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THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME AUGUST 2016 £ 4.40

T HE

BIG TR EN D ISS U E

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR THE NEXT SIX MONTHS

9 770957 894205

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PEOPLE PL AC ES D E C O R AT I N G HOUSES FURNITURE COLOURS


THE BIG TREND ISSUE

CONTENTS UP FRONT THE MOMENTS, MATERIALS AND MAKERS 23 TH E LUXE FIN ISH BLUE SODALITE 25 THE CR AFT ORIGA MI 2 6 T H E FA B R I C C O L L E C T I O N L A R S E N ’ S T R I B A L T E X T I L E S 2 9 T H E B U I L D I N G M AT E R I A L G L A S S B R I C K S 31 T H E D I S C O V E R Y R E L I C S T O R U G S 3 5 T H E E X T R AVA G A N C E E M B R O I D E R E D L E A T H E R 37 T H E ACC ES S O RY M I R RO R S 41 T H E I N N O VA T I O N D E S I G N E R F L A T - P A C K 42 T H E C H EF TO K N OW M A R I A N N E L U M B 4 5 T H E N E W N O R D I C D E S I G N S C E N E R E Y K J AV Í K 4 6 T H E B R I T I S H B R A N D T O WA T C H H F U R N I T U R E 49 T H E R E N A I S S A N C E D U O S PAC E C O P E N H AG E N 5 3 T H E I N T E R N A T I O N A L B R A N D T O WA T C H G H I D I N I 19 61 54 T H E FO RG OT T EN A RT BO O K G I L D I N G 57 T H E N E W H O U S E S T Y L E M O D E R N E D W A R D I A N 5 8 T H E C A M PA I G N S AV E O U R L I B R A R I E S 61 T H E A R C H I T E C T O F T H E M O M E N T B J A R K E I N G E L S 62 T H E A RCH I T EC T WE WI L L N E VER FO RG E T Z A H A H A D I D 16 2 T H E B R A N D T O R E C O N S I D E R S W A R O V S K I

AT THE BACK PLACES TO GO 14 2 T H E C I T Y T O V I S I T A A R H U S 14 6 T H E O P E N I N G D E S I G N M U S E U M 14 8 T H E H O T E L S A N A R Á , M E X I C O 15 0 T H E S E C R E T R E T R E A T T H E A Z O R E S

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HOME TRENDS AND DESIGN DIRECTIONS 6 8 S PA C E A G E

Take a tour of this South African home, which works the futuristic trend 80 PETROL SLICK

Our favourite products with this season’s most colourful finish 82 BL ACK AN D WH ITE

Graphic shapes, clean lines and sleek silhouettes – go monochrome 8 4 S TAT E M E N T A R C H I T E C T U R E

This Mexico City property shows why dramatic details are big in interiors 98 CAN EWO RK

The intricate weave that’s no longer just for chairs 10 0 M A K E I T M A R B L E D

Vibrant new ways to use this swirling paint effect 10 2 R AW B E A U T Y

How one stylish couple used honest materials to achieve the roughhewn look 114 S H A R P G L A S S

Fresh techniques give this classic material a new edge 116 F O R E S T G R E E N

It’s time to embrace the season’s hottest shade 118 T R I B A L T W I S T

Filled with African crafts, this Kenyan house will inspire you to try the tribal trend 13 0 O U T O F J A PA N

Take the Eastern approach to simple, streamlined style 13 2 S Y M M E T R Y

This compact Barcelona apartment is a masterclass in simple, ordered beauty 16 S U B S C R I B E A F A N T A S T I C O F F E R F O R O U R M O S T L O YA L R E A D E R S

ON THE COVER

The living room on our newsstand cover is from ‘Symmetry’ house, p132. Our subscribers’ cover features the striking exterior of the ‘Statement Architecture’ house, p84

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NEWSSTAND COVER: CHRISTIAN SCHAULIN SUBSCRIBER COVER: EDMUND SUMNER

15 2 T H E A D D R E S S B O O K N A M E S T O K N O W


T HE

B I G T R EN D ISS U E

Which comes first, the idea for a trend or the trend itself? Or to put it another way, who decides what might capture the zeitgeist of tomorrow? It is the eternal design conundrum, trying to decipher the winds of change and then observing how those stylistic shifts might materialise as real-life looks, sounds, or even tastes. Today, seasonal styles and trends affect everything: our clothes and food, even our cars and, of course, our homes. In this special issue, we’ve taken a long hard look at what’s out there, scouring the design shows and searching the furniture fairs, and we’ve put together an edit of the people, places, moods, materials and moments that we feel will be big news over the next six months. Everything you need to know to be completely up to date!

Editor-in-Chief PS... You’ll notice too that we’ve been playing with our paper over the last few months and this issue combines matt and our normal glossy stock. Why? Because we can! And it’s fun. And it feels nice. And because texture and tactility is important. Let us know what you think via Twitter @MOgundehin @ELLEDecoUK

Follow me on Twitter: @MOgundehin Follow us on Instagram: @elledecorationuk Check out elledecoration.co.uk

AUGUST 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 13


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THE BIG TREND

ISSUE

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR THE NEXT SIX MONTHS

FUTURE MOODS

MOMENTS MATERIALS

MAKERS


THE LUXE FINISH

BLUE SODALITE The desirable stone that’s a deep shade of indigo When we first spotted the blue, delicately veined top of the ‘Oreste’ table by Armani/Casa at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair, we presumed it was made from an exotic type of marble and fell instantly in love with its wonderfully rich colour shot through with trails of pure white. The tabletop, however, is made not from marble but from blue sodalite, a gem-like mineral (so named due to its high sodium content). First discovered in Ilimaussaq, Greenland in 1811, sodalite is similar to lapis lazuli, but has a darker, more moody hue that looks perfect with brass and dark woods. Want to be bold and use it across a floor or wall? Try Antolini’s ‘Lapis Blue Classic’ (price on request; antolini.com).

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN PICTURE: FABRIZIO MARCO NANNINI

‘Oreste’ table with blue sodalite top, £12,240, Armani/Casa (armanicasa.com)

ED


THE CRAFT

ORIGA MI

WORDS: BEN SPRIGGS PICTURES: ANDREW MEREDITH, ALAIN BRAIDWOOD, KIRSTY NOBLE

The ancient art of paper folding is having a moment in 2016 Designers are finding new ways to wow us with the possibilities of folded paper. Take Umut Yamac’s new ‘Perch’ lights for Dutch brand Moooi, (pictured: from £503 for a wall light; moooi.com) featuring delicate illuminated birds made of paper. For the product’s debut at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair, we were charmed by a flock of origami birds perched on a 2.5-metre tall tree-like structure that looked like a magical aviary. On a smaller scale, Scottish designer Kate Colin makes vibrant lampshades (below left, from £180; katecolindesign.com) by precisely folding, scoring and stitching together pieces of Fabriano Tiziano paper, which is known for its high cotton content and durability. Want to try your hand at this ancient craft? The recently published Paper Home by Esther Thorpe (£16.99, Pavilion Books) contains step-by-step instructions for 15 origami projects, including crane mobiles, star garlands, lampshades and vases (below right). E D

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T H E FA B R I C C O L L E C T I O N

LARSEN The most stylish way to work the tribal trend in your home African design is garnering a lot of attention in the West this year, and Larsen’s latest fabrics offer a simple way to tap into the trend. The collection is inspired by the village of Tiébéle in Burkina Faso (right), where every house is adorned with murals that convey aspects of the tribe’s culture. The art of wall painting is an ancient practice, and in Tiébéle the women continue to paint their mud houses using pigment made from natural materials such as ground up earth, chalk and volcanic rock. Ariane Dalle, the design director for Larsen, married these monochromatic graphic motifs with fine natural linens embellished with embroidery to create an exquisite contemporary collection. Want more tribal inspiration? See our Tribal Twist house on p118.

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURE: ALAMY

Linen-mix fabrics, from left ‘Butler’, £115 per metre; ‘Warner’, £145 per metre; ‘Cooper’, £110 per metre; ‘Howard’, £98 per metre, all Larsen (larsenfabrics.com) E D

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T H E B U I L D I N G M AT E R I A L

GLASS BRICKS

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURES: DARIA SCAGLIOLA AND STIJN BRAKKEE, OMER DIACCI

This glistening façade made us rethink building with clear blocks Not since the building of Pierre Chareau’s La Maison de Verre (French for The House of Glass) in 1932 have we seen such beautiful use of glass bricks. Perfectly transparent and with an incredibly detailed finish, Chanel’s new ‘Crystal Houses’ shopfront (above), designed by architecture firm MVRDV, is a work of art. The brief was to emulate the heritage and character of the existing building, creating a glass façade that mimics the original brickwork right down to the detailing of the window frames. The transparent bricks scale upwards until they merge with the traditional terracotta ones above. The result is a wonderfully delicate-looking finish, but these bricks, produced by glassmaker Poesia, are anything but fragile. The Glass and Transparency Laboratory of Delft University of Technology, along with a team of engineers, subjected the blocks to pressure, impact, and heat shock testing, creating glass that is around ten times stronger than normal brick. There is another positive to working with glass: it is fully recyclable. Any waste materials, such as imperfect bricks, can be melted down and re-purposed (mvrdv.com; spaziopoesia.it). How to recreate the look yourself Poesia sells a range of simple glass-block designs (left) for residential projects from its UK stockist Rosso Dotto (from £14 for a single brick; rossodotto.com). If you crave the retro look of glass squares, we recommend the ‘La Rochere’ brick by Glassblock Technology, which comes in a selection of patterns and finishes (pictured right, from £140 per square metre; glassblocks.co.uk). E D

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T H E D I S COV ERY

RELICS TO RUGS Ancient mosaics unearthed beneath designer Luke Irwin’s home proved the perfect inspiration for a new collection

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

What are the chances of a rug designer finding a priceless ancient Roman mosaic beneath his own home? That’s what happened to Luke Irwin, whose work on re-purposing an old barn at his Wiltshire farmhouse was halted when builders hit ancient ruins. Following a subsequent excavation by Historic England, it transpired that the find was the flooring of a 1,800-year-old villa called Deverill, possibly the largest ever built in Britain. Of huge archaeological importance – the news hit global airwaves from Australia to Canada – the discovery also dealt Irwin, a self-confessed history buff, a dream hand. ‘I always look to the past when I’m creating my rugs,’ he says, ‘but this took that to another level.’ Irwin has transposed the precise teal blue, white and bright terracotta basketweave pattern (pictured overleaf, also known as Geoche) of the mosaic not in ceramic, but as a deep-pile wool-silk carpet. The resulting ‘Deverill’ rug is the keystone of his new collection, but research into Sicilian and ancient Greek mosaics led to further designs that explore classically geometric tiling and more abstract patterns. In an endeavour to recreate the look caused by the aging of the relic, Irwin found two methods. The first is traditional carpet hand-carving, which involves cutting into the rug to sculpt a realistic ‘eroded’ effect. The second is more inventive. ‘We plotted lines of wool around each square “tile”. When the rug comes off of the loom it is washed in a dilution of iron oxide that reacts with the wool, removing it to reveal a precise indent down to the warp and weft.’ ‘The most important thing was for the rugs not to be a pastiche,’ he says. ‘We are not the British Museum shop; I tried to take something ancient and design something relevant. The story should capture the imagination as much as the rugs catch the eye. ‘The Mosaic Collection’, from £1,440 per square metre (lukeirwin.com). ➤

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RELICS TO RUGS LUKE IRWIN

‘I ALWAYS LOOK TO THE PAST WHEN I’M CREATING MY RUGS, BUT THIS TOOK IT TO ANOTHER LEVEL’

The remains of a 1,800-year-old Roman villa were unearthed at Luke Irwin’s Wiltshire property. His new ‘Mosaic Collection’, which includes ‘Aurelius’ (top right) and ‘Vespasian’ (previous page and right), is inspired by the ancient mosaic flooring found on site (detail above) E D

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T H E E X T R AVA G A N C E

EMBROIDERED LEATHER Studioart’s new ‘Ricamo’ collection is the haute couture of homeware Whether used for upholstery or to create decadent curtains and wallcoverings, Italian brand Studioart’s luxuriously tactile ‘Ricamo’ range features embroidery work that enhances the colour and characteristics of leather. The intricate designs include contemporary geometric patterns and delicate floral motifs. Studioart’s founders, Nadia and Gianfranco Dalle Mese, are known for their pioneering and creative work with leather, but they are also well tutored in traditional craftsmanship. Their father, Giuseppe Dalle Mese, set up the renowned Montebello tannery – located in the region of Vincenza, this family business has been producing leather for major fashion houses for over 40 years. The perfect marriage of modern design and timeless quality, each pattern in the ‘Ricamo’ collection, available from Rubelli/Donghia, is custom-made and meticulously stitched by hand. We love the abstract repeating pattern of a mountain range that adds an extra detailed dimension to the deep moody blue of this ‘Everest’ leather (studioart.it). ED

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURE: MATTEO CASTAGNA

‘Everest’ embroidered leather curtain, from £1,114 per square metre, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com)

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T H E ACC ES S O RY

MIRRORS

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL

Optical illusions and tricks with colour – these new designs are functional works of art

Why choose a plain looking glass when your mirror can be an artistic talking point? The ‘Arch’ (pictured, £918) by New York-based design studio Bower takes design trickery to a new level, creating the illusion of a physical doorway – a device that will make tight hallways and small rooms feel more open. The clever effect is produced using a precisely cut segment of black-tinted glass, which creates the shadow of the archway and gives the impression of depth. Founded by Danny Giannella and Tammer Hijazi in 2013, Bower prides itself on its experimental approach to design – the brand also sells mirrors in colourful geometric shapes that appear to pop out of the wall (bowernyc.com). These New Yorkers are not the only designers creating cool mirrors, though. From the colour of Bonaldo’s ‘New Perspective’ design to the graphic look of Ron Gilad’s ‘Deadline’ mirrors for Cassina, there are plenty to pick from. Turn the page for six of our favourites. ➤

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ARTISTIC MIRRORS SIX OF THE BEST

Clockwise from top left ‘Orlo Offset’ blue mirror by Theo Williams, £475, Another Brand (anotherbrand.co.uk). ‘Shaping Colour’ purple mirror, £4,345, Germans Ermičs (germansermics.com). ‘New Perspective’ oblong mirror by Alain Gilles for Bonaldo, from £206, Go Modern (gomodern.co.uk). ‘Treasure’ diamond mirror by Amy Cushing, £7,500, Vessel Gallery (vesselgallery.com). ‘Deadline’ striped mirrors by Ron Gilad, from £888 each, Cassina (poltronafraugroup.com). ‘Seeing Glass, Big Round’ orange mirror by Sabine Marcelis and Brit van Nerven, £3,700, Mint (mintshop.co.uk) E D

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T H E I N N O VAT I O N

DESIGNER FLAT-PACK

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN PICTURES: JEPPE SØRENSEN

Two of our favourite Scandinavian brands are asking you to assemble their new furniture at home. The savings are worth the effort

The ‘Ace’ range by Danish designer Hans Hornemann for Normann Copenhagen and ‘Can’ by French duo Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Hay both combine high-quality materials and cutting-edge design. The only difference from the companies’ usual offerings is that you have to do the final assembly yourself. Don’t worry, though, the emphasis is on simplicity. To build an ‘Ace’ chair, sofa or footstool, you simply screw the readyupholstered back and seat together and fix the moulded plywood legs into the pre-made holes. The ‘Can’ sofa and lounge chair’s wonderfully plump upholstered cushions attach to a tubular steel frame using fabric straps. As Erwan Bouroullec says: ‘The name “Can” represents the idea that you can. You can make it, just don’t be afraid.’ And what’s the benefit of doing it yourself? Normann Copenhagen’s ‘Ace’ range is up to half the price of its comparable furniture and Hay’s ‘Can’ lounge chair is £226 cheaper than its similarly sumptuous ‘Uchiwa’ design. Plus, there’s no lead time, so you can have your sofa delivered straight away. With savings to be made by doing it yourself, this is a great opportunity to pick up a designer piece at a pinch. Top ‘Can’ lounge chair by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, from £909, Hay (hay.dk) Above ‘Ace’ grey side chair by Hans Hornemann, £349.90, Normann Copenhagen (normann-copenhagen.com) E D

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T H E C H E F TO K N O W

MARIANNE LUMB Book a table at this young star’s restaurant, London’s most bijou fine dining experience

Seating just 14 diners, Marianne Lumb’s eponymous restaurant situated on London’s Chepstow Road is the capital’s most intimate fine dining establishment. It is inspired by Lumb’s years spent working as a private chef, and the succinct tasting menu of seasonal fare reflects her previous experience at quality dining spots such as the Michelin-starred Gravetye Manor in Sussex. ‘My cooking style is based on classical French techniques, but there is also an Italian simplicity to it,’ Lumb says. You may recognise her from a successful stint on BBC’s Masterchef: The Professionals in 2009, but her passion for food has much earlier beginnings. Lumb’s father was a butcher, and her first jobs included fruit picking at Belvoir Fruit Farm and stilton turning at an independent dairy in her home village of Long Clawson,

Leicestershire. By the age of 21 she had decided to become a professional chef and has since cooked for celebrities, politicians and leading industry figures including the Sainsbury family and Lady Bamford, the founder of Daylesford Organic. Rather than following the path of other TV personalities and moving away from the kitchen, Lumb remains a head chef first and foremost, cooking at Marianne and devising new dishes. ‘Our menu is constantly evolving, with sometimes two to three dishes changing every week,’ she says. With an interior designed by Ed Godrich and inspired by the intimacy of a private dining room, Marianne is available to hire for events, for which Lumb will create a beautiful bespoke menu. Alternatively, book a table during the day to sample the remarkably affordable £35 three-course lunch. 104 Chepstow Road, London W2 (mariannerestaurant.com). E D 42 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK AUGUST 2016

WORDS: SARAH MORGAN PICTURES: JON CARDWELL

‘MY COOKING STYLE IS BASED ON CLASSICAL FRENCH TECHNIQUES AND ITALIAN SIMPLICITY’


TH E N EW N O RD I C D ESI GN SCEN E

MADE IN R E Y K J AV Í K

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: GUDRUN VALDIMARSDÓTTIR

Icelandic designers are proving that there’s more to the country than breathtaking landscapes. Every spring, creatives meet in the capital for Design March – here are two of our top brands from the show

NORTH LIMITED

HAF STUDIO

This trio’s collections are inspired by the Icelandic landscape – think angular shapes and volcanic materials. Headed by Sigríður Hjaltdal Pálsdóttir, Guðrún Valdimarsdóttir and Þórunn Hannesdóttir, North Limited came together by chance during an international exhibition in 2014. ‘We found out that the three of us were invited to show our work in Germany, so we devised a plan to exhibit as a group,’ Sigríður says. Now working together back in their homeland, the team have created ‘Stefnir’, a set of diamondshaped plates made from lava, marble and basalt. This year, they adapted the design in two new ways, expanding the collection to include clothes hooks and mirrors (northlimited.com).

A slick approach to everything from interiors to products characterises this creative firm, run by Karitas Sveinsdóttir and Hafsteinn Júlíusson. Recent interior designs include a sleek monochrome look for Reykjavík fashion boutique SUIT and an ultra-stylish new headquarters for Icelandic bank Kvika. Its graphic recyclable food and drink packaging for airline Icelandair, featuring trivia and cool typography, takes sustainable design to new heights. This year at Design March the studio showcased its ‘BERG’ collection, a range of hexagonal multifunctional storage units available in inky blues, icy greys and granite hues – they’re a perfect homage to Iceland’s beautiful glaciers (hafstudio.is).

Clockwise from top left ‘Keilir’ candlestick holders, £33 each; ‘Berg’ side tables, from £380 each; ‘Stefnir’ hooks, £71 each; mirror, £260

Clockwise from top left Icelandair food box; Kvika bank; private home in Reykjavík; ‘Wheel of Nutrition’ plate, £19; ‘BERG’ tables (prototypes) E D

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T H E B R I T I S H B R A N D TO WAT C H

HFURNITURE Love smart storage with quirky details? This innovative firm is for you

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

Since Mexican-born, London-based designer Alejandro Villarreal founded H Furniture two years ago, the brand has impressed with its unusual take on classic design inspiration. The latest launch is the ‘Belt’ hanging rack (pictured, £480) and shelving unit by Munich-based designer Jessica Nebel, which are both made from wood and leather straps. H Furniture’s first collections feature a similar mix of traditional and modern influences. The ‘Leather’ seating range is based on the clean lines of mid-century Scandinavian design; the simple ‘Corner’ sideboard and mirror have striking geometric details; and the idea for the ‘Loom’ chair, whose seat is made from woven cord, was inspired by a belt-making loom found in Oaxaca, Mexico. Today, Villarreal continues to work with top design talent – textile artist Ptolemy Mann has just given the ‘Loom’ chair a colourful update. Innovative designs with a focus on craft: we can’t wait to see what’s next (hfurniture.co). E D

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THE RENAISSANCE DUO

S PAC E COPENHAGEN

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS

Furniture, lighting, interior design – the co-founders of this Danish studio are the names to know in every discipline

Who are they? Signe Bindslev Henriksen and Peter Bundgaard Rützou, co-founders of Space Copenhagen, are so successful as a duo that it’s hard to imagine they were ever rivals. The Copenhagen-based designers became friends while studying at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts and, upon graduating, both set up their own studios. ‘There weren’t many offices with our focus, so we became each other’s closest competitors,’ recalls Henriksen. Their solution? Merge the two companies into Space Copenhagen. Founded in 2005, the studio works across interior design, furniture, lighting and art direction. The pair clearly thrive on freewheeling between disciplines, but why is this so appealing? ‘Although interior and furniture design involve different processes, they enrich each other,’ says Rützou. What are they known for? Their style melds the organic, spare aesthetic of Danish mid-century design with a restrained opulence. To date, their pieces include the ‘Copenhagen’ pendant

lights (inspired by lamps on the city’s piers) for &tradition, monolithic ‘Moon’ tables for Gubi, and subtly ornate ‘Ren’ chairs for Stellar Works. The latter grace the project that truly put Space Copenhagen on the map: its redesign of legendary Copenhagen restaurant Noma. Working closely with owner and chef René Redzepi, the duo gave the venue an edgier but still cosy Nordic makeover, combining austere pumice-grey furniture with tactile fur throws and brass accents. Their latest project is New York hotel 11 Howard (11howard.com), whose interior has a glam, boudoir-chic vibe – think blush-pink and marble – yet is still characteristically clean-lined. Turn the page to see examples of the prolific studio’s work. What does the future hold? Soon us Brits will be able to enjoy a flavour of Space Copenhagen’s work first hand – the pair’s design for a hotel at new development Manhattan Loft Gardens in Stratford, London, opens in 2018 (spacecph.dk). ➤

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SPACE COPENHAGEN THE PORTFOLIO

From top ‘Copenhagen SC6’ lights for &Tradition, £179 each, Nest (nest.co.uk). A bedroom at 11 Hotel in New York (11howard.com). Interior of Fiskebaren restaurant, Copenhagen (2009). ‘Spine’ daybed for Fredericia, from £3,605, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). The redesigned interior of Noma, Copenhagen (noma.dk). ‘Moon’ table, £3,429, Gubi (gubi.com) E D

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PICTURE: HENRIK BECKER NIELSEN

THE CLEAN AESTHETIC OF DANISH MID-CENTURY DESIGN MIXED WITH A RESTRAINED OPULENCE


T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L B R A N D TO WAT C H

G H I D I N I 1 9 61 We’ve fallen for its contemporary designs in brass

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

Brushed, patinated or polished to a golden lustre, brass accessories and lighting add warmth to any interior – but there’s one new brand that’s pushing the possibilities of this material further than ever before. Based in Brescia, northern Italy, Ghidini 1961 is the result of a partnership between designer Stefano Giovannoni – best known for his collaborations with Alessi – and Ghidini Giuseppe Bosco, a leading brass manufacturer that has been trading since 1961. Giovannoni has brought a wealth of design talent on board to create inventive pieces for Ghidini’s craftspeople to perfect. The Campana brothers’ ‘Kaleidos’ wall lights are origami-like sheets of folded brass, while Andrea Branzi’s ‘Porto’ console combines distressed and polished metal. Giovannoni himself has contributed the Jeff Koonsesque ‘Rabbit’ doorstops. The real talking point, though, is the ‘Miami’ desk and chair by Slovenian-born designer Nika Zupanc, clad entirely in mirror-polished brass. As well as being a feat of manufacturing excellence, these designs elevate this beautiful material to dizzying new heights of luxury (ghidini1961.com).

From top left ‘Kaleidos’ wall light by the Campana Brothers, from £3,667; ‘Miami’ desk, from £3,823; ‘Miami’ chair, £1,521; ‘Flamingo’ desk lamp, £1,287; ‘Sunset’ mirror, £920; ‘Florida’ bowl, £226, all by Nika Zupanc; ‘Factory’ pendant light by Elisa Giavannoni, £1,833; ‘Rabbit’ doorstop by Stefano Giovannoni, £202; ‘Here (Thimble)’ ice bucket by Studio Job, £5,992; ‘Porto’ console by Andrea Branzi, £4,135, all Ghidini 1961 (ghidini1961.com) E D


T H E F O RG OT T EN A RT

BOOK GILDING Meet the London-based artisan resurrecting a craft that’s perilously close to extinction Who is he? Jean-Francois Lanzetta, founder of three-year-old company Inhedited (the name is a cross between Inherited and Edition) is an expert in the ‘amazing, almost lost art of hand-gilding books’. After ten years spent working in finance, the French-Italian apprenticed with a gilder near Zurich before moving to London to set up his own firm using bespoke equipment built by a company in Switzerland – the very last one in Europe producing machinery for gilders. He then introduced himself to the British Society of Bookbinders, who knew of no other book gilder. As well as one-off commissions, Inhedited also produces elegant notebooks – they are bound in history, look current, and should last a lifetime. What is the gilding process? ‘I receive manuscripts as a block, bound but not covered. They go into the gild press to hold them still and then I sand each edge,’ says Lanzetta. The gold foil is then heated to exactly 300 degrees Celsius to activate the glue and pressed onto the edge horizontally

so that the pages don’t become stuck together. ‘There is a beautiful moment,’ Lanzetta says, ‘when you take the book out from the press and bend it to flick the pages. There is a crunch, a crack when the gold splinters, and the book flies open with shiny leaves.’ You are welcome to call in to see Lanzetta in his shared Dalston studio by appointment. However, because his gilding apparatus is one of a kind, neither client, competitor nor the curious team at ELLE Decoration are granted admission to the nearby gilding workshop, home to what Lanzetta hopes might one day become ‘the Hermès of bookbinding’. Where can I buy the notebooks? There are three varieties available online and from Lanzetta’s workshop. The travelsized ‘Proa’ (£414) is named after the vessel upon which Ferdinand Magellan, Portuguese explorer of the 16th Century, sailed to the Americas; the larger is called ‘Pervoló’ (£258) – the Latin word for ‘I fly through’ – connoting the necessity of writing throughout life. ‘Eight’ is a set of eight notebooks (above; £1,680). A fine sheet of magnetised steel in each of the covers means the books stand up together without bookends. Lanzetta has been told that clients hesitate about writing in his books, afraid to tarnish their beauty. His response? ‘No, these are to be used!’ (inhedited.com). E D

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

‘There is a crunch, a crack when the gold splinters, and the book flies open with shiny leaves’


THE NEW HOUSE STYLE

M O D E R N E DWA R D I A N WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURE: DENNIS GILBERT/VIEW

Knox Bhavan Architects has updated the Brownstone for the 21st Century These two terraced houses in North Dulwich, London are a stylish counterpoint to the glass and steel housing popping up across the capital. Built by London practice Knox Bhavan Architects, they take the best elements of grand Edwardian architecture and add some contemporary thinking. The three-storey building, entitled ‘Brownstone’, was designed to replace an ugly 1950s property built to fill a bomb-damaged segment of the original Edwardian terrace. Constructed from terracotta and white sandstone blocks, which are all individually handcrafted, the homes look traditional from the front, but are covered in tongue-and-groove larch cladding at the rear. In contrast to the elegance of the façade, the interiors are kept clean and simple, with polished poured concrete flooring, curving white walls and bamboo joinery (knoxbhavan.co.uk). E D

Explore the interiors online at elledecoration.co.uk AUGUST 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 57


T H E C A M PA I G N

SAVE OUR LIBR ARIES One in ten UK libraries is under threat of closure. It’s time to take action!

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN PICTURE: GETTY IMAGES

Every well decorated home should have a full bookshelf. As German novelist Heinrich Mann once wrote, ‘A house without books is like a room without windows.’ For many, a lifelong love affair with the written word begins at the local library. But due to government spending cuts, those libraries are under threat. It’s time to take a stand. In the five years since the first official Save Our Libraries Day (5 February 2011) was held, more than 400 libraries have closed. This is an epidemic that is playing out on a local level and there are things you can do right now to prevent a closure in your area. Check The Library Campaign (librarycampaign.com) for news on the latest planned closures and how you can get involved in stopping them, from signing a petition or writing to your local councillor, to taking part in organised ‘read-ins’ (peaceful demonstrations with the added bonus of some quiet reading time). Many communities are also deciding to take matters into their own hands, creating volunteer-run projects such as London’s Kensal Rise Community Library – currently raising funds with the intention of opening in 2017. But are libraries really that useful in the modern world of e-readers and the internet? We think so and, with physical book sales recently having risen for the first time in four years, it’s clear that the tactile joy of a good book is back in fashion. To quote author Neil Gaiman: ‘Google can bring you back 100,000 answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.’ That’s a skill and a resource that should be cherished. E D

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THE ARCHITECT OF THE MOMENT

BJARKE INGELS

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: IWAN BAAN, JONAS BIE

Meet the Danish maverick claiming his place alongside the architectural greats This year, Danish architect Bjarke Ingels joins the likes of the late Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel and Frank Gehry by creating the annual summer Serpentine Gallery Pavilion. His ‘Unzipped Wall’ design (above) consists of interlocking fibreglass bricks stacked in a fluid, wave-like form. ‘We decided to work with one of the most basic elements of architecture: the brick wall,’ says Ingels. You can visit this striking white structure, which contains a cafe and exhibition space, from now until 9 October (serpentinegalleries.org). So how did Ingels, whose London office opened in June, find his name mentioned alongside such architectural legends? In 2006, he left architecture practice OMA, headed by renowned Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, and set up his own studio, BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group). Over the following decade he established himself as an architectural innovator. The first scheme to win him international acclaim was Mountain Dwellings, an apartment block on the outskirts of Copenhagen, completed in 2008. Often described as ‘the man-made mountain’ it’s a democratic piece of architecture, cleverly concealing car parking and utilities while offering plenty of natural light and individual garden space for every resident. Since then, Ingels has designed another unique Copenhagen housing complex, 8 House, and, for the World Expo in Shanghai in 2010, a spiralling cycle path wrapped around a pool that was filled with water transported from Copenhagen harbour. After opening his first New York office in 2011, Ingels has conquered the US, too. He recently won a competition to design a new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site, as well as another steel-and-glass mountain-shaped apartment complex on 37th West Street. At the same time, he’s been collaborating with prolific British designer Thomas Heatherwick on the new Google headquarters in Bayshore, California. We expect that Ingels is a name we will be hearing a lot more in 2016 and beyond (big.dk). E D AUGUST 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 61


THE ARCHITECT WHO WE WILL NEVER FORGET

ZAHA


If you look up the word ‘architecture’ on Google Images, it won’t be long before you come across a building by Zaha Hadid, perhaps third or fourth after the Parthenon or the Sydney Opera House, then followed by several more. You will also find buildings that look as if they were designed by her, but are actually some of the very many imitations across the world. It is one sign of the way she epitomised the contemporary idea of what an architect is: she was a maker of spectacular forms whose attraction lay in the degree to which they transgressed previous ideas of what is possible in the construction of buildings. Her designs aspired to hover and fly. They avoided the rectangular at all costs – in her earlier work she favoured acute angles and oblique lines, later she preferred curves that went in all directions. Often they were indeed barely possible, and intensely demanding of budget, practicality, physics and of the people whose jobs it was to be concerned about such things. Her buildings’ many OMG moments also come with some WTFs, when the ambitions of her imagination stumble over hard reality, and end with painful or clumsy details. The design, construction and inhabitation of a Zaha building could be deemed an extreme sport. Her architecture is therefore a display of willpower – to which the millions of online clicks it gets are in some way responding –

her student days, recalls how ‘she was always concerned about my wardrobe, always thinking “that dress would look good on Maddy”.’ Serious as she was about life and work, she also appreciated its frivolities. Vriesendorp recalls singing along with her to Alicia Keys, ‘singing really high. We laughed so much: she had such a laugh always. There was shouting, screaming, crying, then laughter.’ The greater significance of Hadid’s unique talent and personality was her contribution to architecture. She burst onto the scene in the early 1980s, a particularly nervous and apologetic time for the profession, with work that was neither. It was explosive, dynamic, dazzling and – although it owed much to Russian Constructivism of the early 20th century – was not really like anything that had been done before. She sparked a big bang of freedom and ideas that other architects are still exploiting. For me, the most interesting quality of her work was its potential for creating new relationships between aspects of city and life: in her unbuilt opera house proposed for Cardiff, for example, audience, performers and passers-by would have encountered each other in unexpected ways. In her MAXXI museum in Rome, a new public place is created, charged by its interaction with spaces of art. The angles, the curves, the flying planes, dramatic in themselves, were at their best a means to this end.

S U P E R S TA R

PORTRAIT: PHILIP SINDEN

Zaha Hadid, who died in March, was one of the greatest – and most controversial – architects of our time, who also turned her hand to fashion, furniture and even cars. Author and critic Rowan Moore sums up her unique achievements

and willpower was one of Hadid’s most conspicuous qualities. She overcame huge obstacles in the first two decades of her career, such as having projects cancelled, mistrust of both her architectural and personal style, rank prejudice, and the great difficulty of the challenges she set herself. Through all this she never compromised her way of practicing architecture. Nor did she retreat behind her style: she was always investigating ways in which it could develop. She also overcame her own diffidence. Those who knew her as a student at the Architectural Association recall how she would present her astonishing drawings almost carelessly, scattered on the floor, as if embarrassed. It took the encouragement of people such as her tutor Rem Koolhaas to realise how exceptional her work was and is: ‘She is a planet in her own inimitable orbit,’ he wrote at the time. ‘That status has its own rewards and difficulties: due to the flamboyance and intensity of her work, it will be impossible [for her] to have a conventional career.’ If there was little sign of reticence in her later years, it was not because the shyness had gone, but because it was well hidden. She always had passion, expressed as rages and tears. If she could sometimes seem from afar to be a bit of a monster, her friends and colleagues all stress her generosity, warmth and concern for others. The Dutch artist Madelon Vriesendorp, who has known Hadid since

In the last 15 years of Hadid’s career a tipping point was reached. Her office, which in the mid-1990s might have closed for lack of work, employed hundreds of people to meet demands from all over the world for stadia, airports, theatres, condominium towers and luxury villas. She also translated her striking forms into products as diverse as jewellery, furniture and cars (see overleaf). She attracted as much controversy as ever, cutting short an interview on the BBC Today programme when she was wrongly accused of complicity in the deaths of hundreds of construction workers in Qatar. She became a celebrity, the living epitome of the ‘starchitect’, iconic in work, person and personality. ‘She liked basking in some kind of glamour,’ says Vriesendorp, ‘but of course it wasn’t always glamorous. There were always people telling her she was so wanted, and it’s always disappointing when those people don’t tell the truth. So she wanted to hold more to her old friends.’ Zaha Hadid was a woman and an Arab in a business dominated by white men. Too many of her obituaries have placed these facts at the top, calling her such things as the greatest female architect in the world. So she was, and it was part of her achievement to have broken past the barriers erected against her. But it diminishes Hadid to qualify her work by gender and race. Man or woman, white or not, she was one of the most exceptional architects of all time. ➤ AUGUST 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 63


ZAHA HADID HIGH WALLS TO HOT WHEELS Our favourite buildings, products and concepts from the Hadid design archive

‘Nova’ shoe for United Nude (2013) The shoe brand was founded by Rem D Koolhaas, nephew of Hadid’s former tutor

‘Liquid Glacial’ chair for David Gill Gallery (2015) Inspired by ice formations, the furniture collection also includes stools and tables

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Cutlery set for WMF (2007) The unusual series comprises five pieces of asymmetrical flatware, made from polished stainless steel

‘Crista’ centrepiece for Swarovski (2016) The stunning crystal and metal design launched at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair

Cuff and ring for Georg Jensen (2016) This sculptural jewellery features curves reminiscent of Hadid’s building designs


PICTURES: STUDIO MIERSWA-KLUSKA, GETTY IMAGES

From left London Aquatics Centre, designed and built for the 2012 Olympic Games in London; bathroom showroom at ROCA London Gallery (2011); Glasgow Riverside Museum of Transport (2011); MAXXI museum (2009), Rome; City Life Milano (2014), a series of seven residential buildings in the Italian design capital; Galaxy Soho (2012), a Beijing-based project comprising four 15-storey towers containing office, retail and entertainment spaces

‘Aqua’ table for Established and Sons (2005) The gentle rippled effect above each of the fin-like legs gives this table a fluid quality

Tap for Avilion Triflow (2009) Taking the movement of water as its inspiration, this modern fitting makes a sculptural talking point

Handbag for Fendi (2014) Hadid’s own version of the brand’s famous ‘Peekaboo’ bag. The layered design was auctioned for charity

‘Crevasse’ vases for Alessi (2005–2008) This angular interlocking pair are cut from a single block of stainless steel

Z Car (2007) The hydrogen-powered concept car was commissioned by art dealer Kenny Schachter

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THE HOT HOME TRENDS

AND NEW

DESIGN DIRECTIONS


S PAC E A G E This Cape Town home works the futuristic trend with cool concrete, sculptural details and fluid spaces


Words KERRYN FISCHER Photography ELSA YOUNG Production LUANNE TOMS/FRANK FEATURES


THE TREND

THE ARCHITECTURE

The 1950s vision of the futuristic home has finally been revised for 21st Century living. This new Modernism takes the aesthetic to extremes: metal clad ceilings, glass that funnels light into secret subterranean rooms and slick, white, textured concrete. This house is the epitome of this new trend and is blessed with sweeping views of Cape Town’s Twelve Apostles mountain range. The largely open-plan space stretches over 1,000 square metres on the ground floor, which is broken into informal yet connected zones for cooking, dining and relaxation. These areas all spill out onto vast terraces. It’s the dream home of Shane Thompson, who works in fashion and as a property developer, and was realised by architect Philip Olmesdahl of SAOTA and interior designer Debra Parkington of Studio Parkington. Here, Philip reveals how he gave this building its super-modern look. saota.com; studioparkington.com

Hidden depths We cut into the mountainside to create the house’s subterranean level, which accommodates utility areas and a garage forecourt. Above, the generous landscaped terraces visually reduce the scale of the property, making it blend into its natural setting. Invisible boundaries The solid, white concrete structure of the building serves to emphasise the transparency of the house’s glasslined first floor. Our idea was that anyone sitting in the main living area would not register the walls or the immense structure of the property, but connect with the views. Open to the elements The kitchen, dining and seating areas all lead out to a 17-metre-long outdoor terrace, which is protected and shaded by a canopy constructed using 400-millimetre-thick concrete that was poured over a steel frame.

Living room A grey modular ‘Tufty-Too’ sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia is overlooked by a classic floor light by Serge Mouille. The silk rug and polished granite side table are both custom designs by Studio Parkington. All the furnishings here are low-slung so as not to distract from the stunning view Stockist details on p152 ➤


Opposite Concrete flooring flows through the interior and out to the pool area. The sunbeds and sofa are by Paola Lenti This page A sculptural Cor-Ten steel zig-zag screen adds privacy for the rooms upstairs. The chairs and round table are by Studio Parkington. The pool is also a skylight, filtering light into the garage below Stockist details on p152 ➤


THE ENTIRE HOUSE WAS SANDBLASTED TO GIVE THE CAST-CONCRETE SURFACES A FINE FINISH THAT HAS A SENSUAL QUALITY AND WARMS THE MINIMALIST INTERIOR


THE INTERIOR Fluid spaces We created a natural flow through the house: the entrance leads into the main kitchen and dining room and then on to the kitchen-bar area and living spaces. The house reveals itself in a remarkable way as you walk through it – and the drama is amplified by the views. United colour We devised the palette at the start of the project, with the intention of creating a calm, uncluttered environment with a stylish and homogeneous feel. Sinuous shapes Interior designer Debra chose furnishings that would create a relaxed feel, but with shapes that counter the linear structure of the architecture. The vintage Mario Bellini sofas, Cassina dining table and chairs, and the curving Vladimir Kagan ‘Serpentine’ sofa are all examples of this. Also, we picked the B&B Italia sofas in the TV room (previous page) because of their low backs – they ensure that nothing distracts the eye as it is drawn across the open living space and out to the pool. Living area The fireplace is carved from travertine stone, which has a warm tone that is echoed in the colours of the furniture. The ‘Serpentine’ sofa by Vladimir Kagan is teamed with a modular sofa by Studio Parkington, covered in Donghia’s ‘Ashlar’ fabric, and two chairs by Warren Platner for Knoll. The black side table is part of Angelo Mangiarotti’s ‘Eros’ series Stockist details on p152 ➤


MUCH OF THE KITCHEN IS CONCEALED BEHIND FLUSH WALLS OF OAK IN A SIMPLIFIED, CONTEMPORARY TAKE ON TRADITIONAL PANELLING


Kitchen A dark bronze prep area overlooks the verdant garden. The blonde oak cabinetry has slick marble worktops and the extractor hood is made from burnished bronze. The black stools are from La Grange Interiors Bar/dining area ‘Meme’ aluminium stools by Streng Design create a sociable spot. The chairs and dining table are by Cassina. Above them hangs a ‘Branching’ chandelier by Lindsey Adelman Stockist details on p152 ➤


THE MATERIALS Metal mix We used metallic accents to give the house its distinctive futuristic feel. The roof and ceilings on the upper floor are made from green-grey toned zinc, while many of the screens and other metal details are made from either Cor-Ten steel (which has a rusted appearance) or burnished zinc. Concrete plan The building ’s white concrete ceilings and walls blend into the poured concrete floors that flow throughout the house. The entire property was sandblasted to give the castconcrete surfaces a fine finish that has a sensual quality and adds warmth to the minimalist interior. Super natural Texture is very important in a pared-back scheme, especially with the strong light that you get in a location like this. There needs to be variation in how that light is dispersed and absorbed. Grey stained oak is used in the bedroom, in contrast with the lighter blonde woods used elsewhere.

Bedroom The bed, designed by Studio Parkington (which also created the silk rug), rests upon a grey oak platform. The flooring is sandblasted granite, while the ceiling is clad in zinc. The headboard and throw are both made using ‘Fadini-Borghi’ fabric by Pierre Frey Stockist details on p152 E D


D E S I G N D I R E C T I O N S #1

PETROL THESE VIBRANT, EYE-CATCHING PIECES ALL FEATURE The hot finish this season is iridescence, the colour-shifting rainbow effect that you see when petrol mixes with water. Picks from the Milan Furniture Fair include glass ‘Oil’ and ‘Warp’ vases by Tom Dixon, Classicon’s polished tinted-metal ‘Pli’ table and Hay’s beautiful – and highly affordable – reflective steel trays. Every piece is elevated by the multi-chromatic finish – colours shift from greens to blues and purples depending on the direction of the light and your vantage point. From small accessories to investment buys, this is the stylish way to add an instant pop of colour to your home.

From left ‘Onix’ tiles, from £225 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.com). ‘Shimmer’ round table, £3,320; dining table, £7,108, both by Patricia Urquiola, Glas Italia (glasitalia.com). ‘Co-Ex 3’ vases, £253 as pictured, Umzikim (umzikim.com). Steel trays, from £11 each, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Warp’ twisted glass vase, £200; ‘Oil’ vase, £275, both Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net). ‘Cone Shade and Bell Cage’ pendant light in ‘Aurora’, £117, Shelter Bay (shelter-bay.ca).


SLICK

A BRILLIANT RAINBOW OF SHIFTING COLOURS

‘Labirinto’ glass cube table by Claudio Bellini, from £690, Natuzzi (natuzzi.com). Cutlery, £41 per item, SUS Gallery (susgallery.jp). ‘Wooden Aquarelle’ nesting side tables by Meike Harde, £864 for a pair, Matter of Stuff (matterofstuff.com). ‘Pli’ polished stainless steel side table by Victoria Wilmotte for Classicon, £850, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘Horn’ pendant light in ‘Aurora’, £59, Shelter Bay (shelter-bay.ca) E D

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D ESI GN D I REC TI O NS #2

BL ACK & MIX GLOSSY SURFACES, GRAPHIC SILHOUETTES AND While it’s a trend that never completely disappears, this season sees the monochrome mood ramp up a notch with numerous sightings earlier this year at the annual Milan Furniture Fair. Leading the way was Lee Broom with his ‘Optical’ lights, gorgeous globes of purest white intersected by skewed glossy black lines. As for furniture, we love the modern minimalist offerings from Baleri Italia and Italian brand Lema’s new ‘Tip’ storage collection. And for walls and floors, look no further than Barber & Osgerby’s new ‘Puzzle’ designs for Mutina – the triple-toned geometric pieces can be arranged to create abstract patterns.

From left ‘Puzzle’ tiles by Barber & Osgerby, £130 per square metre, Mutina (mutina.it). ‘Optical’ floor light, £895, Lee Broom (leebroom.com). ‘Bob’ marble side table by Jean-Marie Massaud, £960, Poltrona Frau (poltronafraugroup.com). ‘Tip’ storage units by Daniel Debiasi and Federico Sandri, available September, Lema (lemamobili.com). ‘Optical’ pendant light, £425, Lee Broom (leebroom.com).‘I.S.I’ dining table and bookcases by Luigi Baroli, from £1,757 each, all Baleri Italia (baleri-italia.com). ‘375’ coffee table by Walter Knoll, £4,695, Forza (forza.co.uk). ‘Valencia’ tall vase, £60; ‘Siena’ plant pot, £25, both by H Skjalm P, Chase & Sorensen (chaseandsorensen.com). ‘June’ side chair by Frank Rettenbacher for Zanotta, from £699, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) E D


WHITE

MATT FINISHES TO UPDATE THE MONOCHROME LOOK


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R


B

ig, bold and Brutalist: all words that capture the spirit of the home of renowned Mexican artist Pedro Reyes. He and his wife, fashion designer Carla Fernández, view this colossal 1980s industrial building – a rare find amid the 16th-century streets of Coyoacán, south of Mexico City – as a ‘living sculpture’. Pedro trained as an architect before becoming a sculptor and has used his skill to create an interior that appears as if it was carved from solid rock, with hammered concrete surfaces and flagstone flooring. There are unusual features everywhere – walls morph into bookshelves and staircases are stacked like Lego bricks. ‘We like late modern Brutalism, but also wanted to use primitive materials like those of the pyramids and other archaeological sites in Mexico. We call it our future caveman style,’ says Carla. Both she and Pedro are passionate about preserving Mexico’s cultural and artistic history and were drawn to this still largely ungentrified neighbourhood, where fellow artists and intellectuals Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo and Leon Trotsky once lived. The 1,000-square-metre space – which is also home to the couple’s two children Laima (10) and Cristobal (nine) – is hangar-like and divided into four bedrooms, a studio, a guest house (for a steady stream of friends, artists and collaborators) and an exhibition space for the couple’s work. But this is an interior that will never truly be finished: it is a constantly evolving space, handmade by local stonemasons and craftspeople that work on site, constantly modifying the structure and experimenting with materials. ‘Our home is a work in progress, a habitable handmade sculpture that allows us to be creative on a daily basis. It’s definitely our greatest collaboration,’ says Carla. pedroreyes.net; carlafernandez.com

THE TREND Jaw-dropping architecture brings drama to interiors. The idea is to fuse form and function in new ways. Here, the owners have created statement walls-cum-furniture, designed elevated floors that divide the open-plan spaces and used natural materials in inventive ways.

THE INTERIOR APPEARS AS IF IT WAS CARVED FROM SOLID ROCK. WALLS MORPH INTO BOOKSHELVES AND STAIRCASES ARE STACKED LIKE LEGO BRICKS


BUILDING BLOCKS ‘We buy over 100 books every month, so always need more bookshelves,’ says Pedro. ‘When we saw this double-height space it made total sense to create a library here. This 20-metre-long wall wasn’t strong enough to hold the books, so we reinforced it with a cast-concrete structure that encompasses the corridor, the mezzanine and the cantilevered staircase.’ The chairs include Pedro’s own ‘Mano Sillas’ (‘Hand Chairs’) – try 1st Dibs for originals. The woven palm chairs were bought locally. For a similar look try ‘Dala’ chairs from Dedon, available at Leisure Plan. The ceiling light, also a sculptural work by Pedro, is inspired by American architect Buckminster Fuller, and made of electrical wire threaded through copper tubes. Beneath it sits a classic lounger and ottoman by Ray and Charles Eames for Vitra. The stone head is a Lenin sculpture by Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși Stockist details on p152 ➤


LIGHT AND SHADE A glass ceiling is supported with concrete beams. ‘It allows an enormous amount of light to enter the house, and the shadow play created by the beams and the movement of the sun is amazing,’ says Pedro. ‘We experimented with concrete blocks [which form the staircase sculpture] rendered with a layer of wax-like concrete paste to create a smooth surface that’s soft to the touch.’ The table sculpture is The Museum of Hypothetical Lifetimes, part of Pedro’s ‘Sanatorium’ installation, first shown at the Guggenheim Museum, New York. The bicycle sculpture is H-H, created for another exhibition, ‘Domingo Salvaje’ Stockist details on p152 ➤


ARTISTIC ORDER This flagstone-paved room was inspired by artist Diego Rivera’s design for the nearby Anahuacalli Museum.‘We keep prints in the vintage wooden plan chest. We need a place for everything otherwise it would be total chaos,’ says Pedro. Retrouvius sells similar midcentury wooden cabinets, or try Metro Retro for old-fashioned filing units. The sculpture on the cabinet and the ‘Mano Sillas’ chair are both by Pedro. Much of the furniture here is vintage, including the factory-style pendant light, which was bought at La Lagunilla flea market in Mexico City. For a similar sofa, try the ‘Relax’ by Florence Knoll, available at Skandium Stockist details on p152 ➤


POURED IN PLACE All elements of the concrete kitchen were poured and cast on site, from the worktops to the cylindrical extractor fan. ‘We decided not to use wooden cabinets, but to have concrete shelves without doors. They are made in the same way as those in the library,’ says Pedro. ‘The objects on the shelves are displayed in an ordered fashion so that they become part of the overall aesthetic.’ In the UK, Low Info makes bespoke concrete furniture and surfaces. For similar tableware, we recommend the ‘Teema’ collection by Iittala, available at Skandium. Find a wooden pestle and mortar and a selection of chopping boards at Not On The High Street Stockist details on p152 ➤


GREEN LIVING Homeowners Pedro and Carla are big fans of Mexican flora and have integrated planting beds into the architecture of the house. These green areas – further highlighted here by a pop of bright yellow – visually divide the living space. ‘Plants play a big part in making our home a space that we really enjoy,’ says Carla ➤


ROCK SOLID ‘We decided to make the bath out of a massive boulder of volcanic rock, so we went scouting on the mountains in search of a piece large enough. The basin is also made of volcanic stone (Aston Matthews’ ‘Bedrock’ basin is similar) and the taps are bespoke. We’ve used concrete instead of tiles on the walls so that the space gives you the feeling of being in a cave. The idea was to make it look like the home of a futuristic caveman, or an extra-terrestrial civilisation,’ says Pedro. Stone Age can build a bespoke stone bath and Mass Concrete creates custom-made concrete wall panels Stockist details on p152 E D


D ESI GN D I REC TI O NS #3

CANE

NO LONGER JUST FOR CHAIRS, THIS INTRICATE WEAVE Canework is making a comeback, with many stylish examples to be seen this season. Although, with a history that dates back to the 17th century, it could be argued that this technique has never been out of fashion. Woven cane (not actually cane at all, but the outer skin of the rattan plant) was originally prized for its hygienic qualities – unlike upholstered seats, its flat surface left nowhere for mites to hide. Over time, the weave has been refined to a six-way pattern, also known as French cane. It is this pattern (blown up to floor-filling dimensions) that inspired Bisazza’s new ‘Vienna Nero’ tiles. Here are more of our top twists on this timeless craft.

From left ‘Vienna Nero’ tiles by Carlo Dal Bianco, £302 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.it). ‘Air’ sideboard by Mathieu Gustafsson for Design House Stockholm, £800, Selfridges (selfridges.com). ‘Oria’ chair by Rafael Moneo, £4,265, Hermès (hermes.com). ‘Allegory’ desk by Gam Fratesi, £1,688, Wiener GTV Design (gebruederthonetvienna.com). ‘S64’ chair by Marcel Breuer for Thonet GmbH, £820, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk). ‘Straw’ pendant lights, from £178 each; ‘Straw’ closet, £1,413, both by Isabelle Gilles and Yann Poncelet, Colonel (moncolonel.fr). ‘529 Rio’ coffee table by Charlotte Perriand, £5,880, Cassina (cassina.com). ‘Libelle’ bookcase by Pietro Russo, from £4,105, Baxter (baxterlondon.net) E D


WORK

IS DECORATING EVERYTHING FROM LAMPS TO TILES


D ESI GN D I REC TI O NS #4

MAKE IT

THIS SWIRLING EFFECT IS BEING USED IN EXCITING NEW Inspired by the flowing veins of colour traditionally used on book endpapers, a fresh crop of designers are applying swirled marbling patterns to everything from floorcoverings to crockery. Now you can cover your walls with marbled wallpaper by Altfield, or top your tables with exquisite hand-poured bowls by Danish designer Troels Flensted. The latter has adapted the traditional marbling technique to create his ceramics by adding mineral powder to a coloured water-based polymer. Once marbled, the solution is poured into moulds and fired in the kiln. Each piece captures the serendipitous moment when the swirls of colour take shape, so you can be sure that every design is unique. Here, we reveal more of our favourite marbled finds.

From left ‘Canyon’ wallpaper, £990 for a 12-metre roll, Altfield (altfield.com). ‘W1’ side tables (white and black), from £1,350 each, Moss & Lam (mossandlam.com). ‘Stick’ candlesticks, £153 each, Grain (graindesign.com). Small poured bowl, £55, Troels Flensted (troelsflensted.com). Vintage sofa covered in ‘Delahaye’ fabric in ‘Slate’ and cushions (two pictured) covered in ‘Delahaye’ fabric in ‘Emerald’, both £59 per metre; green cushion covered in ‘Pavia’


MARBLED WAYS – TRY IT ON WALLPAPERS, CERAMICS AND MORE

velvet fabric, £79 per metre, all Designers Guild (designersguild.com). Pouf covered in ‘Galena’ fabric, £45 per metre, Kai (kaifabrics.com). ‘Marble’ wool and silk-mix rug by Rodarte, from £1,300 per square metre, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com). ‘Transition’ table, £3,200; benches, £2,300 each, Snedker Studio (snedkerstudio.dk). ‘Newton’s Bucket’ bowls, £540 each, Silo Studio (silostudio.net) E D

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Words TRISH LORENZ Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


With exposed brickwork and iron elements, this charming live/work space in Bologna is a perfect example of the trend for honest materials. Its owners tell us how they put the look together


THE TREND

Honest materials with roughhewn finishes and a keen eye for vintage finds are key to producing the authentic look of this sustainable property near Bologna, where tough elements such as exposed brick and iron are juxtaposed with delicate, cosy pieces like antique lighting and soft leather. The house is called FutureLab, and is home to art dealer and antiquarian Anna Likhaceva and her partner, textile designer Andrea Lambertini. Inside, the 600-squaremetre building reveals vast living areas and creative spaces that also play host to a range of social projects. ‘It’s our house, but it’s also a place where we hold events and commission artists to create their work,’ says Anna. ‘We also help teenagers, usually kids who have problems, to identify where their skills lie and give them experience that will help them find work. From the beginning of the renovation, we wanted this place to be a social and artistic lab.’ Spread over three floors, the property’s ground level is almost entirely given over to a 200-square-metre open-plan living room. Large windows open from this space on to the indoor swimming pool on one side, and to gardens and the kitchen on the other. The first floor includes a dressing room, two spacious areas that are used for events, photo shoots and exhibitions, a bathroom and the couple’s private gym. Upstairs, on the second floor, is Anna’s office and the couple’s bedroom – a restful space with a wall of glass overlooking the treetops. Portrait Homeowners Andrea Lambertini, a textile designer, and antiques expert Anna Likhaceva Living area Vintage French armchairs (try Leather Chairs of Bath for reproductions) give the vast open space a cosy feel. A set of beautiful antique windows, originally from an orangery in Belgium, separate the living room from the kitchen, where an antique chandelier (see previous page) adds a luxe touch Stockist details on p152 ➤


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FOUR WAYS TO ACHIEVE RAW BEAUTY Pick strong materials ‘We used iron to strengthen the brickwork, partly to make the building secure but also because we love the power of the material,’ says Anna. ‘The floors are grey polished concrete, our favourite colour – we like neutral hues punctuated with touches of red.’ Maximise light using glass ‘Internal windows, used as room dividers, open up the really ancient part of the building. The glass screen that surrounds the kitchen was once part of an old orangery. We sourced it through an antiques dealer in Belgium,’ says Anna. Reuse as much as possible ‘From the bricks to the woodwork and even the old doors, which we converted to tabletops, we salvaged as much as we could during the renovation process,’ says Anna. ‘We also have solar panels, burn waste wood for heating and use rainwater and grey water tanks [which reuse waste water from the bathroom] for the garden. None of these are new ideas, but we think it’s important to show others that ecofriendly restorations really do work.’ Search for unusual furnishings ‘We love to collect objects that connect with the past,’ says Anna. ‘My father is a Russian antiquarian and I also deal in antiques, while both Andrea and I share a passion for industrial furniture from the 1920s and 1930s, especially English and French examples. The building itself also informed how we furnished the interior – we wanted its heritage to shine through.’

Living area The original brickwork and open fireplace are strengthened by iron. The rug is an African design from Altai, while a marble bust of Alexander II sits on the floor. ‘We like to combine pieces from different periods. Some items are from my personal collection and others we found at auction,’ says homeowner Anna. To the left of the living room is the indoor swimming pool, which is encased in glass Stockist details on p152 ➤


AUGUST 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 107


‘WE’VE MIXED THE BRICK DETAILS WITH IRON, GLASS AND WOOD TO CREATE A MODERN INDUSTRIAL FEEL THAT REFLECTS THE BARN’S HISTORY’

Dining area The breakfast table is made from reclaimed barn doors that were original to the space. Try Lumens for similar pendant lights Kitchen With its exposed brick and distressed wood surfaces, vintage French dresser and vintage copper pendant light, the kitchen is warm and homely rather than sleek and modern Stockist details on p152 ➤


Hallway The first floor is simply decorated with an African rug from Altai and vintage wooden furniture Bathroom Antique French basins from the 1930s (try Salvo Web) are teamed with 19th-century mirrors. For a similar vintage trunk, try Scaramanga. A roll-top bath sits on a mezzanine level above Stockist details on p152 ➤


‘WE LOVE OBJECTS THAT CONNECT WITH THE PAST, AND HAVE A PASSION FOR INDUSTRIAL FURNITURE FROM THE 1920S AND 1930S’


THE TOP-FLOOR BEDROOM IS A PEACEFUL SPACE WITH A WALL OF GLASS OVERLOOKING THE TREETOPS

Bedroom The homeowners varnished the wooden floor with resin to give it a glossy look that helps to reflect light around the room. The bespoke bed is made from African mahogany and has a lacquered grey finish (for a similar throw, try The Throw Company). The carpet is a vintage kilim from Altai and the trunk is a vintage French piece (try Scaramanga for a good selection of vintage luggage) Stockist details on p152 E D

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D ESI GN D I REC TI O NS #5

SHARP

GLASS HAS A NEW CUTTING-EDGE LOOK. THINK From cast and silvered to coloured and cut, today’s designers continue to dream up fresh ways of using glass. Italian brand and glass specialist Glas Italia gives us ever more groundbreaking uses of this ancient material, including Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec’s poured-glass ‘Nesting’ side tables that remind us of Fox’s Glacier Mints, and Nendo’s ‘Layers’ bookshelves, whose coloured sliding glass panels are the contemporary answer to medieval stained glass. For Lasvit, Tel Aviv-born Parisbased designer Arik Levy has expanded his ‘Crystal Rock’ collection, which now includes a series of beautiful faceted vases that resemble gemstones.

From left ‘Commodore’ sideboard by Piero Lissoni, from £3,757; side table by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, £1,262, both Glas Italia (glasitalia.com). ‘Murano’ table light in ‘Cigar’, £3,390, Bottega Veneta (bottegaveneta.com). ‘Stairs’ pendant lights by Atelier Oï, from £1,956, Lasvit (lasvit.com). ‘Layers’ sideboard by Nendo, £6,158, Glas Italia (glasitalia.com). ‘Crystal Rock’ vases (two pictured)


GL ASS

FROSTED SURFACES AND INTERESTING FORMS

by Arik Levy, from £552 each, Lasvit (lasvit.com). ‘Ottoman’ coffee table by Scholten & Baijings, available September, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Alba’ decanter by Joe Doucet, £192, Nude (nudeglass.com). ‘Les Endiablés’ candleholder by José Lévy, £340, Saint-Louis (saint-louis.com). ‘Isola’ shelves by Massimo Castagna, £3,450, Gallotti & Radice (gallottiradice.it) E D

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D ESI GN D I REC TI O NS #6

FOREST FROM RICH EMERALDS TO INKY TEAL-TINGED HUES, Sometimes they’re bright and jewel-like, at others they’re so dark and earthy as to be almost indistinguishable from black – whichever you prefer, make sure you’ve got some moody green shades in your home this season. For inspiration, look to Moroso, where Patricia Urquiola’s new ‘Belt’ sofa offers the perfect example of a forest-meets-teal hue (as well as the most on-trend style for seating right now: a cinched-in duvet shape). Designers Guild is the go-to brand for wallpapers and fabrics in a variety of bottle green, racing green and moss shades, while Danish brand Louise Roe showcases a dreamy pairing of forest and pale pink. To be really of the moment, team these dusky greens with rich browns and indigo.

From left ‘Glenville’ velvet fabric (bottom), £65 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com). ‘Limewood’ wallpaper (top) in ‘Fairweather Green’, £115 per roll, Liberty (liberty.co.uk). ‘Grace’ marble vase, from £43, Louise Roe (louiseroe.dk). ‘Belt’ sofa by Patricia Urquiola, £8,722, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Freddy’ side table by


GREEN

MOODY GREENS ARE A BIG STORY THIS AUTUMN

Thierry Lemaire for Fendi Casa, £2,420, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Languedoc’ vase, from £665, Lalique (lalique.com). ‘Kitt’ chair by Stefan Diez, prototype, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Solanio’ screen by Matteo Cibic, £13,230, Bonotto Editions (bonottoeditions.com). ‘Kiki’ sofa by Ilmari Tapiovaara, £2,497, Artek (artek.fi) E D

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TRIBAL

From vibrant prints to intricate beading and ornate carvings, the tribal trend is big this year.

Words EMMA LOVE Photography MARTIN LOF/LIVING INSIDE


TWIST

We meet the man preserving Africa’s original craft heritage in his Kenyan home

The exterior of the African Heritage House (as it is officially known) is made of hand-cut stone from a local river, which is covered in cement and painted to look like mud. The motifs on the walls were inspired by African pre-colonial architecture and adapted by Joanna Bristow, creative manager of African Heritage ➤


Long before the ‘tribal’ aesthetic became a big European trend, Alan Donovan (left) was devoted to collecting African art. American-born Donovan calls the wilds of Kenya his home: he fell for Africa’s charms during the 1960s, when he was deployed to Nigeria as a humanitarian worker, and later quit his job to further explore the continent and its culture. He became fascinated by the tribal ornaments and clothes of the Turkana people, and learnt to make jewellery with local craftspeople. The enterprise led to the establishment of Nairobi’s African Heritage Gallery – the first Pan-African exhibition space on the continent. In 1989, 17 years after the gallery opened (sadly, it has since closed down), Donovan began building this unique house on the Athi Plains overlooking the Nairobi National Park. The stone property is filled with more than 6,000 rare artworks, artefacts and fabrics. Last year, the house was named a national monument by the Kenyan government and Donovan is in negotiations with the Obama Foundation to turn it into an African studies centre. Here, we talk to Donovan about his extraordinary collection. The tiered design of the house was inspired by the Great Mosque of Djenné in Mali, which is constructed from mud. We have a lot of rainfall here, so that wasn’t practical. Instead this house was built using solid stone, which was mined from a nearby river. The stone was cut, hand-carved into blocks and then covered with layers of cement that was painted to resemble mud. I bought many traditional African fabrics when I ran the African Heritage Gallery – as its representative I would visit around 20 countries each year. Many of the fabrics in my house depict traditional patterns that are no longer made. Indigo dye is popular in West Africa and I have a lot of blue cloth made by Yoruba women. Each African fabric has its own story. The curtains in the dining room, for example, are a Kente cloth. This type of material originates from the Ashanti kingdom (where it was used to make robes for royalty) and is the most famous cloth in Africa – it’s still worn today. It has to be woven on a narrow loom outdoors, and always by men. Originally created using silk, its distinctive, vibrant patterns are now often made using cotton instead. A Bakuba fabric (or Kuba, as it’s better known) from the Congo adorns the chairs in the living area. Kuba cloth inspired many famous modern artists such as Picasso and Matisse (who hung a collection of Kuba textiles on his studio walls).

Entrance The front door is inlaid with copper and brass and comes from Kashmir in northern India. Papyrus furniture from western Kenya sits on the veranda outside (Rattan Direct sells similar in the UK). The brass snake doorstop was created using the ancient ‘lost-wax’ method from Nigeria – a process that involves creating a mould to easily duplicate intricate sculptures Stockist details on p152 ➤

I’ve enjoyed African art since boyhood. I would much rather own a piece of traditional African art, such as an original Kuba fabric, than a Matisse that was inspired by that cloth. Some people think that craft traditions across the continent are all the same, but there is tremendous diversity in the handicrafts and culture. Berber rugs from Morocco cover the stone floors in most of the rooms in my house, but I also have many palm-fibre mats and prayer rugs in the corridors that were woven on the east coast of Africa by the Pokomo people and in the Nubian region of Egypt. There was once a thriving dhow trade that brought goods on ships from India and China to Africa. I bought beds from the sellers and re-purposed some parts by turning them into chairs. I’ve also bought a couple of old doors from Oman, new wood-carved pieces from Lamu and woven papyrus furniture from western Kenya that is arranged on the veranda and in the roof room. I love the multi-headed sculpture in the roof room. It was made by the Bambara people of Mali. Each of the heads represents an ancestor, so the structure serves the same function as a family tree. Traditionally, the Bambara would remove the heads and dance with them during their rituals. Beads are used decoratively on everything in Africa. Cowrie shells, for example, were once used as the currency in Africa, so there are tons of those on all kinds of products. In the corridor, I have a large beaded panel depicting an elephant hunt by Nigerian artist Joseph Olabode and the beads for that were imported from former Czechoslovakia (many glass beads were made in Czechoslovakia specifically for the African bead trade). Beads take on a great significance in some pieces, such as in my carved wooden doll made by the nomadic Samburu people of northern Kenya. It’s a fertility doll carried by young girls who want to have children. The painted zigzag design on the wall in the roof room is by American photographer Carol Beckwith (whose book African Ceremonies explores vanishing tribal customs) and was inspired by Maasai shields. She hand-painted the wall, together with artists from the African Heritage Gallery, using modern acrylic paints in traditional African colours: black, off white and ochre red. The cream-coloured paint in the corridors was mixed to replicate the pigment that the Swahili people once made from eggshells. The key elements of the African design aesthetic include colour, pattern and beautiful hand-carved wooden objects. So many historic designs are disappearing because there’s no local market for them. Traditional ceremonies (which demanded pieces such as masks, sculptures, textiles and jewellery) no longer take place as they once did, and there are a lot of imports from China. Many people who visit my house have never seen these forms of African art. That’s why I’m trying to create an African studies centre – I want to preserve the culture for future generations.


‘THE KEY ELEMENTS OF AFRICAN DESIGN INCLUDE COLOUR, PATTERN AND BEAUTIFUL HAND-CARVED WOODEN OBJECTS’

Living room The double sofa at the heart of this space was made from an old Swahili cradle. Aluminium embossed panels by a Nigerian blacksmith decorate the wall, alongside a collection of gourd bowls from Northern Cameroon. Fulani camel blankets from the Sahara Desert are draped on the wall and sofa. The cushions are covered in kuba cloth, woven from palm fibre in the Congo, and mudcloth from Mali. Maasai cowhides decorate the surfaces ➤

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Roof room Papyrus chairs (one above) from western Kenya are mixed with Lamu chairs, which are fitted with cushions covered in Kuba cloth from the Congo (The Conran Shop sells Kuba cushion covers). The zigzag pattern painted on the walls was designed and hand-painted by American photographer and artist Carol Beckwith. It is inspired by the decoration on Maasai shields. Hand-woven barkcloth mats cover the floor Stockist details on p152 ➤


Above This ‘family tree’ sculpture with brass applique and movable heads is by the Bambara people of Mali Opposite An ornate brass screen from India is draped in textiles from Ghana, Lamu and India, plus an ivory-and-silver ceremonial horn from Guinea. The hide-covered chair is studded with brass by the Ashanti craftspeople of Ghana ➤

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THE ROOFTOP GARDEN OVERLOOKS THE WIDE OPEN GRASS PLAINS OF THE NAIROBI NATIONAL PARK

Roof garden The glass-topped dining table was made by African Heritage, as were the iron chairs with ornately carved bone handles. The view from this spot is beautiful, taking in the Nairobi National Park and the Ngong Hills –where Kenyan settler Karen Blixen of Out Of Africa fame once lived E D


D ESI G N D I REC T I O NS #7

OUT OF TRADITIONAL JAPANESE DESIGN IS REIMAGINED Designers are taking their lead from the pared-back, functional style of Japanese design. There’s an abundance of futon-inspired upholstery – Patricia Urquiola’s new ‘Beam’ sofa for Cassina is padded perfection, while Bonaldo’s ‘Alvar’ modular bed allows you to play with quilted platforms. There’s also a move towards dark-stained woods paired with high-shine lacquer – take Hermès’s new tableware and Meridiani’s super-gloss ‘Shine’ furniture range. For a more literal representation, look to Designers Guild’s ‘Winter Palace’ wallpaper, or Rubelli’s exquisite revived 19th-century fabric print for Armani/Casa, which features an idyllic landscape: it has been skilfully applied to the brand’s impressive ‘Levante’ screen.

From left ‘Winter Palace’ wallpaper, £68 for a 10-metre roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com). ‘Larry’ side table, £10,100, Armani/Casa (armanicasa.com). ‘Serena’ table light by Patricia Urquiola, £387, Flos (flos.com). ‘Alvar’ bed by Giuseppe Viganò, from £2,725, Bonaldo (bonaldo.it). Cushions covered in vintage fabric.


JA PA N IN MODERN SHAPES AND SLEEK LACQUER

‘Beam’ sofa by Patricia Urquiola, from £5,640, Cassina (cassina.com). ‘Levante’ screen, £9,180, Armani/Casa (armanicasa.com). ‘Centre de Table et Coupes en Laque’ tableware, from £478 each, Hermès (hermes.com). ‘Elliot’ sideboard by Andrea Parisio for Meridiani, from £3,625, Bianchi Furniture (bianchifurniture.co.uk) E D

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The marker of true beauty is stunning symmetry. Take inspiration from this beautiful Barcelona apartment to create an on-trend ordered aesthetic Words KERSTIN ROSE Photography CHRISTIAN SCHAULIN


The human eye perceives symmetry as the ultimate sign of beauty and now we are striving for a similar sense of balance and order in our homes. In this 345-square-metre apartment on one of the wide, tree-lined avenues of Barcelona’s upmarket Eixample district, carefully placed pairs of furniture help to create a wonderfully symmetrical look. Inside, the decor has Art Nouveau details, from stained-glass windows to ornate ceiling roses and decorative tiled floors. Agnès Blanch of architectural design studio Vila Blanch reworked the period interior to maximise the sense of symmetry. The oblongshaped apartment is bookended by a grand stucco-decorated library and the vast living room. Agnés has used the apartment’s original floor tiles as a grid to align key fittings and has grouped furnishings together, repeating design details throughout the space. Here, she reveals more about the decorating tricks she used to create this look. estudiovilablanch.com


TA KE TWO Living room (this spread and previous) Twin pillars, intricately carved with vines and fruit, stand either side of the window. The columns were in situ when the owners moved into the house, but they cannot ascertain whether they are original Art Nouveau details or later additions. Inspired by these dominant structures, a pair of velvet ‘Charles’ sofas by B&B Italia in ‘Sirio’ blue fabric sit either side of the room. They are grouped with two ‘OW149 Colonial’ chairs by Carl Hansen & Søn and twin ‘45º/Tavolino’ coffee tables by Ron Gilad for Molteni. A simple ‘Stockholm’ sideboard by Punt Mobles provides storage, while the ‘Heracleum’ pendant light by Moooi (available from Houseology) adds drama. The paintings are Empordà (green) by Guerrero Medina, Mira´m als ulls (grey) by Nuria Guinovar and Drift (blue) by Perico Pastor. The yellow sculpture on the wall is by Barcelona-born Lluis Lleó Stockist details on p152 ➤


G R I D L IN E S Library Oak bookshelves, built by a carpenter, line the walls on either side of the beautiful arched bay window, following the lines of the graphic tiled floor – Alhambra Home sells similar floor tiles. Two ‘FH419 Heritage’ chairs by Carl Hansen & Søn (available at Skandium) nestle together to create a cosy reading nook. The floor lamp is the ‘Kelvin LED’ by Flos (try John Lewis) and the black side table is the ‘Cicognino’ by Franco Albini for Cassina Stockist details on p152 ➤


AS A GRID TO ALIGN KEY FURNITURE, THE ARCHITECT HAS GIVEN THIS APARTMENT A SENSE OF SYMMETRY SLE E K AN D CH IC TV room An ‘Anna’ table by E15 is surrounded by four ‘DSW’ chairs by Charles and Ray Eames, available from Vitra. The slimline black wall light is the ‘265’ by Paolo Rizzatto for Flos Bedroom The low-slung style of the ‘Selene’ bed and ‘Maxalto’ bedside cabinets, all by B&B Italia, highlight the clean, simple lines of the room. The artwork is Hortènsies (Hydrangeas) by Perico Pastor and the two small wall lights are both ‘Toccami’ by Viabizzuno Stockist details on p152 E D


THE PLACES TO GO

THE CITY

HOTEL

RETREAT MUSEUM


T H E C I T Y TO V I S I T

AARHUS

Hop across the North Sea to the Danish city offering culture, heritage and hygge


WHY GO NOW? A heady cocktail of Michelin-starred restaurants, midcentury architecture, sea air and plenty of hygge (all that is convivial and cosy) awaits those who bypass Denmark’s capital in favour of next year’s European Capital of Culture. Copenhagen’s slightly smaller – but increasingly enticing – neighbour will be creatively and culturally supercharged in 2017, with exhibitions and workshops on everything from art to theatre, dance, music, literature, architecture and design (aarhus2017.dk). And fortuitously, British Airways has now launched a direct flight to Aarhus South. It’s a speedy 1.5 hours from London Heathrow (£72 for a return flight in September; ba.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, QUINTIN LAKE, JULIAN WEYER

WHAT TO SEE Top of the list is Aros, the modern art museum crowned by Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson’s supersized installation ‘Your Rainbow Panorama’ – a circular coloured-glass walkway with 360-degree views of the city. Our picks from the museum’s current exhibition list are a show of the late American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe’s work (until 30 October) and ‘New Nordic: The Icelandic Love Corporation’, which Icelandic musician Bjørk collaborated on (October 2016–January 2017; aros.dk). Be sure to visit some of the city’s architectural gems, from the modern Iceberg Building (a chalky-white high-rise block that overlooks the harbour) to Aarhus City Hall, designed by Arne Jacobsen and Erik Møller in 1941. The Botanical Gardens is also a joy. Danish architecture firm CF Møller designed the snail-shaped greenhouse in 1969 and recently created a new tropical hothouse (sciencemuseerne.dk). The Old Town open-air museum is another pick for sunny days: it consists of carefully restored Danish buildings that date as far back as the 16th century (dengamleby.dk). ➤

Opposite Two of the top contemporary sights in the city are ‘Your Rainbow Panorama’, a glass walkway standing on top of Aros museum, and the striking Iceberg Building This page Spend the day at the newly reinvigorated Botanical Gardens (top and bottom). The tower of Aarhus city hall stands above the town’s more classical architecture (top right). Aros modern art museum


WHERE TO SHOP

The cobbled streets of the Latin Quarter are Aarhus’ oldest, and house many a small, quirky shop – try 1+1 Textil, which sells Danish handicrafts ranging from porcelain and costume jewellery to tea cosies (1x1textil.dk). Also worth a visit is the headquarters of historic Danish ceramics brand Kähler and Friends, where you will find new and archive pieces available to buy (kahlerdesign.com). Nr4 is a must for the curious mind. It is run by craftspeople – glass-blowers, potters, textile artists and a goldsmith – who use the space as a workshop but also serve behind the tills (nr4.dk).

WHERE TO STAY Located down a cobbled street in the city centre, the dovegrey building that was once CF Møller’s studio now houses Hotel Oasia (doubles from £94 per night; hoteloasia.com). Rooms are simple and stylish – Bang & Olufsen speakers, beds from Hästens, chairs by Poul Kjærholm – and the breakfast area has wallpaper decorated with architectural sketches. For old-school opulence, Hotel Royal offers top-quality service and glorious sea views (doubles from £120 per night; hotelroyal.dk). A good affordable option is contemporary bolthole Zleep (doubles from £42 per night; zleephotels.com). WHAT TO EAT Streets abound with cafes serving fresh smørrebrød – slices of rye bread topped with fish, cold meat or cheeses – but the city hall’s Raadhuus Kafeen is our top pick (raadhuus-kafeen.dk). Head to Teater Bodega (teaterbodega.dk) for a brasseriestyle dinner of smoked eel and scrambled eggs, washed down with a chilled glass of aquavit. If you’re seeking gourmet delights, book a table at one of Aarhus’s three Michelin-starred eateries – Restaurant Frederikshøj, Gastromé and Substans. We especially like the latter, for its beautifully presented dishes such as Norway lobster bisque and pear and caramel muesli for pudding (frederikshoj.com; gastrome.dk; restaurantsubstans.dk). E D

From top Frederikshøj restaurant. Cushions from 1+1 Textil. Ceramics from Kähler and Friends. A bedroom at the stylish Hotel Oasia

PICTURES: JESPER RAIS, MARTIN GRAUGAARD

COPENHAGEN’S SLIGHTLY SMALLER AND INCREASINGLY ENTICING NEIGHBOUR HAS SERIOUS STYLE


THE OPENING

DESIGN MUSEUM Bigger, more immersive and, for the first time, free to visit, this is London’s new cultural hotspot

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: COURTESY OF OMA

On 24 November 2016, 27 years after Sir Terence Conran established the Design Museum, the institution will open in its impressive new location: the former Commonwealth Institute on London’s Kensington High Street. Like its former home – a 1940s banana warehouse on the South Bank that was converted to resemble a 1930s Modernist building – the new venue is something of an architectural palimpsest. Built in 1962 to replace the ornate but unpopular Victorian Imperial Institute, the Grade II-listed building has had a troubled history, lying empty since the Institute’s closure in 2004. It has now been resurrected and given a £20 million facelift by architect John Pawson that has preserved its soaring roof and added new galleries, learning spaces, a library, auditorium and restaurant.

THE BUILDING HAS BEEN GIVEN A £20 MILLION FACELIFT BY ARCHITECT JOHN PAWSON Pawson has selected pieces of Vitra furniture to complement the 1960s architecture, with designers featured including Jean Prouvé, Jasper Morrison and Charles and Ray Eames. Visitors are promised a decidedly 21st-century museum experience: instead of focusing on object-led displays, the museum will stage immersive exhibitions that explore how issues such as technology and the environment relate to design today. The opening show is entitled ‘Fear and Love: Reactions to a Complex World’ (24 November – 23 April 2017). Masterminded by chief curator Justin McGuirk, it will feature installations that reflect on the rapid pace of change in design and the anxiety and optimism that engenders. Also on show will be the ‘Designs of the Year 2016’ exhibition, as well as a display called ‘Designer Maker User’, for which members of the public have suggested their favourite objects (designmuseum.org). E D 146 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK AUGUST 2016

The new home of London’s Design Museum is the city’s former Commonwealth Institute. Completed in 1962 by architecture team Robert Matthew, Johnson-Marshall and Partners (RMJM), the existing building’s most iconic feature is its soaring hyperbolic paraboloid roof


T H E H OT EL

SANAR Á Find your inner calm at this Mexican eco resort’s new luxury villa

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Amidst the crumbling ancient Mayan ruins and sparkling sherbet-white sands of Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula lies hotel Sanará (which means ‘you will heal’ in Spanish), an incredibly chic eco retreat. Founded in 2014 by holistic living advocate Daniella Hunter and her partner Charlie Stuart Gay, it is the hotel to visit this autumn thanks to a new addition to its traditional rooms and suites: a contemporary two-storey villa nestled at the edge of exotic gardens facing the beach and the crystal blue Caribbean sea. The villa’s poured concrete floors are softened by whimsical touches, such as a dreamcatcher and ornate chandeliers, and wooden details. The terrace, sheltered by palm fronds and a lattice of terracotta tiles, is the perfect spot for watching the sun set. Hatha, ashtanga and vinyasa yoga classes are held in the hotel’s grounds, and the on-site spa offers healing and beautifying treatments. Whole villa (sleeps eight) from £1,210 per night; ground floor suite (sleeps four) from £605 per night (sanaratulum.com). E D

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T H E S E C R E T R E T R E AT

THE AZORES Escape to this picturesque archipelago for the ultimate relaxing break

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES

Where is it? Portuguese in nationality but closer to the Caribbean geologically and climatically, this self-governed group of nine islands lies in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. First formally recorded by the medieval Genoese in the 14th century, they remain somewhat on the periphery of common knowledge, despite direct, low-cost weekly flights to and from London in less than four hours (from £35.99 one-way; ryanair.com; sata.pt). What makes it special? The islands perch upon 1,766 volcanoes and more than 70 geothermal hot springs, which, along with vibrant flora and fauna and plentiful fresh produce, conspire to make this the perfect spa break destination. Other gifts from nature include the Gulf Stream’s warm Caribbean currents that render lagoons tempting to even the most swimming-shy, and self-service naturally sparkling water from taps in the towns. Where should I stay? São Miguel is the largest of the islands, and home to the spectacular Lake Furnas (pictured). Check into the Furnas Boutique Hotel for its beautiful shadowy green swimming pool and eco-spa, which offers holistic treatments; staff can also organise whale-watching trips, hikes and diving (rooms from £102; furnasboutiquehotel.com). What should I do there? After a restorative wallow in one of the 40-degree, iron-rich springs, head to low-key joint O Miroma to try a wholesome local casserole cooked by burying the stewpot in the ground to simmer in the heat of the volcanoes. Finally, make time to explore the quieter islands, such as Santa Maria, where birdsong fills the air. E D

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

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THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS PILLOWS COLLECTION

THE KYOTO CORNER SOFA BY NUASTYLE The Kyoto Corner Sofa by Nuastyle offers chic urban style without the high price tag. Its fluid lines and distinctive metal feet combine to create a comfortable sofa with true contemporary elegance. Kyoto is available in many beautiful fabrics; as well as in various complementing armchair and sofa sizes, all made to order in Europe. Prices start from £1495 including free UK delivery. Elle Decoration readers get £250 off with discount code ELLE250 valid until 31.08.16 www.nuastyle.com or call 020 3394 0134 for free fabric samples.

The name of each pillow (each deadly sin is represented by an animal): • Pride (Orgueil): A Peacock • Lust (Luxure): A Tiger • Greed (Gourmandise): Snakes • Desire (Envie): An Octopus • Anger (Colère): A Lion • Laziness (Paresse): A Cat • Avarice (Avarice): A Magpie It is the collection Spring Summer 2016, Boudoir des Lubies HOME and Made in France. We used velvet as material and the back is embroidered with gold thread. www.boudoirdeslubies.com


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T H E B R A N D TO R E C O N S I D E R

S WA ROVS K I

Think this company just makes jewellery? You’re missing out. Its new home range is a glittering success

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURE: MARK COCKSEDGE

Since Daniel Swarovski declared his mission to create ‘a diamond for everyone’ in 1895, his brand has become as multifaceted as the sparkling stones for which it is so famous. The company’s reach has extended to everything from roles in movies (Swarovski crystals appeared in Breakfast at Tiffany’s) to making telescopic sights for rifles. In the last few years, however, Swarovski has been largely inactive on the interiors front, having ceased to launch collections for its ‘Crystal Palace’ project, a series of spectacular chandeliers by the likes of Tord Boontje, Ron Arad and Jaime Hayón. But this April, it unveiled the ‘Atelier Home Swarovski’ range, for which company chief Nadja Swarovski has invited design greats from Zaha Hadid to Raw Edges to create pieces. The highlight for us is Aldo Bakker’s collection of crystal-and-marble vases (below). Available autumn (atelierswarovskihome.com). E D

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