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PRACTICAL IDEAS FROM THE EXPERTS

healthyfood.co.uk

WUXIUNRY

AL HAMPERRoEfE GLUTEN-F S GOODIE

NOVEMBER 2016 £3.20

Why marriage is bad for

WEIGHT LOSS

How to escape the traps EXPERT ADVICE

INFLAMMATION Easy diet solutions NUTRITION GUIDE

7 TOP FOODS to MAX YOUR WORKOUT REVEALED!

FAT

in that CHEESE PIZZA

1 1

Mexican bean feast

9

772045 822039

l

l l SM ART SWAPS G IN OK CO EE FR YIR DA

PLUS

l BEST ROAST?

Lamb versus pork l Simple meals with PEARL BARLEY l KEFIR: the new gut-friendly drink

Teriyaki salmon with stir-fried greens

Blender muffins

BEN FOGLE Blender on his healthy muffinsdiscoveries


Just like Prosciutto di San Daniele and Grana Padano cheese, true taste and real origins simply cannot be imitated. That is why the European Union created the Protected Designation of Origin scheme. PDO makes regional specialities with centuries of tradition easier to recognise. So next time you want to enjoy the unmistakeable �lavour of these unique delicacies, look for the PDO logo. Proud carriers of the PDO logo.

Follow our tradition at www.granapadano.it www.prosciuttosandaniele.it

CAMPAIGN FINANCED WITH AID FROM THE EUROPEAN UNION AND ITALY.


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

WELCOME

hfg

F

OR BETTER, FOR WORSE. If you’re

married or living together, YOU’LL HAVE

BEEN THROUGH MANY UPS and, hopefully, fewer downs. But research shows there’s only one way our weighing scales go after getting hitched – and that’s up. Yes, reader, it happened to me. Most nights, my partner and I sit down to a proper meal at home. THE ONLY PROBLEM IS THE PORTION SIZES of that meal have, over the years, been on a grander scale than if I lived alone. Having experienced the weight creep, I’m more careful about how much I eat and say no to seconds (most of the time). I also cycle and run off those surplus calories. Maybe your partner is a biscuit fiend or habitual takeaway buyer? IDENTIFYING THE ISSUE IS YOUR STARTING POINT. Nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow shares her top five solutions for different food-related scenarios on p16. In this issue we look at the LINK BETWEEN INFLAMMATION

PS Know someone who could do with some healthy eating inspiration? Turn to p90 for our special price for a Christmas gift subscription to HFG

AND LIFESTYLE diseases and give you a specially tailored diet plan (p25). We also have practical ADVICE FOR THOSE ON A DAIRY-FREE DIET (p31). WITH THANKS TO GEMMA DOYLE, DIANA GALLIGAN, SARA NORMAN

Plus, of course, we have well BALANCED AND HEALTHILY PROPORTIONED RECIPES. If your partner is the type who wants a takeaway Indian on a Friday evening (and I know a man who does), you have to make our slimmed down chicken tikka masala (p72). It’s a fakeaway that delivers. Give it a go and LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK – send us a photo and it may be included in our December issue, out on 1 December.

MELANIE LEYSHON, EDITOR

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 3


CO N T E N T S

IN THIS MONTH’S NOVEMBER

p69

p53 p16 p25 p86 p64

p84

p41 p74 p22

p51

TALKING POINTS 3 Editor’s letter 6 Meet our experts 8 Let’s talk… 94 How I stay healthy Adventurer and TV presenter Ben Fogle

HEALTH & NUTRITION 10 Health notes 16 Is your marriage making you fat? How to make wedded bliss work for your wellbeing 25 Eat well to avoid inflammation Get the latest nutrition advice

4 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

p78

p94

38 Smart swaps Indian curry 41 Lamb vs pork Find out which is the roast with the most 82 Weight-loss star How cancer motivated Margaret to lose 6st 86 7 foods to fuel your workout 92 Why we need… Vitamin E

RECIPES 42 November recipe index 44 Your monthly diet planner 48 Weeknight dinners 54 Around the world on a bean DIY baked beans with variations

61 6pm panic A zingy salmon supper, ready in 20 min 62 Something to curl up with… Main meal soups for chilly days 68 Take lunch up a level with recipes by top chef Dan Doherty 72 Extreme makeover Low-fat chicken tikka masala 74 Put it on the menu Pearl barley 77 Dinner for one 78 Pulse-and-go muffins Easy gluten-free bakes 80 New on the drinks menu Coffee-shop-style but lighter


ISSUE

p31

p77

EYE TO EYE MEDIA LTD, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES 01795 414778 Healthyfood.co.uk/subscribe EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 020 7803 4128 FAX 020 7803 4101 EMAIL Info@healthyfood.co.uk WEB Healthyfood.co.uk Editor Melanie Leyshon Art director Tina Betts Assistant editor Liz Atkins Senior sub editor Rebecca Almond Editorial assistant/writer Laura Day Nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow Recipe consultant Phil Mundy Digital editor Rebecca Brett Assistant web producer Isabella Bradford Digital intern Isabeau Brimeau ADVERTISING SALES Ad director Jason Elson 020 7150 5397 Senior sales Laura Collinder 020 7150 5043 Group head, partnerships Josh Jalloul 020 7150 5040 Regional business development manager Nicola Rearden 0161 209 3629

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SHOPPING 12 Seasonal ways to five-a-day 14 This month we love 22 What’s the deal with kefir? 31 Your guide to healthy dairy-free cooking Phil Mundy’s tips, cheats and recipes 84 How much fat in a cheese pizza?

DON’T MISS 53 Win a luxury gluten-free baking hamper from Doves Farm Worth £50

p72

90 Subscribe to HFG for less 76 Coming up in next month’s issue On sale 1 December 96 References 97 Nutrition lowdown 98 5 top facts to take away

READ MORE ONLINE Find hundreds of healthy recipes, health features and blogs about health trends at

HEALTHYFOOD.CO.UK

Managing director Seamus Geoghegan 020 7803 4123 seamus@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Publishing director Adrienne Moyce 020 7803 4111 adrienne.moyce@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Consultant editorial director Jo Sandilands Circulation director Owen Arnot 020 7803 4121 Production director Jake Hopkins 020 7803 4110 Marketing consultant Julia Rich 020 7803 4129 Finance director Gary Pickett gary.pickett@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Finance manager Adam Wright 01733 373135 adam.wright@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Healthy Food Guide magazine is published by Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT, under licence from Healthy Life Media International Limited and its content includes copyright material which is owned or controlled by, and is reproduced under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The title Healthy Food Guide and the Healthy Food Guide logo are trade marks owned by, and used under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Healthy Life Media International Limited, its subsidiaries, affiliates or contributors. For licensing enquiries contact Phil Ryan, Healthy Life Media International, phil.ryan@hlmedia.co.nz.

ISSN 2045-8223. Printed in the UK by Southernprint Ltd. Colour origination by Rhapsody. Copyright Eye to Eye Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without permission. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in advertisements, articles, photographs or illustrations. Eye to Eye Media Ltd is a registered data user whose entries in the Data Protection Register contain descriptions of sources and disclosures of personal data. This paper is manufactured using pulp taken from well-managed, certified forests. All prices correct at time of going to press. UK basic annual subscription rate for 12 issues, £38.40; Europe and Eire, £55; rest of the world, £60. Back issues cost £5. Member of the Audit Bureau Of Circulations.


E X PE R T S

Get healthy the hfg way Eating and living well for longterm good health – that’s the HFG mission. We don’t believe in short-term fad diets, but making small changes for big gains. Read how our experts can help you...

l

Look for the symbols

on our recipes. They will enable you to pinpoint recipes for your needs. See p43 for more information.

LOW CAL

LOW FAT

We can help you break

l out of yo-yo dieting, as our recipes come in satisfying portion sizes. We use everyday ingredients to make your favourite dishes healthier and no foods are off the menu. We’d never recommend cutting out key food groups, unless you have an intolerance or allergy.

All our recipes

l are analysed by our qualified dietitians and nutritionists, below, and tried and tested by our recipe consultant Phil Mundy. They are created to guidelines set out by the NHS Eatwell Guide for key food groups, to ensure they’re well balanced.

We look at the science

l behind the headlines to clear up and demystify mixed messages about current health issues. Our experts always look at the body of evidence, never just one isolated study.

LOW SATS

vegetarian

LOW SALT

HIGH FIBRE

HIGH

HIGH

PROTEIN CALCIUM

gluten free

HIGH IRON

1

5-A-DAY

dairy free

Meet our experts: qualified dietitians, nutritionists and medical professionals

JULIETTE KELLOW is Healthy Food Guide’s nutrition consultant. She’s a registered dietitian who has worked in the NHS, the food industry and within the media.

DR DAWN HARPER works as a GP and runs regular clinics on women’s health and weight management. She appears on Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies.

JENNIFER LOW is a dietitian who works as a consultant for the NHS and the private sector. She specialises in eating disorders, IBS and bariatric surgery.

AMANDA URSELL has a degree in nutrition and a post-graduate diploma in dietetics. She is an award-winning writer and a visiting fellow at Oxford Brookes University.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTING EXPERT PANEL l Tracy Kelly, registered dietitian l Helen Bond, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association l Norma McGough, registered dietitian at Coeliac UK l Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation

6 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


LET’S TALK… hfg

So what’s on your mind? Let us know – via email, facebook and twitter

STAR LETTER

YOUR VIEWS DAIRY IS AN ETHICAL ISSUE

FACING MY FOOD DEMONS YOUR ARTICLE ON BINGE EATING DISORDER (BED) in September’s issue led to a major turning point in my life. I’m 44 and have been a binge eater for over 25 years, which has been the cause of depression and anxiety. I’ve been too ashamed to ever tell anyone about it, but recently I’ve felt I must do something as we have two daughters and I desperately don’t want my disorder to affect them. Your article rang so true that I plucked up the courage to show it to my husband and say, ‘This is me.’ He’s been so supportive, as you explained BED so well, and now we’re working together on a day by day basis. I’m proud to say I haven’t binged for three weeks and am feeling so positive about the future. Thank you for bringing to the fore a number of disorders that so many people are too ashamed to talk about. You really have helped me to confront some demons and get help from my nearest and dearest. D-M, Edinburgh

GO TO EONLINE NTE R CO MONT THIS healt MPETITHIO’S hyfo o NS

d.co. uk

SOME MAJOR facts about dairy products were completely overlooked in ‘Going dairy free – are we milking it?’ (September issue): that of the animal exploitation involved in the dairy industry, and the ‘cons’ of consuming animal milks besides lactose intolerance. Calcium in animal milk is designed for another species, not humans – veg such as leafy greens are much better sources of calcium. Humans exploit the reproductive systems of animals to produce milk for profit alone. Make the healthy ethical choice and go vegan. Sarah Egholm, via email

CONGRATULATIONS This month’s star letter writer will be set for healthier baking with this KitchenAid non-stick bakeware set (baking sheet, muffin tin, loaf pan and rectangular and square cake pans), worth £82, which comes with a five-year non-stick guarantee. kitchenaid.co.uk

8 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

HFG EDITOR MELANIE REPLIES:

Our dietitians focused purely on nutrition, and dairy is the most easily absorbed source of calcium. We believe ethical issues are a matter for each reader to decide. Turn to p31 for dietary tips for those who need or choose to cut out dairy.


N E WS A N D V I E WS

YOUR PICS

My version of dukkah chicken & veg bake from @healthyfoodmag Oct issue. Yum! @electrogirl68

Always good to see you’re enjoying our recipes at all times of day and at home or away…

Reading @healthyfoodmag at the Dead Sea #healthylifestyle #Whereveryouare @154317Ami

Mmm @chiacharge pudding for breakfast this morning. A recipe from @healthyfoodmag #fruit #milk #yogurt @Natalie_Thomas_

OUR NEWS

ALDO GETS WAISTED

HFG nutritionist Amanda Ursell talked weight loss with chef Aldo Zilli on his Monday morning Soho Radio Show – he’s our new recruit for the 2017 HFG Get Waisted Challenge.

EMAIL US info@healthyfood.co.uk

We’ve been spreading the healthy message on air, getting into pick and mix soups and stealing ideas from overseas

LUNCH TO LOOK FORWARD TO

We got a sneak peek at the new healthy offerings coming soon from M&S, including build your own soups. Off the shelf lunches are about to get the personal touch…

FOLLOW US @healthyfoodmag

GOOD MORNING, VIETNAM

HFG writer Laura Day made a host of healthy discoveries on her recent trip to Vietnam. Read her recommendations to try at home at healthyfood.co.uk/blog.

TALK TO US ON facebook.com/ healthyfoodguideuk

SHARE PICS ON INSTAGRAM @healthyfoodmag

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 9


S C I E N C E U PDAT E

HEALTH NOTES Diet and fitness facts for your wellbeing

3

out of 4 people still don’t know that WEIGHING TOO MUCH INCREASES THE RISK OF CANCER, says Cancer Research UK. Being overweight or obese is thought to be responsible for 18,100 DEATHS from cancer each year and is linked in particular to 10 types, including cancers of the breast, bowel, womb and oesophagus. If you need to lose weight, it’s best to do it gradually to keep it off long term – get started with our diet planner on p44.

BRAIN BOOSTERS There’s yet more evidence supporting the link between a healthy diet and children’s learning abilities. A Finnish study monitoring children aged six to eight years old found those who ate a diet rich in fruit, veg, fish, wholegrains and unsaturated fats, and low in red meat, sugary products and saturated fats performed better in tests measuring their reading skills than those with an unhealthy diet. Need lunchbox inspiration to keep little brains powered? Download our easy guide at healthyfood.co.uk/ article/healthylunchbox-guide.

10 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


H E A LT H

SATURATES: THE STORY CONTINUES

REDUCE THE RISK OF ADHD

Research shows high intakes of saturates are bad for the heart, but new findings suggest they affect the brain, too. The study found this type of fat causes inflammation in the brain’s hypothalamus, which plays a major role in regulating appetite. The result? We’re more likely to overeat and gain weight. More research is needed to confirm this, but we stand by our advice to cut saturates and choose healthier fats found in avocado, oily fish and olive oil.

We know a pregnant woman’s diet can affect her unborn child’s health in many ways, and the latest evidence highlights yet another reason to cut down on sugary, fatty foods. A new study by King’s College London and the University of Bristol found high intakes of sugary and processed foods during pregnancy increased the likelihood of changes to a gene associated with ADHD, compared with those who followed a healthy diet.

WORDS: LAURA DAY, HANNAH SCHOLFIELD, JOANNA FREEDMAN. PHOTOS: GETTY, ISTOCK, POSED BY MODELS

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE GYM

90

The percentage of TV chefs who don’t practise GOOD FOOD SAFETY HABITS, such as washing produce and hands, which are essential to REDUCE OUR FOOD POISONING RISK. Don’t forget that while the camera’s rolling they may cut corners, so it’s a case of don’t try this at home!

Not only does laughter release endorphins, but it can help us enjoy (and stick with) an exercise programme, a study suggests. When elderly people took part in twice-weekly exercise classes that incorporated laughter, their mental health and aerobic endurance significantly improved. Perhaps better still, 96% said laughter was an enjoyable addition to exercise, while 89% said they felt motivated to take part in other classes. Next time you’re at the gym, try tuning into a comedy show or podcast.


S H O PPI N G

SEASONAL ways to

FIVE-A-DAY IN NOVEMBER

As winter frosts threaten tender growth, turn to exotic PASSIONFRUITS for colour and sturdy CHICORY and SHALLOTS for crunch

CHICORY

ONE PORTION OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY

Grown in the dark, its vibrant white tips and slightly bitter flavour pep up less wellendowed leaves, tossed in a winter salad.

5–6

PASSIONFRUITS

Nutritional reasons to buy This leafy veg, also known as endive, is delicious eaten raw in salads, sliced and added to stir-fries or halved and griddled. Available in red and yellow, it’s the red variety that’s particularly rich in anthocyanins. These naturally occurring antioxidants give the leaves their deep hue and have been linked to better heart health, as well as protecting against certain cancers and cognitive decline. More research is needed to confirm the health benefits of anthocyanins but, regardless, all chicory counts towards your five-a-day. Per 80g l 9kcal l 0.6g sugars l 1g fibre

serves 4 as a side Spray a non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a high heat. Halve 4 chicory lengthways, then fry cut-side down for 3–4 min until browned. Transfer to a plate. Toast 30g chopped pecans in the pan for 2 min. Meanwhile, make a dressing by whisking the zest and juice of ½ orange with 1tbsp olive oil, 2tsp sherry vinegar, 2tsp dijon mustard and black pepper. Drizzle over the chicory, then top with the pecans.

12 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Sweet and tart, these tropical fruits are packed with antioxidants, vitamins and fibre – a welcome reminder of warmer times.

Nutritional reasons to buy

ONE PORTION OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY

80g

Cut open these wrinkly little fruits and you’ll find vibrant yellow pulp and heaps of crunchy seeds – perfect for adding to smoothies and fruit salads, and mixing into porridge or natural yogurt. They provide two important antioxidants: vitamins A and C, both of which are needed for healthy skin and to keep your immune system strong. However, as each passionfruit only contains around 15g flesh and seeds, you need to eat several of them to get a significant intake of these nutrients. Per passionfruit l 5kcal l 0.9g sugars l 0.7g fibre

In the kitchen LAYER fat-free Greek yogurt, crushed meringues and passionfruit pulp in small glasses for a twist on Eton mess. MIX passionfruit pulp with a little lime zest and juice, a few fresh mint leaves and crushed ice. Top with cloudy apple juice for a virgin cocktail. PUSH passionfruit pulp through a fine sieve (discard the seeds), then mix with diced pepper, cucumber and chopped fresh coriander. Spoon over cooked prawns for a zingy starter.

WORDS: JULIETTE KELLOW, PHIL MUNDY, JOANNA FREEDMAN. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

In the kitchen

PASSIONFRUITS


ONE PORTION OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY

3–4

SHALLOTS

SHALLOTS

The smaller, sweeter siblings of onions, shallots have a milder flavour, so they aren’t as eye-watering to prepare!

Nutritional reasons to buy Shallots tend to have a milder flavour than onions, but many of the same nutritional attributes. They contain vitamin C and flavonoids – in particular quercetin, which acts as an anti-inflammatory – and their sulphur compounds may help to protect against certain cancers. Per shallot l 5kcal l 0.8g sugars l 0.5g fibre

In the kitchen FRY sliced shallots gently with fresh sage leaves until

caramelised. Add a splash of balsamic vinegar, then serve with pork. SLICE shallots thinly, then gently fry until they’re softened and golden. Stir through mashed potatoes along with some chopped fresh parsley and wholegrain mustard to taste. DRIZZLE halved shallots with oil and roast until sticky. Allow them to cool before adding to a leafy green salad and tossing with a dressing made with olive oil and lemon juice.


THIS MONTH WE L VE

We’ve scoured the shelves for greattasting, nutritious products and selected our favourites to make your weekly shop easier

Step away from the Studies show crunchy sausage rolls and grab food is more satisfying, this generous salad from and Propercorn is on to the new Balanced it. This half-popped Choice range at Gregg’s. corn is light with bite. Gregg’s Teriyaki chicken noodle salad, £3/275g

Propercorn Crunch Corn, 89p/30g, Tesco

Per serving l 256kcal l 3.7g fat l 0.6g saturates l 20g protein l 1.2g salt

Per 30g (Salt & Pepper) l 146kcal l 8g fat l 1.2g saturates l 1g sugars l 0.2g salt

Vegan goes mainstream with a new range of four low-fat, flavoursome soups. Vietnamese Super Green gets our vote.

Add a gorgeous caramelised note to home bakes with this unrefined coconut sugar (just remember it’s still sugar…)

Pump up lunch with this new range of breads, wraps and rolls, baked with pulses and grains to pack in at least 7g protein per serve.

Glorious Super Soup, £1.89/ 600g, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Ocado

The Groovy Food Company Organic Coconut Sugar, £3.99/500g, Tesco

Warburtons Wholemeal Protein Wraps, £1/4 wraps, Asda, Morrisons, Co-Op

Per 100g l 390kcal l 1g fat l 0g saturates l 95.8g sugars l 0.1g salt

Per wrap l 184kcal l 3.3g fat l 0.8g saturates l 2.4g sugars l 0.7g salt

Per ½ pot (Vietnamese Super Green) l 117kcal l 1.3g fat l 0.5g saturates l 3.1g sugars l 1g salt

14 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


COMPILED BY LAURA DAY

S H O PPI N G

Try grating this firm goat’s cheese on to your winter soup – its clean, subtle flavour is lovely with crackers, too.

Forgot to soak your oats overnight? This quick-soak gluten-free fruity bircher will sort you out in 5 min.

Delamere Dairy Mild Goats Cheese, £2.69/150g, Tesco, Ocado

MOMA Bircher Muesli Raspberry & Coconut, £3.49/400g

Per 30g l 98kcal l 9g fat l 6g saturates l 6.4g protein l 0.4g salt

Per 50g (unsoaked) l 191kcal l 5.6g fat l 2g saturates l 5.9g sugars l 0.1g salt

This lactose-free We think we have an yogurt has just the addiction. This might just be the best granola right amount of sharp we’ve ever tasted – and to be refreshing – we’ve been stirring it into our it’s gluten free with curries and tagines. no refined sugars. Rude Health Cacao & Vanilla Granola, £4.99/450g, Waitrose, Ocado, rudehealth.com

Arla Lactofree Natural Yogurt, £1.35/400g, Asda, Co-Op

Per 40g l 185kcal l 7.6g fat l 2g saturates l 4.4g sugars l 0g salt

Per 100g l 59kcal l 2.2g fat l 1.4g saturates l 5.5g sugars l 0.1g salt

We love the simplicity of these recipes, with fresh ingredients neatly weighed out and delivered to your door. Fab for kitchen novices. Classic Box, £39/3 meals for 2 people, hellofresh.co.uk Nutrition values vary

The nutty flavour of this gluten-free buckwheat pasta is a natural partner for homemade rich tomato sauces. By Sainsbury’s Buckwheat Penne, £2.15/500g Per 200g (cooked) l 368kcal l 3.2g fat l 0.7g saturates l 1g sugars l 0g salt NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 15


IS YOUR MARRIAGE MAKING Y U FAT? Being married is generally good for our health, but scientists have discovered our waistlines suffer after tying the knot! So what are the benefits and drawbacks of marriage – and how can we make it work for our wellbeing?

16 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

W You’re less ❛likely to die prematurely – but you’ll put on 24–30lb in the first five years after getting hitched

E OFTEN HEAR MARRIAGE IS GOING OUT OF STYLE, but it’s still the most common way for us to live. In 2015, there were 12.5 million married couples in the UK and more than 3 million cohabiting partnerships, according to research by the Office for National Statistics. In comparison, just 7.7 million aduIts Iived alone. And there’s increasing evidence that getting hitched is about more than a pretty frock and confetti. Marriage, it appears, keeps us alive! A study from Warwick University found married men were 6.1% less likely to die over a seven-year period than their single friends. A trip up the aisle was also (to a lesser extent) good for women, reducing the risk of premature death by 2.9%. But while there are many positive health benefits to being married, there are some drawbacks, especially for our waistlines. We looked at the latest research to review the health ups and downs of marriage, and offer strategies for beating the bloat.


H E A LT H

WEDDED BLISS AND WEIGHT GAIN AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH found that within six months of getting hitched, newlywed women gained almost 5lb – and this couldn’t be attributed to strict dieting before the wedding (those who had starved themselves gained even more weight after marriage). Weight gain doesn’t stop there, either, nor is it limited to brides. According to a study at the University of North Carolina, young women gain around 24lb in the first five years of marriage while men gain around 30lb. Another study, published in the journal Health Psychology, found the happier a couple were, the more weight they gained. For every unit rise in satisfaction, men and women gained an average of one-tenth of a BMI unit every six months – roughly equal to 1lb a year for a 5ft 4in woman weighing 8½st. Unmarried couples living together didn’t experience the same weight gain. Why? Researchers suggest people tend to pay less attention to their weight in a committed relationship because they feel confident they’ll never have to impress a potential partner again. They may also hunker down in front of the TV with a big meal every evening. There’s evidence that married couples take less exercise than singles, too.

STAY-SLIM TACTICS Dr Andrea Meltzer, a professor of psychology who studied the weight gain of 169 newlyweds, says the people most likely to stay svelte are those who are ‘considering going back into the mating market’. Her tip? Rather than thinking about your body in terms of looks, consider how healthy you are. If you love eating together, use the opportunity to cook healthy, lower-calorie meals, and take up an activity you can do together, such as walking, running or playing tennis. A US study of middle-aged couples found that when a wife met the recommended 150 min target of moderate intensity exercise a week her husband was 70% more likely to achieve it, too.

TURN THE PAGE for our nutrition consultant’s practical solutions NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 17


DODGE THE FAT TRAPS

and HERE’S HOW

Follow Juliette Kellow’s tips for staying slimmer together… FAT TRAP 1 He frequently

comes home with ‘treats’

You don’t buy them as part of your weekly shop but he regularly brings home crisps, biscuits and chocolate. You know they’re loaded with calories and fat but if they’re in the house, you can’t resist them. Slim strategy Ask him to bring lower-calorie tasty treats that are better for both of you. A bunch of grapes, punnet of strawberries or a pineapple will satisfy a sweet tooth. Win win Swap a nightly 250-calorie bar of chocolate for fresh fruit and you’ll save around 200 calories each day.

♥♥ In a year lose… 21lb

FAT TRAP 2 He often cooks It helps you out, but he thinks he’s auditioning for MasterChef and creates calorie-packed meals with loads of high-fat ingredients. Slim strategy Men love a challenge, so explain that you want to lose weight and set him the task of helping you to achieve it. Before you know it, he’ll be researching healthier recipes and asking you to buy lower-fat ingredients. Win win Halve your evening meal calories from 1,000 to 500 by asking him to cook recipes from our diet planner (p44). If he cooks three times you’ll save 1,500 calories a week.

♥♥ In a year lose… 22lb

FAT TRAP 3 Your leisure time

involves eating and drinking

Drinks at the pub, dinner with friends, popcorn at the cinema, coffee and cake while shopping… just part of your life as a couple. Slim strategy Spend your leisure time being more active. A country walk, going for a sauna and swim or

18 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

joining a dance class will all burn calories – and remove you from eating opportunities. Win win Get the Strictly bug and join a local salsa class together. An hour-long lesson and then an hour of practising each week will burn around 800 calories.

♥♥ In a year lose… 12lb

FAT TRAP 4 You eat the same

amount as him

Your portions are man-sized – and sometimes if he’s having seconds you will, too. Slim strategy Wise up to the fact that you need a fifth fewer calories than he does if you want to stay trim. Put a fifth less food on your plate – that’s 4tbsp rice to his 5tbsp. Win win Reduce your portions of carbs and meat by 20% and you’ll cut 200 calories off your meal. If your plate seems a little empty, fill the gap with extra salad or veg.

♥♥ In a year lose… 21lb

FAT TRAP 5 He disagrees when

you moan you’re getting fat

Sure, he’s noticed a few extra pounds, but he doesn’t want to upset you by agreeing that your bum really does ‘look big in that’. Trouble is, as long as he keeps dodging the issue, you don’t feel motivated to shift those pounds. Slim strategy Dig out photos of when you first met and remind him how much slimmer you were then. He’s probably put on weight, too, so plan to slim down together. Win win Burn calories and put the spark back into your love life with three weekly sessions of lovemaking. You’ll burn around 110 calories each time!

♥♥ In a year lose… 5lb

MENTAL WELLBEING HOWEVER IRRITATED we may get with a live-in partner, research using figures from the World Health Organization suggests married people are less likely to suffer anxiety and depression. Men get the biggest boost, while women are as happy when they cohabit, according to a new study published in the Journal of Family Psychology. Other research shows the wellbeing effects of marriage are about twice as high if your spouse is also your best friend. Single women may be the true winners in the happiness stakes in the end, though. In a study from the University of Padua in Italy, wives were found to suffer less stress after their husbands died, while the opposite was true for men.

FOCUS ON FRIENDSHIP Being happy – at any age – doesn’t depend on whether or not you’re married, says psychologist Phillippa Perry, author of How to Stay Sane. ‘Close, nurturing friendships, where you fully let down your “social mask” and can be yourself are what’s essential. We all need someone who not only listens but reads between the lines and perhaps even gently challenges us.’


H E A LT H

MARRIAGE CAN BENEFIT YOUR HEALTH MATTERS OF THE HEART WHEN IT COMES TO OUR HEART HEALTH, those who tie the knot tend to fare better. One study found that both married men and women were up to 12% less likely to suffer from cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attacks and stroke, than single, divorced or widowed people. This effect was strongest in people under the age of 50. Married couples also do better than single or divorced people after heart surgery, according to researchers from the University of Michigan. Those who were divorced, separated or widowed were 40% more likely to die or develop a disability two years after the operation. Even more dramatically, a Finnish study found that the risk of death after a heart attack was 51% higher in men who had never been married and 43% higher in unmarried women. The researchers suggested the simple matter of having someone with you when you have a heart attack means you get to hospital faster, which increases your chance of healthy survival. They also thought that having a partner to support you afterwards was important, both in practical and emotional terms.

HEART-HEALTHY TIPS Don’t lose heart if you’re footloose and fancy free. There are potentially heart-healthy benefits to being single, such as the increased likelihood that you will exercise and stay slim. Your heart health can be boosted further by eating healthy food and surrounding yourself with close friends and family. In any case, whether we’re single, with a partner or married, the British Heart Foundation suggests we should all be aware of the symptoms of a heart attack, such as chest pain, pain in the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach, feeling uncomfortable, sweating, lightheadedness, shortness of breath and nausea or vomiting – and we shouldn’t hesitate to call 999 immediately.

CANCER RECOVERY

Single men ❛with cancer are more likely to die than married male patients

NEW RESEARCH FROM THE CANCER PREVENTION INSTITUTE of California found that single men with cancer were 24% more likely to die than married male patients, while the death rate for single female patients was 17% higher than for their married counterparts. Dr Scarlett Gomez, who led the research, suggests as well as benefiting from practical support, such as having someone to drive them to hospital appointments and reminding them to take medicine, cancer patients also need emotional support, which reduces stress. ‘Cancer can be a very scary thing, and it’s good to have someone by your side,’ she says.

SELF-SUPPORT STRATEGIES ‘Single people can make things easier by maintaining social networks, which means they’ll be able to rely on friends and family members for help,’ says Scarlett. Joining a reading group, walking club or any other group activity is a good investment for the future. Don’t forget, the cancer charity Macmillan (macmillan.org.uk) offers phone help, plus support groups and online forums. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 19


H E A LT H

WHY FALLING OUT IS BAD FOR YOU IT SHOULD COME AS NO SURPRISE that the quality of a relationship can have a bearing on your health and how you deal with any health problems. Studies have found that unsupportive marriages lead to higher blood pressure, and a study at the University of Utah found people who had angry arguments with their partner were as likely to develop heart problems as those who smoked or had high cholesterol. Arguing is even linked to slower wound healing, because stress weakens the immune system. Conversely, having

The de-stressing effect of holding your husband’s hand is so profound it can be seen on brain scans

support from a spouse has an impact on how we cope with health problems. Research from the University of Virginia found women in a stressful situation who held their husband’s hand felt immediately calmer – an effect so profound it could be seen on brain scans. For women in the happiest marriages, the changes in the pain centres of their brains rivalled the effect of strong painkillers.

BUT NAGGING CAN BE GOOD WHAT’S MORE of a surprise, perhaps, is that married men seem to thrive even if the relationship is unhappy. Researchers believe this has a lot to do with the power of nagging. Wives are usually more likely to remind husbands to quit smoking, to eat healthily, to stop having chocolate and to take medicine, explains Professor Hui Liu from Michigan State University. This marital tension may be good for the husband’s health in other ways, too. ‘For men, an increase in negative marital quality has been shown to lower the risk of developing diabetes,’ says Hui Liu. ‘Women, on the other hand, may be more sensitive than men to the quality of a relationship,’ she says. ‘For them, a good marriage was related to a lower risk of being diabetic.’

KEEPING YOUR MARRIAGE in good shape could be as important as working out in the gym. Professor Christine Proulx of the University of Missouri has studied the health of married couples for over 20 years. ‘We often think about the ageing process as something we can treat medically with a pill or more exercise,’ she says, ‘but it’s clear that working on your marriage may also benefit your health.’

20 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

WORDS: LEAH HARDY. ILLUSTRATIONS: GETTY

KEEP WORKING ON IT


Great Wall of China Trek 25 MAY-2 JUNE 2018

Trek the Great Wall of China and raise funds for the children’s charity of your choice For more information and to register online:

www.actionforcharity.co.uk 01590 646410 | events@dreamchallenges.co.uk DreamChallenges

@dreamchallenges #LetsTrekForChildren


S H O PPI N G

What’s the deal with…

KEFIR

Enjoyed in Russia and central Asia for centuries, the oldest health drink on the block is now gaining fans over here

WHAT IS IT? It’s a drink made from kefir ‘grains’ (a yeast/bacterial culture in the form of tiny grain-like florets) fermented in cow’s or goat’s milk. Kefir originated in the Caucasus and has been a diet staple for more than 2,000 years in eastern Europe. It’s widely available online and it’s popping up in many UK stores, too.

THE HEALTH BENEFITS In Russia, Kefir is consumed daily by adults. Being particularly rich in probiotic bacteria (it contains more healthy bacteria than yogurt), it’s thought to improve digestion and strengthen the immune system – although the impact on immunity is thought to be minimal in people who are already in good health. Kefir has also been found to reduce symptoms in people with lactose intolerance. Some people believe it has the power to protect against cancer, although far more studies involving humans are needed to confirm this. Nutritionally, it’s high in protein and calcium – a 200ml serving provides roughly a third of our recommended daily calcium intake. However, kefir can be high in calories and flavoured varieties often contain added sugars, so check labels and choose those with the lowest.

HOW IS IT USED?

Kefir is refreshing with a slightly tart flavour and a consistency somewhere between milk and yogurt. It can be poured over fruit or cereal or served as a drink. Experiment with it as an alternative to yogurt or soured cream in salad dressings and smoothies, too.

You can buy either plain or flavoured kefir (the smoother, flavoured varieties are delicious but cost more). You can also try fermenting your own at home for a ready supply, using the Mad Millie Kefir Kit (£9.99, lakeland.co.uk).

Wloszczowa Kefir, Morrisons, 87p/400g Per 100g l 45kcal l 1.5g fat l 1g saturates l 3.4g sugars l 0.1g salt

22 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Bio-tiful Dairy Honey & Mint Kefir Smoothie, Ocado, £1.99/250ml Per 100ml l 71kcal l 2.9g fat l 1.9g saturates l 8.6g sugars l 0.1g salt

Biona Organic Kefir Natural, £2.20/250g, Planet Organic Per 100g l 53kcal l 1.5g fat l 1.1g saturates l 5.5g sugars l 0.2g salt

WORDS: JENNIFER ELWIN. PHOTO: ISTOCK

FROM THE SHOP TO YOUR TABLE


H E A LT H

EAT WELL TO AVOID

INFLAMMATION It’s the first line of defence against infection and repairs bodily harm, but there’s another side to inflammation that threatens rather than protects our overall health

N

egative as the word sounds, inflammation is actually our body’s natural reaction to burns, infections and injuries. It’s a normal immune system defence and kicks in when our bodies are under attack. However, scientific research shows that in some people this defence mechanism

doesn’t switch off, which means the body’s defences turn in on themselves, attacking our good health. Scientists believe this puts us more at risk of developing conditions such as type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s, cancer and heart disease. This happens when the acute inflammation that our body

uses to fight infections turns into life-changing chronic inflammation (see The different types on p27).

Scientific findings on chronic inflammation l In

obese people, inflammatory proteins triggered in the enlarged

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 25


the brain, which disrupts brain signalling and leads to depressive symptoms. Now researchers are keen to explore whether this inflammatory response in the brain is the reason antidepressants (which target the emotion neurotransmitters in the brain) are ineffective in some patients. They also want to find out whether certain people are more susceptible to inflammation because of genetics, stress or both.

Risk, detection and treatment THERE ARE MANY FACTORS that may influence whether chronic inflammation occurs, including illness and genetics. But research has also revealed that our lifestyle plays an important part – this includes a poor diet, being overweight, smoking, stress and excessive alcohol consumption. Worryingly, there are very few symptoms of chronic

TESTING FOR INFLAMMATION A blood test can detect a family of proteins in our bloodstream known as inflammatory biomarkers. Collectively called cytokines, they are produced by the cells of the immune system and stimulate the production of CRP, an inflammatory marker that is produced by the liver in response to inflammation. Levels of CRP in the blood are raised when we have an infection or injury, but once the healing process starts, they should return to normal. Consistently high levels of CRP may be an indication of chronic inflammation and long-term health issues such as heart disease.

inflammation itself – it usually only comes to light as the cause of another serious condition. However, a blood test measuring levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) can be carried out to determine whether there is inflammation in the body (see Testing for inflammation, below). CRP levels become elevated by infection and long-term disease, and the test is used to: l check for infection after surgery l monitor an infection or disease that can cause inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis l monitor the treatment of a disease or infection. While the CRP test can’t identify exactly where the problem lies in the body, increased levels may prompt other tests to be carried out. ‘Treatment of chronic inflammation usually involves a number of factors,’ explains HFG expert and GP Dawn Harper. ‘It may include painkillers, anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy or weight management – particularly if weight-bearing joints, such as the knees, are involved.’

The diet remedy WHAT WE EAT can have a significant impact. In fact, the link between diet and inflammation is so strong scientists have developed the Dietary Inflammation Index (DII), which scores foods for their positive or negative effects on chronic inflammation. Turn the page to get a flavour of what you should be eating to keep your body in a soothed state.

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

fat cells have been linked to metabolic conditions such as insulin resistance. l Cancerous tumours can set off an immune response causing inflammatory chemicals to fuel tumour growth. l Recent studies into Alzheimer’s disease have revealed that higher numbers of microglia, a group of immune cells, linger in sufferers’ brains than in those with a healthy brain. l Research has found chronic inflammation influences the formation of artery-blocking clots, which are the ultimate cause of heart attacks and many strokes. l A new school of thought also links depression to a physiological response, rather than treating it as a state of mind. Earlier this year, scientists at King’s College London found a link between blood inflammation and increased oxidative stress on


H E A LT H

THE DIFFERENT TYPES l ACUTE INFLAMMATION This is the visible, short-term form that most of us are familiar with – a bump, a bruise or healing cut that lasts for a few days. ‘Think about a splinter in your finger or an abscess on a tooth,’ explains Dr Donna Arnett, chair and professor of epidemiology at the University of Alabama. ‘Our body launches an attack with our white blood cells and chemicals that results in redness and swelling to kill the bacteria or rid the body of the intruder.’ l CHRONIC INFLAMMATION This is when the immune system is constantly responding to substances it sees as a threat. These

substances can seem harmless at the outset, such as certain foods, or be more obvious risk factors such as smoking. Chronic inflammation can lead to poor gut health, which in turn causes symptoms such as heartburn, IBS, fat storage and insulin resistance. It also poses perhaps the biggest threat to our long-term physical and mental health, triggering conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, high cholesterol, Alzheimer’s disease and many cancers.

NATURAL WAYS TO FIGHT IT

Good news – your risk of chronic inflammation can be reduced. First, if you smoke, quit. Next on your checklist are these:

EAT A HEALTHY DIET Include as many antiinflammatory foods, such as fresh fruit and veg, in your daily diet as possible. Turn the page for a full breakdown of what to eat more or less of. REACH AND MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT Healthy eating and exercise will help you lose weight. One study found overweight or obese post-menopausal women who lost at least 5% of their body weight through diet and exercise reduced their risk of inflammation by almost half. DEAL WITH STRESS While some stress is unavoidable, too much can cause inflammation. Explore ways to manage your stress levels to reduce your risk, such as exercise, meditation and yoga, a long soak in the bath or talking it out with a close friend or relative.

1

2

3

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 27


Amanda Ursell’s storecupboard saviours The following foods are at the core of an anti-inflammatory diet, and it makes sense to include as many of them as possible in your everyday diet

VEG AND PULSES

WHOLEGRAIN STARCHY CARBS

Both are full of antioxidants, including polyphenols, which may help fight inflammation. Try onions, broccoli, tomatoes, kale and spinach, and pulses such as butter beans, lentils, haricot and red kidney beans. Carrots, peppers and dark green leafy veg are a good source of carotenoids, which may help lower CRP levels. How much? At least three 80g servings each day.

Wholegrain foods add fibre to your diet, which appears to lower CRP. Think wholemeal bread, pitta and tortilla wraps, wholewheat pasta and brown rice, and wholegrain breakfast cereals such as porridge oats, Weetabix and Shredded Wheat. How much? One serving with every main meal.

FRUITS

OLIVE OIL

All berries are packed with anti-inflammatories. Also include in your daily diet apples, oranges and any seasonal fruit that’s good value for money. How much? At least two 80g servings each day.

28 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Full of heart-friendly monounsaturated fats, olive oil also gives us antioxidants and contains oleocanthal, a compound scientists say can help reduce inflammation. How much? As a guide, 1tbsp a day in cooking or dressings.

NUTS

Studies have associated nuts with reduced CRP, so snacking on a handful of almonds, walnuts and cashews, for example, might be a good idea. Choose unsalted nuts with skins, ideally. How much? A 30g handful as a snack or part of a main meal.

OILY FISH

The omega-3 fats in oily fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines help reduce CRP and interleukin-6, two inflammation-promoting proteins in our bodies. How much? Aim for at least one serving a week.


H E A LT H

Your anti-inflammatory meal plan Ready to make changes to your diet? Keep inflammation in check with Amanda’s easy-to-follow menu

DAY 1

BREAKFAST 50g low-sugar muesli with 1 handful blueberries and 150ml skimmed or unsweetened almond milk

MORNING SNACK

DRINKS

Coffee and tea both contain polyphenols and other compounds that may protect against inflammation. Be sure to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated, too. How much? Around 3–4 cups of coffee or tea a day is fine. If you’re pregnant, stick to 1–2 cups and have no more than 200mg caffeine daily (this also includes other caffeine-containing drinks).

30g handful almonds LUNCH 1 wholemeal pitta filled with ½ can tuna in spring water mixed with 3tbsp canned sweetcorn (both drained) and 1tbsp light mayo. Plus 1 chopped apple and 1 orange topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt

AFTERNOON SNACK 4 oatcakes with 4tbsp reduced-fat hummus and cucumber sticks DINNER Medium portion homemade veggie chilli served with 1 baked potato, 30g reducedfat cheddar and salad. Plus a serving of stewed rhubarb with sweetener 1,693kcal, 53.9g fat, 11.6g saturates, 76.1g sugars, 4.2g salt

DAY 2

WHAT NOT TO EAT Filling up on natural, fresh and plant-based foods helps to minimise your intake of inflammatory foods.

Inflammatory foods include:

l refined starchy carbohydrates l fried foods

l high-fat or sugary puddings l sweets

l sugary

drinks

l large portions of red meat l processed meats, such as

sausages and burgers.

Regular intake of these foods will also contribute to weight gain, which itself increases the risk of inflammation.

BREAKFAST 2 scrambled eggs served on 2 slices toasted wholemeal bread with 2tsp low-fat spread and 1 grilled tomato MORNING SNACK 1tbsp sultanas and 30g unsalted cashews LUNCH 1 wholemeal tortilla wrap filled with ½ small sliced avocado, ½ small ball reduced-fat mozzarella and a handful rocket. Plus 1 slice cantaloupe melon AFTERNOON SNACK 1 skinny latte with 1 pear DINNER Stew made with 1 skinless chicken breast, 2 handfuls butternut squash, ½ onion, 1 carrot, 4tbsp pearl barley

and 200ml reduced-salt stock. Plus 1 apple 1,738kcal, 55.4g fat, 16.5g saturates, 88.4g sugars, 4g salt

DAY 3

BREAKFAST Porridge made with 4tbsp oats and 275ml skimmed milk, topped with 1tbsp sesame seeds and 3 dried apricots

MORNING SNACK 30g unsalted peanuts LUNCH 2 slices wholemeal bread filled with 100g low-fat cottage cheese mixed with diced 6cucumber. Plus 2 satsumas AFTERNOON SNACK 3 rye crispbreads topped with 1 sliced hard-boiled egg and 1 sliced tomato DINNER Stir-fry made from 150g salmon steak, 1tsp olive oil and lots of stir-fry vegetables (eg spring onions, carrots, peppers and broccoli), served with 1 layer of dried wholewheat noodles, boiled. Plus 1 grilled banana with 1 small pot low-fat plain fromage frais 1,757kcal, 64.6g fat, 13.1g saturates, 82g sugars, 2.9g salt


H

EN

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TC GET KI

How to eat healthier: PART 6

HP HIL

S H O PPI N G

CLE V E R

W

Your guide to

HEALTHY DAIRY-FREE COOKING THE DEMAND FOR DAIRY FREE is on the rise and, thankfully, so is the number of alternatives. I’m going to show you how to use them in your cooking to replicate the creamy texture of traditional milk products without adding lots of fat and sugar

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 31


S

TOP BY THE DAIRY CHILLER CABINET at the supermarket and you’ll spot dozens of products that have never been near a cow’s udder. Until a few years ago dairy-free options were limited, but it’s suddenly trendy to swap milk for nut or soya alternatives – and the market is booming as a result. In fact, you could have a different flavoured cup of coffee each day of the week, not to mention the host of yogurts, spreads and cheese replacements to choose from. Of course, while some eschew dairy by following a vegan diet, for example, there are others for whom it isn’t even an option due to allergy or intolerance. Regardless, ensuring good, low-fat flavour and high calcium intakes are top priorities.

REPLACE MELTED BUTTER WITH OIL

Light olive and sunflower oils are fine to use in most recipes, while the rich flavours of extra-virgin olive oil and avocado oil go well with chocolate and fruitbased baking recipes. As a guide, replace 100g melted butter with 5tbsp oil and 1½tbsp water. FREEZE LEFTOVER dairy-free yogurt, such as soya, in ice cube trays. It’s great for whizzing up with berries to make thick, ice-cold smoothies.

DAIRY-FREE COOKING KNOW-HOW

recipe needs whipped substituting milk have a cow’s milk 1You’re 2 Acream 3You in a recipe allergy Remember, some milk alternatives will be thicker and creamier than cow’s milk, so they’ll react differently to heat during cooking. Others, such as coconut and oat, will give the recipe a stronger flavour.

Use canned coconut milk instead. Chill overnight, then spoon off the separated solid cream (save the milk for another recipe), sweeten to taste and whip until it forms stiff peaks.

DIY NUT MILK

Soak 100g whole nuts overnight in cold water – cashews and almonds work really well. Rinse and drain, then blend with 1¼ litres cold water in a food processor until very smooth. Strain through a fine sieve lined with muslin or use a nut-milk bag (available from Amazon). The milk will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for a few days. Add the leftover nut pulp to spicy soups or curries to help thicken them. 32 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

You’ll also need to avoid sheep and goat’s milk, as they contain proteins that people with a cow’s milk allergy will also be sensitive to, so check labels.

lactose 4You’re intolerant

There’s some good news – you may still be able to consume some dairy. Lactose-free cow’s milk is now readily available, and many people find they can eat hard cheese (which contains minimal lactose) and yogurt without any symptoms.

need a butter 5You replacement

Shop carefully: many vegetable oil-based spreads contain buttermilk, so won’t be suitable for a dairy-free diet. Check labels and opt for pure oil or soya spreads, such as Vitalite Dairy Free.


S H O PPI N G

HANDY INGREDIENTS

PLENISH CASHEW MILK (£3.49/1 litre, Waitrose) Rich, creamy and delicious in coffee and on cereal. No added sweeteners, stabilisers or preservatives.

ENGEVITA NUTRITIONAL YEAST FLAKES

WAITROSE AVOCADO OIL SPREAD

(£3.29/125g, Holland & Barrett) Add to sauces or sprinkle over salads for a hit of cheesy flavour.

(£1.25/250g) Works well in baking, and makes a good white sauce alternative mixed with dairy-free milk.

ALPRO SINGLE SOYA FRESH (80p/250ml, widely available) A low-fat dessert topping. Also great for adding depth to dairy-free custards, soups, and sauces.

Dairy-free myths busted!

MYTH If you can’t eat dairy, you can’t eat eggs, either Eggs are laid

some brands, yes, so choose from the many unsweetened varieties. Vegetable or nut-based oils may also be added, but even so most dairyfree milks contain less than 2% fat (similar to semi-skimmed milk).

MYTH Dairy-free diets lack calcium Many milk and yogurt alternatives are fortified with calcium (as well as vitamin D), although bear in mind that the calcium in dairy products is more easily absorbed by the body. There are plenty of other food sources of calcium, too, such as canned fish (with bones), green leafy veg, nuts, wholegrains and pulses.

(£2.30/200g, widely available) A mild cheese substitute that melts well – add to sauces, pasta bakes or ‘cheese’ toasties.

based spreads in the UK no longer contain hydrogenated fats. They have significantly less saturated fat than dairy-based spreads, too.

MYTH Milk alternatives are full of fat and sugar Sugar is added to

if you add a little flavoured oil, such as walnut or almond, with sunflower oil or a dairy-free spread (see above left). Or use vanilla, citrus zest or ground spice for a deeper flavour.

(£3.37/350g, widely available) Rich and creamy but high in fat, so watch portions. Mix with garlic and cucumber to make tzatziki.

VIOLIFE VEGAN CHEESE

MYTH Vegetable spreads are full of hydrogenated fat Most vegetable-

FROM CALCIUM DEFICIENCY hyperbole to ‘no eggs’ nonsense, let’s set the record straight:

MYTH Cakes made without butter taste bland You won’t miss the butter

THE COCONUT COLLABORATIVE NATURAL YOGURT

KEEP A SMALL TUB of

extra-virgin olive oil or avocado oil in the fridge. It will solidify slightly, making it easy to spread on to bread. You’ll use less of it than if you were spreading butter. Or for a thicker sandwich spread, mix with an equal amount of plain dairy-free yogurt.

by chickens, not cows! So they’re fine to eat if you have a milk allergy or lactose intolerance. That said, some people can’t eat eggs due to a separate allergy or dietary choice. Try these alternatives… l Aquafaba This is the water from canned unsalted pulses, such as chickpeas. Add 3tbsp to baking recipes in place of an egg. For the lightest results, whisk until foamy before folding into the mix. You can even use it to make meringue. l Orgran No Egg (£3.29/200g, Holland & Barrett) This gives really good results in baking and can be used to make vegan mayonnaise. l Soy protein This works well in sauces and bakes. To achieve light egg-free brownies, mix 1tbsp soy protein to 3tbsp water per egg. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 33


STA-FO O D

Five simple, delicious DAIRYFREE RECIPES

Quick, easy and so satisfying you won’t even notice there’s anything missing…

The dietitian’s view There are two main medical reasons l Milk protein allergy Thought

to affect 3–6% of infants and young children, it’s caused by the natural protein in dairy products. Most children will outgrow this allergy by the age of five. l Lactose intolerance This is more common in adults than children. Relatively rare in Europeans, it affects a greater number of people of Asian and African origin. Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest lactose, which is the natural sugar in dairy products. It’s caused by a

34 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

THAI BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP serves 4 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil, add 1 large leek, sliced, and 1 medium butternut squash, peeled and diced. Fry gently for 10 min. Stir a 160g can coconut cream until smooth, then add all but 2tbsp of it to the pan with 2–3tbsp Thai red curry paste and 900ml very low salt veg stock. Simmer for 15 min or until the squash is tender. Whiz until smooth with a stick blender, then divide among 4 bowls. Drizzle with the remaining 2tbsp coconut cream and garnish with shredded fresh Thai basil or coriander to serve. Per serving l 288kcal l 17.5g fat l 13.1g saturates l 16.3g sugars l 0.5g salt

SALMON WITH HERB SAUCE serves 2 Heat oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Dice 2 medium potatoes, put in a large baking tray and spray with oil. Roast for 18 min. Turn the potatoes, then add 2 x 150g skinless salmon fillets and 250g runner beans, sliced. Cook for 12 min more. In a saucepan, melt 1tbsp dairy-free spread with 1tbsp plain flour, then cook for 1 min. Gradually add 150ml unsweetened soya milk, whisking with a balloon whisk, and cook for a few min to thicken. Stir in 3tbsp chopped fresh parsley, 1tbsp dijon mustard and 1tbsp chopped capers. Drizzle over the salmon and veg. Per serving l 582kcal l 30.7g fat l 5.7g saturates l 5.7g sugars l 1.3g salt

PHOTOS: PHIL MUNDY, ISTOCK

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Sometimes there’s no option but to go dairy free, as reduced amount of lactase in the small intestine – the enzyme needed to digest lactose – and can result in bloating and diarrhoea. However, many sufferers find they can tolerate varying amounts of lactose without symptoms. And, unlike an allergy, the condition is often temporary (following food poisoning or a stomach upset, for example).

Shop smart l Avoid milk, milk powder,

milk drinks, cheese, butter, margarine, yogurt, crème fraîche, fromage frais, all varieties of cream, ice cream and ready-made


S H O PPI N G

VEGAN PESTO PASTA serves 4

CHOC-PECAN CHEESECAKES makes 4

BAKED BERRY CUSTARDS serves 4

Cook 350g wholewheat rigatoni in unsalted water according to the pack instructions. Meanwhile, put 50g fresh basil (reserving a few sprigs to garnish), 1 large garlic clove, 30g toasted cashews or almonds, 2tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, 3tbsp nutritional yeast flakes (see p33) and 3tbsp water in a food processor. Whiz until smooth, then season to taste with black pepper. Drain the pasta, then quickly return it to the pan. Add 500g mixed cherry tomatoes, halved, then stir in the pesto. Serve garnished with the reserved basil sprigs. Per serving l 421kcal l 12.1g fat l 2g saturates l 8.5g sugars l 0g salt

In a saucepan, simmer 2tsp agar agar flakes (available online) with 6tbsp water for 6–8 min to dissolve. Remove from the heat, then add 75g dairy-free dark chocolate, chopped, and leave to melt. Meanwhile, in a food processor, whiz 20g water biscuits, 50g pitted dates and 20g pecans until fine, then press into 4 small glasses. Clean the processor, then blend 300g silken tofu with 1tsp vanilla extract. Stir the chocolate mixture until fully melted, then blend with the tofu. Spoon into the glasses and chill for 2 hr. Top each with a pecan half to serve. Per serving l 267kcal l 16.2g fat l 5.9g saturates l 14.9g sugars l 0.1g salt

Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/ gas 4. Put 4 x 150ml ramekins in a baking dish. Pour water into the dish to come half-way up the ramekins. In a pan, whisk 1½tbsp custard powder with a splash from 125ml unsweetened soya milk until smooth. Add the rest of the milk with 250ml single soya cream and 1½tbsp agave nectar. Heat gently for 5 min, stirring. Set aside to cool for 5 min, then whisk in 1 large egg. Divide 175g raspberries among the ramekins, then pour in the custard. Bake for 25–30 min until almost set. Cool, chill, then serve with berries. Per serving l 157kcal l 8.7g fat l 1.4g saturates l 7.7g sugars l 0.2g salt

Jennifer Low explains guacamole (often made with cream). l Check labels on breakfast cereals, soups, baby food, processed foods (such as sausages, pasta and pizzas), instant mashed potato, baked goods such as bread rolls, ready-made sauces, dips and gravies, pancakes, batters, ready meals, puddings, custards, cakes, biscuits, crackers, chocolate, confectionery and crisps.

Dairy-free labelling law Cow’s milk is one of the specified allergens that must be labelled by law on food ingredients lists, and it has to appear in bold. However, you need to know what to look for when you check the labels (see right)…

LABEL KNOW-HOW DON’T ASSUME A ‘FREE FROM’ LABEL MEANS FREE FROM DAIRY – it may be a reference to gluten or nuts, for example. If any of the following are listed, a product contains cow’s milk and should therefore be avoided: l CASEIN

l MILK SOLIDS

l CASEINATES

l NON-FAT MILK

l HYDROLYSED CASEIN

l WHEY

l SKIMMED MILK

l WHEY SYRUP SWEETENER l MILK SUGAR SOLIDS

l SKIMMED MILK

POWDER

l LACTOSE

Sheep and goat’s milk do not have to appear in bold in the ingredients lists, so you’ll need to read labels carefully if you also need to avoid them.

Eating out advice If it is not stated on the menu that a dish is dairy free, ask. Restaurants must supply this information by law. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 35


Embrace the flavour Eating well when you have a food intolerance is made easier and tastier, thanks to the new Sainsbury’s Deliciously FreeFrom range JUST IN TIME FOR THE entertaining season, you’ll be pleased to discover Sainsbury’s Deliciously FreeFrom range is now bigger and better than ever. There’s a wide choice of sweet and savoury products to create all your favourite dishes. Sainsbury’s has put in a lot of effort to ensure each one tastes fantastic and looks so good you’ll be happy to serve it to guests. The range makes cooking for those with allergies and intolerances a breeze – see for yourself by trying this showstopping winter salad recipe (right) with Sainsbury’s Deliciously FreeFrom Greek-style cheese alternative. Made in Scotland, it has the same salty tang and crumbly texture as feta – minus the milk.

COURGETTE, spinach & FETA PIE


HADDOCK FISHCAKES

Milk-free cheese, roasted squash and pecan salad PREP 15 MIN COOK 20 MIN SERVES 4 VEGETARIAN GLUTEN FREE MILK FREE Please ensure all ingredients used are free of all relevant allergens.

MILK-free CHEESE, roasted squash AND pecan SALAD If made as per the recipe.

1 small butternut squash, sliced into 2cm thick rounds 3tbsp olive oil 2tbsp balsamic vinegar 2 fresh thyme sprigs 160g pack Italian-style salad leaves 200g pack Sainsbury’s Deliciously FreeFrom Greek-style cheese alternative, crumbled 2tbsp dried cranberries Large handful pecans 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Put the squash in a baking tray and drizzle with half the oil and vinegar. Season with pepper, add the thyme and toss. Roast for 20 min, then cool slightly. 2 Whisk the remaining oil and vinegar in a bowl with a little pepper. Divide the salad and squash among 4 plates, scatter with the cheese alternative, cranberries and pecans, then drizzle over the dressing to serve.

Discover the Deliciously FreeFrom range instore and online at sainsburys.co.uk


INDIAN CURRY BELLY BLOATER

2 onion bhajis

429 kcal

24g fat

Chicken korma

Peshwari naan

1,248 kcal 91g fat

748 kcal

27g fat

38 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

BOLLY-GOOD

SAVE 168kcal 7g fat

SAVE 527kcal 54g fat

SAVE 244kcal 17g fat

261 kcal

17g fat

2 poppadums with 1tbsp lime pickle and 1tbsp raita

721 kcal

Chicken jalfrezi

504 kcal

Plain naan

37g fat

10g fat

DON’T ORDER TOO MUCH Share one main dish and one portion of rice between two – there’s usually plenty to go round. Or choose dishes that include rice as part of the meal (such as biryani) so you don’t need to order an extra portion of rice.

LEAVE FAT IN THE DISH Rich sauces often contain a lot of oil or ghee. You can still get all the flavour of the dish without all the extra calories by spooning out the meat and veg on to your plate and leaving most of the sauce in the dish.


Making your own curry is the surest way to control calories (see p72), but if you’re having a treat night, use our guide to wiser choices

BELLY BLOATER

Lamb vindaloo

Prawn tikka masala

1,047 kcal 68g fat

WORDS: ROSE CONSTANTINE SMITH, JULIETTE KELLOW

hfg SMARTS SWAP BOLLY-GOOD

SAVE 263kcal 20g fat

784 kcal

48g fat

Lamb rogan josh

1,197 SAVE kcal 592kcal 90g fat

605 kcal

King prawn balti

44g fat

496 kcal

387 kcal

Plain rice

46g fat

Pilau rice

NUTRITION

9g fat

SAVE 109kcal 8g fat

ADD YOGURT If your curry is too hot, don’t guzzle beer to soothe your mouth! Just add a couple of spoonfuls of fat-free plain yogurt to your curry to cool things down.

HOLD THE CREAM Curries cooked in creamy sauces are also packed with calories. Masala, korma and pasanda dishes, for example, are all made with cream. Choose vegetablebased sauces instead or go for tandoori and tikka dishes, which don’t come with a sauce.

1g fat

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 39


NUTRITION

THIS vs THAT Two popular Sunday roasts, both providing quality protein – but which is the better choice for those nutrition extras?

PER 100g 203

ENERGY (kcal)

182

Lamb is a versatile meat. The leg, which comes from the rear of the animal, is one of the more expensive cuts. It’s perfect for slow-roasting and can be bought deboned, rolled and even prestuffed ready to pop in the oven.

29.7

PROTEIN (g)

33

9.4

FAT (g)

3.8

SATURATES (g)

0.2

SALT (g)

THE NUTRITION LOWDOWN

0.1

VITAMIN B1 (mg)

0.7

THE NUTRITION LOWDOWN

LAMB is a winner for zinc and iron, 6.2 both of which help to keep our immune systems strong. An 0.3 important consideration, as 48% of girls aged 11–18 and 27% of women 2 aged 19–64 have very low intakes of iron, while almost one in five 1.5 teenagers have very low intakes of zinc. Lamb also contains twice as 360 much vitamin B12 as pork, which is needed to make red blood cells. 220 However, it’s much higher in fat, especially saturates, so it’s not such 1.8 a good choice for heart health.

VITAMIN B3 (mg)

9.7

VITAMIN B6 (mg)

0.5

VITAMIN B12 (mcg)

1

PORK often gets a bad rap for being a fatty meat, but lean cuts are among the lowest in fat when compared with other red meats. It’s much lower in total fat than lamb and contains half the amount of saturates. Although slightly lower in zinc, iron and vitamin B12, it’s a significantly richer source of many other vitamins and minerals, in particular the antioxidant selenium, which many of us are deficient in: almost half of all adult women and 30% of adult men have exceptionally low intakes. It’s also one of the best dietary sources of vitamin B1 – great for a healthy heart, brain and nervous system.

WORDS: ROSE CONSTANTINE SMITH, JULIETTE KELLOW. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

LEG OF LAMB

LEG OF PORK

Like lamb, leg of pork can be bought rolled for roasting. It’s full 5.5 of great flavour and is generally much cheaper than lamb – a leg 1.9 of pork can be almost half the price per kg. 0.2

PANTOTHENIC ACID (mg)

2.9

POTASSIUM (mg)

400

PHOSPHORUS (mg)

250

IRON (mg)

1.1

4.6

ZINC (mg)

3.2

4

SELENIUM (mcg)

21

AND THE WINNER IS… PORK Reducing the amount of saturated fat we consume is crucial

for lowering our risk of heart disease, especially as cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer in the UK. So while lamb provides some beneficial nutrients, pork is the healthier option overall. Leave the crackling, though – a 20g piece contains 110kcal and 3g saturates (that’s 15% of the daily maximum for saturated fat in just a few mouthfuls). NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 41


R EC I PE S

NOVEMBER

WHAT TO COOK THIS MONTH Our recipe consultant Phil Mundy uses everyday ingredients to create easy, tasty recipes. Each dish is analysed by nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow

ALL ES RECIPand triedsted te

IF YOU ONLY MAKE ONE THING... Save cash and ❛calories by making

a comforting coffee shop inspired drink to snuggle up with at home (p80).

melanie leyshon editor


R EC I PE S

YOUR GUIDE TO HEALTHY DAIRY-FREE COOKING 34 Thai butternut squash soup 288kcal 34 Salmon with herb sauce 582kcal 35 Vegan pesto pasta 421kcal 35 Choc-pecan cheesecakes 267kcal 35 Baked berry custards 157kcal

WEEKNIGHT DINNERS 48 Shakshuka 281kcal 49 Beef, mushroom and red wine pies 339kcal 50 Feta and leftover roasted vegetable tart 414kcal 51 Teriyaki salmon with stir-fried greens 558kcal 52 Garlic and rosemary chicken with cheesy polenta 323kcal

AROUND THE WORLD ON A BEAN 54 Basic baked beans 192kcal 55 Make it British 381kcal 56 Make it Italian 485kcal 57 Make it Spanish 240kcal 57 Make it Indian 424kcal 58 Make it Mexican 399kcal 59 Make it Moroccan 451kcal

RECIPE INDEX 6PM PANIC

61 Salmon, chilli and lemon fettucine 466kcal

SOMETHING TO CURL UP WITH… 64 Mexican chilli bean soup 292kcal 64 Minted pea and ham soup 321kcal 65 Red curry chicken noodle soup 451kcal 66 Salmon, celeriac and leek chowder 370kcal 67 Moroccan lamb, tomato and sweet potato soup 436kcal TAKE LUNCH UP A LEVEL 69 Chickpea pancakes with yellow lentil and squash dhal 437kcal 70 Grilled sea trout with potato, cucumber and grain mustard salad 430kcal 70 Middle Eastern-spiced roast vegetables, lentils, feta and mint salad 402kcal EXTREME MAKEOVER 73 Chicken tikka masala 544kcal

PEARL BARLEY 74 Arrabbiata meatballs with pearl barley 337kcal 74 Salmon and barley salad bowl 377kcal 74 Leek, cumin and barley soup 152kcal DINNER FOR ONE 77 Quinoa with leek and squash 517kcal GLUTEN-FREE PULSE-AND-GO MUFFINS 78 Basic blender muffins 142kcal 79 Mixed berries 147kcal 79 Choc chip and hazelnut 191kcal 79 Apple and cinnamon 146kcal 79 Pecan and date 204kcal 79 Coconut and raspberry 160kcal 79 Banana and peanut butter 195kcal NEW ON THE DRINKS MENU 80 Vanilla honey chai tea 75kcal 80 Maple almond milk 56kcal 81 Coconut and date hot chocolate 142kcal 81 Creamy dark hot chocolate 198kcal TURN THE PAGE for dietitian

Juliette Kellow’s monthly meal planner

Guide to recipe symbols & nutrition analysis vegetarian gluten free dairy free suitable for freezing

0.3g salt or less per 100g At least 6g fibre per 100g or 3g fibre per 100kcal

450kcal or less for a main course; 300kcal or less for breakfast; and 150kcal or less for a starter, snack, drink or dessert

At least 20% of the calories come from protein At least 30% of the RDA per serving

PHOTO: GETTY

3g fat or less per 100g 1.5g saturates or less per 100g 5g total sugars or less per 100g

At least 30% of the RDA per serving

1

The number of portions of fruit and/or veg contained in a serving

l Nutrition is calculated using McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods, Seventh Edition, but may vary slightly depending on your ingredients. l All recipes are approved by Diabetes UK as suitable for people with diabetes. l We use standard UK measurements, where 1tbsp is 15ml and 1tsp is 5ml. l For gluten and dairy-free recipes, we recommend you check all product labels. l In vegetarian recipes with cheese, use a vegetarian substitute if you avoid animal rennet. l Our freezing symbol means a recipe can be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw and reheat until piping hot. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 43


HFGÕS WEEKLY Juliette Kellow

HFG NUTRITION CONSULTANT

❛The key

to healthy eating is to enjoy it!❜

WEEKDAY MEALS p77

p52

OUR MENU PLAN is designed to help you MEAT lose around 1lb a week FREE MONDAY (and more if you have a BREAKFAST 344kcal lot to lose). It includes 1 apple, 1 pear, 2 plums and a handful blackberries topped at least five portions of with a 170g pot fat-free Greek fruit and veg a day, and yogurt and 2tbsp toasted oats two portions of fish SNACK 100kcal each week, one of them 1 slice wholegrain toast with oil rich. We also make 1tsp low-fat spread and a scrape of Marmite sure you get enough vital nutrients, such as LUNCH 399kcal calcium. And, as we use 1 serving Make it Mexican baked beans (p58) many of the delicious SNACK 122kcal recipes in this issue, 3tbsp reduced-fat hummus and there’s no deprivation ½ each red and green pepper, cut involved. Over the into sticks page, you’ll find DINNER 517kcal suggestions for the 1 serving quinoa TOTAL with leek and weekend and the kcal squash (p77) following weeks…

1,482

44 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

TUESDAY BREAKFAST 352kcal 1 banana and peanut butter muffin (p79), 1 orange and a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt

SNACK 142kcal 1 coconut and date hot chocolate (p81)

LUNCH 369kcal 1 wholemeal wrap filled with mixed leaves, 6 cherry tomatoes, 100g cooked prawns, ½ can crab meat (drained) and 1tbsp reduced-fat seafood cocktail sauce. Plus 1 apple

SNACK 243kcal 3 rye crispbreads topped with ½ mashed avocado and 1 tomato

DINNER 323kcal 1 serving garlic and rosemary chicken with cheesy polenta (p52)

TOTAL kcal

1,429


R EC I PE S

DIET PLANNER p59

p51

p80

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST 245kcal

BREAKFAST 366kcal

BREAKFAST 307kcal

1 boiled egg with 1 slice wholegrain toast and 1tsp low-fat spread. Plus 1 orange

Porridge made from 4tbsp oats and 275ml skimmed milk, topped with 2 handfuls blueberries and 1tbsp chopped hazelnuts

4 stewed plums topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 5tbsp bran flakes

Milkshake made by blending 200ml skimmed milk with 1 banana

SNACK 80kcal 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

1 serving maple almond milk (p80)

LUNCH 451kcal

LUNCH 451kcal

LUNCH 470kcal

1 serving Make it Moroccan baked beans (p59)

Salad made from 6tbsp cooked wholewheat penne, 1 roasted red pepper from a jar (drained), 5 cherry tomatoes, 1tbsp toasted pine nuts, 1tbsp red pesto, a handful rocket and 1tbsp grated parmesan

SNACK 147kcal

1 serving red curry chicken noodle soup (p65)

SNACK 92kcal 15g unsalted almonds

SNACK 60kcal 3 celery sticks filled with 3tbsp low-fat soft cheese DINNER 504kcal

DINNER 558kcal 1 serving teriyaki salmon with stir-fried greens (p51)

TOTAL kcal

1,493

1 grilled lean lamb steak (marinated in garlic, rosemary, 1tsp wholegrain mustard, lemon zest and juice and 1tsp olive oil), 1 large boiled potato mashed with 1tsp low-fat spread, steamed carrots and kale and 1tbsp mint sauce

TOTAL kcal

1,461

SNACK 56kcal

SNACK 100kcal 4 sesame breadsticks

DINNER 544kcal 1 serving HFG chicken tikka masala (p73)

TOTAL kcal

1,477

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 45


WEEKEND MEALS

NOW KEEP GOING...

p66

p50

p79

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFASTS

BREAKFAST 344kcal

BREAKFAST 357kcal

1 wholemeal wrap filled with 2 lean rashers back bacon, shredded lettuce, 1 sliced tomato and 2tsp light mayo

French toast made from 2 slices wholegrain toast dipped in 1 beaten egg mixed with cinnamon, then fried in 1tsp sunflower oil and served with 2 handfuls blueberries, 3tbsp low-fat natural yogurt and 1tsp maple syrup

Spiced muffin 1 apple and

AROUND 300kcal EACH

cinnamon muffin (p79), 1 banana and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

Scrambled eggs and tomato

SNACK 98kcal 15g hazelnuts

1 slice wholegrain toast with 1tsp low-fat spread, topped with 2 eggs scrambled with 1tbsp skimmed milk, and 1 chopped tomato

LUNCH 370kcal

LUNCH 486kcal

Bran flakes and banana

1 serving salmon, celeriac and leek chowder (p66)

3 slices lean roast pork with 2 roast potatoes (roasted in sunflower oil), steamed carrots, green beans and cauliflower, reduced-salt gravy and 1tbsp unsweetened apple sauce

7tbsp bran flakes with 1 chopped banana and skimmed milk

SNACK 274kcal 1 pecan and date muffin (p79) with 1 skinny cappuccino

SNACK 144kcal 30g reduced-fat cheddar and a handful grapes

DINNER 339kcal 1 serving beef, mushroom and red wine pie (p49)

TOTAL kcal

1,471

SNACK 111kcal 2 rye crispbreads topped with 2tbsp low-fat soft cheese and 1 tomato DINNER 414kcal 1 serving feta and leftover roasted vegetable tart (p50)

TOTAL kcal

1,466

AFTER YOU’VE FOLLOWED our menu planner for a week, create your own using the ideas on the right. Choose ONE breakfast, ONE lunch, ONE dinner and TWO snacks each day. Plus have an extra 300ml skimmed milk in skinny coffees or shakes. 46 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Avocado and egg crispbreads 3 rye crispbreads topped with ½ mashed avocado and 1 sliced hard-boiled egg

Fruit salad with almonds 1 orange, a handful grapes and 1 apple, chopped and topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 1tsp chopped almonds

Banana and maple syrup toast 2 slices wholegrain toast topped with 1 mashed banana, 1tsp flaked almonds and 2tsp maple syrup

Fruity wheats 2 Shredded Wheat with 2 handfuls blueberries, 1 chopped orange and skimmed milk


R EC I PE S

p64

LUNCHES Super soup

AROUND 400kcal EACH

p61

DINNERS Pasta salmon supper

AROUND 500kcal EACH

1 serving minted pea and ham soup (p64) and 1 slice wholegrain bread

1 serving salmon, chilli and lemon fettuccine (p61). Plus 1 kiwi fruit

Mixed bean, tuna and rice salad

Pork casserole Casserole made

Salad made from 4tbsp cooked brown rice, rocket, ½ large can mixed beans in water (drained), 1 small can tuna in water (drained), cucumber, 1 tomato, fresh parsley, lemon juice and 1tsp olive oil

from 125g lean pork, 1 small onion, 1 carrot, 1 celery stick, ½ large can tomatoes, 1tbsp tomato purée, mixed herbs and reduced-salt stock to cover, served with 1 large potato, boiled and mashed with 1tsp low-fat spread. Plus 1 apple

Chicken and mango wrap 1 wholemeal wrap filled with baby spinach and coronation chicken made from 1 small skinless chicken breast, ½ ripe mango, mild curry powder to taste and 3tbsp low-fat natural yogurt. Plus 1 apple

Veg-packed omelette Omelette made from 1tsp sunflower oil, 1 chopped small red onion, ½ sliced courgette, ½ sliced red pepper, 1 sliced boiled potato, 2 beaten eggs and 3tbsp grated reduced-fat cheese, served with salad

Beef salad sandwich 2 slices wholegrain bread filled with 2tsp low-fat spread, 1 slice lean roast beef and salad. Plus 1 pear and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

Prawn stir-fry Stir-fry made from 2tsp sunflower oil, 100g prawns, 3 spring onions, 2 handfuls pak choi, 1tbsp reduced-salt soy sauce and Chinese five spice, fresh ginger and garlic to taste, served with 8tbsp cooked brown rice

Roasted vegetable traybake Traybake made from a large handful chopped butternut squash, 6 cherry tomatoes, 1 carrot, 1 small red onion and ½ red pepper (all chopped), tossed with chopped fresh herbs and 2tsp olive oil and topped with 50g reduced-fat feta, then roasted and served with a 10cm piece granary baguette. Plus 1 kiwi

p80

SNACKS

AROUND 100kcal EACH

Vary your two snacks each day to keep it interesting l 1 serving vanilla honey

chai tea (p80) and 1 handful blackberries

l 1 hard-boiled egg with a large

bowl of salad

l 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

with 1 satsuma

l 2 rye crispbreads with 2tsp

low-fat soft cheese and cucumber slices

l 2 sesame breadsticks with 2tbsp

reduced-fat hummus

l ½ mango and 1 orange l 1 slice wholegrain toast topped

with 1tbsp low-fat soft cheese and chopped celery

l 3tbsp tzatziki with 1 carrot and

½ red pepper cut into sticks

l 15g unsalted nuts l 30g reduced-fat cheddar

with 3 celery sticks

l 1 banana and 1 handful

blueberries

l 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt

sprinkled with ground cinnamon

l 2 single measures gin,

whisky, vodka or rum with calorie-free mixers

l ½ wholemeal pitta with 1tbsp

reduced-fat hummus

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 47


WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

FAMILY eMEALS d! Each month, we bring you a batch of healthy, quick and easy midweek suppers, with meat, chicken, fish and veggie options to please everyone

sort

Shakshuka prep 10 min cook 30 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free Cooking oil spray 1 red pepper, roughly diced 200g mushrooms, sliced 390g can Heinz Beanz Peri Peri, or similar 400g can chopped tomatoes 8 eggs 2tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley, to garnish 1 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium heat. Cook the pepper for 3 min. Add the mushrooms and cook for a further 5 min. Add the beans and tomatoes and bring to the

48 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Shakshuka

boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 5 min. 2 Make 8 wells in the tomato mixture, then crack an egg into each. Cover and cook over a medium heat for 12–14 min until the egg whites are cooked but the yolks are still soft. Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and some ground black pepper, then serve. Tip For a more substantial meal, serve with wholegrain toast.

3 PER SERVING

281kcal 12.1g fat 3.2g saturates 19g carbs 10.2g sugars

5.3g fibre 22.6g protein 1.1g salt 106mg calcium 4.6mg iron


R EC I PE S

Beef, mushroom and red wine pies prep 15 min cook 20 min serves 4 Cooking oil spray 1 onion, diced 200g mushrooms, sliced 400g 5% fat beef mince 4 heaped tsp reduced-salt gravy granules 2tsp dijon mustard 100ml red wine 500g potatoes, peeled and thickly sliced 2 garlic cloves, sliced 350g cauliflower florets 3tbsp skimmed milk 2tbsp snipped fresh chives, plus extra to garnish 350g broccoli florets

the garlic, then stir through the milk and chives. 4 Divide the beef mixture among the warmed dishes (or spoon into the large dish). Top with the mash, then bake for 5 min or until lightly browned. Meanwhile, steam the broccoli until just tender. 5 Garnish the pies with extra chives and black pepper, then serve with the broccoli.

3 PER SERVING

339kcal 7.5g fat 3.2g saturates 35.5g carbs 9.5g sugars

8.5g fibre 30g protein 1.1g salt 103mg calcium 4mg iron

Beef, mushroom and red wine pies

1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6 and put in 4 x 500ml ovenproof dishes (or a 1.5 litre baking dish) on a baking sheet to warm. 2 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium heat. Fry the onion and mushrooms for 5 min or until softened. Add the mince and cook, stirring, for 5 min or until browned all over. Add the gravy granules, mustard and wine to the pan along with 125ml boiling water. Season with black pepper and bring to the boil, then bubble for 2 min to cook off the alcohol. 3 Meanwhile, steam the potatoes and garlic for 8 min. Add the cauliflower and cook for a further 6–8 min until both the potatoes and cauliflower are tender. Mash with

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 49


Feta and leftover roasted vegetable tart prep 10 min cook 45 min serves 4 vegetarian Cooking oil spray 5 large filo pastry sheets, at room temperature (we used Jus-Rol) 500g leftover roasted vegetables (eg red pepper, squash, onion, broccoli), or frozen chargrilled veg, thawed

100g frozen spinach, thawed and excess moisture squeezed out 6 eggs 4tbsp skimmed milk 50g reduced-fat feta, crumbled 100g mixed salad leaves, to serve 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Spray a 23cm diameter tart tin with oil. 2 Spray each sheet of filo pastry with oil, then fold in half and spray the top with oil. Lay each folded sheet in the tin, ensuring that all of the inside is covered. Fold the excess back into the tin, leaving a little pastry standing proud of the rim.

3 Spread the vegetables and spinach over the filo base. Whisk the eggs and milk in a jug and season with ground black pepper. Pour the egg mixture over the vegetables, then scatter with the crumbled feta. 4 Bake the tart for 40–45 min until cooked through and just golden. Serve with the salad leaves.

2 PER SERVING

414kcal 16.9g fat 4.3g saturates 45.2g carbs 8g sugars

5.7g fibre 20.9g protein 1.6g salt 232mg calcium 3.5mg iron

Feta and leftover roasted vegetable tart

50 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


R EC I PE S

Teriyaki salmon with stir-fried greens

Teriyaki salmon with stir-fried greens prep 10 min cook 15 min serves 4 dairy free 4 x 150g skinless salmon fillets 2tbsp teriyaki marinade Cooking oil spray 2tsp toasted sesame oil 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 long red chilli, finely sliced 350g tenderstem broccoli, halved 300g pak choi, halved lengthways 1tbsp reduced-salt soy sauce Juice 1 lime 2 x 250g pouches ready to heat brown rice 1 Put the salmon in a shallow dish with the teriyaki marinade and turn

to coat. Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Add the teriyaki salmon fillets and cook for 2–4 min on each side or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate and cover loosely with foil to keep warm. 2 Return the pan to a medium-high heat and add the sesame oil, garlic, chilli and tenderstem broccoli. Cook for 5 min. Add the pak choi and soy sauce, then cook for a further 3 min or until just tender. Stir in the lime juice. 3 Meanwhile, heat the rice according to the pack instructions.

4 Divide the rice, salmon and greens among 4 plates, then serve straightaway.

2 PER SERVING

558kcal 25.6g fat 4.7g saturates 42.1g carbs 4.3g sugars

7g fibre 40.3g protein 1.4g salt 153mg calcium 2.6mg iron

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 51


R EC I PE S

Garlic and rosemary chicken with cheesy polenta prep 10 min cook 20 min serves 4 1 very low salt chicken stock cube dissolved in 825ml boiling water 160g instant polenta 30g parmesan, grated Cooking oil spray 2 large chicken breasts, halved horizontally to create 4 thin fillets 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 fresh rosemary sprigs, leaves chopped 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 350g green beans, sliced 125g baby spinach 1tbsp balsamic vinegar

52 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

1 Put the stock in a large saucepan and set over a high heat. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and pour in the polenta in a steady stream, whisking constantly with a balloon whisk. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 min or until the polenta becomes a soft ‘mash’. Remove from the heat and stir in the parmesan, then set aside. 2 Meanwhile, spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium-high heat. Rub the chicken with the garlic and rosemary, then fry for 5 min on each side or until cooked through. Transfer to a plate and cover to keep warm. 3 Add the tomatoes to the frying pan and cook for 3–5 min until they’re almost blistering. Add the

beans and cook for 2 min. Add a splash of water to create steam, then toss through the spinach and cook for 1 min or until it’s wilted and the beans are tender. 4 Divide the polenta, chicken and vegetables among 4 plates. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar, grind over black pepper and serve.

2 PER SERVING

323kcal 5.3g fat 2.1g saturates 39g carbs 5.6g sugars

4.8g fibre 30.3g protein 0.5g salt 173mg calcium 2.7mg iron

RECIPES: MEGAN CAMERON-LEE. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

Garlic and rosemary chicken with cheesy polenta


CO M PE T I T I O N

WIN

a luxury gluten-free hamper worth £50

5

UP FOR GRABS

T

HERE’S NOTHING QUITE LIKE THE AROMA of baking, particularly as we get into the Christmas spirit. But creating delicious cakes and breads can be a bit trickier for those avoiding gluten. To make life on a gluten-free diet easier, we’ve teamed up with Doves Farm, the family-owned Wiltshire miller specialising in organic and free-from flours and foods, to give away five luxury gluten-free hampers just in time for the festive season. Each hamper is packed with Doves Farm’s award-winning flours and other free-from baking

essentials, including xanthan gum and baking powder, as well as a Doves Farm dough scraper and a gluten-free cookbook. So you’ll be equipped with all the inspiration, know-how and ingredients you need to make great-tasting bakes for everyone to enjoy.

All you need to create wonderful winter bakes for your family and friends

SEE MORE of Doves Farm’s freefrom range at dovesfarm.co.uk. Twitter: @dovesfarm

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN, go to healthyfood.co.uk/competitions by 30 November 2016 and answer the simple question. You’ll find full terms and conditions on the website. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 53


R EC I PE S

Around the world on a BEAN Baked beans provide the perfect combo of hunger-busting protein and fibre. But you don’t have to limit yourself to the canned variety. By making your own, you can reduce salt and sugars – and create meals inspired by international flavours

How to soak beans

Cook’s tips

overnight method

l Instead of dried beans, use 2 x 400g cans of cannellini beans in water with no added salt or sugar (drained). l As an alternative to canned tomatoes, whiz 400g fresh vine tomatoes with 2tbsp tomato purée in a blender. l To make the basic baked beans gluten-free, use gluten-free stock.

Soak dried beans in cold water for at least 12 hr. Drain well and rinse.

quick-soak method Put the beans in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil, then cook for 1 min. Remove from the heat, cover with a lid and leave to soak for 1 hr, then drain. The beans are now ready to cook.

54 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Basic baked beans prep 15 min + soaking cook 1 hr 45 min serves 6 vegetarian dairy free 250g dried cannellini beans, soaked and drained (see cook’s tips) 2 fresh sage sprigs, leaves picked and roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, roughly sliced 3tbsp olive oil 1 red onion, finely chopped 400g can chopped tomatoes (see cook’s tips) 1tsp dried mixed herbs 1tsp reduced-salt vegetable stock powder diluted with 125ml boiling water (see cook’s tips) 2tsp agave nectar or runny honey 1tbsp cider vinegar 1 Put the beans in a medium pan with enough cold water to cover them by 2½cm. Add the sage and garlic, then bring to the boil. 2 Cover the pan with a lid, then reduce the heat and simmer for 1 hr 30 min or until the beans are soft but still hold their shape. 3 Meanwhile, heat 1tbsp of the oil in a non-stick pan. Add the onion and cook for 10 min or until soft. Add the tomatoes, herbs and stock, then cook for 10–15 min to make a thick sauce. Set aside. 4 Once the beans are cooked, drain them, then return to the pan along with the tomato sauce. Stir in the remaining oil, agave or honey and cider vinegar. Season with black pepper, then heat through, stirring occasionally, for 10–15 min.

2 PER SERVING

192kcal 6.3g fat 0.9g saturates 24.8g carbs 6.4g sugars

9.9g fibre 10.5g protein 0.2g salt 61mg calcium 3.3mg iron


Make it British prep 2 min cook 5 min serves 6 vegetarian dairy free 1 batch basic baked beans (see recipe, left) 12 slices wholegrain bread 1 Heat the beans gently, stirring now and then, until hot. Toast the bread. 2 Serve 2 slices of toast per person with the beans spooned on top, spinkled with ground black pepper. Tip Swap the bread for a jacket potato, if you prefer.

2 PER SERVING

381kcal 8.1g fat 1.4g saturates 62.7g carbs 8.7g sugars

14.1g fibre 18.2g protein 1g salt 228mg calcium 4.8mg iron

Make it British

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 55


Make it Italian TO FREEZE

IP K’S T COO ollowing ef For th s, make the s recipe aked bean ut b basic p54) witho ( recipe e sage and . th herbs d e x i m

prep 5 min cookfor 15 all minthese serves 6 variations, make the vegetarian

basic baked bean recipe without the 4tbsp pine nuts sage and mixed 1 batch basic bakedherbs beans

(see cook’s tip, left) 2tsp dried oregano 50g sun-dried tomatoes, finely chopped 25g fresh basil, finely chopped, a few leaves reserved to garnish 12 slices wholegrain bread 30g parmesan-style vegetarian cheese, shaved, to serve

1 Lightly toast the pine nuts in a dry non-stick frying pan. Put the baked beans in a medium pan and stir in the toasted pine nuts, oregano, sun-dried tomatoes and basil. Heat for 15 min, stirring now and then. Meanwhile, toast the bread. 2 Serve the beans on the toast, topped with the cheese and garnished with extra basil leaves.

2 PER SERVING

485kcal 16.6g fat 2.8g saturates 65.7g carbs 11g sugars

Make it Italian

15.4g fibre 12.2g protein 2.1g salt 292mg calcium 5.6mg iron


R EC I PE S

Make it Spanish

Make it Spanish prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 6 vegetarian dairy free 1tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 2 celery sticks, chopped 1tsp smoked paprika 250g button mushrooms, sliced 1 batch basic baked beans (see cook’s tip, far left) 150g spinach, chopped 150g kale, stalks removed, torn Juice ½ lemon 4tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley, to garnish (optional) 1 Heat the oil in a large non-stick pan over a low-medium heat. Add the onion, celery and paprika, then cook for 6–7 min until the onion and celery are translucent. 2 Add the mushrooms, then increase the heat to medium and cook for 5 min or until golden. 3 Mix in the baked beans and heat for 15 min, stirring occasionally. Add the spinach, kale and lemon

Make it Indian

juice, then season with black pepper. Cover and cook for 3 min to wilt the greens. Remove the lid, stir and season with more pepper if needed. Serve the beans scattered with the parsley, if using.

3 PER SERVING

240kcal 8.9g fat 1.3g saturates 28.9g carbs 9.8g sugars

13.1g fibre 13g protein 0.4g salt 150mg calcium 4.5mg iron

Make it Indian prep 5 min cook 15 min serves 6 vegetarian dairy free 300g basmati rice 1 batch basic baked beans (see cook’s tip, far left) 2tbsp curry paste 50g sultanas

3tbsp desiccated coconut 4tbsp chopped fresh coriander, plus extra to garnish 1 Cook the rice according to the pack instructions, then drain. 2 Meanwhile, put the beans in a medium pan and mix in the curry paste, sultanas, coconut and chopped coriander. Heat for 15 min, stirring occasionally. 3 Serve the beans with the rice, garnished with extra coriander.

2 PER SERVING

424kcal 9.8g fat 2.8g saturates 73.1g carbs 12.8g sugars

11.7g fibre 15.2g protein 0.4g salt 77mg calcium 5mg iron

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 57


R EC I PE S

Make it Mexican

hfg

COVEPRE RECI

prep 5 min cook 15 min serves 6 vegetarian 1 batch basic baked beans (see cook’s tip, p56) 1tbsp chipotle paste, or to taste Zest and juice 1 lime 1 green pepper, diced 25g fresh coriander, leaves and stalks chopped separately, a few leaves reserved to garnish 12 slices wholegrain bread 6tbsp low-fat soured cream and large pinch smoked paprika, to serve 1 In a medium pan, mix the beans with the chipotle paste, lime zest

58 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

and juice, pepper and coriander stalks. Heat gently for 15 min, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, toast the bread. 2 Stir the chopped coriander leaves into the beans, then serve on the toasts, topped with the soured cream and sprinkled with the paprika and remaining hebs.

2 PER SERVING

399kcal 8.6g fat 1.6g saturates 64.6g carbs 10.6g sugars

14.8g fibre 19.6g protein 1.1g salt 243mg calcium 4.9mg iron

RECIPES SARAH SWAIN. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART, ISTOCK

Make it Mexican


Make it Moroccan prep 5 min cook 15 min serves 6 vegetarian dairy free 1 batch basic baked beans (see cook’s tip, p56) 50g pitted dates, chopped 2tsp harissa paste ½tsp ground cinnamon Zest and juice 1 small orange 350g wholewheat couscous 30g toasted flaked almonds 4tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves 1 Mix the beans with the dates, harissa, cinnamon and orange zest and juice in a pan. Heat for 15 min, stirring occasionally. 2 Meanwhile, put the couscous in

Make it Moroccan

a bowl and mix with 450ml boiling water. Cover with clingfilm and leave for 10 min or until the water has been absorbed. Uncover, then fluff the grains with a fork. 3 Divide the couscous and beans among 6 bowls, then scatter with the flaked almonds and coriander. Serve straightaway.

PER SERVING

451kcal 10.4g fat 1.4g saturates 71.2g carbs 15g sugars

14.9g fibre 19.9g protein 0.3g salt 96mg calcium 5.8mg iron


R EC I PE S

PLUS FROZEN PEAS BABY SPINACH RED CHILLI

6pm PANIC Swap your go-to pasta sauce for zingy omega-3 rich salmon

Salmon, chilli and lemon fettuccine prep 5 min cook 15 min serves 4

RECIPE: KERRIE RAY, CHRISSY FREER. PHOTO: MARK O’MEARA

250g fettuccine 350g frozen peas 90g lightest soft cheese Zest 1 lemon and juice ½ lemon 150g baby spinach 2 x 180g packs hot smoked salmon fillets, flaked 1 long red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped 1 Cook the pasta in a large pan of unsalted boiling water for 10 min or until it’s al dente. Add the peas and bring the water back up to the boil, then remove from the heat and drain, reserving 3tbsp of the cooking water in a small bowl. 2 Return the pasta and peas to the pan. Stir the soft cheese, lemon zest and juice into the reserved cooking water and mix to make a smooth sauce. Add the sauce to the pasta and peas along with the spinach. Toss with tongs until the spinach is just wilted and the pasta is coated in the sauce. 3 Transfer the fettuccine to a serving dish, then top with the flaked salmon and chilli and serve. Tip For a less intense hit of chilli, stir the chilli through the pasta when you add the spinach.

1 PER SERVING

466kcal 10.3g fat 2.4g saturates 59.3g carbs 8.9g sugars

8.2g fibre 38.1g protein 2.2g salt 125mg calcium 3.6mg iron

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 61


R EC I PE S

Mexican chilli bean soup, p64

SOMETHING to CURL UP WITH…

Colder days call out for hearty fare. These filling soups make a warming meal without being heavy on the fat or calories

62 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


Minted pea and ham soup, p64

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 63


min until the pepper starts to soften. 2 Add the cherry tomatoes, canned tomatoes, stock, beans and corn to the pan, then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low, partially cover the pan and simmer for 30–35 min until the cherry tomatoes are tender. When the soup is nearly ready, warm the tortillas according to the pack instructions. 3 Stir the chopped coriander into the soup, then ladle it into 4 bowls. Top with soured cream and diced avocado, then garnish with extra coriander leaves and ground black pepper. Serve with the tortillas.

Mexican chilli bean soup prep 10 min cook 45 min serves 4 vegetarian Cooking oil spray 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 yellow pepper, cut into 1cm dice 1tsp dried chilli flakes 1tsp smoked paprika 1tsp ground cumin 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 400g can chopped tomatoes 1 very low salt vegetable stock cube dissolved in 900ml boiling water 400g can kidney beans in water, drained and rinsed 200g frozen sweetcorn 2 wholegrain tortillas, halved 6tbsp chopped fresh coriander leaves, plus extra leaves to garnish 4tbsp low-fat soured cream 1 small ripe avocado, flesh diced 1 Spray a large saucepan (that has a lid) with oil and set over a medium heat. Fry the onion and garlic for 3–4 min until softened. Add the pepper, chilli flakes, paprika and cumin. Cook, stirring often, for 4–5

64 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

4 PER SERVING

292kcal 9.9g fat 2.7g saturates 39.8g carbs 16.7g sugars

12g fibre 12.6g protein 0.5g salt 118mg calcium 4.2mg iron

Minted pea and ham soup prep 15 min cook 35 min serves 4 1tbsp olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 celery stick, finely chopped 300g potatoes, peeled and diced 1 very low salt chicken stock cube dissolved in 1 litre boiling water 500g frozen peas 200g cooked lean ham hock, shredded 1tbsp snipped fresh chives, plus extra to garnish 4tbsp chopped fresh mint leaves, plus extra leaves to garnish 4tbsp low-fat soured cream 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread

1 Heat the oil in a large saucepan (that has a lid) over a medium heat. Fry the onion and garlic for 3–4 min until softened. Add the celery and potatoes, and cook, stirring, for 5 min. 2 Add the stock to the pan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low, then cover with the lid and simmer for 20–25 min until the potatoes are tender. Remove the lid, then stir in the peas and cook for 3 min or until they are hot. 3 Remove the pan from the heat, then blend the soup with a stick blender until almost smooth. Stir in the ham, chives, mint and 1tbsp of the cream. Season with black pepper and simmer over a low-medium heat until hot. Toast the bread. 4 Divide the soup among 4 bowls. Top with the remaining soured cream, garnish with the extra chives and mint, and a grind of black pepper, then serve with the toast.

2 PER SERVING

321kcal 6.4g fat 1.6g saturates 45.5g carbs 12.2g sugars

10.3g fibre 21.2g protein 1.4g salt 140mg calcium 3.7mg iron


R EC I PE S

Red curry chicken noodle soup prep 15 min cook 25 min serves 4 dairy free Cooking oil spray 2 garlic cloves, crushed 3 shallots, thinly sliced 2tbsp Thai red curry paste 1 very low salt chicken stock cube dissolved in 1.25 litre boiling water 500g skinless chicken breasts, halved horizontally 200g dried Pad Thai rice noodles 2tsp palm or brown sugar 250g pak choi or choy sum, cut into 4cm pieces 200g sugar snap peas, halved lengthways ½ x 25g bunch fresh coriander leaves, chopped, plus extra sprigs to garnish 150g beansprouts (see tip) ½ x 160g can coconut cream 1 small red chilli, thinly sliced, to garnish Lime wedges, to serve

fragrant. Add the stock and chicken, then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low, then cover the pan and simmer for 12–15 min until the chicken is just cooked through. Remove the pan from the heat. Transfer the chicken to a plate using a slotted spoon, then shred using 2 forks. 2 Meanwhile, put the noodles in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. Set aside for 5 min or until just tender, then drain. 3 Return the soup to the heat and bring back to the boil. Add the sugar, pak choi and peas. Simmer for 2–3 min until the vegetables are

tender. Add the noodles, shredded chicken, coriander, beansprouts and coconut cream. Simmer until hot, then ladle the soup into 4 bowls, using tongs for the noodles. Top with sliced chilli and extra coriander leaves, then serve with lime wedges to squeeze over.

2 PER SERVING

451kcal 10.8g fat 6.8g saturates 51g carbs 8.3g sugars

4.3g fibre 38.2g protein 0.7g salt 104mg calcium 3.1mg iron

Red curry chicken noodle soup

1 Spray a large saucepan (that has a lid) with oil and set over a medium heat. Add the garlic, shallots and curry paste, then cook, stirring, until

Tip Unless beansprouts are labelled as ‘ready to eat’, cook them until steaming hot throughout. This is to help reduce the risk of food poisoning.

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 65


R EC I PE S

Salmon, celeriac and leek chowder prep 15 min cook 40 min serves 4 Cooking oil spray 2 leeks, halved lengthways and finely sliced 1 bay leaf 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 medium celeriac, peeled and diced (about 350g prepared) 250g potatoes, peeled and diced 1 fish stock cube dissolved in 1 litre boiling water

350g skinless and boneless salmon fillet 350g frozen sweetcorn 90g lightest soft cheese Zest 1 lemon 4tbsp fresh dill, chopped, plus extra sprigs, to garnish 1 Spray a large saucepan (that has a lid) with oil and set over a medium heat. Add the leeks, bay leaf and garlic, then cook, stirring, for 4–5 min until the leeks soften. 2 Add the celeriac, potatoes and stock to the pan, then bring to the

boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for 20–25 min until the vegetables are tender. Add the salmon in one piece and poach for 3–4 min until just cooked through. Remove the pan from the heat, then lift out the salmon fillet and set aside on a plate. Blend the soup with a stick blender until smooth. 3 Break the salmon into bite-size pieces, then stir into the soup along with the sweetcorn, cheese and lemon zest. Return to the heat and gently simmer for 3–5 min until hot. Stir through the chopped dill and season with pepper. Ladle the soup into 4 bowls and garnish with extra dill sprigs to serve.

3 PER SERVING

Salmon, celeriac and leek chowder

66 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

11.7g fibre 26.9g protein 1.1g salt 113mg calcium 2.8mg iron

RECIPES: ANNETTE FORREST. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

370kcal 16.6g fat 3.2g saturates 30.9g carbs 12.3g sugars


Moroccan lamb, tomato and sweet potato soup prep 20 min cook 1 hr 30 min serves 4 Cooking oil spray 400g lean boneless lamb, cut into 2–3cm pieces 1 onion, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2tsp harissa paste (or more to taste) 50g dried apricots, finely chopped 1 very low salt chicken stock cube dissolved in 700ml boiling water 2 x 400g cans chopped tomatoes 500g sweet potatoes, peeled and diced 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 6tbsp flatleaf parsley leaves, roughly chopped, plus extra leaves to garnish 2tsp lemon zest and 6tbsp fat-free Greek-style yogurt, to serve 1 Spray a large non-stick frying pan (that has a lid) with oil and set over a medium heat. Add the lamb and cook, turning occasionally, until browned all over. Transfer to a plate and set aside. 2 Spray the pan with oil again and return to the heat. Add the onion, garlic and harissa paste. Cook, gently scraping the base of the pan, for 2–3 min until the onion softens. Return the lamb to the pan along with the apricots, stock and tomatoes. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and partially

Moroccan lamb, tomato and sweet potato soup

cover the pan. Simmer for 45 min, stirring occasionally. 3 Stir in the sweet potatoes and chickpeas. Cook for 35–40 min until the lamb is tender. Stir in the parsley, then ladle the soup into 4 bowls. Sprinkle with black pepper, the lemon zest and extra parsley leaves, then serve with a dollop of yogurt.

5 PER SERVING

436kcal 11.3g fat 4g saturates 52.2g carbs 24.4g sugars

10.8g fibre 34.8g protein 0.5g salt 179mg calcium 5.2mg iron

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 67


R EC I PE S

Take lunch up a level Treat yourself to a taste of the high life with these nutritious dishes from Dan Doherty, the executive chef at London’s tallest restaurant

68 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

What the chef cooks at home… All-day eatery Duck & Waffle is on the 40th floor of the iconic Heron Tower. Here Dan shares some of his favourite recipes to enjoy at home with friends and family.


R EC I PE S

Chickpea pancakes with yellow lentil and squash dhal

Chickpea pancakes with yellow lentil and squash dhal

prep 10 min cook 50 min serves 4 vegetarian For the dhal 500g butternut squash, peeled and deseeded 2tbsp olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2½cm piece fresh ginger, finely chopped 1 red chilli, finely chopped 1tsp ground coriander 1tsp ground turmeric 1tsp ground cumin 150g canned yellow lentils, drained 400g can chopped tomatoes 500ml reduced-salt vegetable stock A few fresh coriander sprigs, finely chopped, plus extra to garnish 4tbsp low-fat natural yogurt For the pancakes 2tbsp olive oil ½ red onion, finely sliced 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 green chillies, finely sliced 100g canned chickpeas in water, drained 150g chickpea flour, sifted 2 eggs, separated 200ml water 1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. To make the dhal, cut the squash into 2cm dice, then spread out in a roasting tray. Drizzle with 1tbsp of the olive oil and season with black pepper. Bake for 25 min or until the squash starts to colour and has softened. 2 Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1tbsp olive oil in a medium pan, then add the onion and garlic and season with pepper. Fry for 4–5 min, without letting them colour, until soft. Add the ginger and chilli and cook for another 1 min. Stir in the ground coriander, turmeric and cumin, then cook for 2–3 min. Add the lentils, tomatoes and stock.

Season with pepper, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 min. 3 Stir in the roasted squash, then cook for a further 5 min. Turn off the heat and keep warm while you make the pancakes. 4 Heat 1tbsp olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and fry, without letting them colour, for 3–4 min until soft. Add the chillies and season with pepper, then cook for a further 1 min. Transfer to a mixing bowl and stir in the chickpeas. 5 Put the chickpea flour in another bowl and make a well in the centre. Whisk in the egg yolks, adding the water a little at a time, until the mixture forms a smooth batter. Stir in the onion mixture. 6 In a separate clean bowl, whisk the egg whites until stiff, then fold them into the batter. Clean the frying pan, then set it over a medium heat. Heat a splash of the

remaining oil, then add 2 ladlefuls of the batter, leaving a gap between them. Cook for 2 min or until golden underneath and starting to set on top. Flip and cook for 1 min or until brown on the undersides. Transfer to a plate. Repeat to cook a total of 8 pancakes. 7 Stir the chopped coriander into the dhal, then spoon on top of the pancakes. Top with a dollop of yogurt, then sprinkle with black pepper and garnish with extra coriander to serve.

3 PER SERVING

437kcal 18g fat 3.2g saturates 51g carbs 16g sugars

11.8g fibre 22g protein 0.9g salt 206mg calcium 5.7mg iron

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 69


R EC I PE S

prep 10 min cook 20 min serves 4 gluten free dairy free 12–15 new potatoes, unpeeled 50ml olive oil, plus a little extra for frying and drizzling 1 shallot, finely chopped 1tbsp wholegrain mustard 2tbsp white wine vinegar 2 fresh dill sprigs, finely chopped 1 cucumber 4 x 160g sea trout fillets 2 heads baby gem lettuce, leaves separated 1 Cook the potatoes in a pan of boiling water until tender. Drain and let them cool a little, then cut into 5mm thick slices. Set aside. 2 Meanwhile, heat a splash of olive oil in a non-stick frying pan, then add the shallot and cook gently for 3–4 min until soft. Season with ground black pepper.

3 Put the wholegrain mustard into a mixing bowl with the vinegar. Slowly whisk in 50ml olive oil, so it emulsifies (combines). Stir in the cooked shallot along with the dill. 4 Peel the cucumber, then halve it lengthways and scrape out and discard all the seeds, using a teaspoon. Cut into 2mm thick slices, then add to the mustard dressing, along with the sliced potatoes. Gently mix. Put the salad in the fridge while you cook the trout. 5 Heat a large non-stick griddle or frying pan over a medium heat. Drizzle a little oil over the fish fillets and season with black pepper. Cook for about 4 min on each side. The cooking time will vary depending on the thickness of your fillets. When you press them with your finger, you should feel the flesh give a little. When ready to serve, make a nest with the gem leaves, then spoon the potato and cucumber salad inside. Serve the fish on top.

Grilled sea trout with potato, cucumber and grain mustard salad

1 PER SERVING

430kcal 23.2g fat 3.7g saturates 20g carbs 3.4g sugars

3.8g fibre 35.1g protein 0.5g salt 66mg calcium 3.7mg iron

Middle Eastern-spiced roast vegetables, lentils, feta and mint salad prep 20 min cook 45 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free 1 parsnip, cut into 3cm chunks 2 carrots, cut into 3cm chunks 1 red onion, cut into 2cm wedges 1 fresh thyme sprig 1 fresh rosemary sprig Pinch each ground cinnamon, cayenne pepper and za’atar spice mix 3 garlic cloves, crushed 2tbsp olive oil 150g cooked green lentils 50g reduced-fat feta 50ml pomegranate molasses Fresh coriander sprig, roughly chopped, stalks included 5–6 fresh mint leaves, roughly chopped 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Scatter the parsnip, carrots and onion in a roasting tray, then add the thyme, rosemary, spices and garlic. Drizzle with 1tbsp of the oil, then give everything a good mix with your hands. Season with black pepper, then roast for 45 min or until the veg are soft and nicely coloured. 2 Remove from the oven and discard the thyme and rosemary. Add the lentils, feta, pomegranate molasses, coriander and mint. Toss together, then tip into a large salad bowl. Drizzle with the remaining 1tbsp olive oil to serve.

70 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

FULL-FAT INGREDIENTS HAVE BEEN REPLACED WITH REDUCED OR LOW-FAT VERSIONS

Grilled sea trout with potato, cucumber and grain mustard salad


3 PER SERVING

402kcal 15.8g fat 4.5g saturates 54g carbs 26.7g sugars

12.9g fibre 13.5g protein 1.3g salt 187mg calcium 3.8mg iron

Middle Eastern-spiced roast vegetables, lentils, feta and mint salad

TIP For a more substantial meal, serve with crusty bread

Recipes from Toast Hash Roast Mash: Real Food for Every Time of Day by Dan Doherty (Mitchell Beazley, £20). Photos: Anders Schønnemann


EXTREME MAKEOVER

CHICKEN TIKKA MASALA The nation’s love of this creamy takeaway dish isn’t likely to wane – it’s just so full of flavour. So why not give it a healthy twist?


R EC I PE S prep 15 min + marinating cook 25 min serves 6

RECIPE: NIKI BEZZANT. PHOTO: MELANIE JENKINS. *WITH BOILED RICE, NAAN BREAD AND MANGO CHUTNEY

25g grated fresh ginger 2tbsp garam masala 1tsp ground cinnamon 150g low-fat natural yogurt Juice ½ lemon 600g skinless and boneless chicken thighs Cooking oil spray 400g rice For the curry sauce Cooking oil spray 1 large onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1tbsp tomato purée 400g can chopped tomatoes 1 very low salt chicken stock cube dissolved in 300ml boiling water 125g dried red lentils 1tsp chilli flakes, or to taste 1tsp runny honey 150ml light evaporated milk 4tbsp roughly chopped fresh coriander, plus extra sprigs to garnish

For the tamarind slaw 150g low-fat natural yogurt 1tsp tamarind paste 1tsp runny honey 1 large carrot, shredded or grated 150g red cabbage, shredded or grated 150g white cabbage, shredded or grated 4tbsp finely chopped fresh coriander leaves 1 Combine the ginger, garam masala and cinnamon in a small bowl. Spoon half the spice mixture into a large non-metallic bowl, then mix with the yogurt and lemon juice. Add the chicken thighs and turn to coat, then cover and marinate in the fridge for at least 1 hr (or overnight). 2 When ready to cook, heat the grill to medium-high. Line a grill tray with foil and spray with oil, then put the marinated chicken thighs on top. Grill for 8–10 min on each side until just cooked. Set aside.

HOW WE MADE IT HEALTHIER l We lowered the fat dramatically by using a spray oil instead of large amounts of ghee. We also swapped traditional cream with light evaporated milk, which still gave a creamy texture without all the fat and calories. l We made our own spice mix instead of using a ready-made paste or blend. This made it far easier to control the amount

of salt in the recipe – and, of course, we didn’t add any to season the curry, either (many recipes recommend adding 1tsp or more). l We used lentils in our sauce to add bulk and to boost nutrients, including soluble fibre – the type that helps to control our blood sugar levels and lower cholesterol. l We skipped the traditional sides of naan bread and

mango chutney, and instead replaced them with a healthy slaw. This helped to cut fat, sugar and salt, while boosting fruit and veg (and therefore vitamins and antioxidants). Our dish provides three of the recommended five-a-day – the classic recipe has just one – and contains almost twice as much vitamins A and C.

3 Meanwhile, make the curry sauce. Spray a large saucepan with oil and set over a medium heat. Cook the onion and garlic for 2 min to soften slightly. Add the tomato purée and remaining spice mixture, then stir for 1 min. Add the tomatoes, stock, lentils, chilli flakes and honey. Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat to low and simmer, stirring often, for 15 min. 4 While the sauce is simmering, cook the rice according to the pack instructions. Combine all the ingredients for the tamarind slaw in a bowl, then set aside. 5 Remove the sauce from the heat and carefully transfer to a blender, then whiz until smooth (or use a stick blender). Add extra water for a thinner sauce. Return the sauce to the pan and bring it back to a simmer, then stir in the evaporated milk. Cut the chicken into bite-size pieces, then add to the sauce. Bring it back to a simmer again and gently bubble for 2–3 min until the chicken is cooked all the way through. Stir in the chopped coriander. 6 Drain the rice, then divide it among 6 bowls along with the curry. Serve with the slaw, garnished with extra coriander sprigs.

3 HFG RECIPE

CLASSIC RECIPE

544kcal

856kcal

6.7g fat

25.2g fat

2.2g saturates

9.4g saturates

89.3g carbs

120.2g carbs

18.3g sugars

23.4g sugars

6.6g fibre

6.6g fibre

37.4g protein

45g protein

0.6g salt

3.6g salt

257mg calcium

300mg calcium

4.4mg iron

5.7mg iron

Per serving

Per serving*

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 73


TURN 4 INGREDIENTS TAKES

ARRABBIATA MEATBALLS WITH PEARL BARLEY

PUT IT ON THE MENU

PEARL BARLEY

Pearl Barley, 55p/500g

65

MIN

24 Skinny Mini Beef Meatballs, £2.50/240g TAKES

SALMON AND BARLEY SALAD BOWL

65

MIN

This unassuming grain has plenty to shout about when it comes to nutrients, versatility and value

T

RAILING BEHIND QUINOA, freekah, kasha and faro in the food fashion stakes, this old-school grain is nonetheless cheap and nourishing, with at least twice as much fibre as brown rice and a low GI. Pearl barley is simply barley with the outer bran layer removed, giving it a ‘pearly’ appearance. It has a chewy texture and delicate nuttiness, and absorbs flavours well. There’s no need to pre-soak – a rinse will do. It cooks in boiling water, in the same way as rice, but takes 30–60 min (until tender but still chewy). Its texture makes it perfect for risotto, and you can use it to thicken soups and stews without adding all the saturated fat and calories of cream. Also delicious cooked and tossed through winter salads, it isn’t, however, suitable for a gluten-free diet.

Love Life Pearl Barley, 55p/500g

Kale, Tenderstem & Spiralized Carrot Steamer, £1.99/180g

LEEK, CUMIN AND BARLEY SOUP

TAKES

65

MIN

HEARTY GOODNESS

Tesco Soup & Broth Mix £1.15/500g A handy storecupboard mix of pearl barley, yellow and green split peas, red lentils and marrowfat peas. Per 100g (cooked) l 100kcal l 0.4g fat l 0.2g saturates l 0.3g sugars l 0.1g salt

74 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

Kallo Very Low Salt Organic Vegetable Stock Cubes, £1.17/6

Pearl Barley, 56p/500g


R EC I PE S

INTO COMFORTING MEALS Selected from

337kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min cook 1 hr serves 2

Arrabbiata Pasta Sauce, £2/340g

Grana Padano, £3.50/200g

Rinse 50g pearl barley with cold water, then drain and cook in a large pan of unsalted boiling water for 1 hr or until tender but still chewy. About 15 min before the end of the cooking time, dry-fry the meatballs in a large non-stick frying pan for 5 min or until browned. Pour in the arrabbiata sauce and simmer for 10 min, adding a little water if the sauce becomes too thick. Drain the pearl barley, then mix with the meatballs and sauce. Shave 15g grana padano into strips with a vegetable peeler, then scatter over and serve. Selected from

377kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min cook 1 hr serves 2

Kiln Roasted Scottish Salmon Flakes, £3.49/100g

Lime & Amarillo Chilli Dressing, £1.29/150ml

Rinse 50g pearl barley with cold water, then drain and cook in a large pan of unsalted boiling water for 1 hr or until tender but still chewy. About 5 min before the end of the cooking time, steam the kale mix according to the pack instructions, then cool slightly. Drain the pearl barley, rinse under running water and drain again. Toss the barley, vegetables and salmon flakes with 3tbsp lime and chilli dressing, then serve straightaway. Or pack the dressing and salad separately and chill to serve later (add the dressing just before eating).

Selected from

152kcal PER SERVING

Dissolve 2 stock cubes in 1 litre boiling water in a large saucepan and set over a medium-high heat. Rinse 100g pearl barley in cold water, drain, then add to the stock. Simmer for 45 min. Add the sliced leeks and ½tsp ground cumin and simmer for a further 10–15 min until the pearl barley and leeks are tender. Ladle into bowls and serve. Sliced Leeks, 97p/700g

Ground Cumin, 67p/33g NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 75

WORDS: NICHOLA PALMER. PHOTO: ISTOCK

prep 5 min cook 1 hr serves 4


LO R E M

IN DECEMBER’S

Festivecheer THINK SLIM! Mindful tips to avoid the excess

T NEXUE ISSSALE ON EC 1D

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE Diet advice to lower your reading WINTER-PROOFING NUTRIENTS that can boost immunity 24 DAYS TO TONED Your easy fitness advent calendar HEALTHIER SEASONAL TREATS H Lower-cal canapés H Slow-cooked meats H New ideas for avo H Lighter comfort puds

Plus

H

Griddled scallops with spicy watermelon and cucumber salsa

sauces & pickles H cooking with dates H survival storecupboard H

76 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


R EC I PE S

DINNER for ONE

Quinoa with leek and squash Make the most of sweet seasonal squash and get all your five-a-day in one simple supper

RECIPE: ALICE BRODIE. PHOTO: DEVIN HART

prep 10 min cook 25 min serves 1 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 1tsp olive oil 175g squash or pumpkin flesh, diced 1 small leek, sliced ½ onion, finely sliced 2 fresh thyme sprigs, leaves only 1 garlic clove, crushed or finely chopped 50g quinoa 2tbsp pine nuts Squeeze lemon juice 4tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley 1 Heat the oil in a large non-stick pan (that has a lid). Add the squash or pumpkin, leek, onion, thyme and garlic, then cook, stirring, for 2–3 min. Cover the pan and allow

the veg to sweat for 10 min, stirring now and then. 2 Remove the lid and add the quinoa with 125ml water. Bring to the boil, then replace the lid and reduce the heat. Simmer for 12–15 min until the quinoa is tender. Remove the lid and continue to simmer until all the liquid has been absorbed. Lightly toast the pine nuts in a dry non-stick frying pan. 3 Stir the lemon juice, parsley and

toasted pine nuts into the quinoa mixture, then serve sprinkled with ground black pepper.

5 PER SERVING

517kcal 27.2g fat 2.2g saturates 54.7g carbs 20.5g sugars

15g fibre 16.7g protein 0.1g salt 210mg calcium 9.7mg iron

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 77


GLUTEN FREE

MUFFINS It’s easy to make lighter muffins that are also gluten free – just whiz up a batch of our basic mix, pick your topping and bake!

Blender muffins prep 5 min cook 25 min makes 12 vegetarian

gluten free

2 large ripe bananas, peeled 200g gluten-free rolled oats (see tip) 250g reduced-fat Greek yogurt 2 eggs 4tbsp runny honey 4tbsp gluten-free self-raising flour (see tip) 1tsp bicarbonate of soda 1tsp vanilla extract Topping of your choice (see right) 1 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Line a 12-hole (or 2 x 6-hole) muffin tin with paper or silicon muffin cases. 2 Put all the ingredients except the topping in a food processor and pulse for 1–2 min until smooth, creamy and combined. You may need to give the mixture a stir halfway through. 3 Spoon the mixture evenly among the muffin cases in the tin, then lightly press your chosen topping on top of each. 4 Bake for 20–25 min until the muffins are golden brown and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Leave to cool for a few min in the tin, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Tip If you don’t need to follow a gluten-free diet, you can use regular flour and oats.

PER MUFFIN (without topping)

142kcal 2.7g fat 0.8g saturates 24.9g carbs 9.6g sugars

78 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

1.6g fibre 5.6g protein 0.3g salt 36mg calcium 0.9mg iron

RECIPES: BROOKE LONGFIELD. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA

PULSE-AND-GO


R EC I PE S

CHOOSE YOUR TOPPING Each makes enough for 12 muffins. For variety, choose two toppings and halve the quantities below

1

4

2

5

3

6

1 Mixed berries 100g blueberries and 4 large strawberries, sliced

Per muffin l 147kcal l 2.8g fat l 0.8g saturates l 10.7g sugars l 0.3g salt

2 Choc chip and hazelnut 50g each dark choc chips and hazelnuts, chopped Per muffin l 191kcal l 6.5g fat l 1.6g saturates l 12.4g sugars l 0.3g salt

3 Apple and cinnamon 1 red apple, diced and tossed in lemon juice, and 1tsp cinnamon

Per muffin l 146kcal l 2.8g fat l 0.8g saturates l 10.6g sugars l 0.3g salt

4 Pecan and date

5 Coconut and raspberry

6 Banana and peanut butter

60g pecans, chopped, and 4 medjool dates, sliced

150g raspberries and 50g shredded coconut

1 small banana, sliced, and 12tsp no added sugar or salt smooth peanut butter

Per muffin l 160kcal l 4.3g fat l 2.1g saturates l 10.3g sugars

Per muffin l 204kcal l 6.3g fat

l 0.3g salt

l 1.1g saturates l 16.6g sugars

Per muffin l 195kcal l 6.4g fat l 1.4g

l 0.3g salt

saturates l 11.3g sugars l 0.3g salt NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 79


NEW ON THE You don’t have to pay over the odds and take a big calorie hit at the coffee

Vanilla honey chai tea

Maple almond milk

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free

Put 250ml skimmed milk, 1–2 black tea bags, 4 whole cloves, 2 cardamom pods, 1 cinnamon stick, ½tsp vanilla extract and 1tbsp runny honey in a saucepan with 300ml water. Warm over a medium heat for 6–8 min until hot, then stand for 2 min. Strain the tea into 2 glasses or mugs.

Put 500ml unsweetened almond milk, ½tsp vanilla extract, 1tbsp maple syrup and ½tsp ground cinnamon in a saucepan over a medium heat. Bring to the boil, then reduce to a gentle simmer and heat for 5 min. Pour into 2 glasses or mugs and dust with extra cinnamon.

PER SERVING PER SERVING

75kcal 0.4g fat 0.2g saturates 13.8g carbs 13.8g sugars

0g fibre 4.4g protein 0.1g salt 157mg calcium 0.1mg iron

56kcal 2.9g fat 0.3g saturates 5.4g carbs 5g sugars

1.3g fibre 1.2g protein 0.4g salt 320mg calcium 0.2mg iron

Vanilla honey chai tea

Maple almond milk

dairy free


R EC I PE S

DRINKS MENU RECIPES: BROOKE LONGFIELD. PHOTO: MARK O’MEARA

shop. Chill out at home instead with these better-for-you mugfuls of bliss

Coconut and date hot chocolate

Creamy dark hot chocolate

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 2 vegetarian gluten free

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 2 gluten free

dairy free

Put 500ml coconut milk drink and 4 chopped pitted dates or 2 chopped medjool dates in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, then reduce to a gentle simmer and heat for 5 min or until the dates are soft. Carefully pour into a blender and whiz until smooth. Return to the pan over a low heat, then stir in 1tbsp cocoa powder for 1–2 min until smooth. Pour into 2 glasses or mugs.

1

PER SERVING

142kcal 3.1g fat 2.7g saturates 27.6g carbs 25.1g sugars

2.2g fibre 1.9g protein 0.3g salt 318mg calcium 0.8mg iron

Put 500ml skimmed milk, 30g finely chopped dark chocolate, 2tsp cocoa powder and ½tsp vanilla extract in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, then reduce to a gentle simmer and heat for 5 min or until the chocolate melts. Pour into 2 glasses or mugs, dust with cocoa powder and top with 2 chopped marshmallows (most are gluten free, but check labels).

PER SERVING

198kcal 7.8g fat 4.6g saturates 22g carbs 19.7g sugars

1.9g fibre 10.7g protein 0.3g salt 322mg calcium 0.7mg iron

Coconut and date hot chocolate

Creamy dark hot chocolate


hfg UDY S CA E ST

LO1S1T lb 6st

WEIGHT-LOSS

STAR Margaret Shukla, 60

❛Cancer was my motivation to stay on track❜

With a hectic work life, Margaret had let her diet slip into the unhealthy zone. A breast cancer diagnosis in 2011 BEFORE led to a total overhaul of her lifestyle

Life became hectic as I started travelling with work, so the weight continued to creep up. I didn’t have an interest in or understanding of my food choices at the time. I wasn’t eating junk food but my diet was very carb-heavy (lots of potatoes and bread) plus butter, jam, creamy sauces, cheese and quick grab-and-go cereals.

I had two knee operations during my 40s, which I’m convinced was due to being overweight. By the time I got to my 50s I was 18st. I was hiding it quite well by wearing

dark, baggy clothes with elastic waistbands and accessorising with colourful scarves to distract the eye.

My breast cancer diagnosis came as a shock. It was a real wake-up call for me. I realised I hadn’t been taking my health seriously enough. All I could think was, why me? Had the weight and unhealthy diet caused it? I was 17st at this point, and it was right then that I decided to focus on the foods I was eating.

The sugary cereals stopped and I switched to sugar-free muesli. In came the wholemeal options. If I was going to have bread, it had to be wholegrain. I discovered the power of vegetables and started eating plenty of dark green leafy veg, in particular.

Cancer was my motivation to stay on track with my new

82 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

healthy diet. I started making my own soups, and vitaminrich juices from watercress, spinach, rocket, cucumber, garlic, ginger, lemon and celery. Fizzy drinks and alcohol were out, too, replaced with herbal teas and plenty of water.

I began valuing the benefits of exercise. During my treatment I took long daily walks with my dogs. My aim was to take exercise seriously as a key activity in my life. I completed a mindfulness programme and came to realise being in nature really helped with my recovery.

My diet was extreme during the year of my treatment because I was so focused on eating only the healthiest foods. I lost 3st that year. Now I’m less rigid but continue to eat a healthy, balanced diet and take

HEIGHT

5ft 3in (1.6m)

WEIGHT BEFORE

18st 12lb (120kg)

WEIGHT NOW 12st 1lb (77kg)

WAIST BEFORE

42in (107cm)

WAIST NOW

29in (74cm)

BMI BEFORE 46.9

BMI NOW 30.1

AS TOLD TO LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

D

URING MY LATE 20S

and early 30s I was healthy, fit and well. But once I got married and had my two children I started to get ‘comfortable’. As a result my weight increased to 14st soon after having my second child.

AFTER


H E A LT H

WHAT I’M COOKING THIS WEEK…

Coriander chicken with chickpea salad ‘I love cooking with herbs and spices, and the coriander and mint in this dish are lovely and fragrant. Mixing them with lime juice produces a great flavour combination.’ Find this and lots more healthy chicken recipes at healthyfood.co.uk

MARGARET 5WAYS LOST IT EASING BACK INTO EXERCISE

I started with long, gentle walks with my Irish Red Setter, but since then I’ve joined a gym and do regular exercise classes at the weekend. INCREASING VEG Eating

plenty of leafy greens has helped me increase the calcium in my diet, which is important for my bone strength. SAYING NO TO JUNK It would

regular exercise. I cook everything from scratch and love high-protein meals using ingredients such as quark, chicken and quinoa. I make curries with lentils and pulses, and I enjoy lots of fish. I try to eat foods of as many different colours as possible to get a wide variety of nutrients. One of my favourite lunches is mackerel salad with beetroot and radishes. I still travel a lot with my job, so keeping an eye on nutrition is a priority. I stick to protein-based meals, avoid sauces and eat a lot of veg. The USA is the hardest place to find healthy foods – I can never get wholegrain bread, for instance. For breakfast, I’ll have something like scrambled eggs or melon instead.

I understand the importance of continuing to

exercise as I age. My husband and I go to the gym together, which we both really enjoy. As well as my aerobics classes I’ve recently discovered strength training. My arms lost a lot of their strength after I had cancer so I’m enjoying regaining it with regular weight training. I also go to aquafit classes, and for something a little more unusual I’m trying yoga – and absolutely love it.

I’ve just been given my five-year clearance since the cancer. I feel a lot healthier now and, having recently turned 60, I’m so proud of what I’ve achieved. I can wear some wonderful clothes I’d never have dreamed of before – that in itself is such a feelgood experience! I’m in a new place, and my journey continues.

be easy to eat muffins or popcorn while travelling because they’re easy to find. Instead, I always go for fruit, veg and highprotein foods to keep me fuller for longer. HAVING A GOAL

My aim was to get to 12st by the time I was 60. My approach was steady – too much pressure and stress isn’t healthy for anyone. SWITCHING TO WHOLEGRAIN

I eat wholegrain toast and limit myself to two slices a day. It keeps me feeling much fuller than white ever did. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 83


How much

FAT in a cheese pizza? Does eating healthily rule out a family classic? Well, it’s best saved for treat nights, but choose wisely and it doesn’t have to be a diet disaster WHAT TO WATCH OUT FOR l A BASIC MARGHERITA, topped

mainly with tomato sauce and cheese, is usually a more waistlinefriendly option than pizzas loaded with lots of other toppings. But the more cheese you add, the more the fat piles up. So beware: those four-cheese pizzas can actually be fattier than a meat feast. lTHE TYPE OF CHEESE USED will largely dictate the fat content of the pizza: ricotta, for example, is much lower in fat than mascarpone. l SIZE MATTERS – the bigger and deeper the pizza, the more fat, calories, saturates and salt it will

contain. Opt for thin-crust and stonebaked over deep-pan. l CHECK THE SERVING SIZE on packs. Most pizzas are created to feed two people, but because we’re used to being served a whole one to ourselves in restaurants, we often do the same at home. Cut half a pizza into the same number of slices as you would a whole one and you may just trick yourself into thinking you’re eating as much as you usually do (fill the empty half of your plate with salad). If you’re dining solo, pop the other half in the fridge for tomorrow’s lunch. l FINDING A LOW-FAT PIZZA IS VIRTUALLY IMPOSSIBLE (that’s one with no more than 3g fat per 100g), so be sure to watch your fat intake for the rest of the day to stay within the recommended daily maximum of 70g.

WE’V GIVEN VALEU PER ½ PIZZES AS SIZES A VARY

Morrisons Thin Cheese Pizza, £1/321g

349kcal per ½ pizza

10.7g fat

Pizza Express Romana Padana, £5/435g, Sainsbury’s, Ocado

476kcal per ½ pizza

14.3g fat

Dr. Oetker Ristorante Pizza Quattro Formaggi, £2.50/340g, Ocado, Waitrose

452kcal per ½ pizza

23.5g fat


S H O PPI N G

Pizza Express Classic Margherita, £4.50/245g, Tesco, Sainsbury’s

Tesco Thin Cheese Pizza, £1/314g

Waitrose Wood-Fired Buffalo Mozzarella & Sun Soaked Tomato Pizza, £3.89/295g

312kcal per ½ pizza

370kcal per ½ pizza

387kcal per ½ pizza

WORDS: ROSE CONSTANTINE SMITH. PHOTO: ISTOCK. FIGURES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

10.8g fat

11.2g fat

13.3g fat

Asda Thin Stonebaked Cheese Feast Pizza, £2.20/290g

Sainsbury’s Deliciously Free From Margherita Pizza, £3/300g

Tesco Finest Buffalo Mozzarella & Tomato Pizza, £5/411g

386kcal per ½ pizza

430kcal per ½ pizza

511kcal per ½ pizza

16g fat

18.6g fat

19.5g fat

Chicago Town The Takeaway Stuffed Crust Four Cheese Melt, £3/480g, widely available

Tesco Stuffed Crust Cheese Feast Takeaway Pizza, £3.75/490g

Goodfella’s Takeaway Slice n’ Share The Big Cheese Pizza, £3.50/555g, widely available

661kcal per ½ pizza

712kcal per ½ pizza

760kcal per ½ pizza (without dip)

26g fat

32g fat

37g fat NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 85


7

FOODS to FUEL YOUR WORKOUT

Have you upped your fitness game recently? Jennifer Low shares the staples to stock up on for quick, healthy preor post-workout meals and on-the-go snacks

W

HAT YOU EAT IS CRUCIAL FOR ACHIEVING YOUR FITNESS GOALS. Food needs to provide energy and the right nutrients for you to perform at your best, to build and maintain strong muscles, and to help you recover quickly after a workout. If you’re planning a strenuous exercise session, aim to have easily-digestible, slow-release carbohydrates one to two hours beforehand, followed by a mixture of protein and carbohydrate shortly afterwards to aid muscle recovery and replenish diminished energy stores. Take inspiration from the ingredients and recipes on the following pages…

86 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

PORRIDGE OATS Work out early in the morning? A bowl of porridge is the perfect post-exercise breakfast. It can also make a good ‘emergency’ supper on the odd occasion you come in really late from a workout and want to refuel quickly. If you follow a gluten-free diet, you’ll need to choose oats that are suitable (not all varieties are gluten free). The positives Oats are a source of slow-release carbohydrate, which

helps replenish muscle glycogen (energy stored in muscles). They also provide magnesium, which is proven to reduce tiredness and fatigue, and may support muscle recovery and relaxation. Quick recipe boost Make a smoothie with oats, low-fat yogurt, reduced-fat milk and berries, then pop in your bag to drink after you’ve worked out. Or plan ahead and make the recipe below – it keeps in the fridge for two days.

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search BERRY BIRCHER PORRIDGE


NUT OR SEED BUTTERS

OATCAKES

No added sugar or salt nut and seed butters are really useful jars to keep in the cupboard for a preor post-exercise snack – as are whole unsalted nuts and seeds. Nutrition fact Nuts and seeds are good sources of restorative protein and healthy fats. They’re rich in minerals, too, including

The no-fuss pre- or postworkout snack, oatcakes provide carbs that can help you sustain energy levels during a workout or re-energise you once you’ve cooled down. The positives Oatcakes are low in fat and contain fibre – but, best of all, they’re portable! Pop a few in your gym bag to nibble after exercising, if it’s going to be a while until your next meal.

magnesium and calcium, which support energy, muscle function and bone strength, plus zinc for the immune system. Quick recipe boost Spread a couple of teaspoons of almond, cashew, hazelnut, hemp seed or pumpkin seed butter on oatcakes, apple slices or wholegrain toast.

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search NUT BUTTER, BERRIES AND COCOA ON TOAST

Quick recipe boost If you aren’t eating on the hoof, spread your oatcakes with no added sugar or salt nut butter, low-fat cottage cheese or reduced-fat hummus to increase your protein intake after a workout. Or make a healthy homemade dip to keep on standby in the fridge.

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search HEALTHY DIPS TO MAKE AT HOME

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 87


HIGH-PROTEIN PASTA

CANNED SARDINES

Pasta is known to be the go-to post-workout food for many. The positives It’s packed with starchy carbs, which refuel our glycogen stores. But studies show that a combination of carbohydrate and protein is more effective for promoting faster glycogen refuelling, as well as more efficient muscle tissue growth, than carbs alone. Try a high-protein variety of pasta, such as Clearspring Organic Green Pea & Quinoa Pasta (£2.89, clearspring. co.uk). This is made with

These are a quick, inexpensive way to get a boost of fitnessfriendly nutrients. The positives Sardines are a great source of protein and calcium, both of which help bones to stay strong. The omega-3 fats they contain also help maintain normal blood pressure and blood levels of triglycerides (a type of fat). This is essential when we’re exercising, as the heart has to work much harder to pump blood around the body,

pea and quinoa flours rather than wheat. It provides 21g protein per 100g (raw weight) compared with around 11g in standard wheat pasta and only 8g in brown rice pasta. Quick recipe boost Try it instead of your usual pasta to serve with your favourite sauce, or add to soups, stews and pasta dishes, such as the recipe below, for an extra boost of protein. You can use it as the base for a filling salad at lunchtime, too – ideal if you’ve done a mid-morning workout.

delivering oxygen to the cells. Some studies even suggest that omega-3 fats may help lower our heart rate and reduce the amount of oxygen we use when exercising. Quick recipe boost Choose sardines canned in oil or tomato sauce (watch the salt content, though) and serve them on wholegrain toast for a speedy post-gym lunch or dinner. Or, when you have more time, give fresh sardines a go – they’re delicious in this Med-style recipe…

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search FRESH SARDINES WITH TOMATOES AND GREMOLATA

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search CHICKEN, AUBERGINE AND PESTO PASTA SALAD

88 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016


NUTRITION

MIXED NUTS AND DRIED FRUIT

BEANS AND PULSES Unsalted cans of beans, lentils and chickpeas are storecupboard saviours as they’re so quick to turn into a nutritious meal. The positives Beans and pulses contain protein and carbohydrates so they’re ideal for adding to meals after exercising. They’re especially useful if you follow a vegan or vegetarian diet and need

a protein alternative to meat, chicken, fish, eggs and/or dairy. Quick recipe boost Stir 3tbsp canned chickpeas or beans into a serving of shop-bought soup (compare labels and choose one with the least amount of salt) for a protein boost and one of your five-a-day.

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search COCONUT CHICKPEA CURRY

This combo makes a great on-the-go snack – ideal when you’re going straight from work to the gym, or need a postworkout nibble to keep you going until lunch. The positives Nuts contain healthy fats and protein, while dried fruit provides a good amount of carbohydrate. Just make sure you watch portion

sizes as both are high in calories – divide into 30g single servings. Quick recipe boost As great as they are on their own, nuts and dried fruit are also a great way to bulk out cereal and porridge with extra protein and healthy fats. They’re also delicious added to cakes and bakes, such as flapjack and bread.

Go to healthyfood.co.uk and search MIXED SPICE FRUIT BREAD


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Juliette Kellow HFG NUTRITION CONSULTANT

WHY WE NEED…

VITAMIN E

his antioxidant helps to protect our cells from damage caused by harmful molecules called FREE RADICALS. In particular, vitamin E keeps our SKIN AND EYES HEALTHY and strengthens our IMMUNE SYSTEM

T

What happens if I don’t get enough? A DEFICIENCY OF VITAMIN E is virtually unheard of in this country, even in people who have poor diets. On average, British women have 8.3mg daily and men, 9.8mg.

…or too much? MOST PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO TOLERATE high levels of vitamin E without experiencing any side effects. But, to be on the safe side, when it comes to taking supplements, the Department of Health recommends no more than 540mg a day.

THE NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE (NRV) for vitamin E, which you’ll see on food labels, is 10mg a day. In the UK there are no specific values given for different ages and stages in life – the Department of Health simply recommends men have at least 4mg vitamin E a day and women, at least 3mg daily. This is because our needs for this nutrient are largely based on the amount of polyunsaturated fats we have in our diets – as a rule, higher intakes of polyunsaturates mean we need more vitamin E.

92 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

NOVEMBER 2016

PHOTOS: GETTY, ISTOCK

HOW MUCH DO I NEED EACH DAY?


NUTRITION

Will taking vitamin E supplements make my skin glow?

EVERYDAY FOODS FOR VITAMIN E (mg) 30g sunflower seeds

11.3

VITAMIN E IS IMPORTANT for healthy skin, but there’s no evidence that taking a large amount in supplement form will help to reduce wrinkles or give you a better complexion. Similarly, while vitamin E is a common ingredient in face creams and anti-ageing potions, there’s little evidence to suggest applying it to the skin is truly beneficial – any improvement may simply be due to the moisturising effect of the lotion. There’s also no medical evidence to suggest that applying creams containing vitamin E to scars or stretch marks will improve their appearance.

30g hazelnuts

7.5

30g almonds

7.2

140g farmed salmon (grilled)

5.5

1tbsp sunflower oil

5.4

30g pine nuts

4.1

1 small avocado

3.2

What about taking supplements to best my overall health?

30g unsalted peanuts

3

30g fortified bran flakes

2.5

1tbsp rapeseed or vegetable oil

2.4

125g can sardines in tomato sauce

2.3

30g brazil nuts

2.2

½ large can chickpeas (120g drained)

1.9

80g blackberries

1.9

1tbsp corn oil

1.9

1tbsp groundnut oil

1.7

HIGH DOSES OF VITAMIN E have been implicated in promoting health and protecting against many diseases, including heart disease, Alzheimer’s, age-related macular degeneration and certain cancers. But so far research has provided mixed and inconclusive results – more studies need to be carried out before taking supplements is recommended. Instead, the focus should be on eating plenty of foods that are naturally rich in vitamin E.

80g butternut squash (baked)

1.5

80g broccoli (steamed)

1.5

30g pecan nuts

1.3

1tsp reduced-fat polyunsaturated spread (41–62% fat)

1.3

140g cod (baked)

1.3

80g watercress

1.2

30g pistachio nuts or walnuts

1.2

140g coley (baked)

1.1

80g kale (boiled)

1.1

1 egg

0.8

So where do I find vitamin E?

½ red pepper

0.8

80g blueberries

0.8

1tsp low-fat olive oil spread (26–39% fat)

0.7

1tbsp peanut butter

0.7

200g pot baked beans

0.7

80g brussels sprouts (boiled)

0.7

10 olives

0.6

200g wholewheat pasta (boiled)

0.5

IT’S FOUND IN A WIDE RANGE OF FOODS, but the best sources are vegetable oils, such as corn and sunflower oil. Vitamin E is also present in nuts, seeds, avocado and green vegetables. Because it’s a fat-soluble vitamin, vitamin E is stored in the body, so we don’t need to have it in large amounts on a daily basis.

NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 93


HOW I STAY

HEALTHY Ben Fogle, 43

TV presenter and adventurer

The broadcaster is no stranger to risk, but he doesn’t take chances with his health – at home or in the wild

Y

ou look a picture of health – has it always been this way? Until I was 30 I never felt the need to exercise or watch what I ate. But as soon as I entered my fourth decade, I realised I needed to put a little more effort into looking after myself. How has your diet changed over the years? I’ve tried to reduce my dairy and meat consumption. I think as a nation we probably consume a little too much of both. Surprisingly, my health has improved over the years. You’ve done some extreme challenges. How do you alter your diet to prepare for them? For long-haul endurance challenges, such as rowing the Atlantic, racing to the South Pole or running the six-day Marathon Des Sables, I’ve had to gain weight. During the challenges, I burn upwards of 6,000 calories a day, so it’s important to start with a good body weight. How do you stay super fit when you’re not doing a challenge? As hard as it is, I try to find an hour for exercise every day. It’s as much for my brain as it is for my body. A run, the gym, a workout in a hotel room or on a forest floor… There’s always a way. It must be hard to eat well on the move. What are the best healthy foods you’ve discovered on your adventures? Travelling as much as I do means it’s too easy just to graze on junk, so I make a point of planning ahead with healthier alternatives. I rate Eat Natural bars. I also helped to


AS TOLD TO MELANIE LEYSHON. PHOTOS: JAMES BYRNE, ISTOCK

TA L K I N G P O I N T S

produce a range of pulse-based snacks called Dilly & Wolf. Which food do you miss the most when you’re away? It’s usually the comfort foods, such as pasta dishes – I love spaghetti bolognese. What are your guilty food pleasures? Crisps and chips. Call me a typical Brit, but I find a bag of salt and vinegar crisps almost irresistible. Have your tastes changed at all? Apparently taste buds change every seven years – and I’m finding myself increasingly turning away from meat. Do you stick with healthy eating and safe alcohol drinking levels? Not at all, but I do keep an eye on things. Like most people, a second helping/bigger portion is always a temptation. My philosophy is to eat and drink everything in moderation, and to ensure an hour’s exercise every day to counter it. We hear you’re doing your bit to help save the bees… Indeed. Ever since I spent a year living off the land for the BBC series Castaway, I’ve found myself worrying about the environment. Keeping bees is a simple, fun and fascinating way of doing my small bit. And my kids love them. If you’re making a healthy supper for the family, what will it be? Roasted fresh fish with rice or quinoa and raw vegetables, and a glass of still water. They love it. Do you have any recurring health issues? I’m particularly prone to colds – it’s probably all the air travel I do (I think air conditioning is the main problem). I’ve recently tried cold water remedies: cold plunge pools, cold showers, cold baths, etc. They’re supposed to boost the immune system and so far they seem to be working. Do you swear by any particular ingredient for your good health? Taking echinacea seems to do the

THREE THINGS I LOVE

THE SEA There is something magical about the sea. It’s calming, fascinating, and keeps you healthy, too. I love paddle boarding, kayaking and swimming. But I’m just as happy on a boat, staring into the water to see what marine treasures I can spot. Wonderful.

FAMILY WALKS These are sacred to me. My family are the most important thing in my life, and these shared experiences are to be treasured. It's great to be close to nature and stay fit at the same time.

PORRIDGE The humble porridge oat plays a huge part in my life! It's delicious, warming, super healthy and wholesome. It’s also brilliantly versatile and you can add all sorts of fabulous toppings, too. As you can imagine, I love adding honey to mine.

trick when a cold is approaching. But again, I believe in everything in moderation. Any part of your body you wish was leaner? I have the biggest calves and bottom! I used to hate them, but I’ve come to realise they both serve me rather well. Any more challenges coming up – and any you wouldn’t do? I always like to have physical goals and I have several plans for next year. But I think BASE jumping [leaping off buildings or cliffs, etc] is a risk too far. There have been too many deaths this year alone. Do you worry about your children’s diets? Of course. A lot of food is laced with invisible sugar and salt. There’s too much temptation everywhere you go. Walk into any petrol station and it tells the tale of our food – junk food and fizzy drinks are prolific. It’s all sugar and artificial ingredients and no emphasis on health. Tell us a surprising fact about you that people may not know… I have a low resting heart rate of between 35 and 45 beats per minute. I inherited it from my grandfather. It’s quite useful. l Ben is supporting the Eat Natural Pollination campaign. To find out how you can become an Eat Natural beekeeper, go to eatnatural.co.uk NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 95


EAT WELL TO AVOID INFLAMMATION p25

REFERENCES Your guide to the research behind this month’s stories and features

HEALTH NOTES p10 l Cancer

Research UK (2016) The public doesn’t know obesity causes cancer, and that’s really worrying. Published online 9 September 2016 l Haapala, E A et al (2016) Diet quality and academic achievement: a prospective study among primary school children. European Journal of Nutrition. First published online 9 September 2016. DOI: 10.1007/s00394-016-1270-5 l Viggiano, E et al (2016) Effects of an High-Fat Diet Enriched in Lard or in Fish Oil on the Hypothalamic Amp-Activated Protein Kinase and Inflammatory Mediators. Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 10 (150). DOI: 10.3389/ fncel.2016.00150 l Cohen, N L and Olson, R B (2016) Compliance with recommended food safety practice in television cooking shows. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. First published online 28 August 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.jneb.2016.08.002 l Rijlaarsdam, J et al (2016) Prenatal unhealthy diet, insulin-like growth factor 2 gene (IGF2) methylation, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in youth with early-onset conduct problems. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. First published online 18 August 2016. DOI: 10.1111/jcpp.12589 l Greene, C M et al (2016) Evaluation of a Laughter-based Exercise Program on Health and Self-efficacy for Exercise. The Gerontologist. First published online 4 August 2016. DOI: 10.1093/ geront/gnw105

SEASONAL WAYS TO FIVE-A-DAY p12 l D’evoli,

L et al (2013) Red chicory (Cichorium intybus L. cultivar) as a potential source of antioxidant anthocyanins for intestinal health. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity. DOI: 10.1155/2013/704310 l Webb, D (2014) Anthocyanins. Today’s Dietitian 16 (3), 20. http://www.todaysdietitian.com/ newarchives/030314p20.shtml l Nicastro, H L et al (2015) Garlic and onions: their cancer prevention properties. Cancer Prevention Research 8 (3), 181-189. DOI: 10.1158/19406207.CAPR-14-0172

IS YOUR MARRIAGE MAKING YOU FAT? P16 l Office

for National Statistics (2015) Families and Households: 2015. http://www.ons.gov.uk/ peoplepopulationandcommunity/ birthsdeathsandmarriages/families/bulletins/ familiesandhouseholds/2015-11-05 l Gardner, J and Oswald, A (2002) Is it money or marriage that keeps people alive. University of Warwick. https://core.ac.uk/download/ files/153/6755061.pdf l Scott, K M et al (2010) Gender and the relationship between marital status and first onset of mood, anxiety and substance use disorders. Psychological Medicine 40 (9), 1495-1505. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291709991942 l Mernitz, S E et al (2016) Emotional health across the transition to first and second unions among emerging adults. Journal of Family Psychology 30 (2), 233-244. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ fam0000159 l Helliwell, J F and Grover, S (2014). How’s Life at Home? New Evidence on Marriage and the Set Point for Happiness. The National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper No. 20794. http://www.nber.org/papers/w20794 l Trevisan, C et al (2016) Marital Status and Frailty in Older People: Gender Differences in the Progetto Veneto Anziani Longitudinal Study. Journal of Women’s Health 25 (6), 630-637. DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2015.5592 l USA Today (2007) Gain a spouse and you’ll likely gain pounds, too. News story 23 October 2007. http://abcnews.go.com/Health/ story?id=3764122&page=1 l The, N and Gordon-Larsen, P (2009) Entry into Romantic partnership is associated with

96 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE NOVEMBER 2016

obesity. Obesity (Silver Spring) 17 (7), 1441-1447. DOI: 10.1038/oby.2009.97 A et al (2013) Marital satisfaction predicts weight gain in early marriage. Health Psycholgy 32 (7), 824-827. DOI: 10.1037/a0031593 l Prichard, I and Tiggermann, M (2014) Wedding-related weight change: The ups and downs of love. Body Image 11 (2), 179-182. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2013.12.005 l Nomaguchi, K M and Bianchi, S M (2004) Exercise time: gender differences in the effects of marriage, parenthood and employment. Journal of Marriage and Family 66 (2), 413-430. DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2004.00029.x l John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (2015) Improving Your Fitness Could Improve the Fitness of Your Spouse. Published online 6 March 2015. http://www. jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2015/ improving-your-fitness-could-improve-thefitness-of-your-spouse.html l Martinez, M E et al (2016) Differences in marital status and mortality by race/ethnicity and nativity among California cancer patients. Cancer 122 (10), 1570-1578. DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29886 l Alviar, C L et al (2014) Association of marital status with vascular disease in different arterial territories: a population based study of over 3.5 million subjects. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 63 (12S). DOI: 10.1016/ S0735-1097(14)61328-0 l Neuman, M D et al (2016) Marital status and postoperative functional recovery. JAMA Surgery 151 (2), 194-196. DOI: 10.1001/ jamasurg.2015.3240 l Lammintausta, A et al (2014) Prognosis of acute coronary events is worse in patients living alone: the FINAMI myocardial infarction register. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology 21 (8), 989-996. DOI: 10.1177/2047487313475893 l Egeland, G M et al (2002) A man’s heart and a wife’s education: A 12-year coronary heart disease mortality follow-up in Norwegian men. International Journal of Epidemiology 31 (4), 799-805. DOI: 10.1093/ije/31.4.799 l University of Utah (2009) Heart hazards of woeful wives. Depression ties marital strain to cardiac risks in women, not men. Press release published online 5 March 2009. http://archive. unews.utah.edu/news_releases/heart-hazards-ofwoeful-wives l University of Virginia (2006) UVA researcher finds high quality marriages help to calm nerves. Press release published online 19 December 2006. https://news.virginia.edu/content/ uva-researcher-finds-high-quality-marriageshelp-calm-nerves l Liu, H et al (2016) Diabetes Risk and Disease Management in Later Life: A National Longitudinal Study of the Role of Marital Quality. The Journals of gerontology. First published online 23 May 2016. DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbw061 l Meltzer,

WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH KEFIR? p22

l Ahmed, Z et al (2013) Kefir and health: a contemporary perspective. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 53 (5), 422-434. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2010.540360 l Guzel-Seydim, Z B et al (2011) Review: functional properties of kefir. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 51 (3), 261-238. DOI: 10.1080/10408390903579029 l Hertzler, S R and Clancy, S M (2003) Kefir improves lactose digestion and tolerance in adults with lactose maldigestion. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 103 (5), 582-587 l Amrita, K et al (2016) Chemopreventive Metabolites Are Correlated with a Change in Intestinal Microbiota Measured in A-T Mice and Decreased Carcinogenesis. PLOS ONE, 2016. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151190

l Tamakoshi, K et al (2003) The metabolic syndrome is associated with elevated circulating C-reactive protein in healthy reference range, a systemic low-grade inflammatory state. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 27 (94), 443-449 l Jung, U and Choi, M (2014) Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. International Journal of Molecular Sciences 15 (4), 6184-6223. DOI: 10.3390/ijms15046184 l Cancer Research UK (2013) Feeling the heat – the link between inflammation and cancer. http:// scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2013/02/01/ feeling-the-heat-the-link-between-inflammationand-cancer/ Published online 1 February 2013 l Alzheimer’s Society (2016) Blocking brain inflammation could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. Published online 8 January 2016. https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/ news_article.php?newsID=2535 l Koenig, W et al (1999) C-Reactive Protein, a Sensitive Marker of Inflammation, Predicts Future Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Initially Healthy Middle-Aged Men. Circulation 99 (2), 237-242. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.99.2.237 l American Heart Association. Inflammation and Heart Disease. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/ Conditions/Inflammation-and-Heart-Disease_ UCM_432150_Article.jsp#.V9Ke4uk2_Hh l Brietzke, E et al (2009) Comparison of cytokine levels in depressed, manic and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders 116 (3), 214-217. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j. jad.2008.12.001 l Hepgul, N et al (2016) Transcriptomics in Interferon-alpha-Treated Patients Identifies Inflammation-, Neuroplasticity- and Oxidative StressRelated Signatures as Predictors and Correlates of Depression Neuropsychopharmacology 41, 2502-2511. DOI: 10.1038/npp.2016.50 l Berk, N et al (2013) So depression is an inflammatory disease, but where does the inflammation come from? BMC Medicine 11 (1), 200. DOI: 10.1186/1741-7015-11-200 l Cavicchia, P P et al (2009) A new dietary inflammatory index predicts interval changes in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Journal of Nutrition 139 (12), 2365-2372. DOI: 10.3945/ jn.109.114025 l Estruch, R (2010) Anti-inflammatory effects of the Mediterranean diet: the experience of the PREDIMED study. The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 69 (3), 333-340. DOI: 10.1017/S0029665110001539 l Lee, J et al (2012) Cigarette Smoking and Inflammation. Journal of Dental Research 91 (2), 142-149 l Minihane, A M et al (2015) Low-grade inflammation, diet composition and health: current research evidence and its translation. British Journal of Nutrition 114 (7), 999-1012. DOI: 10.1017/S0007114515002093 l Imayama, I et al (2012) Effects of a caloric restriction weight loss diet and exercise on inflammatory biomarkers in overweight/obese postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial. Cancer Research 72 (9), 2314-2326. DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-3092 l Slavich, G M and Irwin, M R (2014) From Stress to Inflammation and Major Depressive Disorder: A Social Signal Transduction Theory of Depression. Psychology Bulletin 140 (3), 774-815. DOI: 10.1037/a0035302 l Lucas, L et al (2011) Molecular mechanisms of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory benefits of virgin olive oil and the phenolic compound oleocanthal. Current Pharmaceutical Design 17 (8), 754-768

7 FOODS TO FUEL YOUR WORKOUT p86

l Peoples, G E et al (2008) Fish oil reduces heart rate and oxygen consumption during exercise. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 52 (6), 540-547. DOI: 10.1097/FJC.0b013e3181911913

WHY WE NEED VITAMIN E p92

l National Institutes of Health. Vitamin E – fact sheet for health professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/ factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/#en32 l Sakamoto, G and Schalock, P (2007) Focus on: vitamin E. The Dermatologist 15 (12). http://www. the-dermatologist.com/article/8065 l Taylor, S L (2008) Alternative treatment for scars. The Dermatologist 16 (6). http://www.thedermatologist.com/article/8866


T H E FAC T S

NUTRITION LOWDOWN We cut through the science to help you work out how our recipes – and the foods you buy in the supermarket – fit into a balanced, healthy diet

JUST LIKE PRE-PACKED FOODS, all our recipes provide detailed nutrition information for a typical serving. But how does that compare with your total daily needs for energy, protein, fat, carbs and certain vitamins and minerals? Provided you stick to the serving size we recommend for each recipe, the easiest way is to compare the nutrition information for each recipe with the Reference Intake (RI). You’ll gradually see this term being used on food labels in place of Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs). The RIs are benchmarks for the amount of energy (kilocalories), fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt we should have each day. The RIs for fat, saturates, sugars and salt are the maximum amount you should have each day, while you should aim to meet the values for carbs and protein each day. There is no RI for fibre but health experts recommend we have 30g a day. Although everyone is different and has different needs for energy and nutrients, the RIs are designed for an average adult, so there’s only one set of values. See the table, right, for the figures. We also analyse our recipes for calcium and iron – this is because these two nutrients are often low in people’s diets in the UK. We can see how much a recipe contributes to our daily needs for calcium and iron by comparing

WHAT IF I WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT? The only way to shed the pounds is to take in fewer calories than you use up, so your body draws on its fat stores to supply it with enough energy. To lose 1lb (0.5kg) of fat you need to create a calorie deficit of 3,500kcal. This means cutting your calorie intake by just 500kcal a day should help you lose 1lb (0.5kg) a week – so, for example, women should lose this amount of weight each week on 1,500kcal and men on 2,000kcal. If you’re also more active, you can expect it to be a little more. However, nutrition experts agree that for good health in the long term, you shouldn’t lose more than 2lb (1kg) a week. REFERENCE INTAKE

it with Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs), which are starting to appear on food labels in place of Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) – again, there is just one set of values.

ENERGY (kcal) FAT (g)

2,000 70

SATURATES (g)

20

CARBOHYDRATES (g)

260

SUGARS (g)

90

PER SERVING

PROTEIN (g)

50

All our recipes come with nutrition information per serving, so as long as you stick to the serving sizes we recommend, the nutrition information we provide will be accurate.

SALT (g)

6

NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE

CALCIUM (mg)

800

IRON (mg)

14

l Individual needs vary considerably, so use this as a general guide only. Ask your GP or doctor to refer you to a registered dietitian if you feel you would benefit from personalised advice. Nutrition is calculated accurately, but may vary, depending on the ingredients used. Only listed ingredients are included in the calculations. NOVEMBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 97


T H E L A S T WO R D

5 TOP FACTS to TAKE AWAY Our favourite healthy snippets and tips from the experts in this month’s issue

What’s the difference between chicken korma and chicken jalfrezi? No, we’re not talking spice mixes, we’re talking 527 calories. Find out which is the wiser choice for your waistline p38

SHALLOTS ARE AS NUTRITIOUS as onions, but they’ll never make you cry… At least not so much. Get chopping and slicing while they’re in season p13

WITHIN FIVE YEARS of getting married, women gain up to 24lb (for men, that’s 30lb!). We propose a do-it-together approach to healthy eating and exercise p16

Giggling over that hard-to -perfect move in your exercise class MAY BE A BONUS. Laughter is linked to improved aerobic endurance p11

COMPILED BY LIZ ATKINS. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

WHAT WE EAT can affect the level of inflammation in our bodies – which is in turn linked to our risk of disease. Discover the foods to fight it p28


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cados 20 avo ml per 250 ! bottle!

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• High in vitamin E, lutein, Co Q10, plant sterols and glutathione • All natural, contains no trans fats, additives, preservatives or artificial ingredients Here’s what Dr Nicholas Gill, International Strength and Conditioning Coach with New Zealand’s All Blacks, has to say: “I like to put Olivado Extra Virgin Avocado Oil in smoothies and on salads because of the high monounsaturated fat content, which is perfect for great health and awesome for performance.”

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