Page 1

SA’S BEST-SELLING RUNNING MAGAZINE

Race-Read In 7 Weeks!y p80

Sean Sanders, 24, has a morning routine to thank for his daily dose of motivation.

p44

“I Swopped Cholesterol For Comrades… And Ran Off 40kg!” p20

From Foodie & Marathoner Kamini Pather

9 Best Headphones For Runners 11269

NOVEMBER 2016 SOUTHERN AFRICAN EDITION

p41

RSA R39.00 (VAT INCL) R41.50 (Foreign Countries) NAMIBIA N$41.50

www.runnersworld.co.za

9 771021 566004


RUN LONG. RUN LIGHT. RUN.


WARM-UP CONTENTS

THE LOOP 06

RAVE RUN 10

NOVEMBER 2016

EDITOR’S LETTER 14

60 NUTRITION SPECIAL

DELICIOUS, NUTRITIOUS… FAST!

Celebrity chef, SA MasterChef winner and marathoner Kamini Pather shares four of her favourite healthy recipes: a quick, easy and energising breakfast, lunch, supper – and a healthy snack. BY MIKE FINCH

ON THE COVER Eat Right, Get Lean.........................73 Delicious Meal Plans.....................60 Motivation Strategy.......................41 The Ultimate 5-K Plan....................80 Speedy Recovery..........................44 Run It Off.........................................20 Music And Running.......................54 Best Headphones..........................47

PHOTOGRAPH BY TOBY MURPHY

54

73

80

DOO BEE DOO BEE DOO… PUFF PANT!

RUN FAST, EAT SLOW

RUN YOUR FIRST (OR FASTEST) 5-K

Music can make you a faster, leaner runner, able to recover at lightning speed. Here’s how to make the most of your playlist. BY LISA NEVITT

NUTRITION SPECIAL What do you get when an Olympian and a trained chef write a cookbook? Healthy, delicious meals for runners. BY SHALANE FLANAGAN AND ELYSE KOPECKY

Looking to take on your first-ever race, or aiming for a new PB? There’s no better distance than the 5-K. Get prepped to toe the start line with confidence with our success strategies and training plan. BY SAM MURPHY

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 3


WARM-UP

CONTENTS

WE’RE ALWAYS RUNNING AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA P H OTO G R A P H B Y E WA L D S A D I E

40

42

SUMMER HYDRATION Beat The Heat Soaring summer temperatures can make running feel uncomfortable – but only if you let them. For top tips to help you prepare for running in the sun, visit runnersworld. co.za/heatstreet

34 HUMAN RACE 17  Leonard Jingose The development coach. 19 The Singlet He knows it all. 20 I Ran It Off! Greg Korck swops cholesterol for Comrades. 25  By The Numbers Chariots Of Fire. 28  What’s Hot Now? KFM radio presenter Carl Wastie shares his favourite songs for running.

PERSONAL BEST TRAINING 34 Speed For All The right interval workout can help you achieve any running goal. 36  The Starting Line The run-walk method is still a great way to get every runner to the finish. 38  The Fast Lane Trying to PB at your next 42.2? Pay attention to these small details. 39 Race Prep Test yourself in training – to predict how fast you’ll finish your next race. 40 Summer Prep Modify your warm-up to run fast on hot days. 41  The Sport Scientist When should you surge?

4

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

MIND+BODY 42  Tame The Flame Prevent chronic inflammation to stay healthy. 44 The Body Shop Five exercises that boost post-run recovery. FUEL 45  Fridge Wisdom Gel, bar, or drink? How you get your carbs can impact your performance. GEAR 47  Pound For Sound The latest options for taking music on the run.

RACES+PLACES 85  Racing Ahead

COLUMNS

ON THE COVER

NOVEMBER

2016

THE GOOD FOOD ISSUE YOUR FIRST

SA’S BEST-SELLING RUNNING MAGAZINE

Eat Right, Get Lean!

5-K (Or Fastest)

Race-Read In 7 Weeks!y p80

Sean Sanders, 24, has a morning routine to thank for his daily dose of motivation.

Sure–Fire Ways To Fuel Your Runs And Boost Energy

A Speedy Recovery

5 Easy Post-Run Exercises p44

“I Swopped Cholesterol For Comrades… And Ran Off 40kg!” p20

22  The Newbie Chronicles Finding Rhythm BY KATHRYN ARNOLD 24  The Road Scholar Bend It Like Barbie BY KIM PENSTONE 26  Running The World The Beauty Of The Unfamiliar BY RAE TREW-BROWNE 90  Back of the Pack Your Pace Or Mine? BY BRUCE PINNOCK

Delicious, Super-Healthy Meal Plans

From Foodie & Marathoner Kamini Pather

Does Music Really Make You Faster?

Beginners

The Simplest Way To Stay Motivated p36

WIRED OR WIRELESS? 9 Best Headphones For Runners

11269

NOVEMBER 2016 SOUTHERN AFRICAN EDITION

RSA R39.00 (VAT INCL) R41.50 (Foreign Countries) NAMIBIA N$41.50

www.runnersworld.co.za

9 771021 566004

Runner – Sean Sanders wears top by Puma, shorts by Asics and shoes by New Balance Makeup by Colleen Paioni Photographed by Casey Crafford


PROMOTION

WE’RE SEARCHING FOR

AWESOME!

SO CAST YOUR VOTE TODAY!

INSPIRING

AUTHENTIC

PASSIONATE

These characteristics describe all the entrants in our Runner’s World Cover Search competition - but there can be only one winner!

COURAGEOUS

UNSTOPPABLE

SPECIAL READERS’ ISSUE

YOUR PHOTO HERE

VOTE NOW for your favourite

entrant, and you could see them on the cover of the February 2017 issue of Runner’s World!

ENTER THE

CONTEST PRESENTED BY

VOTE NOW AT COVERSEARCH.RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA SEE COVERSEARCH.RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA FOR TERMS AND CONDITIONS


WARM-UP

THE LOOP THE INBOX

WINNING LETTER

THE QUESTION

NATIONAL PRIDE

UNTIL IT’S GONE

I’ve slipped a disc in my lower back; which means that for the next eight weeks, I’ll have to stay in bed. I’m not allowed to walk further than my kitchen or bathroom. What is helping me stay strong is the list of races I plan to run once I’ve recovered. I know I’ll have to start from the beginning again, but I’m confident that with adequate rest, and a patient return to running, one day I’ll be able to compete in a 10-kilometre race. And I’ll appreciate running so much more.

During one of our recent morning runs, from Hout Bay to Noordhoek via Chapman’s Peak, I was reminded of three things: 1) I am proud to run in this beautiful country; 2) running has made me realise I’m capable of so much more than I ever imagined; and 3) life is about making memories, and meeting incredible people along the way. I often wonder if all of South Africa’s problems would be solved, were our leaders to each be given a pair of running shoes.

– JESSE-KIM GRUNDLING, GEORGE

– TRACEY-LYNN SMALBERGER, CAPE TOWN

TWEET OF THE MONTH

“From a very young age, this lady has been my hero and inspiration @ elanameyer” – @charnebosman

THE POLL

Health and well being

Faster running

Weight loss

General fitness

Runner’s World reserves the right to edit readers’ submissions. All readers’ submissions become the sole property of Runner’s World and may be published in any medium and for any use worldwide.

This month’s winning letter will receive a pair of Budds By DJ Fresh Bluetooth Earbuds, valued at R699. Whether you’re road or trail running, hiking or at the gym, at home, at work or in between, BUDDS By DJ Fresh will give your life a soundtrack. Music and calls are transmitted to your earpiece wirelessly, allowing you freedom to move without the restrictions of being physically attached to your mobile. The rubber buds, ear-hoops and in-ear control panel all work together to give you a lightweight but firm in-ear grip. Write to: Runner’s World, PO Box 16368, Vlaeberg, 8018; Fax: 021 408 3811; or email: rwletters@media24.com (letters must be no longer than 100 words and must include your name, address and telephone number or email address).

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S ; P H OTO G R A P H B Y J OYC E L E E

34% 22% Which goal do you most identify 21% 23% with?

HOW MANY DAYS A WEEK DO YOU COOK DINNER FROM SCRATCH?

25%

50%

25%

0-2 days

3-5 days

6-7 days


THE GALLERY

#INSTARWRUN We asked runners to show off their running experiences. Here are four submissions that made us envious.

“Good morning #instarwrun #parkrun”

“Great 30-plus run as a pre-birthday gift for this 30-plus birthday tomorrow #loverunning #instarwrun #runrevolution” – @ayandadla

“10km in 32 degrees is #nojoke #40andfit #marathontraining #instarwrun” – @celeste_coetzee

“Lesotho Challenge #marathon completed. High altitude with over 1 000 metres of climbing #100differentmarathons” – @doppierunner

– @alexistelfer

READER COMMENTS

WHAT’S THE WEIRDEST THING YOU’VE EVER SEEN A RUNNER DO IN A RACE? “Juggle two balls, at the same time as running a 15-kilometre race on a farm.” – Michèle Tameris Bruwer

“Crouch down behind a bush, still in full view of everyone!”

“Run backwards at Two Oceans and the Comrades. At least it makes having a face-to-face conversation easier.”

“Carry three sticks of burning incense around a parkrun course.”

– Karlien Schreuder

– Michelle Webster

– Shani Hayward

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 7


RUNNER’S WORLD PROMOTION

SA’S BIGGEST ONLINE RUNNING PORTAL Training Programmes for Every Distance Complete Race Calendar Expert Tips, Workouts and Injury-Prevention Advice Everyday Motivation!

WARM-UP Southern African Edition. A joint venture between Rodale Press, Inc and Media24 Magazines.

EDITORIAL

RW staffers’ favourite getup-and-go songs to run with… Mike Finch Twenty One Pilots, Ride Lisa Nevitt I don’t usually listen to music when I run, but if I had to choose… Linkin Park, Remember The Name Mark Arendse LMFAO, Party Rock Anthem ft. Lauren Bennett, GoonRock Dave Buchanan Joe Satriani, Surfing With The Alien Andre Valentine Tool, Parabola Rae TrewBrowne Pharrell Williams, Happy Yentl Barros The 1975, Chocolate Penny Trevena Crystal Fighters, LA Calling Amy Mostert Misfits, Dust To Dust Ryan Scott The Bloodhound Gang, Fire Water Burn

www.runnersworld.co.za facebook/RunnersWorldSA

@ runnersworldza

instagram.com/runnersworldza

FOR YOUTUBE LINKS TO THE FULL LIST OF OUR BEST SONGS TO RUN WITH, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/ RUNNINGTUNES

Editor MIKE FINCH (mike.finch@media24.com) Deputy Editor LISA NEVITT (lisa.nevitt@media24.com) Senior Designer MARK ARENDSE Chief Sub/Managing Editor DAVE BUCHANAN Editorial Assistant ANDRÉ VALENTINE (andre.valentine@media24.com) Online Editor RAE TREW-BROWNE (rae.browne@media24.com) Digital Content Manager YENTL BARROS (yentl.barros@media24.com) Digital Assistant PENNY TREVENA (penelope.cairns@media24.com) Picture Editor AMY MOSTERT Gear Editor RYAN SCOTT (madibapi@gmail.com) Scientific Editor DR ROSS TUCKER Editor-at-Large BRUCE FORDYCE CONTRIBUTORS Dominic Barnardt, Tudor Caradoc-Davies, Casey Crafford, James Garaghty, Liam Hammer-Nel, Toby Murphy, Colleen Paioni, Kim Penstone, Bruce Pinnock, Ewald Sadie, Ryan Sandes, Kelvin Trautman, Dean Venish, Liz Applegate, Kathryn Arnold, Oscar Bolton Green, Caitlin Carlson, Shalane Flanagan, Jeff Galloway, Paul Grimes, Alexi Hay, Alex Hutchinson, Janne Iivonen, Corey Jenkins, Bee Johnson, Elyse Kopecky, Cindy Kuzma, Joyce Lee, Mitch Mandel, Mark Matcho, Sam Murphy, Matt Rainey, Andy Rementer, Brad Stulberg, Kirsten Ulve, Peter Yang

PUBLISHING & MARKETING Publishing Manager FRANCOIS MALAN 021 408 1228 (francois.malan@media24.com) Marketing Manager LISE COETSEE 021 443 9833 (lise.coetsee@media24.com) Marketing Assistant KELYN DONOUGH 021 443 9866 (kelyn.donough@media24.com)

PUBLISHING SALES TEAM Commercial Manager KYLEE ROBERTSON 011 217 3036 / 076 263 9114 (kylee.robertson@media24.com) Digital Sales Manager BEN PRETORIUS 011 217 3054 (ben.pretorius@media24.com) MYLES KELSEY (CPT) 021 443 9475 / 082 613 8498 (myles.kelsey@media24.com) LAMEEZ RAIZENBERG (CPT) 021 408 3960 / 082 909 9696 (lameez.raizenberg@media24.com) HANNES BURGER (CPT) 021 408 3078 / 076 152 4605 (hannes.burger@media24.com) KATHRYN MOLYNEAUX (JHB) 011 217 3197 / 083 395 3442 (kathryn.molyneaux@media24.com) MILLI MAHLANGU (JHB) 011 217 3051 (milli.mahlangu@media24.com) MEDIA24 CENTRAL SALES CRAIG NICHOLSON (General Manager: Advertising) 011 217 3035 (craig.nicholson@media24.com) TAMMY HOLTSHAUSEN (Johannesburg) 011 217 3022 (tammy.holtshausen@media24.com) THERESA LAVERY (Durban) 031 566 2442 (theresa.lavery@media24.com) DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALES (CPT) 021 468 8299 (JHB) 011 993 8050 (DBN) 021 468 8070 (EMAIL) INFO@SPACEMAIL.CO.ZA

CIRCULATION SALES & SOLUTIONS Head of Circulation LEONI VOLSCHENK Head of Retail ANDRELINE VAN TONDER Circulation Manager RIAAN WEYERS 021 443 9964 Product Manager GEORGE VAN BILJON Subscription Manager JENNY MARINUS

SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES TEL 087 740 1041 FAX 086 457 5945 E-MAIL: runnersworld_subs@media24.com SMS ‘RUNNERSWORLDSUBS’ TO 32361 (R1 PER SMS) WEB www.my-mags.com CALL CENTRE OPERATING HOURS: MON-FRI 08:00 TO 17:00 ALL SUBSCRIPTION PAYMENTS TO: RUNNER’S WORLD, PO BOX 16428, VLAEBERG, 8018

SHARED SERVICES Production Manager (Health & Sport) KERRY NASH Digital Project Manager RIDHWAANA BARADIEN 021 408 3530 Advertorial Co-Ordinator AMY MOSTERT

MEDIA24 MAGAZINES General Manager Lifestyle CHARLENE BEUKES CFO Lifestyle RAJ LALBAHADUR General Manager Leisure LOUISE MENY-GIBERT PUBLISHERS OF MEN’S HEALTH, WOMEN’S HEALTH, RUNNER’S WORLD, BICYCLING

Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation

REPRODUCTION MEDIA24 REPRO PRINTING PAARL MEDIA CAPE DISTRIBUTION ON THE DOT

CONTACT US WEB WWW.RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA; EMAIL RWLETTERS@MEDIA24.COM; TEL 021 443 9447, POST RUNNER’S WORLD (SA), PO BOX 16368, VLAEBERG 8018 RODALE INTERNATIONAL SVP, International Business Development and Partnerships ROBERT NOVICK Executive Director, Business Development and Global Licensing KEVIN LABONGE Editorial Director JOHN VILLE Director, Business Development and Global Licensing ANGELA KIM Director, Global Marketing TARA SWANSEN Deputy Editorial Director VERONIKA RUFF TAYLOR Senior Content Manager KARL ROZEMEYER International Finance Manager MICHELE MAUSSER Production Assistant DENISE WEAVER Editorial Assistant NATANYA SPIES Administrative Assistant SHOI GREAVES PUBLISHED BY RODALE PRESS, INC., 33E MINOR STREET, EMMAUS, PA, USA. TEL: 001-215-9675171. © COPYRIGHT 1993 BY RODALE PRESS, INC., AND TOUCHLINE MEDIA, (PTY) LTD. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED, STORED IN A RETRIEVAL SYSTEM OR TRANSMITTED IN ANY FORM OR BY ANY MEANS, ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL, WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER. THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NOESPONSIBILITY FOR RETURN OF UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, ART, PHOTOS OR NEGATIVES. CONTRIBUTORS SHOULD INCLUDE A SELF-ADDRESSED AND STAMPED ENVELOPE. TO ONE OF MY RUNNING HEROES, COUSIN HEATHER. CONGRATS ON YOUR BIG NEWS! ROLL ON MARCH! LISA X


WARM-UP

RAVE RUN

SOWETO PHOTOGRAPHS & WORDS BY… Dominic Barnardt RUNNERS… Wandile Zondo & Kabelo Lesito GPS LOCATION 26°14’48.3”S 27°52’58.4”E TERRAIN Soweto: a big place, with an even bigger sense of community. It’s relatively built-up, and quite densely populated. Off the busy main roads are side streets flanked by rows of houses, shebeens, cafés, and other thriving small businesses. The main roads have good pavements, but there’s less traffic in the side streets. Soweto is mostly flat. The level sections tend to run alongside rivers – like Klipspruit Valley Road, which passes Orlando Stadium. But in areas like Vilakazi Street, there are steep, short, punishing climbs. Vilakazi forms part of the Soweto Marathon, an iconic race that passes historic landmarks. BEST TIME TO RUN Soweto is busy, so early mornings at the weekend are best. Traffic picks up early during the week, as people commute out of Soweto for work. Afternoons are also an option, though even at this time there’s still a fair amount of activity. Soweto is also a social hub: people dig hanging out with friends, and this constant hustle and bustle will add flavour to your run. DURATION Like I said, Soweto’s a big place. You can choose pretty much any distance and work out a loop that suits your needs. Feeling nervous? Runners from local athletics clubs will be happy to show you around. Contact Soweto Athletics Club (sowetoathletix.co.za) 10

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 11


WARM-UP

RAVE RUN SOWETO

or Thesis Run Cru (thesis. co.za). There are also athletics tracks, like the one at the University of Johannesburg campus, where you can train on a flat surface, in a controlled environment. OTHER ACTIVITIES Shebeens; bike tours; bungee jumping; bird watching; Maponya Mall; Hector Pieterson Memorial Museum REFUEL AT Only 24-hour garages are open in the morning. Run in the afternoon, and your options open up. Like beer? Then Soweto Gold is a must. There’s nothing like a great-tasting cold one after a short, hot run. If you’re after something more substantial, local hot spots include Sakhumzi Restaurant (sakhumzi.co.za) and Chaf Pozi (chafpozi.co.za). GETTING THERE ‘Soweto’ is short for ‘South Western Township’, which does explain where it is to a degree. It lies just off the N1, south-west of Johannesburg, close to Nasrec. Approaching from the north? Head down the N1 south; there are a few entry points off to the west from there. If you’re approaching from Roodepoort, come in through Dobsonville (one of the northernmost suburbs) on Elias Motsoaledi, or the M77. INTERESTING FACTS Soweto is home to two of the biggest soccer clubs in South Africa, Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates. A derby match at Orlando Stadium between the two giants of South African soccer is not to be missed. Other suburbs within Soweto include Pimville, Mofolo South and Eldorado Park. In 2012, the GeoNames geographical database verified the population at 1 695 047; I’d say it’s probably closer to two million now.

FOR MORE AWESOME RUNNING PICS, VISIT WW W. MYRUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / INSTARWRUN.


NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 13


WARM-UP

EDITOR’S LETTER

RUN TO EAT Food is not just fuel. Like music, it can feed the runner’s soul.

I

’ll admit, I love running with music. There’s nothing quite like a good playlist to help you fly along a route, forget about your burning quads, and not hear the sound of your own heavy breathing. A playlist helps you get swept up in a world that’s all your own: your own pace, your own music, your own rhythm and your own time. Sometimes my playlist is all high-energy and upbeat, and at other times it’s chilled and relaxed, and puts me in a Zen-like trance that dissolves the stresses and makes the footfalls lighter. Some hate running with music, saying it ruins the reason they run: to get away from it all, including the noise. Others say running with music is dangerous; you’re less focused on your

Ironically, Lisa admits that despite her investigation, she’s not one for the earbuds. “Loud music in my ears makes me kind of panicky.” But if you’re otherwise inclined, gear editor Ryan Scott has put together some of the most phenomenal listening tech available, with in-ear buds so bright, you’ll never lose them (‘Pound for Sound’, page 47). We discovered that celebrity chef Kamini Pather (‘Delicious, Nutritious… Fast!’, page 60) also plugs in when she runs – but she doesn’t listen to music. Instead she trots out to foodie podcasts (and probably arrives home hungry!).

COVER SEARCH We’re searching for South Africa’s most awesome runners. Enter our Runner’s World Cover Search, presented by Asics, and win a chance to appear on our cover and share your running story!

PRESENTED BY

THE FOOD REVOLUTION Putting this issue together we were delighted to work with 2013 MasterChef winner Kamini Pather, who shared her favourite healthy,

surroundings and therefore more vulnerable, especially in urban, traffic-infested areas. Running with music is an individual choice. I still believe you can run safely with music (with the volume turned down, and away from traffic). Or choose a hybrid approach: with music on your own, but without when you’re with others. In this issue, deputy editor Lisa Nevitt investigates the value of running with music, in ‘Doo Bee Doo Bee Doo… Puff Pant’ (page 54). We look at whether or not music can make you a better runner, and whether or not it’s all in your head. We also give you some ideas about the right kinds of music to run with, and the clever apps you can load on your cellphone to enhance the process. 14

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

runner-friendly recipes. She recently finished the Sanlam Cape Town Marathon in just under five hours, and brings us the sort of recipes that all runners will drool over, but are still quick and easy to make. It’s all part of our Good Food Issue, and a chance to try recipes that deliver healthy, weight-friendly alternatives, but don’t skimp on taste and nutritional value. As Kamini says: “I really eat anything, and I love food. But it’s okay – I run, too!” MIKE FINCH EDITOR-IN-CHIEF @MikeFinchSA

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A L E X I H AY

“There’s nothing quite like a good playlist to help you fly along a route…”


in partnership with

Twin Skin

The ultimate Anti-Blister running sock The NEW Twin Skin range has been completely redesigned for 2016. The biggest update to the range in its 25 year history. The Twin Skin range utilizes drirelease® engineered blends providing superior wicking, faster drying and greater overall peak performance compared to previous models. WHAT IS drirelease®? drirelease fabrics offer a patented blend of 85-90% synthetic, hydrophobic (water repelling) fibres and 10-15% natural, hydrophilic(water absorbing) fibres. The built-in combination efficiently pulls moisture and perspiration away from the skin and pushes it to the exterior ofthe fabric where it can evaporate quickly. The NEW Twin Skin has a 25% improvement in drying time. This will significantly help ensure any moisture is not left against the skin where it can lead to blisters forming. The quicker drying time also improves the overallcomfortfor the user and ensures a better running experience. All the performance & styling improvements are gained whilst ensuring a superb handle feel for user.

Classic

Anklet MOISTURE WICKING

All drirelease®fabrics utilize hydrophobic and hydrophilic fibres to pull moisture away from the skin — fast.

@hilly_southafrica

PERMANENT PERFORMANCE

With no chemicals or irritants to wash out over time, drirelease® ensures eco-friendly, long term fabric performance.

Socklet FAST DRYING

SUPERIOR COMFORT

drirelease® fabrics’ soft, natural feel keep wearers dry and comfortable — Regulating body temperature by Keeping skin up to 7ºF cooler.

www.adventureinc.co.za

In test after test, drirelease® fabrics reach one of the industry’shighest standards for dryness — up to four times faster than cotton.

Available at

ODOR CONTROL

FreshGuard® prevents odors by mitigating the development of foul smells from microorganisms so odors do not cling todrirelease® fabrics.

and other specialist running outlets


“RUNNING HAS PLAYED A MASSIVE ROLE.” – KORCK CONQUERS KILOS.

HUMAN( )RACE p20

NEWS, TRENDS, and REGULAR RUNNERS doing AMAZING THINGS

NAME: LEONARD JINGOSE AGE: 36 PROFESSION: ADMIN MANAGER

E M E E T T HP O L E V E D MENT COACH

Making AChange

Leonard Jingose is a passionate runner who wants to revive distance running in Bloemfontein. So he’s formed the Pamoja AC SchoolAthletic Development Structure – which was challenging, in a community where running isn’t as popular as other sports like rugby and cricket. But that hasn’t stopped Jingose; his passion for athletics is helping Bloemfontein’s disadvantaged youth to become accomplished young adults. WORDS: André Valentine PICTURES: Dominic Barnardt

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 17


HUMAN RACE

Development starts at grass-roots level. Together with assistant coach David Molhiselwa, I wanted to groom and help young athletes, and establish a development structure that would identify talent up to the age of 19. This platform would allow kids to grow, and to showcase their talent. At the time, nobody else

(Left to right) Rethabile Jabane, Xoliswa Rapulane, Tselane Williams and Vuyiswa Khauta won medals at the recent SA Schools Cross-Country Championships, in Mpumalanga.

feeding scheme, so they don’t have much money. It’s hard to find running kit for them; a lot of it comes from kind donations via Facebook.

Athletes learn discipline, dedication, respect, honour – and the importance of education.

Schools were keen to get involved. They’d been longing for the opportunity, but hadn’t known how to go about it. So our idea was received with open

It’s not just running. We want to foster kids who will participate in track and field, cross-country, road running, race walking, and field events, including discus, shot-put and long jump. I’m a development coach, who has participated in Two Oceans, the Comrades, and other big South African races. My primary focus is cross-country, road running, and track and field. Working with kids and junior athletes has been challenging. Most of the children come from disadvantaged backgrounds, and they’re in the school18

arms, and schools kindly offered us the use of their sports fields. We’ve seen positive results from our relationship.

The children have learned important lessons. When they win, they either save their prize money, or contribute it to their family’s welfare. R300 is a lot of money to them; it will help them to buy something that will help their whole family.

Members of the local community are sceptical. Because running isn’t popular here, they’re surprised to see us training. They mock us and make jokes. We hope to change perceptions by involving parents in this project. They’ve seen us running, and have begun to ask questions. Most have congratulated our efforts. Our club is gathering momentum. But there are some parents who have resisted. They don’t want their kids to do athletics, because they’re concerned it will distract

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

I assure them that running will help their kids to become better adults. A healthy body breeds a healthy mind. From an early age, we teach them about discipline, dedication, respect, honour – and the importance of focusing on their education just as much as on their athletic careers. If those are the principles kids grow up with, the chances of them becoming better adults are far higher. Running makes kids happy, because they love it and they’re passionate about it. It helps them to grow, both mentally and physically. I never had that support when I started doing sports.

“…the joy I see on those kids’ faces when they’ve performed well…” was doing this. These kids had been neglected, and I wanted to nurture them.

them from schoolwork, or cause them to come home late at night after training.

I do it for free, on a voluntary basis. For the joy I see on those kids’ faces when they’ve performed well, and get to stand on the podium and receive their medals. That’s enough for me. It’s the greatest happiness ever.

Jingose (right), together with assistant coach David Molhiselwa (left), works on a voluntary basis to provide kids with the support he never had when he was growing up.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DONATE YOUR OLD RUNNING GEAR TO THE BUDDING YOUNG ATHLETES AT PAJOMA AC, CONTACT PAJOMAAC@GMAIL.COM.


The Singlet

BECAUSE RUNNING ISN’T JUST ABOUT STRING VESTS. ASK THE TRAIL STAR Ryan Sandes

Minimalist or cushioned shoes? Meat or vegetables? Snake or bear encounter? Uphill or downhill? Heart-rate monitor or running by feel? – KELLY, Durban If I had to pick one, I’d go for a minimalist shoe. But I like my running shoes to be somewhere in between: a little cushioning, and a seven- to eight-millimetre drop. Meat trumps vegetables. I love biltong, burgers and a good braai. Though I do try to eat ethically-sourced and organic meat; and for conservation reasons, I’ve considered becoming a vegetarian.

“…staying in tune with your body is important.” PETROL-STATION POOPER Sometimes, on a run, I dash into petrol stations to use the loo, and don’t buy anything. Is this bad form? – JOAN, Umhlanga The petrol station is the pit stop of our proud nation, attracting holiday-makers, truckers, hookers, churchgoers, bikers – and even incontinent runners like you. Save for those dusty Karoo towns – where the petrol-station loos are padlocked, and can only be opened by a key that is fastened around the neck of a ninja goat that lives on top of a (very) distant mountain – petrol stations tend to compete for your attention, whether you’re Mr Moneybags The Motorist, or a penniless runner who has been desperately searching for a place to do their business for the last eight kilometres. Today you’ll leave with nothing but lighter bowels; but tomorrow the staff are betting

ILLUSTRATION BY ANDY REMENTER

you’ll drop R800 on a full tank. Pushing the boat out, you’ll even throw in a packet of Nice ’N’ Spicy NikNaks and a copy of Runner’s World. Still think using their facilities is somehow unjust? Look at the bigger picture: have you seen the price of fuel these days? LIAR, LIAR! PB’S ON FIRE! Is it okay to leave a pace group towards the end of a race to shave a few seconds off a PB? – PAUL, Johannesburg In order to help you answer that question, I am going to

That happened at a time – you tell them for the umpteenth time – when hoverboards hadn’t been invented yet, and the only way of getting around was by using a trusty pair of legs. But deep down inside, you’ll know that besides being a boring old windbag, you’re also a BIG FAT LIAR! The very fact that you’re writing in to ask me if it’s okay shows that you know it probably isn’t. I don’t really give a hoot for PBs and sneaky tricks to shave seconds off them; but my advice to you would be to follow normal

“…besides being a boring old windbag, you’re also a BIG FAT LIAR!” ask you to look far into the future… It’s the year 2068: you’re lying on your deathbed, boasting to your grandkids about the PB you set in 2016.

procedure, and stay with the pace group. Achieve that PB with a clear conscience – and only then may you bore everybody to tears with your tale of triumph.

Despite the cuddly appearance of bears, they are known to be aggressive, so given the choice I’d rather bump into a slithery snake. On a run in the States once, when a bear once started bounding down a trail towards me, I didn’t stick around to see if he wanted to be my friend – I bolted in the opposite direction! Uphill running is best. There’s nothing more epic than summiting a big climb, and then looking down at where you’ve come from. Running down fast, winding singletracks is fun too, but it can be taxing on your legs during a race. I prefer to run by feel (as opposed to using a heart-rate monitor), because I think staying in tune with your body is important. Ryan Sandes, a.k.a. ‘Hedgie’, is a trail-running supremo, with race wins too numerous to mention.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 19


HUMAN RACE

I RAN OFF 4 0 KG!

RUN IT OFF CLUB

KORCK CONQUERS KILOS A sales director swops cholesterol tablets for Comrades.

THE WAKE-UP At high school I was active, and when I left matric I played a little sport. But then life got in the way. The funny thing is, when I looked in the mirror I didn’t even notice my weight had ballooned to 130 kilograms. It was only when I went for an annual medical check-up that concerns were raised. My blood pressure was extremely high, and my doctor gave me a choice: either shed some kilos, or start taking tablets to get my cholesterol back under control.

GREG KORCK Age: 33 Home Town: Cape Town Height: 1.92m Occupation: Sales Director Time Required: 3 Years

THE SHAKE-UP At the time I was only 28 years old, and I didn’t want to start taking medication at such a young age. So there was only one thing for it: I would have to lose weight. I went to see a dietician, and she recommended a healthy-eating plan. She helped me to realise that what I put into my body affects what I get out of it. My wife and I began walking around

a three-kilometre loop close to our home, and eventually my dietician recommended I join a running club. Sticking to my new routine was challenging at first, but I soon got over that when I saw the positive difference it was making, both mentally and physically. THE REWARD Running has played a massive role in my weight loss. If you’d have told me three years ago that I’d go on to run 15 marathons (PB: 3:29, on a hilly course) and achieve a Comrades personal best of 8:56, I probably would’ve given myself a heart attack by laughing so hard. But not only has running encouraged me to lead a healthier lifestyle; it has taught me that with hard work, anything is possible. And through my newfound passion, I’ve met like-minded people who’ve become lifelong friends – they’ve helped me on my journey in a way that only runners will understand. – As told to Lisa Nevitt

Then: 130kg Now: 90kg

20

HAVE YOU RUN OFF SIGNIFICANT WEIGHT AND CHANGED YOUR LIFE? SHOW US YOUR BEFORE-AND-AFTER USING #RWIRANITOFF ON INSTAGRAM OR TWITTER, OR EMAIL YOUR STORY TO RWLETTERS@MEDIA24.COM.

PHOTOGRAPHS SUPPLIED


They don’t call it ‘runner’s knee’ for nothing. Nearly 80% of runners suffer some form of injury each year, from minor shin splints and ankle sprains to debilitating knee injuries and stress fractures. What if you had protection in place to help you get back on the road after a setback? Introducing MiFitLife, a true lifestyle endurance product aimed at rewarding high-performing athletes, helping you to train and race at your best. If you make the grade, you’ll receive comprehensive injury and illness cover (including life & funeral cover) with no medical underwriting - no questions asked. Members enjoy race entry cover, VIP treatment and discounted entries to MiFitLife events, access to exclusive training from top athletes and coaches, and best of all, cover for those times when your runner’s knee returns to try and take you down. Visit www.mifitlife.co.za to see if you make the grade.

www.miwaylife.co.za

0860 64 54 33 Terms and conditions apply. Eligibility, cover and benefits are determined on individual risk profile. MiWayLife is an authorised FSP (No. 45741) and its products are underwritten by Sanlam Life Insurance Limited, a registered long-term insurer.


The Newbie Chronicles

HUMAN RACE

BY KATHRYN ARNOLD

FINDING RHYTHM If you’ve got the running-form blues, just break your stride into parts you can practise.

22

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

ILLUSTRATION BY BEE JOHNSON


P

erhaps you’re familiar with the old insult, “She can’t walk and chew gum at the same time.” Said dummy possesses so little brain capacity, goes the logic, that she’s unable to simultaneously complete two activities. Perhaps you’re also familiar with the concept of running ‘form’ – the proper posture one is meant to maintain while in motion. Your head is supposed to be up, your gaze directed forwards and not on your feet – which, incidentally, are supposed to be flexed (from the ankles), then rolling (onto the balls), then lifting (but not too high), then landing (but not too hard). Your torso: erect. Your hands: not fisty. Your shoulders: down. Your elbows: bent at 90 degrees. Your attention: gone three sentences ago. Perhaps you’re wondering if proper form

I walked in, I’d find myself surrounded by 10-year-olds, staring up at me with blatant pity.) News flash: the drums are hard. Yet it was sort of fun to be so resoundingly bad at something. The stakes were low. If I messed up, no one but my teacher noticed. (He was 25, bless his heart. Once, he told me I should check out this great new singersongwriter he liked, maybe I’d be into him. It was Paul Simon.) Here’s why the drums are so dam­n­ably difficult: it’s the whole walking-​chewing thing, times eight million. Imagine you’re seated at a drum kit. To your left are, clockwise from your waist, the snare (the rattly sound that backbones every song ever), the hi-hat (a cymbal sandwich you open and close with your foot), the crash (big cymbal), and a tom (small, booming drum). To your right, clockwise from your chest: another tom (slightly more booming), the ride (tinnier cymbal), the floor tom (even boomier), and bass drum (boomingest of all – you hit it with a foot pedal).

both boil down to a maddening kind of multi-tasking – the kind that makes your brain want to jump out of your skull and then explode. Telling each hand and foot to do something different on a drum kit is asking your mind to cleave itself into quarters. (It’s about as pleasant, too.) Which is why you have to clear your head and shift to muscle memory. In drumming and running, you have to do like Mad Men’s Don Draper: “Think deeply about it. Then forget it.” Break each step (or beat) into chunks. Practise each chunk ad nauseam. And then never, ever think about the chunks in the moment. I’m now a good drummer. All that brainsplitting stuff that once felt impossible is old hat. (Old hi-hat, as it were.) I used to learn songs by writing out what each beat required. Beat one: hi-hat/kick drum. Beat two: hi-hat/snare. And so on. Play that beat at a snail’s pace. Then go a little faster. Then a little faster than that. Then

“Drumming and running both boil down to a maddening kind of multi-tasking – the kind that makes your brain want to jump out of your skull and explode.” is attainable? I know I do. I can walk and chew gum at the same time – I mean, it’s been a while, but I’m confident. But I’m convinced I’ll never learn how to forwardlookingly flex-roll-lift-land while remaining erect, unfisty, drop-shouldered, and rightangled. Why not just ask me to conduct Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 while juggling cats and reciting the final lines of ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’? But then I remember: oh yeah... the drums. In May 2014, plagued by a certain romantic restlessness, I took a free drumming lesson at a local music school. I had no special aptitude – that was clear by the end of lesson one – and yet I wound up coming back once a week, and later twice a week, for a year, even though the school taught mostly children. (Often when

Now imagine you’re playing a four-part rock beat, easy as it gets. Your left foot clamps the hi-hat closed. On all four beats, your right hand taps the hi-hat, tink tink tink tink. On beats one and three, your right foot kabooms the bass drum, thunk (pause) thunk (pause). On beats two and four, your left hand pelts the snare, (pause) thwack (pause) thwack – but make sure you’re using your wrist, not your arm! And let the stick’s tip bounce, don’t drive it into the drum’s skin! And listen for your cue to start the chorus, in which you lambaste the crash instead of the hi-hat! And when you bash your head against the wall in frustration, try not to lose consciousness – that fouryear-old waiting outside needs the room to practise ‘Moby Dick’. He’s really into Zeppelin lately! The point is that drumming and running

at the correct tempo. With my running form, I applied the same principle. I stood in my lounge and moved only my arms – 90-degree-angled elbows, shoulders loose, hands unclenched. After 10 ridiculous minutes of this, my body’s not going to forget the feel of that arm position any time soon. Repeat with feet and torso. Add it all together, properly positioned body part by properly positioned body part. Don’t try to mastermind the operation – let each piece of you remember what it’s supposed to do, and allow your mind to be empty, only dimly conscious of the extraordinary feat it’s accomplishing. Then: get out and rock this thing. Kathryn Arnold is a writer for Time and Wired, and is the author of the novel Bright Before Us (2011).

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 23


HUMAN RACE

The Road Scholar BY KIM PENSTONE

BEND IT LIKE BARBIE

Why this pointless body part is the bane of every runner’s existence.

O

n the seventh day, the Creator sat atop a fluffy cloud, admiring his greatest creation: Man. “If you had to do it all over again,” asked a cherub, “what would you change?” After careful consideration, He responded with a sad shake of his (al)mighty head: “The knees. I don’t know what I was thinking when I made them. Too many moving parts. Too much that can go wrong. It’s the one serious flaw in an otherwise almost perfect design.” You know it’s true. From ordinary strains and sprains to ligament tears, fractures, and dislocations; from tendinitis, bursitis and osteoarthritis, to the bane of every runner’s existence: Runner’s Knee, Jumper’s Knee, and ITBS. Knees wear and tear, and they’re overused – and abused, according to overpaid specialists. But it strikes me as somewhat strange that the Creator didn’t see this coming, and reinforce them appropriately. (Even Mattel realised that bendy legs were a risky business – a liability, destined to lead to breakage. Barbie only got knees in 1966. And even then, when those bendy bits were truly put to the test, her little plastic legs would pop open like pink-skinned sausages on a spit.) I’d be lying if I said I didn’t understand Barbie’s plight. But because I tend to suffer more from ITBS than any other knee-related injury (thus far, touch wood), the sensation I feel is more of a steel clamp being slowly but surely tightened, by a man with biceps the size of your average speed bump in Saxonwold; as opposed to sausage-like skin-splitting. It’s a fine point of differentiation, but most runners would be able to identify. I was recently the recipient of this particular clamp-crushing pain when I ran the Skukuza Half. I was running strong. I was in peak form, even if I do say so myself. But I made the mistake of running the race with my 24

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPH BY ISTOCKPHOT.COM


RUNNER BY THE NUMBERS

husband. Who, I might add, is not a runner. Forgive him, for he is a cyclist. But because he is Man, and (I hate to admit) superhumanly fit, he started his training with what he referred to as ‘an easy 10-kay’. After just four or five ‘fun runs’, he decided he was good to go for a half marathon. He took off like an impala at the start, and even though I told myself repeatedly that I was treating this as a training run, my pride wouldn’t allow him to disappear into the dust. To date, I’m not sure why my ITB flared up. Most probably a number of factors culminated in a perfect storm: a niggling calf strain, some very worn shoes, a spate of over-training, and the impala-like pace set by my husband. (The fact I hadn’t been able to… go before the start didn’t help, either.) Nonetheless, at the 11-kilometre mark, my left knee felt the first turn of the screw. And it all went downhill from there. I managed to make it to the end, but I was forced to lubricate the joint – and my sense of humour – with several cans of the best. (Turns out Castle Lager, laced with Cataflam, is particularly effective. Physiotherapists should include it in their rehab plans.)

“Even Mattel realised that bendy legs were a risky business…” The good news is I’m back on the road; only this time, suitably humbled by my close encounter of the ‘knee-dy’ kind. I like to think that I’m old and wise enough to actually commit to stretching and strengthening; but you and I both know that most runners’ rehab programmes last only as long as the pain endures. The better news is that Cycling Husband, who galloped to the finish line leaving me to fend for myself in lion country, has well and truly poked his knees. Turns out Man wasn’t designed to beast a half marathon having done zero training. Hmm. Perhaps there was method in the Creator’s madness. Everyone needs a dose of humble pie every now and then. And there’s nothing like a weakness of the knees to truly bring a runner – or in my husband’s case, a cyclist – to his knees.

CHARIOTS OF FIRE

Just as We Are The Champions is the go-to soundtrack for every trophy ceremony, Chariots Of Fire has become as synonymous with endurancerunning races as it has with over-the-top, slow-motion scenes in the movies. But what do you really know about Vangelis’s iconic tune – and what the Fordyce’s sock does it actually have to do with endurance running?

1981 FOUR 58 THE YEAR IT WAS RELEASED. IT WAS THE SOUNDTRACK TO A MOVIE, WHICH GOES BY THE SAME NAME. The number of instruments used to play the song: synthesizer, piano, drums and, uh, percussion. Probably quite a lot of instruments, then.

90

The ideal number of beats per minute a song should have, in order to help you achieve an ideal running cadence of 180 steps per minute. (For more tips on running with music, turn to page 54.)

THE NUMBER OF BEATS PER MINUTE.

1986

The first time Chariots Of Fire was played at the Comrades Marathon.

3000m 11400 7th

679

THE LONGEST RACE REFERENCED IN THE MOVIE WAS THE STEEPLECHASE.

The number of days the entire movie soundtrack spent in the Billboard 200 Official Charts.

In the same year, Bruce Fordyce won his

Comrades.

THE NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS WHO LISTENED TO IT AT THE COMRADES START LINE THAT DAY.

Kim Penstone is a recent convert to the religion of running. But she is devout. She has even started a blog, called runlikeamom.co.za. Read it, especially if you’re one of the many women who manages to squeeze in a run before the school run, or a half marathon before Sunday lunch with the in-laws.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 25


RU N NIN G

NAME

the W

RLD

FRANCE

Rae Trew-Browne AGE 31 PROFESSION Runner’s World Online Editor

NOVEMBER 2016

Bombing down the singletrack makes it worth taking the ski lift up.

THE BEAUTY OF THE UNFAMILIAR A French village reminds RW’s online editor why he took up running in the first place. There’s something familiar about this morning’s run. My breathing feels like it normally does: in sync with my feet, as they skip along a nostalgic concoction of tar and cobbles. My shoes land softly, and then launch into my next stride, and the air rushes across my face as I billow out a cloud of condensation in front of me. I know this feeling. Every runner

26

does. It’s familiar, being out in the crisp, morning air, while most people are still indoors preparing for the day ahead, and the sun is only just starting to peek over the horizon. A nearby bakery floods the street with the smell of fresh baguettes. Making a mental note to finish my run there, I turn and head up through a thick forest – where the

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

gentle clanging of cowbells rings through the trees, as a herd of cattle makes its way to a pasture to graze. Suddenly, everything doesn’t feel quite so familiar… As I run through the scattered pine trees, it hits me: I’m in a foreign country, somewhere I’ve never been before; I started my run on roads I’ve never run on before; and when I pick up the occasional conversation, it’s in a language I don’t understand. This reminds me of one of the beauties of running: the unfamiliarity of adventure is one reason I run, and I suspect I’m not alone.

I cross a small stream that meanders its way down the Col de la Loze – a high mountain peak on the outskirts of a small skiing village called Courchevel, which is in the Savoy province of France. All five senses are captivated. My eyes take in the raw, natural beauty of the alpine landscape, the trees, and the mountain peaks that span as far as the eye can see – some are so high that even in summer, they’re still blanketed in winter snow. My ears are tickled by a smooth, flowing stream. As it courses its way down a slope, it seems to do so in unison with the ringing cowbells – a soothing soundtrack for my run. My feet feel their way along uneven terrain, but I feel like I’m floating. My nose recalls the inviting scent of freshlybrewed coffee from the café on the corner, and my taste buds prepare for that first sip of French espresso. This is definitely not familiar – not at all. I find myself on a path that winds its way 2 200 metres above sea level. My breathing becomes laboured, and I try to suck in as much oxygen as I can. But there’s a brief moment of respite: I meet a group of runners heading towards me, and though I’m only able to communicate with them through smiles and hand gestures, we part ways having shared the beauty of our surroundings. Far from my usual running routes back home at sea level, this experience makes me realise just how easily we can be sucked into the mundane routine of training; in rushing to finish a scheduled session, we miss out on the feeling of

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RAE TREW-BROWNE


being outside. We are victims of our own success. The fitter we get, the faster we want to run; and the faster we run, the quicker we forget why we started running in the first place. There’s no time trial, hill sprint or loathed long run planned for today; it’s just me and the mountain – and the beauty of the unfamiliar.

Unusual architecture in La Tania (top); a quaint village at the bottom of a valley (middle).

BEST TIME OF YEAR TO VISIT During winter, when the area is most likely to be covered with snow, thousands of visitors from all over the world flock to the famous ski slopes. But in summer, particularly in August, the snow melts away to reveal pristine singletrack and footpaths. Warm days and cool evenings make for ideal running conditions. SKI LIFTS The ski lifts run in winter – good news for those who like traversing mountain slopes covered with fresh powder. Bombing down the singletracks is a lot of fun, as they can get quite steep in places. TOP TIP: GEAR UP, AND STAY HYDRATED Since the altitude changes so drastically over short distances, it can be pleasantly warm at the base of a mountain, but as you climb higher it can get very chilly. Packing extra layers is advisable. Drink plenty of water, as your body dehydrates quickly at high altitude.

In winter, these trails and valleys are a mecca for skiers; and in summer, a paradise for trail runners.

GETTING THERE The easiest way to get to Courchevel in France is to fly (via Dubai) to Geneva in Switzerland. Once in Geneva, you can catch a shuttle from the airport straight to your accommodation. We used a company called Snow Drone Transfers, who drove us through Annecy and past the lake. During summer, most of the chalets and flats are empty, so finding accommodation isn’t difficult. The village is full of restaurants and cafés – Le Tremplin quickly became our favourite.

Rae Trew-Browne is the online editor for Runner’s World. When he’s not online, he’s in the mountains chasing summits. NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 27


HUMAN RACE WHAT’S HOT NOW

CARL WASTIE’S TOP TEN RUNNING SONGS By Luke Sadler

E MEET TH R A D IO ER PRESENT

KFM presenter Carl Wastie is no stranger to music; after all, it is his job. As a lifelong runner, he’s had plenty of time to hone both his pace and his playlist. “Music is like running lubricant,” he says. “It’s rhythmic, which helps me to balance my breathing and pace. That’s important to me, because speed has always been my strong point – the five-kay is my favourite distance.”

1/ Faint, Linkin Park “This song makes me want to run at full speed on the treadmill,” says Wastie. It’s ideal for transforming latent anger into speed and power.

2/ Cinema, Benny Benassi ft Gary Go This song has a bouncy beat, and synthesised vocals make for a pleasant listening experience. While it’s not a song you can sprint to, Wastie says it’s “designed for cardio”.

3/ Don’t Let Me Down, The Chain Smokers ft Daya

28

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

5/ Language, Porter Robinson “This track puts a solid heart rate on auto,” comments Wastie. It does, right from the first beat – and continues to do so at a rocking 128bpm. It’s a lengthier number, at just over six minutes, but it varies between pumping electro and soft vocals. For those with a shorter attention span, there are radio edits and other variations of a more standard threeminute duration.

6/ Purple Lamborghini, Skrillex ft Rick Ross This song is quirky; a laidback rap beat is overlaid with Skrillex’s electric sounds. As Wastie points out: “Whatever Skrillex touches turns into pure energy.” Isn’t that what every runner wants?

This tune has a subtle menace about it, promising big things to come. “It’s the ideal Suicide Squad track for a warm-up jog,” Wastie says. The pace is a little on the slow side, but the intensity lies just beneath the surface.

8/ New Divide, Linkin Park This is a great allrounder, with enough of everything to satisfy most moods. Wastie enjoys it as “a power track that elevates adrenaline”. While it isn’t as frenetic as many other hits (it’s not as pumping as some electro tracks), the steady drums and gritty guitar will help you dig deep when you’re fatigued.

9/ NGUD, Kwetsa ft Cassper Nyovest “While this song’s bpm is a bit low, there is something about its pace that helps you breathe during longdistance runs,” Wastie says. As South African runners, we all need a bit of contemporary kwaito on our playlists – and this particular song is great for cruise control.

10/ High Voltage, Linkin Park [It would appear Mr Wastie has a thing for Linkin Park. Or they’re better for running than we realised! – Ed.] Wastie cites this song as “effective in boosting stamina levels”. It is indeed a good combination of solid beats and intense lyrics.

FOR YOUTUBE LINKS TO THE FULL LIST OF OUR BEST SONGS TO RUN WITH, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /RUNNINGTUNES

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E S Y O F C R A I G CO R K E R P H OTO G R A P H Y

This track sets out at a leisurely tempo; but don’t let that fool you – you’re not in for a dreamy wander through a field, and it doesn’t give you licence to slow your pace to a crawl. The beat changes constantly throughout the song, which is ideal for hard intervals that are interspersed with recovery periods. The constant refrain “Don’t let me down” is a great mantra. Wastie says: “The bass line and drop is the perfect accompaniment for the last stretch, when you have no gas left.”

4/ Levels, Avicii Not the dancing type? This song might awaken the dormant ‘dancer tendency’ within you – and if there’s one universal truth, it’s that it’s easier to run when you feel like dancing. Avicii is a great artist to have on your running playlist, and this tune is a prime example: it’s got a catchy beat, and just enough repetition to help you finish strong on your last couple of repeats.

7/ Heathens, Twenty One Pilots


Go Digital Today! SUBSCRIBE NOW Only R32 Per Month! (NORMAL PRICE R39)

TERMS & CONDITIONS: eBook gift offer ends 20 November 2016. eBook gift not valid in conjunction with the Discovery Vitality discount.


FREE Runner’s World The Runner’s Body eBook (valued at R99) when you subscribe! IFE! INJURY-PROOF FOR L

A Simple 10-Minuteut Prevention Worko

OCTOBER 2016

Best Tips Ever

Can’t Beat The Heat?

Eat This (And After) Every Run p44

Subscribe now and get a 20% discount, plus a FREE

Try Our 4-Week Adaptation Plan

lon! Try A Triath crets of

eBook!

Success Se t An Olympic Medallis

52 Ways To Reignite Your Flagging Mojo... TODAY! Run... ver! RecoBe fore

Go Digital

r

Gea tion ra y 9 H dcks Pa ated! &R t s e T ed

What are these weird things? See p58.

WHY GO DIGITAL? Buy Previous Issues Preview the Current Issue Buy the Current Issue Special Digital Subscription Offers

BEST DEAL

20%

Tarryn Taylor, 28, uses Pilates as part ing of her cross-train e. programm

DISCOUNT

Running Blind! ing

The Truly Amaz i nis Story of Richard Mo 10268

e Bomb? r A T im Is YoururiTngic) Scke d hin Be ce ien Special Report

AN EDITION SOUTHERN AFRIC INCL)

RSA R39.00 (VAT tries) Coun R41.50 (Foreign NAMIBIA N$ 41.50

ld.co.za www.runnerswor

The (Reass ercise Heart Health and Ex

004 9 771021 566

Every day, scientists learn more about how the body adapts to the stress of running — and how various body systems contribute to running performance. Now Ross Tucker and Jonathan Dugas, whose blog, Science of Sport, has already created a devoted readership, join with esteemed fitness author Matt Fitzgerald to provide a captivating tour of the human body from the runner’s perspective. Focusing on how runners at all levels can improve their health and performance, The Runner’s Body offers the newest, most surprising, and most helpful scientific discoveries about every aspect of the sport — from how best to nourish the runner’s body, to safe and legal ways to increase oxygen delivery to the muscles. Full of surprising facts, practical tips and informative illustrations, The Runner’s Body is a must-have resource for anyone who wants to become a better — and healthier — runner.

Get your digital subscription at: mysubs.co.za/magazine/runners-world

For Print Subscriptions: DIGITAL:

Go To:

mysubs.co.za

Call:

0877 401 041

Email:

runnersworld_ subs@media24.com

Go to:

www.runners world.co.za

SMS:

‘RWNOV’ and your name to 32511, and we’ll call you (SMS costs R1)


34 42 47 TRAINING

MIND+BODY

GEAR

PERSONAL BEST GET FIT, EAT SMART, RUN STRONG

GOT YOU COVERED Kudos if you keep your shirt on during sunny runs. Many skin-care experts say clothing shields skin more effectively than sunscreen. But if you’re fair-skinned, you can get burned even through your gear. Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) is a rating system used for apparel: an old cotton T-shirt (if you’re still running in one) has a UPF of around 5 (feel the burn). That’s why you should opt for clothing that’s rated 50 (excellent).

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 33


TRAINING FINISH YOUR FIRST RACE

SPEED FOR ALL

No matter your experience level or running goals, interval workouts should be part of your routine. By Cindy Kuzma

RUN FAST FOR A SHORT DISTANCE.

Slow down for a bit to recover. Do it all over again. Interval training boils down to this simple formula – and offers runners a route to continuous improvement. “Interval training is going to increase your level of fitness faster than pretty much any other type of running,” says Jeff Gaudette, owner and head coach of RunnersConnect. Giving yourself a breather between segments of fast running allows you to handle more of it, delivering a greater stimulus to your heart, lungs, and muscles. And despite fast running’s reputation for causing injuries, half-marathoners who incorporated intervals into their training were less likely to get hurt than those who didn’t, according to a recent study. Though this may

34

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

have something to do with mileage and experience level – advanced runners tend to do more intervals and have a lower injury risk – there’s also evidence that running form may improve at quicker paces, says Gaudette. Provided that you begin with a fitness base and allow ample time between hard workouts for recovery, “short, hard bursts can teach your body a more efficient way to run, which ideally transitions into the rest of your training”, Gaudette says. Tweak the reps and rest and you can create an infinite number of workouts, each with its own benefits. Whether you’re targeting an injuryfree half or full marathon, your first (or fastest) 5-K, or just the ability to run stronger or longer, here are interval sessions that can get you there.

Steady, consistent running will carry you across the finish line of your first 5-K. But if you can already comfortably complete an easy 5-K run, adding surges of speed will make a faster-than-usual pace come naturally on race day. Plus, mixing things up with a weekly speedy run adds a bit of fun to your training routine, says Rebekah Mayer, the national training manager at Life Time Run. THE WORKOUT Try a fartlek run – the term means ‘speed play’ in Swedish. After a 10-minute warmup, choose a landmark between 30 seconds and three minutes ahead. Run at a comfortably challenging pace – you should be able to speak only a word or two at a time – until you reach it. Walk or jog slowly for about the same amount of time to recover. Repeat for 10 to 15 minutes before a 10-minute cool-down. NAIL A SHORT, FAST RACE

The biggest barrier to a faster 5-K or 10-K comes from the waste products that build up in your muscles when you pick up the pace, Gaudette says. Intervals at these race paces train your body to process these substances while also increasing the rate at which oxygen travels to your muscles, allowing you to run faster for longer. “You’re getting an opportunity to practise

the pain, mental stress, and fatigue that come with running at that pace,” says coach Carl Leivers. THE WORKOUT A f t e r a 10-minute warm-up, run 12 x 400-metre repeats at your 5- K pace (if that’s your goal distance) with 30 seconds of easy running in between. Targeting a 10-K? Do 16 x 400 metres at 10-K pace instead. The first few reps should feel relatively easy – the second half should be where it gets tough, Gaudette says. BUILD STRENGTH

Age and/or neglect can rob your muscles of their fast-twitch fibres, eventually sapping your speed, power, and strength. Fortunately, you can fight back with really short, super-fast intervals. Summoning fast-twitch fibres to propel you at full tilt trains your brain to recruit them more quickly and efficiently at any speed – while you might associate these fibres only with fast running, your body can also use them to keep you moving forward when slow-twitch fibres are fatigued, Mayer says. These workouts can even convert some flexible muscle fibres into the fastest-twitch type, Gaudette says, which results in a fluid, more efficient stride. THE WORKOUT After a long warm-up – three to si x k ilom e tr e s – run the following series of repeats as fast as you can without feeling out of


Very short, hard repeats help build power, efficiency, and muscle – and best of all, they’re a blast.

control: 3 x 100 metres, 3 x 150 metres, 3 x 100 metres. Take two to three minutes of standing or walking rest to recover fully between each rep. As you sprint, focus on leaning forward slightly and pawing backwards with your hamstrings and glutes. Supplement these workouts with two to three weekly strengthening sessions for your hips, core, and glutes; lowerbody weakness can cause injury-​ i nducing breakdowns at top speed, Gaudette says. INCREASE ENDURANCE

P H OTO G R A P H B Y C O R E Y J E N K I N S/G E T T Y I M AG E S

RECOVERY ZONE What you do between hard intervals depends on the purpose of your workout.

STANDING

This alleviates stress and impact between short, fast reps to build speed and strength. Avoid dropping your hands to your knees, as this could cause lightheadedness.

WALKING

Newer runners benefit most from walking between repeats of at least 400 metres – it brings your heart rate down, but keeps blood flowing to clear waste products.

JOGGING

It keeps your heart rate elevated, extends the distance of your workout, and simulates laterace fatigue. It is suitable recovery for most workouts at less than all-out effort.

Intervals can boost your efficiency in ways that help you run longer than ever – whether you’re aiming to increase from five kilometres to 10, or all the way up to a half or full marathon. “The more efficient you can be, the less energy you’ll use to run a given pace,” Gaudette says. “That allows you, potentially, to go a lot further before you start to break down.” THE WORKOUT Warm up for 10 minutes, then run 500-metre or kilometre repeats at a comfortably challenging pace (you might be able to speak a short sentence, but not quote Shakespeare, Gaudette says). Recover by jogging for half the time the rep takes. Start with five kilometres or 6 x 500 metres, and increase every two to three weeks until you’re logging eight kilometres or 10 x 500 metres of fast running.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 35


TRAINING

THE STARTING LINE

TIPS FOR BEGINNERS FROM AN EASY-GOING COACH

BY JEFF GALLOWAY

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. There’s so much gear out there – what do I really need? Shoes that are appropriate for you, first and foremost. Get fitted by an expert at a speciality runningshoe shop. Women need a comfortable, supportive sports bra. Though tech apparel is nice – especially socks! – there’s nothing wrong with running in cotton if you’re just starting. What about gels or sports drinks – do I need those?

STILL GOING STRONG

My run-walk method is a timeless get-started strategy. I started working with new runners in 1973, the year after I ran in the Munich Olympics, when Florida State University asked me to instruct a course in beginning running. I used my run-walk method for the first time with my students, and it proved so successful that I’m still teaching it – and using it myself – today. While plenty has changed in the last 43 years, this is still my best advice.

habit and running-specific physical adaptations. Plus, most runners at any level recover faster when they run every other day – the day off in between helps the body rebuild stronger.

TAKE WALK BREAKS Walk breaks prevent aches, fatigue, and burnout. Newbies should only walk, until they can do so for 30 minutes. Then, use 10 minutes of the 30-minute session to run-walk – run for 10 seconds, walk for 50 seconds, repeat 10 times. Lengthen the run-walk period by three to four minutes each workout. Once you can spend 30 minutes at this ratio, add

VARY YOUR ROUTINE This is important for physical improvement as well as your motivation. Running different routes and terrain invigorates the brain and gives the body a chance to adapt to different surfaces. Doing a run every other week that’s at least 50 per cent longer than your usual runs builds endurance and allows you to explore unfamiliar areas.

36

five to 10 seconds to each run segment followed by 45 to 60 seconds of walking. And don’t ditch this technique as you become more experienced: even I use walk breaks on my runs, usually a 20- to 30-second run/10-second walk ratio. RUN EVERY OTHER DAY This manageable frequency is enough to develop a

JOIN OUR ONLINE TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR BEGINNERS AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /28DAYS

If you’re running for less than 60 minutes, probably not. Beforehand, have an easily digestible snack (such as a banana) if you’re hungry, and have a few swigs of water. Stop for more mid-run if you’re thirsty.

The Excuse Other runners intimidate me. BEAT IT

Many runners nowadays are most interested in how running makes them feel, and the friendships that develop when logging kilometres with others. Local runninggear shops or clubs can suggest beginner-friendly group runs and races – try a few, and you’ll probably find that other runners are welcoming.

ILLUSTRATION BY JANNE IIVONEN


TRAINING

THE FAST LANE

TRAINING ADVICE FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE

BY ALEX HUTCHINSON

Stay behind the leader of a reliable pace group to save about 2% of your energy.

SWEAT THE DETAILS

Small, smart strategies to nail a 42.2 time goal.

RUN COLD Conditions that feel comfortably cool when you’re jogging can still be warmer than optimal for racing. In 2012, French researchers analysed 1.8 million marathon results and found that the fastest times occurred with surprisingly 38

chilly race-day temperatures of six to seven degrees Celcius. Of course, you can’t choose the weather. But if you’re hoping the planets will align for a PB, target an early spring or late autumn or even winter race, when temperatures are more likely to be cold than hot.

FOR MORE TRAINING TIPS AND PL ANS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / TRAINING.

TUCK IN According to Andrew Jones, another scientist with the Sub2 Project, setting up a race where top runners draft behind others the entire way could slice two to three minutes off marathon times. For mortals, running with a pace group (or even just a few other runners) offers a similar advantage. Even on a still day, overcoming air resistance takes about two per cent more energy. Tuck within one metre behind the leader to maximise the benefits. In an informal group, remember to take turns at the front: you’ll be better off alternating than you would be running alone. LIGHTEN UP The Sub2 researchers will use sensors to measure the force of their athletes’ steps in an attempt to optimise their strides. A simpler way you can deploy right now to improve efficiency is to wear lighter shoes. Reducing your shoe weight by 100 grams saves roughly one per cent of your energy. Just make sure to train enough in the lighter shoes, including during long runs, to ensure that you’ll be comfortable for a full marathon.

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E S Y O F T H E H O U S TO N M A R AT H O N

In 1982, RW asked six famous marathoners what the world record would be in 2050. Just one – Alberto Salazar, now a prominent coach – predicted a time of 2:00.00. Wishful thinking? Not according to the scientific team behind the Sub2 Project, launched in late 2014 to bring a two-hour marathon closer to reality. The project’s focus on marginal gains offers insights that are useful even for those of us chasing more modest PBs.

FIND A FAST COURSE Yannis Pitsiladis, the exercise scientist who heads the Sub2 Project, visited the Dead Sea in Israel to scout it as a marathon site. Since it’s 500 metres below sea level, there’s about five per cent more oxygen in the air, offering a potential boost. You don’t need to go that far, but there’s more to picking a fast course than avoiding hills. For example, the Dubai course, which hosted six of the 10 fastest women’s marathon times last year, has just four turns, compared to 26 in New York. One way to assess a course’s speed is to consult the Association of Road Racing Statisticians’ ‘race

time bias’ rankings (arrs. net), which compare how large numbers of elites perform at different races. The rankings incorporate the effects of weather, turns, hills, and intangibles like crowd support. For example, Houston is the fastest US course on the list, at 48.9 seconds faster than average, followed by Chicago and Los Angeles.


TRAINING RACE PREP

SEE THE FUTURE

Dial into your goal pace with a predictor workout. By Caitlin Carlson

NO MATTER HOW WELL your training’s going, you may doubt your ability to hit your goal time on race day. Whether you’re aiming for a 5-K or a marathon, most plans (wisely) don’t include workouts in which you run your full race distance at goal pace with no recovery periods. Such a simulation would be overly taxing at best, and injury-provoking at worst. But how else can you be confident that your work is paying off? The answer is a less-extreme predictor workout, done three to five weeks before race day. “Being able to predict your marathon time has many potential benefits, including enhanced mental preparation, informed goal setting, nutrition planning, and fluid planning,” says Dr Eloise Till, who researched a marathon predictor workout for a study published earlier this year. But marathoners aren’t the only runners who can benefit: there are similar workouts you can do before your 5-K, 10-K, or half marathon, says John Henwood, a running coach at Mile High Run Club. “These workouts give you a good indicator of what you’ll be capable of on race day,” promises Henwood. “Plus, they simulate the adrenaline you’ll experience, so you can arrive at the starting line calm and confident.” Find your goal race’s predictor workout (below), and try it after a warm-up consisting of a 10- to 15-minute jog, a few minutes of dynamic stretches, and four or five strides.

5-K PREDICTOR

10-K PREDICTOR

21.1 PREDICTOR

42.2 PREDICTOR

THE WORKOUT 5 x 1km at 5-K

T H E W O R K O U T 5 x 1. 5 k m at 10-K race pace, with a 400-metre recovery jog between each interval. THE FORMULA Average the pace of your five 1.5km repeats, and multiply the result by 6.2. WHEN Three weeks before race day. WHY “1.5km is long enough to tap into the endurance you need in the 10-K, so it’s a good predictor,” says Henwood.

THE WORKOUT ‘Race’ a 10-K at 80 per cent effort. THE FORMULA Take your 10-K time in minutes (for example, a 55:30 is 55.5) and add 0.93. Multiply the result by 2.11. WHEN Three to five weeks before race day. WHY “A 10-K is great, because it has that endurance aspect of a half marathon, but doesn’t require you to run too much so close to race day,” says Henwood.

THE WORKOUT Run marathon

race pace, with a 400-metre recovery jog between each interval. THE FORMULA Take the average of your five singlekilometre times, and multiply it by five to get your predicted finish time. WHEN Three weeks before race day. WHY “It’s a good indicator of whether you can handle five kays at a certain pace even with rest in between, since a 5-K is less about endurance and more about short bursts of energy,” says Henwood.

ILLUSTRATION BY MARK MATCHO

pace for 16 to 23 kilometres of a 32km long run. THE FORMULA Take the average kilometre time from your race-pace kays, and multiply it by 42.2. WHEN Five weeks before race day for intermediate runners; a second time two weeks later for advanced runners. (Beginners should skip this workout, and use their usual long-run pace.) WHY “Long runs are great predictors because a marathon is just one really long run,” says Henwood.

WANT TO TRY THE EXACT WORKOUT FROM TILL’S STUDY? VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /MARATHONPREDICTOR FOR FULL DETAILS.

39


TRAINING SUMMER PREP

COOL YOUR JETS

Running hard in the heat? You still need to warm up. By Caitlin Carlson IT’S COMMON knowledge that running your fastest requires an

A sports-drink ice lolly can help you hydrate and cool down before you begin your warm-up.

adequate warm-up. But is that still the case when you’re sweating just standing around? In short, yes. “You can’t abandon the warmup altogether,” says Matt Wilpers, coach at Mile High Run Club and on the app CoachCasts. “A lot of the benefits of a warm-up have nothing to do with body temperature.” The right pre-run routine gradually elevates your heart rate, loosens up muscles, and reminds your nervous system how to run optimally, so you perform well from the start. But you can – and should – make adjustments to your warm-weather warm-up. “It takes less time for the body to feel ready to race when it’s hot,” Wilpers says. Here’s what to do before a race (or speedwork) when the temperature’s on the rise.

PRE- COOL Try wetting towels, freezing them, and placing them around your neck during your warmup, or consuming a water or sports-drink ice lolly or slushy before you run. “Research shows that this can keep your core

RUN... A BIT

LOOSEN UP Dynamic stretches help your muscles fire at the right times when you’re running fast. Do these moves, cutting down on quantity if it’s blazing hot: start with 20 metres down and back of walking knee tucks, quad pulls, lunges,

40 RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

to go longer, slow down – taking walk breaks as often as needed – to keep your heart rate low. “Your rate of perceived exertion should remain the same as if it were a crisp autumn day – aim for 5 or lower on a scale of 10,” says Holder. Also, stay in the shade as much as possible.

and toy soldiers. Then do moves like fire hydrants, hip circles, bird-dogs, and glute bridges (10 reps each side) before drills like butt kicks, high knees, and skips. Finish with some 10to 15-second accelerations up to goal pace, wrapping up right before the gun if it’s race day.

Is it possible to train for the Comrades on the trails? – AMY, Pretoria Trail running tends to be done on gravel tracks, which are softer on your muscles, bones, ligaments and tendons than unforgiving tar roads. The surface on trails is also far more variable, so you get a much better distribution of load across the foot, the ankle, and the muscles that help you stabilise through the stance phase of running. This means that you’re also less prone to overuse injuries, due to the variety in stressors on landing. Unfortunately, there’s an increased risk of acute

“I’m a big fan of trail running…” injury due to falling, tripping, stepping in a hole, etc. So you must exercise caution, and look where you’re going. I’m a big fan of trail running: uphill sections help strengthen your legs and improve your hill running, and running downhill strengthens your legs for the eccentric load. But it’s important to do some running on tar. Your legs need to be accustomed to the harder surface and reduced variability in foot strike you’ll experience on race day. A rule of thumb: aim for a 50/50 ratio on weekday runs, and then a couple of longer runs on the tar at the weekend.

Lindsey Parry is a qualified biokineticist, Two Oceans and Comrades silver medallist, and 2:47 marathoner. Email him at lindsey@ coachparry.com.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

I L LU S T R AT I O N S B Y O S CA R B O LTO N G R E E N ; F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

You should still jog during your warm-up to prep your muscles for dynamic stretches, but cut down on the time or the intensity. Wilpers recommends at least eight to 10 minutes of jogging, but if you’d like

temperature down,” says Nike+ Run Club Coach Joe Holder. You can also pour cool water on your body’s “natural cooling spots” – pulse points like your neck and wrists, says Holder. Drinking cold water can keep you cool and hydrated; have about half a litre 30 minutes before activity.

ASK THE COACH Lindsey Parry


TRAINING

THE SPORT SCIENTIST

PROVEN STRATEGIES FROM A LEADING PHYSIOLOGIST

BY DR ROSS TUCKER

The recipe for happy running memories: start fast, finish slow.

WHEN SHOULD YOU SURGE?

Scientists have uncovered the best time to speed up. Many years ago, I read an interview with legendary Czech runner Emil Zatopek, published in this very magazine. For those who aren’t in the know: Zatopek won four gold medals and one silver across two Olympic Games. But he’s best known for winning a never-repeated treble of the 5 000 metres, 10 000 metres and the marathon, at the 1952 Olympics, held in Helsinki. In the article, Zatopek spoke about his training. For some reason, the aspect I remember most clearly was his staple afternoon session. He ran at an easy pace for the majority of his hour-long session, followed by a final lap he described as “always very hard”. Finishing a session strong seems logical; certainly, it’s something we’ve all done. At the end of our easy runs especially, we know we’re only one kilometre from home, so we pick up the pace, and nudge it up a little further as we get closer. Often, we run the end of each session as though we’re competing in the Olympic final. AT THE END? Guilty as charged: many of my own easy runs have ended this way. But switching on the afterburners for even one kilometre every time you run will undo the benefits of your PHOTOGRAPH BY PEOPLEIMAGES.COM

easy session very quickly. Easy runs are crucial for your recovery, overall fitness and health. While it may not seem that gunning it for four or five minutes out of a 45-minute run will have any effect, in

my experience it’s often the difference between staying on the proverbial tightrope and falling off it. It’s a classic example of hedging your training goals, and it’s an easy mistake to make. When you finish your easy runs hard – often much faster than your 10-kilometre race pace, and on relatively tired legs – you change the purpose of your session: from recovery, to muscular and nervous-system stress. This adds considerably to your training demands. All in all, I’d caution against using Zatopek’s method. IN THE BEGINNING? Another really interesting implication – more for new and returning runners – comes from the world of behavioural economics. This is a field that studies how people make decisions, and how their ‘unconscious strings’ might be pulled to help them make better choices.

What they’ve found is that when unfit people finish a training session very hard, they’re more likely to have negative memories of that session than when they do exactly the same overall session, but running the hard part first and the finish very easy. A fast start, followed by an easy finish, led to the volunteers having fond memories of training – both 15 minutes and also 24 hours later. Their forecasts for subsequent training sessions were also more optimistic, because they felt more positive after an easy finish. That’s important, because one of the things that puts people off running is how unpleasant it can sometimes feel – and let’s face it, running is tough for anyone who’s either starting out, or coming back from injury. THE STRATEGY If you’re a newbie who wants to build happier memories and more positive perceptions, you might be better off doing the harder stuff early, while rested, and ending your training session with the easier parts. If you’re an experienced runner, one tactic you might use is a very easy cool-down. Think of it as adding the ingredients for your mental and emotional state before your runs. Be mindful of this if you’re helping novices, either as their coach or training partner – finishing hard might seem like fun to you, but it may not be their ideal scenario. Time your battles wisely, or run the risk of killing off their enjoyment of running altogether.

RW Scientific Editor Dr Ross Tucker has a BSc (Med) (Hons) Exercise Science Degree and PhD from the Sports Science Institute. Visit him at www.sportsscientists.com.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 41


MIND+BODY

TAME THE FLAME Don’t let physical (and mental) stress put your body in a state of chronic disrepair. By Brad Stulberg

AFTER YOU FINISH A RUN,

white blood cells rush biochemicals to your legs, where they rebuild your hardworking, worn-out muscles. This process can last a few hours to a few days, depending on the damage incurred. During this time, it’s possible to feel fatigued, sore, and achy: that’s your nerves

42

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

sending pain signals to your brain so you know your quads need a break. You may also notice slight swelling, because fluids carrying healing nutrients can expand tissue. All of this is a healthy physical response known as inflammation. Or more precisely, acute inflammation, which

is what doctors call the immediate and short-lived reaction to a distinct event. If you take it easy and fuel properly during this period of repair, your body will return to normal. Better than normal, actually. Your muscles will adapt to the stress – restored and rebooted – so they end up stronger. But if you disrupt this healing process on a regular basis – say, you skip rest days, do back-to-back hard workouts – you could put your body in a state of chronic inflammation, says Dr Iñigo San Millán,

assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in the US. And that’s not healthy. Chronic inflammation occurs when the body is placed under constant physical and/ or psychological stress. Unlike acute inflammation, which promotes recovery in one part of the body and resolves quickly, chronic inflammation is pervasive and ongoing. The biochemicals that should repair your muscles do the opposite – they destroy tissue and cause cells to malfunction, San Millán says. This can expedite the body’s aging process and increase the risk of injuries, arthritis, and cardiovascular disease. “The dose and duration makes the poison,” San Millán says, meaning a bit of inflammation for a short period can be good, whereas a lot for a long period can be harmful. Runners, in particular, need to be aware of chronic inflammation, because eccentric muscle contractions (the kind that occur when you run) trigger a heightened inflammatory response. If you log high mileage year-round, San Millán recommends talking with your doctor about getting bloodwork. Ele­vated levels of certain biomarkers can suggest chronic inflammation. Of course, ‘high mileage’ is tricky to define. Everyone has a unique threshold for how much their body can handle; one runner’s peak week might be another’s recovery week. And your own baseline ebbs and flows throughout your running life. During periods when

ILLUSTRATIONS BY KIRSTEN ULVE


your training is on point and you’re in top shape, you may be able to surge beyond your normal limits. At other times, the same training volume could leave you feeling beaten up. This is common as athletes get older; recovery becomes more necessary with age. Being aware of all of this and adjusting your training accordingly is critical, says Dr Trent Stellingwerff, who is the head of

innovation and research for the Canadian Sport Institute Pacific in British Columbia. Stellingwerff advocates a training plan that doesn’t overtax the body and includes recovery. “Generally, the lowest levels of chronic inflammation you’ll find are in athletes following a smart system that includes exercising between 45 and 90 minutes a day, eating right, and sleeping well,” he says.

Runners who push hard without sufficient recovery are more susceptible to chronic inflammation. If you experience difficulty sleeping, night sweats, elevated heart rate upon waking, increased muscle soreness, a general sense of fatigue, and burnout, you should scale back. Reducing your risk of chronic inflammation will help you live a healthier and longer running life.

How to Soothe the Pain Monster 5 ways to prevent chronic inflammation RECOVER Follow hard efforts with easy days so your body can heal. Exercise physiologist Dr Iñigo San Millán also suggests taking a monthly recovery week, during which you reduce the length and intensity of runs. Schedule at least one low-​impact crosstraining day into your weekly routine. “You get the benefits of increased bloodflow, without the stress of impact,” he says. FUEL UP On a run, muscles burn through glycogen, their main fuel source.

“Running on glycogendepleted legs can lead to inflammation,” says Dr Matthew Laye, assistant professor of health and human performance at the College of Idaho in the US. During runs lasting over an hour, ingest a sports drink or energy gel. And refuel within 30 to 60 minutes (with protein and carbohydrates). EAT WELL Outside of performance fuelling, avoid simple sugars in processed foods. Laye says if you overload your body with sugar when your

muscles aren’t refuelling, your body struggles to absorb the sugar, which contributes to inflammation. Eat whole, natural foods, some fruit, and plenty of vegetables. Cherries, kale, avocados, and salmon contain anti-​ inflamma­tory agents. SLEEP Overnight, human growth hormone and testosterone flood your system, which helps your body rebuild itself. “Short-changing sleep increases your risk of chronic inflammation,” says San Millán. “You should get at least seven,

ideally eight, hours of sleep every night. If you don’t, cut back on training.” STRESS LESS When your brain is overloaded with demanding work or emotional stressors, your body can become deprived of glycogen – the same fuel source that feeds your muscles and prevents inflammation. This means that if you are experiencing a period of heavy life stress, it’s critical to eat (and sleep) well. If you can’t, scale back on training until you can.

Pop a Pill?

After a hard run, it’s okay to experience muscle tenderness, soreness, and even a little temporary muscle swelling. Under most circumstances, experts recommend letting this process run its course without interference. “Taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can blunt training adaptations,” says Rob Nied, a sportsmedicine physician. But there are some exceptions. • You ran your goal race and are very sore. Take an ice bath and an NSAID (Ibuprofen), if you want to. Doing so at this point won’t disrupt training gains (training’s done!). • You twisted your ankle and have visible redness and swelling or severe soreness. Apply ice and consider taking an NSAID for two or three days to treat an acute injury. • Your plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendinosis is flaring up again. For a chronic overuse injury, you may need to take an NSAID for seven to 10 days. Still in pain after that? See a doctor.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 43


MIND+BODY THE BODY SHOP

INSTANT RECOVERY This post-run routine gives beaten-up muscles a healing boost.

IF YOU COME TO A screeching halt after racing or running hard, waste products and even your body’s own healing nutrients and chemicals can pool in your legs, creating extra inflammation that harms rather than heals. To avoid that, Robyn LaLonde, running coach and co-owner of Edge Athlete Lounge, a recovery studio, developed this cool-down routine. It reduces swelling, calms your nervous system, and sends a fresh supply of blood to carry nutrients to – and toxins from – fatigued muscles and joints. If more than 30 minutes have passed since your hard run, start with five to 10 minutes of brisk walking to bring your heart rate back up and reopen constricted vessels. – Cindy Kuzma

STABILITY BALL TWIST Lie down, arms at your sides. Raise your legs straight and place a stability ball between your ankles. Keeping your lower back pressed into the floor, rotate your legs and the ball to the right until your left foot is in front of your right foot. Pause for one second, then rotate back in the other direction. Continue for one minute.

If you don’t have an exercise ball, mimic the same motion with scissor kicks.

LEG SWINGS Stand with your hands on your hips. Engage your core slightly, gently flex your right foot, and swing your right leg from front to back. Keep your upper body still and eyes forward. Do 25 swings on each leg. TORSO STRETCH Stand facing the back of a chair; place your hands on top. Step backwards to extend your arms and spine. Relax your head, keep your legs straight, and sink your spine down so your upper body is parallel to the floor. Hold for one minute while taking long, slow breaths – inhale for three counts through your nose, then exhale three counts through your mouth. LEGS UP THE WALL Lie with your butt against a wall, legs extended up, perpendicular to the floor. Keep the entire back of each leg in contact with the wall if you can; if your hamstrings feel strained, bend your knees slightly. Open your arms to the sides, palms up, and hold for five to 15 minutes. For an added hip and groin stretch, bend your knees outward and bring your feet sole-to-sole. CHILD’S POSE Kneel on the floor, tops of your feet down and knees hip-width or wider – the further apart, the deeper the hip stretch. Stretch your arms straight out in front of you, palms down, and place your forehead on the floor (or as low as you can go). Hold for one to two minutes. I L LU S T R AT I O N B Y K I R S T E N U LV E

44 RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT RAINEY


FUEL

FRIDGE WISDOM

NUTRITION ADVICE FOR HEALTHY, HUNGRY RUNNERS

BY DR LIZ APPLEGATE

Perk Up If you hit the wall...

Drinks provide about 14 grams of carbs per cup. For hydration and performance, they also have sodium and potassium.

1 / GET BUZZED

Caffeine may help. Aim for 30 to 50mg (gels and chews typically have 20 to 50mg per serving) a little more than halfway through your run. The kick can help make the effort feel easier.

2 / SWISH AND SPIT

GEL, BAR, OR DRINK?

What research reveals about mid-run carb consumption

FUELLING YOUR LONG RUNS and races is just as important as training for

them. Anyone who’s bonked (and who hasn’t?) knows you can’t skimp on your mid-race carbohydrate fix. But how you get your carbs matters too. New research from Massey University in New Zealand found that athletes who consumed gels, sports drink, or a combination of an energy bar with gel and drink had less gut discomfort, less fatigue, and a decreased level of exertion compared with those who only ate an energy bar.

POWER YOUR RUN During a marathon, 60 to 75 per cent of your fuel comes from carbs, and the remainder from fat. For a half marathon, when you’re running faster, you use even more carbs. Carb stores, which are made up of glycogen, give you the ability to move. But they’re limited, lasting about an hour for hard efforts and two hours for a slower pace. At this point, you’ll

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY

start running on empty, which causes your blood sugar levels (glucose) to plummet. That’s when you hit the wall. Taking in quick carbs – gels, chews, and sports drinks – will keep your glucose levels stable, allowing you to keep moving forward (somewhat) comfortably. FUEL EARLY AND OFTEN When you’re on the road for more than 60 minutes,

you’ll need 30 to 60 grams of carbs per hour, according to the American College of Sports Medicine. The athletes in the New Zealand study consumed carbs every 20 minutes. Make sure you’re getting enough fuel by dividing it into 420kJ chunks (about 23 to 25 grams of carbs). Gels and chews on the market often fall into this range. (Bars can be harder to digest due to their protein and fat content.)

Rinse your mouth with a sip of sports drink for about 15 seconds before spitting it out. This will alert your brain to the presence of carbs, lowering your perceived sense of exertion.

3 / MAKE A PIT STOP

If your fuel is sloshing around in your stomach, a toilet break may help calm things down.

MIX IT UP Studies show that having a fuel source with different types of carbs (e.g. maltodextrin and cane syrup) can improve absorption. The carb source in the New Zealand study contained fructose and maltodextrin. Just try your fuel in training first!

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 45


GEAR

POUND for SOUND IS MUSIC PART OF YOUR RUNNING ROUTINE (SEE PAGE 54)? DO YOU NEED TO STAY CONNECTED TO YOUR SMARTPHONE – EVEN WHEN YOU’RE RUNNING? DO MOTIVATIONAL PODCASTS HELP YOU PICK UP THE PACE? BOY, HAVE WE GOT SOME GREAT GEAR FOR YOU.

Wireless = extra freedom

BY RYAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES GARAGHTY

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 47


GEAR 1

2

5

3

4

The Samsung Iconx Buds are waterproof and can store up to 4GB of music.

Bluetooth 01/ BODY GLOVE BSPORT R650

02/ SKULL CANDY GRIND WIRELESS R1 499 Bluetooth connectivity range is

48

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

03/ BEATS STUDIO WIRELESS R5 999 In order to be on trend and get the best-quality sound, you need to pop a pair of Beats on your head. The design is smooth and less industrial-looking than most over-

ear options. The operating buttons are intuitive, and easy to use while on the move. 12 hours of wireless battery life – and if you choose to wire up (a cable is included) you can expect up to 20 hours.

04/ VOLKANO STRIDER SERIES SPORTS HEADPHONES R490 When not in use, the secure and solid neckpiece can easily be folded away. 20 hours of battery life after only two hours of charging. The headphones hook over the ears for extra-sturdy fit while running. Includes an arm pouch suitable for a smartphone.

05/ SAMSUNG ICONX BUDS R3 499 These buds are the future; not just of audio, but also of fitness tracking. They’re waterproof, cord-free, and feature an ambientsound mode, which means you’re still able to hear what’s happening in your surroundings while you’re listening to music. The buds have the capacity to store up to 4GB of music themselves, but you can also stream music from your phone via Bluetooth. Using smartphone connectivity, you can monitor your heart rate and fitness activity – from your ear, to your screen.

P H OTO G R A P H S U P P L I E D ( S A M S U N G I C O N X )

This sweat-proof in-ear option features a soft cable, which sits gently on your neck and can be adjusted to avoid bounce while on the run. Four hours of music-playback ability. A dual microphone means you can make and receive calls.

over 10 metres (great news… for giraffes!). The headphones are strong, and didn’t drop out once during testing. Plush leather and soft-sponge over-ear speakers are gentle on your ears, and deliver crisp, clear sound. The metal frame can easily be adjusted to secure the headset to your head. 12-hour battery life.


6

In-Ear Buds 06/ SKULL CANDY R749 Testers raved about the triple-lock system, which secures the buds in place during even the most rigorous head movement, without being obtrusive. If you need ear buds that are sweat-, water- and rain-proof, this set has you covered. A clip on the cable secures them to your running top. Right-angle jack / Left-right specific / Extra earbud covers / Take and make calls

7

Adapts to your ear for a secure fit.

07/ POLAROID SPORT EARBUDS R120 The soft cable was the least robust of all those tested. But that also means it feels soft around the ears. A silicon section hooks around the ear to keep the buds in place. Straight jack / Left-right specific / Extra earbud covers

8

08/ SENNHEISER R160 The Sennheisers aren’t sport-specific, and the earphones are a little bigger than most. But if you’re looking for the best sound quality, the only other option that can match them is the Skullcandy. Best bass sound. Right-angle jack / Left-right specific / Extra earbud covers

9

09/ PHILIPS BASS SOUND SHE3590 R145 The smallest in-ear buds we tested fitted securely after a side-to-side wiggle. The cable split, from the single length to the individual ear strands, was also the longest – which is great for those who tend to feel choked by buds with a shorter split. Right-angle jack / Left-right specific / Extra earbud covers

10/ JBL C100S1 R199 The shortest cable of all those tested, by four centimetres – which is good for those who feel a loose cable gets in the way and gets caught on things. The operating button is really small, which could pose a problem for runners with large fingers. A slightly more ‘tinny’ sound than the rest. Straight jack / Left-right specific / Extra earbud covers

10

Modern running gear often features a small hole to accommodate headphone cords.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 49


GEAR

MP3 Players

11

11/ ZARTEK V2 4GB R1 250 A fully-waterproof MP3 player that can even be used for swimming. The in-ear mechanism isn’t as secure as other in-ear options though. Charges over 2.5 hours via USB, which then gives you 12 hours of playback. The 4GB memory will hold over 800 tracks.

12/ APPLE WATCH SPORT R5 000 When it comes to listening to music, the Apple watch is a great alternative to your smartphone. But it’s not quite an MP3 player; rather, it enables you to access iTunes via your smartphone. You can choose from all your music on iTunes, without having to create a specific batch of files for running. This is only relevant for Apple users. Needs to be charged daily.

13

13/ LENCO 4GB MEDIA PLAYER R599 A simple, lightweight music carrier for your regular playlist. Though you can change the tracks, the device isn’t very user-friendly on the move. It stores 4GB of music; which means you can save at least 800 tracks, in either MP3 or WMA format. There’s no Bluetooth connectivity, and we’d also recommend swopping out the ear buds that come with the player for one of the sets featured on page 49. Micro SD card option for extra music.

14/ CIVVIO 8GB WATERPROOF MP3 PLAYER R1 600 Another fully-waterproof MP3 player, the Civvio is compact and includes an FM radio option. An 8GB storage capacity means you can store over 1 500 tracks, and the battery lasts for 10 hours. Charges via USB.

12

14

15

MP3 players are all but extinct, as smartphones dominate as the preffered choice of music carriers.

15/ APPLE IPOD TOUCH 32GB R4 900 An imitation of the iPhone, both in terms of aesthetics and functionality. It includes apps, a camera and storage, without smartphone capabilities. The iPod is around three quarters of the size of the iPhone 6, which means it’s light enough to be carried in a pouch, bag or belt (like the Puma belt, featured on page 51). Includes the Apple ear pods; although the next version will probably only include the new wireless Apple Airpods.

50

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

FOR A FULL LIST OF STOCKISTS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/STOCKISTS.


NEW GEAR

1

01/ BLACKROLL FROM R250 Myofascial therapy has gained momentum this year, and many runners are enjoying the beneficial effects. BlackRoll is from Germany, and offers a range of choices that target different areas on the body. From a double-ball roller for the specific trigger-points of the spine, to smaller rollers for the forearms, these highquality foam rollers are ready to help your running-weary body. blackroll.com

ASK THE GEAR GUY Ryan Scott

How do I prevent chafing from the straps of my running pack? – PIETER, Table View

2

The most popular hoodie ever!

03/ ADIDAS Z.N.E. HOODIE R1 699 This stylish and functional hoodie comes in white only. Designed based on feedback adidas received from their impressive list of sponsored athletes, the hoodie accommodates on-trend over-the-ear headphones, extends a little further past the face than most hoodies, and zips up to cover the mouth. The idea is to help top performers to stay focused on their event. All those tricks aside, the tapered cut, extra room at the shoulders, and narrower waist make it the most impressive piece of clothing we’ve seen this year.

FOR A FULL LIST OF STOCKISTS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / STOCKISTS.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES GARAGHTY

02/ PUMA EXPANDABLE WAIST BELT R329 Many runners can’t bring themselves to strap a smartphone carry-case to their upper arm, because it feels uncomfortable and it doesn’t look fashionable. We tested this alternative option, and it quickly became a favourite. Stretch fabric keeps the phone firmly in place – although it’s not robust enough for clumsy runners in the habit of accidentally dropping their phones.

3

Chafe can sometimes be so painful it brings your longdistance runs to a standstill, wreaking havoc on your training schedule. Prevention is better than the cure. Until you’ve broken in your new pack, rubbing a small amount of Vaseline into your shoulders and neck before you run is advisable. Assess the fit of the pack, adjusting areas that feel a little loose, or that you suspect might cause chafing. Massaging the harder areas on the outer edges of the fabric sometimes helps to create a supple feel.

“Prevention is better than the cure.” The most effective way to avoid chafe is to take the weight off the shoulder area. Adjusting the (oftenneglected) waist and chest straps will help you distribute weight more evenly. The most common reason runners avoid fastening these straps is that they feel too constrictive. To avoid this feeling, take a deep breath before fastening, then clip the straps on and adjust for comfort. The weight is now transferred to the hips and chest, and it’s more likely that the pack will stay in place, leaving you to run naturally without having to worry about burning chafe.

RW Gear Editor Ryan Scott is comfortable running on the road and mountain trails alike, and is seldom seen wearing the same pair of shoes twice.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 51


FRESH SHOES DOWNHILL SOLUTION

THE BIG ONE Hoka One One Clifton 3 • R2150 • 221 grams (women’s version) Hoka is a brand already entrenched in American and European running culture, and offers footwear options suitable for both road and trail. In January 2017, this shoe – pronounced ‘Hokuh Oh-nay Oh-nay’, which is Maori for ‘to fly over the earth’ – will be released in South Africa. The shoe’s signature oversized soft-stack height has caused a stir in the market. But despite its bulky appearance, it’s surprisingly lightweight, and the forefoot is roomy.

The shoe was originally designed to make downhill trail running easier – and more fun after a hard climb. The result? A chunky, soft and lightweight shoe. Testers spoke highly of its comfortable fit.

CLIFTON SHORES

The Clifton 3 is actually named after the iconic Clifton beaches in Cape Town, and was inspired by one of the shoe’s early supporters, legendary South African runner Johnny Halberstadt.

The ultimate runner’s high.

BUCK THE TREND

Hoka created the maximalist category at a time when natural, minimalist designs (at the opposite end of the spectrum) were trending. Which raised questions: about how stable a highstacked shoe actually is, and whether the sole is too soft. But testers were adamant the shoe needs to be experienced firsthand, in order to appreciate its lightness and ease of use.

52

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES GARAGHTY


AFTERTHOUGHT

ROAD SURFING

With so much going on in the sole, the good-looking upper is almost an afterthought. The fabric has lots of overlays and is seamless, which makes it durable and adds to the shoe’s overall comfort.

The road shoe features ‘rocker’ technology, which means it’s been designed like a surfboard; there’s a slight, upward turn at both the front and the back of the midsole. The result is a smooth ride that accommodates all types of foot strikers, and counters concerns about stability.

Hoka are the originators of maximalism.

FOREFOOT WIDTH

A prominent feature in most Hoka models is the wide toebox and forefoot. The previous version, the Clifton 2, was given a bit of stick for being designed with less width than previous models. So Hoka have responded by bringing back the wide toe-box and forefoot in the Clifton 3 – the foot is no longer prevented from splaying upon impact.

FOR A FULL LIST OF STOCKISTS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / STOCKISTS.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 53


54

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


Can music make you a faster, leaner runner, able to recover at lightning speed? WORDS: Lisa Nevitt

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 55


stimuli trying to reach the brain – such as fatigue-related messages from muscles and organs,” says Dr Costas Karageorghis, a sports psychologist who has studied music’s positive influence on athletes. According to Bood, music doesn’t appear to influence what you feel (your muscles will still ache and your breathing will still be laboured during a challenging interval), only how you feel about it (it shapes – positively – your interpretation of effort, fatigue and pain).

Up tempo

YOU CAN SPOT MUSIC-LOVING RUNNERS by the telltale white wires sticking out from their ears as they trot past. They’re in a trance: a happy zone of audio stimulation and endorphins, which science has proven to increase motivation (and make Apple Music executives’ eyes gleam). A Runner’s World survey of 11 328 runners revealed that 74% of respondents were all for music; and advances in technology – wireless headphones, and even watches that store music – have made it more enjoyable and comfortable to listen to. But running with music is a complex issue, and safety concerns mean those earbuds can be a dangerous accessory. So here’s how to stay safe, have more fun, and make the most of your playlist.

during a run in order to push myself.” Researchers at Dalhousie University in Canada examined the influence of music on self-paced running. They found participants who listened to fast-tempo music – as opposed to no music at all – were more likely to self-select a higher running speed, elevate their heart rate to a higher level, and find the experience of running more enjoyable. Furthermore, Robert Jan Bood, a researcher at the MOVE Research Institute in Amsterdam, found that music significantly delays time to exhaustion. That’s because motivational music helps you to focus on the positive aspects of running, like happiness (and Livin’ La Vida Loca), and less on the negative aspects. “An external stimulus such as music can actually block some of the internal

Bood points out: humans are rhythmic beings (at least, some of us are). We tap our feet and air-drum to the beat of the music we listen to, and attend fitness classes like spinning and step aerobics, where music determines how fast or slow we go. Why should running be any different? In 1998, Haile Gebrselassie achieved a world-best time of 4:52.86 minutes in the 2 000 metres. The Olympian revealed that in training, he’d coupled his cadence (steps per minute) with the beat of Scatman by Scatman John, which was (mysteriously, some might say) popular at the time. Who knew? From a scientific viewpoint, Bood says, keeping the beat helps runners to maintain a consistent pace, by coupling cadence to the required tempo. When Emsley tried running with music that had a prominent and consistent beat, she says, it helped her boost her pace from 5:10 mins/km to 4:30 mins/km. “Music makes me run much faster. My body unconsciously adapts to the rhythm – when the beat gets faster, I tend to speed up with it.” She explains why: “The rhythm of the music travels in through our ears and down our auditory pathways to the supplementary motor area, where it then joins forces with the brain activity responsible for the

Up beat ‘Pro’ music is psychologist Lindy Emsley, who loves pairing her fast-paced road and treadmill runs with upbeat electronic music tracks. She’s what sports psychologists call a ‘dissociator’ – she spends her runs looking for ways to forget her protesting quads as she approaches a monster hill. “I find listening to upbeat songs distracts me from how tired I’m feeling,” she says. “Sometimes, a distraction is all I really need

56

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

RockMyRun: An app that streams music from a range of different genres. You can choose how many beats per minute your music should have.

PaceDJ: Does the same thing as RockMyRun, only it selects music from your own music library.


The most efficient running cadence, according to runningtechnique coach Sean Tait from offthemarktraining.com is 180spm (steps per minute). Most of us run at around 160spm – so here are Sean’s song recommendations for getting your cadence up, and your motivation on turbo.

FOR YOUTUBE LINKS TO THE FULL LIST OF OUR BEST SONGS TO RUN WITH, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA /RUNNINGTUNES

signalling of movement, helping us to keep pace by providing an external timing signal.” So runners work harder, as a result of the motivational aspect of the music; and more efficiently, thanks to a consistent beat that matches their cadence, says Bood.

Chilled out What the researchers at Dalhousie University also found is that listening to slow music, post-exercise – again, as opposed to no music – resulted in faster heart rate and blood-lactate recovery.

That’s because music actions the bits of the nervous system that conserve energy, and one of the ways it does so is by slowing down heart rate. Interestingly, listening to static noise (or fast music) didn’t lower participants’ heart rates at rest. Healthy individuals and athletes who engage in high-intensity interval training could use slow music during active rest periods to hasten recovery. A study published in the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research found the most important factor for relaxation was how much participants liked the music. Makes sense; but it also highlights the effect of our emotional response to music: listening to

• 50 Cent, In Da Club • Alanis Morrissette, Hand In My Pocket • Ashlee Simpson, Pieces Of Me • Avril Lavigne, Fall To Pieces • Billy Idol, Speed • Cher, If I Could Turn Back Time • Daft Punk, Fall • Don Henley, The Boys Of Summer • Evanescence, Taking Over Me • Foo Fighters, No Way Back • General Public, Tenderness • Hall And Oates, Maneater • Katy Perry, Simple • Kelly Clarkson, Behind These Hazel Eyes • Michael Jackson, They Don’t Care About Us • Michelle Branch, Where Are You Now • Missy Elliott, Get Ur Freak On • New Found Glory, My Friends Over You • Pink, 18 Wheeler • Paula Abdul, Straight Up • Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Californication • Ricky Martin, Livin’ La Vida Loca • Roxette, Almost Unreal • The Beatles, Yellow Submarine • UB40, Red Red Wine

Note: Some of these songs are around 90spm, not 180spm. Step either side of the beat, so that you’re running double-time.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 57


Tempo Listening to Enya will hardly get you in the mood for smashing a 200-metre repeat, but it will help during your recovery. Genre or vibe You ARE smashing a 200-metre repeat? Pumped-up electronic music from David Guetta will help you to up your pace. Lyrics Which is more likely to motivate you on that hill: Happy, by Pharrell Williams, or an angry heavymetal singer screaming at you to ‘just go ahead and die’?

58

The memory the music triggers. Were you listening to Scatman when, gazing wistfully out of your kitchen window, you witnessed your cat meeting an untimely end on the front of a garbage truck? Then skip the Scat! The structure or compilation of the tracks. Interval training? Try beasting it on the manic sections of Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody, and recovering during the softer sections. *Suggested by Professor Andy Lane, a sports psychologist from the University of Wolverhampton, UK.

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

motivational songs (with a tempo that matches our cadence) helps improve our times, and calm songs accelerate our recovery.

Switched off Emsley says music definitely has its place in her interval training and tempo runs, but on the trails? Not so much. “There’s enough happening in the mountains to keep me distracted, without having to listen to music. I enjoy the changing landscape, and being quiet in nature is also a good opportunity to reflect and make

important decisions.” Besides, music isn’t the only way to boost your performance. In fact, ultra-marathoner Sean Robson – who sits firmly on the ‘Con’ side – sees it as an unwelcome distraction on his long training runs. According to sports scientists, Robson is an ‘associator’ – he prefers to focus inwards during a run. “I enjoy interacting with my environment, whether it’s the sound of barking dogs, moms pushing prams, or crashing waves,” he says. Running without music, Robson is more aware of his body’s cues: his breathing, foot fall and leg turnover, and any aches and pains. “When you run with music, you can’t hear those cues, so you’re not learning to connect them to your effort level,” explains Dr Jim Denison, a sports sociologist and coach. Robson describes himself as a regular ‘Chatty Cathy’, who’d rather interact with fellow runners and listen to their stories than be swept away by a song. “I don’t need music to motivate me,” he says. “I remind myself that I’ve never regretted a run, even when I wasn’t keen on starting it. The energy and enthusiasm provided by running with others – be they regular partners, or complete strangers – is really special.” Nor does Robson need to Sail Away on Enya’s lulling tones in order to bring his heart rate back down to earth. A no-fuss kinda guy, he simply goes for a cool-down walk, and ends with squats and lunges.


Pros • Elevates mood.

• Helps you to up your cadence. • Motivates you to a strong finishing kick.

Cons • You can’t focus on your surroundings and your body.

• Running with headphones isn’t safe.

• Helps you block out fatigue.

• Carrying a music player can (sometimes) be cumbersome.

• Reduces your perception of your body’s limits.

• Many races don’t allow music players and headphones.

Adapted from Should You Listen to Music While Running? by Scott Martin and Caitlin Giddings.

Listen wisely There’s another consideration. Safety is an important aspect too. Ask yourself: would you drive a car or ride a bike while wearing headphones? Probably not. Running with music means you may not hear what’s going on around you, like traffic, or a mugger. And another reason Emsley doesn’t listen to music when she’s trail running is that when navigating technical terrain, making sure she doesn’t fall flat on her face requires total concentration. Many of South Africa’s major races don’t allow music players with headphones. At the popular Outsurance KFM Gun Run half marathon, for instance, you may be disqualified if you’re caught using them. “That’s because when runners are listening to music, they tend to zone out, and can’t hear traffic, other

runners, or instructions from marshals,” says race organiser Sue Ullyett. “They become oblivious to what’s going on around them.” And that’s dangerous, to themselves and to others.

Hand in hand The research shows that running and music can go hand in hand – if you want them to. Music certainly has its place (and pace!) in our sport, though some runners choose not to run with it at all. Each to his own. But here’s something to mull over: in South Africa, 40% of women and 11% of men are obese. A common reason people avoid exercise is because they don’t enjoy it. So if running with music helps people to enjoy exercise – and as a result, burn kilojoules, lose weight, and elevate their fitness levels – then can’t music be used to improve our country’s health?

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 59


60 RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


Delicious, Nutritious…

Fast! Celebrity chef, SA MasterChef winner and marathoner Kamini Pather cooks up meals worthy of any runner.

Words: MIKE FINCH Images: TOBYMURPHY.COM

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 61


Kamini Pather has heard the words ‘never trust a thin chef’ too often. “It’s an old way of thinking, and food has to be part of a balanced life,” says the 33-yearold former Durbanite over a coffee, near her new home in Cape Town. Clearly. The 2013 South Africa MasterChef winner, radio and TV host, stylist and food writer is far from overweight – especially since she started running in 2010. This year, she finished her first 42.2km, at the Sanlam Cape Town Marathon. She is also about to film her second series of Girl Eat World, now airing on Netflix in the US, and has become a global food personality beyond SA shores. “I look at a guy like (UK chef) Antony Worrall Thompson, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes and had to make a radical change to his life,” Pather says. “Just because you enjoy food and cooking doesn’t mean you have to live an unhealthy life.” Pather grew up in a large Indian family in Glenwood in Durban, and remembers big lunches cooked by her grandmother Savi, who still rules the family dinner even now, when Kamini goes to visit. “I come from a big, extended family, with three siblings, and we would sit at this long table with the kids at the end,” Pather remembers. “Even now, when I go to visit my gran, she still makes the main food dishes, and I’m left with the menial tasks.” But it’s these early memories that kickstarted Pather’s love affair with food; and driven by that love, she’s ambitious. She started with a job as an intern at Eat Out magazine, and then Taste, and did a short stint as a radio DJ and then as a chef on SABC TV’s Expresso show. But it was in 2013 that Pather’s big break came, when she auditioned for the local version of MasterChef. “I remember only deciding at the last minute to go and try out; and when I got there it was late in the day, and I just walked in. We went through various rounds before it was whittled down to the people who made it on to the TV show.” Pather did so well, she won the season. But the show only aired six months after the actual competition ended. “It was tough going to functions and not being able to tell anyone that I had won, since it all had to be confidential. I stopped going out to functions for a while!” MasterChef success led to her own TV show, in which each week, Pather travelled from home in Johannesburg to places such as Bangkok, Lima and Dubai, to taste the local dishes and present her experiences. “I basically did nine countries in nine

62

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

Pather makes sure she has meals prepared in the fridge, so that when she returns from her run, she can whip up something fast, simple and delicious.


weeks. It was hectic.” The Running As her confidence grew in the world of food, Pather also knew that the excesses of her lifestyle would require some attention, and in 2010 she started running. “I guess what got me going was the Nike+ app and the motivation it gave me,” Pather remembers. “I started off doing two kilometres, and was utterly exhausted.” But gradually she started to build her mileage, and by 2013 was regularly running eight to 10 kilometres, three times a week. “I realised when I was on MasterChef that I’m quite a competitive individual, and running gave me an outlet for that.”

But she’d never run further than 15 kilometres. Until in 2016, the organisers of the Cape Town Marathon challenged her to take on a full 42.2. “I was intimated at first, but I wanted to break five hours. That was my goal: I decided I would rather die than not break five hours,” Pather says. In the end, she achieved that goal. But it wasn’t easy. “Yes, there were some tough moments, when I honestly didn’t think I would make it.” But the build-up to race day rewarded her with some motivating training sessions. “You have those moments in training, when you have a session that shows you the hard work

“You have those moments in training, when you have a session that shows you the hard work is paying off.” In her youth Pather ice-skated competitively, even competing in an overseas competition as a junior, so she had some athletic background to fall back on – and some strong legs to carry her. She’s also a qualified yoga instructor, and uses yoga to help herself relax and stay flexible.

is paying off. I remember doing a 21-kilometre run and feeling invigorated, energetic and light on my feet. It was a great feeling.” In between all the hard work, Pather plans to run at least one marathon a year, and use her love of running to explore the cities she gets to visit while making her TV show. “I’m one of those people who always has to do an out-and-back route, otherwise I get lost,” she admits. “I once did an eightkilometre run in Lima, and I also ran in Bangkok. But it was so busy and noisy.” Food to heal Given her high-pressure lifestyle, Pather must also ensure that whatever she eats is quick and easy to make. “When you come back from a run late in the evening, you need to make something fast. I like making couscous, for instance, because it’s instant; and I also make sure I have stuff prepared in the fridge that I can cook.” But she’s also partial to the simplicity of peanut butter on toast. Pather uses a lot of turmeric in her food – it’s a natural anti-inflammatory, and a spice that she grew up loving. “Actually, I really eat anything, and I love food. But it’s okay – I run, too!”

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 63


This steak was salted and placed on a wire rack in the fridge for two days, to intensify its lip-smacking flavour.

64 RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


The Post-Run Chow-Down Steak & Black Rice

Serves 2 INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Steak

300g  sirloin steak

2T  butter 2 cloves garlic

Salt and pepper 120g  black rice 160ml  boiling water (enough to cover the rice by 1cm)

2  handfuls baby spinach

1  brown onion, cubed

1T  canola oil

200ml coconut milk 1 stalk lemon grass

1  red chilli (optional, but live a little)

¼tsp  turmeric powder

Salt and place in the fridge, uncovered and on a wire rack, for two days before you intend to serve it. The idea is that the surface of the meat dehydrates and intensifies the flavour. Before cooking, take it out of the fridge and allow to reach room temperature by leaving it out, covered, for a few hours. Brush the meat with canola oil. Heat a pan to smoking point. Place steak into the pan and flip every five to 10 seconds. As the meat takes on colour, feel the thickest part of the steak (see below). When the steak is almost done, toss in the butter, tilt the pan to one side to collect the fat, and add the crushed garlic clove. Spoon the fat over the meat until basted. Allow to rest before slicing.

[ NOTE: HOW T O T E S T FOR T HE PERFEC T S T E A K ] With a relaxed hand, touch your index finger to your thumb. Press the fleshy area below the thumb with the index finger of the other hand. If it feels like the steak, your steak is rare. For a medium-rare steak, touch your middle finger to your thumb and do the same test.

Black rice

Wash rice twice in cold water before putting it on the stove and adding the boiling water. Allow to cook on high heat for 20 to 25 minutes. You’ll know it’s beginning to soften when it starts to turn purple. While the rice is cooking, sweat off half the cubed onion with 1T oil and a pinch of salt. Cover the pot with the lid so the onion steams as well as frying – the onion needs to glisten. When the water has evaporated from the rice and the rice is almost soft enough, transfer to the pan of onion and cook further. You may need to add another splash of water at this stage. Stir the baby spinach through before serving. Taste for seasoning.

Turmeric coconut sauce

Sauté the other half of the cubed onion in 1T of oil, with a pinch of salt, the bruised stalk of lemon grass, garlic and red chilli. Again, cover with a lid to truly soften the onion. When it is, add ¼tsp turmeric to the pot and stir. Allow the turmeric to cook out for three minutes before pouring the coconut milk into the pot. Stir until the colour is even. TO SERVE:

Portion the spinach and black rice onto the plates. Slice the steak, and drizzle with coconut sauce.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 65


Place in the oven until the cheese bubbles on top of the warm, chewy sourdough bread.

The ingredients for tasty cheese on toast? Sourdough bread, red onion, and of course, a generous smothering of goat’s cheese.

66

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


The Snack

The Ultimate Cheese On Toast

Serves 1

INGREDIENT S

2 slices of sourdough (or any bread that you have)

Butter

4-5 balls of Bocconcini 1 log of chevin

A few rounds of red onion Salt and black pepper METHOD

Heat oven to 200°C. Apply a thin layer of butter to the bread, and toast on a griddle pan. Smother the toast with as much goat’s cheese as you dare, and tear some bocconcini over it. Top with red onion and season. Place in oven until cheese is bubbling. Eat IMMEDIATELY.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 67


The Power Lunch Spicy Fish Cakes

Serves 4 (small portion) INGREDIENTS

450g  hake (or any white fish you desire) 600ml  full-cream milk

1  clove garlic

1  bay leaf

2  medium potatoes, baked and mashed

½  cup red quinoa

handful  fresh coriander leaves, roughly chopped

METHOD

Poach fish: place in a wide pan, cover with milk and garlic. Allow milk to heat to scalding point (but NOT boiling), and let fish sit in hot liquid until opaque. Wash bitterness from quinoa by rinsing three times. Cook in ½ cup of water until split. When the fish is cooked, strain off the milk. Keep milk in case the mixture needs moisture. Save the garlic. To the mashed potato, add the garlic (mix thoroughly), quinoa, flaked hake, coriander and green chilli. Season and mix together well. With wet hands, shape spoonfuls of mixture into round, flat patties. Allow to sit in fridge for a few hours, before frying to a crisp and serving with a slice of lemon and a side salad.

1-2  green chillies (depending on your taste)

1T  canola oil to fry

68

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


These fragrant fishcakes are best served fried to a crisp, with a slice of lemon and a fresh salad on the side.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 69


Comfort food: A handful of blueberries makes this hearty, warm breakfast worth salivating over.

70

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


The Morning Get-Me-Up Ancient Grain Porridge

Serves 4 INGREDIENTS

2T rolled oats

2T red quinoa

2T spelt

2T chia seeds

METHOD

1 crystal rock salt

1 stick cinnamon

1 cup water

The day before, rinse quinoa three times; then mix the grains together, add cinnamon stick and salt, and cover with water. Allow to soak overnight. In the morning, warm through. Add extra water if necessary. When hot, add a splash of coconut milk, some raw sugar, and blueberries.

340ml coconut milk Jaggery (raw sugar) Handful of blueberries

[

CHECK OUT: K A MINI PAT HER

]

Follow Kamini on Twitter @KaminiPather, and on Instagram @kaminipather.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 71


RUN In their new book, two runner friends – one a fit mom and trained chef , the other an Olympian who loves her food – explain how to watch your times and weight drop by nourishing your hardworking body with unprocessed whole foods, local fresh produce, and organic meat. Bonus: the recipes are delish!

EAT ho

Fo od M p it

hs by rap tog ndel Ma

ch

SHALANE FLANAGAN AND ELYSE KOPECKY

BY

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 73


WE ALL KNOW what ‘run fast’ means, right? Kick some @#*! It means not just surviving, but also thriving, in our insanely fast-paced lifestyles that don’t seem conducive to having the time (or energy) to cook. But what do we mean by ‘eat slow’? It represents a way of eating that includes preparing nourishing

critical to faster recovery times. “When coaches and athletes are asked what is the major contributor to good athletic performance, they often say things like VO2 max, training load, or a particular type of training,” says Dr Ron Thompson, co-author of Eating Disorders in Sport. “But a major contributor to good athletic performance is good health, and the major contributor to good health (other than genetics) is good nutrition. The well-nourished athlete will not only perform better, but will perform better for longer.” Shalane and I have shared a love of good food since we met in 2000 as anxious newbies on the crosscountry team at varsity. Shalane (Although our definition Flanagan (left) of ‘good’ has definitely and Elyse evolved over the years!) Kopecky share a love of running After graduation we both and good food. moved to another city – Shalane to run for Nike, me to work for Nike Running – so

meals from scratch, sitting down at a table instead of eating on the go, enjoying food in the company of friends and family, seeking out foods that were grown or raised with care, and tuning in to what our bodies need to thrive. Although runners are often put on a pedestal as the epitome of fitness, we know all too well that we are not immune to serious health issues. Convenience foods, including bars, gels, and sports drinks, not only lack real nutrition, but they’re also high in refined grains, processed sweeteners, industrial oils, and artificial ingredients. For runners who are constantly breaking down their bodies during intense training sessions, nutrient-dense foods are

74

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

our paths had stayed very much intertwined until I moved abroad, and then came back home to attend culinary school. In August 2013, we reunited – over a meal, naturally! ‘Indulgent nourishment’ is how we define our way of eating. We know our hardworking bodies need substantial fuel, so we indulge in our favourite whole foods. By filling up on the healthful foods we love and not obsessing over kilojoule counts, carbs, or fat, we’re able to eat in tune with what our bodies need. Real food

Adapted from Run Fast, Eat Slow: Nourishing Recipes for Athletes, by Shalane Flanagan and Elyse Kopecky (R379, takealot.com).

PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER YANG

P R E V I O U S PAG E : P H OTO G R A P H B Y P E T E R YA N G ( F L A N AG A N & KO P E C K Y ) ; H A I R & M A K E U P B Y CO L I E M A R I E A R T I S T R Y

Leading up to a big race, Shalane will limit sweets. But mostly she focuses on a balanced diet rich in wholesome foods that keep her energised.

allows the body to function optimally without weight gain. All of our recipes were crafted to maximise flavour and nutrition and to minimise inflammation, digestive distress, and toxins. They were vetted by an incredible team of runners, including a high-school cross-country runner, an ultramarathoner-CEO, a physicist, a running-shop owner, a breast cancer oncologist, and a dad inspired to cook more healthily for his active family. Best of all, Shalane – despite her crazy training and travel schedule – road-tested every single recipe. She found that her racing weight came naturally – no deprivation needed. She was enjoying food more than ever, and was recovering faster from her gruelling 38-kilometre training runs at 2 100 metres. Shalane went on to run a PB in the marathon, break her own American 10-K road record, and qualify for her fourth US Olympic team in the marathon. – ELYSE KOPECKY


WHAT’S ON TODAY’S MENU?

Lots of fresh, whole foods for every meal and snack WHEN DECIDING what to eat to eat well, it’s best to look at the full picture, including where the food came from, how it was grown, how much it was processed, how it tastes, and, most importantly, how it makes you feel. For us that means eating a varied diet that includes meat, veggies, fruit, cultured dairy, legumes, whole

grains, nuts, and seeds. We seek out organic and local ingredients as much as possible and enjoy eating with the seasons, since food picked at its peak not only tastes better, but is also more nutrient-dense. We don’t eat meat every day, but we do believe it’s healthy to include on a regular basis. In many of our dishes,

the veggies shine and meat becomes the loyal side companion. As much as possible, we try to get our meat from trusted local farmers who care about the planet. The free-range chicken, beef, ostrich, and lamb we buy is expensive, but our philosophy is to eat better-quality meat and less of it, for maximum nourishment.

Save time by using raw beetroot (instead of baked). Puree them in a highspeed blender.

BREAKFAST

MAKES 2 SERVINGS

Place the beetroot, blueberries, banana, milk, coconut water, ginger, and almond butter in a blender. Blend on high speed for several minutes until smooth.

Shalane starts every day with coffee, a protein source, and fruit or veggies. Beetroot is rich in antioxidants.

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

1 cooked beetroot, peeled and quartered 1 cup frozen blueberries 1 small frozen banana 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 cup coconut water 2.5-cm knob fresh ginger, peeled 1 Tbsp. almond butter

Coconut water gives a boost of electrolytes, and almond butter helps your body absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the beetroot and blueberries.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY OSCAR BOLTON GREEN

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 75


LUNCH

MAKES 6 SERVINGS


1 cup dried green lentils, sorted and rinsed ½ tsp. fine sea salt 3 medium carrots, peeled and grated 2 cups loosely packed chopped kale/spinach, stems removed ½ cup chopped toasted pistachios or almonds ½ cup chopped dried apricots ¼ cup pitted, chopped Kalamata olives 1 Tbsp. Ras el Hanout (Moroccan spice blend) 1 cup uncooked couscous, prepared according to package instructions

cauliflower in d e e ur té p or 3 minutes as a u Sa oil f for couscous. e lo iv titute bs su

Place the lentils in a medium pot, add the salt, and cover with 5cm of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer until tender but not mushy, 25 to 30 minutes. Drain and set aside to cool. Place the carrots, kale, nuts, apricots, olives, and Ras el Hanout in a large salad bowl. Add the couscous and lentils and toss until evenly combined. Add two-thirds of the dressing, toss, and taste. Add more dressing to taste, if needed. Cover the salad and place in the fridge to chill for at least 30 minutes, or until ready to serve.

This hearty salad is packed with fibre, vitamins, and inflammationfighting spices.

SHOP LIKE SHALANE Fresh favourites vary depending on what’s in season, but these are some typical items in Shalane’s shopping trolley.

76

APPLES AND PEARS

ASPARAGUS

AVOCADOS

Keep the doctor away with these fruits that are rich in antioxidants, vitamin C, and fibre. Shalane’s go-to PM snack is an apple smeared with nut butter.

A spring favourite, with vitamin K for strong bones, B vitamins for energy, and vitamins A, C, and E.

Sprinkle salt on half an avocado for a snack. Avos are rich in one of the healthiest fats out there: monounsaturated fatty acids, which are glorious for fighting inflammation.

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

BANANAS Coveted by runners for their essential nutrients, including potassium and other electrolytes, and vitamin B6 for energy.


nd ,a , E on. ti

fat-soluble vita rich in s i min r r o f c l a e a l i c t t i um t en s s u s a B e bs A or K, p

SNACK

Pre-heat the oven to 180°C. Line a standard 12cup muffin tin with paper muffin cups. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, oats, cinnamon, nutmeg, baking soda, salt, and walnuts, plus raisins, dates, or chocolate chips if using. In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs, courgette, carrots, butter, syrup/honey, and vanilla. Add to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. The batter will be thick. Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling each to the brim. Bake until the muffins are nicely browned on top and a toothpick inserted in the centre of a muffin comes out clean, 25 to 35 minutes.

MAKES 12 MUFFINS

2 cups almond flour 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 2 tsp. ground cinnamon ½ tsp. ground nutmeg 1 tsp. baking soda ½ tsp. fine sea salt ½ cup chopped walnuts ½ cup raisins, chopped dates, or chocolate chips (optional) 3 eggs, beaten 1 cup grated courgette 1 cup grated carrots 6 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted ½ cup maple syrup/ honey 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Almond flour and whole-grain oats in Shalane’s grab-and-go veggie snack offer more nutrients than white flour.

BEEF, OSTRICH

BEETROOT

BERRIES

BREAD

When Shalane is training at high altitude, she craves burgers. Beef and ostrich are rich in iron, a mineral your red blood cells need to carry oxygen to your hardworking muscles.

These sweet, earthy veg are rich in antioxidants, anti-​inflammatory compounds, and naturally occurring nitrates, proven to lower blood pressure.

Blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries pack a sweet punch of nutrients, including antioxidants, anti-inflammatory compounds, vitamin C, folate, and potassium. Seek out organic.

When buying bread, look for ‘wholewheat flour’ – not ‘wheat flour’, which is equivalent to white flour.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH Roast it and toss it into pasta, or puree it into a soup. It’s got the right mix of antioxidants and vitamin C to put up your best defence against cold and flu, whatever the season.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 77


DINNER

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

1 egg, beaten ½ cup finely grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for garnish 1 cup finely chopped kale/spinach (about 4 leaves), stems discarded if preferred ¼ cup almond flour or fine bread crumbs 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1 tsp. dried oregano ½ tsp. fennel seeds ¾ tsp. fine sea salt ½ tsp. red pepper flakes 4 50 grams minced ostrich or minced beef 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil prepared marinara sauce 340 grams dried spaghetti (gluten-free if sensitive) 8 fresh basil leaves, torn (optional)

In a rush? Simply sauté meatball ingredients minus the almond flour and egg.

Ostrich’s bright red hue comes from iron, which is key to keeping your red blood cells transporting oxygen to your hardworking muscles.

CAULIFLOWER We roast a batch nearly every week for a fabulous soup and salad topper. Pulsing raw cauliflower florets transforms them into the texture of couscous. Cauliflower is a nutrientdense star.

78

In a large bowl, stir together the egg, Parmesan, kale, almond flour, garlic, oregano, fennel seeds, salt, and pepper flakes. Add the ostrich or beef, and use your hands to combine the meat. Form the mixture into 12 five-centimetre meatballs, rolling each meatball firmly

CHICKEN (DARK MEAT)

CITRUS (ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT)

Chicken is a great source of protein, rich in minerals, especially iron, and energy-giving B vitamins. Dark meat is higher in fat (good fat!), but is also more mineraldense.

An orange has more than 170 phytonutrients for fighting inflammation and boosting immunity. Combine fresh-squeezed orange juice, coconut water, and sea salt.

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

in your hands. In a heavy-bottomed pot with a lid, warm the oil over medium-high heat. Place the meatballs in the pot in a single layer without crowding them, and cook, turning the meatballs so they brown on all sides, about 5 minutes. Scrape the brown bits off the bottom of the pot as you go. If using beef mince, pour out all but 1 to 2 Tbsp. of the fat prior to adding the sauce. Add marinara sauce to meatballs. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens, 30 to 45 minutes. Cover and keep warm over low heat until ready to serve. While the sauce is simmering, cook the pasta according to the package directions. To serve, divide the pasta among 4 pasta bowls and arrange the meatballs on top, along with a generous ladle of sauce. Garnish with Parmesan and fresh basil, if using.

FISH Fish is an easily digestible source of protein and is also rich in inflammationfighting omega-3 fatty acids, energising B vitamins, bonebuilding magnesium, and other minerals.

GREENS (SPINACH, KALE, BROCCOLI) We sneak veggies into smoothies, soup, muffins, and quiche.


t dates d ig e s o t inerals, syEa igh in m h tassium. are ding po lu inc

DESSERT

MAKES 18 BALLS

For the pecan butter: 2 cups pecans 10 dates, pitted ½ tsp. ground cinnamon For the coating: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil 3 Tbsp. honey 3 Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder 1 tsp. coarse sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. To make the pecan butter: spread the pecans out on a baking sheet and roast in the centre of the oven for 8 minutes, stirring after 4 minutes. Allow the pecans to cool completely. In a food processor or high-speed blender, combine the pecans, dates, and cinnamon. Pulse or blend on high until smooth. Do not overprocess – you want the pecan butter thick. Transfer to a small

HERBS (BASIL, PARSLEY, DHANIA) Herbs add freshness, flavour, satisfying colour, and an incredible set of phytonutrients.

bowl. Use your hands to roll the pecan butter into bite-​​size balls. (If the nut butter is warm or liquid-y, chill it in the fridge to make it easier to handle.) Place the balls on the baking sheet. To make the coating: place the oil in a small microwaveable bowl and microwave in increments of 10 seconds, stirring in between, until almost completely melted. (Alternatively, the oil can be melted in a small saucepan over low heat.) Stir in the honey and cocoa powder until smooth. Drop one ball at a time in the chocolate coating, use a fork to lift out, and return it to the baking sheet. Continue with the remaining balls. Top each truffle with a small pinch of the salt. Place the baking sheet in the fridge for 10 to 15 minutes or until ready to serve.

Dark chocolate is loaded with antioxidants, but shop-bought chocolate treats are loaded with refined sugar and hydrogenated oils.

MUSHROOMS They add a satisfying meaty flavour and texture to vegetarian dishes, and a satiating earthy sweetness. They’re a powerhouse of B and D vitamins and are proven to boost immunity.

SWEET POTATOES STONE FRUIT (PEACHES, PLUMS, APRICOTS) Rich in niacin, vitamin K, vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium.

These orangefleshed sweet potatoes are our top pick for a pre-race dinner as a digestible source of complex carbs and protein.

TOMATOES Tomatoes are rich in cancer-fighting and cardio-boosting lycopene, and they deliver a wealth of B vitamins. We like them topped with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, basil, mozzarella, and sea salt.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 79


RUN YOUR FIRST

5-k (Or Fastest)

A 5-K is a perfect goal for new runners – and it’s a great way to test yourself if you’ve done a few races already. Words Sam Murphy Photography Ewald Sadie

80 RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016


W

hen you took your first running steps, crossing a finish line may have been the furthest thing from your mind; but now you’re running on a regular basis, you might be wondering whether you’re ready for your first race. “A 5-K is the perfect target for budding runners to set their sights on,” says coach Russell Holman (runfaster-pb.com). “It doesn’t take months to prepare for, and the distance is manageable enough not to intimidate.” The challenge could simply be to finish, to run all the way to the line, or to achieve a particular time goal. And it’s not so punishing that it’ll take weeks before you’re ready to toe the line again. It’s also an extremely popular race distance, so when you’re ready, you’ll have no problem finding a 5-K event to enter. And even if you’ve already bagged your first medal, coach Jeff Gaudette (runnersconnect.com) advises against immediately stepping up to a 10-K: “Many runners want to jump up in race distance too quickly,” he says. “Why not become completely comfortable with the distance before trying to move up? It’ll increase your fitness, and your confidence that you can progress.”

Finish, then finish better

“When you’re ready, you’ll have no problem finding a 5-K event to enter.”

The primary goal for your first 5-K is to finish – with a smile on your face. “You should be running for 20-30 minutes a few times a week before you begin a 5-K plan,” says Gaudette. Even though you may have progressed beyond run/walk, there’s no need to rule out walking altogether. “My previous attempts to take up running always failed because I’d considered walking a cop-out,” says Tracey Anderson, a 44-year-old IT consultant. “When I did a ‘Couch to 5-K’ plan and was actually encouraged to mix walking and running, it felt so much more achievable and enjoyable. I’m now a regular parkrunner.” A good rule to follow is to run as much as you can, but walk as much as you need. Consistent easy runs of 20-30 minutes build a good base of stamina. But to hone 5-K fitness, you’ll need to do two things. First, focus on making one of your weekly runs a little bit longer. “Train in minutes rather than by kilometres,” suggests Holman. “Increasing by small increments minimises the injury

risk associated with ramping up volume too aggressively.” Gaudette recommends building your ‘long run’ to 8-10km. “This will help to develop your aerobic system further,” he says. It will also boost your confidence about covering the race distance. The second thing is to add a challenge to one of your weekly runs. “You need to add stimulus for further gains,” says Gaudette. This could be in the form of faster running or hill training. Research in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that six weeks of hill training or flat-ground interval training both elicited improvements in ‘time to exhaustion’. Hills develop leg strength and challenge your cardiovascular system without adding too much musculoskeletal stress, and Spanish research last year found highintensity intervals improved stride length. “Intervals run close to goal race pace with short recoveries are most relevant to 5-K performance,” says Gaudette. “They focus on speed endurance – your ability to hold NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 81


6 SUCCESS STRATEGIES 1/ START RIGHT

Stick to a warm-up you’ve used in training, says Holman. “If you have a time goal, four to eight strides can help get your body prepared to run at your target speed,” adds Galloway.

2/ SOUND ON

A study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that listening to motivational music during a 5-K race improved performance.

KITTED OUT Get your gear right – and keep it light.

3/ FIND YOUR SPACE

Don’t automatically go to the back of the field. Look at banners denoting estimated finish times and line up in the appropriate area.

4/ DON’T PANIC

“I was sick with nerves on my first 5-K and went off too fast,” says Helen Pierce (41). If it’s crowded over the first kilometre, don’t waste too much energy trying to battle your way through.

5/ ANTICIPATE DISCOMFORT

Chasing a PB is tough, so be prepared to ‘embrace’ pain. If you feel breathless, focus on your exhalations. “When people are not breathing out sufficiently, they are leaving little room for more air to get into the lungs,” says coach Julian Goater, author of The Art of Running Faster (Human Kinetics).

6/ LATCH ON – TO A FELLOW RUNNER

A study from Bath University in the UK found that when two runners ran in front or behind one another, they felt running was easier, even though there was no difference in their heart rate or finish time.

82

RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

a fast pace for the entire distance.” The 2-kilometre test (see week 4, right) is a good way of predicting a realistic goal time and race pace to aim for.

Running well

Warming up – for training and racing – is vital. A study from Manhattan College in New York found that just five minutes of warming up enabled runners to exercise for longer than did launching straight in. Start with a brisk walk, incorporating some mobility exercises such as heel-and-toe walking, bringing your knees to your chest, walking lunges and flicking your heels up to your bottom. Then begin to jog at an effortless pace before working up to your desired speed. Everyone has their own running style, but

there is some common ground when it comes to good technique: strong posture (think tall, but relaxed), quick and light feet (a high ‘cadence’ or stride rate) and minimal braking between strides. “Add some drills to your workouts,” says Holman. “Establishing the correct movement patterns through drills helps them become second nature, so that when it gets tough in the final two kilometres of your race you won’t be wasting energy on inefficient movement.” Try high knees, fast feet and skipping drills. Good running form helps in minimising injury risk – but adding some regular strength training to your weekly routine will lower the chances further. “There’s also evidence that strength training improves running economy,” adds Holman. “Try variations of lunges, squats, step-ups and dead lifts.”


THE RW RACE-READY 5-K PLAN

Countdown to race day

As race day approaches, wind down your training to ensure you wake up feeling raring to go. But don’t stop altogether – a couple of short runs will keep you ticking over. “Going for a short, easy jog the day before the big day can help dispel some of the nervous energy you might feel,” says coach Jeff Galloway. Skip the prerace pasta-fest: “Five kilometres isn’t far enough to require carbo-loading the night before,” says sports dietician Ruth McKean. “Eating too much may make you wake up feeling sluggish or full. Just eat your usual evening meal.”

On pace

A sure way to finish well is to get the pace right. But this can be tricky, says Holman. “Go off way too fast and you will suffer in the closing stages. Go off way too slowly, and you haven’t got long to make up the time you ‘lost’ in the first two kilometres.” Even at world-record level, most 5-K runners run the first kilometre a little faster than their average pace. And in a study comparing performances in which runners were instructed to run the first kilometre at either goal pace or three to six per cent faster, a fast start tended to result in a better finish time. “I made two mistakes in my first 5-K,” says 68-year-old John Bridger, who took up running only six years ago and has a 5-K PB of 22:53. “I set off too slowly, and I didn’t push on with one kilometre to go, when I could have easily.” Don’t worry if you don’t get it right first time, though – pace judgement is a skill that takes practice.

The programme below will get you race-ready in seven weeks – and see you through your first few 5-Ks. Simply repeat it, adding a rep or set, or a couple of extra minutes, to up the ante. (If you don’t feel ready to advance the sessions, repeat as is – you will still develop your speed, strength and endurance.) WEEK

1 2 3 4 5

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

Warm up, then 20 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 4 sets of 3 mins easy, 2 mins moderate, 1 min hard. 5 mins easy to finish

Rest

Warm up, then 20 mins easy

Crosstrain* or rest

Warm up, then 35 mins easy

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then 10 mins easy, 8x30-sec hills with walk/jog rec. 5 mins easy to finish

Rest

Warm up, then 25 mins easy

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then 40 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 25 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 10 sets of 1 min easy, 1 min hard. 5 mins easy to finish

Rest

Warm up, then 2x10 mins moderate with 2-min jog between. 5 mins easy to finish

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then 45 mins easy

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then run 10 mins easy, 6x45-sec hills with walk/jog rec. 5 mins easy to finish

Rest

Warm up, then 4 x strides**, then timed 2.5km run.*** Finish with 5 mins easy

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then 45 mins easy with last 5 mins slightly faster

Rest

Rest

Warm up, then 5 sets of 1-K at planned race pace, 2 mins rest between each. Then 5 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 25 mins moderate plus 4 x strides

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then 50 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 30 mins easy, to include 3x1-min hill repeats, with walk/jog recoveries

Cross-train or rest

Warm up, then 60 mins easy

Rest

15 mins easy plus 3 x strides OR crosstrain or rest

Race 5km

Warm up, then 30 mins easy

Lightening the load

You can make your race debut in any comfy clothing and a pair of running shoes, but lightweight garments that fit well are best. “Many new runners are self-conscious and wear far too much,” says Gareth McCully, a running coach who works with beginners. “They’ll wear baggy gear to hide in, tie jackets around their waists, and carry phones and drinks bottles. It weighs them down physically and mentally.” Flappy clothes will also increase wind resistance and may distract you, or work loose. Commit to a comfy but minimal race-day outfit that’s tried and tested, says McCully. As for that bottle? You don’t need any fluid for a 5-K – and certainly not a sports drink. “You will not get dehydrated, provided you have drunk a normal amount of fluid in the preceding 24 hours,” says McKean.

6 7

Rest

Warm up, then 30 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 10 mins easy. Then 5 sets 1 min easy/1 min hard, then 1-K at goal pace. 5 mins easy to finish

Warm up, then 5 sets of 1-K at planned race pace, 1 min rest between each. Then 5 mins easy

Rest

Warm up, then 25 mins easy

*Cross-training: try to avoid high-impact work – cycling, swimming, yoga or weight training are ideal. **To perform a ‘stride,’ begin running, accelerating smoothly to goal pace (a swift pace but not a sprint) over 20-25m, focusing on good form and staying relaxed. Maintain for 20-25m, then decelerate smoothly and walk to start point to repeat. ***To convert your 2.5-kilometre time to a 5km race-time prediction, convert your result into a decimal number and multiply by 2.22. Then work out how this breaks down in pace per km (you’ll need a km/pace for the session in weeks 5 and 6). For example, if your 2.5-kilometre time is 11 mins 30 seconds, this converts to 11.5 x 2.22 = 25.53. This number, converted into minutes and seconds equals 25 mins 32 seconds. This equals a goal race pace of 5.06 per km.

NOVEMBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 83


SIGN UP

LOGIN

TRANSFORM YOUR BODY IN JUST 12 WEEKS! SIGN UP FOR ONLY R499.

START TODAY!

The runninbgenefits of include…

• The fa ste burn kil st way to ojoules • Conve n cost-eff ient and ective • Impro ves over all healt h • Helps y o u de-stres to s

It’s Not Too Late to Get Back in Shape With the Run It Off Plan! Running is guaranteed to get results! Sign up today and receive… • • • • • •

12-week workout plans developed by professional trainers 12 weeks of meal plans, including complete shopping lists Suitable for men and women of all ages and body types Strength workouts that are easy to do at home Easy-to-follow instructions and motivation Video demonstrations of all exercises

ONLY R499

SIGN UP NOW AT RUNITOFF.CO.ZA

WORKS ON ANY DEVICE!


RACING

AHEAD

T h e b e s t r u n n i n g , m u l t i - s p o r t a n d a d ve n t u r e r a c e s t h is N ove m b e r • C o m p il e d by C r a i g D u n c a n, r a c e e d i to r (r w r a c e e d i to r @ g ma il.c o m)

TOUGH ONE: A must -do race on the annual calendar.

ED’S CHOICE now 85, he still loves watching his friends and family race. Hot on McShane’s heels are two runners who are set to tackle their 30th this year; and 19 will participate in their 20th, five of whom ran their first back in the 80s.

GAUTENG SUNDAY 27 NOVEMBER

5 32

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F J E T L I N E AC T I O N P H OTO

RAC City Lodge Tough One 32km & Asics Five Old Parktonian Club, 1 Garden Road, Randburg, Johannesburg; 32km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:30am. Vreni Welch 011 422 8256 rac.co.za John McShane currently holds the record for the highest number of finishes, having completed the Tough One 36 times. Though he’s D I S TA N C E I C O N S :

WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER

5 10 15

Rowlin National Brokers Night Race Benoni Northerns Sports Grounds, Albert Bekker Park, Brodigan Street, Northmead, Benoni; 15km & 10km: 7pm; 5km Fun Run: 7:10pm General Enquiries 083 573 1011 /Jan Jordaan 082 800 0762

SUNDAY 6 NOVEMBER

10 21.1 42.2

Old Mutual Soweto Marathon FNB Stadium, Nasrec Road, Nasrec, Soweto; 42.2km: 6am; 21.1km: 6:30am; 10km: 7am Enquiries 061 917 1001/2 sowetomarathon.com

SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER

SUNDAY 20 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1

4 10 21.1

Tom Jenkins Challenge (AGN League Race) Union Buildings, Government Avenue, Pretoria; 21.1km & 10km: 6:30am; 5km Fun Run: 6:40am Daan du Toit 082 572 4169/ James Matshekga 082 566 1595

F I N D E V E N T S W I T H Y O U R F A V O U R I T E D I S TA N C E S Q U I C K LY, U S I N G T H E F O L LO W I N G

Alberton Half Marathon & 10km Alberton Rugby Stadium, corner of Second Avenue and Braun Avenue, Verwoerdpark, Alberton; 21.1km & 10km: 6am; 4km Fun Run: 6:10am Michael Brandon Kirby 074 159 3605/Glyn Rhynhoud 082 451 6317 KEY:

0-9KM

10-19KM

20-29KM

30+KM

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 85

KEEP GOING


R A C IN G

A HE A D

WINELANDS RUN: Celebrate its 39th year by running on this scenic route. ED’S CHOICE

KWAZULU-NATAL SUNDAY 20 NOVEMBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E SY O F R I C K A N D S H E L B Y P H OTO G R A P H E R S

15 Queensburgh Mineshaft 15 km Run/Walk Queensburgh Sports Association, 60 Bowker Road, Escombe, Queensburgh; 15km Run & Walk: 6am Robin Archer 082 905 6005 As the name suggests, there are a few testing hills (though not quite vertical) – but friendly marshals and frequent aid stations are a welcome distraction. The race is part of the ‘King and Queen of the Mountain’ series, a competition that also includes the Supa Mama Savages, the SHF Capital Climb and the BMG

Stainbank Cup. Complete three out of these four events, and stand a chance to win category prizes including running shoes and cash.

SUNDAY 6 NOVEMBER

10 21.1

THE KZN HALF N MARATHO CHAMPION SHIPS

Save Orion Half Marathon Run/Walk Save Hyper, 362 Victoria Road, Pietermaritzburg; 21.1km & 10km: 5:30am Ajith Deena 083 659 2732 saveorionclub.co.za

SUNDAY 13 NOVEMBER

5 10

Greater Edendale 10km Run/Walk FNB Wadley Stadium, Georgetown, Edendale; 10km: 7:30am; 5km Fun Run: 9am Nonkululeko Mdlalose

033 897 8650 / 083 413 9827

SUNDAY 13 NOVEMBER

15 21.1 42.2

ED’S CHOICE

Bluff 42km Marathon, 21km Vets Run & 15km Walk Fynnlands Combined Sports Club, 55 Smith Drive, Bluff, Durban; 42.2km, 21.1km & 15km: 5:30am Dennis 076 186 3920 / Lindsay Kapp 083 625 3386

SATURDAY 26 NOVEMBER

21.1 42.2

Sani Stagger Marathon & Half Marathon (Down Run) Sani Pass Hotel, Good Hope Farm Sani Pass Road, Himeville; 42.2km: 6am; Lesotho Border Post; 21.1km: TBA Heather-Louise Parsons 076 951 7911 sanistagger.co.za

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


to Eikestad Primary School. Entries close on 3 November.

ED’S CHOICE

WESTERN CAPE

5

NO 10 -K TH IS Y EA R

BlueBoost Winelands Marathon and Half Marathon Eikestad Primary School, Doornbosch Road, Krigeville, Stellenbosch; 42.2km: 5:30am; 21.1km: 5:50am; 5km Fun Run: 6:30am Top Events 021 511 7130 topevents.co.za The marathon route begins in picturesque Stellenbosch, passes Spier Wine Estate and heads towards Somerset West. It’s joined by the 21.1 at the 32-kilometre mark, on the beautiful Stellenrust Road. Both routes then head back

Cape Town Proud 2B A Donor Walk Mouille Point Lighthouse, 100 Beach Road, Mouille Point, Cape Town; 5km: 10am Organ Donor Office 0800 22 66 11

SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1

City Orchard Half Marathon & 10km Pniel Dwarsrivier Sport Complex, Main Road, Pniel; 21.1km: 6:45am; 10km: 7am; 5km Fun Run: 7:15am Ralph Jacobs 083 586 1168

SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER

5 15

SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

TRAIL RUNNING

runner’s bucket list, it’s also considered the toughest: pure mountain running on a variety of terrain, from hiking paths to jeep tracks.

SATURDAY 19 – SUNDAY 20 NOVEMBER

42 65 100 Salomon Skyrun & Skyrun Lite 19 November: Mountain View Country Inn, 36 Botha Street, Lady Grey; 100km & 65km: 4am; 20 November: Balloch Cottages (halfway point of Skyrun 100km), Wartrail/Barkly East; 42km: 4am Michael de Haast 072 078 5278 skyrun.co.za

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

The Skyrun is 20 years old this year, which makes it the oldest trail-running race in South Africa. On every serious trail

THURSDAY 3 – SUNDAY 6 NOVEMBER

69

Fairview Dryland Traverse Adventure Trail Run 3 November: Cango Caves, R328 North, Oudtshoorn; 8km: 4:30pm; 4 November: Swartberg Pass (on the R328, between the Cango Caves and Prince Albert); 27km: 7:30am; 5 November: Rust en Vrede Waterfall Parking Area, Oudtshoorn; 23km: 7:30am; 6 November: De Hoek Mountain Resort, Scenic

Klaas Maffa Memorial 15km Run The Huguenot Monument, Excelsior Road, Franschhoek;

Cape Route 62; 11km: 9:30am Enquiries 044 279 1013 / 071 572 4809 drylandtraverse.co.za

SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

6.5 14 21

Encounter EG Trail Run Fisherman’s Bend Farm, Kokstad; 21km: 7:30am; 14km: 8am; 6.5km: 8:30am Sonja Moxham 079 335 1807 /Cobus 079 508 2156 encountereg.co.za

SATURDAY 12 & SUNDAY 13 NOVEMBER

7 7-8 12

Delheim Outdoor Weekend 12 November: Delheim Trail Run; Delheim Wine

SATURDAY 26 NOVEMBER

10.4 21.1 42.2

Die Vlakte Marathon, Half Marathon & 10.4km Heidelberg High School, 1 Murray Street, Heidelberg; 42.2km: 5am; Soutpan (at the halfway mark, between Heidelberg and Witsands); 21.1km: 6am; Vondeling Primary School, Highway Road, Witsands; 10.4km: 7am Nico Steyn 083 226 3091 aswd.co.za

SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1

Mitchells Plain Titans Half Marathon Rocklands Sports Complex, Weltevreden Road, Mitchells Plain; 21.1km: 6am; 10km: 6:15am; 5km Fun Run: 8am Lance Scheepers 076 245 5872

Estate, Knorhoek Road, Stellenbosch; 12km: 7:30am; 7km: 7:45am; 13 November: Delvera Full Moon Hike; Dirtopia Trail Centre, R44, Stellenbosch; 7-8km: arrive by 4:30pm, start no later than 6:15pm Dirtopia 021 884 4752 dirtopia.co.za

SUNDAY 27 NOVEMBER

8 18

Eston Xmas Classic Virginia Farm, Ezimwini Road, Eston; 18km & 8km: 7am Corinne Thompson 083 271 3142 SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

P H OTO G R A P H B Y L I A M H A M M E R- N E L

5 21.1 42.2

SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

KEEP GOING

P H OTO G R A P H B Y K E LV I N T R AU T M A N

SATURDAY 12 NOVEMBER

15km: 7am; 5km Fun Run/ Walk: 7:15am Nolan Hendon 072 785 6529


Other Provinces

EASTERN CAPE BORDER SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

21.1 42.2 Twizza Bonkolo Marathon & Half Marathon Bonkolo Dam, off the R392, Queenstown; 42.2km & 21.1km: 5:30am Theo Ferreira 082 873 4597

SUNDAY 6 NOVEMBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y D E A N V E N I S H

10

Lightning Fast 10km Johnson & Johnson, Voortrekker Road, Wilsonia, East London; 10km: 7am Helen Pretorius 083 609 6706

Elizabeth; 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:10am Allister Marran 072 621 4429

10 21.1 The Gonubie Coastal Challenge Gonubie Sports Club, corner of Smith Street and Recreation Road, Gonubie, Buffalo City; 21.1km Walk: 6am; 21.1km Run: 6:30am; 10km Run/Walk: 7am Mark 082 553 0949 / Nico 084 508 4577

FREE STATE SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

5 10 15

Vaal Toyota Sasolburg Summer Race DP de Villiers Stadium, HF Verwoerd Road, Sasolburg; 15km & 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:15am Dolf Binneman 073 339 6809

EASTERN PROVINCE SATURDAY 12 NOVEMBER

5 10 Baywest Mall 10km & 5km Baywest Mall, 100 Baywest Boulevard, Hunters Retreat, Port

SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

5 15

Engen Curie to Engen Crossing 15km & 5km Fun Run Engen Curie Park Convenience

Centre, 110 Vereeniging Drive, Bloemfontein; 15km: 6am; Engen College Court Park Crossing Convenience Centre, College Court Park West, Bloemfontein; 5km Fun Run: 6:30am Bloem Striders (Jaco Grobbelaar) 082 416 6779

SATURDAY 12 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1 42.2

Southern Cross Industries (SCI) 42km Marathon, 21km & 10km & 5km Fun Run Bloemfontein Achilles Sport Centre, corner of Att Horak Street and Parfitt Avenue, Willows, Bloemfontein; 42.2km: 5:30am; 21.1km: 6am; 10km: 7am; 5km Fun Run: 7:30am Beverley Olivier 071 895 3183

SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER

4.8

23

Ficksburg Cherry Race & Imperani Fun Run Ficksburg Primary School, 1 Imperani Street, Ficksburg; 23km; Walk: 6:30am; Run: 7am; 4.8km Imperani Fun Run: 7:15am

Audi Fourie 073 808 6289

NORTHERN CAPE FRIDAY 4 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1

NE W ROUTE!

BVI Half Marathon Upington Show Grounds, Upington; 21.1km: 5:30pm; 10km: 6pm; KFC Neon 5km Fun Run: 6:30pm Carel Burger 082 622 7109 kalaharikuierfees.co.za

GRIQUALAND WEST SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1

Louis Jooste Memorial Blue Run Pirates Running Club, Jacobus Smit Avenue, Kimberley; 21.1km & 10km: 6:30am; 5km Fun Run: 7am Mark Hunt 082 462 4066

SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER

5 10 21.1

Knights of Da Gama Half Marathon St Patrick’s College, 170 Du Toitspan Road, Kimberley; 21.1km, 10km & 5km Fun Run: 6:30am Justino de Freitas 083 364 3898

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


R A C IN G

Women’s Race Hoërskool Warmbad, 4 Swanepoel Street, Bela-Bela; 42.2km: 5:30am; 21.1km: 6am; 10km: 6:15am; 5km Fun Run: 6:30am Erica Kotze 014 736 6008

16+ years para duathlon and sprint duathlon: 5km run, 20km cycle, 2.5km run 20+ years standard: 10km run, 40km cycle, 5km run trinitysports.co.za

A HE A D

Olympic: 1.5km swim, 40km bike, 10km run (non-drafting) Sprint: 450m swim, 20km bike, 10km run General Queries 041 581 7990 ironman.com/ 5150nelsonmandelabay

SUNDAY 20 NOVEMBER

ADVENTURE RACING & MULTISPORT

Standard Bank 5150 Nelson Mandela Bay King’s Beach, Marine Drive, Summerstrand, Port Elizabeth / Nelson Mandela Bay

SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER

MPUMALANGA WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E S Y O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S

2 4.9 10

The Beast (obstacle race) The Wedge, Muldersdrift, Beyers Naude (next door to Casalinga) Savage Beast 15km Wild Beast 10km Tame Beast 5km Beast Team info@ beastchallenge.co.za thebeastchallenge.co.za

Sasol Secunda Night Race SUNDAY 6 NOVEMBER Sasol Recreation Club, 1 Trinity Germiston #1 President Swart Street, Ekurhuleni Municipal Park, Secunda; 10km: 7pm; 4.9km Germiston Lake & 2km: 7:15pm Triathlon: E Abednego Sibanyoni L T T SHU 082 332 9448 T O S TA R T& 8-9 years: 75m swim, 1km O F 2 1.1K M cycle, 500m run 10 K M 10-11 years: 200m swim, 5km cycle, 1.25km run SATURDAY 5 NOVEMBER 12-15 years: 400m swim, 10 21.1 42.2 10km cycle, 2.5km run Kaapsehoop Uniwisp 3-in-1 16-19 years: 750m swim, Marathon 20km cycle, 5km run The Pear Orchards (1km 16+ years para triathlon and from Kaapsehoop); 42.2km: sprint triathlon: 750m swim, 5:30am; Kaapsehoop/ 20km cycle, 5km run Nelspruit Road; 21.1km: 20+ years standard: 1500m 5:30am; 10km: 6am swim, 40km cycle, 10km run Yolanda 084 607 6314 Duathlon: 8-9 years: 500m run, 1km cycle, 500m run 10-11 years: 1.25km run, 5km cycle, 500m run SATURDAY 12 NOVEMBER 12-15 years: 2.5km run, 10km 5 10 21.1 42.2 cycle, 1.25km run SPAR Bela-Bela Marathon, 16-19 years: 5km run, 20km Half Marathon & 10km cycle, 2.5km run

LIMPOPO

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


Back of the Pack BY BRUCE PINNOCK

YOUR PACE OR MINE?

Behind every great leader is... the real leader.

T

90 RUNNER’S WORLD NOVEMBER 2016

(Not that I’m suggesting runners are cattle. Although, if one watches a herd of runners, shepherded by marshals to the opposite side of the road as they eagerly follow the flock towards a watering point, one does have to wonder…) Those at the head of the group only think they’re leading-slash-setting-the-pace. But in order for the group to stay together – in the true spirit of camaraderie – doesn’t everyone have to wait for the slowest runner, at the back of the pack? In which case, ask yourself: who is setting the pace, actually? In every group I’ve ever run with, there’s

ask, “Have you heard this one?” What ensues is a long and pointless yarn, told in a soft, lulling drawl, which forces the group to hang back in order to listen to it. His record? One of Kosie’s jokes once lasted five kilometres, and reduced the group – as they lingered for a punchline that never quite seemed to materialise – to a shuffle so slow, there was no coming back from it. Other ploys include the time-honoured loose shoelace, and the accidental trip-andfall (complete with Extended Recovery Walk), not forgetting the old ‘marshal stopped me for traffic’ trick.

“Herding cattle is done quietly and unobtrusively, from behind.” been very real, stiff competition among the guys at the back of the pack – to slow the group down to the most miniscule of shuffles. It’s a subtle operation. After all, no-one wants to be that guy – the one who whines, “You guys are going too fast!” Kosie is one of the great masters of pace-setting, and has employed a number of successful strategies. One of his ploys is to

Perhaps the most curious feature of this leadership-from-the-rear phenomenon is that the group never breaks up. Those at the front never speed up and leave in disgust. And this is because they know that when they cross the finish line, they can blame their terrible time on the noble act of stopping to help the guy at the back of the pack. Now that’s leadership!

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y I S TO C K P H OTO

here’s an unspoken rule about camaraderie in running, best illustrated by those who sabotage their own personal bests to help those in distress over the finish line. Behind a smokescreen of sympathy, these do-gooders disguise what running is truly about… competition. Apart from the elites vying for first place, the rest of us runners tend to cluster in big groups, all running at the same pace. But believe it or not, competition exists among our back-of-the-packers too. In every group, there are runners who want to be the leader – the God-like being everyone expects will set the pace. But that being is seldom the runner who is actually in the lead. Madiba himself wrote that the best leadership comes from the back. To make his point, he likened leadership to herding cattle, which – as he learned as a young herd boy – is done quietly and unobtrusively, from behind. As with so much of what he said and did, Madiba was right about this too. Think about it: who actually sets the pace in a huskypowered sled team? It’s not the lead dog; it’s the oke at the back, cracking the whip and shouting, “Mush! Mush!” (Which is shorthand for: “For the love of God, get a move on! I’m freezing my nuts off back here!”) And in a boat race, it’s the cox who sets the pace, shouting, “In, out! In, out!” He can do so mercilessly fast, because he’s not the one exerting himself to the brink of death. No coincidence that at the end of the race, it’s tradition for the other rowers to chuck him overboard, into the raging river from whence they’ve rowed; hoping he might drown, presumably. The same is true for runners.


WIND SPEED 18 km/h

WEATHER

36°

CROSS WIND 18 km/h

23

temp

FALLING ROCKS CAUTION!

LION’S HEAD HEIGHT 669m

55

60

5 10

50

15

45

20

40 35

323m

30

25

TIME ELAPSED

01:57:03

0m

1670m

UNEVEN TERRAIN AHEAD 12

km/h

TO GO

AVERAGE SPEED

Don’t avoid risk. Manage it. In today’s volatile economic climate, how do you earn the investment returns you need with the safeguards you want? For 19 years, the Investec Opportunity Fund has stayed the course by delivering inflation-beating, dependable returns. By investing in a diverse portfolio of quality blue-chip names and across asset classes both locally and abroad, it aims to minimise risk and maximise opportunity. The Investec Opportunity Fund. Don’t avoid risk. Manage it. Go to opportunityknocks.co.za, call 0860 500 900 or contact your financial advisor.

Unit Trusts

Retirement Funds

Offshore Investments

Investec Fund Managers is a registered unit trust manager and does not guarantee the capital or return of the portfolio. Past performance is not a guide to future performance. Investec Asset Management is an authorised financial services provider.

6sdsdc  
Advertisement