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OCTOBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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56 18 Ask Bicycling

Make sure your bike is safe to ride with our simple, quick bike-essentials checklist.

20 Eat

Magic brownies! They’ll get you high on life, and raring to ride.

22 The Scientist

Do your feet hurt on every ride? There’s a reason for that. This is what it is.

24 The Coach

Tailor-make your tapering plan, and always be in peak racing condition.

Hell Yeah, It’s 947!

With the 947 Cycle Challenge around the corner, we bring you 94 expert tips on training, eating and preparing for the event – and earmark 7 City of Gold landmarks for you to admire along the route of Jozi’s premium road race. BY ANDRÉ VALENTINE

52 The Power Of Slow

In cycling, speed is synonymous with victory and success. But during a bike tour around the world, one cyclist discovers that sometimes, what you gain

when you go slowly is more valuable than what you win for going fast. BY DEVI LOCKWOOD

56 In Search Of The Fountain Of Youth

Nick Forbes is not your average pensioner. He’s a competitive cyclist, who at 70 is smashing up and down hills, and knocking over the PBs of riders half his age. Can you, too, live long and prosper… on a bike? BY JONATHAN ANCER

Cherise reveals she wasn’t as much in love with cycling as we thought… until now.

27 Training

15 ways to improve everything you do on a bike. Seriously, everything.

28 Buzz

Calling adventurous MTBers: is trespassing on private land ever justified?

32 Action Figure

Stephen Fabes – the doctor who cured his world by bike.

34 Places We Love

Jozi’s 5 best coffee-&-a-munch stops – by a rider who knows.

N I C K A L D R I D G E | B O B M A D I S O N | M AT T R A I N E Y | E R I K V E R M E U L E N | S U P P L I E D

43

30

26 In My View


36 Trends

We have a Specialized Turbo eBike to test for a year. Here are our first thoughts.

38 Fetish

Tyres with perfectly-aligned tan lines. Geddit?

39 Freewheelin’

39

The good, the bad and the psychotic of belonging to cycling WhatsApp groups.

40 101 Reasons We Love Cycling

Stoke isn’t just a city in England. It’s a vibe we strive

for through cycling. Here’s what gets us stoked.

12 The Ride 14 Editor’s Letter 30 StyleMan 31 Rider2Rider 31 Cyclism 85 Race Diary 90 The Frame

67 All The Good Stuff

Every year, new trends flood the cycling world. We separate the good from the bad, and bring you nine new trends – and the best gear they’ve produced.

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BY OLI MUNNIK

82 Pomp Stasie

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We review 5 top-of-the-range inflation stations – and prove that not all pumps are equal. BY OLI MUNNIK


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GHO S T RIDE R IM A GE BY HE NDRIK S T E Y T L E R , 17 S E P T E MB E R 2 01 6 This shot was taken during Kevin Benkenstein’s second of three Everesting attempts. I got there at 11pm, and heard Kevin speaking to his girlfriend, saying, “Babes, time to go home – this is not a spectator sport.” So in a nutshell, it was a pretty lonely mission. It was cold and windy with rainy patches, and a headwind on the climb. But it was also for a good cause, because Kevin was raising money for Qhubeka, an organisation that distributes bicycles to empower people. I wanted to get a cool shot that would sum up Kevin’s attempt – which is why I deliberately went for the ghost effect, to symbolise him as an apparition, doing the same thing over and over again at regular intervals. His attempt was successful. METADATA CANON 5DMK3, 14MM, F2.8, ISO 200, F4.0, 2-SECOND EXPOSURE, 2XSB600 SPEEDLIGHTS WHERE THE SENTECH TOWER, BRIXTON, JOHANNESBURG

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NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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Southern African edition. Bicycling® is a registered trademark of Rodale Inc. All rights reserved. Published under licence from Rodale Inc.

EDITORIAL EDITOR MIKE FINCH (mike.finch@media24.com) DEPUTY EDITOR JONATHAN ANCER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT ANDRÉ VALENTINE (andre.valentine@media24.com) ONLINE EDITOR RAE TREW BROWNE (rae.browne@media24.com) ONLINE CONTENT MANAGER YENTL BARROS (yentl.barros@media24.com) ONLINE JOURNALIST PENELOPE CAIRNS (penelope.cairns@media24.com) SENIOR DESIGNER ALANA DOYLE CHIEF SUB / MANAGING EDITOR DAVE BUCHANAN GEAR EDITOR OLI MUNNIK (olivermunnik@gmail.com) PICTURE EDITOR AMY MOSTERT SCIENTIFIC EDITOR DR JEROEN SWART OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR LABEEQAH SULIMAN CONTRIBUTORS

NICK ALDRIDGE, KEVIN BENKENSTEIN, MARK CARROLL, ZOON CRONJE, JAMES GARAGHTY, RENAY GROUSTRA, ANDREW HILL, CRAIG KOLESKY, NICK MUZIK, RENS REZELMAN, EWALD SADIE, CHERISE STANDER, HENDRIK STEYTLER, ERIK VERMEULEN, NIC WHITE, BRIAN FISKE, CLAIRE GOING, JACOB HOWARD, BOB MADISON, MATT RAINEY, AC SHILTON

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INSPIRED JOURNEYS AND ADVENTURES

AUDAX300 RIDE BY RICHARD BAUFELDT / 

Pass (7.3km, 464m, 6%), then followed Franschhoek Main Road into scenic Villiersdorp. Then he passed the Brandvlei Dam en route to Worcester, and followed Slanghoek Road, going from flat and fast to stiff undulations, then into the climb up beautiful Bain’s Kloof Pass (9.2km, 326m, 4%), the second and last of his challenging climbs. After descending the Pass again he headed for Wellington, then deviated onto the R44, taking it all the way to RiebeekWest before turning back to Wellington and following the R101 back to the start.

SO, WH AT ON EA RTH IS AUDA X?

The Audax Series is a global set of challenges, made up of long-distance (200km-plus), self-supported single-stage rides. These must be ridden at an average speed of between 15 and 30km/h from start to finish, and between control points. Event distances range from 200km to 300km, 400km, 600km – and even 1 000km, though not yet in SA. Support vehicles are not permitted, except to ‘shadow’ riders, but may provide support at the control points. Other cyclists are allowed to tag along, but must be a part of Audax. Control cards are signed at certain points on the route to monitor performance and speed. Despite the criteria, these events are not viewed as races – they are seen as ‘social’ rides, for cyclists who share a common interest in riding long distances. For more, visit audaxsa.co.za. 12

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

Date

10 September 2016 Distance

305.3km Time

13:17:57 Elevation Gain

2 683m Average Power

133W Average Speed

23km/h Average Heart Rate

121bpm Average Cadence

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Distance:

6 365.3km Time:

287 hours 10 minutes Elevation Gain:

67 103m Rides: 116

SUPPLIED

Strava is full of people hunting KOMs, taking on segments, and sharing challenging rides. Some consider this over the top; but that’s the nature of the beast – head to the site, and you’re going to find a bunch of achievers. So when we discovered Cape Town cyclist Richard Baufeldt’s 13-hour, 300km+ ride on Strava, we wanted to know just how crazy this dude is. It turns out he’s participating in the Audax series (see below) and this ride was just… part of his training. Baufeldt started from Paarl (at 3am!), headed to Franschhoek via Franschhoek


Editor’s Letter

THAT

Stretch Of Road ONE OF THE JOYS OF RIDING IS THOSE PIECES OF ROAD WE JUST LOVE TO RIDE.

T

STRETCH OF TAR THAT LEADS FROM THE GRAVEL JEEP TRACK ON THE WESTERN

SLOPES OF TABLE MOUNTAIN TO THE STOP

It’s part of our regular mountain-bike route; we climb for almost an hour on rutted, rocky dirt track, before hitting the eerie smoothness of a quiet tar road in the shadow of the Cape’s iconic landmark. It starts with two testing drags, but then dips down past a boom gate – and then the fun really starts. Something about the fast undulations, sweeping bends and rollercoaster-like upward surges just makes this an exhilarating piece of tar. It’s the reward of going fast after a bout of ponderous climbing, and the sudden thrill of speed and cornering makes the eyes wider and the adrenaline surge. It’s one of my favourite stretches of road in Cape Town, and I almost always push hard, eager to feel the rush of the sloping terrain and the brisk air in my face. STREET ON KLOOF NEK.

There is a section where we have to slow down, as we cruise past the tourist buses (and the ditzy tourists, peering at the sky as they cross the road!), but once free of the traffic, a series of hairpin bends rounds off the experience before the final drop down

[There’s just] something about the fast undulations, sweeping bends and rollercoaster-like upward surges… to the stop street. In this issue, on page 40, we celebrate everything we love about cycling. Our team sat down to think about the little things that make us want to ride bikes, and that we’d miss if we didn’t. We got to 101 before we ran out of space, but we know there are probably a thousand more reasons to add. We were also inspired by deputy editor Jonathan Ancer’s story on the Recyclers of Fish Hoek – a group of retirees who prove that age is not a deterrent to performance. In his story

MARK CARROLL’S 4-MINUTE HILL REPEATS USE THESE INTERVALS TO PREP FOR THE 947 CYCLE CHALLENGE – AND THEN TURN TO PAGE 43 FOR MORE.

J Find a hill that will take four minutes or more to finish. J Start at the base, and go up hard for four minutes, measuring your effort. JTurn and roll back down easy, taking up to four minutes before hitting it again. J Four to eight repeats will be more than enough, if done properly.

14

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

(In Search Of The Fountain Of Youth, p56), Jonathan interviews 70-yearold Nick Forbes, a fit-looking Keith Richards-lookalike aiming for a sub-3 Cycle Tour in 2017. Pretty inspiring stuff – it makes you realise that no matter what the birth date in your

ID book says, you can still be competitive at an age when most people expect you to be holed up in a home, playing bingo. And then there’s the story that staffer Andre Valentine did with 35-year-old round-the-world rider Dr Stephen Fabes, that quite simply has made us all wonder if we’ve made the right choices in life. Oy vey! Now, go out and ride… Mike

editor

@MIKEFINCHSA

SUPPLIED

THERE’S A 5.7-KILOMETRE


HELPFUL ADVICE FROM EXPERTS AND RIDERS

THE ONE THING THAT CHANGED IT ALL I participated in endurance sports from a young age, and started riding bikes when I was 10. But when I was 25, I set myself a goal of achieving a sub-3 Cape Town Cycle Tour, and that changed the way I approached my training and riding. It took a long time and I had a few setbacks, but at 50 – 25 years after setting my goal – I finally achieved the sub-3 I wanted. My new goal is to be on the final podium in the Masters category at the Absa Cape Epic. I haven’t achieved it yet, but I’m not giving up on that goal either. waleed baker

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business owner

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

S P O R T Z P I C S Z A / C A P E E P I C / E WA L D S A D I E

BELIEVING IN ACHIEVING


A L L YOU R R I DE QUA N DA R I E S – S OLV E D

Many cyclists just plonk their bikes down after a ride, and hop on for the next one without doing a bike inspection. But this leaves you vulnerable to any number of mishaps as a result of wear and tear from your previous outing. To avoid this, here’s a five-minute bikemaintenance check to do after each ride, so for your next one, you’re ready to go at the drop of a helmet:

18

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

- Check your wheels are in true by spinning the wheel and watching the distance between the rim and the brake pad. It should be uniform for the entire rotation. If it wobbles, the wheel needs truing. - Check your quick-releases for side-to-side play in the wheel, and QRs or skewers that aren’t tight or secure. Make sure quick-releases are closed all the way, and that bolt-on skewers

are securely fastened. - Check brakes for grit on the pads and caliper alignment. If your brakes feel gritty, clean the pads with a rag and degreaser. Calipers are aligned if the pads are equidistant from the rim. - Check cleats for loose bolts and overall wear. Worn-out cleats won’t engage as crisply, and bolts can loosen over time. If your cleat isn’t secure on your shoe, tighten the bolts.

ISTOCKPHOTO

I FEAR THAT MY BIKE MAY COME APART MID-RIDE. HOW CAN I CHECK THAT IT’S SAFE TO GET ON?


F I never get acid reflux – except on long rides. What the hell? During normal digestion, the food you chew and swallow is moved along your digestive tract by rhythmic contractions called peristalsis, in a biological process called gastric motility. As your digestive muscles are called off duty during exercise, this system can go a little haywire, leaving you with decreased motility and setting the stage for reflux – where your stomach acid starts coming up the wrong way and giving you heartburn. A survey of more than 600 endurance athletes found that 67% of cyclists – more than runners and triathletes – suffer with acid reflux. “Cyclists may be even more susceptible because of their hunched-over position on the bike,” says sports nutritionist Leslie Bonci. If this problem plagues you, eat smaller amounts more frequently while on long rides, and consider taking an antacid, such as Tums, prophylactically before you roll out.

F I’m a newbie, and against the advice of more experienced peers, I’ve been using my big gear to save energy and go faster. They’re wrong and I’m right… right? You often see new cyclists cranking down the road in their biggest possible gear option, under the illusion that they’re going faster and pedalling less, thus saving energy. The problem is, turning over a mud-heavy gear is a lot of work. “You’re just wasting yourself,” says former pro Meredith Miller. After an hour, your quads will throw in the towel, while the rest of your group-ride spins on. Cycling coach Clayton Feldman says the perfect place to ride is where you can turn over your pedals at 80rpm or greater. If you’re on a hill, that might drop as low as 60rpm; but if you’re falling below that, you need to shift into an easier gear. If you’re out of gears, you need a cassette with more options.

25

PER CENT IS THE DROP IN FATIGUE 40 CYCLISTS EXPERIENCED AFTER SNIFFING PEPPERMINT OIL. THIS CAME ALONG WITH A 6% RISE IN STRENGTH.


Ooh, Magic Brownies! WHAT DOES A 17-YEAR-OLD WANNABE pro cyclist think about as he trains? Brownies. And banana bread. And muffins. “A lot of my recipes are what I crave when I’m riding,” says Spencer Miller, who shares his dessert concoctions with 62 000-plus Instagram followers and at macro-chef.com. Coached by former pro Tom Danielson, Miller considers riding uphill to be his strength. But maintaining a climber’s lean physique while satisfying a sweet tooth takes creativity. So four years ago Miller started creating his own, nutrient-packed treats. “I focus on whole foods and things that are natural,” he says. For these decadent chocolate–peanut butter brownies, he uses oat flour rather than the refined white variety, equal parts sugary (agave syrup) and kilojoule-free (stevia) sweeteners, and replaces most of the traditional recipe’s oil with apple puree and – stay with us here – black beans (see box). Miller, who is home schooling to have more time to ride, hopes to race in Europe. But if that doesn’t work out, he could still make his mark on the WorldTour. “I’d like to work with food,” he says. “Either open my own café or maybe be a team chef.”

SRSLY, beans?

To boost fibre and protein, Miller adds black beans to his brownie batter. The first time he tried it, he was worried he’d end up with

20

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

“something that tasted like a tortilla”, but he swears you won’t notice them. (Even our most skeptical tester agreed.) For the recipe, visit bicycling.co.za/ magic-brownies.

M AT T R A I N E Y

– AC SHILTON


FOOT LOOSE B Y DR J E ROE N S WA R T

When I ride, I get severe pain in my left foot – it feels like somebody is shocking me. What is this, and what can I do about it? – Bob, Gaborone

DOCTOR’S ORDERS

Sharp, shooting or electric sensations can be caused by compression of the interdigital nerves, between the bones of the forefoot (the metatarsals). This pain will shoot down the space between two toes, or feel like a hot spot under your foot. Repetitive compression or grinding of the nerve between the two metatarsals can result in scarring around the nerve (known as a neuroma) and persistent pain, even if you improve the fit of your shoe. A neuroma will be visible on an ultra-sound or an MRI, and can be relieved by injecting some corticosteroid – though surgical excision is the best permanent solution. If there’s no neuroma, enough space in the front of your shoe could solve it. If your shoe has three velcro straps or multiple buckles, loosening the front two straps should do the trick. But many newer shoes use laces or ratchet dials with nylon

22

wires, which make it difficult to reduce pressure in the front while maintaining enough retention for pedalling. Another possible cause for your pain is ‘metatarsalgia’, from excessive flattening of the transverse arch of the foot: when pedalling, force applied to the pedals is transmitted through the forefoot. This can

Pain can be temporarily alleviated by scrunching up your toes. result in the transverse arch collapsing, exposing the interdigital nerves and either compressing them between the sole of the shoe and the metatarsals, or exposing the cartilage in the joint between the metatarsal and the first toe bone. You’ll usually feel this pain as a burning sensation under the front of your foot; it can be temporarily alleviated by

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

innersoles for a reasonable price. Lastly, the newer mechanical buckles of some shoes can create hard points over the top of the foot, and these can irritate the deep peroneal nerve as it becomes exposed over the top of the foot, causing pain and numbness. If you think this may be the culprit, try another pair of shoes, or add some padding to the tongue of the shoe.

The most common cause of forefoot pain is excessive compression of the forefoot through wearing overly-tight shoes. This can result in insufficient blood flow to the forefoot, which then results in pain or numbness because of insufficient oxygenation of nerves and other tissues. One way to assess whether a shoe will fit your forefoot is to trace around your foot on a piece of paper while standing and bearing weight on the foot. Take out the inner sole of your cycling shoe, and place it over this tracing. If the tracing is significantly wider than the innersole, your shoe will probably be too tight.

A SUCCESSFUL FITTING

Dr Jeroen Swart is a sports physician and exercise physiologist at the Sports Science Institute of South Africa.

scrunching up your toes. Some cycling-shoe manufacturers (such as Specialized and Bontrager) incorporate a metatarsal button to lift the second, third and fourth metatarsals, supporting the transverse arch and reducing this effect. Or a podiatrist can create a metatarsal button on your existing

G E T T Y/ G A L L O I M A G E S

A


JHB/E 10020811JBJB/

Competition entries close 11 November 2016. For full terms and conditions visit www.fortuner4x4challenge.co.za


The Final Stretch GET TO PEAK CONDITION ON RACE DAY – BY FORMULATING YOUR OWN TAPERING PLAN. BY M A RK C A RROLL

Your big race is approaching, you’re riding well, and your training has been consistent. Everything’s going just fine. But you still have one more aspect to get right: the taper. With tapering, experience is invaluable. There’s no one-size-fits-all strategy, and uncontrollable factors such as a stressful lifestyle and restless sleep may require a more aggressive taper. Even for the same individual, the taper strategy that worked perfectly before may not be as effective next time round. Here are the important factors to note

when coming up with your tapering plan: TAPER DURATION The general rule is eight to 14 days, with the length of your taper depending on the following considerations: • How fast do you recover generally? The faster an individual recovers, the shorter the duration required for tapering. • How many hours per week do you train? A 20-hours-a-week rider will need a longer taper than someone

Many people ride in a fasted state to ‘burn fat’, while Banters believe that ketosis turns them into fat-burning machines. But fat-burning capacity is not dictated by diet choice – it’s dictated by aerobic fitness. The fitter you are, the higher the fat percentage you burn at any given training intensity. And the mythical ‘fat-burning zone’ is just that – a myth. Yes, as intensity rises, the body relies more on carbs (glycogen) than fat to support or bridge the gap in energy demand. But the amount of fat you use rises too, resulting in more fat burn. A fasted ride does fast-track aerobic fitness, so it can help with fat burning – as part of your long-term strategy.

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Mark Carroll owns Cadence Cycling Performance & chairs the CSA Coaching Commission .

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

ISTOCKPHOTO

THE COACH

T H E R E A L FAT- S H R E D D E R


training six hours a week. • What level of accumulated fatigue do you have? Has lethargy set in, along with persistently sore and tired legs? If so, taper for longer.

five days a week, continue with this frequency. The exception would be if you have high levels of fatigue, needing an aggressive taper – only then should you reduce frequency.

The taper strategy that worked perfectly before may not be as effective next time round. Prioritising races is important too – if your calendar has a dozen big races, you’ll spend the season tapering rather than preparing. Treat less important races as ‘train troughs’ that contribute to your preparation for the races that really matter. VOLUME AND INTENSITY Your intensity must not reduce during a taper; and ideally, neither should your training frequency. If you normally ride

The only component that should reduce during your taper is volume, both in training hours and volume of intensity: • Reduce session volume by doing shorter rides, i.e. shorter training time and distance. • Reduce the volume of intensity during the taper – the duration of intervals as well as total number. Aim to halve the volume in the taper. Note that individual differences in fitness and recovery as well as lifestyle

must be considered here too. EVENT-SPECIFIC TAPERING Interestingly, whether the taper is for a three-day stage race or a one-day classic, the general rules are the same because your goals remain the same – to offload fatigue, increase freshness, and find those extra gains in performance. WHAT TO EAT DURING THE TAPER Kilojoules in, kilojoules out. If you keep portion size unchanged for 10 days, while cutting back on training, then expect to gain weight and fat. Note the key here is portion size, not composition of meals; so keep eating the same type of foods, while cutting back on how much is served up. It’s better for you to arrive at the start of a race a little over- rather than under-recovered, so don’t be afraid to schedule an extra rest day if you need it, or to cut the time on your training days.

NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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IN MY VIEW BY CHERISE STA NDER

TRAINING

Hard Core

Core exercises for people who don’t have time to cross-train. BY CL AIRE GOING

If you’ve found yourself putting your core on the back burner lately, try these tips to get a little more out of everyday activities.

Turn Gardening Into A Workout

W

WITH MY FIANCÉ BENNO WORKING ON THE MTB

I have to spend a lot of time alone looking after Thomas Burry. The last stretch was a very long five weeks of feeling like a single mom. At first I had no idea how I was going to survive on my own, with baby not a fan of being by himself. But then I started exercising, and my world changed. I’ve been cycling for almost 18 years; and for most of those 18 years, I’ve had pressure on me to perform – from family, from sponsors, and most of the time from myself. Trying to make a living out of sport is tough: you have to be very harsh with yourself, and sometimes your motivation is low. So honestly, when I fell pregnant I was happy with not having to ride much. But about two months after giving birth, I desperately wanted to get fit and feel good about myself again, and I started doing a little exercise. Now, in a good week, I’m running about 30km and riding three or four times – and I love it! For the first time, I’m doing it WORLD CUP CIRCUIT,

purely because I want to. I’ve discovered that exercising is the best antidepressant; and no matter how rough my day’s been, or how tired I feel, a little run around the block or a ride (even on the indoor trainer) makes me smile and opens my mind. So my advice to everyone out there is to go outside and get some fresh air. Sometimes, that’s all you need to turn a frown upside down. I am very blessed to be travelling through Europe at the moment with my parents, so that means sometimes my

Honestly, when I fell pregnant I was happy with not having to ride much.

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

mom can babysit while my dad and I go outside and explore the mountains. I still have a long way to go before I can think about racing again, but I’m getting there – one pedal stroke at a time.

Cherise Stander, who has just become a mom, represented South Africa at the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

Always Take the Stairs Taking the stairs is another opportunity to work on your core. Tighten the muscles in your midsection, stand up straight, and as you raise your knee for each step, focus on your lower abdominal muscles. Lifting your knees a little higher will target your lower rectus abdominal muscles, which can give you a smoother pedal stroke. And keep your hand off the railing: “If you’re using the rails to help yourself up the stairs, you’re not using your core muscles in an efficient way,” Bates says.

COOL STUFF

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ISTOCKPHOTO

BACK ON THE BIKE, CHERISE DISCOVERS IT’S ONLY WHEN LIFE KEEPS YOU OFF THE BIKE THAT YOU REALISE HOW MUCH YOU LOVE RIDING.

Julie Bates, Body Geometry Fit coach at Specialized, says that like cycling, “manual labour requires core strength and posture to protect you from injury”. To build your best core, “it’s crucial to be aware of other core muscles, and how they play into becoming a better cyclist.” For example, raking and sweeping use your obliques, which help when you’re pulling on the handlebars.


ON A CLIMB G

IN THE PACK G

AFTER A RIDE G

FASTER G

Do steady-state intervals, which help you produce more power more comfortably. Twice a week, during a ride, pedal 10 minutes at an intensity where you can’t easily converse, but aren’t gasping. Recover 10 minutes. Repeat two more times.

Get in line. Tucking in behind another rider can cut wind resistance by more than 25%. The next-to-last cyclist benefits the most, but even the first in line gets a boost – areas of low pressure between riders help push the leader along.

Break out the foam. Like massage, foam rolling loosens adhesions that can keep muscles from working smoothly. When you find a tender spot, hold the pressure on it for a few seconds, then roll through.

COMFORTABLE G

Trick yourself. When a climb seems like too much, fire up iTunes from your jersey pocket, says cycling multi-discipline pro Jeremy Powers. Even if you can barely hear it, the music can be enough to distract you from the hill ahead.

Stagger your position. Ride just to the left or right of the rider in front of you so that you can see the road ahead. Knowing that you have extra time to react to what’s coming can put you more at ease.

Ditch the chamois ASAP. Postride bacteria thrive in sweaty shorts, and can lead to some itchy moments – and even worse, a rash. For parking-lot peel-offs, you know the drill: wrap the towel, slip off the shorts, slip on the clean pants.

DISAPPEAR G

Break away. On a moderate climb, do 8 to 10 efforts of about 30 seconds: Shift up until you’re pedalling at 50 to 60rpm. Sprint out of the saddle until you hit 100rpm. Sit and accelerate, shifting to maintain cadence. Recover 3 to 5 minutes.

Kill the creak. Bike squeaking? It’s probably your bottom bracket. If so, a squirt of water (not sports drink!) from your bottle may temporarily quell the noise. Remove, clean, and reinstall per the manufacturer’s instructions before your next ride.

Don’t gorge. While you need both protein and carbs after a ride, kick off your ravening with something labour-intensive to chew, such as an apple or pear – it’ll curb hunger so you don’t power through an entire pack of jelly babies.

SMARTER G

Shift early and often to keep your cadence above 70rpm whenever possible. Grinding big gears forces your body to rely on fast-twitch muscles, which fatigue quicker than their slow-twitch counterparts.

Give yourself space to manoeuvre if you need to respond quickly to an obstacle, traffic, or another rider – don’t ride the white line, or stick to the edge of the pavement.

Close your eyes. The National Sleep Foundation recommends 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night, but a Stanford University study found that elite athletes felt less fatigued and were able to run faster with even more – up to 10 hours a night.

A BETTER PERSON G

SO U RCE S: J eremy Power s , 2016 US c yclocross champion; Rob er t Pickels , lead e xercise phy siolog is t at the Univer sit y of Color ado Spor t s M edicine and Per for mance C e n t r e ; To n y B u s t a m a n t e , o w n e r o f Ve l o s m i t h B i c y c l e S t u d i o ; L e s l i e B o n c i , co - a u t h o r, B i ke Yo u r B u t t O f f

15 ways to become a faster, fitter, and even friendlier cyclist - no superglue or welding torch required BY BRIAN FISKE

Don’t make it a thing if you’re having a good day and your mate is having a bad day. Instead, focus your conversation on a more pressing issue – like the merits of muesli versus an omelette.

Be vocal. Let newcomers know what to expect on your ride: you can point out obstacles, call out approaching cars, signal all turns and stops, and ride no more than two up.

Find A Long-Distance Rider – and support their cause. There’s always someone riding from one point to another in aid of charity. Look out for them, and make a contribution – it doesn’t take much, and it all counts.

NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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THE HOT TOPIC THAT GOT US TALKING WHILE M AKING THIS ISSUE

INTO THE LION’S DEN When is it okay to be a rogue rider? It’s not – except when you’re between a fence and a hard place... THE PLAN WAS SIMPLE: WE (ME AND TWO MATES) WOULD BE DROPPED OFF IN A KLEIN KAROO TOWN, JUMP ON OUR BIKES, AND RIDE 100KM OF DIRT BACK-ROADS TO A NATURE RESERVE

Our partners would meet us at the reserve, with a fridge full of beer. We’d used Google and Strava to map out an adventurous route – one that would take us on rarelyused, perhaps forgotten provincial roads and public servitudes. With the route loaded onto a Garmin we set off under a warm winter sun, with a gentle wind at our back. Within the first 10km the gravel district road had narrowed into a rough farm track. After diving down into a riverbed and climbing out the other side, we arrived at our first obstacle: a gate, with a game-fence ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF LADISMITH.

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

running to our left and right. We stood there, puzzling. What to do… should we carry on, or not? In my experience, farmers and gamereserve managers are generally more than happy to have you cross their land, as long as you let them know you’re coming – but there was no-one about to ask for permission. Purists argue that rogue riding is never okay, and generally I do my utmost to avoid riding where I’m not wanted – but what choice did we have? We had done some due diligence, trying to establish contact with land-owners before setting out, but with limited success. So after weighing up the risks (being arrested for trespassing, we assumed), we decided we had no alternative but to push on. We were prepared to face the consequences if necessary. This ride better be

OLI MUNNIK

BY OLI MUNNIK


worth the risk, we thought! On we rode, our eyes peeled for any sign of human life. Eventually we exited the farm; and breathed a sigh of relief, thinking we were getting off private land – but actually, that’s when things got spicy. Unbeknown to us, we were now entering a 55 000ha private game reserve, which had privatised the provincial road. We know now that we were allowed to be on the road, as long as we were escorted through the park by rangers – a fact Google and Strava neglected to mention. (We’d learn later that if a road on Google Maps winds its way through green shading, it probably runs through a protected area – so it’s best to establish the status of such a road beforehand.) Blissfully unaware, we continued towards Ladismith – until we were stopped in our tracks by Mike, a reserve employee. He informed us that we were trespassing, and would have to come with him. Uh-oh. ‘Risk versus reward’ was much on our minds as we were bundled into Mike’s van.

Noticing a pistol strapped to his waist, we added Frank to our list of present dangers! Mike took us to Frank, a fierce former recce (double uh-oh), now heading up the park’s anti-poaching unit. Frank explained that sections of the park were stocked with lion, elephant and buffalo, and posed a clear and present danger to us. Noticing a pistol strapped to his waist, we added Frank to our list of present dangers! But after a stern talking-to, he merely escorted us off the property. With our adrenaline pumping, we saddled up and waved goodbye to Frank. At that point, the only lion I wanted to encounter was a cold one that I could down, and feel satisfied. Eventually we arrived at our destination – in the dark – and with ice-cold beers (Castle Lites, not Lions) we toasted a truly exhilarating adventure. I don’t think rogue riding’s the way to do things, and I don’t condone it; you should always contact landowners to get permission before you ride. But sometimes, aren’t there mitigating factors that force riders who seek adventure in far-flung places to go rogue? As long as you’re prepared to apologise profusely if caught, and take responsibility for the consequences – which could include being eaten by a lion. Or being shot by a recce.


S T Y L E M A N Q U I P S , R E AWINNING D E R T TIP IPS AND CYCLING FOR YOUR LIPS

STYLEMAN

I DON’T FOLLOW TRENDS, MOSTLY, BUT I DO LIKE TO BE ON POINT WHEN I SEE FASHION TAKE A BIG SHIFT. WHAT IS IT WITH SUNGLASSES THESE DAYS? IS THERE A BACKLASH AGAINST GLASSES THAT LOOK LIKE THEY WERE MADE TO BE WORN ON A BIKE? WHAT’S WITH THE ELVIS SUNGLASSES AND THE WAYFARERS? DID I MISS A TURN?

– Andrew, Pietermaritzburg ANDREW, IF YOU LIVE IN

PIETERMARITZBURG, YOU DID NOT MISS A TURN IN FASHION, YOU MISSED THE TURN OF THE

Sleepy Hollow. Oh, the wild pleasures I have endured and wallowed in there. I think I know the glasses of which you speak. They are worn by an American team. I have seen a dodgy reputation consultant in Cape Town wearing them too. They are retro, almost anti-fashion; and thus, they have become fashion. Alex Howes, the American rider with CannondaleDrapac, wears a pair of POC Require because, and I quote, they are “the most ridiculous glasses I can find”. He has a theory behind why he wears the thickest of white frames in a contest as hard as cycling: “Honestly, it’s kind of a ridiculous sport in general. You have a bunch of emaciated Transformer characters out there, grown men who shave their legs and wear colourful CENTURY.

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

spandex. So you’ve got to do something just to remind yourself and the rest of the world that it is kind of silly.” It’s hard to find fault with that thinking.

MY DAD’S SON? I N THE LAST YEAR, I’VE

STARTED WONDERING WHERE MY CYCLING TALENT COMES FROM. I MEAN, I LOVE MY DAD AND HE’S GREAT TO RIDE WITH, BUT, WELL, HE’S JUST ‘OKAY’. THERE USED TO BE A JOKE IN THE FAMILY THAT MY UNCLE, WHO IS A REALLY GOOD CYCLIST, IS MY REAL FATHER. I’VE STARTED TO WONDER WHETHER THAT MIGHT BE TRUE. IS IT POSSIBLE FOR A GENE TO BE LATENT IN MY DAD? I LIKE MY UNCLE, BUT, WELL, MY DAD PAYS FOR MY BIKES. AND FOOD. I DON’T WANT TO USE MY REAL NAME.

– Anon, nowhere near Newlands YOU ARE NOT ALONE, ‘ANON’.

Many is the night I have lain awake, hoping I was the bastard son of Merckx and Jeannie Longo. I dreamt I was birthed at the foot of Mont Ventoux, then wrapped in a yellow jersey, spirited away and given to a family of peasants. They would have been farmers, in a strange place, far away from my homeland. Under that foreign sun, I would have shown incredible strength and little pain. I would have been unbreakable. No, wait – that’s my Superman fantasy. I never asked my dad if I was his child, and neither should you, Anon. Use the guilt to get a new bike.

G E T T Y/ G A L L O I M A G E S | I S T O C K P H O T O | B O B M A D I S O N

FISHY FASHION


RIDER 2 RIDER

Makeshift Chain Link When replacing a chain link mid-ride, make it less tedious by using a paper clip to keep the links together while you’re getting your chain-breaker in place. – Ralph Davids

Wheel Saver If you have glass or road debris stuck in your wheel, simply inflate tyres to proper pressure, and carefully remove embedded debris with tweezers. But beware: a cut tyre or sidewall will blow out, so replace it – John Lamour

TRAVEL RIM PROTECTOR

If you don’t want your bike rack to scratch your rims or frame – wrap the straps in an old inner tube. This will ensure that when your bike moves around while you’re driving, your rims are protected. Because road wheels are smaller, cut a piece from a pool noodle (preferably the kind with the hole in the middle) and wrap it over the rim and tyre before strapping it down. – Kobus Liebenberg

WIN!

A PAIR OF BUDDS BY DJ FRESH WORTH R699 All you have to do to stand a chance of winning is email your tip, with ‘Reader Tip’ in the subject line, to bicycling@media24.com.

CYCLISM

Souplesse (FRENCH/COLLOQUIAL/ STATE OF BEING)

Pronounced ‘Soup Please’; but it has ‘lesse’ to do with the chowder, and everything to do with the rider. Derived from the French word for ‘flexibility’, this cycling term is so much more, defining the state of perfection attained by a smooth and elegant pedal stroke – it’s the perfect storm of Looking Pro. Former world champ Maurizio Fondriest is said to have cycling’s most admired souplesse, which he acquired by spending days practising his pedal stroke in front of a mirror.

RANGER JERSEY

BUILT FOR ANY TRAIL

THE RANGER IS ARGUABLY THE BEST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK IN THE WORLD OF TRAIL GEAR. WE HAVE WORKED HARD TO MAINTAIN MANY OF THE PERFORMANCE AND AESTHETIC QUALITIES FOUND IN OUR PREMIUM GEAR BUT OFFER IT AT A MORE AFFORDABLE PRICE POINT. THE RESULT IS A TIMELESS, DO IT ALL GEAR THAT IS ONE OF OUR BEST SELLING PRODUCTS YEAR AFTER YEAR.

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NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA Image: InkBlack Visual Art

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016


ONE-ON-ONE WITH THE HEROES OF CYCLING

issues with the bike? Badly. I’m an incompetent mechanic! Were you fortunate enough to avoid mechanical issues, then? Not a chance. In total I suffered 221 punctures, and went through 25 tyres, 14 chains, 10 sets of pedals and over 20 sets of brake pads. At least I used the same frame, although everything else was changed! In terms of medical work, what was it that you did exactly? I visited projects more as an observer, and not as a practising doctor.

O DR STEPHEN FABES O AGE:35 B IK E : S A N T O S T R AV E L M A S T E R 2 .6 CROMO ROHLOFF O PROFESSION: DOCTOR

O

I N T E R V I E W A N DR É VA L E N T IN E PHOTO SUPPLIED

What makes you so adventurous? I’ve always been drawn to travel in wild places. I love the sense of vulnerability, and the constant questioning that comes from moving through unfamiliar places. And with this trip, I wanted an adventure, and a new challenge. How did your family handle you doing this again? They were very supportive – my mum even came out a few times to visit me en route. Did you plot an exact route, or just follow your gut as you rode? Very little planning in this regard. It was more like: London-Istanbul-Cairo-Cape Town, I’d fill in the gaps as I went. I loved the flexibility of this approach – and I’d occasionally decide on routes at a junction, or change my mind after meeting another cyclist. How did you handle mechanical

How long did you stay in the places you stopped at? Generally not more than two weeks, with the exception of Cape Town, where I stayed for some time. Speaking of South Africa, how was your experience here? Incredible. When I crossed the border a car stopped, and a man handed me a sack of oranges. I received hospitality throughout the country. And on my way into Cape Town, another car stopped, and the driver offered to let me stay in his beach house or city house. He gave me his frontdoor keys, on the side of the highway. What was your favourite part of the country? I didn’t see enough of it, but as a city, Cape Town was fantastic, and it was good fun riding in through the Northern Cape. In all the countries you visited, did you ever have any trouble with the locals? Very little. I was treated with respect everywhere, and only experienced a few issues, usually with drunk people! I crossed both Syria and Afghanistan, and received more hospitality than anywhere else. Did you ever have to bribe your way out of a situation? No. Bribing just makes it difficult for everyone

else behind you, and creates a culture of corruption. If you don’t break the rules, and if you stand firm, usually you won’t need to. How far do you ride on an average day? On a flat, paved road I liked to cover about 130km – but high in the mountains, on bad roads, with a headwind… it was a lot less. I virtually never rode at night, so sunlight often governed how far I rode. My record is 209km through the Namib Desert, with the help of a tailwind and lots of Dairy Milk chocolate. Was there a point in the ride that you thought about giving up and going home? There were tough times – most memorably crossing Mongolia during the winter, when I was camping at minus-35 degrees Celsius. But I never got so fed up that I planned to go home.

When I crossed the border a car stopped, and a man handed me a sack of oranges. Six years is a long time to be jobless. How did you pay for everything? The first thing to say is that cycling around the world is very cheap. What I’ll spend in six years on the road might be the same that people my age spend on a small car. Before I left the UK I saved as much as I could by working lots of hospital shifts, living in the cheap hospital accommodation, and spending like I was still a student. And this lasted you the full six years? I ran out of money completely in Mexico, but that seemed like the worst reason of all to quit. From then on I managed to continue through working as a freelance features writer for travelling, cycling and leisure magazines, public speaking at schools and public events, and selling photographs, either as postcards or as calendars.

NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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Jozi’s Top Ride Stops

Former pro Kevin Benkenstein spends hours riding Joburg’s streets – here are his 5 favourite places to refuel.

Benky, who just completed his third Everesting challenge for Qhubeka, is an ex-pro cyclist, current market developer for Specialized SA, and coffee lover.

EGOLI ECSTASY

ABOVE: The Surrey Hills – like its namesake in England, this plate is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. LEFT: ‘Be-spoke’ furniture – cycling-centric tables at The Grind.

“A busy, vibrant coffee shop within a bicycle shop, made to feel like home by baristas who take the time to learn your name. With bike parking and product to view, it’s the perfect place to end a weekday ride.” F Favourite Brew: Coffee in a Cone F Favourite Meal: Banana Bread Slice with PB and Syrup

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

“Because it’s in Parkhurst, just a few minutes’ ride from the Spruit, the tables are always full of dirt-covered riders. Vovo Telo welcomes cyclists, and has bike parking to go with killer coffee and killer food.” F Favourite Brew: Flat White F Favourite Meal: The Surrey Hills and a Pain au Raisin

“This place is so Joburg. Trendy and a place to be seen, but also with great staff, who are always friendly. A good place to get great food.” F Favourite Brew: Greek Coffee F Favourite Meal: Salmon Scramble

SUPPLIED

“A great ‘country’ vibe in the middle of the Cradle of Humankind. The food is good and the coffee is strong, and it’s always full of cyclists making their mid-ride stop.” F Favourite Brew: Cappucino F Favourite Meal: Breakfast Tortilla or Breakfast Pizza

“Cool, trendy and busy, this shop is always a hub of energy. With big tables and a bike rack for your steed, it’s a great place to stop on any weekday ride.” F Favourite Brew: Cold-Brewed Coffee F Favourite Meal: Swiss Fruit


BY MIKE FINCH PHOTO BY JA MES GA R AGHT Y

EEEEEBIKE! In China, there are more than 120 million of them; and in Europe, close to a million. So eBikes – or electric bicycles – are more than just a fad. We’ve added a top-of-the-range Specialized Turbo 250 S eBike to our Bicycling fleet for a full year, to find out whether these pedal-assist bikes have a place in the hardcore world of South African cycling – or as an alternative to an expensive, gas-guzzling motor vehicle. VISIT BICYCLING.CO.ZA/AYEARWITHANEBIKE TO READ ABOUT OUR EBIKE JOURNEY.

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016


Altimax sport THE TOP PERFORMER WHEN IT COUNTs

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BY OLI MUNNIK PHOTO BY JA MES GA R AGHT Y

OLD-SCHOOL They’re usually reserved for the beach, and long days in the saddle, but as we head into 2017 tan lines are making a comeback – to a bicycle near you. Tyre manufacturers like Challenge are bringing the old-school tan-walled tyre back into fashion. A set of these handcrafted 700x27C Challenge Paris-Roubaix open tubulars won’t simply add elegance and panache to your vibe – their bigger contact patch on the road will give you better grip and soak up road buzz, offering a luxuriously fast ride. CHALLENGE PARIS-ROUBAIX OPEN TUBULAR 700X27C PRICE: R990 PER TYRE PRIVATEER.CO.ZA

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016


FREEWHEELIN’ BY JONATH A N A NCER

< Chats

DAYS OF OUR RIDES Like saddles-sores on your hairy ass, so are the Days of our Rides.

Ant: 6am: Meet at lights. 2 hours + cappuccino? Pod: In! Jenny: In. Please be gentle. JGR69: Poker night tonight, so will be well hung tomorrow. (Nudge, nudge, wink wink, Jen.) Evan: Bwwwahahahahaha! Jethro: Thanks for adding me. I just want to introduce myself. I’m Jethro and I did the Epic in 2013. Evan: Bwwwahahahahaha! Mandy: Hello? Kev: Just had beer #8. #wasted #hic #Ilovebeer Kev: Beer #9 down the hatch. #bulletproof Brian: Hi. Just made the best crumpets. Hope you all have a divine day! Mandy: You Can’t live A Positive Life With A Negative Mind! Ant: Shot for lekker ride, okes. A beaut. Pod, what happened? Pod: Holy marbled mackerel, I overslept. Goddammit. Jethro: I overslept once at the Epic. Had to rush to make it to the start in time for B Batch. Jenny: Nice one, boys, but my legs are toast. Kev: I’ll drink a toast to your legs. #Beer#10 #winning ANT REMOVED KEV FROM DAYS OF OUR RIDES.

JGR69: You need someone to spread your toast? LOL! Evan: Bwwwahahahahaha! Jethro: Every morning before the start of the Epic I ate a slice of toast. ANT REMOVED JETHRO FROM DAYS OF OUR RIDES .

DaveB: Thanks for removing Jethro, admin. I hate braggers and namedroppers, which is what I told the MEC after I did this epic marathon in Iceland. ANT REMOVED DAVEB FROM DAYS OF OUR RIDES.

JGR69: Jen, the best part of the ride was watching you go down … (THE HILLL!!!) Jenny: JGR69, stop being such a sexist pig!!! JGR69: If a cyclist is someone who enjoys cycling, is a sexist someone who enjoys sex? #justsaying #hahaha #WelcomeToInnuendoClubAndThanksForComing! JENNY HAS LEFT DAYS OF OUR RIDES.

JGR69: Was it something I said? LLOLOLOLOOOOLLL!!! Mandy: You Can’t Stop the Waves, But You Can Learn How To Surf! ANT REMOVED BRIAN, JGR69, EVAN, POD AND MANDY FROM DAYS OF OUR RIDES.

Ant: Jono, just u and me left in the group. It was becoming a cycling soap opera. Jono: Shouldn’t that be a ‘spoke opera’? ANT REMOVED YOU FROM DAYS OF OUR RIDES .

NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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BY THE BICYCLING TEA M IMAGE CRAIG KOLESKY

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based around similar intervals, you’ll be in the best shape to deal with the pace, stay with the bunch, and pull off your best race. – Mark Carroll, Level 2 cycling coach, owner of Cadence Cycling and head of the Cycling SA Coaching Commission

——————

Have your kit, timing chip and race fuel ready the day before the race. Don’t forget your recovery drink, towel and change of clothes for after the race. – Carroll

—————— Have your bike cleaned and properly serviced. A reliable bike will make a big difference to your confidence on the start line. – Carroll

——————

EAT AND DRINK HEALTHILY Healthy eating during the preceding week can make a big difference to how you feel on the day. Stay away from fried foods. Be sure to eat carbohydraterich meals right after those rides in the week –

when you’re still warm, the nutrients go straight to your muscles. – Dr Jeroen Swart, head of the Discovery High Performance Cycling Centre at the Sports Science Institute of South Africa, and Bicycling’s Scientific Editor

—————— Even as a sub-3hour rider, you should be eating on this ride to make sure you

SUPPLIED

For your best chance at finishing this race well, don’t view it or train for it like you would for an endurance event – it’s a speed event. LSD (long slow

distance) rides will provide you only with ‘junk miles’. This race demands frequent and variedintensity surges, lasting anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes. If your training has been


DEALING WITH WIND Survive windy situations on the route – or take advantage of them. – Kim Rose-Gershow, BikeMax Power Level 2 coach with FitTrack

F Consider the wind direction; position yourself in the bunch on the side where you will get the most protection from the wind. F Be careful of riding at the front of the bunch for too long if there is a headwind. F If you’re in a bunch where others are not taking their turn at the front, a tailwind can offer a good opportunity for you or a group of people to break away.

still have glycogen stores available at the end. – Carroll

——————

Make sure your bike is in great condition. Check tyres for cuts and wear, check your saddle bag has everything

you need and that your spare tubes are in good nick. Your bike should have been set up at least four weeks before. Comfort and efficiency are the most important criteria for having a good ride on the day. – Gary Beneke,

former Springbok cyclist, cycling coach, and owner of Gary Beneke Sports

——————

TRAIN THE DAY BEFORE Do a warmup routine, but throw in 3x1-minute efforts and 3x30-second efforts with five minutes easy pedalling between. This important ride will ensure you

arrive at race day with a bit of snap in your legs. – Carroll

F Stay as close to the front third of your bunch as possible. Not only is it a safer place to ride, it also puts you in a better position in case of a bunch split.

——————

It’s human nature to do what you’re good at; most athletes spend too much time

on the areas they’re good at, and not enough on those they’re weaker at. So ask yourself: what is my weakest area? The answer is what you should be

doing more of in your training. – Rose-Gershow

—————— Soak up the event and the joy that cycling offers. The 947 Cycle Challenge is a big deal, and you’re part of it – just go out there and have

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It’s mid-October, you’re reading this, and with mounting dread you’re coming to the realisation that you’re under-trained. Don’t panic: Dr Carol Austin, head of performance support and medical at Team Dimension Data, has a plan to help you wing it (but don’t let this happen again, okay?).

points en route, in case the going gets too tough. This is important. Medically, participating in an event like this without prior training is not advisable. So request a thorough assessment from your doctor, and get clearance to proceed.

If you’re an average-rider first-time entrant, count on a five-hour journey. If you’re a seasoned cyclist with a PB of 2:30, a sub-3 may be possible – with the right seeding, and drafting buddies.

A step-by-step plan to ensure you wing it perfectly.

Coast the descents, save your energy for the climbs, and draft whenever possible.

Keep your cadence high (80 to 100rpm), to reduce muscular fatigue and prevent cramping.

Go out easy – use the first 30 minutes of the race as a warm-up. After that, pace your race carefully.

Take your bike out for some easy 45-minute endurance spins. Focus on eating healthily, and avoid alcohol.

In-depth knowledge of the course will help you moderate your efforts in accordance with your fitness level. So drive the route beforehand.

Every survival plan should include a pathway for retreat; so identify ‘bail-out’

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RACE WEEKEND PLAY-BY-PLAY

Your inbuilt ‘pace-ometer’ (i.e. your Rate of Perceived Exertion) is the most reliable. Don’t go beyond a 70% effort level – you don’t have a lot of matches to burn.

If you’re in the pack and suffering, don’t cling on. There’ll be plenty of ‘passing traffic’ to choose from – drop off, and join a slower bunch.

– By Carol Austin SATURDAY Prepare your kit, and then stay off your feet as much as possible. Eat a low-fat, carbohydrate-rich dinner, and get to bed early. SUNDAY – RACE MORNING Eat a carbohydrate-rich breakfast, about two to three hours before your start time. PRE-RACE HOUR Fuel up with an energy bar, and some water. EVERY HOUR Aim to consume 40 to 60g of carbohydrates per hour, in the form of energy drinks, real food, energy bars, or gels. DRINK UP Maintain your hydration levels by drinking a minimum of 500 to 750ml of liquids per hour. TAKE BREAKS Aside from allowing refuelling, a short break will do wonders for the butt, back, leg and neck pain that you’ll probably be experiencing.


GOING DOWN SAFELY Descending can be

exhilarating – but also dangerous. Maximise the fun and minimise the danger, with these tips. – The Bicycling team

F Remain confident and focused, and you’re 90% down the hill already. Hesitate, and you’re destined for an unfortunate ending. fun! – Carroll Be aware of the route and its obstacles, such as hills, corners, etc. Forewarned is forearmed.

Two bottles – 750ml of water, and a 750ml low-concentration energy drink (drink this bottle first) – should be enough for most. – Beneke

94km is a three- to four-hour effort, so the first hour of the event requires patience and restraint. Enjoy, watch, and save your energy.

– Beneke

——————

– Beneke

——————

——————

For most riders,

The 947 Cycle Challenge is fast, and has some sharp bends. Here’s how to ensure they don’t leave you eating tar – The Bicycling team. BRAKE BEFORE THE TURN, and power

through it.

—————— The first 15km of the race is really nerve-wracking for most. Anxiety, high energy levels and stress cause irrational behaviour; so be careful. – Beneke

– Bruce Diesel, head

——————

coach and co-founder of CycleZone

START ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE TURN, so

——————

you can cut towards the apex.

YOUR INSIDE KNEE SHOULD BE BENT

and your outside leg should be almost straight, but not locked. USE YOUR INSIDE ARM to keep you on

track.

KEEP YOUR WEIGHT FIRMLY PLANTED ON YOUR OUTSIDE FOOT, and push your

SUPPLIED

inside arm further into the turn.

The harder you push on your inside arm, the tighter you’ll turn.

volume. So, if you were doing 10 anaerobic intervals in a session, in the last week do five. You can’t improve fitness in that time; but you can lose sharpness. This way, you enter the race fit, and feeling fresh and sharp.

In the week leading up to the race, don’t reduce training intensity – reduce training

One energy bar and two energy gels in your back pocket are enough to keep you sustained for this event. – Beneke

—————— Visualisation is a powerful tool. So before the race,

F Keep your upper body loose and let your bike follow the contour, keeping your body poised above the pedals. F Straighten your arms to let the bar fall away, and let your seat slide forward between your legs. F Instead of resting on descents, shift up to maintain your cadence – and increase your speed. F Even down ultra-steep sections, try to stay off the brakes. If you must brake, slide back even further. And remember to use the back brake only. F Descents are all about balance. As you sweep through the turns, concentrate on keeping your core tight as you manoeuvre your bike. F As you descend, watch for hazards in your path. F Keep your arms in, crouch low, and wear figure-hugging cycling clothing. All these give you better aerodynamics. F Probably the most important thing to remember is to hold your line. This ensures an accident-free descent. NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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NUTRITIONAL DO’S AND DON’TS What you eat can affect how you perform on race day. Here are a nutritionist’s guidelines to ensure what you’re eating doesn’t lose you time. – By Megan Pentz-Kluyts

THE DO’S…

Continually snack on highcarbohydrate foods the day before a race. Try to eat every couple of hours. Over the last 24 hours, reduce the fibre intake of your diet, and race feeling ‘light’. Fluids and concentrated sources of carbohydrate such as sports drinks and sugary foods can be used to ensure that you meet your target. Two to three hours prior to the event, have a light pre-event meal.

AND THE DON’TS...

Don’t try anything new, especially on race day.

Be careful with your fat intake and don’t get tricked by high-fat carbohydrate foods such as chocolate, ice cream, rich desserts and takeaways. Don’t drink too much water. A dangerous condition termed hyponatremia (low sodium) can develop as the result of this. 48

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

visualise the route in detail, using sight, sound, smell, taste and touch. – Rose-Gershow

—————— Keep the legs going during the final week. They needn’t be long outings – two or three times, for 40 to 60 minutes. Allow yourself a rest day on Friday. – Swart

—————— Save yourself on the parts of the course that don’t suit you; make the most of your strengths on the parts that do. – Rose-Gershow

—————— Train on hills that take between one and five minutes to ride. There are

plenty of these in the 947. – Diesel

——————

WARM UP Use your warm-up for nervous system activation, by doing a couple of race-pace efforts. Your muscles may cool down before the start – but your nervous system, which fires your muscles, will be ready and stay activated for several hours. – Carroll

—————— Eat three hours before the race, and choose low-fibre foods – you don’t want any form of bloating. – Carroll

—————— Snack on a small banana or drink 300ml of your energy drink, 30 minutes before the start. – Carroll

——————

If you’re a six-hour-plus rider, you’re not going to become a five-hour finisher just because you start fast. Digging too deep catches up with you. The same applies to riders who

start out clinging to a group of riders faster than they are – eventually, you’ll have to repay the high cost of keeping up. Stick with a pace you can sustain, and you’ll finish strong. – Chris Carmichael, cycling coach and owner of Carmichael Training Systems

——————

CARBO-LOAD Eating about eight to 10 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight, per day, for

SUPPLIED

Ensure that carbohydrates form the bulk of all meals and snacks.


MARK CARROLL’S 4-MINUTE HILL REPEATS WORKOUT

Master the short, sharp 947 hills – with our coach’s expert workout.

FIND A HILL that will take four minutes or more to finish. START AT THE BASE, and go up hard for four minutes. TURN AND ROLL BACK DOWN EASY, taking up to four minutes before hitting it again. FOUR TO EIGHT REPEATS WILL BE MORE THAN ENOUGH, if done properly. volume within the 16- to 32-minute range.

the three days prior to the race, should optimally elevate your muscle glycogen levels. But you have to rest, or you’ll compromise the carboloading process. – Megan PentzKluyts, sports nutritionist

—————— When you choose to stand, click into the nextlarger gear and stand when one foot reaches the top of the pedal stroke, to minimise momentum loss. – Selene Yeager, cycling coach and Bicycling’s Fit Chick

—————— Recovery is vital,

so listen to your body, and ask: is today’s training session going to increase my fitness, or increase my fatigue? – Carroll

—————— When you take your turn at the front, don’t be tempted to put the hammer down – you’ll pay for any unnecessary redline efforts later on. – Carroll

——————

Position your hands on the brake hoods and relax your arms, so

your elbows sit wider than your hips. If you’re short, slide back on the saddle to generate more force through the top of the pedal stroke, and to encourage your heel to drop through the bottom of the stroke. If you’re tall, slide forward, positioning your hips so they come close to lining up with the bottom bracket, to generate max muscle force. – Yeager

——————

FILL YOUR JERSEY Cycling-jersey pockets are designed to carry food easily and accessibly, which you will need to prevent that glycogendeficit ‘barrier’. The important thing is to be gulping energy well before you feel flat. Use masking tape to stick a banana or energy gel to your top tube or stem for easy access. – Pentz-Kluyts

——————

REST UP Sleep well the two nights before the event. No excessive alcohol should be consumed for these two days, as

alcohol causes dehydration and affects liver function, the source of your energy supply. – Beneke

—————— You don’t have to train every day. Just enjoy a fastpaced, three-hour group ride on the weekend, and three to four one-

hour high-quality sessions in the week. – Carroll

—————— If hills are your weak point, position yourself close to the front at the bottom, so that you can drift back through the bunch and still be in the group at the top of the hill. – Carroll

– Kim Rose-Gershow Make sure you drink enough of the right stuff before the race, to maximise performance and avoid dehydration. HYDRATION STARTS THE DAY BEFORE YOUR RIDE. Avoid anything with caffeine – it’s a diuretic, and will dehydrate you. HAVE WATER BESIDE YOUR BED THE EVENING BEFORE THE RACE; and if you

wake up during the night, sip from it.

ON RACE MORNING, DRINK ABOUT 750ML WATER OR CARBOHYDRATE DRINK, one

to two hours before the race.

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THE FIRST TURN-OFF (AFTER 13KM) GETS TOUGH, with the first

real uphill. Don’t start too hard and burn out here. – Beneke USE THE BUNCHES IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE RACE. The second

half will have you doing a lot of the work yourself. – Diesel AFTER SOME CLIMBING, THE FAST SECTION PAST THE SUNNYSIDE HOTEL IS DANGEROUS. Stay focused, and

The ultimate route cheat sheet, from two 947 route experts: Gary Beneke and Bruce Diesel

AVENUE DOWNHILL, past the

Zoo. High speeds can mean big accidents. – Beneke STAY TUCKED INSIDE THE BUNCH ON THE M1. The race gets tough on

the R24, so going too hard on the M1 will leave you with nothing when you get there. – Diesel THE CRITICAL PART OF THE RACE COMES WITH 25KM TO GO.

watch your speed. – Beneke

Here, fatigue and urgency set in, and the undulations are steep and demanding. – Beneke

ANOTHER SECTION TO RESPECT IS THE FAST JAN SMUTS

THE RACE IS FAST THROUGH RANDBURG AND BRYANSTON.

Concentrate, and stay close to the front of the group. – Diesel WITH JUST 5KM TO GO, THE PLEASURE OF THE LONG DOWNHILL PAST KYALAMI RACETRACK is a time to

recuperate, regain energy, and enjoy. – Beneke THE FINAL KILOMETRE IS HECTIC, SO BE CAREFUL – there’s

no point in doing 94km and then crashing. Cramps tend to set in now. Stay in or near the front of your group. – Beneke

—————— Pedal the bike, use the gears, and keep the cadence between 85 and 90rpm in all circumstances: uphill, flats and downhill. Don’t slog, or grind at the pedals. – Beneke

—————— Learn to eat and drink on the bike, and don’t change your supplement formulas on the day. – Beneke

—————— Train in the heat and wind at least once a week. Most people have start times that mean they will be riding in the heat and wind along the R24.– Diesel

——————

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– Mark vd Merwe, cycling coach with

With a week to go, rides shouldn't exceed 2.5hrs. Any more, & you’re likely to deplete reserves, with too little time to replenish. Vary cadence (easy and hard gears), & eat a highcarb meal immediately after. – Swart

—————— At the start, ride a slightly smaller gear than normal, to give yourself time to warm up.

Roadcover Cycling

—————— Stay in your bunch, don’t attack them; and if your bunch drops you, sit up & wait for the next one. – Van der Merwe

—————— On hills, don’t crunch your upper body. Put your hands on top of the bars, and ride a light gear. – Van der Merwe

—————— It’s not advisable to overtake if you’re in a bunch. But if you see a gap and want it, shout a quick ‘Passing right!’, pedal past quickly, and resume your line. – The Bicycling team

SUPPLIED

ROUTE-TIP TANDEM


Joburg has a lot to offer cyclists (especially on a day when there are no cars on the road to get in your way!). Here are the parts of the route you’ll enjoy… including a new speed test. – By the Bicycling team

Still under development, the Riversands Commercial Park serves as the start and finish of the 947 Cycle Challenge. It aims to redefine commercial parks in South Africa; at its centre is the Incubation Hub, a business incubator established in 2015 that will be home to 150 small businesses, and which aims to churn out a steady flow of much-needed entrepreneurs.

Kyalami was built in 1961, and has hosted 20 Formula 1 races. The venue lost its international status in 2010 and was auctioned off in 2014. The man who made the successful bid, motorbusiness entrepreneur and race driver Toby Venter, had big plans; and after a massive refurbishment, the track was reopened in May this year. The 947 Cycle Challenge route heads into it, and cyclists will get to spend some time on the track, giving you a chance to see how fast you really are. (Just don’t overdo it. There’s a lot of 947 still to come!)

With almost 40% of the race cycled on a freeway, it’s little wonder the 947 is renowned for its speed. It took road engineers 12 years to finish the M1, which is a staple of the Cycle Challenge. It’s a triple-carriage highway, which is clogged with cars 364 days of the year; but it’s car-free on 947 Sunday, allowing the peloton to spread out while taking riders to the highest point on the route.

One of Jozi’s most important landmarks, the Nelson Mandela Bridge is the largest cable-stayed bridge in Southern Africa (284m long). It was opened in 2003, and crosses 46 railway lines. On the 947 route it serves as a great Instastop (Instagram photo stop) – and it’s a favourite for race photographers too, so practise your bike pose and save it for this section.

One of Johannesburg’s founders gave the land around the Zoo and Zoo Lake to the city on condition that it would be open to people of all races – unusual, for colonial times. The Zoo Lake was opened to the public in 1908, and has

become a favourite picnic spot. The large island in the middle of the manmade lake is the breeding ground for a number of bird species. This stretch of the 947 is very popular with the Sunday brunchers who come out to support. Enjoy the cheers (and beers and braais) along the way.

Opposite the Zoo Lake is the 112-yearold Johannesburg Zoo, which is home to 320 wild and wonderful species, including white lions, and a Siberian Tiger named Twist. Its most famous resident was Max the gorilla, who was shot by a criminal who ran into Max’s enclosure to evade police.

From Jan Smuts Avenue, the route continues onto Bram Fischer Drive in Randburg. This stretch of tar is named after liberation struggle hero Bram Fischer, a lawyer, who defended Nelson Mandela and his co-accused in the 1963 Rivonia Treason Trial, before the police decided to put him in the dock too. Fischer disappeared, and managed to evade the police for almost a year before he was captured, tried and imprisoned for life.

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J A C O B H O WA R D

Taking it easy up Hawkins Hill, outside Wellington, New Zealand


The Power of Slow

I was always in a hurry – until I started riding my bike around the world. BY DEVI LOCKWOOD

I

n January 2015, I reach the base of Mount Messenger on the North Island of New Zealand. A yellow-and-blue sign reads: ‘Winding Road/Be Patient’. It’s there for good reason. This section of State Highway 3 twists up a series of steep switchbacks. Summiting the mountain is the only way to cover the 90km from Awakino to New Plymouth along the coast. I am riding my bicycle to a hui (the Maori word for ‘gathering’) of climate-justice activists in New Plymouth, and I am running out of time. for the last two years i have been travelling, mostly by bicycle, to collect 1 001 stories about water and climate change from people I meet. (The number came from The Arabian Nights, in which the heroine Scheherazade spends 1 001 nights telling stories to a murderous king, in order to save her own life.) So far I have heard more than 500, in the United States, Fiji, Tuvalu, New Zealand, Australia, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia. When I was a student at Harvard University two years ago, I equated speed with success. I hurried from lectures to rowing practice to the digs where I lived, and then back to class. My life was calculated in minutes. I knew how long it would take me to shower, to ride my bicycle down to the river. I danced through a carefully calculated schedule. I was good at being in a rush. My body started to rebel. The summer after my final year, I tore my ACL playing soccer. The reconstructive surgery forced me to slow down. I was devastated. I didn’t know how to define my own value outside of the paradigm of working hard in order to move more quickly. Who am I? What do I want? Where am

I going? I chose to find the answers in movement. The idea for a bike trip was born. In August 2013, I flew to Memphis, Tennessee, with my audio recorder, my Surly Disc Trucker touring bike, and a deep desire to listen. My plan was to cycle 1 300 kays of the Mississippi River Trail from Memphis to the Gulf of Mexico. I’d collect stories from people I met, and write poems inspired by those stories for my senior thesis in Folklore & Mythology. after the first two switchbacks on Mount Messenger, I am – as the Kiwis say – ‘puffed’. Out of breath. Squinting in the January summer sun. Cursing every item I’d brought with me – will I ever use the water purifier? My harmonica?! I train my eyes on the road’s precious few centimetres of shoulder, and pray that the truck drivers will see me in my neon vest. At the summit, I stop just before a narrow archway tunnel to enjoy the view of treetops and valley floor, the whole sky laid out above me like a thousand-piece puzzle. I watch a cottonwool cloud pass overhead. As I take long sips from my water bottle, a white van pulls up next to me, kicking gravel in its wake. The driver rolls down the window. “I saw you starting the climb when I was on my way to a job,” the man says, smiling through his beard. “Do you want a ride down? I’m a cyclist, too, and this bit is winding. No shoulders. Not so safe when the cars come flying.” A few minutes later, my bicycle is balanced in the back of his van. “I���m Tony,” he says. “I’m an upholsterer. What on earth are you doing at the top of this hill?” F

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Harvard for some ‘purposeful wandering’ after graduation. I didn’t know how long I would be gone, or exactly where I would end up. Now that I’d started listening, I couldn’t stop. I don’t have a fixed plan. I don’t ride with a bicycle computer. I stop frequently. I walk around with a cardboard sign that says ‘Tell me a story about water’ on one side, and ‘Tell me a story about climate change’ on the other. In my travels I have learned about industrial agriculture, cargo ships, and methods of generating electricity. tony nods as i tell him my story. His yellow Labrador tries twice to crawl into my lap, then settles in the space between the front seats, his snout on his paws. My bicycle rattles in the back. I scratch behind the dog’s ears and catch glimpses of ocean sweeping out from the bush below us. I follow the white parallel lines of the waves, thinking about the distance a single wave travels before it meets the shore. What stories does the water tell? The act of telling Tony my own story reminds me of my

SLOW CYCLING MEANS STOPPING TOPICKAFLOWER AT THE SUMMIT.. mission – to listen. I can’t give someone my full attention if I’m in a hurry. I forget about the road for a moment, and focus on my breath. In listening, I give the whole of myself – my ears, my heart – to a storyteller. In cycling, I give the whole of myself – my body, my spirit – to a place. I move through the landscape, and the landscape moves through me. Slowness has become part of my daily practice. Slow cycling means waving at people as I pass. Slow cycling means travelling with a Koki pen in my handlebar bag and writing messages on telephone poles or highway guardrails or alley walls: ‘Just play.’ / ‘Slow is

beautiful.’ / ‘Read more poetry.’ Slow cycling means, on some days, stopping every kilometre to add another line to the poem that I am churning in my head. Slow cycling means picking a flower at the summit of Arthur’s Pass, putting it behind my ear, and getting off the bicycle to do a happy dance; because, yes, I made it to the top of a mountain by the power of my own body. I view cycling as active listening, a tool to learn more about this beautiful planet that I call my own. When Tony asks me if I have time to eat lunch with him and his family, I say yes. We pull up at a farmhouse in the middle of a field. After sharing a few plates of avocado on toast, he disappears into his upholstery workshop for half an hour and emerges with a neon-yellow flag he’s made for my bicycle. “This way, the truck drivers can see you more easily,” he says. I make it to the hui on time. DEVI LOCKWOOD’S POETRY AND NON-FICTION STORIES HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE GUARDIAN, STORYSCAPE, CICADA, AND ELSEWHERE. FOLLOW HER JOURNEY AT ONEBIKEONE YEAR.WORDPRESS.COM.

J A C O B H O WA R D

Riding a bicycle – as a woman, across vast distances, at my own pace – starts conversations. All sorts of people talked to me as I rode the Mississippi River Trail: musicians, farmers, river guides, nurses, journalists, truck drivers. After a month, I had recorded more than 50 hours of stories. Back in Boston, the tales of the Mississippi wound themselves around my ankles and wouldn’t let go. I recognised a pattern: The further down the Delta I travelled, the more people told me stories about climate change. Storms are more intense and frequent. Insurance prices are too high for many people to move back into their homes near the water. Some live in trailers on stilts. Oil drilling intensifies saltwater encroachment on the land. How can you leave a place that you once called home? What happens when vast swathes of land cease to exist? Who is to blame? I started wondering about these changes on a global level. In September 2014, I left home again, this time on a travel fellowship from

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016


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GRAND MASTER: 70-yearold Nick Forbes knows that keeping up a reasonable level of activity can offset age-related decline.

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BY JONATHAN ANCER PHOTOGR APHS BY NICK ALDRIDGE

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I’m no racing snake; but on the odd occasion, as the bishop said to the actress, I like to go hard. This morning is one of those occasions. Or was. I let out a heavy sigh as I watch the old-timer (now in a sleeveless gold muscle top) strap the biggest moonbag I’ve ever seen around his waist. What the hell is in there? Probably, I think cruelly, a stash of softboiled eggs, a spare set of dentures, and a fold-up Zimmer frame. Seventy-odd kilometres later, I’m deep in the pain cave; and I’ve burnt several boxes of matches trying to keep up with 70-year-old Nick Forbes, who I can’t help but observe is riding effortlessly, his moonbag flapping in the wind. When the sun begins to rise I notice his finely-chiselled calves, his glutes of steel, and his quads of fury. Old cyclists never die, I think, as we finally pull into a coffee stop. They just get more aerodynamic. I’lI never judge a rider by his wrinkles again. The next time I saw Nick was at the start of the Cape Town Cycle Tour – he wasn’t going to give it horns, he informed me, because he’d just ridden five days of the Tour of Good Hope, and his legs were jelly. Ohhh-kay. Let’s face it – 500km and 5 000 metres of climbing is not your average pre-Cycle-Tour taper. Nevertheless, Nick smashed the Cycle Tour, in a time of 3:18:05. But amazingly, he wasn’t first in his age category. In fact, that impressive time didn’t even secure Nick a spot on the 70-plus podium: he came fourth. The honours went to John Passmore, who sailed home in 3:06:27, beating 27 333 other riders. And the oldest rider on the day was 85-year-old Edward Thomlinson, who came home in front of 1 071 other cyclists – also, in front of the thousands of younger coach potatoes who didn’t even make it to the start. We’re used to seeing riders deep into their 40s at the sharp end of the field. 58

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

But these days the roads and mountain trails are packed with craggy, grizzly, silver-haired foxes on bikes. And it got me wondering if cycling is the key to keeping old age at bay. To put it another way: is cycling the elusive Fountain of Youth?

T // in another galaxy

Well, says cycling coach and sportsscience whiz Ian Rodger, keeping up a reasonable level of activity can offset agerelated decline – and because cycling’s not weight-bearing (directly) and is less wearand-tear mechanically, it’s the perfect go-to activity. “One of my clients is an orthopaedic surgeon; he says old runners and born-again runners are padding his retirement for him. Riding isn’t as rough on the body as running – and you can recover more quickly to train again.” Rodger tells me that because a bike is more forgiving than running, riders can do massive volumes of training and thereby lose vast amounts of weight too. “Cycling can be an amazing transformation – with low injury risk; you won’t smash your knees trying to get fast,” he says. In the run-up to this year’s Cape Town Cycle Tour, Forbes turned to Rodger for coaching. “Nick isn’t your average 70-yearold, and he hasn’t exactly spent his life playing shuffleboard – he’s been active, and he’s got capacity. He’s in the 99th percentile,” says Rodger. In other words, Nick is the one per cent. Rodger pulls out Nick’s stats. “He can do 20 pull-ups and 140 push-ups in three minutes. When it comes to top-end power, he’s in another galaxy. And how’s this: his one-minute max power is 590 watts. This is special – serious stuff for any age.” Rodger believes that with Nick’s power, he could kill a lot of hopefuls in a drag race. “He can do the kinds of effort and

push out the numbers and intensity of people 30 years his junior. He’s smashing sessions, and doing as much as the guys who want a podium in the vets.” Before Nick reinvented himself as a cyclist he was a dedicated runner, who pounded the slopes of Plum Pudding on Table Mountain. And a rower. And a world-ranked race walker. After graduating from medical school in the early 1970s he relocated to New York, where he worked as a pathologist – a medical detective, investigating sudden, unexpected deaths. He returned to South Africa in the 1990s. And occasionally he’d pick up a bike to ride the Argus; but his first love was running. However, when he got to his late 60s, a dicky knee saw him turn to something with less impact to get his endorphin kicks: cycling. During his first year of riding ‘seriously’, he averaged 100km a week; his second year, 200km. And this year he’s averaging 300km a week – with no sign of


ROCKING ROLLER: When people see Nick Forbes smashing up hills, they wonder how old this fit and strapping Rolling Stone lookalike is - and when he tells them, they do a double-take.

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RETIRED AND RE-TYRED: Members of the Recyclers cycling group gather for their weekly ride.

letting up. When people see him smashing up hills and ask him how old he is, they do a double-take when he tells them. “Someone told me I looked like an athletic version of Keith Richards,” he laughs. If he were a mountain biker, I’d say the only thing he and Keef have in common is that they’re rock stars rolling over stones; but Nick is a thoroughbred roadie, who gets satisfaction from every Strava cup in his virtual trophy cabinet. “But I’m only competitive against myself,” he says.

T // deadhead power

It’s probably no surprise, given Nick’s scientific background, that he’s a metrics man. He’s fanatical about wattage; it’s precise, and measures the real thing: 60

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your power. He trains with a heart-rate monitor, a power meter and a cadence sensor – and he analyses his data. He’s also bought a Wattbike; and though he’s a fan of Bach and Schubert, when he’s pushing wattage he listens to the Grateful Dead. Odd choice? Meandering hippy music perhaps, but their songs last 15 minutes each and have a consistent beat that’s great for cycling rhythm. Another thing he did that helped to improve his performance was make contact with Mike Calvin, someone he “bumped into” on Strava. “I started to ride with Mike, who’s a year older than me, and I watched in awe as he tore up the hills. I learnt a lot from him. I also joined the Recyclers – a club for retired people – and rode with some pretty fast guys, including John Eloff, who’s the doyen of old-timer riders.” Nick’s hard work paid off, and in 2014


DEFY YOUR AGE

he did a 3:35.05 Cycle Tour. He plays down that achievement, though: “I think what happens is that when people start biking, they can get to a 3:30 Argus without doing too much. But if you want to get 20 minutes faster… you have to embark on sophisticated training.” Which is why, in the run-up to the 2016 Cycle Tour, he engaged the services of Ian Rodger, who Nick describes as his “genius coach”. Rodger draws up a bespoke weekly programme for him, and Nick sends him his data files. Rodger’s toughest task is getting Nick to rest. Recovery, which takes longer as we get older, is crucial in ensuring riders maintain a high level of fitness. “He tells me I don’t do enough ‘zenlike’ rides, but I can’t help myself – I throw in a few surges. Then he responds with an emoticon of an indignant face. But I see a

Older athletes generally have a lower capacity for recovery, says Dr Iñigo San Millán, director of the Exercise Physiology and Human Performance Laboratory at the University of Colorado. Their bodies can’t repair muscle damage as fast, and masters athletes are more susceptible to muscle damage. Be warned: if you slack off, it takes a lot more time to get your mojo back. “When you’re 20 and stop for three weeks, you can recoup your fitness in a month and a half,” says San Millán. “When you’re in your 60s, it’s more like a few months.” The respiratory system starts to change, too: the chest wall stiffens, the lungs don’t recoil as well, and you’re unable to use as much lung capacity. Lastly, when a woman hits menopause she can lose 20% of her bone mass in the following five years. Men lose only about 0.4% a year – but cyclists are more susceptible to

bone-density loss. The good news is that 70 is the new 60, and 60 is the new 50. We’re seeing improved performance from older athletes, due to a greater understanding of training, nutrition, recovery, and injury prevention and

WHAT YOU CAN DO Resistance training becomes even more important now: a study in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research reported that for men and women in their 60s and 70s, endurance exercise alone wasn’t enough to

“ T HE GOOD NE WS IS T H AT 7 0 IS THE NEW 60, AND 60 IS THE NEW 50. WE’RE SEEING IMPROVED P E R F O R M A N C E F R O M O L D E R AT H L E T E S .” treatment. Put simply: athletes are taking better care of themselves. In 2012, a researcher analysed Tour de France legend Miguel Indurain’s physiology, and found that while the now-50year-old had packed on a few pounds since his retirement in 1997, he still had a VO2 max comparable with that of active pro cyclists. With intensity – often built in to our rides, in the form of hills – cyclists age better than runners.

keep up muscle strength – in fact, the decline was significant. Do multi-joint moves like burpees, squats, and deadlifts. Not only do they increase strength; they can improve agility and reflexes, which also decline with age. And the impact and resistance help maintain your bone density better than cycling does alone. As for recovery? Don’t do more than two or three short, intense workouts a week.

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hill, and it pulls me – so [adopts tough-guy Mafia accent] whatcha gonna do ’bout it?” So Nick isn’t over the hill. But he sure can get over the hill. “I’m trying to see how far I can go. I’m still improving, and making gains incrementally.” He’s working on improving his cadence (“I mash, instead of spin”) and his descending skills, and he’s recently acquired a racing weapon – a Giant TCR Advanced Pro 0, with aero wheels. “These gains all add up,” he says, adding that the final frontier is to drop four kilograms. Although he doesn’t say as much, I figure Nick has his eye on becoming the first 70-year-old rider to crack the holy grail of road cycling – a sub-three Cycle Tour. I ask him about it; and he says that although he’s riding strong at the moment, his “crumbling, arthritic knee-joint is a veritable Damoclean sword hanging over my cycling longevity. I don’t see any sub-3 Cape Town Cycle Tour participants with bionic knees.” But that’s the only thing that might stop him – and he’s not the only one; aging riders everywhere are not just hanging in there. Long after runners have thrown away their tackies, older cyclists remain seriously competitive. At 43, Kristin Armstrong won her third Olympic gold medal in the women’s individual time trial; in 2013, 41-year-old Chris Horner won the Vuelta a España, making him the oldest Grand Tour champion in history (he’s now 44 and still on the pro circuit); and in 2014, 43-yearold Jens ‘Shut Up Legs’ Voigt covered 52.115km in an hour (a new world record at the time). Closer to home is 63-year-old Linus van Onselen, who achieved the coveted 62

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sub-3 at this year’s Cycle Tour, finishing among the elites, in 204th position; he was also crowned Masters World MTB Champion in 2013. “Linus,” says Rodger, “isn’t doing it by sitting on his arse and watching the Discovery Channel. He’s grinding it out, every single day. Most people see the clock is ticking; and for them, that’s great motivation to smash it.” Rodger’s well aware of how competitive older riders can be. He recently bumped into Nick on a ride, and the two of them finished the route together. “It’s not often that a 70-year-old guy smacks you around the head, but I got schooled,” he says.

T // the pensioner peloton

It’s Thursday morning, and Fish Hoek beach parking lot is abuzz – with 35 Recyclers, in skin-tight Lycra and yellowand-blue cycling jerseys. (I see a group

of women of a certain age chatting, and wonder what the collective noun is for mature women riders – a ‘granny gear’ of elderly cyclists?) There are four groups, divided according to capability – Groups A, B and C, and the club’s social riders, who are in D batch. Before setting the groups off, the ride leader reminds the members about an upcoming theatre evening featuring Oom Schalk Lourens, the Herman Charles Bosman character; but that’s the only thing I witness that’s reminiscent of a retirement-home outing. I join about eight riders (including Nick) in the A group, making our way around the Peninsula to Cape Point, the salty sea breeze in our faces. I ride with Margie, who tells me that at 62, she’s the baby of the Recyclers. “You’ve got to have young blood,” she says. Unlike many riders who migrated from running to cycling when their knees started to give in, Margie took up cycling 13 years ago


Left PENSIONER PELOTON: Nick Forbes and friends hoof it up Cape Town’s tough Redhill climb. Below USING HIS LOAFers: A Recycler gets ready for the morning’s ride. Bottom NO STOPPING: Despite losing his leg in a hitand-run, Renford Brand continues to cycle.

when she met a man who cycled. He said that if they were going to make anything of their relationship, she needed to ride. She liked him, so she thought, why not. She’s now finished 13 Cycle Tours – and although her relationship with the cyclist came to an end (“probably because I started beating him”, she jokes), her relationship with the bike is flourishing. There’s serious firepower in the A and B groups – Frank, who sub-3ed the Argus in 1994; Miles, a former Western Province rugby backliner; Dick, a mountain biker who won his age category in Kenya’s 10to4 race; Janine, who regularly wins her age categories at road and MTB events; and Chris and Norman, who between them have a bag of silver Comrades medals. Chris is back on the bike after an operation eight weeks earlier, to sort out carpal tunnel and arthritis issues in his hand. He’s also had both hips replaced. After the first replacement he did the Two Oceans Ultra, as well as two Ironmen

“The Recyclers ‘club’ was formed in 1999, when Mike Berger ran an advert in a local paper seeking the company of retired people for social rides. Initially, eight to 12 people would ride regularly from Constantia Village, until the start was moved to Fish Hoek. Today there are over 90 members – and most ride regularly, every Thursday. “The average age of our members is 71, with Andre Swanepoel having just retired from cycling at 90. There are eight in their 80s, and 39 in their 70s. Until this year, member Alex Stewart had ridden every Argus. Many have done 21, and several have won their age groups – some of them, year after year. There are also regular outrides from other venues, and weekends away. “Although the Recyclers were formed without any rules, there is a structure, with a chairman, an editor of our weekly newsletter, a social secretary, a treasurer, a designer for our shirts, etc. And a member who keeps a database of all members! A mechanically-minded member maintains a parts bank, which members may draw from at no charge. We have a charter – and an indemnity. “To accommodate numbers on the road, the Recyclers break into groups – A, B, C and D, according to strength – and then ride together, usually over a similar distance and in the same direction, which is chosen by a member each week. “Afterwards we socialise together for breakfast; and often, we have a guest speaker talking on cycling-related matters.” – Simon Brooke, Chairman, Recyclers

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– after the second, he still bagged a couple of half Ironmen. “I can do a 20-kilometre run, as long as I don’t go too hard,” he says. We climb up Smitswinkel and enter Cape Point Nature Reserve, doing a 10-kay loop. Nick is leading the pack at this stage. “Nick is strong,” Chris tells me. “He’s very competitive in his age category.” “Of course he is,” someone pipes up from behind, “everyone else in his age category is dead.” The peloton erupts in a roar of laughter. Nick hammers up the climb to exit the reserve, Margie gives chase. “I’m Quintana, on Froomey’s wheel!” she yells – and at the last moment, she attacks, cresting the rise ahead of Nick. After two and a bit hours – with 55km and about 800m of climbing under our belts, it’s been a decent pace – we return to Fish Hoek beach parking lot, and head to the restaurant for breakfast. And a Recyclers tradition: birthday bubbly. I got a mention in the Recyclers newsletter sent out the following week, explaining that I’d been there for a Bicycling feature on the positive effects of cycling on aging: “Fortunately, Jonathan did not witness Peter A’s evidence of the aging process, when he rode off leaving his car boot wide open. Luckily, Neil D was on hand to rescue the situation.” The Recyclers remind me that while cycling helps keep people young physically, people who cycle also tend to have a positive outlook, on life and living and exercise and health – and being active. Rodger agrees. “Age-related decline in capacity has a lot to do with decline in activity levels; so if you keep active, you won’t age as quickly. In fact, if you exercise like a demon you’ll preserve a shitload of what you had – but if you sit on your arse, you’ll lose it all. It’s use it or lose it.” And Nick, like the rest of the Recyclers, uses it – maybe too often for his coach’s liking. But he’s vowed to take “a whole week” off the bike after the Double Century with his team (the ‘Flying Friands’, Banting fans), before sharpening up to have a full tonk at the Cycle Tour in March. However, he says, there are so many variables – wind, heat, rain – and if he bombs out, it won’t be the end of the world. “I’ve strongly emphasised biking for the last couple of years, but I’m not going to do this indefinitely. At some point my knee will fail me.” Before I can ask if that will be the end of the road for exercise, he adds, “…and then I’ll hike with Bongo [his dog], lift weights, row, and swim.” 64

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GOLDEN: They may be retired, but these members of the Recyclers (clockwise from top left) Dick, Hannie, Dennis and Stewart are active in the saddle.

As a pathologist, Nick can testify to the frailty – and the strength – of the human body, so I figure he may be able to provide the definitive answer to whether or not cycling is indeed the Fountain of Youth. “Exercise in general is the answer,” he says. “Combine resistance training with endurance and intervals, and watch your diet – that’s the secret. And remember, there are no guarantees in life: I’ve seen the fittest guys drop dead. Your genetic blueprint is really going to determine how long you live. But cycling keeps you physically and mentally sharp. You can see a spark in the eyes of people who are fit that’s not there in people who are sedentary. Look at the 70- and 80-yearold riders in the Recyclers – there’s a vitality to them.” It’s true. The Recyclers’ energy is palpable; it’s cycling camaraderie in action. It strikes me that though there are two groups in the Recyclers – the competitive riders, flying up hills; and the more sedate D-groupers, who just enjoy spending time outdoors and being active – there is a real social connection between them (and a lot of banter). And friendship; cycling brings people to each other. Maybe that’s part of the secret of what keeps old cyclists young. Cycling itself may not be the fabled Fountain of Youth; but hanging on to one’s youth is about keeping active – and taking large gulps from the Fountain of Enthusiasm.

While scientists have a good grasp on the general human lifespan, what they know less about is the human ‘healthspan’ – how quickly we slide into a state of serious decline. In a study published in the Journal of Physiology, scientists put 125 cyclists (both male and female) ranging in age from 55 to 79 through a series of tests, to determine the health and strength of their heart, lungs, muscles, minds, hormones, balance, mood, and more. They found that cyclists who maintain a high level of physical activity are better off over time. Even the oldest cyclists had generally healthy markers of cardiovascularand metabolic health, such as healthy, normal glucose, insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Their actual maximum heart rates were higher than for their nonactive peers.


YOU WANT TO GAIN SPEED WHEREVER YOU RIDE? HERE’S HOW! GET FAST Every cyclist wants to get faster, from front-of-the-pack racers to chatty charity-ride participants. Producing more speed is what makes riding a bike worthwhile – whether you want to improve your seeding position at the next Cycle Tour, or add a bit more zest to your weekend ride. Going fast makes everything more fun – and here’s the book that’s going to help you do it.

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EXCLUDING POSTAGE


ALL THE GOOD STUFF

THE 9 TRENDS THAT WILL DEFINE YOUR CYCLING NEXT YEAR

ONE BIKE, MORE FUN The Niner Jet9 RDO defines a new range of more versatile MTBs capable of running t wo wheel sizes – depending on whether it’s fun or speed you’re af ter.

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1. FAST… JUST BETTER!

Slacker and longer, with more travel, means better handling and more confidence: Meet the next generation of do-it-all mountain bikes!

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In recent years there’s been a proliferation of new mountainbike categories and standards, with different wheel sizes, travel options, axle spacing and tyre widths – not to mention the 2x-versus-1x drivetrain debate. As the quagmire

of categories grows, it’s always a delight when brands release an allencompassing bike built with the modern trailrider in mind. Boasting 120mm of rear travel, a 67.5-degree head angle and a longer top tube paired to a short stem, Niner’s allnew Jet9 RDO is the quintessential mountain bike for South Africa. While the RKT 9 RDO model with 100mm of travel takes care of the racing snakes, the redesigned Jet9 is built with more relaxed [R]Evolution geometry and longer travel that lets you rock ‘n roll on the trails without needing to call in a shuttle to take you uphill, as Niner’s CVA suspension delivers efficient performance. The Jet9 RDO also has a trick up its sleeve: the frame and the bulletproof RockShox Pike are built to accommodate both 29er and 27.5+ wheels, with tyre clearance for widths of up to 2.5” and 3.0” respectively. We at Bicycling feel the majority of SA riders will stick to the proven track record of 29ers, given our riding conditions. However, the fact that the Jet9 RDO offers the versatility of both wheel options can only be a good thing,

especially for riders looking for even more confidence, stability and traction. Niner’s [R]Evolution geometry translated into a stable, neutral riding position that made us feel safe and in control when descending at high speed. And handling at low speed was agile, thanks to the Jet9’s longer reach and short stem. In terms of suspension, small-bump sensitivity was effective, but on the bigger hits, this 66kg tester struggled to bottom out the rear shock. At the front, the Pike’s 130mm of suspension took care of business, keeping the front tyre planted on the trail – and travel can be upped to 140mm when running 27.5+ wheels. If we absolutely had to, we’d categorise the Jet9 RDO as fitting snugly into the ‘one bike that can do it all’ box.


In May, during the third round of the XCO World Cup in La Bresse, France, the internet was abuzz with spy shots of Swiss superstar Nino Schurter wielding a totally redesigned Scott Spark. Schurter (on a 29er) and his Scott Odlo teammate, Sweden’s Jenny Rissveds (on a 27.5”) went on to win the 2016 men’s and women’s Elite World Championships – as well as Olympic gold in Rio – aboard the new Spark. This quartet of victories was a supreme display of the new-generation Spark’s racing capability. The most significant change is the orientation of the rear shock, which is now vertically mounted and uses a rocker with a pivotless swing-arm – what this means is that the swing-arm doesn’t use a linkage or bearing at the rear axle, which saves weight and requires less maintenance. The new suspension platform has

also allowed engineers to improve smallbump sensitivity while increasing progression at the top of the stroke. The Spark’s rear shock uses a ‘trunnion’ mounting position, which Scott says has helped to create a very compact 29er frame with excellent stand-over height. In terms of rider fit and trail confidence, thankfully Scott have followed the trend of a longer front centre paired with a slacker head angle. Boost hub spacing is another new addition to the Spark range, with the full line-up going wider. There are a dizzying number of options available, from the range-topping 1 749g carbon-fibre Spark RC SL to the more pricesensitive alloy versions, such as the featured Spark 940. While the more XC-race-oriented RC line restricts racers to 100mm of travel, the Spark 940’s Fox front and rear suspension (plus dropper post) offers a plush 120mm, which is better suited to the more casual rider.

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2. PLUSH GETS FAST (AND SEXY!)

The new breed of endurance road bikes won’t sacrifice speed, looks or agility for comfort. You CAN have it all!

Attempting to put the Roadmachine into a specific genre is futile, as BMC have intentionally brought together the best facets of their aero Timemachine, endurance Granfondo and climbing Teammachine frames to create a bike that simply defies boundaries and can do it all – like a boss!

Striking lines reminiscent of a stealth bomber underpin a superbly fast ride that oozes with all the trimmings a modern road bike (and rider, for that matter) deserves. The Roadmachine’s light and stiff frame (BMC claim 930 grams) is built with geometry that hits the sweet spot between endurance and full-blown race weapon. It accelerates

at will, corners evenly, and – thanks to a set of hydraulic brakes – stops on a dime. It’s engineered with Swiss precision, and the Shimano Ultegra Di2 wires and brake hoses are internally routed through the handlebar, stem and steerer tube, reinforcing the frame’s clean lines. Despite clearance for up to 30C tyres, the bike comes specced with 25C Continental GP4000, which are great in their own right; but jislaaik, man, how luxurious would the ride be with a set of 28C or 30C puppies? Next level, we think. With the Roadmachine arriving days before our printing deadline, we had just enough time in the saddle to feel for ourselves what a great

job BMC’s engineers have done. Based on our first impressions, we’d say the Roadmachine is more race bike than old-school endurance or new-school adventure – although with the right tyres, it could handle gravel. BMC’s revised endurance geometry hasn’t compromised on sharp handling or quick acceleration. Where the Roadmachine excels is in its versatility. And understandably so; this was BMC’s goal from the outset, to create a modern endurance road bike that is built to be the best at thriving in all conditions. No matter where the road leads you or how fast you’re planning on getting there, when seated on the Roadmachine the ride will be exceptional.

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In September, Specialized invited Bicycling to visit their Stellenbosch HQ, as they had something to show us. Carefully

hidden in a row of bikes was something we’d never seen before: a road bike with a shock in the steerer tube, a SWAT box above the BB, and a new seat-clamp design that’s never been seen on a Specialized. When we saw the word ‘Roubaix’ emblazed on the seat stay, we realised that what we had before us was the latest (and yet to be announced) iteration of one of the most efficient endurance platforms on the planet. In years gone by, the Roubaix’s plushness was credited largely to the fork- and seatstay-mounted Zertz inserts, which absorbed vibrations and road buzz. The latest version of the Roubaix forgoes the Zertz in favour of – at the front end – what Specialized are calling a ‘Future Shock’; while at the rear end, a newly-designed and -positioned seat clamp called the Drop Clamp adds 20 degrees of compliance. The Future Shock, positioned above the head tube, is a lightweight suspension system that offers 20mm of travel, designed to reduce the harshness of rough

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tarmac by isolating you from the surface of the road. In essence the rider floats above the road, with the Future Shock oscillating according to changes in the road surface. The result is less rider fatigue and greater front-wheel traction. The Drop Clamp sees the seat-post clamp positioned lower down on the seat tube. Above the clamping brace the seat tube’s diameter increases, allowing for 20 degrees of added compliance – which, coupled with the CG-R seatpost (affectionately known as the ‘CobbleGobbler’), is a genuine energy-saver.

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We were initially highly sceptical of the Future Shock – thinking it would simply bob up and down as we pedalled – but in practice, a short test ride through Stellenbosch and surrounds showed that the Roubaix was indeed a bump-busting machine. The shock’s position translates into there being no unnerving movement of the handlebars – it’s like magic. The new Roubaix lives up to its promise: it’s an energy-saving experience that will make you faster. Just don’t ask us to adjust or tighten the headset!


LOOK OUT FOR THE JANUARY EDITION OF BICYCLING FOR MORE DETAILED REVIEWS OF THESE CUTTING-EDGE WEAPONS, IN OUR COVETED BIKE BUYER’S GUIDE. NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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3. TIGHT GETS COOL 2017 shoes marry retro laceups with easy-to-tighten boa systems that make adjustments easy on the fly. It’s style and function.

During the 2016 season, an attentive eye may have noticed a few Shimanosponsored MTB World Cup and World Tour riders sporting

Shimano’s newgeneration performance mountain-bike and road shoes before they were unveiled to the public at Eurobike in late August. On the road, the R321 has been superseded by the all-new S-PHYRE RC9 road shoe, with a more price-conscious RC7 model joining the fray. For the baggie brigade, the XC9 and XC7 models will be replaced by the S-PHYRE XC9 (pictured)

and XC7 respectively. As the common name would suggest, the on- and off-road S- PHYRE range share common technology and design cues, with the outsoles differing to accommodate the respective demands of each discipline. A well-ventilated synthetic-leather one-piece Teijin Avail micro-fibre upper features throughout the S-PHYRE range, with the RC9 and XC9 models sporting a more sophisticated dimpled surface. The uppers are all moulded directly onto the shoes’ carbon soles,

contact, with an easyto-adjust Velcro strap system. A Techlace ‘coupler’ allows convenient replacement and customisation of laces if needed. Furthermore, the addition of a strap with Boa L6 dial across the top of the Sentrie’s instep makes entry and exit more user-friendly. While the Techlace

solves the inefficiency of laces, it does create a very busy design. Some (like me) may argue that the time it takes to tie laces is a small price to pay for the Empire’s clean, elegant lines. Others of course will feel that the Techlace’s adjustability (and design) makes the Sentrie the shoe to be seen in in 2017.

saving weight. For the first time ever, Shimano have opted for Boa wire closure systems as opposed to a ratchet for their premium shoe models, offering precise micro-adjustment on the fly. Interestingly, Shimano have done away with their heat-moulding custom-fit system, allowing them to remove the outsole’s lasting board, which saves weight while still offering maximum comfort and stiffness. In response to the wear and tear of off-road riding, the XC9 and XC7 MTB shoes’ outsoles are more robust than their road cousins, and were developed in conjunction with Michelin to be more durable and provide reliable grip in both dry and wet conditions.

With the proliferation of modern tensioning systems, lace-up cycling shoes had been all but relegated to the dustbin of history.

That was until 2013, when Giro unveiled the ‘back-to-the-future’ Empire – a race-specific lace-up shoe designed with all the modern trimmings (like a perforated micro-fibre upper, and a carbon sole) but that offered the superb fit and ridecomfort that laces are renowned for. A drawback, though, was that many felt

the Empires were cumbersome to get on and off, as well as difficult to adjust while on the fly. With this in mind, Giro went back to the drawing board and developed their brand new Techlace system. This design blends the comfort and fit of laces, derived from the multiple points of

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4. THE BEST OF ALL WORLDS To create the best all-round helmets, manufacturers are blending aerodynamics, airf low and light weight – rather than focusing on just one characteristic.

As with the Giro Synth, Bell designed the Zephyr to tick many boxes rather than being skewed towards one characteristic

– say, cheating the wind, or being superlightweight. Here, the design focus was on blending a fit-andforget feel with great airflow management and aerodynamics. And of course on safety! What sets the Zephyr apart is its Progressive Layering construction and new MIPS-integrated fit system, which focuses heavily on improving energy dissipation while maximising ride comfort with a highly tuneable fit. Progressive Layering means the Zephyr is constructed with two different layers of EPS foam – higher density on the outer shell, and lower density on the inner – that are able to absorb the varying energies experienced in a crash. The second significant feature, and one you’ll notice immediately, is the new Float Fit Race

retention system that snugly cradles your pip, offering three points of adjustability. The Zephyr is the first helmet we’ve seen in South Africa that integrates MIPS technology directly into the fit system, as opposed to being a layer between the helmet’s shell and its padding. The result is a noticeably comfortable feel, with no pressure points. It also improves ventilation, by not impeding airflow through the length of the helmet. A small but effective detail is the tab that extends from the brow pad that attaches to the nose of the helmet. It’s designed to carry sweat away from your forehead, directing the drips over and away from your sunglasses.

With both Nino Schurter and up-and-coming star Jenny Rissveds in their stable, Scott can claim a strong racing heritage along with their

race-winning Orica Bike Exchange sponsorship. They’ve put that too good use to design a helmet that offers both clever aerodynamic qualities and the all-essential ability to breathe. Designed in a wind tunnel (like everything in cycling!), the helmet allows for better airflow while improving ventilation, using MIPS technology. MIPS uses micro perforations in

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the lining of the helmet to improve breathability. Add in the Halo Fit System, which provides adjustable fit right around the head, and it’s everything Nino and Jenny (and you!) need in a helmet.


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5. 11-SPEED REACHES THE MASSES If you gauge them by the unveiling of so many new and updated products in recent months, Shimano’s engineers have clearly had their noses to the grindstone! Over and

above their new range of elite-level S-PHYRE shoes, Shimano have released an updated version of their top-tier Dura Ace Di2 groupset, as well as upgrading their second-tier XT MTB groupo to Di2. While these updates represent cuttingedge technology, what sparked our interest most was the revamping of the underrated SLX mountain-bike groupset. By bringing 11-speed (with an option to go 1x) to their third-tier groupset, Shimano continue their legacy of relatively fast-paced technological trickledown. And despite it being announced early in 2016, Bicycling feels this segment of the market is where the

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

Trickle-down tech will make 1x11 systems, and 11-speed cassettes, more accessible to every rider. Cool and functional is finally in reach.

action truly is for the average consumer going into 2017. Aesthetically, the SLX has received a welcome facelift, with improvements throughout the various components that makeup the groupset. Most significantly, riders now have the choice of running either a 2x11 setup paired to an 11-40T cassette, or a 1x11 configuration

paired to a wider 11-42T cassette. In the past, Shimano have been criticised for not designing cassettes with a wide enough range. In response they’ve announced an 11-46T that will extend the high-end range for those riders struggling on the climbs. We salute Shimano for bringing 11-speed and 1x to a wider crosssection of the market.


You may be reading this wondering what on earth ‘Burra Burra’ means, and what it has

to do with Specialized’s new range of adventure gear? Well, the Burra Burra family of bags, like all of the products in the adventure range, draws its name from

The pack features a welded roll-closure design that’s highly resistant to inclement weather, while an aluminium stabiliser arm minimises bouncing and side-to-side shifting for a more secure, comfortable ride. The attachment fits both 27.2mm and 30.9mm seatposts, but is not compatible with dropper or carbon seatposts. If the weather does close in, a urethane-coated YKK zipper pocket will keep smaller items (like your phone) dry. Depending on the nature of your typical adventure (or commute), the Stabiliser Seatpost is available with either 10 or 20 litres of carrying capacity.

6. FIND

A few months ago I purchased a Santa Cruz Stigmata gravel bike – it looks like a road bike, but rides like a mountain bike! Arguably the most important element in this type of riding – known in South Africa as CX, gravel or adventure riding – is your tyres.

They’ve got to be high-volume and tubeless, they’ve got to have enough tread to grip but not too much to hold you back on tar, and of course, they need strong sidewalls for durability. The new 700x42C Sawtooth adventure tyre from Specialized is pretty much the perfect solution for those wanting to take their riding into uncharted territory. They feature Specialized’s 2Bliss tubeless system allowing for lower

a specific place in Henry W. Coe State Park, which is located a stone’s throw from the company’s Morgan Hill HQ. Burra Burra Peak offers a wealth of trails, dirt roads and tough terrain that proved to be the perfect testing ground for the Burra Burra’s design and testing process. The Stabiliser Seatpack is designed for those riders looking to head out for the sort of overnight or multi-day bike adventure where you need a little more carrying capacity than a traditional backpack has. It can also be used as alternative storage for commuters, keeping the bag off their backs, which reduces sweating and shoulder pains.

YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

pressures, GRIPTION rubber compound for durability, a jagged ‘sawtooth’ tread pattern that extends to the tyre’s shoulder for improved cornering, as well as an Endurant casing and BlackBelt for puncture protection. And did we mention they’re available with tan sidewalls, and you can fit them on your 29er?

Done all the races? Now it’s time to find your own adventure in 2017. Here’s the gear to do it with.

NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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Scott’s in-house parts brands Syncros has been quietly developing a quality range of components and accessories from

7.

INTEGRATION IS EVERYTHING

With integrated stems that house your bike computer, brands are realising the more seamless and uncluttered the interface, the better the ride experience.

Every now and again a product comes along that is not revolutionary or overly complex, but rather attracts us at a level of simplicity,

where their design and tactile feel speak volumes for their appeal. Blackburn’s ‘socket in your pocket’ Switch Tool is one of these items. The case’s slim, hardwearing foldup design makes the Switch Tool practically unnoticeable when carried in your rear shirt pocket; and importantly, its flat surface area means that in a crash, it won’t press up against and penetrate your body like a small tool could

80

potentially. Inside you’ll find a pouch for cards, cash or a gaiter, as well as eight tool bits (T25; T30; flat screwdriver; hex keys 2.5mm; 3mm; 4mm; 5mm; 6mm) and a lever to connect the tool bits to. A simple attachment system makes the Switch Tool easy to use on the fly. An internal flap running the length of the carry case helps to keep moisture away from the tools, as well as reducing the chance of anything falling out. Blackburn opted for a narrow rubber sleeve to keep things neatly tied up – if you happen to lose it, an elastic band should do the job.

BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

8. N+1

saddles to pumps. In 2017, there is a push to position Syncros not just as a brand synonymous with Scott, but rather as a stand-alone aftermarket solution for riders on any brand of bike. Something new going into 2017 that will simplify your life is a custom-fit stem cap that neatly integrates a Garmin-style quarterturn mount into a Syncros RR stem. Nine different lengths, from 60mm to 115mm, will be available, at either a five-degree angle or straight. The mount will come stock-standard on all Scott RC-level mountain bikes, and will be available aftermarket for those wanting to unclutter their handlebars.

Fact: No matter how much you have, or need, there will always be something to buy.


9. COMPACT & POWERFUL Devices will become more powerful, but will take up less room and be more wearable off the bike.

Ever since launching their Micro GPS cycling computer Lezyne have been at the forefront of providing compact GPS devices for datahungry minimalists.

In 2017, Lezyne will take their offering from your handlebar to your wrist, with the launch of the Micro GPS Watch. Ideal for multi-sport athletes and enthusiasts alike, this industriallooking watch is slightly narrower and longer, but offers exactly the same features as Lezyne’s cycling-specific computers. Via Bluetooth or ANT+™ the unit pairs with power meters, heart-rate monitors and speed/cadence sensors, as well as syncing with iOS and Android handhelds through Lezyne’s Ally app. When paired to

the app, the Micro C GPS Watch offers turnby-turn navigation, live tracking, Strava Live Segments and phone notifications (text messages, emails and phone calls). It’s also built with an integrated accelerometer, to calculate steps in the lifestyle mode. Runtime is over 100 hours in normal mode, and up to 14 hours in GPS mode.

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With hours upon hours spent racing and training, correct tyre pressure is without doubt a detail that should never be overlooked. It needs to be optimised to improve rider efficiency, and to maximise the tyre���s grip and the bike’s overall stability. As conditions change daily, so should your tyre pressure. Lezyne’s beautifully designed Digital Drive floor pump sports a digital gauge, accurate to within 3%, that’ll ensure you’re rolling as efficiently as possible. R1 495

ER WHAT NO M AT T CYCLIST TYPE OF , FROM YOU ARE FRANCE E D R U O T EWBIE, PRO TO N BLE THE HUM PUMP IS BICYCLE ENSABLE P S I D N I YOUR N YOU’RE E H W Y L L A OF SOME IN NEED G BICYCLIN . R I A H S FRE OU 5 OF BRINGS Y . THE BEST

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BICYCLING.CO.ZA • NOVEMBER 2016

SUPPLIED | JAMES GARAGHT Y

TWOWHEELSTRADING.CO.ZA


While the ComPak pump offers all of the advantages of a standard floor pump – big volume (up to 200psi), a sturdy base, easy-to-read pressure gauge and thread-on Presta or Schrader heads – its secret lies in its ability to fold into a compact, efficient shape that allows it to be stored in a slim,

padded case, making it perfect for travelling. A bonus is the foldablehandle design, which provides storage for two tyre levers and patches.

R1 899 SPECIALIZED.COM

I first used an Ergostick back in 2008, when racing for the Red Mongoose mountain bike team. Almost 10 years later, I must have been through at least six of them – some lost, some gave up the ghost after much abuse – but they were all faithful, reliable, efficient and cost-effective companions over thousands of training and racing kilometres.

Take the guesswork out of seating your tubeless tyres with Ryder’s Air Tank. It sports an additional high-pressure air cylinder that can be ‘charged’ with air and then released in a single burst, seating your tubeless tyre on the rim. Simple and klaar – no swear words or trips to the petrol station needed! R1 295 OMNICO.CO.ZA

R125 OMNICO.CO.ZA

NOVEMBER 2016 • BICYCLING.CO.ZA

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NOVEMBER 2016

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PUT WHAT YOU’VE LEARNED TO GOOD USE

CAPE CLASSIC 380 SPRING CL ASSICS

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

NICK MUZIK

The Cape Classic 380 promises full professional support on a 380km route that includes some leg-searing climbs, exhilarating speed, and beautiful summer scenery. It’s based in Montagu, and the first two stages start and finish at the Montagu Country Hotel. The third stage takes riders away from Montagu on a 140km journey to Ceres, with an uphill finish up Michell’s Pass, ensuring riders earn their celebratory drinks afterwards. 4-6 NOVEMBER, MONTAGU, 380KM OVER 3 DAYS

IT’S NOT ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’VE COME IT’S ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’RE WILLING TO GO. WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A RACE, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


WESTERN CAPE MTB

5 NOVEMBER BONNIEVALE CYCLE RACE 2016 50km, 31km Hoërskool Bonnievale, 6 Van der Merwe Street, Bonnievale Contact Karen Kleingeld karenk@ k2b.co.za, 021 671 4079 Web bonnievalefees.co.za Online Entries pedalpower.org.za

5 NOVEMBER GARDEN ROUTE NATIONAL PARK FUN RIDE 35km, 12km Harkerville Forestry Station – Garden Route National Park Contact James Stewart muddyfoot@grcom.co.za, 0829257885 Web: muddyfootadventures.co.za

5 NOVEMBER SURVAL DUST AND TAR (STOF EN TEER) 76km Surval Boutique Olive Estate, Oudtshoorn Contact Jakhals Events jakhals. events@gmail.com, Corne 073 194 2948, Stephanie 073 659 7980 Web jakhalsevents.wixsite.com/ jakhalsevents Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

12 NOVEMBER DELHEIM NIGHT RIDE 12km Delheim Wine Estate, R44 near Stellenbosch Contact Dirtopia Trail Centre info@ dirtopia.co.za, 021 884 4752 Web and Online Entries dirtopia.co.za

13 NOVEMBER DELHEIM MTB DAY & ENDURO 30km, 12km, 7km, Enduro Delheim Wine Estate, Knorhoek Rd

off the R44, near Stellenbosch Contact Dirtopia info@dirtopia. co.za, 021 884 4752 Web and Online Entries dirtopia.co.za

19 NOVEMBER NISSAN TRAILSEEKER WC #4: BOSMAN 70km, 40km, 20km, 10km Bosman Wines, Wellington Contact Advendurance info@ advendurance.com, 086 199 0001 Web and Online Entries trailseekerseries.co.za

20 NOVEMBER LANGEBAAN LCE MTB FUNRIDE

CHALLENGE 80km, 30km Langebaan Country Estate Contact Pam Rutledge info@ lcecyclechallenge.co.za, 022 772 2787 Web lcecyclechallenge.co.za Online Entries pedalpower.org.za

26 NOVEMBER CORONATION DOUBLE CENTURY 202km Swellendam Show Grounds Contact Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust Events Office info@ coronationdc.co.za, 021 681 4333 Web and Online Entries

coronationdc.co.za MULTI-STAGE

4-6 NOVEMBER CAPE CLASSIC 380 380km over 3 days Montagu Contact Andrew Selby a-selby@ mweb.co.za, 082 495 0199 Web and Online Entries capeclassic. info

4-6 NOVEMBER FNB WINES2WHALES ADVENTURE 210km (3-day stage race) Lourensford Wine Estate Contact Race Office adventure@

38km, 18km Langebaan Country Estate Contact Charisse Hansen chansen@ iafrica.com, 072 290 8380 Web lcecyclechallenge.co.za Online Entries pedalpower.org.za ROAD

5 NOVEMBER BONNIEVALE CYCLE RACE 96km, 60km, 35km, 10km Hoërskool Bonnievale; 6 Van Der Merwe Street, Bonnievale Contact Karen Kleingeld karenk@ k2b.co.za, 021 671 4079 Web bonnievalefees.co.za Online Entries pedalpower.org.za

5 NOVEMBER SURVAL DUST AND TAR (STOF EN TEER) 75km Surval Boutique Olive Estate, Oudtshoorn Contact Jakhals Events jakhals. events@gmail.com, Corne 073 194 2948, Stephanie 073 659 7980 Web jakhalsevents.wixsite.com/ jakhalsevents Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

19 NOVEMBER LANGEBAAN LCE CYCLE

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

THE RACE CALENDAR IS COMPILED TWO MONTHS IN ADVANCE. FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE RACE DETAILS, VISIT WWW.BICYCLING.CO.ZA/CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’VE COME IT’S ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’RE WILLING TO GO. WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A RACE, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


wines2whales.co.za Web and Online Entries wines2whales.co.za

5-6 NOVEMBER SWELLENDAM 100 MTB 91km Field and Fork, Main Rd, Swellendam Contact Garden Route Events louise@gardenrouteevents.co.za, 044 382 6852 Web and Online Entries swellendam100mtb.co.za

7-9 NOVEMBER FNB WINES2WHALES RIDE 210km (3-day stage ride) Lourensford Wine Estate, Somerset West Contact Race Office ride@ wines2whales.co.za Web and Online Entries wines2whales.co.za

11-13 NOVEMBER FNB WINES2WHALES RACE 210km (3-day stage race) Lourensford Wine Estate,

Somerset West Contact Race Office race@ wines2whales.co.za Web and Online Entries wines2whales.co.za

19-20 NOVEMBER SANLAM MTB INVITATIONAL DAY 100KM 2-day stage race Rhebokskloof Wine Estate, Paarl Contact ASG Events eventsupport@asgworld.co.za, 076 830 5578 Web: sanlammtbinvitational.co.za Online Entries asgevents.co.za

URBAN WARRIOR The Telkom 947 MTB Challenge offers everything that makes an MTB race exciting, then makes it even more interesting by throwing in a few urban obstacles.

MULTI-SPORT

6 NOVEMBER SPUR ADVENTURE TEAM/ SOLO RACE #2 10-12km mountain biking & 2-3km trail run Oak Valley, Elgin/Grabouw Contact Quantum Adventures info@outdoor-elements.co.za, 021 789 0188 Web quantumadventures.co.za

WESTERN CAPE

Online Entries entrytickets.co.za

20 NOVEMBER SPUR ADVENTURE TEAM/ SOLO RACE # 3 20-25km Mountain bike & 5-6km Trail Run Paul Cluver, Grabouw Contact Quantum Adventures info@outdoor-elements.co.za, 021 789 0188 Web quantumadventures.co.za Online Entries entrytickets.co.za

MPUMALANGA MTB

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

SUPPLIED

This is a weekend of trail fun, with trail-running events on the Saturday; but for mountain-bike junkies, it’s all happening on the Sunday. There are four distances to choose from: to start with, a 7km, 14km or 30km, all of which include singletrack on the slopes of the Simonsberg mountains maintained by Dirtopia. But the main event is the Enduro race, which will take place on the more gnarly sections of the trail network, and is aimed at more experienced riders. Space is limited, so pre-enter as soon as you see this. – Renay Groustra

5 NOVEMBER ALZU TOUR DE FARM 80km, 40km, 15km, 1km Laps Alzu PetroPort N4, between Middelburg and Belfast Contact Piet du Toit eggs@alzu.co.za, 082 388 3322 Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

26 NOVEMBER FOREVER RESORTS SWADINI MTB 50km, 25km Forever Resorts Swadini

Contact Hatoere Tours hpwagener@vodamail.co.za, 082 741 1514 Web hatoere.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

LIMPOPO MTB

5 NOVEMBER MAGOEBASKLOOF MTB CHALLENGE 80km, 40km, 20km, 5km Standford Lake College, Haenertsburg Contact Steve Willson swillson@stanfordlakecollege.co.za, 015 276 6130, 082 637 3651 Web magoebasklooftourism.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

19 NOVEMBER RUST DE WINTER MOUNTAIN BIKE CHALLENGE 65km, 30km, 10km 4×4 ATV Campsite, Rust de Winter Contact Deon mountainbike@4x4atv.org, 082 920 6103 Web 4x4atv.org Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

THE RACE CALENDAR IS COMPILED TWO MONTHS IN ADVANCE. FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE RACE DETAILS, VISIT WWW.BICYCLING.CO.ZA/CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’VE COME IT’S ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’RE WILLING TO GO. WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A RACE, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


KWAZULU-NATAL MTB

5 NOVEMBER ENCOUNTER EAST GRIQUALAND TRAIL RUN & MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE 40km Fisherman’s Bend Farm, Kokstad Contact Cobus cobust@ewt.org.za, 079 508 2156 Web encountereg.co.za Online Entries roag.co.za

5-6 NOVEMBER GOODERSON MONKS COWL MTB CHALLENGE 40km, 20km, 10km Gooderson Monks Cowl Golf Resort Contact Ward Events info@ wardevents.co.za, 031 563 5645 Web wardevents.co.za Online Entries roag.co.za

27 NOVEMBER ESTON XMAS CLASSIC 40km, 22km, 10km Virginia Trails, Eston Contact Corinne Thompson thompsons@edelnet.co.za, 083 271 3142 Web virginiafarm.co.za Online Entries roag.co.za

GAUTENG MTB

5 NOVEMBER CARNIVAL CITY MACSTEEL NATIONAL CLASSIC MTB RACE 60km, 30km, 12km, 6km Carnival City Contact Race Office info@ germistonclassic.co.za, 061 918 1002 Web germistonclassic.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

6 NOVEMBER CYCLESURE HOLLARD MTB

SERIES @ BABBA’S 2016 – EVENT #11 55km, 35km, 12km, 1km Babba’s Lodge, Bultfontein Contact Franco Sport francosportevents@gmail.com, 082 490 5061 Web francosport.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

13 NOVEMBER TELKOM 947 MOUNTAIN BIKE CHALLENGE 55km, 25km Riversands Commercial Park, Fourways Contact Harford Sports Promotions SA cyclechallenge@947.co.za, 011 017 2700 Web cyclechallenge.co.za Online Entries events.primedia.co.za

KWAZULU-NATAL

The KZN racing calendar is reaching its end-of-season holiday. But don’t let this deter the racer in you: head to the hills for the Goodersons Monks Cowl MTB Challenge, especially if you want to reduce the staffparty-overindulgence guilt, and are looking for a chilled weekend away with the family. The newlybuilt trails up in the Champagne Valley are going to be special, as the race heads out towards Bell Park Dam and into the mountains above. This ‘pre’-holiday getaway is something everyone will enjoy. – Andrew Hill Web magaliesadventure.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

19 NOVEMBER RUST DE WINTER MOUNTAIN BIKE CHALLENGE

ROAD

65km, 30km, 10km 4×4 ATV Campsite, Rust de Winter Contact Deon mountainbike@4x4atv.org, 082 920 6103 Web 4x4atv.org Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

70km, 40km, 10km Midvaal Raceway, Meyerton Contact Wimpie van Niekerk 083 460 9338 Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

26 NOVEMBER NISSAN TRAILSEEKER GP #5 – DIAMOND RUSH 70km, 40km, 20km, 10km Cullinan Sports Grounds, Cullinan Contact Amelia info@ advendurance.com, 086 199 0001 Web advendurance.com Online Entries trailseekerseries.co.za

27 NOVEMBER MINI MAGALIES ADVENTURE 50km African Pride Mount Grace Country House & Spa Contact Leverage Corporation info@leveragecorporation.co.za, 011 463 7730

6 NOVEMBER PROTEA CYCLE CHALLENGE

6 NOVEMBER CARNIVAL CITY MACSTEEL NATIONAL CLASSIC CYCLE RACE 125km (elite), 103km, 65km Carnival City Contact Race Office info@germistonclassic.co.za, 061 918 1002 Web germistonclassic.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

011 017 2700 Web cyclechallenge.co.za Online Entries events.primedia.co.za

20 NOVEMBER TELKOM 947 CYCLE CHALLENGE 94km Riversands Commercial Park, Fourways Contact Harford Sports Promotions SA cyclechallenge@947.co.za, 011 017 2700 Web cyclechallenge.co.za Online Entries events.primedia.co.za MULTI-STAGE

26-27 NOVEMBER MAGALIES ADVENTURE

12 NOVEMBER TELKOM 947 10KM FAMILY AND KIDDIES RIDE

115km (2-day stage race) African Pride Mount Grace Country House & Spa Contact Leverage Corporation info@leveragecorporation.co.za, 011 463 7730 Web magaliesadventure.co.za Online Entries cycleevents.co.za

10km Riversands Commercial Park Contact Harford Sports Promotions SA cyclechallenge@947.co.za,

ROAD

EASTERN CAPE

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

THE RACE CALENDAR IS COMPILED TWO MONTHS IN ADVANCE. FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE RACE DETAILS, VISIT WWW.BICYCLING.CO.ZA/CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’VE COME IT’S ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’RE WILLING TO GO. WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A RACE, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


20 NOVEMBER TOUR THE EASTERN CAPE CYCLING ROAD RACE 106km King Street and Umtata Street, Butterworth to Orient Theatre, East London Contact Race Office eccyclingtour@gmail.com, 082 086 1106

23-25 NOVEMBER ST BERNARD’S CYCLE CHALLENGE 300km (3-day stage race) From Port Elizabeth to East London (along the R72) Contact Marchel Brown fundraising1@stbh.org.za, 083 335 6167 Web www.stbh.org.za

26 NOVEMBER ACTION CYCLES STEAK RACE 90km Grass Roof Farm Stall corner Seaview Road and Heron Road Contact Masters and Ladies Cycling Club admin@masterspe.co.za, 082 706 0411 Web and Online Entries masterspe.co.za

THE ULTIMATE TEST you may not win $1 million (yet), but the 1 000km Munga still offers a unique experience in long-distance, single-stage racing.

FREE STATE MTB

MULTI-STAGE

12-13 NOVEMBER TRANS ELANDS 2-DAY STAGE RACE 183km (2-day stage race), 90km (LITE 2-day stage race) Wacky Woods Private Riverside Resort Contact Lex Holmes sharonholmes.holmes8@gmail.com, 083 342 8306 Web and Online Entries offroadevents.co.za

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

ERIK VERMEULEN

17-19 NOVEMBER ASSAGAI MTB STAGE RACE 225km (3-day stage race) The Blue Hole Contact Assagai Outdoor Events tokoloshdj007@gmail.com, 073 358 6112 Web and Online Entries assagaioutdoorevents.co.za

12 NOVEMBER PLATBERG CLASSIC MTB RACE 50km, 25km, 10km Platberg Eco Park Contact Race Office platbergmtb@gmail.com, 076 358 7804 Web facebook.com/platbergmtb Online Entries bouttime.co.za

30 NOVEMBER - 5 DECEMBER THE MUNGA 1 000km From Bloemfontein to Diemersfontein Wine and Country Estate Contact Alex Harris 083 383 7378 Web & Online Entries themunga.com

GAUTENG

The 33rd edition of this race takes place on the East Rand of Gauteng, and you can choose between the 12km, 30km and 60km MTB events on Saturday, and the 65km and 103km road races on Sunday. This is a Cape Town Cycle Tour qualifying event, and also positioned just two weeks prior to the Telkom 947 Cycle Challenge, so it’s a great warm-up race. The slightly flatter terrain will make for fast racing. – Nic White

THE RACE CALENDAR IS COMPILED TWO MONTHS IN ADVANCE. FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE RACE DETAILS, VISIT WWW.BICYCLING.CO.ZA/CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’VE COME IT’S ABOUT HOW FAR YOU’RE WILLING TO GO. WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A RACE, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

http://mentholatum.co.za I www.facebook.com/deepheatza

KEEP GOING


REAL IMAGES FROM REAL RIDERS

S U B M I T T E D B Y @ R E N S . R E Z E L M A N | I M AG E C O U R T E S Y J E T L I N E AC T I O N P H O T O

T H I S WA S TA K E N 2 10 K I L OM E T R E S I N T O T H E T R A N S B AV I A A N S : A 2 3 0 - K I L OM E T R E , 2 4 - HOU R M T B R AC E , A N D A G R E AT T E S T OF C A M A R A DE R I E A N D T E A M WOR K . A S N IG H T FA L L S , T H E ROA D S A R E DE A D QU I E T; BU T YOU R M I N D I S BUS Y. T H E S E DE R E L IC T BU I L DI NG S A R E J US T OF F T H E ROU T E A S YOU A PPROAC H J E F F R E Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S B AY, A N D YOU H A R DLY NO T IC E T H E M AT N IG H T. BU T T H E I R E E R I N E S S C A P T U R E S YOU R OW N MO OD, A N D R E F L E C T S YOU R S TAT E OF M I N D : T I R E D A N D L ON E LY, BU T L O OK I NG F OR WA R D T O T H E AC H I E V E M E N T OF F I N I S H I NG .

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R140 EXCLUDING POSTAGE

Most of us got into this sport with one common goal... to lose weight without it feeling like a chore. While we know cycling is gentle on the joints, and every ride is an adventure, losing weight quickly and efficiently can still be a bit hit and miss. But not anymore. In Ride Your Way Lean, expert Selene Yeager provides a comprehensive cycling plan that will allow you to shed fat, streamline your body, and improve your skills on the bike. Get it now.

This book offers training plans that turbocharge metabolism, along with complementary nutritional advice Go to FitShop.co.za and click on BICYCLING SA


NINO SCHURTER

NO SHORTCUTS Helmet on, buckle clicked and fit system adjusted. Now it’s just you and the ride ahead. We obsessed over every detail, every material and every technology to develop the CENTRIC PLUS. Brimming with innovation and shaped by years of focus on safety, this is one of the most advanced high-performance helmets we’ve ever created. Exceptional comes as a standard. SCOTT helmets, get your head in the game. #whatsahead

CENTRIC PLUS with SCOTT AIR Technology

SCOTT-SPORTS.COM © SCOTT SPORTS SA 2016 | Photo: Simon Ricklin


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