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PRACTICAL IDEAS FROM THE EXPERTS

healthyfood.co.uk

ONE-TRAY ROAST CHICKEN SUPPER

OCTOBER 2016 £3.20

LOWER your CANCER RISK Latest diet & lifestyle advice SCIENCE UPDATE

WHY HUNGER MAKES you ANGRY THE GREAT GLUTEN-FREE BAKE OFF Healthy sweet treats! NUTRITION GUIDE

VITAMIN C 4

Easy ways to boost your intake

9

772045 822039

1 0

Dukkah chicken and vegetable bake

PLUS Revealed! FIBRE l

in that rice pouch l HERBAL TEAS for every complaint l Simple meals with ARTICHOKES

Sweet potato ‘lasagne’

Chocolate muffins

Anjum Anand’s lighter Indian supper


green teas and herbal infusions With over 90 years of herbal expertise, we are proud to use only the finest natural and organic ingredients known for their therapeutic and rejuvenating properties.


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

WELCOME

hfg

G

OING GLUTEN FREE ISN’T EASY. People who have been diagnosed with coeliac disease or

a gluten intolerance can vouch for that. However, THE RANGE OF GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS AVAILABLE has

improved no end. At Whole Foods Market recently, I found an awe-inspiring array of gluten-free pastas – black soya bean, red lentil, edamame… And MAINSTREAM SUPERMARKETS ARE EXPANDING on staples such as flours, cereals and pastas, too. What remains a challenge is baking. Shop bought glutenfree cakes and biscuits that taste great tend to be LOADED WITH FAT AND SUGAR to make up for the dry texture you often get when gluten is left out. WITH THANKS TO GEMMA DOYLE, SARA NORMAN. COVER PHOTO OF ANJUM ANAND: JONATHAN GREGSON

HFG recipe consultant PHIL MUNDY OVERCOMES the most common home cook’s dilemmas in this month’s guide (p27). His insider tips, picked up over the years, can help you turn a crumbly, dry or sunken cake into a triumph.

GET ACTIVE FOR CHARITY On the fitness front, THE TEAM HAVE BEEN GOING PLACES – on two wheels. Two of us (myself and senior sub-editor Rebecca Almond) have signed up for ACTION FOR CHARITY’S WOMEN V CANCER RIDE THE NIGHT challenge in London on 27 May 2017. We’re already in training as it’s 100km! Most of us know someone who has had or is battling this cruel disease, and it’s a good way to raise funds in their name. You can find out about the charity’s events at actionforcharity.co.uk. Meanwhile, you can READ ABOUT 10 WAYS TO LOWER YOUR RISK OF CANCER (p16).

MELANIE LEYSHON, EDITOR

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 3


CO N T E N T S

IN THIS MONTH’S OCTOBER

p51

p63 p16 p22 p27

p46

p92

p48 p76 p60 TALKING POINTS 3 Editor’s letter 6 Meet our experts 8 Let’s talk… 94 How I stay healthy Sport Relief celebrity coach Greg Whyte

HEALTH & NUTRITION 10 Health notes 16 10 ways to cut your cancer risk Latest expert diet advice 22 The science of ‘hangry’ How to stop flying off the handle when you’re hungry

4 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

p43

p68

p64

74 Weight loss star How Carol lost 2½st and improved her health 82 It’s so good to stretch The new workout trend everyone can do 92 Why we need vitamin C

RECIPES 32 October recipe index 34 Your monthly diet planner 38 Gluten-free breakfasts to fuel your day 42 Weeknight meals 50 Easy dinners (lunch included) 59 6pm panic

60 Put it on the menu Globe artichokes 63 Dinner for one Our low-calorie cover recipe can be easily upscaled to a family meal! 64 Anjum Anand’s lighter Indian supper 68 Extreme makeover Chocolate muffins 70 Portable puds Easy jar recipes

SHOPPING 12 Seasonal ways to five-a-day 14 This month we love


ISSUE p64

EYE TO EYE MEDIA LTD, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES 01795 414778 Healthyfood.co.uk/subscribe EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 020 7803 4128 FAX 020 7803 4101 EMAIL Info@healthyfood.co.uk WEB Healthyfood.co.uk

p82 Editor Melanie Leyshon Art director Tina Betts Assistant editor Liz Atkins Senior sub editor Rebecca Almond Editorial assistant/writer Laura Day Web assistant Isabella Bradford Nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow Recipe consultant Phil Mundy ADVERTISING SALES Ad director Jason Elson 020 7150 5397 Senior sales Laura Collinder 020 7150 5043 Group head, partnerships Josh Jalloul 020 7150 5040 Regional business development manager Nicola Rearden 0161 209 3629

p55

27 Your guide to healthy glutenfree baking Tips and recipes from our recipe consultant 48 How much fibre in ready to heat rice? 57 What’s the deal with seaweed? 76 It’s always tea time! Herbal teas to make you feel better 81 Broccoli vs tenderstem

DON’T MISS 87 Win a stay at Champneys for two! Worth up to £510

p72

89 Subscribe to HFG for less 91 Coming up in next month’s issue On sale 1 November 96 References 97 Nutrition lowdown 98 5 top facts to take away

READ MORE ONLINE Find hundreds of healthy recipes, health features and blogs about health trends at

HEALTHYFOOD.CO.UK

Managing director Seamus Geoghegan 020 7803 4123 seamus@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Publishing director Adrienne Moyce 020 7803 4111 adrienne.moyce@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Consultant editorial director Jo Sandilands Circulation director Owen Arnot 020 7803 4121 Production director Jake Hopkins 020 7803 4110 Marketing consultant Julia Rich 020 7803 4129 Finance director Gary Pickett gary.pickett@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Finance manager Adam Wright 01733 373135 adam.wright@eyetoeyemedia.co.uk Healthy Food Guide magazine is published by Eye to Eye Media Ltd, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen Street, London SE1 1YT, under licence from Healthy Life Media International Limited and its content includes copyright material which is owned or controlled by, and is reproduced under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The title Healthy Food Guide and the Healthy Food Guide logo are trade marks owned by, and used under licence from, Healthy Life Media International Limited. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Healthy Life Media International Limited, its subsidiaries, affiliates or contributors. For licensing enquiries contact Phil Ryan, Healthy Life Media International, phil.ryan@hlmedia.co.nz.

ISSN 2045-8223. Printed in the UK by Southernprint Ltd. Colour origination by Rhapsody. Copyright Eye to Eye Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without permission. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in advertisements, articles, photographs or illustrations. Eye to Eye Media Ltd is a registered data user whose entries in the Data Protection Register contain descriptions of sources and disclosures of personal data. This paper is manufactured using pulp taken from well-managed, certified forests. All prices correct at time of going to press. UK basic annual subscription rate for 12 issues, £38.40; Europe and Eire, £55; rest of the world, £60. Back issues cost £5. Member of the Audit Bureau Of Circulations.


E X PE R T S

Get healthy the hfg way Eating and living well for longterm good health – that’s the HFG mission. We don’t believe in short-term fad diets, but making small changes for big gains. Read how our experts can help you...

l

Look for the symbols

on our recipes. They will enable you to pinpoint recipes for your needs. See p33 for more information.

LOW CAL

LOW FAT

We can help you break

l out of yo-yo dieting, as our recipes come in satisfying portion sizes. We use everyday ingredients to make your favourite dishes healthier and no foods are off the menu. We’d never recommend cutting out key food groups, unless you have an intolerance or allergy.

All our recipes

l are analysed by our qualified dietitians and nutritionists, below, and tried and tested by our recipe consultant Phil Mundy. They are created to guidelines set out by the NHS Eatwell Guide for key food groups, to ensure they’re well balanced.

We look at the science

l behind the headlines to clear up and demystify mixed messages about current health issues. Our experts always look at the body of evidence, never just one isolated study.

LOW SATS

vegetarian

LOW SALT

HIGH FIBRE

HIGH

HIGH

PROTEIN CALCIUM

gluten free

HIGH IRON

1

5-A-DAY

dairy free

Meet our experts: qualified dietitians, nutritionists and medical professionals

JULIETTE KELLOW is Healthy Food Guide’s nutrition consultant. She’s a registered dietitian who has worked in the NHS, the food industry and within the media.

DR DAWN HARPER works as a GP and runs regular clinics on women’s health and weight management. She appears on Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies.

JENNIFER LOW is a dietitian who works as a consultant for the NHS and the private sector. She specialises in eating disorders, IBS and bariatric surgery.

AMANDA URSELL has a degree in nutrition and a post-graduate diploma in dietetics. She is an award-winning writer and a visiting fellow at Oxford Brookes University.

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTING EXPERT PANEL l Tracy Kelly, registered dietitian l Helen Bond, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association l Norma McGough, registered dietitian at Coeliac UK l Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation

6 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016


Just like Prosciutto di San Daniele and Grana Padano cheese, true taste and real origins simply cannot be imitated. That is why the European Union created the Protected Designation of Origin scheme. PDO makes regional specialities with centuries of tradition easier to recognise. So next time you want to enjoy the unmistakeable �lavour of these unique delicacies, look for the PDO logo. Proud carriers of the PDO logo.

Follow our tradition at www.granapadano.it www.prosciuttosandaniele.it

CAMPAIGN FINANCED WITH AID FROM THE EUROPEAN UNION AND ITALY.


LET’S TALK… hfg

So what’s on your mind? Let us know – via email, facebook and twitter

STAR LETTER

YOUR VIEWS FUEL FOR THE SCHOOL DAY

CHANGING YOUR DIET STARTS WITH THE MIND I WAS INSPIRED BY DARIN McCLOUD and his weight-loss success (Aug issue). If he can lose nearly 6st and manage to complete those athletic challenges, then I really have no excuse for the extra weight I’m carrying. I followed Darin’s example and bought the gold Slimpod programme from thinkingslimmer.com. I listened to the podcast every day on my two-week, all-inclusive holiday, and I found myself generally choosing the healthy food on offer – and I also learned to stop when I was full. For the first time ever I didn’t put on any weight on holiday. Now I’m keeping it up by cooking from the healthy recipes in HFG (I loved the pick ‘n’ mix salad feature). Since starting to eat this way, I’ve also been craving fruit and vegetables, drinking mainly water – and my dogs are getting twice as much exercise as normal, too. Thank you for kickstarting my new lifestyle. Debbie Coulson, by email

GO TO EONLINE NTE R CO MONT THIS healt MPETITHIO’S hyfo o NS

PICKING UP MY MOTHER’S HFG (Sept issue), I was interested to see the Healthy School Lunchboxes card sticking out. As a teacher, I can vouch for the importance of encouraging children to choose a healthy, nutritious lunch every day to help them concentrate and prevent energy slumps. I think this card could be a really good resource to help teachers spread the message about the link between nutrition and health – anything that promotes healthy lifestyle choices among the next generation is welcome. Maria Betts-Davies

CONGRATULATIONS The writer of this month’s star letter wins four books from The Medicinal Chef’s Eat Your Way to Better Health series by Dale Pinnock (Quadrille, £14.99 each). Each book has easy to make recipes plus nutrition and diet advice for a specific condition.

8 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

d.co. uk

Go to healthyfood.co.uk/ nutritioncards for more cards


N E WS A N D V I E WS

YOUR PICS

My version of the rhubarb and ginger trifles from August’s magazine! @eatclean86

Roast pepper, pea & courgette quiche from @healthyfoodmag. Filo pastry for lower carbs, plus feta and tofu for meat-free protein. Leftovers taste just as good cold the next day @jrcomms

OUR NEWS

ORGANIC INSPIRATION

We headed to the fabulous organic bakery E5 Bakehouse to discover why food writer Anna Jones likes to cook with organic produce. Find her Turkish flatbread recipe on our website.

EMAIL US info@healthyfood.co.uk

These are some of the highlights freshly whisked, baked and simmered in your kitchens this month

Tried this #interesting#unusual savoury porridge for dinner from @healthyfoodmag and it’s amazing! #oats #kale #mushrooms #feta @nat_thomas_

We’ve been getting ready for colder days with soups and the latest favourite warming alternative to a latte

BEETROOT BONUS

Not just for salads and juices, beetroot is headlining in lattes. At London Grind, they mix beetroot powder in water, then top with hot milk. Naturally sweet, refreshing and pretty.

FOLLOW US @healthyfoodmag

SOUP SPREAD

We’ve been beavering away in the test kitchen to come up with the best winter comfort foods. Keep your eyes peeled for these and more delicious soups next month…

TALK TO US ON facebook.com/ healthyfoodguideuk

SHARE PICS ON INSTAGRAM @healthyfoodmag

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 9


S C I E N C E U PDAT E

HEALTH NOTES Diet and fitness facts for your wellbeing

DON’T FEED A SWEET TOOTH

UP TO

50%

The EXTRA CALORIES we may be consuming, compared with official figures from surveys. According to the independent Behavioural Insights Team, in the UK we under-report our calories by about 1,000 per day, which would explain the RISE IN OBESITY levels, when data supplied should indicate a drop. Seems the nation suffers from FOOD AMNESIA… Read ‘Do you cheat on your calorie count?’ at healthyfood.co.uk and see how those ‘little’ extras can quickly add up.

IS COMMUTING A HEALTH HAZARD? EVEN IF YOUR INNER CALORIE COUNTER is spot-on (see above), your commute could be responsible for adding 767 calories a week to your diet – enough to gain almost 11lb in a year! A Royal Society of Public Health (RSPH) report says the average commute has increased by an hour a day, affecting our stress levels, blood pressure and BMI, and reducing time for health-promoting exercise, cooking and sleeping. We’re also more likely to buy unhealthy food after a stressful rush-hour journey. Why not try walking or cycling part of the way? Meanwhile, you can vent by sharing commuter stories with RSPH on Twitter using #unhealthycommute.

10 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

SWAPPING REFINED white sugar for sweeteners sounds great for our waistlines, but a study from the University of Sydney found using them could trick our brain into encouraging us to eat more. The brain senses a relationship between sweetness and the energy content of food, so when it detects sweetness without calories, it prompts us to seek out more energy-providing food. So weaning ourselves off sweet flavours may be better than simply trying to substitute them.


H E A LT H

53

The percentage of SUPERMARKET PROMOTIONS on unhealthy products. According to an analysis by Which?, 52% OF CONFECTIONERY is on special offer, compared with just 30% OF FRESH FRUIT and 34% OF FRESH VEG. Meanwhile, half of shoppers say they wish supermarkets would increase the healthier promotions to make it EASIER TO CHOOSE HEALTHY FOODS. Our advice? Stick to the perimeter, taking a detour to those tempting inner aisles only for specific items on your list.

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTOS: GETTY, ISTOCK

WHEN IT’S NOT SO GOOD TO TALK… EVERY PARENT OF A TEENAGER knows the importance of keeping the channels of communication open, but it could pay to keep mum on the subject of weight and dieting – including your own. That’s the view of US paediatricians who’ve issued new guidelines suggesting this tactic should be applied to all teenagers, not just the ones with weight problems, to reduce the incidences of obesity and eating disorders. Instead of drawing attention to the problem, they say, families should eat regular meals together and parents should encourage a healthy, balanced diet and exercising for fitness, not weight loss. Lead author Dr Neville Golden says parents ‘who talk about their own bodies and weight can inadvertently encourage kids to have body dissatisfaction’.


SEASONAL ways to

FIVE-A-DAY IN OCTOBER

The autumn harvest is as plentiful as it is varied. Celebrate the season with SQUASH, KOHLRABI and WILD MUSHROOMS

WILD MUSHROOMS

You don’t need to go foraging (if you do, be careful what you pick) as supermarkets now sell the likes of porcini, oyster, morels and girolle, as well as wild mushroom mixes. The nutrition will vary depending on the variety but, as a rule, mushrooms are packed with fibre and provide blood-pressurecontrolling potassium, the antioxidant selenium plus copper for healthy ONE PORTION OF YOUR nerves and strong immunity. FIVE-A-DAY Mushrooms also contain phosphorus and manganese for strong bones, and a variety of B vitamins such as B2, folate and pantothenic acid, all of which help to release energy from food. Plus they make a satisfying veggie alternative to meat in dishes such as stir-fries, burgers and stews. Per 80g l 13kcal l 0.2g sugars l 0.9g fibre

80g

In the kitchen

SAUTÉ a bunch of spring onions and 300g wild mushrooms in a large pan with a little oil until soft. Add 600ml reduced-salt stock, 50ml madeira and simmer for 10 min. Season with black pepper and 1tsp dijon mustard, then blend to make a smooth soup. FRY mushrooms in a little oil, then add to a classic omelette mixture with 1tsp chopped fresh tarragon and finely grated parmesan. ADD sliced mushrooms to potatoes roasted in a little oil for the last 15 min of cooking time for a Sunday lunch side.

12 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

80g

SQUASH

Butternut, acorn, spaghetti, sweet dumpling… The list is long, and it’s worth exploring the different flavours and shapes of them all.

Nutritional reasons to buy Squash makes a low-carb alternative to potatoes (roast, mash or boil). Nutrients vary – for example, 80g baked acorn squash has 352mg potassium, compared with 224mg in butternut and 96mg in spaghetti. But the star is the beta-carotene in butternut. This antioxidant is used to make vitamin A in the body (vital for healthy skin, eyesight and immunity). An 80g serving provides around 54% of our daily needs for vitamin A. Per 80g (butternut, baked) l 26kcal l 3.1g sugars l 1.5g fibre

In the kitchen

STICKY SQUASH SALAD serves 4 as a side Heat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Slice 750g squash into 3cm thick wedges and put in a lined baking tray. Spray with oil and season with black pepper and grated nutmeg, then roast for 30 min. Toss with 1tbsp maple syrup, then roast for 5 min more. Set aside to cool. Mix 50g strong blue cheese with 6tbsp low-fat natural yogurt and 2tbsp skimmed milk until smooth, then stir in 2tbsp snipped fresh chives. Toss the squash with 100g spinach leaves, 1 sliced chicory head and 2tbsp toasted pumpkin seeds, then drizzle over the yogurt dressing to serve.

WORDS: REBECCA ALMOND, JULIETTE KELLOW, PHIL MUNDY

Nutritional reasons to buy

ONE PORTION OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY


S H O PPI N G

KOHLRABI

It looks and sounds unusual, but it’s a member of the cabbage family and tastes a bit like a sweet turnip. Not so ‘out there’, really…

Nutritional reasons to buy Kohlrabi contains many of the nutrients you’d find in its more common green leafy cousin, the cabbage. In particular, it’s rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that can help to protect against cell damage (see p92). It also contains folate, a B vitamin that’s needed for keeping our nervous system healthy and for ensuring a healthy pregnancy. Folate is especially important for women planning to have a baby or in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy to help ensure the baby’s spine develops properly. As a result, health experts recommend women eat more folate-rich foods when planning to have a baby and in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, as well as taking a 400mcg daily ONE PORTION supplement of folic acid. OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY Per 80g l 14kcal l 2.4g sugars l 2g fibre

80g

In the kitchen

FINELY SHRED, then toss with mustard, low-fat natural yogurt and apple for a creamy slaw. THINLY SLICE and stir-fry with chilli and spring onions until tender (adding the leaves towards the end of cooking if using). DICE AND ROAST with a little curry powder and oil, then toss with chopped fresh coriander before serving with grilled chicken or fish.

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 13


THIS MONTH WE L VE

Delicious, full of fruit and high in fibre, we can’t fault this shining example from the cereal aisle.

Thick, fruity and thirstquenching… Just goes to show there’s no need to add sugars to make a drink quaffable.

Nairn’s Gluten Free Oat Muesli, £2.59/450g, Asda, Sainsbury’s

Mello Cold Pressed Watermelon Juice, £2.49/250ml, Boots, Waitrose

Per 45g serving l 170kcal l 4.8g fat l 0.6g saturates l 8g sugars l 0g salt

Per bottle l 100kcal l 0.3g fat l 0g saturates l 20.5g sugars l 0g salt

Wholegrain rice, corn and buckwheat make these three times as interesting as your regular rice cake. We like the 26kcal detail.

These herby, veganfriendly protein strips (mainly soya) are ideal for stir-fries, wraps and pasta and get a thumbsup on flavour from us.

Little cubes of heaven, made with raw fruit and nuts – a great substitute for after-dinner chocs, we’ve found.

Riso Gallo Gluten-Free 3-Grain Rice Cakes, £1.15/15 rice cakes, Ocado

The Fry Family Food Co Rice Protein & Chia Stir-Fry Strips, £2.99/300g, Ocado

Nakd Posh Bits, £2.59/130g, widely available

Per rice cake l 26kcal l 0.2g fat l 0g saturates l 0g sugars l 0g salt

Per 75g l 164kcal l 8.9g fat l 1g saturates l 0.2g sugars l 0.7g salt

We’ve scoured the shelves for greattasting, nutritious products and selected our favourites to make your weekly shop easier

14 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

Per 35g (Cocoa Mandarin) l 131kcal l 3.8g fat l 0.9g saturates l 15.1g sugars l 0g salt


S H O PPI N G

Oh so creamy, without the slightly unwelcome tang of some varieties (despite not being sweetened).

COMPILED BY LAURA DAY. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

Rachel’s Organic 0% Fat Greek Style Natural Yogurt, £1.75/450g, Sainsbury’s, Ocado, Waitrose

These no-added-sugars, Need a pick-me-up? cocoa-flavoured oat and Swap that double sultana snack bars are espresso for a shot of technically for kids, but turmeric (with apple that hasn’t held us back. juice and a hit of chilli). Organix Punk’d, £2/6x23g bars, Ocado, Amazon

James White Turmeric Juice Zinger, £1.49/70ml, Waitrose, Holland & Barrett

Per 100g l 60kcal l 0.1g fat l 0.1g saturates l 8.7g sugars l 0.2g salt

Per 23g bar (Cocoa & Orange Crash) l 94kcal l 3.8g l 0.5g saturates l 5.4g sugars l 0g salt

Per shot l 33kcal l 0g fat l 0g saturates l 6.6g sugars l 0g salt

Dried fruit provides sweetness, but this justadd-boiling-water pot has some added sugar, so a ready measured portion makes sense.

Coconut sap, garlic and sea salt give this the umami flavours of soy sauce without gluten or soy. Use sparingly, though – it’s high in salt.

These skinny meatballs (with 43% of an adult’s daily protein needs in one serving) went down a treat with our homemade pasta sauce.

Perkier Cranberry & Raisin Porridge, £1.25/60g, widely available

The Coconut Company Organic Amino Sauce, £4.99/150ml, thecoconutcompany.co

M&S 24 Skinny Mini Beef Meatballs, £2.50/240g

Per pot l 218kcal l 2.6g fat l 0.5g saturates l 12.8g sugars l 0.1g salt

Per 1tsp l 13kcal l 1g fat l 0.5g saturates l 1.1g sugars l 0.6g salt

Per ½ pack l 132kcal l 2.9g fat l 1.2g saturates l 0.7g sugars l 1.1g salt OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 15


ways to CUT your CANCER RISK We’re continually learning about the lifestyle factors that may reduce our risk of cancer. Here are simple changes you can make from today

16 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016


H E A LT H

M

OST OF US KNOW someone affected by cancer. In the UK, a person is diagnosed every two minutes. Incidence rates have risen by nearly 30% since the 1970s, increasing in women by 37% and in men by 17%. This can be partly explained by more robust screening programmes. But it’s also down to our lifestyles: the way we eat and whether we drink, smoke or exercise (and how often). According to Cancer Research UK, 42% of cancer cases are preventable through lifestyle changes. Current statistics show 9% of diagnoses can be linked to an unhealthy diet alone. Alarming? Yes, but it does mean there are steps you can take to reduce your risk – starting right now.

HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

1

WATCH YOUR WEIGHT AND WAIST

BEING OVERWEIGHT or obese accounts for 5% of cancer cases and increases the risk of 11 cancers including kidney, breast and bowel, so it’s important to keep an eye on the scales. You can assess your BMI and ensure it’s within the healthy range of 18.5 to 24.9 by using the BMI calculator at nhs.uk. Waist size is an equally important measure. It should be no larger than 80cm (31.5in) for women or 94cm (37in) for men. Find out how to measure your waist accurately at healthyfood.co.uk/article/how-tocheck-if-youre-overweight. ‘Always avoid fad diets when trying to lose weight,’ says Monika Siemicka, oncology dietitian and BDA spokesperson. ‘Yes, you may lose weight very quickly, but once

you return to old eating habits the weight is more likely to come back on. For the best results, think about long-term changes that are easy to make and stick to.’ If you’re among the 62% of adults who are overweight or obese, ask your GP to refer you to a dietitian to guide you through a healthy weight-loss plan, or search for a registered dietitian at freelancedietitians.org.

2

Veg such as broccoli, kale, spinach and carrots contain antioxidants that can reduce the risk of mouth and throat cancers

TURN TO PLANTS

THERE’S PLENTY OF EVIDENCE LINKING a diet rich in vegetables, fruit and pulses to a reduced cancer risk. ‘Years of research have shown a healthy balanced diet can help to reduce the risk of cancer,’ confirms Dr Jana Witt of Cancer Research UK. The connection between eating large amounts of red and processed meat and colorectal or bowel cancer is also well established; a US study found those who ate a vegetarian diet had a 22% lower risk of colorectal cancer. When dietary patterns are broken down, eating too few fruit and veg accounts for 5% of cancer cases, eating red and processed meat for 3%, eating too little fibre for 2% and too much salt for 1%. But there is good news: according to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), consuming fruit and non-starchy veg such as broccoli, kale, spinach and carrots can reduce the risk of cancers of the mouth and throat. This may be because they contain lots of antioxidant nutrients, as well as other naturally occurring substances that help to protect cells in the body from damage.

3

CUT PROCESSED FOODS

THE WCRF confirms that processed meat, such as bacon, salami, chorizo and ham, increases the risk of gut cancers, possibly because the preservatives it contains irritate the gut. It recommends we eat no more than 500g cooked red meat a week and goes as far as to say we should avoid processed meat entirely. But in the UK, the Department of Health recommends a combined maximum of 70g cooked red and processed meat a day. Eating a lot of processed foods (meat or otherwise) means you’re more likely to have a diet high in saturated fat, which may increase your risk of several cancers, including breast cancer. The large-scale European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) study found post-menopausal women who ate higher levels of saturated fats doubled their risk of breast cancer compared with those eating the least amount. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 17


4

HOWEVER YOU STAY ACTIVE, whether by running, swimming, cycling or weight training, keep doing it – you’re protecting yourself against a number of cancers, including breast, bowel and womb. And if you don’t exercise, get into the habit. Around 3,400 cancer cases a year are linked to being physically inactive. Besides keeping your weight down, exercise can reduce levels of hormones, including oestrogen, which is thought to fuel some forms of breast and womb cancers. Being active also helps food to move through the bowel, limiting the time food and any harmful chemicals spend there, so reducing the risk of gut cancers.

5

6

MOVE MUCH MORE

BE WISE WITH BOOZE

THE CAUSAL LINK between alcohol and cancer is undisputed. There’s no safe limit or difference between varieties. And now we know alcohol doesn’t just increase the risk of liver cancer but seven other types of cancer, too, including bowel, breast and mouth/ throat. ‘Research shows nine in 10 people aren’t aware of the link between alcohol and cancer,’ says Jana. She suggests having some alcohol-free days each week, swapping every other alcoholic drink with a soft drink and choosing lower-alcohol options. Stick to the recommended intake of no more than 14 units a week for both men and women. Even slightly above this and the risk increases of dying from alcohol-related causes. Visit drinkaware.co.uk for more advice.

18 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

If no one smoked there would be 64,500 fewer cancer cases in the UK each year

DON’T SMOKE

IT’S THE LARGEST single preventable cause of cancer in the UK. In fact, if no one smoked there would be 64,500 fewer cancer cases every year. ‘Quitting smoking isn’t easy,’ recognises HFG expert Dr Dawn Harper. ‘But there’s more support out there than ever before.’ The health benefits of giving up are massive, so it’s really worth going for it. Just 20 minutes after your last cigarette your heart rate will start to drop and after two weeks your circulation will improve. But here’s the really important bit: if you can stay off the cigarettes for 10 years your lung cancer risk falls to half that of someone who still smokes. Speak to your GP about local smoking cessation services or visit nhs.uk/smokefree for free support.

7

DON’T RELY ON SUPPLEMENTS

THEY’LL NEVER BE as good as the nutrients found naturally in food. Eating a varied, healthy diet is usually enough (with a few exceptions, such as folic acid for women trying for a baby and in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, and vitamin D during the winter months). ‘There are so many different nutrients in our diets – it’s not just one specific vitamin that’s going to reduce our risk, which we see in the hype about superfoods,’ says Monika. ‘Instead, it’s about getting balance in our diet.’ On the whole, research has shown supplements have no effect on the risk of common cancers and in some cases have even been found to be harmful. High doses of beta-carotene supplements, for example, actually increase the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

8

CHECK YOUR PILL

TAKING THE COMBINED contraceptive pill has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, but this returns to normal 10 years after you stop taking it. But some studies have found the pill offers protection against cervical, womb, ovarian and colon cancers. ‘One in four women in the UK use the combined pill and it’s an excellent form of contraception,’ says Dawn. ‘For most women the benefits outweigh the risks, but if you have a family history of breast cancer, it may be time for a contraceptive MOT. There’s a lot of choice, so have a chat with your GP.’


H E A LT H

Cycling, running, swimming… They all count, and can make a huge difference to your general health and cancer risk

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 19


H E A LT H

9

10

Colorectal cancer is less common in people who eat a high-fibre diet; their risk is reduced by as much as 20%. Fibre cuts down the transit time of food in the gut and, therefore, the amount of time harmful bacteria are in our digestive system. ‘Eating fibre creates a symbiotic relationship in our bowel with the good bacteria,’ says Monika. ‘Bacteria feed off the dietary fibre, which is then converted back into short-chain fatty acids. Around 95% of adults don’t get enough fibre (we need around 30g a day). Find it in anything labelled as wholegrain and by eating plenty of fruit and vegetables.’

DON’T FEAR SOYA

20 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

CHECK YOUR BREASTS l THIS MONTH is Breast Cancer Awareness

Countries ❛that have a

high soya intake don't equally have high rates of breast or prostate cancer

month. Nearly 60,000 people are diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year – that’s one person every 10 minutes. It’s the most common cancer in women in the UK, but it also affects men (around 340 cases a year). Women aged 50–70 are invited for a breast screening every three years, as the older the person the higher the risk. But it’s important to check your breasts regularly, whatever your age, so you can easily spot when something isn’t normal for you.

l SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS of breast cancer include a change in the size or shape of the breast, a lump or thickening that feels different from the rest of the breast tissue, dimpling of the skin, swelling around the armpit or collarbone, or nipple discharge. l CHECK YOUR BREASTS around the same time

every month if you have periods (a good time is two to three days after it). Use the flat of your hand and check all parts of the breast, right up into the armpit and collarbone.

l SEE YOUR GP if you notice any changes that are

unusual for you. Remember, everyone’s breasts are different – some people have naturally lumpy breasts or one breast larger than the other. Checking regularly will make it easier to spot changes.

l VISIT breastcancercare.org.uk/awareness-

month for more information and advice.

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATIONS: GETTY, ISTOCK

Soya products contain phytoestrogens, which have a similar structure to the female sex hormone oestrogen (high levels of which are linked to some cancers, such as breast cancer). Previously, it was thought these phytoestrogens mimicked the effect of oestrogen, sparking concerns that eating soya products would increase the risk of breast cancer. However, in 2012 the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) revealed soya products don’t raise oestrogen levels in humans, but may in fact help to lower the risk of breast cancer. AICR also confirmed that women who had breast cancer or had survived the disease no longer needed to worry about eating moderate amounts, such as one or two daily servings of tofu, soya milk or edamame. The WCRF goes as far as to say there may be a link between better survival after breast cancer and eating foods containing soya, but the evidence isn’t yet strong enough to recommend eating more. Studies that have looked at the impact of soya on other hormonerelated cancers, such as prostate and womb cancers, generally show no increased risk. The fact is, soya foods are consistent with eating a more plant-based diet (see p17). ‘Many countries that have a high soya intake don’t equally have high rates of breast or prostate cancer,’ says Monika. ‘Soya has a very good nutrient profile as it contains lots of essential amino acids. But if you’re swapping regular cow’s milk for soya alternatives, make sure it’s fortified with calcium.’

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The science of

HANGRY

Being angry when you’re hungry isn’t a character flaw – it’s a scientific phenomenon, explains weight loss scientist Amanda Salis

H

AVE YOU EVER SNAPPED angrily at someone when you were hungry? Or has someone snapped angrily at you when they were hungry? If so, you’ve experienced ‘hangry’ (an amalgam of hungry and angry) – the phenomenon whereby some people get grumpy and short-tempered when they’re overdue for a feed. But where does hanger come from? And why is it that only some people seem to get hangry? The answer lies in some of the processes that happen inside your body when it needs food.

you’re hungry is behaving within socially acceptable norms, such as not snapping at people. So while you may be able to conjure up enough brain power to avoid being grumpy with important colleagues, you may let your guard down and inadvertently snap at the people you are most relaxed with or care most about, such as partners and friends. Sound familiar?

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF HANGER THE CARBOHYDRATES, PROTEINS AND FATS in everything you eat are digested into simple sugars (such as glucose), amino acids and free fatty acids. These nutrients pass into your bloodstream, from where they are distributed to your organs and tissues and used for energy. As time passes after your last meal, the amount of these nutrients circulating in your bloodstream starts to drop. If your blood-glucose levels fall far enough, your brain will perceive it as a life-threatening situation. You see, unlike most other organs and Unlike other organs, tissues in your body – which can use a variety of nutrients to keep your brain is critically functioning – your brain is critically dependent on glucose dependent on glucose to do its job. You’ve probably already noticed the dependence your brain has on glucose; simple things can become difficult when you’re hungry as your blood glucose levels drop. You may find it hard to concentrate, for instance, or you may make silly mistakes. Or you may have noticed that your words become muddled or slurred. Another thing that can become more difficult when

22 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

ANOTHER BODILY RESPONSE BESIDES A DROP IN BLOOD GLUCOSE concentrations, another reason people can become hangry is the glucose counter-regulatory response. Let me explain… When blood glucose levels drop to a certain threshold, your brain sends instructions to several organs in your body to synthesise and release hormones that increase the amount of glucose in your blood. The four main glucose counterregulatory hormones are: growth hormone from the pituitary gland situated deep in the brain; glucagon from the pancreas; and adrenaline (sometimes called epinephrine) and cortisol, which are both from the adrenal glands. These last two glucose counter-regulatory


H E A LT H


H E A LT H

control hunger, neuropeptide Y and the Y1 receptor also regulate anger or aggression. In keeping with this, people with high levels of neuropeptide Y in their cerebrospinal fluid also tend to show high levels of impulse aggression. As you can see, there are several pathways that can make you prone to anger when you’re hungry. Hanger is undoubtedly a survival mechanism that has served humans and other animals well. Think about it like this: if hungry organisms stood back and graciously let others eat before them, their species could die out. While many physical factors contribute to hanger, psychosocial factors also have a role. Culture influences whether you express verbal aggression directly or indirectly, for instance. And as we are all different across all of these factors, it’s little wonder there are differences in how angry people seem to get when they’re hungry.

DEALING WITH HANGER

NATURE AND NURTURE ANOTHER REASON hunger is linked to anger is that both are controlled by common genes. The product of one such gene is neuropeptide Y, a natural brain chemical released into the brain when you are hungry. It stimulates voracious feeding behaviours by acting on a variety of receptors in the brain, including one called the Y1 receptor. Besides acting in the brain to

24 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

l Amanda Salis is associate professor at The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, The University of Sydney.

© 2016 THE CONVERSATION (CONVERSATION.COM). PHOTOS: ISTOCK

hormones are stress hormones that are released into your bloodstream in all sorts of stressful situations, not just when you experience the physical stress of low blood glucose levels. In fact, adrenaline is one of the major hormones released into your bloodstream with the ‘fight or flight’ response to a sudden scare, such as when you see or hear something that you think threatens your safety. Just as you might easily shout out in anger at someone during the ‘fight or flight’ response, the flood of adrenaline you get during the glucose counter-regulatory response can promote a similar response.

THE EASIEST WAY TO HANDLE HANGER is to eat something before you get too hungry. While you may hanker for quick-fix foods, such as chocolate and crisps, when you’re in the throes of hanger, junk foods generally induce large rises in blood-glucose levels that come crashing down fast. Ultimately, they may leave you feeling hangrier. So think nutrient-rich, natural foods that help satisfy hunger for as long as possible, without excess calories. Eating as soon as you’re hungry may not always be possible. This may be the case during long shifts at work, for instance, or through religious fasts such as Ramadan, or during weight-loss diets that involve severe energy restriction (such as Hunger and anger intermittent fasting diets). All of these should only be done if your doctor has are controlled by given you the all-clear. common genes In these cases, it can help to remember that, with time, your glucose counter-regulatory response will kick in and your blood-glucose levels will stabilise. Also, when you go without food, your body starts breaking down its own fat stores for energy, some of which are converted by your body into ketones, a product of fat metabolism. Ketones are thought to help keep your hunger under control because your brain can use ketones in place of glucose for fuel. A final – and very civilised – way of handling hanger is to suggest that difficult situations be dealt with after food, not before!


Vary your dairy

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For a happy, healthy diet: give goats’ milk a go It’s no secret that the right diet is essential to feeling great, but that doesn’t have to mean a strict, complicated regime; low carb, no carb, caveman… the list is endless. At St Helen’s Farm, we think happy, healthy eating is simple. Every meal, drink and snack should be a balanced variety of nutritious, delicious foods that make you and your body happy. That’s a healthy diet. You wouldn’t eat the same green vegetable every evening for dinner, or have the same, boring carbohydrate every breakfast time, so why have the same dairy products in your tea, on your cereal, on your toast?

Simple switches to your routine such as swapping cows’ milk for goats’ milk, for just a couple of days a week will add variety to your diet without compromising on taste, providing an essential mix of nutrients from different sources. Goats’ milk is a natural alternative to cows’ milk that’s gentler on the stomach, containing different proteins and smaller fat particles that are easy to digest. And with more Biotin and Vitamin A, great for healthy skin and immune systems, it’s an easy swap on the way to eating happy and healthy. Light and refreshing, goats’ milk can be used in the same way as regular milk in hot drinks, cereals, cooking and smoothies. So, unlike plant based alternatives, it’s as versatile as cows’ milk.

St Helen’s Farm produces award winning goats’ dairy produce, straight from the farm and packed every day. Its fresh milk products are available in whole, semi skimmed and skimmed, perfect for every taste and diet.

Health and important to well being are all simple swap to of us. Making a your daily die t can make a real difference to y o u an your family’s overall health d .

Helen Bond

Consultan

t Dietitian

St Helen’s Farm Available in

Call 01430 861715 Visit www.sthelensfarm.co.uk StHelensFarm


EN

How to eat healthier: PART 5

IT

TC GET KI

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HP HIL

S H O PPI N G

CLE V E R

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Your guide to

HEALTHY GLUTEN-FREE BAKING EVEN FINALISTS ON The Great British Bake Off find gluten-free baking a challenge. One route to success is piling in the sugar and fat, but I’m going to show you how to get good results without resorting to unhealthy strategies

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 27


F

OR MANY PEOPLE, taking part in the current baking trend isn’t quite as simple as grabbing a recipe book, a bag of flour, a few other ingredients and getting to work. The problem? Gluten! If you need to avoid it, the obvious solution is to use a gluten-free flour blend. But, sadly, it’s not always just a case of substituting your flours. Here, I’ll show you how to get to grips with the different types, helping you experiment for great results. You’ll soon be creating recipes that taste just as good, if not better, than their gluten-containing counterparts.

Choose the right flour You can’t bake without it, so what should you use? A single type of flour can work well for basic recipes, such as pancakes or flapjacks, but a blend will generally give you better results. Bought all-purpose blends are fine for simple cakes, cupcakes and batters, but the flavour can be a little bland. If you plan to do a lot of gluten-free baking, experiment with a mixture of different grain flours, starches and nut flours. When you find your perfect blend, make up a batch and store in an airtight container for up to three months.

VARIETIES TO TRY... l WHOLEGRAIN FLOURS: teff,

sorghum, quinoa, maize, millet, buckwheat, brown rice. l WHITE FLOURS/STARCH: cornflour, arrowroot, potato, tapioca (cassava), rice. l NUT FLOURS: chestnut, almond, coconut, hazelnut.

MY GO-TO BLEND… To make 1kg all-purpose flour, mix 200g sorghum flour, 200g millet flour, 300g rice flour and 300g potato starch.

Tips for successful gluten-free bakes

1

WHEN BAKING LOAF CAKES, divide the mixture between two 1lb tins rather than using one 2lb tin. The cakes will cook more quickly and are more likely to cook through evenly, rise better and be easier to cut once baked. FOR MOISTER CAKES, PUT AN OVENPROOF DISH or tin of water in the base of the oven – the extra steam will stop the top of the cake drying out as quickly. GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS OFTEN COOK more quickly than wheat-flour based ones, which means they may not cook through as evenly. Reducing the oven temperature by around 10°C (gas ½) can help. USE CORN-FED EGGS – the bright yolks will help recreate the

2

3

4

28 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

traditional golden colour you get from wheat flour. IF A CAKE GOES WRONG (if it doesn’t rise or is too moist, for example), don’t waste it. Crumble it up and bake in a medium oven until you have crunchy clusters. Store in the freezer to sprinkle over cooked fruit, then bake for a tasty crumble. Red berries taste great with chocolate cake, or try apple or pear with a citrus or ginger topping.

5

TO STOP BISCUITS and bars breaking so easily, swap up to half the sugar for an inverted sugar, such as honey or syrup. Agave nectar and date syrup work well, too.

FOR CAKES that stay moist, try swapping half the amount of fat in a recipe for a fruit purée – apple, apricot and banana all work well and add their own subtle flavours.


S H O PPI N G

Handy ingredients to keep in your storecupboard GLUTEN PROVIDES STRUCTURE. It locks in moisture, giving sponginess to cakes and elasticity to doughs. These are some of the best products available to help give your bakes similar results without it.

XANTHAM GUM helps to improve crumb structure and stability. We love Doves Farm Xantham Gum, £2.35/ 100g, widely available

FRUIT PURÉES are a healthy way to add moisture to bakes, without adding lots of extra fat. We love Biona Organic Apple Purée, £1.49/ 350g, Ocado

A treat’s a treat IT’S GREAT TO SEE a bigger choice of gluten-free products at the supermarket. But before you load up your trolley, be aware that these often contain more calories than wheat-based versions, as extra sugar and fat are often used to replicate the texture and flavour of regular products. Simply switching from wheat-containing to glutenfree baked goods, therefore, means you may take in extra calories. All cakes, biscuits or muffins should be regarded as a treat and not something to be eaten every day. Baking your own makes it easier to control the sugar and fat content. But don’t eat the whole batch in a couple of days – wrap single portions and freeze for up to a month.

PSYLLIUM HUSK helps give springiness and improves colour. Best in doughs and pastry. We love Super Nutrients Organic Psyllium Husks, £4.99/ 125g, Holland & Barrett

WHAT ABOUT FLAVOUR? If you’re used to regular baking, you may have to alter your expectations. Bakes won’t taste the same and they’ll have a different texture, but go with it and you’ll learn how to cope with the challenge.

BUCKWHEAT has a strong, slightly bitter flavour, easily offset by adding spices – try cinnamon or allspice. We love Doves Farm Wholemeal Buckwheat Flour, £3.29/1kg, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Ocado, Morrisons

ALMOND and chestnut flours have a nuttiness that can create really delicious cakes. Hold back on other bold flavours and let the flour speak for itself. We love Sukrin Almond Flour, £8.59/250g, Planet Organic

VANILLA extract or paste (check it’s gluten free), can improve the flavour of blander flours. Also try citrus zest, nutmeg or cocoa. We love Nielsen Massey Pure Vanilla Extract, £6/118ml, widely available

SWAP MILK in a cake or scone recipe for buttermilk – the higher acid content will react quickly with any raising agents and give more lift to your batter or dough.

TEST YOUR BATTER If you’re unsure if your cake batter will rise, put 1tbsp of it in a cup and microwave for 15– 30 seconds. It’s a good indicator of how the cake will perform in the oven – and whether you need more liquid or flour. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 29


IN

FI

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PH

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STA-FO O D

5 sweet GLUTENFREE

treats

CRANBERRY AND ALMOND SCONES makes 10

CHOCOLATE TEFF FLOUR BROWNIES makes 12

Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/ gas 6. Line a baking tray with parchment. In a large bowl mix 265g gluten-free plain flour, 1tbsp gluten-free baking powder, 40g caster sugar, 40g toasted flaked almonds and 50g dried cranberries. In a jug whisk 2tbsp sunflower oil, 1 egg, 175g buttermilk and 1tsp vanilla extract, then pour into the dry ingredients and stir to form a soft dough. On a floured surface, shape into a 2.5cm disc. Cut 6cm rounds with a cutter, re-rolling the offcuts to make more, then put on the tray 3cm apart. Brush with a little milk, sprinkle with a few extra almonds and bake for 14–18 min until golden. Per scone l 197kcal l 6.3g fat l 0.8g saturates l 9g sugars l 0.4g salt

Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/ gas 4 and line an 18cm square cake tin with parchment. In a large bowl whisk together 2 eggs and 100g caster sugar for 3 min until thick and pale. Add 100g melted dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), 140g apple purée (we used Biona), then sieve in 100g teff flour and 25g pure cocoa powder. Fold in gently until combined. Spoon into the tin and bake for 20–25 min until just set but still squidgy. Cool for 15 min in the tin before cooling completely on a wire rack. Cut into 12. Per brownie l 139kcal l 4.9g fat l 2.6g saturates l 14.5g sugars l 0g salt

The dietitian’s view KNOW THE LAW

WHEN A CAKE RECIPE uses eggs, separate them first. Add the yolks as normal, but whisk the whites until stiff before gently folding in. You’ll create more air and produce a lighter texture. 30 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

Recent EU legislation has changed the way food labels show allergens. Instead of a separate box listing them, allergens must now be included in the ingredients list and highlighted in bold. This makes it essential to check the ingredients list if you need to avoid any products that contain gluten. But remember, gluten itself won’t usually be listed, but the cereals containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, rye and oats, will be picked out in bold.


S H O PPI N G

RASPBERRY, BANANA AND CHOCOLATE MUFFINS makes 10

GINGER AND DATE OAT BARS makes 12

SPICED COCONUT FLOUR PANCAKES serves 4

Heat the oven to 160°C/ fan 140°C/ gas 3. Line a muffin tin with 10 paper or silicon cases. In a large bowl mash 2 large ripe bananas, then beat in 1 egg, 4tbsp sunflower oil, 125ml skimmed milk or dairy-free alternative and 2tsp vanilla extract. Add 300g glutenfree plain flour, 1tbsp gluten-free baking powder, 75g dark chocolate chips and 15g freezedried raspberries or strawberries, crumbled. Fold the mixture quickly until just combined, then spoon into the cases. Bake for 25–30 min until golden and cooked through. Cool on a wire rack. Per muffin l 223kcal l 7.4g fat l 2g saturates l 10.3g sugars l 0.4g salt

Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/ gas 4. Line a 20cm square cake tin with parchment. In a blender whiz 125g soft pitted dates, 40g crystallised ginger, 2 eggs and 3tbsp sunflower oil until smooth. Pour into a large bowl and mix in 1tsp ground ginger, 175g gluten-free porridge oats and 25g gluten-free flour (use your favourite). Spread into the tin and bake for 25–30 min until golden. Cool in the tin for 10 min, then cut into 12 bars and cool completely on a wire rack. Per bar l 141kcal l 4.9g fat l 0.8g saturates l 9.6g sugars l 0g salt

In a large bowl put 60g coconut flour, 90g gluten-free plain flour, 1tsp bicarbonate of soda, 1tsp vanilla extract, ½tsp ground allspice, 2 large eggs, 225ml skimmed milk and 2tbsp agave nectar. Whisk well. Heat a large non-stick frying pan and spray with sunflower oil. Drop heaped tablespoonfuls of the batter into the pan, about 4cm apart, and cook over a medium heat for 1–2 min until pale brown underneath. Carefully turn and cook for a further 1 min. Repeat with the remaining batter, to make 12 pancakes. Serve with 3tbsp fat-free Greek yogurt and 80g warmed frozen cherries per person. Per serving (3 pancakes) l 318kcal l 5.5g fat l 2.6g saturates l 23.7g sugars l 0.9g salt

Let Jennifer Low be your nutrition guide at the supermarket THINGS TO WATCH FOR l AVOID flours made from wheat, rye

or barley, including plain flour and self-raising flour, spelt flour, semolina flour, batter mixes, breadcrumbs, oats not labelled as being gluten free (see right), oat milk, suet, muesli and wheat-based cereals. l CHECK labels on oats, baking powder, cake decorations, marzipan, ready to use icings, dried yeast, rice, soya or nut milks, mincemeat and nut butters, as all these may contain gluten. l YOU CAN USE any flours labelled

gluten free, polenta (cornmeal), arrowroot, artificial sweeteners, bicarbonate of soda, corn starch (flour), cream of tartar, food colouring, gelatine, icing sugar, potato starch (flour), fresh yeast, ground almonds, dried fruit, preserves, treacle, syrup, eggs, butter, oils and spreads. For an at-a-glance guide to shopping for gluten-free ingredients, download our chart, compiled in association with Coeliac UK, from healthyfood. co.uk/nutritioncards.

ARE ALL OATS OK? Oats are often produced in the same factory as wheat, rye and barley, so always look for oats that are labelled as gluten free to avoid cross-contamination. It’s also important to be aware that a small number of people who react to gluten may also react to avenin, a protein similar to gluten that’s found in oats. Ask your dietitian for advice if you’re unsure whether or not it’s safe to include gluten-free oats in your diet. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 31


R EC I PE S

OCTOBER

WHAT TO COOK THIS MONTH Our recipe consultant Phil Mundy uses everyday ingredients to create easy, tasty recipes. Each dish is analysed by nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow

IF YOU ONLY MAKE ONE THING...

Cooking an authentic ❛curry doesn’t have to be labour intensive. Anjum Anand’s light, scented chicken dish (p64) is a revelation.

melanie leyshon editor


R EC I PE S

RECIPE INDEX GLUTEN-FREE TREATS 30 Cranberry and almond scones 197kcal 30 Chocolate teff flour brownies 139kcal 31 Raspberry, banana and chocolate muffins 223kcal 31 Ginger and date oat bars 141kcal 31 Spiced coconut flour pancakes 318kcal

GLUTEN-FREE BREAKFASTS 40 Chia and mixed berry breakfast pudding 283kcal 40 Sweetcorn and pepper fritters with avocado smash 395kcal 41 Buckwheat and lemon pancakes 231kcal

45 Stuffed chicken with sweet potato mash and roasted greens 429kcal 46 Hot and sour fish soup with noodles 417kcal

EASY DINNERS + LUNCH 51 Baked ratatouille 338kcal 51 Roasted vegetable and feta couscous salad 349kcal 53 Balsamic roast beef with vegetables 392kcal 53 Roast beef, rice and root veg salad 537kcal 55 Pea pilaf with grilled tahini chicken 435kcal 55 Quick tuna and rice salad 512kcal

60 Stuffed peppers 349kcal

DINNER FOR ONE 63 COVER RECIPE Dukkah chicken and vegetable bake 513kcal

ANJUM ANAND’S LIGHTER INDIAN SUPPER 64 Cardamom-scented chicken curry 351kcal 66 Quick carrot salad 100kcal 66 Warm tandoori mushroom, spinach and chickpea salad 341kcal 67 Stir-fried nigella cabbage 157kcal

EXTREME MAKEOVER 68 Chocolate muffins 122kcal

6pm PANIC WEEKNIGHT DINNERS 42 Quick chickpea and tofu curry 565kcal 43 Sweet potato ‘lasagne’ 480kcal 44 Creamy chicken and corn filo pie 448kcal

59 Prawn arrabbiata 379kcal

GLOBE ARTICHOKES 60 Artichoke and seafood tagliatelle 495kcal 60 Lamb steaks with artichokes and fennel 317kcal

PORTABLE PUDS 71 Blueberry cheesecake jars 143kcal 71 Chocolate custard jars 169kcal 72 Vanilla almond rice jars 138kcal 73 Apricot and apple crumble jars 265kcal

TURN THE PAGE FOR DIETITIAN JULIETTE KELLOW’S MONTHLY MEAL PLANNER Guide to recipe symbols & nutrition analysis vegetarian gluten free dairy free suitable for freezing

0.3g salt or less per 100g At least 6g fibre per 100g or 3g fibre per 100kcal

450kcal or less for a main course; 300kcal or less for breakfast; and 150kcal or less for a starter, snack, drink or dessert

At least 20% of the calories come from protein At least 30% of the RDA per serving

PHOTO: GETTY

3g fat or less per 100g 1.5g saturates or less per 100g 5g total sugars or less per 100g

At least 30% of the RDA per serving

1

The number of portions of fruit and/or veg contained in a serving

l Nutrition is calculated using McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods, Seventh Edition, but may vary slightly depending on your ingredients. l All recipes are approved by Diabetes UK as suitable for people with diabetes. l We use standard UK measurements, where 1tbsp is 15ml and 1tsp is 5ml. l For gluten and dairy-free recipes, we recommend you check all product labels. l In vegetarian recipes with cheese, use a vegetarian substitute if you avoid animal rennet. l Our freezing symbol means a recipe can be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw and reheat until piping hot. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 33


HFG’S WEEKLY Juliette Kellow

HFG NUTRITION CONSULTANT

❛The key

to healthy eating is to enjoy it!❜

WEEKDAY MEALS p42

OUR MENU PLAN is designed to help you MEAT lose around 1lb a week FREE MONDAY (and more if you have a BREAKFAST 296kcal lot to lose). It includes Porridge made with 4tbsp oats and 275ml skimmed milk, topped with at least five portions of 2 chopped pitted dates fruit and veg a day, and SNACK 75kcal two portions of fish 3 brazil nuts each week, one of them oil rich. We also make LUNCH 453kcal 1 toasted panini filled with ½ small sure you get enough avocado, 1 tomato, ½ ball reducedvital nutrients, such as fat mozzarella and fresh basil calcium. And, as we use SNACK 96kcal many of the delicious 3tbsp reduced-fat hummus with 3 celery sticks recipes in this issue, there’s no deprivation DINNER 565kcal involved. Over the 1 serving quick chickpea and tofu curry (p42) page, you’ll find suggestions for the TOTAL weekend and the kcal following weeks…

1,485

34 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

p53

TUESDAY BREAKFAST 330kcal 1 slice wholegrain toast with 1tsp low-fat spread and 2 scrambled eggs. Plus 1 orange

SNACK 192kcal 1 skinny cappuccino and 1 chocolate muffin (p68)

LUNCH 461kcal 1 wholemeal wrap filled with ½ small can pink salmon mixed with 3tbsp steamed peas, watercress and 2tbsp tzatziki. Plus a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

SNACK 50kcal Handful grapes

DINNER 392kcal 1 serving balsamic roast beef with vegetables (p53)

TOTAL kcal

1,425


R EC I PE S

DIET PLANNER p40

p59

p43

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST 340kcal

BREAKFAST 283kcal

BREAKFAST 353kcal

1 apple, 1 pear and 1 plum, chopped and topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 3tbsp toasted oats

1 serving chia and mixed berry breakfast pudding (p40)

1 toasted wholegrain bagel filled with 1 sliced banana, 1tbsp low-fat soft cheese and 1 chopped pitted date

SNACK 92kcal 15g unsalted almonds

SNACK 114kcal 1 thin slice malt loaf with 1tsp low-fat spread

LUNCH 410kcal

LUNCH 537kcal 1 serving roast beef, rice and root veg salad (p53)

SNACK 121kcal 2 rye crispbreads with 2tbsp low-fat cottage cheese and cucumber

DINNER 379kcal 1 serving prawn arrabbiata (p59)

TOTAL kcal

1,469

1 wholemeal pitta and 1 carrot and ½ red pepper cut into crudités, served with guacamole made from 1 small avocado, 2 tomatoes and lemon juice, chilli and garlic to taste

SNACK 189kcal Large bowl of salad topped with 1 boiled egg and 3tbsp low-fat cottage cheese

DINNER 435kcal 1 serving pea pilaf with grilled tahini chicken (p55)

TOTAL kcal

1,431

SNACK 80kcal 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

LUNCH 512kcal 1 serving quick tuna and rice salad (p55)

SNACK 66kcal 3 celery sticks filled with 3tbsp tzatziki

DINNER 480kcal 1 serving sweet potato ‘lasagne’ (p43)

TOTAL kcal

1,491 OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 35


WEEKEND MEALS

NOW KEEP GOING...

p40

p71

p41

AROUND 300kcal EACH

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

BREAKFASTS

BREAKFAST 395kcal

BREAKFAST 365kcal

Blueberry pancakes

1 serving sweetcorn and pepper fritters with avocado smash (p40)

1 wholegrain bagel, toasted and topped with steamed spinach and 1 poached egg. Plus 1 small glass unsweetened fresh orange juice

1 serving buckwheat and lemon pancakes (p41). Plus 1 pear

SNACK 120kcal 1 skinny cappuccino and 1 apple

4 walnut halves

5tbsp bran flakes with 2tbsp sultanas, 1 chopped apple and skimmed milk

LUNCH 429kcal

Cheese and tomato omelette

1 serving stuffed chicken with sweet potato mash and roasted greens (p45)

Omelette made from 2 eggs filled with 1 tomato, 4tbsp low-fat cottage cheese and fresh parsley

SNACK 143kcal

Plums with yogurt

1 blueberry cheesecake jar (p71)

3 chopped plums topped with a 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt and 5tbsp bran flakes

SNACK 100kcal LUNCH 450kcal 1 wholemeal wrap filled with 3tbsp reduced-fat hummus, 1 grated carrot and 1tbsp pine nuts. Plus a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

Fruity bran cereal

SNACK 93kcal 1tbsp sunflower seeds

DINNER 417kcal 1 serving hot and sour fish soup with noodles (p46)

TOTAL kcal

1,475

DINNER 410kcal 4 thin slices toasted granary bread topped with 1 small can drained sardines in olive oil mixed with 1 tomato, ½ small red onion, fresh parsley and garlic

TOTAL kcal

1,447

AFTER YOU’VE FOLLOWED our menu planner for a week, create your own using the ideas on the right. Choose ONE breakfast, ONE lunch, ONE dinner and TWO snacks each day. Plus have an extra 300ml skimmed milk in skinny coffees or shakes. 36 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

Banana, berry and oat smoothie 200ml skimmed milk blended with 1 banana, 2 handfuls blackberries and 3tbsp oats

Ham and egg plate 1 slice wholegrain bread, 1 slice lean ham, 1 boiled egg, 1 tomato and 1tbsp low-fat cottage cheese. Plus 1 orange

Banana on toast 2 slices wholegrain toast topped with 2tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter and 1 mashed banana


R EC I PE S

p51

LUNCHES Couscous feta salad

AROUND 400kcal EACH

DINNERS Mediterranean veg

AROUND 500kcal EACH

1 serving roasted vegetable and feta couscous salad (p51). Plus 1 pear

1 serving baked ratatouille (p51) plus 1 chocolate custard jar (p71)

Cheat’s veggie pizza

Beef chilli and rice

10cm piece granary baguette, halved lengthways, topped with 4tbsp tomato pasta sauce, ½ small red onion, 4 mushrooms, 1 tomato and ½ ball reduced-fat mozzarella, all sliced, and sprinkled with mixed herbs. Bake until the veg are cooked and the cheese is melted. Serve with salad

Chilli made from 100g 5% fat beef mince, ½ small onion, ½ green and ½ red pepper, chilli powder, ½ large can chopped tomatoes, 1tbsp tomato purée, 200ml reduced-salt beef stock and ½ large can red kidney beans in water (drained). Serve with 4tbsp cooked brown rice and salad

Mackerel on toast

Salmon wrap

2 slices wholegrain toast topped with ½ small can mackerel in olive oil (drained) and 2 tomatoes. Plus 1 plum and a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt

1 salmon fillet, brushed with olive oil and lemon juice, then grilled and served in 1 wholemeal wrap, with salad and 2tbsp tzatziki

Jacket potato with chicken salad

Chicken pie

1 jacket potato topped with 3tbsp tzatziki mixed with 1 small cooked, diced skinless chicken breast, diced cucumber and mixed leaves

1 serving creamy chicken and corn filo pie (p44), plus 1 apple

Tuna and bean salad PHOTOS: ISTOCK

p71

Salad of mixed leaves, ½ large can mixed beans in water, 1 small can tuna in water, cucumber, 1 tomato, fresh parsley, lemon juice and 2tbsp fat-free dressing. Plus a 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt and 2 plums

Thai stir-fry noodles 1 serving straight-to-wok flat rice noodles mixed with 3 sliced spring onions, 1 handful beansprouts, a sliced 1-egg omelette and garlic and chilli to taste, fried in 2tsp sunflower oil with 1tbsp roasted peanuts and fresh coriander, lime juice and chilli sauce to taste. Plus 1 orange

SNACKS

AROUND 100kcal EACH

Vary your two snacks each day to keep it interesting

l 2 slices lean ham spread with 2tbsp

low-fat soft cheese, topped with sliced cucumber and rolled up l 1tbsp unsalted almonds l 4 brazil nuts or walnut halves l 1 clementine, 1 apple and 1 kiwi l 3tbsp reduced-fat hummus and 3 celery sticks l 1 thin slice malt loaf l 1 slice wholegrain toast and 1tsp no added sugar or salt peanut butter l Bowl of salad with 1 boiled egg and 1tbsp fat-free dressing l 1 banana and 1 handful blueberries l 125g pot fat-free fruit yogurt with 1 clementine l 1 rye crispbread topped with 2tbsp low-fat cottage cheese, 1 chopped tomato and chopped cucumber l 1 slice wholegrain toast with 1tsp low-fat spread and Marmite l 4tbsp tzatziki with ½ red pepper l 3tbsp bran flakes with skimmed milk l ½ can tuna in water with 1 tomato, ½ green pepper, 3 celery sticks, all chopped, with chilli sauce to taste

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 37


GLUTEN-FREE BREAKFASTS TO FUEL YOUR DAY

Chia and mixed berry breakfast pudding

Turn breakfast into a treat with these alternatives to toast and cereal – whether you need to avoid gluten or just fancy shaking up your morning routine 38 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016


R EC I PE S

Sweetcorn and pepper fritters with avocado smash

ET SWEOURY V or SATIONS P O or f E YON R E V E

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 39


2 PER SERVING

283kcal 13.4g fat 1.5g saturates 33.4g carbs 23g sugars

17.3g fibre 8.7g protein 0.2g salt 389mg calcium 3.3mg iron

Chia and mixed berry breakfast pudding prep 10 min + chilling cook 5 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 500ml unsweetened hazelnut milk (we used Rude Health) 90g chia seeds ½tsp vanilla extract 2 small ripe bananas, mashed 300g frozen mixed berries 4 prunes, pitted and chopped 4tbsp plain soya yogurt 1 kiwi, peeled and diced 1 small apple, diced 2tbsp ground flaxseed or ground flax and nut blend 1 Put the hazelnut milk, chia seeds, vanilla extract and banana in a bowl and stir well to combine. Put the bowl in the fridge and leave for at least 2 hr or overnight until the chia seeds swell and the mixture takes on the texture of tapioca. 2 Put the mixed berries and chopped prunes in a pan and gently heat for 5 min or until the fruit is softened and juicy. Mash slightly, then set aside to cool. 3 When ready to serve, divide the chia pudding among 4 glasses, jars

40 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

Sweetcorn and pepper fritters with avocado smash prep 15 min cook 20 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free Cooking oil spray 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 250g frozen sweetcorn, rinsed under a hot tap to thaw 1 small red pepper, diced 30g pumpkin seeds 125g gram (chickpea) flour 1tsp smoked paprika 2tsp ground coriander

2 eggs, lightly beaten For the avocado smash 1 large avocado 150g frozen broad beans, thawed Juice ½ lime, plus wedges to serve 25g bunch fresh mint leaves Tabasco, to taste 1 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and fry for 5 min or until translucent. Add the sweetcorn, red pepper and pumpkin seeds, then cook for 2 min. 2 Transfer the vegetable mixture to a large bowl, add the flour and spices, then gradually stir in 125ml cold water and the eggs until the mixture is combined. 3 Clean the frying pan, then return it to the hob and spray with oil. Put a scoop of the mixture (about 2 heaped tbsp) into the pan for each fritter and, working in batches, gently fry for about 3 min on each side or until golden. Continue until all the mixture is used up, to make 8 fritters in total. 4 To make the avocado smash, put the avocado, broad beans, lime juice and most of the mint in a food processor. Season with black pepper and Tabasco, then pulse until the mixture is coarse, adding 1–2tbsp water if it’s too thick. 5 Serve 2 fritters per person, topped with the avocado smash and garnished with the remaining mint leaves, ground black pepper and lime wedges to squeeze over.

2 PER SERVING

395kcal 19.9g fat 3.8g saturates 38g carbs 10.1g sugars

13.6g fibre 19.5g protein 0.2g salt 103mg calcium 4.4mg iron

RECIPES: JO BRIDGFORD. PHOTOS: MELANIE JENKINS

or bowls. Top with the berry sauce, then spoon over some soya yogurt, diced fruit and flaxseed (or flax and nut blend).


R EC I PE S

Buckwheat and lemon pancakes prep 10 min cook 15 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free 350g low-fat natural yogurt 1tsp vanilla extract 1 small ripe banana, mashed Zest and juice 1 small lemon 1 large egg, separated 100g buckwheat flour 1tsp gluten-free baking powder 250g fresh blueberries Cooking oil spray 4tsp runny honey

1 In a large bowl, whisk 125g of the yogurt with the vanilla extract, mashed banana, lemon zest and juice, and the egg yolk. Add the flour, baking powder and half the blueberries, and stir to combine. 2 In a clean mixing bowl, beat the egg white with an electric mixer on a high speed until stiff peaks form. Gently fold half the egg white into the pancake batter until smooth, then fold in the rest. 3 Heat a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and spray with oil. Put 2 heaped tbsp of the batter into the hot pan to make

1 pancake. Cook for 2 min until small bubbles appear on top of the pancake, then carefully flip. Cook for another 1–2 min until golden on both sides. Transfer to a plate and keep warm. 4 Repeat until all the pancake batter is cooked. You should have 8–12 pancakes in total. 5 Serve 2–3 pancakes per person, topped with the remaining yogurt, a drizzle of honey and the rest of the blueberries.

1

PER SERVING

231kcal 4g fat 1.2g saturates 39.6g carbs 22.6g sugars

Despite the misleading name, buckwheat is actually gluten free so it’s suitable for people with a sensitivity or intolerance.

2.8g fibre 10.1g protein 0.5g salt 169mg calcium 0.8mg iron

Buckwheat and lemon pancakes

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 41


R EC I PE S

Quick chickpea and tofu curry prep 10 min cook 25 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 200g brown rice 1tsp sunflower oil 1 red onion, chopped 400g tofu, cubed 800g frozen mixed vegetables 80g balti curry paste 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 1tsp runny honey 400g can chopped tomatoes 40g roasted unsalted cashews Fresh coriander, to garnish (optional)

Quick chickpea and tofu curry

WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

FAMILY MEALS rted! so

Each month, we bring you a batch of healthy, quick and easy midweek suppers, with meat, chicken, fish and veggie options to please everyone 42 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

1 Cook the rice according to the pack instructions, then drain. 2 Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan, then fry the onion for 4 min. Add the tofu and fry for 3–4 min until golden. Add the mixed vegetables, curry paste and chickpeas and stir for a few min to heat through. Add the honey and tomatoes, then fill the tomato can with about 100ml water, swill it around and add it to the pan. Simmer for 10 min or until the sauce thickens (add more water if you prefer a thinner sauce). 3 Serve the curry with the rice, topped with the cashews and garnished with coriander, if using.

4 PER SERVING

565kcal 17.8g fat 2g saturates 78.6g carbs 18.1g sugars

16.8g fibre 27.4g protein 0.9g salt 264mg calcium 8.1mg iron


Sweet potato ‘lasagne’ prep 15 min cook 35 min serves 4 gluten free 600g sweet potatoes, scrubbed and sliced lengthways into 5mm thick slices 1tbsp olive oil 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2tsp dried oregano Large pinch dried chilli flakes 500g 5% fat beef mince 400g can chopped tomatoes 1tbsp worcestershire sauce 300g low-fat cottage cheese 80g baby spinach 80g reduced-fat mature cheddar, grated 320g broccoli florets 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Put the sweet potatoes in a microwave-proof dish with 2tbsp water, then cover and microwave on high for 8–10 min until soft. Drain and set aside. Or steam the slices until tender. 2 Meanwhile, heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Add the garlic, oregano, chilli flakes and mince, then fry for 6–8 min until browned. Add the tomatoes and worcestershire sauce, then boil for a further 10 min or until the sauce has thickened. 3 Spoon half the mince into a medium, deep ovenproof dish and completely cover with half the sweet potatoes. Spread with half the cottage cheese, followed by half the spinach. Repeat the layers

Sweet potato ‘lasagne’

in the same order. Scatter over the grated cheese and season with freshly ground black pepper, then press down lightly to compact the layers a little. 4 Bake for 15 min or until the cheese is melted and the top is browned. Meanwhile, steam the broccoli until just tender, then serve with the bake.

4 PER SERVING

480kcal 15.6g fat 6.9g saturates 42.4g carbs 17.3g sugars

9.7g fibre 45.8g protein 1.4g salt 392mg calcium 5.5mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 43


Creamy chicken and corn filo pie prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 dairy free

Creamy chicken and corn filo pie

3 PER SERVING

448kcal 9.6g fat 1.4g saturates 59.4g carbs 18.6g sugars

44 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

13.2g fibre 33.8g protein 1.2g salt 118mg calcium 1.8mg iron

Cooking oil spray 650g carrots, cut into chunks 1 onion, finely diced Large handful fresh thyme, leaves roughly chopped, plus extra sprigs to garnish 2 garlic cloves, crushed 450g skinless chicken breast, diced 2tbsp plain flour 200ml very low salt hot chicken stock 410g can creamed corn (see tip) 150g frozen sweetcorn ½ x 270g pack filo pastry (we used Jus Rol) 1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6 and grease a 1 litre ovenproof dish with spray oil. 2 Boil the carrots in a saucepan of water for 20–25 min until soft. Drain, then mash with plenty of ground black pepper and keep warm. 3 While the carrots are cooking, spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set over a high heat. Add the onion, thyme and garlic and fry for 3–4 min. Add the chicken and cook for 5 min or until lightly golden. Add the flour and combine well with the chicken. Add the stock, stirring until a thick sauce starts to form. Add the creamed corn and sweetcorn and heat through. Season with pepper, then simmer for 5 min. 4 Spoon the chicken mixture into the prepared dish. Spray each filo sheet with oil, then lightly scrunch up and lay over the filling to cover completely. Spray again with oil, then bake for 15 min or until golden. 5 Serve with the mashed carrot, garnished with extra thyme sprigs. Tip Despite the name, creamed corn doesn’t usually contain any dairy, but always check the label if you need to avoid milk.


R EC I PE S

Stuffed chicken with sweet potato mash and roasted greens

Stuffed chicken with sweet potato mash and roasted greens prep 15 min cook 25 min serves 4 gluten free 4 skinless chicken breasts 1 shallot or ½ small red onion, finely diced 60g reduced-fat soft cheese 8 soft pitted prunes, roughly chopped Cooking oil spray 600g sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks 350g broccoli, cut into florets 350g brussels sprouts, halved 1tsp sesame oil 25g flaked almonds

1 Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6 and line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Cut a slit lengthways along each chicken breast to form a pocket. In a small bowl, combine the shallot or onion, soft cheese and prunes. Spoon a quarter of the filling into each pocket and push it in firmly. Put the chicken in the baking tray and spray with oil, then bake for 20–25 min until cooked. 2 Meanwhile, put the sweet potatoes in a medium pan, cover with boiling water and boil for 15 min or until soft. Drain, mash and keep warm. 3 Put the broccoli and sprouts in a lined baking tray and toss with the

sesame oil and plenty of black pepper. Bake for 12–15 min until just tender and lightly golden. Add the almonds and cook for a further 3 min or until golden. 4 Serve the chicken with the sweet potato mash and roasted veg.

4 PER SERVING

429kcal 10.1g fat 2.5g saturates 39.7g carbs 18g sugars

14.3g fibre 47.4g protein 0.5g salt 139mg calcium 3.8mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 45


R EC I PE S

Hot and sour fish soup with noodles prep 15 min cook 15 min serves 4 dairy free

1 Heat 1tsp of the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Fry the garlic, ginger, lime zest and half the diced chillies for a few min. Add the miso paste and 1 litre boiling water to the pan, then cover and bring back to the boil. Add the vegetables and edamame beans and bring to the boil again. Add the fish and simmer for 3 min. Set the soup aside for 5 min so the fish can poach in the residual heat (it should be opaque when cooked). 2 While the fish is poaching, cook the noodles according to the pack instructions. Drain, then toss with the remaining oil and divide among 4 serving bowls. 3 Spoon the fish soup over the noodles, then squeeze over the lime juice and top with the coriander and remaining chillies. Serve with extra lime wedges to squeeze over.

46 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

2 PER SERVING

417kcal 6.3g fat 1.1g saturates 50.3g carbs 9.7g sugars

8.4g fibre 37g protein 1.8g salt 113mg calcium 3.6mg iron

Hot and sour fish soup with noodles

RECIPES: JESS MOULDS. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART

2tsp sesame oil 3 garlic cloves, chopped 25g fresh ginger, grated Zest and juice 3 limes, plus wedges to serve 2 mild red chillies, finely diced (deseed for a milder soup) 2tbsp white miso paste 160g shiitake mushrooms, sliced 160g green beans, sliced 160g green cabbage, shredded 160g edamame beans 500g white fish fillets, cut into chunks 250g buckwheat or brown rice soba noodles Small bunch fresh coriander, roughly chopped


www.kleankanteen.com


How much

FIBRE in ready to heat rice?

Uncle Ben’s Long Grain Rice, £1.49/250g Per 125g serving

0.5g fibre

You can now prepare rice in double-quick time, but not all pouches are equal on the fibre front ibre in food helps to fill us up, it’s good for digestion and helps prevent constipation. Good intakes are also linked to lower rates of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and bowel cancer. l Buying ready-to-heat rice saves time and helps you control portions. Most packs serve two, with a usual portion being around 110–140g. l Pouches vary in the amount of salt they contain, so check labels. As a rule, flavoured varieties tend to contain more salt – they may even be high in salt. Veetee Golden Vegetable Rice, for example, has a massive 2g per serving (that’s a third of the maximum recommended for a day). l Keep meals interesting by

F

choosing rice blended with other ingredients such as quinoa, lentils, red rice, wild rice or vegetables (but still watch the salt). l It can be tough to reach the 30g fibre a day experts recommend, so get into the habit of checking labels and choosing products with the most (wholegrain or brown varieties will help boost intakes). As a rule, any food with at least 6g fibre per 100g is a good source.

Tilda Brown Basmati Wholegrain Rice, £1/250g Per 125g serving

2.1g fibre

FIBRES VALUEING PER SERV (½ PACK)

Tesco Wholegrain Rice, 50p/250g Per 125g serving

3g fibre


S H O PPI N G

Tilda Pure Basmati Rice, £1/250g

Veetee Basmati & Wild Rice, £1/280g

Seeds of Change Quinoa & Wholegrain Rice With A Hint Of Garlic, £1.50/240g

Per 125g serving

Per 140g serving

Per 120g serving

COMPILED BY JENNIFER LOW. MAIN PHOTO: ISTOCK

0.9g fibre

1g fibre

1.4g fibre

Tilda Wholegrain Pilau Rice, £1.59/250g

Veetee Basmati Rice, £1/280g

Waitrose Firm And Nutty Whole Grain Rice, 67p/250g

Per 125g serving

Per 140g serving

Per 125g serving

2.4g fibre

2.8g fibre

Worldwide Foods Classic Basmati Rice, 49p/250g, Aldi

Uncle Ben’s Wholegrain & Quinoa Rice, £1.50/220g

Merchant Gourmet Wholegrain Rice Mix With Seaweed, £1.99/250g

Per 125g serving

Per 110g serving

Per 125g serving

3.6g fibre

3.9g fibre

2.8g fibre

6g fibre OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 49


EASY DINNERS (with lunch included)

Baked ratatouille

RECIPES SALLY PARKER, PHOTOGRAPHY MARK O’MEARA

So busy making dinner that you’ve no time to prepare tomorrow’s lunch? These two-for-one offers are too good to pass by


R EC I PE S

THE DINNER Baked ratatouille

prep 15 min cook 30 min serves 4 + 1 extra portion ratatouille vegetarian gluten free 1 large aubergine, chopped into 1.5cm cubes 1 large red onion, chopped into 1.5cm cubes 1 large red pepper, chopped into 1.5cm cubes 1 large courgette, chopped into 1.5cm cubes 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2tsp fresh thyme leaves Cooking oil spray 400g can cannellini beans in water, drained 400g baby plum tomatoes, halved 2tsp balsamic vinegar For dinner (serves 4) 200g quick-cook polenta or fine cornmeal 50g parmesan or Italian-style vegetarian hard cheese, finely grated Fresh basil leaves, to garnish (optional) 1 Heat the oven to 200ºC/fan 180°C/gas 6 and line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Put the chopped aubergine, onion, pepper and courgette in the tray, then scatter over the garlic and thyme. Spray with oil, then roast for 20 min. 2 Add the beans and tomatoes to the tray and drizzle over the balsamic vinegar. Bake for another 10 min or until the vegetables are golden and the tomatoes soft. Stir and season with black pepper. 3 While the ratatouille is cooking, put 1 litre water in a large saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low, then add the polenta in a slow, steady stream. Cook, mixing with a whisk, for 6–7 min until thick and creamy. Remove from the

THE LUNCH

Roasted vegetable and feta couscous salad prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 1 vegetarian

heat and stir through two-thirds of the cheese with a spoon. 4 Transfer a fifth of the ratatouille to a container, leave to cool, then cover with a lid and chill for lunch the next day. Divide the polenta among 4 plates, top with the rest of the ratatouille and sprinkle over the remaining cheese, then serve garnished with basil, if you like.

4 PER SERVING

338kcal 5.9g fat 2.8g saturates 57.1g carbs 10.9g sugars

50g wholemeal couscous Juice ½ lemon 1 serving leftover baked ratatouille 40g baby spinach 20g reduced-fat feta, crumbled 1tsp olive oil 1 Put the couscous in a bowl with 90ml boiling water, then cover and leave for 5 min or until the liquid is absorbed. Squeeze over the lemon juice, then fluff the grains with a fork. 2 Meanwhile, microwave the leftover ratatouille for 1–2 min until heated through. Mix with the spinach, then serve with the couscous, topped with the feta, olive oil and a grind of black pepper.

9.2g fibre 14.9g protein 0.3g salt 215mg calcium 2.7mg iron

4 PER SERVING

349kcal 8.1g fat 3.1g saturates 52g carbs 12.5g sugars

12.2g fibre 17.9g protein 1g salt 222mg calcium 4.9mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 51


R EC I PE S

Balsamic roast beef with vegetables

52 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016


THE DINNER

Balsamic roast beef with vegetables prep 15 min cook 1 hr 15 min serves 4 + 1 extra portion beef and roasted veg gluten free dairy free 1tbsp balsamic vinegar 1tbsp wholegrain mustard Cooking oil spray 750g lean beef roasting joint 500g baby beetroot, trimmed, peeled and halved (or quartered if large) 500g baby carrots or small carrots, trimmed and halved For dinner (serves 4) ½ large head cauliflower, cut into florets 400g potatoes, peeled and chopped 1tbsp creamed horseradish (we used Colman’s) 1tbsp snipped fresh chives, to garnish (optional) 1 Heat the oven to 190ºC/fan 170°C/gas 5. Line a large baking dish or tray with baking paper. Mix the balsamic vinegar with the mustard in a small dish. Set aside. 2 Spray a large non-stick frying pan with oil and set it over a high heat. Brown the beef all over until it’s golden (about 10 min). Transfer the beef to the prepared tray and brush on all sides with the vinegar mixture. Roast for another 10 min. 3 Remove the beef from the oven, then add the beetroot and carrots to the tray. Lightly spray the veg with oil, then return the tray to the oven and roast for 45 min for medium or until the beef is cooked to your liking. 4 Transfer the beef to a plate, cover loosely with foil and leave to rest for 10 min. Return the vegetables to the oven for a further 10 min or until golden and tender. 5 Meanwhile, steam the cauliflower

THE LUNCH

Roast beef, rice and root veg salad prep 5 min serves 1 gluten free dairy free and potatoes for 15–18 min until tender, then mash together with the horseradish until smooth. 6 Thinly slice the beef. Put a fifth of the beef and the carrot and beetroot mixture into a container, leave to cool, then cover and chill for lunch tomorrow. 7 Divide the mash among 4 plates, then top with the remaining beef. Serve with the rest of the vegetables, sprinkled with the chives (if using) and a grind of black pepper.

3

1 serving leftover balsamic roast beef with vegetables 125g cooked wholegrain rice and quinoa mix 40g rocket 1tsp sunflower seeds 1tsp balsamic vinegar, to drizzle 1 Put the leftover roast beef and vegetables on top of the quinoa and rice, then scatter with the rocket and seeds. Drizzle with the balsamic vinegar and season with ground black pepper, then eat straightaway.

3

PER SERVING

392kcal 8.6g fat 2.9g saturates 39.7g carbs 18.2g sugars

10.1g fibre 41.3g protein 0.7g salt 93mg calcium 6.4mg iron

PER SERVING

537kcal 14g fat 3.1g saturates 59.2g carbs 16.1g sugars

9.5g fibre 43.9g protein 1.1g salt 169mg calcium 8.1mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 53


Pea pilaf with grilled tahini chicken


R EC I PE S

THE DINNER

Pea pilaf with grilled tahini chicken prep 15 min + marinating cook 25 min serves 4 + 1 extra serving pilaf dairy free For the pilaf 2tsp olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 1 green chilli, sliced 2 garlic cloves, crushed Zest 1 lemon 250g basmati rice 550ml very low salt chicken stock 350g frozen petit pois 200g baby spinach For dinner (serves 4) 2tsp tahini paste 1tsp preserved lemon paste 1tsp ground cumin Juice ½ lemon 400g mini skinless chicken fillets Cooking oil spray 320g green beans 2tbsp toasted flaked almonds, to serve 1 Combine the tahini, lemon paste, cumin and lemon juice in a shallow dish. Add the chicken, turn to coat, then cover and chill for 1 hr. 2 To make the pilaf, heat the oil in a large saucepan (that has a lid) over a medium heat. Sauté the onion for 5 min or until soft. Add the chilli, garlic and lemon zest, then cook, stirring, for 1 min. Add the rice and stir to coat the grains in the oil. Pour in the stock and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low, then cover the pan and simmer for 10 min or until the liquid is absorbed and the rice is al dente. 3 Rinse the petit pois under boiling water from the kettle, then add to the pilaf. Cover and cook for 1 min, then remove from the heat. Top with the spinach, then cover the pan and set aside to steam for 5 min.

THE LUNCH Quick tuna and rice salad

prep 5 min cook 5 min serves 1 dairy free

4 Meanwhile, heat a large griddle or non-stick frying pan over a high heat and spray with oil. Drain the chicken of any excess marinade, then add to the hot pan. Cook for 2–3 min on each side, loosely covered with foil, until golden and cooked through. While the chicken is cooking, steam the green beans. 5 Fluff the pilaf with a fork, then transfer a fifth to a container. Cool, then cover and chill. Divide the remaining pilaf among 4 plates, top with the chicken, then sprinkle with the almonds. Serve with the steamed green beans.

1 serving leftover pea pilaf 125g sweetcorn 1tsp reduced-salt soy sauce 120g can no-drain tuna, flaked 1tsp toasted flaked almonds 2tsp hot chilli sauce, to serve (optional) 1 Combine the pilaf with the sweetcorn and soy sauce. Top with the tuna and almonds, then drizzle over the hot chilli sauce, if using, and serve. Tip This is also great heated up. Put the pilaf, sweetcorn, soy and tuna in a microwave-proof bowl, cover and microwave on high for 2–3 min until heated through. Or, if you’re at home, heat in a wok or frying pan sprayed with oil over a medium heat.

2 PER SERVING

435kcal 10.2g fat 1.5g saturates 52g carbs 5.9g sugars

9.5g fibre 37.1g protein 0.8g salt 177mg calcium 5.1mg iron

3 PER SERVING

512kcal 8.2g fat 1.3g saturates 67.1g carbs 13.8g sugars

10.5g fibre 46.2g protein 2g salt 114mg calcium 4.6mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 55


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For information and to register online:

www.actionforcharity.co.uk events@actionforcharity.co.uk • 01590 677854 Raising funds for these charities:

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S H O PPI N G

What’s the deal with…

SEAWEED

It may seem like a challenging ingredient to cook with, but it’s worth a go as most varieties are packed with nutrients

WHAT IS IT? Most of us have swum in the sea trying to dodge this dark algae, which grows in the shallower parts of the ocean. But there are hundreds of edible varieties that can be harvested, and most are generally packed with vitamins and minerals as well as being low in calories and fat, and high in fibre. One of the most well known in the UK is nori seaweed – the type used to make sushi.

HOW IS IT USED?

Until recently, seaweed has generally been sold dried (it needs to be pre-soaked), but fresh varieties are now stocked in some supermarkets. Dark green kombu is used to flavour stocks and soups, black hijiki strips can be added to stir-fries and purple dried dulse makes a handy snack to eat straight from the pack. Granulated or flaked seaweed is sold as an alternative seasoning to salt because of its umami (savoury) flavour – although they can still be very high in salt, which is a natural component of seaweed. Seaweed flavoured soups and snacks, such as crisps, rice cakes and crackers, are also available. Don’t confuse it with Chinese crispy seaweed, which is actually finely shredded spring cabbage.

THE RESEARCH It’s a staple in some of the healthiest regions in the world, including Okinawa in Japan. Studies have found it can slow digestion, help prevent fat being absorbed and increase good bacteria in the gut. As it grows, the algae absorbs vitamins and minerals from the sea, including calcium, iodine, folate, magnesium, vitamins C and E, B group vitamins and antioxidants. It may be good for heart health as it contains nutrients and natural compounds that can help to lower cholesterol, as well as antioxidants that fight inflammation, which can damage cells. It contains active ingredients useful for reducing blood pressure and may also play a part in protecting against breast cancer.

WORDS: LAURA DAY. PHOTO: ISTOCK

FROM THE SHOP TO YOUR TABLE There are many types available, but we recommend starting with these…

Waitrose Cooks’ Ingredients fresh Kombu Seaweed, £1.99/50g, Waitrose, Ocado Per ½ pack l 11kcal l 0.1g fat l 0g saturates l 0g sugars l 0.2g salt

Yutaka Sushi Nori, £1.79/11g (5 sheets), Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s Per sheet l 5kcal l 0.1g fat l 0g saturates l 0g sugars l 0g salt

Mara Seaweed Dulse flakes, £5.49/30g, maraseaweed.com l Per 1g serving l 2kcal l 0g fat l 0g saturates l 0g sugars l 0.1g salt

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 57


'It’s pure and delicate – it’s amazing' Daniel Galmiche, Norwegian Seafood Council ambassador and chef

Daniel Galmiche’s Norwegian Fjord Trout with courgettes and sauce vierge PREP 15 MIN COOK 10 MIN SERVES 4 6tbsp olive oil 1 shallot, chopped 1 tomato, deseeded and diced 1tbsp good balsamic vinegar Juice ½ lime 4 x 140g Norwegian Fjord Trout fillets 2 large courgettes, peeled into ribbons 1 handful fresh flatleaf parsley, finely chopped 1 To make the sauce, warm 4tbsp of the oil in a small pan over a low heat for about 30 sec. Add the shallot and cook for 2 min, then remove the pan from heat. Stir in the tomato, vinegar and lime juice, then set aside and keep warm. 2 Fill a large pan with water and heat to 60°C. Brush each fillet with oil and sprinkle with pepper, then individually wrap in clingfilm and make watertight. Poach for 5–6 min. 3 Remove the fillets from the water, unwrap and pat dry with kitchen paper, then brush again with oil and season. Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat, then fry the fillets, skin-side down, for 2–3 min until the skin is golden. 4 Meanwhile, toss the courgettes with a little oil and black pepper, then cook in a hot non-stick griddle pan for 2–3 min on each side until tender and lightly charred. 5 Stir the parsley through the sauce, then drizzle over the fillets and serve with the courgettes. PER SERVING ● 358kcal ● 24.5g fat ● 4.2g saturates ● 4.2g carbs ● 4g sugars ● 2g fibre ● 30.4g protein ● 0.4g salt ● 69mg calcium ● 1.8mg iron

Fresh from the fjords Sustainable, lean and simple to cook, Norwegian Fjord Trout is a great catch when it comes to making a delicious and nutritious meal Norwegian Fjord Trout is a healthy source of protein and omega-3 fats. Farmed in cold, clear coastal seawater, the fish store much of their fat in their abdomen, making it easier to cut away to produce lean, nutritious fillets.

A versatile ingredient Fjord trout is different from European river trout in size, taste and colour. Prized by chefs for its delicate flavour, firm texture and deep red-orange hue with white marbling, the fish is perfect for

creating raw or marinated dishes such as sashimi and ceviche, as well as for light grilling, baking or frying.

Sustainably sourced Norway is one of the world’s leading aquacultural nations, thanks to its strict environmental regulations and sustainable practices, which are certified by the Marine Stewardship Council. Available all year round, the fish grow up in uncrowded waters with plenty of room to swim – and you can tell by the taste.

Look out for Norwegian Fjord Trout in selected Tesco stores and fishmongers soon


R EC I PE S LINGUINE OLIVE OIL GARLIC CANS CHERRY TOMATOES PARMESAN MIXED SALAD LEAVES

6pm PANIC

RECIPE: MEGAN CAMERON-LEE. PHOTOS: MARK O’MEARA, ISTOCK

An Italian-style supper that’s on the table in under 30 min? Mamma would be proud

Prawn arrabbiata prep 10 min cook 15 min serves 4 250g linguine 1tbsp olive oil 3 garlic cloves, chopped 1 large red chilli, sliced 1 large red pepper, sliced into thin strips 2 x 400g cans cherry tomatoes 300g cooked peeled and deveined king prawns 100g baby spinach 30g parmesan, shaved, and 125g mixed salad leaves, to serve

1 Cook the linguine in a large pan of unsalted boiling water according to the pack instructions, then drain. 2 Meanwhile, heat the oil in a separate large pan. Add the garlic, chilli and pepper and cook over a medium-high heat for 5 min or until soft. Add the canned tomatoes, then bring to the boil and bubble for 5 min. Reduce the heat to low, then add the prawns and spinach and cook for 1–2 min until the prawns are hot. 3 Toss the linguine with the sauce,

then divide among 4 bowls. Top with the parmesan, then add a grind of pepper and serve with salad leaves.

3 PER SERVING

379kcal 6.8g fat 2.1g saturates 57.7g carbs 11.5g sugars

6.5g fibre 25.7g protein 1.4g salt 192mg calcium 3.2mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 59


TURN 4 INGREDIENTS ARTICHOKE AND SEAFOOD TAGLIATELLE

PUT IT ON THE MENU

GLOBE ARTICHOKES

Mussels, Squid, Clams & Shrimp In A Tomato & Herb Sauce, £3.50/450g

LAMB STEAKS WITH ARTICHOKES AND FENNEL

TAKES

15 MIN

Marinated Artichokes, £1.50/250g TAKES

30 MIN

If fresh are too faffy, don’t miss out on these flavoursome veg – buy them in a jar, frozen or canned instead

A

RTICHOKES are one of the few veg it makes sense to buy ready-prepared and cooked. They’re ideal for topping pizzas, tossing into salads and stirring through pasta dishes. Or serve simply with cold meats and bread for a deli-style platter. To avoid adding unnecessary fat to a recipe when using canned artichokes, choose those in water rather than oil. Artichokes in jars or from the freezer aisle are likely to be marinated in oil, so drain them well and use in moderation to keep the calories, fat and salt down. The good news: just two artichoke hearts count as one of your five-a-day. They’re a good source of nutrients, providing potassium, folate and fibre. Plus, they’re considered to be prebiotic so feed good gut bacteria.

Artichoke Hearts In Water, £1.60/390g

ARTICHOKE STUFFED PEPPERS

Fresh fennel, £2/400g TAKES

40 MIN

OIL-FREE

Ponti Zero Olio Pepper And Lemon Artichokes £2.79/314ml, Ocado All the flavour of marinated artichokes without the fat. Just keep an eye on your salt intake. Per 100g (drained) l 60kcal l 0.5g fat l 0g saturates l 2.9g sugars l 1.7g salt

60 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

4 red sweet pointed peppers, 80p each

Artichoke Antipasto, £2/280g


R EC I PE S

INTO AN EASY MED-STYLE SUPPER Selected from

495kcal PER SERVING prep 5 min + thawing cook 10 min serves 3 Thaw fully, then heat the seafood and marinated artichokes, separately, according to the pack instructions. Meanwhile, cook the tagliatelle in a large pan of unsalted boiling water for 3 min or until al dente, then drain. Toss the pasta with the cooked seafood and artichokes, along with 2tbsp of the parsley, then serve. Truly Italian Traditional Tagliatelle, £1/300g

Daregal Le+ Taste Quick Frozen Parsley, £1/50g Selected from

317kcal PER SERVING prep 10 min cook 20 min serves 2

Garlic bulb, 30p

Lamb leg steaks, £3.50/300g

Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Drain the artichokes, then cut them in half lengthways and put them in a large baking tray. Slice the fennel, reserving the green fronds to garnish, then add to the tray and mix with the artichokes. Cut the whole unpeeled garlic bulb in half across the wide middle, then add to the tray along with the lamb. Spritz everything with spray oil and season generously with black pepper. Roast for 20 min, turning occasionally, or until the fennel is tender, the garlic is soft and the lamb is cooked to your liking. Squeeze the garlic flesh out of its skin and spread over the lamb. Scatter the fennel fronds over to serve. Selected from

prep 10 min cook 30 min serves 4

Bulgur Wheat, Chickpeas & Quinoa, £1.50/250g

Be Good To Yourself 35% Less Fat Mozzarella, £1/125g

Heat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Cut the peppers in half lengthways, scoop out and discard the membrane and seeds, then put them in a shallow baking tray. Drain the artichokes, reserving 2tbsp of the oil, then toss with the pack of bulgur wheat, chickpeas & quinoa. Divide among the pepper halves. Drain and tear the mozzarella into pieces, then dot over the stuffed peppers. Drizzle over the reserved artichoke oil, then roast for 30 min or until the peppers are tender and the mozzarella is melted and golden.

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 61

WORDS: NICHOLA PALMER. PHOTOS: GETTY, ISTOCK

349kcal PER SERVING


R EC I PE S

DINNER for ONE

Dukkah chicken and vegetable bake High in protein and low in saturates, this delicately spiced dinner also takes care of four of your five-a-day

hfg

COVEPRE RECI

RECIPE: LIZ MACRI. PHOTO: MARK O’MEARA

prep 10 min cook 35 min serves 1 (see tip) gluten free ½ yellow or red pepper, thickly sliced ½ small red onion, cut into wedges 5 baby carrots, tops trimmed, halved lengthways if large (or use 1 regular carrot) ½ x 400g can chickpeas in water, drained 125g skinless chicken breast 1tbsp olive oil 1tbsp dukkah spice mix 25g reduced-fat feta Handful salad leaves, to serve

1 Heat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Put the pepper, onion and carrots in a small baking dish. Bake for 10 min. 2 Remove the veg from the oven, then top with the chickpeas and chicken breast. Drizzle with the oil and sprinkle with the dukkah, then return to the oven and bake for another 20–25 min until the veg are tender and the chicken is cooked. 3 Transfer the chicken to a board and thickly slice. Spoon the veg into a serving dish, then put the chicken on top and crumble over

the feta. Season with pepper, then serve with the salad leaves. Tip Simply multiply the ingredients to serve 2 or more.

4 PER SERVING

513kcal 21g fat 5.2g saturates 34.8g carbs 12.3g sugars

15.2g fibre 46.6g protein 1.6g salt 214mg calcium 3.8mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 63


R EC I PE S

Anjum Anand’s

LIGHTER INDIAN SUPPER The TV chef and cookbook author proves it’s easy to make curry night lower in calories but just as delicious

THE MAIN

Cardamom-scented chicken curry

prep 10 min cook 50 min serves 4 dairy free

❛Proper homemade Indian

food is very healthy and can form a well-balanced meal. That’s because Indian breads are mostly wholemeal and authentic curries are full of spices, ginger, garlic, onions and tomatoes, which are all hailed as nourishing foods. I’ve put together a few of my favourites to try to wean you off the takeaway menu.❜

64 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

4tbsp vegetable oil 1 onion, finely chopped 15g fresh ginger, grated 4 fat garlic cloves, grated 1 tomato, chopped 2–3 green chillies, whole but pierced 2–3tsp ground cardamom, or to taste (see Anjum’s know-how, right) 1 rounded tsp ground coriander ¾tsp ground cumin ½tsp freshly ground black pepper, or to taste 600g skinless chicken joints 1 rounded tsp cornflour Handful chopped fresh coriander 4 mini reduced-fat naan breads, warmed 1 Heat the oil in a non-stick pan (that has a lid). Add the onion and fry until well browned. Add the ginger and garlic and cook, stirring, for 1–2 min until the garlic is cooked and starting to colour. 2 Add the chopped tomato, pierced chillies and ground spices. Sauté for a few min, then add a

splash of water and cook for 6–7 min more until the oil begins to come out of the mixture, stirring more as it starts to dry up. 3 Add the chicken joints and sauté in the masala for a few min (it will start to stick to the base of the pan). Add 400ml water and bring to the boil, then cover the pan and simmer until the chicken is cooked – it will take 25–35 minutes, depending on the size of the joints. 4 Stir a little cold water into the cornflour to make a paste, then stir this into the curry and cook for another few min. Add extra water to the pan if necessary – the sauce should be light and thin (see Anjum’s know-how, right). Stir in the chopped fresh coriander, then taste and adjust with more black pepper or cardamom as needed before serving with the naan breads. Tip If you need to follow a gluten-free diet, swap the naan for boiled basmati rice.

PER SERVING

351kcal 15.2g fat 1.5g saturates 32.2g carbs 4.6g sugars

3.4g fibre 22.2g protein 0.6g salt 142mg calcium 3.1mg iron


R EC I PE S

Anjum’s know-how ‘This is a really light, almost brothlike curry from the Sindhi community. Cardamom can differ in strength, so I leave it to you to decide how much to add – you can always put in more at the end of cooking, if you like.


R EC I PE S

CHOICE of Quick carrot salad prep 10 min cook 3 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 4tsp dry-roasted peanuts 4 large carrots, coarsely grated 1tsp sugar 4tsp lemon juice, or to taste Handful chopped fresh coriander leaves 1tbsp vegetable oil 1tsp brown mustard seeds

Anjum’s know-how You can put this together in an instant, and it’s great for cleansing the palate during a rich meal.

1 Coarsely grind the peanuts in a mortar and pestle. Toss with the grated carrots, sugar, lemon juice and coriander in a salad bowl. 2 Heat the oil in your smallest pan until hot. Add the mustard seeds and cover as they will splutter. As they reduce their spluttering, pour them over the salad and toss well. Taste, adjust the seasoning with black pepper, then serve.

1 PER SERVING

100kcal 5.9g fat 0.8g saturates 10.9g carbs 10g sugars

Anjum’s know-how This is a lovely salad with lots of flavours and textures. The roasted cumin powder in the dressing is optional, so if you don’t have any, don’t worry about leaving it out.

66 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

5.1g fibre 2.1g protein 0.2g salt 40mg calcium 0.6mg iron

Warm tandoori mushroom, spinach and chickpea saladd prep 10 min + marinating cook 8 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 300g mix shiitake, oyster and chestnut mushrooms, cleaned 100g baby spinach 200g can chickpeas, drained Handful walnuts, lightly crushed


R EC I PE S

SIDES

Anjum’s know-how Raw peanuts are the best ones to use, but if you only have roasted ones, add them in towards the end of cooking, just to heat them through.

For the tandoori marinade 2 fat garlic cloves, grated 8g fresh ginger, grated ½tsp chilli powder ¾tsp garam masala ¾tsp ground cumin 2½tbsp lemon juice 5tbsp olive oil For the dressing 4tsp cider, sherry or white wine vinegar 3tbsp extra-virgin olive oil ½tsp dijon mustard ½ red onion, finely sliced Large pinch roasted cumin powder (optional; see Anjum’s know-how) 1 Mix together all the ingredients for the marinade in a medium bowl. 2 Halve any large shiitake and oyster mushrooms (keep the smaller ones whole) and cut the chestnut mushrooms into 1.5cm thick slices. Toss the mushrooms in the marinade, making sure each piece is coated, then set aside for 30 min. 3 Heat the grill to high, then grill the marinated mushrooms for 3Ð4 min on each side until lightly charred (the shiitake and oyster mushrooms will take 3 min and the chestnut mushrooms will take an extra min on each side). 4 Meanwhile, in a small bowl or jug, whisk together the ingredients for the dressing with 1tsp water. 5 Put the spinach in a serving bowl, then add the mushrooms, chickpeas, walnuts and dressing. Season with black pepper, toss, then serve.

1 PER SERVING

341kcal 32.1g fat 4.2g saturates 7.8g carbs 2.1g sugars

3.5g fibre 6.3g protein 0.2g salt 86mg calcium 3mg iron

Stir-fried nigella cabbage prep 10 min cook 15 min serves 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free 2tbsp vegetable oil Small pinch asafoetida (available in the spice aisle of large supermarkets) 1tsp brown mustard seeds 1tsp nigella seeds 2–3 small dried red chillies 2tsp skinned, split black gram lentils (urad dal), washed 2 heaped tbsp peanuts, chopped (see Anjum’s know-how) 15–20 curry leaves, torn in half 1 white cabbage, finely shredded 1 Heat the oil in a large wok or non-stick saucepan. Add the

asafoetida and the mustard and nigella seeds, then fry for 30 sec or until the seeds pop. Add the whole dried chillies, lentils and peanuts. Turn the heat down and fry until the lentils start to colour, then add the curry leaves and cabbage. 2 Stir-fry for 3 min, then cover the pan and cook on a low heat for a further 6Ð7 min until the cabbage has wilted but still retains some bite. Serve straightaway.

2 PER SERVING

157kcal 10.7g fat 1.3g saturates 11.3g carbs 9.3g sugars

5.5g fibre 5.7g protein 0.2g salt 117mg calcium 1.8mg iron

l Recipes from I Love Curry (Quadrille, £17.99) and Indian Food Made Easy (Quadrille, £9.99), both by Anjum Anand. Photos: Jonathan Gregson, Vanessa Courtier and John Carey. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 67


EXTREME MAKEOVER

CHOCOLATE MUFFINS prep 15 min cook 15 min makes 12 vegetarian 185g wholemeal self-raising flour ½tsp ground cinnamon 30g cocoa powder, sifted 60g Total Sweet (or other sweetener) 2 eggs 2tbsp sunflower oil 1tsp vanilla extract 160ml skimmed milk 200g peeled pumpkin or butternut squash, finely grated 25g dark chocolate

HOW WE MADE THEM HEALTHIER l Chocolate muffins are typically made with melted chocolate, and chocolate chips or chunks are often added, too. We made our muffins with cocoa powder, which is free from sugar and contains less fat than chocolate. Its strong flavour also means you can use less of it. We decorated our muffins with

just a little melted chocolate, so they still look and taste indulgent. l To reduce saturates, we swapped butter for sunflower oil and used skimmed milk. l We used a sweetener rather than sugar to cut calories and avoid added sugars. In fact, our muffins tick the box for being low in sugar.

68 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

l Adding pumpkin or squash to the batter keeps the baked muffins moist, while boosting fibre. l Our muffins are slightly smaller than traditional muffins (which are often oversized). Reducing portion sizes is one of the easiest ways to enjoy treats – so you can have your cake and eat it, too…

1 Heat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4 and line a 12-hole muffin tray with paper cases. 2 Sift the flour, cinnamon and cocoa into a large mixing bowl. Stir in the sweetener, then add the eggs, oil, vanilla extract and milk. Mix until combined, then stir in the pumpkin or squash. 3 Divide the batter equally among the paper cases, then bake for 15–18 min until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Leave the muffins to cool in the tray for 5 min, then transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely. 4 Once the muffins are completely cool, put the chocolate in a strong food bag and sit in a bowl of hot water from the tap until melted. Cut off the tip of one corner of the food bag, then drizzle the chocolate over the cakes. Allow to set before serving.

HFG RECIPE

CLASSIC RECIPE

122kcal

262kcal

4.2g fat

10.4g fat

1.2g saturates

6.5g saturates

19.9g carbs

39.4g carbs

2.4g sugars

19.3g sugars

1.4g fibre

1.1g fibre

3.8g protein

5.2g protein

0.2g salt

0.5g salt

75mg calcium

121mg calcium

0.8mg iron

0.9mg iron

Per muffin

Per muffin

RECIPE: LOTTIE COVELL. PHOTO: YUKI SUGIURA

They’re rich, dark and decadent – but contain half the calories and fat of a traditional recipe. Teatime just got a lot more interesting…


R EC I PE S

L ONL SUGOW TRE A2R87 Y AkTca l


PORTABLE PUDS Offered to bring dessert? Don’t worry about transportation – these dinner party jars will stay in one piece (they’re perfectly portioned, too!)

Blueberry cheesecake jars

70 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

If y don’t p ou transp lan to desser ort the ts, simply you can them i serve n gl or bow asses ls.


R EC I PE S

Blueberry cheesecake jars prep 10 min cook 5 min makes 4 vegetarian 4 gingernut biscuits 150g blueberries 2tbsp reduced-sugar blueberry jam 180g Philadelphia Lightest soft cheese 170g pot fat-free Greek yogurt 1tbsp agave nectar 1tsp vanilla bean paste 1 Crush the biscuits in a food processor or smash with a rolling pin. Divide the crumbs among 4 small pots or jars with lids. 2 Heat the blueberries with the jam in a small pan for a few min until the blueberries begin to release their juice. Leave to cool. 3 Mix together the soft cheese, yogurt, agave nectar and vanilla bean paste. Roughly swirl the blueberries into the cream cheese mixture, then spoon on top of the crumbs. Cover with the lid, then chill until ready to transport or eat.

PER JAR

143kcal 2.5g fat 1.4g saturates 22.4g carbs 17.8g sugars

1g fibre 9.7g protein 0.5g salt 115mg calcium 0.6mg iron

Chocolate custard jars

Chocolate custard jars prep 10 min + chilling cook 5 min makes 4 vegetarian gluten free 4tsp custard powder 325ml skimmed milk 1tsp vanilla bean paste 2tsp granulated sweetener (we used Truvia) 60g dark chocolate (around 70% cocoa solids), roughly chopped 4tbsp low-fat natural yogurt 100g frozen mixed berries, thawed 1 mandarin, segmented and pith removed 1 In a mixing bowl, mix the custard powder with 4tbsp of the milk, the vanilla and the sweetener to make a paste. Heat the remaining milk in a pan until hot but not boiling. Pour

the hot milk over the paste and stir well, then return the mixture to the pan and heat, stirring, until thickened. Remove from the heat. 2 Stir the chocolate into the custard until melted, then spoon the mixture into 4 pots or jars with lids. Leave to cool, then chill, uncovered, in the fridge for at least 2 hr or until set. 3 Top with the yogurt, berries and mandarin segments, then seal and keep chilled until ready to transport or serve.

PER JAR

169kcal 7.2g fat 4.3g saturates 20.4g carbs 14.6g sugars

2.7g fibre 6.5g protein 0.2g salt 188mg calcium 0.7mg iron

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 71


Vanilla almond rice jars prep 10 min cook 45 min makes 4 vegetarian gluten free dairy free

1 Put the rice, milk, agave nectar, vanilla bean paste and cinnamon in a medium pan. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer over a low heat for 40–45 min, stirring often, until thick. Spoon into 4 pots or jars, leave to cool for 30 min, then chill in the fridge until ready to assemble. 2 While the rice is cooking, heat the fruit with the agave nectar until softened, then leave to cool. 3 Spoon the fruit over the chilled rice, seal with lids and chill until ready to transport or eat. Sprinkle with nutmeg to serve if you like. Tips If you don’t need to follow a dairy-free diet, this works just as well with skimmed cow’s milk. l It keeps in the fridge for 2 days, although you may prefer to keep the rice pudding and fruit separate until ready to serve, to prevent the fruit bleeding into the rice.

PER JAR

138kcal 2g fat 0.3g saturates 28.6g carbs 11.2g sugars

4.7g fibre 2g protein 0.1g salt 160mg calcium 0.5mg iron

RECIPES: SARAH SWAIN. PHOTOS: DEVIN HART

Vanilla almond rice jars

80g short grain or pudding rice 450ml unsweetened hazelnut milk, such as Rude Health (see tips) 1tbsp agave nectar 1tsp vanilla bean paste ½tsp ground cinnamon For the fruit topping 200g frozen berries or cherries 2tsp agave nectar Ground or grated fresh nutmeg, to sprinkle (optional)


R EC I PE S

Apricot and apple crumble jars prep 15 min cook 20 min makes 4 vegetarian dairy free 150g dried apricots, sliced 1 large apple, chopped 1 large pear, chopped 175ml unsweetened apple juice ½tsp ground allspice 40g rolled oats 40g flaked almonds 1tbsp chia seeds 1tbsp runny honey 1 Put the apricots, apple and pear in a saucepan with the apple juice and allspice. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for about 20 min, stirring occasionally, until softened and the liquid has almost been absorbed. Set aside to cool. 2 While the fruit is cooking, put the oats and almonds in a non-stick frying pan and toast over a medium heat for 2–3 min until golden. Remove from the heat and stir in the chia seeds and honey. Cool, then crumble the mixture. 3 Divide the fruit among 4 pots or jars, then sprinkle with the crumble. Seal with lids and chill until ready to transport or eat.

Apricot and apple crumble jars

2 PER JAR

265kcal 8.1g fat 0.8g saturates 44.8g carbs 36g sugars

8.1g fibre 6.1g protein 0.1g salt 99mg calcium 2.7mg iron


hfg UDY S CA E ST

LOS Tt 2½s

WEIGHT-LOSS

STAR

Carol Bailey, 54, town clerk from Suffolk

❛Too much white bread was my downfall❜ Carol’s yo-yo dieting is a familiar problem. To get out of the habit, she had to think about what, as well as how much, she was eating

Diabetes bombshell THEN, IN 2005, A BIG BLOW: I discovered I had type 2 diabetes. I managed to lose a few

74 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

AFTER pounds but I seemed to yo-yo between 12st and 12½st, and nothing seemed to BEFORE work for long. By 2008 the results of my HBA1C [a blood test that gives an indication of how well blood sugar levels are controlled in the long term] showed a significant increase in my blood sugars and I was given medication for my diabetes. WHEN KEITH HAD A MAJOR HEART ATTACK, I had so much to think about, I ended up living on takeaways and junk food until he came home. The final straw came in February this year when my blood sugars once again increased significantly and I was put on yet more medication. I was tired of being told to lose weight – why did no one realise it just wasn’t that easy?

Rethink on refined carbs I REALISED MY REGIME WOULD HAVE TO CHANGE drastically. Too much white bread had been my downfall, so out it went. I also stopped eating pastry, cakes, biscuits, crisps,

HEIGHT

5ft 7in (1.7m)

WEIGHT BEFORE

12st 8½lb (80kg)

WEIGHT NOW

10st 2lb (64.5kg)

WAIST BEFORE 37in (94cm)

WAIST NOW

31in (79cm)

BMI BEFORE 27.7

BMI NOW 22.3

AS TOLD TO MELANIE LEYSHON. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

M

y weight has always been a challenge. My adolescent puppy fat went on, but never went away, and I remained an apple-shaped size 16. I had my first son in 1987, quickly lost the stone I’d gained, but that was it – still an apple-shaped size 16! WHEN I REMARRIED, I lost 2½st in order to have IVF, but when I became pregnant with my twin girls the weight went back on, and this time I couldn’t shift it. My blood pressure increased to a dangerously high level and I was put on permanent medication at just 34 years old. I also had a few life blows, which I think hindered any serious weight loss. I lost my dad and my marriage didn’t work out – by which time I had lost my self-confidence. BUT THEN TWO WONDERFUL THINGS happened. After five years’ studying I graduated with a degree in business administration and I met Keith, now my husband. I’d found a partner who positively encouraged me in everything I did. I started to have interviews for new jobs, which meant I needed to think about how I looked and the impression I gave others.


H E A LT H

WHAT I’M COOKING THIS WEEK… Balsamic chicken with warm lentil salad ‘As I don’t eat red meat, I’m always looking for new ways to cook poultry. This is quick, easy, delicious, wholesome and filling. Give it a try.’ Find this recipe and more healthy chicken recipes at healthyfood.co.uk

miles in three months), as I wanted to give something back to help others with diabetes. I’M NOW WALKING between five and seven miles every day and my weight stays around 10st 2lb. I keep a before and after photo in my purse to discourage me from ever returning to where I was. My blood sugar levels have reduced again and, more surprisingly, so have my blood pressure levels for the first time in 20 years – so much so that my blood pressure medication has been reduced.

Now I’m waist watching HEALTH-WISE, THINGS HAVE REALLY IMPROVED and the icing on the cake (not literally, of course!) was giving most of my clothes to the local charity shop and buying or making myself new ones that are two to three sizes smaller. Through exercise, I’ve increased my muscle mass and my body fat is in the healthy range. I had my visceral fat (the dangerous, internal type you can’t see) measured in a body scan. My rating is five, which indicates a low health risk. Now I keep a check on my waist size, which is a good indication that I’m not creeping up into the danger zone. No more apple-shaped size 16!

FIVE WAYS CAROL LOST IT alcohol and chocolate. In came 0% fat Greek yogurt, lots of fruit and veg, wholemeal bread and all meals prepared from scratch. My new treats became Alpen Light bars or rice cakes, and I stepped up the exercise.

The effect on my medication THE WEIGHT STARTED TO COME OFF at a rate of 1lb to 2lb a week and the more that came off, the more determined I was to reach the goal weight I’d set of 10st 10lb. WHEN I’D LOST ABOUT 10lb, my doctor reduced my diabetes medication. I couldn’t believe I was down to 10st 11lb – with only 1lb to go from my goal (and a week away in Italy with tempting foods) I was scared I was going to crack. But I didn’t. I WAS OVER THE MOON when I reached my goal weight – it was the best feeling ever. I felt so much happier, healthier and fitter that I decided to sign up for the Diabetes UK 1 Million Step Challenge (you walk almost 500

DITCHING THICK SLICED WHITE BREAD I now limit myself to

two slices of wholemeal daily (160kcal instead of 490kcal).

UPPING THE EXERCISE I now walk five to seven miles a day (350–400kcal used up) and attend regular exercise classes. GIVING UP BUTTER AND SPREADS

I quickly realised I simply didn’t need them (saving 200kcal a day). AVOIDING EMPTY KCAL I have one or two small glasses of wine a week, not half a bottle with supper (saving 300kcal a day). SAYING NO TO CRISPS I never

thought I could live without them! I could get through a sharing bag (around 750kcal).

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 75


IT’S ALWAYS

TEA TIME!

Refreshing, soothing, calming, energising… Herbal teas are so much more than a fragrant alternative to your regular builder’s brew. Here’s how to tap into the benefits

F

ANS OF TRADITIONAL TEA who only make time for the occasional peppermint or chamomile infusion could be missing a trick. There’s a herbal tea for every occasion, with therapeutic effects reported by devotees that go beyond avoidance of caffeine. Many herbalists and alternative nutritionists swear by herbal teas to help with issues as varied as indigestion and insomnia. Admittedly, if you’re looking for hard evidence, this is hard to come by. ‘Research looking into the health benefits of herbs – and herbal teas – tends to be limited and studies aren’t usually well designed or carried out on a large enough scale to draw any definite conclusions,’ says HFG nutrition consultant Juliette Kellow. ‘Results often vary widely, too, with many studies concluding there’s only a small benefit, if any at all.’

So why do they swear by them? BREWING TIP Always put a lid over your mug when infusing your tea. It stops all the therapeutic volatile oils evaporating

Stephanie Caley

7 good reasons to put the kettle on ‘Regardless of whether or not herbal teas really do have any medical benefits, they’re certainly a great addition to your diet,’ says Juliette. Here’s why she suggests adding them to your day… l THEY’RE A GREAT way to

boost your fluid intake so you stay hydrated

anyone who needs a dairy free diet but doesn’t enjoy black tea or coffee

l THEY’RE a caffeine-free

l THEY’RE GENERALLY calorie

alternative to coffee later in the day if you suffer with insomnia or struggle to drop off

free, so perfect for helping us to control our weight

l THEY’RE SOOTHING to drink.

So even if they don’t have any making them great replacements proven medical benefits, they may have a placebo effect for for sugary soft drinks and some people fruit juices

l THEY’RE SUGAR FREE,

l THEY’RE A GOOD choice for

76 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

l THEY’RE delicious!

‘We use a lot of teas to help deliver the health benefits of the herbs,’ says medical herbalist Stephanie Caley of the National Institute of Medical Herbalists (NIMH). They’re also versatile. You can enjoy them hot, or chill them for a refreshing alternative to cordials. If you’re trying to wean kids off squash and juice, fruity herbal tea blends can work wonders. You can even use them to make ice lollies or mocktails. ‘Once you find herbs you like that work for you, it’s nice to make your own blends from fresh or dried herbs,’ says nutritionist Amanda Hamilton. ‘You’ll get multiple benefits from the different herbs as well as creating some lovely flavours.’ You can, of course, buy single herb or ready-blended herbal tea bags and loose leaf teas. We asked the experts for their pick of herbal teas for some of the most common ailments and problems (see right).

NUTRITION NOTE ‘Don’t rely on them to provide you with a heap of nutrients,’ says Juliette. ‘While the raw ingredients may be a good source of certain vitamins or minerals, the infusion that’s made from these ingredients may actually contain only a small amount, if any. Nevertheless, there are plenty of good reasons to give them a try (see left).’


S H O PPI N G

IF YOU WANT TO…

IF YOU WANT TO…

SLEEP BETTER

SOOTHE DIGESTION

JUST AS THERE ARE lots of reasons you might not be able to get to sleep, there are lots of herbs to help. l Here are a few of Stephanie’s favourites: LIME FLOWERS ‘These contain volatile oils that are thought to bind to benzodiazepine receptors in the brain, in the same way tranquilisers do. They’re very calming.’ SKULLCAP ‘Useful for a mind that’s racing.’ CHAMOMILE ‘It’s very calming, particularly for anxious people, and has quite a sweet taste. It’s often used in sleep blends, but children tend to like it on its own so it can be a good bedtime drink for them.’ VALERIAN ROOT ‘This is soporific due to its volatile oils and valerenic acid.’ In Norway, it’s even sold over the counter as a sleep aid – a 2002 Norwegian review of 18 studies concluded it has a hypnotic effect with few side effects.

PEPPERMINT ‘Peppermint oil capsules are often prescribed by doctors for IBS.’ It has anti-spasmodic properties, relaxing the gastrointestinal tract. It’s also easy to make your own with fresh mint leaves. CARDAMOM ‘Crush pods, then steep to ease indigestion and flatulence.’ GINGER ‘This anti-emetic is good for nausea, thanks to fast-acting compounds called gingerols and shogaols, known to calm the digestive tract. Stir 1tsp dried ginger into hot water or pour boiling water over some sliced, fresh root for a really effective drink if you’re feeling sick.’ CHAMOMILE ‘An anti-spasmodic and anti-inflammatory.’ l Amanda’s favourites include: FENNEL and ARTICHOKE ‘Both ease bloating.’ BASIL ‘It’s warming to the digestion.’

TEAS TO TRY

TEAS TO TRY

l Celestial

Seasonings Sleepytime Herbal Tea, around £1.74/20 bags, health food shops, hawthornhealth.com. A sublime blend of chamomile, spearmint and lemongrass.

l Dr Stuart’s Valerian

Plus Tea, £2.40/15 bags, drstuarts.com, Holland & Barrett. Made using a

traditional Victorian recipe with lime flowers, valerian, hops, passionflower and fennel.

TUMMY TROUBLE? Try a blend designed to relax the gut. l Stephanie recommends these:

l We Are Tea Soothe For

Tummy Relief, £3.50/12 bags, Sainsbury’s, wearetea.com.

Developed by Amanda Hamilton, these combine fennel, chamomile, lemon verbena, holy basil, mint and ginger. l Pukka After Dinner,

£2.39/20 sachets,

pukkaherbs.com, Ocado. A blend of sweet fennel, cardamom, liquorice and roasted chicory. l Natur Boutique

Organic Artichoke Tea, £2.99/20 bags, Holland & Barrett. Surprisingly

palatable – an alternative to peppermint if you’re feeling bloated.

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 77


IF YOU WANT TO…

CARE FOR YOUR COMPLEXION

BOOST ENERGY

WHETHER YOU HAVE a problem or want to help to age-proof your skin, there’s a specialist tea. l Stephanie suggests you try these: ROSEHIP ‘All berries are good for vitamin C but rosehips are a particularly potent source. Vitamin C helps the body make collagen and it’s a powerful antioxidant, so it’s great in the fight against skin ageing.’ You can pulp fresh rosehips and boil them, or buy ready-made tea. DANDELION ‘This is cleansing and may also help with liver function and hormone clearance if you have a problem with acne.’ l Amanda also recommends: NETTLE ‘This is rich in iron and trace minerals and has skin-soothing antihistamine properties.’ CALENDULA and ECHINACEA ‘These are both good for sensitive, inflamed skin’.

TEAS TO TRY l Caley’s

Apothecary Organic Time For Beauty Loose Tea, £5.50/50g, caleysapothecary.co.uk. A fruity blend of rosehips, bilberries, goji berries and dried orange peel.

l We Are Tea Glow For

Skin Radiance, £3.50/12 bags. Another of Amanda’s blends, this one combines red berries with calendula, echinacea, dandelion and nettle.

78 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

TEMPTING AS IT is to reach for a strong coffee when your energy flags, these may be a better bet. l Stephanie likes: NETTLE ‘Tiredness is often caused by low iron levels and nettle is really useful as it can help to replenish them. People often find nettle tea is a great pick-me-up. It’s good to have vitamin C to aid iron absorption, though, so it’s best to have some C-rich fruit at the same time.’ GINSENG ‘This is a better way to prevent exhaustion than relying on caffeinated drinks. It’s powerful stuff, though, so don’t use it all the time – just when you need a lift. And avoid drinking it in the evenings as it could keep you awake.’ This stimulant herb contains phytochemicals that have been found in studies to improve stamina, concentration and alertness.

TEAS TO TRY l Pukka Ginseng Matcha

l Dai Wang Korean

with red ginseng and pure green matcha powder – this gives an extra kick due to the caffeine.

contains ginseng root granules that dissolve in water to make one drink.

Green Tea, £2.79/20 sachets, pukkaherbs. com.Green tea blended

Ginseng Tea, 49p/3g sachet, Holland & Barrett. Each sachet

WORDS: HANNAH EBELTHITE. PHOTOS: ISTOCK. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

IF YOU WANT TO…


S H O PPI N G

IF YOU WANT TO…

IF YOU WANT TO…

REDUCE INFLAMMATION

LIFT YOUR MOOD OR CALM YOUR MIND

MASTER HERBALIST Sebastian Pole explains the medicinal appeal of a spice that is widely viewed in India as an anti-ageing elixir. TURMERIC ROOT ‘There’s strong evidence on its anti-inflammatory properties. Inflammation in the body is caused by things such as smoking, drinking and stress, and it contributes to most chronic diseases, from joint problems and skin conditions such as acne and eczema, to inflammatory bowel diseases, dementia, diabetes, cancer and even depression. But the yellow pigments in turmeric, especially one called curcumin, have potent antioxidant, immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory actions to help reverse it.’ l Make tea by stirring 1tsp turmeric into hot water (or add it to other herbal teas). With such a strong pigment, this can be messy, so you may prefer to buy the tea ready made!

CERTAIN HERBS CAN GIVE you a psychological boost or soothe anxiety. l Stephanie has these recommendations: LEMON BALM ’This is my all-time favourite herb for when you’re feeling down or anxious. It grows easily in the garden or in a pot, and the fresh leaves make the best tea, although you can buy it dried to use in winter. The oils are uplifting – even the smell gives you a boost.’ ROSE PETALS ‘In herbal medicine these are used for grief as they’re wonderfully comforting.’ LAVENDER ‘A very soothing remedy.’ l Recent research by Northumbria University found: PEPPERMINT Drinking peppermint tea enhanced and aroused both mood and cognition, helping to improve long-term memory, working memory and alertness. CHAMOMILE This had a calming and sedative effect which significantly slowed memory and attention speed.

TEAS TO TRY

TEAS TO TRY

l Pukka Turmeric Gold,

£2.39/20 sachets, pukkaherbs.com.

A delicious blend of Indian turmeric, cardamom, lemon and green tea (so there is a little caffeine in these).

l Higher

Living Golden Turmeric, £1.67/15 bags, higherlivingherbs.com. If you prefer a spicier, caffeine-free blend, this one also contains ginger, liquorice and rose petals.

l Caley’s Apothecary

Organic Time To Relax Loose Tea, £5.50/50g, caleysapothecary.co.uk. A blend of chamomile, lavender and lemon balm that looks and smells as pretty as it tastes.

l Heath & Heather

Lavender & Echinacea,

£1.85/20 bags, Holland & Barrett. Soothing lavender with an added immuneboost from echinacea. l Aveda Comforting Tea, £10/20 bags, aveda.co.uk. A sweet-tasting blend of peppermint and liquorice for when you want to give yourself a treat.

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 79


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NUTRITION

THIS vs THAT

They both contribute to our five-a-day, but is one nutritionally better for us than the other? We put broccoli and tenderstem head to head

PER 80G

BROCCOLI

WORDS: JULIETTE KELLOW. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

This popular member of the brassica family (which also includes kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, cauliflower and pak choi) originates from the Calabria region of Italy. It used to be known as calabrese for that reason, but now it goes by the name broccoli from the Latin ‘brachium’ for branch or arm.

28

ENERGY (kcal)

0.5

FAT (g)

1.5

SUGARS (g)

3.2

FIBRE (g)

318

POTASSIUM (mg)

38

CALCIUM (mg)

THE NUTRITION LOWDOWN 65 Broccoli contains close to twice as much vitamin C as tenderstem, 0.8 although most people in the UK already get enough vitamin C (see 0.2 p92). But its slightly higher folate content makes it particularly useful 78 for women planning a baby and those in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, to help protect against 1.4 neural tube defects. The marginally higher amounts of potassium and 63 iron in broccoli are a useful boost, as intakes are low in around a quarter 76 of teenagers and women under 65.

27

TENDERSTEM

This brassica is a more recent addition to supermarket shelves. 1.6 It originates from Japan and is a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale. As the name suggests, its 3 stems are thin and tender, so you can eat the whole veg (you can, 286 of course, eat the thick, woody, broccoli stalk, but you need to 56 slice it and cook it for longer). 0.2

PHOSPHORUS (mg)

78

IRON (mg)

0.6

MANGANESE (mg)

0.4

VITAMIN A (mg)

294

VITAMIN E (mg)

0.9

VITAMIN C (mg)

36

FOLATE (mcg)

57

THE NUTRITION LOWDOWN Tenderstem has slightly more phosphorus, manganese and calcium than broccoli – all vital for bone health. But it really wins out in the vitamin A stakes, providing almost four times more than broccoli. Around 10% of teenage boys and men, 20% of women and 14% of teenage girls have very low intakes of vitamin A, so adding tenderstem to the menu will help to boost intakes. Plus you get all the goodness from the stem rather than throwing it in the bin.

AND THE WINNER IS…

TENDERSTEM – by a hair’s breadth! Nutritionally, the two brassicas are very similar. But the excellent vitamin A content of tenderstem, together with the fact that it needs no prep and there’s no waste, gives it the edge over broccoli for us. That said, we recommend you enjoy both in your diet. Steam and serve as a side or in a salad, blitz into soup, eat raw with a dip, or add to stir-fries, pasta or risotto. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 81


it’s so good to

STR ETC H Most of us like a quick stretch first thing in the morning. But as a regular activity, it can lengthen muscles and improve posture. Laura Day discovers a new flexible friend

D

ID YOU STRETCH when you got up this morning? Along with putting the kettle on and jumping in the shower, a morning stretch is a way of getting ourselves in gear before the day begins. But besides this brief, bleary-eyed burst of limbs, how often do you indulge?

the way we used to. On average, a sedentary 50-yearold will lose almost half a pound of muscle every year (and you can start to lose it before that age if you’re inactive). But you don’t need to accept this decline as inevitable. Stretching can be restorative and preventive. It can do wonders for core strength, too. If you’ve ever done yoga you’ll know what regular practice can do in the long-term. A Downward-Facing Dog pose, for example, can evolve in as little as 30 days from needing to lift your heels to getting them flat on the mat. If certain aspects of yoga or Pilates put you off, stretching is still within your reach, and the same benefits are up for grabs: you’ll walk taller, you’ll correct your posture and you’ll look and feel slimmer.

Stretching 101 THIS FLEXING of a muscle or tendon helps improve its elasticity. It’s an instinct (think about animals when they wake up) that leaves us feeling flexible, invigorated and relaxed. Regular exercise shortens your muscles, which is why stretching is incorporated into any cool-down to bring muscles back to their resting length. If we don’t do it, we become stiff, lose our range of movement and may develop pain. ‘Easy movement of our bodies is something we take for granted until it’s going or gone,’ says Ciaran Organ, founder of PureStretch classes. ‘I see fitness instructors in their 50s coming to stretch classes after noticing their body deteriorate with wear and tear from years of exercise. Regular stretching gives them greater flexibility and mobility.’

Power to your muscles AS WE GET OLDER our joints stiffen, our muscles age and we don’t move

82 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

ANTI-AGEING Maintaining your core strength means you’ll be able to future-proof your fitness and weightloss goals

Build a routine to suit you BEING ABLE TO MAINTAIN freedom of movement and core strength means you’ll be able to future-proof your fitness and weight-loss goals (and you’ll feel more positive as a bonus). It’s the ultimate complementary therapy and redresses the balance of your more intense workouts. Try a simple daily 10-minute stretch routine (see overleaf), or commit to a 45-minute session once a week. ‘Stretching supplies great blood flow to your muscles and enables them to work most effectively,’ says Ciaran. ‘I can’t stress enough how fantastic stretching is for both your body and mind. You’ll be focusing in on yourself and how your body feels, and we don’t do enough of that.’

Lengthen and strengthen Stretching techniques can also be applied midworkout. The Stretch & Tone class at Virgin Active incorporates stretching during a cardio/strength routine. Instructor Christine Turner gives attendees the option to stand on circular sliding discs known


F I T N E SS

HEAD to TOE workout TYPES OF

STRETCHING l A PA S S I V E O R S TAT I C STRETCH is applied when the body is resting. It uses your hand, a strap or partner for support. Example: quad stretch, where you hold your foot behind you. l A N AC T I V E

O R DY N A M I C STRETCH uses the body weight only and is unsupported. Example: a lunge.


as gliders, which bring fluidity to sweeping foot and leg movements and help you get the most out of a stretch. For Christine, the benefits are undisputed. ‘I find gliders give you the maximum stretch and work all your muscles, including the core, without you realising.’ But why add stretches mid-routine? ‘My theory is if you shorten your muscles with exercise you should then lengthen them, so for 45 minutes we alternate cardio and strength with stretches,’ she says. ‘Using gliders means you get a fantastic active recovery, too. It really is for everyone – I have attendees aged up to 84.’

TOTAL BODY PLAN Muscles don’t work on their own – it’s best to stretch the entire body, doing 20–30 second holds per stretch

Blood sugar benefits Greater flexibility and range of movement is the undisputed benefit of stretching, but surprising

evidence has begun to emerge that doing it regularly may lower blood sugar levels. In a small 2015 Korean study, participants with type 2 diabetes committed to an eight-week supervised programme of static/passive stretching. Blood sugar levels were significantly reduced in the static stretching group, compared with the group who didn’t stretch or exercise. In 2011, Australian researchers came to the same conclusion when studying a group of adults who were either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or at risk of developing the condition. After eating a meal and drinking fruit juice, participants in two groups underwent 40 minutes of stretching or mock stretching (meaning no tension was applied). The group doing the genuine stretches had a greater drop in their blood glucose levels during the regime. Libby Dowling, senior clinical adviser at Diabetes UK, says there’s still much more research to be done before we can be sure of a link. ‘While these studies suggest there may be some benefit to passive stretching, they were in small numbers of people who were studied over a relatively short time period,’ she says. ‘Without larger studies, where people are followed for longer,

Ciaran Organ’s

1-MINUTE STRETCH ROUTINE

M OV E 1 Comb the hair

Starting with the right hand, make a swift, sweeping motion with your arm up and over your head, tilting your body as you do so. Do the same with your left arm. Complete 4 reps.

Benefit

Mobilises the shoulders and stretches the sides of the body and the lower back.

84 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

M OV E 2 Goalpost arms

Raise your arms to the side and bend your elbows up at 90 degrees. Push both arms back, bringing your shoulder blades together. Sweep the arms in a circle, return your arms to the starting position, then repeat in the opposite direction. Complete 3 reps.

Benefit

Opens the chest and shoulders.

M OV E 3 Side to side rotation

Keeping your arms out and elbows bent at 90 degrees, rotate your torso to the right, then to the left. Keep your knees and hips still and facing forwards. Complete 4 reps.

Benefit Mobilises the spine.


PHOTOS: GETTY. PRICE CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

F I T N E SS

we’re unable to say whether passive stretching is a good alternative.’ What we do know is that keeping physically active can help both prevent and manage type 2 diabetes, and activity can take many forms and intensities to suit the individual. The studies suggest passive stretching may be of use for those with limited capabilities who can’t exercise, such as arthritis sufferers, those who are very obese or the elderly.

just work on their own – everything is connected,’ says Ciaran. You may have tight hamstrings, for instance, but the problem may not be your hamstrings at all. Ciaran says it’s best to stretch the entire body, doing 20–30 second holds per stretch. Beware of overstretching, too, which can weaken your muscles. ‘As soon as you’re flinching, holding your breath or shaking, you need to stop,’ she says. ‘This means you’ve gone too far and you’re putting your body through stress. When stretching, you’re aiming to feel enjoyment, like a really gorgeous yawn.’

Find your perfect routine

How to do it right

Stay flexible with our top picks for flexibility practice: l NHS Strength and Flex five-week exercise plan nhs.uk/livewell/strength-and-flexibility/pages/ get-fit-with-strength-and-flexibility.aspx l PureStretch classes purestretch.co.uk l Virgin Active Stretch and Tone classes virginactive. co.uk/classes/stretch-and-tone l Stretchworks DVD (general fitness level – all ages) £12.99, Amazon

Surprisingly, there is a right and wrong way to stretch, and contrary to what might feel right, it’s not just about addressing back pain with back stretches or tight hamstrings with leg stretches. ‘I recommend staying away from isolated stretches because muscles don’t

‘It’s really important to do this routine every day – it only takes a minute. It will help mobilise your body, particularly your shoulders and back,’ says Ciaran.

M OV E 4 Overhead stretch

Sweep both arms overhead (keeping the shoulders pulling down and away from your ears). Take the arms back down by your sides. Complete 5 reps.

Benefit Loosens the shoulders.

M OV E 5 Side stretch

Keeping your arms raised over your head and shoulders down, lean over to the left side and then to the right. Complete 3 reps.

Benefit Opens up the lower back.

WA THE DTCH EMO Cia

ran demo routin nstrates th is e at hea exclusivel y lthyfo co.uk /stret od. ch

M OV E 6 Monkey swing

With arms above your head and feet flat on the ground, bend forward, swinging your arms up behind you as your head comes towards the floor, then back above your head as you return to standing. If you suffer from a bad back, do it slowly and only if it feels comfortable. Complete 3 reps.

Benefit Stretches the lower back and shoulders.

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 85


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LO R E M

IN NOVEMBER’S

DIET DILEMMAS

solved!

T NEXUE ISSSALE ON OV 1N

MARRIAGE & WEIGHT Is your partner making you fat? INFLAMMATION Diet changes to lessen the damage DAIRY-FREE COOKING Tips for success GUT REACTION Is kefir the answer? COMFORT FOOD H Big ideas for baked beans H Muffins to whiz in the blender! H Make a meal of soups H Hygge-yourself hot drinks

Mexican chilli bean soup

PLUS H Indian swaps H ideas for pearl barley H vitamin E H


Juliette Kellow HFG NUTRITION CONSULTANT

WHY WE NEED…

VITAMIN C

his water-soluble vitamin has many functions in the body. It has a vital role to play in making COLLAGEN (a component of our blood vessels, bones, cartilage, gums, skin and teeth) so it’s important for helping WOUNDS HEAL . It’s also needed for our NERVOUS SYSTEM, helps give us a strong IMMUNE SYSTEM and, as an ANTIOXIDANT, it mops up cell-damaging free radicals.

T

IT’S VERY RARE in the UK to suffer with a deficiency of vitamin C, which results in scurvy, a condition that’s practically unheard of these days. Average daily intakes of vitamin C are around 80mg a day across most

age groups, so the majority of us get plenty. Large amounts (over 1,000mg a day) can cause side effects such as stomach pains, diarrhoea and flatulence, but you’re only likely to get this much through supplements. Symptoms usually disappear once you stop taking the supplements.

HOW MUCH DO I NEED EACH DAY? THE NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE (NRV) for vitamin C, which you’ll see on food labels, is 80mg a day. But there are more detailed guidelines in the UK for vitamin C needs at specific ages and stages in life, and these tend to be lower than the value used for labelling purposes.

19+ yr

ADULTS

(men and women)

Breastfeeding women

70mg

Pregnant women

50mg

15–18 yr

40mg

CHILDREN

(boys and girls)

11–14 yr (boys and girls)

1–10 yr

BABIES

(boys and girls)

92 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE

OCTOBER 2016

40mg

0–12 mth

35mg 30mg 25mg

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

Can I have too little or too much?


NUTRITION

Where to find vitamin C

EVERYDAY FOODS FOR VITAMIN C (mg)

THE MAIN SOURCES are fruits and vegetables. Particularly rich sources include citrus fruits and their juices, strawberries, peppers, blackcurrants, green leafy veg and kiwis. Because in the UK we eat large amounts of them, potatoes are another main contributor of vitamin C.

80g stewed blackcurrants

104

½ red pepper

101

½ yellow pepper

97

½ green pepper

96

1 orange

83

Do supplements stop colds?

150ml orange juice (from the chiller cabinet)

60

SADLY NOT, unless you’re regularly doing endurance activities, such as running marathons, or are frequently exposed to very cold environments, where they may halve your risk of catching a cold. However, there is evidence that vitamin C supplements of 200mg or more a day may help a little to reduce the length of time you experience symptoms. Studies have found that taking vitamin C may reduce the length of a cold by 8% in adults and 13% in children.

80g kale (boiled)

57

80g raw watercress

50

80g Brussels sprouts (boiled)

48

80g broccoli (steamed)

48

150ml long-life orange juice or unsweetened grapefruit juice

47

80g strawberries

46

1 slice cantaloupe melon (150g)

39

150ml apple juice

39

A food preservative

80g green cabbage (boiled)

36

THE ANTIOXIDANT EFFECTS of vitamin C mean it’s often used as an additive in food processing in a similar way to preservatives. Listed on food labels using its technical name, ascorbic acid, or E300, it helps to extend the shelf life of products and improve the taste and look of food. For example, it’s used to stop cut fruits, pulps and juices discolouring (it’s why we squeeze vitamin C-rich lemon juice over sliced apples or avocados to stop them browning) and added to beers to improve their shelf life. It also helps to maintain the colour of meat and is used in baked products as a flour improver.

80g broccoli (boiled)

35

1 kiwi

35

80g baby sweetcorn (boiled)

31

½ grapefruit

29

½ mango

28

80g red cabbage (boiled)

26

80g raspberries

25

80g cauliflower (boiled)

24

80g raw baby spinach

23

80g canned sweetcorn

19

200g potatoes (boiled)

18

Regular top-ups

1 tomato

18

1 slice honeydew or watermelon (200g)

16

80g sweet potato (boiled)

14

80g frozen peas (microwaved)

14

80g baked butternut squash

12

80g courgette (stir-fried)

12

80g blackberries

12

80g frozen mixed veg or peas (boiled)

10

VITAMIN C CAN’T BE STORED in the body, so it needs to be included in our diet every day. It’s very sensitive to heat and water, both of which destroy it, so eating fruit and veg raw whenever you can will make full use of the vitamin C they contain. When cooking, keep them in large pieces, use the minimum amount of water and cook for a minimal amount of time (vegetables should be eaten al dente rather than mushy).

OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 93


HOW I STAY

HEALTHY Professor Greg Whyte OBE, activity expert

A former British modern pentathlete, Greg now coaches celebs for tough sporting challenges. He explains why setting a goal is so important for weight loss

94 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

AS TOLD TO MELANIE LEYSHON. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

H

ow is your health right now? On a scale of one to 10, I’d say 10. I exercise at least five times a week and eat a healthy diet. There’s a direct relation between physical activity and your health. Research shows the more you exercise, the fewer coughs and colds you’ll get, or at least they won’t be as prolonged. Exercise helps your respiratory system fight bugs. How do you stay motivated now that you’re no longer a professional athlete? I practise what I preach. Being successful is about setting realistic goals. They shouldn’t just be ‘I want to get fitter,’ or ‘I want to lose weight.’ You need to set small goals and a timetable. What’s your own fitness plan? I follow the exercise for the project I’m working on. For example, earlier this year I worked with comedian Jo Brand on her Hell Of A Walk and DJ Greg James for his triathlon challenge. I actually find it easier to work out the busier I am, as you have to target a time slot and put it in the diary. Did you change your diet when you stopped being a professional athlete? My diet itself didn’t change dramatically, just the calorie content. When you’re exercising intensely you’re eating to replenish lost energy. When you stop, you can have the same healthy diet, but don’t need to eat as much. I see a lot of ex-professional athletes who


TA L K I N G P O I N T S

ALL-STAR CAST: Greg has coached David Walliams, Jo Brand and Davina McCall in their Sport Relief challenges are now incredibly overweight because they haven’t adjusted their calorie intake. It’s all about the difference between calorie expenditure and consumption. Any weight issues? I’ve never been overweight, but my weight fluctuates depending on the sport I’m doing. When I was swimming the channel [training David Walliams] I needed to put on weight, so I gained 8kg. But I lost the same amount when I was running a marathon in the Sahara desert. What’s your best bit of diet advice? Make it yourself. The biggest problem is eating too much processed food that contains sugar. When my kids see my wife making her homemade bread they actually ask, where’s the sugar? It’s in so many foods, from sandwiches to salads and ready meals, it’s just expected to be an ingredient.

THREE THINGS I LOVE STRAWBERRIES The fruit sugars they contain are good for you 9BAR This seeded bar is my go-to snack MY FITBIT SURGE to track my activity and sleep

Do you cook? As a family, yes. I enjoy cooking, although I’m no Gordon Ramsay, but my wife is a very good cook. What do you eat for an energy boost? I don’t go for sugary snacks that give an instant hit, but for complex carbs or protein that increases satiety – a glass of milk or a seed-based bar. And for a treat? It’s about balance and moderation and not excluding anything. I love a doughnut and tease my kids, telling them the strawberry jam counts as one of my five-a-day. We shouldn’t think of any food, including chocolate or alcohol, as bad. Food should be about happiness and not about the misery of exclusion. Do you have a weight-loss tip? Identify what you’re trying to achieve. Just saying you want to eat more healthily has no end goal. But be realistic. The biggest barrier to losing weight is time – people try to do too much too soon (saying, for example, ‘I want to lose 6st by February’). Losing it is possible, but give yourself time. What’s your general attitude to health? A healthy lifestyle and diet is for life, it’s not just something you address in middle age. It’s important from birth all the way through to old age. And your top piece of health advice? Do more physical activity, for sure. We need to be moving more and more often. That means walking,

taking the stairs, parking as far away from an entrance as possible. Being an ‘athletic potato’ and doing a 30-minute workout a day is all very well, but that’s not enough if you’re inactive for the rest of the day. There are great advances around health – activity trackers are motivational as they show you how little you’re doing! A lot of people are surprised to find they’re not as active as they thought. You’ve just written a book about pregnancy and exercise. How did that come about? I’ve got three young children and when my wife was pregnant there was no information about exercising. I don’t mean it was limited – it was non-existent. There are also lots of old wives’ tales around fitness and pregnancy, such as the ludicrous claim that the umbilical cord can get wrapped around the baby’s neck if you exercise. I wanted to dispel those scare stories. The book has two main aspects: what’s safe to do, and myth busting. It also looks at optimising your fertility and improving your chance of getting pregnant. It’s evidence and science based. l Bump it up: the Dynamic, Flexible Exercise and Healthy Eating Plan for Before, During and After Pregnancy by Greg Whyte (Bantam Press, £14.99) is out now. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 95


REFERENCES Your guide to the research behind this month’s stories and features

HEALTH NOTES p10 l

The Behavioural Insights Team (2016) Counting Calories: A new report from BIT on the problems with official statistics on calorie intake, and how they can be solved. Published online 8 August 2016. http://www.behaviouralinsights.co.uk/ health/counting-calories-a-new-report-from-biton-the-problems-with-official-statistics-oncalorie-intake-and-how-they-can-be-solved l Wang, Q et al (2016) Sucralose Promotes Food Intake through NPY and a Neuronal Fasting Response. Cell Metabolism 24 (1), 75-90. DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2016.06.010 l Royal Society for Public Health. Health in a Hurry. https://www.rsph.org.uk/our-work/policy/ championing-the-publics-health/health-in-ahurry.html l Which? (2016) Most supermarket promotions on less healthy food. Published online 4 August 2016. https://press.which.co.uk/ whichpressreleases/more-supermarketpromotions-on-less-healthy-food l Stanford Medicine News center (2016) One approach can prevent teen obesity, eating disorders, new guidelines say. https://med. stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/08/ new-guidelines-offer-one-approach-to-preventteen-obesity-eating-disorders.html l American Academy of Pediatrics (2016) AAP Clinical Report: Steps to Prevent Teen Obesity and Eating Disorders. https://www.aap.org/ en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/ AAP-Clinical-Report-Steps-to-Prevent-TeenObesity-and-Eating-Disorders.aspx?nfstatus=401 &nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000000000000000&nfstatusdescr iption=ERROR%3a+No+local+token

10 WAYS TO CUT YOUR CANCER RISK p16

l Cancer Research U. Cancer incidence statistics. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/healthprofessional/cancer-statistics/ incidence#heading-Zero l World Cancer Research Fund (2016) Summary of global evidence on cancer prevention. http://www.wcrf.org/int/research-we-fund/ continuous-update-project-findings-reports/ summary-global-evidence-cancer l Public Health England. UK and Ireland prevalence and trends. https://www.noo.org.uk/ NOO_about_obesity/adult_obesity/UK_ prevalence_and_trends l Orlich, M J et al (2015) Vegetarian Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Colorectal Cancers JAMA Internal Medicine 175 (5), 767-776. DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.59 l Cancer Research UK. Diet and preventable cancers. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/ health-professional/cancer-statistics/risk/ preventable-cancers#heading-Three l Cancer Research UK. Definite risks for mouth and oropharyngeal cancer. http://www. cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/ mouth-cancer/about/risks/definite-risks-formouth-and-oropharyngeal-cancer l Cancer Research UK. Diet and breast cancer. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/ type/breast-cancer/about/diet-and-breastcancer#fats l World Cancer Research Fund. Red and processed meat and cancer prevention. http://www.wcrf-uk.org/uk/preventing-cancer/ ways-reduce-cancer-risk/red-and-processedmeat-and-cancer-prevention l Cancer Research UK/ Physical activity and cancer. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/ causes-of-cancer/physical-activity-and-cancer l Cancer Research UK. Alcohol and cancer.

96 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE OCTOBER 2016

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/healthprofessional/cancer-statistics/risk/ alcohol#heading-Zero l Cancer Research UK (2015) Processed meat and cancer – what you need to know. http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk. org/2015/10/26/processed-meat-and-cancerwhat-you-need-to-know l Neuhouser, M L et al (2009) Multivitamin Use and Risk of Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease in the Women’s Health Initiative Cohorts. JAMA Internal Medicine 169 (3), 294-304. DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2008.540 l NHS Choices. Combined pill. http://www.nhs. uk/conditions/contraception-guide/pages/ combined-contraceptive-pill.aspx#Risks l Cancer Research UK. The contraceptive pill and cancer risk. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/ about-cancer/cancers-in-general/cancerquestions/the-contraceptive-pill-and-cancer-risk l American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) (2012). Soy is safe for breast cancer survivors. New review of the research. Press release published 15 November 2012. http://www.aicr. org/press/press-releases/soy-safe-breast-cancersurvivors.html l World Cancer Research Fund (2014) Breast Cancer Survivors. http://www.wcrf.org/int/ research-we-fund/continuous-update-projectfindings-reports/breast-cancer-survivors l Aune, D et al (2011) Dietary fibre, whole grains, and risk of colorectal cancer: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. British Medical Journal 343:d6617. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.d6617 l Breast Cancer Care. Facts and Statistics 2016. https://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/about-us/ media/press-pack-breast-cancer-awarenessmonth/facts-statistics

THE SCIENCE OF ‘HANGRY’ p22

l Bushman B J et al (2014) Low glucose relates to greater aggression in married couples. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 111 (17), 6254-6257. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1400619111 l Sainsbury, A and Zhang, L (2010) Role of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in regulation of body weight during energy deficit. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 316 (2), 109-119. DOI: 10.1016/j.mce.2009.09.025 l Nguyen, A D et al (2012) Y1 and Y5 receptors are both required for the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis in mice. PLoS One 7 (6):e40191. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040191 l Karl, T et al (2004) Y1 receptors regulate aggressive behavior by modulating serotonin pathways. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 101 (34), 12742-12747 l Coccaro, E F et al (2012) Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity correlates with impulsive aggression in human subjects. Biological Psychiatry 72 (12), 997-1003. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.07.029 l De Almeida, R M et al (2015) Behavioural, hormonal and neurobiological mechanisms of aggressive behaviour in human and nonhuman primates. Physiology & Behavior, 143, 121-135. DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.02.053 l Gibson, A A et al (2014) Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews 16 (1), 64-76. DOI: 10.1111/obr.12230

WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH SEAWEED? p57

l Sho, H (2001) History and characteristics of Okinawan longevity food. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 10 (2), 159-164

l Burtin, P (2003). Nutritional value of seaweeds. Electronic Journal of Environmental Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2 (4), 498-503 l Philpott, J and Bradford, M (2006) Seaweed: Nature’s secret for a long and healthy life. The Nutrition Practioner. Winter 2006. http:// clearspringdev.clients.codepositive.com/sites/ default/files/Sea%20Vegetables.pdf l Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University (2010) Seaweed to tackle rising tide of obesity. Press release published online 29 March 2010. http://www.ncl.ac.uk/hnrc/news/news/ item/seaweed-to-tackle-rising-tide-of-obesitycopy-copy l Fitzgerald, C et al (2011) Heart Health Peptides from Macroalgae and Their Potential Use in Functional Foods. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 59 (13), 6829-6836. DOI: 10.1021/jf201114d

IT’S ALWAYS TEA TIME! p76

l Culpepper, L and Wingertzahn (2015) Over-the-Counter Agents for the Treatment of Occasional Disturbed Sleep or Transient Insomnia: A Systematic Review of Efficacy and Safety. The Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders 17 (6). DOI: 10.4088/PCC.15r01798. eCollection 2015 l Chang, S M and Chen, C H (2016) Effects of an intervention with drinking chamomile tea on sleep quality and depression in sleep disturbed postnatal women: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Advanced Nursing 72 (2), 306-315. DOI: 10.1111/jan.12836 l Pallesen S et al (2002) Valerian as a sleeping aid? Isdsskr Nor Laegeforen 122 (30), 2857-2859 l Valussi, M (2012) Functional foods with digestion-enhancing properties. International Journal of Food Sciences & Nutrition 63 (Suppl 1), 82-89. DOI: 10.3109/09637486.2011.627841 l McKay, D L and Blumberg, J B (2006) A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). Phytotherapy Research 20 (8), 619-633 l Palatty, P L et al (2013) Ginger in the prevention of nausea and vomiting: a review. Critical Reviews in Food Science & Nutrition 53 (7), 659-669. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2011.553751 l Rutto, L K et al (2013) Mineral Properties and Dietary Value of Raw and Processed Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.) International Journal of Food Science. DOI: 10.1155/2013/857120 l Meral, I and Kanter, M (2003) Effects of Nigella sativa L. and Urtica dioica L. on selected mineral status and hematological values in CCl4-treated rats. Biological Trace Element Research 96 (1-3), 263-270 l Aggarwal, B B and Harikumar, K B (2009) Potential therapeutic effects of curcumin, the anti-inflammatory agent, against neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 41 (1), 40-59. DOI: 10.1016/j. biocel.2008.06.010 l Northumbria University (2016) Herbs that can boost your mood and memory. Press release published 29 April 2016. https://www. northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/news-events/ news/2016/04/herbs-that-can-boost-your-moodand-memory

IT’S SO GOOD TO STRETCH p82

l Hoon Park, S (2015) Effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Journal of Physical Therapy Science 27 (5), 1463-1465. DOI: 10.1589/jpts.27.1463 l Nelson, A G et al (2011) Twenty minutes of passive stretching lowers glucose levels in an at-risk population: an experimental study. Journal of Physiotherapy 57 (3), 173-178. DOI: 10.1016/S1836-9553(11)70038-8

WHY WE NEED VITAMIN C p92

l Douglas, R M et al (2004) Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 18 (4): CD000980 l Hemila, H and Chalker, E (2013) Cochrane: Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold. http://www.cochrane.org/ CD000980/ARI_vitamin-c-for-preventing-andtreating-the-common-cold


T H E FAC T S

NUTRITION LOWDOWN We cut through the science to help you work out how our recipes – and the foods you buy in the supermarket – fit into a balanced, healthy diet

JUST LIKE PRE-PACKED FOODS, all our recipes provide detailed nutrition information for a typical serving. But how does that compare with your total daily needs for energy, protein, fat, carbs and certain vitamins and minerals? Provided you stick to the serving size we recommend for each recipe, the easiest way is to compare the nutrition information for each recipe with the Reference Intake (RI). You’ll gradually see this term being used on food labels in place of Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs). The RIs are benchmarks for the amount of energy (kilocalories), fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt we should have each day. The RIs for fat, saturates, sugars and salt are the maximum amount you should have each day, while you should aim to meet the values for carbs and protein each day. There is no RI for fibre but health experts recommend we have 30g a day. Although everyone is different and has different needs for energy and nutrients, the RIs are designed for an average adult, so there’s only one set of values. See the table, right, for the figures. We also analyse our recipes for calcium and iron – this is because these two nutrients are often low in people’s diets in the UK. We can see how much a recipe contributes to our daily needs for calcium and iron by comparing

WHAT IF I WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT? The only way to shed the pounds is to take in fewer calories than you use up, so your body draws on its fat stores to supply it with enough energy. To lose 1lb (0.5kg) of fat you need to create a calorie deficit of 3,500kcal. This means cutting your calorie intake by just 500kcal a day should help you lose 1lb (0.5kg) a week – so, for example, women should lose this amount of weight each week on 1,500kcal and men on 2,000kcal. If you’re also more active, you can expect it to be a little more. However, nutrition experts agree that for good health in the long term, you shouldn’t lose more than 2lb (1kg) a week. REFERENCE INTAKE

it with Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs), which are starting to appear on food labels in place of Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) – again, there is just one set of values.

ENERGY (kcal) FAT (g)

2,000 70

SATURATES (g)

20

CARBOHYDRATES (g)

260

SUGARS (g)

90

PER SERVING

PROTEIN (g)

50

All our recipes come with nutrition information per serving, so as long as you stick to the serving sizes we recommend, the nutrition information we provide will be accurate.

SALT (g)

6

NUTRIENT REFERENCE VALUE

CALCIUM (mg)

800

IRON (mg)

14

l Individual needs vary considerably, so use this as a general guide only. Ask your GP or doctor to refer you to a registered dietitian if you feel you would benefit from personalised advice. Nutrition is calculated accurately, but may vary, depending on the ingredients used. Only listed ingredients are included in the calculations. OCTOBER 2016 HEALTHY FOOD GUIDE 97


T H E L A S T WO R D

5 TOP FACTS to TAKE AWAY

Our favourite healthy snippets and tips from the experts in this month’s issue

Need a nudge to abandon that packed carriage and walk or cycle to work? Commuting stress means we eat OVER 700 EXTRA CALORIES a week p10

SWAPPING MILK for buttermilk in your gluten-free bakes will give them more lift, due to its higher acid content p29

If a GRUMBLING TUMMY turns you into a monster, you can blame it on low blood sugar, hormones and even your genes. (But think of others – don’t skip meals!) p22

LOW IN CALORIES and fat, edible seaweed is often packed with minerals and vitamins. Find out how to sneak it into meals and snacks p57

COMPILED BY LIZ ATKINS. PHOTOS: ISTOCK

AUTUMN IS AWASH with squash and therefore beta-carotene, used to make vitamin A in the body. One 80g serving provides 54% of our daily vitamin A needs p12


LOCO FOR COCONUTS! , creamy coconut es ak fl t nu co co d te as Delicious to ia seeds to provide... ch of ng li nk ri sp a d oil an

NUTRITIOUS ENERGY!

Also in our range

All Natural Natural source of fibre Omega 3 Goodness Protein packed

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