operations for children with cleft palates, through Operation Smile. With the help of Signature Of Hope, we plan to build five schools in some of South Africa’s poorest communities. It’s become so much more than just a paddle across the ocean.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M A L E E N H O E K S T R A ( M A I N ) ; R I C H A R D H A L L M A N ( B I G WAV E S U R F I N G )

Running teaches us that our capabilities are so much bigger than we realise. Most people will never reach that point, which means they’ll never discover what they’re actually made of. But when athletes get to a point where they feel like they can’t go on, the

for the last 20 years, so I feel at home there. I’ve always enjoyed sailing, big-wave surfing and SUP… basically, anything that floats!

For the last 20 years, Bertish has chased 60foot waves. He’s certainly not afraid to stare death in the face!

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RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016


The Singlet

BECAUSE RUNNING ISN’T JUST ABOUT STRING VESTS. ASK THE TRAIL STAR Ryan Sandes

I’m injured. What should I do? – DAVID, Sandton How you respond to treatment depends on your unique physiology, and the type and severity of your injury. That’s why what works for me won’t necessarily work for you. A wide variety of treatments achieve good results, and I wouldn’t say that any one of those is particularly better than the other. I go for a regular sports massage, and visit a chiropractor, a physiotherapist and a lynotherapist. These treatments, combined with mobility and strength training, help me to avoid injury. Maintaining a healthy body and preventing injuries is vital,

“…it’s vital you stay in tune with your body…” I’VE HAD AN EARFUL! When did it become acceptable for runners to play music on a device without earbuds – for all to hear – during a race? – ZANELE, Randburg Races are a veritable circus, because they attract a wide variety of folk – from serious to casual, and from charitable souls wearing deep-sea diving suits, to exhibitionists in G-strings who ‘claim’ to be running for rhinos… my point is, what falls within the realms of ‘acceptability’ at these races is as broad as the lives of those taking part. You might pull up at a robot and be offended by a taxi driver’s Celine Dion album, which he has turned up so loud it vibrates through the tarmac and into your buttocks (I actually don’t see anything wrong with that…). But it will only be a matter of time before the traffic moves on, transporting away with it the sweet voice of the Canadian warbler.

ILLUSTRATION BY ANDY REMENTER

When it comes to race day, the same applies: run faster, run slower; or if you too are wearing headphones, drown the offender out by cranking up your own

you as a couple, and others as only an individual. Giving up a golden ticket because your better half is grumpy is just plain daft! If she got one, do you think

“Do whatever it takes to move away from he or she who has offended your ears…” volume. Do whatever it takes to move away from he or she who has offended your ears – and bear in mind that today’s the day you share the road with the rest of the human zoo. GOLD OR GRUMPY? My wife and I have participated in four marathons together. Via a lottery, I got the ‘golden ticket’ for a marathon; she did not. I’m happy; she is not. Do I still run? Should I defer? – DANIE, Mossel Bay The mantra ‘happy wife, happy life’ does not always apply. Sometimes life smiles down on

she’d give it up? Unless you’ve made some random oath to never run a race without each other, there’s no reason to give up a perfectly good free entry. What’s more, she can probably still buy an entry. Look at forums and social media pages, because somebody always pulls out just before race day. And if, for some reason, your trouble-and-strife can’t buy one, she needs to come to terms with the fact that sometimes fortune favours others. There will come a time when she gets the ticket – or some other luckbased equivalent. Then you get to be the grumpy one.

because once you’re injured, it can take a very long time to treat, and it can set your training back considerably. I always ask lots of questions when I go for treatments, in order to better understand how my body works. Questions like: what do you think is making that line feel tight? And, what can I do to stop my ankle from locking up? I participate in lots of overseas races, which means I travel a lot. Often I have to self-treat areas of tightness. I believe it’s vital you stay in tune with your body, and understand how it moves. The ability to self-diagnose and treat restricted and tight areas will go a long way towards ensuring you remain a healthy and happy runner. Ryan Sandes, a.k.a. ‘Hedgie’, is a trail-running supremo, with race wins too numerous to mention.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 19


HUMAN RACE

RUN IT OFF CLUB

DAILY DOSE

I RAN OFF 2 1 .6 KG!

How a Durban diabetic ditched medication – and weight.

THE WAKE-UP It wasn’t the news I was diabetic that came as a shock to me – my mother and grandmother both suffer from the disease. It was the fact that following a healthy diet had done nothing to reduce my reliance on medication, or help to control the weightgain associated with it. Within two years of being diagnosed, my doctor had

MINNESH KALIPRASAD Age: 40 Home Town: Durban Height: 1.74m Occupation: Project Controls Manager Time Required: 11 Months Then: 91.6kg Now: 70kg

20

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prescribed a daily total of 16 tablets and five injections of insulin, and I piled on the kilograms. Clearly, diet wasn’t enough. THE SHAKE-UP I decided to start exercising; at least four times a week at first, gradually increasing to six once I felt my body could handle it. When I started ‘running’ at my local parkrun, my pace was closer to walking. But as I grew stronger, I was able to replace walking segments with running. In a bid to win back control of my health, I’ve completed over 100 parkruns, and participated in numerous 10-kilometre and halfmarathon races. THE REWARD Being diabetic is a journey of self-discovery: each person is different, in terms of how they react to medication and food types. The simple truth is that I still self-test my glucose levels three times daily. I undergo a battery of tests every six months, to ensure my numbers are in the correct ranges. That’s good practice, even for healthy individuals. I consult with a dietician at least once annually, and have an annual check-up with an ophthalmologist and a podiatrist. But since I took up running, my weight has dropped by roughly 24%, and I haven’t injected insulin since August 2014. I’m also taking less oral medication. My goal for 2016 is to qualify for Two Oceans. You see, I love moving the goalposts – and if it benefits my overall health and well-being, then why shouldn’t I? – As told to Lisa Nevitt

PHOTOGRAPHS SUPPLIED


HUMAN RACE

Planet Runner BY KELLY KIDGELL

AFROH

(Acronyms For Runners’ Other Halves) In short – here’s how to survive their bizarre habits.

B

eing a runner’s wife, husband or Significant Other is not for sissies. But familiarising yourself with these (amusing but accurate) acronyms could help you survive your runner’s tears, brawls, and episodes of sheer insanity.

PTW: Pass The Wine. Explanation not

entirely necessary. Something to do with the crazy often making us feel as if we’re LTWTL (losing the will to live). TPCR: Toilet Paper Consumption Rate.

Obviously, it’s high in any runner-inhabited household. Apparently that’s on account of 22

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

their ‘metabolism’. Although I’m certain it’s a simple case of being FOS (full of the proverbial).

road-side seconding campaign. Stay firm. Don’t peak too soon. Nobody likes a flaccid banana.

STFD: Shut The Front Door! You are permitted to shout this, at any given moment, during one of their boring running stories. For example: Runner: Babe, you’ll never guess what happened at the club tonight. We began our pyramid fartlek (PF)… You: SHUT THE FRONT DOOR! Your hands should be as sarcastic as your face. He’ll soon get the message. You could also pretend to yawn. (I find just saying the word ‘yawn’ is less effort.)

NLB: Nuclear Laundry Basket. The struggle is real. Cross-contamination must be avoided at all times. Sweat-infused, skid-marked garments. Use gloves.

CT: Camel Toe. One simply can’t not look. Great for self-amusement at races. Between the CT and PSPN (poly-short-protruding nuts), it’s like Cirque du Genitale down there.

BR: Banana-Ready. That pivotal moment in any

FML: … You’ll mutter it numerous times a

GR: Gag Reflex. Stimulated by NLB. Also by runners’ toes. Ugh! Bleeding nipples, too.

ILLUSTRATION BY ISTOCKPHOTO


“Pretend you’re a runner, and watch in amusement as promoter people act overwhelmingly interested in your fantasy race campaign.” day, between your runner’s mood swings, stinky-running-shoe-induced GR, and having to pick up foam rollers, trigger sticks and moist running kit. Smile and remember the CT.

forecasts. We’re talking wind direction, humidity and precipitation. FML. Imaginary injuries, sickness and moodiness. PTW.

BP: No, not blood pressure. Bush Poo. It’s a real thing. I’m just going to leave it at that.

SF: Strava Frenzy. A daily occurrence, usually indulged in upon the loo, a.k.a. the ‘throne’. Which usually leads to...

FTE: Free-Time Envy. Directly proportional to the number of children residing in your household. Ah, how we dream of having an hour or two to ourselves, as we death-stare our running spouse all the way out the door, fantasising about mixing Deep Heat with his Vaseline. TM: Taper Madness. Insanity: that’s basically

what it is. You’ll see and hear things you never imagined possible. Detailed weather

EROEP: Eye Rolls of Epic Proportion. I see

more of my roof than I do of my runner guy. SF? EROEP. Intense interest in the upcoming annual race calendar? EROEP. Tapering week, and subsequent TM? EROEP. GF: Ghost Flu. He’s certain it’s there, but nobody else can see or feel it.

Presents mostly during TM. RH: Race Holidays. Or, ‘holidays’. Nothing relaxing about them, until after his race. Pack wine, and indulge in the race expos and registration. If you’re like me, you’ll pretend you’re a runner, and watch in amusement as promoter people act overwhelmingly interested in your fantasy race campaign. Sample the freebies en route to the massage tent. RDT: Runner-Dispersing Tactic. If at any given point you feel ‘runner’d out’, cough and splutter loudly. Groan, even. Perfect for expo crowds, awkward pasta-party mingling – and even in the bedroom. SFP: Suckers For Punishment. And no, not the runners. Us: the ones who embrace their psychotic traits, in our strangely addictive desire to fulfil our role in supporting incredible goals and dreams.

Kelly Kidgell is a mom of three and a runner’s wife. She loves writing about both, while simultaneously sipping wine. Read her blog at survivingtherunnerguy.co.za, and visit her Facebook page (facebook.com/runnerwife)

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The Road Scholar

HUMAN RACE

BY BRUCE DU BOURG

THE RIDDLE

What is it that makes us feel so dreadful when we can’t run?

I

’m injured. All that’s changed in my life is that I’ve stopped running. I should be celebrating the fact that I can hit the snooze button a few more times every morning. So why do my days seem less bright? After some introspection, I think I may have solved the conundrum. To explain it, I will illustrate what a typical work day would be like, if everyone approached it the way runners approach running.

24

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

You look for the oldest and tattiest shirt you can find in your cupboard, because you know that this will gain the respect of your colleagues at work. You don’t need to do anything with your hair – your cap will take care of it. You drive to work at 5:30am. Two things stand out: firstly, there’s no traffic; secondly, you’re excited about where the road will take you. At the office, you prefer to take the stairs. As you near the top, other stair climbers offer

a few enthusiastic cheers of encouragement. You arrive at your desk, conveniently located in the middle of an open, green park. Everybody admires your tatty shirt. You fill your lungs with a few deep breaths of crisp, fresh air. You take a moment to admire a crested barbet that has just landed on a colleague’s coat rack. You begin to make your way through your tasks for the day. Work is tough, but you know that it will inevitably lead to an easy stretch, where you can relax for a bit. You find someone who’s working on a similar project to yours. You’ve never met him before, so you decide to break the ice with a light-hearted comment – something about being blinded by his fluorescent green shoes.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ISTOCKPHOTO


2016 BY THE NUMBERS

He’s not offended. In fact, he makes a weak joke about how you couldn’t lose him in the dark after a 12-hour day. Before long, you learn about his family, and his hopes and dreams. In turn, you share some of your own problems. His advice is helpful, but not intrusive, and it’s based on experience. You call your psychologist and cancel next week’s appointment. A SQUIRT OF COLLECTIVE SPIRIT You fall behind, but your colleagues don’t try to push ahead. They seem determined not to leave you behind, in spite of the obvious cost to them. They abandon their progress for the day – as well as their pursuit of an annual bonus – to help you out. In fact, one guy runs down to the office canteen to pick up some refreshments for you, so that you’re able to keep going. You’re eternally grateful, and push on. As 5pm approaches, you get more and more tired. But then, something strange happens: the harder you work, the better you feel. Inexplicably, fatigue is accompanied by exhilaration, as endorphins flood your neural pathways. You look forward to the time for going home; but for some reason, you don’t want the day to end.

“You fall behind, but your colleagues don’t try to push ahead.” You finish work with an overwhelming sense of accomplishment. But before you leave, you have a quiet drink with your colleagues. There is an air of excitement as you chat about how the day has gone. Strangely, everybody is as excited about their colleagues’ performance as they are about their own. When you arrive home, your happiness overflows to your interactions with your family. You find that all of your children’s pranks make you laugh, and you even take a genuine interest in your spouse’s issues at work. You lie awake in bed, reflecting on the day’s standout moments. And you never get tired of going to sleep with a smile on your face.

Bruce Du Bourg is an accountant who carefully balances writing and running.

3:45.22 MARC LAUENSTEIN’S RECORD TIME FOR THE GNARLY 42KM OTTER TRAIL RUN

THREE 85 & FOUR HENRI SCHOEMAN AND RICHARD MURRAY’S FINISHING POSITIONS IN THE TRIATHLON AT THE RIO OLYMPICS

4 MINUTES 57 SECONDS

24th

Finishing position of Lusapho April in the Rio Marathon. April was SA’s first male finisher, in 2:15.24

ED WHITLOCK’S AGE WHEN HE RAN SUB-4 HOURS AT THE TORONTO MARATHON

(Do the same – turn to page 37)

8:07.41

The time Johan Nel ran at the Comrades to win the 60+ men’s category

The time winner Charné Bosman gained over Caroline Wöstmann in the final 2km of the Comrades Marathon

3:13.33

THE TIME ZIMBABWEAN MIKE FOKORONI RAN TO WIN THIS YEAR’S OLD MUTUAL TWO OCEANS ULTRA – THE SLOWEST TIME IN 22 YEARS

5:18.18 2:08.42 DAVID GATEBE’S RECORD ‘DOWN’ RUN AT THE COMRADES MARATHON

Ethiopia’s Asefa Mengstu’s winning time at the Sanlam Cape Town Marathon, to establish a new SA Allcomers record

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 25


RU N NIN G

NAME

the W

RLD

ICELAND

Warren King AGE Old Enough PROFESSION Trail Event Organiser

DECEMBER 2016

The author, participating in the Laugavegur Ultra Marathon.

FARAWAY FJORDS

The harder the journey, the more beautiful the destination.

Iceland: land of fire and ice, the midnight sun, the Northern Lights, and the Eyjafjallajökull volcano. It’s two thirds of the size of our Eastern Cape Province, and has a population of around 320 000, which is roughly the same as that of East London. Two out of every three Icelanders live in the greater Reykjavik region. It’s the fifth most sparsely populated country in the world. Sitting astride the MidAtlantic Ridge – where

26

the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates are moving apart – Iceland is one of the world’s great volcanic hotspots. The country generates 100% of its electricity with renewables: 75% from hydro power, and 25% from geothermal activity. Add to this the low human footprint, and you find an incredibly pristine and unspoilt landscape. You can drink directly from most of its rivers and streams – which makes running on Iceland’s remote

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

and dramatically beautiful trails that much easier. KALDBAKUR PEAK, WESTFJORDS Westfjords is one of Iceland’s most remote regions. Its population isn’t large enough to justify bridges or ferries, so the only way to travel between fjords is to drive around them. Ten as-thecrow-flies kilometres become a torturous 100. There is muscular wind, and misty rain. That said, the scenery is unforgettable… I arrived at the pretty little fishing village of Þingeyri, and decided to run up Kaldbakur, the highest peak in the Westfjords. The first five kays consisted of a basic jeep track, which snaked its way along the valley floor and climbed gradually.

The landscape alternated between emerald-green lichen, black-and-grey volcanic rock, and brilliantwhite patches of snow. On either side of me, mountains soared. Through it all flowed a crystal-clear river. Countless glacial waterfalls – one of the most characteristic features of the country – cascaded everywhere. Fat, shaggy sheep eyed me curiously. The trail zigzagged up the mountain for another five kilometres, crossing a high pass, and became a razor-thin hiking track, complete with sheer drops on either side, as it turned towards the peak – most of which I found too steep to run on, but luckily I was in no rush. As I climbed higher, the fjords and valleys on the other side of Kaldbakur came

PHOTOGRAPHS BY WARREN KING


From top to middle: Capital city of Reykjavic; Kaldbakur views; Mývatn Nature Baths.

into view. The last couple of kilometres were arduous, but it was easy to forget about the challenge in the face of such overwhelming physical beauty. The peak was a broad, flattish expanse. In every direction were snow-capped mountains, plunging green valleys and brilliant-blue fjords. I walked around the top of Kaldbakur for over an hour, unable to wipe the stupid grin off my face. Energised, I decided to test my downhill skills on the way back, cutting across all of the switchbacks and basically running straight down the mountain, stopping only to drink from one of the streams. Once back in Þingeyri, I indulged in unbelievable Belgian waffles with whipped cream – the speciality of the town’s only restaurant.

VIK, SOUTHERN ICELAND Iceland’s southernmost settlement lies on the shores of a beautiful black-basalt beach, and is nestled at the foot of the imposing Reynisfjall Ridge. Ironically for Iceland’s rainiest town, the weather was perfect. Brilliant blue skies and warmer temperatures allowed me to run in shorts and a T-shirt for the first time. Conveniently, the path up the Ridge ran right outside my guesthouse. The first couple of kilometres consisted of a too-steep-to-run jeep track, which switchbacked up the side of the mountain, and continued a while longer at the top to what looked like a weather station situated at the southern edge of the bluff, overlooking the sea. From middle The brilliant blue skies were to bottom: evidence of a country that Akureyri, doesn’t use fossil fuel Iceland’s second city; Skógafoss for energy. Waterfall; the The landscape itself was author. fantastically unique – unlike anything I had encountered back home – consisting of volcanic rock covered with thick green lichen. The result was technical terrain that required absolute focus and concentration; but with the right rhythm and foot placement, it was intriguingly bouncy. I soon worked out that there was a simple trail-marking system, which consisted of wooden poles stuck in the ground, and which

generally seemed to follow the same vague counter-clockwise direction around the top of the mountain that I was aspiring to climb. But the poles were few and far between, and many of them had come out of the ground and were lying flat, impossible to see from any distance. But it all added to the fun. I found myself rambling around this beautiful environment, completely on my own but for the endless vistas and the quizzical gaze of the usual bunch of well-fed sheep, comfortable in the knowledge that Get there it was basically There’s no easy way to get there from impossible to get South Africa. The most direct routes are really lost. via most of the big European airport hubs, The theoretical such as London, Paris or Frankfurt, and loop that I was then on to Reykjavik. following turned Run into a figure-ofIt’s easy to be self-sufficient, and there’s eight, completing also no shortage of events. Check out the circumference hlaup.is for the calendar (in Icelandic), of the northern part local Facebook community group Trail of the mountain and Running Iceland, and arcticrunning.is bringing me back to for tailored, guided running excursions. my starting point. The southern part of Eat the mountain took There are great restaurants in Reykjavik, me along cliff tops, but options are limited in smaller towns. Excellent seafood. Self-catering is a good soaring out of the option for those on a budget. sea and alive with exotic sea birds. Sleep Below was the Infrastructure has lagged behind the pretty town of Vik, boom in tourism, so there’s a shortage with its red-roofed of big hotel chains, and sometimes even a church and blackshortage of beds in peak season. AirBnB basalt beach. I took is a useful alternative, as is camping. the obligatory selfie Book in advance. with the famous Get down with the locals Reynisdrangur Locals are hospitable and friendly. sea stacks rising Tourists tend to be outdoorsy, and helpful from the sea in in the event of any logistical hiccup. the background; Icelandic legend has Iceland is expensive for South African it that they are trolls travellers; indulging in a post-run craft that were caught beer will hurt your wallet. out in the sun. Then, happily, I turned in the direction of home. A wonderful country, all in all – and heaven for trail runners.

YOUR RUNNING HOLIDAY IN ICELAND

Warren King confesses to a wanderlust, and a passion for trekking, trail running, travel and his dogs.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 27


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32 38 42 47 TRAINING

MIND+BODY

FUEL

GEAR

PERSONAL BEST GET FIT, EAT SMART, RUN STRONG With almost no protein or fat, slushies aren’t as filling as smoothies – and they’re perfect for pre-run energy.

FOOD STYLING BY CHRIS LANIER

CHILL OUT

When the day is hot, you’ll run better by starting cool. Lowering your body temperature can improve performance by 3.7 per cent, according to a German study, worth a whopping 55 seconds in a 25:00 5-K. That’s why Olympians such as Deena Kastor and Meb Keflezighi take pre-race measures to chill out, literally – sitting in airconditioned rooms, wearing ice vests. You can cool yourself from the inside out with this slushy, suggested by Chris Fischer, a chef who runs 5-Ks in the heat of summer. Blend together a handful of fresh stemmed strawberries, lemon slices (minus the rind), watermelon cubes, ice, and honey to taste, topped with a sprig of mint. Then, quickly – go for a run!

PHOTOGRAPH BY TED CAVANAUGH

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 31


TRAINING RACE PREP

STREET SMARTS

Because massive big-city races require a little thoughtful prep By Lisa Haney

32

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

FIFTY-FIVE MEN FINISHED – and the sole woman dropped out of – the first New

York City Marathon, held entirely within Central Park in 1970. This year, more than 50 000 people lined up on the southeastern end of the VerrazanoNarrows Bridge for a course that winds through the city’s five boroughs. A big-city marathon means big crowds of spectators as well as runners. “It can be overwhelming, but that’s also part of the fun of it,” says John Honerkamp, head coach at New York Road Runners, who ran New York for the sixth time this year. There are a lot of complex logistics – New York, for example, has three starting lines with 17 different start times, ranging from 8:30 to 11 am. Whether you’re running New York or a major local race like the Old Mutual Soweto Marathon or the Sanlam Cape Town Marathon, you’ll have to navigate situations you wouldn’t in smaller-scale racing. Here’s how to prepare so you can enjoy race day and perform at your best.

PHOTOGRAPH BY GETTY IMAGES / GALLO IMAGES


TIME YOUR FUELLING

You’ll wake before dawn to get to the start of most major marathons, but you may not step into a starting pen until hours later. To simulate race day, follow the same timing before at least a couple of key long runs, experimenting with when and what you eat, Honerkamp says. Eat a full meal – such as toast/a bagel with sliced banana, a spoonful of nut

butter, and a drizzle of honey – two to three hours pre-race, says Heather Caplan, a dietician and coach who runs marathons and long-distance races herself. Then have a small snack (about 400 kilojoules) of easily digestible carbs 20 to 30 minutes before go time. Longer wait? Add a snack shortly after you wake, and make your breakfast and prerace snack portable, for easy carrying to the start area.

DRESS & PACK SENSIBLY

“Throwaway clothes are key, because it may be freezing at the starting line,” Honerkamp says. Even if you take a tog bag, you will have to part with that gear well before the starting gun. Carry an old blanket and wear clothes you can ditch at the starting line – tracksuit pants, a long-sleeve T-shirt, an old jacket, and a hat and gloves if needed. (Many

PREPARE FOR POST-RACE

BIGCITY BLUES: Preparation and a plan are essential for getting the most out of city marathons.

Don’t collapse on the couch after your long runs: “Walk a kilometre to the shop and then back home,” Honerkamp says, to learn to keep moving for at least another 10 to 15 minutes on tired legs. In a race with tens of thousands of finishers, long finishing chutes are common: in New York, for example, you have about

races donate cast-offs.) And don’t ditch your extras too early: in the biggest races, you may spend more than 15 minutes moving towards the starting line before you cross it. If possible, plan a postrace meeting with your family or friends, who can carry dry clothes, a snack, and anything else you need; that way, you can skip bag drop and pick-up, and clear pre-race security more quickly.

two kays between the finish line and where you can pick up your tog bag and exit Central Park. And at any big race, unless you scored a hotel room right near the finish, you’ll probably have to navigate crowded streets to get to where you’re staying. Grab some snacks on your way out of the finish area to start the refuelling process, Caplan says, since it may be a while before you get to your bag or celebration brunch.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 33


TRAINING

THE STARTING LINE

TIPS FOR BEGINNERS FROM AN EASY-GOING COACH

BY JEFF GALLOWAY

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. How much must I run to avoid starting from scratch in 2017? Ten to 15 minutes three times a week will keep your body adapted to the movement of running, though doing less than usual will cost you fitness. If you’re not going to meet your quota, don’t let it become a slippery slope – every day presents a fresh opportunity to get in a few kays. How can I keep my diet under control this holiday season?

FIT AND JOLLY!

Make time for even a few kilometres this holiday season. Life can get in the way of running at any time of the year, but holidays are especially challenging. Whether you’re hosting parties and visitors from out of town, or just attending get-togethers and travelling, a busy social calendar leaves less time for logging mileage. If you’re struggling, make your mantra ‘Something is better than nothing’, and try these tactics for keeping a routine intact. PLAN AHEAD If you look at your schedule, you can probably pinpoint windows during which you’re least likely to have other obligations usurp your running time. For many people, that’s first thing in the morning. If it’s before the sun rises, plan to run in a safe, well-lit area, or hit the treadmill. 34

REFRAME Think of your run not as an item on your to-do list, but as an activity that will destress you. Even a short run can improve your attitude and prepare you to tackle a busy day. You have to take care of yourself before you’re fully able to take care of others, and exercise is a great means of self-care.

JOIN OUR ONLINE TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR BEGINNERS AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /28DAYS

GO FOR FIVE Struggling with motivation? Tell yourself that you only need to run for five minutes. Once you’re dressed and out there, you may want to go longer. If not, you can run five and head home – it still beats doing nothing. TRY A WALK If running didn’t require changing and showering, it would be more time-​ efficient. You can get around both those steps by walking, and you can also include friends and family members who might not be up for a run. Walking by itself doesn’t deliver all the benefits run-walking does, but it helps you maintain some fitness when you’re strapped for time.

Track your food intake with an app or notepad. If you often eat more when stressed, try heading out for a run (or walk) as soon as you start feeling overwhelmed.

THE EXCUSE I have relatives visiting, so I can’t run until they’re gone. BEAT IT

Set your alarm 30 to 45 minutes early, and get out of the door before others arise. This way, you don’t have to sacrifice your run or time with your family. Put out your clothes and shoes the night before, to make the transition out of bed as smooth as possible.

PHOTOGRAPH BY EWALD SADIE


TRAINING

THE FAST LANE

TRAINING ADVICE FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE

BY ALEX HUTCHINSON

HOW TO RUN MORE LIKE THIS GUY Go faster and further using less energy with these strategies to boost efficiency.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDREA MANZATI

GET JUICED Beetroot juice has been the concoction of choice for distance runners since a 2009 study from British researchers at the University of Exeter showed it improved endurance. How? The high nitrate content of beetroot, along with other micronutrients, reduces the oxygen cost of exercise (another way of saying that it improves running economy) by as much as 3 per cent. In a cycling study, drinking beetroot juice before a race translated into faster 15-K race times by 2.7 per cent. Since beetroot juice upsets some stomachs, getting the timing and amount right takes trial and error (which you’ll want to do during your training cycle, not right before a race). A typical dose is 300ml of juice (or a 70ml ‘shot’ of concentrated juice); take one dose about two-and-a-half hours before your race or hard workout. For an extra boost, take another one the night before.

FREE YOUR MIND It’s tempting to make a conscious effort to run more smoothly, but that can backfire. In one German study, runners who were instructed to pay close attention to their breathing or to the movement of their feet had worse running economy than when they were simply told to watch the scenery around them. Running is a deceptively complicated series of movements, and you’re better off leaving most of them on autopilot. That doesn’t mean you should abandon all attempts to improve your form – just don’t fixate on it. Get a friend to watch (or film) you near the beginning and end of a hard run, and look for what changes when you’re tired. If you notice that you begin to hunch forward, for example, plan to check your posture after every kilometre and make adjustments if needed. Other­w ise, relax and enjoy the view.

FOR MORE TRAINING TIPS AND PL ANS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / TRAINING.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y G A L LO I M AG E S /G E T T Y I M AG E S

Eritrea’s Zersenay Tadese (above) ran the fastest half marathon ever – 58.23 – and is a four-time world champion at the distance. He’s also the most efficient runner ever tested. In a 2008 study by Spanish researchers, the superstar consumed just 150 millilitres of oxygen per kilogram of bodyweight for every kilometre he ran – about 30 per cent less than a typical three-hour marathoner, and 20 per cent better than previous efficiency champs like 1972 Olympic Marathon winner Frank Shorter. Unlike VO2 max, which reflects the maximum amount of oxygen you can consume, ‘running economy’ is a measure of how much oxygen you are consuming (and therefore how much energy you’re burning) to maintain a pace. Using less oxygen is a big advantage in long races – you’re saving more fuel for later in the race. While economy can only be measured in a laboratory, the real-world effects are clear: if two runners have the same VO2 max, the more economical runner will win. The simplest way to boost economy is to run a lot, but if you’re already doing that, there are subtler steps you can take to wring more speed from each breath.

TAKE A LEAP Your legs are like springs, coiling to store energy and then uncoiling to release it for the next stride. Since stiffer springs store more energy, it helps to have ‘stiff’ and springy leg muscles and tendons. One way to accomplish this is through plyometric training, which involves explosive movements like jumps. In a study published this year, runners who added plyometrics to their training for six weeks improved their economy and sliced 2.6 per cent off their 3-K times. Twice a week, before an easy run, do drop jumps: step off a low ledge, then leap as high as you can straight up, with both feet. Focus on making each jump powerful, rather than trying to do as many as possible. Start with two sets of five jumps off an 18-centimetre ledge (the height of a typical stair), and progress to up to six sets of 10 jumps, with the final two sets from a height of 0.5 metres.

35


TRAINING ASK THE EXPERTS

Can social media help my running? Yes – if you avoid comparing yourself to others. Instead, analyse what friends post. If someone shares a favourite interval routine or strength circuit, consider how it might boost your fitness. And if a friend gets hurt, their posts may clue you in to training mistakes you should avoid. – Lora Johnson is a running coach (crazyrunninggirl.com).

Is it okay to bounce between 15 and 50 weekly kilometres?

Avoid it if you can. Fluctuating this much puts your body on a distressing roller-coaster ride: One week you’re doing serious running – demanding a lot from your muscles, bones, and joints – and the next week you’re barely logging enough kays to stay fit. Stick to a tighter range, like 25 to 40 k i l o m e t r e s . T hi s allows your body to adapt to the stress of higher-mileage weeks during lower-​ mileage weeks without taking a step backwards. – Sara Sellitto is a running coach (runninginpink.com).

If you must ’gram a run, wait until you’re done: habitual mid-run breaks can hinder fitness gains.

36

That depends on your fitness level and goals. A new runner training for a 5-K, for example, should try to do at least a 20-minute run. More experienced athletes should aim for at least 30 minutes. But any kilometres you can squeeze in will boost your fitness (see ‘Fit and Jolly!’ on page 34). Frequent short runs, in fact, will help your body adapt to running better than infrequent long ones – so choose three 20-minute runs over a single weekly hour. – Larry Rich is a running coach (sweattracker.com/ coaching).

Age grading works two ways: it compares your time at a given distance to the world record for your age and sex (an age-graded score), and it calculates how fast you’d run given your current fitness if you were in your 20s (an age-graded time). This allows men and women of all ages to ‘compete’, and runners over 30 (the age when the body starts to lose muscle) to see how new times stack up to past PBs. For example, a 50-year-old woman’s 2:00 half marathon nets an age-graded score of 61.79 per cent (compared to the world record of 1:14.09) and an age-graded time of 1:45.31. If her PB was a 1:47 set at age 29, age-grading shows she’s fitter now, despite slowing with age. If she had set the same PB at age 40, that race would score 63.04 per cent – a better performance.

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

I’m training for a marathon, but I’m going on a skiing holiday in December and will miss some sessions. How can I minimise the impact? – LIAM, Muizenberg Most people take time off during the festive period. For some runners that means plenty of free time; but others might be so busy, they struggle to fit in any training at all. Should you skip running for one or two weeks in favour of a relaxing holiday, I can assure you it will have little to no impact on your running fitness. Plumping for an active holiday –

“…45 to 60 minutes, every second day…” like a ski trip, say! – will further reduce your loss, by helping you to maintain leg strength and cardiovascular fitness. Planning a longer, threeto four-week trip? Consider pushing your marathon out by two to three weeks – after all, it’s marathon season in South Africa, which almost guarantees you’ll find a suitable replacement. Another option would be to continue training while on holiday: reduce your mileage, by running for 45 to 60 minutes every second day, and treat skiing as a cross-training activity – although this option will probably mean finding a local gym with a treadmill, or travelling further down into the valley where the roads are clear of snow. Lindsey Parry is a qualified biokineticist, Two Oceans and Comrades silver medallist, and 2:47 marathoner. Email him at lindsey@ coachparry.com.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y CA S E Y C R A F F O R D

The Explainer What is ‘age grading’?

What’s the shortest run that’s worth doing?

ASK THE COACH Lindsey Parry


TRAINING

THE SPORT SCIENTIST

PROVEN STRATEGIES FROM A LEADING PHYSIOLOGIST

BY DR ROSS TUCKER

a thing as ‘running age’. Your biological age is obviously a powerful influence on your running performance. But your running age may interact with this in such a way that two 50-year-old Four to five: runners, for instance, the number of are different if one is in marathons you his 35th year of running need to run, in order to reach (having begun as a your peak. teenager), and the other is in his fifth. This can also be seen in elite marathon runners. The best predictor of an individual’s performance is not necessarily their age, but how many marathons they’ve run.

AGE DEFYING

What can an 85-year-old sub-four marathoner teach us about peak performance? In October this year, 85-year-old Ed Whitlock ran a marathon in 3:56.38. He has been described as an extraordinary freak of nature. But it’s worth noting that Whitlock’s time has dropped significantly since he set the marathon world record in the 80-84 age category (3:15.54). Furthermore, when he was 73, Whitlock broke three hours! There are interesting lessons in Whitlock’s progression. He hasn’t so much bucked the trend of getting slower with age; rather, he’s held on to his ability better than the rest of us. YEARS RUNNING Whitlock was a good runner in his early twenties – one of the best in England. But once he finished university he stopped running completely,

and took an almost-twentyyear break before he returned to running in his forties. That break, arguably, helped his longevity; because in addition to biological age, there is such

PHOTOGRAPH BY GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

NUMBER OF MARATHONS Whitlock’s outrageous subfour-hour marathon wasn’t the only Father-Time-defying marathon feat to happen in October. At the Berlin Marathon, Wilson Kipsang ran a close second behind the winner, Kenenisa Bekele. In so doing, he bucked a trend among elite marathon runners, who typically get slower once they’ve run around seven to eight marathons. Kipsang ran his marathon world record in his eighth attempt. Then he got progressively slower in his next four marathons, before running his fastest ever in number thirteen. You find that peak after five, but before 10, for many of the greatest marathon runners in history. Martin Lel had it. Wilson Kipsang looked like he would have it – until Berlin in October. Among former worldrecord holders, Paul Tergat was slightly earlier, running his world record in attempt number six. Patrick Makau ran his record in number five. The legendary Haile Gebrselassie fit the bill. He

ran his first world record in his seventh marathon, then another in his ninth; and then Father Time began to catch up with him, as he got progressively slower – even bagging a hat-trick of nonfinishes before retiring. THE CEILING The point is that the very best take time to become the very best, as they must learn both training and racing demands to peak. However, there’s a point at which they can’t get any better; and I suspect it’s because the demands of preparing for the marathon (training weeks that sometimes surpass 180 kilometres), plus the actual demands of the race, begin to add up. What will be interesting to see is how the current top two – Bekele, and Olympic champion Kipchoge – fare in the future. Bekele has run three, so he’s due to improve. Kipchoge has done eight, so the clock may just be ticking. But he’s so good that I wouldn’t be surprised to see him improve again in 2017. I’ve seen similar statistics for the general everyday runner too. Us mere mortals tend to run our best marathons in about our fourth or fifth attempt. This would be slightly earlier than the elites, because we’re not professionals, able to sleep and dedicate our time to performance. Plus, we may lose interest and focus, because of the demands of constantly pushing to be faster. But we can all aspire to be the next Ed Whitlock. RW Scientific Editor Dr Ross Tucker has a BSc (Med) (Hons) Exercise Science Degree and PhD from the Sports Science Institute. Visit him at www.sportsscientists.com.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 37


MIND+BODY

HIP, KNEE, ANKLE, FOOT Osteoarthritis The ‘wear-and-tear’ condition that occurs when cartilage breaks down over time. Blame genetics and biochemical responses (not necessarily running).

JOINT ACTION

How to minimise injury risk and keep your hips, knees, and ankles running strong

HIP Bursitis This friction syndrome is caused by inflammation of the bursa – the small sac of fluid that lubricates the muscles and tendons that run around the hip joint. ●

By AC Shilton

KNEE Patellofemoral pain (a.k.a. ‘runner’s knee’) Discomfort behind the kneecap (patella) caused by repetitive contact between the underside of your patella and your femur (thigh bone). ● Patellar tendinopathy Inflammation of the tendon that runs from the kneecap to the top of the tibia (one of two lower leg bones). The pain usually occurs at the bottom of the patella, especially when running downhill. ● Torn meniscus Cartilage on the inside and outside of the knee acts as bumpers between the femur and tibia. As you age, it becomes thinner and more susceptible to damage. ●

In the US, knee pain strikes as many as 2.5 million people annually. Running itself isn’t to blame – although running incorrectly can be.

ANKLE Achilles tendinopathy One of the most common sources of ankle pain, caused by inflammation of the largest tendon in the ankle. ● Ankle sprain When the foot and ankle turn in or out suddenly, the ligaments that stabilise the ankle joint can become damaged. ●

This is body paint! See how it was created at runnersworld.co.za/ bodypaint.

BIG TOE Bunion Under repetitive pressure, the big toe joint can move out of place, swell, and turn inward, causing a painful, bony protrusion.

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RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

B O DY PA I N T I N G B Y J E N A I C H I N F O R H A L L E Y R E S O U R C E S ; C LOT H I N G : B R I E F B Y CO U T U R E F I T N E S S W E A R B Y E L I S A B E T TA R O G I A N I AT R O G I A N I .CO M

LET’S GET THIS OUT OF THE WAY: running won’t ruin your knees, no matter what your smug, sedentary co-worker says. “There are three large studies that show long-term endurance running doesn’t seem to affect joint health,” says Dr Richard Willy, an assistant professor of physical therapy at East Carolina University in the US. In fact, runners may have healthier joints than their inactive counterparts, says Dr Max R. Paquette, an assistant professor of biomechanics at the University of Memphis. It’s well known that weightbearing exercises such as

What Hurts? Common ailments that sideline runners


running strengthen bone and muscle, and it’s believed that they might do the same for cartilage, the tissue that cushions joints. And strong muscles – built by running and strengthtraining (see page 40) – support joints so they are less vulnerable to injury. Yet there’s a condition called ‘runner’s knee’ for a reason. Patellofemoral pain (knee pain) is the most reported injury in the sport. Hip, ankle, and foot injuries happen too. But not because someone is running – it’s because he or she is running with flawed form or muscle imbalances (see right). So while you can rest assured that running is healthy for your entire body – joints included – it’s important to learn what causes joint pain. Taking steps to minimise the risk can help you keep running into your golden years.

WHY DOES MY KNEE ACHE? FORM FLAWS Willy says hip adduction – when the thigh moves inward from the hip mid-stride, causing a knock-kneed effect – is one of the most common sources of biomechanical-related knee pain. Overstriding is another. MUSCLE IMBALANCES This is intricately related to biomechanics, since muscle imbalances can cause poor biomechanics – and conversely, poor biomechanics can result in imbalanced muscle development. If you can’t do a single-leg squat without wobbling or having your knee dive in or out at a steep angle, you may have some glute or hip weaknesses that need attention, says Dr Keith Spain, a sports-medicine specialist at the Orthopaedic Group.

5 WAYS TO PROTECT YOUR JOINTS SHORTEN YOUR STRIDE “An increase in step rate of 5 to 10 per cent can reduce patellofemoral joint load by up to 20 per cent,” Willy says. Garmin’s foot pod or the MilestonePod can help you monitor your step rate. Willy says stride rates are highly individual, but it’s generally recommended to aim for 160 to 190 steps per minute. A word of warning: be careful not to accidentally change how your foot hits the ground. Shifting your footstrike pattern can change the load on your Achilles tendon. CHECK YOUR MECHANICS Although Willy doesn’t want you to change your foot strike, he does suggest having your running form evaluated if you suffer from joint pain – or if you’re really serious about preventing it. A physical

PROBABLE CAUSES OF THE PAIN

GENETICS While the link between running injuries and genetics is still unclear, Spain says that arthritis has a genetic component. “If your parents had arthritis, you’re more likely to have it,” he says. And while of course age is a factor, Spain says that getting old doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get arthritis. “I see 80-year-olds without any arthritic changes, and 50-year-olds with terrible arthritis.” GENDER Women are twice as likely to report knee pain as men, Willy says. But researchers aren’t entirely clear on why. “The hypothesis has been that women’s lower-extremity alignment places the knee in a position where it’s more susceptible to injury; I think there’s more to it than that, though,” says Paquette, adding

that subtle differences in women’s connective tissue make-up may also play a role. Pregnant women or women who have just given birth are also more susceptible to joint injuries, because ligaments relax to prepare for childbirth. UNKNOWN FACTORS Pain is something researchers are still working to understand better, says Willy, adding that joint-related pain seems to be individual. “Two runners with the same biomechanics can go through the same training programme, and one gets injured but the other doesn’t,” he says. “We really don’t know exactly why that happens.” He says that variables such as sleep quality, nutrition, and even psychosocial factors – such as fear of getting injured – may contribute.

Pop a Pill?

REDUCE THE LOAD

therapist who works with runners should be able to detect issues such as hip adduction and overstriding – and instruct you on how to correct them. In research he conducted in 2012, Willy found that runners with knee pain who did eight gaitretraining sessions had less knee pain when re-evaluated months later. WATCH YOUR WEIGHT Runners often complain of more joint aches and pains as they age, and one contributing factor can be weight gain. Dr Paul DeVita, director of the Bio­m echanics Laboratory at East Carolina University in the US, has conducted research that links excess weight with increased knee load – and possible injury risk – in runners. “Many of us are simply too heavy for our joints,” Spain says.

REPLACE WORN SHOES The verdict is still out on what footwear is best for reducing joint load. Both Willy and Paquette say you need to find out what works best for you. When you do get a new pair, it’s key to break them in with a few short runs before going long in them. “The exposure to a new shoe after being in an old one could potentially be a risk factor for injury,” Paquette says. MIX IT UP Changing where and how loads are placed on joints may keep injuries at bay. “Runners who always do the same thing every day are more at risk,” Willy says. “Change the surface, your route, and your tempo, and crosstrain. The more variable your movements, the less you stress your tissues.”

You’ve undoubtedly seen the rows of glucosamine supplements at the chemist, and wondered if they help. While you’ll find plenty of people who swear by them, the data-​driven answer seems to be mixed. For a 2015 study published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, researchers gave 605 subjects with knee pain either glucosaminechondroitin or a placebo. After two years, both groups reported reductions in knee pain in equal levels – meaning the glucosamine had worked no better than a sugar pill. This builds on previous research. A few studies have found that glucosamine could possibly slow arthritic changes. Still, most docs will tell you to keep extra kilograms off, strength-train regularly, and shorten your stride.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 39


MIND+BODY THE BODY SHOP

STRONG MUSCLES, HEALTHY JOINTS Six best exercises to support your hips, knees, and ankles

EXPERTS AGREE that one of the most important things a runner can do to prevent joint pain is to incorporate regular strength work into their training routine. Strengthening exercises condition muscles, tendons, bone, and cartilage so that they can better tolerate the stress of running. The exercises here, provided by Mark Temme, a physical therapist who works with runners, work the muscles that support your hip, knee, and ankle joints. Temme prescribes single-leg exercises to runners because “running is simply a series of one-legged squats,” he says. “You’ve got to strengthen your legs in a way that has a functional carryover to your sport.” He recommends doing this routine two or three times a week. Once you can do these exercises comfortably with proper form, add weight. Temme says that runners should work up to being able to do six to eight repetitions with a weight that is heavy enough so that the last few repetitions in a set are difficult. This helps mimic the stress load placed on the body while running. – AC Shilton

SINGLE-LEG LUNGE Stand in front of a bench or chair and place your left foot on it. Squat down until your right thigh is parallel with the ground. Beginners should start with 10 repetitions (on each side), with the goal of working up to 20 repetitions. MAKE IT HARDER Once you can do 20 reps with proper form, hold dumbbells. SINGLE-LEG DEADLIFT Stand on your left leg. Keeping your back straight, bend forward and reach for the ground. Return to standing and repeat. Start with 10 reps (on each side), with the goal of working up to 20 reps. MAKE IT HARDER Once you can do 20 reps with proper form, hold dumbbells. SINGLE-LEG CALF RAISE Stand on your right leg – feel free to touch a wall or chair for balance. Slowly lift up onto your toes, then lower down. Work up to 30 reps on each leg. MAKE IT HARDER Once you can do 30 reps on each leg with proper form – and not using anything for balance – you can hold dumbbells. SINGLE-LEG BRIDGE Lie with knees bent and arms extended out. Straighten your right leg. Tighten your glutes and lift your hips. Hold for a few seconds, then lower. Work up to 25 repetitions on each leg. MAKE IT HARDER Once you can do 25 reps on each leg with proper form, fold your arms across your chest. SIDE LEG LIFT Lie on your side with your legs extended out. Lift your right leg up slowly, then lower it slowly. Do not allow your pelvis to roll forward or backward. Work up to 30 repetitions on each side. MAKE IT HARDER Once you can do 30 reps with proper form, wear ankle weights.

C LOT H I N G : R E E B O K B R A , N E W BA L A N C E S H O R T S , 36 1 ˚ S H O E S

SIDE PLANK Start on your left side. Tighten your abs and lift your hips up. Hold for 30 seconds, then relax. Switch sides and repeat, aiming for five reps on each side. MAKE IT HARDER Lift your top leg while in the plank position.

40

SEE THESE EXERCISES IN MOTION AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /HEALTHYJOINTS.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL


FUEL EXPIRES NEVER The science of sports nutrition has evolved, but these classic products still get the job done. By Kelly Bastone

marathon without drinking anything along the way, yet that was the status quo until the 1960s. “People thought that drinking cold beverages while running would give you a side stitch,” says 1968 Boston Marathon winner and Runner’s World Editor-atLarge Amby Burfoot. Eating on the run? Unthinkable. “The concept of sports nutrition didn’t exist as it does today,” says US sports nutrition manufacturer Bill Gamber, who became so famished during Ironmans in the ’80s that he would devour a whole barbecued chicken after crossing the finish line. Science has since helped runners understand the power of proper fuelling, and today, sports nutrition has become a multi-billionrand industry. While runners turn to their favourite brands, the principles are the same: simple carbohydrates, electrolytes, caffeine, carbto-protein ratio, and protein for recovery. Here’s a look at some major milestones – how they came to be, and their value to runners today.

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RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

1965 SPORTS DRINKS

Until the 1960s, athletes didn’t understand the importance of hydration, and marathoners weren’t allowed to drink water before the halfway mark. But when a football coach asked researcher Dr Robert Cade (a 4.20-miler in high school), how players might get a competitive edge in hot weather, Cade suggested a cocktail of sucrose, glucose, sodium, potassium, and phosphate (sugar and electrolytes). “The early version had too much sodium for runners,” says Burfoot, who participated in a 1970 study. Soon his team started winning – and sports drinks have since turned into a $13 billion (around R181 billion) business. TODAY’S TAKE “Carbs increase fluid absorption, keep you focused, and delay fatigue,” says registered dietician Kim Larson, US Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson. Drink up on runs over 60 minutes.

1978 COFFEE

Starting in the late 1970s, Dr David Costill (the first researcher to investigate whether sports drinks actually worked) and others started publishing studies suggesting that caffeine could boost endurance. Marathoners responded by drinking coffee before races. When they hit the market in 2008, Extreme Sport Beans became one of the first caffeinated sports nutrition products, with 50 milligrams of caffeine per pouch. Now you can get a kick from sports drinks, chews, and gels. TODAY’S TAKE Recent studies confirm that caffeine keeps your mind sharp, releases free fatty acids (which spare glycogen stores and help you run longer), makes hard efforts feel easier, and isn’t a diuretic. While some runners drink coffee only on race days for a boost, try it first in training so you’ll know how it affects you.

1986 ENERGY BARS

Brian Maxwell was a top-ranked Canadian marathoner in the late ’70s and early ’80s when he started experimenting with portable carb sources that could sustain his bloodsugar levels in the later stages of races. He and his partner started distributing logs of oats, sugar, and protein, which became popular with Tour de France cyclists, and then the rest of the world. Competitors soon followed Maxwell’s PowerBar, and now scores of brands target everyone from ultrarunners to desk jockeys. TODAY’S TAKE There’s a bar for every runner, whether vegan or Paleo. Brands like RaceFood and Biogen emphasise whole foods. Watch the sugar content – some are sweets in disguise. Before your run, look for a bar that’s high in carbs, moderate in protein, and low in fat, says Larson. Post-run, go for a bar that’s high in carbs and protein.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDREW JOYCE

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I TC H M A N D E L ( TOA S T, E N E R GY D R I N K ) ; T H O M A S M AC D O N A L D ( WAT E R ); I S TO C K P H OTO (CA K E )

YOU’D BE CRAZY to run a


Oops! Not for Consumption Today, distance runners know to refuel with 30 to 60 grams of carbs every 45 to 60 minutes on runs over an hour.

AREN’T YOU GLAD YOU NEVER TOOK THIS ADVICE? 1809 Captain Barclay Allardyce, a longdistance trekker (precursor to today’s trail runners), told athletes to eat mainly meat (beef and mutton) and to avoid liquids as much as possible – except for liquor (if served cold) and beer (if home-brewed and unbottled) – during their events.

1902 1992 ENERGY GELS

Back in the day, runners sucked on honey during races for a quick hit of sugar. By the late ’80s, gooey formulations from the UK and New Zealand became popular among Ironman competitors. But it wasn’t until 1992, when GU debuted, that gels really took off. GU founder Bill Vaughan, a runner himself, sought a portable fuel that would release its energy faster than existing bars. His blend of complex and simple sugars with amino acids (the building blocks of protein) gave endurance runners a turbo boost. But in some cases, the high sugar concentration also led to indigestion, which triggered GI panic. TODAY’S TAKE Gels are easy to carry on long runs and have the perfect amount of kilojoules and carbs. Take with water to help dilute the sugar concentration, says exercise physiologist and marathon coach Patti Finke.

2006 CHOCOLATE MILK

Amid the proliferation of formulated nutrition, researchers delivered some surprising news: cow’s milk offered the ideal recovery formula, especially if it included a little chocolate syrup. The research (from the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism) found that protein-rich chocolate milk was better at promoting recovery than energy drinks. The news made runners’ guilty pleasure seem like a superfood, and it suggested that whole foods could be just as beneficial as lab creations. Chocolate milk not only has the 4:1 ratio of carbs to protein that’s optimal for recovery; it’s also cheap, hydrating (providing fluids and electrolytes), and tasty. TODAY’S TAKE Subsequent studies have confirmed this classic drink replenishes carb stores and repairs muscles. Aim for 250ml within 30 minutes post-run.

2012 BILTONG

Runners’ growing preference for unprocessed foods – and an urge to clean up, after our 20-year sugar bender – helped launch the Paleo diet and other low-carb eating strategies into popularity. Sports foods and drinks started including various amounts of protein, and runners took to snacking on beef and ostrich. TODAY’S TAKE “While we’re not as dependent on carbs as we once thought, midrun protein can cause GI distress,” says Larson. What recent science has confirmed is that protein is most beneficial when it’s distributed throughout the day, rather than concentrated in one dose. Follow a recovery meal with a biltong snack several hours later. Or after a long run or marathon, eat two or more protein-rich meals. “The recovery process after hard efforts lasts for 24 to 48 hours,” says Larson.

Middle-distance runner E.C. Bredin deemed toast a better fuel than bread.

1950s Per coaches’ advice, Australian sprinter Shirley Strickland shunned soft foods and fluids the day before and on race day. After competition, she’d guzzle as much as four litres of water.

1985 Nathan Pritikin’s book Diet for Runners touted a high-carb diet (80 per cent of total kilojoules). Runners took that to mean carbs plus fat, like cake and ice cream.

2010 Energy drinks were advertised to have the same benefits as sports drinks. Scientific research said no way.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 43


FUEL

FRIDGE WISDOM

NUTRITION ADVICE FOR HEALTHY, HUNGRY RUNNERS

BY DR LIZ APPLEGATE

BEST BITES

Thirty years of truth about diet plans, weight loss, and mid-run fuelling IN 1986 I wrote my first column for Runner’s World,

covering sports drinks and hydration. Over the years, my columns have been based on the latest scientific research available. And while performance nutrition has undoubtedly changed – even flip-flopped – these are steadfast truths to keep in your fuel belt.

Taking photos of your meals is an easy and accurate way to see how much you’re eating. The Meal Snap app actually gives you a kilojoule count.

logging 40km a week and eating 9 600kJ a day needs about 70 to 100g of protein, 250 to 350g of carbs, and 30 to 70g of fat. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT Training runs prepare you for race day. But you also have to practise your nutrition. Research shows that you can teach your body to better absorb carbs by trying your fuelling routines before your race. Too often, marathoners try to consume carbs every 30 to 60 minutes (which is good!) during their race, but haven’t trained their stomach for this type of constant fuelling. WHAT TO DO Practise your midrun nutrition – 30 to 60g of carbs every hour. Try the drinks and gels (if any) that will be offered on the racecourse, and take note of what works. DON’T (ALWAYS) BELIEVE THE HYPE Superfoods (such as kale, blueberries, and sweet potatoes) are called super

44 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

A MARATHON, NOT A SPRINT On the road, you want to be fast. But to sustain lifelong healthy weight, patience and consistency are key. Strategies for weight loss and maintenance have changed based on research, but the bottom line is the same: burn more kilojoules than you consume. Studies show that those who keep their fit figure are consistent with their fitness routines (60 minutes of daily physical activity), avoid dieting extremes (don’t ditch carbs!), and have balanced nutrition. WHAT TO DO Keep tabs on weight fluctuations. That will help you curb weight gain by seeing which lifestyle changes contributed to the creep.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY

FOOD STYLING BY ED GABRIELS FOR HALLEY RESOURCES

THERE IS NO ‘MAGIC’ PLAN What you eat depends not just on factors such as gender, age, fitness, and genetics, but also on your training plan and goals. This means your recommended range of macronutrients (carbs, protein, fat) changes – which we now call periodised performance eating. Start with nutrition articles (like mine!), but tailor the advice to fit your body’s demands. WHAT TO DO Keep a log and take photos of your training diet during your low-mileage and higherintensity seasons. Use a health-tracker app to better understand your intake of kilojoules and macronutrient breakdown. For example, a 68kg runner

for a reason: nutrientpacked foods have health benefits – but an all-kale diet won’t make you the next Olympian (sorry!). The same goes for supplements. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. WHAT TO DO Eat kale, blueberries, and sweet potatoes. But also check the validity of sky-high claims with credible sources: the US Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition (scandpg.org).


FUEL

QUICK BITES

COOL SOUP!

THAI CARROT SOUP

Carrots are packed with vitamin A for a healthy immune system. TOSS 450g peeled and chopped carrots, 1 seeded and quartered yellow pepper, 2 peeled shallots, and 4 peeled cloves garlic with 1 Tbsp. olive oil. ROAST at 200°C for 30 minutes. Allow to cool, then blend with 1 cup low-sodium vegetable broth, 1 tin light coconut milk, a 2.5cm piece peeled fresh ginger, 1 Tbsp. honey, juice of 1 lime, 2 tsp. curry powder, and a couple of pinches salt, until smooth. CHILL for at least 2 hours; serve with 1 tsp. chopped, unsalted roasted peanuts and 1 tsp. coriander. Makes 4 servings.

Rehydrate with a fruit- or veggie-packed bowl of chilly goodness.

By registered dietician Matthew Kadey

Thai Carrot

RASPBERRY GAZPACHO

Avocado Basil

LEMON-BLUEBERRY SOUP

Blueberries supply key antioxidants for body AND brain health. SIMMER 4 cups fresh or frozen blueberries, 1 cup water, 2 Tbsp. honey, ½ tsp. cinnamon, ½ tsp. ground ginger, and pinch of salt until berries burst, about 5 minutes. PUREE soup with zest of 1 lemon and juice of ½ lemon in a blender, then strain through a fine sieve back into pan. WHISK together 1 cup almond milk with 1  ½ Tbsp. cornstarch; stir into blueberry mixture and simmer until slightly thickened, stirring often. CHILL for at least 2 hours and serve topped with 1 Tbsp. toasted coconut flakes. Makes 4 servings.

Vitamins and minerals in fruits and vegetables help speed post-run recovery.

LemonBlueberry

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

Traditional gazpacho can decrease blood pressure, and the raspberry twist adds sweetness and fibre. PLACE ½ cup water, 4 chopped medium tomatoes, 1  ½ cups raspberries, 1 cup Peppadew (sweet piquanté) peppers, ½ peeled and chopped English cucumber, 1  ½ tsp. fresh thyme, 2 chopped spring onions, 1 chopped clove garlic, 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar, and ¼ tsp. each salt and pepper in a blender. BLEND until slightly chunky. With machine running on low speed, slowly drizzle in 2 Tbsp. olive oil. CHILL at least 2 hours and serve with 2 tsp. crumbled feta. Makes 6 servings.

CORN YOGHURT SOUP

Corn Yoghurt

Raspberry Gazpacho

AVOCADO BASIL SOUP

Help your heart with avocado’s healthy fats, and your gut with kefir, which is rich in probiotics. BLEND together 1  ½ cups water, 1  ½ cups plain kefir or yoghurt, 2 small avocados, 1 chopped green pepper, ½

chopped English cucumber, 1 cup basil, 2 chopped spring onions, 1 chopped clove garlic, 1 seeded and chopped jalapeño chilli, juice of ½ lime, and ½ tsp. kosher salt, until smooth. With machine running on low speed, slowly drizzle in 2 Tbsp. olive oil. CHILL at least 2 hours, and serve each with 1  ½ tsp. roasted pumpkin seeds and ½ tsp. chopped chives. Makes 6 servings.

Boost protein by serving soup with a toasted cheese or tuna sandwich on whole-grain bread.

The lutein found in corn can protect and improve eye health. SLICE off kernels from 3 corn cobs (or use 3 cups frozen corn). BLEND kernels with 1 chopped medium butternut, 1 chopped yellow pepper, 1 cup plain Greek yoghurt, ¾ cup low-sodium vegetable broth, juice of ½ lemon, 1 chopped shallot, 2 chopped cloves garlic, ½ tsp. cumin, ¼ tsp. chilli powder, and ¼ tsp. salt, until smooth. CHILL at least 2 hours, and serve with 1  ½ tsp. pesto. Makes 6 servings.

FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA AND PREP VIDEOS, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /SOUP

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GEAR of the YEAR IT’S BEEN A GREAT YEAR FOR GEAR: NEW BRANDS HAVE HIT SOUTH AFRICAN SHORES, SHOES HAVE BECOME MORE INNOVATIVE, PRODUCTS WE LOVE HAVE HAD AWESOME UPDATES, AND THERE ARE MORE OPTIONS FOR RUNNERS TO CHOOSE FROM THAN EVER BEFORE. HERE ARE OUR TOP PICKS FROM 2016. BY RYAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES GARAGHTY

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 47


GEAR

BEST Trail Shoes: ALTRA SUPERIOR 2.0

The Superior 2.0 is low-profile, flexible, and moulds to your foot – both on top and underneath – like a moccasin, allowing you to glide lightly over the trail. It also has excellent cushioning, which protects your feet from feeling beaten up. This year Altra added three millimetres of foam to the midsole, and gave this edition a more aggressive tread. They also reduced the weight by more than 30 grams – by using lighter foam, and putting fewer overlays on the upper – and yet it’s lost none of its flexibility. This malleability, combined with the wide forefoot and low heel, keeps you stable despite the soft feel underfoot. 258g

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GEAR

FOOTWEAR BEST FOR... 5-K 01/ ADIDAS ADIZERO ADIOS 3 It was going to be difficult to improve on the adiZero Adios 2 – the shoe worn by Dennis Kimetto, the fastest marathoner ever, with a time of 2:02.57 at the Berlin Marathon in 2014. But this year testers confirmed that the 2016 update of the popular racer is even better. The midsole remains consistent: a fulllength slab of springy Boost foam is rimmed with firm foam around the top, which adds a bit of stability and creates a fast-rolling feel. adidas tweaked the outsole, wrapping the forefoot in a thin, waffle-cut layer of stretchy Continental rubber, improving flexibility, traction, and durability. Testers also reported that the mesh-and-suede-like upper feels softer and fits larger feet than previous versions. 232g

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21-K 02/ NEWTON GRAVITY V The five lugs under the Gravity V are tuned to deliver the highly responsive ride of early Newton shoes, making this our middle-distance fast-feel shoe of the year; one that still delivers plenty of cushioning in both heel and forefoot. This update refines the upper, most noticeably in the panels on each side at the ball of the foot. Testers said this produced the feeling of a wide toe-box within a snug overall fit. 275g

MARATHON 03/ ASICS DYNAFLYTE FlyteFoam – the same midsole compound featured in the Kayano – gives the DynaFlyte a soft-butlightweight undercarriage. Asics reports the material is 55 per cent lighter than its traditional foams, yet we found it delivers cushioning on par with the heavier Cumulus and Nimbus. “It’s a versatile trainer with a responsive feel,” said a tester from Gauteng, who raced a 1:27 half marathon in it during testing. 266g

02 04

ULTRA MARATHON 04/ BROOKS GLYCERINE G13 Brooks made a good shoe great with this 2016 update to its premier neutral-cushioning model. With no reduction in cushioning, Brooks deepened the grooves in the midsole, significantly improving the flexibility and creating a shoe that coddles while delivering high performance. “Overall, it provided both comfort and support,” said Joe Brown, from Bedfordview. “Usually, comfort shoes are too squishy.” The unique upper won unanimous praise. It stretches and moulds around your foot, letting it flex where it wants to, with printed overlays and a more substantial mid-foot wrap providing support where needed. 312g DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 49


GEAR FITNESS MONITOR 05/ F ITBIT BLAZE Activity and health trackers have become firmly entrenched in our everyday lives. In response, we tested a device you can wear all day and run with comfortably. Not only does the Blaze measure all the necessary metrics you’d expect; it also includes a nifty heart-rate monitor, which doesn’t need to be strapped awkwardly to your chest in order to give an accurate reading. The flexibility of both touchscreen and buttons makes for a simple but effective user experience. But the best thing about this activity tracker is how it looks: thin and stylish.

TECH 06

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INNOVATION 06/ BELT LIGHT ULTRASPIRE LUMEN 600 We’re familiar with Ultraspire’s hydration systems and carriers; but this year the brand introduced an impressive 600-lumen light, which is attached to a belt that’s also useful for carrying essentials. The light is mounted on the waist, and is far stronger than other lights we’ve tested all year.

WEARABLE TECH 07/ SAMSUNG ICONX EARBUDS These buds are the future – not just of audio, but also of fitness tracking. They’re waterproof, cordfree, and feature an ambient-sound mode, which means you’re still able to hear what’s happening in your surroundings while you’re listening to music. The buds have the capacity to store up to 4GB of music themselves, but you can also stream music from your phone via Bluetooth. Using smartphone connectivity, you can monitor your heart rate and fitness activity – from your ear, to your screen.

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UPDATE 08/ TOMTOM SPARK If you want to listen to music while you run, that usually means carrying a smartphone or an MP3 player. But the new TomTom exercise watch has an in-built capacity to store up to 500 tracks, and it’s easy to navigate. It also has Bluetooth capability, so you can connect wireless earphones.

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GEAR

BESTGPS: GARMIN FORERUNNER 630

Often the flagship GPS watch for a brand is huge; bulky and heavy to the point that wearing it when you’re not running is not an attractive proposition. This top GPS running watch has all the metrics you need and more, looks plausible as an everyday watch, and weighs just 44 grams. If you’re not using it for training, the battery lasts for four weeks; in exercise mode, 16 hours. Testers also enjoyed the goal-orientated functions, which are easy to operate.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 51


BEST Jacket: NORTH FACE STORM STOW JACKET In 2016, The North Face took their brand to another level in South Africa. This 140-gram, fully-waterproof jacket is one of the pinnacle items in the range. The jacket packs into the left sleeve and can be easily stowed away in your tog bag. The hood can also be packed away, and has an adjustable ripcord for optimum fit when in use. There’s another adjustable ripcord at the back – below the shoulder blades, and about midway up the jacket – that gives it an extra-tight fit in blustery conditions.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y ?? ?

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GEAR

BODY WEAR

UNDERWEAR 09/ UNDER ARMOUR

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Like The North Face, Under Armour has upped their game in South Africa, and produced our favourite item of men’s underwear this year. Three different fabrics all deliver on comfort and durability, while remaining thin enough to wear under any choice of running shorts. The comfortable, thick waistband, together with the crotch section and leg panelling, keep the underwear in place – no slipping or creeping.

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SOCKS 10/ INJINJI RUN LIGHTWEIGHT NO SHOW

Injinji socks have been our favourite since we first tried them three years ago, and remain a foot sensation every runner should experience. Those nasty little pieces of toenail that dig into the tender skin of a neighbouring toe become a non-issue, and the level of comfort is as good as it gets.

DEBUT 11/ STANCE SOCKS FUSION RUN 448 AND WOMEN’S FUSION RUN CREW

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Since featuring the Stance socks, we’ve spotted creative colours and longer lengths more frequently, on both trail and road. In 2016, the brand introduced great designs to brighten up any run – we’ve had a sneak peek at the 2017 range, which promises to be equally creative and fun.

VALUE 12/ PUMA EXPANDABLE WAIST BELT

Many runners can’t bring themselves to strap a smartphone carry-case to their upper arm, because it feels uncomfortable and doesn’t look fashionable. This year testers were elated when we presented them with this alternative option, and it quickly became a favourite. Stretch fabric keeps the phone firmly in place – although it’s not robust enough for clumsy runners in the habit of accidentally dropping their phones.

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DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 53


GEAR

BEST Newcomer: HOKA ONE ONE CLIFTON 3 Hoka is a brand already entrenched in American and European running culture, and offers footwear options suitable for both road and trail. In January 2017, this shoe – pronounced ‘Ho-kuh Oh-nay Oh-nay’, which is Maori for ‘to fly over the earth’ – will be released in South Africa. But we loved testing the shoe so much that we couldn’t resist showing it to you one last time. The shoe’s signature oversized soft-stack height has caused a stir in the market. But despite its bulky appearance, it’s surprisingly lightweight, and the forefoot is roomy.

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GEAR

STYLE BOTTOMS – MEN 13/ NIKE DRI-FIT 3-INCH SHORTS

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They almost float around the waist, buttocks and thighs. The combination of a wide, tight waistband, seamless leg openings, and short length makes for a comfortable fit.

BOTTOMS – WOMEN 14/ FREDDY SUPERFIT The special, heart-shaped cut accentuates the buttocks, and a high-quality stretch fabric smoothes and shapes the hips and thighs. But those aren’t the only reasons these tights proved to be the jewel of 2016 – a subtly-placed collection of Swarovski crystals above the left ankle elevates this pair to a new level of running chic.

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EYEWEAR 15/ ADIDAS ZONYK PRO The 2016 Olympic Games in Rio produced some incredible performances – one of which was achieved by sporting brand adidas, when they created this eyewear specifically for the Games. Don’t be fooled by the ‘lifestyle’ design; this pair is sport-specific, and features a wide field of vision, a lightweight frame made of adidas SPX™ material, and traction grip on the inside of the arms to prevent the glasses from slipping. Big style, hefty price tag.

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POST-RACE GEAR 16/ ADIDAS Z.N.E. HOODIE This stylish and functional hoodie made a statement – the only available colour in 2016 was white. The design was based on feedback adidas received from their impressive list of sponsored athletes. The hoodie accommodates on-trend over-the-ear headphones, extends a little further past the face than most, and zips up to cover the mouth. The idea is to help top performers stay focused on their event. All those tricks aside, the tapered cut, extra room at the shoulders, and narrower waist make it the most impressive piece of clothing we’ve seen this year. Look out for more of this standard from adidas in 2017.

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GEAR

BEST Pack:

SALOMON S-LAB SENSE ULTRA SET The neatest little pack we’ve ever tested. It doesn’t include a reservoir; instead, liquids are carried solely in two 500-millilitre soft bottles (sold separately), which can be easily inserted into the pouches on the shoulder straps, and accessed quickly on the run. The pack moulds to the shape of your body, so choosing the correct size is essential. I tested the pack in summer conditions in the Alps. It fitted like a second skin, and could be worn without a top underneath it. It’s really soft, and feels more like a top than a pack. Two chest straps ensure lock-down, which means the pack doesn’t bounce around, even when it’s full.

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GIFTS BOOK 17/ SHOE DOG The story of Nike, as written by founder Phil Knight. He borrowed $50 (around R670) from his father to start his own company, selling shoes from his car boot. Since then Nike has blossomed into one of the world’s most iconic brands, achieving sales of over $30 billion (around R400 billion) a year. If you’re a runner, you probably have or have had a pair of Swoosh in your cupboard.

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CHRISTMAS-STOCKINGFILLER 18/ RACE NUTZ These magnetic race-number fasteners work just as well as safety pins. Made from two separate pieces of plastic, the mechanism wedges a piece of your running top into place at each corner of your race number. Not ideal for very delicate fabric – but then, neither are safety pins.

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THE SPF MENU Running outside leaves skin more vulnerable to the

risks of summer sun, but our menu provides the key nutrients

that will protect your outer layer from the inside. WORDS VERONIKA RUFF TAYLOR ● PHOTOGRAPHY HEARST STUDIOS

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y D E A L ( S U N G L A S S E S : OA K L E Y E V P R I Z M R OA D)

BEARING FRUIT Limes can help protect your skin and keep it looking good.

You know the basics of sun protection: slather on a waterproof sunscreen well before you head out for your run; wear a hat and sunglasses; cover as much skin as you can stand; and ideally, run before 10am or after 4pm (when the sun is less intense). But runners – who are particularly susceptible to skin damage caused by sun exposure – need to do more to look after their skin. Skin cancer is among the most common forms of the disease. And an Austrian study found marathon runners have an increased risk for melanoma – the most dangerous form of skin cancer – thanks to a double whammy of increased sun exposure and suppressed immune function caused by high-intensity training. But all types of runners who enjoy summer runs are more at risk of skin cancer, because sweat causes your skin to absorb more harmful ultraviolet rays, according to the US Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund. However, research suggests runners can further protect their skin by focusing on diet. “Food alone will not protect your skin,” says Rachel Weinstein, a holistic health coach who runs Wooden Spoon Wellness. “But studies have shown some foods can better support your largest organ than others.” Load up on the foods on the pages that follow to boost your body’s sun defences. DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 59


TOMATOES

Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant – it helps prevent DNA damage that can result from sun exposure. It’s found in red fruits and vegetables – watermelon, strawberries, red peppers, and – in its highest concentrations – in cooked and tinned tomatoes. Adding 55g of tomato paste to your daily diet – pizza, anyone? – could cut your risk for sunburn and increase your skin’s natural sun protection by one third, according to research conducted at the Universities of Manchester and Newcastle in the UK, and published in the British Journal of Dermatology. And research by the US National Cancer Institute found that when it comes to lowering your melanoma risk, the more lycopene you eat, the better. So load up on watermelon and strawberries, be generous with the tomato sauce, and go big on small, fresh tomatoes. “Smaller tomatoes, like Roma, pack in more lycopene than larger beefsteak tomatoes,” says Weinstein. TEA AND COFFEE

International Journal of Cancer, found that people who had previously suffered from skin cancer who ate at least one serving of antioxidant-rich leafy greens per day cut their risk of developing new growths by more than 50 per cent. And a large-scale study from Italy found a correlation between number of servings of dark leafy greens consumed per week, and risk of developing melanoma. In short, the more you eat, the greater the protection. PAWPAW

“We often hear about pawpaw or papaya in skin creams and scrubs, but it also offers a number of benefits to your skin when eaten,” says Weinstein. “Pawpaw is rich in nutrients, such as beta carotene and Vitamin C, so it delivers similar anti-ageing benefits to those you get from tomatoes and citrus fruit. Pawpaw also contains enzymes that reduce inflammation in the body and aid with digestion, so it helps your body to absorb many nutrients.” Research published in Experimental & Therapeutic Medicine earlier this year found that participants who took a supplement made from papaya (FPP, or fermented papaya preparation) twice a day for 90 days showed a ‘significant improvement in skin evenness, moisturisation and elasticity’.

Your morning pick-me-up of choice can also give your skin a boost. Various teas have been found to fight skin ageing through both antioxidant (e.g. rooibos) and antiinflammatory effects, and research has also DARK CHOCOLATE shown that drinking at least a cup of black Highly palatable research has shown three tea per day can help cut risk of squamous squares of dark chocolate a day may keep cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer. your skin healthier and looking younger. A A study reviewed in the journal Clinics study published in Nutrition Journal found in Dermatology found that EGCG, one of the flavonoids in dark chocolate help fight the major polyphenol compounds found ageing caused by UV damage. After eating in green tea, reverses UV-induced sun damage. Getting a little more exotic, lotus seed tea was recently found to ‘drastically’ protect skin from a loss of moisture caused by UV exposure, according to a study published in Preventive Nutrition and Food Science. The hard truth for those with a sweet tooth If you’re more of a coffee drinker, your chosen brew can However, you If you’re eating to save glycation, sugars your skin becomes also help protect your skin from your skin, you need attach to proteins in less supple and more don’t need to avoid the elements – especially if you to pay close attention your bloodstream, vulnerable to sun all sugars. The natural drink a lot of it. A Norwegian study when it comes to f o r m i n g h a r m f u l damage. A study in sugars found in fruit published in the International the dessert menu. n e w m o l e c u l e s the British Journal of are less damaging to Journal of Cancer found women M u l t i p l e s t u d i e s called AGEs. These Dermatology found the skin, and fruits who drink five or more cups of have directly linked molecules damage t h a t t h e a g e i n g often contain the coffee per day were less likely to sugar consumption the proteins that effects of these AGEs beneficial antioxidants develop melanoma. t o p r e m a t u r e keep your skin firm, i n c r e a s e r a p i d l y needed to fight sun

IT’S NOT JUST DESSERT

SPINACH

Dark-green leafy veg, such as spinach and kale, contain powerful cancer-fighting antioxidants. One Australian study, published in the 60 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

ageing of the skin. A natural process called glycation is to blame. During

including collagen and elastin. As your collagen and elastin proteins are damaged,

after the age of 35. Several studies have also linked glucose to melanoma.

damage. So: step away from the biscuit tin, and head for the fruit bowl.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ???


LYCOPENE HELPS PREVENT DNA DAMAGE FROM THE SUN.

PASS THE KETCHUP! (But put it on your chips, not your skin.)

three 10g pieces of dark chocolate per day for 12 weeks, the elasticity of participants’ skin was greatly improved. But before you embark on a guilt-free Dairy Milk binge, it’s important to note that the type of chocolate matters: the study found the higher concentrations of flavonoids found in darker chocolate led to greater skin elasticity. “Chocolate is most often mixed with sugar – sometimes a lot of sugar – as well as fillers and binders such as hydrogenated oils and soy lecithin, which can inflame your system,” says Weinstein. “The more pure the chocolate – think 70 per cent cocoa and above – the lower the sugar, and the fewer the additives, the more benefits you will receive.” PRAWNS AND CRAYFISH

The same Italian research that championed leafy greens found eating at least one serving of fatty fish or shellfish per week could double your melanoma protection. And shellfish – such as prawns and crayfish – contain both high amounts of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids and a second skin-saving nutrient: a powerful carotenoid called astaxanthin. Astaxanthin gives these shellfish their distinctive reddish-pink colour, and has been found to fight inflammation and cancer up to 10 times more powerfully than other antioxidant carotenoids, according to a review published in the Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. CITRUS FRUITS

P H OTO G R A P H B Y ? ? ?

Many studies have shown that citrus fruits – including oranges, grapefruits, lemons and limes – help prevent inflammation, premature ageing, and several forms of cancer. This is in large part due to their high levels of vitamin C, which boosts immunity and combats skin cancer. “Citrus fruits contain phytonutrients that have been shown to protect skin from sun damage and melanoma,” says Weinstein. But while you’ll get some benefits from citrus juices, she stresses that it’s far better to eat the whole fruits. Don’t be overzealous on your peeling prep, eit her. “The secret spot for phytonutrients in oranges is in the skin, the pith (the fleshy white part between the skin and the segments) and the translucent membranes around each segment,” says Weinstein. The spongy white layers that cling to the outside of each segment, which you probably often pull off, contain the bulk of the fruits’ fibre and biotin, a B vitamin critical to skin health.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ???

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 61


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SOME ARE WINNERS, SOME MAKE WINNERS… BUT ALL HAVE HAD A PROFOUND EFFECT ON THE STATE OF SA RUNNING IN 2016. Words: MIKE FINCH and LISA NEVITT

The 10 Most Influential People In South African Running

PHOTOGRAPH BY CASEY CRAFFORD


Transformer Of Trails

Stuart McConnachie Director, Cape Town Running Company, 39

Stuart McConnachie is the technical director of the Ultra Trail Cape Town (UTCT) – a multidistance event that was the brainchild of race director Nic Bornman. The race – which offers a range of distances: 35km, 65km and 100km – has changed trail runners’ mindsets about what is achievable. That’s what motivates McConnachie’s role within the trail-running community. He recognises it’s not the distance that matters, but the journey of growth – for some, racing 35km feels more like 100. “We dig to see others taking on new challenges, realising their abilities and discovering a passion for trail,” McConnachie says. The event has also contributed towards tourism: this year, 35% of participants will fly into Cape Town from over 40 countries, including the US, the UK, Australia and France. “UTCT is a popular destination race, because you don’t need to drive six hours out of the city to reach the mountains – in Cape Town, they’re right on your doorstep,” he explains. “Hopefully that means we’ll be on the Ultra Trail World Tour in the not-sodistant future – and that will obviously

help us to attract more international elites.” Another way McConnachie helps to bring his community together is through his Tuesday Trails initiative, a social running group that enables every level of runner to experience Table Mountain’s trails every Tuesday night. Combined with his exposure to international trail events like the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc®, the personal relationships McConnachie has formed with local runners have enabled him to develop an understanding of what his community needs. So he started the Petzl Wolfpack Trails – a fiveto 10-kilometre event, held at night, on golf courses around South Africa. Such events are an ideal introduction to night-time off-road running, because they take place in a safe and controlled environment. Most trail runners are environmentally aware – McConnachie is no different. But beyond the personal, in support of local initiatives McConnachie has gathered groups to assist in trail clean-ups, and has helped in cutting overgrowth on Devil’s Peak. – LN

64 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPH BY XAVIER BRIEL


The Coach

Lindsey Parry

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y G A L LO I M AG E S /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( B OT H A ) ; R E N S K E D E K L E R K ( PA R RY )

Comrades and Triathlon South Africa Coach, 39 When I first met Lindsey Parry in 2006, he was working as a biokineticist at the Sports Science Institute in Cape Town. A passionate runner and the son of a Comrades medallist, Parry has ticked off memorable performances of his own, including a sub-3hour marathon, a silver Comrades, and some impressive triathlon results. In 2004, that passion landed him a job as official coach of the Comrades Marathon, taking over from the legendary Don Oliver. At first the young coach’s appointment was met with criticism, as the old guard were sceptical of his training methods – big mileage was replaced with more recovery, and focused sessions. But 12 years down the line, Parry has established himself firmly as a coach with a dedicated following – including not only the best of the best, but also the many thousands of ordinary runners who train for the Comrades and other events each year. Parry, who already has 10 Comrades finishes to his name, is arguably the most successful running coach in South African history. He helped turn Comrades and Two Oceans star Caroline Wöstmann from an ‘also-ran’ into a champion – a fact she readily admits. “Lindsey has helped me transform my running career,” she says. “He gave me structure.” Parry is also coach to current Comrades champion Charné Bosman, who – despite years at the top level of running – turned to Parry to help her succeed at Comrades. As if Parry’s achievements in running were not enough, he is also the national coach of Triathlon South Africa (TSA), and was part of the team that celebrated Henri Schoeman’s bronze medal and Richard Murray’s fourth place at the Rio Olympics. But perhaps the best assessment of Parry’s skills comes from radio presenter Brad Brown, who transformed himself from weighing 165kg to being an ultra-marathon runner and Ironman finisher: “There are few coaches who can train both world champions and the average back-of-thepacker. Lindsey Parry is one of them.” – MF

Champion-Maker

Ans Botha Coach and mentor, 74

An Olympic gold medal and a world record – in the same race? It doesn’t get any bigger. And for South Africans, Wayde van Niekerk’s Rio Olympics performance will go down as one of our greatest-ever sporting achievements, after he broke Michael Johnson’s 17-year-old 400m world record on his way to victory. In the stands was Tannie Ans Botha, Van Niekerk’s 74-year-old coach, whose delighted face was broadcast across the world as the shy Van Niekerk became the toast of Rio. It was South Africa’s first sprinting gold for almost a century, and much of his success has been attributed to her mentorship. So unglamorous is Botha that as Van Niekerk celebrated, she attempted to get through the crowds to congratulate him. “There was security, and they just wouldn’t let me through!” she told the New York Times. Botha was the one who encouraged Van Niekerk to focus his attention on the 400m, after suffering injuries

training for the more intense 200m event – his favourite. It wasn’t easy – even now, Van Niekerk still prefers the shorter sprints to the longer one-lapper. But Botha is more than just a coach. Her motherly but firm manner is how she deals with her small band of athletes in Bloemfontein, and she’s known not to tolerate late arrivals and slacking off. A former sprinter who grew up in Namibia, Botha has been head coach at the University of the Free State since 1990, and has spent 50 years coaching some

“I’M GRATEFUL I COULD TRUST IN HER WORK…” of South Africa’s best running talent – including athletes such as Thuso Mpuang, who won bronze and silver at the World Student Games in 2009 and 2011. “She’s an amazing woman,” Van Niekerk told RW earlier this year. “She’s played a huge role in what I am today. I’m grateful I could trust in her work, and I think it speaks for itself. “What she’s achieved as a coach… I’m just thankful to be part of the history she’s made.” We are too! – MF

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 65


The Prodigy

Ntando Mahlangu Won silver in the men’s T42 200-metre final at the 2016 Paralympics, 14

In exactly 23.77 seconds, blade runner Ntando Mahlangu achieved big things. Even more impressive was his lightning-fast rise to the Paralympic podium – because four years ago, Ntando Mahlangu was in a wheelchair. He was born with hemimelia, which meant the lower part of his legs didn’t develop properly. As a child from a disadvantaged background, living with a disability, he belonged to arguably one of the most marginalised groups in the country. Yet Mahlangu dreamed of becoming one of the fastest men in the world – and then he actually did it. Which means not only that his athletic ability is outstanding, but that his self-belief and determination are bulletproof too. Mahlangu could easily have stayed in the confines of his wheelchair, but when he was 10 years old, he decided that to be able to walk, he would have the lower part of his legs amputated through the knee. His supporters, too, can be considered heroes. In 2012, Jumping Kids – a non-profit organisation that makes prosthetic limbs for children – gave Mahlangu his first pair of blades. Mahlangu recalled: “For the first time, I could walk. I vomited – not out of fear, but out of happiness.” His mom and grandmother told him he could do anything, and he affectionately describes his coach as a ‘pushy tannie’ who offers him no sympathy at training sessions. Because these people believed in him and gave him opportunities, he had no reason to think he couldn’t succeed. It took Mahlangu just one week to learn to walk, and after two weeks, he was able to run. Soon he was competing in national competitions, and in the past two years he has

become the African record-holder in the 100, 200, 400 and 800 metres. He is the world-record holder in the 400m in the T42 class. He has run even faster than that record, but in an able-bodied event, so his time is considered unofficial. “I believe his self-confidence stems from knowing what he has already accomplished, and building on it,” explains Jumping Kids operations manager Michael Stevens. “He knows he can run fast, so now when he races he doesn’t worry about the competition – just about his own performance.” Because he doesn’t have knees or ankles, Mahlangu uses his hips to run. They pivot in an inward, circular motion. “At the start of a race, he doesn’t have the initial thrust that he would if he had knees, but once he gets up to speed, because he’s using bigger muscles, he accelerates,” explains Stevens. “That’s especially advantageous in the 400 metres. I believe Ntando can get his time down to the 45-second mark – it would be unreal if he could get his time closer to Wayde van Niekerk’s record, all things considered.” The able-bodied athletes Mahlangu runs with don’t see him as a boy with no legs – they recognise him as a runner, striving to achieve the same goals they are. Now that the Paralympics is over, life returns to normal: Mahlangu plays soccer with his friends, spends time with his family, tucks into a lasagne and enjoys DJ’ing. School is important to him, because he aspires to become an engineer. But when it comes to athletics, he’s a prodigy – and an inspiring example of what is possible for children living with disability. – LN

“HE KNOWS HE CAN RUN FAST…”

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The Colonel

John Hamlett In the 2001 Comrades Marathon, as Andrew Kelehe ran through Westville on his way to victory, the Colonel was shouting: “Fly with wings, Andrew, fly!” It was an emotional moment for Kelehe, after the death of his daughter just months before, and the Colonel – John Hamlett – had tears running down his face as he shouted encouragement from atop the press truck following the leaders. The running policeman went on to finish in 5:25, to become the first black South African to win the race since 1992. It’s Hamlett’s no-nonsense approach to coaching – and the position he once held as a colonel in the army – that earned him his nickname, and his reputation as a master tactician. For 33 years Hamlett has looked after a small group of handpicked athletes, many of them from disadvantaged backgrounds, and drilled them into becoming endurance superstars. His belief in them is palpable, and his passion for producing Comrades champions, in particular, seems limitless. At first take, he’s an intimidating character. Despite his age, he’s physically defined, with a strong handshake that matches his resolute belief in every athlete he works with. His holistic approach to coaching combines hard training with a balanced lifestyle, and a strong focus on nutrition. Sometimes controversial, Hamlett can often be seen out on the route on race day, shouting at and encouraging his runners. After his win in 2001, Andrew Kelehe worked closely with Hamlett to produce a new generation of champions – including Kelehe’s own brother, Gift, who won the race in 2015. But perhaps Hamlett’s crowning achievement came in 2016, when David Gatebe broke the ‘unbreakable’ Down Run record of Russian Leonid Shvetsov by almost two minutes, in 5:18. Gatebe’s attack 26km from the finish was decisive; one more piece of evidence that Hamlett’s ability to build confidence in his athletes has been key to his success in producing a staggering 45 Comrades gold medals. – MF

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y CA S E Y C R A F F O R D ( M A H L A N G U ); K E V I N R E E V E S ( H A M L E T T )

Coach and mentor, 56


Weight-Loss Wonder Woman

Tshidi Laka Ran off 40kg, 37

Tshidi Laka (Run It Off Club, RW September 2016) is living proof that running, combined with a healthy diet, is one of the most effective ways to burn kilojoules and get fit. At 128kg, Laka didn’t like the way she looked or felt. Her weight-loss journey began with a simple desire to change her life. But that’s a decision that no-one can make for you – you must do it yourself, and it’s in that process that heroes are made. Laka started running – alone, and slowly at first – around a nearby soccer field. A dietician helped her to control her eating habits, by becoming mindful of what she was eating and when she was eating it. Her new diet includes plenty of fruit, vegetables, fibre and three litres of water

The Hopeful Romantic

Roy Hein

Ran the Comrades Marathon for the woman he loves, 61

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a day. Each day, she runs after work for 30 to 40 minutes. Laka’s reward? She has completed six 10-kilometre races, and she is able to walk distances she couldn’t before. “Words cannot describe how wonderful I feel right now,” she told us, proudly. Laka’s ability to turn away from a sedentary existence and shed unwanted kilograms is motivating her to reach her goal weight of 70kg – and her success has inspired others to embark on their own weight-loss journey. – LN

PHOTOGRAPH BY ???

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J E T L I N E AC T I O N P H OTO (CO M R A D E S ) ; S U P P L I E D ( H E I N & TO D D, L A K A )

Roy Hein could be considered a modern-day Prince Charming, because he took a risk to perform a selfless act for the woman he loves. In our article The End And The Beginning (RW August 2016), writer Natasha Freeman describes how Tracy Todd dreamed of running the Comrades, but when a car accident rendered her quadriplegic, she lost her independence. Despite Hein having himself recovered from a crippling heart attack, he was so inspired by Todd’s fighting spirit (and her radiant smile) that he decided to run the world’s greatest footrace, the Comrades, for her. The pair first met on an online dating site, and connected instantly.

They spoke honestly about what they loved, their achievements and their disappointments – until one day, Todd shared her biggest regret: that she hadn’t run the Comrades when she’d had the chance. Without hesitation, Hein offered to run it for her. Race day arrived, and with it mixed emotions. On the one hand Todd cried, because she so badly wanted to run the Comrades herself; and on the other, she prayed Hein would arrive at the finish safely, without any health complications. But the encouraging text messages Todd sent throughout his race were all the support Hein needed to keep soldiering on. For the last 30 kilometres of the Comrades, he carried a touching tribute to Todd – a sign, with the words ‘For my friend, Tracy Todd’, and a photograph of Todd, smiling radiantly from her wheelchair. Through Hein, Todd finally had the opportunity to ‘run’ the great ultra – and she also had Hein’s heart. The pair had fallen head over running shoes in love with each other, and to prove it, they shared their first kiss just five minutes after meeting for the first time. In April 2015, they were married. In conclusion, the author writes: “If there’s one thing Hein and Todd’s triumph-over-tragedy story teaches us, it’s that love helps us get through it together.” Hein’s story certainly had the power to bring tears to our eyes here at RW. – LN

“WORDS CANNOT DESCRIBE HOW WONDERFUL I FEEL RIGHT NOW...”


The Braveheart

Caroline Wöstmann 2016 Comrades Marathon runner-up, two-time Two Oceans champion, 33

In 2016, Caroline Wöstmann and Charné Bosman produced one of the most dramatic moments in Comrades Marathon history. With a 15-minute lead going into the final 20km of the race, Wöstmann – the outright favourite, after her win in 2015 and double victory at the 2015 and 2016 Two Oceans Marathon – began to fall apart, as she paid the price for a too-fast early pace. At the time, Bosman had almost resigned herself to settling for second place, with a seemingly insurmountable gap to bridge between her and Wöstmann. But as Wöstmann began to cramp – walking often, and weaving across the road – the gap began to close dramatically. At one stage Wöstmann swerved into the path of a marshal’s motorbike; and with 12km to go, it seemed impossible that she would even finish. But she refused to give up, and the drama continued in front of millions on TV. As Wöstmann staggered, fell and walked her way agonisingly towards Durban, Bosman suddenly realised she had a chance to win. But it took until they hit the streets of Durban, with only 2km to go, for Bosman to finally catch the struggling mother of two – within earshot of the stadium. Bosman accelerated past, terrified that her rival would find a second wind and challenge her again. But it was not to be: Bosman ran on to an emotional victory, with Wöstmann losing almost five minutes over those last 2km. At the post-race press conference, Wöstmann celebrated with Bosman as if she had won the race herself, paying tribute to her friend and sometime training partner. And while we celebrate Bosman’s win, we applaud Wöstmann. For the Johannesburg-born runner to have suffered through those final 12km was a lesson to everyone who has ever run the great race between Durban and Pietermaritzburg. Never give up, no matter who you are! – MF

PHOTOGRAPH SUPPLIED BY KPMG

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Cinderella Man

Peter Moses Former gang member, runner, 39

Peter Moses comes from an area where it’s seen as normal for young people to slip into a life of crime. The courage he had to talk candidly about his former life, and the new challenges he faced as a runner (‘Cinderella Man’, RW April 2016), changed our lives here at RW. Moses’ story has the power to grab a child from the Cape Flats by the shoulders, shake him or her wildly, and shout, ‘Even if you find yourself in a dark place, you can get out of it – provided you make the right choices!’ When he left gang life behind, Moses’ life spiralled into poverty, and he faced opposition from a community that knows no other way of living. Changing the course of his life was an uphill struggle, but his two boys stood out as a reason to keep trying. “Since he’s taken up running, Peter has become a positive role model for his kids,” says close friend Sue-Ann Fourie. “His mother – who wasn’t around for much of his childhood, and blames herself for his descent into gangsterism – oozes with love and pride.” Moses is addressing the problem of gangs in his community. When he ran the 100km at the Cape Town Festival of Running (and came second!), he raised R4 000 for the JAG Foundation, an organisation that introduces disadvantaged youths to sport. He now has a coaching qualification through Western Province Athletics, which means he can offer his services to schools. Moses has a new job at the Cape Town Running Company, making route markers for the Ultra-Trail Cape Town. At the Petzl Wolfpack Trails, he’s affectionately known as the lanterne rouge, because he wears a red light and sweeps the 5km race. “He inspires those of us who could be termed ‘privileged’,” says Fourie. “Each time we’re having a bad day – when we complain we’re slow or fat – we’re reminded of Peter, who doesn’t have kit or even proper nutrition. Everything he has is scraped together from donations. “And yet he always has a fat grin on his face. It’s impossible to walk through an event venue with Peter without having to stop constantly, because everybody greets him. He’s got to be inspiring people!” – LN

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PHOTOGRAPH BY NICK ALDRIDGE


The Dreamer

Janet Welham

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M I K E F I N C H

Race Director, Sanlam Cape Town Marathon, 51 In their teenage years, Elana Meyer and Janet Welham were fierce competitors: Meyer dominated on the road, and Welham had the edge in cross-country events. But at age 20 – as the prospect of international competition dwindled, during the isolation years – Welham went into the business of business; while Meyer continued with the business of running. Fast forward to 2013, and the two combined their passion for running to start Endurocad – an academy aimed at helping build future marathon stars in South Africa. And it was Endurocad that eventually led to Welham and Meyer’s involvement in South Africa’s fastest-growing marathon – the Sanlam Cape Town Marathon – after they approached former Springbok rugby captain Francois Pienaar for funding for their academy. “We didn’t get the funding – but it led to a discussion about the Cape Town Marathon, and how we could turn it into

Africa’s major,” Welham remembers. Meyer and Pienaar used their high profiles to get buy-in from the local federation at Western Province Athletics and Athletics South Africa, and muchneeded funding from sponsors such as title-holder Sanlam.

“WE HAD TO BUCK THE TREND, BECAUSE ULTRARUNNING IS VERY POPULAR.” “We sold the dream; and the dream was to put Africa on the marathon-running map. We wanted to use that to leverage change, get everyone involved and ensure that we got buy-in. It was about making Cape Town both South Africa’s and

Africa’s big-city marathon.” This year they maxed out the marathon field, at 8 000 (along with 12 000 in the 10km), and look set to continue growing in 2017 – despite a running culture rooted in ultras. “We had to change the culture of running in South Africa. We had to buck the trend, because ultra running is very popular. But it’s not a case of either/or... it’s about creating space for both.” They’ve concentrated on encouraging half-marathon runners to up their distance to take on a marathon, while also focusing on the global city-marathon hype. Currently the CT Marathon is an IAAF Silver Label event, and hopes are that the race will be upgraded to Gold Label status for 2017. “Being a marathon, we get to compare ourselves to other marathons around the world. The Sydney Marathon was held on the same day as ours, and was a Gold Label event. But they had just 4 500 finishers, and their winning time was three minutes slower than ours… So we can see that we compare quite nicely against other international marathons.” Whether the CT Marathon will reach the 35 000-plus numbers seen in cities like London, New York, Berlin, Tokyo and Paris remains to be seen; understandably, Welham is cautious. “I think we would look to cap the marathon at 15 to 20 000 within the next three years, but that depends on the logistics and the capability of the route to handle numbers like that. Could we go bigger? I guess anything’s possible – but we’re not thinking like that yet.” Perhaps one of the stand-out aspects of the CT Marathon has been its focus on environmental impact. In 2015 the event was declared carbon neutral; and in 2016, climate neutral. “It’s a complicated process, that looks at everything from water sachets to driving to meetings to buying carbon credits on the stock exchange,” Welham says. “But it’s something we’re extremely proud of.” With lots of coaching and runningdevelopment workshops happening behind the scenes, Welham and her team are clearly dedicated to more than just presenting a world-class race each year: for them, the dream is also the legacy each event leaves behind. “The reward for all of this will come in the years ahead,” Welham says. “It will come when we are recognised as part of the world’s major series.” – MF

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Run faster with less effort? All you need to do is...

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Getting oxygen to your working muscles is the most natural thing in the world – but with the right training, you can boost your performance with every breath you take.

Words Lisa Buckingham

| Illustrations Paul Blow DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 73


Y

ou’re standing outside waiting for a GPS lock. Yo u h a v e n ’ t taken a step, but in your brain a preparation process has already been triggered. “Your respiratory centre is found in an area of the brain called the hypothalamus,” says Dr John Dickinson, head of the Respiratory Clinic at the University of Kent in the UK. “It knows when you’re about to exercise, so you’ll unconsciously start breathing slightly faster and more deeply, and capillaries will start to dilate in anticipation of carrying more oxygen.” As you set off, you need to consider how to help this natural response work effectively. “Starting slowly is key to allowing these processes to build up, rather than shocking the system,” says Paul Hough, lead sport and exercise scientist at St Mary’s University Sports Performance Service in the UK. Managing your early effort to allow your system the time to kick in is particularly important if you’re a new runner, or rebuilding your fitness after a layoff. “The fitter you get, the quicker your oxygen kinetics will kick in at the beginning of a run,” says Dickinson. “This means that the shift between rest and producing enough energy aerobically will be quicker, so the breathless Iron-rich foods, to help discomfort that comes at maintain the haemoglobin the beginning of a run will you need for effective be over with more quickly.” oxygen delivery If you’re paying attention as you start to run you’ll notice a shift in how Meat and fish contain you breathe. At rest, you the most bioavailable breathe primarily through form of iron. your nose, but very soon Green leafy veg. Eat into a run “you switch to plant sources of iron mouth breathing, as it’s the with vitamin C-rich easiest way to draw in air”, foods, such as oranges, says Dickinson. Although to increase absorption. this delivers more air Pulses (eg chickpeas) to your lungs, there is Eggs a downside: when you Tofu nose-breathe at rest, air is Beans warmed and humidified F  ortified breakfast by your nose, but breathing cereals through your mouth Whole grains during exercise bypasses Dried figs and apricots this process. This can N  uts and seeds cause problems, especially Dark chocolate in winter. “Dry, cold air

Foods to boost O² delivery

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can be damaging to the airways because the nose can’t do its normal job of warming/humidifying,” says Dickinson. “This means the lower airways in the lungs have to do it, which can lead to irritation.” Over a long period, if you’re genetically susceptible and consistently run in very cold air, this could cause permanent damage to the lungs. If it’s truly Arctic outside, consider wearing a scarf or bandana loosely across your face. “This warms the air before it goes down into your airways and also captures the moist breath coming out, which then humidifies the air going in,” says Dickinson. “You can also avoid early runs in really cold conditions. The freezing, dry air of early morning will warm up and become more moist later.”

RHYTHM AND POWER

As your run progresses, your breaths become more frequent and your heart rate rises. Your muscles now have a greater need for oxygen to facilitate

the conversion of carbs or fat into energy – and as the heart and lungs are responsible for delivering this oxygen, they have to work harder. “At rest, your lungs will be taking in 10-12 litres of air per minute. When you run, depending on how big you are and how fast you’re running, this increases by four to eight times,” says Alison McConnell, professor of exercise science at Bournemouth University in the UK and author of Breathe Strong, Perform Better (Human Kinetics). As things start to feel harder, breathing in rhythm can control the regularity and depth of your breathing, improving its efficiency; and in turn, boosting performance and lowering your perception of effort. “Break each phase of the breath into a number of footstrikes,” says McConnell. “For example, begin your inhale on your left foot strike, continue it through the right footstrike, then exhale in the same pattern. You can experiment with what’s comfortable for you. This not


CELL MATES Red blood cells carry oxygen where it needs to go.

called haemoglobin, which transports it to your quads, hamstrings and every other muscle that’s working to keep you moving. The more haemoglobinloaded red blood cells you have, the more oxygen you can transport to your muscles. It’s that simple equation that has led many athletes into the dark world of stimulating artificial red blood cell production, most notably via the banned substance EPO. However, there are some safe and legal ways to maximise your haemoglobin levels. “Exercise in itself increases red blood cells to meet the extra demands on the body, but if you’re a regular exerciser, your body has probably already adapted to this increased load and you won’t see large increases once you’re fit,” says Dickinson. One way to shock the body into producing more red blood cells is by training at altitude (or in a similarly deoxygenated hypoxic chamber), but research shows this can take two to three weeks to take effect. That’s fine for elite athletes who ship out to high-altitude training camps for months on end, but not so practical for the rest of us.

FOOD FACTOR

only gives a feeling of control over your breath, it also encourages you to breathe deeply and slowly.” That slower, deeper breathing will benefit your running. “Taking deeper, slower breaths will deliver more oxygen to the muscles than short, shallow breaths, as you’re taking in more air and expending less energy,” says Dickinson. “But it should be a satisfying breath, rather than an excessively deep breath.” After you inhale, oxygen-rich air travels down your trachea, on into two tubes called bronchi and then into smaller tubes called bronchioles, eventually reaching microscopic sacs called alveoli in your lungs. Our lungs have roughly 480 million of these and it’s through their walls – by a process called diffusion – that oxygen is delivered into your blood via capillaries. It stands to reason, then, that having more alveoli would improve your oxygen supply; but that’s not something you can achieve through training. “The lungs are not trainable, and you cannot

grow more alveoli,” says McConnell. “But you can improve the muscles that inflate your lungs – mainly the diaphragm and intercostal muscles – so you can take more air into your lungs with each breath.” You can train these muscles by practising deeper, more efficient diaphragmatic breathing (‘belly breathing’) and through inspiratorymuscle training (see ‘Train your breathing muscles’, p76). Several studies on subjects using the popular inspiratory muscle-training device POWERbreathe found a 31 per cent improvement in inspiratory-muscle strength, a 27 per cent increase in inspiratory-muscle endurance, and up to seven per cent faster recovery during sprint repeats. When that precious oxygen passes into your blood it hitches a ride on a protein inside your red blood cells

“YOU CAN IMPROVE THE MUSCLES THAT INFLATE YOUR LUNGS.”

Better news is that your diet can also help, with iron being crucial, as it’s an essential component of haemoglobin (see ‘Foods to boost oxygen delivery’, left). Iron deficiency can limit red blood cell production. “And in women, menstruation will also deplete them, so sufficient iron intake is vital,” says McConnell. Women should aim to consume 14.8mg a day, and men, 8.7mg. Another factor to consider is breathing in carbon monoxide, which can impair performance by bonding with haemoglobin, thereby compromising red blood cells’ ability to transport oxygen to muscles. Carbon monoxide is present in cigarette smoke, and is also an environmental pollutant prevalent in vehicle emissions. A n d c a r b o n m o n ox i d e i s n ’t the only pollutant we need to be aware of as we breathe on the run. “It’s worth noting the scientific consensus is that the benefits of exercise outweigh the negative effects of pollution in healthy people,” says Dickinson. But there are still negative effects to consider. “Our lungs try to protect themselves by producing more mucus to push invading particles back out, but they can’t fully defend themselves and pollution produces an inflammatory response in the airways,” says DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 75


Dickinson. “Frequent, long-term running in polluted air can lead to exercise-induced asthma, but it’s an issue of dose and how genetically susceptible you are.” Dickinson believes air-filter masks can decrease the level of pollutants you inhale, but questions how practical wearing anything that compromises airflow is for runners, and suggests alternative anti-pollution strategies: “To limit your exposure, avoid running next to busy roads, pay attention to air-quality forecasts, and run at times when pollution is lowest.” Pollution levels tend to be lower before 7am and after 8pm. Ozone, another potential breathing irritant for runners, is highest on hot days in spring and summer. Getting your five-a-day could help offset the effects. “Air pollutants injure the lung via oxidative mechanisms, which are controlled by antioxidant availability,” says Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health at King’s College London. “Some food components are powerful antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E, so fresh fruit and veg are thought to be beneficial.”

Train your breathing muscles Start by working on correct diaphragmaticbreathing technique. Progress to using an inspiratory muscle-training device

THE PUMP CARD

Once your red blood cells have picked up their oxygen, they are pumped around your body, with their precious cargo, by your heart. And it’s here that you can make serious gains in terms of improving oxygen delivery. “Your lungs don’t limit your supply of oxygen, but the heart can,” says Dickinson. “The bigger the volume of blood the left side of the heart can pump to your muscles with each beat [aka stroke volume], the more oxygen they’ll receive.” That capacity of the heart to pump blood is vital for improving the endurance athlete’s holy grail – V02 max. “Think of V02 max as being like the size of a car engine,” says Hough. “If your car can go at 190kph maximum speed, it can cruise easily at 145kph. But if it’s max speed is 160kph, it will struggle to cruise at 145kph. A high V02 max gives you a bigger capacity to go faster for longer. And the best way to improve it is by including sessions where you’re running close to, or at, your V02-max pace. As a rule of thumb, this is roughly the hardest pace you could keep up consistently

“WE PRODUCE LACTATE THE WHOLE TIME WE’RE RUNNING...”

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Diaphragmatic-breathing exercises Practise these exercises from sports physio Jehan Yehia daily, at rest. The technique will transfer to your running. 01/ Place a hand on the base of your ribs and breathe in. Breathe deeply from the lower ribs upwards, expanding the lower ribs and abdomen. You should feel the base of your ribs and abdomen expanding, not the front of your chest.

for 10 to 12 minutes.” When the oxygen-carrying red blood cells arrive at your working muscles, the haemoglobin drops off its load and the muscle uses it immediately to convert stored glycogen into energy to power your run. That energy is generated by your mitochondria, the powerhouses of your muscle cells. “Mitochondria need oxygen to convert carbs (and fat on longer, slower runs) into a molecule called ATP, which is the body’s energy currency,” says Hough. “And it’s possible to both improve the ability of the mitochondria to convert oxygen efficiently, and to increase their numbers.” The key to seeing significant improvements in both your heart and mitochondrial function is variety in your training sessions. “Long, slow runs at a conversational pace increase the heart’s pumping capacity and its endurance,” says Dr Graham Sharpe, principal lecturer at the School of Science & Technology at Nottingham Trent University in the UK. And long, slow runs also improve the ability of your mitochondria to burn fat as fuel, according to Hough. “This is particularly important for longer races, such as marathons.’’ Short, intense interval sessions are very effective at boosting your heart’s ability to pump larger volumes of blood and improving your V02 max, and have also been shown to improve mitochondrial function, according to Hough. To improve V02 max, Hough recommends four to six four-minute intervals at a hard but not maximum pace, with three minutes of light jogging recovery in between. “The best sessions to enhance mitochondrial function

0 2 / Lie on your back, knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Arch your lower back upwards, then flatten it into the floor, and then find a neutral position between the two. Take three deep breaths, feeling your lower ribs and abdomen expand, then ‘rest’ with three normal breaths. Repeat, this time holding each breath for a couple of seconds before exhaling.

would be all-out sprints for 10 to 30 seconds, with a rest period six times longer,” says Hough. A third element to add is resistance training. “Recent research has shown resistance training can also boost mitochondrial function,” says Hough. “And stronger, more efficient muscle means that the heart and lungs don’t have to work as hard to deliver oxygen,” says Dickinson. “Working on core

LET IT GO Breathing out rids the body of carbon dioxide.


I nspiratory-muscle exercise Once you’ve mastered good diaphragmatic breathing, try inspiratory-muscle training (IMT). “Running strengthens the diaphragm, but you don’t get the results you get with inspiratory training,” says Sharpe. The most accessible method is a device such as a POWERbreathe (powerbreathesa.co.za), which has a valve that provides resistance as you inhale.

and leg strength in particular can also improve running economy [how efficiently you use oxygen].” At the same time as dropping off oxygen, your blood ‘picks up’ carbon dioxide, which your muscles produce as a waste product when triggering energy release. This is where that old runner’s foe, lactate, comes into play. “We produce lactate the whole time we’re running, and our muscles can

use it as fuel – it’s not a waste product,’” says Sharpe. “But we reach an exercise intensity where the rate at which we produce lactate exceeds the rate at which we can use it, and it starts to accumulate in the blood. This is known as lactate threshold.” Runners know all too well the effects of reaching lactate threshold; our breathing becomes harder, verging on desperate, as we gasp for air. But you may be surprised to learn what’s driving this: “It’s not to take in more oxygen,’” says Sharpe. “Your blood, even when you’re working at high intensities, is still saturated with oxygen – it can’t carry any more. You breathe harder because your body is trying to get rid of carbon dioxide, and it does this because that’s the most effective way of controlling the build-up of acids [such as lactate] in the blood.” “You can delay this point by adding training sessions that take you just above your lactate threshold,” says Dickinson. “Try hard one-kilometre efforts followed by a kilometre of active recovery. That way, you’ll be able to run for longer at a higher intensity before

experiencing lactate build-up and its accompanying breathing discomfort.” The unwanted carbon dioxide exits your body after diffusing through the walls of the alveoli into your lungs, which push it back through the bronchioles, bronchi, trachea, and out of your mouth. So if the exhale is getting rid of C02, which is key to avoiding lactate build-up, is it best to breathe out as hard as you can? “No,”says Dickinson. “Your exhale is a more passive process than the inhale, as it’s predominantly powered by your breathing muscles springing back. You should allow it to feel natural – forcing air out leads to a greater need to breathe in again, which can lead to hyperventilation.” Fast, shallow breathing affects the balance of oxygen and C02 in the blood, and can cause dizziness and blurred vision. According to Dickinson, no matter how hard you try, you can’t improve the maximum amount of air you expel from the lungs after a deep inhalation. So exhaling naturally is the vital final component of good, efficient breathing. All you need to do is inhale. And exhale. And so on…

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 77


2369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.1SOUTH0122243124524556353245345345334548302615 55221546555545252543245245245245322302164255455545465255986534215425254504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855420123696502154830261595632151 54830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659 651230185464811654847821036510014486521685542012369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300 5742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659465522154655554525254324524524524532230216425545554546522222252524555559865342154252545048 THE STATE 4242424245245234603300.16497550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 OF THE 0012 36527 998 504 3026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.16497550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534 SOUTH 6435212205165946552215465555452525432452452452453223021642554555454652222225252455555986534215425254504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855 AFRICAN 4524532456365635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842 821036510014486521685542012369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.164975502100021346958 RUNNER, 86420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659465522154655554525254324524524524532230216425545554546225252455555986534215525450486915644561145641651230185464 2016* 550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450 4456114564165123018546481165484782103651001448652168554201236965021548302615956321512965480125181000156489624874156428646685542012369650215150505113224242424242424524 * With a few insights about our foreign friends. 4504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855420123696502154830261595632151296548012518100015648962487415642864668554201236965021515050511322424242 TO CELEBRATE THE 50TH 821036510014486521685542012369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.164975502100021346958 86420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659465522154655554525254324524524524532230216425545554546522222252524555559865342154252545048691564456114564165123 ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST-EVER 0.16497550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742. 8691564456114564165123018546481165484782103651001448652168554201236965021548302615956321512965480125181000156489624874156428646685542012369650215150505113224242424242 ISSUE OF RW, WE CONDUCTED A SURVEY. 69 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659465522154655554525254324524524524532230216425545554546522222252524555559865 505051132242424242424245245234603300.16497550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 00 THE RESULTS SHOWED THAT ALMOST 52222225252455555986534215425254504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855420123696502154830261595632151296548012518100015648962487415642864668 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.53465948422212212522554598643521220516594655221546555545252543245245245245322302164255455545465222222525245555598653421542 HALF OF SOUTH AFRICAN RUNNERS LOG use a63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 running app 32242424242424245245234603300.16497550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 0012 3652 252524555559865342154252545048691564456114564165123018546481165484782103651001448652168554201236965021548302615956321512965480125181000156489624874156428646685542012 MORE THAN 30 KILOMETRES PER 4896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.16497550210002134695875221010122243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 6321512965480 25432452452452453223021642554555454652222225252455555986534215425254504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855420123696502154830261595632151296 WEEK. BUT YOU PREFER TO RUN ALONE, 30261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659465 215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.164975502100021346958752210101222431245245324563656353 ON A ROAD. YOU’RE UP FOR A LITTLE 5459864352122051659465522154655554525254324524524524532230216425545554546522222252524555559865342154252545048691564456114564165123018546481165484782103651001448652 say their favourite 243124524532456365635324534534533454830261595 632151296548012518100 01564896248741 5 64286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.534659484 NIGHT-BEFORE-THE-RACE NOOKIE, running movie is buy shoes 10014486521685542012369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.16497550210002134695875221010122243 Forest Gump at speciality 2212212522554598643521220516594655221546555545252543245245245245322302164255455545465222222525245555598653421542525450486915644561145641651230185464811654847821036510014486 running stores BUT STAUNCHLY OPPOSED TO 524532456365635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252 21685542012369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.164975502100021346958752210101222431245245324 BIB-SWOPPING. TO COMPARE, WE 545986435212205165946552215465555452525432452452452453223021642554555454652222225252455555986534215425254504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855420 65635324534534533454830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252255459864 ALSO POLLED THOUSANDS OF RUNNERS IN 369650215483026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.1649755021000213469587522101012224312452453245636563532 2122051659465522154655554525254324524524524532230216425545554546522222252524555559865342154252545048691564456114564165123018546481165484782103651001448652168554201236965021 2463215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 OTHER COUNTRIES. GLOBALLY, 4534533454830261595 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.534659484222122125225545986435212205165 3026159563215129654801251810001564896248741564286466855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.164975502100021346958752210101222431245245324563656353245345345334 80 PER CENT OF YOU TRACK YOUR RUNS 6552215465555452525432452452452453223021642554555454652222225252455555986534215425254504869156445611456416512301854648116548478210365100144865216855420123696502154830261595 4830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012 36527 998 504869 1564 .1234.5725742.424450.10242495886420031622.5346594842221221252255459864352122051659465522154 2151296548012518100015648962487415642864601854648116548478210365100144865216855420123696502151505051132242424242424245245234603300.164975502100021346958752210101222431245245 WITH GPS. THE CHINESE LOVE SOCIAL 865216855420123696502154830261595 63215129654801251810001564896248741564286469745 0012

HERE YOU ARE

70%

50%

MEDIA – AND WHO KNEW ITALIANS

WERE SO HARD-CORE?

PHOTOGRAPH BY CASEY CRAFFORD

27%


DEMOGRAPHIC DATA & PREFERENCES

AT WHAT AGE DID YOU START RUNNING?

%

20

10

33%

of SA runners prefer to run in the spring. Autumn placed second, at 29%.

37

Median age of SA respondents

GENDER

31%

Runners in most of the world prefer training in the morning. But in Poland, 52% enjoy running in the evening. In five countries, survey respondents were overwhelmingly male: Italy 80% Portugal 79% Mexico 75% China 73% France 71%

United States

55+

50–54

45–49

40–44

35–39

30–34

25–29

18–24

15–17

>15

0

TEN

OF THE 20 COUNTRIES POLLED, INCLUDING SOUTH AFRICA, SAID LOSING WEIGHT WAS THE MAIN MOTIVATION TO START RUNNING.

AVERAGE KILOMETRES PER WEEK BY COUNTRY Italy United Kingdom France Portugal

YOUR GO-TO CROSS-TRAINING 47% Strength training

Spain China Norway Australia/New Zealand

22% Cycling

South Africa

19% Swimming

Sweden

17% Yoga/Pilates

Brazil

FAVOURITE TIME OF DAY TO RUN?

Mexico Hungary Argentina

69%

Globally, running solo is up 16% since 2006. Training with a friend is down from 35% to 15%.

Canada

25%

Before dawn

44%

0.5%

Morning Midday/ lunch

30%

Evening

0.5%

Night

Belgium/Netherlands Turkey

34% of South African runners prefer to run alone.

80 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

43.7 42.8 40.1 37.0 36.2 35.4 35.1 34.8 34.0 33.5 33.5 31.6 29.8 29.6 29.5 29.3 28.3 26.6


ETIQUETTE

RUNNING WITH A DOG

WHAT KIND OF RUNNER ARE YOU? 53%

FOR

Competitive runner/racer

000

20%

Globally, Italians, at 62%, are the most competitive.

Occasional (I run every now and then, to clear my head and stay healthy)

AGAINST

Dedicated health-andfitness runner

61%

27%

93%

3%

Treadmill

Road

18%

Trails

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE POST-RUN RITUAL?

2%

Ice bath

2%

Massage

9%

Nap

Around the globe, showering was number one – and Portugal proved cleanest, at 76%.

30%

Eat and drink

AGAINST FOR

78%

of you voted for the burger as your favourite postrace splurge. With 5% of the vote, pancakes are the least popular.

Runners in the Netherlands enjoy a bowl of post-race erwtensoep, split pea soup. Yum?

7%

Globally, Argentina is the only country where more than 20% of respondents (24%) were against waving.

32% of South Africans chose a banana as their favourite pre-race meal.

The banana won in 15 countries. Oats took silver.

SNOT ROCKETS

14%

HOW DO YOU FUEL YOUR LONG RUN?

AGAINST FOR

Track

20%

WAVING TO OTHER RUNNERS

ON WHAT SURFACE DO YOU RUN, PRIMARILY? 1%

FUEL TIME

39%

57% Shower/ bath

24%

86%

Energy gel

12%

Energy chews/ gummies

3%

Sweets

28%

Sports drink

Which celebrity would you hit the road with?

Kevin Hart 13%

Alicia Keys 10%

Kevin Spacey 9%

Ethan Hawke 8%

Pippa Middleton 9%

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 81


RACE REPORT

WEARING THE RACE SHIRT IN THE RACE

PER CENT OF PEOPLE POLLED SAID THEY RAN A COLOUR RUN IN THE LAST YEAR, MAKING IT THE MOST POPULAR NON-TRADITIONAL RACE IN SOUTH AFRICA.

63%

LOVE ON THE RUN

AGAINST FOR

WOULD YOU RATHER… Have sex?

Go running?

21%

41%

37%

34% of Chinese runners took part in a colour run; an additional 29% have done a glow-in-thedark race.

South Africans have the most experience with imbibing on the run; 9% have finished a beer mile.

TOP-RANKING BUCKET LIST MARATHONS 1. Two Oceans 52% 2. Comrades 34% 3. Cape Town Marathon 33% 4. New York City 28% 5. London 27% 6. Paris Marathon 19% 7. Soweto Marathon 19% 8. Berlin Marathon 17% 82

RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

Globally, the NYC Marathon is the most desired event: 36% list it as a must-run race.

40%

BIB SWOPPING AGAINST FOR

37%

of runners in SA chose the half marathon as their favourite race distance, followed by 34% for the 10-K.

In Argentina, Italy, and China, more than 86% of runners would wear the shirt during the race.

9%

OF SA RUNNERS BELIEVE RUNNING HAS IMPROVED THEIR SEX LIVES.

91%

Only 2% of South African runners have had a post-run one-night stand.

4% of SA runners met their current husband, wife or partner through running.

FORTY-SIX

per cent of SA runners would have sex the night before a race.

Which elite runner would you want to pace you?

34% Caroline Wöstmann

13% Ryan Sandes

7% Usain Bolt

4% Rene Kalmer

4% Wayde van Niekerk

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y I S TO C K P H OTO.CO M ( P R E V I O U S 2 PAG E S , C O LO U R R U N ) : G A L LO I M AG E S /G E T T Y I M AG E S (CO M R A D E S M A R AT H O N ); JA M E S G A R AG H T Y ( E A R P H O N E S ); S COT T S E R FAS / R E D B U L L C O N T E N T P O O L ( RYA N S A N D E S )

TWENTY-TWO

ETIQUETTE


SHOES, GEAR & DIGITAL DATA

60%

60

OF SOUTH AFRICAN RUNNERS USE GPS TO TRACK THEIR RUNS.

30 20%

DO YOU POST YOUR RUNS ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

0 Mobile phone

Music player

GPS watch

HOW MANY PAIRS OF RUNNING SHOES DO YOU BUY EACH YEAR?

In China, 71% post their runs on social media.

4%

+

11% 50%

1%

2%

R3 000+

47%

R1 500 – R2 499

58% RUNNING WITHOUT UNDERWEAR

YES

In Sweden, runners spend an average of R2 520 per pair. Polish runners spend the least: R1 130.

R499 or less

$

48 %

Only 2% of SA men will run shirtless, while 37% of Frenchmen will.

34% OF SA RESPONDENTS SAY THEY LISTEN TO AUDIO ON THE RUN.

WHAT YOU LISTEN TO Music 91% Podcasts 3% Audiobooks 1%

No

Radio 3%

66%

67%

HOW MUCH ARE YOU WILLING TO SPEND ON A PAIR OF RUNNING SHOES?

R2 500 – R2 999

In Hungary, 60% of runners get by with only one pair of shoes per year.

42%

33%

34%

35%

2%

60%

RUNNING WITH EARBUDS

AGAINST FOR

%

36%

ETIQUETTE

AGAINST FOR

THINGS RUNNERS CARRY IN 2016

Other 2%

24%

of women would wear patterned tights, but only 6% of men would.

R500 – R1 499

METHODOLOGY We conducted this survey on runnersworld .co.za for 30 days last March, as did our editions in the US, Argentina, Australia/New Zealand, Belgium/Netherlands, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy,

18%

52%

30%

of SA runners use compression gear.

say they prefer technical material.

still feel good wearing cotton shirts and socks.

Mexico, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. We received 17 177 total responses worldwide, with 648 from SA. For complete results, go to runnersworld.com/survey.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CASEY CRAFFORD

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 83


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RACING

AHEAD

T h e b e s t r u n n i n g , m u l t i - s p o r t a n d a d ve n t u r e r a c e s t h is D e c e m b e r • C o m p il e d by C r a i g D u n c a n, r a c e e d i to r (r w r a c e e d i to r @ g ma il.c o m) to help develop the sport of running in South Africa. The Street Mile is open to all, but prizes will only be awarded to entrants in the following age categories: 7-19 and 20-39. All finishers will receive a medal.

ED’S CHOICE

GAUTENG SATURDAY 10 DECEMBER

1.6 5 10

Nedbank Skosana Road Race (AGN League Race) Correctional Services, Kgosi Mampuru Street, Pretoria; 10km & 5km: 6:30am; Street Mile: 8:30am Enoch Skosana 082 825 8001 / 071 588 2625 The race supports Skosana Legend Development, an initiative that encourages local running legends to pass on their skills, and use their status,

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y T H E U N S C O E T Z E E

D I S TA N C E I C O N S :

SUNDAY 11 DECEMBER

FRIDAY 16 DECEMBER

SATURDAY 31 DECEMBER

7.9

5 10

The Pirates Wobblers & Wigglers Hat Run Pirates Club, 25 Braeside Street, Greenside; 7.9km: 8am Gregory Cleeve-Edwards 083 717 4900

Nedbank (NRCVT) Ou Jaar’s Party 10km Kollegepark Primary School, Hans van Rensburg Street, Vanderbijlpark; 10km & 5km: 6pm Dawid Jordaan 082 364 1954

SATURDAY 31 DECEMBER

5 10 21.1

Orlando Half Marathon Orlando Communal Hall (next to the Orlando Stadium), Soweto; 21.1km: 6am; 10km: 6:15am; 5km Fun Run: 6:30am; Junior Dash: 10am Johannes Mashiga 073 944 2571 / Sibongile Maruta 078 445 0249

5 10

Old Year’s Race Run/Walk Rietondale Park, North Street, Pretoria; 10km & 5km Fun Run: 5pm Daan du Toit 082 572 4169

SKOSANA ROAD RACE: 10-K runners support local development.

F I N D E V E N T S W I T H Y O U R F A V O U R I T E D I S TA N C E S Q U I C K LY, U S I N G T H E F O L LO W I N G

KEY:

0-9KM

10-19KM

20-29KM

30+KM

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 85

KEEP GOING


R A C IN G

A HE A D

WESTERN CAPE SATURDAY 3 DECEMBER

5 10 15 Straggler’s Beachcomber Strandfontein Pavilion, Strandfontein Road, Strandfontein; 15km: 6:30am; 10km: 6:45am; 5km Beach Run/Walk: 7:30am Allen Barnes 083 858 5857

BMG/ STAINBANK CUP: Meander through nature reserves and parks.

The popular 15-K run and 10-K walk are both League Races, which take place on the Pavilion and Lukannon Drive. The 5-K is a family fun run on the beach – children from local schools in Strandfontein, Pelican Park, Mitchell’s Plain and Khayelitsha are encouraged to participate. Organisers are looking for volunteers to transport children to and from the event.

ED’S CHOICE

SUNDAY 4 DECEMBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E SY O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S

10 15 BMG/Stainbank Cup 15km Run & 10km Walk or Run Yellowwood Park Sports Club, Barbet Road, Yellowwood Park, Durban; 15km Run & 10km Walk or Run: 6am Fred Schoon 083 384 4053 / Dowan Burton 081 354 1718 It used to be a two-lapper, featuring the notorious ‘Puke Hill’ in the final kilometre of each lap. The route now includes a four-kilometre section through the tranquil Ezemvelo Kenneth Stainbank

Nature Reserve. But it’s still a toughie; the undulating roads in Yellowwood Park shouldn’t be underestimated. Another fun fact: a bagpiper will greet runners as they pass the famous Coedmore Castle. You should be able to spot zebra, too.

THURSDAY 15 DECEMBER

5 10

Mandela My Life My Future Challenge Green Hub, Blue Lagoon, Durban; 10km & 5km Run & Walk: 6:15pm Anand Naicker 083 783 6363

SUNDAY 18 DECEMBER

5 10 21.1

SUNDAY 11 DECEMBER

15

Illovo Sugar 15km Christmas Challenge Westville Athletic Club House, corner of Maryvale Road and Syringa Avenue, Westville; 15km: 6am Sharon Schubach 082 414 1783

The Big Hill Run Sugar Rush Park, Esenembe Road, Ballito; 21km & 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Trail Run: 6:30am Zeldi Mann 071 422 0953 SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S

KWAZULU-NATAL

ED’S CHOICE

STRAGGLER’S BEACHCOMBER: Enjoyed by young and old alike.

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


WEDNESDAY 7 DECEMBER

5 10

Taal Monument 10km Nite Race Taal Monument, Gabbema Doordrift Street, Paarl; 10km: 6:30pm; 5km Fun Run: 6:40pm Sybrand du Plessis 083 770 5107

FRIDAY 16 DECEMBER

4.2 10

The RCS Gugulethu Reconciliation Day 10km Race NY 49 Stadium, NY 49, Gugulethu; 10km: 7am; 4.2km Fun Run: 7:10am Themba Shoko 082 476 4656 / Thobile Ndzube 073 318 2563

HOGSBACK TRAIL RUNS: Scenery, farm roads and festive spirit.

SATURDAY 10 DECEMBER

10 21.1

Palm Tyres 21.1km & 10km Palm Tyres, Symonds Street, George; 21.1km & 10km: 6am Alf Zehmke 083 650 5098

WEDNESDAY 14 DECEMBER

10

Growthpoint Properties Sundowner 10km V&A Waterfront (between the back of the Table Bay Hotel and the Helipad), Cape Town; 10km: 6:15pm Top Events 021 511 7130

SATURDAY 31 DECEMBER

5 10 21.1

Dangerpoint Half Marathon Gansbaai Primary School, corner of Ridderspoor and Dahlia Streets, Gansbaai; 21.1km: 7am; 10km: 7:30am; 5km Fun Run: 8am Boats van Staden 072 789 3627

SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

ED’S CHOICE

TRAIL RUNNING SATURDAY 10 DECEMBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C R A I G M U L L E R M E D I A ( H O G S BAC K T R A I L R U N )

3 10 21 Kempston Hogsback Trail Runs Hogsback Inn swimming pool area (off the R345), Hogsback; 21km & 10km: 8am; 3km: 11:30am Sharon Eldridge 083 284 3781 This remote, beautiful landscape is the kind of place where you’d imagine hobbits or fairies might live. Last year, the start of the race had to be delayed – because cows had chewed the route markers attached to strands of long grass! Expect spectacular

views, forest streams, winding roads, lush green forests, mountain reed buck and wild horses. Cool off in the swimming pool at the finish venue, and enjoy food and drink. You could win an out-of-the-ordinary prize. SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


ULTRA-TRAIL CAPE TOWN: A bucketlist race for technical trail runners.

ED’S CHOICE

SATURDAY 10 DECEMBER

35 65 100

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H B Y N I C K M U Z I K

Ultra-Trail Cape Town Gardens Tech Rugby Club, corner Upper Orange Street and Montreal Avenue, Oranjezicht, Cape Town; 100km & 65km: 4am; 35km: 7am Race Contact 079 741 7626 ultratrailcapetown.com Rivalling the likes of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc® in France and the Ultra-Trail Mount Fuji in Japan, this race offers runners the opportunity to explore technical terrain on the slopes of Table Mountain,

Lion’s Head, Signal Hill, Devil’s Peak and Kirstenbosch – which together form an iconic World Heritage Site, and one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. You’ll understand why, once you’ve experienced these beautiful, sweeping views at first hand.

SUNDAY 4 DECEMBER

5 10 21

NE W R ACE!

Land Rover Centurion Mountain Monster Hakahana Trails (next to Gerotek, approximately 15km west of Pretoria); 21km Mountain Monster: 6am; 10km Mega Monster: 6:15am; 5km

Mini Monster: 6:30am labsportscience@gmail.com hakahanatrails.co.za

14km: 8:30am Richard 043 841 1062 morganbayhotel.co.za/ activities/hagmorkei.html

SUNDAY 11 DECEMBER

5 10 15

SUNDAY 18 DECEMBER

Trilogy Trail Run Warwick Wine Estate (on R44, approximately 12km from Stellenbosch); 15km: 7am; 10km: 7:15am; 5km: 7:30am Dirtopia 021 884 4752 dirtopia.co.za

SUNDAY 18 DECEMBER

14

S P R O C EE DA L TO A LO CE. C R ÈC H

5 12 18

Umhlanga Jockey Summer Festival Trail Run Millennium Stage, Umhlanga Promenade Main Beach, Umhlanga; 18km: 6am; 12km: 6:10am; 5km: 6:15am Buzz Bolton 082 956 1608 umhlangatrailrun.co.za

20

Hagmorkei Trail Run Haga Haga Country Club, Main Road, Haga Haga; 20km &

SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


R A C IN G

Other Provinces

Shaun Roberts 082 711 1341

SATURDAY 17 DECEMBER

EASTERN CAPE BORDER SUNDAY 4 DECEMBER

4 8 Daily Dispatch 8km & 4km Fun Run Orient Beach Pools Area, East London; 8km & 4km: 9am Carmen Petersen 043 702 2089

5 10

Drommedaris Holiday 10 & 5km Run Drommedaris Furniture Store, corner of Drommedaris Street and Jeffreys Road, Jeffreysbay; 10km: 7am; 5km Fun Run: 7:05am Elize Fenwick 061 217 0825 / Chris Fenwick 082 577 1800

Northern Cape Aluminium and Glass Magersfontein 25km & 10km Magersfontein Battlefield (close to the Modder River on the N12); 25km & 10km: 6am David Janse van Vuuren 083 443 8198

NORTH WEST CAPE No races scheduled for this period.

A HE A D

ADVENTURE RACING & MULTISPORT SUNDAY 4 DECEMBER Kinetic Adventure Venue TBC 16-19km MTB, 5-6km run, 1km kayak, obstacle course: 8am Teams of two Heidi Muller 082 564 6468 kinetic-events.co.za

WEDNESDAY 28 DECEMBER

5 10

SATURDAY 17 DECEMBER

5

Jingle Bells 5km Charity Fun Walk Gonubie Sports Club, corner of Smith and Recreation Road, Gonubie, East London; 5km Family Walk: 8am Marilene van Biljon 072 056 2374

EASTERN PROVINCE

Friends of St Francis Nature Areas 10km & 5km Run/ Walk Cape St Francis Resort, Da Gama Way, Cape St Francis; 10km Run & 5km Run/Walk: 7:30am Joan Brady 083 398 3948

FREE STATE No races scheduled for this period.

SATURDAY 3 DECEMBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E S Y O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S ( F R I E N D S O F S T F R A N C I S )

5 10 42.2

Aspen Pharmacare PE City Marathon NG Kerk, Marne Avenue, Lorraine, Port Elizabeth; 42.2km: 5am; 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 7am

NORTHERN CAPE GRIQUALAND WEST SATURDAY 10 DECEMBER

10 25

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


Back of the Pack BY BRUCE PINNOCK

FULL OF... RUNNING How to master supreme comfort in uncomfortable times.

‘B

90 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

how said runner, despite having already run more than 35 kilometres, was “full of running”. I leaned back on my squishy pillow, contemplating what I’d need to do to get so fit that after 35 kilometres, I too would be ‘full of running’. Or just ‘half-full of running’. Or even – as I adjusted the pillow under my head, yawned, and stretched out my legs – ‘still running’. I know what you’re thinking. Getting out of bed would be a great place to start. Yeah, yeah. Smartarse. But then the commentator uttered a phrase that brought me crashing back down to earth. She observed that the runner looked “supremely comfortable”. Oh, puh-lease! In my book, ‘supremely comfortable’ is

“No wonder you look like a constipated King Charles Spaniel.” look like a constipated King Charles Spaniel.” And with that, I was out of the zone – and finally, out of bed. In conclusion: to find supreme comfort, perhaps you should abandon any attempt to master the running expertise of an elite marathoner – or even the expression of a constipated King Charles Spaniel, for that matter – in favour of sticking to what you know: Darling? Pass me a beer.

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y I S TO C K P H OTO

est practice’, for running, includes: conquering uphill climbs, improving speed, and most importantly, using it as a convenient excuse to vacate the house before your mother-inlaw arrives. (Whoops! How did that get there? Quick! Delete that last comment before my wife sees it.) For example, the other day I was watching a marathon on TV, hoping to gain insight into how best to improve my running. Admittedly, I was doing so from the comfort of my bed. But before you judge me, consider the fact that long-distance races tend to start at arse-o-clock – most people are still tucked up at that time. The camera had zoomed in on the leading runner. The commentator rabbited on about

defined as ‘lying on the couch, watching TV, icecold beer in hand’. You need a refill? Just a click of the fingers, and your wife will come running. (Whoops! How did that get there? Quick! Delete that last comment before my wife sees it.) The commentator went on to explain that the reason the lead guy was doing so well was that he was “in the zone”. His glazed eyes fixed facing forward, whatever zone the runner was in, he appeared to be gazing out of it with the SDS (you know, the ‘shitting-dog stare’). Admittedly, as I can’t recall ever being ‘in the zone’ myself, I’m not exactly an expert. Nevertheless, the fact that this guy was unbeatable because he was in the zone got me thinking. (Only for me, of course, ‘unbeatable’ means ‘having the ability not to come dead last’. At the 35-kilometre mark of a marathon, a commentator would be more likely to describe me as ‘with a little waddle left’ than ‘full of running’.) Come to think of it, how do you know if you’re ‘in the zone’? Surely, the moment you have to ask yourself if you’re in the zone, you are – by definition – on the outside looking in. As I lay in bed, studying this ‘supremely comfortable’ runner, I concluded that the only way to get into the zone would be to visualise myself being there. To which end, I would adopt the same SDS look that was emblazoned across the unbeatable runner’s face. Getting the SDS right took a long time, considering I was lazing around in bed rather than actually running. But the more I concentrated, the more I began to feel supremely comfortable – almost unbeatable, in fact. Until my wife entered the room. “You aren’t still lazing around in bed?” she asked, in that tone of voice. “No wonder you


WIND SPEED 18 km/h

WEATHER

36°

CROSS WIND 18 km/h

23

temp

FALLING ROCKS CAUTION!

LION’S HEAD HEIGHT 669m

55

60

5 10

50

15

45

20

40 35

323m

30

25

TIME ELAPSED

01:57:03

0m

1670m

UNEVEN TERRAIN AHEAD 12

km/h

TO GO

AVERAGE SPEED

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