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A Simple 10-Minute Prevention Workout

Best Tips Ever

OCTOBER 2016

Can’t Beat The Heat?

Try Our 4-Week Adaptation Plan

Try A Triathlon!

Success Secrets of An Olympic Medallist

52 Ways To Reignite Your Flagging Mojo... TODAY!

Gear

ion t a r d y 9H Packs What are these weird things? See p58.

Run... Recover! Eat This Before (And After) Every Run p44 S

Tarryn Taylor, 28, uses Pilates as part of her cross-training programme.

Running Blind! The Truly Amazing Story of Richard Monisi

port p

Is Your Ticker A T ime Bomb? TThe h (Reassuring) (R )S Science Behind B h d Heart Health and Exercise

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WARM-UP CONTENTS

OCTOBER 2016

THE LOOP

RAVE RUN

EDITOR’S LETTER

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52 RUNNER’S MOTIVATION BOOSTERS Lost your mojo? Here’s how to get it back! BY JOE MACKIE & KERRY MCCARTHY

ON THE COVER Easy Post-Run Exercises...............50 Best Tips Ever!................................70 Fuel For Runners............................44 How’s Your Heart?..........................78 Beat The Heat.................................43 Triathlon/Cross-Training Special.. 43 Hydration Packs.............................55 Blind Runner....................................17

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OUT OF SIGHT

HOW TO MAKE AN OLYMPIC MEDAL

IS YOUR TICKER A TICKING TIME BOMB?

Want to get the most out of your cross-training? We share South African triathlete and Olympic medallist Henri Schoeman’s success secrets.

In the wake of a death caused by a suspected heart attack in this year’s London Marathon, RW investigates whether running can spell trouble for your heart.

What can a blind runner teach us about the way we look at the world? BY LISA NEVITT

BY MIKE FINCH

BY SAM MURPHY

PHOTOGRAPH BY ISTOCKPHOTO

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 3


CONTENTS WE’RE ALWAYS RUNNING AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y P E O P L E I M AG E S

WARM-UP

33 SUMMER HYDRATION Hydration and proper fuelling is the key to successful training, and finding a comfortable strategy will help you complete your longer runs. In this month’s issue, RW gear editor Ryan Scott reviews the best hydration solutions for every run (see page 55). Visit runnersworld. co.za/hydration for more refreshing tips.

50 HUMAN RACE 23 24 29

48

The Singlet He knows it all. I Ra It Off! Henry Crause: from battlin the bulge to fighting fit. By The umbers Running scared.

with all things strawberry. Quick Bites Kick your run into high gear with mini-meals.

MIND+BODY 50 Post-Run Protection Get stronger and avoid injury with this 10-mi ute stability routine.

PERSONAL BEST TRAINING 34 Tips From The Top What everyday runners can learn from the successes (and failures) of this year’s US Olympic Marathon Trials. 38 The Starting Line Not racing? No problem! You can still visit the expo for advice deals and motivation. 40 The Fast Lane These tactics can help you stave off sickness – even during your toughest training. 42 Ask The Experts How do I get rid of a side stitch? 43 The Sport Scientist How do I beat the heat? FUEL 44 More Power to You Getting enough pro ein in your diet is essential – but when you eat it is important, too. 46 The Run er’s Pantry Refresh

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RUNNER’S WORL

OCTOBER 2016

GEAR 55 Mix And Match A hydration solution for every runner. 60 The Sho Test Inov8 Ultra 270, as worn y trail star Nicolette Griffioen.

R 85

ES+PLACES Racing Ahead

ON THE COVER

OCTOBER

2016 Simple 10 Minute Plan INJURY-PROOF FOR LIFE! APrevention

Best Tips Ever

OCTOBER 2016

Can’t Beat The Heat?

Try Our 4-Week Adaptation Plan

TryATriathlon!

Success Secrets of An Olympic Medallist

52 Ways To Reignite Your Flagging Mojo... TODAY!

ar

Ge ation 9 Hydr s ck d What are these weird things? See p58

Run... Recover! Eat This Before (And After) Every Run p44

COLUMNS

Tarryn Taylor 28 uses pilates as part of her cross t aining programme

Th (R S B h d Heart Health and Exercise

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28

90

The Road Scholar Downward-Dog Days BY PETER SAGAL The Newbie Chronicles A Pain In The… Leg BY KATHRYN ARNOLD Back of the Pack Bruce’s Truce BY BRUCE PINNOCK

Running Blind! The Truely Amazing Story of Richard Monisi

p

Is Your Ticker A T ime Bomb?

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Runner – Tarryn Taylor wears crop top and tights by Oiselle, and shoes by New Balance. Make-up by Colleen Paioni Photographed by Casey Crafford


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AWESOME! DOES THAT SOUND LIKE YOU? ENTER NOW and tell us your

story (or that of a runner you know). You could be on the cover of the February 2017 issue of Runner’s World!

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WARM-UP

THE POLL (1)

THE LOOP THE INBOX

WINNING LETTER

LIFE SAVER

R.E.S.P.E.C.T.

Just after my sixth Comrades, y and a few days shy of my 34th birthday, I survived a n pulmonary embolism. When I woke up one morning with h e what felt like a pinched nerve in the middle of my back, I didn’t think too much of it, and went to work as usual. But come the evening, was in debilitating pain n, and I couldn’t breathe. boyfriend rushed me t emergency room, wh e I wass diagnosed immedii ely a admitted into hig care. The I stayed for a eek, bare n able to hold a conversation or walk the bathroo unassistt , because of t dama to my lung. Had I n been r ning fit, I probab wouldn’t ave survived .

Running with my wife, I’ve seen the way she’s treated by men. Long stares, inappropriate gestures, and comments to their friends – most of which she’s unaware of, because it takes place behind her back. The vulgar actions of what is clearly more than a minority reflect poorly on the male population, who seem to consider it their right to objectify women merely because they’re attractive. Voice your opinion when you see inappropriate behaviour: the woman on the receiving end is someone’s mother, sister or wife, and they deserve to enjoy running. – JODY MITCHELL, DUNDEE

– GLORIA PUCCIATTI, C

HOW MANY PAIRS OF RUNNING SHOES DO YOU OWN?

URION

THE QUESTION

IF YOU COULD GO BACK IN TIME, WHAT PIECE OF ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE YOUR YOUNGER RUNNING SELF? “Why did you stop running for twenty years? Imagine where you could’ve been today with 20 years of extra training.” – Gavin Byl “Don’t compare yourself to friends who’ve been running for longer than you have. This is your journey.” – Ansunette Pelser “Quit the boyfriend, not the running.” – Helen Phillips

“Just do it, how ever slow you may be.” – Kathy Bergh “Strengthen your glutes, don’t run through injurie and rest when you nee Increase your distance slow and invest in a good running coach.” – Ilze Wagener

12%

“Patience is the key to reaching success in all distances: don’t go too far, too soon.” – Shaun de Jager

Runner’s World reserves the r ght ht to t edit dit read d ’ submissions. All readers’ sub sions become the sole property of Runner’s Worl ublished in any medium and for any us orldwide.

36% 52% 1-2 Pairs

This month’s winning let will receive a pair Budds By DJ Fresh Bluet Earbuds, valued at R699. Whet u’re re road or trail running, hiking or at the at home, at work or in between, BUDDS By DJ Fresh will give your life a soundtrack. Music and calls are transmitted to your earpiece wirelessly, allowing you freedom to move without the restrictions of being physically attached to your mobile. The rubber buds, ear-hoops and in-ear control panel all work together to give you a lightweight but firm in-ear grip. Write to: Runner’s World, PO Box 16368, Vlaeberg, 8018; Fax: 021 408 3811; or email: rwletters@media24.com (letters must be no longer than 100 words and must include your name, address and telephone number or email address).

3-4 Pairs

5+ Pairs


THE GALLERY

TWEET OF THE MONTH

THE POLL (2)

How often do you race? 47% Every

#INSTARWRUN We asked runners to show off their running experiences. Here are four submissions that made us envious.

month

43% Only at major events

10% I don’t

“Running anywhere and everywhere. Short little urban runs are great!”

race

– @runningthecape

“Two simple guys with a dream.” – @WaydeDreamer @AkaniSimbine READER COMMENTS

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y JA M E S G A R AG H T Y ( S H O E S ); N I C K A L D R I D G E ( TO P R I G H T ); P E O P L E I M AG E S .CO M ( B OT TO M R I G H T )

“#Trailrunning in the rain at #Jonkershoek with @sharonsleigh on a lucky Monday afternoon out. River flowing strong at #Witteburg, but it is getting late and cold so time to turn back. #instarwrun” – @jameswsleigh

FINISH THE SENTENCE: I RUN BECAUSE…

“#Spring has sprung. Time to #parkrun. #instarwrun” – @alexistelfe

“...I can. I’ve been blessed with two strong legs, and a cold one goes down so much better once I’ve burned off all those kilojoules.”

“...I like being one of the first to see the sunrise.”

– Wendy Strydom

“...I was born in a little tent close to a river; and just like that river, I’ve been running ever since.”

“...it helps me to believe I can push my limits, and achieve anything I put my mind to.” – Elsje Swart

“...it’s much cheaper than an appointment with a psychologist.” #15km done! So happy with my time and effort. Lovely race and course. #oceanbasketrace #womensrunningcommunity #womenrunning #cmiyc #instarwrun - @kloppersulrike

– Amelia Herbst-Smit

– Joan Esterhuizen Budde

– Poet Noah

“...it’s my ‘me time’: I think, process, digest and de-stress. Often my most creative ideas come to me when all I can hear is the sound of my feet hitting the road.” – Gina Howse

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 7


RUNNER’S WORLD PROMOTION

SA’S BIGGEST ONLINE RUNNING PORTAL Tr a i n i n g P r o g r a m m e s for Every Distance Complete Race Calendar E x p e r t Ti p s , W o r k o u t s a n d Injury-Prevention Advice Everyday Motivation!

WARM-UP Southern African Edition. A joint venture between Rodale Press, Inc and Media24 Magazines.

EDITORIAL Editor MIKE FINCH (mike.finch@media24.com) Deputy Editor LISA NEVITT (lisa.nevitt@media24.com) Senior Designer MARK ARENDSE Chief Sub/Managing Editor DAVE BUCHANAN Editorial Assistant ANDRÉ VALENTINE (andre.valentine@media24.com) Online Editor RAE TREW-BROWNE (rae.browne@media24.com) Digital Content Manager YENTL BARROS (yentl.barros@media24.com) Digital Assistant PENNY TREVENA (penelope.cairns@media24.com) Picture Editor AMY MOSTERT Gear Editor RYAN SCOTT (madibapi@gmail.com) Scientific Editor DR ROSS TUCKER Editor-at-Large BRUCE FORDYCE CONTRIBUTORS Nick Aldridge, Dominic Barnardt, Govan Basson, Shaun Benjamin, Tudor Caradoc-Davies, Casey Crafford, Calvin Fisher, James Garaghty, Tobias Ginsberg, Chris Hitchcock, Jacques Marais, Glen Montgomery, Nick Muzik, Lindsey Parry, Bruce Pinnock, Ewald Sadie, Ryan Sandes, Belinda Stange, Hermien Webb, Kathryn Arnold, Leo Espinosa, Nick Ferrari, Chris Fischer, Jeff Galloway, Michelle Gatton, Amy Gorin, Paul Grimes, Alexi Hay, Myke Hermsmeyer, Chris Hinkle, Alex Hutchinson, Sam Island, Matthew Kadey, Yishane Lee, Joe Mackie, Mitch Mandel, Kerry McCarthy, Sam Murphy, Katie Neitz, Plamen Petkov, Matt Rainey, Andy Rementer, Dan Saelinger, Peter Sagal, Jarren Vink, Jay Wright

PUBLISHING & MARKETING Publishing Manager FRANCOIS MALAN 021 408 1228 (francois.malan@media24.com) Marketing & Events Coordinator RICHARD D’AGUIAR 021 408 1242 (richard.daguiar@media24.com)

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WARM-UP

RAVE RUN

CHAPMAN’S PEAK, CAPE TOWN

PHOTOGRAPHS BY… Nick Muzik RUNNER & WORDS BY… Ryan Scott GPS LOCATION Starting in Hout Bay: 34° 2’ 56.267” S; 18° 21’ 44.362” E Starting in Noordhoek: 34° 5’ 49.895” S; 18° 22’ 38.618” E TERRAIN The tar road is in good condition, and rises from either side to a peak at the halfway point of the pass. There are lots of opportunities to join the trails for an off-road adventure. BEST TIME TO RUN In winter, water runs off the mountain, and there’s deep, green vegetation, and colourful, flowering fynbos. Start from the Hout Bay side early in the morning, when the sun is looking over your shoulder from behind. Sunsets in the evenings are equally fantastic. INTERESTING FACTS Chappies forms part of the 56-kilometre Two Oceans ultra. But by the time you hit it, you’re already 27 kilometres into your race, with 29 still left to go. At this stage, you may not be in the best state to fully appreciate your beautiful surroundings. That’s why running Chappies at leisure is more of a treat – stopping regularly to take in the views is a must. LOCAL’S TIP There are public bathrooms just after the tollgate; and close to the ablution block is a mini waterfall, which is signposted from the

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OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 11


WARM-UP

RAVE RUN CHAPMAN’S PEAK, CAPE TOWN

mountain side of the road, and runs with refreshing, cold water between May and January. Café Roux, at the Noordhoek Farm Village, serves delicious post-run breakfasts – and even has a well-equipped children’s playground. THE RUN Since this majestic section of road became a privatised stretch – you have to pay a toll, if you want to travel by car – there is far less traffic for runners to contend with. This is one of the most scenic (and downright incredible) running routes South Africa has to offer. The route is 10 kilometres long. Running on the sea side of the pass is best; for the most part, there’s a hard shoulder that’s ample for you to run on safely – even two abreast, with a buddy. There are a few short segments on the Noordhoek side where you’ll have to stop and wait for cars travelling towards Hout Bay to pass; but there’s enough space to do so in safety. Traffic doesn’t tend to be an issue unless it’s a particularly busy summer day, or during tourist season. Five kilometres into the pass, from either side, you’ll reach the main viewpoint – the vistas of the Atlantic Ocean from this spot are as spectacular as it gets! From here, either keep going and do the full 20-kilometre out-and-back; or for a shorter 10-kilometre option, simply turn and run back the way you came (or carry on, and arrange for someone to pick you up on the other side). PARKING There is safe – and free – parking outside the Velocity Gym and Vida e Caffè in Hout Bay, which is situated at the foot of Chapman’s Peak Drive. Starting from the Noordhoek side? Your best bet is to park at the Noordhoek Farm Village. If you’re pressed for time, or simply want to run a shorter distance, there is parking at East Fort, which is situated two kilometres into the pass from the Hout Bay side.

FOR MORE AWESOME RUNNING PICS, VISIT W W W. MYRUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / INSTARWRUN.


OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 13


WARM-UP

EDITOR’S LETTER

WE WANT YOU! Our Cover Search competition needs your inspiring story.

T

here must be something in the very nature of running that’s turned it into a pastime that elicits such passion – it can’t just be the accessibility and convenience! I doubt there are many other sports, besides cycling perhaps, that can match it for the pure dedication runners have for their ‘hobby’. It’s a passion that has fuelled the readership of this magazine in South Africa for over 26 years, and globally for more than 50 years. But it’s driven by the readers themselves – they share their stories, advice and inspiration with us daily, and we’re privileged to be part of such a vibrant community. Which brings me to our Runner’s World Cover Search competition, presented by Asics. It’s a chance to pay tribute to our readers, while

But the running transformation is never just about losing centimetres, and fitting into the clothes you wore when you were 21. It’s far more than that. Running is a healthy addiction, a source of confidence, balance and stress relief; and it can turn lives around. I can’t imagine a week with no exercise, and for many of our readers it’s the same. It’s not a 12-week programme (though it may start that way!). It’s an activity that becomes ingrained in who we are, and without it, we’re out of sorts. There’s a sense of something missing. A runner may well be born out of a need to lose weight, or to get healthy. But even when weight-loss goals are achieved or balance has been restored, runners continue to run. We run because it’s what we do.

COVER SEARCH We’re searching for South Africa’s most awesome runners. Enter our Runner’s World Cover Search, presented by Asics, and win a chance to appear on our cover and share your running story!

PRESENTED BY

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So don’t be shy to enter our Cover Search competition, and tell us your story. We want to hear from you. And we want to share your passion and the success that you’ve enjoyed through running, to inspire others. Click on the link, send us your story and pics, and you may well see yourself on our cover in February. Quite honestly, we’d be honoured to have you!

MIKE FINCH EDITOR-IN-CHIEF @MikeFinchSA

www runnerswor d co za

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A L E X I H AY

also telling some of the amazing stories that happen every day on the streets and trails of SA. Every runner, from beginner to veteran, has an inspiring story; and though you may not think yours deserves to be splashed across the pages of You magazine, that doesn’t mean we don’t think it’s worth sharing! Part of our intention with this competition is to give our readers the chance to share with us how much running has changed their lives. We constantly get feedback from our readers – via email, our social media, or just stopping for a chat – about the transformative power of running. Our regular ‘Run It Off Club’ section is inundated with contributions from runners who have changed their futures by losing unwanted weight.

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“MY FIRST HALF MARATHON IN 1:49!” – H NRY CRAUSE IS FIGHTING FIT.

HUMAN( )RACE p24

NEWS, TRENDS, and REGULAR RUNNERS NERS do doing AMAZING THINGS

Out Of Sight What can a runner who can’t see teach us about the way we look at the world? By Lisa Nevitt PICTURES: Dominic Barnardt

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 17


R RICHARD MONISI fell four times during the Comrades Marathon this year. The first time, he tripped over a cat’s eye in the road. The second time, he stumbled into a pothole, and on a third occasion, he took a sharp corner and bumped into a pavement. His fourth accident happened just 500 metres from the finish line. But for Monisi, it was just another day beating the odds. Why? Well, Monisi is legally and functionally blind, with just five per cent sight in his left eye. As he shuff led into the stadium, he heard a cacophony of cheering and music. “Amazing!” the spectators shouted. “Awesome!” The noise only confused his senses further. Unsure of the way, he lost his balance and fell. But as swiftly as he hit the grass, he felt hands on either side of him lifting him to his feet – fellow runners were on hand, determined to help him. “Let’s go!” they encouraged, urging him not to give up. Monisi finished the Comrades in 8:28. Even more significant than his time was the fact that he ran most of the race without the assistance of a guide. But he’s no stranger to falling down, picking himself back up again, and carrying on: he’s been doing it his entire life.

BORN BLIND As a child, because he had never been able to see, Monisi didn’t even realise he had a disability. He often bumped into things, and fell, and hurt himself – but he thought that was normal; didn’t everyone fall? Each time, he got up and carried on playing. Growing up in a rural village near Louis Trichardt was difficult. The basics were scarce, people were starving, and no-one was helping. Monisi lived with his mother Anna, his father James and his brother Lucky. But though Monisi played happily with his older cousin Gloria, he was 18

RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

Monisi, at home with his wife Jane Mokone and his youngest son, Prince.


Part of the reason Monisi has achieved more than most ‘ablebodied’ people is his humble ability to accept help from others.

“Monisi felt a great sense of injustice – and even then, at his young age, he refused to give in to his ‘inferior’ status.” Monisi felt a great sense of injustice – and even then, at his young age, he refused to give in to his ‘inferior’ status. “Then let Gloria come with me, and I’ll go and buy sugar,” he pleaded. “And if I fall, so what? I’m used to it! I want to be like the other children.” “You are disabled,” Anna repeated. P H OTO G R A P H B Y J E T L I N E AC T I O N P H OTO ( TO P R I G H T )

never given the same opportunities and responsibilities that she had. Gloria and Lucky were often sent on errands, to buy sugar or tea. They attended the local school. Monisi, on the other hand, stayed at home. At seven years old, he asked his mother: “Why?” Anna explained. “You can’t be sent on errands, because you can’t see where you’re going. You’re blind, which means you’re disabled. Disabled children can’t cope in a general school, and we certainly can’t afford to send you to a specialist school.”

LIGHT IN THE DARK When Monisi was 12, he contracted typhoid – an infectious and dangerous bacterial fever – and was admitted to Elim Hospital in Louis Trichardt. While he was there, the attending doctors took the opportunity to examine his eyes and confirmed what his mother had been telling him all along – he was blind. But there was hope, and they were able to operate on Monisi’s left eye. Two days after his operation, a doctor removed the bandages, and light flooded

into what had been a lifetime of darkness. Although Monisi couldn’t make out shapes or even colours, he moved a finger in front of his eye, fascinated by the way the light shifted. He had five per cent vision. Not much. But five per cent was more than before. The doctors warned him: “Don’t look at the sun – it will make you completely blind again.” They began to teach Monisi how to use touch – feeling rounded edges, right angles and corners – to identify objects. The eyes, it seemed, were not the only way of ‘seeing’. On his behalf, the doctors applied to the Pretoria School for the Blind. It was there that Monisi finally gained access to the facilities and equipment he needed to participate in sports – swimming first, then basketball. But he had started his schooling late, and because of his age, when he reached

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 19


HUMAN RACE

Monisi trains alone, on a one-kilometre section in his local park.

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016


RUNNING BLIND MONISI’S ACHIEVEMENTS 11 Two Oceans Ultras, best time: 4:46.00 Monisi’s achievements (listed left) have made him a popular guy among SA’s running community.

12 Comrades Marathons, best time: 8:28.23 Marathon PB: 3:15

But in the fourth month, a man called Gerald Fox – the founder of Rocky Road Runners – approached him in the mall. “You have a good physique – tall and slender,” he observed. “Even though you’re blind, you’d make a good runner.” Fox made Mon isi a n i nt r ig u i ng

touch and a cane. And so his passion for long-distance running was born – Monisi began to enter events. He achieved a marathon personal best of 3:45, but wanted to do even better. He trained harder, and slotted a new PB: 3:15. Fellow runners warned those who were

““If you stop begging and start running, I promise to support you.”

MONISI BEGAN TO RUN Monisi lived in Penny ville close to Westbury – far from Soweto and the suburbs, the most likely sources for a guide. So in training, he ran alone. Up and down, on a straight, one-kilometre section in his local park. He woke up at 3am and trained until 6am. It was the quietest time of the day, devoid of noisy traffic that could hamper his senses. To avoid bumping into things, he used a combination of hearing,

thinking of volunteering to guide him. “If you’re guiding this man, you must watch out,” they said. “He’ll burn you. You’ll hit the wall. He runs fast.” Monisi was 32 when he met Jane Mokone, who is also blind. She was the captain of the women’s team at a football tournament for the blind he attended at Filadelfia Secondary School in Shoshanguve. He liked Jane. She was patient, a good listener. Luckily, she gave him her phone number. In November 2003, the pair were married. Then Monisi’s first son, Valentine, was born, in 2004; their second, Prince, is a year and 10 months old. Like his father, Prince can only see out of one eye. For Monisi, the start of the Comrades Marathon is a horrible experience – it scares him. He can hear lots of people all talking at the same time, lots of people making nervous noise. The songs only add to his trepidation. As if the disorientation isn’t enough, he has only just met his pilot and guide, Florence Munyei, for the first

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 21

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J E T L I N E AC T I O N P H OTO ( B OT TO M ) / S U P P L I E D ( TO P )

grade 10 he was asked to leave. Sadly, he did not get the opportunity to write his matric exams. Monisi received a ‘disability’ grant from the government, but it was very little. His father was working in Johannesburg at the time, which inspired him to pack a bag and catch a train to the big city. For the first month, Monisi stayed with a friend, Manaba – a blind man he’d met at school in Pretoria. When the time came for Monisi to receive his next grant payment, he realised he didn’t have the money to return to Louis Trichardt and collect it. So for the next three months, he and Manaba sang and begged in the doorway of a mall. And people donated money, which the pair used to buy food.

proposition: “If you stop begging and start running, I promise to support you.” He offered the blind man a room at the back of his place. He would go on to train with him early in the mornings and after work, and then help him get a job at Services For The Blind. And once Monisi was established, Fox helped him to move into his own place – to live independently. (Sadly, Services For The Blind closed four years ago, leaving Monisi unemployed.) How could Monisi disappoint the man who had done so much for him?


Monisi’s guide couldn’t keep up with his pace during this year’s Comrades. He ran most of the 89 kilometres alone.

time. Munyei stands next to him. She wears a belt, and attached to the belt is a piece of string for Monisi to hold. The famous cock-crow sounds, signalling the start. “Even if I don’t finish, I’ll try my best,” Monisi reminds himself, as the crowd slowly surges forward. For the first 10km, there are too many

GUIDANCE FOR YOUR GUIDES Are you thinking of being a guide for a blind runner? You’re probably nervous about the job, unsure of what to do – how hard do you pull on the tether, how much do you tell him or her? The American Foundation® For The

other runners for Monisi to set a pace. Munyei leads, advising him when there are obstacles in the way, and when to turn right or left. “Here comes the blind guy!” the pair shout when they want to pass other runners. Sometimes Monisi bumps into fellow competitors, and together they tumble. But then, his guide has to admit defeat:

Blind recommends the following, to make your job easier. • Be explicit. Saying “Be careful here” doesn’t convey any information. The runner is already being careful. But “The ground is a little rough here” tells the runner what he or she needs to know. • Put action first, followed by background information. “We’re approaching a crowd of

people standing on the path, so…” doesn’t tell the runner what to do until it’s too late. Instead, say: “Move right – we’re approaching a crowd of people standing…” • Ask about decisions in advance. If there are two routes, mention it as soon as you know, so you won’t have to stop to discuss the options. If you want to stop for water, say so before you get to the water station.

Munyei can’t maintain Monisi’s brutal pace. Grasping his white stick, he decides to go it alone. Monisi tracks the time by the sun: when it’s on his face, he knows it’s 8am; a bit higher, 9am. When he can see the shadow of the sun, it’s mid-afternoon. “We’re halfway,” shouts a fellow runner, and Monisi recognises his voice from one of the races he did in training at home. His heart lightens – he remembers that the man behind the voice just happens to run at the same pace as him. Monisi knows he’s on track for a good time. Sometimes he takes a wrong turn, but other runners – realising he’s blind – help out by calling him back to the route. “I’m waiting for you, my man!” shouts a fellow competitor, running just ahead of him. And when Monisi falls in the stadium, they pick him up, and their camaraderie carries him the rest of the way. It’s through sheer determination, and his humble ability to connect with other people, that Monisi achieves the same as – more than – ‘able–bodied’ people are able to achieve. Whatever hand life deals you, you don’t have to give in to it. You just need to find a different way of… looking at it.

• When obstacles such as bumps or ruts can’t be avoided, alert the runner to them verbally. Be sure to mention the direction. “Kerb up” or “Kerb down” tells the runner whether to step high or expect a drop.

uphill” or “We’ll be bearing to the right in a few steps” are good descriptions.

• Give advance warning of turns. Be sure to mention the direction.

• Tell your runner about things the two of you are passing that might be of interest. Are there drinking fountains? Rugby fields? Shady areas? Vineyards? Public toilets?

• Especially in unfamiliar territory, tell your runner about the terrain. “We’re coming to a long, low

Adapted from the website of the American Foundation® For The Blind (afb.org)

The ‘design elements’ used in this piece are the Braille symbols for the letters next to them: ‘O’, ‘R’, ‘G’ and ‘T’. 22

RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016


The Singlet BECAUSE RUNNING ISN’T JUST ABOUT STRING VESTS. ASK THE TRAIL STAR Ryan Sandes

How do you avoid illness when travelling to overseas races? – CARL, East London One of my major fears when travelling to an event is picking up a bug or virus. My immune system is usually run down, because I’m tapering and have been training hard. To reduce my chances of getting sick, I get plenty of sleep and hydrate with electrolytes. I don’t do a hard training session on the same day I travel.

“I don’t want to over-stress my immune system...” GUILT-ERCISE Is running after binge-eating a good idea? – MARY, Port Elizabeth I seldom binge-eat; but when I do, I’m inclined to crawl onto the couch, undo the top button of my jeans, let my boep assume the digestive position, flick on the rugby replays, and then drift gently into a food coma. In my opinion, any other course of action is futile. Ask yourself: why do I want to run after inhaling a large pizza? Is it because I feel guilty? Is it because my reflection in the mirror resembles that of a little piggy? Regardless, running right now isn’t the answer – in fact, it could actually be bad for you. Your digestive system, stuffed with all that delicious food, will be thrown around unnaturally. Ask yourself: when did I ever see a lion, fresh from the kill, go out on another hunt? If you run now, you’ll probably feel weak, then dizzy, and then you’ll throw up. You’ll waste all that delicious food – which in sporting terms is

ILLUSTRATION BY ANDY REMENTER

referred to as a double-fail. My recommendation is that you enjoy your over-indulgence. Be the best over-indulger you can be! Wallow in your gluttony, sleep it off, let your food digest – and only then should you go for a run. POOP OR SCOOP? While running with my dog, is it okay to toss a bag of his poo into a stranger’s rubbish bin? – GARY, Paarl Umm… there’s no definitive answer to this question,

that dump will land up at the dump in a matter of hours; or will it sit there, maturing magnificently, for days? Are you a good person who cares about other peoples’ happiness? Would you consider trail running instead – which in all honesty, your dog would probably prefer – and tossing the offending matter into a nearby bush, au naturel? Would you consider purchasing one of those poo holders – you know, those bags you attach to your dog’s collar, so that it carries it all the way

“Is your dog a Chihuahua that poos Smartiesized bokdrolletjies , or a Great Dane with turds the size of a lemon meringue pie?” because there are so many variables to consider. Is your dog a Chihuahua that poos Smartie-sized bokdrolletjies, or a Great Dane with turds the size of a lemon meringue pie? Is it rubbish-collection day, meaning

home? (Though running with a thin-plastic poo bag is asking for trouble.) Ask yourself all of these questions – leave no poo unturned – and you’ll know what to do.

I travel with a medical mask, in case any of the other passengers are sick. I keep my nasal passages clean with a saline nasal spray, and Bactroban cream (antibacterial medicine) prevents germs from entering my nose. I get up regularly to move my legs and do mobility exercises. I drink plenty of fluids, but avoid drinking too much coffee or alcohol, which will dehydrate me. I’m still not convinced compression tights or socks actually work, but I do try to keep my feet elevated, to prevent ankle swelling. Once I’ve landed, I try to get plenty of sleep, and ensure my runs are easy for the first two days. I don’t want to overstress my immune system, which has already been weakened by long-haul travel.

Ryan Sandes, a.k.a. ‘Hedgie’, is a trail-running supremo, with race wins too numerous to mention.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 23


HUMAN RACE

RUN IT OFF CLUB

WEIGHT ON, WEIGHT OFF If Henry wanted to compete in karate, he would have to slim down...

THE WAKE-UP My sensei noticed I was overweight. I was participating in our national championships and felt very out of breath. After my kumite (fighting), he told me straight that I was too fat, and that I wouldn’t get any further unless I was willing to slim down. I had succumbed to working life, which is different to being at school: you don’t have time to be active with your friends, and when you’re on the go, it’s easier to grab a quick bite at a fast-food restaurant. THE SHAKE-UP I followed a strict diet, carefully monitoring my kilojoule intake. I took up CrossFit in the mornings, and at night I started walking five kilometres – in Crocs! When my weight began to drop and I felt stronger, I bought some running shoes and started jogging. Soon, I could run five kilometres with ease, and began gradually

24

I RAN OFF 2 9. 2 KG!

upping my distance to 10 kilometres. Watching my family eat whatever they wanted, while I had to watch what I ate, took tremendous willpower. Finding the time to exercise between work and my personal life was also difficult. There were some people who doubted I would be able to keep the weight off; they said I would return to my old habits. THE REWARD I joined an athletics club in Despatch, and achieved a time of 1:49 at my first half marathon. By committing to my weight-loss – despite temptation, and the fact that others doubted me – I’ve learned that the mind is powerful enough to help you achieve anything. My rewards might sound silly to some; but to be able to wear smaller clothes, and have people hardly recognise the new me, is just the best! – As told to Lisa Nevitt

HAVE YOU RUN OFF SIGNIFICANT WEIGHT AND CHANGED YOUR LIFE? SHOW US YOUR BEFORE-AND-AFTER USING #RWIRANITOFF ON INSTAGRAM OR TWITTER, OR EMAIL YOUR STORY TO RWLETTERS@MEDIA24.COM.

HENRY CRAUSE Age: 33 Home Town: Despatch Height: 1.6m Occupation: Professional Nurse – Life St George’s Hospital Time Required: 2.5 months Then: 98.7kg Now: 69.5kg

PHOTOGRAPHS SUPPLIED


HUMAN RACE

The Road Scholar BY PETER SAGAL

DOWNWARD-DOG DAYS Yoga is good for everyone – sayeth Inflexible Man. here was a time when I was obsessed with minutes. Getting my half-marathon time down to 1:30, just because that seemed cool. Now I’m obsessed with centimetres – specifically, ten of them, which is the current distance between my heel and the mat while I’m doing a downwardfacing dog. Yes, this is another column about an old man discovering yoga. These are the reasons, in no particular order, why I have resisted doing what everybody (friends, ex-wife, trainers, doctors, physical therapists, probably even a few strangers) advised me to do, and pick up yoga: it’s boring and easy, and boring because it’s easy. It’s for girls. It’s all about woo-woo and inner peace and spirituality, and I don’t go for that. And, I just don’t bend that way. As any other man would tell you, the first three are just a smokescreen for the last. No self-respecting man would ever attempt something he knows he’ll fail at, because,

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

in fact, we don’t actually respect ourselves enough to try. So I wasn’t going to go anywhere near a yoga studio until such time as I could touch my toes with legs straight, and that wasn’t happening in this lifetime. When revelation came, it came in the form of a vision – much like Saul on the road to Damascus; but instead of Jesus, it was Emily Blunt, in the science-fiction movie Edge of Tomorrow. Ms. Blunt plays a futuristic warrior battling be-tentacled aliens with her bare hands; and when we meet her, she is lying prone on the ground – except for the fact that she’s not actually on the ground but suspended above it, holding herself up on her bent arms, perfectly still and straight and parallel to the floor. It’s totally bad-ass, which is odd because it’s a yoga pose called the peacock, and peacocks are not generally considered to be symbols of bad-assery. I would like to do that, I thought. Otherwise, it was mainly age. Runners are famous for having tight hips and hamstrings, and I’ve been running for decades now, and I

am about as good at stretching as I am about returning phone calls. With my 50th birthday receding in my rear-view mirror, I find myself making these odd noises whenever I have to step up onto something, or climb out of a car. The noises sound familiar to my ear. The noises are the same ones my father makes. My father turns 80 this year. But the final step? A yoga studio opened. And they offered me a week for free. And it was winter. I was willing to sign up just to sit in the hot studio. Four months later, I’m addicted, going three days a week, on the days when I don’t run, or sometimes even when I do. The reasons I do it are very much linked to the reasons I didn’t do it for so long… so, in order: It’s boring and easy, and boring because it’s easy. First of all, it’s not easy, as my complete failure to do most of the poses shows. But another word for ‘boring’ is ‘meditative’, and another word for that is ‘focused’. During class, after some struggle, I learned to focus on what I’m doing, how I’m doing it, how I’m breathing, as per instruction. When I run, my mind wanders to a hundred different places as my legs turn over and over in their automatic cadence; and while that kind of mental journey can be refreshing, it’s also good to be here, now, even if ‘here’ is a very warm room where you’re trying to stand on one leg. Focus. Focus. Breathe. Stare at a spot on the floor. Relax your arms. Focus. Improve. Learn. Focus. It’s for girls. And so what? Girls are in fact pretty great, at any age, and if by ‘for girls’ we mean ‘collaborative, cheerful, uplifting, positive, and bright’, then by God, let me be more girlish. As I’ve got older, I’ve discovered that the male way of approaching problems – hitting them with your forehead until they go away or you die – is perhaps less than optimal, and the female way – getting together to encourage each other as you make small steps of progress – has its benefits. The teachers in my classes are almost all female, and it took me about, oh, 30 seconds to get over my ironic scoffing at their empty praise (“You’re looking good! So strong, Peter!”) and start wagging my imaginary puppy tail. And while yoga teachers rarely have the bulging muscles and rock-hard abs of other fitness instructors, they are lithe, supple, and strong as all get-out. There are worse things to be, such as my current stiff and saggy self. It’s all about woo-woo and inner peace

ILLUSTRATION BY JAY WRIGHT


and spirituality, and I don’t go for that. Yeah, and maybe my not going for that may have something to do with the lack of hair on my head and the surplus of medications in my bathroom closet. Inner peace is only laughed at by people who don’t have it, and if I can trade my constant roiling inner monologue for 60 minutes of calm focus a few times a week, well, I still have plenty of time to dine on my own intestines the rest of the week. Every class in this studio ends with the teacher saying, “The light in me honours the light in you”, and the first few times it was everything I could do to repress a daft engine-warning-light joke. Now, I won’t say I believe in internal lights, but I’d like to. I just don’t bend that way. True, and I still don’t… but I’m working on it. There was a time in my mid-30s I couldn’t run five kays without gasping, and I worked on it and trained and eventually ran marathons; and if I had just said to myself, “No way,” I’d still be overweight and heading for an early grave, and you wouldn’t be reading these words now. Why apply that kind of defeatism to my flexibility? It may be that psychologically, our ability to run is an issue of performance, and we are all trained to believe that performance can be improved. Yet flexibility seems like a property of our body, like our height or our features, and can’t be messed with. But it can. In fact, I have found the transformations from just six months of yoga, as minor as they are, to be as astounding as (if different from) those that came from running. I carry myself a little taller. My shoulders are more squared. My midsection seems tighter, and my poor knotted hamstrings a little longer. The feeling is not so much that I’m getting better, but that I’m becoming different – a metamorphosis rather than a gradual improvement. At my age, I didn’t know there was a butterfly in me.

But what about my running? This magazine has extolled yoga as an aid to running for years, and so far, I can vouch for it. My runs have felt looser, easier, and my recovery from them quicker. Pains that were starting to dog me in my hips and legs when I started the classes have faded away. But even better than all of that is a new kind of mental strength. I ran my first half marathon for a while in August, and I was not in great shape, and was feeling the strain way, way too early. So I remembered my (cheerful, upbeat, female) yoga instructor’s words, and concentrated on my breathing, deeply in, deeply out, with due attention paid to each step. I became calmer. The discomfort I was feeling faded. Instead of counting the kilometres, regretting the ones I had run (too fast!) and the ones to come (too far!), I practised breathing, and being here, now – and thusly, I was there, then. And the kilometres passed. As for the peacock pose – are you kidding me? But I’m pretty decent at crow pose, where you support yourself on your bent arms, in a crouch, with your knees tucked on top of your elbows. All I have to do now is slowly extend the length of my body straight back, my torso and legs held up off the ground, all my weight in my arms; and, like Emily Blunt, exchange tough-guy dialogue with Tom Cruise without breathing hard. Seems impossible. But six months ago, so did crow. I’m not sure if the light in me is strong enough yet to honour the light in you. But two or three times a week, I’ll be in a hot room on a mat, trying, with focused breaths, to fan my flame.

Peter Sagal is a 3:09 marathoner and the host of US radio show Wait, Wait... Don’t Tell Me!


HUMAN RACE

The Newbie Chronicles BY KATHRYN ARNOLD

The bulging, teardrop-shaped muscle that extends downwards from my knee – my right one, most often – sometimes gets so tight and stiff by the third or fourth minute of a run that I have to pause and use the sturdy butts of my hands to rub the pain away. On dire days, I’m able to rub away only enough agony to limp home. On the worst days, I’m too racked with the fear of shin-shredding to even go out. Needless to say, this can’t go on. Not if – Attention, attention, this is big! – I’m going to start increasing my endurance enough to run a 5-K at the park in February. Yeah, that’s right: a 5-K. I’m taking on this modest goal because I enjoy succeeding more than I enjoy failing; and because the whole idea of running, after all, is to advance carefully, incrementally, towards ever more ambitious plans. In fact, pushing too hard too fast is typically why those demon splints occur: work your legs too strenuously before they’re ready, and they’ll scream bloody murder. But can I possibly be ‘pushing too hard’? My pace would embarrass a snail. I mean, for God’s sake, I’m giving myself five months to train for a measly 5-K at my local park. I’m not exactly shooting for the stars here. Something else must be at play.

A PAIN IN THE… LEG If something hurts when you run, there’s probably a good reason – and a remedy. I hate them. I mean, I really hate them – as much as I hate audible chewing, people who lack spatial awareness, and corporatespeak. (Synergy! Scalable! Drill down! Ugh... please, shut up.) I hate them with the fire of a thousand blowtorches marinated in liquid capsaicin and poached in magma. What are ‘them’, you ask? Them are shin splints, and them are the worst. When I first began to run, it felt as though my tibialis muscle was being ripped from the bone, fibre by fibre. Guess what? It still feels like that. Except now, I run more often than next-tonever, which means my tender tissues are

I

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

being yanked from my skeleton at a more frequent rate. For the uninitiated, ‘shin splints’ is an umbrella term for the stress pains experienced in the front or inner area of a runner’s lower leg. In case the ripping description above wasn’t evocative enough, I’ll try again: imagine your shin muscle is a wet rag you’re wringing out, twisting until it feels so torqued up and taut it can be wrung no more. Imagine someone using two forks to then tatter your shin muscle, in much the same way one shreds a hunk of braised pig into pulled pork. In my case, the pain is always in the front of my leg, never the side; this means I’m suffering from anterior, as opposed to medial, shin splints.

After a bit of digging (i.e., looking at relevant articles on runnersworld .co.za – I swear they don’t pay me to plug the site), I learn that shin splints aren’t caused only by overzealousness. They can also be caused by overpronating, which is when the foot rolls excessively inwards with each strike. Luckily I can nix this potential culprit from the list of suspects. I underwent a gait test at a running-shoe shop before buying my slick Mizuno (they don’t pay me, either, I swear) running shoes, at which time I learned that my feet are remarkably neutral – they don’t roll inwards or outwards. My feet are moderate centrists! Additionally, the ‘old, worn shoes cause shin splints’ maxim clearly doesn’t explain my affliction – I’ve just bought mine. It seems that shin splints can also result from inadequate stretching. But no, no, that’s not me at all. I stretch diligently. I enjoy stretching. It feels awful, but in a good way – like those massages that hurt so badly they make you tear up, but also cure your knotted neck. Another explanation bites the dust. And then I find the quote – also on

ILLUSTRATION BY LEO ESPINOSA


runnersworld.co.za, I think, but I’m starting to suffer information overload – that clicks everything into place: “Because the propulsive motion of running works the rear of the leg more so than the front, muscle imbalances are common among runners… runners typically have overworked, tight calf muscles and weak shin muscles.” Aha! Because here’s something I haven’t mentioned: my calves are naturally ginormous. They wouldn’t be out of place on a heroic Greek statue (of a man). They’re basically a pair of spanspeks. Suddenly, it’s clear: the enviable cannons attached to my pins are bullying my puny tibiales into submission. Solution? Beef up the shins, baby!

RUNNER BY THE NUMBERS

THUMP, THUMP, THUMP IN THE NIGHT Since All Hallows’ Eve – a.k.a. Halloween, a celebration of the supernatural that originated in Ireland – reached South African shores, there has been a boom in spooky fancy-dress parties, events and movie nights. But how can runners best celebrate this bone-chilling evening? Outdoor-events company Dirtopia have the answer: a terrifying night-time trail-running race at Muratie Wine Estate near Stellenbosch, called the Halloween Night Forest Run – which is bound to give participants the heebie-jeebies…

“It feels awful, but in a good way – like those massages that hurt so badly they make you tear up, but also cure your knotted neck.”

Kathryn Arnold is a writer for Time and Wired, and is the author of the novel Bright Before Us (2011).

PEOPLE ENTERED THE EVENT IN 2015.

SEVENT

30 25L

OF WHOM WERE CHILDREN, AGED BETWEEN SEVEN AND 17.

225

OF THEM WORE COSTUMES.

Bottles of Coke and…

P H OTO G R A P H S S U P P L I E D ( H A L LOW E E N T R A I L )

Here are a few ways that one can do this: point your toe and draw the alphabet on the floor (I choose to write KATIE RULES over and over); put a towel on the floor and use your toes to grasp it and pull it towards you; stand with all 10 toes on a step, then slowly sink one heel down, then raise it again. I go at these exercises with vigour. And after a few weeks, I start to notice that the ol’ splints have, by and large, split. They come back now and again, but they are no longer the constant menace they were. I’ve spent a lot of time here talking about hate. Let me mix it up and talk about the opposite: love. First off: I love my local park. I mean I love it. I love the trees, the flowers, the array of people who use it, from children to grannies to hipsters who tie things between the trees and practise tightrope-walking. I love the dog-walkers and the frisbee-throwers. I love my local park as a whole, really – in fact, I love it almost as much as I hate shin splints. Good thing I’ll be trading one for the other, a dozen reps of KATIE RULES at a time.

300

People dressed up as monsters. It was their job to burst out of the shadows and make participants jump!

THE NUMBER OF SACKS FROM WHICH PARTICIPANTS WERE GIVEN TRICK-OR-TREAT SWEETS DURING THE RACE.

...of Powerade were used to replenish participants at the finish line in 2015.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 29


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OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 33


Lessons on racing, pacing, p Olympic and focus from the O Marathon Trials in tthe US. By Alex Hutchinsson

WHEN THE WORLD’S BEST marathoners toed the line

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016 2

P H OTO G R A P H B Y N I C K A L D R I D G E

in Rio’s famous Sambódromo,, the American team had one advantage over most of their ady faced the Olympic rivals: they’d alrea pressure of a do-or-die race – in wilting ee was all that heat, where placing top thre mattered – and succeeded. W h i l e m o s t c o u n t r i e s r eli e d o n committees and long-term performance c marathoners, records to pick their Olympic n and top three the US took the top three men women at a selection race – this year’s Marathon Trials were held in F February in Los hat in an event Angeles. The format means th whose unpredictability is one of its greatest est favourite is challenges, even the stronge just one mistake away from oblivion. It makes g, and it offers for edge-of-the-seat viewing useful lessons about the thin line between marathon success and failure.. Amy Cragg, Desiree Linden, Shalane and Flanagan, Galen Rupp, Meb Keflezighi, K Jared Ward were the six wh ho passed this arned on a hot year’s trials test. What they lea day in LA provides lessons for any runner e. lining up for an important race


PUSH HARDER WITH A FRIEND

Beat the heat: minimise your warmup to avoid starting with a high body temperature.

STAY OUT OF THE MIDDAY SUN

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y CA S E Y C R A F F O R D

With a personal best time of 2:21.14, Shalane Flanagan was the fastest runner in the women’s field, and a favourite to make the team. But with five kilometres to go, her spot was in jeopardy. “I was really dizzy, chills, ringing in my ears, couldn’t see straight,” she told Runner’s World after the race. She was seriously dehydrated and overheating as she stumbled to the finish. Everyone knew it would be hot – temperatures reached 24 degrees Celcius, a trials record – so why was a veteran like Flanagan so fried? While the effects of temperature and humidity are well known, a third factor in overheating, solar radiation, is often overlooked. Most marathons begin early, but the women’s trials race started at 10:22am, exposing the runners to intense midday

sun. A study publishe ed this year found that sol ar radiation levels of 800 watts per square metre, equivale ent on, to a clear sunny day at noo cut time to exhaustion in half compared to a test at the same air temperatu re and humidity with no sollar radiation. If you have to race in the midday sun, minimi se your warm-up to avo id starting with a high bod dy her temperature, says research Ronald Maughan, one of the authors of the solar radiation study. Seek shade, st ay ear hydrated, and if you we a hat, make sure it’s w ell no ventilated. And there’s n substitute for experienc ce, an, Maughan says. Flanaga who hung on for thir d, ber worked in a heat chamb at the US Olympic Trainin ng Centre in Colorado Springs to hone hydration and pacing am plans for Rio, where a 9:30a presented similar challenge es.

A memorable image from the trials was eventual winner Amy Cragg hanging back to run with Flanagan, her training partner, as Flanagan began to struggle. They ran side by side and stride for stride, at times seeming to merge into one runner. Did Cragg’s presence help? Almost certainly, according to a growing body of research on teamwork. A study of rowers at Oxford University found that their pain threshold, measured by a tightened blood pressure cuff, increased more after a workout with their teammates than after the same workout performed alone. The bonds between teammates may act as a “social placebo”, says Emma Cohen, a cognitive and evolutionary anthropologist at Oxford. Knowing that we have

teammates nearby triggers changes in brain chemistry that help us handle pain and fatigue, perhaps because we know help will be at hand if we push too far. Flanagan and Cragg’s synchronised strides may have acted as an even stronger cue of “social support”, Cohen says. In another study, she and her colleagues showed that athletes improved at a running test when they warmed up with a teammate – and improved even more when they and their teammate did a synchronised warm-up involving dynamic exercises in time with a metronome. (The same brain-chemistry effects may explain why we love dancing.) Running may be an individual sport, but it’s more fun (and faster) with friends.

Hanging out with a training partner helps boost your performance.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S W WORLD 35


TRAINING Pace yourself – don’t be tempted to go out too fast in the first half.

HAVE A PLAN. STICK T O I The vagaries of proper pacing in a marathon are so complex that you could write a thesis on them – which is what Jared Ward did for his master’s degree in statistics at Brigham Young University, US, analysing split times for 5 000 participants in a marathon. His research was motivated by his first marathon, in 2013, where he went from giving his wife a thumbs-up at the halfway point to “tunnel vision and a loss of form” in the final kilometres. His most important insight: focus on your own limits rather than responding to the runners around you, or to the emotion and excitement of the race. After the 24-kilometre mark in Los Angeles, when n Tyler Pennel threw in a surrge that broke up the pack, Ward W knew he couldn’t keep up. u He dropped into fourth plac ce and focused

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RUNNER’S WORLD RLD OCTOBER 2016

RESIST THE URGE TO SURGE It’s no coincidence that the first big moves in both the men’s and women’s races came from relatively inexperienced marathoners, both making their second attempts at the distance. Tyler Pennel, a 28-yearold with a previous time of 2:13.32, took the lead around 24 kilometres; Taylor, a 29-year-old Kellyn T d debuted in 2:28.40 who had in 2015, was in front by the 13-kilo metre mark. One more t hing they had in on: their moves felt commo easy at the time. en I took the lead, “Whe I didn’tt bust out a crazy surge,” said Taylor, who wound up fading to sixth. “It was relaxed and easy until the heat got to me.” Pennell, who ended up in fifth,, offered the same rationale for his unplanned The course is slightly surge: “T

downhill, and I just began to relax and run what felt comfortable.” Then, once he realised he was opening up a lead, “I let that emotion take me.” As the marathon veterans around them might have warned, it’s supposed to feel easy until well after halfway. The marathon isn’t like shorter races, where the pain is spread relatively evenly across the distance; instead, the agony is concentrated in the final kilometres. You have to recalibrate your expectations and resist the urge to accelerate just because you feel good. It’s a message Pennel and Taylor won’t forget next time. “With my inexperience, it definitely wasn’t a great call for me to be out front,” Taylor said after the race. “Lesson learned.”

The T e marathon is supposed tto fe eel easy for the first half. The e agony is concentrated in n the final kilometres.

T H I S S P R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H S B Y G L E N M O N TG O M E R Y; N I C K A L D R I D G E ; CA S E Y C R A F F O R D

Focus on your own race, rather than on your competitors around you.

on hitting the fastest pace he n safely. That could maintain pace was fastt enough to hortly before catch Pennel sh 34 kilometres, p putting Ward ee. into the top thre In the women n’s race, Desi ed a virtually Linden execute identical strateg gy by sticking to her planned splits of 3:30 kilometres (based on her training and the forecast conditions), even though that meant letting the top three open up a gap in the middle of the race. Whether your goal is to stick to a certain effort level or a certain pace, you need the confidence and experience to tune out your surroundings – because if you try to run someone else’s race, you’ll be the one paying the price in the final kilometres.


ADJUST YOUR TRAINING It’s tempting to call Meb Keflezighi ageless: his second-place trials finish, at age 40, stamped his ticket for his fourth Olympic team since 2000. But Keflezighi isn’t immune to the passage of time, nor is his longevity a fluke. He works hard at keeping his body healthy, and he’s made crucial adjustments to his training. Before his 2014 win at the Boston Marathon, for example, he made the switch from a seven-day cycle to a more forgiving nine-day schedule, to ensure recovery between hard workouts. The nine-day cycle involves three target sessions – an interval workout, a tempo run, and a long run – each followed by two days of recovery, says Scott Douglas, the co-author (with Keflezighi) of Meb for Mortals. And if Keflezighi

doesn’t feel good after two easy days, he’ll take an extra before continuing. “The point isn’t that nine is better than seven,” Douglas says. “It’s that you should be flexible.” The approach isn’t just for older runners: Keflezighi got the idea in part from Paula Radcliffe, the marathon world-record-holder, who used an eight-day ‘week’ in her heyday. Of course, there’s a logic to seven-day cycles for nonprofessional runners, because that’s how our lives are organised. You’ve probably got more time for a long run on Saturday or Sunday, and a better chance of finding training partners to join you. You could think instead in two-week cycles, aiming for five hard days out of every 14. Or you could simply postpone workouts when you don’t feel recovered.

Be fl flexible: if you u don’t feel recov vered, take an eextra easy day.

Not even elite athletes can win every race – prioritise the goal you value most.

PICK ONE GOAL PER SEASON Even though it was his first marathon, Galen Rupp looked comfortable – and dominant – in winning the trials by over a minute. Then, less than a month later, he was racing 3 000 metres at the USATF Indoor Championships, in an attempt to qualify for the IAAF World Indoor Championships. Given his credentials, including an Olympic silver in 2012 over 10 000 metres and an American record of 7:30.16 in the indoor 3 000, you might have thought this race would be no problem for him. Instead, Rupp lagged, finishing eighth, 10 seconds behind the winner. The result was a reminder that even the greatest runners can’t have it all. You must pick which goals are most important. In Rupp’s

case, first prize was earning an Olympic Marathon berth. “I have no regrets,” Rupp said after the track race. (And with time to recover and train, he was back to peak form at July’s US Olympic Track Trials: he won the 10 000 metres and qualified for the 5 000-metre final.) It’s easy to be distracted by conflicting goals: you want a 5-K PB, and a Comrades-qualifying marathon, and to run that destination race. Pick one alpha goal for each season, and consider whether you’ll risk sabotaging it with a secondary goal. That’s part of what made the Olympic races so compelling: for everyone on those starting lines, that was the most important race of their year, and perhaps their lives. We may never be Olympians, but we can do the same.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 37


TRAINING

THE STARTING LINE

TIPS FOR BEGINNERS FROM AN EASY-GOING COACH

BY JEFF GALLOWAY

You Asked Me Jeff answers your questions. Is it okay to take goodies at an expo if I’m not racing? Yes – the vendors want as many people as possible to try their products (and to pay for more later). Because you’re not racing, you don’t have to worry as much about upsetting your stomach with new foods, but it’s wise to exercise restraint – and to leave some for the other expo-goers! The expo inspired me to jump into a race – how do I know how far I can handle?

DEALS, PRO TIPS, FREE FOOD! Find good stuff at a race expo, even if you’re not running. You may not be ready to tackle a marathon, or any other big race, but that doesn’t mean the event has nothing to offer you. If the race attracts enough entrants, it probably hosts an expo – often free and open to the public – in the days leading up to the start. There, races, running clubs, speakers, and vendors converge to connect with runners. Here’s what you might find if you visit one. RUNNING CLUBS Talk to the representatives on hand to find out when and where group runs take place, and which might be appropriate for your fitness level. You should be able to get a sense for which clubs are most welcoming to beginners. Group runs are usually free to join; when you find a club you like and become a member, you may be eligible for perks

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such as race discounts, club gear, and access to clinics and guest speakers. RACES Destination events as well as local ones will tempt you to register, and may offer a discount. Some display past T-shirts, medals, and other swag at expos to entice entrants. You can also find out whether an event has training

JOIN OUR ONLINE TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR BEGINNERS AT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /28DAYS

If you’ve worked up to five kays in training, you can enter a 5-K; if six, a 10-K. Since you weren’t planning to race, start easy – run the first few kilometres 30 to 90 seconds slower per kilometre than you think you can handle.

groups that meet in the leadup to race day. DISCOUNTS Most expos have several apparel vendors selling all the workout clothing you need – from visors to socks – at a discount. Shop around: another booth may have the same item for less.

Fact or Fiction An expo is a good place to buy my first running shoes. FICTION

EXPERTS Massage therapists, physical therapists, and other pros may be present to field questions about keeping your body healthy. Some expos also bring in guest lecturers – such as doctors, nutritionists, elite runners, or me! – to share wisdom.

Brand-new runners ought to go to a speciality shoe shop for a fitting. The experts there will ask you questions to ensure you end up with a pair that feels comfortable and does not cause injury.

ILLUSTRATION BY SAM ISLAND


TRAINING

THE FAST LANE

TRAINING ADVICE FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE

BY ALEX HUTCHINSON

consider it not a rest day, but an investment in your health. FUEL THE LONG RUNS The hard training that’s required to chase PBs can leave your immune system weakened. And research suggests that the length of the run, rather than its intensity, matters most: in a recent study, two hours at a moderate pace dampened immune function more than 30 minutes of intense running. Taking in carbohydrates during and after long runs can help fight off a rise in immunesuppressing stress hormones. If you’re running for longer than 90 minutes, plan to have a sports drink or gel; and after any long or hard workout, refuel with carbohydrates and protein in a four-to-one ratio – a peanut-butter-and-banana sandwich with a glass of milk, for example.

Fewer sick days yield greater performance. nce

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FOR MORE TRAINING TIPS AND PL ANS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / TRAINING.

MIND YOUR D LEVELS Even though the Norwegian skiers did their heaviest training before their winter racing season began, they were most susceptible to infections towards the end of winter. A possible culprit is the seasonal variation in vitamin D, which is primarily gained via sun exposure. A recent analysis concluded that to minimise the risk of infections, athletes should aim for 75 nmol/L of 25(OH)D (the marker of vitamin D measured in blood tests) rather than the usual target of 50 nmol/L. Fatty fish, eggs, and fortified milk provide some vitamin D, but the researchers also recommend taking 1 000 IU per day of vitamin D3 supplements if it’s cold.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y I S TO C K P H OTO

No-one likes getting sick. But the stakes are particularly high for competitive runners, because even minor training disruptions can knock your goals out of reach. Sound like hyperbole? Earlier this year, Norwegian sports scientists published an analysis of nine years of training data from their world-beating cross-country ski team. The Olympic or world championship medallists in the study reported an average of 14 days per year with symptoms of respiratory or gastrointestinal infection; the other athletes, all among the best in the world, reported 22 sick days per year. Dodging an ill-timed bug, in other words, might be the difference between podium and also-ran. There are some obvious steps you can take to lower your risk of infection when travelling to an overseas race: wash your hands frequently, get plenty of sleep, eat well, stay hydrated, and so on. There are also some less obvious risks: pro ultrarunner Sage Canaday finds he’s most vulnerable when he heads to a crowded (and germladen) public space after a long run in a colder climate. Here are other measures to keep in mind if you’re training hard now.

BEWARE OF AIR TRAVEL In the Norwegian study, athletes were five times as likely to report symptoms the day after a flight, and the risk stayed elevated for up to a week. In addition, infection risk tripled the day after a race. As a result of the study, Norwegian skiers are now advised to wait a day after racing before flying home. That may not be practical for everyone, but the same general principle applies. After a race, or after air travel, give yourself at least one easy day before jumping back into training. And if you’ve raced and flown, take the next day off completely – and


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TRAINING ASK THE EXPERTS

Extend the arm on the same side as your stitch and bend to the opposite side to find relief.

ASK THE COACH Lindsey Parry

How can I get rid of a side stitch? Slow down or stop and breathe slowly and deeply. Pressing the stitch or stretching your arms overhead may help. So can ‘running tall’ – slumping restricts the diaphragm, the muscle beneath your lungs that helps you breathe. – Angela Bekkala is an exercise physiologist and coach (happyfitmama.com).

Is it best to always run at the same time of day?

What’s a great training run for the 5-K and the marathon?

It’s fine if you have trouble running consistently – you’re less likely to forget or find an excuse when it’s an unchanging part of your routine. Over time, though, a string of morningonly or evening-only runs might become boring. Just like with route, distance, and pace, you can play with time of day to spice up your routine. That said, if you’re training for a morning race, be sure to log early kilometres regularly, so your legs get used to ‘waking up’. – Jim Partridge is a running coach (runnershigh.com).

Try weekly anaerobic threshold (AT) runs, known a s tempo runs. These workouts train your body to sustain a hard pace as your muscles learn to quickly metabolise lactic acid – and your mind learns to manage fatigue. The pace needs to be hard enough for conversation (beyond a few words at a time) to be difficult. A 20-minute run at AT pace, with a five-minute jog before and after, is a quick, solid 5-K or marathon workout. – Rebekah Mayer is run training manager for Lifetime Run (lifetimerun.com).

The Explainer When did people start running for health reasons?

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Generations of runners have surely felt that their sport made them healthier, but the public wasn’t always so sure. When non-runners read about runners limping off the course or collapsing in the Olympic Marathon, they assumed running couldn’t be good for you. Two best-sellers that championed running as a healthy pursuit probably did the most to change minds. In 1967, coaching legend Bill Bowerman coauthored Jogging with cardiologist Waldo Harris. The thin paperback sold more than a million copies. A decade later, Jim Fixx’s The Complete Book of Running made the case in greater detail. The idea that running has health benefits has been confirmed in countless studies since, converting even more people into regular runners (about 26 million, according to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association).

RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

In terms of marathon training, what is meant by ‘quality over quantity’? – TRACY, Franschhoek A common mistake made by non-elite marathoners is to run too hard, too often, which compromises their ability to convert their times over short distances into long distances. If your 10-kilometre time is 60 minutes, for example, then your half-marathon time should be 2:13, and your marathon time should be 4:40.

“Run slower on your easy days…” Make the following changes: • Run hard over a maximum of one session per week. • Hard running should make up a maximum of 15% of your total weekly volume – for example, if you’re running 40km a week, hard running should be 6km, including a warm-up and cool-down. • Gradually increase one or two of your runs, so that you get in a long run that’s a minimum of 25 kilometres three to four weeks before your goal marathon. Run slower on your easy days, and you’ll be able to run slightly higher volumes, without increasing your injury risk; you’ll also develop your aerobic system better, which is vital if you’re exercising for over 30 minutes. On top of that, you’ll feel much fresher, come your hard-running days – and as a result, you’ll get more out of speed and strength sessions. Lindsey Parry is a qualified biokineticist, Two Oceans and Comrades silver medallist, and 2:47 marathoner. Email him at lindsey@ coachparry.com.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAINEY


TRAINING

THE SPORT SCIENTIST

PROVEN STRATEGIES FROM A LEADING PHYSIOLOGIST

BY DR ROSS TUCKER

exhaustion is neither fun nor advisable, and it’s also not a good idea to stress yourself out like that every day. Just like you wouldn’t go out and smash consecutive long runs or interval sessions (I hope), you shouldn’t expose yourself to heat too often – it’s just too risky. THE STRATEGY If you know a race is coming up, and you want to be in a good condition for it, try the following:

Aiming for a PB this summer? Take advantage of heat adaptation.

• First Two Weeks: Three runs, at least three days apart, of between 20 and 30 minutes in warm temperatures. Don’t worry about pace. Just get your body to feel the heat, so that it kicks in the physiological adaptations.

BEAT THE HEAT The better we sweat, the cooler we stay. Here’s how... Famous biologist Bernd Heinrich described us as ‘thermal warriors’, unique among all living animals for our ability to manage high temperatures when running. With peak summer looming, it’s time to gear up for battle; and that means adapting your body to the challenge of the heat. Fortunately, our physiology has a few tricks up its sleeve, some of which are (very) long-term, and even go as far as to change the shape of our bodies: people who evolved at the equator, for example, tend to be taller, with very long arms and legs relative to their height. That’s because being ‘elongated’ helps the body to act like a radiator, increasing the surface area to assist with heat loss. This is may be part of the reason why Kenyans are such great runners; their long, skinny legs help them run more efficiently, but they also help keep them cool. But that takes generations… we have weeks. THE ADAPTATION Luckily, there are short-term adaptations we can advantage of if we’re aiming for a PB this summer. The main one is our capacity to sweat. Sweating helps our bodies to lose enormous amounts of heat, so the better we do it, the cooler we stay. That’s good, because science has shown that once

PHOTOGRAPH BY EWALD SADIE

the body temperature reaches a critical ‘cut-off’, our day is done. The brain basically shuts us down, and we can’t send signals to our muscles any more. That’s why one of the classic signs of over-heating is that we look ‘drunk’, unable to move our limbs in a coordinated way. The hot brain is ‘failing’ us.

The fitter we become, the more we sweat, and the more our plasma volume increases, which means we have a bigger capacity to lose heat. We also learn to tolerate that unpleasant ‘hot’ feeling – and perception is a critical part of being a better hot-weather runner. This is why pouring cold water on yourself may help; it doesn’t actually lower your body temperature – but physiologically speaking, perception is reality, and so it’s worth doing. THE TIME Research shows we can adapt within a week, but only with really aggressive strategies. For instance, one study had non-acclimatised athletes exercise to exhaustion in a hot environment, for six consecutive days. On day one, the athletes barely made it to 20 minutes before their body temperatures and exertion maxed out. But by the end of the week, they were running for an hour. However, running to

• Week Three: Two runs, up to 40 minutes, with at least two days rest in between. Pace becomes more important – if you’re training for a half marathon, for instance, these can be at race or tempo pace. •Week Four: Three runs, at least one day apart, where you do what you’d consider ‘normal’ training. By this time, you should be feeling like you’re getting on top of the challenge. From then on, running once or twice a week in hotter temperatures should help to maintain the adaptation. Planning on racing in the heat? This strategy is the difference between hitting goals and being flattened by temperatures – it’s definitely worth a try.

RW Scientific Editor Dr Ross Tucker has a BSc (Med) (Hons) Exercise Science Degree and PhD from the Sports Science Institute. Visit him at www.sportsscientists.com.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 43


FUEL

Keeping your stores high builds strength and helps prevent injury – especially after you run.

MORE POWER TO YOU Timing is everything when it comes to protein’s impact on performance and recovery. By registered dietician Amy Gorin.

WHEN OLYMPIC MARATHONER

Shalane Flanagan sits down for post-run meatballs, she’s doing her body a big favour. Protein, made up of amino acids, is so important to muscle repair, recovery, and building that runners should have a greater portion of the nutrient after their workouts than at any other time of day, according to new research from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) in the US, and the Dieticians of Canada. Indeed, instead of looking at general intake guidelines, runners should plan their daily protein consumption around their workouts – and readjust intake on days when they aren’t exercising. This, researchers say, will help your muscles become stronger and more adaptable to training. “Protein helps build back damaged muscles to prevent injury and

Plan your protein intake around your workouts, and eat a little less on days you don’t exercise.

GOOD SOURCES These contain all 9 essential amino acids crucial for muscle health.

CHIA SEEDS A complete plant protein with 3 grams per tablespoon, these are a great mix-in for yoghurt or oats.

FISH One of the densest forms of protein, 80g cooked snoek provides 21 grams of protein for only 400 kilojoules.

GREEK YOGHURT With 17 grams per 170g, this aids recovery thanks to its leucine, which your muscles burn as fuel.

MEAT Choose lean meats: chicken breast, lean beef, or ostrich. 85g of sirloin steak has 24g of protein.

make you stronger,” says Tara Collingwood, a certified sports dietician and official nutritionist for a well-known marathon. “Stronger equals more speed and more endurance.” According to this research, which focused on how much protein athletes need and when they need it, you should consume 1.2 to 2 grams per kilo of body weight daily. So a 68-kilogram woman, for example, needs 81 to 137 grams. These recommendations are well above the Recommended Dietary Allowances. “There is good evidence that this increased protein helps athletes to maximise metabolic adaptation to training,” says registered dietician Alissa Rumsey, a spokesperson for the Academy. The paper looked at a range of athletes and their protein requirements. Runners who log a few kilometres a day fall on the lower end of the spectrum (1.2 to 1.5 grams per

POWDER* When time is tight, mix protein powder into a smoothie or yoghurt. Choose brands with little sugar and few additives.

SOYABEANS These come in many forms, e.g. edamame and tofu. Half a cup of shelled edamame has 9 grams of protein.

*Powders serve a purpose, but they aren’t ideal sources of protein. Always read the label carefully – some have little protein, or are high in sugar and kilojoules. Try to find brands that have been verified by a third party.

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

ILLUSTRATION BY EBOY


kilogram of body weight). Those clocking longer, harder mileage (at least 40 to 50 kilometres weekly) should aim for 1.5 to 1.8 grams per kilo, while those serious about lifting weights need the most protein, at 2 grams per kilo of body weight. Of course, as a runner, you still need a side order of carbohydrates with your protein. On easy run days,

aim for 5 to 7 grams of carbs per kilogram of body weight. For higherintensity workouts, like intervals or a long run, have 6 to 10 grams per kilo. “If you don’t refuel with carbs, the body will break down protein to replenish depleted glycogen stores,” says Collingwood. “You may not have enough protein left for muscle recovery.”

RUN AND RECOVER These are protein options for a 68-kilogram female runner. Depending on when you run, choose a meal or snack for fuel and recovery. On hard days, have a post-run snack with more protein. If you’re running long or doing speedwork, aim to have the higher amount of protein in your meal or snack; for easier runs, the lower amount. On rest days, divide your daily total protein intake evenly between meals and snacks.

PRE-RUN MEAL OR PRE-RUN SNACK 2 to 3 hours before: 25 to 40g

EAT 140 to 170g grilled chicken or salmon on 2 slices of whole-grain bread with lettuce, tomato, and ¼ avocado WHY? “Protein prior to a workout makes amino acids available for your muscles to use during exercise,” says Rumsey.

1 hour before: 5 to 10g

EAT A hardboiled egg with a slice of toast WHY? A little protein pre-run makes amino acids available so your body doesn’t break down the protein in your muscles. Limit intake to 10 grams – the nutrient slows digestion, which could lead to GI troubles.

POST-HARD-RUN SNACK OR POST-EASY-RUN SNACK Within 30 minutes to 2 hours: 17 to 20g

Within 30 minutes to 2 hours: 10g

EAT Wholewheat pita with ½ cup edamame hummus, or 340g chocolate milk blended with a banana and a tablespoon of peanut butter WHY? “Your muscles are ‘thirsty’ post-workout, and take in higher amounts of protein and carbs up to 24 hours after your workout,” says Rumsey.

EAT ½ cup Greek yoghurt with a piece of fruit and honey for carbs WHY? You still need protein on easy days (about five kilometres) or rest days. But decrease your intake to 1.2 to 1.5 grams per kilo of body weight. “On easy days, you don’t need as many kilojoules, or as much protein,” Rumsey says.

REST OF THE DAY Every 3 to 5 hours: 61 to 101g, across remaining meals and snacks EAT 85 to 115g lean beef, ½ cup quinoa, ¼ avocado, 1 cup broccoli; or 85 to 115g grilled chicken topped with 10 olives, ½ cup brown rice, side salad; or 170g tofu, ½ cup beans and rice, ¼ avocado, sautéed veggies in 2 tsp. olive oil WHY? You want to spread the rest of your protein needs across the remaining meals and snacks to ensure that your body is able to absorb all the amino acids to build and repair muscles, says Collingwood. Pairing protein with fat and carbs further nourishes your body and sustains your workouts.


FUEL A cup of strawberries has 205 kilojoules and 3 grams of fibre. The fruit also helps ward off the ill effects of high-fat, high-sugar diets.

THE RUNNER’S PANTRY

BERRY, BERRY GOOD Chef and runner Chris Fischer shares his favourite ways to enjoy this in-season fruit. are available year-round, but their juicy sweetness peaks in spring and summer – bonus points if you can pick your own. “Eating strawberries still hot from the sun is one of the greatest things on earth,” says Chris Fischer, author of The Beetlebung Farm Cookbook, about his family-owned farm. For more, see beetlebungfarm.com. – Yishane Lee SURE, STRAWBERRIES

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FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION DATA, BONUS RECIPES, AND PREP VIDEOS, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /STRAWBERRIES.

STRAWBERRYCHEESE TOAST Butter a slice of toasted bread and top with trimmed, thinly sliced strawberries and thickly sliced cheddar cheese. Eat as is, or briefly melt cheese in oven.

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Chop 225g trimmed strawberries, and add to saucepan with 1 Tbsp. sugar and 1 Tbsp. water. Cook over med-high heat till berries soften, about 7 min. Set berry compote aside to cool. Halve 4 biscuits (recipe online, see below) and fill with compote and whipped cream.

STRAWBERRY, WATERMELON, AND FETA SALAD Blend ½ cup trimmed, quartered strawberries and ½ cup cubed watermelon. Garnish with feta cheese, chopped parsley, black pepper, and a touch of red-wine vinegar.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MITCH MANDEL

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

Thanks to strawberries, this shortcake dessert is rich in bone-healthy manganese.

MASHED STRAWBERRIES AND GRANOLA Mash a handful of trimmed strawberries with a fork, add maple syrup to taste, and top with your favourite granola and milk.


FUEL QUICK BITES

MUG SHOTS Microwave-safe, nutrient-packed mini meals for any time of day BREAKFAST

By registered dietician Matthew Kadey.

Chocolate Raspberry French Toast

Kick-start your day with whole grains, which can lower the risk of heart disease and cancer. CUBE 2 slices whole-grain bread. Place half in greased 500ml beermug. Layer with raspberries, more bread cubes, and more raspberries. WHISK 1 egg, 1⁄3 cup milk, 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder, ½ tsp. cinnamon, and ½ tsp. vanilla extract. Pour mixture into mug; let sit 1 minute. MICROWAVE for about 2 minutes. Top with honey and nuts.

DINNER

Pasta Bolognese

Beef gives you a hit of energy-boosting iron. MICROWAVE ½ cup macaroni

and ½ cup water in 500ml mug until pasta is tender, 6 minutes, stirring every 1 minute. In separate mug, MICROWAVE 55g beef mince and ½ cup chopped mushrooms 3 minutes. Stir in ½ cup marinara sauce and ½ tsp. each dried oregano, garlic powder, and onion powder. MICROWAVE 30 seconds. Add topping to pasta; garnish with Parmesan cheese.

Complete a mug meal with a piece of fruit, a side salad, or a small roll. DESSERT

Upside Down Peach Crisp

Peaches pack vitamin C. MICROWAVE 2 tsp. coconut oil

in 500ml mug 20 seconds.

POST-WORKOUT

STIR in 2 Tbsp. quick-

Honey Walnut Granola

MICROWAVE 2 tsp. honey

and 2 tsp. coconut oil in 500ml mug on high until liquefied, 20 seconds. Stir in ¼ cup rolled oats, 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts, ¼ tsp. ground ginger, ½ tsp. vanilla extract, and pinch salt. MICROWAVE on medium for 3 minutes, stirring once, until oats are toasted. STIR in Greek yoghurt and berries.

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LUNCH LENTIL SALAD WITH POACHED EGG

These legumes deliver hunger-fighting fibre, and eggs supply high-quality protein. MICROWAVE 1 cup baby spinach, ½ cup cooked lentils, 1 diced tomato, 1 Tbsp. parsley, 1½ tsp. lemon juice, and pinch salt in 500ml mug for 1 minute. In separate mug, MICROWAVE one egg in ½ cup water and ¼ tsp. vinegar for 1 minute. Top lentil mix with egg.

FOR COMPLETE RECIPE NUTRITION DATA, GO TO RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /MUGMEALS.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MITCH MANDEL

F O O D S T Y L I N G B Y PAU L G R I M E S

cooking oats, 1 Tbsp. chopped pecans, 2 tsp. brown sugar, 1 tsp. flour, ½ tsp. lemon zest, and ¼ tsp. cinnamon. In a bowl, toss 1 chopped peach with 1 tsp. flour and ¼ tsp. cinnamon. MICROWAVE peaches in mug until bubbly, 2 minutes.

Refuel with carbs, protein, and antioxidants.


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MIND+BODY WHEN JAY CARDIELLO was on the running THE BODY SHOP

POST-RUN PROTECTION Get stronger and avoid injury with this 10-minute stability workout. By Katie Neitz

team at university, he never took the time to work on the post-run extras that keep a body healthy. “After a workout, I just wanted to get out of there,” he says. “I ended up with a cracked tailbone, an injury that cut my varsity career short.” As Cardiello rehabbed his back, he became aware of the muscular weaknesses and imbalances that contributed to his fracture. He resumed running with a new commitment to staying strong and balanced. Cardiello wants runners to benefit from all he’s learned on the road to recovery. That’s why he’s partnered

with Runner’s World to create a series of 10-minute post-run routines that build strength, mobility, and stability. His goal is to help runners go faster and further – without getting hurt. The workouts are short and simple: they don’t require much space or equipment. And they complement a runner’s training schedule. After a hard run, it’s obvious a cooldown rourtine will benefit you. What’s not so obvious is that for lesser runs, you should still do some form of cool-down. So after an easy run, do Cardiello’s stability routine (shown on the following pages), which features core and one-legged strength work. “Investing just 10 minutes will make you stronger and also happier,” says Cardiello, a personal trainer. “You’ll enjoy your running more, knowing that you are taking care of your body.”

G R O O M I N G B Y CO U R T N E Y L E W I S ; S AU CO N Y C LOT H I N G & S H O E S ( A S H L E Y ); CO P P E R F I T S H I R T, N E W BA L A N C E S H O R T S , M I Z U N O S H O E S ( JAY )

Ashley Higginson competed in the 3 000-metre steeplechase at the 2016 US Olympic Trials.

Jay Cardiello runs 50 kilometres a week.

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT RAINEY


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MIND+BODY

1

2 3

STABILITY PERFORMANCE WORKOUT

This 10-minute routine (30 seconds of each exercise) builds leg and core strength. Many of the moves are single-legged, to mimic the demands of running (which is essentially a one-legged balancing act) and prevent asymmetrical imbalances to improve performance and prevent injury.

LUMBERJACK SQUATS Interlock your fingers above your head. Quickly lower into a squat while swinging your arms down. Rise back up to standing while swinging your

6

LEANING ROTATIONS WITH REACH (RIGHT) Balancing on your right leg, lean forwards and extend your left leg back. Rotate your torso as you reach your left hand towards your

arms back overhead.

right foot.

SQUAT TO KNEE RAISE Lower down into a squat, then quickly drive your right knee as high as possible out to your side. Lower your right leg back down, then repeat on the other

LUNGE TO GLUTE KICK (RIGHT) Step back with your right leg and lower down into a lunge. Come back up to standing and kick your right foot back towards

7

side.

your glutes.

STABILITY KNEE DRIVERS (RIGHT) With your arms in running position, brace your core and drive your right knee up as high as possible. Lower Do as many reps back to standing as you can in 30 and repeat. seconds, working to increase the number of reps you can perform in that time period as you

LUNGE TO FRONTKNEE DRIVE (RIGHT) Step back with your right leg, and lower down into a lunge. Come back up and drive your right knee up towards your chest.

ACTION/ REACTION (RIGHT) Drive your right knee up and then extend it forward, to mimic the motion of running. Flex your right foot, and scrape the ground with

STABILITY KNEE DRIVERS (LEFT) With your arms in running position, brace your core and drive your left knee up as high as possible. Lower back to standing and repeat.

8

get stronger.

4

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your forefoot.

5

SINGLE-LEG SQUATS (RIGHT) Lift your left leg off the ground. Bend your right knee and lower down into a squat. Pause, then return to standing.

10

ACTION/REACTION (LEFT) Drive your left knee up and then extend it forwards, to mimic the motion of running. Flex your left foot and scrape the ground with your forefoot.

52

DONE A HARDER RUN? RECOVER THE NEX T DAY WITH RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA /RECOVERY.


11

SINGLE-LEG SQUATS (LEFT) Lift your right leg off the ground. Bend your left knee and lower down into a squat. Pause, then return to standing.

16

BALANCE BEAMS Get in a plank position. While keeping your back flat, raise your right arm and left leg parallel to the floor. Return to the plank position. Repeat with your left arm and right leg.

12 13

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LEANING ROTATIONS WITH REACH (LEFT) Balancing on your left leg, lean forwards and extend your right leg back. Rotate your torso as you reach your right hand towards your left

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FORWARD WALKOVERS Step forwards with your right leg, lifting your leg high, as if you are going over a hurdle. Repeat with the left leg. Continue alternating

foot.

legs.

LUNGE TO GLUTE KICK (LEFT) Step back with your left leg and lower down into a lunge. Come back up and kick your left foot back towards your glutes.

BACKWARD WALKOVERS Step backwards with your right leg, lifting your leg high, as if you are going over a hurdle behind you. Repeat with your left leg. Continue alternating legs.

LUNGE TO FRONTKNEE DRIVE (LEFT) Step back with your left leg, and lower down into a lunge. Come back up and drive your left knee up towards your chest.

WALKOUTS Stand tall. Reach down to place your palms on the ground. Walk out until you are in a plank position. Reverse direction, walking your hands back to your feet.

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ALTERNATING LEG SWINGS Extend your arms out in front of your body. Swing your right leg forwards. Bring it back down. Then swing your left leg forwards. Continue alternating legs.

SALUTATIONS Come into prayer position, palms together in front of your chest. Take a deep breath, exhale, and circle your hands out to your side, then up overhead.

Return to standing.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 53


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GEAR

Easy Access: Water bottles on your chest allow you to sip often.

MIX & MATCH

THE LARGE VARIETY OF HYDRATION PRODUCTS AVAILABLE TODAY MAKES FINDING A SOLUTION THAT SUITS YOUR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS MORE FEASIBLE THAN EVER. WE LOOKED AT SOME OF THE BEST ON THE MARKET…

BY RYAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES GARAGHTY OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 55


GEAR 01/ SALOMON 20L S-LAB ADV SKIN PEAK R3 999

The most important item to pack? Water – to keep you hydrated on remote trails.

This is the largest pack in our review. Its most prominent feature is the zip in the middle of the bag, running from top to bottom rather than from side to side across the top. Nick Boyd, who tested the pack in Namibia, said: “Easy access to the main section makes a ton of difference when a heavy run has made my brain dead and my hands clumsy.” A removable internal section and mesh construction create a cavity between the pack and your back, and contribute to a more aerated pack – which is useful in the hot, desert conditions you’ll encounter in places like Namibia. A capacity of 20 litres is adequate storage space for a sleeping bag and food. An extra pair of shoes can be hooked into the bungee cords on the side panels. 500ml soft bottles fit into the straps (Note: bottles are sold separately.)

02/ SALOMON SOFTCUP R129 Testers found this simple (and obvious) running-hydration aid an efficient tool for use on medium-length trail runs, or at aid stations that serve water out of large containers. It’s great for scooping water from streams, or sharing water from a friend’s hydration pack. You can clip your fingers into the silicon rings for ease of use, and the 125-millilitre cup can be folded and stowed away easily.

03/ ULTRASPIRE COLLAPSIBLE BOTTLE R380 This 500-millilitre-capacity soft bottle can either be combined with other gear-carrying equipment, or you can carry it in your hand on shorter outings. It works best in the front pocket of a pack. Tester Kenton Templeton commented: “The tube slides easily via the infusion valve, and can be trimmed to optimal length.”

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016


5 04/ NIKE 2-BOTTLE WAISTPACK R550 The Waistpack features twin 160-millilitre bottles, and a pouch suitable for holding a camera-phone – all items small enough not to cause discomfort around your waist. Having your phone handy means you can take pictures and record your run using an app with ease. Tester Vicky Hodgers commented: “I prefer carrying my phone in this belt, as opposed to using an armband. A tip: don’t put your key in the same pouch!”

05/ ULTRASPIRE VELOCITY R2 388 The Velocity has seven litres of storage, and the capacity to carry 1 100 millilitres in two bottles. An added bonus is the option to insert a bladder pack (sold separately), which will enable you to carry an additional two litres of water. The straps are soft and easily manoeuvrable, making this pack a piece of cake to put on and take off.

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Find a hydration solution for a variety of trail-running conditions.

4 7

06/ DEUTER HYDRATION INSULATOR R199 This simple yet ingenious device helps you to avoid the most bitter of disappointments: water freezing in your pipe and/or nozzle. Remember, the water in these particular parts of your drinking system is more susceptible to cold temperatures, and once it’s frozen, it’ll probably stay that way for the duration of your run. The sleeve simply fits over the exposed pipe and nozzle, keeping the cold out.

07/ CAPE STORM SPRINT BELT R290 Waist belts are not as simple as they look. This single-bottle carrier is designed to sit on one hip, making reaching downwards across the chest and accessing the bottle easier. There is enough padding to prevent uncomfortable contact with your hips, and the buckle is strong and can be adjusted easily. Testers noticed that when the bottle is more than half empty, the belt should be tightened. It has a useful pocket for keys, a phone, or a protein bar.

8 9 stage, you’ll probably need a satellite phone to call for help more than you’ll need waterpurification tablets!

08/ WATER PURIFICATION TABLETS R45 If your running takes you to places where you may only have murky, muddy water available, just one of these tablets, per litre, will ensure it’s drinkable. In extreme conditions – where the water looks contaminated, or could cause typhoid, dysentery, cholera, bilharzia or E. coli – two tablets are prescribed. But at that

09/ POLAR PLATINUM WATER BOTTLE R230 Post-race recovery drinks or treats often sit in the car and spoil in the heat while you’re out doing the hard work. Insulation inside this plastic bottle keeps the liquid temperature low, so your prerace preparation won’t be in vain. No BPA contaminants. 700ml capacity.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 57


GEAR 13

10/ OSPREY REV 6 PACK R1 799 The top-heavy, teardrop p shape of this small daypack locks down securely, thanks to two chest-high straps and mesh shoulder strapss, which can be adjusted d comfortably. Tester Sally y Greenfield used the Biostretch bungee, on the e outside front panel, to lock down an extra jacket she e was carrying. It includes a separate hydration sleeve e, with a 1.5-litre reservoir.

13/ CAMELBAK CLEANING BRUSH KIT R300

Don’t wait until you can see a build-up of dirt; make sure you clean your water carrier and its tubes every second or third time you use it. If you don’t take care of your pack, it can cause stomach bugs. This pack contains a specially-angled handle for the larger brush, and a fine pipe-cleaner-sized scraper for the tube. Remember to clean the brushes, too!

Avoid stomach bugs: Remove and clean the bladder after each use.

11/ SALOMON S-LAB B SENSE ULTRA SET R2 100 The neatest little pack we’ve ever tested. It doesn’t include a reservoir; instead, liquids are carried solely in two 500-millilitre soft bottles (sold separately), which can be easily inserted into the pouches on the shoulder straps, and accessed quickly on the run. The pack moulds to the shape of your body, so choosing the correct size is essential. I tested the pack in summer conditions in the Alps. It fitted like a second skin, and could be worn without a top underneath it. It’s really soft, and feels more like a top than a pack. Two chest straps ensure lock-down, which means the pack doesn’t bounce around, even when it’s full.

14

14/ CAMELBAK RESERVOIR DRYER R200

Drying your liquid carrier after you’ve rinsed it out can be frustrating. But this clever dryer assister folds in on itself when inserted, and then expands and separates the walls of the carrier, allowing the pack to dry effectively. It won’t stick together, which prevents damp spots. As with brushes, rinse to keep clean every time.

FOR A FULL LIST OF STOCKISTS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA/STOCKISTS.

Replace an old bladder with a fresh one, without having to buy a whole new pack.

12/ K-WAY 2L HYDRATION RESERVOIR R350 There are a number of packs that can accommodate this hydration bladder/reservoir – which means you could save yourself having to buy a brand-new pack, when all you really need is to carry more water. Volumes vary, so make sure you match up your choices wisely. Attention to detail comes in the form of a magnetic bite valve, which keeps the mouthpiece in place. The rubber is PVC- and BPA-free, and it’s anti-microbially treated. The tube is 99cm long.

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016


NEW GEAR

ASK THE GEAR GUY Ryan Scott

01/ MOVE TAGS R175 Emblazoned with choice words of inspiration, the idea behind these pewter tags is to motivate you on the run. Choose any words you like – maybe even your goal time for a specific race! A curved design flows with the natural arc of your foot.

My new pair of running shoes is causing pain on specific parts of the top of my feet. Why?

1

– HAYDEN, Melkbos

Tag Team: Choose your own words of inspiration.

2

3

02/ MAUI JIM STONE CRUSHERS R2 310 Bringing the Aloha Hawaiian spirit to South African shores, the Stone Crushers feature lenses that block 100% of UV rays, eliminate glare and enhance depth perception. This lightweight pair is ideal for long runs.

03/ ADIDAS ZONYK PRO R3 399 The 2016 Olympic Games in Rio produced some incredible performances – one of which was achieved by sporting brand adidas, when they created this eyewear specifically for the Games. Don’t be fooled by the ‘lifestyle’ design; this pair is sport-specific, and features a wide field of vision, a lightweight frame made of adidas SPX™ material, and traction grip on the inside of the arms to prevent the glasses from slipping. Big style, hefty price tag.

FOR A FULL LIST OF STOCKISTS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / STOCKISTS.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES GARAGHTY

That sounds like a hot spot, which occurs when running shoes put too much pressure on the foot. Fresh out of the box, new running shoes are sometimes threaded way too tight. But by loosening and rethreading the laces yourself, you can control how snugly the upper fits. It would be impossible for manufacturers to create an

“…you can control how snugly the upper fits.” inner that is the right fit for all feet. Which is why it’s wise to check the inners, because if they’re too thick they could be putting your feet under too much pressure – our testers often run without inners altogether. On the other hand, it might well be that the shoe is incompatible with your feet. Unfortunately, sometimes this only becomes apparent after you’ve purchased your shoes and run in them a few times. Hot spots aren’t exclusive to the top part of the foot, either; you can also experience pain underneath the foot, caused by friction between the tread and the road.

RW Gear Editor Ryan Scott is comfortable running on the road and mountain trails alike, and is seldom seen wearing the same pair of shoes twice.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 59


FRESH SHOES

WARTS & ALL

The right pair of shoes for you can keep going for over 1000km.

Inov8 Ultra 270 • Replaced by: Inov8 Trail Talon 250 • R1 825 • 250 grams Nicolette Griffioen has powered her way to some great performances in 2016. Recently, she won the South African Ultra Trail Championships in Hout Bay. And a couple of months before that, she took 13th place at the World Mountain Running Association Champs in Slovenia. These are the actual shoes in which she aced that race... mud and all!

SOFT AND LIGHT

“The holes are probably there because the front of my feet are quite broad, and rub against the material; and if soft, light material is subjected to hundreds of kilometres of wear and tear, holes are inevitable. But I’d rather that than run in a heavier shoe!”

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES GARAGHTY


FAST AND TECHNICAL

“I find the 270s light enough for shorter distances, yet cushioned enough for ultras. I enjoy the low, four-millimetre drop, as I’m a fan of the mi imalist concept. The more I can feel the g ound’s surface, the happier and more con dent I am with fast, technical running. The 70s are a great combination [of attributes for a mixed-terrain shoe.”

270 BECOMES 250

The shoe has a four-millimetre drop from heel to toe; and although this pair looks like it’s been run over by a truck every day for a year, Nicolette says the shoe has served her well for over 1 000 kilometres, having proved a perfect fit. The name of the shoe, ‘270’, indicates its weight in grams. This drops to 250 in the next iteration – the Inov8 Trail Talon 250 – which is now available in South Africa.

ALL MIXED UP

“The course featured a mixture of different terrains and surfaces: singletracks, jeep tracks, scree slopes, montane grasslands, moist forest trails, hidden rocks, and muddy descents. Not once did the 270s falter.”

FOR A FULL LIST OF STOCKISTS, VISIT RUNNERSWORLD.CO.ZA / STOCKISTS.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 61


WHO... ME? Henri Schoeman surprised everyone, including himself, with a bronze medal in the triathlon at the Olympic Games

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPH BY GETTY/GALLO IMAGES


2016

CROSS-TRAINING SPECIAL

HOW TO Make An OLYMPIC MEDAL At the Rio Olympics, Durban-born Henri Schoeman upstaged some of the big favourites to take the bronze medal in the triathlon. Coach Lindsey Parry explains how he got there... Interview MIKE

FINCH

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 63


S

South Africa’s national triathlon coach, Lindsey Parry, is no stranger to success with his athletes. He’s coach to 2015 and 2016 Comrades marathon champions Caroline Wöstmann and Charné Bosman, and then was there to witness unfancied Henri Schoeman win the bronze medal at the Rio Olympics in August. Although Schoeman is coached by father Joe, Parry is the man who does the final tweaking ahead of big events. He watched as Schoeman went from feeling ill, to standing on the podium.

have been swimming their whole lives. He was falling off the curve he needed to be on to be a worldclass swimmer.

really committed to working on his running, but has battled with shin splints most of his life.

Henri has always been determined to be the best. When he goes out of T2 he wants to race the Brownlees (two-time Olympic champion Alistair Brownlee and silver medallist Jonny). He sees himself as one of the top guys, and he knows he’s going to get there.

Henri comes from a swimming background, and swims between 16 and 17 kilometres a week. He’s always had niggling injuries, and battles with running, so he spends more time in the pool. He sometimes only does one hard run a week, and then does most of his training swimming and cycling. But in the last year he’s managed to get in more running, by focusing on his strength to prevent injury. He’s

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

Because of the limited running, Henri focuses on limited 10km track sets of varying distances. Henri started doing triathlon when he was 16, when he realised that he wasn’t tall enough to make it as a swimmer, like his brother (multiple SA champion) Riaan. The family

Henri focused on his cycling, and did a lot of motor pacing stuff and indoor training, because it’s not that safe to ride on the road in Durban. A typical cycling workout would vary between longer intervals, high-intensity and higherresistance work in the early season. In the build-up to Rio he did a lot of short, intense, hardcore hill repeats.

RUNNING... NOT SO MUCH! Schoeman battles with running injuries, so does specific sessions to maximise his training without big mileage.

That self-belief can be one of his weaknesses. He wants to run with them from the start, and then runs until he blows. But in

PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY/GALLO IMAGES


2016

CROSS-TRAINING SPECIAL

BABY FACE Despite his baby-faced looks, Schoeman showed maturity beyond his years at the Olympics, with a perfectly measured ride and run.

triathlete) trust their systems. Henri is happy in Durban as a base, and Richard likes to travel around the world. It works for them.

Cross-Training ForRunners Want to injury-proof and strengthen your body, boost your speed and endurance, and breathe new life into a tired routine? Here are some expert answers to your cross-training/triathlon FAQs…

My job, in the week before an event like the Olympics, is to give them all they need in that last week, including support and encouragement. Both Henri and Richard had big wobbles – and Henri was making out he had full-blown flu, when he just had a sniffle!

Rio he made the decision to let them go, and see if they would blow up in the heat. In the end, he ran his own race, and that was his success.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H R I S H I TC H CO C K ( TO P R I G H T, H Y L A N D) ; S U P P L I E D ( R O B E R T S )

Henri’s dad, Joe, is a sub-fourminute miler, so he’s a natural runner. Henri is still very capable, and ran 30 minutes for 10km in Yokohama in May.

Before race day I took Henri to the doctor, to give him a full scan, and the doctor gave him the all-clear to race flat out the next day. Richard Murray is a very positive dude, with a ton of self-belief. He has very few wobbles, but he’s also been around longer. But even at these Olympics he had his wobble, same as he did in

MEET THE E XPERT S

“He sees himself as one of the top guys, and he knows he’s going to get there. “ In two or three years, I think, he’ll be the kind of athlete that can win week in and week out. He just needs to get more consistent with his running, and he’s about 12 to 18 months away from that. Athletes like Henri and Richard Murray (who finished fourth in Rio, and is SA’s top-ranked

London four years ago. Triathlon in South Africa is seeing the benefits of the Lotto funding we got in 2009, when young guys like Henri got the right support. But we still need to try and pull juniors in from the bottom, and have enough funding to convert them into world-class athletes.

Kate Roberts

Britt Hyland

Competed in triathlon at the 2008 Beijing and 2012 London Olympics, and at the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games. Her other accolades include African Champion four times in a row, and a ranking of seventh in the world in 2010.

Has finished three half and three full Ironmans, and she represented South Africa as an age-grouper at the ITU World Champs (Olympic distance) in Australia (2010), and in London (2013).

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 65


2016

CROSS-TRAINING SPECIAL

Gear WHERE DO I START? YOU... JUST BETTER! The right bike and set-up can make all the difference to your performance on race day. And get the right advice.

“Comfort trumps style. Resist the temptation to go on a gear binge, because in cross-training, less is more,” says Roberts. “None of your entrylevel gear has to be expensive: while the cost of a professional’s bike might run into five figures, for example, a beginner definitely doesn’t need to spend this much.”

THE BIKE: WHERE DO I GET ADVICE?

Hyland recommends visiting a second-hand shop, where the owner can check your position and height on the bike before selling it to you. He or she will also kit you out with other essentials, like shoes and a helmet. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR IN A BIKE?

“You may be spending up to eight hours on it in a full Ironman,” says Hyland. “Weight, good components and the condition of the bike (if it’s second-hand) are important factors to consider, because a cheap bike may cost you more in unnecessary repairs and maintenance.”

THE SUIT: BEST FOR: SPRINTS “A tri-suit can be used for competing in all three disciplines,” advises Roberts. “It’s made from material that dries quickly after the swimming leg, and it usually has some sort of chamois for comfort during the cycling leg.” BEST FOR: LONG DISTANCES IN COLD WATER

“For Ironman or half-Ironman participants swimming in cold water, a wetsuit is best. It’ll keep you warm, conserve energy for other legs, and help you to stay buoyant and swim faster.“

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RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS HITCHCOCK


BRRR! For novices, swimming is the discipline most feared; but with the right drills, it’s the easiest to train for.

Training SW IMMING: WHERE DO I GET ADVICE?

Roberts recommends spending time with a good swimmer, or a coach, to help perfect your stroke early on – which will save you a lot of frustration, and you’ll reap big rewards later in the process.

HOW DO I PROGRESS TO SWIMMING IN OPEN WATER?

“Start off by learning the correct freestyle technique in the pool, and once you feel comfortable, progress to open water,” advises Roberts. “It’s important to include an open-water swim once every second week, as the swimming leg of a triathlon is held in a dam, lake, river or ocean.”

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS HITCHCOCK

CYCLING: WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO BECOME A GOOD CYCLIST?

It’s all about time in the saddle, says Hyland: the more you practise, the more confident you’ll feel.

Swimming Techniques

Cycling Skills

Sighting – lifting your head to look for course-markers or buoys.

Practise changing gears on flat roads. Don’t ride only in the big ring. There should be no noise coming from your bike.

Dolphin Kicking – diving to make headway against waves.

Spin your legs often, and keep your cadence (leg speed) relatively high.

Body Surfing – cruising on a wave to build speed towards the end of a swim.

Correct bike set-up ensures you maximise your power and avoid straining your body.

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2016

CROSS-TRAINING SPECIAL

Nutrition P H OTO G R A P H B Y N I C K F E R R A R I ( F O O D)

DO I HAVE TO CHANGE MY DIET? “The diet you’ve become accustomed to for running won’t change much in terms of what you’re eating, but the quantity you need to consume will, because you’ll need more energy for cross-training,” explains Roberts.

Your First Race HOW WILL I KNOW IF I’M READY?

“Your local triathlon club or coach will be able to advise you when you’re ready, based on your fitness levels,” says Roberts.

Races And Formats SPRINT – 750m swim, 20km bike, 5km run – Slanghoek (October)

OLYMPIC – 1.5km swim, 40km bike, 10km run – Ekurhuleni 5150 African Championships, Germiston (November) 70.3 – 1.9km swim, 90km bike, 21.1km run – East London (January) / Durban (August)

IRONMAN – 3.8km swim, 180km bike, 42.2km run – Port Elizabeth (April)

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THE WASHING MACHINE Finding a sighting point on the horizon before the swim will help you navigate the shortest route possible.

WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE COURSE?

for elites.

According to Roberts, you should consider what the weather and environmental conditions will be like, and the number of competitors, in order to gauge any adjustments you’ll need to make to your race strategy to accommodate these factors.

Use of flippers or other propulsion and flotation aids is illegal, and can result in disqualification.

WHAT ARE THE RULES ON RACE DAY?

Wetsuits are allowed at ITU events where the water is below 24°C for agegroupers, and below 20°C

Start slowly on the swim, and not right up front if you’re weaker or less experienced. You must be wearing your helmet before you mount your bike, and you can’t take it off until you’ve dismounted.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS HITCHCOCK / PHOTOSPORT

There are also strict rules at the ‘bike mount’ line: don’t start riding out of transition until you’ve cleared the line. Ride single file on the bike leg, and keep left if you’re a slower rider. On the run, hydrate well.

shoes, hydration and other gear are set up,” Roberts explains. “The first transition, known as T1, is between the swim and bike segments of the race; and the second, known as T2, is between the bike and the run. Most triathlon events have one common transition area for both T1 and T2.”

WHAT DO I DO IN TRANSITION?

“Changing from one discipline to another takes place in a designated space called a ‘transition area’, where your bike, running

Want to start cross-training for your first triathlon? Visit runnersworld.co.za/training/ triathlon for our six-week programme.

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Horror show

Does a TV-series marathon seem more appealing than a tempo run? Recent research linking TV watching to premature death might just nudge you off the sofa and into your running kit. The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, followed 221 426 adults over 14 years, and found watching TV for three to four hours a day was associated with a 15 per cent increase in risk for major causes of death, including heart attack and cancer.

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r t h is a e id s n o c , ll a h it s t h e w r e w energy o l lp a il ic w g r lo o h c If y o u y very of ps li e d d el your e u iz f s e r r e o t d sup e t y f o r m u la ll ia c e p s , ls e g g m o jo . in n n u r g in g g f la M c C a rt hy c k ie , Ke rr y a M e Jo ds Wor d io s , G e tt y H e a rs t S tu hy ap gr to ho P

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Stow me the money

Adding a financial incentive to your runs could deliver the extra push you need to keep hitting the road. Create your own rewards system, by stashing a certain amount – R5 or R10, say – for every kilometre you run, then at a set date (after your next race, or in six months) spend the cash on yourself. The pay-off will go beyond that new pair of jeans you’ve been after: “External rewards are wonder ful incentives,

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because they often transform into internal rewards,” says Harvard Medical School sports psychologist Jeffrey Brown, author of The Runner’s Brain (R277, exclus1ves.co.za). “The pay-off includes increased confidence in reaching a goal.”

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Sore point

I f a c h i n g muscles are a regular roadblock to your running motivation, supping u p c o u l d c l e a r t h e w a y. A s tudy publishe d in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism found participants taking an L- g l u t a m i n e s u p p l e m e n t

re duce d p o s t- exercise delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), especially in women; and recovered their muscle strength faster, especially in men.

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Bright future

Your best 100-metre times may be behind you, but age needn’t be a barrier to a motivation-boosting PB target if you play the long game. Analysis of the fastest ultramarathon runners from 1960 to 2012 published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Re s e ar ch foun d that th e average age of the fastest man has increased from 29 to 40

(though for the fastest woman, it’s held at steady at 35).

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Chubby genes o skinny jeans?

If you’re star ting to think that running can’t win in the battle against your genetic pre disp osition to weight gain, don’t give up on sole power. Research at McMaster University, Canada, which analyse d data from over 17 000 adults, suggests that while variants of the 14 genes studied do have the potential to increase a person’s risk of becoming obese, physical exercise can reduce that risk by up to 75 per cent.


In other words, when it comes to your weight, you can outrun your genetic destiny.

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Gear up

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Go on, liver little

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y I S TO C K P H OTO ( P I G GY BA N K ); G E T T Y / G A L LO I M AG E S ( B R A I N I L LU S T R AT I O N )

Running can be the simplest, and cheapest, of sports, but cunning kit upgrades could deliver motivating marginal gains. And if you invest in new kit that really takes your fancy, you could send your motivation up (and your times down). It’s called ‘enclothed cognition’ – a term coined by researchers at Northwestern University, Chicago, who found that the clothing a person wears can trigger mental changes that positively affect their performance. In short, if you look and feel the part, you’re more likely to act it, too.

Just a little running can do a lot for your liver. A study published in the Journal of Hepatology found that three different eightweek exercise programmes – 60 mins of low to moderate activity four times a week, 45 mins of high-intensity activity three days a week, or 45 mins of low to moderate activity three days a week – all significantly reduced liver fat and visceral adipose tissue.

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Blast from the past

Next time you’re struck by a willpower-cut, think bright thoughts about a great run or race from the past. In a study published in Memory, this recall of a previous positive exercise experience was associated with increased motivation to exercise again.

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Memory Jog

It’s not just your heart and lungs that will thank you for lacing up your running shoes. Recent Boston University Medical Centre research found that b e t te r c a r di o r e s p i r a to r y fitness was associated with larger brain volume and better memory-test performance.

Bad weather? 10-12 Good running… When spring has not sprung quite as much as those of us with outdoor kilometres in our diaries would have liked, a glance through the window at the frost, wind and rain can be a serious motivation sapper. But

there are reasons to embrace the unfriendly elements: When it ’s cold… burn blubber. Research published in Frontiers in Physiology found cold conditions increased the use of fat as fuel when you run at sub-maximum effort. When it’s windy… ‘tame the lion’. Running in blustery conditions develops strength and s tamina, says coach B r e n d a n C o u r n a n e . L i ke running on hills or sandy beaches, pushing against the wind is a resistance exercise that makes your legs work harder. Most runners make the mistake of clenching their bodies and lowering their heads; instead, stay relaxed and loose, bending forwards from the ankles, “like when

you’re running uphill”, says Cournane. He recommends starting your runs into the wind (when muscles are fresh), and ending with a tailwind. With more experience you can flip this round; battling wind when you’re tired develops the confidence, power and endurance that you’ll want on race days. W h e n it ’s r ainin g… embrace your inner child. There’s a growing body of exp er t opinion that says bringing play fulness into exercise can aid motivation and help keep you running. A rainy day is the perfect opportunity to leave the Garmin behind, stick on an old pair of shoes, and jump in every puddle you find to inject a little more fun into your run.

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City quicker

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So many major world cities, so little time. Keep mind and body refreshed by combining city-break sightseeing with your chosen sport on a city running tour. The following locations have well-established companies taking runners on a tour of major city landmarks. 13/ New York (cityrunningtours. com. newyorkcity) 14/ Lisbon (lisboncityrunners. com) 15/ Buenos Aires (urbanrunningtours.com.ar) 16/ Rome (livitaly.com/tours) 17/ Tokyo (www.tokyorunning.jp) 18/ Melbourne (runningtours. com.au) 19/ Istanbul (marathonturk.com/eurasia) 20/ Moscow (gorunningtours. com) 21/ Madrid (madridsightrunning.com) 22/ Cape Town (runcapetown.co.za) 23/ Copenhagen (runningcopenhagen.dk)

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24/ Johannesburg (endorphinexpeditions.co.za) 25/ Singapore (gorunningtourssingapore.com)

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Junk kays

The occasional post-run takeaway reward won’t slow you down, says a study in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. After a 90-minute glycogen-depletion workout, subjects were given either isoenergetic spor t supplements or fast food while they recovered. Tests found no differences in their rate of glycogen recovery, blood sugar or insulin response, or in their performance in a 20km bike time trial following the recovery period.

Turn a 27-28 new page Book time with one of these tomes to re-fire your running mojo:

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Once A Runner (R226, exclus1ves. co.za) Originally self-published by author John L Parker in 1978 and republished last July, this enthralling tale of a varsity runner struggling to make the Olympics is regarded as one of the greats of running fiction.

The Great Run (R129, exclus1ves. co.za) Braam Malherbe achieved a remarkable feat – running 4 218km along the Great Wall of China with his partner was a first for a South African distance runner.

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And the beat goes on

Yo u p r o b a b l y realise that running now is an investment in your future health, but new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association confirms how high the returns can be. Following thousands of


adults from initial fitness tests in the 1980s to follow-up tests an average of 27 years later, researchers found that higher early cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with better heart health and a lower death rate from heart-related issues, or any other cause.

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Take heart

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y CA LV I N F I S H E R ( TO K YO) ; G E T T Y / G A L LO I M AG E S ( B U R G E R ) ; JA M E S G A R AG H T Y ( B O O K ); P L A M E N P E T KOV ( S PAG H E T T I )

You don’t have to wait that long for the benefits to kick in, though. A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital found training for a marathon can trigger structural changes in the hearts of recreational runners previously only thought to occur in elites, lowering their risk of cardiovascular disease.

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Train smarter

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If you want to make every session count, invest in smart tech.

Garmin Connect Insights (connect. garmin.com) A new service from Garmin for members of its Connect online training portal, which uses not only your own data but that of athletes like you to give you p er sonalise d feedback on your training, as well as tips, advice, and items

it thinks are of interest.

Ithlete (myithlete.com) A clever training tool that could be invaluable in your f ight agains t the injur yinducing, will-sapping effects of overtraining. It’s an app that measures your heart-rate variability (the gap between beats of your heart) and tells you u when you’re too fatigued to ttrain and when you’re good to g go.

Strava (strava.com) S If y you haven’t yet immersed you urself in Datatopia, signing up could be just the driver you nee ed. Record and access the min nutiae of every run, engage witth other users, compare performance over individual matched runs, monitor mulative totals…it might just cum cha ange your life. A little.

Group dynamic

Be it real-world or virtual, social interaction with like-minded souls can be the spur you need to keep going. Reach out at…

Tribesports (community. tribesports.com) This exercise-focused social network inspires huge loyalty among its members, who swop tips, inspiration, banter and information – and earn points through exercise, which can unlock material and virtual benefits.

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weeks) can ease the severity of asthma attacks, improving lung function and altering inflammator y response.

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Spaghetti function

T h e g u i l t- f r e e con nsumption of carbs is one of the great rewards of our spo ort. And despite recent qu es tioning of the carb loa ading principle, it seems yo u can still pound those pav vements powered by penne. Australian research published in the Journal of Applied Phy ysiology found carbs are the e primary energy source use ed by the body during half marathons.

Breathe easy

If you s truggle with asthma, here’s another reason to run: a study on mice published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Scienc e in Sports suggests regular moderate aerobic exercise (30 mins at a moderate pace, three times a week for eight

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Having a serious race goal is great, but add some variety to your race calendar by throwing in a few events where you can concentrate on having fun. Here’s our pick:

The Color Run™ South Africa, national, various dates

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A scenic fun run. Wheelchairusers and moms with prams are welcome. All participants are given free ice-cream. There’s also a half marathon and a 10-K. Contact Ronel Prinsloo: 082 579 0288

Run for a good cause: the chosen beneficiary is the National Osteoporosis Foundation of South Africa. There will be lucky-draw prizes and food stalls at the finish. Contact Tania: 021 976 4995

Who said fun runs have to be short? This 12-K has DJs, singers, dancers, bands, and so much more along the route. thecapetown12.com

There’s been an outbreak; Joburg is under attack! Enter either as a runner and run for your life – or as a flesh-eating zombie, chasing the other runners. Tickets also available for spectators. facebook.com/ ZombieRunSouthAfrica

Neon Run, national, various dates

Family atmosphere. The scenic route comes alive with runners dressed in bright colours, and there are DJs and dancers. Participants are given a healthy meal at the finish. durbaniterace.co.za

Run For Fun (aka the Ice-Cream Run), Pretoria East, October

FNB Cape Town 12 ONERUN, Milnerton, May

Zombie Run: Undead Festival, Johannesburg, October

Dubbed the happiest 5-K on the planet, this race is certainly colourful: participants are doused in vibrant paint at each kilometre marker, and there’s a festive atmosphere at the finish. thecolorrun.co.za

DurbaNite Fun Run, Durban, last Friday of every month

Rattle Them Bones Fun Run, Durbanville, October

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South Africa’s most electric and glowing night event. Run, cycle, skate, walk, hop or skip around a 5-K route at night, wearing neon accessories and body paint. Some of SA’s top DJs and musicians will perform at the after-party. neonrun.co.za

Valentine’s Day 10km Night Run and 5km Romantic Fun Run, Free State, February This scenic, safe, well-lit, paved route is as suitable for wheelchair-users and prampushers as it is for runners and walkers. Wear red, and you could win a prize. Contact Tanya Holtzhausen: 082 778 8429

Old Mutual Two Oceans Fun Runs, Cape Town, April An opportunity for the whole family to experience the spirit of this amazing event on Easter weekend – from little ones, tweens and teens to parents, grand or otherwise. twooceansmarathon.org.za/ events/fun-runs

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St. Peter’s 9.8km Nite Fun Run, Tzaneen, August Choose between a 9.8-K and a 5-K route through the suburbs. Both routes are flat, and walkers are welcome. Contact Wendy Graham: 015 307 3534

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Resolution reboot

In his research, psychologist Dr John Norcross found that three months after making a resolution, 50 per cent of resolvers had fallen off the good-intentions wagon. But his research also revealed that people who make resolutions are 10 times more likely to change their behaviour than those who don’t. If you’re struggling to stick to a running resolution, stop thinking you ‘have to’ go running, says Scott Douglas, co-author of Meb for Mortals (R377, exclus1ves. co.za). “That mindset can make running feel like an obligation.” Instead, he advises reframing your running in the language of reward, saying you ‘get to’ go for a run.

Get away

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Whether you’re after warmweather training, hidden trails or a foreign race minus the accommodation costs, a change of scenery can inject some enthusiasm.

The Body Holiday Quadrathlon, thebodyholiday.com A luxury health resort in St Lucia offering a full complement of facilities and activities. Their newest offering is a stunning

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S ; TO B I A S G I N S B E R G ( F N B CA P E TOW N 1 2 O N E R U N ); C L AS S PAS S .CO M , T H E B O DY H O L I DAY.CO M ( TO P R I G H T )

Fun runs

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quadrathlon, comprising trail running, mountain biking, rappelling and sea kayaking.

Contours Trail Running Holidays, contours.co.uk Try one of the new trail-running holidays from UK-based walkingtour specialists Contours. Explore the off-road nooks and crannies of the country while your baggage is moved for you to each night’s accommodation.

Nightswapping, nightswapping.com This is a cashless version of AirBnB. Join the global network and allow members to stay in your spare room (or whole house). This ‘earns’ you nights you can redeem in members’ houses around the world. SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

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Train in vein

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Trick question

Another reason to HIIT the road: a study review published in Sports Medicine concluded that 12 weeks of thrice-weekly high-intensity interval training is a powerful way to enhance vascular function.

Here’s a sneak y DIY psych trick: a review published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology of more than 100 studies examined the ‘question-behaviour effect’, a phenomenon in which asking people about performing a behaviour influences whether they do it or not. It concluded that asking questions about whether you will do a certain thing makes positive behaviour more likely to happen. So, are you going for that long run?


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Words Sam Murphy Photography Dan Saelinger

Is your ticker a ticking time bomb? Captain David Seath died from a suspected heart attack in this year’s London Marathon, aged just 31. In the wake of his tragic death, and headlines about the possible risks of excessive exercise, RW investigates whether running can spell trouble for your heart

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us a feel-good glow. There’s the endorphin rush, the stress relief, the sense of accomplishment and the knowledge we’re doing ourselves good. Countless studies, encompassing vast numbers of subjects – young and old, healthy and unhealthy (including heart-attack survivors), slim and overweight – have confirmed the link between aerobic exercise and cardiovascular health. It’s estimated that hitting the recommended activity guidelines (150 minutes of moderate exercise, 75 minutes of vigorous exercise – or a combination of both – per week) slashes the risk of cardiovascular disease in half. If you’re a regular runner, you’re almost certainly ticking this box. Chances are you’re doing more than that – which means even greater benefits, right? Well, that depends on who you ask…

American cardiologist Dr James O’Keefe is a leading proponent of the ‘too much exercise’ hypothesis, which argues, in his words, that, “a safe upper-dose limit potentially exists beyond which the adverse effects may outweigh its benefits”. His TED Talk ‘Run for your life: at a comfortable pace, and not too far’ has received over 400 000 views. Last year, O’Keefe co-authored a paper in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology with Dr Peter Schnohr, a Danish cardiologist who set up the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976, to study risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Their paper argued that running fast, a lot, is as bad in terms of mortality rates as not running at all. They advised a limit of no more than three sessions a week, not exceeding 2.4 hours in total, and at a slow- to-average pace (6.15-7.30min/km). Cue shock headlines such as ‘Fast running is as deadly as sitting on the couch’ (Daily Telegraph, UK) and ‘Too much jogging is just as bad as doing none at all’ (Daily Mail, UK).

Too much of a good thing? Six months later, Sam Lloyd – a healthy, fit 44-year-old runner from Kent in the

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UK, with a love of long distances and an enthusiasm that has led her to coach four running sessions a week on top of her own training – collapsed, after suffering a cardiac event. She had a pacemaker fitted, and is now back running. But the episode has left her spooked – and confused. One doctor told her that running was to blame, while another ruled this out. ‘I don’t know how far I can push myself safely,’ she says. ‘I have questions that just haven’t been answered.’ O ’Keefe a nd Sch noh r ’s st udy wa s subsequently heavily criticised for the way it presented and interpreted its data. The number of deaths among the 36 runners who did more than four hours running per week? Two. Critics argue such figures are too small to be statistically significant. What’s more, we don’t even know how those two runners died – it may have had nothing to do with running. When you look at the data broken down by speed, the case for slowing down does not convince: there were six deaths among 201 runners who’d classified their typical running speed as fast (5 min/km), compared with seven of the 176 classified as slow (7.30 min/km).

Nevertheless, the ‘too much of a good thing?’ debate has been hotting up, with the focus shifting towards insidious damage over years of training, rather than the traditional concern over sudden cardiac death. Two new reviews have been published this year, one titled ‘The potential cardiotoxic effects of exercise.’ Should we be concerned? “Let me start by saying there is no doubt in my mind that exercise is good for you,” says Professor Sanjay Sharma, a consultant cardiologist at St George’s, University of London, and Medical Director of the London Marathon. “People who exercise have a better lipid profile, better blood pressure, they’re less likely to suffer diabetes or be obese, and they live three to seven years longer than non-exercisers. If you could package up all the benefits of exercise, it would be a miracle pill.” But, says Sharma, these benefits arise from exercise meeting the current guidelines. “What about people who are doing 10 or 20 times this amount? Can too much of a good thing become a bad thing? At present, there’s a great deal of evidence that exercise is good for the heart, and only a small amount of evidence that – for some people – there may be such a thing as too much.” He cites a st udy in t he Journal of the American Medical Association last year, which concluded that doing the recommended weekly 2.5 hours of physical activity brings a 30 per cent risk reduction in all-cause mortality. But do three to five times that amount and the risk reduces further, to 35 per cent. “They found you could do 10 times as much without increased mortality risk,” says Sharma. However, Schnohr, O’Keefe and others have talked about a ‘U-shaped curve’ in terms of endurance training’s effect on cardiovascular risk: the notion that the greatest risk reduction comes from the middle ground, and that there is a point beyond which benefits are no longer accrued and exercise may become detrimental. “Almost everything in nature operates on some degree of U-shaped curve,” concedes Dr Larry Creswell, a heart surgeon at the University of Mississippi’s School of Medicine, who writes a blog called Athlete’s Heart (athletesheart.org). “There’s a sweet spot, and a point where there are diminishing returns – and then, perhaps, harm. But in my opinion, that curve is not yet defined for athletes who do a lot of exercise. And there’s no reason to believe the same U-curve would apply to all.” Sharma agrees with Creswell that the relationship between exercise volume and benefits is not linear. “You reap more benefits up to a point, and then you plateau,” he says. “At some further point, it becomes harmful.


Long-term endurance exercise causes changes to the heart But that point is not going to be the same for everyone.” There’s no debate that longterm endurance exercise causes st r uct ura l, f unct iona l a nd electrical changes to the heart (see ‘Heart of the matter’, right). The s e c h a n g e s , col le c t ively referred to as ‘Athlete’s Heart’, are generally considered benign, but some researchers question this assumption. “These adaptat ions may a lso have deleterious effects,” states a study rev iew published recently in Physiological Reviews. “Cardiac biomarkers are acutely increased by exercise; and atrial fibrillation, myocardial fibrosis and coronary a r t e r y c a l c i f i c a t i o n a pp e a r more common in older athletes, compared to their inactive peers.” Disturbing stuff. But let’s look more closely at the research.

the presence of cardiac troponins is used to determine a heart attack – but following endurance exercise the rise is small, it happens in just about everyone, and it rapidly returns to normal.” This quick symptom reversal suggests there’s nothing to worry about – that any damage is merely transient. But not everyone is convinced. “Cytokines can paralyse and damage heart cells temporarily, but repeated over a number of years, a build-up of these microtraumas can result in healthy tissue being replaced by scar tissue,” says Lars Andrews, cardiac physiologist and founder of Cardiac Athletes, an online community for athletes with heart issues (cardiacathletes. com). In a study in which rats exercised to extremes, they developed enlargement of all four chambers of the heart, abnormal heart stiffness, an increase in scarring, and an enhanced susceptibility to dangerous

heart-rhythm problems that did not go away. “We can’t replicate such a study in humans,” notes Sharma. “But studies of lifelong veteran athletes suggest there may be similar adverse cardiac remodelling.” A study in which Sharma and Whyte were involved found that along with marked structural changes to the heart, 50 per cent of lifelong runners had myocardial fibrosis or heart-tissue scarring. While it was a very small study – just 12 runners – the incidence was correlated to the number of marathons and ultras they’d amassed and the number of years they’d been competing. Another study, published in the European Heart Journal, looked at the heart records of more than 50 000 people who’d participated in extreme endurance races over a 10-year period. Researchers found that the more times subjects had raced, and the faster their finish times, the more likely they were to be hospitalised in the ensuing 10 years for an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). “Long-term endurance training does seem to do something to the heart,” says Sharma. “In some instances, it can promote scarring and lead to more arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. It may be that some people’s genetics make their hearts more vulnerable to these issues, while others are protected. More quality research is needed. What we cannot do i s rely on u nder p owere d or scaremongering studies that may lead us to erroneous conclusions.”

Heart of the matter

Breaking our rhythm

Dr Larry Creswell lists the heart adaptations induced by long-term endurance exercise

In the long run Imag ine you had your hea r t scanned just after a marathon or ultra: “It’s likely there’d be signs of damage,” says professor Greg Why te OBE, director of performance at the Centre for Health and Human Performance in London (CHHP.com), and the man who helped Eddie Izzard prepare for his epic marathon challenges. “We’d see raised cardiac troponins [associated with heart disease] in the blood – a clear sig n of damage. In other circumstances,

Lower resting heart rate

Increased size of all four heart chambers (left ventricle, right ventricle, left atrium and right atrium)

Thickening of the walls of the ventricles, the heart’s ‘pumping’ chambers

Rise in max. cardiac output (blood pumped per min) and stroke volume (blood pumped per beat)

Atrial fibrillation (AF) has featured prominently in the recent debate. A disturbance of the heart’s rhythm that produces an irregular and of ten rapid hea rtbeat, “A F is typically a disease of older people,” says Sharma. “There’s a prevalence of around 10 per cent in the eighth decade, a nd t he condit ion is associated with a fivefold increased risk of stroke.” Ho we v e r, a nu m b e r of st ud ies have h ig h l ig hted a n unexpectedly high incidence of AF among endurance athletes. One study, which compared the cardiovascular health of orienteers versus healthy controls, found that of 228 subjects with no risk factors for AF, 12 developed it. In the control group, just two of the 212 subjects free of risk factors developed A F, bot h of whom

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engaged in vigorous exercise. However, the study authors noted that most of the orienteers who developed AF responded well to medication and had continued competing. Interestingly, there may be a gender divide, too: a review published in March this year concluded from existing data that a high volume of exercise raised the risk of atrial fibrillation among men (especially those under 50), but actually reduced it in women. Richard Smith* is a runner and doctor who began suffering from AF five years ago, aged 49. “The first time it happened, I was lying in bed,” he says. “It felt as if the usual rhythmic beat in my chest had been replaced by a rabbit leaping around in a sack. My pulse felt weak and thready. I was shocked.” That first episode lasted a few hours. In the years since, Smith has suffered a further 40 episodes, lasting from 15 minutes to 18 hours. “The research suggests there is a link between lifelong exercise and AF,” says Sharma. “But it may be that the type of AF athletes get is somehow different. It’s almost unheard of for athletes with AF to have strokes, despite stroke being one of the major health risks associated with the condition. Perhaps the absence of other risk factors for stroke, as a result of regular exercise, protects them.” It’s a point worth noting. Regardless of the number of endurance athletes – from marathon runners to Tour de France riders – found to have structural or electrical changes to the heart, the fact is that as a group, they tend to live longer and suffer fewer diseases – including heart disease – than non-exercisers. “In terms of quality of life and length of life, exercise is beneficial,” says Whyte. Smith continues to feel well, running 1 600 kilometres a year and playing soccer twice a week. “I’ve been checked out by a cardiologist, and there’s no evidence of cardiomyopathy or ischaemic heart disease, meaning I have what’s known as ‘lone’ AF [where the condition is present without other risk factors],” he says. “I’m told there is no need to cease physical activity.” But he urges anyone experiencing arrhythmia to go

for tests. “It’s important to exclude other risk factors and causes,” he says. “And there have been significant advances in treating AF. A procedure called ablation, which kills the cells that cause the abnormal electrical activity, is rapidly becoming the treatment of choice.”

Tune in, check out Getting checked out isn’t always as easy as it should be, however. Doctors (especially those outside the field of cardiology) don’t expect healthy, active people to have heart problems, which is perhaps why it took so long for Sam Lloyd’s condition to be diagnosed. “My doctor never dreamt there was something wrong with my heart when I approached her,” she says. The first indication of a problem came in the form of breathlessness. “I’d sometimes feel as if I had to gasp for air, and I’d occasionally get dizzy. And training felt harder. I went to the doctor and had some blood tests.” The results came back clear, but the breathlessness continued. Lloyd returned to her GP for a resting ECG (electrocardiogram), asthma check and lung X-ray. All these tests came back clear. Even a n echoca rdiog ra m, a sca n of t he heart, found nothing untoward. But the symptoms continued, and Lloyd insisted there was something wrong. “I was told it was probably stress,” she says. Finally, she was given a 24-hour ECG. “I was about to start my taper for a race in the Pyrenees,” she remembers. A week later she received a call. “‘Stop everything,’ the doctor said. ‘Don’t be on your own, and don’t do anything strenuous.’ It was very, very scary.” Lloyd’s heart was experiencing electrical malfunction – the ECG revealed it was dropping to as low as 18 beats a minute, and missing as many as six beats at a time. She was referred to have a pacemaker fitted, but a few days later she woke up feeling unwell and asked her husband to take her to hospital, where she passed out. “I

Watch out for red flags “Be vigilant for these warning signs, and get checked out if you experience any of them,” says Dr Creswell.

Discomfort or pain in the chest

82

Disproportionate shortness of breath

RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

Unaccustomed feelings of fatigue

Blacking out (or nearly doing so)

Palpitations and arrhythmia

Feeling lightheaded during exercise


‘In terms of quality of life and length of life, exercise is beneficial’ had a 20-second heart stop. They fitted the pacemaker immediately.” Lloyd has what’s known as first-degree heart block, in which the electrical rhythm of the heart is disrupted; and sinus bradycardia, where the heart rhythm slows. The pacemaker prevents her heart rate dropping too low, and steps in if it skips a beat. She now trains with a heart-rate monitor, and backs off if she’s not feeling well. “Running puts us in tune with our bodies,” she says. It was most likely that sense of awareness, built up over many years of running, that convinced her something was wrong and made her persist in looking into the cause. It underlines the importance of listening to your body and heeding warning signs. (See ‘Watch out for red flags’, below left).

Take heart There are also sensible steps you can take to look after your heart. Lifestyle factors, such as not smoking, keeping stress under control and eating healthily are a given. But Andrews stresses the importance of avoiding training when you’re not 100 per cent healthy – particularly in the case of fever, which can lead to myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart that has been linked to subsequent

scarring. He also flags the importance of scarr n, to avoid putting undue stress on hydration, or overheating. the heart through dehydration dehy ut prepa ration. For Why te, it ’s about p “ People t a k i ng on big endu ra nce challenges need to train correctly,” he says. “What we’re seeing now with the emergence of these extreme challenges is an increasingly older field. In younger athletes, nearly all cardiac deaths are due to inherited heart problems. In the over-35s, it’s mostly a result of acquired cardiovascular disease. You’ve got to have a look under the bonnet and exclude problems in the first place.” It’s worth noting that despite the explosion in popularity of long-distance races, we haven’t seen a concomitant increase in deaths among runners and other endurance athletes, aside from the occasional rare, tragic case of undiagnosed cardiovascular disease. Whyte offers two reasons for this, both of which lead him to conclude that ultimately, we have little to worry about. “Firstly, the heart’s ability to cope is amazing,” he says. “Lots of systems in the body are more likely than the heart to succumb to failure as a result of excessive exercise. And secondly, people prepare for these challenges properly – or if they don’t, they get found out and have to quit before the damage is done.” So where does all this leave us dedicated runners? Should you be ditching that summer ultra? “I don’t think for one second that endurance running necessarily raises the risk of heart problems,” says Sharma. In 35 years of the London Marathon, he says, there have been 14 deaths, not all of which were attributable to heart issues. And that’s despite the fact that in the last 30 years, the number of people running marathons has rocketed. Research has shown that the risk of dying from cardiac arrest in a marathon is one in 100 000, compared with an estimated rate among the general population of one in 1 000. “Of course, there is a point where exercise gives diminishing returns; and there may be a point where it begins to do more harm than good,” says Creswell. “At present, we don’t know where that point is, and it’s unlikely to be at the same place for everyone. In the meantime, the overwhelming evidence is that exercise is good for you – even if you are exceeding the 150 minutes per week recommended for health.” So, be sensible. Look after your heath holistically and don’t assume that running renders you immune from cardiovascular issues. But above all, keep in mind the fact – acknowledged by every single study mentioned here – that the many and varied benefits of exercise far, far outweigh the potential risks.

OCTOBER 2016 RUNNER’S WORLD 83


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SUNDAY 2 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1

Rainbow Half Marathon & 10km Barnard Stadium, Green Avenue, corner of Plane Road (close to Kempton Golf Course), Kempton Park; 21.1km & 10km: 7am; 5km Fun Run: 7:10am Stanley Khoele 082 968 1372 / John 083 320 9331

SATURDAY 8 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1

Chamberlain Capital Classic Half Marathon & 10km Phobians Club, Queens Crescent, Lynwood; 21.1km & 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:15am Bert van den Raad 076 594 8906 / Gerald Kroukamp 084 582 7242

NE W VENUE!

SATURDAY 8 OCTOBER

60

ED’S CHOICE

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H S C O U R T E S Y O F J E T L I N E AC T I O N P H OTO

GAUTENG SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER

T NEW STAR E TH TIME FOR ! M K 21.1

5 10 21.1 42.2

SABS Jacaranda City Challenge SABS Groenkloof, 1 Dr Lategan Road, Groenkloof, Pretoria; 42.2km & 21.1km: 5:45am; 10km: 6:15am; 5km Fun Run: 6:30am Marieta Bortoli 082 466 7031 / Kobus Stander 082 688 6697 D I S TA N C E I C O N S :

The marathon is a qualifier for Comrades and Two Oceans, there’s a combined prize purse of over R110 000, and early entrants will be given goodie bags and moisturewicking T-shirts. The route is of moderate difficulty, with a few challenges. There will be cheerleaders at water stations and a general medical checkup station at the finish.

SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1

FREE ICE CRE AM!

SATURDAY 29 OCTOBER

Run for Fun (aka The Ice-Cream Run) Evangelies Gereformeerde Kerk, corner of Ajax and Atterbury Streets, Olympus, Pretoria East; 21.1km: 5:45am; 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:15am Ronel Prinsloo 082 579 0288

F I N D E V E N T S W I T H Y O U R F A V O U R I T E D I S TA N C E S Q U I C K LY, U S I N G T H E F O L LO W I N G

Lite 2 Nite 12-Hour Circuit Race Hoërskool Driehoek, Ramsbottom Street, Vanderbijlpark; minimum 60km: 8am Malie van der Walt 082 853 9144

5 10 21.1

King Price Irene Farm Race ARC Campus (access from Nellmapius Drive), Irene, Centurion; 21.1km & 10km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:10am Wynand Breytenbach 012 662 4446 / 082 937 0733 irenerunner.co.za/king-priceirene.html KEY:

0-9KM

10-19KM

20-29KM

30+KM

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

`llh2''e]fl`gdYlme&[g&rY A ooo&^Y[]Zggc&[ge'\]]h`]YlrY

D>>I @HBG@


R A C IN G

A HE A D

ED’S CHOICE

WESTERN CAPE SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1 OUTsurance KFM Gun Run Atlantic Seaboard (exact venue TBA), Cape Town; 21.1km: 6:30am; 10km: 7:15am; 5km Fun Run/Walk: 8:30am Top Events 021 511 7130 thegunrun.co.za

KWAZULU-NATAL SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H B Y B E L I N DA S TA N G E

Goss & Balfe South Coast Marathon & Half Marathon (aka Sapphire Coast Marathon) Venue TBA: Hutchison Park, Amanzimtoti; 42.2km & 21.1km: 6am Race Office 060 716 1049 / Desmond van der Merwe 082 806 0348 totiac.co.za Recent bad weather and flooding has washed away some of the railway line, and as a result, the marathon and half may have to start and finish at Hutchison Park in Amanzimtoti. But race organisers are still hopeful the original route will be accessible by race day, and plan to inform all entrants once the route has been finalised. Pre-entries close on 8 October. There will be no late entries.

SUNDAY 2 OCTOBER

5 16

Duke of York ‘Flying Scramble’ Run/Walk

Bishopstowe Hall, Gordon Street (close to Chief Mhlabunzima Road), Pietermaritzburg; 16km: 7am; 5km Fun Run: 7:30am Andre Booysen 082 318 5137

One of the largest races in Cape Town – it attracts 18 000 participants – turns 24 this year. Historically, the Noon Day gun was fired to signal the end of the race, hence the name. These days, the race starts and finishes with the firing of a cannon by the Cape Field artillery. This year, the event will implement #bangitinthebin, a green campaign that encourages runners to put their water sachets into the bins provided (for more information, visit runnersworld. co.za/gunrungreen).

SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER

12.5 21.1 Meiringspoort 21.1km & 12.5km Northern stop-and-rest of Meiringspoort (close to De Rust, on the N12); 21.1km: 7am; 200m south of the ‘Skelmkloof Drif’ low-level crossing of Meiringspoort; 12.5km: 7am Hannerie Delport 076 130 7920 meiringspoort21.co.za

SUNDAY 9 OCTOBER

10 21.1

Superspar Chappies Challenge Velocity Sports Lab, Chapman’s Peak Drive, Scott Estate, Hout Bay; 21.1km: 6:30am; A little way up from the Chapman’s Peak Hotel, Chapman’s Peak Drive, Hout Bay; 10km: 7am Gregson Lubbe 072 120 9929

SATURDAY 22 23 OCTOBER

160

T! NE W EV EN FI R ST IN! A IC FR A

African Centurion Walk Robben Island, Cape Town;

FRIDAY 28 OCTOBER

5 10

ED’S CHOICE

Durban North – Umhlanga Rocks CPF October Nite Run/Walk Crusaders Sports Club, 10 Ranleigh Crescent, Durban North; 10km & 5km Fun Run: 6:30pm Dave Ward 082 492 1995 wardevents.co.za

SATURDAY 29 OCTOBER

7 14

Pecanwood Oktoberfest Sport & Lifestyle Festival Pecanwood Farm, Birnamwood Road, Merrivale, Umgungundlovu, KwaZulu-Natal; 14km: 8:15am; 7km: 8:30am Jared Wilson 083 790 2801 pecanwoodoktoberfest.com

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

`llh2''e]fl`gdYlme&[g&rY A ooo&^Y[]Zggc&[ge'\]]h`]YlrY

D>>I @HBG@


RUNTHEBERG: Best suited to trail runners with technical experience.

160km (solo or 4 × 25-mile team relay): 12pm Asonele Kotu 081 346 7746 africancenturion.co.za

SUNDAY 2 OCTOBER

4.5 14 21.1

NE W R R O U TE FO M E TH 21 .1 K

SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER

4 10 21.1 42.2

H IS TO RUICTE V O ET R OED ! R EV IV

ED’S CHOICE

SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

Voet Van Afrika Marathon 14 October: Mega Park, R319, Bredasdorp; 4km Toontjie Fun Run: 6pm; 15 October: Elim Road (approximately 9km from the start), Bredasdorp; 42.2km: 6am; Mega Park, R316, Bredasdorp; 21.1km: 7:30am; 10km: 8am Frans Botha 082 675 1311 / Anette Botha 082 418 7523 voetvanafrika.co.za

7 15

TRAIL RUNNING SATURDAY 1 SUNDAY 2 OCTOBER

30 50 Runtheberg All Out Adventures, Moeggestap Farm (off D119), Bergville, Northern Drakensberg; Extreme: 50km (25km per day); Challenge: 30km (15km per day) Warren King 083 449 4113 runtheberg.co.za

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H B Y R AC E O R G A N I S E R S ( TO P ); G OVA N BAS S O N ( B OT TO M )

P H OTO G R A P H B Y S H AU N B E N JA M I N ( A R K I M AG E S )

K-Way Constantia Valley Grape Run Alphen Hall, Constantia Main Road, Constantia; 21.1km: 6:30am (limited to 1 000 runners); 14km: 7am (limited to 1 000 runners); 4.5km Family Fun Run: 7:45am Charlotte Kettlewell 021 761 8887

An ideal introduction to the world of multi-day trail-running races. Challenge participants face climbing, descents, boulders and rivers; Extreme participants will overcome near-vertical climbs. Your reward? Panoramic views of mountains on the first day, and valleys on the second.

SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1

PG Glass Vlakvark Trail Run Faan Meintjies Nature Reserve (off the R30), Klerksdorp; 21.1km & 10km: 7am; 5km: 7:15am Carel van Zyl 071 877 6608

LoveTrail White Mountain White Mountain Lodge, Giant’s Castle Road, Central Drakensberg, Estcourt; 15km & 7km: 7am Race Office lovetrail@ trailmag.co.za

6:30am – 6:50am (staggered start); 8-Hour Run: 14 October: Prologue: 10am – 4pm; 15 October: +/- 42km: 6:30am – 6:50am (staggered start) Matty Smith (Magnetic South) 044 382 2932 theotter.co.za

FRIDAY 14 SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER THURSDAY 13 SUNDAY 23 OCTOBER

+/-250 Kalahari Augrabies Extreme Marathon Augrabies Falls South African National Park, Augrabies Falls (around 120km west of Upington); 15 – 23 October: 26km, 33km, 39km, 79km, 45km & 26km Nadia Arndt 083 309 7755 kaem.co.za

100 161 Cederberg Traverse 100km Sanddrif Campsite, Dwarsrivier Farm, (right at Algeria/Cederberg sign after Citrusdal on the N7), Clanwilliam; 14 October: 100 mile: 5am; 15 October: 100km Non-Stop & 2-Day: 5am Caeli Manuel 072 924 2371 energyevents.co.za/event/thecederberg-traverse-2016

WEDNESDAY 12 SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER

42 The Otter Storms River Mouth Rest Camp, Garden Route National Park; 11-Hour Challenge: 12 October: Prologue: 10am – 4pm; 13 October: +/- 42km:

SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

`llh2''e]fl`gdYlme&[g&rY A ooo&^Y[]Zggc&[ge'\]]h`]YlrY

D>>I @HBG@


R A C IN G

A HE A D

Other Provinces

EASTERN CAPE BORDER SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

HARRISMITH MOUNTAIN: A gruelling climb up the slopes of the Platberg.

5 10 21.1 68 Legends Ultra Marathon, Half & 5km Fun Run 30 September: Bisho Stadium, Bisho; 5km Fun Run: 6pm; 1 October: Bisho Stadium, Bisho; 68km: 6am; Philip Kahts Softball Stadium, Gleneagles Road, Bunkers Hill, East London; 21.1km: 6:30am; 10km: 7am; Meta Scott 071 074 8022

EASTERN PROVINCE SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1 Windpomp Half Marat on & 10km Botanical Sports Grounds, top of the Ouberg Pass, R63 (between Graaff-Reinet nd Murraysburg); 21.1km: 7a ; 2km after the gate to the Cam edoo Nature Reserve, on the R63; 10km: 7:15am; Botanical Spor s Grounds; 5km Fun Run: 7:30a Rozelle Köhne 049 891 0825

SATURDAY 8 OCTOBER

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E SY O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S

10 27

Kowie Striders 27km & 10km Run/Walk Big Pineapple, Summerhill Farm, R67, Bathurst; 27km Run: 7am; Walk: 7:30am; Country Club, French Road, Port Alfred; 10km: 8am Lynette Harbrecht 082 811 4908

Spring Run Bloemfontein Achilles Sports Club, Att Horak Street, Bloemfontein; 21km: 6:30am; 10km: 7am; 5km Fun Run: 7:15am Beverley Olivier 071 895 3183

SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

5 10

21

Webbers & Vic Theron Laboratories Dress-Up

Lichtenburg; 21.1km: 6:30am; 10km & 5km Fun Run: 6:40am Lucy Kearney 076 694 0463 lichtenburgmarathonklub. webs.com

WEDNESDAY 19 OCTOBER

5 10

SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER

5 15

NE W S TA R T T IM E

Harrismith arrismith Mountain Race Platberg Stadium (at the foot of the Platberg Mountain), Harrismith; 15km: 10am; 5km Fun Run: 10:15am Barbara van der Hoven 084 570 2544 harrismithmarathonclub.co.za

NORTH WEST CENTRAL NORTH WEST

FREE STATE

Colour Run: 8:30am Liefie Day 082 334 2658 / Jasper van Zyl 083 290 4743

Supa Quick 10km Nite Olen Park Rugby Stadium, Piet Bosman Street, Potchefstroom; 10km & 5km Fun Run: 7pm Theo Coetzee 083 538 3162

NORTH WEST NORTH SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

5 15

25

Kromberg & Schubert 25km, 15km & 5km Hoërskool Brits, 1 Johan Street, Brits; 25km & 15km: 6am; 5km Fun Run: 6:15am Lani Hartmann 083 628 4584

SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER

2.5 5 10 Matlosana Mall Fun Run Matlosana Mall, N12, Klerksdorp; 10km: 7am; 2.5km: 8am; 5km Rotary Rainbow

SATURDAY 29 OCTOBER

5 10 21.1

Lafarge Zebra Zamba Lichtenburg Boat Club,

MPUMALANGA SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

4.9 10 21.1 Build It Graskop God’s Window Half Marathon & 10km Graskop Caravan Park, Louis Trichardt Street, Graskop; 21.1km, 10km & 4.9km Fun Run: 7am Amanda Wessels 084 583 6945

WEDNESDAY 5 OCTOBER

5 10

Maximed Pharmacies 10km Night Race Standerton Showgrounds, Princess Street, Standerton; 10km & 5km: 7pm Lukas van der Merwe 082 412 4161

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

`llh2''e]fl`gdYlme&[g&rY A ooo&^Y[]Zggc&[ge'\]]h`]YlrY

D>>I @HBG@


5-6km Dash (over 10-year-olds) 1km Mini (6- to 10-year-olds): 7am-5pm impichallenge.co.za

SUNDAY 30 OCTOBER Kinetic Multisport Challenge Bobbejaanskloof, Hartbeespoort Dam 3km trail run, 3.5km kayak, 15km MTB, 7km trail run (2830km): 8am Heidi Muller 082 564 6468 kinetic-events.co.za

SATURDAY 29 OCTOBER

5 10 20 32 48 Coaldust 5-in-1 Circuit Challenge (aka Elkana Pay Per Kay) Elkana Educational Centre, 1 Flamink Street, Emalahleni; 48km, 32km, 20km, 10km & 5km Fun Run (circuit route of 2.5km): 6am Abie Smit 082 341 0998

LIMPOPO

SUNDAY 2 OCTOBER

FRIDAY 7 OCTOBER

5 10

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E SY O F R AC E O R G A N I S E R S

Mazda Polokwane Nite Race 2-in-1 Old Peter Mokaba Stadium, Dorp Street, Polokwane; 10km & 5km Fun Run: 6:30pm Corrie Calitz 082 464 1963

O&M CAPE TOWN 90963/E

FitKids indi iduals (1km run, 200m swim, m run): 10:30am FitKids Relay (1 m run, 200m swim, 1km run): 1 am 1km Run for Fun: 1 :45am Biathlon (5km run, 2 km cycle): 12:30pm Duathlon (5km run, 20 m cycle, 2.5km run): 12:30pm Triathlon (800m swim, 0km cycle, 5km run): 3pm freshpakfitnessfestival. o.za

Kinetic Adventure Rac Venue TBA (close to Parys) 6-19km MTB, 5-6km trail run, 1km kayak, obstacle course (25km): 8am Heidi Muller 082 64 6468 kinetic-events.co.za

SATURDAY 1 & SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER

ADVENTURE RACING & MULTISPORT SATURDAY 1 OCTOBER

30TH A N N IV E S

Freshpak Fitness Festival Clanwilliam Dam, Ou Kaapse Road, Clanwilliam 1.5km short swim: 9am 3km long swim: 9am

Impi hallenge #4 Gauteng S uts House, Jan Smuts Avenue, Centurion, Pretoria 20km Elite 12km Challenge 12km Corporate

SEARCH THE COMPLETE LIST OF RACES IN SOUTH AFRICA: RUNNERSWORLD. CO.ZA/RACE-CALENDAR

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE ROAD BEHIND YOU. IT’S ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD.

WHEN ACHES AND PAINS GET IN THE WAY OF FINISHING A MARATHON, WE’LL BE THERE TO KEEP YOU GOING.

`llh2''e]fl`gdYlme&[g&rY A ooo&^Y[]Zggc&[ge'\]]h`]YlrY

D>>I @HBG@


Back of the Pack BY BRUCE PINNOCK

BRUCE’S TRUCE Strike a peace deal with yourself, and the ultra will be your oyster.

T

90

RUNNER’S WORLD OCTOBER 2016

realise you forgot to put on your pants.) The one in which you run into the stadium, neck-and-neck with the marathon world champion, only to be jolted awake by the effort it takes to lunge forwards, break the tape, and cover yourself in glory. My dream had left me with the (irrational)

“…my mind had made a coalition with my bowels; together, they staged a protest strike.” belief that I could do what’s fashionable among the hipsters these days: live my dream. But first, I needed to get my mind right. I began by taking myself to one side and giving myself a pep talk, sternly telling myself that all I needed was for my body to do what it was told. I warned myself that I would stand no more goofing around – usually, my body has an arsenal of excuses as to why it shouldn’t run. And I told myself what my

goal would be: a PB in the upcoming ultra marathon. My goal was received in disbelieving, stunned silence – you’d have thought I had proposed hiking to the South Pole, barefoot – and I realised the internal struggle to conquer myself wouldn’t be as straightforward as I imagined. My body was plotting a dirty fight – it would stop at nothing, using guerrilla tactics if necessary. Before I’d even begun the ultra marathon, I realised something was wrong. Behind my back, my mind had made a coalition with my bowels; together, they staged a protest strike. Diarrhoea! As I hastily sprinted for the toilet, I actually heard my body ask, smugly: “Now which arsehole is boss?” I learned a tough lesson that day: the mind’s job is not to conquer, but to compromise. We need to work with it, and listen humbly to our bodies before cooperation can be gained. Of course, there’s no point trying to tell a fired-up young hipster this. Like a newly-wed, he must learn the hard way; and then, suitably chastened and humbled, find his way through the maze of a relationship: lofty marathon goals, golden anniversaries, and ‘till death do us part’. And throw out any foolish ideas about conquering.

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y I S TO C K P H OTO.C O M

he most famous mountaineer of them all, Sir Edmund Hillary, once stated: “I did not conquer Everest; I conquered myself.” He conquered himself. Which is mind-blowing. In pursuit of our own lofty goals, many of us have been inspired to follow Hillary. Case in point: a famous running guru once visited our clubhouse, and used this quote in his presentation. The inspiration – especially among the young hipsters, with their manbuns, skateboards and wizard-like beards – was palpable. Then came his thundering, final speech: “The most important fight is the one that takes place in your mind. Win the private war going on inside you, and you will conquer yourself.” And with that, he exited the room to a standing ovation. The guys at the back of the pack had reservations: the idea was too simple. Big Mac looked down at his large, flabby body and muttered, “If it came down to a choice of what to conquer, I’d choose climbing Everest.” But the youngsters were all fired up, raring to conquer themselves – and ultimately, to go on and win an ultra marathon. They have a lot to learn. I don’t know about you, but I can’t say I’ve ever come close to ‘conquering’ myself. The best I’ve managed is an uneasy truce. Every time I get ahead of myself and start dictating to my body what it should be doing, I get a nasty reminder of who’s boss. Which makes me feel as close to conquering myself as the mother whose two-year-old throws a tantrum on the floor of the supermarket. The last time I attempted to conquer myself was after I’d had that dream. You know that dream? (No, not the one where you’re in a crowded lift, and you suddenly


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