Page 1

THE NO-SWEAT BIKE COMMUTE P. 34

6 THINGS EMTs WISH YOU KNEW P.40

CYCLING’S ULTIMATE

PASTA SAUCE P.30

THE FAST, FUN, SMOOTH SPECIALIZED ROUBAIX 

CAMPAGNOLO’S NEWEST— WORTH IT? P. 6 4

BEST WINTER WORKOUT P.32

TIRES FOR MUD, ICE, SNOW, & MORE P. 86


The desire to go back is always there. Back to the place where you are truly comfortable—free to be yourself, speak your mind, invite people in, or simply close the door to it all. You live here.

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME


N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 6 // V O L U M E L V I I // N U M B E R 1 0

RIDE HERE NOW!

THE

BEST BIKE CITIES!

40

P. 17

Stories

44

15 An Insane Climb Changed Everything

17 How Bikes Are Making America More Awesome By BICYCLING Staff and Contributors

30 Pasta! Pasta! Pasta! Whip up the tastiest ride fuel ever. By Maria Rodale

The indoor workout that doesn’t suck. By Jon Christian

34 The Secret to Sweat-Free Commutes By AC Shilton

38 How to Crush Long Rides By Brett Smith 40 What EMTs Wish You Knew

34

These post-crash tips could save your life. By Selene Yeager

44 A Beautiful Disaster Dream rides aren’t always so dreamy. By Jered Gruber

56 Meet the Forrest Gump of Sober Cycling By Tracy Ross

4

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Ci t y : St a rce v ic / is to ck ; B r a in : M CK I B I L LO ; Rid er s : G r u b er I m a g e s ; S hir t : J ay Wa t s o n

32 Get Crazy Fast


Stuff 61 Ethic Paint Works Turn your bike into a canvas.

64 Campagnolo Potenza Could this new group take on Shimano Ultegra?

66 Open U.P. This gravel bike goes all ways.

68 Specialized Roubaix and Ruby So much more than smooth.

72 Fat Chance Slim Chance 2.0 A reincarnated steel racer that’s still magical.

76 Cleary Meerkat

82

61

A kids’ bike so fun it inspired our first comic-strip review.

80 Drama-Free Dropper Posts 82 Felt VR2 84 Bontrager Meraj S1 Women’s Softshell Crush winter with $150.

86 The Ultimate Guide to Cyclocross Tires

72

90 Recommended Black metal meets bikes.

EVERY ISSUE

12 The Selection 100 This Way On the Cover Photograph by Mitch Mandel. 6

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Sp ecialized and Felt : M at t Rainey ; Ethic and Fat Chance: R y an O lszew ski

Go ahead, ride there.


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THIS MONTH’S TOP TIPS, BEST ADVICE, AND PERSONAL PICKS FROM OUR EDITOR BILL STRICKLAND

ONE

2 . When winter hits, I usually try out something fresh for fitness. One year it was weights and plyo, one year a lot of running, one year an aerobic mishmash I refuse to call Crossfit. One year I split a lot of wood. This winter, I really want to see what Zwift, the online training/gaming/ community platform I’ve so far only dabbled with, can do for me. I’ll be the avatar in a BICYCLING/House Industries kit stubbornly pedaling through the high-tech virtual-reality world on a steel bike and aerodynamics-bedamned, low-profile wheels.

i bought a cotton/merino shirt from parker dusseau about five years ago. It’s the toughest, best-wearing “good” shirt I own, and it gets me through everything from wrenching in my bike shop and ripping around town to pitching TV producers or explaining BICYCLING to mainstream ad execs with millions of dollars to spend. It’s been caught on chainring teeth, accidentally run between chain and cassette, snagged on valve stems, and assaulted with grease, cleansers, rain, mud, snow, slush, blood, sweat, and (yes) tears—and definitely shows a little character for all of that but never lets me down. We profile the brand’s founder, Vaughn Brown, this issue. He and I also started talking about creating a custom BICYCLING version of the shirt I love. The resulting collaboration has some cool new details and should wear (and wear in) even better. Get the story on page 34, and see the shirt at shop.BICYCLING.com.

4

THE BEST BIKE CITIES

I grew up—and discovered cycling— just outside of Chicago, so its spot atop our list of 50 Best Cities for Cycling is gratifying. On page 17, we tell you about the coolest things some of those cities are doing. To find out why they made the list, go to BICYCLING.com/bestcities16.

BIKES ARE MOST BEAUTIFUL TO ME WHEN THEY’RE CLEAN BUT NOT PRISTINE—AND MORE SO AT THE DESTROYED END OF A HORRIBLE HARD RIDE WHEN THEY’RE WAITING TO GET THAT WAY. 12

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Por tr ait : B r akethroug h M edia ; Shir t : @ B IC YCLIN GDE SIGN

The community of cycling forms the center of my friendships and my day-to-day life, and is the key driver of my improvements as a rider. I read a reliable study recently that said about 21 percent of cyclists only ride alone—missing out on that connection. Some can’t shape their lives around set schedules, or are put off by the character or politics (or mandatory ugly kit) of local groups. Joining the Rapha Cycling Club is a way to belong while also reaching beyond your neighborhood. Among the most notable fiscal paybacks of the $200 annual membership are free coffee at any of the worldwide clubs (easy to see cyclists drinking back their membership fee in a year) and the ability to book a $25 daily rental of a high-end Canyon road bike (huge if you travel a lot to major cities).


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THE ONE THING THAT CHANGED IT ALL COMING UP SHORT Photograph by M A R S H A L L K A P P E L

Once I heard about Everesting—climbing the total height of Mount Everest in a single ride, out and back on the same route—I couldn’t stop thinking about that number: 29,092 feet. I did my first attempt on Sentinel Peak outside Tucson. I accumulated around 21,000 feet of elevation in 14 hours. I went through every emotion possible. There were laps where I was crying. Although my attempt was unsuccessful—the weather was unseasonably warm, I got stung by a bee—I learned that I can be alone with myself for hours. Since then I’ve done more long solo rides, like the 40-mile dirt road up the backside of Mount Lemmon. I’ve found that the physical pain of cycling helps me clear my head. Riding keeps me sane and strong. JUS TIN WEEKS , 24

/ BIKE SHOP SALES / TUCSON , ARIZONA NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

15


If you’re satisfied with current MTB pedals, then you may not be interested in the Speedplay Syzr. The Syzr is designed differently to deliver 100% of rider power directly through the cleats instead of through the spongy rubber lugs of the shoes like the others. The Syzr includes additional features you won’t find anywhere like micro-adjustable float, Target Acquisition Technology, and custom fit options. If you’re tired of wasting power and are ready to adapt to an advanced technology that gives you total power efficiency as well as improved ergonomics, then the Syzr is designed for you. To learn more, visit Speedplay.com.

Hand assembled at Speedplay in San Diego, California


RIDE HERE NOW!

THE

BEST BIKE CITIES! P. 19

Getty Images

, ds e n r tre t a ly— , a e p l s t h i e n d oo o p e d e a - fr e , t 7 1 s i ike els F e F th eniu re bone G S TA f N g o n o t- m ry L I S it o -ye ies eve BIC YBCU TOR r a p l e cit f o r A N D T R I b e l m r r L E ON ce d si g ouette N DI LA N D C A n in b Y I A a ak d B m an

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

17


Bicycles mean business as well as fitness, says Fort Worth’s Betsy Price

F

or bike love with a Texas twang, head to Fort Worth for one of Mayor Betsy Price’s rolling town hall meetings. Each week, the 66-year-old hosts a casual, 7to 8-mile ride to meet residents—some on their own bikes, others using B-Cycle bike share—and chat about their ideas on how to improve the city. “When you put spandex on a body like mine, people will tell you just about anything,” she says. On weekends, you might spot Price at a group ride, answering questions from new cyclists. The mayor got into cycling more than 40 years ago, when she and her husband bought bikes to celebrate their first anniversary. In 2011, she brought her passion to the mayor’s office, pedaling to work events and talking to coworkers about riding. “I realized if I was going to maintain an active lifestyle as mayor, it would be vital to find ways to incorporate it into my city activities,” Price says. She also wanted to bring cycling to the city she loves. “The health of communities is critical to your economic development, to your engagement, to

18

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

the vitality of your community,” Price says. “Biking became a huge piece of that.” She launched an initiative called FitWorth that includes programs devoted to wellness, including the Tour de Fort Worth, which overlaps with the Tour de France and features 21 days of cycling events. Price rides them all. “You’d have to be crazy to be me,” she laughs. “In a good way.” Price says every member of her staff and city council has tried riding at least once, and she’s committed to bringing cycling to the masses, from her town-hall rides to a Complete Streets program that aims to ensure that new roadways are safe for all users. Since she took office, the city has added 66 miles of bike lanes and put $1.2 million toward building trails, to make it safer and easier for residents to exercise. “Obesity is a creeping disease—you’ll end up with high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart problems,” Price says. “And businesses coming into the city want to know about the health of the workforce. So if we can say we’re the fittest community around, that’s a big draw.”—Molly Hurford Photo Illustration by @ B I C Y C L I N G D E S I G N

 No. 3 CURB APPEAL San Francisco boasts more than 5,000 bike racks, but you’ll find the coolest ones outside the Madrone Art Bar at Fell and Divisadero

Postcard: Get t y; Price and Mur al: Cour tesy

America’s Most Bike-Crazy Mayor



No. 1

No. 2 BIKES NOT BULLETS In May 2015, Karim Nahim, 47, manager of the Miami Bike Shop, partnered with the city’s police department to launch a gun buyback program with a twist—instead of receiving cash or a gift card, anyone turning in a firearm would walk (or ride) away with a free bicycle, no questions asked. Thanks to local fundraising efforts and contributions from bike companies, Nahim was able to give away 75 road, mountain, and kids’ bikes; he hopes to repeat the event during the 2016 holiday season. “One guy wanted to give his neighbor’s kids a couple of bikes because their parents couldn’t afford them,” Nahim says. “There was also a girl whose dad bought her a gun when she moved to Miami. But she wanted a bike to see the city.”—Danielle Zickl


Streets. The gallery/watering hole sponsored the city’s 69th bike corral—a curbside area that holds four or five bike racks—which doubles as an on-street mural. “Diamonds on Divis” is the work of Bay Area painter Kristin Farr, whose colorful geometric designs appear in public spaces around the world.—Emily Furia No. 4 A MAN, A MAGNET, AND A DREAM If you want to reduce your chances of getting a flat in Austin, Texas, head for the bike lane on East 51st Street. Since July, Andy Jones, 56, has been sweeping the 5-mile stretch with a giant roller magnet, which he drags behind his Surly Big Dummy. “A bunch of friends were getting flats there,” says Jones, “and I thought, ‘This is not a hard problem to solve.’” He says he’s picked up about nine pounds of metal so far, and plans to tackle other areas in town. “Once people understand what I’m doing, they’re excited about it,” he says—“especially cyclists who see what’s coming off the road.”—D.Z.

E

very two years we sift through Census and department of transportation data on more than 100 cities, consult with experts from organizations such as People for Bikes and the League of American Bicyclists, and talk with bike advocates and everyday riders to identify the 50 most bike-friendly towns in the United States. We look at everything from miles of bike lanes to the percentage of cycling commuters who are female—a key indicator of safe bike infrastructure—to the number of cyclist-friendly bars. The goal is not only to help you plan your next relocation but also to inspire riders and municipalities to advocate for more of the forward-thinking changes you’re reading about on these pages. (“Shaming works,” admits one city planner we spoke to this year.) For detailed info on this year’s picks and our rankings, visit BICYCLING.com/bestcities16.

RANK CITY

2014 RANKING "

RANK CITY

2014 RANKING "

1

CHICAGO

2

26

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA

24 

2

SAN FRANCISCO

7

27

BOISE, IDAHO

20 

3

PORTLAND, OREGON

4

28

LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA

23 

4

NEW YORK CITY

1

29

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

37 

5

SEATTLE

8

30

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE

34 

6

MINNEAPOLIS

3

31

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY *

43 

7

AUSTIN, TEXAS

11 

32

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA

40 

8

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

10 

33

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN

41 

9

WASHINGTON, DC

5

34

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA

31 

10

BOULDER, COLORADO

6

35

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

39 

11

DENVER

12 

36

CINCINNATI

35 

12

FORT COLLINS, COLORADO

9

37

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA

32 

13

INDIANAPOLIS *

25 

38

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

14

SALT LAKE CITY *

26 

39

COLUMBUS, OHIO

15

PHILADELPHIA

14 

40

MIAMI

29 

16

MADISON, WISCONSIN

13 

41

CLEVELAND

50 

17

BOSTON

16 

42

COLUMBIA, MISSOURI

44 

18

EUGENE, OREGON

15 

43

ATLANTA

NEW

19

NEW ORLEANS

22 

44

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA

NEW

20

PITTSBURGH

21 

45

TAMPA, FLORIDA

NEW

21

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

27 

46

MILWAUKEE

36 

22

TEMPE, ARIZONA

17 

47

SALEM, OREGON

38 

23

TUCSON, ARIZONA

18 

48

SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA *

30 

24

LOS ANGELES

28 

49

THOUSAND OAKS, CALIFORNIA

33 

25

ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA

19 

50

DETROIT

* BIGGEST JUMP ( 3-WAY TIE ) * BIGGEST DROP

NEW NEW

NEW


No. 6

Bike Share Grows Up 5 ways bike share continues to evolve to better serve our communities  IT’S EASIER TO USE

When bike share rolled out, it strongly favored those buying an annual pass; shortterm rental options were cumbersome and pricey. But operators are shifting the pricing structure to be closer to that of bus or train travel. Washington, DC’s Capital Bikeshare, Philadelphia’s Indego, and Los Angeles’s Metro Bike are just three of a growing number offering easy single-ride checkout, priced at $4 or under.



 THE BIKES ARE GETTING COOLER

The orange-and-silver townies in Portland, Oregon’s Nike-sponsored Biketown system have a shaft (not chain) drive, stowable U-lock, and a solar-powered LCD display. Nike even painted some of them as classic sneaker designs. So far, Delia 20

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Ephron has yet to write a bizarre rant about the color like she did for the New York Times about Citi Bike’s distinctive blue-hued rides.  IT’S BECOMING MORE ACCESSIBLE

After Portlanders asked for tricycles and hand cycles in their bike share fleet, the city announced it would add them in 2017. Boston, Chicago, Washington, DC, and Austin, Texas, among other cities, offer inexpensive (typically about $5) annual memberships for low-income riders. And Los Angeles recently received a grant to expand its system in low-income neighborhoods.  E-BIKES ARE JOINING THE FLEET

Some bike-share systems are starting to incorporate electric pedal-assist bikes from

the Montreal-based company, Bewegen. The wireless, solarpowered kiosks don’t need to connect to a power grid. Find them in Baltimore and Birmingham, Alabama, and next year in Richmond, Virginia.  IT’S REALLY SAFE

Bike share had an unwelcome milestone last summer: the first fatality, when Virginia Murray was hit by a truck while using one of Chicago’s Divvy bikes. Her death is as tragic as any of the hundreds of cyclist deaths that occur each year. But consider that US bike share has traveled millions of miles, with more than 30,000 bikes. Bike share may even be making cycling safer. The National Association of City Transportation Officials examined data from seven cities and found that cycling becomes less risky as more people ride.—Joe Lindsey

Boise Bic ycle Project and Bike Share: Cour tesy

 No. 5 NOT YOUR AVERAGE EARNA-BIKE PROGRAM Every Friday, mechanics from Idaho’s Boise Bicycle Project co-op teach a maintenance class at the South Boise Women’s Correctional Center, where inmates refurbish donated bikes that are then given to local children in need. After fixing 15 bikes, an inmate earns the right to receive her own bicycle from the program upon release. Since the program, called Shifting Gears, began last February, 12 women have earned bikes. Some keep wrenching after they’ve met the requirement. “They get every last piece of dirt off because they care so much about the kids,” says Jimmy Hallyburton, executive director of the BPP. Hallyburton says Shifting Gears could nearly double the number of bicycles the BPP is able to give away—up to 1,000 a year—and is providing the women with new skills as well as a means of transportation. He hopes to expand the program beyond Boise. “This isn’t just about bicycles,” he says. “It’s about wanting to make a lasting impact on the community.”—D.Z.


YAY BI K E S ! have to pedal, literally, on a freeway.—Ian Dille No. 8 BURRITOS BY BIKE In 2012, Tommy Clark, a seminary student in Memphis, Tennessee, stuffed 15 bean burritos into his backpack, hopped onto his fixed-gear, and rode around the city handing out food to anyone who appeared to be in need. “People hugged me and high-fived me,” Clark says. “One guy said, ‘Man, I’m so thankful for you tonight. Can I say a prayer with you?’ It was one of the most spiritually moving moments of my life.” Today, his Urban Bicycle Food Ministry relies on hundreds of volunteers who make up to 400 burritos a week. On Wednesday nights and Saturday mornings, 15 to 30 cyclists ride for about an hour and a half handing out food, water, toiletries, and other essentials. “When someone comes up to us and says, ‘You helped my son,’ or ‘You helped my friend,’ or ‘You helped me,’” Clark says, “it makes me never want to stop doing this.”—D.Z.



22

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

148% increase in property values for homes within a block of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail, since its opening in 2008

1,900 2

meals for the needy donated by cyclists during the 2015 Cranksgiving food-drive scavenger hunt in Tempe, Arizona

3,000

number of cyclists who show up to the casual Slow Roll ride in Detroit each Monday

MPH

Speed by which cyclists outpace cabs in Midtown Manhattan (according to Citi Bike)

TH E 2016 BI K E CITI ES

HALL SHAME of

Not. Funny. // An SUV in Columbus, Ohio's satirical July 4th Doo Dah Parade displayed a bike on the hood, a pair of legs sticking out of the sunroof, and a sign that read, “I’ll share the road when you follow the rules.” #BikeLaneFail // After widening Austin Bluffs Parkway, a six-lane arterial, Colorado Springs striped a questionmark-shaped bike lane that forced cyclists to stop at an off-ramp. The city’s transportation manager told the Colorado Springs Gazette that the idea was to tell cyclists that it is their responsibility

to yield to motorists, and that “you might want to be a fairly experienced cyclist before tackling Austin Bluffs.” Blaming the victim // In July, Matthew von Ohlen was killed while riding in a Brooklyn bike lane, by a hitand-run driver who appeared to have intentionally struck the cyclist. The next day police officers blocked the bike lane at the crash site to issue tickets to bike riders. Gone but not forgotten // Boulder, Colorado’s biketopian reputation took a hit when city council voted to remove a protected

bike lane on Folsom Street—just 11 weeks into the yearlong pilot project. Dark comedy // Because the $5.76 million repurposing of Philadelphia’s Manayunk Bridge, a former railway, didn’t budget for any lighting, bike commuters found a locked gate when arriving at the bridge after sunset.

 PLUS: THE 2016 WORST BIKE CITY Charleston, South Carolina, has one of the country’s highest bike commute rates—so why are we calling it this year’s worst city for cyclists? Find out at BICYCLING.com/ charleston.—I.D.

Bridge: Kur t Stricker/Get t y Images

 No. 7 NEXT-LEVEL WATER CROSSINGS On September 12, 2015, Portland, Oregon, opened Tilikum Crossing, a 1,720foot, cable-stayed bridge solely for cyclists, pedestrians, buses, and trains. The largest non-car span in the country is a striking addition to the Willamette River panorama, with LED lights that change colors based on the water’s speed, height, and temperature. But cyclingmad Portland isn’t the only place where new bike infrastructure doubles as a local landmark. In just two years, Philadelphia’s 15-foot wide Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk, which hovers over the water for a 2,000-foot stretch, has become one of the city’s most Instagrammed spots— look for it in the Rocky movie Creed. In Austin, Texas, the Boardwalk at Lady Bird Lake, which runs along the Colorado River, became an instant tourist attraction when it was unveiled in 2014. And a soon-to-be-opened bike-ped bridge spanning the gorge of Austin’s Barton Creek will give local riders safe passage on a route where they now


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 No. 10 A GREENER FOOD CHAIN A Florida-based organization called Fleet Farming converts homeowners’ lawns into organic gardens, then transports the harvested produce by bicycle to local farmers’ markets and restaurants. Residents may keep a share of the bounty for their own use and are not responsible for maintaining the plot.—E.F. 

No. 9

They Don’t Just Sell Bikes The Freewheel Project gainesville, florida Ryan Aulton ran a shop called Pleasant Cyclery for seven years. But he and his wife, Jamie, “wanted people to have an option for a sub-$200 bike that wasn’t from Walmart.” That was hard with a traditional shop’s business model. So in 2015, they leased a rundown, 12,000-squarefoot warehouse and turned it into The Freewheel Project, a not-for-profit shop that sells refurbished donated bikes for $200 and under, as well as new models ($1,000 and up). The Aultons say that the driving force is their employees and volunteers. Equally important is their financial model—they rent out twothirds of the building. Some of the proceeds go toward parts for kids’ bikes, which Freewheel services at no cost. 24

G&O Family Cyclery seattle Tyler Gillies and David “Davey Oil” Giugliano are chasing a different niche. G&O, which opened in 2013, caters to families, mostly with young children, who want to ride more for transportation. To figure out what kind of bikes and accessories to recommend for each individual family—from $99 balance bikes to $3,000plus front-loading box bike models—“we talk about how their kids eat, and where they go to school, jobs,” says Oil. Because of that, the staff quickly gets close to its customers. “When families walk in and kids pull out of their parents’ hands to give us a hug, that feels great,” says Oil. “We’re privileged to be in this place in our customers’ lives.”

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Des Moines Bicycle Collective The DMBC opened in 2008, but over the past few years it’s become as much advocacy group as bike shop, says executive director Jeremy Lewis. The organization runs Des Moines’s B-Cycle bike share and offers bike giveaways, maps, and earn-a-bike programs. It also works with city planners to improve cycling infrastructure. The efforts are paying off. Protected bike lanes are part of Des Moines’s Bicycle Master Plan, and the city is conducting a mobility study to help it improve conditions for cyclists. Area employers are using amenities like bike parking to attract a younger workforce—and working with the DMBC and other groups to ask city council for safer streets to match.—J.L.

No. 11 BIG WIN FOR BIKE LANES In 2011, the city of Chicago began installing curb-protected bike lanes (which use a concrete barrier to separate cars and bikes). But the Illinois Department of Transportation prohibited the structures on statecontrolled roads, including Chicago’s Clybourn Avenue, a dangerous corridor for cyclists. In 2013, advocates sent more than 3,000 emails to then-Governor Pat Quinn protesting the policy, and the state soon relented. The Clybourn lanes opened in November 2015, and the city continues to convert older bike lanes, which separate cars and bikes with less durable plastic bollards, to curb-protected designs. The concrete barriers send an important message: Chicago’s commitment to safe and low-stress cycling is permanent.—I.D.

D M B C and Fleet Far ming : Cour tes y

These shops are making it easier for people in their towns to get around on two wheels


How Pope Francis—seriously!—helped Philly’s bike advocates (and one cycling skeptic) get more people riding

I

t was one of Pope Francis’s more obscure miracles—for one weekend, in Philadelphia’s typically car-clogged Center City, the streets were wide open for bike riding and other types of motor-free gallivanting. When the news came out that the Secret Service would be closing 4.7 square miles of streets to cars in the so-called Pope Zone for the historic September 2015 visit, local cyclist Alexandra Schneider saw a huge opportunity for bikes. She sent out a call on social media: “The streets will all be closed—let’s have a ride!” Schneider expected to recruit about five to 10 friends to join her on a 10-mile loop. But media outlets picked up on the PopeRide story. Ultimately 3,000 cyclists showed up. Its success gave rise to an Open Streets campaign in Philadelphia, and in July of this year, the city announced that the first Philly Free Streets event would take place September 24. The Open Streets fervor also attracted the ire of Stu Bykofsky, a Philadelphia Daily News columnist known for his hot takes on bike lanes and scofflaw cyclists, among other things. Schneider, who’d been reading his column for

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years, says she “fangirled” at being personally called out. “I felt like, ‘I’ve made it!’” she says. After Schneider reached out to him via Facebook, Bykofsky—who insists that he’s not anticyclist, just anti-bad cyclist behavior—agreed to meet with her. Together with the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, they organized Byko’s Safe Bike Ride, an 11-mile, lawabiding group ride through the city that raised $2,000 for an organization that serves homeless women and children. Bykofsky also agreed to stop referring to cyclists as “pedalphiles”— provided that local bike advocates refrained from describing him as “anti-bike.” Schneider thinks more of that kind of dialogue—and more Open Streets events—has the power to show people that everyday cycling can be the norm. “A lot of critics are people who still view cycling as an activity for children,” she says. “One of the best ways to engage those people is to present an image of cycling that’s like, ‘Let’s go have a picnic and instead of driving, we’ll ride there—let’s go about our daily lives, but with bikes!’”—Caitlin Giddings Photo Illustration by @ B I C Y C L I N G D E S I G N

P o p e a n d Cy c l i s t s : G e t t y ; M o o n l i g h t M a s h : C o u r t e s y

#PopenStreets



No. 12

 No. 13 DANCE PARTY! Thirty-two-year-old Al Hongo, founder of Eugene, Oregon’s most popular social ride, the Moonlight Mash, says the event “rose from the ashes of my 1987 Honda Accord.” In the spring of 2012 he removed his car’s stereo system, mounted it to a bike trailer, and led a music-infused ride in the light of the full moon. Today, the Mash draws hundreds of cyclists each full moon between May and October. The playlist is broadcast live by the University of Oregon’s student-run radio station, so you’re never far from the tunes—which Hongo promises are “always danceable.” Participants include everyone from kids on tricycles to roadies in Lycra, and costumes are encouraged (past themes have included Bowie/ Prince, Star Wars, and Ugly Sweater). Hongo, who works as a mechanic and “basket advocate” at the shop Bicycle Way of Life, says the Mash is beloved by locals and visitors alike: “People have told me they made sure their road trip came through Eugene on the night of the ride so they could attend.”—D.Z.


No. 14 NO MORE BIKES IN BATHTUBS Spurred by demand from prospective tenants looking to live a car-free (or car-light) lifestyle, property owners are finding creative ways to court cyclists, and not just in traditionally bike-friendly locales or the biggest cities. Here are some of the most intriguing developments.

BI1116_cities011

Atlanta // The apartments at Ponce City Market provide a bike valet for residents and guests, and showers for commuters; $1 from every car-parking fee goes to the Atlanta BeltLine project, a network of greenspace, transit facilities, affordable housing, and 33 miles of trails. Cincinnati // Each unit at Abigail Apartments gets access to a secure bike locker, and residents receive a 50 percent discount on the city’s bike share, Red Bike. Cleveland // Renters at the Lofts at West Side Community House get access to the building’s bike-share fleet, a free membership to the local advocacy group and the Bike Rack commuter center, and a handmade wall-mounted rack from Soulcraft Woodshop. Des Moines, Iowa // Bici Flats, due to open this spring at the junction of three trails, includes a bike-washing room, bike storage, and wider hallways that make it easier to wheel your most prized possession through the building.—E.F.

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No. 15

The Accidental Bike Advocate This civil rights lawyer is making the streets safer for everyone

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amika Butler distinctly remembers the moment she became one of us—or as she puts it, “one of those crazy bike people.” She’d been driving for about two years in Los Angeles to her job at a nonprofit foundation when a doctor put it to her straight: “You’re young, you’re black, you’re driving everywhere, and you fit into this borderline-diabetic risk group. You have to do something about that.” So Butler started riding a bike for exercise. Then a friend convinced her to train for the AIDS/LifeCycle, a seven-day fund-raising ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles. In the middle of a grueling training ride, she realized she

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

had become that person—clipped in, spandexed, worried about how much weight her water bottle added on a climb. When the position of executive director at the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition came up in 2014, she applied. Initially the Nebraska native seemed like an outsider pick for the position. But her background as a civil rights lawyer and social justice advocate turned out to be a good fit—and her perspective brought more inclusivity and equity into the bike-advocacy conversation. She was on a panel that discussed the subject at the 2016 National Bike Summit and gave the keynote speech at the continued on p. 92 Photograph by S E R E N A L I U


keep tabs on the competition, no matter how far they fall behind

Š2016 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries


Stories

 MAKE T HIS R IDE F UEL Î

The Pasta Sauce Inspired by Cycling BY M A RIA RODA LE

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BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

MY DAD, ROBERT RODALE, who bought BICYCLING magazine in 1978, watched his first track cycling race at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, where he competed on the American skeet shooting team. He came back determined to build a velodrome near our home, in Trexlertown, Pennsylvania. So we went to Montreal to see a sixday race. We went to Vienna, Austria, for the junior world championships. And after my dad opened his velodrome, lots of cyclists came through our house. When I was 16, I served as Eddy Merckx’s driver. (Fortunately he enjoyed risk, so we

got along fine.) Eventually my dad bought a house where visiting racers could stay. My sister Heidi was hired to cook for them and sometimes I helped. I still remember stirring a giant pot of spaghetti. A bunch of hungry cyclists can eat a lot of spaghetti. While I’m sure my dad wished that I’d been a bike racer, I found that all of my exposure to the world of cycling really made me want to cook. And eat. My new cookbook, Scratch, has my dad’s Bolognese recipe in it. One of the key ingredients is tomato sauce, and here’s my recipe for making it from scratch. The best sauce starts with great, ripe tomatoes. You can cook it fast or slow. You can keep it simple (I add a little butter and serve it with pasta and Romano cheese) or use it as a base for more complicated recipes. A good tomato sauce is kind of like a good bike—it takes you where you want to go.

Photograph by S TA C E Y C R A M P


BASIC TOMATO SAUCE

STEP 1 Core, halve, and gently squeeze threequarters of the juice from the tomatoes. (Don’t squeeze too hard; you still want a bit of juice in there.) STEP 2 In a blender or food processor, pulse the tomatoes, garlic, salt, and basil to combine, working in batches if necessary.

Prefer a chunky sauce? Simply cut the tomatoes into quarters and roughly break up with a potato masher. STEP 3 In a large saucepan, heat the oil on medium. Add the tomato pulp, stir, and reduce heat to low. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for two to three hours, until the sauce reaches your desired consistency. STEP 4 If you’ll be freezing the sauce, pour it into wide-mouthed glass canning jars, leaving an inch of space for it to expand. Let the sauce cool, then freeze it for up to 10 months. Makes 1 quart.

PER ¹₂ CUP  67 calories / 3g protein / 11g carbs (3g fiber, 7g sugar) / 2g fat / 211mg sodium

Maria Rodale is the CEO of Rodale Inc., BICYCLING’s parent company. For more of her recipes, order a copy of Scratch at scratchcookbook.com.

Cour tesy

INGREDIENTS 5 pounds organic tomatoes, any variety 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp salt Leaves from 1 sprig fresh basil 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil


ÅT HE N

Roller racing icon Charles “Mile-a-Minute” Murphy (left) in 1901

N O WÆ Deep in the pain cave at Sacred Tattoo in New York City

 There’s no drafting, so the races favor riders who can churn out massive power for short intervals. “The body redlines immediately,” says Jonathan Morrison, co-owner of OpenSprints. With little to no wind resistance, winners typically hit 40 to 45 mph. With very high gearing, speeds of 60 mph or more are possible.

Stories

The Most Fun You’ll Have Riding Indoors Goldsprints pit riders head-to-head, on stage, for brutal efforts of 30 seconds or less. Here’s everything you need to know about these madcap stationary bike races. BY JON CHRISTIA N Photog r aph by Libr ar y of Cong ress /Cor bis / VCG v ia G et t y Ima ges

 A Goldsprint event feels like a combination of a punk show and a cyclocross race—you’re as likely to spot a Sex Pistols patch as anything made from spandex. Riders pedal track bikes with forks mounted to stands, and electronic rollers show each racer’s speed and progress on a projector screen for the benefit of a raucous crowd.

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 Goldsprints’ predecessor, roller racing, dates back to the early 1900s. One of the sport’s oldest known photos (above), from 1901, shows Charles “Mile-aMinute” Murphy (left)—best known for drafting a speeding locomotive. Today bike shops and clubs can build their own hardware using kits sold by OpenSprints of Salt Lake City.

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

 They’re named after a beer—probably. The 1999 Cycle Messenger World Championships in Zurich featured a stationary bike race sponsored by Swiss brewer TurbinenBräu. The poster for the event featured TurbinenBräu’s Gold Sprint beer, and according to roller racing lore, the name stuck. What we do know: Races are often hosted in bars.

 Want to crush the competition? Try this workout from Jim Rutberg, coach and author of The TimeCrunched Cyclist: Once a week, on a stationary bike or trainer, pedal as fast as possible in the easiest gear you can spin without bouncing in the saddle. Start with short bursts of 20 to 30 seconds and build up to efforts of one to two minutes, with recovery periods at least as long as the previous interval. Do one or two sets of 10.  The winners may surprise you. Tim Fry, whose company, Mountain Racing Products, owns the Kreitler roller brand, recalls stumbling into a sprint at a Portland, Oregon, art gallery where the final two competitors were a Lycra-clad roadie and a bike messenger. When the messenger advanced to the finals, he celebrated by stripping down to a pair of bright pink underpants for the finals. “I don’t know if it’s a competition between messengers,” Fry says, “or between messengers and everybody else in the world.”


Photograph by P A R K E R F E I E R B A C H

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

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Stories

The Secret to No-Sweat Style Vaughn Brown, founder of San Francisco-based Parker Dusseau, on what inspires his line of tailored adventure apparel—and the one ridingto-work trick he swears by BY AC SHILTON

I

grew up skateboarding. It was the mid ’80s, and back then it really meant something to be a skateboarder. It was very much a fringe sport—there was a specific uniform and we wore brands that identified us to each other. That’s where I picked up my interest in clothing. We’d skate in the heat for two, three hours wearing jeans and T-shirts and flannel. So people started to make stuff to skate in that would allow you to be mobile and look the part. I’m 44 now and my style has definitely matured over the years, but I still want pieces that are comfortable and allow me to be active. The brand is named for my uncle, Gene “Skip” Parker Dusseau. He was the guy who introduced me to an active lifestyle. He took me on my first backpacking trip, he got me into skiing, he got me into biking, he introduced me to everything. He wore the quote-unquote performance clothing of his 

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BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Photography by J AY WAT S O N


Stories ies GET THE BICYCLING x PARKER DUSSEAU WORK SHIRT! Made from a blend of soft wool and Japanese cotton, our hard-wearing, sharp-looking, charcoal button-up shirt features a mesh shoulder gusset for mobility, black reflective details in the collar and cuff, shatterproof Duraflex rubber buttons, contrast interior piping and buttonhole stitching. $165 shop.BICYCLING.com

find out where the bodies are buried in terms of production and sourcing.

Ace Your Commute Style 1 Ask yourself, “If I weren’t riding today, how would I want to look?”

2

time. They were all very classic pieces—chinos, shorts, vests—in natural fibers like wool and waxed cotton. That’s really an inspiration for me and for the line. He passed in 2004, before I started the brand, but I think he knows what I’m doing. It’s great to have him as a muse.  There are a lot of fancy, technical things on 36

the market right now, but our goal is to keep things pretty simple, pretty classic, pretty timeless. And we rely on natural fibers and fabrics (like merino wool) for performance.  Clothing production is super complicated, especially if you haven’t done it before. When I started the brand in 2013, I found out that there’s

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

nobody in San Francisco who could make a structured men’s suit. For the core pieces in the line— the shirts, the chinos— we work with a great factory here in San Francisco. But for the suit we went to Shanghai, based on an introduction I got from a woman in the industry. Much of this business is about getting on the phone and asking questions and trying to

From there, choose pieces that allow you to ride. Don’t have a closet full of Parker Dusseau? Reach for items that breathe and will move with you. Look for give across the back of a shirt. With pants, you want flexibility around the knees, rear, and through the crotch.

3 Good foundation garments are key. Brown wears merino wool T-shirts, socks, and skivvies, which feel good next to the skin, are antimicrobial and temperature regulating, and don’t retain odor.

 People are always like, can you give me some style tips? And I always say, find basics that you really like, then accessorize around them with an awesome pair of sneakers or a really cool watch. But start with a nice, classic, foundational look. [I have] a small number of well made pieces that I build around. I think I own one pair of jeans, but they’re a really good pair and I wear them a lot. I don’t have a closet full of shirts.  Aesthetic is important to me. I put on a different outfit when I’m on my carbon bike than I do when I’m just doing my daily commute, but I always take pride in how I look and what I wear.  It sounds super analog, but one way to not arrive at work sweaty and looking like you’ve just been to battle is to not put yourself through battle. I see a lot of riders absolutely hammering on their way to work, but there’s also the option to slow down and chill. Just get on your bike, pedal, and relax a little.


Stories

You Can Ride Farther Than You Think Ultracyclist Kelsey Regan, who holds three cross-state records, helps you tackle your hang-ups about pedaling long distances BY BRETT SMITH

EXCUSES













“I’M NOT FAST, ATHLETIC, OR INTO TRAINING PROGRAMS.”

“BUT I’VE NEVER RIDDEN THAT FAR.”

“I DON’T HAVE A FANCY BIKE.”

“I DON’T HAVE THE CASH— OR A CREW.”

“I’M TOO OLD.”

“I’M NOT A MECHANIC.”

Regan averages about 13 mph and takes time to stop and smell the wildflowers. She doesn’t follow a program or log miles—she just rides. “I prefer to enjoy riding for what it is,” she says. She advises new cyclists to start slowly: “If you can do 30 miles the first week, do 40 the next.”

µ 

µ 

BUSTED

BUSTED

Regan, now 25, was a new cyclist when she completed her first ultra ride, in 2012. Bored during a break from Iowa State, she left her home in Davenport, Iowa, and rode 70 miles north, hauling a $25 tent from Walmart. One week and 500 miles later she was at Lake Superior—and yes, she rode back. “You don’t have to know what you’re doing to get started,” she says. Regan learned from her mistakes along the way—she jettisoned nonessential gear on day 2 at her father’s vacation home.

Regan rode nearly 50,000 miles— including her recordbreaking rides in Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin— on a Specialized Dolce Sport she bought for $970. “You can do a lot with an entrylevel bike and hand-me-down gear,” she says.

While ultra-race entry fees can run hundreds of dollars, many cost $100 or less, and some are free. Many are unsupported, a challenge Regan relishes: “I enjoy the uncertainty,” she says. “It’s not just about who’s the fastest. It’s about fixing mechanicals, navigating, planning, staying awake. Having to figure out everything without a support crew creates a more level playing field.”

3 FREE ULT R A RACES

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Regan aims to take down all 50 crossstate records and estimates she’ll finish when she’s 72. At the 2014 National 24Hour Challenge, where riders aim to log as many miles as possible in one day, she was inspired by 75-year-old James Hlavka, who pedaled 394.7 miles to her 341.5.

µ  BUSTED

When Regan took off on her 1,000mile Lake Superior ride, she didn’t know how to change a flat. When she punctured, a YouTube tutorial and the can openers from two multitools helped her get back on the road. It’s easy enough to be prepared ahead of time: Get schooled at a city bike co-op, or check out our online maintenance course at rodaleu.com.

ARIZONA TRAIL RACE 300 miles, Parker Canyon Lake, AZ; April 7, 2017 // ALMANZO 100 102 miles, Spring Valley, MN; May 20, 2017 // TRANS AM BIKE RACE 4,300 miles, Astoria, OR, and Yorktown, VA; June 3, 2017

Rob and Julia Campbell/ Stocksy

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SPONSORED CONTENT

(left to right) ASE CEO Pat Cunnane, Eduard Prades of Caja Rural, and Milay Galvez, Fuji International Marketing Manager, celebrate Prades’ win at the 2016 Philadelphia International Cycling Classic

FUJI IS A PROUD CITIZEN OF PHILADELPHIA, and encourages our employees to be active in both cycling and bicycle advocacy in our city. Our company’s culture of involvement, and our belief that corporate responsibility starts at home, has lead to a positive impact in the city, and in the cycling industry as a whole. Fuji is a proud supporter of The Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, an organization whose initiatives include programs to get more people on bikes, establish safer bike routes, and removing barriers to riding. Each year, Fuji also donates a fleet of bikes to the Cadence Youth Cycling program, which helps Philadelphia youth train as part of a group after school, and also supplies the program’s elite athletes with race bikes. Fuji also supports the Philly-based organizations Gearing Up and Neighborhood Bike Works. Since 2002, Fuji has been a proud sponsor of the Philadelphia International Cycling Classic, and has sponsored both the women’s Team Tibco and men’s Caja Rural teams, which both raced PICC in 2015 and 2016. Caja Rural won the race both of those years in what was a very exciting moment for Fuji and all members of the Philly cycling community. Our annual party on the infamous Manayunk Wall, adjacent to the finish line, helps Fuji employees, customers, and fans celebrate the longest-running major city bike race in the country. By supporting the city we live and ride in, we are provided with the opportunity to experience firsthand the positive effects of cycling. By encouraging cycling within our company, Fuji has cultivated a community of cyclists who are proud to be part of the Philadelphia cycling culture.

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PLAN AHEAD Make personal health and medication info easy to find. You can set up a Medical ID on an iPhone and make it available from the lock screen. Other options: Road ID, dog tags, or an ICEdot crash sensor that you can enable to share your location and medical information via text.

HEAD You don’t want to mess with a possible concussion or bleeding on the brain. Get checked out if you have a cracked helmet, headache (even if it comes on later), confusion, vision changes, or if you lose consciousness. CHEST If it hurts to breathe deeply, you might have a broken rib and should see a doctor. “Cracked ribs can have sharp edges,” Martin says, “and if it’s an unstable fracture and it shifts, it can puncture a lung.” BELLY Palpate your abdominal area gently. A tender spot could mean internal damage to soft tissue or vital organs. If your belly becomes distended or firm, that’s a sign of possible internal bleeding. Seek medical attention.

Stories

6 THINGS EMTS WISH YOU KNEW No matter how good a cyclist you are, crashes happen. But before you jump back on your bike, run through this quick checklist from Greg Martin, an advanced EMT in Ketchum, Idaho, to be sure you’re really good to go. It could save your life. BY SELENE Y EAGER

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SPINE Spinal cord injuries need immediate attention. If you have numbness and/or tingling in your fingers or toes, or discomfort when turning your head 45 degrees to the left or right, get to the ER. BLEEDING Forget what you’ve seen in movies about using a tourniquet; you risk doing more damage than good. Manage heavy bleeding by placing direct pressure (preferably with something clean) on the wound. Keep it there until you can see a doctor. Illustration by M C K I B I L L O


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CHASING FALL WHEN A DREAM RIDE DOESN’T LIVE UP TO EXPECTATIONS, MAKING IT HOME BECOMES THAT MUCH SWEETER BY JERED GRUBER

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY GRUBER IMAGES


LAST YEAR while scrolling through my phone on top of some pass in the Pyrenees in the middle of July, waiting for the tsunami of the Tour de France to arrive and the chance to spring into action for three minutes with my camera, I happened across a story about fall colors. Interesting thing about fall colors: You can chase them down a mountain. The colors change at higher altitudes before the lower ones. They also change at the higher latitudes before the lower ones. Everything moves down. These ideas tangled in my head with the one overriding thought I have that comes from too many months on the road: I want to go home. Colors and bikes and home. What if Ashley and I ride from north to south along the Eastern part of the United States, chasing the colors all the way home to Georgia? We could get some friends, invite people to join us through social media, and find someone to drive a support van. We could see all the things! That night, I drifted from editing images of the Tour to plotting away on my favorite mapping software, Ride with GPS. It’s an idle game of procrastination that masquerades as work. I click and street view and drop my little peg man all over the world, and I get excited about the possibilities. Click, click, click. The red line roams across the screen. The elevation profile emerges: Teeth pop up—large, sharp ones. The line grows longer, the teeth grow in number, my smile grows bigger. it’s easy to make a route on a computer. Fingers don’t cramp, they don’t keel over in exhaustion at mile 120. They don’t ache and moan, they don’t get weary, they don’t toss and turn because they’re too tired to sleep. It was an immense distance from where we’d decided to start in Emmaus, Pennsylvania, the home of the magazine you’re reading now, all the way to Athens, Georgia, the place that houses our hearts. The funny thing about chasing fall or riding home—we referred to it differently depending on the day, our mood, or whether or not autumn had already liquidated the E

area—is that we had to start at the end. We loaded up the van in Athens, then drove a thousand miles north to Emmaus. At one point, Thomas looked out the window and said, “We’ve been driving for 10 hours, Jered. It’s a long way home.” My smile wavered for a moment, but then I saw a road twisting into the red leaves, an old farmhouse tucked off to its side. It’s going to be fine. We’ll take it one day at a time. It can’t be that hard.

MORE HURT THAN WE EXPECT It doesn’t matter how many big rides you’ve done, how many centuries, double centuries, Grand Tours, whatever. Any ride can hurt—badly. On the first day, we roll out of Emmaus into a calendar page: a narrow road weaving lazily down a broad slope with an aging cornfield to the right, a giant red barn to the left, and a forest of red and orange and yellow in the distance. Then we hit Amish country. We motorpace behind a horse-drawn buggy clop, clop, clopping down the road. Young boys in white shirts, dark pants, and suspenders; and girls in dark blue dresses and matching bonnets come running to the fence to cheer us on. We all hurt more than we expect to, but we’re so distracted by the world we have stumbled into, we miss the warning signs, and when we arrive in York, Pennsylvania, after seven hours of rolling hills, it hits all at once. A storm of tired. I wake the next morning feeling like slow footsteps on an old wooden floor, wondering how we’re going to make it to Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, that day, let alone all the way home to Athens. I run into an older guy on the way to breakfast. We trade good mornings and he asks: “How far are you going today?” “110 miles.” He nods, neither surprised nor dismayed. “I like that. I ride my bike around my neighborhood sometimes. It’s 3 to 4 miles. It’s hard at first, but it gets better.” NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

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WHAT HAVE I DONE? Jon is limping, hamstrung. Ash is curled in a ball, cycling shoes still on, seemingly asleep in the parking lot. I just want to go to bed. Two days in, 10 days to go, and we’re in a bad way. Thomas Brown was the USA Crits overall champion a couple of years ago. Now he’s leaning against a basketball hoop, drinking a beer, broken. His ride to Georgia is probably over. It’s kind of a big-deal moment. It was my wild idea to chase the falling leaves all the way home, but it was Thomas who took my notion and made it real, something that made sense and was doable, on paper at least. It’s always like that. I dream big in cloudy lines; Thomas draws them in dark and finite. Though I’ve known him only a few years from the Athens race scene, once we became friends it was like we always had been. We spend winters in search of every paved road, dirt road, and path in rural northeastern Georgia. When Ashley asks what we did or what we talked about, I just shrug and say, “I don’t know. Stuff, I guess.” I never really know why, but it always leaves me with happy feelings, the kind I miss more than anything when I’m thousands of miles away for nine and a half months shooting races in Europe. Thomas is the friend I had in mind when I dreamed up this ride. I wanted to go exploring with Thomas, because that’s what we do. Jon gets up and makes Ashley a sandwich. When we announced the trip on social media, Jon Robichaud asked to come along for the whole thing. Jon had been working full time, but was about to embark on a year of traveling with his wife, Pamela, in a converted Sprinter van. To kick it off, he figured he’d join us for 10 days of autumnal exploring. I can’t imagine moving, but there he is, handing Ashley a sandwich. I can’t even get up to take care of myself, let alone do something for anyone else. That feeling, that terrifying feeling of what have I done? Are we even going to make it through today, let alone all the way back home? That is very real.

KING BABIES! It didn’t seem that crazy when we cooked up this plan. It would be challenging, but come on, we were solid riders. Eighty to 100 miles a day with support? How bad could it be? Really bad. It’s day three, somewhere in Maryland on a deeply rutted paved road covered with green

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and orange leaves, less than an hour into the riding. Thomas struggles on the first climb, recedes, then disappears. Next time we see the van, he’s at the wheel, his knee officially done. There are still 90 miles to go today, and hundreds between this lovely Maryland side road and home. Number one rule of the big ride: Don’t pay attention to the full totals of the day. Stats like 180 kilometers and 3,500 meters of climbing (roughly 112 miles and 11,500 feet) are enough to make Alberto Contador’s legs twitch. So we stop every two hours or so: Feed 1 (second breakfast), Feed 2 (lunch), Feed 3 (early dinner). That splits the day into four manageable parts. The food stops are paramount. Jon introduces us to the magic of what he calls King Baby sandwiches: Hawaiian rolls, Fluff (spreadable marshmallow for those who missed out on a feral childhood), and sandwich meat. The whole thing really takes off when you add a little crunch—thank you, potato chips. We take in the final bits of Maryland before arriving at our third state: Virginia. We are supposed to ride the world-famous Skyline Drive from Front Royal to Luray, but as we approach Front Royal, it seems that most of the East Coast has descended for peak-season leaf peeping. Cars stretch into the distance. So we zig when we are supposed to zag, and we parallel Skyline Drive to the west on a road that feels like a secret. Fort Valley Road runs through a small dip within the greater Shenandoah Valley, sheltered by the two arms of the Massanutten mountain range. The relentless rolling hills of the first two and a half days give way to this flat (but still mostly uphill) stretch that dances alongside Passage Creek for about 23 miles. It’s an oasis of beauty in a gorgeous land of difficult that ends at Fort Valley Gap, where it’s only two miles of climbing to the top, and then we drop into Luray. Another day done, one day closer to home.

EMBRACE THE TUCK Where Fort Valley gave us ease, everywhere else gave us struggle. We had trudged up painful, never-ending hills followed by never-longenough descents through Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia. And as we head south, the hills only grow. Brendan Cornett, another friend from Athens, spent years as a bike-racing vagabond


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THE LEAVES ARE MY FAVORITE COLORS—RED AND ORANGE AND EVERY SHADE IN BETWEEN.


roaming all over the country in pursuit of a dream, but he’s not your typical skinny bike racer. He’s short and thick with calves the size of my head and the smoothest pedal stroke I’ve ever seen. And he falls downhill like a cannonball released from a hot-air balloon. His compact frame and efficient speed make him the one to follow when the road tilts downward. He drops to his top tube, chin to top cap, and if you’re not paying attention, the wheel you are on is gone. If you want to stay attached, the tuck must be your constant friend, or you waste energy pedaling hard to catch up. Brendan’s efficiency becomes all of ours. We ride the hills easier, crush the downhills with no effort, roll the flats. We can do this! When the hills get really big, we settle into our own rhythms and fall in love with Appalachia one bend at a time, one long section of dirt at a time.

BONFIRES AND MOONSHINE Somewhere barely inside West Virginia, a cow charges. It’s on two legs and carrying a beer. It’s Thomas. Wearing a cow suit. I laugh so hard my legs stop working. By the end of day four, we hit the Raw Talent Ranch just outside of Mathias, West Virginia. Owner Jay Moglia is one of those characters cycling seems to produce: a former dirtbag racer (in the most affectionate sense of the term), musician, bike courier, and plain-speaking philosopher. He’s the kind of guy who needs a beer with his home-cooked meal and a few sips of moonshine in front of the bonfire for the day to be complete, for the truth to flow. That bonfire! Jay quietly disappears from the dinner table. He gets the fire raging all orange and beautiful, while we sit inside watching his silhouette beneath the moon. We are tired and worked over. Sleep is on everyone’s mind, but the fire sings a pretty tune. The night is cold and clear. We sit around the fire, miles and miles from anyone else. We don’t talk a lot, just stare, that fire stare that people have engaged in for millennia. We gasp at the power of Jay’s moonshine and decide that jumping over the fire is probably the best idea.

THE LAST GOOD DAY By my figuring there are about five perfect days each year—one for each season, plus a wildcard. It’s the fifth day of our ride. The

leaves are my favorite colors—red and orange and every shade in between. It’s in the low to mid 60s, the type of weather in which you start bundled up, but gleefully shed layers as the day goes on. We’re in West Virginia where deciduous trees are putting on their finest show as dirt and gravel crackle beneath our tires. The roads are steep, and I’d love to stand and stretch my back a bit, but the loose dirt decides otherwise. If the price of admission is a low cadence and my butt stuck in the saddle, I’ll pay it every day from now until I’m broke. We’ve arranged to meet up with pro mountain biker Jeremiah Bishop. He’s a smiling, skinny monster of a bike rider, but today he’s just happy to be outside playing tour guide. We check out two of the big climbs on his Alpine Loop Gran Fondo. One is an out-andback on dirt, the other is a killer right out of the Alps. We spot a mother bear and two cubs in the woods. We take in a glorious meadow, a perfect farmhouse, and the Appalachian Mountains extending as far as we can see. Talk turns to the weather. Jeremiah says it’s supposed to rain. Something called Hurricane Patricia is moving our way. We ride more dirt, cross three streams—Ash plants a foot solidly in the middle of one—and then we begin the final climb. Reddish Knob is one of the classics in the area, the crown jewel of the Alpine Loop. At the top, the impossibly skinny road ends at 4,397 feet above sea level in a wide, graffitied parking lot. There’s a giant white slash across the painted blacktop that says: VA STATE LINE. It’s not a lie. Jeremiah points out bumps and lumps and ridges across the horizon, telling me about this and that and everything. I feel small, and the world below looks even smaller.

ONLY COLD AND ONLY WET Patricia makes landfall at some point while we sleep. She arrives softly, but by morning, the rain is dancing on the leaves. I can barely gather the energy to get out of bed after checking the weather: rain, plus temperatures just this side of snow. There’s no way we are riding in this. Ashley and Brendan immediately tap out, happy for a forced rest day. Thomas one-ups them by leaving altogether, home to see about fixing his damaged knee. That leaves Jon, me, and Chris Scott, owner of the Stokesville Lodge in Mount Solon, Virginia, where we

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spent the night. Jon wants to ride. We could have a lovely day of quitting, but Jon has to put his tough hat on. I curse Jon that morning. I dress spitefully. I put my shoes on spitefully, and everything else I can possibly find to cover my body— spitefully. I clip in spitefully and trudge out into the rain. I pout and prepare for misery. This is nuts. It won’t last long. Except it does. And it is—I hate to say it—kind of fantastic. Chris has tales to tell, Jon is happy, and I reluctantly cross the line to positive, and even when Chris turns around to head home, we stay happy. It is cold and wet, but it is only that.

GOING THROUGH THE MOTIONS A couple of hours earlier, the rain had stopped. Gray skies remain, but it’s time to roll. There are two of us that day, Brendan and myself. Ashley is in the van suffering from weather-induced lack of motivation, Jon is hobbled by hamstring issues. It’s day seven of our ride, day two of torrential downpours. We have a hundred miles to go before nightfall. We roll fast and smooth over drying Virginia roads and wet orange leaves turning brown with time on the dark pavement. The miles tick by with no real effort. We are flying, and it’s fun. Brendan turns around: “Where’s the van?” We stop. Five missed calls. The van is stalled on the side of the road about five miles behind us. On the map, the closest town is Dublin, Virginia, a ways down Highway 100. We head back. Suddenly things aren’t so easy. It feels like five hours of riding have been added to our legs. Chatter stops. If the van carrying all of our food and belongings gives up today, we’ll be hardpressed to find a way home, let alone continue the trip. Brendan remembers a mechanic’s shop some distance down the road. The van groans and heaves, but somehow we get it to the repair shop where we sit in the lobby, anxiously rustling through magazines like a family awaiting news of a loved one. The door opens and a man in his early 20s, hands blackened by car grease, bursts forth. “Ah, it’s no big deal,” he says in a thick Virginia drawl that sparkles against the corrugated-metal walls. “We’ll get you rollin’ again before you know it.”

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We rejoice at the news, but our elation doesn’t last long. Before Thomas went home, before the rains came, before the van broke down, it had been an adventure. But we still have four 100-mile-plus days to go, up and over and along the Blue Ridge Mountains. The reality sets in and we find ourselves looking to the horizon, just wanting to be home.

RIDING HOME The final day was supposed to be a glorious homecoming. The whole trip was. We had gone to bed the night before hoping for a pause in the rain, but when we awaken, heavy drops smack into still-green leaves. We had chased fall, caught it, and passed it somewhere back in South Carolina. The day starts in the completely foreign roads of far northeastern Georgia, heads to the vaguely familiar, continues to the road I pedaled on my first-ever bike ride, and finishes with a hill I’ve ridden hundreds of times. I am sick though. The rain, the fatigue, everything has caught up with me on the final day. I try to pretend it’s okay. I take a hero pull with Brendan, but can’t match him. I hold it together through town, but as we come to the final hill between our ride and being done, I fall to pieces. I watch as our little group rides away, and I feel tears coming. It wasn’t supposed to be this way, none of it was supposed to be like this. What happened? Cars pass, the group disappears over the top. I crumble, and I’m certain that everything has been a giant mistake. Then I pull into the Dowds’ driveway. John and Barbara are the patron saints of Athens cycling, and have opened their home to itinerant cyclists for years. They’ve given so much to the sport, to Ashley and me, that it’s a fitting place to end the ride. The garage light is on, and everyone is smiling. I get hugs, happy faces, Brendan says something funny, Ash gives me a kiss, and the previous week and a half starts to fade. It doesn’t matter. In the end, it was just a bike ride—a really, really long bike ride—but it finished as all good ones do: with smiles and hugs, some shit talking, a bunch of good food, laughter, and then a long night’s sleep. That’s all I really wanted. Jered and Ashley Gruber spend most of the year with their cameras chasing the pro peloton around Europe. This is the first time they chased fall.


Stories

Nick Basalyga wants to harness the power of cycling to help people struggling with addiction.


Meet the Forrest Gump of Sober Cycling Prior to this year, social worker Nick Basalyga had rarely traveled west of his hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania. That changed on a foggy day this past July when he embarked on a ride from San Francisco to Philadelphia. When we checked in with him along the way, he explained why he took to the road and how cycling has healed him. BY TR ACY ROSS

So you started in San Francisco, and you’ve never been there before? Nope, I’ve never visited any of the states or towns (with the exception of Pennsylvania) on my tour. Why is that? I grew up with addiction. My dad was an alcoholic. He made poor financial choices, had trouble keeping jobs. My parents relied on family members to keep us afloat. And we didn’t always have extra money for things like travel. But now you’re out West, and what exactly are you doing? I’m doing a cross-country bike tour to raise money for a nonprofit I began called In the Saddle. It’s a play on the addiction term “on the wagon,” and also the sentiment “I’m doing good. I’m back in the saddle.” The other piece, of course, is that bike seats are called saddles. It’s for people who decide to get sober and spend time in a drug or alcohol treatment center, but who find that they don’t know what to do or who to hang out with once they’re out. With In the Saddle, they’ll be with people the same sex and age, and we’ll do group rides, community service, and support each other throughout our recovery.

Are others riding with you? No, but I’m hoping for a slow build—kind of like Forrest Gump, but on a bike. How did you get into cycling? I started riding when I was 4. Then in college, my mom bought me a Trek 3700. I used that to get to class but mostly for my job that summer—I was a handyman for an elderly couple outside of West Chester, Pennsylvania. It was three miles from my apartment, so a six-mile round-trip. I loved the physical effort of biking to work in the morning, being out in the sun doing yard work, and riding home in the late afternoon. I was training to walk on to the West Chester University soccer team in the fall, so I was focused, getting in shape, and helping people. I was happy. And then you started drinking more? Yes. My drinking affected my soccer, which contributed to me losing my starting position. And my grades suffered. How bad did it get? I had a problem from the moment I had my first drink at 16. I enjoyed the taste of beer, but I always drank to get drunk. It came to a head during a blackout episode in 2010.

A friend and I had been out partying and he got locked out of my apartment. He called me 20 times trying to get in. Fortunately, he made it inside, but the next morning I found the doorframe busted. It was also Mother’s Day, and I had such a bad hangover. My mom had already dealt with an alcoholic and now I saw how she’d have to deal with another. So that day I stopped cold turkey. A year and a half later, I purchased my Specialized Secteur. Nice. And cycling helped you? It totally lifted my spirit. I mostly rode alone, but I felt

BY LEARNING TO FIX BICYCLES, SOMEONE IN RECOVERY CAN RESHAPE HIS SELF-IDENTITY.

free, confident, and at peace with the changes I had continued to make in recovery. Did you ride continually after that? By a year later [three years into his recovery], I’d become what I’d call a high-end recreational cyclist. My favorite game was to go faster than the guys with the nice stuff. But then in 2013 I went to grad school for social work at New York University and stopped riding. Perhaps as a result, I made a rash of bad decisions. I felt like my recovery wasn’t in a good place, and I didn’t feel stable. Two years later, I got back on the bike, doing a 30-mile roundtrip commute to a job at an after-school program in Harlem. It was a great way to start my day and end it, and it’s been a staple ever since. You eventually started working at a retail bike shop, right? Bicycle Therapy in Philly? I did. And it’s funny. Because they don’t actually do therapy. Were there times when you really wanted a drink but went on a bike ride instead? Oh yeah, absolutely. After a long day at work I’d want a drink, but I’d know that I just 

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Stories

needed to get on the bike and hammer for a couple of hours and I’d feel better. Even now, six years into being sober, I know if I’m not exercising, being around people in recovery, and giving back to my community, I start to rationalize sliding back into bad behavior. And that’s the model I’ve used to build In the Saddle. When did you come up with the idea? In November of 2015. I had seen too many people relapse after treatment, heard too many stories of people overdosing and dying. They had a common theme: “I stopped going to meetings, started hanging out with my old friends, and fell back into addiction.” I thought about my recovery, the services that are out there, and a program I’d worked in as a social worker that was great but lacked group therapy. You need all of the pieces: a group, an activity, community service, and therapy because when someone is in active addiction, they struggle with their self-identity, lack purpose, and

need more connections to meaningful relationships. How will In the Saddle address this? By developing the skills to ride and fix bicycles, someone in recovery has the opportunity to reshape their self-identity. By using these skills to positively impact their group and community, they can develop purpose. And by meeting regularly and talking about personal challenges in recovery, they can develop relationships. How much money are you hoping to raise on your ride? About $250,000 will cover our first program year, help us secure a space, and buy cycling equipment and parts. We’re also hoping to get donations to help pay for [things like] urine tests to assure that everyone is sober. How much have you raised so far? Just a little over $3,500, but we’re far from the end, so I’m hopeful we’ll get there. In the Saddle is

AFTER A LONG DAY I’D WANT A DRINK, BUT I’D KNOW I JUST NEEDED TO RIDE.

already a legal nonprofit, no matter how much we raise on this ride. By running at a smaller scale, we’ll be able to collect data, and then apply for city, state, and federal grants, and establish ourselves as a recovery program. And how do you plan to attract people to In the Saddle? This fall, we’ll fund-raise, recruit at treatment centers, and coordinate with other addiction/ recovery organizations to connect with individuals interested in early recovery. What’s the first thing you’ll tackle? We’ll start programming during the winter with indoor rides and bicycle education so group members can learn to build and repair bikes for themselves and the surrounding community. And our

counselors will facilitate group therapy sessions. Now that you’re a few weeks into the ride, what’s one highlight of your trip so far? I met this guy Charlie, out on Nevada Highway 50, who was training for the 508-mile Silver State Race. He was driving by and saw me and stopped to talk. I was on my way to speak at a treatment center in Fallon, Nevada, that night. After that, for several days, he’d drive to meet me at the end of each ride and we’d grab dinner. Other than that, it’s people who see my shirt with the In the Saddle logo on the back and tell me about people they’ve lost to overdose or addiction. When they do that, I know I’m doing the right thing, even though before this ride, the longest one I’d ever done was 63 miles.

The road to recovery doesn’t have to be lonely.

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ETHIC PAINT WORKS Life’s too short to ride a boring bike

Photography by R YA N O L S Z E W S K I

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Ethic Paint Works continued from p. 61

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LOOK AT YOUR BIKE. Really look at it. Does your bike reflect your inner light? When I bought a road frame a few years ago, I was in the throes of a depressive episode and couldn’t muster the energy to select anything but satinblack paint. This is not normal for me. Bikes are exciting, and I like them to look that way. Though I love my bike, the paint had always bugged me. I wanted it to look brighter, lighter, more joyous—which is what it feels like to ride it. One of the greatest things about bicycles is how easily you can transform them. A new handlebar or set of tires will make a bike feel different. New paint doesn’t change how the bike fits or performs. But it seems to, and that’s why it is magic. You will swear your bike rolls faster, smoother. You will ride it more.

On these pages, you’re seeing the handiwork of Ethic Paint Works. Ethic is the in-house paint shop of Denver’s Alchemy Bicycle Company and does contract work for other small builders. It recently opened its doors to the public. The painters honed their skills working at Serotta and Independent Fabrication. Their work shows impressive range: clean single color, hand striping, intricate masking, special effects, and logo re-creation. The company is responsive and easy to communicate with. You can send the artists finished artwork to execute or share your overall vision (“I like interesting simplicity—and stripes”) and discuss options over email before settling on a design. Is bespoke paint right for you? Here are a few things to consider.

Ethic’s work starts at $420 for a frame and fork painted in one color. It can go way up from there (the paint jobs shown here and on the previous page are $1,060 and $2,099, respectively).  time The standard turnaround is four weeks from the time the design is finalized; more complex paint takes longer. Ethic offers rush service (seven to 10 days) for $250.  fine print Custom paint might void your frame’s warranty. Your bike is the paintbrush you use to trace the lines of your joy all over the land. But it also can be a canvas that expresses how it makes you feel. This silver bike, with stripes the colors of the Colorado flag? That’s mine. Now it looks like it rides: bright and shiny with bits of sun and sky.—matt phillips  money


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Stuff

Campagnolo Potenza Why your next new bike could shift with Italian style


PRICE

$1,050 WEIGHT

2,487 grams (as tested, with 11-32 cassette)

CAMPAGNOLO HAS MADE no secret that its new midrange Potenza group is intended to go shifter-toshifter with Shimano’s Ultegra. It’s a tall order: Ultegra 6800 is a stunning combination of price, weight, and performance that has made it the dominant drivetrain on bikes costing (most commonly) about $2,500 to $5,500. For Campy to unseat Ultegra as original spec on more midrange bikes will require some behind-the-scenes business, but before that, Potenza has to match up against Ultegra in the stuff that matters to riders. So, does it? At retail, Potenza would cost you about $115 more than Ultegra ($1,050 versus $935). But bike manufacturers get volume discounts, so it’s possible that a bike built with Potenza could be the same price as the same bike built with Ultegra. The Potenza group is about 80 grams heavier on my scale, mostly due to the crankset, which has a bottom bracket for a BSA threaded shell. I’ve ridden Potenza about 1,000 miles so far, often back-to-back with Ultegra, which comes out just ahead in performance, but with a smaller Photography by M AT T R A I N E Y

gap than its slight advantages in price and weight. Of Campy’s mechanical groups, Potenza requires the lightest touch and is the smoothest shifting. I’m inclined to say it is Campagnolo’s best-shifting mechanical group, though it lacks some of the features of the brand’s higher end groups. Potenza upshifts only one gear per press, while Record upshifts up to five. And it lacks some of Campy’s endearing character, like the distinct, crisp mechanical feel and sounds. Lever throws are shorter than Ultegra, and the clicks are sharper compared with Ultegra’s damped and buffered quality. Shifts feel faster, more robust, and only a little less smooth. Even Potenza’s front shifting—where Shimano is usually clearly ahead of the competition—is fast, polished, and nearly equal. Ultegra still has the smoothness and refinement that makes it the leader, but only just. Shifts are announced with more noise than Ultegra, but less than typical for Campagnolo. Once in gear, Potenza turns with a hush, save for some noise from the chainrings at extreme chain angles. To be fair, Shimano and SRAM groups do the same. Ergonomically, Potenza is a step up for Campagnolo. The hood covers—its best yet—have good grip and some cushion, which is helpful for riding without gloves. Newly shaped hood peaks are an improvement as well, making the additional hand position on top of the peaks more functional. Potenza’s thumb buttons drop lower than Campy’s other mechanical groups, mimicking the shape of its EPS electronic shifter buttons. They’re also easier to reach from the hoods and drops. A lightly textured strip on the front of the brake levers offers more grip than a shiny finish, especially when your hands are wet. Campy has also introduced a new and improved brake-pad compound for aluminum rims: power is up, modulation is smoother, and the brakes feel livelier. But Shimano’s brake feels a little stiffer and modulates better where it is most crucial: near lockup. I don’t think Potenza “beats” Ultegra. But it is very, very close to equal, and, in every way, a legitimate alternative for all riders.—matt phillips

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W H AT Y O U NEED TO KNOW Rides as well— with little to no compromise—on regular road tires as it does with mountain bike knobbies 2 Blurs the lines between a road, ’cross, and gravel bike 2 Sold as a frameset

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Photograph by R YA N O L S Z E W S K I


Stuff OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS, I started using my ’cross bike as my road bike. It allowed me to piece together loops mixing paved and dirt roads where I saw more squirrels, rabbits, and deer than cars. A skilled rider could take a regular road bike with 28mm tires on routes like these, but not everyone is comfortable with that, and some may want to venture into terrain, like singletrack or rugged fire roads, that would challenge even seasoned riders. That’s why the Open U.P. exists. It lets you match tires and wheels to your skills and local routes. U.P. stands for unbeaten path, and Open’s carbon, multisurface road bike took me to places I’d ridden by but never explored before. It feels natural on pavement and somehow still takes to the dirt like it was designed for it—a blend I’ve yet to experience with other bikes. The Open U.P. rides so beautifully that I extended my routes farther than usual, venturing to fire lookouts and abandoned campgrounds in the middle of nowhere. It feels smoother than a race-bred ’cross bike, and that’s particularly noticeable when it’s outfitted with smaller tires on pavement. Flattened and curved seatstays promote rear-end and pedaling stiffness and help generate an excellent ride quality that rivals that of many endurance

road bikes. It shines most on dirt roads with 40mm-ish-wide tires, where it seems to float over choppy sections that cause stiffer bikes to chatter and skip. In very general terms, the Open’s geometry is similar to a cyclocross bike, but with roughly 5mm shorter chainstays and a bottom bracket that is about 5mm closer to the ground. It handles a bit quicker than you’d expect, and has that “sit-in” feel that often characterizes bikes with a lower bottom bracket—the bike is more stable, a little easier to get on and off of, and the handlebar is effectively higher. Open cleverly drops the drive side chainstay to create clearance for up to a 50-tooth chainring while keeping the chainstays to a short 420mm, with clearance for up to a 54mm-wide tire. Much like the current crop of 29er mountain bikes with plus-tire compatibility, this road bike can also accept 650b wheels with highvolume tires because the outer diameter ends up being similar enough to PRICE a traditional 700c wheelset $2,900 to not upset the geometry (framset) and handling. I’ve found WEIGHT that the secret to setting up 19.1 LB (L, as a bike like this is to choose tested with the smallest, fastest-rolling Ultegra Di2)

tire that you’re comfortable with in the dirt so that riding on the road is still efficient and fun. I briefly experimented with 2.1-inch-wide mountain bike tires and found them to be a little overkill on the dirt and slow on the pavement for my taste. But the bike handles well in this setup, and some folks will appreciate it. I found my sweet spots in Schwalbe’s G-One HS 38mm, WTB’s Nano 40mm, and Horizon’s new 47mm tires (which are 650b). The slack, 72.5-degree seat angle is designed to be used with a zero-offset seatpost, but I prefer a steeper seat angle to get my fit right. On the flip side, I loved the aggressively short head tube, but some may find themselves with a big stack of spacers under their stem. Gravel and adventure bikes are not for everybody. Compared with your typical endurance road bike, they tend to be a little overbuilt and too attentive to stability for people who mostly stick to pavement. But the U.P. is special because it also rides so well as a road bike that you can almost forget it’s capable of much more with different tires. If you are lucky enough to live anywhere near rural dirt roads and ever wondered where they go, the question really isn’t whether you should buy an Open U.P., but rather what color it should be.—ron koch


Stuff

The Future Shock cartridge provides 20mm of smooth travel in the front. A standard threadless stem clamps to the portion above the rubber boot, while the section below is housed in the steerer tube. Three spring options allow the rider to tune the suspension feel.

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PRICE

$6,500, as tested (Pro build with Ultegra Di2) WEIGHT 17.6 LB (54cm Roubaix); 17.5 LB (51cm Ruby)

the carrefour de l’arbre—the last hard cobblestone section in Paris-Roubaix, and one of the toughest overall—opens with a serpentine, beat-up, crowned section of Belgian block dotted with washtub-size “potholes” that, on this day, was slippery with recent rains. On a bicycle, the most difficult bit of the sector is the sharp lefthander at the “T” intersection that has a crater on the inside. If you’re taking the corner at speed and stray over the crown, you risk sliding to the right and catapulting into the adjacent field. We hit the big stones at about 25 mph. Normally, at this speed, getting through that turn would be a full-body-rattling, eyes-shaking-out-of-your-head daredevil maneuver you need to experience to truly imagine. Instead, my line was jangly and rattly—this is the Hell of the North, after all—but never uncertain or out of control. The completely rethought 2017 Specialized Roubaix made all the difference. Back in 2002, Specialized was one of the first companies to create a completely new bike (rather than modifying an existing model for the teams) to tackle the Classics. That first version of the Roubaix had a longer wheelbase, taller head tube, and slightly more relaxed geometry than most race bikes of the time. It also had increased clearance for bigger tires (up to 28mm). Most distinctively, polymer inserts (called Zertz) were molded into the frame to damp the ride and take the sting out of the cobbles. Best part: The bike was available to the masses. *Flemish for: cobble eaters

The Roubaix has been updated since then, but the new model—along with a redesigned women’s Ruby— is the first full overhaul of the platform. The standout feature of both frames is the Future Shock suspension cartridge. Comprised of a balanced set of springs in a sleeve equipped with roller bearings, which connects the stem to the steerer tube, it suspends the rider from harsh jolts and hits that might otherwise send you off your chosen line, and allows the front tire to maintain better contact with the road surface. The frame is also a radical departure. The Zertz inserts in the stays and fork legs are all gone. On the men’s version, the head angle now matches that of the Tarmac (Specialized’s carbon race bike), the rider position is lower, and the wheelbase is shorter. The Ruby keeps the rider position and women’s geometry of the earlier version. On both, the frame is lighter and structurally stiffer than the previous model, accepts up to a 32mm-wide tire, and is disc-brake only. Both bikes benefit from Specialized’s Rider-First Engineered approach (the Ruby is the first women’s model from Specialized to get this), which scales tube shapes and sizes for frame size and rider weights. According to Specialized, this makes bikes of every size ride and react the same instead of differing in stiffness or handling as the frames get bigger or smaller than the “sweet-spot” norm they were designed for (usually around 54 to 56 cm). In our experience with Rider-First bikes, this claim is accurate. NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

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W H AT Y O U N E E D T O K N O W Roubaix gets a racier geometry than the previous model 2 Ruby becomes first Specialized women’s bike to get Rider-First size-specific tubing and layups 2 Prices start at $2,600 for the Elite models and top out at $10,000 for SRAM eTap equipped S-Works models 2 All frames share the tunable Future Shock cartridge

The top portion of the seat tube is oversized and ovalized, housing a seatpost clamped 60mm below the top tube junction, which allows the post to flex fore and aft to better isolate the rider from bumps and jolts.

The signature Zertz inserts aren’t gone from everything—the CG-R seatpost still uses one. In addition, 60mm of the seatpost above the clamp sits in an oversized portion of the seat tube (the clamp is that same distance lower from the normal top-of-the-tube location), giving the post more length to flex while the rider is seated. A rubber dust cap seals this junction, to keep the internals clean. The last big part of the updated package is the Roval CLX32 wheelset. The carbon rims have a new, shallower profile that Specialized claims is as aerodynamic as the deeper CLX40 and some 60mm-deep rims by other manufacturers, but still offer a forgiving ride. They 70

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

boast an internal width of 21mm, closer to XC mountain bike wheels than the 17 to 19mm widths more common on road-race wheels. This adds volume to the tires and translates to the ability to run lower pressures for more traction, comfort, and control. When you first push on the bar, you may notice the subtle bobbing of the stem and think this just isn’t going to work. It seems as if the setup will rob you of energy. But as our testers rode the bike, this worry vanished. Some did note the bar movement, but none ended up feeling it cost them power, and all of us quickly got used to the motion. Specialized claims—with data telemetrically captured during real-world

testing with longtime partner McLaren—that the bike actually saves your energy by smoothing the ride and delaying muscle fatigue. Our testing bore this out, especially on long rides, where the Ruby and Roubaix really excel. Said one tester, about a mixed pavement, dirt, and gravel route she had previously ridden only on Specialized’s carbon race bike, the Amira, “I felt a lot more fresh when I rode it on the Ruby—my arms, hands, lower back, and pelvic area were not sore, and I had more energy over the course of the entire ride. And I could ride plenty fast, keeping up with speedy friends, taking long pulls, and setting Strava PRs on a bunch of climbs and segments.” Said another of the Roubaix, “On some of the worst of our local roads—in thick gravel and loose corners followed by potholes and cracks and ruts—the bike could have gone faster and rougher, but I was the one who held it back.” Some testers noted that the bike was less stellar at isolating single bumps or taking the sting out of individual sharp edges. The Roubaix and Ruby seem to be best at smoothing terrain that is continually rough and chopped up, rather than saving you from the occasional pothole. All of us came away with an impression that the bikes handle superbly, especially downhill and around corners. We were discernibly more confident on technical descents and loose or rough terrain because the tires felt glued to the pavement. It took less muscle—and brainpower—to keep the bike on a chosen line. After riding the Roubaix, I’d agree with Specialized that smoother is faster. Other companies—from Moots to Trek to Pinarello and more—have been approaching this with road bike suspension. But by suspending the front end, where handling is most affected, and dialing in the rest of the bike for a comprehensive system, Specialized has made a huge leap. As one rider put it, “It’s truly transformative, like a new level of what should be expected.” Photography by M AT T R A I N E Y


A NEW MEMBERSHIP TO MATCH (ALMOST) EVERY OUTFIT. You have a jersey for your weekend rides. One for your charity rides. And of course, three for your gran fondos. We know what that’s like. That’s why the new USA Cycling Ride Membership brings you everything from roadside assistance to free gear for any occasion. Join to support the sport you love at www.usacycling.org/ride.


Fat Chance Slim Chance 2.0 Still got it!

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W H AT Y O U N E E D T O K N O W Two versions: Race, with 44mm head tube and Enve carbon fork with tapered steerer; and Classic, with straight head tube for externalcup headset and steel fork with 1.125-inch steerer 2 Frame color comes in blue, red, white, or yellow 2 Buy it as a frameset starting at $2,295 or complete bike starting at $4,255 with Shimano Ultegra 2 Tire clearance for 28mm tires, and a bit more


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Photography by R YA N O L S Z E W S K I

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Stuff

THE NEW FAT CHANCE Slim Chance is a TIGwelded steel road frame, which isn’t a big deal: Hundreds of builders all over the world crank them out daily. But 25 years ago, when the first Slim Chance arrived, a welded steel road frame was special. In the early 1990s, steel frames were almost all joined with brazed lug construction. TIG (which stands for tungsten inert gas) welding is generally more difficult than brazing and requires great care and skill. But properly executed, it results in a very light and strong joint. Though Chris Chance is mostly known for his Fat City/Fat Chance mountain bikes, he began his framebuilding journey in the 1970s by training at Witcomb Cycles, a custom builder of high-end steel road frames in Connecticut, with the likes of Richard Sachs, Ben Serotta, and Peter (J.P.) Weigle. After Witcomb, Chance started Fat City Cycles in Somerville, Massachusetts, in 1982, turning out lightweight mountain bikes. This background enabled him to make the first Slim Chance road frame lighter than most of its peers (by forgoing lugs), yet very strong and stiff. Fat Chance shuttered in 2000, and Chris Chance took a 15-year break from the bike world. Today most steel road frames are welded, and it’s the lugged and brazed frames that are a novelty.

Now Chris Chance has returned, and so has the Slim Chance. The world around it has changed a lot, but the Slim Chance 2.0 isn’t radically different from the original. It’s still steel and still welded, the BB is still threaded, and there’s still a pump peg. Geometry is even similar to the ’91 bike (which is also similar to a modern-day carbon race bike like, for example, the Specialized Tarmac). However, the new Slim’s tubing diameters have increased slightly, as have the fork steerer and seatpost diameters, to improve stiffness. But the Slim of today doesn’t hold the same unique position in the bike market that it did 25 years ago. The norm for performance is in another galaxy now. The new Slim is still a high-performance steel road bike, but it’s not fast, light, or stiff like a modern carbon bike. If you focus your bike purchases on what they’ll do for you on the Strava leaderboard, this is not your bike. What it is: a gorgeous steel bike, one of the nicest I’ve ever ridden, custom or stock. It’s delightfully smooth. I was hypnotized by the visible fore/aft oscillation of the fork legs moving in response to bumps. I melted with joy at the way the bike swooped wide arcs through turns. I giggled at how composed it was bombing at over 50 mph.

The frame is springy, lively, and courses with energy. I so enjoyed this bike that I pulled off the computer mount, because this bike made me stop giving a crap about time, distance, speed, or watts. Riding it just made me happy. Its heritage may be as a light racing bike, but in today’s context, the Slim has the gravitas of an elder statesman. It will not hold you back, but it does not push you forward like the best highperformance road bikes do. Sure, you can ride it hard, and of course a fast rider will still be fast on it. But this bike is about quality and freedom—and the experiences created by both. As a bike reviewer, I want to situate the Slim Chance among the many choices available to consumers and let you know exactly where it fits in. I don’t know that I can. The Slim helped create the world of welded steel bikes, but because that world is now so big and rich, the Slim melts into it rather than stands alone. But it is remarkable that it can PRICE be reintroduced, with rela$2,650, tively few changes, and still as tested feel like a fresh and modern (Classic craft-built steel bike. The frame, painted reasons have changed, but Enve stem) the bike is still something WEIGHT special.—matt phillips 17.0 LB (S)


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Stuff

No More Dropper Dramas Dropper seatposts make trail rides way more fun—but some can be notoriously unreliable. We tested 10 popular models. These three shot to the top.

ROCKSHOX REVERB STEALTH

FOX TRANSFER PERFORMANCE SERIES PRICE $314 POST, $65 LEVER WEIGHT 643 GRAMS* (30.9MM DIAMETER, 150MM TRAVEL)

The Transfer offers two lever options—a leftside under-bar mount for 1x drivetrains and a left- or right-side barmounted lever for 2x or 3x setups. Infinite height adjustments can be made through the travel, and although return speed is fixed, it can be modulated at the lever—the farther you push, the faster the return. It offers excellent overall performance at a relatively low price. The only caveat: It is 10 to 15mm longer than many popular posts, potentially limiting how far it can be inserted into some seat tubes.—ron koch

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Other than a new, gold logo at the top, the second-gen Reverb looks just like the original. And it still has infinite adjustability, very little side-to-side play, and good resistance to extension when you’re lifting your bike by the saddle while the post is compressed. Return speed (still adjustable) is slightly faster, but you’ll notice the biggest improvement months later as updated internals keep the dropper from becoming a squishy “suspension” post, a weakness that plagued first-generation Reverbs. Thus far, between several testers over three months, it seems to be more reliable. We did, however, unanimously dislike the push-button style remote that has a smaller target and requires a greater reach for your thumb.—r.k.

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

KS LEV INTEGRA PRICE $379 TO $429 WEIGHT 557 GRAMS (30.9MM DIAMETER, 125MM TRAVEL)

The LEV Integra is available in most popular sizes and drops, is reasonably light, has minimal play, and is smooth in its travel

with adjustable return speed. The cartridges that control the up and down movement have held up well in most cases, the bushings have a decent life, and it doesn’t gum up too easily. Routine maintenance is easy, too: It pops apart with basic

tools, and the remote system uses commonly available derailleur housing and cable. The post comes stock with a rocker switch-style remote that can be stacked next to shifters without interference, but the 1x-specific Southpaw remote ($35) is one of the best available: It’s ergonomically superior and, because it sits under the bar like a shifter, easy to actuate. —matt phillips

Photograph by R YA N O L S Z E W S K I

*A l l w e i g h t s i n cl u d e r e m o te a n d h o s e

PRICE $471 WEIGHT 609 GRAMS (30.9MM DIAMETER, 150MM TRAVEL)


Stuff

Felt VR2 Endurance gets shreddy BOTH THE NEW FELT VR2 and I were being pushed to our limits as we descended the increasingly rough dirt road high above Solvang, California. Not helping was the creeping darkness and the night’s worth of gear I had packed for a quick overnight trip to watch the meteor shower. It was somewhere in the middle of this ridge, with the city lights below to my left and the brightly lit oil rigs in the Santa Barbara Channel to my right, when I remembered I was riding an endurance road bike. The day before, I was carving smile-inducing arcs on a canyon road on the same bike with smaller, 28mm-wide tires. The VR2 responds quickly to a sprint and has a ride quality that’s smooth but lively. Now, with just a swap to bigger (35mm) tires, I was doing something that I wouldn’t have expected to do on this type of bike in the not-so-distant past. Felt’s new VR line has little in common with the Z-series model it replaced. Like all endurance road bikes, it emphasizes comfort with flattened, variable-profile seatstays and a new seat-tube junction that exposes more of the seatpost, resulting in 74 percent more deflection at the saddle compared with the Z-Series, says Felt. To maintain a consistent ride quality through the size range, the VR has sizespecific tube shapes and layups, and three lower headset bearing sizes. It also has a 23 percent stiffer head tube. Compared with Felt’s Race FR models, it features a taller stack and shorter reach for a more upright and less demanding riding position. To prepare the VR for going off pavement, Felt outfits the bike with subcompact 46/30t chainrings. For general road riding this works well, especially on

steep climbs, but I often found myself spun out on the long, gradual descents near my house in the Southern California mountains. Adding to the VR’s versatile nature is a pair of top-tube bosses for mounting a bottle cage or small bag. Hidden mounts on the fork and seatstays are compatible with a fender set designed specifically for this bike.

The build we tested comes with Ultegra Di2, Mavic Ksyrium Disc Allroad wheels, and Yksion Elite Guard 28c tires (though our test bike had different wheels and tires because the Mavics were not yet available). Technically, 30mm tires are the largest that will fit, but knowing my overnighter would involve a lot of dirt, I threw on some 35mm Schwalbe G-Ones.

They fit, though for legal reasons Felt cannot recommend using such wide tires, so I can’t either. VR stands for variable road, but the best part of this bike is how little performance it sacrifices for increased versatility. My light bikepacking adventure was at the edge of what this bike is capable of, but like other similar models I’ve Photograph by M AT T R A I N E Y


PRICE

$5,499 WEIGHT

17.7 LB (58CM)

tested recently—the Cervélo C5 and Specialized Diverge, for example—I was more impressed with what it could do than what it couldn’t. With their tire clearance, geometry, and ride characteristics, these bikes have little to do with racing and everything to do with getting out for an enjoyable ride, no matter what road you take.—ron koch

W H AT Y O U NEED TO KNOW New endurance road bike that replaced Felt’s Z Series 2 Fits up to a 30mm tire 2 Fender and top tube bag mounts 2 Climb-friendly subcompact gearing


Stuff

Bontrager Meraj S1 Softshell Jacket #optoutside even if #outsideisfreezing

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QUALITY GEAR MADE IT POSSIBLE for me to ride outdoors all winter long last year in Eastern Pennsylvania. Of the few key items in my winter kit, my jacket was the most valuable. A good one blocks the wind and insulates, but breathes so that you don’t become a sweaty, freezing mess. My go-to—the 7mesh Strategy softshell—works beautifully, but costs $225. That’s why the $150 price tag of the new women’s Meraj S1 Softshell caught my attention. It skips some costlier features like taped seams and a waterproof zipper, and the front-facing panels are constructed of softshell material by 37.5, a newer player in the market than Gore, the company that makes the Windstopper fabric used in many premium jackets like the Strategy. The S1 is designed to keep you warm (between 30 and 40° F) by keeping you dry. The 20,000mm

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

waterproof rating is on par with good ski jackets, and under a faucet, water beaded off for several minutes. To vent body heat, the back panels are constructed of breathable thermal material (this part isn’t water resistant). And when you do sweat, the 37.5 technology in the softshell panels uses volcanic material and coconut shells to create more space between the fibers, allowing your body heat to push moisture out into the air, rather than simply pulling it to the surface like some other wicking materials, says Bontrager marketing manager Sam Foos. The S1 is formfitting enough for road riding and has three roomy rear pockets. On the men’s side, the Velocis S1 Softshell provides the same construction and features at the same reasonable price. PRICE $150 , WEIGHT 346 grams (S) —gloria liu Photograph by R YA N O L S Z E W S K I


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Gr a ss: Nicola s Cope/Get t y Images


WET MUD

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yclocross racers can get very granular about mud: wet mud, slippery mud, clay, soup, peanut butter—the list goes on. A good mud tread will have tall blocks to cut through the soft stuff and reach down to any hard earth underneath. Spacing should be wide enough to keep the tire from packing up (holding mud and clogging the tread), and balance traction and stiffness so as not to be squirmy under load. The side knobs will be taller and aggressive for good grip in corners. go with

WIDELY SPACED, TALL KNOBS

WHAT PRESSURE SHOULD I RUN?

recommended Clement PDX Blurs the line between mud and allrounder with fast-rolling, closely spaced center treads and aggressive knobs. If you can buy only one set of tires that works in every condition, this is it. // a l s o g o o d Challenge Limus Starshaped, tall knobs clear well and bite hard. Maxxis Mud Wrestler A durable, tubeless-ready casing with good, straight-line traction and excellent aggressive side knobs for cornering.

Generally, the lower the pressure in your tires, the better your traction—less air allows the tire to spread out and conform to the ground. But it also needs to be balanced with skill level to avoid tire squirm under hard cornering, and pinch flatting or burping (when a tubeless tire temporarily unhooks and releases air). No matter the tire, a good starting range for beginners is 24 to 35 psi. (Heavier riders should err on the high side.) In soft conditions, you will benefit from lower pressure; on rougher tracks or those with higher-speed corners, bump it up. To learn to ride at lower tire pressures, visit BICYCLING.com/ridelow.

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

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TUBULAR OR CLINCHER? go with

Tubulars are made of a casing that is sewn closed around an inner tube. They’re glued or taped to a type of rim built specifically to fit them. Clinchers are open (a U-shape instead of a sewn-shut O), and the edges, called beads, lock into the shaped edges of the rim during inflation. They can be tubeless-ready or made solely to work with inner tubes, and are most often made of vulcanized construction, where the weave and the tread are formed in a mold, then injected with molten rubber under pressure. When they are made of the same fabric material as tubulars, but aren’t sewn shut and use beads instead of glue or tape, they are called open tubulars. Tubulars are harder to pinch flat, can be run at lower pressures than clinchers, and will usually stay on the rim after a puncture, allowing you to ride to the pit. But if you flat, the tire is harder to repair, and because swapping a new kind of tire onto the rim is inconvenient (remember the tape and glue), many people who use them end up owning multiple wheelsets on which they leave condition-specific tires mounted. If price is no object, and you want the lightest and best riding option, choose tubulars. Otherwise, clinchers (or open tubulars) are easier to swap—and less expensive.

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AN ALLROUNDER

DRY TO SLIGHTLY WET

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ll-rounders are, as the name suggests, adept in a wide range of riding. They roll fast, are grippy in smooth terrain, and hold their own in the wet, up to a point. Most use some version of the original Clement company’s Grifo Neve design (now licensed by Challenge). This type of tread is comprised of chevrons and arrows in the center bordered by lines of half moons and dots along the edges. It’s fast, with good bite in corners—but the blocks are too short and closely spaced for deep mud.

recommended Challenge Grifo The original and still the best all-rounder. // a l s o g o o d Clement MXP The slightly more aggressive MXP rolls fast, but due to taller, closer-spaced knobs, gets clogged quicker with dirt when things get wet. Dugast Typhoon Tubular only, and one of the most supple casings available. Buy it if you want what the pros are on.

how wide should i go? Competitors in UCI races and US national championships are limited to a maximum 33mm tire width—this includes any portion of the tread too. That’s also the width we’d recommend for pretty much any race.

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016


SHOULD I GO TUBELESS?

Tubeless tires can be run at lower pressures than traditional clinchers with less risk of pinch flats, and sealant inside the tire can fix small punctures sometimes even while you’re rolling. Drawbacks include the lack of choices in treads, though that is quickly changing, and the possibility of burping at too-low pressures. Also, sealant generally works for tire cuts up to only about 4mm long. Still, if you don’t want to shell out for multiple sets of tubular wheels and tires, tubeless is your best choice. And many tubeless-ready 29-inch XC mountain bike wheelsets work with ’cross tires.

FAST GRASS, ICE, OR DEEP SAND

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go with

A FILE TREAD

ost riders will be set with an all-rounder and a mud tire. But if you want to be prepared for every possible condition, add a file tread to your quiver. The most specialized of the three, file treads consist of short (usually a millimeter or so) clusters of pyramids similar to those on rasp files used in woodworking. They have low rolling resistance, but that comes at the cost of traction in wet terrain. Recently file treads have undergone a resurgence, with manufacturers adding side knobs to bridge the gap between dry surfaces and wet. These are best for when cornering traction is at a premium but you still need to roll fast—like dry, damp, or deteriorating courses with off-camber sections. The file section also grabs ice well thanks to an even and wide contact patch.

recommended Challenge Chicane Multiple casing options, and maintains decent traction if conditions deteriorate midrace. // a l s o g o o d Clement LAS Fast rolling, great for smoother grass courses and sand. Smaller side knobs give less cornering traction than other options. Kenda Happy Medium Aggressive side knobs and large file tread center. Tubeless options and multiple sizes available. NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.COM

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Recommended A recurring, unequivocal, indefensible endorsement of things that make us happy

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To stand out in the pack, I’m constantly seeking eccentric, limited-run clothing and gear from smaller companies. This jersey lets me show my support for this group of London riders who are trying to bring the dark side to cycling. Even if I’m not riding fast, I’m still riding like hell. $65

This was the first cycling cap I bought, and the word Merde! on the underside of the bill accurately summarizes those “What am I getting myself into?” feelings I had on my early big group rides. Plus, with all the different types of clouds on the cap, I know I’m always dressed for the weather. $24

North London Thundercats Black Metal Bike Club Supporters Jersey

90

Tenspeed Hero TSH Storm Cap

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016

3

Resolute Bay NX1 Jeans

I love wearing flashy clothes for high visibility on and off the bike. These jeans from Resolute Bay have a stylish, slim cut that looks sharp while you’re grabbing a beer with friends and also has reflective accents that help keep the ride home safe. Durable stretch cordura denim stays comfortable and crisp over multiple rides. $107

4

5

Panasonic DMCLX100 Camera

For me, capturing the scenes of the ride is as important as the ride itself. The LX100 gives me all the controls of a massive DSLR—like focus, aperture, RAW format, and even 4K video—in a small package that fits in my jersey pocket. Manual buttons and dials let me change settings with one hand while keeping the other on the bar. $700

CHOSEN BY BICYCLING’s video producer Pat Heine, who will take on any route in any conditions, as long as the ride ends with French toast.

Maps

I always carry a phone on a ride, but nothing says adventure like whipping out a paper map. I like to unplug from GPS and pick a destination, not knowing what I’ll find along the way. Sometimes I plan a ride using a vintage map just to see how much the area has changed over time. And the best part is, I’m left with an awesome, inexpensive souvenir from the journey.

Photograph by M AT T R A I N E Y


Bikes Make America More Awesome continued from p. 28

If LA is a better city for people who bike, it’ll be a better city for everybody. first Better Bike Share conference, which was devoted to making bike share more accessible to low-income riders. Butler cites a well-known image to explain the difference between equality and equity. In it, three people of different heights are trying to watch a soccer game over a fence. Above the word “equality,” they each stand on a similar-sized crate and only the tallest two can see the game. Above “equity,” the shortest soccer fan is on two crates, the middle-sized fan is on one, and the tallest has no crate. All three can now see over the fence. In bike advocacy terms, Butler says, an equitable distribution of new bike resources

frequently means focusing on lower-income neighborhoods and communities of color, which often lack bike infrastructure due to things like structural racism and a historical lack of investment by transportation planners. It also means recognizing that traditional methods of talking about bike infrastructure—public meetings about proposed bike lanes, for example—will fail to serve certain residents, such as those who work multiple jobs or don’t speak English. When Butler first considered the job at LACBC, the focus on bicycles seemed limiting. But being able to move freely is such a core civil right, she says, that transportation

concerns intersect with the other social justice issues she cares about. Access to bikes and public transit means access to health care, education, and the environment. Still, creating change in a metropolis hemmed in by highways is a huge challenge. But Butler is committed to making more people—and more types of people—feel safer and happier riding bikes. She’s working on a sales tax ballot measure to ensure that biking and walking projects would receive a portion of the revenue. If it passes it could provide underserved communities with sidewalks, Safe Routes to School initiatives, and access to key bicycle networks. The Coalition is also working with the Los Angeles Unified School District and an organization called Youth Educational Sports to develop a PE-class cycling curriculum for 30 middle schools where the majority of students are eligible for free or reduced lunch. “If LA is a better city for people who bike, it’ll be a better city for everybody,” Butler says. “I want to be part of that. I was raised by strong black women who always taught me, if not you, who?”—C.G.

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No. 16 A BIKE IN EVERY CLASSROOM According to the National Center for Safe Routes to School, only about 22 percent of kids in the United States walked or biked to or from school in 2012, down from 42 percent in 1969. But a handful of cities are taking steps to reverse the trend. In 2015, Washington, DC, became the first school district in the country to make bicycle education a mandatory part of the elementary school curriculum. The district’s fleet of nearly 1,000 Diamondback Mini-Viper BMX bikes rotates through DC’s second-grade gym classes, where students learn bike safety and, if necessary, how to take their first pedal strokes. This fall Seattle public schools started offering bicycle safety education to all third through fifth graders. And in Boulder, Colorado, 2008 Olympic cyclist Mike Friedman runs an after-school program called Pedaling Minds, which teaches elementary school kids everything from bike skills to the science of cycling—using bikes to demystify physics, engineering, and chemistry.

Older kids are benefitting, too. Los Angeles is adding cycling to the PE curriculum in some middle schools, and in March, Colorado’s Fort Collins High School became the first secondary school in the nation to be classified as a Bicycle Friendly Business by the League of American Bicyclists. Students who commute can take advantage of bike parking, tools, free maintenance, and gear giveaways.—E.F. No. 17 HOW TO MAKE DRIVERS GET IT The city of Fort Collins, Colorado, offers a variety of cycling classes, ranging from riding with kids to a women’s adult learn-toride program. But the most popular is the Bicycle Friendly Safe Driver Certification Course, created in 2015, which teaches drivers (including professional bus and truck operators) how to safely operate motorized vehicles near cyclists. The city offers the classes for free and is aiming to instruct as many as 1,000 residents by 2017. Vehicle operators in Austin, Texas, are also learning a few lessons about safe driving.

The American

Last summer, the police department created a new position to work exclusively on enforcing motorist behaviors that endanger bike riders. Rheannon Cunningham, the officer and local bike racer appointed to the role, led a 2013 undercover operation that educated and ticketed drivers who violated the city’s safe passing law. Her current duties include coordinating bike-related police training and serving as the liaison to the cycling community.—I.D.

BICYCLING (ISSN 0006-2073) Vol. 57 No. 10 is published 10 times a year (monthly except bimonthly in November/ December and January/February) by Rodale Inc., 400 S. 10th St., Emmaus, PA 18098. Periodicals postage paid at Emmaus, PA 18049, and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to BICYCLING, P.O. Box 26299, Lehigh Valley, PA 18002-6299. In Canada: Postage paid at Gateway, Mississauga, Ontario; Canada Post Publication Mail Agreement Number 40063752. Return any address changes to BICYCLING, 2930 14th Ave., Markham, Ontario L3R 5Z8; GST #R122988611. Copyright by Rodale Inc., 2016. BICYCLING, incorporating Cyclist magazine, is published by Rodale Inc. Subscribers: If the postal authorities alert us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within 18 months.

GREG L E MOND HAS WITHSTOOD THE TEST OF TIME. He is America’s only recognized Tour de France winner, yet his three Tour wins tell only part of his story.

Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer documents LeMond’s legendary career year by year. This celebration of LeMond covers it all with incisive writing, revealing interviews with teammates and rivals, and illuminating photographs both new and well-known.

AVAILABLE IN BOOKSTORES AND ONLINE AT VELOPRESS.COM/LEMOND


MY INCOME WILL INCREASE 20% WITH EVERY YEAR I STAY IN SCHOOL. Globally, 62 million girls are not in school and even more are fighting to stay there. Girls empowered with an education will delay marriage, have fewer children, earn a higher income, and are more likely to invest in their families and communities. When girls gain skills, knowledge, and confidence, they break the cycle of poverty and help strengthen societies. EDUCATE GIRLS, CHANGE THE WORLD.

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STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION OF Bicycling REQUIRED BY ACT OF OCTOBER 23, 1962: SECTION 4369, TITLE 39, UNITED STATES CODE, FILED, October 1, 2016 Publication Number 0006-2073 Annual Subscription Price: 19.94 Contact Person: Joyce Shirer Telephone: 610-967-8610 Bicycling is published 10 times a year at 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus PA, 18098, publication and general business offices. 9. The names and addresses of the publisher, editor and managing editor are: Publisher: Zachary Grice, 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098 Editor: William Strickland, 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098 Managing Editor: Jennifer Sherry, 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA 18098 10. The owner is: Rodale, Inc., 400 South 10th Street, Emmaus, PA, 18098. The stockholders thereof being, Rodale Family Trusts – JP Morgan Trust Company as Trustee 11. The known bond holders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None 15. EXTENT AND NATURE Average no. of copies SEP 2016 Single each issue during preceding 12 mos.

issue nearest to filing date

381,052

374,860

197,028

185,277

14,929

15,468

C. TOTAL PAID CIRCULATION (Sum of B1 and B3)

211,957

200,745

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102,958

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F. TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (Sum of C and E)

314,915

318,731

62,155

53,195

3,982

2,934

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381,052

374,860

I. PERCENT PAID

67.31%

62.98%

OF CIRCULATION

A. TOTAL NO. COPIES (Net Press Run) B. PAID CIRCULATION 1. Mailed Paid Subscriptions 3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other paid

G. COPIES NOT DISTRIBUTED SINGLE COPY NOT DISTRIBUTED OTHER NOT DISTRIBUTED

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19,886

15,597

231,843

216,342

C. TOTAL PRINT DISTRIBUTION + 334,801 PAID ELECTRONIC COPIES

334,328

D. PERCENT PAID (both Print & Electronic Copies)

64.71%

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50% of all distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. Publication of the Statement of Ownership is required. Will be printed in the Nov/Dec issue of this publication. Stephen Twilliger, EVP/CFO

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OUR ONGOING EXAMINATION INTO THE NATURE OF EXISTENCE, THE MEANING OF LIFE, AND MUCH MORE IMPORTANT STUFF

JULIANA “JEWELS” SMITH 35, comic book creator and cofounder of Red Bike and Green cycling collective NEW YORK CITY

or

Arriving 1

1 x Leaving

Classics x 1

1 Grand Tours

Climbing 1

x1 Sprint x1 Hats x1 Mechanical x1 Weight1 1 x Descending

Drop bar 1 x

1 Flat bar

Racing 1

1 x Riding2

Fast 1 Flat 1

x1 Strong x1 Rolling

Pen3 x 1

1 Pencil

Breakaway 1 Caps 1 Electronic 1 Color 1

Chase 1 How 1 Less 1 DC 1 Pack 1 x 1 Desire x

1 x Escape

x1 Why x1 More x1 Marvel4 1 Solo 1 Necessity

Fashion 1

1 x Style

Melody 1

x1 Rhythm

1 Paved x

1 Unpaved

Dream 1 x Fame 1 That 1 Sunrise 1 East Coast 1

1 Plan 1 x Glory5

x This 1 x1 Sunset x1 West Coast6

1. Light bikes are less ridiculous to carry up stairs. I live in New York! 2. I’m into community-oriented rides like Clitoral Mass. Being involved in organizing such a large women’s ride in only a few months was exciting. Creating a space for an intergenerational, interracial group of women to support women-owned businesses was a bonus. 3. In comic book art, a pen means the page is inked and closer to being done. 4. Two words: Black. Panther. 5. It’s really easy to get fame nowadays, but I want whatever I do to be dignified. 6. Always. Always. Always. That’s not a question.

100

BICYCLING.COM • NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2016

Photograph by C H R I S S C H O O N O V E R


It’s the beauty of a well-made choice.


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