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2016 RUNNER’S WORLD

COVER SEARCH FINALISTS 1 EILEEN MOON (co-winner) Cellist, Cancer Survivor 2 DORI LIVINGSTON Cop on the Run 3 AARON SAFT Building Community 4 MICHAEL and DONALD HARMS Pushing Through CP 5 ELIZABETH GRAY Domestic Abuse Survivor 6 JOHN REYES Outracing PTSD 7 KRYSTALANNE CURWOOD The Natural 8 RHONDA FOULDS Taming Parkinson’s 9 JIM BRADEN Still Running at 81!

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2016 RUNNER’S WORLD

COVER SEARCH FINALISTS 1 JOSH LaJAUNIE (co-winner) Lost 230 Pounds 2 DORI LIVINGSTON Cop on the Run 3 AARON SAFT Building Community 4 MICHAEL and DONALD HARMS Pushing Through CP 5 ELIZABETH GRAY Domestic Abuse Survivor 6 JOHN REYES Outracing PTSD 7 KRYSTALANNE CURWOOD The Natural 8 RHONDA FOULDS Taming Parkinson’s 9 JIM BRADEN Still Running at 81!

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“MY WISH IS TO RACE MY BROTHER IN MONACO.”

Professional drivers on closed course. Do not attempt. Prototypes shown with options. Production models will vary. ©2016 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.


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MOUNTAIN RUNNING PATAGONIA, ARGENTINA Trail runners of the world, take note. Tucked away in the southernmost point of South America, Patagonia is home to some of the world’s most breathtaking scenery and most difficult mountain climbing. For professional endurance runner and fervent nature lover Fernanda Maciel, this is a dream combination. She explains that, “Exploring a new place is a way to challenge myself to find new emotions and observe the beauty of nature.” Along with two American ultra runners, she set off to run and hike Cerro Catedral, a technical and tough climb in Patagonia, Argentina. They began their ascent early in the morning, and braved cold, windy weather to conquer this adventure of a lifetime.

RUNNING WILD IN THE MOUNTAINS “I like the lifestyle of meditation, mountains and sports,” muses Fernanda Maciel, a professional runner who lives and trains in Anserall, Spain—a small village in the Pyrenees mountain range that boasts just 80 inhabitants. “I can run for hours and hours in the mountains, feeling the fresh air and observing the silence around me. A full day in the mountains is a challenge and a gift.” She credits endurance trail running with helping her to observe how her mind, body and spirit work together.

FROM TRAVELING TO TRAINING Whether Fernanda is at the top of Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the western hemisphere, training in the Spanish Pyrenees, or simply going out, she turns to her lifestyle jacket—The North Face ThermoBall. “From traveling to training…it’s important to feel comfortable, dry and warm in my daily life.” For all of her adventures, she makes sure to pack her ThermoBall (and her headlamp). “After all day exploring, a cold night without any light from the city or moon arrived in Cerro Catedral. The long way down was tough, it took to us around three hours of non-stop speed running down in the dark.”

Adventure Running Tips • Pay attention! While it’s natural to want to gawk at the incredible views, keep your eyes on the trail to watch out for hazards ahead. Use a walking break to observe the beautiful scenery and soak up the wonders of nature.

Putting It to the Test

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When You

Run through the Theme Parks and straight into a dream come true. Sign up for an email reminder at runDisney.com to be notiďŹ ed when events open for registration.


Every Mile Is Magic

CALIFORNIA

FLORIDA

Disneyland® Half Marathon Weekend presented by Cigna August 31 - September 3, 2017

Disney Wine & Dine Half Marathon Weekend presented by MISFIT TM November 2 - 5, 2017

Super Heroes Half Marathon Weekend November 9 - 12, 2017

Walt Disney World ® Marathon Weekend presented by Cigna January 4 - 8, 2017 On Sale Now • January 3 - 7, 2018 25th Anniversary

Star Wars TM Half Marathon—The Light Side January 12 - 15, 2017 On Sale Now • January 11 - 14, 2018

Disney Princess Half Marathon Weekend presented by Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals February 22 - 26, 2017 On Sale Now • February 22 - 25, 2018

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Star Wars TM Half Marathon—The Dark Side April 20 - 23, 2017 On Sale Now • April 18 - 22, 2018

PARIS

Disneyland® Paris —Val d’Europe Half Marathon Weekend September 21 - 24, 2017

All races subject to age eligibility requirements and capacity limits. © & ™ Lucasfilm Ltd. © MARVEL © Disney


WARMUP CONTENTS

DECEMBER 2016

RAVE RUN

EDITOR’S LETTER

THE LOOP

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Altra Torin 2.5

WINTER SHOE GUIDE

Best Buy: Mizuno Wave Sayonara 4

We road-tested dozens of new shoes, and these 14 outpaced the rest. Find your perfect pair. BY JEFF DENGATE AND

Editor’s Choice: Nike Air Zoom Structure 20 R E S O U R C E S ; G R O O M I N G B Y RY U TA R O F O R H A L L E Y R E S O U R C E S ; C LOT H I N G & S H O E S B Y B R O O K S R U N N I N G CO M PA N Y

COV E R P H OTO G R A P H S B Y G E O R G E L A N G E ; S T Y L I N G B Y S H E A DA S P I N ; H A I R & M A K E U P B Y C I N DY A DA M S & C L AU D I A A N D R E AT TA F O R H A L L E Y

MARTYN SHORTEN, PH.D.

Best Buy: Nike Zoom Span

Best Update: Saucony Triumph ISO 3

ON THE COVER Reader’s Issue.............................. 62 Gear of the Year .......................... 56 10 Holiday Hacks ......................... 46 Cover Search .............................. 62 Run Stronger ............................... 38 Lunch Smarter ............................ 48 Crush Hills .................................. 34 Beat Leg Pain .............................. 52

PHOTOGRAPH BY NICK FERRARI

62 RW COVER SEARCH

72 BOOK EXCERPT

78 SPECIAL REPORT

REAL RUNNERS, INCREDIBLE STORIES!

YOU DON’T KNOW PHEIDIPPIDES!

RUNNING WHILE FEMALE

This year’s talented finalists lead remarkable lives. Meet the men and women who inspired us the most.

Think you know the real story behind the ancient legend? An ultrarunner voyages to Greece to seek the truth.

Wolf whistles, catcalls, and other harassment is a constant annoyance for women runners. What, if anything, can be done?

BY THE EDITORS OF RW

BY DEAN KARNAZES

BY MICHELLE HAMILTON

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 7


CONTENTS

50

WE’RE ALWAYS RUNNING AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM

21 HUMAN RACE 21

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Back Story Olympian, American record holder, and emoji lobbyist Molly Huddle dishes before her marathon debut. Team in Training Gold medalist Gwen Jorgenson and retired pro cyclist Patrick Lemieux make marriage (and teamwork) work. The Newbie Chronicles How an ordinary training run can often be extraordinary. BY KATHRYN ARNOLD

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PERSONAL BEST

Intersection Tom Hanks runs into a wedding photo shoot; Rob Riggle gives marathon advice.

26

These Running Times In praise of the solitary run.

27

Ask Miles Can I turn the volume down on other runners’ music?

TRAINING

“We got married at a pizzeria in Cable, Wisconsin, where we had gone mountain biking together,” says Lemieux. “We served pizza, beer, and ice cream. You can only eat quinoa and birdseed for so many meals, right?”

34

Find Your Spark Choose your next goal and unclutter your training schedule for optimal enjoyment.

36

The Starting Line Strategies to keep your running routine intact during the holidays.

38

The Fast Lane Boost your efficiency with tactics inspired by Olympian Zersenay Tadese.

40

Race Prep Going on race-cation? Prime your body for the heat.

42

Ask The Experts Will social media help or hurt your training?

44

Next Level Kate Grace talks about her first Olympics.

BY JONATHAN BEVERLY

USA Half Marathon Invitational A selective half marathon in San Diego—if you can qualify.

I’M A RUNNER 108

Cynthia Erivo The Broadway star is getting ready for the biggest race of her life.

10 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

BEHIND THE SCENES Watch a video of Dean Karnazes being turned into a Greek statue (page 72) at runnersworld.com/ spartavideo.

FUEL 46

Holiday Trimmings Avoid weight gain this season with these tips.

48

Quick Bites Six mouth-watering upgrades to grilled cheese.

50

Fridge Wisdom Recover after a cold run with warm, antioxidantpacked drinks.

RACES+PLACES 98

Looking for a gift for the runner in your life? Our 30 Under $30 guide has tons of gear ideas that will be sure to inspire merry winter miles. At runnersworld .com/30under30.

“Acting in The Color Purple has been like running a marathon,” says Erivo, who plays Celie in the Broadway revival. “You’ve got easy moments, tough moments, moments of absolute exhilaration and joy, and I feel like that might be what the New York City Marathon will feel like.”

MIND+BODY 52

Position Statement Take a stand, literally, against tight hips and hamstrings.

54

The Body Shop Strengthen your hammies for good alignment.

GEAR 56

Gear of the Year From socks to avocado preservers, these products belong on your wish list.

TREADMILL TESTS In the market for a new treadmill? Just in time for winter, we tested more than a dozen machines. Read the reviews for some of the best at runners world.com/treadmills.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H R I S H I N K L E ( H U D D L E ); M I TC H M A N D E L ( T E A ); B R I A N JAC KS O N /A L A M Y ( B OW ); J O N AT H A N S P R AG U E ( K A R N A Z E S ); M AT T R A I N E Y ( T R E A D M I L L ) ; N AT H A N P E R K E L ( E R I VO)

PERFECT PRESENT


David Willey EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Jessica Ni Murphy

ART + PHOTOGRAPHY BENJAMEN PURVIS Design Director CLARE LISSAMAN Photo Director ERIN BENNER Art Director RENEE KEITH Photo Editor TARA MAIDA Art Production Manager KAREN MATTHES Designer KRISTEN PARKER Assistant Photo Editor

DIGITAL CHRIS KRAFT Site Director ROBERT JAMES REESE Executive Producer SCOTT DOUGLAS, ERIN STROUT Senior Editors BRIAN DALEK, CHRISTOPHER MICHEL Digital Editors HANNAH MCGOLDRICK Social Media Editor DAVID E. GRAF Senior Multimedia Producer DEREK CALL Junior Video Producer GINA OLD Web Producer JENNIFER GIANDOMENICO Tablet Producer

BRAND DEVELOPMENT

WRITERS AT LARGE JONATHAN BEVERLY, AMBY BURFOOT, JOHN BRANT, CHARLES BUTLER, BENJAMIN H. CHEEVER, SARA CORBETT, STEVE FRIEDMAN, CYNTHIA GORNEY, MICHAEL HEALD, KENNY MOORE, MARC PARENT, MARK REMY, PETER SAGAL, ROBERT SULLIVAN, NICK WELDON

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LIZ APPLEGATE, KRISTIN ARMSTRONG, CHRISTIE ASCHWANDEN, TODD BALF, ADAM BUCKLEY COHEN, BOB COOPER, CALEB DANILOFF, LAUREN FLESHMAN, JEFF GALLOWAY, PETER GAMBACCINI, MICHELLE HAMILTON, JOHN HANC, HAL HIGDON, ALEX HUTCHINSON, LISA JHUNG, CINDY KUZMA, YISHANE LEE, DIMITY McDOWELL, JANICE McLEOD (Research), SARAH BOWEN SHEA, MARTYN SHORTEN (Shoe Lab), CHRISTOPHER SOLOMON, BARBARA WEBB (Copy)

ADVISORY BOARD PAM ANDERSON, NATE APPLEMAN, PAMELA NISEVICH BEDE, R.D., MARK BITTMAN, WALTER M. BORTZ, M.D., RICHARD T. BRAVER, D.P.M., JEFFREY L. BROWN, PSY.D., DAVID COSTILL, PH.D., JACK DANIELS, PH.D., LAURA DUNNE, M.D., MICHAEL FREDERICSON, M.D., JANET HAMILTON, R.C.E.P., CINDRA KAMPHOFF, PH.D., NIKKI KIMBALL, M.S.P.T., JORDAN METZL, M.D., REBECCA PACHECO, DANIEL J. PERELES, M.D., GESINE BULLOCK PRADO, STEPHEN M. PRIBUT, D.P.M., SAGE ROUNTREE, PH.D., JOAN BENOIT SAMUELSON, FRANK SHORTER, CRAIG SOUDERS, M.P.T., PAUL D. THOMPSON, M.D., CLINT VERRAN, P.T., PATRICIA WELLS

ADVERTISING

Maria Rodale CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PAUL McGINLEY EVP, General Counsel, Chief Administrative Officer STEPHEN TWILLIGER EVP, Chief Financial Officer

New York 212-573-0300

What is your longest running streak?

Southeast Sales Manager MARY ELLEN MORELLI maryellen.morelli@rodale.com New England Sales Manager NICOLE RAGUCCI nicole.ragucci@rodale.com Sales & Marketing Coordinator JUSTINE CHUN Sales Assistant SARA DE SIMINE

Chicago 312-726-0365 Midwest Sales Representative JORDAN SCHEIBE Sales Assistant ZACHARY MACKOWIAK

Detroit 248-637-1352 Detroit Advertising Manager KATHY THORPE kathy.thorpe@rodale.com Sales Assistant SUE MARINELLI

“365 days! I like to say it in days instead of one year—it sounds longer!”

“A sad 35 days. I believe in rest and cross-training.”

“322 days. It was to keep me motivated for a big race I had planned for late September.”

• “I somehow run fewer miles when I streak than when I take my usual two rest days per week, so my longest was 40 days— despite being a founder of the #RWRunStreak.”

Los Angeles 310-252-7518 Southwest Sales Representative MARK MASERO mark.masero@rodale.com Sales Assistant RENETT YOUNG

Northern California 707-775-3376 Northwest Sales Representative NICHOLAS FREEDMAN nick@mediahoundsinc.com Account Manager DARLENE GAMBONINI-MCGINNIS darlene@mediahoundsinc.com

MARKETING Director of Integrated Marketing LAUREN BREWER Integrated Marketing Director KATHLEEN JOBES Art Director TRACI CONRAD HAFNER Integrated Marketing Director ALISON BROWN Associate Marketing Manager SARAH HEMSTOCK Research Director PAUL BAUMEISTER

PRODUCTION

• “A bit more than 6 years. It was detracting from enjoying my running. I forced myself to miss a day to break the compulsion. And then of course ran 14 miles the next day.”

MIRANDA DeSANTIS SVP, Human Resources LAURA FRERER-SCHMIDT SVP, Corporate Sales & Women’s Health MICHAEL LAFAVORE Editorial Director ROBERT NOVICK Head of Global Business Development JOYCEANN SHIRER SVP, Marketing HEIDI CHO VP, Digital Content GAIL GONZALES VP, Publisher, Rodale Books

J.I. Rodale FOUNDER, 1942–1971 RODALE INTERNATIONAL KEVIN LABONGE Executive Director of Business Development & Global Licensing JOHN VILLE Editorial Director ANGELA KIM Director of Business Development & Global Licensing VERONIKA RUFF TAYLOR Editorial Director, Runner’s World International TARA SWANSEN Director of Global Marketing KARL ROZEMEYER Senior Content Manager NATANYA SPIES Editorial & Content Coordinator

We inspire health, healing, happiness, and love in the world. Starting with you.

Print Production Manager KELLY McDONALD kelly.mcdonald@rodale.com; 610-967-7615 Production Specialist LYNN LAUDENSLAGER lynn.laudenslager@rodale.com; 610-967-8143

BUSINESS OFFICE Vice President, Finance LAURIE JACKSON Finance Manager JACKIE BAUM Advertising Finance Manager SUSAN G. SNYDER

CONSUMER MARKETING Vice President, Retail Sales MICHELLE TAUBER Executive Director SUSAN K. HARTMAN Senior Manager HEATHER COX Associate Manager, Events SUZANNE ALLAIRE

RODALE FOOD

“366 days of one mile or more. On day 367, I ate a doughnut instead.”

BETH BUEHLER Chief Operating Officer

Test Kitchen Manager JULISSA ROBERTS Test Kitchen Senior Associate Editor JENNIFER KUSHNIER Test Kitchen Associate Editor AMY FRITCH

INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS EDITORS-IN-CHIEF ARGENTINA GERMAN PITTELLI, AUSTRALIA LISA HOLMES, BRAZIL ANDREA ESTEVAM, CHINA YAN YI, FRANCE GUILLAUME DEPASSE, GERMANY MARTIN GRUENING, HUNGARY MATE PÁSZTOR, ITALY MARCO MARCHEI, LATIN AMERICA CESAR PEREZ COTA, NETHERLANDS OLIVIER HEIMEL, NORWAY EIVIND BYE, POLAND MAREK DUDZINSKI, SOUTH AFRICA MIKE FINCH, SPAIN ALEJANDRO CALABUIG, SWEDEN STEFAN LARSEN, TURKEY FATIH BUYUKBAYRAK, UNITED KINGDOM ANDY DIXON

RUNNER’S WORLD is a proud member of

Rodale Inc. • 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098-0099 rodaleinc.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE 800-666-2828 Email rwdcustserv@rodale.com Online runnersworld.com/customer-service Mail Runner’s World Customer Service P.O. Box 26299, Lehigh Valley, PA 18002-6299 Absolute satisfaction guaranteed. We occasionally make our subscribers’ names available to companies whose products or services may be of interest to you. You may request your name be removed from these promotion lists; call 8 00-666-2828 or go to rodaleinc .com/privacy-policy.

Licensing Contact Wyndell Hamilton at Wright’s and Reprints Media, 281-419-5725 x152, whamilton@ wrightsmedia.com. Printed in USA

Attention, Specialty Running Stores: Sell Runner’s World in your store, risk-free. Call 800-845-8050 for details.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I C H A E L B U R R E L L /A L A M Y (CA L E N DA R ) ; M I TC H M A N D E L ( D U M B B E L L S ); M AT T R A I N E Y ( D O U G H N U T )

WARREN GREENE Brand Editor BUDD COATES Training Director LORI ADAMS Senior Projects Coordinator

VP/PUBLISHER

Associate Publisher PAUL COLLINS paul.collins@rodale.com Chief Running Officer BART YASSO bart.yasso@rodale.com

EDITORIAL JOHN ATWOOD Editor TISH HAMILTON Executive Editor SUZANNE PERREAULT Senior Managing Editor CHRISTINE FENNESSY Multimedia Features Editor JEFF DENGATE Articles Editor (Shoes+Gear) KATRIN M C DONALD NEITZ Articles Editor (Mind+Body, Human Race) MEGHAN KITA Senior Editor (Training, Races+Places) HEATHER MAYER IRVINE Senior Editor (Food+Nutrition) LINDSAY BENDER Assistant Managing Editor ALI NOLAN Associate Editor KIT FOX Reporter

Molly O’Keefe Corcoran

MANAGING DIRECTOR


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RAVE RUN

SILVERTON, COLORADO RUNNER Cheryl Albrecht THE EXPERIENCE At 10,910 feet, Molas Pass in the San Juan Mountains boasts some of the most pristine air in the nation. Go out for 12 miles on Segment 25 of the Colorado Trail for views of Little Molas Lake. “It’s a beautiful, inspiring place to run,” says Albrecht. “You feel like you’re on top of the world.” LOCAL LEGEND Access the Colorado Trail via the Million Dollar Highway, a road that some say gets its name from the price it cost to build it. Others say the fill dirt that it’s made of contains more than a million dollars’ worth of gold ore. CROSS-TRAIN Go for a ride on the 21-mile singletrack mountain bike trail that connects Molas Pass to Bolam Pass Road. LOCAL FARE Get warm at The Rum Bar—just a 10-minute drive away—with a cup of Colorado Coffee, a hot cocktail of house-made coffee liqueur, black coffee, and whipped cream. PHOTOGRAPHER Kennan Harvey/ Aurora Photos

FOR DIRECTIONS, RESOURCE INFORMATION, AND DOWNLOADABLE WALLPAPER IMAGES, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/ RAVERUN.


DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 15


EDITOR’S LETTER

All 10 finalists of our 2016 Cover Search met in New York City for a photo shoot, where they were joined by judges Willey (in jacket), Hamilton (far right), and Yasso (third from left).

In addition to appearing on our cover, both winners of the RW Cover Contest will receive the following prizes:

EVERYDAY HEROES A SIMPLE BUT POWERFUL IDEA once again

16 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

our Cover Search, has helped her recovery process from that trauma. Our staff met after this year’s horrible murders to talk about what RW might publish about them. Mercifully, serious crimes are very rarely committed against runners, but at the meeting some staffers began to talk about how blurry the line can be between violence and harassment. “What do you mean, harassment?” I asked, and proceeded to get my mind blown. Several women explained how common it is for them to be ogled, catcalled, propositioned, and even followed while they’re out running. Not occasionally, but all the time. And not in a way that’s eye-roll annoying, but in a way that can be frightening. I was stunned, outraged, and (because they were so surprised that I was so surprised) embarrassed. I know scores, if not hundreds, of female runners— friends, relatives, colleagues, and readers. I’ve run countless times with women and don’t recall witnessing a single offense. But the women who are on the receiving end of this abuse aren’t running with men. Most often, they’re running alone. We decided on the spot that this was a story worth reporting on, and Senior Editor Meghan Kita and Contributing Editor Michelle Hamilton got to work. To ask readers about their own experiences, they put a survey

$750 worth of shoes and apparel from official running sponsor Brooks Running…

And a VIP spectator’s weekend at the New York City Marathon, including grandstand seats along the finish in Central Park. Want to be on our cover next year? Go to runnersworld.com/ coversearch2017 for details.

DAVID WILLEY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

@DWilleyRW

This month, split covers feature our two Cover Search winners, Eileen Moon and Josh LaJaunie. Cover photos by George Lange

PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE LANGE

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N ( R O C K ‘ N ’ R O L L M A R AT H O N , N E W YO R K C I T Y M A R AT H O N ); M AT T R A I N E Y ( S H O E S )

animated the Runner’s World Cover Search this year: Regular runners do amazing things every day. In May, we began collecting their stories—your stories—by asking entrants to describe their breakthrough moments when they accomplished something remarkable, overcame long odds, or decided to make a sea change in their lives. More than 1,000 runners entered, and after three months of spirited debate and a couple days of Skype interviews, Chief Running Officer Bart Yasso, Executive Editor Tish Hamilton, and I settled on 10 finalists, with help from our guest judges, Jim Weber, the CEO of Brooks Running, and WABC’s Amy Freeze, the marathon-running meteorologist. We chose Eileen Moon and Josh LaJaunie to appear on split front covers, but all the finalists appear on the inside cover flap. Their stories begin on page 62, and their video profiles are at runnersworld.com/coversearch. You can also meet last year’s finalists there. I thought of one of them, Samantha Gardner, this past summer when three female runners were murdered during a nine-day span. In 2005, Samantha was attacked while running on a Sunday afternoon by a man who held her for six hours, raped her, and threatened to kill her before letting her go. Gardner says that running, and participating in

A trip to a 2017 International Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon of their choice (that’s Montreal, above), courtesy of presenting sponsor Toyota…

on our website. More than 4,500 people responded, and 43 percent of women said they experience harassment while running, compared with only 4 percent of men. As you’ll see in “Running While Female” (page 78), the statistics get even more shocking. The story raises all kinds of uncomfortable issues but offers no easy solutions, because there aren’t any. Gender-based harassment is a complex social problem, not just a running problem. Women are harassed (and worse) every day in America while they walk to their offices and down grocerystore aisles. But running is supposed to be an escape from everyday annoyances and stressors. That’s what it’s always been for me, aside from the occasional exchange with an aggressive driver. I assumed female runners enjoyed the same reprieve. Now I know that isn’t always true, and I’m grappling with what to do with that new, unpleasant knowledge. Talking openly and honestly about on-the-run harassment— and about its prevalence—is a step in the right direction. At the very least, it leads to greater empathy, especially among male runners. Even if women can’t be entirely spared this odious treatment out on the roads, I hope it’s helpful for them to know they aren’t alone or at fault. We runners are a tribe, and I think I can speak for my gender when I say this to any and all women who continue to run despite facing this deplorable headwind: However you need us, we’ve got your back.


Get in touch with a different kind of remote.

Introducing the new Volkswagen Golf Alltrack with 4MOTION® all-wheel drive. Soon to be everywhere. When it comes to the moments we remember, how many take place in your living room? If you’re still trying to recall, perhaps it’s time to reacquaint yourself with a world beyond Wi-Fi, where the stunning beauty of a vista in front of you is not virtual reality but reality reality. The Golf Alltrack comes with 4MOTION all-wheel drive, Off-Road Mode, and enough turbocharged power to motivate you off the couch. Because happiness favors the spontaneous.

vw.com

Optional accessories shown. Always ensure that your vehicle is equipped with appropriate tires and equipment and always adjust your speed and driving style to the road, terrain, traffic, and weather conditions. See Owner’s Manual for further details and important limitations. ©2016 Volkswagen of America, Inc.


THE LOOP

THE INBOX

A TALE OF 50 CITIES At 11, Chicago just missed the top 10 list (“America’s 50 Best Running Cities,” October). The two major reasons? Safety and climate. Okay, safety I get, but the weather here is great! #dontaskmeafteroctober

THE NEW MATH

KELSEY BLINDT GROSS, VIA FACEBOOK

CHRIS GAFFNEY, VIA FACEBOOK

Chiming in for Louisville. I’ve lived and run in Portland and Seattle, and they’re great. But we have a Frederick Olmsted– designed park system and the Kentucky Derby Festival Marathon and “mini marathon” (13.1), which goes into the legendary Churchill Downs horse track! What’s not to love? SUZ ANNE DUVALL, VIA FACEBOOK

I get that everyone will have their own biases, but no Austin, Texas, on the list—really? You’d be hard-pressed to find a city anywhere in the nation with more races per capita, more trails and areas to run, and such a great running scene.

230 pounds is equal to:

634 McDonald’s double cheeseburgers (5.8 oz. each)

248 pairs of Nike Free Flyknit men’s shoes (size 10, 7.4 oz./shoe)

3,345 GU Energy sport gels (1.1 oz. each)

1,533 Clif energy bars (2.4 oz. each)

DAN SMITH, VIA FACEBOOK

EDITOR’S REPLY: We hear you— Austin was close! It scored low in the climate index, bumping it to 53rd. If we’d had an “editors’ pick” index, it probably would’ve made the list. Read more about it at runnersworld.com/austin.

1.71 Galen Rupps (134 pounds each)

Send comments to letters@runnersworld .com. If your letter is published, you’ll receive an RW T-shirt. RUNNER’S WORLD reserves the right to

edit readers’ submissions. All readers’ submissions become the sole property of RUNNER’S WORLD and may be published in any medium and for any use worldwide.

Buy it at shop.run nersworld.com, but return it if you break your streak! (We’re kidding.)

THE SCALE

This year’s cover search co-winner Josh LaJaunie (page 63) lost an incredible 230 pounds! To get a sense of just how much that is, we made a few comparisons. STREAK WITH US

The RW Holiday Run Streak is back! We know it can be hard to keep your running on track this time of the year—but it’s easier if you have a goal. The process is simple: Run at least one mile per day, every day, starting on Thanksgiving (Thursday, November 24) and ending on New Year’s Day (Sunday, January 1). Get the deets at runnersworld.com/ rwrunstreak. Buy our dry-wicking streaker shirt to run with pride!

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R U S H JAG O E ( L A JAU N I E ); M E D I A B L I T Z I M AG E S /A L A M Y ( B U R G E R ); M I TC H M A N D E L ( S H O E , G U ); T H O M A S M AC D O N A L D (C L I F BA R ); K E V I N M O R R I S / P H OTO R U N ( R U P P )

I’ve run in nine of the top 10 cities and feel fortunate. There are wonderful places all over this country, and running is the best way to see a new place. My best add this year was running Puget Sound [Seattle] three mornings in a row.

If you want a good estimate of your finish time, check out our new Race Time Predictor. You’re now able to enter more data for better results. Find it at runners world.com/tools/ race-time-predictor.


THE QUESTION

WHAT’S THE GRUNGIEST YOU’VE EVER LET SOMETHING GET AND STILL WORN IT?

THE GIFTS

Trying to find the perfect present for the runner on your list? We’ve got you covered with new RW gear. Turn to page 56 for more running gift ideas.

Our Running Is a Natural High sweatshirt was inspired by a shirt we sold in the 1970s. Get yours at shop .runnersworld.com.

THE GALLERY

#RUNNING CLOTHESCHAOS Show us your messy running-clothes drawer!

“Gotta sort me drawers out—any good solutions?” —@emjsimmo

Because who really needs a drawer?! —@chelseatietjen

ILLUSTRATION BY DAN WOODGER

Actually, yes. Turn to page 35!

Did the Tough Mudder and then ran 10 miles the next day without cleaning my shoes. That was pretty gross. —@zachtothejohnso I’ve never washed my hat, ever. Bought it in 2006. It’ll wash the power from it. Plus it’s more sentient than most. —@rowmanrox Same socks & sports bra for a whole week during summer. Was out of town and forgot to pack more. Pretty stinky and stiff by week’s end. —@pippa10 I actually don’t think I want to know the answers to this question. —Gigs1973


Run to a better place with the Adrenaline GTS 17. It’s got the perfect balance of support and cushioning to deliver a super smooth ride.

Š 2016 Brooks Sports, Inc.


TRIATHLON’S POWER COUPLE p22

WAHLBERG, HANKS & HART p25

HUMAN( )RACE NEWS, TRENDS, and REGULAR RUNNERS doing AMAZING THINGS

BACK STORY

MOLLY HUDDLE 32, PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Huddle plans to make her marathon debut in New York City after an epic track season: She won the U.S. outdoor track championships in the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, then in Rio, she shattered the American 10,000 record (30:13.17). But what got a lot of fans talking and tweeting was her campaign for the creation of a female runner emoji. “Though it’s a lighthearted topic among gender equality issues, the request was serious,” she says. “I do love a good emoji.” —SCOTT DOUGLAS

FIRST ADVENTURE “I’ve heard New York is a difficult debut. But I feel like I need to be excited about a race that long in order to commit to that level of work. And New York has that excitement.” SPEED QUEEN “Before training for the marathon, the longest run of my life was about 18 miles. For New York I planned to get up to 24. I’m not doing as much intense track work. I miss the intensity.” RIO HEAT “About halfway in the 10,000 it felt like an I’mgoing-to-blow-up level

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS HINKLE

of fast. But near the end I realized I needed a sub-5:00 mile to get the American record.” [She clocked a 4:51.] NAILING IT “I paint my fingernails as part of my race prep. It’s something fun and meditative. I’m not yet sure what they will look like for NYC—I usually go with something that ties into the race.” SHORT SIDED “I have a shorter right leg, so I’ve always had a small hitch in the way I move. I wear an orthotic and I need to work on hip and ankle mobility.” STRONG =HEALTHY “My lifting plan includes hurdle drills, back squats, single-leg squats, and abductor exercises. I use pretty light weights, and it’s about 30 minutes of exercises two or three times a week.” ROLE MODELS “In college I knew I wanted to run professionally and was inspired by Deena Kastor. What American women did in Rio will go a long way in inspiring the next crew.” TOUGH COOKIE “I’m struggling with learning how to bake. I’m successful about 10 percent of the time. Cinnamon rolls are the holy grail because when done right they are delicious. Mine have been a disaster.”

EMOJI EQUALITY THE IDEA

“I was texting with a running friend and wished I could use a female athlete emoji. I tweeted about it and got nearly 500 likes and 200 retweets.” THE PROCESS

“My training partner and I submitted a request to the Unicode Consortium with a suggested design—our version had a ponytail.” THE APPROVAL

“In September, Apple released the iOS 10 update with emojis reflecting gender diversity—including a female runner [above].” THE MEANING

“We like to actually be able to see ourselves in the products that are meant to represent us. There is an underlying message of exclusion otherwise.”

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 21


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THE DECISION Patrick “I was really pragmatic about where I was with my career and felt like I’d maxed it out. I knew my understanding of what an athlete needed to succeed would be really beneficial to Gwen. The decision to be done bike racing and look after Gwen was really a no-brainer.” Gwen “He had flown to one of my races in Madrid and he told me. It came as a complete shock. At first I tried to convince him to change his mind, afraid he might regret it. But he had thought about it for a really long time.”

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DOMESTIQUE BLISS Gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen had a competitive advantage going into Rio: her husband. When Gwen Jorgensen launched her triathlon career in 2010, the former University of Wisconsin swimmer and runner knew a key to her success would be her commitment to cycling. As it turns out, one cyclist’s commitment to her proved just as crucial. Jorgensen, now 30, met Patrick Lemieux, now 29, in 2011 on a group ride in Milwaukee. She was still a full-time accountant; he was a pro cyclist visiting from St. Paul, Minnesota. The ride began with Jorgensen picking Lemieux’s brain and ended with the two making dinner plans. Before long, they were juggling a relationship with their frenetic racing schedules, a tall task that ended the day Lemieux announced he was retiring from cycling to become Jorgensen’s one-man support 22 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

crew. “Gwen was a better athlete than I ever was,” Lemieux says. “I knew there was more she could accomplish.” Leaving logistics to Lemieux, whom she married in 2014, Jorgensen focused on her athletic career. She ramped up her training to include annual stints in Australia and Spain and went from rising star to world champion. Her crowning achievement came in Rio, where she won Olympic gold, four years after a flat tire had deflated her medal hopes in London. After the 1.5K swim and 38.5K ride, she leaned on her strength as a runner to win the 10K road finale. “We put four years of work into one day,” says Jorgensen, who is making her marathon debut November 6 in New York City. Here’s how the couple balances the workload. —NICK WELDON

ANOTHER SURPRISE Patrick “A month later I bought the ring, a unique one without a big diamond protruding from it but with diamonds embedded in the band, since she’s always swimming and running and changing clothes. In December 2013, I proposed on a bike ride, since that’s how we met.” Gwen “I was surprised! A week earlier Pat had planned a ride for us and I thought he might propose, and he didn’t. I came home bawling. On this ride it was the first big snowfall in Minnesota, and he asked to stop and take a picture and got down on one knee…I actually took a step back and slipped and fell.”

Gwen Jorgensen says her coach, Jamie Turner (at right in center photo), and husband, Patrick Lemieux, were key to her goldmedal performance in Rio (1:56:16). It’s the first time an American has won gold in the Olympic Triathlon.


the logistics of our trip. But I hate planning ahead for meals.” Gwen “This past year, in-season, I went once. I do enjoy baking in the off-season.”

C O U R T E S Y O F K A R L H E N D R I KS E ( L E M I E U X R AC I N G ); M I TC H M A N D E L (OAT M E A L ); T H O M AS M AC D O N A L D ( L AU N D RY ); Y H L I M /A L A M Y (G R O C E R I E S )

US PT LR E AT W/I OBN I KBEYS ,NBAI K TE R SE Y O F WAG N E R A R AU J O & S P E C I A L I Z E D ( R U N N I N G ); CO U R T E SY O F G W E N J O R G E N S E N & PAT R I C K L E M I E U X ( W E D D I N G ); ICO L LU MEE);GCOOEUSRH

T H I S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y O F N I L S N I L S E N & U S A T R I AT H LO N ( TO P L E F T ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F S P E C I A L I Z E D ( K I TC H E N , J O R G E N S E N & T U R N E R ,

MORNING RITUAL Patrick “Gwen always wakes up before me. If we need to be up at 6 a.m., she’s up at 5:50. She’ll go for her morning run while I make her breakfast.” Gwen “Breakfast is always oatmeal. On a nonrace day I’ll add a poached egg, nuts, and fruit. We travel with a rice cooker and Pat will make the oatmeal in it.”

CHORES Patrick “Laundry. Maintaining the bikes. Getting her water. Doing the dishes. Managing our budget. I don’t think there’s anything super sexy about my job, but I’m always on call and always within earshot of Gwen.” Gwen “What falls into my lap? Nothing. I train.”

GROCERY TRIPS Patrick “Six times a week. I’m very organized and I think months in advance of a race for mechanical things she’ll need for her bike, or planning

WORKOUT ROUTINE Gwen “In-season I’m training every single day, and Tuesday through Saturday it’s three sessions a day: swim, bike, run. A normal week might be 20,000 meters swimming, 200 to 300K on the bike, and 25 to 50 miles running.” Patrick “I try to ride six days a week, an hour or two a day. If I can do three hours on Saturday, that’s great. I tried running once. I felt like I was getting worse at riding and marginally better at running. It didn’t pan out.” RACE DAY Patrick “I’ll make her breakfast, wash and check her bikes, and depending on when the race is, maybe make a second breakfast or lunch, then check the bikes again and send her off. At the race I make it easy for her to know where I’ll be. I might say, ‘I’ll be outside the athlete’s lounge, over by this tree, and I will not move until your race starts.’ ” Gwen “On race day it’s about me needing him around me at all times. He’s there to play music if I want music, or sit and read next to me.”

THE ADVANTAGE Patrick “When I’m out bagging bikes [packing

them] for an hour and a half, I know that Gwen is resting while her competitors are doing the work I’m doing.” Gwen “Pat always says, ‘Getting groceries or cooking one day won’t tire you out, but these things add up over time.’ I come home from a swim and lunch is on the table. I’m taking a nap before my competitors have sat down to eat.” GOLDEN MOMENT Gwen “I was so focused on running to the finish that I had no idea I had a huge gap. I looked back with five meters to go and saw no one there and started smiling uncontrollably. I crossed the finish and cried. It was a mixture of disbelief and joy.” Patrick “It was so cool to see her cross the finish line. I was really overwhelmed and totally relieved. No matter what the result had been, there would have been no regret in the work we did—however, the feeling of winning was much better than the feeling of losing would have been.” BETTER TOGETHER Patrick “I really look up to Gwen’s work ethic and commitment. In the work I do now and in the work I’ll do in the future, I can ask myself, ‘Do I have the same drive Gwen has?’ If I do, I’ll be successful.” Gwen “I’ve become dependent on him. I say his name so many times in a single day. The reason I could train abroad and made the changes I needed to in order to become successful is that Pat said he would be there for me every day.”

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 23


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The Newbie Chronicles BY KATHRYN ARNOLD

A RUN TO FORGET Who knew running could be so delightfully dull? ell, I’m afraid the jig is up. It’s time we acknowledge the obvious: For a column that is (A) in a running magazine and (B) about becoming a runner, it really doesn’t contain much running. ¶ Actually it contains, like, none. None running. ¶ I blame myself (I mean, who else is there?). See, I’m a writer before I’m a runner, and I’m acutely aware that prose about the physical act of running has the potential to be straight up deadly: “I took a step. Then another. Then another. Soon, I had taken many steps. I decided to take more.” This, dear reader, is the kind of insipidness I’ve tried to spare you. Except! (There’s always an except.) Running has become such a curious feature of my life, such a tricky but transcendent source of growth that I wonder now whether I could tackle the subject without putting us all into a coma. ¶ So here goes. ¶ Two days ago, I ran home from work. My office, in Manhattan, is 13 blocks from my apartment. It’s a short distance—less than a mile—but hey, a small something is better than a big nothing. I dragged my running shoes from the pile beneath my desk, changed into a pair of Technicolor athletic leggings, and headed out. ¶ Eighth Avenue was a straw-colored straightaway in the diffuse light of dusk, and I wove through the tourists and haughty business folk on my way to Columbus

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Circle. Oh, those first two minutes of a run, when you feel like you’re flying! Oh, those fleeting moments before the leadenness kicks in and your breath leaves you—I love those minutes. They don’t last, of course. By the time I crossed the circle and turned onto Central Park West, I’d reached the part I don’t love, where my body feels like a wheezing bagpipe, like a machine that’s breaking down. My ears throbbed with brain-blood, my mouth went dry, and the euphoria, the pride of exercising (I’m doing what I’m supposed to!) gave way to an awareness that my belly was jiggling and everyone could see it jiggling and the universe had narrowed to just one tragic jiggling belly at which every sentient being was privately laughing. But then I got through a few blocks—62nd Street, 63rd, 64th… Whoa, I’m already at 64th?—and, thanks to a mercifully short attention span, lost interest in my anxieties. Not because I achieved some kind of high or had some epiphany about the pointlessness of insecurity; no, I really did just forget to care. At 67th Street the light changed and I was forced to stop, and by “forced” I mean “relieved,” because I still find it easier to run if I can pause midway through and breathe a few deep, glorious breaths. I don’t collapse or suffer a stroke or spontaneously combust if I don’t pause, mind you; I just prefer to, and I can do whatever I want. Then the light changed again, and it was time to venture on. Three blocks on, in fact, to 70th Street, where I hung a left toward Columbus Avenue. This is where it always gets tricky: The chic women with their small dogs and huge strollers, and the little fenced flowerbeds around the street’s trees, cram the sidewalk with obstacles reminiscent of those in the long-forgotten video game Paperboy. I end up doing a kind of dorky, hopping parkour around leashed children and wilting begonias. I will almost certainly break an ankle this way. But I didn’t that day. I reached my ILLUSTRATION BY LEO ESPINOSA


Kathryn Arnold is a writer in New York City. She’s written for Time, New York, Slate, and Wired, and is the author of the novel Bright Before Us (2011). She is on her happily boring way to running her first 5K.

MOMENTOUS Trinity Gay, 15, a rising track star and the daughter of Olympian Tyson Gay, dies after being caught in the crossfire during a shooting at a Kentucky restaurant.

Death Cab For Cutie frontman Ben Gibbard places 29th in a 100-mile race with a time of 25:18:28. Princess Beatrice of York finishes a race with 4 legs: 2-mile swim, 87-mile bike, 13.1-mile run, 10,991foot mountain climb. Meb Keflezighi visits a children’s hospital in Akron, Ohio, and lets patients try on his Olympic silver medal.

A 62-year-old Florida runner becomes enraged with a 13-yearold cyclist for blocking a path and grabs him by the throat.

A trailer for Mark Zac Efron (left) and Wahlberg’s film James Marsden about the hunt for (above) finish the the Boston Marathon Nautica Malibu bombers is released. Triathlon. (See the movie in theaters in January.)

STOP!

E L E V E N I N C ( S H O E S ); W I N M C N A M E E /G E T T Y I M AG E S ( S T E I N ); N O R D I C I M AG E S /A L A M Y ( B I K E ); M A R K M A LO N E Y/ L E X I N G TO N H E R A L D - L E A D E R V I A A P (G AY )

P R E S S ( WA H L B E R G ) ; A N D R E W L I P OV S K Y/ N B C ( FA L LO N ) ; K E I T H B E D F O R D/ T H E B O S TO N G LO B E V I A G E T T Y I M AG E S ( M I C H A E L S C OT T R OA D R U N N E R S ) ; M E G M I L L E R P H OTO G R A P H Y - N YC BAS E D P H OTO G R A P H E R ( H A N KS ); CO U R T E SY V I R G I N A M E R I CA &

front door, went inside, listened to my thudding pulse on the couch for a few minutes (leaving a big, nasty sweat mark, per usual) while watching something shameful on Bravo, then took a shower. I made dinner. I had dessert. (I always have dessert.) I went to bed. The end. I can’t claim that this run was remarkable in any way. There was no ground gained in any global sense—no strides were made in my career as a runner, other than the literal ones. I learned no lesson, obtained no nugget of wisdom to pass on to you in 800 words. But that’s the point. A runner’s life is defined by repetition, monotony. That this run was ordinary means I’m doing it right. (It might also mean that I’ve just bored you to death, and now you’re dead, and it’s my fault.) That ordinariness means I can say something extraordinary: It’s nothing special that I ran that day, because I run—as in present tense, not future (I will run) or future perfect (I will have run) or, as was typical even fairly recently, conditional (I would run…). I never thought I’d be able to say that. I never thought that running would become a mostly rote activity, as opposed to the daunting, ego-incinerating albatross it once was. I never thought I could do what I’m doing. How often in life do you get to say something like that? If the act of watching yourself change, of watching your life improve footfall by footfall, is boring, then I have bad news for you: I am now the boringest person ever. I am a challenged, jiggling, persevering, parkouring megabore. And I am super okay with that.

Where running and culture collide

Green Party presidential candidate (and four-time marathoner) Jill Stein tells Politico: “I assume I have the lowest blood pressure of any candidate.” When told that Hillary Clinton’s is 100/70, she responds, “Man, I would be happy to run a race with her anytime.”

Virgin America launches the “First Class Shoe” with built-in wifi, a USB port, and a tiny video display.

A Young and the Restless actor (and runner) whose character was killed off the show starts rumors that he’s returning by quoting Galen Rupp in a tweet.

The Michael Scott Road Runners (named for the clueless The Office boss) race Boston’s MBTA Green Line on foot every month.

Chicago Marathon finisher and comedian Rob Riggle offers marathon advice: “sprint,” “try new gear,” “hydration is overrated,” “wear itchy fabric.”

FRIVOLOUS

GO!

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y G L E N N TAC H I YA M A (G I B BA R D); P R I N C E S S B E AT R I C E V I A T W I T T E R ( P R I N C E S S B E AT R I C E ); V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N ( K E F L E Z I G H I ); S P L AS H N E W S ( E F R O N ); R I C H C R U S E /S P L AS H N E W S ( M A R S D E N ); G R E TC H E N E R T L / R E U T E R S V I A Z U M A

THE INTERSECTION

I never thought that running would become a mostly rote activity. I never thought I could do what I’m doing.

Kevin Hart earns the admiration of Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers for appearing on RW’s 50th anniversary cover in throwback mode.

Tom Hanks stops midrun in NYC’s Central Park to crash a wedding photo shoot.


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These Running Times BY JONATHAN BEVERLY

THE LOVELY LONELINESS In praise of the solitary run

ome Out and Play!” reads the headline. “Run Together!” shouts the cover of this very magazine. Another praises “The Rise of Running Tribes” and depicts a group of beautiful young people smiling, posing, and generally being goofy, one lady perched on the back of a shirtless man. The articles describe high-spirited fun, group F-bomb chants, music and dancing during workouts, games designed to make sure you don’t run alone, and mandatory hugs. Lots of hugs. ¶ Excuse me while I cringe and recoil. ¶ Before anyone gets offended, let me make clear: It’s not you, it’s me. ¶ I am, admittedly, not the target age for the new wave of running groups, but I can’t think of any time in my life when I would have felt completely comfortable in one of them. I started life a geek: small, nervous in groups, the kind who hovers around the edges, watching, poised for flight. I was, and am, more likely to choose a book over a ball, a quiet walk through the woods over a crowded, noisy party. ¶ There was a time, not long ago, when these qualities made me well-suited to be a distance runner. Overlooked

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in all the excitement these days about “seriously social workouts,” ignored in the stories that tout “the long-distance runner, lonely no more,” is the fact that for some, loneliness was, and is, one of the sport’s attractions. Running used to be a haven for those who often prefer to be alone. We could head out the door and retreat to our own world, unburdened by the pressures and obligations of social relations, free from the awkwardness and self-consciousness of company. From the beginning, as a teenager facing the usual rush of gangly emotions and nascent adult conflicts, I ran to get away. Henry David Thoreau was a walker, not a runner, but he had the same mind-set. “To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating,” he wrote in Walden. “I love to be alone. I never found the ILLUSTRATION BY THOMAS FUCHS


G O YO U !

ASK MILES

Runners who inspire us DAVID BROWN

He’s been around the block a few times— and he’s got answers.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B O B M A R T I N F O R O I S /C O U R T E S Y O F U N I T E D S TAT E S O LY M P I C C O M M I T T E E ( B R OW N ); CO U R T E SY S T E G M A I E R P H OTO G R A P H Y ( S E A R L E )

Fastest blind athlete in the world

Wearing an American flag– design blindfold made by his mom, Brown won gold in the 100 meters at the 2016 Paralympics. Brown, who lost his eyesight at age 13 due to complications from a rare illness, ran tethered (with a three-inch shoestring) to his guide, Jerome Avery. Racing in the T11 category (for athletes who are almost or completely blind), Brown finished in 10.99, only .07 second shy of his own world record, set in 2014. “Jerome yelled for me to lean at the finish,” says Brown, 24, of Chula Vista, California. “I listened to hear how far back the other runners were; then I started celebrating.” —KIT FOX

SCOTT SEARLE Stays clean running— with a yo-yo

Searle, 40, doesn’t just run 15 to 25 miles most days of the week in Davenport, Iowa. He logs those miles while performing rock the cradle and around the world. Searle, a former drug and alcohol addict who got sober in 2008, doesn’t remember why he first picked up a yo-yo before a run, but it’s now a consistent part of his life. “I was having a real hard time getting out of the house, and that yo-yo just spoke to me,” he says. “It helps with my anxiety; it helps me stay focused. You should see the smiles and honks that I get.” Searle has run five marathons, four 50Ks, and at press time he was planning to run another 50K on October 30— with the yo-yo. —MEGAN DITROLIO ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDY REMENTER

When did it become acceptable for runners to play music on a device without earbuds— for all to hear— during a race? —Emily J., San Diego

True story: Recently I was running on a forest trail in solitude and silence. Until I approached another runner and heard…Peter, Bjorn, and John? Yes. The Swedish pop trio was blaring from her tiny, tinny phone speaker. If you’re in a race, where the “audience” is dense and captive, this would be annoying, especially if there were multiple speakers playing multiple tinny songs. You could control your airspace by wearing your own earbuds and playing your own music. But if you’re like me and not keen on audio distractions at all, sadly, I’m not sure what we can do. Running with music is the new norm, and I’m afraid earbud-free listening is not likely going away. So here we are. Dum ditty, dum ditty, dum dum dum.

MILE S AS

KS

My wife and I have participated in four marathons together. I got the “golden ticket” via lottery for a marathon, she did not. I’m happy, she is not. Do I still run? Should I defer? —Ed P., Pittsburgh

You’ve left out some crucial details, Ed. For instance: Is there no other way for your wife to snag an entry for this race? In other words, could she get a bib if she agreed to run with a charity? If you defer, will your

wife have a decent shot at getting in next year? Just how unhappy is your wife, exactly—clouds-andrain-showers unhappy or hurricane unhappy? Lacking answers to these questions, I’ll offer some conservative advice: Sit this one out. There are plenty of marathons out there, but you’ve only got one wife. Keep her happy. Have a question for Miles? Email him at askmiles@ runnersworld.com and follow @askmiles on Twitter.

What’s the best and worst running gift you’ve gotten? Best: homemade medal rack from running partner. Worst: vanilla-flavored gels. @amybbuzz Worst: clothes I don’t want. Don’t buy me running clothes. Best: Honey Stinger Waffles. Yum. @lnrbailey The best? THE FLASH logo hoodie w the bolts on the ears. The worst? A postrun beer. I’m 3 years SOBER! @_ShaneEdmundson

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 27


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in Desert Solitaire, “Most of my wandering in the desert I’ve done alone. Not so much from choice as from necessity—I companion that was so companiongenerally prefer to go into places where able as solitude.” no one else wants to go.” Solitude was a solace for Smith, the But Abbey wasn’t complaining. In hero of Alan Sillitoe’s 1959 short story the next line he praised that solitude: “I that gave us the now-reviled phrase, find that in contemplating the natural The Loneliness of the Long- Distance world my pleasure is greater if there Runner. A juvenile delinare not too many others quent serving his time in a contemplating it with me, reformatory, Smith gets to at the same time.” run each morning to train The same is true for Do you prefer to for an interschool race. me: I find the presence of run alone or with “It’s a treat, being a longothers often mars the exothers? distance runner, out in the perience, whether I’m conJoin the conversation world by yourself with not templating natural beauty on Twitter using a soul to make you bad-temor exploring the myriad #RWSoloRun and following @jbevrun. pered or tell you what to do,” trails of ideas within my Smith says. “Sometimes I head. The two often come feel I’ve never been so free together, with a patch of as during that couple of hours trotting nature providing the solitude and the up the path.” loneliness creating the mind-set with During that era, and up until recently, which to notice and enjoy it. being alone as a runner was necessary— This chance to pay attention is also why, not a lot of others wanted to spend the on solitary runs, I don’t listen to music time on the roads and trails that we did. or podcasts. The rhythm of the run is I related to Edward Abbey when I read,

music enough. Running is a time when I can pause the barrage of inputs, to hear the quiet sounds our society’s cacophony often drowns out—or to hear from myself for a change. But the loneliness of the distance runner is lovely for more reasons than lack of distractions. Solitary runners nurture their independence daily. We need not gather a team or an opponent to pursue our passion. No ground rules have to be argued, no leaders appointed. Alone we decide which route to take and how far to wander out. Alone we have to make our way back. I’m not antisocial. I search out running partners. The best, admittedly, share my mind-set and know how, and when, to be alone together. When I started running with my teenaged son, he told me that I talked too much. We’ve now done a lot of silent miles together. Over the course of the San Francisco Half Marathon last summer, for example, both running strong but not all-out, we spoke at most 10 words each. That was a good run. I’m not against running groups, either.

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Time to Graduate to Graduated Compression Smart Seam A special tape is used to create a flat surface against the skin to avoid rubbing and chafing that often occur during exercise.

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3D design Unique 3D design reduces bunching of fabric behind the knee and offers a comfortable fit, ideal for any type of activity allowing for smoother movements.

Running is all about blood circulation. Fitness is defined by it and most all of our training is focused on gaining better circulation, whether by way of a stronger heart, better flow or efficiency. Even when we aren’t “training” much of what we do to recover is about blood flow too. Wearing tights that serve to channel venous blood from your extremities to the heart helps reduce the stagnation of that blood and lymphatic fluid in your legs. In turn, such tights also decrease swelling. This is called “graduated compression” and it is found in C3fit’s Inspiration Long Tight. C3fit’s unique pattern and cut work to apply greater pressure in the ankle and more relaxed compression as the tights progress up the leg to calf, knee and thigh. That design helps the Inspiration Long Tights to promote better blood circulation and supply oxygen and nutrients to every part of the body. Unlike traditional running tights or leggings, C3fit’s graduated compression tights push the blood back to the heart, serving as a “pump” to push blood up the leg. That attribute is what makes C3fit’s medical-grade tights worthwhile for recovery, especially during long travel periods

or even when you are sedentary after a run. They also share a benefit with many standard compression tights, that of suppressing muscle vibration, which reduces impact and damage caused from running, especially on jarring descents, thereby improving performance while in action. Blood flow and getting oxygen more quickly into working muscles and body parts is kind of a big deal. Think about a certain blue pill or why people strive to sleep high and train low. Why do runners do VO2 max efforts to condition the heart and lungs? Graduated compression is designed to help achieve some of those benefits, and it only makes sense that C3fit has engineered their tights to help with blood flow for reduced leg swelling and increased performance and muscle efficiency. The Inspiration Tight features C3fit’s 3D design pattern behind the knee for optimal mobility without loss in the designated amount of compression. They also feature C3fit’s Smart Seam, employing a sealed stitch to avoid abrasion, chafing or impressions on the skin from running. The Inspiration Tight represents compression designed for high performance.

www.c3fit.com/us


Independent runners don’t react well to mandatory cheerleading or commands like “Louder!” We don’t hug, particularly not on demand.

I’ve joined a club in every city I’ve lived in as an adult. I love runs and workouts with the high school kids I coach. But the love of loneliness is why, after a few days when all my runs are with the team, I feel jumpy and paranoid, like I haven’t run at all for some time, and it takes a solitary second run or a long weekend exploration to restore my equilibrium. And it’s why, by the end of a week at an event or conference when I’m surrounded by other runners, I find excuses to miss the morning group run and head out to do a quiet loop by myself. For me, running company is best taken in small doses. Even when running with a group, the independent distance runner tends to prefer to make his or her own decisions on details like pace, distance,

and, especially, level of interaction and enthusiasm. We don’t react well to mandatory cheerleading or commands like “Louder!” We don’t hug, particularly not on demand. If we seem standoffish, it is because we are. We can fake gregariousness, but running is a time to be honest. If we can’t be ourselves on the run, when can we? I applaud the running tribes who are inspiring new people to enjoy our sport. And I love that celebrating the difficulty of hard work is integral to the appeal of many of them. I’ve reluctantly enjoyed the few times I’ve joined such groups, and admit that, if I relax my default defenses, the cheers and music and hearty camaraderie can produce a rush. But if you, like me, find yourself longing for the quiet of the empty road or

trail, accompanied by nothing but the sound of your breath and the wind in the trees, know that you are not alone. Our tribe dates back to before the first running boom. It is a tribe of solitary silhouettes moving quietly through still early mornings on empty roads. We’re not outcasts. We’ve chosen this loneliness, and it defines and enriches us. “I knew what the loneliness of the long-distance runner running across country felt like,” said Sillitoe’s Smith. “As far as I was concerned, this feeling was the only honesty and realness there was in the world.” Jonathan Beverly has been a competitive runner since 1977. The former editor-in-chief of Running Times , he writes and runs on the high plains of the Nebraska/ Colorado border.


It’s remarkable just how much forgiveness a single sheet of paper can hold. Putting thoughts on paper can be a powerful way to express feelings, heal and inspire. We asked five people whose lives have been touched by violence or cruelty to write Letters of Peace that reflect their enduring faith in humanity. Meet the authors, read their letters and learn more about the power of paper. Visit howlifeunfolds.com/lettersofpeace | #lettersofpeace

A charitable donation was made on behalf of the author of this letter. Š 2016 Paper and Packaging Board.

From the Makers of Paper and Packaging


34 46 52 56 TRAINING

FUEL

MIND+BODY

TURN UP THE HEAT

PERSONAL BEST GET FIT, EAT SMART, RUN STRONG

P H OTO G R A P H B Y S T E V E C O L E I M AG E S /G E T T Y I M AG E S

Once upon a time, if you wanted to recover quickly postrun, you had to brave a tub full of ice cubes. But recent research casts the efficacy of the cold treatment in doubt. Rejoice! And turn up the tap. Hot baths can help soothe tired muscles and make reading Runner’s World in the tub so much more pleasant. A long, hot bath may encourage your body to adapt as it would to the stress of summer running (see “Sweat to Succeed,” page 40). Even better: A 2010 paper found that such heat adaptations can boost performance even in cool weather. Save the ice for smoothies.

GEAR

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 31


YOUR PERFECT RUNNING PARTNER Motivation in motion. The Apple Watch Nike+ is the latest in a long-running partnership between two of the world’s most innovative brands. With leading-edge comfort to the way it connects you to running buddies through Nike+ Run Club, it’s your perfect running partner.

L EA R N M O R E AT NIK E . COM/A PPL E WAT CH


TRAINING FIND YOUR SPARK

Set your next, best goal by identifying what gives you the most satisfaction. By Kelly Bastone

Club runs can help you explore new-to-you routes (and meet newto-you workout buddies).

34 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

of items you’re storing out of obligation, and keeping only your favorites. Applied to training, Kondo’s idea can help runners trim the “shoulds” and focus on what gives them the most satisfaction, says Colorado-based ultrarunner and “holistic” coach Art Ives. The best way to set a goal might be to first identify the type of running that sparks the most joy for you and then let that dictate your running target, says Larry Blaylock, a running coach in Los Angeles. Here’s how to choose your next goal (and organize your training) according to the workouts that bring you happiness.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y JAS O N J. H AT F I E L D/ TA N D E M S TO C K .CO M ( R U N N E R S )

“do it all” like a runner. When you read about the benefits of long runs, tempo runs, intervals, hill workouts, postrun strides, cross-training, and on and on, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by everything you think you should accomplish. If your quest to fit it all in is dampening your enjoyment of running, it’s time to declutter your training schedule. Organizing maven Marie Kondo, who introduced her philosophy in 2014’s bestselling The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, followed that manifesto with a practical guide called Spark Joy. Its premise: Happiness comes from letting go

NOBODY TRIES TO


three times a week to maintain runningspecific adaptations.

YOU LOVE TO CLIMB

P H OTO G R A P H B Y S COT T M A R K E W I T Z ( B I CYC L I S T S )

Taking on other sports is great for all-around fitness, but you need at least one rest day per week.

YOU LOVE GOING LONG YOUR GOAL To race farther “I love running longer, because you work so much stress out,” Blaylock says. Plus, long runs change your perception of limitations. “There’s a second energy that you get in the later stages,” Ives says. Blaylock recommends choosing a race up to 60 percent longer than you’ve ever gone—whether that’s a 10K or a 100K. Training for a 10K takes eight weeks; prerequisites for an ultra include several marathon finishes and 21 to 24 weeks of training. Avoid injury by following a plan: Find one at runnersworld .com/training-plans.

YOU LOVE THE BURN OF TEMPO PACE YOUR GOAL A fast 10-miler Tempo runs—which include at least 20 minutes of running at a comfortably hard pace—appeal to people who love to push themselves. Tempo workouts raise your fatigue threshold—letting you run faster, over longer distances, without tiring. That’s key for a strong 10-miler, which requires both speed and endurance. Start week 1 with one 20-minute tempo session (bookended by a five- to 10-minute warmup and cooldown), and vary the duration of the tempo phase (up to 40 minutes) each subsequent week.

AVOID STUFFICATION Runners’ closets tend to overflow with shoes, clothes, and memorabilia that have low utility but high emotional value. Here’s how to conduct a clearinghouse.

1 / Sort your race shirts into two piles: the ones you love and the ones you never reach for. Do the same with bibs and/or medals: Do you need to save both from every race? (No!)

YOUR GOAL A trail run There’s more to hills than just the incline: “Hill climbs represent working toward and reaching a high point,” says Ives. Choose a trail race that’s shorter than your go-to road distance, and start by logging a weekly trail session. For the first three to six weeks, run on short, rolling hills. Then over the next three to six weeks, graduate to hills that are longer (up to two miles) and steeper. Keep the effort level easy, even if your pace slows to a walk: “These climbs build strength and stamina,” says Ives. “The speed will follow.”

YOU LOVE TO RUN (AND HIKE, AND BIKE, AND...) YOUR GOAL An obstacle race or triathlon When runners challenge their bodies in different ways, they unlock heaps of childlike fun—and build total-body strength. Sprint triathlons don’t necessarily require a ton of additional training time, and obstacle races show off all-around fitness. Run for at least 30 minutes

2 / Photograph memory-triggering but unused race memorabilia, and create a scrapbook that pairs those pics with captions explaining event memories and achievements.

YOU LOVE RUNNING WITH OTHER PEOPLE YOUR GOAL A full datebook Chatty runs are great for developing base aerobic fitness, Blaylock says. But buddies can also propel runners through hard workouts. Offer to join friends for hills or intervals: If they’re slower, you can up their game, and if they’re faster, you can chase them. Be sure to take slow, easy days before and after. Try expanding your circle, too: Join a local shop or club run each week.

YOU LOVE JUST RUNNING YOUR GOAL To run healthy You don’t have to race to enjoy the physical and mental benefits of running. Aim for at least 90 minutes per week of running at your happy pace. To stay injury-free, do two weekly 15-minute strength-training sessions. Target core muscles (with moves like planks and side planks), along with some lower leg and glute work (like squats and lunges).

3 / If you’re crafty, you can turn unwanted race T’s into a quilt, or display bibs and medals in a shadowbox. Both put mementos where you can see—and appreciate—them.

4 / Cart away the discards. Kondo advises people to thank their objects for the happiness or service they provided. Then donate T’s and medals, and recycle meaningless bibs.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 35


TRAINING

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. How much must I run to avoid starting from scratch in 2017? Ten to 15 minutes three times a week will keep your body adapted to the movement of running, though doing less than usual will cost you fitness. If you’re not going to meet your quota, don’t let it become a slippery slope—every day presents a fresh opportunity to get in a mile or two. How can I keep my diet under control this holiday season?

FIT AND JOLLY!

Make time for even a few miles this holiday season. Life can get in the way of running at any time of the year, but holidays are especially challenging. Whether you’re hosting parties and visitors from out of town or just attending get-togethers and traveling, a busy social calendar leaves less time for logging miles. If you’re struggling, make your mantra “something is better than nothing,” and try these tactics for keeping a routine intact. PLAN AHEAD If you look at your schedule, you can probably pinpoint windows during which you’re least likely to have other obligations usurp your running time. For many people, that’s first thing in the morning. If it’s before the sun rises, plan to run in a safe, well-lit area or hit the treadmill. 36

REFRAME Think of your run not as an item on your to-do list, but as an activity that will destress you. Even a short run can improve your attitude and prepare you to tackle a busy day. You have to take care of yourself before you’re fully able to take care of others, and exercise is a great means of self-care.

JOIN OUR ONLINE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR BEGINNERS AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/THESTARTINGLINE.

GO FOR FIVE Struggling with motivation? Tell yourself that you only need to run for five minutes. Once you’re dressed and out there, you may want to go longer. If not, you can run five and head home—it still beats doing nothing. TRY A WALK If running didn’t require changing and showering, it would be more timeefficient. You can get around both those steps by walking, and you can also include friends and family members who might not be up for a run. Walking by itself doesn’t deliver all the benefits run-walking does, but it helps you maintain some fitness when you’re crunched for time.

Track your food intake with an app or notepad. If you eat more when stressed, try heading out for a run (or walk) as soon as you start feeling overwhelmed. (See “Holiday Trimmings,” page 46.)

THE EXCUSE I have relatives visiting, so I can’t run until they’re gone. BEAT IT Set your alarm 30 to 45 minutes early and get out the door before others arise. This way, you don’t have to sacrifice your run or time with your family. Put out your clothes and shoes the night before to make the transition out of bed as smooth as possible. ILLUSTRATION BY RAMI NIEMI


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TRAINING

HOW TO RUN MORE LIKE THIS GUY

Go faster and farther using less energy with these strategies to boost efficiency.

38

FOR MORE FROM ALEX, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/SWEATSCIENCE.

GET JUICED Beet juice has been the concoction of choice for distance runners since a 2009 study from British researchers at the University of Exeter showed it improved endurance. How? The high nitrate content of beets, along with other micronutrients, reduces the oxygen cost of exercise (another way of saying that it improves running economy) by as much as 3 percent. In a cycling study, drinking beet juice before a race translated into faster 10-mile race times by 2.7 percent. Since beet juice upsets some stomachs, getting the timing and amount right takes trial and error (which you’ll want to do during your training cycle, not right before a race). A typical dose is 10 ounces of juice (or 2.4 ounces of concentrated “beet shot”); take one dose about two-and-ahalf hours before your race or hard workout. For an extra boost, take another one the night before.

FREE YOUR MIND It’s tempting to make a conscious effort to run more smoothly, but that can backfire. In one German study, runners who were instructed to pay close attention to their breathing or to the movement of their feet had worse running economy than when they were simply told to watch the scenery around them. Running is a deceptively complicated series of movements, and you’re better off leaving most of them on autopilot. That doesn’t mean you should abandon all attempts to improve your form—just don’t fixate on it. Get a friend to watch (or film) you near the beginning and end of a hard run, and look for what changes when you’re tired. If you notice that you begin to hunch forward, for example, plan to check your posture after every mile and make adjustments if needed. Otherwise, relax and enjoy the view.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDREA MANZATI

P H OTO G R A P H B Y V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N

Eritrea’s Zersenay Tadese (above) ran the fastest half marathon ever—58:23—and is a four-time world champion at the distance. He’s also the most efficient runner ever tested. In a 2008 study by Spanish researchers, the superstar consumed just 150 milliliters of oxygen per kilogram of bodyweight for every kilometer he ran—about 30 percent less than a typical three-hour marathoner, and 20 percent better than previous efficiency champs like 1972 Olympic Marathon winner Frank Shorter. Unlike VO₂ max, which reflects the maximum amount of oxygen you can consume, “running economy” is a measure of how much oxygen you’re consuming (and therefore how much energy you’re burning) to maintain a pace. Using less oxygen is a big advantage in long races—you’re saving more fuel for later in the race. While economy can only be measured in a laboratory, the real-world effects are clear: If two runners have the same VO₂ max, the more economical runner will win. The simplest way to boost economy is to run a lot, but if you’re already doing that, there are subtler steps you can take to wring more speed from each breath.

TAKE A LEAP Your legs are like springs, coiling to store energy and then uncoiling to release it for the next stride. Since stiffer springs store more energy, it helps to have “stiff” and springy leg muscles and tendons. One way to accomplish this is through plyometric training, which involves explosive movements like jumps. In a study published this year, runners who added plyometrics to their training for six weeks improved their economy and sliced 2.6 percent off their 3K times. Twice a week, before an easy run, do drop jumps: Step off a low ledge, then leap as high as you can straight up, with both feet. Focus on making each jump powerful, rather than trying to do as many as possible. Start with two sets of five jumps off a seven-inch ledge (the height of a typical stair), and progress to up to six sets of 10 jumps, with the final two sets from a height of two feet.


TRAINING BRE AK A SWE AT RACE PREP

SWEAT TO SUCCEED

Ace a destination race by priming your body for heat at home. By A.C. Shilton IT’S HARD to resist the allure of a January or February race-cation. Sun, shorts, and an umbrella-garnished drink at the finish line— what’s not to like? However, heading south for a distance race can be tricky, especially if you train in old-fashioned winter. “If you’re accustomed to a cool climate, then running a race in heat is going to be much harder,” says Janet Hamilton, an Atlanta-based coach. “You may need to rethink your time goal.” How much to adjust depends on your fitness level: One study that examined decades of finisher data at seven marathons found that the negative effect of temperature, humidity, and solar radiation on finishing time increased significantly the longer a runner took to complete the race. This may sound discouraging, but don’t cancel your travel plans. With a little extra effort, you can acclimatize your body to heat—even when it’s cool where you live—to feel stronger on a warm race day.

Try using a treadmill in a warm room: Most thermostats hover in the 65- to 70-degree range, which is perfect if you leave fans off. If your treadmill is in a

TIME IT RIGHT Heat acclimatization helps your body build blood volume and helps your sweat glands kick into high gear faster. You need at least five days of heat training

ADD IT UP While running 60 to 100 minutes will give you the most benefit, shorter bouts help, too, Minson says. Because your final sessions happen during

SOAK IT IN A recent study found that spending 40 minutes in a hot tub directly after 40 minutes of running at regular temperatures could result in some heat accli-

chilly garage, add layers or bundle up and run outside. Aim for the feeling of running on a hot summer day, says Christopher Minson, Ph.D., who studies thermoregulation at the University of Oregon. It’s easy to overheat, so bring fluids.

to see a benefit, while seven to 10 is better, says Minson. These 10 days don’t need to be in a row, but you want no more than two days between sweaty sessions. Do most runs in the two to three prerace weeks in warm conditions.

taper, don’t run hard: A conversational pace is fine. Also use these sessions to practice hot-weather fueling. Drink smaller volumes of fluid every 10 to 15 minutes, versus a larger volume every 20 minutes as you might on cool days.

matization. If you don’t have access to a hot tub, a hot bath or sauna could work in a similar way, Minson says. For best results, you need to keep your core temp up for more than 30 minutes, so prepare to have pruney fingers.

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TRAINING ASK THE EXPERTS

Can social media help my running? If you must ’gram a run, wait until you’re done: Habitual midrun breaks can hinder fitness gains.

Yes—if you avoid comparing yourself to others. Instead, analyze what friends post. If someone shares a favorite interval routine or strength circuit, consider how it might boost your fitness. And if a friend gets hurt, their posts may clue you in to training mistakes you should avoid. —Lora Johnson is an RRCA-certified coach in Austin, Texas (crazyrunninggirl.com).

Is it okay to bounce between 10 and 30 weekly miles? Avoid it if you can. Fluctuating this much puts your body on a distressing roller-coaster ride: One week you’re doing serious running—demanding a lot from your muscles, bones, and joints—and the next week you’re barely logging enough miles to stay fit. Stick to a tighter range, like 15 to 25 miles. This allows your body to adapt to the stress of higher-mileage weeks during lowermileage weeks without taking a step backward. —Sara Sellitto is a coach and certified trainer in the Baltimore area (running inpink.com).

42 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

Age grading works two ways: It compares your time at a given distance to the world record for your age and sex (an age-graded score), and it calculates how fast you’d run given your current fitness if you were in your 20s (an age-graded time). This allows men and women of all ages to “compete” and runners over 30 (the age when the body starts to lose muscle) to see how new times stack up to past PRs. For example, a 50-year-old woman’s 2:00 half marathon nets an age-graded score of 61.79 percent (compared to the world record of 1:14:09) and an age-graded time of 1:45:31. If her PR was a 1:47 set at age 29, age-grading shows she’s fitter now despite slowing with age. If she had set the same PR at age 40, that race would score 63.04 percent—a better performance. Plug in your times at runnersworld.com/agegraded.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y TO D O R T S V E T KOV/G E T T Y I M AG E S

The Explainer What is “age grading”?

What’s the shortest run that’s worth doing? That depends on your fitness level and goals. A new runner training for a 5K, for example, should try to do at least a 20-minute run. More-experienced athletes should aim for at least 30 minutes. But any miles you can squeeze in will boost your fitness (see “Fit and Jolly!” page 36). Frequent short runs, in fact, will help your body adapt to running better than infrequent long ones—so choose three 20-minute runs over a single weekly hour. —Larry Rich is a San Francisco–based coach (sweattracker .com/coaching).


TRAINING Key Workout

NEXT LEVEL

WHAT “Choose your own adventure” hills and blasts

KATE THE GREAT

WHY It has the same benefits as a track workout but forces you to learn effort.

First-time Olympian Kate Grace set 800-meter PRs at the U.S. Track Trials and at the Games. By Erin Strout

KATE GRACE’S first season

TIPS FROM THE TOP

TRICK YOUR BRAIN When Grace has doubts during a tough workout, she acknowledges it, then focuses on a “but,” as in, “This hurts, but I’m the kind of athlete who can do this.”

44 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

WORK WITH STRESS After overcoming her most recent injury, Grace worried she’d end up hurt again: “I used that fear to propel me into doing my physical therapy exercises.”

WHEN Two weeks before a season’s first big race HOW Time 1 minute at hard, controlled effort up a hill. Mark the spot. On your way down, mark a spot 100 meters from the base. Do 4 sets of 2 x full hill (hard effort) and 1 x 100-meter hill blast (harder effort). Recover for 2:00 to 2:30 for hills and 1:30 for blasts. Choose if you’ll do a fifth set by gauging what you have left.

TOP UP POSTRUN Grace eats a 200-calorie snack 10 minutes after every workout to jump-start her body’s recovery. She aims for a well-rounded diet that focuses on whole foods.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y V I C TO R S A I L E R / P H OTO R U N

on the world-championship level was full of surprise and delight. In July, she pushed past two prerace favorites—who had tangled and fallen—to win the 800-meter 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials and set a personal record. A month later in Rio, she improved her PR to 1:58.79 in the semifinal round and was the lone American in the final. While it was her first time in the big leagues, in some ways Grace says she’s been preparing her whole life. As the daughter of 1980s aerobics icon Kathy Smith, Grace early on learned techniques—like meditation—to deal with pressure. At Yale University, Grace made three NCAA finals in the 800 meters. In 2011, Grace joined the New Jersey–New York Track Club and gradually doubled her weekly mileage to 60,

which improved her times but began a cycle of injuries. When she moved to Bend, Oregon, in 2014 to run with sponsor Oiselle’s elite team, experts suggested she make massage and strength-training part of her routine. But it wasn’t until Grace joined Drew Wartenburg’s NorCal Distance Project in July 2015 that she became as disciplined as elite-level performance requires. Grace thrived in Sacramento despite arriving with a tear in her plantar plate. When she resumed workouts, Wartenburg took her off the track to do long hill reps and fartlek runs, a major factor in her improvement. “They taught me what it means to work your edge in a race and find the point that you feel is hard— or too hard—and play with that,” Grace says.


2. KEEP YOUR OFFICE STOCKED Holiday desserts are loaded with sugar and fat and are generally low in nutrients. So when your coworkers bring in cookies, doughnuts, and truffles, turn instead to a drawer (or work fridge) full of healthy, satiating snacks. Try full-fat Greek yogurt, fresh veggie sticks and hummus, a piece of fruit, and a small bag of mixed (unsalted) nuts. And limit your trips past the free table!

HOLIDAY TRIMMINGS

10 tips to navigate the food festivities and still fit into your tights By Pamela Nisevich Bede, M.S., R.D. EVEN IF YOU RUN every day between Thanksgiving and New Year’s (see “Streak With Us,” page 18), you’re not immune to weight creep. In fact, more than 50 percent of annual weight gain happens in that 38-day period (give or take a few days, depending on the calendar). Here’s how to make it through the eating-and-drinking season without waistline regret.

46 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

1. PREGAME YOUR PARTY Make the most of arriving fashionably late by having a healthy mini meal an hour before you go. Aim for 250 calories (or fewer), with 15 grams of protein and five to 10 grams of fiber, like a spinach salad with chicken and cranberry relish. Filling up will make it easier to resist pigs-in-a-blanket.

3. HAVE TREATS… After a run you need to restock your muscles with glycogen and help them recover with protein. This is a good opportunity to satisfy your sweet tooth, as long as you proceed with caution. Reach for desserts that have health benefits: vitamin A– rich pumpkin pie or a scoop of calcium-packed vanilla ice cream topped with fresh fruit. Research has shown that your appetite is suppressed for a short time after a workout, making you less likely to overeat postrun. 4. …BUT NOT TOO MANY If you’re logging more miles this winter to offset the holiday spread, you have a little bit of wiggle room for an extra treat. But running a 5K doesn’t earn you the (caloric) right to eat an entire pan of brownies. Research has found that even highly active people gain weight during the holiday season. Fill up on fruits, veggies, and lean protein after your run. ILLUSTRATIONS BY LUCI GUTIÉRREZ


RUN IT OFF ONE MILE BURNS APPROXIMATELY 100 CALORIES, FEWER IF YOU’RE SMALLER. PLAN YOUR MILEAGE ACCORDINGLY. 1 MILE ½ cup eggnog 110 calories The average holiday dinner racks up 3,000 calories. Get your run in early and take a walk later.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y W I L L S TA N TO N /A L A M Y (C H E E S E CA K E )

5. BUILD THE PERFECT DINNER PLATE At your next holiday celebration, divide your plate into quarters: Fill half with fiberpacked veggies, a quarter with lean protein like turkey or fish, and a quarter with nutrientrich carbs such as sweet potatoes or stuffing made with whole-grain bread. For dessert, fill half a small (!) plate with fruit and half with your favorite sweets— no piling high!

6. DRINK UP Water, that is. When you’re running in the cold, it’s easy to become dehydrated because you’re not drinking as much. And it’s even easier to mistake thirst for hunger. Rather than holding a mixed-drink calorie bomb or a fully loaded dessert plate, keep your hands (and stomach) full with a caloriefree glass of still or sparkling (with lemon!) water. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

cobbler is your best bet—pecan pie is your worst, with about 500 calories per slice. 9. MAKE YOUR CALORIES COUNT Enjoy the foods you can’t have every day. Mashed potatoes are tasty, but how often can you have your aunt’s labor-of-love sweet potato soufflé? 7. LIMIT THE LIQUOR Yes, there are some health benefits to having a glass of red wine (good for your heart), and dark beers tout vitamins and minerals. But alcohol is high in calories (seven per gram), and it can lead to dehydration. Try to limit your intake to one or two drinks per day, and alternate them with water. (Throwing too many back also makes you more likely to serve yourself an extra slice of pie.) 8. SWAP IT Toast your holiday cheer with a light beer instead of sweet wine and save 40 calories per ounce. Instead of a biscuit, have a dinner roll, which also has 40 fewer calories. When you top your turkey, au jus has 80 fewer calories than gravy. And for dessert,

3 MILES 1 slice pumpkin pie 330 calories 10K 1 slice pecan pie topped with ½ cup vanilla ice cream 640 calories HALF MARATHON 6 oz. roasted turkey, baked sweet potato with pat of butter, 1 cup coleslaw, 1 cup macaroni and cheese, 1 medium buttered biscuit 1,300 calories MARATHON 6 oz. prime rib, 1 cup green bean casserole, 1 cup mashed potatoes with gravy, 1 cup stuffing, 1 glass red wine, 1 slice of cheesecake with scoop of ice cream 2,468 calories

10. BE A HEALTHY HERO Bring a dish that you (and your runner friends) would feel good about eating. You can’t go wrong with a veggie side dish like Brussels sprouts or a salad packed with healthy grains, winter root veggies, and kale.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 47


FUEL

SMOKY BLACK BEAN

Stay full with the fiber and plant protein from black beans. TOP 1 slice whole-grain bread with mashed black beans, sliced roasted red pepper, grated smoked Cheddar cheese, thinly sliced avocado, and second bread slice.

CHICKEN FIG For each recipe, heat a pat of butter on medium-low, and grill sandwich until both sides are crispy and cheese has softened.

Roasted chicken is high in protein, and figs give you bone-building calcium. SPREAD fig preserves on 1 slice whole-grain bread and top with minced rosemary, sliced rotisserie chicken, grated baby spinach, Fontina cheese, and second bread slice.

QUICK BITES

Power your run with these grownup takes on grilled cheese. By Matthew Kadey, M.S., R.D. APPLE CHEDDAR

CAPRESE

The vitamin C in tomatoes helps protect runners from colds. SPREAD basil pesto on 1 slice sourdough bread, and top with thinly sliced prosciutto, grated mozzarella cheese, sliced tomato, arugula, and second bread slice.

SALMON BEET

Nitrates from beets and omega fats in salmon may improve muscle endurance. TOP 1 slice marble rye or pumpernickel bread with smoked salmon, a squeeze of lemon juice, a schmear of cream cheese, sliced roasted beets, dill, and second bread slice, coated with more cream cheese.

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FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA AND FOOD PREP VIDEOS, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/GRILLEDCHEESE.

STEAK KIMCHEEZE

Vegetarian? Even without meat, each sandwich is packed with protein and nutrients.

Energize your runs with the iron in steak, and keep your gut healthy with the probiotics found in kimchi. TOP 1 slice whole-grain bread with grated jack, Provolone, or Havarti cheese, thinly sliced cooked sirloin or flank steak, chopped kimchi, and second bread slice.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y E D G A B R I E L S F O R H A L L E Y R E S O U R C E S ; I L LU S T R AT I O N S B Y LU CY E N G E L M A N

Antioxidant-rich apples and omega 3–packed walnuts add crunch. TOP 1 slice whole-grain bread with thinly sliced apple, grated sharp Cheddar cheese, chopped fresh sage, chopped walnuts, and second bread slice.


FUEL

WARM UP YOUR COOLDOWN

Questions from the Crowd

Recover with these antioxidant-rich drinks.

A cup of tea has only two calories, and has been linked to a lower risk of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.

50 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

MEXICAN-STYLE HOT CHOCOLATE Bittersweet chocolate has polyphenols, which, when routinely consumed, can help boost bloodflow and improve running performance. The heat from cayenne pepper may also rev up your metabolism. Postrun, the protein and carbs in milk will help your muscles recover. DRINK UP Mix 1 cup low-fat milk, 1 oz. 70 percent cacao bar (chopped), 2 tsp. raw sugar, ¼ tsp. vanilla, and a pinch of ground cayenne pepper. Warm, stirring until chocolate melts evenly. TURMERIC TEA A staple in Indian-style curries, turmeric is partially made of curcumin, shown to be an anti-inflammatory. In eastern medicine, curcumin is used to treat digestive disorders and arthritis. Research has also found that this phytochemical may fight oxidative damage from tough workouts. DRINK UP Steep slices from a 1" piece of fresh, unpeeled turmeric for 4 to 5 minutes and strain. Or try turmeric tea bags, which are often mixed with GI-friendly ginger. Organic varieties may contain greater levels of curcumin.

HOT APPLE CIDER Unfiltered cider from fresh apples (and their skin) is packed with quercetin, which may protect you from cancer and heart disease. Quercetin may also boost exercise performance by improving your body’s ability to use oxygen. You’d need a lot of cider for some of these benefits, so make sure to eat other quercetin-packed foods like onions, grapes, and citrus. DRINK UP Heat apple cider and add ground cinnamon. CINNAMON COFFEE A sprinkle of ground cinnamon in your morning joe can help curb blood sugar spikes, which have been linked to insulin resistance, a precursor to Type 2 diabetes. Coffee has its health perks, too: It may reduce the risk of Parkinson’s disease, and its caffeine is linked to improved athletic performance. DRINK UP Add a dash of cinnamon to your brew (or steep with a stick for 5 minutes). HOT TODDY Feeling sniffly? Nip it with this winter favorite. The flavonoids in lemons may help keep the cold at bay, and honey soothes cough and throat irritation. (Plus, a kick of bourbon can keep your mind off the misery.) DRINK UP Steep 1 rose hips tea bag in 8 oz. hot water; add 1 oz. bourbon, 2 tsp. honey, and juice from ¼ lemon. Place lemon wedge in bottom of cup and stir.

Is it okay to have coffee before and after my run? Prerun caffeine has been shown to make hard efforts feel easier. Try it in training so you know how it affects you. Coffee after your workout isn’t harmful (phew!), but it shouldn’t replace a carbprotein recovery meal. It will help boost your mood and energy levels, which is a plus if you’re heading to your desk. How should recovery refueling change as you age? As you get older, your calorie needs decrease due to a slowing metabolism. And there is evidence that muscle-building also slows down. This means you have less room to indulge and should focus on making every calorie count, especially those after a workout. Choose quality foods (lean meats, eggs, dairy, soy) to get your 10 to 25 grams of postrun protein.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL


MIND+BODY

Poor (“Extended”) Posture HEAD

POSITION STATEMENT

Tight hips and hamstrings? The problem may be how you’re standing.

This stance contributes to chronic hamstring tightness.

Over toes

LOWER RIBS/ STERNUM Forward of the body

ABDOMINALS Stretched out

By Brian Sabin

RUNNERS OFTEN ASSUME that tight hips and hamstrings are simply an occupational hazard. And that if they ever want to touch their toes again, they’ll have to dial down the mileage or spend hours on the yoga mat. But Trevor Rappa, P.T., D.P.T., a physical therapist at Resilient Performance Physical Therapy in New York City, says that running isn’t necessarily to blame—poor posture is likely at fault. And stretching will only provide temporary relief until the root cause is addressed. A lot of runners, and people in general, carry themselves with what Rappa and others call “extended posture.” In this type of stance, a person carries his lower ribs in front of his body, his glutes jut out behind him, and there is a big curve in his lower back (see right). It’s not just a bad look: This alignment impairs the functioning of the diaphragm.

52 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

“Your diaphragm should be your primary muscle of respiration,” says Mike Robertson, M.S., C.S.C.S., and coach to high-performance athletes at Indianapolis Fitness and Sports Training. “If you get stuck in extended posture, the diaphragm flattens out and can no longer work effectively.” When your diaphragm isn’t properly functioning, a cascade of problems results. Your brain, knowing that the body has to breathe, recruits help from other muscles— like your hip flexors and lower back muscles. “If the diaphragm doesn’t work well, inefficiencies will result,” says Jonathan Pierce, performance therapist to gold medal long jumper Brittney Reese and a consultant to Bowerman Track Club. When your hip flexors are tight from repetitive use, corresponding tension can be present in the diaphragm. Tight hip flexors can also extend

LOWER BACK Has a dramatic curve

DIAPHRAGM Flattened and not activated

GLUTES Pushed back and up

PELVIS Slants downward at more than a 10degree angle

HAMSTRINGS Elongated

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL


Proper Posture HEAD In line with heels

LOWER RIBS/ STERNUM In line with chest

ABDOMINALS No longer elongated

LOWER BACK Slight curve

DIAPHRAGM Activated, fully functional

GLUTES Under pelvis

PELVIS Neutral or pointing downward only slightly (less than 10 degrees)

HAMSTRINGS Normal length

the lumbar spine, pull the pelvis downward, and cause your glutes to stick out. Experts call this an “anterior pelvic tilt.” Robertson explains: “When your pelvis tips forward, it is literally stretching your hamstrings on the back side, which can make them feel tight.” But, wait, aren’t stretched-out hamstrings a good thing? Not if it’s your pelvis doing the stretching, says Robertson. Working to lengthen and elongate your hamstrings can be good—if your hamstrings are actually shortened. However, Robertson says an anterior pelvic alignment is often putting tension on your hamstrings, and it needs to be fixed if you’re going to get any lasting relief. Stretching your hamstrings in a downward-facing-dog pose feels good as you’re doing it—but it won’t stop chronic tightness, he says. Experts say the real solution starts with posture correction. Being conscious of good posture and working to adjust your stance throughout the day is important. Robertson also recomAdopt this mends a simple posture to release breathing drill tension on the to activate your hamstrings. diaphragm (see right) and exercises to strengthen your hamstrings (see next page). Master these and you’ll shut down those overactive hip flexors, restore proper posture, and give your hamstrings long-term relief. Here’s the first step to standing taller, breathing deeper, and running better.

Breathe Right

To break out of an extended posture, you need to learn to fully exhale, which will activate the diaphragm and restore proper pelvic position. Do this drill daily to help your body learn the best alignment.

1 / Lie on your back with your feet flat on the floor. Take a breath in through your nose. Notice how your abdominals lift and your tailbone pushes into the floor.

2 / Exhale through your mouth. Push all the air out of your lungs; there’s more in there than you think. Keep pushing. Your abdominals will move closer to the floor, your back’s curve will lessen, and more of your pelvis will contact the floor.

3 / With all of the air out, hold the bottom of the exhale for 3 to 5 seconds. Your ribcage will come down. Use your lower abs to pull the pelvis into neutral alignment—your midback and upper glutes against the floor. On the next inhale, try to maintain this alignment, breathing into your belly and chest. Take four to five breaths this way.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 53


MIND+BODY

WARMUP

THE BODY SHOP

HAMSTRING HELPERS A simple strengthening workout relieves a common tight spot.

ALL FOURS BELLY LIFT

90-90 HIP LIFT

Get on your hands and knees with your palms flat on the ground beneath your shoulders. Exhale and round your back toward the ceiling. Keeping your back curved, take four to five breaths, then relax. That’s one rep. Do five.

Get in the position shown here. Exhale. Lift your pelvis so your lower back flattens against the floor. Maintain that as you breathe in, then out fully. Hold the end of the exhale for three to five seconds. Take five breaths; hold the exhale on each. Repeat that five times.

DAY ONE

DAY TWO

DEADLIFT

SINGLE-LEG DEADLIFT

Hold a pair of dumbbells. Hinge at the hips by pushing your glutes back, and lower the weight in front of your legs. Lower the weight as far as your flexibility allows, then push with your hips and thighs to bring it back up. Do three sets of eight to 10 reps.

Hold a dumbbell in your left hand. Hinge at the hips to lift your left leg as you lower the weight down. Return to standing. Do three sets of eight to 10 reps on each side.

CONTRARY TO POPULAR BELIEF, stretching won’t

necessarily improve hamstring flexibility and restore range of motion. If poor alignment is to blame, your hamstrings are already in an overextended position and stretching can be counterproductive, says Mike Robertson, M.S., C.S.C.S., and co-owner of Indianapolis Fitness and Sports Training. The first step in finding relief, he says, is to work toward achieving proper pelvic positioning, which will alleviate tension down the back of your thighs (see previous page). The second step is to strengthen your hamstrings so they can help you maintain that good alignment—while sitting, while walking, and while running. Robertson recommends the following two-day workout. Do the warmup moves to help you get good pelvic positioning first. Then do the first two strength moves on one day and the second two on another day. If you run two or three times per week, do these workouts on your off days. If you’re running more regularly than that, do them after you run. —BRIAN SABIN

Keep your back and hips in a straight line by contracting your abdominals.

54

SEE THESE EXERCISES IN MOTION AT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/HAMSTRINGHELPERS.

BALL LEG CURLS Lie on the floor with your heels on top of a stability ball. Lift your pelvis so that your body forms a straight line from head to heels, exhale, then use your heels to roll the ball toward your glutes. Do three sets of eight to 10 reps.

NORDIC HAMSTRINGS Kneel with your feet secured. Exhale and lower your torso toward the floor. Keep the movement slow and controlled for as long as you can. When you start to accelerate forward, place your hands in front of you. Press through your hands to push yourself back up. Do three sets of three to five reps.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL


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GEAR

HARD WEARS

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1 / KATADYN BEFREE Ditch the iodine tablets. This soft flask has a microfilter that keeps out almost all trail-side nasties you’ll find in North America. $40 2 / JULBO AERO LITE These frameless shades weigh less than an ounce and have lenses that darken in intense sun, good for everything from trail runs to high-noon workouts. $180 3 / POLK BOOM BIT Clip this Bluetooth speaker to your shirt or hat so you can still hear traffic. The battery lasts 1:45 on full-blast—dial it back to save juice. $30

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GEAR OF THE YEAR

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You’ve been a really good runner, right? Put this cool stuff on your wish list (or just get it yourself). By Jeff Dengate 6

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4 / JAYBIRD FREEDOM Wire-free headphones are hip since Apple announced AirPods, but we still reach for this Bluetooth set. They sound great and are comfortable on long runs, plus the cable makes it a cinch to find them in the bottom of a duffel bag. $200 5 / BLACKBURN 2’FER Designed for cyclists, this blinker hooks to your waistband and has an intense flickering pattern. There’s no chance a driver will fail to notice you on an early morning jog. $25 6 / GARMIN FENIX 3 HR Sure, it’s bulky, but this GPS tracker has a huge battery, barometric altimeter, and all-day fitness activity monitoring. Plus it can display notifications from your smartphone. $600 7 / APPLE WATCH NIKE+ The already popular casual watch is now runner-ready, thanks to GPS and a waterproof build. The Nike+ model prioritizes run tracking and has sporty style. $369

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8 / GOODR RUNNING SUNGLASSES These Wayfarer-style shades fit a wide range of faces without sliding or bouncing. $25 9 / PETZL REACTIK+ Pair this 300-lumen lamp with a smartphone app to adjust lighting patterns and extend run time. $110

56 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

S T I L L P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R YA N O L S Z E W S K I & M I TC H M A N D E L

A sensor monitors ambient light and adjusts the brightness to your surroundings.


Paula Radcliffe Marathon World Record Holder Olympian •

Zero Runner has become a fun and helpful addition to my “ Thetraining. By mostly off-road running and supplementing with Zero Runner sessions, my foot and the rest of my body stay healthy. In fact, I have found the added benefit of the Zero Running is to actually mobilize my ankle and strengthen my running mechanics. Its action is probably as close to running as you can get.

BE A STRONGER, HEALTHIER RUNNER: • Avoid injury • Run without impact • Manage recurring issues •

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GEAR

2

SOFT GOODS

1 / ALLBIRDS WOOL RUNNERS Like a mix of a Nike Free and Ugg boots, these are cozy, stink-free, and suitable for any time you’re not running. $95 2 / STIO SECOND LIGHT ALPHA JACKET Polartec Alpha insulation keeps you toasty in a polar vortex. Plus the slim cut and materials quiet the swishing noise when you run. $299

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3 / ROKA WOMEN’S ELITE RUN 4" LOW RISE SHORT Wetsuit-maker Roka has a well-tailored running line that includes these breezy shorts. A wide waistband is snug and has a back key pocket. $70 4

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4 / ALTRA THE ONE JUNIOR A legit running shoe for kids, these pint-sized Altras have a healthy foot shape, and are light and flexible. Comes in sizes 1 to 6 only. $60

3 5 / SAXX KINETIC RUN SHORT Guys, these unbelievably comfortable shorts have a boxer brief with a “ballpark pouch” that eliminates all bouncing and irritation. $75

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6 / WOOLX TEES Made of 100% superfine merino, the Mia V Neck (women) and Outback (men) are far less scratchy than some other wool layers we’ve worn. $59

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8 / STANCE RW FUSION RUN SPEED CREW Stylish calf-length socks are a hot look. Runner’s World special logo editions are available with or without runners at shop.runnersworld.com. $18

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58 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

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9 / HEX PERFORMANCE LAUNDRY DETERGENT For persistent odors, try this Free + Clear scent, available in both liquid detergent and single-dose cubes that dissolve in the washer. $10 PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

S T I L L P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y & M I TC H M A N D E L

Inside the eco-friendly package is a clear liquid, free of dyes, formulated specifically to clean synthetic fabrics.

7 / OUTDOOR RESEARCH CENTRIFUGE PANTS Winter is no match for the polyester layer covering the front of the legs. A griddedfleece backside dumps heat when you really get the blood pumping. $130


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OF YOUR RUNNING CAREER

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MANAGE IMPACT Runners know that chronic impact from hitting the pavement day after day can cause fatigue, compromised form and overuse injuries. Consider that Meb Keflezighi runs on soft surfaces 80 percent of the time, and hard surfaces, only 20 percent. Treadmills, tracks and trails provide some cushioning, but still subject the body to significant ground reaction forces. Cross training with stationary bikes, ellipticals and water running reduces impact but also feels less productive to runners than logging miles. The new Zero Runner® is a valuable training option that replicates natural running motion and lets runners choose their own stride – but totally eliminates impact. Independent hip and knee joints deliver freedom of motion and natural human biomechanics–without the pounding.

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GEAR

2

COOL EXTRAS

1 / TRAPPER WRAP AVOCADO SAVER You don’t have to whip up guacamole to ensure you use an avocado before it browns. Wrap this stretchy container around a half to save it a few extra days in the fridge. $8 2 / HARI MARI DUNES A padded toe post and grooved footbed cradle tired feet, while a rounded arch gives just enough support for extended wear. $45

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3 / AER DUFFEL PACK This backpack/gym bag has compartments for shoes and clothes, and a sleeve for a 15-inch laptop. It’s stylish for trips to an office, yet is built to withstand years of vacations. $150

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4 / EPIC WIPES These 32" x 20" disposable wipes kept a vanful of RW editors fresh during a Ragnar Relay. Packed the size of an energy bar, you can easily toss one in any bag, just in case. $3 each or $25 for 10 5 / SQUIRREL’S NUT BUTTER Whipped up in small batches in a Flagstaff home kitchen, it spreads on slightly greasy, but cleans up Heat the easily and doesn’t stain entire mitten in clothes. From $5 a microwave 20 to 30 seconds for three hours of warmth.

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7 / HXT MARATHON MITTEN Reheatable packets in the body and fingers keep you warm in freezing temps. $80

Best Shoes in the World The top vote-getters from editors of RW’s international editions. Reviews at runners world.com/bestshoes.

60 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

EDITOR’S CHOICE

Saucony Triumph ISO 2

BEST DEBUT

New Balance Fresh Foam Vongo

BEST UPDATE

Adidas Adizero Adios 3

BEST BUY

BEST TRAIL

Brooks Ghost 9

Brooks Cascadia 11

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

S T I L L P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y, R YA N O L S Z E W S K I & M I TC H M A N D E L

6 / THULE URBAN GLIDE Easy to adjust, this jog stroller folds flat with the twist of one handle and has a multi-height handlebar, a reclining seat, and a dial to fine-tune the front tire’s track. $400


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INCREDIBLE STORIES

C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P E T E R H O F F M A N ; R U S H JAG O E ; L A R S E N & TA L B E R T; M I C H A E L S TA R G H I L L , J R . ; N AT H A N P E R K E L ; JA S O N A R T H U R S ; P E T E L AC K E R ; R E B E C CA S T U M P F ; M AT T T R A P P E ; L E X E Y S WA L L

REAL RUNNERS


P H OTO G R A P H B Y R U S H JAG O E ( B OT TO M )

Clockwise from left: Gray, LaJaunie, Livingston, Braden, Moon, Saft, Foulds, Reyes, Curwood, and the Harmses represent runners everywhere.

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JOSH LaJAUNIE 38, MANAGER WHO LOST 230 LB. THIBODAUX, LOUISIANA “I JUST NEVER LET UP ON HOW I DO ME, AND I HOPE

“I read that running was a good fat-burning workout, and something clicked.”

RW 2016

COVER SEARCH

THAT BLEEDS OVER TO THE PEOPLE I LOVE THE MOST.”

By Nick Weldon JOSH LAJAUNIE GREW UP in the tiny 5,000-person hamlet of Chackbay, Louisiana, which is as way out there as it sounds. The road from New Orleans passes through miles of cypress swamp and narrows as it winds past sugar cane fields and flickering petrochemical plants. Billboards advertise airboat tours, drive-thru daiquiris, and hot boudin sausage, and then the road gets narrower, bumpier, and darker still, until finally it hits Bayou Lafourche, the autobahn of swamp country, lined with many little backwaters like Chackbay. Here, LaJaunie drawls, “the compass is this side of the bye-yuh, that side of the bye-yuh, up the bye-yuh, or down the bye-yuh.” It is not a place where you’d expect to find a plant-eating, Scott Jurek– worshipping ultrarunner who throws around words like “endothelium.” If you see LaJaunie’s “before” pictures and then meet him in person, you can’t help but wonder, Who is this guy?

#outdatbayou DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 63


LaJaunie weighed 420 pounds (inset) before he started running near his home in Thibodaux (left).

64 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

point of pride. Cajun food, likewise—its dueling complexity and rusticity now celebrated nationwide—has hardened into a cultural totem. “You’d start everything with a roux,” LaJaunie says. “You’d make gumbo, jambalaya, or pot-fried rabbit or squirrel, cooked in that gravy until it falls off the bone. Or we’d be boiling crawfish, frying fish, doing a deer chili, doing a sauce piquante.” Being big came with being a LaJaunie. So did football. A promising 290-pound high school lineman, LaJaunie was offered a scholarship to play at the University of Arkansas at Monticello, which, for the first time, took him outside of his bayou bubble. His coaches wanted him to gain weight, but instead of bulking up in the gym, LaJaunie ate his way to 320 pounds. “I wasn’t really an athlete,” he says. “I was more of a fat pawn, and the quarterbacks and running backs were the rooks and queens.” In his first semester away, LaJaunie slipped a disc in his back, grew homesick, and returned home to enroll at Nicholls State in Thibodaux, where he now lives with his wife, B.J., and two dogs. He promptly f lunked out and fell into partying with the back-home

LAJAUNIE WAS RUNNING three days a week, but the radical change to his diet—which radically changed his body—wasn’t sparked until the spring of 2013, when he and B.J. decided to avoid all processed foods for the 40 days of Lent. During this time, LaJaunie also read Christopher McDougall’s best seller Born to Run, where he learned about the vegan ultrarunning legend Scott Jurek. He blazed (Continued on page 103)

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R U S H JAG O E ; CO U R T E S Y O F J O S H L A JAU N I E ( I N S E T )

This fit and ebullient fellow who politely sends back steamed veggies because they’re drenched in an unknown sauce? Who cheerfully gabs with awestruck locals who read about him in the paper, and who talks about Boston qualifying and 100-milers and the nuances of veganism? Who is he, and what did he do with Josh LaJaunie, the 6-foot-4, 420-pound ex–football player from the photos? “I was a skinny kid in, like, kindergarten,” says LaJaunie (pronounced LahZHAN-nay). “But my family fixed that.” LaJaunie was raised in “a food culture,” he says, specifically that of the Cajuns, French-speaking Canadians expelled by the British in the mid18th century. Cajuns and others who made their way out to the bayou—like LaJaunie’s French ancestors—learned to assert themselves within the cutthroat swamp food chain, becoming adept hunters and fishermen who let no animal go to waste. They were cut off not only by geography but also by the prejudices of city folk in New Orleans and elsewhere who came to deride the French-speaking, critter-eating swamp people with the slur “coonass,” which LaJaunie and others have reclaimed as a

crowd, drinking heavily and eating poorly. When friends got busted, he decided to cut down the partying—and his ballooning weight. He took appetite suppressants, lost 100 pounds, then gained it right back. Around this time he met B.J. and replaced late-night bar crawling with excursions into New Orleans with her to watch the Saints and hunting trips with his grandfather, whom he calls Bam Bam, and his brother, Dustin. B.J.’s tough love, more than anything else, turned him around. “I said I wouldn’t marry somebody who didn’t finish college,” she says. LaJaunie re-enrolled at Nicholls to pursue a business degree. When he and B.J. got married in 2008, he wore a size 62-long suit jacket, size 54 pants, and a shirt with a 22-inch neck. “Today I look at my wedding pictures and tell her I’m sorry,” he says. He topped out at 420 pounds in 2009. Then a childhood friend, Jeff Thibodaux (a common name in those parts), called and asked LaJaunie if he wanted to join a gym with him. He felt like an unlikely workout buddy, but they eased back with “old-school football stuff” like squats and bench presses and bicep curls. Soon LaJaunie was walking on the treadmill, flipping through old issues of Runner’s World. “I read about how running was a good fat-burning workout,” he says, “and something clicked.” LaJaunie and Thibodaux first took it outdoors one particularly swampy summer day, alternating running and walking from one telephone pole to the next. “It was more jiggling than running,” LaJaunie says about the half-mile workout. Before long, they were running three miles at a time. LaJaunie got his business degree in December 2011, and he and Thibodaux ran the Crescent City Classic 10K in New Orleans the following spring, finishing together in 1:43. He still weighed 320.


“Training for a marathon R

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to work toward.”

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is something positive

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EILEEN MOON 47, NE W YORK PHILHARMONIC CELLIST AND CANCER SURVIVOR WARWICK, NE W YORK “RUNNING AND MUSIC BRING TOGETHER COMMUNITIES OF LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE, AND I LOVE THE ENERGY OF THAT HUMAN INTERACTION.”

By Tish Hamilton

P H OTO G R A P H B Y N AT H A N P E R K E L

EILEEN MOON has a tremendous amount of energy, which is a good thing, because she needs it for all the passions competing for her attention. As a cellist in the New York Philharmonic, she plays in up to four concerts per week, all of which require rehearsals and time learning the music. She’s the founder of a music series in Warwick, New York, 65 miles northeast of the city, with which she performs chamber music (more rehearsals!). She shares a house in Warwick with her

#musicalexa


Moon, near her home in Warwick, got a stroller so she could take her ailing dogs on runs. “I just want them to be happy,” she says.

66 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

Moon keeps track of the concerts, rehearsals, appointments, and commitments with a paper pocket calendar tucked in her purse, highlighted in colors to show Myers’s days of travel (orange) and off work (yellow). “I have to prioritize, and it’s so much easier for me to see this,” she says. “It makes me feel better to have a sense of what to expect for planning for dogs, socializing, races, et cetera.” Not that she’s the calm center of all this chaos. “I am definitely not evenkeeled,” Moon says, her hyperkinetic hair whipping around her face (she never wears a ponytail—not even when running). “I’m a very reactive person.” Moon’s interests began to twine when she joined the Philharmonic in 1998, which is where she met Myers. The two moved in and started to expand their menagerie. “At one point we had seven dogs and four cats,” Moon says. Touring Europe, Asia, and the U.S. with the orchestra, she noticed a couple of horn players (though not Myers) would go for runs around the city. She asked to join them—“I now know they slowed down for me a lot”—and back in New York City (where they lived at the time), she dabbled in shorter races. But the event that crystallized her thinking was her breast cancer, diag-

nosed in 2010, which required surgery, eight weeks of radiation, and months of physical therapy. Not long after that, she had to have two surgeries to remove bone spurs from both her shoulders. She couldn’t play her cello for six months. While it was difficult to stay home and not perform—“I felt guilty”—the enforced time off gave her time to think about what really mattered to her. “Those years of convalescence were a time of personal enlightenment for me,” Moon says. “I thought, maybe I can learn something. Maybe something positive can come from this.” WHAT MATTERED MOST: music, animals, running, and community—and bringing all those passions together. By then, Moon and Myers (and their dogs and cat) had relocated to Warwick, a bucolic and eclectic town in a former farming area of the Hudson Valley. As she recovered, she joined the local Chamber of Commerce and produced music events to help raise money for the care of animals. She conceived musicalexa (named after her niece) as an online forum to connect runners with artists who want to take up the sport. More recently she launched Running for Pits, hoping to get runners to take pitbulls out of animal shelters to calm (Continued on page 105)

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y N AT H A N P E R K E L ; C O U R T E SY O F E I L E E N M O O N ( D O G S )

long-time partner, Phil Myers, the Philharmonic’s principal French horn player—who often travels the world to teach and perform—and their six small dogs. Because five of the pooches are suffering from various elder-caninerelated issues (so many vet visits!), she bought a DoggyRide jogging stroller that holds them all for jaunts in a nearby park. She is cofounder and lead energizer of Friends of Warwick Valley Humane Society, for which she conceives fundraising events (like chamber music!). She and Myers also keep an apartment across the river in Fort Lee, New Jersey, to sleep at after late-night concerts. She practices once or twice a day, an hour or more each time. And then there’s her fitness routine: She runs four or five times a week, works out with a personal trainer at a local gym, and rides her new indoor Peloton bike. When she decided to tackle the New York City Marathon, she didn’t get in through connections with the orchestra. Instead, she did the New York Road Runners’ 9+1 program, in which you are guaranteed entry to the marathon if you complete nine NYRR races and volunteer at one. And lastly, she schedules mammograms once a year to make sure her breast cancer hasn’t recurred. Got all that? Whew.


JIM BRADEN 81, retired manager The Woodlands, Texas “I don’t worry about what I can’t do.”

#beautifullife

Elizabeth Gray 43, manager and domestic abuse survivor West Columbia, South Carolina “It has taken me so much work to have peace and joy in my life.”

#GeezerJock

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P E T E R H O F F M A N (G R AY ) ; M I C H A E L S TA R G H I L L , J R . ( B R A D E N )

AT MILE 25 of her first marathon, Elizabeth Gray heard a voice in her head. You will never run a marathon. It was the whisper of her ex-husband from her second marriage, taunting her as the finish came into focus. “People ask me all the time how I ended up in an abusive relationship,” says Gray, who was an active-duty U.S. Marine from 1991 to 1995. “I was insecure after a divorce [she was previously married for 12 years]. I had two kids. I didn’t think anyone else would want me. I met this smooth-talker and was tricked by his charm.” He was controlling from the start. “If I didn’t listen, there would be hell to pay.” He ripped the gearshift out of her Saturn and broke her nose with the sun visor. He head-butted her in the face, causing a purple bruise that was too large and dark to conceal. Her friends noticed. Her clients at the salon she owned at the time noticed. She filed 13 police reports between 2005 and 2010. Still, when people asked what happened, she lied. “I was supposed to be this tough Marine,” she says. “I had my pride, and I was too embarrassed to ask for help.” When he started yelling at her children, who were then in middle school, she knew she had to find a way out. In 2010, Gray turned to Sistercare, a nonprofit that serves victims of domestic abuse. She stayed with a friend until she found a new place. “I felt like a failure,” she says. “I was going through my second divorce and was scared all the time. That’s when I started running again. When I was a Marine, I ran all the time.” After crossing the finish of that first 26.2 in 2012, she sat down on a curb and cried. “I knew I had come through a dark time,” she says. “I knew that God had a higher purpose for me, and that it involved running.” Gray’s mission is to complete 50 marathons in 50 states while raising awareness about domestic violence. On December 17, she will run The Three Bridges Marathon in Little Rock, Arkansas—her 26th marathon in her 25th state. She documents her progress on her Facebook page, Marathons Against Domestic Violence, and dedicates her races to victims and advocates. Now a restaurant manager, she is on South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley’s Domestic Violence Task Force and has met with members of Congress to discuss intimate partner abuse. “I want people to know there is life after trauma,” she says. “I had the courage to take that first step and run a marathon. It’s made my life awesome.” —ALI NOLAN

JIM BRADEN’S fitness week starts on Monday, with a 5.6mile run on a golf course near his home. He runs a little more than 5 miles on Wednesdays and Fridays, too. Saturdays he goes 8 to 10, and Sundays he does a “lovely easy run around a lake.” On Tuesdays and Thursdays? Braden calls those “off” days— but he’s at the gym, doing cardio on the bike, StairMaster, or rower and a strength workout. It’s an ambitious routine for anyone, let alone an 81-year-old. But Braden refuses to give in to the consequences of age. Sure, he’s slower. That’s inevitable. With his running and working out, however, he’s certain he’s staved off diseases that could affect his life expectancy—and his quality of life. In his 30s, as a manager with Shell, he would take a walk after work with his wife, Karen, and two boys to de-stress from his day. One day the walk included a run to the corner, which soon turned into a one-mile jog. Then came a 5K and a 10K, followed by marathons. (His PR is 3:02.) In his 50s, Braden discovered triathlon and qualified for the

Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii, seven years in a row. He did the Western States and Leadville 100-milers. “Over the years, I pretty much got every hole on my runner’s card punched,” he says. His mantra these days: Stay in the game. At 80, he ran the Houston Marathon in 4:52:50. In February, he clocked 2:14:51 for a half marathon in Galveston. A year ago he sold his triathlon bike but replaced it with a hybrid (with a kickstand). He says he has probably run his last marathon (we’ll see), but if that allows him to keep running half marathons, the less punishing event, he’s fine with that. “Yes, running gets more difficult,” he says. “But here I am still fit and feisty.” Even with his seven-daysper-week exercise routine and year-round gardening—Braden is the only one of his neighbors who doesn’t employ a landscape service—he admits to one vice: drinking a porter, every afternoon at about 3 p.m., on his deck, with a book and his dog. “See?” he says. “I’m a normal guy.” —SARAH LORGE BUTLER DECEMBER 2015 RUNNER’S WORLD 67


DORI LIVINGSTON 53, Special Agent, State Police Austin, Texas “I’m not going to let cancer beat me.”

#johnteamrwb

John Reyes

#greatfaith

68 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

5 flat for the 40,” she says—and in 1999 she became a running back for the Women’s Football League team the Austin Rage. “We played full-contact NFL rules. It was so, so fun.” Livingston quit in 2002 when she injured her neck, but has always loved the camaraderie of a team. So she was an easy sell when she met Rick Nichols of Rogue Runners, a thriving local running club. She joined and ran her first marathon. And then an ultra. All while dealing with treatments for recurring melanoma. “Running is a big stress release,” she says. In Rogue Runners, she also met the woman who would become her wife. Now a special agent in the Criminal Investigations Division, Livingston has spread her passion for running to her colleagues on the force. She talked two men on her hallway into running a half marathon. Sidelined for eight months when she damaged her shoulder in an ultra, she is just now returning to three-milers. She has been cancer-free for a year and has her sights on the Tahoe Triple marathon next October. “I’m so excited!” she says. “I’m missing all my endorphins. Running just makes me happy.” —T.H.

MOST PEOPLE NEVER KNEW how angry he was because usually he kept it stuffed inside. Families enjoying a park on a sunny day didn’t know. The guy next to him complaining his shower wasn’t hot enough didn’t know. The woman at Burger King? She might have known. As she stood at the counter, berating the staff for putting a tomato on her burger—You’ve got one job! One job!—he grabbed the burger, flipped it open, and threw the tomato in the trash. “How hard was that?” he demanded. Army Staff Sgt. John Reyes was angry most of the time, especially with civilians. They had no idea how good they had it. No idea that little Iraqi girls—like the one who gave his soldiers cold Pepsi on a hot day—were getting shot for being friendly to the Americans. In 2008, after two deployments in Iraq, after losing buddies in combat and to suicide, Reyes realized his anger wasn’t normal and decided to get help. His therapist asked him about his hobbies, and he said he liked to run. When he ran, he didn’t think. After he ran, he felt better. Run more, she told him. When you feel angry, go for a run. And so he bumped up his runs from two or three a week to five or six, and when he hit a hill and his lungs hurt, he thought about his buddies who took their lives, how they’d be on that hill, too, if they’d gotten help. He got better, but it was recovery within the bubble of the Army. In 2012, a friend introduced him to Team Red, White, and Blue, a nonprofit dedicated to enriching veterans’ lives through physical and social activity that includes service members and civilians. Reyes started to open up and he came to understand that the civilians he met shared his values. And some of them were pretty banged up, too—suffering familiar feelings of loneliness, depression, anxiety, rage. Accidents and assaults, he realized, can leave the same calling cards as bullets and bombs. Reyes, who with his wife has a 4-year-old daughter, is now the athletic director of the Colorado Springs chapter of Team Red, White, and Blue. He shares what he’s learned: that asking for help isn’t a sign of weakness. That running can be the best medicine. That surrounding yourself with positive people doing positive things can change the course of your life. “If you haven’t had help, get help,” he says. “Get angry at the trail, that’s what I do. I’m like, ‘All right, trail, you’re not going to take me.’ There’s something out there for everyone.” —CHRISTINE FENNESSY

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y L A R S E N & TA L B E R T ( L I V I N G S TO N ) ; R E B E C CA S T U M P F ( R E Y E S )

NO ONE EVER GOES to a physical exam expecting to discover she has cancer, but for Dori Livingston, the diagnosis of stage 3 melanoma shocked both her and her doctors for two reasons: because that type of cancer is not common among people with darker skin and because it was uncommonly aggressive. She was in surgery the very next day. “They took out a good chunk of my arm,” she says. “It was pretty scary.” On the same day in 2009 that Livingston found out about her melanoma, a good friend learned of her own stage 4 breast cancer. When that friend suggested that the two run a Susan G. Komen 5K, which raises money for cancer, Livingston said yes. Never mind that the race was that very weekend, never mind that she wasn’t even running much. “After that I got the bug,” she says. Livingston, 53, describes herself as “an athlete by nature.” She was a sprinter in high school and played basketball in college. After she joined the Texas police department in 1994, she would run laps around a local track just to stay in shape. One day she noticed women playing tackle football. They asked her to try out—“I’m pretty fast, I ran

34, Army Staff Sergeant Colorado Springs “We all have our issues. Running may not solve them, but it will help you deal with them.”


KRYSTALANNE CURWOOD 31, WAITRESS AND STUDENT BOULDER, COLOR ADO “WHEN YOU GET YOUR COMMUNITY BEHIND YOU,

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M AT T T R A P P E

YOU CAN GO EVEN FARTHER.” KRYSTALANNE Curwood barely had a warmup before she became a runner—and a very fast one at that. In 2012, her mother, Lynnmarie Mann, signed up for a half marathon a nd encou ra g e d her daughter to start running, too. Curwood, then 27, was living in Los Angeles, where her fitness regimen consisted of one activity: Latin ballroom dancing. K r ysta la n ne sta r ted running a few days per week, five to seven miles at a time. A month later, a close friend was murdered and her employer called to say her position had been eliminated. Mourning the loss of her friend and her job, she went with her mother to the Rock ’n’ Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon. Curwood’s result: 1:37:46. That was when she started taking running seriously. In 2013, she followed the news of the bombings at the Boston Marathon finish line with horror and was motivated to qualify for the 2014 race. She did so easily on her first attempt, running San Diego in 3:09:57. For Curwood, more important than her race

were the conversations she had along the way, specifically with two brothers who’d been in Boston. “From mile seven to mile 23, I talked with people who were near the bombs or had just finished,” she says. “Hearing their stories, how t hey were more concerned about others, made me realize: It’s an individual sport, but it’s really not. We’re all cheering for each other.” Now training in Boulder, Colorado, with the Boulder Track Club and coach Kathy Butler, Curwood has bests of 2:49:36 in the ma rathon and 1:16:58 in the half marathon. She runs 80 to 120 miles per week. Skechers provides her with free gear. As a relative newcomer, she says every race is an eye-opener, as she sees athletes in wheelchairs, parents pushing disabled children, charity runners happily raising money for causes. Curwood, 31, balances her mileage with a physically demanding job as a server and new-staff trainer at BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse. She’s also pursuing a master’s degree in criminal justice. “When I get out on the run in the morning, I see the same people, and whether they’re walking or running, they’re my community,” she says. “They’re my inspiration.” —S.L.B.

#liveintentionally


READERS’ CHOICE

MICHAEL & DONALD HARMS 33 AND 20, SPECIAL EDUCATION TE ACHER AND HIS SON MANASSAS, VIRGINIA “WHEN WE RUN, DONALD FORGETS HE HAS A DISABILITY. HE FEELS LIKE JUST ANOTHER RUNNER.” MICHAEL HARMS first noticed Donald’s smile. They were on a porch at a home for children with disabilities in Jamaica in 2010. Donald lay on a mat. He was 13 years old, and because of spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, had severe mobility limitations, communicating in short monosyllabic bursts. He could smile, though—a bright, wide smile. Harms remembers scooping Donald up in his arms. “I felt like I wanted to take care of him for the rest of my life,” he says. Harms and his wife, Hope, had traveled to Jamaica for their second time volunteering at the home. They’d quit their jobs as special education teachers and hiked half the Appalachian Trail. They wanted to travel. All their

belongings were in storage. They were not ready to have kids. Especially one like Donald, whose disability would require aroundthe-clock care for the rest of his life. But that was before his smile. It took over two years of navigating the bureaucratic maze of two governments, but the Harmses brought Donald home in 2013. For a year, he and his parents got to know each other. His dad struggled to find activities for the inquisitive teenager. “He loves sports,” Harms says, “but it was difficult to find things he could do.” The answer came when a friend sent a video of Dick and Rick Hoyt, the father-son duo famous for completing 32 Boston Marathons and six Ironmans with Dick pushing son Rick, who

is wheelchair-bound with cerebral palsy, just like Donald. Father and son watched the video mesmerized. Donald started repeating, “Dah. Dah. Dah.” “Oh, do you want to do what they are doing in the video?” Harms remembers asking. Donald lifted his left foot—the limb he has the most control over— and pushed it against the table. He spun around to face the door. He wanted to go for a run. Now. So they did. A one-mile loop around the neighborhood. “Donald was smiling the whole time,” Harms says. Since then, they’ve completed more than 30 races together, including two marathons. The trophies, plaques, and medals hang above Donald’s bed. Michael and Hope have had two kids since adopting Donald. As their lives have gotten busier, Harms says he and Donald are closest out on the run. “It’s hard to not just see his disability,” Harms says. “But when we are running together, you see how much fun he’s having. You see an athlete. A smiling one at that.” —KIT FOX

#TeamDonald P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E X E Y S WA L L


READERS’ CHOICE

AARON SAFT 39, running-store owner Asheville, North Carolina “I do as much good as I can through running, because that’s what I know.”

#INeverGiveUp Rhonda Foulds

#RUN828

53, mother with Parkinson’s disease Justin, Texas “Running is not a cure, but it gives me a much better quality of life. I feel normal when I run.”

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y P E T E L AC K E R ( F O U L D S ); JA S O N A R T H U R S ( S A F T )

TWELVE YEARS AGO, Rhonda Foulds relied on 32 medications and a wheelchair to get through the day. Today, she relies on one thing: running. Foulds was training for her first marathon in 1999 when she noticed a tremor in her right pinky finger. When the twitching spread to her hand, then to her arm, and then she could no longer turn her head or smell anything, she sought medical attention. The diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease stunned Foulds, then only 35 and the mother of three young boys. “I thought this was an old-person’s disease,” she says. Foulds stopped exercising and eventually didn’t have the strength to stand upright or feed herself. In 2004, she elected to have an intensive surgery called deep-brain stimulation, during which doctors placed electrodes in her brain and connected them to a stimulator implanted in her chest. The device changed Foulds’s life dramatically. Soon she was doing a half mile at her local park—but she had gained 100 pounds. One day, her middle son, Zachary, home on military leave, joined her. Remembering her past as a runner, he asked her if she thought she could pick up the pace. “I felt better than I had in 10 years,” she says. “I went home and signed up for a 5K six weeks away.” Since then Foulds has done 44 marathons and three 50Ks. (She gave her 2014 Boston Marathon medal to her neurosurgeon.) Not that it’s easy. The device doesn’t stop the disease—there is no cure for Parkinson’s. When Foulds wakes up in the morning, she is very stiff. “I move like the Tin Man,” she says. Running loosens her up and keeps her feeling good for hours, which is why she doesn’t like to miss a day. She received the most votes in our “readers’ choice” contest. “My youngest son is in the Navy,” she says, “and he had his entire ship voting for me.” There’s also a surprising perk that has come from her active life. “When I run, I get my sense of smell back,” she says. “I remember the first time I smelled a pine tree while running. I cried. Running has turned on something in my brain.” —KATIE NEITZ

AARON SAFT’S favorite superhero is The Flash—a.k.a. “the fastest man alive.” Saft owns action figures (“For my kids!”), T-shirts with the hero’s signature lightning-bolt insignia, and a thick stack of Flash comics. He loves the skintight, red-suited hero for two reasons: The Flash runs really, really fast. And he improves the lives of people in his community—the citizens of Central City. Sounds a lot like Saft, who also runs really, really fast. When he was 14, he clocked a 4:56 mile. At age 28, he set a 2:30 marathon PR. This year, he took eighth in the National 50 Mile Trail Championships. He logs 90 to 100 miles a week on singletrack trails in the Pisgah National Forest, often with his 2-year-old miniature Australian shepherd, Miles. And with the running store he co-owns in Asheville, Saft hopes to improve the lives of people in his community. “I really believe in giving back to others and making this place better,” he says. “It’s something my parents instilled in me.” When Saft quit his job as a

high school Spanish teacher and opened Foot RX Running in 2007, it didn’t take long for him to decide that he was going to do more than just sell the shoes displayed on wall-mounted racks. “I love sharing my passion for running and trails with others,” he says. “I want people to be less intimidated.” Saft organizes more than 35 races a year, many on trails. His signature event is a monthly $5 5K, which he offers so that families of four or five can afford to run races together. His wife, an osteopath, and two children, ages 9 and 5, often come out to run or volunteer. Proceeds from his races are funneled though his nonprofit, RUN828 Foundation, to disperse to causes as well-known as Habitat for Humanity and as granular as local trail maintenance. “I feel most like myself when I run,” Saft says. “I feel like I can think. I can breathe. I can relax.” Sounds a lot like his favorite speedy hero, who once said, “Life is locomotion. If you’re not moving, you’re not living.” —K.F.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 71


“FOR ME, THE QUEST WAS DEEPLY PERSONAL. I WOULD FINALLY RUN ALONGSIDE MY ANCIENT BROTHER.”


YOU DON’T THE ROAD DEAN TO SPARTA KARNAZES KNOW PHEIDIPPIDES! Adapted from

A New Book by

H A I R & M A K E U P B Y T R EJA M C C L I S H ; B O DY PA I N T I N G B Y R I C H D I LT Z

AN ULTRAMARATHONER VISITS HIS ANCESTRAL HOMELAND FOR THE TRUTH ABOUT THE ORIGINAL “MARATHONER.” THINK YOU CAN HANDLE IT?

M

any runners are familiar with the story surrounding the origins of the modern marathon. As the well-worn legend goes, after the badly outnumbered Greeks somehow managed to drive back the Persians who had invaded the coastal plain of Marathon, an Athenian messenger named Pheidippides was dispatched from the battlefield to Athens to deliver the news of Greek victory. After running about 25 miles to the Acropolis, he burst into the chambers and gallantly hailed his countrymen with “Nike! Nike! Nenikékiam” (“Victory! Victory! Rejoice, we conquer!”). And then he promptly collapsed from exhaustion and died. Turns out, however, the story is bigger than that. Much bigger. ¶ The whole idea of recreating an ancient voyage was fantastic to me. Looking for an excuse to visit the country of my ancestors, I signed up for the little-known Spartathlon in 2014, an Photograph by J O N A T H A N

SPRAGUE

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 73


ultramarathon from Athens to Sparta that roughly follows the path of the real Pheidippides. It felt like the right way to tell his story—the actual story of the marathon. Here’s what I discovered:

1

PHEIDIPPIDES WAS NOT A CITIZEN ATHLETE,

but a hemerodromos: one of the men in the Greek military known as day-long runners. What they did was considered beyond competition, more akin to something sacred. Much is written about the training and preparation of Olympic athletes, and quite detailed accounts of the early Greek Games exist. Comparatively little is recorded of the mysterious hemerodromoi other than that they covered incredible distances on foot, over rocky and mountainous terrain, forgoing sleep if need be in carrying out their duties as messengers. Like Pheidippides, I run long distances—ultramarathons. Years ago, on my 30th birthday, I ran 30 miles, completing a celebratory mile for each one of my unfathomable years of existence. That night forever altered the course of my life. I wanted to go farther, to try 50-mile races even. And so I did. Training and life became inseparable, one and the same, intimately intertwined. Running these long distances was liberating. I felt a closeness to Pheidippides and I resolved to learn what really took place out there on the hillsides of ancient Greece.

2

THE STORY THAT EVERYONE IS FAMILIAR WITH

is that of Pheidippides running from the battlefield of Marathon to Athens to announce Greek victory, a distance of about 25 miles. But first he ran from Athens to Sparta, to gather Spartan troops to help the Athenians in combat against the Persians. The distance was much more than a single marathon, more like six marathons stacked one upon the other, some 150 miles. At the modern-day Spartathlon, I’d supposedly retrace those steps. It is a demanding race with aggressive cutoff times. Runners must reach an ancient wall at Hellas Can factory, in Corinth—50.33 miles—within nine hours and 30 minutes or face elimination. For comparison, many 50-mile ultramarathons have cutoff times of 13 or 14 hours to complete the race in its entirety. At the start, I was surrounded by 350 warriors huddled in the predawn mist at the foot of the Acropolis of Athens. For me the quest was deeply personal. I’d been waiting a lifetime to be standing in this place. I would finally run alongside my ancient brother, Pheidippides, albeit two and a half millennia in his wake. The starting gun went off, and away we went, into the streets crowded with morning traffic. Policemen were stationed at most 74 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

From top: The author in his grandfather’s house; standing with Hermes in Athens; the start of the 2014 Spartathlon.

The modern Olympic Marathon, the one sports enthusiasts identify with ancient Greece, had no place in the ancient games at all. The original Olympic footrace was a relatively short sprint. Called the Stade, it consisted of a roughly 200meter dash on a straight stretch of grass. Indeed, the modern marathon wouldn’t come into existence for another several thousand years.

Herodotus, the first Greek historian to write about the Battle of Marathon, never mentions the final run. And despite our popular belief, neither ancient Greek writer Plutarch nor Lucian refers to Pheidippides as the individual who ran from Marathon to Athens. They assign that run to an entirely different messenger.

Adapted with permission from The Road to Sparta, by Dean Karnazes. Published by Rodale.


MARATHON 3

of the main intersections to stop vehicles, but after crossing streets we runners had to run on the sidewalks, avoiding stray dogs, trash cans, and meandering pedestrians.

ATHENS

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3

2

••

Pheidippides Spartathlon

GREECE SPARTA

According to experts in Greek history, Pheidippides ran from Athens to Sparta (1), then from there back to Athens (2). Modern legend says he only ran from Marathon to Athens (3). However, these last 25 miles are assigned to another messenger in the annals of Ancient Greece.

From left: Running the 2010 Silicon Valley Marathon in a toga; the author’s calves, a trademark of the (Greek) Karnazes family.

ANCIENT GREEK ATHLETES WERE KNOWN to

eat figs and other fruits, olives, dried meats, and a particular concoction composed of ground sesame seeds and honey mixed into a paste (now called pasteli). Hemerodromoi also consumed handfuls of a small fruit known as hippophae rhamnoides (Sea Buckthorn), thought to enhance endurance and stamina. This is how Pheidippides likely fueled during his run, and how I ran the race, too. Every few miles in the Spartathlon, there were aid stations overflowing with modern athletic foods, but no figs, olives, pasteli, or cured meat were to be had. I was supplied along the way by my crew, but by the time I picked up a bag of food in Corinth (about 50 miles in), the once delectable pasteli now tasted like maple syrup mixed with talcum powder, chalky and repulsively sweet, and I could no longer tolerate the stuff like I had during my training runs. I tried gnawing on a piece of cured meat, but it was rubbery and the gristle got stuck between my teeth. I had several figs, which seemed to sit best in my stomach. About 50 miles later, after climbing Mount Parthenion and plummeting some 1,200 feet from the summit, I was eventually deposited in the remote outpost of Sangas, where my crew was waiting for me, asking me if I could eat. I shook my head no, too exhausted to answer. I kept running.

4

DAWN IS THE BEWITCHING HOUR during an

“Unihemispheric slow-wave sleep” refers to half of the brain being awake (including an open eye) while the other half shows signs of sleep. I’ve since talked to other ultramarathoners who’ve experienced sleep running.

all-night run. Running through the Arcadian foothills, I fought to stay awake. Slowly, ever so gradually, my eyelids drooped downward. Still, I pressed on. When I reopened my eyes, I found myself in the middle of the road. What the heck? I thought. Then it happened again, and I realized I was sleep running. Given ancient Greek record, Pheidippides would have likely passed through this very same section of Arcadia in the early morning hours, just as I was doing then. To think that an ancient hemerodromos was running here 2,500 years ago fascinated me, and knowing that this was the land of my ancestors made the experience even more visceral. Just as I was fully realizing the depth of my connection to this place, a large diesel truck came barreling down the highway straight for me, thrusting me back into the present-day reality of the modern Spartathlon. It was a stark reminder that while some things hadn’t changed since ancient times, other things had. I was gaining toward Tegea, which would mean about 30 more miles to go. DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 75


“EXHAUSTED AS HE WAS,

PHEIDIPPIDES’S JOB WAS NOT

OUT ON THE RETURN TRIP—ABOUT 150 MILES BACK TO ATHENS.”

T H I S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H B Y J O N AT H A N S P R AG U E

P R E V I O U S S P R E A D, C LO C KW I S E F R O M TO P L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H S B Y V L A D I M I R R YS ; CO R E Y R I C H P H OTO G R A P H Y (CA LV E S ); K AT E AS T L E ( R U N N I N G I N TO G A ); BA B I S G I R I T Z I OT I S /G O E X P E R I E N C E ; YA N N I S D I M OT S I S

COMPLETE. AFTER A NAP, HE SET


P H OTO G R A P H S B Y E L I A S L E FA S ( L E F T ); BA B I S G I R I T Z I OT I S /G O E X P E R I E N C E ( R I G H T )

5

Left: Running the Navarino Challenge in Messenia prior to the big race. Right: At the Spartathlon finish with King Leonidas.

7

PHEIDIPPIDES RAN THE DISTANCE in two days.

AGAIN, PHEIDIPPIDES MADE THE TRIP in about

I reached the end in 34:45:27. There is no finish line to cross, no mat to step over or tape to break; instead you conclude the journey by touching the feet of the towering bronze statue of King Leonidas in the center of town. The mayor of Sparta places an olive leaf wreath upon the head of each finisher and you are handed a golden goblet of water to drink from the Evrotas River, similar to how Olympian winners were honored in ancient times. Exhausted as he must have been from the journey, Pheidippides’s job was not complete. He needed to present a compelling case for why the Spartans should join the Athenians in battle. “Men of Sparta,” he reportedly said, “the Athenians beseech you to hasten to their aide, and not allow that state, which is the most ancient in all of Greece, to be enslaved by the barbarians.”

two days’ time. After he reached Athens, the city deployed 10,000 adult male Athenian citizens to Marathon to fend off 60,000 Persians. Despite being outnumbered, the Greeks were in an advantageous battle position, so General Miltiades, the leader of the Athenian troops, had the men hunker down to await the arrival of the Spartans. But the next day Miltiades got intelligence that the Persians had sent their cavalry back to their ships and were planning to split into two groups and surround the Greeks. The most prudent strategy would be to retreat to Athens to defend the city and wait for the Spartans to join the fight. But, thanks to Pheidippides, Miltiades knew the Spartans wouldn’t come soon enough, and the Athenians would be hung out to dry. He decided that the Athenians would wake early the next morning and attack the current Persian position while their horsemen were absent and before they had time to carry out their plan.

6

APPARENTLY HIS PLEA WAS convincing, for it worked. But the moon wasn’t full, and religious law forbade the Spartans to battle until it was, which wouldn’t be for another six days’ time. Pheidippides had to let his people know about the delay. So he did the unthinkable. After a brief catnap and some food, he awoke before sunrise and set out on the return trip—about 150 miles back to Athens. With his constitution fairly compromised, Pheidippides found himself trudging back over Mount Parthenion, when suddenly he had a vision of the god Pan standing before him. With the face of a human but the body and horns of a goat, Pan was an unsettling figure to behold. According to the historian Herodotus, Pan explained that while he was loyal to the Athenians, they must worship him properly in order to preserve the alliance. Pan had great powers that could unravel the enemy, and he would bestow the Athenians with these abilities, but only if they were to revere him as they should.

The literal translation of the word “marathon” is “a place full of fennel” (yes, the aromatic herb). Why fennel? Because when the invading Persian military forces landed on the shorelines of Greece in 490 BCE, they encountered a massive field of fennel. It is here that the Battle of Marathon took place. So I guess all those bumper stickers on athletes’ cars displaying 26.2 should actually be changed to read “Fennel.”

Hear a conversation with David Willey and Dean Karnazes on the RW Show. Available on iTunes, Stitcher, and other podcast platforms. More details at runnersworld.com/ audio.

8

IF PHEIDIPPIDES HAD FAILED in his 300-mile ultramarathon, what has been called the most critical battle in history might have been lost. Thus was the battle ultimately waged and won at Marathon. Eventually, the Spartans arrived in Athens and learned of the outcome. Before they got there, a messenger—but not Pheidippides, according to scholars—had run 25 miles to deliver the good news. So why do we run 26.2? Why are we not running some 300 miles, the distance Pheidippides ran from Athens to Sparta and back? Why highlight the shorter run when a much greater feat occurred? Perhaps because in that final jaunt from the battlefield of Marathon to Athens, the mystic messenger supposedly died at the conclusion. To the ancient Greeks, nothing could be nobler than dying after performing a heroic deed for one’s country. DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 77


A SPECIAL REPORT BY MICHELLE HAMILTON SURVEY CONDUCTED BY MEGHAN KITA AND PETER SMITH

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y N A M E G O E S H E R E

MALE RUNNERS MAY BE SHOCKED TO LEARN HOW OFTEN WOMEN MUST ENDURE ON-THE-RUN HARASSMENT. MANY FEMALE RUNNERS HAVE COME TO JUST EXPECT ITâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; AND THAT SHOULD UPSET US ALL.


ILLUSTRATION AND LETTERING BY JAMES VICTORE

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WORLD 79


W When three young women were mur-

80 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

43 percent of women runners say they are harassed at least sometimes

From a survey conducted online September 8–16, 2016, and shared with Runner’s World social media followers and newsletter subscribers and on run nersworld.com. Results are based on the responses of 2,533 women and 2,137 men who run outdoors.

In reality, the chance of being murdered midrun is very, very small. A woman between the ages of 16 and 44 has only a 1 in 35,336 chance of being the victim of a homicide at any time. The risk for random homicide is even lower: A woman is far more likely to be killed by someone she knows than by a stranger. And she puts herself in far greater danger when she gets in her car to drive to school or work, when her risk of death is 2.5 times higher than by death at the hands of another person. The actual risk of dying in a car crash is 1 in 14,165—far higher than homicide at any time—yet random murders generate a disproportionate amount of anxiety. Many runners (women as well as men) didn’t think twice about training alone before this past summer’s tragic, headline-making cases stoked their fears. Many still don’t. Those athletes may count on running to be a stressreliever, an escape from everyday cares, a chance to feel free. Others have long felt more trepidation about logging miles solo—young women especially— ILLUSTRATION BY JAMES VICTORE

P R E V I O U S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H B Y E WA L D S A D I E ; T H I S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H B Y M I TC H M A N D E L

dered midrun over a period of nine days this past summer, runners reacted with understandable shock, alarm, and concern. Nothing about the victims’ final miles should have been out of the ordinary: All three headed out in broad daylight. All three were on routes they’d traveled safely in the past. Their deaths occurred while they were running by themselves—one in Michigan, one in New York City, one in Massachusetts. But almost every runner trains alone sometimes. That such ordinary circumstances led to such unfathomable tragedy made these stories especially heartbreaking. At press time, more than two months had passed, and no suspects had been named in any of the three cases, which are likely unrelated. As details of the murders spread in early August, well-meaning nonrunners started peppering the athletes in their lives (especially the women) with advice: Don’t run with headphones. Don’t run in the dark. Don’t run alone. Runners joined the discussion, too—some eager to share what they do or carry to feel safe, others dealing with a newfound sense of vulnerability. “Emotional stories about people we relate to have a strong effect on us,” says Jessica Gall Myrick, Ph.D., an assistant professor and researcher in media and emotions at Indiana University Media School in Bloomington, Indiana, and a former collegiate runner. When a person sees herself (or a loved one) in a victim, it’s easier to connect with the story, and the more similarities, the stronger the connection. Multiple cases intensify the reaction: “It can make you think the threat is greater than it really is,” says Myrick.


because they are more likely to be interrupted in intrusive and sometimes frightening ways. Indeed, 43 percent of women at least sometimes experience harassment on the run, according to a recent RW survey, compared with just 4 percent of men. In the vast majority of cases, it’s not life-threatening. But it is pervasive, and it’s upsetting, and it’s most likely happening to you or someone you know. A man will look a woman up and down as she runs past. A driver will shout a come-on, laughing with his friends as they speed away. A person on a bike or in a car will follow a woman, and she might dart down a side street to escape. Even if nothing like this happens most days, knowing that it (or something worse) could happen causes stress. As the recent national dialogue surrounding Donald Trump’s sexist comments and alleged assaults brought to light, almost all women—runners or not—have endured unwanted sexual attention. And no matter how swift a woman’s pace, it’s impossible to outrun harassment.

YOUR WIFE, YOUR FRIEND, YOUR TEENAGE DAUGHTER–– SHE’S BEEN HARASSED

Of course, not every female runner has

to deal with intrusive and unwanted attention on every single run, nor is every woman who laces up running shoes hypervigilant and scared. But some report especially high victimization rates: For women runners under 30, harassment is a frequent experience, with 58 percent in our survey saying it happens to them midrun always, often, or sometimes. And the more often she or her peers experience such intrusion, the harder

—JENNIFER HERR, 36, BROOKLYN

been followed by a person in a vehicle, on a bicycle, or on foot

it becomes to access the carefree headspace many runners pursue and perhaps take for granted. Erin Bailey, 25, is on highest alert in the summer, when she runs outside several times per week. On a warm-weather four-miler this year near her home in Boston, she gave a thank-you wave to a parking attendant for stopping traffic so she could pass, and he responded by saying, “‘ Mmm hmmm,’ like he was salivating over a steak,” she says. Jae Cameron, 30, of New York City endures stares and whistles so regularly on her work commute that she pauses at the door before she heads out on a run. Do I really want to go out there? she asks herself. Do I really want to go deal with this? Bailey and Cameron live in big cities, and it’s true that urbanites are most likely to face unsolicited attention: Fifty-five percent of all city runners say they at least sometimes experience harassment on their runs. That’s a simple function of population density—the more people you see, the greater the odds one of them will act like a jerk. The converse is true, too—if you run in a quiet suburban residential neighborhood, you may not see anyone at all on your morning fourmiler. Still, that means only runners who encounter zero pedestrians or vehicles are guaranteed an uninterrupted run. While rural runners are the least likely to report being targeted, those who endure it don’t benefit from the relative anonymity that larger communities provide. “There’s a high chance women in rural areas will see their harasser again,” says Holly Kearl, founder of the advocacy nonprofit Stop Street Harassment (SSH), “because they can’t avoid a store or run down a different road.”

IT SUCKS

Imagine running down the street, in the zone, and someone honks at you for no apparent reason. Your heart rate quickens, you start to sweat from alarm in addition to exertion, and you bristle at the fact that a stranger has disturbed your otherwise pleasant run. This time, picture the peace of a quiet country road…and how that peace might evaporate when a stranger driving a car slows down to tail you. Thirty percent of women who responded to our survey

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 81


have been followed by someone in a car, on foot, or on a bike while running. Now imagine that your pursuer rolls down his window and asks if you’d like to [insert sexual act here]—a proposition like the ones 18 percent of women told us they’ve received midrun. Scary. All of these scenarios, plus illegal behaviors such as flashing and groping, fall on the harassment spectrum. “Street harassment invades a person’s space and rights, like any form of sexual harassment,” says Debjani Roy, deputy director of New York City–based advocacy group Hollaback! Of the women RW surveyed who have been targeted midrun, 79 percent say it bothers them “a lot” or “somewhat.” And it’s not just annoying or inconvenient—a growing body of research shows chronic harassment can affect a woman’s confidence and exacerbate issues such as depression, anxiety, body-image concerns, and eating disorders. Harassment reminds women that they’re vulnerable, robbing them of a sense of safety. Chelsea Cloud, 32, from Kalamazoo, Michigan, finds herself picking up the pace after an unwanted encounter. “If a harasser’s need is to take power away from women, then I will show how powerful I can be,” she says. But by the third incident—she once counted eight during a single run—she feels enraged and defeated. “I try not to let it get to me, but it does,” says Cloud. “Harassers are taking away my freedom and right to run outside in peace.” Some women react by altering their running behaviors: Among RW survey respondents with concerns about safety or unwanted attention, 73 percent say those concerns have inspired them to run with a phone, 60 percent to limit their runs to daylight hours, and 52 percent to change running routes. “Women may choose to run more trails to get off the streets, but this comes with another set of dangers,” says Cloud. “Just last year, a young woman in my community was dragged off of the Bicentennial Trail in Portage, Michigan, and into the woods by a male attacker. Thankfully, she escaped and got help.” Given this calculus—populated areas breed harassment, while remote areas 82 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

can provide cover for potentially da ng erou s people—some women turn to the safety of the treadmill. In fact, 27 percent of women RW surveyed say concerns like these have driven them to run indoors at least once. In a national survey by SSH, 23 percent of women said they exercised at the gym instead of outside to avoid being victimized. Some women find even that’s ineffective: Boston-based runner Bailey eventually stopped going to her gym after a man there said her workout tights would look better off. “Running is supposed to be a release, a sanctuary,” she says. “Instead, I’m wondering if I’m going to be safe.”

WTF ARE THESE GUYS THINKING?

—AMBER BALBIER, 35, McKINNEY, TEXAS

women runners have been flashed

If a female friend were to tell you, “Some jerk said something disgusting to me while I was running,” you’d assume said jerk was a man—and you’d almost certainly be correct. Of the women who reported being harassed in the RW survey, 94 percent name men as the primary perpetrators. The forces driving these men are the same ones behind the gender-pay gap and the fact that calling women “fat pigs” does not automatically disqualify a political candidate in the United States: sexism and inequality. “The public sphere is [still] a male space,” says Michael Kimmel, Ph.D., distinguished professor of sociology and gender studies at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York. That’s why any woman who leaves her home for any reason—to run, to work, to get the mail—could potentially be harassed, and why this is not just a running issue but a societal one. Honks, innuendos, and so on are a man’s way of saying, “You are present in my space and I’m going to let you know it’s my space.” This power play is present in the majority of unsolicited sexual attention, particularly when men are with other men, though not all men are conscious of it. “In a sex-biased culture, street harassment can become ingrained in male behavior,” says Shira Tarrant, Ph.D., a gender studies professor at California State University, Long Beach. Boys and teens model the behavior of the men in their lives, and if the adults objectify


He Said WHAT?! Just some of the comments women have heard while running “A man crossing the street toward me called out,

“I passed a man walking his large dog, and I waved at the dog. The dog’s owner responded by saying, yelled at me on a fine summer morning. Yes, I had a shirt on.” —MARY HARVEY, 35, BROOKLYN

A few steps later another man said,

“A group of older, drunk dudes saw me and started catcalling and calling out every step I took with Once I passed, the two men met on the sidewalk to complain about how I hadn’t stopped to chat. They yelled loudly enough to make sure that I heard what an

—ELITZA NICOLAOU, 35, TRAVERSE CITY, MICHIGAN

“I was running when I came up on a couple of dude-bros working out on the lawn near the path, flipping tires and such. As I ran by, one yelled,

They were commenting on the motion of my chest as I moved.” I was for continuing on my run.” —ANNA REVOLINSKY, 26, PORTLAND, OREGON

—MAUREEN FINN, 25, STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT

“A guy yelled, “A man jumped out from behind a boat and shouted,

and pointed down. I thought he was pointing at the tire, but then I realized he was pointing at his crotch.”

—AMBER CARR, 28, KALKASKA, MICHIGAN

Then he started laughing, like it was so funny.” —RACHEL McNARY, 35, SEATTLE

USE THE HASHTAG #HARASSEDMIDRUN TO SHARE YOUR REACTIONS TO THIS STORY AND CONTINUE THE IMPORTANT CONVERSATION ABOUT MIDRUN HARASSMENT.

as he landed in my path.” —KAKI TALBOT, 29, GRAPEVINE, TEXAS


WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

In the meantime, women deal with the

possibility of being targeted by controlling the only factor they can: their own behavior. “I never run in the dark by myself, and when I am running alone 84

RUNNING ARMED

All 50 states have laws allowing citizens to carry firearms, and a few runners feel safer doing so. Here, Jo Kula of Aberdeen, North Carolina, explains why:

—ERIN BAILEY, 25, BOSTON

women runners have been sexually propositioned

FOR MORE STORIES FROM WOMEN WHO RUN ARMED, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.COM/RUNNINGARMED.

“My dad taught me how to shoot when I was 10 at a family cabin. In high school I was on a shooting team, then I joined the Army. I’ve always been around guns. I got my concealed carry permit in January 2016. I carry a Walther CCP—I named it Walter. I sometimes let my friends or family know, ‘I got Walter on me.’ I clip it to the front pack that is part of my ultra kit. “I’m training for a race that’s kind of crazy [the Grand to Grand Ultra, a 170-mile, seven-day stage event]. Here in North Carolina, during the day it can be 90 degrees with 100 percent humidity. I work with a trainer in the morning, so this summer I was often waiting until early evening to run. I started coming across some people in vehicles who made me uncomfortable. They would pass me, then turn around and pass again. I feel much safer now that I carry. “Being a gun owner, there’s a lot of responsibility. I go to the range and practice to stay current on my permit. I go through the motions of unzipping my pack, building muscle memory. Where is the gun, so my hand just naturally falls to it? “I know people who are anti-gun, who look at me like I’ve got a gorilla growing out of my forehead. I believe I have to protect myself and my family or friends. But I don’t just rely on my gun. If I need to kick [an assailant], break their nose, whatever, I’ve had that training, too.” —AS TOLD TO CINDY KUZMA

P H OTO G R A P H B Y F O U R S I D E D T R I A N G L E /A L A M Y (G U N )

women or treat them with disrespect, the minors learn that it’s acceptable or even admirable. K im mel conduct s informa l polls with his students, and he says that while men or boys may think they’re whistling or catcalling to score a date, harassment really has little to do with romance, or even with women. “The real center of attention is a man’s relationship with other men,” he says. Men and boys want to look cool, be funny, or find validation and acceptance from other men. Society teaches that to be a man, you must be powerful, aggressive, and dominant, and some men apply that to how they treat women on the street. But this narrow definition of masculinity is only part of the problem, says Tarrant. A man’s own ego, self-esteem, and sexual or personal issues come into play, as well. This is one reason harassment can turn violent: If a woman exerts her authority by ignoring a guy or speaking her mind, the man may feel rejected or humiliated and act upon that anger. Men who would never think of catcalling a woman can perpetuate inequality in subtle ways, often unconsciously. Some everyday examples include talking over women in meetings, soliciting ideas from only male colleagues, and dismissing another man’s bad behavior with an excuse like “some guys are just jerks.” When a woman runner shares a story of being targeted, asking her what she was wearing or whether she was alone implies that at least some of the blame might fall on her, when in fact the choice to harass belongs to the man alone. “I’ve been harassed in the dead of winter, completely bundled up with a mask covering most of my face,” Cloud says.


during the day, I ensure that it’s in one of Denver’s busiest parks or in a well-populated area,” says Elizabeth Lemont, 22, of Aurora, Colorado. “I also try to switch up my routes so that no one could memorize where and when I go.” When harassment does occur, it’s hard to know how to respond. “I worry about men in cars trying to take retribution to my actions, so usually I don’t do anything,” says Tasha Coryell, 28, from Tuscaloosa, Alabama. But during a longer run, Coryell says, “I tend to react poorly and might glare or put up my middle finger—when I am really tired, I just can’t deal with it.” The potential for offensive words to turn into actions is why some women carry protection; Kate Nyland, 36, of Brooklyn brings pepper spray on solo runs. “If I feel threatened, I simply hold it up—finger on the trigger—with a no-nonsense look on my face,” she says, adding, “I suppose this is confrontational, and it could backfire if the harasser is carrying a weapon.” While 21 percent of women tote pepper spray on their runs at least sometimes, a few women (1 percent) have gone to a greater extreme, carrying a loaded gun. Michele James, 34, a police officer in Enid, Oklahoma, started running with her handgun after she learned in her professional training that an attacker may be able to fight through pepper spray. (See “Running Armed,” opposite page, for another woman’s story.) What a woman is wearing doesn’t protect her from being harassed, advocates like Kearl and Roy agree, but even so, there’s a widespread perception that the less you wear, the more likely you are to be targeted. “I never run in just a sports bra, which is sometimes unpleasant midsummer,” says Leslie Davis, 29, of Evansville, Indiana. Erin Bailey prefers to run in a sports bra and compression shorts in the heat, but sometimes will put on more and baggier clothing just to deflect comments. “I ask myself, Can I suffer through four miles in a shirt?” she says. “Yes? Okay, I wear a shirt. Can I do it for eight miles? No, that’s not best for my training.” And that’s what nearly every young female runner has to do: find her own per-

—EMILY BUTLER, 32, PHILADELPHIA

3

percent of women runners have been grabbed, groped, or otherwise physically assaulted

sonal tipping point between feeling safe and comfortable, and feeling like she’s “giving in” to harassers. “While I think it’s important to tell people when they’re being predatory and sexist, the feeling of fear wins out every time,” says Olivia McCoy, 24, of Lexington, Kentucky. “But being harassed has nothing to do with me, where or when I’m running, or what I’m wearing; it’s about a person thinking that because I’m in public they have the right to make gross comments to and about me.” Lindsay Knake, 28, of South Lyon, Michigan, refuses to change her behavior. “If I cover up or stay inside, then I’m only cowing to the people who seek control over women. This behavior is not okay, and I believe we need to stand up to it.” There’s no immediate, easy solution, because sexual harassment is a complex societal problem. But open and honest conversations about the issue—ones that include men as well as women—are a step in the right direction. “Too often, street harassment is normalized and minimized,” Kearl says. “Listening to people’s stories with empathy is important because these actions signal that street harassment is a serious issue.” Kimmel encourages men to speak up when they witness sexist treatment. “If I say nothing, even though I don’t like the behavior,” he says, “other men assume I support it.” Even if female runners can’t be entirely spared of harassment, disrupting the status quo is a place to start. DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 85


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IMAGES AND DATA FOR BOTH MEN’S AND WOMEN’S SHOES

BY JEFF DENGATE & MARTYN SHORTEN, PH.D. PHOTOGRAPHS BY NICK FERRARI


RW SHOE FINDER

THE SHOE FINDER HELPS YOU PINPOINT SUITABLE MODELS BASED ON YOUR RUNNING HISTORY AND OTHER SHOES YOU LIKE. FOR MORE DETAILS ON FIT AND PERFORMANCE, SEE OUR REVIEWS ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES.

DO YOU KNOW THE TYPE OF SHOE THAT WORKS WELL FOR YOUR SIZE, STRIDE, AND PREFERRED RIDE?

START HERE

YES

Proceed directly to the grid below. Shoes are arranged in terms of cushioning, weight, sole height, flexibility, and stability features as measured in the RW Shoe Lab. You’ll find lighter, less-supportive shoes in the bottom left and highly cushioned, more stable shoes in the top right. Shoes in the middle provide a balance of performance and protection features and can work well for many runners.

NO

Put yourself into a runner group using the table at right. When you’ve arrived at a color-coded group on the bottom of the table, locate it on the grid below. Shoes in that encircled group tend to work well for runners like you. Start with shoes well within your group, but feel free to consider models along the border or in a neighboring group.

SHOES IN THIS REGION ARE LIGHT, FLEXIBLE, AND WELL CUSHIONED WITHOUT STABILITY AND SUPPORT FEATURES.

Based on tests at the RW Shoe Lab, we fixed the shoes on this grid to show how they compare. Then we overlaid the grid with runner groups to show which shoes work well for certain runners.

MORE

E BEST UPDATE Saucony Triumph ISO 3 p. 93

Altra Torin 2.5 p. 95

Adidas UltraBoost ATR p. 94

BEST BUY Nike Zoom Span p. 94

LESS SHOE

C Nike LunarGlide 8 Reviewed Previously Karhu Fluid 5 MRE p. 95

BEST BUY Mizuno Wave Sayonara 4 p. 96 Topo Athletic ST-2 p. 96

SHOES IN THIS REGION OFFER A FIRM, CLOSE-TO-THE-GROUND RIDE WITH LITTLE WEIGHT AND FEW RESTRICTIONS ON FOOT MOTION.

For every Shoe Guide, men’s and women’s models are tested on the road and in the lab. Images here are a mix of both.

B A

LESS


WE ANALYZED DATA FROM MORE THAN 3 MILLION USERS OF THE RW ONLINE SHOE FINDER TO SORT RUNNERS INTO SEVEN GROUPS. RUNNERS IN EACH GROUP HAVE SIMILAR SHOE NEEDS BASED ON A FEW KEY VARIABLES.

RUNNER GROUPS

BODY SIZE Body Mass Index is calculated from your weight and height, and offers a fairly reliable indication of body type. BMI = Weight (pounds) / (Height [inches]) 2 x 703. Or use the calculator at runnersworld.com/bmi. Generally, the higher your BMI, the more shoe you need.

BMI < 23 Examples: Under 160 lb. for 5'10" man Under 134 lb. for 5'4" woman

BMI 23–27 Examples: 161–188 lb. for 5'10" man 135–157 lb. for 5'4" woman

BMI > 27 Examples: Over 189 lb. for 5'10" man Over 158 lb. for 5'4" woman

RUNNING EXPERIENCE This includes how long you’ve been running and how much you run. Find your level here by estimating your average miles per week over the past year. The more you run, the more efficient you tend to become and, generally, the less shoe you need.

More than 20 miles per week

More than 15 miles per week

More than 10 miles per week

INJURY EXPERIENCE During normal training, do you tend to develop problems in your joints, bones, and connective tissue? Those with higher incidence of injuries tend to need shoes with more support. Note: Shoes cannot cure injuries, and the causes of problems vary greatly. If you’re battling persistent injuries, you should see a medical professional. GROUPS

No

Fewer than 20 miles per week

Yes

A

Yes

B

No

No

C

Fewer than 15 miles per week

Yes

Yes

B

D

No

No

E

Fewer than 10 miles per week

Yes

Yes

No

D

F

G

SHOES IN THIS REGION COMBINE MAXIMAL CUSHIONING AND SUPPORT, WITH PLENTY OF PROTECTIVE MATERIAL BETWEEN YOU AND THE GROUND.

CUSHION

Saucony Guide 10 p. 92

Mizuno Wave Enigma 6 p. 93

Asics Gel-Kayano 23 Reviewed Previously

Asics Gel-Cumulus 18 p. 92

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 17 p. 93

“Reviewed Previously” shoes are well-known models, shown here for reference. Visit runnersworld.com/ shoesearch to read reviews of them.

MORE SHOE

CUSHION

EDITOR’S CHOICE Nike Air Zoom Structure 20 p. 92

Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 33 Reviewed Previously

D Puma Speed 500 Ignite p. 95

G

F New Balance 860v7 p. 94

SHOES IN THIS REGION COMBINE FIRM CUSHIONING AND AN ABUNDANCE OF STABILITY FEATURES, PROVIDING CONTROL AND PROTECTION.


INTRODUCING THE FREEDoM. Experience our first shoe to offer a full midsole of EVERUN Continuous Cushioning. Giving you even more energy return, more responsiveness, more amazing cushioning that you’ll feel throughout your entire run. Exclusively available at select retailers 12/1. Or pre-order now at saucony.com


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WINTER SHOE GUIDE 2016

Saucony Guide 10 $120 The Guide keeps you toeing the straight line, even as the shoe itself veers a little from the last version. In tests at the RW Shoe Lab, scores for cushioning and stability rated higher than for the Guide 9. Credit the soft ride to the full-length layer of bouncy foam that Saucony placed directly beneath the sockliner. It also tweaked the chevron-tread outsole to give more ground contact and a smoother ride.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

10.1 oz 8.4 oz 33.2 mm (heel); 25.2 mm (forefoot) 32.0 mm (heel); 23.5 mm (forefoot)

Asics Gel-Cumulus 18 $120 Runners with heavy foot strikes need a big shoe like the Cumulus to handle the impact. But even smaller testers liked the soft ride. “As its name suggests, this shoe is like running on a cloud,” says Runner’s World Executive Editor Tish Hamilton. “It’s very comfortable for short run/walks and longer runs, too. And it didn’t run ‘heavy,’ as some more cushioned shoes I have trained in.”

As Nike re-categorizes its shoes, the Structure has found a home in the “run fast” silo—maybe not a place you’d expect to find a stability shoe. When you need support, it uses a slanted block of foam that angles higher toward the medial (inner) edge of the shoe and is fused in the molding process to a softer foam that makes up the rest of the HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT shoe. That compression-molding eliminates glues and other joining FOREFOOT CUSHIONING materials that can make a shoe stiff. FIRM SOFT A Zoom Air unit in the forefoot proFLEXIBILITY vides a firm platform during toe-off. LESS MORE Boosting comfort, the upper uses a Weight: 10.7 oz 8.8 oz “waisted strobel,” which is a narrow Height: 33.8 mm (heel); 23.2 mm (forefoot) junction where mesh meets foam, to 30.6 mm (heel); 22.8 mm (forefoot) better cradle your foot.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 11.6 oz 9.4 oz 34.9 mm (heel); 26.3 mm (forefoot) 33.7 mm (heel); 25.3 mm (forefoot)

92 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Sharon M. Becker AGE: 45 HEIGHT: 5'5" WEIGHT: 120 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 25 YEARS RUNNING: 30 HOME: Grand Rapids, MI OCCUPATION: Artist

“The Structure 20 is so comfortable and has such a great ride. The lacing structure will make many narrow-footed runners happy—it seems snug and fits the foot in the right spots. The cushioning was just right, but this shoe seemed to have better support than similar-weight shoes.”

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AT T R A I N E Y ( S H O E S T I L L S O N W H I T E ) ; S E T S T Y L I N G B Y N I C O L E H E F F R O N ; I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y C H A R L I E L AY TO N

NIKE AIR ZOOM STRUCTURE 20 $120


Mizuno Wave Enigma 6 $150 Despite the fact that the Enigma has the thickest and least flexible sole of any shoe in this guide, wear-testers really responded to its ride. They gave it higher scores for cushioning and comfort than the previous version. A U-shaped Wave plate sandwiched between two different foams delivers a smooth, soft ride. That plate extends all the way forward to the toes, to help you through your gait cycle efficiently. HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

11.3 oz 9.2 oz 39.5 mm (heel); 26.9 mm (forefoot) 35.8 mm (heel); 25.5 mm (forefoot)

SAUCONY TRIUMPH ISO 3 $150

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 17 $120 Small tweaks improved on this proven winner. Runners who complained about fit issues with the previous model will be happy to know that new upper materials in the forefoot give a little more wiggle room. Another minor change: The midsole is a slight bit softer. The change will be imperceptible to most runners, though you may notice it when you first put it on.

A year ago, Saucony added a bouncy midsole foam to the Triumph, its premium daily trainer for neutral runners, but they’re adding even more this time around. The shoe gets a bigger slab of the material in the heel for improved responsiveness on heel strike. Lab tests revealed a dramatic improvement in impact shock reduction. We also saw flexibility scores HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT rise. Both qualities were well received by our testers, who also appreciated FOREFOOT CUSHIONING the spacious toebox but said that the FIRM SOFT shoe runs a little short. The upper FLEXIBILITY has been refined, most notably with LESS MORE an engineered mesh giving a sturdy Weight: 10.8 oz 8.7 oz hold through the forefoot, and a Height: 37.1 mm (heel); 25.3 mm (forefoot) slimmed-down saddle that still locks 36.2 mm (heel); 25.8 mm (forefoot) the midfoot down.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 10.9 oz 8.9 oz 35.9 mm (heel); 23.3 mm (forefoot) 33.9 mm (heel); 22.6 mm (forefoot)

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Alex Ingram AGE: 23 HEIGHT: 5'4" WEIGHT: 159 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 30 YEARS RUNNING: 8 HOME: Emmaus, PA OCCUPATION: Engineer

“This is an excellent update. The heel cushioning is softer, the forefoot is firm yet flexible, and the toebox is cavernous! The toebox is much more forgiving than the Triumph ISO 2, and the Isofit system is less restrictive. It’s a good option if you want to throw a bit of speedwork in at the end.”

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 93


WINTER SHOE GUIDE 2016

Adidas UltraBoost ATR $180 Similar to the UltraBoost, a shoe we’ve previously reviewed, the ATR version has a springy ride but gets minor tweaks that make it suitable for “allterrain running” or able to handle winter roads. The first is a weatherproof film that covers the toe cap of the Prime Knit upper to fend off water and slush. The outsole has been tweaked, too, with a flat web of rubber delivering more surface contact.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

11.2 oz 9.6 oz 32.6 mm (heel); 20.6 mm (forefoot) 32.6 mm (heel); 20.3 mm (forefoot)

NIKE ZOOM SPAN $100

New Balance 860v7 $125 Runners seeking a shoe that delivers a ton of support yet still has a peppy ride were pleased by the new 860. A two-layer foam midsole offers a stable foundation for a wide range of runners, but proved a touch too firm for some testers, who said they wanted more heel cushioning. For faster efforts, though, the shoe stood out. Try before you buy: The 860 runs slightly short.

“This is the Pegasus, but with some stability,” says RW’s Brand Editor, Warren Greene, who served as the magazine’s Shoe Guy from 2005 to 2012 and logs a ton of miles in the Peg. Delivering that stability is a short support wedge under the arch. Neutral runners who don’t need the helping hand won’t even feel that device, though, since there’s a layer HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT of softer foam over top of it. The ride is even softer than the Peg’s, too. FOREFOOT CUSHIONING Tests at the RW Shoe Lab show that FIRM SOFT the stack heights (how much foam FLEXIBILITY and rubber sits below your foot) are LESS MORE on par, though the Span’s foam comWeight: 9.2 oz 7.4 oz presses more easily. “They feel like a Height: 33.0 mm (heel); 23.3 mm (forefoot) light racing shoe,” says Chris Garges, 31.0 mm (heel); 21.6 mm (forefoot) a speedy tester from Bethlehem, PA.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 11.4 oz 9.3 oz 31.9 mm (heel); 21.0 mm (forefoot) 31.8 mm (heel); 20.1 mm (forefoot)

94 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Erin Benner AGE: 34 HEIGHT: 5'8" WEIGHT: 124 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 25 YEARS RUNNING: 22 HOME: Mertztown, PA OCCUPATION: RW Art

Director

“I love this shoe. It is a lightweight trainer with plenty of flexibility in the forefoot and just enough cushioning for a longish run (10 miles). The heel-to-toe drop was perfect for me; I like a little bit of it—otherwise I have calf/Achilles issues. It’s great for track and hill workouts, when I’m running fast.”


MEN’S WOMEN’S

Altra Torin 2.5 $120

Puma Speed 500 Ignite $120

Karhu Fluid 5 MRE $120

The half-number model designation means the Torin keeps the same midsole and outsole setup of the previous model but gets some minor adjustments. You do get the same extremely plush, zero-drop ride and roomy toebox. One change has been to lift the vamp (the fabric over the toes), giving a little more space between the mesh and your toenails— a change welcomed among testers. Many reported they liked the style and modern materials that provide lightweight comfort.

Puma is overhauling its entire performance line to give it a bouncier foam and a rubber band in the forefoot outsole to provide snap on toe-off. The goal is to make you faster—or at least make you feel faster. “I liked the responsiveness,” says Mike Nowak, who logs 45 miles per week near his home in Holt, MI. “They were soft enough for long runs but still able to do pure speedwork.” The bouncy layer of foam is positioned closest to the foot—Puma is tweaking placement and amount of this foam in shoes across its line.

Karhu shoes have a small but loyal following for their stable, fast-rolling ride. But some testers found previous versions to be stiff. The Fluid 5 is softer and has a redesigned “fulcrum,” a dense foam lever under the midfoot to shift you to your forefoot faster after landing. Lab tests confirm that it’s softer than previous versions but that it also got heavier (two iterations ago, the men’s shoe weighed just 9.6 ounces). Wear-testers say it doesn’t feel heavy on foot, though, and the fit of the seamless upper is comfortable for long runs.

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

HEEL CUSHIONING SOFT

FIRM

FOREFOOT CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT

LESS

FIRM

FOREFOOT CUSHIONING FIRM

FLEXIBILITY

Weight: Height:

HEEL CUSHIONING SOFT

SOFT

FIRM

FLEXIBILITY MORE

9.2 oz 7.3 oz 29.2 mm (heel); 29.1 mm (forefoot) 28.7 mm (heel); 28.4 mm (forefoot)

LESS Weight: Height:

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING SOFT FLEXIBILITY

MORE 9.7 oz 8.3 oz 28.7 mm (heel); 22.2 mm (forefoot) 26.7 mm (heel); 20.8 mm (forefoot)

LESS

MORE

Weight: Height:

11.1 oz 9.2 oz 27.9 mm (heel); 21.4 mm (forefoot) 27.7 mm (heel); 20.6 mm (forefoot)

NOW ON RUNNERSWORLD.COM MORE SHOES AND REVIEWS In addition to the 14 shoes here, our website provides access to hundreds of shoe reviews. Go to runnersworld.com/shoefinder to see more shoes that meet your needs in fit and performance.

VIDEO BREAKDOWN Runner’s World Shoes & Gear Editor Jeff Dengate (left) takes a hands-on look at each pair of running shoes reviewed in this guide. Watch his insights at runnersworld.com/shoevideos.

HOW WE TEST You know we review running shoes. But do you know how much sweat and science is involved? To see what goes into a Shoe Guide, visit runners world.com/how-we-test.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 95


WINTER SHOE GUIDE 2016

Topo Athletic ST-2 $90 A true minimalist shoe, the ST-2 has a thin layer of foam separating your foot from the road. As a result, some testers likened it to running barefoot, but they gave it high marks for flexibility and overall comfort. All were unanimous in loving the fit of the upper. A stretchy mesh is soft against your skin—whether you wear socks or not. Plus there’s no rigid heel counter, so you can pack the shoe flat in a bag if you’re traveling.

MEN’S WOMEN’S

HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM

SOFT FOREFOOT CUSHIONING

FIRM

SOFT FLEXIBILITY

LESS Weight: Height:

MORE 6.7 oz 5.4 oz 19.1 mm (heel); 18.1 mm (forefoot) 17.8 mm (heel); 16.6 mm (forefoot)

LAB REPORT: FOAM FEST For decades, midsoles were made from either polyurethane (PU) or ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). Now, most brands are releasing new foams that promise even better performance. Adidas’s Boost, an expanded thermoplastic urethane (TPU), came out in 2013. TPU is more rigid than EVA, so a foam made from it can have thinner cells and bigger airspaces, making it more compressible and less likely to “bottom out.” That gives the shoes a bouncy feeling and better durability. Newer foams, like Saucony’s Everun, are blends of EVA, PU, and TPU. They confer similar benefits and, with rubber in the mix, can be exposed to the road without the need for an outsole. In the future, we may see even lighter, bouncier midsoles made from harder, more elastic materials like nylon or even carbon foams.

96 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

MIZUNO WAVE SAYONARA 4 $110 The original Sayonara was a far different beast than the versions that followed—as the shoe aged, it got taller and softer. This version continues with the same midsole and outsole configuration as v3, but it has gotten considerably firmer. While some felt that it’s now a little too firm, that’s good news for our fast, efficient testers who reach for this HEEL CUSHIONING FIRM SOFT shoe on up-tempo days and who like a fair amount of road feel. “Mizuno FOREFOOT CUSHIONING nailed the cushioning just right FIRM SOFT without adding any weight,” says FLEXIBILITY Chris Vincent, a 52-year-old woman LESS MORE from Jackson, MI, who zips along at Weight: 9.2 oz 7.1 oz 7:30 pace while running 40 miles per Height: 31.8 mm (heel); 21.6 mm (forefoot) week. Testers also appreciated the 29.2 mm (heel); 20.0 mm (forefoot) breezy mesh, which vents heat.

TESTER’S TAKE NAME: Craig VanSumeren AGE: 55 HEIGHT: 5'11" WEIGHT: 172 lb. MILES PER WEEK: 35 YEARS RUNNING: 36 HOME: Okemos, MI OCCUPATION: Supply

Chain Management

“This shoe just feels fast. It has a great toebox fit and enough cushioning for long training runs, but it’s light enough for short tempo runs. And although it’s a neutral shoe, it has plenty of support even for a big guy like me. It’s a great ‘anytime’ shoe to have at the back door.”


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RACES+PLACES

TIPS, TRENDS, and MUST-RUN EVENTS

USA HALF MARATHON INVITATIONAL The Boston Marathon is the most famous selective race, but a San Diego–based event is vying for similar recognition. All who wish to enter the USA Half Marathon must submit a sub2:30 qualifying time; to be eligible for prize money requires a much faster standard (from 1:10 for men under 30 up to 2:10 for women 75 and older). On the next page, speedsters who ran last year’s inaugural race share what they loved about it. November 19, San Diego, usahalfmarathonsandiego.com

CELEBRATE Start your tour of San Diego’s craft beer offerings at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, which offers ample outdoor seating. stonelibertystation.com

98 RUNNER’S WORLD DECEMBER 2016

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R U N N E R B U Z Z M E D I A /CO U R T E SY O F U S A H A L F

Runners conquer early race hills before a fast, flat finish along San Diego Bay.

T


Ask Coach Jenny Maximize winter months by entering a race series.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R U N N E R B U Z Z M E D I A /C O U R T E SY O F U S A H A L F ; M I TC H M A N D E L & M AT T R A I N E Y ( D O N U T S ); CO U R T E SY O F G R E AT R AC E O F AG O U R A H I L L S

WELL-PLANNED COURSE “As we stood in the starting chute, we could see the sun rising between two buildings in downtown San Diego. That was followed by a long, gradual uphill, which was nice to have early because you got it out of the way. The second half of the race is completely flat. In fact, the whole course was laid out nicely: It was wide enough so it wasn’t crowded, and there were plenty of aid stations.” —BRIAN McANENY, 47, GARDEN GROVE, CA

FIT FIELD

SUPERSTAR SPECTATOR “The highlight of the race for me was seeing San Diego’s marathon superstar Meb Keflezighi on the sidelines at the 10K mark. [Meb’s brother, Merhawi, is one of the USA Half’s organizers.] I remember being a spectator at the Boston Marathon in 2014 and watching Meb come around the corner on Hereford Street [the second-to-last turn before the final straightaway], minutes away from clinching the win. It was so crazy that now Meb was out there cheering us on and giving us high fives.” —CHRISTINA TROUT, 33, SAN DIEGO

“In other races, I get so mad zigzagging around people who just stop running at random points early in the race. Here, people were serious about running. I could tell I was surrounded by people who love half marathons because of the challenge, who aren’t just doing one so they can get a medal and say they’ve done it. Now that I’ve done this race, I don’t enjoy the others as much.”

“I loved that they gave finishers a jacket instead of another tech T-shirt, because it makes you feel like you did something more epic. When you wear it around, people know you qualified for something. I’m not all that fast, but I liked that I qualified for something not everyone was able to do.”

—WENDY O’DWYER, 47, SAN DIEGO

—CINDY STALLO, 40, SANTEE, CA

ON-COURSE CAMARADERIE “I got a lot of support from other runners on the uphill. There were people coming from behind and encouraging you. You could see they were locals and had trained on those hills. They said, ‘You’ve got this; we’re almost there.’ ” —DIANA MARCIN, 33, RANCHO MISSION VIEJO, CA

TOP-NOTCH SWAG

INDULGE Get your postrace sugar fix a mile from the finish at Donut Bar. Good luck deciding between flavors like maple bacon, butterbeer, and triple chocolate threat. donutbar.com

How do I ease into winter racing after a busy autumn schedule? If you are coming off a hard season, especially if it included a marathon, you should recover with three to four weeks of easy-effort runs. After that, a race series—with weekly or monthly events—is a great way to maintain fitness during a time when you may not be training specifically for anything. How hard should I be running? If you did run a lot over the fall, you don’t want to burn out over the winter months. Since most winter series consist of shorter distances (5K to 10K), treat races like tempo or fartlek workouts. If you’re running a five-mile event, for example, start with an easy warmup mile, run the next three at a comfortably hard pace, and cool down during the final mile. Consider each race to be that week’s speedwork, and plan accordingly—run easy on the days before and after. Should I run the entire series if training for my spring event will start midway through the winter? If you’re looking to nail a goal time later in spring, you should prioritize the targeted workouts on your training plan. Once your plan is in full swing, you may still use one or two races later in the series to test your fitness and practice your race-day routine. Jenny Hadfield is a running coach in Chicago. Visit her blog at runnersworld.com/coachjenny.

World-Class Support Spot Olympic runners cheering at these races. GREAT RACE OF AGOURA HILLS DEENA KASTOR 5K Olympic marathoner Deena Kastor first ran this mostly downhill race when she was a local high school standout, and now it bears her name. The masters ace returns to marshal the 5K when her racing schedule allows. April 1, 2017, Agoura Hills, California greatrace.run/deena-kastor

RUNNER INTERVIEWS CONDENSED AND EDITED BY CLAIRE TRAGESER

SPRINGFIELD STRAIGHT 800 Keep an eye out for race founder and Olympic 800-meter runner Nick Symmonds along this straight, flat, half-mile course. Vendor booths positioned along the route draw additional crowds and give finishers an excuse to stick around. July TBD, 2017, Springfield, Oregon springfield800.com

BEACH TO BEACON 10K Joan Benoit Samuelson, winner of the first women’s Olympic Marathon, founded this gently rolling race in her coastal Maine hometown in 1998. While she does occasionally run it, she can always be seen greeting runners at the finish. August 5, 2017, Cape Elizabeth, Maine beach2beacon.org

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 99


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â&#x20AC;˘ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 64 through Jurekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, Eat & Run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it was humanly possible for people to go hundreds of miles on their feet, and not only is this dude doing this, but he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eat meat and dairy,â&#x20AC;? LaJaunie says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was totally blown away.â&#x20AC;? Almost immediately, LaJaunie cut out meat and dairy. He broke an hour in the Classic weighing 285 pounds and kept racing, getting faster, going longer, and getting thinner. By the summer of 2014 he reached his present weight of 190. The great-grandson of a Mississippi Baptist minister had become a true disciple of the plant-based-diet movement and, before long, was a full-fledged evangelist. Today, meals are simple: raw oats with fruit, or kale and salsa mashed into a baked potato;

instead of Cajun spices, he tosses nutritional yeast onto just about everything. He launched a blog and started sharing his story in regional health-food stores. He makes an appearance in Jason Cohenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Change: The Film, a documentary about inspiring weight-loss stories, which has not yet been released. Although LaJaunie eats vegan, he downplays the label because the hunters and anglers heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to help, he says, associate the term with â&#x20AC;&#x153;disgustingly crazyâ&#x20AC;? megaphone-wielding activists. He wants to be a light for his community without condescending, because he totally understands the contrast between his before and after. HE STILL GETS GUYS who tell him, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If eating this way kills me, oh well, this is me doing me, bruh.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the reason that Nonc Toot and Tonte Linda have heart attacks in they 50s,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re cursed as Louisianians genetically.â&#x20AC;? Just as often, though, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get stopped at, say, the hardware store, by people looking for help with weight issues, or bump into people like an old friend who took his advice a few years ago and has lost 100 pounds â&#x20AC;&#x153;going totally plant-based and is now speaking the gospel.â&#x20AC;? LaJaunieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest beneficiaries have

been his own family. Most are running, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all adopted plant-based diets; his father, mother, brother, sister, Bam Bam, wife, and mother-in-law have collectively lost almost 600 pounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a healthier bunch because of Josh,â&#x20AC;? says his brother, Dustin, who has run several half marathons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beaten down a path for us, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m right behind him.â&#x20AC;? LaJaunieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, who had a heart attack two years ago, had been one of the longest holdouts. Through better eating and walking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s down about 40 pounds,â&#x20AC;? LaJaunie says, biting back tears. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finally working without me preaching.â&#x20AC;? In September, LaJaunie finished third at the Wildcat 100-miler in Florida, his longest race to date. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll run the New York City Marathon in November and hopes to shave his 3:24 marathon PR to a Bostonqualifying 3:10 at the New Orleans Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Marathon in February. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d also like to break 40 minutes in the Classic 10K that was his first race ďŹ ve years ago. Eventually, he wants to run all 110 miles of Bayou Lafourche from Donaldsonville all the way down the bye-yuh to Port Fouchon on the Gulf, having locals run segments with him along the way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not ashamed to say it,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to change the world.â&#x20AC;?

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RACING AHEAD 10 YEARS RUNNING!

ADVERTISING SECTION

FINISH ON THE FIFTY!

SOUTH ATLANTIC

DEC 17 - Great Outdoor Provosion Co. Surf-N-Santa 5 Miler Virginia Beach, VA Contact: J&A Racing, 3601 Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23455. (757) 412-1056 info@surfnsanta5miler.com www.surfnsanta5miler.com

Mississippi Blues Marathon, Half Marathon, Quarter Marathon & Marathon Relay JANUARY 7, 2017 JACKSON, MS

Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon, Half Marathon, Relay & 5K APRIL 2, 2017 KNOXVILLE, TN

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Contact: Jason Altman PO Box 53442, Knoxville, TN 37950 (865) 684-4294 knoxvillemarathon@gmail.com

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Contact: P.O. Box 321330, Flowood, MS 39232

JAN 15, 2017 - Naples Daily News Half Marathon Naples, FL Contact: Perry Silverman, P.O. Box 8636, Naples, FL 34101. (678) 777-5622 psilverman@aol.com www.gcrunner.org www.napleshalfmarathon.net

FEB 3-4, 2017 - Critz Tybee Run Fest 2017, 5K, 10K, Half Marathon, 2.8 Mile Beach Run, 1 Mile & Kids Fun Run Tybee Island, GA Contact: Emily Dover, 7000 Abercorn Street, P.O. Box 22999, Savannah, GA 31403. (912) 629-7031 runfest@critz.com www.critztybeerun.com

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FEB 5, 2017 - Daytona Beach Half Marathon, Half Relay, 5K & Speedway Challenge 13.1+5K Daytona Beach, FL Contact: Joann Magley, 123 W Indiana Avenue, Deland, FL 32720-4612. (386) 822-5062 raceinfo@daytonabeachhalf.com www.daytonabeachhalf.com

Mississippi Gulf Coast Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K & Kids Marathon

Publix Florida Marathon & Half Marathon Weekend

DECEMBER 9-11, 2016 MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST

FEBRUARY 4&5, 2017 MELBOURNE, FL

Contact: Pat Fellows 2350 Beach Boulevard, Suite A, Biloxi, MS 39535 (888) 786-2001 pf@msgulfcoastmarathon.com

Contact: Mitch Varnes P.O. Box 33100, Indialantic, FL 32903 (321) 759-7200

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Louisiana Marathon Running Festival Marathon, Half, Quarter, 5K & Kids Races

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JANUARY 15, 2017 BATON ROUGE, LA

Bataan Memorial Death March 26.2 Mile & 14.2 Mile

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MARCH 19, 2017 WHITE SANDS MISSLE RANGE, NM www.bataanmarch.com

Contact: Danny Bourgeois

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FEB 10-12, 2017 - 10th Anniversary DONNA Marathon Weekend The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer Marathon, Half Marathon, Ultra, Team Relay, 10K, 5K & Challenge Events Jacksonville Beach, FL Contact: DONNA Headquarters, 11762 Marco Beach Drive, Suite 6, Jacksonville, FL 32224. (904) 355-PINK (7465) info@breastcancermarathon.com www.breastcancermarathon.com

FEB 11, 2017 - Hilton Head Island Marathon, Half Marathon & 8K Hilton Head Island, SC Contact: Bear Foot Sports, 20 Towne Drive, PMB #200, Bluffton, SC 29910. (843) 757-8520 bfs@hargray.com www.bearfootsports.com

FEB 25-26, 2017 - Publix Gasparilla Distance Classic Race Weekend 25th - 15K & 5K 26th - Half Marathon & 8K Tampa, FL Contact: Susan Harmeling, Executive Race Director, P.O. Box 1881, Tampa, FL 33601. (813) 254-7866 registration@tampabayrun.com www.tampabayrun.com

FLAT, FAST, RUNNER & FAMILY FRIENDLY, THE BEST OF RUNNER “BOOTY”, BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT COURSES WITH A DISTANCE FOR EVERYONE!

MAR 18-19, 2017 - Yuengling Shamrock Marathon Weekend, Marathon, Half Marathon, 8K & 1M Virginia Beach, VA Contact: J&A Racing, 3601 Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23455. (757) 412-1056 info@shamrockmarathon.com www.shamrockmarathon.com

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ADVERTISING SECTION • CONTINUED FROM PAGE 66 APR 17, 2017 - Flying Pirate Half Marathon & First

APR 23, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in

Flight 5K Kitty Hawk, NC Contact: Peggy Stovall, 2234 South Lark Ave., Nags Head, NC 27959. (252) 255-6273 info@obxse.org

Galveston Galveston, TX Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com

www.flyingpiratehalfmarathon.org

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MAY 7, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K

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in North Myrtle Beach North Myrtle Beach, SC Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

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NORTH CENTRAL

APR 21-22, 2017 - Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon, Half Marathon, Marathon Relay, 10K, 5K & Youth Run Champaign-Urbana, IL Contact: Jan Seeley, P.O. Box 262, Champaign, IL 61824. (217) 369-8553 director@illinoismarathon.com www.illinoismarathon.com

APR 30, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in Chicagoland Lake Zurich, IL Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

Save 10% - Use RWCHIDEC16 (Exp. 12/31/16)

MAY 6, 2017 - OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon (13.1 Miles) Indianapolis, IN Contact: 500 Festival, 21 Virginia Ave., Suite 500, Indianapolis, IN 46204. (317) 927-3378 raceinfo@500festival.com www.indymini.com

Includes a lap around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway!

MAY 21, 2017 - Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K, 8K, 5K, Kids Run & Challenge Series Cleveland, OH Contact: Kayla Henderson, 29525 Chagrin Blvd., Suite 215, Pepper Pike, OH 44122. (216) 464-5510 kayla@clevelandmarathon.com www.clevelandmarathon.com

SEP 16, 2017 - Air Force Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K & 5K Dayton, OH Contact: Race Director, 5030 Pearson Rd., Building 219, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433. (937) 257-4350 usaf.marathon@us.af.mil www.usafmarathon.com

SOUTH CENTRAL

DEC 10-11 - The Mississippi Gulf Coast Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K & Kids Pass Christian, MS to Biloxi, MS Contact: Pat Fellows, 2350 Beach Boulevard, Suite A, Biloxi, MS 39535. (888) 786-2001 pf@msgulfcoastmarathon.com www.msgulfcoastmarathon.com

JAN 15, 2017 - Louisiana Marathon Running Festival, Marathon, Half Marathon, Quarter Marathon, 5K & Kids Races Baton Rouge, LA Contact: Danny Bourgeois, 721 Government Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70802. (888) 786-2001 danny@thelouisianamarathon.com www.thelouisianamarathon.com

MOUNTAIN PACIFIC

JAN 15, 2017 - Maui OceanFront Marathon, Half Marathon, 15K, 10K & 5K Lahaina, HI Contact: Les Wright, P.O. Box 20000, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96151. (530) 559-2261 runmaui@gmail.com www.runmaui.com

FEB 18, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon in Temecula Special Edition Temecula, CA Contact: Continental Event & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

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FEB 19, 2017 - Lost Dutchman Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K , 8K Trail Run & 1 Mile Fun Run Apache Junction, AZ Contact: Grady McEachern, P.O. Box 6417, Apache Junction, AZ 85178. www.lostdutchmanmarathon.com

Most scenic races in Phoenix area!

MAY 21, 2017 - Kaiser Permanente Colfax Marathon, Half Marathon, 10 Miler & Marathon Relay City Park, Denver, CO Contact: Melissa Bissett, PO Box 6117, Denver, CO 80206. (303) 770-9600 melissa@runcolfax.org www.runcolfax.org

Denver’s Ultimate Urban Tour

JUN 4, 2017 - Divas® Half Marathon & 5K in San Francisco Bay Burlingame, CA Contact: Continental Events & Sports Management, P.O. Box 56-1154, Miami, FL 33256-1154. info@runlikeadiva.com www.runlikeadiva.com

Save 10% - Use RWSFBDEC16 (Exp. 12/31/16)

INTERNATIONAL

NOV 12, 2017 - Athens Marathon, 10K & 5K, Original Historical Course Athens, Greece Contact: Apostolos Greek Tours Inc., 2685 S. Dayton Way #14, Denver, CO 80231. (303) 755-2888 www.athensmarathon.com

Various Support Packages.

MAY 26-28, 2017 - Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, Scotiabank Half Marathon, 10K, 5K & 2K Ottawa, ON, Canada Contact: 5450 Canotek Road, Unit 45, Ottawa, ON K1J 9G2. (613) 234-2221 questions@runottawa.ca www.runottawa.ca

Be here. Run here. Celebrate Canada’s 150th at Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon.

C L OS IN G DA T E F OR T H E MARC H 2 0 1 7 I S S U E I S DECEM BER 5, 2016

them with exercise. “Working with business people, not artists like myself, pulled me out of my comfort zone,” Moon says. “It’s wonderful to have the opportunity to be of worth to my community.” It was when she was given the go-ahead to return to playing and running that she decided to tackle the marathon. “I needed to set a goal for myself that was achievable,” she says. “It would give me impetus every day to wake up and say, However long it takes to get there, it’s something to work toward and be positive about.” Moon chose the 9+1 guaranteed-entry program for her first New York City Marathon because, she says, “I’m really goaloriented, so to sign up for all these races was a huge motivator.” She volunteered at the marathon expo after a morning concert with the Philharmonic. “We were playing a Sibelius symphony, and it ends like you’re flying in the wind, it’s so powerful,” she says. “I remember turning to my stand partner, Carter Brey, also a marathoner, and saying, ‘Can you imagine if 2 percent of the 40,000 people running the marathon were here right now? It would be standing room only!’” She noted that Lincoln Center, the orchestra’s home, is near the finish line of the marathon, and talked about a pasta party or an event for kids during marathon weekend. “Why aren’t we doing this?” she says. “It’s a great idea!” Moon is running New York again this year. She sees a lot of parallels between music and running, from the performance of the artists and runners to the people who attend concerts or spectate at races. “Running and music are similar because we are trained to prepare for goals,” she says. “The preparation, the practice, the time off, the rest, the reading up on articles, the listening, it’s a familiar process. If you can approach it in an organized and wholesome manner, it continues down that road with positive results.” And it helps to have a day planner. RUNNER’S WORLD (ISSN 0897-1706) IS PUBLISHED 11 TIMES A YEAR, MONTHLY EXCEPT BI-MONTHLY IN JANUARY/FEBRUARY, BY RODALE INC. VOLUME 51 NUMBER 11, EDITORIAL OFFICES 400 SOUTH 10TH ST, EMMAUS, PA 18098 (610-967-5171). ©2016 RODALE INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, P.O. BOX 26299, LEHIGH VALLEY, PA 18022-6299. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT EMMAUS, PA, AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. IN CANADA POSTAGE PAID AT GATEWAY MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO. CANADA POST PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 40063752. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADA ADDRESSES TO RUNNER’S WORLD, 2930 14TH AVE, MARKHAM, ONTARIO L3R 5Z8. GST #R122988611. SUBSCRIBERS: IF THE POSTAL AUTHORITIES ALERT US THAT YOUR MAGAZINE IS UNDELIVERABLE, PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. WE HAVE NO FURTHER OBLIGATION UNLESS WE RECEIVE A CORRECTED ADDRESS WITHIN 18 MONTHS.

DECEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 105


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STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION OF Runner’s World REQUIRED BY ACT OF OCTOBER 23, 1962: SECTION 4369, TITLE 39, UNITED STATES CODE, FILED, October 1, 2016 Publication Number 0897-1706 Annual Subscription Price: 24.00 Contact Person: Joyce Shirer Telephone: 610-967-8610 Runner’s World is published 11 times a year at 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098, publication and general business offices. 9. The names and addresses of the publisher, editor and managing editor are: Publisher: Molly O’Keefe Corcoran, 733 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10017 Editor: David Willey, 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098 Managing Editor: Suzanne Perreault, 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098 10. The owner is: Rodale, Inc., 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA, 18098. The stockholders thereof being, Rodale Family Trusts – JP Morgan Trust Company as Trustee 11. The known bond holders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None 15. EXTENT AND NATURE Average no. of copies SEP 2016 Single OF CIRCULATION

each issue during preceding 12 mos.

issue nearest to filing date

772,204

769,144

483,845

449,021

43,292

52,996

527,137

502,017

92,397

139,912

619,534

641,929

145,199

127,247

A. TOTAL NO. COPIES (Net Press Run) B. PAID CIRCULATION 1. Mailed Paid Subscriptions 3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other paid C. TOTAL PAID CIRCULATION (Sum of B1 and B3) D1,E. FREE OR NOMINAL RATE DISTRIBUTION F. TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (Sum of C and E) G. COPIES NOT DISTRIBUTED SINGLE COPY NOT DISTRIBUTED

7,471

-32

H. TOTAL (Sum of F and G)

772,204

769,144

I. PERCENT PAID

85.09%

78.20%

OTHER NOT DISTRIBUTED

CLASSIFIED

16. ELECTRONIC COPY CIRCULATION

A. PAID ELECTRONIC COPIES

HYDRATION & CARRIERS

®

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64,066

60,429

591,143

562,446

C. TOTAL PRINT DISTRIBUTION + 683,540 PAID ELECTRONIC COPIES

702,358

D. PERCENT PAID (both Print & Electronic Copies)

80.08%

B. TOTAL PAID PRINT COPIES + PAID ELECTRONIC COPIES

86.48%

50% of all distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. Publication of the Statement of Ownership is required. Will be printed in the December issue of this publication. Stephen Twilliger, EVP/CFO

9/26/2016 107


I’M A RUNNER

Interview by Nick Weldon

CYNTHIA ERIVO

ACTOR/SINGER-SONGWRITER, 29, BROOKLYN fied, and running is a really good way to let some tension go.

“I want to show people that it’s possible to be an athlete both on stage and off stage.”

I HAVE EIGHT SHOWS a week. It’s extremely physical. In my role as Celie, I rarely leave the stage over the course of two-and-a-half hours. There are fights and dancing and it’s a workout every time you get on stage. BEING PHYSICAL outside of work allows me to have the stamina to do that. There are days when your mind is tired and the only thing that can get you through is your body. I RUN MOSTLY around Brooklyn. I love my speed run on Wednesday. Maybe I’m a glutton for punishment, since I have two shows that day. And Saturday long runs are fun because I like going for as long as I can and seeing where I can go. That’s always refreshing. SOME OF THE CAST decided we would try to run a mile a day. I’m always checking up on people and making sure they get in a few runs a week. Some are new to it, but they’re still willing to give it a chance. Just having the courage to try once, I think, is rather cool.

MY GOAL TIME WAS 1:45, but I had a small asthma attack at mile 11 and finished in 1:47:19. Luckily, I was able to do both shows.

108

I STARTED RUNNING when I was 22 and at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, at first to help offset my weight training. My body likes weight work, and doing distance keeps everything toned so I don’t bulk too much. WHEN YOU’RE IN A CLASS full of young actors, everyone’s both hungry to get started and petri-

GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.COM/IMARUNNER FOR A VIDEO INTERVIEW.

Erivo won the 2016 Tony Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical for her work in The Color Purple. She’s running the NYC Marathon on November 6.

PATIENCE IS A REALLY USEFUL THING

in distance running. It’s taken me a long time to learn that, and it’s a valuable lesson. If you’re always sprinting, you might miss something; slow down and you might catch what you need to catch. PHOTOGRAPH BY NATHAN PERKEL

H A I R & M A K E U P B Y J OA N N A S I M K I N

I NEEDED TO finish the Brooklyn Half this year, my first half marathon, in enough time to get ready for two shows of The Color Purple [on Broadway] later that day. I took it as a challenge.

DURING MY HOLIDAY in Morocco last year, the trainer in my hotel’s gym didn’t have anyone to work with, so I asked if he’d run with me. We ended up running all over Morocco for a week and a half. We’d never met, but our common ground was that we wanted to run. That’s pretty awesome.



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