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THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME OCTOBER OCTOBER 2016 2016 ££4.40 4.40

HOW TO DECORATE

BIGGEST ISSUE OF THE YEAR!

H OW T O U S E FA B R I C + WA L L PA P E R + PA I N T WAYS T O M I X PAT T E R N A N D C O L O U R W I T H C O N FI D E N C E O U R S T E P - BY-S T E P P ROJ E C T G U I D E

HIGH STREET HITS The style-for-less best buys P E R F E C T PA RQ U E T Everything you need to know

D I G I TA L D I R E C TO RY 14 new online shops you’ll love

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REVEALED! THE LONDON LOOK Inside the capital’s most inspiring homes Plus our guide to the London Design Festival How to make marble work Artificial grass: a gardening revelation


OCTOBER 2016 Style 41 Wish list This month’s high street special is packed with afordable buys 51 News Why finials are out and Indian design is in. Plus, discover Soho House’s first homeware range 60 Shopping A digital directory of our favourite online shops and a tour of Aram Store, the first in our new series of design destinations 67 Decorating Everything you need to know about parquet, light switches, and using marble like a pro 79 Design How we fought the fakes, and a closer look at Brit designer Richard Sapper, developer Sammy Lee and Italian style icon Angelo Donghia

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H OW TO DECOR ATE Mix pattern and colour with confidence using our bumper fabric, paint and wallpaper sourcebook. Packed with inspirational room sets, beautiful moodboards, the very best new-season pieces and our step-by-step decorating guide, it has everything you need to create your dream interior

86 Architecture Denys Lasdun’s National Theatre, John Pawson’s new Welsh retreat and Daniel Libeskind’s idea of home 93 Gardening Discover why artificial grass is the one fake we do love 96 Technology A show-stopping TV and the future of the kitchen table 100 Colour The story of vermilion, a brilliant red with a mysterious past

COVER IMAGE: ADRIAN BRISCOE SUBSCRIBER COVER IMAGE: SEBASTIAN ERRAS/BASSET IMAGES (PHOTOGRAPHY), PIXART PRINTING (PRODUCTION)

141 ELLE Decoration British Design Awards 2016 The top new names in print and pattern, craft, lighting, accessories and furniture ON THE COVER This room set from How To Decorate features an armchair covered in Zofany velvet, and yellow silk Arte wallpaper . For more ideas, head to p103

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THE LONDON LOOK 156 The bespoke house Take a look inside a RIBA award-winning new-build and read the architect’s guide to creating something unique 168 Jewel in the town Decorated using marble, this Clapham townhouse is the height of luxury. Steal its style using our palette of coloured stones 182 Pink perfection How to use this season’s hottest hue 188 A life in design: the Conran story Celebrating Sir Terence Conran’s impact on British design 192 Cosmopolitan calm This urban home has a peaceful palette of blush pink and concrete – we show you the easy way to get the look 204 Watercolour memories British designer Carolyn Quartermaine’s home in Provence shows of her dreamy (uniquely British) work 212 Take the tile tour Look at London from a new perspective with our guide to its most fascinating floors 216 New loft living This revamped 18th-century warehouse has a fresh, comfortable take on inner-city style 228 Cool Britannia Our favourite new pieces of British design

192 Escape

Finally

255 News British breaks, new exhibitions and Germany’s secret island getaway

238 In conversation with Kelly Hoppen We ask the designer about her career past, present and future

269 London Design Festival We reveal what not to miss at the UK’s top design event. Plus, a quick guide to Design Centre Chelsea Harbour

242 Urban icon The renovation of this Barbican apartment brings 21stcentury living to a Modernist gem

284 Iconic British houses Seven architectural treasures to visit now

32 Subscribe Sign up now and receive a free Muji difuser gift, worth £48 290 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 293 VIP Club Fantastic ofers for our most loyal readers 306 The last word What #TeamED has been tackling this month

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THE LONDON LOOK London is often considered a microcosm of the globe in terms of the richness and variety of its populace, so this month we wanted to see if the same could be said of its homes, dedicating the entire central section of the magazine to ‘The London Look’. And what we discovered as we edited our choices down was exactly that, a veritable snapshot of the world encapsulated in some of the best abodes in our capital city. From a New York-style loft owned by a jeweller in Liverpool Street to an extraordinarily luxe, Italian marbled wonder in Clapham. Brightly coloured Brutalism for a chic bachelor pad in the Barbican to the very height of bespoke Modernism from brilliant British architect Jamie Fobert for a Danish/American couple in central Bloomsbury. And, modest minimalism in New Cross, courtesy of young architects Zoe Chan and Merlin Earys. Oh, and I threw in a rather charming bolthole in the south of France too, because the work of its owner, designer extraordinaire Carolyn Quartermaine, embodies a very particular kind of London look that we would have been remiss to exclude just because she now spends half her time abroad (that’s my excuse anyway!). But, as she so

‘We have this unique ability to mix the historical with the contemporary in a singularly maverick way. It’s about daring and dreaming’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

eloquently puts it, ‘None of the things I do would have happened if I weren’t British. We have this unique ability to mix the historical with the contemporary in a singularly maverick way. It’s about daring and dreaming and the use of colour. We can embrace the grunge side, the goth side and it makes for a vibrancy that you don’t see in Germany or France. We are not strait-laced, we don’t go down just one path and seek perfection in a design and leave it at that, which tends to produce something very cold. We go a lot further with the story.’ And exploring a personal narrative is what the best designed, crafted or composed homes always seek to do. It is the same with the greatest designers too; they tell stories with their work. Thus, in this issue, we’ve profiled both Kelly Hoppen MBE and Sir Terence Conran – London has been pivotal to both of their successes. After all, it’s always fascinating to understand where great British design stories began. Certainly one thing I’ve learnt from interviewing people at the top of their game is that, once they had a vision of what they wanted to achieve, there was a refusal to let anyone tell them they wouldn’t ultimately succeed. And I think there’s something terribly British/London about that, too.

What I’ve been testing this month... dog hair busting vacuum cleaners With two hounds in the house and a dark wooden floor, staying on top of dog hair is a major issue in my household. So the arrival of the new Dyson ‘Cinetic Big Ball Animal’ has caused something of a revolution. It sounds like a jet engine taking of when in action, but my word does it have some serious suction. Armed with the ‘tangle free turbine tool’, rugs and carpets were rendered as new. Unbelievable power. And, this latest model has fixed all previous Dyson niggles, such as the cylinder being tricky to empty and having to clean out the filter. Brilliant. £449.99 (dyson.co.uk). PS See more top vacuums for pet owners on p306.

Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Twitter: @MOgundehin

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M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief

Editor’s Assistant Rosie Cave (020 7534 2522) Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

E DI T OR I A L Art Director Tony Peters (020 7534 2521) Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs (020 7439 5027) Features Director Amy Bradford (020 7534 2524) Photography Director Flora Bathurst (020 7534 2503) Deputy Art Director Philippe Blanchin (020 7534 2518) Homes Editor Jackie Daly (020 7534 2512) Decorating Editor Alex Kristal (020 7534 2527) Photography Editor James Williams (020 7534 2513) Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin (020 7534 2519) Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan (020 7439 5343) Junior Features Writer Charlotte Brook (020 7534 2522) Junior Designer Jack Melrose (0207 534 2521) Decorating Intern Stephanie Iles (020 7534 2526) Associate Features Editor Emma Love Associate Editor Sarah Slade Editor-at-Large Talib Choudhry Managing Editor Debbie Black (020 7534 2558) Workflow Director Imogen Van Zaane (020 7534 0000) Associate Stylists Hannah Bort Sania Pell Amanda Smith-Corston Suzanne Stankus With thanks to Emma King, Rebecca Rhodes, Tessa Carey

PU BL I SH I NG & A DV E RT I SI NG Group Publishing Director Jacqui Cave (020 7439 5273) Publisher’s Assistant Rosie Cave (0207 534 2522) Associate Publisher Christopher Daunt (0207 439 5175) Account Manager Octavia Thompson (020 7439 5462) Account Manager Marina Connolly (020 7297 3468) Classified Sales Executive Hannah Symondson (020 3728 6233) Director of Hearst Magazines Direct Cameron Dunn (020 7927 4699) Regional Sales Lisa Rogers (01619 629254/07702 346037) Head of Hearst Create Dan Levitt (0203 640 2184) Partnerships Director: Create Rozana Hall (0207 439 5377) Partnerships Manager: Create Siobhan Cosgrave (020 7439 5106) Art Director: Create Tanja Rusi (0207 439 5374) Art Editor: Create Leo Goddard (0207 439 5000) Project Managers: Create Richard Adams (020 7534 2596) Danielle Falco-Grimshaw (020 7439 5617) PR Executive Alice Roberta Taylor (020 7439 5047)

PRODUCT ION

CI RCU L AT ION Circulation and Marketing Director Reid Holland Head of Marketing Operations Jennifer Smith Head of Consumer Sales & Marketing James Hill Group Customer Marketing Manager Karen Sharp (020 7439 5543) Junior Consumer Marketing Manager Vicky Chandler (020 3728 7688) Subscriptions Marketing Executive Kathryn Green (020 7439 5687)

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S U K Chief Executive Oicer Anna Jones Managing Director, Brands Michael Rowley Chief Finance Oicer Claire J Blunt Director of Editorial Strategy & Content Louise Court Chief Revenue Oicer Duncan Chater Chief Technical Oicer Darren Goldsby Director of Communications Lisa Quinn HR Director Surinder Simmons ELLE Decoration is published by Hearst Magazines UK, a trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd.

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T R A DEM A R K NO T ICE

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ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benqué CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi Brand Management of ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée SVP/International Director of ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickaël Berret Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Flora Régibier Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

NOVEMBER ISSUE ON SALE OCTOBER 6 2016

T H I S MON T H ’ S CON T R I BU TOR S Instagram @adrianbriscoe Profession Photographer Feature How to decorate, p103 Interiors style Calm and neutral, with lots of natural materials Favourite colour Navy blue Influences Nature, art, cinematography and people Design hero Anyone from the Bauhaus Favourite city It has to be Lisbon, Portugal, for its chilled-out, faded retro atmosphere Most precious possession My Lotus Esprit Dream buy A Henry Moore sculpture, or a Rothko Perfect day Being able to time travel

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Jack Melrose Twitter/Instagram @jamelrose About Jack is Team ED’s new Junior Designer Favourite colour Black Interiors style Very minimalist. I am heavily influenced by contemporary and Scandinavian design, and like to have everything monochrome, neutral and raw. Less is more, and simplicity is the ultimate sophistication Favourite city London of course! People may call it a rat race or the smog, but London is just so fabulous to me. You can’t beat walking around the streets and parks of central London

Dinah Hall Instagram @dinahhall Profession Writer Feature Watercolour memories, p204 Home I live on Dartmoor in a granite and glass house (the perks of marrying an architect), but also have a tiny flat in London with Georgian panelling, painted black. Which makes me look hideously smug on Instagram Interiors style After interviewing Carolyn Quartermaine I spent days fantasising about 1950s Italian cane furniture and collaged wallpaper, but the reality is white walls, Pinch sofas, sheepskins and Hans J Wegner ‘Wishbone’ dining chairs

INTERVIEWS: SARAH MORGAN

Adrian Briscoe


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SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING • GA R DENING • A RCHITECTUR E

STYLE

REACH FOR THE SKY Dutch landscape painting is justly revered, but where would its Old Masters have been without the flawless skies of their native land? The latter’s clarity and colours are the inspiration behind this wallpaper by Amsterdam duo Little Owl Design (aka Bruce Wayland and Marcello De Simone), who have juxtaposed their own photographs with details from antique etchings to create a collage efect. The design comes in three palettes – stormy grey, a soft violet that evokes dusk and this serene blue. ‘Dutch Sky’ wallpaper, £162 per nine-metre roll (littleowl.eu). More top wallpaper picks in How to decorate, p103.

F O R M O R E O B J E C T S O F D E S I R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / N E W S


Style | S H O P P I N G 1

HOT ON THE HIGH STREET WISH LIST

We’re celebrating the high street with a bumper round-up of super affordable best buys #EDLoves

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5 1 Be soothed by the tranquil greens in this Solitude Is Bliss artwork by Michelle Collins. £150, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 2 These golden candlesticks have a glam 1970s feel. From £6.99 each, H&M (hm.com) 3 Picture frames can be modern too – as proved by these colourful, graphic resin frames. £14 each, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 4 The brass cladding on this ‘Geo’ sideboard makes it feel much more expensive than it is. £999, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 5 Introduce a subtle hit of colour and texture with the ‘Borders’ rug. £120, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 6 The shape of this ‘Swole’ copper side table by Blu Dot makes it easy to draw up to a sofa or armchair. £325, Heal’s (heals.co.uk) 7 There’s an elegant 1930s vibe to this ceramic ‘Contessa’ vase. £35, M&S (marksandspencer.com) 8 Tap into the trend for marbled finishes with the ‘Griin’ bottle vase. £25, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 9 Contrasting tassels are the perfect finishing touch on this ‘Salaya Ikat’ cushion. £35, Urban Outfitters (urbanoutfitters.com) 10 We can’t believe this cool, graphic ‘Geo’ cushion costs just £7. George Home (asda.com) 11 This dainty ‘Mid-century’ seat is a comfier way to sit at the dining table. £399, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) ➤

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HIGH-STREET HITS 1 Hang this vinyl ‘Design Project 016’ wallpaper vertically or horizontally for a cool visual efect. £33 per ten-metre roll, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 2 These ‘Paloma’ pendant lights look great in a contrasting cluster, or hung singly in a hallway. From £59 each, M&S (marksandspencer.com) 3 Cheer up a wall with this graphic parrot poster. £65, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 4 We love the smoky colours and quilted finish of this ‘Veyed’ chair. £375, French Connection (frenchconnection.com) 5 Camille Walala’s Memphis-esque ‘Aria’ rug for Floor Story is truly art for your floor. £800, Heal’s (heals.co.uk) 6 Lisa Firer’s marbled, striped and spotted porcelain vessels are the stars of the ‘Design Africa’ showcase by Heal’s. From £35 for a tealight holder (heals.co.uk) 7 The ‘Design Project 001’ smoked glass table lamp makes a bold statement with its gleaming finish. £160, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 8 The geometric pattern on this ‘Brookland’ pasta bowl makes us think of Mediterranean sunshine and cuisine. £8, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 9 This delicately patterned ‘Kaleidoscope’ bowl is the perfect shape for party snacks. £1, Tesco Direct (tesco.com/direct) 10 The ‘Kenta’ table makes a striking addition to a dining space,and there’s a matching bench, too. £2,195, Lombok (lombok.co.uk) ➤

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HIGH-STREET HITS 1 This framed handmade paper wall art adds a pop of texture and colour to any room. £269, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 2 Hang this textured glass ‘Gabriella’ pendant from the Gray & Willow collection over a dining table. £80, House of Fraser (houseofraser.co.uk) 3 You won’t find a better faux finish than this ‘Faux Wood Efect’ wallpaper. £20 per ten-metre roll, Graham & Brown at House of Fraser (houseofraser.co.uk) 4 The ‘Stamford’ bed is a contemporary take on the Victorian wrought-iron style. From £295, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com) 5 We love the hits of warm yellow in this ‘Abstract Ribbon’ wool rug. £649, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 6 Cosy up with this mohair blanket in an on-trend safron yellow. £99.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com) 7 This map-inspired cushion is dotted with the names of cities from around the world. H&M. £7.99 (hm.com) 8 Purple details make this basket a stylish choice for laundry or storage. £49.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com) 9 With its super-slender proportions, this gold table lamp is a useful task light for cramped corners. £19.99, TK Maxx (tkmaxx.com) 10 A folding side table like this ‘Butlers Tray’ is fabulously versatile; use by a bed or sofa. £35, Tesco Direct (tesco.com/direct) 11 The African-inspired pattern on this ‘Tribal’ vase looks great in monochrome. £25, Debenhams (debenhams.com) ➤

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HIGH-STREET HITS 1 ‘Duck Egg Innocence Twig’ wallpaper by Graham & Brown has a delicate appeal. £15 per ten-metre roll, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 2 Fluted finishes are so now and this ‘Dorette’ light shade has a glamorous tassel to boot. £268, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com) 3 This bone-inlaid bar cabinet is a beautifully intricate heirloom piece. £1,499, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 4 The pale blue tones of this ‘Starfield’ rug evoke faded grandeur. From £270, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 5 Hang a group of these ‘Pebble’ mirrors to make an elegant wall display. From £38 each, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 6 The distinctive boxy shape and layered blue tones of this ‘Bloc’ armchair caught our eye. £895, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 7 With its oriental-style watercolour print, this cushion is as pretty as a picture. £8, Matalan (matalan.co.uk) 8 We can’t resist the lustrous finish of this golden glass vase. £14.99, H&M (hm.com) 9 This Art Deco-style ‘Circlet’ nest of tables is smart and sexy. £125, Next (next.co.uk) ➤

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HIGH-STREET HITS 1 Zofany’s ‘Akaishi’ wallpaper features an subtle pattern of mountains in old gold. £55 per metre, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 2 Create an op art feel with this eye-popping wood parquetry wall decoration. Small, £169; large, £249, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 3 We predict this gorgeous metallic sideboard will sell out fast. £249.99, TK Maxx (tkmaxx.com) 4 The grey and tan tones of this ‘Vintage king’ rug go with everything. £155, French Connection (frenchconnection.com) 5 This oak ‘Cooks’ dining table doubles as a prep surface and comes with a marble, concrete or oak top. £2,795 (as pictured), Heal’s (heals.com) 6 Invest in this brass ice bucket for chic cocktail parties. £35, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 7 There are some great oak utensils in Sainsbury’s new ‘Cookshop’ range, including this pestle and mortar. £16, Sainsbury’s (sainsburys.com) 8 Buy these grey marble-efect canisters in bulk for stylish storage. £8 each, George Home (asda.com) 9 This ‘Palatial’ pasta bowl features a delicate beaded edge. £3.50, Sainsbury’s (sainsburys.com) 10 The oak ‘Duhrer’ dining chair has a pared-down Scandinavian feel. £199, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) E D

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Style | N E W S

NEW TAKES ON INDIAN DESIGN They’re bang on trend. The latest is Swedish fashion designer Martin Bergström’s ‘Svärtan’ range for Ikea in minimal monochrome, out September (ikea.com). RUBY RUTH’S OTHERWORLDLY DOLLS Knitted with vintage textiles, with giant buttons for eyes, they just make us happy. From £18 (rubyruthdolls.com). DIPTYQUE’S ‘VINAIGRE DE TOILETTE’ Scent your airing cupboard with it, spritz bedlinen with it, bathe in it or just wear it. £50 (diptyqueparis.co.uk). LITTLE GREENE’S ‘RUBINE ASHES’ PAINT As used in London’s Asprey showroom – it’s the perfect grey-lilac. £19.25 for one litre (littlegreene.com).

UP AND DOWN

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK (THE LOEWE DOWN) PICTURES: PABLO QUEVEDO, MIGUEL PEREZ

THE LOEWE DOWN As Loewe’s creative director since 2013, Northern Irish-born designer Jonathan Anderson has propelled the Spanish luxury fashion brand forwards while often looking back to its roots – it was founded in 1846 as a cooperative of leather artisans. After creating a range of ceramicinspired leather bowls in 2015, he has now expanded Loewe’s home ofering by employing a leather inlay technique to embellish early 20th-century oak furniture. Like marquetry for leather, the ‘intarsio’ method is Anderson’s cutting-edge slant on the jigsaw-puzzle knitting technique of the same name. Leather is precisely sliced into shapes using laser-cutting technology, then master artisans slot the pieces together to form the design before it is ironed to create a seamless finish. The idea was inspired by Bloomsbury Group artist Roger Fry’s colourful painted cupboard doors, chairs and tables, and many of the graphics used are derived from Loewe’s archive of silk prints. There are six pieces in the collection (pictured above and right) and they’re all made to order. Furniture from £6,725 for a lamp; notebooks, £250 each (loewe.com).

FUSSY FINIALS Lumps of crystal, twiddly metal spears and gaudily-coloured gobstopper knobs at the end of curtain poles all turn us of. Give us simple, slimline button finials every time. DOORMATS WITH SLOGANS Visit John Lewis instead for afordable jute designs ( johnlewis.com). SUGARY CHOCOLATE Pana’s sugar- and dairy-free chocolate still tastes like a guilty pleasure (panachocolate.com). FAKE DESIGNER FURNITURE Its days are numbered thanks to a change in the law – championed by us! See p79 to find out more.

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CHEZ MONSIEUR DIOR ‘Living in a house that doesn’t reflect who you are is akin to wearing someone else’s clothes,’ Christian Dior once said. The famed couturier was as fastidious about interiors as he was about fashion, decorating his original headquarters at 30 avenue Montaigne, Paris, in tones of grey, with white lacquered furniture and toile de Jouy fabrics. Now, as the House of Dior opens a spectacular New Bond Street boutique (above) designed by architect Peter Marino, it is also unveiling its new Dior Maison collection. The aim? To capture the spirit with which Dior furnished his own houses. It was also inspired by his childhood home in Granville, Normandy (right), now a museum, of which he once said: ‘my life and my style owe almost everything to its site and architecture.’ Its pink and dove-grey palette are clearly referenced in a range of faience tableware by India Mahdavi for Dior Maison, which has scalloped edges that recall patterns from recent fashion collections. Other designers involved include artist Véronique Taittinger, who has revisited Dior’s graphic ‘cannage’ motif on ceramics, while at a lower price point there are candles and teas inspired by Dior fragrances. The cashmere throws and embroidered linens are also easy to covet. 160–162 New Bond Street, London W1 (dior.com).

1 ‘Cannage’ tray by Véronique Taittinger, £330 2 Plates by India Mahdavi, from £95 each 3 Pink carafe by Giberto Arrivabene, £420 4 ‘Couture’ vases by Jeremy Maxwell, £1,200 each 5 ‘Cannage’ candle by Véronique Taittinger, from £135 6 Ashtray by Jerome Faillant Dumas, on sale September 7 Cards by Michael Cailloux, £80

F I N E LY T U N E D S T Y L E

So accustomed are we to seeing black or wooden pianos that these multicoloured numbers by Cambridge-based experts 1066 Pianos come as quite a surprise. The ‘Edelweiss’ range (pictured) can be commissioned in any shade (or combination of shades) you choose. Using the new online ‘build your own piano’ design tool, customers can pick colours, finishes and sizes, which are then handcrafted to order in the company’s workshop. Not a natural Chopin? Clever self-playing technology can be built in: link the piano to your iPod and let the instrument do all of the hard work for you. Magic! Prices from £15,000 (edelweisspianos.com).

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Style | N E W S

THE MAGIC NUMBERS

John Lewis’s biggest launch of the year is its new ‘Design Project’ collection. Two years in the making, it features 250 products ranging from candleholders to sofas and armchairs, all given a number rather than a name, just as they would be in a designer’s studio. For more examples from the collection, see our high-street wish list on p39. ‘No002’ chair, £1,799; ‘No031’ lamp, £250 ( johnlewis.com).

FOR THE LOVE OF LURÇAT Jean Lurçat lived in a golden time for European art: he was friends with leading lights of the Cubist and Surrealist movements in the 1920s, but unlike them, never became a household name. That was partly due to his preferred media – tapestry, ceramics, fabric and wallpaper, as well as poetry – but also to his unconventional aesthetic, inspired by the decorative arts of the Middle Ages and dominated by animals, fantastical creatures and cosmology. Now Lurçat is making waves again thanks to a new collection of fabrics and wallpapers by Pierre Frey, created in collaboration with the Jean and Simone Lurçat Foundation. There are three fabrics and three wallpapers, including the Matisseesque ‘Sirènes’; ‘Arlequins’ linen, a colourful treatment of the harlequin theme; and ‘Champagne’ wallpaper, a dreamlike evocation of bubbles, starbursts and birds. Fabrics, from £103.20 per metre; wallpapers, £199.20 per ten-metre roll (pierrefrey.com). You can also visit the Atelier-Musée Jean Lurçat, the artist’s home and studio, in France (46400 Saint-Laurent-les-Tours). From left ‘Arlequins’ linen. ‘Sirènes’ fabric in blue and yellow. ‘Soleil Noir’ linen. A fantastical mural inside the Atelier-Musée Jean Lurçat. Pink ‘Champagne’ wallpaper

Buy this! You may spend ages choosing the perfect armchair, but how much thought do you give to footstools? Proper relaxation demands a proper investment, so hurrah for The Footstool Workshop, which makes bespoke handcrafted designs in six diferent shapes and a variety of sizes. There’s a huge choice of fabrics and legs, from simple cubes to castors that make it easy to move larger ottomans around a room (thefootstoolworkshop.co.uk).

INSPIRING WORDS The new generation of self-help books is pint-sized and punchy, as well as boasting a strong graphic look. From Do Book Co comes Do Design by designer Alan Moore, the latest in a series of paperbacks that also includes Do Improvise and Do Lead (£8.99 each; thedobook.co). It invites us to think about how and why we create objects and, as the cover clearly states, why beauty is the key to everything. Elsewhere, Swedish stationer and designer Kikki K has published her ‘Inspiring Books’ series (£9 each; kikki-k.com), which each feature handy bite-sized tips on a wide variety of subjects. Our favourite is Want a Home You Love? by interior designer Anna-Carin McNamara, which explains how creating the perfect space can have an impact on all areas of your life.

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Style | N E W S

M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E MICHAEL SODEAU

We ask a tastemaker what they are reading, watching, listening to and downloading

M O O DY B LU E S Californian artist Deborah M Allen creates abstract works based on watercolour techniques, which resemble clouds of ink in water. Her latest project is ‘Jenny’, a range of ceramics for 1882Ltd, the Stafordshire-based maker of contemporary bone china. Who is Jenny? She’s the mum of 1882Ltd’s founder, Emily Johnson, who died of cancer last year. Five per cent of all sales from this range will be donated to cancer charity Macmillan Cancer Support. Plates from £23 (1882ltd.com).

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INTO THE FOREST

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Wallpaper designer Sian Zeng’s new ‘Hua Trees’ collection reflects her European and Chinese cultural heritage, recalling antique hand-painted oriental wallpaper of natural scenes, but with a modern slant. It comes either as a mural or as a set of fabric stickers that add magic to children’s rooms. £175 for a 2.1x3-metre mural; fabric stickers, from £30 each (sianzeng.com).

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS (MY CULTURAL LIFE) PICTURES: GETTY, ANDY MATTHEWS , ALAMY, EMILY DENNISON, JON DAY

Sodeau is a multidisciplinary designer who creates everything from furniture to interiors. He is creative director of London design show Designjunction, and his studio celebrates its 20th anniversary next year (@michaelsodeaustudio; michaelsodeau.com). I’m currently listening to GoGo Penguin (2), a band I discovered while watching Later… with Jools Holland. The band consists of a pianist, double bassist and drummer, and the dexterity with which they play is incredible. The song that makes me feel instantly happy is She’s a Rainbow by The Rolling Stones. My wife Lisa and I played it at our wedding ceremony. The books that have influenced me the most are ones on the work of 20th-century artist Bruno Munari. The freedom with which he and other creatives of his generation, such as Enzo Mari and Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni approached design is so interesting. My favourite quote is ‘Less is more’. Famously attributed to architect Mies van der Rohe, it’s actually from Robert Browning’s poem Andrea del Sarto (also known as The Faultless Painter). It epitomises what’s good about design and the modernist edict ‘Form follows function’. The last exhibition I saw was ‘The World of Charles and Ray Eames’ at London’s Barbican art gallery. I was fascinated by their plywood 1 prototypes and chair frames (5). I’ve always loved David Hockney’s art. I really like his earlier paintings, particularly A Bigger Splash (1; 1967). Hockney has inspired generations with his new form of drawing; he’s rather like David Bowie, who also transformed himself by experimenting with diferent genres. If I had a free day in London, I’d spend it exploring the city on my bike. I’m a member 2 of the Rapha Cycle Club (3). I have two favourite destinations. The first is the Isle of Skye, which has an incredibly beautiful and diverse landscape. The second is Sweden. Many of its cities, such as Stockholm (4), Gothenburg and Malmö, ofer a rich design history and wonderful food.


Style | N E W S

HOUSE TO HOME

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE TOTAL SPEND MUST EXCLUDE COST OF THESE CANDLES. *TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLY, SEE ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK FOR DETAILS PICTURES: JOSHUA MONAGHAN/ HOUSE & GARDEN/THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS LIMITED, DAMIAN RUSSELL

Having grown from a single London club to a global empire, Soho House now has designs on your home, with a new product range based on its super-cool interiors ‘It was a response to our guests and members,’ says Nick Jones, founder of global network of members’ clubs and restaurants Soho House, of its first homeware range. ‘We were constantly being asked, “where can I get your sheets, where are the towels from, who is the glassware by?” As more houses opened, we decided to start designing everything to go in them ourselves. The next step was to make those things available for people to buy.’ The result is Soho Home, a collection of over 450 items including textiles, lighting, tableware, upholstery and accessories, all designed to encapsulate the laidback yet luxurious vibe found in Jones’s venues. Four years in the making, Jones, group design director Vicky Charles, and European design director James Waterworth all admit that it’s been a steep learning curve. ‘The opening of Soho House Chicago really got the project moving, but we soon realised that it takes a lot more time to develop some products than others’, says Vicky. ‘What the research has given us, however, is a Rolodex of experienced manufacturers and craftspeople from all over the world’. Now, the in-house design team works with companies such as Italian linen weaver Frette, iconic Stafordshire pottery Burleigh, and traditional furniture maker George Smith to name but a few. ‘They’re great partnerships’ says Jones. ‘You’re not only getting the feel of Soho House, but the quality of these suppliers,

which is phenomenal’. Design inspiration is taken from the houses themselves – currently customers can shop from Chiswick’s High Road House, Babington House in Somerset, the group’s newest rural outpost Farmhouse, which opened in Oxfordshire in 2015, Soho House New York and, of course, Chicago. Going forward the plan is to develop collections from the 13 other existing properties, plus any new locations as they launch (Barcelona, Mumbai and Amsterdam are currently under construction). The aim, says Jones, is to deliver goods within 48 hours. ‘I’m an impatient person, I want things now,’ he says. The website also carries a selection of vintage pieces sourced by the team. Previously available only to members, the range will be ofered to non-members from September. So how do they expect it to fare with those not already au fait with Soho House style? ‘It isn’t pretentious or flashy. It’s reasonably priced and good quality,’ says Jones. ‘I think more than just our members will appreciate that.’ (sohohome.com). Portrait From left, James Waterworth, Vicky Charles and Nick Jones Products, from top Vintage rug, from £795; ‘Barwell’ coupe, £28; ‘Whichford’ teapot, £75; ‘Spoon’ armchair, £1,800; ‘Portobello’ cashmere throw, £450

READER OFFER Spend £125† or more at sohohome.com and get a free set of travel candles from the Cowshed range, worth £26 – six fragrances available. Simply add your choice of candle to your basket then enter code ELLEDECO at the checkout*.

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Style | S H O P P I N G

D E S I G N D E S T I N AT I O N A R A M S T O R E

All shops are not made equal, some are essential one-stop design emporiums. This month, we visit the fantastic Aram Store in London’s Covent Garden

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FOUR OF OUR TOP ARAM PIECES

‘Girard’ cofee table by Alexander Girard for Knoll International, £999

‘Non Conformist’ chair by Eileen Gray, £2,608

‘Kora’ porcelain vase by Studiopepe, £149

‘Palette JH8’ table by Jaime Hayón for &Tradition, £995

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURE: PAUL RAESIDE

What’s the store’s history? The London shopping scene received two strong shocks to the system in 1964: Habitat landed on Fulham Road; and a few months earlier, Aram Store opened on the King’s Road. The two shops served diferent clientele, but both were radical departures for Brits who’d grown up with wartime Utility furniture and ‘brown’ antiques. Zeev Aram’s white-box store stocked the work of Bauhaus icons and Modernists like Marcel Breuer and Le Corbusier. Detractors denounced it as ‘hospital furniture’ and sent Aram hate mail. He was unfazed. ‘The important thing is that there was a reaction,’ he recalls. ‘I was afraid people would just walk past.’ Now, we can see how radically ahead of its time the store was. Today, Aram Store occupies an impressive four-floor space in Covent Garden. What brands will I find there? Pieces by Le Corbusier and Breuer are still present and correct, manufactured by Cassina, Vitra and Thonet; other big hitters include Carl Hansen & Søn, Fritz Hansen, Flos, MDF Italia and Knoll International. You’ll also find a brand new 180-square-metre space dedicated to Italian bed brand Flou (above right), of which the store is the exclusive London stockist. Flou’s luxurious upholstered beds in neutral hues – including the first-ever modern upholstered bed, Vico Magistretti’s ‘Nathalie’ design (1978) – are a true insider secret. What’s its USP? Founder Zeev Aram’s aim is to provide ‘excellent service’ and ‘as wide a range as possible’ of the best modern design. Not merely a store, it has also acted as a champion of both new and established talents, through exhibitions in its top-floor gallery space. Here, in 1981, Japanese icon Shiro Kuramata’s work was seen in Europe for the first time; a young Jasper Morrison got his big break in 1987 when his ‘Thinking Man’s Chair’ was spotted by manufacturer Giulio Cappellini at the shop’s 23rd anniversary show. What makes it a must visit? Aram Store is the only place where you can buy authentic reissues of the great Irish Modernist Eileen Gray’s designs (Zeev Aram championed the neglected designer’s work in the 1970s and now has the world licence to produce and distribute her furniture). And if you’re not in the market for a big investment, the store has an excellent selection of gifts and accessories for the style conscious. 110 Drury Lane, London WC2 (aram.co.uk)


Style | S H O P P I N G

TOP OF THE (ONLINE) SHOPS These days you can find a marvellous array of quirky things for your home online – from handcrafted accessories to vintage curiosities. Here, we round up the 14 new webshops you need to know!

M AT T E R O F S T U F F What does it sell? This London-based gallery accords great importance to materials – hence its name and its focus on cool, contemporary furniture and accessories with a craft story behind them. The price point ranges from a few pounds into the thousands. Hot buy ‘Gesture’ handmade stained porcelain bowl by Meghan Hutchins, who forms one third of design studio Creo Collective, £60 Log on at matterofstuf.com

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: TERRY DONNELLY, TIM YOUNG

MINOR GOODS What does it sell? They’re being modest, but Minor Goods is really a major find. Its ‘less is more’ design aesthetic extends to pretty blue and green stoneware, lovely wooden spoons and cotton-cord placemats: it’s a capsule collection of beautiful basics. Hot buy Handcrafted oak chopping board, £38 for medium (pictured) Log on at minorgoods.com

SECRET LINEN STORE What does it sell? This is bedlinen central: lovely cotton sheets come in endless categories such as ‘white’, ‘striped’, and the extremely handy ‘Ikea size’. There are also collections of throws, valances and children’s bedding. Consider it a one-stop shop for your bedroom! Hot buy ‘Percale’ washed cotton bedding in duck-egg blue: pillowcases, from £15; duvet cover, from £45 Log on at secretlinenstore.com

AT E L I E R S U K H A What does it sell? Atelier Sukha (a Sanskrit word meaning ‘joy of life’) describes itself as ‘a cosy little department store in Amsterdam’ selling unique, handmade items. That means Tibetan wool carpets and giant floor cushions crafted in Nepal, as well as pretty monochrome paper storage boxes and neem-wood plates from India. The overriding theme is pale and interesting. Hot buy Giant cotton ‘Chulto’ floor cushion, £750 Log on at atelier-sukha.nl

LA TRÉSORERIE What does it sell? This Paris-based company lives up to its name with simple, utilitarian tableware (think old-school glass sugar shakers and classic wooden washing-up brushes), hammered metal saucepans by Japanese firm Yoshikawa, wire wall-hung shelves and linen bath towels. In other words, everyday luxury at its best. Hot buy Striped tasselled linen bath towel, £53 Log on at latresorerie.fr

WORKSHOP What does it sell? This Brighton boutique’s online arm sells stylish, functional household goods from around the world. Wooden-handled kitchen knives by Spanish maker Pallarès, dustpan-andbrush sets by Swedish label Iris Hantverk and incense by Margate apothecary Haeckels are among the treasures. Hot buy Japanese straw trivet, £16 Log on at workshopliving.co.uk ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 63


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COULEUR LOCALE What does it sell? As the name suggests, this brand sells a wealth of local crafts from far-flung places. Oferings range from tribal stools from Zimbabwe and pompomtrimmed towels from Morocco to Indonesian feather-and-shell crowns. Brilliant for statement pieces and curious gifts. Hot buy Black Tunisian stoneware by Nelson Sepulveda, from £16 for a bowl Log on at couleurlocale.eu THE OTHERIST What does it sell? This Dutch webstore is a virtual cabinet of curiosities: framed butterflies and beetles, surreal ‘Animalia’ trays by French brand iBride and realistic ceramic fruits by West Midlands duo Penkridge Ceramics are among the wonderful oddities on ofer. Hot buy ‘Polyura Cognathus’ framed butterfly, £69 Log on at otherist.com NOOK SHOP What does it sell? Pleasingly pared-down utility-style homewares for the bathroom and kitchen. We love the traditional white enamelware from Europe, Robert Welch’s cast-iron pestles and mortars, and old-school wooden household brushes. Hot buy Brass plant mister, £14.95 Log on at nookshop.co.uk ARTILLERIET What does it sell? Artilleriet sells furniture and accessories by brands that you’ll have heard of – Astier de Villatte, Hay – alongside many that you won’t know, but will love. Its edit is impeccable in an understated Scandinavian way, and while there are many expensive pieces, it’s great for afordable gifts, too. Hot buy ‘A4’ bentwood bistro chair in red, £140 Log on at artilleriet.se 64 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

CURIOUS EGG What does it sell? Set up in 2015 by Scottish artist Lorraine Aaron and her husband Roddy, this company sells original artworks, unusual wallpapers, candles and beauty products, as well as a selection of home accessories. Aaron’s network of skilled artisans can also source special items or make bespoke pieces. Hot buy ‘Bardot’ lampshade, £65 Log on at curiousegg.com T H O R S T E N VA N E L T E N What does it sell? We’re delighted that Thorsten van Elten has launched a webstore selling cool and crazy designs from Eastern Europe and his native Germany (design fans may remember his former website THEO and his east London shop selling work by up-and-coming designers). Don’t miss the lovely blog. Hot buy ‘All You Need’ oak toolbox, £57.50 Log on at thorstenvanelten.com MARK LEWIS INTERIOR DESIGN What does it sell? London interior designer Mark Lewis’s webshop is the place to find perfectly understated hardware for your home, such as shelf brackets and simple, oldfashioned coat hooks. There are also reclaimed floorboards, Welsh slate tiles and customised furniture. Hot buy Bronze ‘D’ handle, £15 Log on at marklewisinteriordesign.com MAISON NUMEN What does it sell? Billing itself as a ‘global portal to the hidden talent of craftspeople from around the world’, this new website debuts with the ‘Latin Animae Vol 1’ collection of crafts from South America. Baskets and great natural textiles are the primary focus. Hot buy Basket by Venezuelan Guarekena women, £45 Log on at maisonnumen.com Find more stylish webshops at elledecoration.co.uk E D

PICTURE: RORY GARDINER

TOP OF THE SHOPS...


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X LAURA GONZALEZ

We talk to our favourite interior designers about their life and work Who is she? Before she had even completed her degree at the Ecole Nationale Superieur d’Architecture de Paris, Laura Gonzalez had set up her own design practice, Pravda Arkitect. ‘A friend ofered me the chance to create the interior of a tailoring store and things took of from there,’ she recalls of the project that began 12 years ago. Her big break was re-designing legendary Parisian rock venue Bus Palladium in 2010, where she paired funky 1970s wallpaper with secondhand finds. ‘I was lucky that the client trusted me despite my lack of experience.’ What’s her style? Gonzalez describes it as ‘bohemian chic,’ with a ‘subtle balance of aged and new, rough and luxury’. This is evidenced in projects such as the Alcazar restaurant in Paris (bottom), which re-launched last summer with a new look that blends marble, brass and terrazzo with an abundance of greenery. Art often appears alongside antiques in Gonzalez’s projects. She sources

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL

Gonzalez’s bohemian-chic style mixes antiques, sourced in her hometown of Paris, with lush greenery and touches of marble them from her favourite Parisian auction house, Piasa, and picks up secondhand items from the city’s Les Puces market. She cites a key influence as the avant-garde work of French interior designer Madeleine Castaing. What are her recent projects? The Manko Peruvian restaurant in Paris, where she paired gold and green malachite with kilim fabrics and lush tropical plants to create something ‘innovative and warm that reflected the style of the cooking.’ She has also worked on several private homes, including a very glamorous Parisian apartment (pictured top and above left) that features a beautiful black marble door frame (details overleaf ) and elegant neutral-coloured living room. What is she currently working on? Two hotels and six restaurants in Paris, ranging from a traditional brasserie to a top secret revamp of an iconic address, plus two new residential projects in London. She says: ‘The most important thing is to tell a story and to understand what that story is going to be from the beginning of a project.’ (pravdaarkitect.wix.com). Turn over for Gonzalez’s expert advice on marble ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 67


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D E C O R AT O R I N D E X : E X P E R T A D V I C E LAURA GONZALEZ’S GUIDE TO WORKING WITH MARBLE How to pick your marble Mix and match diferent colours of stone and various polishes. Each slice is diferent and the veins in it can change the overall efect, so it’s important to choose the exact piece you like from a dealer – I use Carrara Marble (carraramarble.co.uk). Choose a specific slab and the dealer will do the measuring and drawings, cut the marble to size and install it. Each type of marble has diferent qualities – for example, it’s a bad idea to use black Nero Marquina marble in a shower because white limescale looks obvious against the dark stone.

Annie Sloan Paints Everything (Cico Books, £14.99) includes 40 DIY projects from the chalk paint expert: from hand-stencilled cushions to painted chandeliers and cabinets, and dyed vintage lace curtains (yes, you can use Sloan’s chalk paint to dye fabric, diluting it to create the colour required – genius!). Whether you love plain colours or pattern, there’s inspiration for everyone.

How to care for marble The only downside to marble is that you have to be careful about maintaining it. I love marble in a kitchen, but I always advise my clients that it needs special care. It’s fragile, so even spilling lemon juice on a worktop can leave a mark. Be sure to clean it with a non-acidic product.

The trick to try at home On a recent project in an apartment in Paris, I used black Nero Marquina marble to create a trim for a doorway (right), as an elegant transition from one room to another. It required a minimal amount of marble, meaning a slightly lower cost, and creates a striking efect. However, installing a marble architrave is complicated, specialist work that requires a technical plan (drawn up by an architect or structural engineer) to ensure safety – the stone is incredibly heavy! Plus, the marble needs to be cut to an accurate angle of 45 degrees for a seamless finish. 68 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

L I B R A RY U P DAT E S Three of the best decorating books to buy this month

Modern Living: How to decorate with Style (TeNeues, £29.95). One of a series of new books (the other two, on chalet style and Scandinavian living, are to follow) penned by former ELLE Decoration homes editor Claire Bingham. She explores some of the world’s most inspiring interiors and ofers DIY tips to get the look yourself. The Stuf of Life by Hilary Robertson (Ryland Peters & Small, £25) is a perennial decorating classic that we love for its invaluable tips on how to style and display your stuf – all the disparate but treasured possessions that we all slowly acquire. You’ll discover how to make the most of a multitude of storage and surfaces around your home, from blank walls to mantelpieces and windowsills. It’s perfect advice for an instant home update.


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

PARQUET, YOUR WAY

WORDS: CLAUDIA BALLIE PICTURES: BOOM PROJECT, FELIX FOREST/LIVING INSIDE

Add character to your floors (or walls) with this classic wood wonder. Here, we explain everything you need to know What is parquet? First used in France in the 17th century, it is made of wood blocks glued to a sub floor to create geometric patterns – available as both solid and engineered boards. The advantage of a solid floor is that it can be refreshed by sanding back and re-oiling or lacquering. Engineered flooring is pre-finished and more stable, so good for adding underfloor heating. Parquet requires a level sub floor (to ensure blocks sit flush) so will need professional installation. What patterns are there to choose from? Popular styles include traditional herringbone, chevron – often found in Parisian apartments – and more complex Parquet de Versailles and Mansion Weave patterns (see next page for details). Also in demand are herringbone and chevron designs laid using oversized boards, which give a bold, modern look that works well in open-plan spaces. Is it easy to maintain? Yes. Treat it as you would a normal wooden floor – sweeping and mopping lightly. To protect it, seal it using hard wax oil, or for a higher sheen choose lacquer. Beeswax gives a rich, mid-sheen finish. If parquet is damaged, individual blocks can easily be removed and replaced. What wood should I choose? The most popular is oak, from golden brown to silvery grey. It can be coloured by coating it with wax or coloured lacquer. Alternatively, the boards can be fumed with ammonia – ‘many floors are treated in this way to give a smoky base,’ says Jeandré Du Toit, sales director at Ecora (ecora.co.uk). Dark woods such as wenge and walnut add drama, while pale maple has a Scandinavian feel. You can also combine diferent woods and add tiles. What about reclaimed parquet? It can be cheaper, but the cleaning, sanding and sealing process often counters any savings. Look out for original mahogany, sapele and merbau parquet – no longer milled for environmental reasons. How much does it cost? Basic reclaimed parquet starts at £25 per square metre, while complex designs in high-quality timbers can be up to £400 per square metre. Don’t forget installation costs – about £90 per square metre. ➤

ON THE WALLS (ABOVE) ‘There is a huge trend for using parquet on walls, in the same way as wood cladding,’ says Richard McKay, managing director of McKay Flooring. ‘Walls are lined with plywood, then the parquet is attached in the same way as if it were being fitted on a floor.’ A similar efect to this costs from £180 per square metre (mckayflooring.co.uk). ON THE FLOOR (BELOW) This original oak parquet has been restored to bring out the natural colours. Expect to pay £24 per square metre for restoration work.

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NINE OF THE BEST PARQUET STYLES

Herringbone This classic parquet works well in period and modern properties. If space allows, extra-wide boards like this ‘Nero oak’ giant herringbone by Element 7 make a statement. From £254.40 per square metre (element7.co.uk)

‘Biscuit’ parquet by Patricia Urquiola These boards with bevelled edges and curved ends can be laid in a number of formations for a playful take on traditional parquet. £192 per square metre, Listone Giordano (listonegiordano.com)

Chevron This parquet pattern can be used to make a narrow space appear wider. Engineered European white oak in ‘Whirlpool Edge’ by Domus gives a really contemporary look. From £112.78 per square metre (domusgroup.com)

Industrial parquet Using all of the timber, including the lighter sapwood, these boards, made from morado, or Bolivian rosewood, are striking and sustainable. From £96 per square metre, Solid Floor (solidfloor.co.uk)

Parquet de Versailles This historic pattern replaced marble floors in the Palace of Versailles in 1684. Solid black charred Elm from the ‘Vault’ collection by Ted Todd adds a modern edge. £359 per 98 x 98 centimetre panel (tedtodd.co.uk)

Mansion Weave Perfect for use in diicult shaped rooms, as it is non-directional. This engineered oak by Ecora is fumed and oiled to bring out the grain in the wood. From £167.82 per square metre (ecora.co.uk)

Hexagonal These engineered oak tiles by Bisazza were designed to be used alone or to mix with the brand’s ‘Cementiles’ range of encaustic tiles. £216 per square metre (bisazza.com)

Coloured McKay Flooring creates parquet in a rainbow of colours. Combine it with wooden boards for a fresh look. From £216 per square metre (mckayflooring.co.uk).

Dutch Weave Laid at 90-degree angles, this parquet has a smart, regimented look. Dutch parquet in ‘Brasil’ by Cheville Parquet, £74.75 per square metre (cheville.co.uk)

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MCKAY FLOORING PICTURE: SEBASTIAN ERRAS/BASSET IMAGES (PHOTOGRAPHY), PIXART PRINTING (PRODUCTION)

From traditional to ultra-modern, there’s a pattern to suit every home. Here are our favourites…


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FIVE OF THE BEST LIGHT SWITCH BRANDS Best for modern industrial Dowsing & Reynolds Founder James Dowsing-Reynolds creates design-led but afordable switches, dimmers and sockets in black, white, gold and silver, as well as tarnished copper. Single copper socket, £17.99. Scott Hall Mills, Leeds LS7 (dowsingandreynolds.com) Best for slimline switches Jim Lawrence This family-run Sufolkbased company’s slimline switches can be used in tight spaces, between doorframes or next to cabinetry for example. Two-gang toggle switch, £47.70. The Ironworks, Hadleigh IP7 (jim-lawrence.co.uk)

D E S I G N D E TA I L S

LIGHT SWITCHES Used every day yet often overlooked, the humble switch has had a makeover. Here we share the tricks and brands to know… From industrial-style toggles to custom colours, there are now a host of alternatives to the standard white box switch. ‘As an architect, details like these are super-important, which is why we designed our own,’ says Massimo Minale, an architect who founded Buster and Punch, which makes chunky metal light switches that take their cue from amplifier knobs (selection pictured above). ‘If you want to make a statement there are plenty of designs that will do just that,’ adds Mark Holloway, owner of Holloways of Ludlow. ‘Industrial styles and bronze are popular right now, but if you’d rather render the switches virtually invisible, match them to your wall colour or look for transparent plates.’ There may be lots of new design options, but the best way to position switches and sockets in a room remains the same. ‘Think about how you use the space, and map out where the furniture will be,’ says Holloway. ‘Plan socket placement to minimise trailing cables. Lights may need a two-way switch, so you can control them from diferent doorways, or the top and bottom of stairs.’ Minale advises dimmer switches inside the room, rather than at the door. ‘A toggle or rocker switch by the door gives instant illumination, but consider a dimmer by the bed, sofa or dining table so that you can control lighting levels from where you are sitting.’ (busterandpunch.com; hollowaysofludlow.com). 74 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

Best for a traditional look Holloways of Ludlow The best place to find Bakelite switches. Front plates are available in a range of wood finishes, ready for painting. Switch on oak, £31.50. 121 Shepherd’s Bush Road, London W6 (holloways ofludlow.com) Best for elegant classics The Nanz Company This US firm makes hardware based on original designs by companies such as Yale, Norwalk and Corbin Russwin. ‘9810LT3’ switch, £333. 420 Design Centre East, Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 (nanz.com)

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURE: MAGNUS TORSNE, BENOIT FRANCHIMONT

Best for a minimal look Luxonov For the ultimate in contemporary design, try this Belgian company, which produces handmade products in brass, exotic skins and woods – it ships to the UK. ‘Neva’ switch, £75. Rue de Spa 146B, 4970 Francorchamps, Belgium (luxonov.com)


GOLD STANDARD The Sofa & Chair Company’s new showroom is a one-stop shop for all your interiors needs, displaying pieces expertly crafted in London When The Sofa & Chair Company was founded in 2002, its reputation for producing high-quality, handcrafted bespoke furniture within a very short time frame quickly made it a go-to for interiors insiders. Fourteen years later, that service remains one of the pillars upon which the company is built. And the commitment behind it – to bring the best pieces to the customer in the least possible amount of time and with the minimum amount of hassle – has been incorporated into every other aspect of the business. This is immediately apparent on a visit to its brand-new west London showroom. The impressive 10,000-squaremetre space is home to an ever-evolving collection of luxury furniture. Not just the soft furnishings upon which The Sofa & Chair Company’s reputation (and name) was built, but every other kind, too – from desks to custom shelving; banquet seating to sumptuous beds. There is also a full range of lighting, homeware and decorative accessories, including the brand’s most recent ofering: made-to-measure curtains. Every piece of upholstered furniture is fully customisable (the new showroom is also home to the UK’s largest fabric library, featuring over 15,000 samples). Once you’ve browsed the collections and discussed your design and lifestyle needs with The Sofa & Chair Company’s expert team of in-store interiors specialists, your selection will be sent to the nearby London workshop’s master craftspeople. There, every aspect of the making process – from CAD designs and fabric cutting to finishing pieces by hand – is undertaken by The Sofa & Chair Company’s in-house designers, carpenters and tailors. And all to the standard and same impressive four-to-six week lead time the company first became known for 14 years ago.

The aim is to deliver you the most luxurious furniture, in a very swift four-to-six weeks

1 Western Avenue Business Park, Mansfield Road, Park Royal, London W3 (thesofaandchair.co.uk)

ON SHOW AT DECOREX INTERNATIONAL The Sofa & Chair Company will be exhibiting at Decorex International 2016 – the first time it has ever done so. The design and interiors exhibition is part of the annual London Design Festival, and ofers an opportunity to discover emerging trends and get closer to the UK’s leading designers and makers. Visit The Sofa & Chair Company at stand H39 to discuss all your interiors needs and discover what its expert team can do to help you achieve them, from initial concept to finished product. 18–21 September, Syon Park, Middlesex (decorex.com)

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The Sofa & Chair Company offers a bespoke service, with all pieces made by hand in its London workshop

This page ‘Urban Wetlands’ wall art, £4,495; ‘Guinea’ dining chairs, £780 each (plus fabric); ‘Ormand’ galvanised metal and marble dining table, £14,995 Opposite page, top ‘Holland’ superking bed, £4,745 (plus fabric); ‘Petite Concave’ chrome and hand-blown glass lamps, £1,495 each; ‘Langham’ high-gloss veneer side tables, £1,995 each; ‘Tansley’ Murano glass chandelier, £4,495; ‘Regency’ silk, lambswool and angora throw, £410 Centre, left ‘Townsend’ bronze, leather and wood desk, £3,795; ‘Charles’ chair, £700 (plus fabric); ‘Dalla’ lamp, £545; ‘Celcius’ shelving, £2,995 Bottom: ‘Rochester’ sofa, £2,445 (plus fabric); ‘Christo’ chairs; £1,695 (plus fabric); ‘Lyra Grand’ lamps, £1,895 each; ‘Caviat’ large ceramic vase, £465; ‘Slate’ cofee table, £3,495; ‘Freya’ tray, £1,995; ‘Tortis’ lambswool throw, from £265; ‘Piped’ cushions, from £65 each; ‘Grafton Beige’ viscose rug, from £1,100, all The Sofa & Chair Company (thesofaandchair.co.uk)


Style | D E S I G N

WE FOUGHT THE FAKES. AND WON! In four months’ time it will be illegal to make or sell knock-off design classics in the UK. Here’s everything you need to know about this overdue change in the law, and why it’s important In 2012 ELLE Decoration launched an ‘Equal Rights for Design’ petition to highlight a copyright protection loophole that made Britain the designer knock-of capital of Europe. Backed by the likes of Sir Terence Conran and Sir James Dyson, we took our campaign to the government and ultimately succeeded in changing the law to bring copyright protection for design into line with other disciplines such as art, music and literature. Victory tasted a little sour though as it wasn’t due to be enforced until 2020, enabling an extremely lengthy transition period for the faux furniture folk to phase out their dodgy stock. But, after continued pressure, the government capitulated and the fakers now have just until the end of January 2017 to get shot of their shoddy goods. Some popular newspapers are already bleating that this means the end of cut-price modern classics for the masses. Think that’s true? Read on to discover why there’s a lot more to it than that… I’m not a designer, so what’s this got to do with me? There are estimated to be 250,000 designers in this country, so even if you’re not one, you’ll probably know somebody who is. These are the people who make your life easier, more eicient, comfortable and beautiful so that you can get on with whatever it is you choose to do. Don’t they deserve a little respect? Plus, the creative industries are a significant part of the UK’s economy, contributing 5.14 per cent of its employment total, 10.6 per cent of exports and 2.9 per cent of Gross Value Added. If designers continue to receive such pathetic protection, why would anyone ever bother to become one? And that’s a lot of jobs and money to lose from the economy. Granted, most creatives work for love and passion, but fair recognition should also be part of the deal. I suppose so, but at the end of the day, aren’t ideas just ‘out there’? Good design and great ideas benefit us all, for sure, but how would you feel if you devoted your life to inventing something that changed the world, or even just made things a little prettier, but no-one gave you any credit for it, let alone paid you? Would you think that’s fair? Isn’t it better all round to acknowledge who thought of what first, who collaborated with who, and credit them

accordingly? The tricky bit is that sometimes ‘ideas’ are rather intangible, unlike bricks and mortar. Nevertheless, musical tunes, literature, even words, phrases and symbols are already commonly recognised as intellectual property, and routinely protected via extensive copyrights, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights and even trade secrets in some cases. Plus, in response to the ‘but I could have done that’ knee-jerk retort… the only answer is, ‘Maybe, but you didn’t, did you?’. From Picasso’s Guernica to Lee Broom’s ‘Decanter’ light (massively ripped of ), they did it first, not you. Okay, so what’s the gripe for design? In the UK, art, literature, film and music are all aforded automatic copyright protection for 70 years after the death of the originating author/s. Whereas for designers, registered designs are protected only from the date of issue and for just 25 years. And worse, if your work is unregistered (costs might prohibit every single permutation of a design being registered), protection lasts for only three years! That seems a bit inconsistent… Exactly! Originally, cover was low as it was only intended to protect things like car parts and industrial components. The rule setters thought that longer cover might impede industrial progress, believing that inventors would not bother to innovate if they continued to get paid for something they’d already done. Well that seems reasonable, why should people be able to make money from something they created ages ago? By that rationale, why should the surviving Beatles continue to profit from their life’s work? Or JK Rowling get any more royalty cheques for the first few Harry Potter books? Or Picasso’s family have their heritage protected? It cuts both ways. Why protect some creative disciplines, and not others? Additionally, we flagged up that the law is out of step with what currently constitutes design. We see ‘design’ as an endeavour on a creative par with art or writing. This isn’t about nuts and bolts anymore. Are designers felt to invest less ‘labour, skill or judgment’ in their work (the criteria governing copyright eligibility) than authors, musicians or artists? ➤

WORDS: MICHELLE OGUNDEHIN

IN THE BEGINNING... It all started with a news piece declaring that Samantha Cameron ‘had brought a taste of Italy to 10 Downing Street’ with a reproduction ‘Arco’ lamp. We were appalled that even in governmental high circles there could be such a lack of understanding about the negative implications of the UK legally being the knock-of capital of Europe. Read all of Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin’s original blog posts on elledecoration.co.uk

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But designers can always take someone who copies their work to court, can’t they? Well, yes, but design rights are currently only enforceable through the civil, rather than criminal courts, and because it’s usually a David (the designer) vs Goliath (copyists) situation, most Goliaths bank on the designers giving up through lack of funds, time or emotional energy. And even if they win, the ofence isn’t seen as criminal, so going to court is no real deterrent in the minds of the bullies who continue to bank cash of the back of another’s originality. If we don’t protect our young designers, we won’t have a design industry in the future. Alright, I can see how this non-protection malarky could be bad for young designers, but what about the old stuf, I mean those designers are dead, so why should I care about them? That’s just manufacturers profiting of a back catalogue isn’t it? Not really. The licence to produce the work of these seminal designers comes with the responsibility to protect those legacies for the benefit of historians, the design-interested, students and future generations, whether that legacy comes in the form of foundations (see box of below), dedicated museums, or a body of work. Manufacturers also pay royalties to the designers’ descendants where relevant. And let’s not forget, in many cases the manufacturers were fundamental in translating those designers’ dreams into realities. For a writer, substitute publisher; for a musician, imagine it as the producer/record label. It’s a partnership; one could not exist without the other. And there’s never a guarantee of continued success, which is why good manufacturers also constantly reinvest in research and development, to hopefully enable a new generation of talent to create the classics of the future. The rip-of merchants circumvent all of this. They care only about quick profit, today, for themselves. But most classics made today aren’t ‘original’, they’re all modified aren’t they? Unless you’re lucky enough to find a vintage one, we’re all buying reproductions! Let’s not confuse two issues here: 1. Who owns the right to reproduce a design. 2. That even licensed models may difer from the very first versions. Authentic within the terms of this discussion means made by the company that legally owns the licence to reproduce the design. And yes, today’s versions of an ‘original’ design may well have the benefit of the progress of technology. For example, the ‘Barcelona’ chair, first designed for the German Pavilion at the 1929 Barcelona Expo. Before the originating designer, Mies van der Rohe, sold the design rights to Knoll in 1953, it was quite probably manufactured by several diferent companies. The extremely rare ‘originals’ – the six debut models – are indeed structurally very diferent from today’s chair. The upholstery was pigskin, and the frame was put together like a complex jigsaw

puzzle. But these details are moot. Bottom line is that Knoll alone owns the right to sell the chair, or modify it with agreement from the Mies Foundation, and as such each ‘authentic’ chair comes replete with a serial number, signature and logo. Anything ‘Barcelona’-esque without these is an unlicensed copycat. But some of this classic stuf is really expensive, why should only the wealthy have access to these designs? This isn’t about wealth, it’s about desire, as certain pieces have become aspirational symbols of a luxury lifestyle. These pieces were never intended as democratic design, just as not everyone can own a Hermès handbag. We encourage people to spend only what they can aford, but also to have the confidence to be original in their choices. Yes the ‘Arco’ lamp, ‘Eames’ lounger et al are exquisite, but they’re not the only lights and chairs in the world! Just as the ‘Birkin’ isn’t the only handbag in existence. I can desire, but not necessarily have, and such is life. It sucks sometimes. But if the copyists can make things cheaper, why can’t the licence-holders? Agreed, if an authentically created ‘Barcelona’ chair from Knoll retails for £4,000+, how can someone else sell the same thing for £400? But let’s think about this for a moment. To sell the chair for this little simply means a lot of corners will have been cut. It’ll be low-quality leather, probably not used on all sides of any cushions (fabric or pleather is commonly substituted where they think you won’t look), the cushion will be filled with cheap foam, the frame will be hollow, and the steel used less than the recommended 12 millimetre thickness. But if it looks the same, what’s the problem? Maybe your conscience will be pricked by the possible human cost. Forget about safe working conditions and fair pay for staf, jettison ecologically aware environmental practice, waste management and so on, as these might well all contribute to getting the price down. But honestly, put an original next to a copy and you’ll immediately be able to tell the diference. And more crucially, comfort and longevity will have been compromised. A quality chair will have seats you sink into, not bounce of. Plus, an authentic classic will age gracefully, gaining patina and character before you hand it down to your children. And, it will hold its value! If you can aford it, it’s a functional heirloom. But I can’t find what I want for the amount of money I have to spend. Then that’s where we at ELLE Decoration must do better. We hereby dedicate ourselves to finding those style-forless items that you’ll love just as much (see our high street wish list on p41), as well as talent spotting the future classics (see p141 for our 2016 ELLE Decoration British Design Award winners). There’s loads of great stuf out there, so no-one ever has to resort to fakes. They aren’t worth it, and you deserve more. E D

MEET THE REAL DEALS The four most ripped-of classics include the ‘Eames’ lounger designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1956; the ‘Arco’ lamp designed by the Castiglioni Brothers in 1962; the aforementioned ‘Barcelona’ chair, and Arne Jacobsen’s 1958 ‘Egg’ chair. They are licensed to the manufacturers detailed right, all of whom contribute ‘Eames’ lounger, licence to the upkeep and support of these owned by Herman Miller in ‘Arco’ lamp, licence ‘Egg’ chair, licence owned ‘Barcelona’ chair, licence designers’ legacies through the listed owned by Knoll. The Mies the US, and Vitra in Europe. owned by Flos. The by Fritz Hansen. van der Rohe Foundation Castiglioni Foundation The Eames Foundation foundations, museums and archives. Jacobsen archive

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Style | D E S I G N

ARRESTING DEVELOPMENT We talk to Sammy Lee, the man whose Greenwich Peninsula project is transforming London Even if you don’t know his name, the chances are that you’ve seen the impact this man has had on London’s residential landscape. Former lawyer turned property developer Hong Kong-born Sammy Lee was behind the redevelopment of the Edwardian Grade II-listed Pearl Building into the Chancery Court hotel (now Rosewood London) and The Knightsbridge apartment complex, luxury homes set around a residents’ garden, but it’s his current project, the regeneration of Greenwich Peninsula (pictured), which is his biggest and most ambitious yet. Lee has teamed up with businessman Henry Cheng (with whom he has worked on and of for nearly 20 years) to form Knight Dragon, a new company tasked with developing a whole swathe of the capital between Canary Wharf and the Thames Barrier. When completed in around 2037, the 150-acre site will comprise seven neighbourhoods with more than 15,000 new homes, two schools, bars (Craft London, top), restaurants, and two and a half kilometres of picturesque river walkway. In short: it’s the largest single regeneration project undertaken in London. ‘For years, I think people were overwhelmed by the scale of the Greenwich site, but where others saw a derelict piece of land, I saw the blank canvas of opportunity,’ says Lee, on the thinking behind the project. ‘The city’s lack of housing is of concern to us all, so we challenged architecture firm

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: BEN ANDERS, CHRIS TUBBS, PAUL CALVER

‘Where others saw a derelict piece of land between Canary Wharf and the Thames Barrier, I saw the blank canvas of opportunity’

Allies and Morrison to create a high density development that combines the energy of New York and Hong Kong but is very much rooted in what makes London great.’ For Lee, an important part of that vision is partnering with creatives, from us at Team ED (the ELLE Decoration Style Consultancy has designed the penthouse floor of the Greenwich Peninsula Marketing Pavilion as a show apartment – see elledecoration.co.uk) to artists including Alex Chinneck, whose A Bullet From A Shooting Star sculpture (above) takes the form of an inverted electricity pylon made of steel; Morag Myerscough, who designed vibrant colourblock cranes; and most recently, Conrad Shawcross, who is making a site-specific sculpture entitled Lenticular Dazzle Camouflage. The towering piece will be constructed using perforated triangularshaped panels, each one the size of a London bus. Lee has also always loved film – in the past he has invested in a film company and was executive producer on the Oscar-winning movie Monster – so there’s a huge new film studio at the heart of the Peninsula. ‘I’m interested in how you weave the arts into the fabric of a place,’ he adds. ‘I believe that places are a reflection of the people that live and work within them, as much, if not more than the architecture.’ (greenwichpeninsula.co.uk). OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 83


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DESIGN HERO RICHARD SAPPER

The German industrial designer best known for his playful appliances with signature red switches

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TV, both for Brionvega. In 1972 he designed his iconic minimalist ‘Tizio’ lamp with a red switch for Artemide, inspired by a personal need – a light that took up little space on his perpetually messy desk. Some of Sapper’s best-loved products were produced for Alessi, including the playful ‘9091’ stovetop kettle with a melodious whistle. It was the brand’s first designer kettle, and established a company tradition. Of the design, Sapper said: ‘Why can’t a kettle give people pleasure and fun?’ Designs for an espresso maker, saucepans and a skyscraper-shaped cheese grater followed in its playful wake. In 1992, the highly versatile Sapper designed the ‘ThinkPad’, an early laptop, for IBM. Inspired by Japanese bento boxes and cigar containers, the ThinkPad paved the way for many of today’s slimline computers – and it featured the designer’s telltale red button. Many of Sapper’s pieces are still in production, including his eminently practical stackable ‘Tosca’ chair for Magis, a testament to their timeless appeal. He is the subject of a new book, Richard Sapper by Jonathan Olivares (right; Phaidon, £59.95). Products, clockwise from left ‘Tizio’ lights for Artemide; ‘ThinkPad’ laptop for IBM; ‘TS 502’ portable radio for Brionvega; ‘9091’ stovetop kettle for Alessi; ‘Tosca’ stackable chair for Magis; hairdryer for La Rinascente department store; ‘Algol’ TV for Brionvega

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS

The work of Richard Sapper (1932–2015) revealed his love of aesthetics: he often said a ‘desire for beauty’ was a fundamental human need. The German designer believed that products should be entertaining as well as useful. Discreetly incorporated into some of his no-nonsense pieces – many of them black because, he noted, ‘it always looks good with other colours’ – was his signature: a scarlet switch or button. Born in Munich, Sapper was fascinated by the exotic background of his father, a painter who grew up in the Guatemalan jungle. He studied philosophy, then business at the University of Munich. There he became hooked on industrial design and, on graduating, landed a job in the design department of car company Daimler-Benz. This gave him a good grounding in technical drawing but little creative freedom, so, in 1958 he moved to Milan, renowned at the time as a hotbed of postwar design. He briefly worked in the more stimulating oice of architect Giò Ponti, then for department store La Rinascente, where he produced a nifty hairdryer with the power switch on its handle so that it could be used with one hand. From 1959, he collaborated with Italian designer Marco Zanuso – a fruitful 17-year partnership that yielded such stylish early 1960s items as the ‘TS 502’ radio (a hinged cube that opens to reveal its controls) and ‘Algol’ portable


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

PLEASANT VALLEY Fresh from masterminding the new Design Museum, which opens this November, award-winning architect John Pawson has created a picturesque modern retreat in the Welsh countryside. Ty Bywyd (‘The Life House’) is the seventh property in Alain de Botton’s Living Architecture portfolio of contemporary holiday homes and was inspired by the simplicity of Japanese design and the architecture of Benedictine monasteries. Sleeping six people, the 260-square-metre structure also evokes Scandinavian style, thanks to the 80,000 handmade Danish bricks that line the interior walls. The combination of materials, such as pale polished concrete floors and Douglas fir ceilings, creates a serene feel. ‘The location is wonderfully remote and I wanted to create a sanctuary where people feel at home,’ Pawson says. Furnishings include beautiful Kvadrat fabric curtains, which glide on Silent Gliss rails, and the house has a ‘contemplation chamber’ built into the side of the valley. £3,200 per week (livingarchitecture.co.uk). Don’t miss ‘Open House London’ is a two-day event celebrating the interiors of some of the capital’s most outstanding buildings. Our picks include Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower in Notting Hill and Andaz at Liverpool Street (formerly the Great Eastern Hotel), with its striking blue domed ceiling and gold detailing. 17–18 September (openhouselondon.org.uk). Head to p254 for more architectural gems you can visit across the UK.

We are making space in our homes for these architectural artworks inspired by the world’s most iconic buildings. Firstly, south London studio 4D Art, set up by artist and designer Steve Forde, a former creative director at the BBC, is creating laser-cut wooden artworks depicting the capital’s most recognisable buildings (1). Each one is finished with a high-gloss, brightly coloured Perspex background (from £850; 4dart.uk). Then there’s Studio Esinam, set up by Gothenburg-based art director and architect duo Josefine Lilljegren and Sebastian Gokah in 2013: we love the fine line drawings of the ‘Landmarks’ and ‘Elevations’ (2) prints (from £49; studioesinam.com). Seeking more colour? Go for architect/designer Sarah Evans’ bold Brutalist prints and textiles, which she creates for her label Oscar Francis. We especially love her graphic cushions (3), which depict the ordered beauty of London’s famous housing estates (from £32; oscarfrancis.co.uk).

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3 WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: PATRIK HAGBORG

LANDMARK COLLECTIONS


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Libeskind is one of the most famous architects in the world, with projects ranging from the award-winning Jewish Museum in Berlin to the Ground Zero site in New York. He has also recently designed furniture with Moroso

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What inspired you to become an architect? I used to be a professional musician: I played the accordion alongside the legendary Israeli-American violinist Itzhak Perlman. Then I attended the Bronx High School of Science, where my interests quickly turned to mathematics, but I always drew and painted; by chance I realised that architecture combined all of my interests. It wasn’t the first thing I considered doing, the idea evolved over time. What does the word ‘home’ mean to you? It’s a sanctuary; a place to be with your family, with friends, to read, to draw. You need to have somewhere that’s really for you – I try not to even look at my phone when I’m at home. What is your favourite room in your house? The whole house! I live in a renovated warehouse in Tribeca, New York. When I bought it, I took many of the interior walls out – I really wanted one big open-plan space. It was my daughter Rachael who asked to keep some walls intact, she being a teenager at the time and wanting privacy. What has been your favourite project? One of the most memorable ones was a private home in Connecticut (4, see it in full in next month’s issue). It was the very first time I had completed a house from scratch – most of my projects are museums and master plans like Manchester’s Imperial War Museum (1) and the Ground Zero site in Manhattan (5). I designed everything from the sofa and carpet to the shower and bed – it was so much fun. The exterior is angular and clad in dark stainless steel; in contrast, the interior is covered in rich oak, like a cosy log cabin. What’s your working process? I always start with a drawing. I love how artistic Renaissance architects created beautiful buildings that we all celebrate today – they all came from a pencil and

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paper. That said, I now use an iPad to draw. I was sceptical using it at the beginning but it’s so precise, and I can instantly send my drawings to clients. Is there a building in the world that you wish you had designed? I recently visited the San Giovanni Battista church near Florence (6), designed in the early 1960s by Italian architect Giovanni Michelucci. It sits on a busy highway outside the city. It’s a masterpiece – it’s astonishing, modern yet complex. I love the idea of spirituality on a highway – if you’re passing you can pop in and speak to God, like a drive-through for religion. What is the biggest challenge for architects today? To make sure the great cities of the world are not just places for the rich; that there is equality in the city centre for everyone. I’m currently working on a project to provide afordable housing in the historic, wealthy part of Berlin (2). I want to show

‘A home is a sanctuary, a place to be with your family and friends. You need to have somewhere that’s for you’ that good architecture doesn’t have to cost a huge amount. Cities become great because of the mix of people and the diverse types of creativity. Why did you start designing furniture? I have designed lighting and other small pieces in the past, but it wasn’t until I met Patrizia Moroso 6 that I thought about designing a full collection of sofas and chairs (3 ‘Gemma’ sofa). Patrizia approaches design with great passion. Plus, creating furniture has a personal touch: it’s immediate, it doesn’t take ten years to complete (libeskind.com).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: MARC LINS, ALAMY, JOSHUA TUCKER

ASK AN ARCHITECT DANIEL LIBESKIND

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Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

A R C H I T E C T U R A L I C O N R O YA L N AT I O N A L T H E AT R E B Y D E N Y S L A S D U N

Although it is one of the best examples of Brutalist architecture in the UK, the Royal National Theatre (completed in 1976) has always been controversial. HRH Prince of Wales – not the biggest fan of modern architecture – once described it as a ‘clever way of building a nuclear power station in the middle of London without anyone objecting’. However, Brutalist buildings and Modernist housing estates have been growing in popularity in recent years, with concrete now the material of choice for many contemporary architects and creatives. Even Instagrammers have become obsessed with the look, beginning a trend for capturing the angular lines of Brutalist masterpieces (follow @thisbrutallife and @brutal_architecture for inspiration). Designed by Sir Denys Lasdun (1914– 2001), a champion of the British Modernist movement, the Royal National Theatre complex consists of three diferent-sized spaces, the grandest being the Olivier Theatre, named after the venue’s first artistic director and legendary Oscarwinning actor Laurence Olivier. Next in size is the Lyttelton Theatre, named after the theatre’s first board chairman Oliver Lyttelton, and lastly, the Dorfman Theatre, dedicated to the renowned philanthropist and investor Lloyd Dorfman. 90 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

Lasdun’s original inspiration for the building was taken from the grand layout of the Piazza San Marco in Venice, a historic square that he believed was like a public theatre, where Venetians played out their daily lives. Incorporating this idea into the design, Lasdun hoped to create a ‘fourth theatre’ out of the open foyer, which would connect all three auditoria with a series of open stairwells, balconies, walkways and ramps, as well as a large outdoor space at the river entrance for summer performances and displays. The detail of the building is exacting: the textured yellow hues of Waterloo Bridge and Somerset House were colour matched and incorporated into elements of the concrete façade and the structure was designed so that it would frame rather than block views of iconic London buildings such as St Paul’s Cathedral. Last year, London-based RIBA awardwinning architecture practice Haworth Tompkins renovated many of the theatre’s interior spaces, including the Olivier Theatre, the foyer levels and the forecourt, ensuring that this Brutalist landmark will continue to inspire for many more generations to come. Architecture tours of the building are available, £12.50 per person. Upper Ground, London SE1 (nationaltheatre.org.uk).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: PHILIP VILE

An icon of the Brutalist movement that adds drama to London’s South Bank


Style | G A R D E N I N G

GREEN, GREEN GRASS OF HOME Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin looks into the one fake we approve of here at ELLE Decoration headquarters: artificial grass

Artificial grass! Surely that’s a big no no in the land of ED, authenticity being king and all that? Well, the fact is, the use of artificial grass is growing in the UK by some 20–30 per cent each year. Why is it becoming more popular? Probably because it’s essentially maintenancefree. No chemicals are needed to keep it looking weed-free and neat; nor water, which as another increasingly precious resource is kind of a big deal. Also, the average garden could take quite some hours to mow each month, meaning that by choosing artificial turf you get a big chunk of your life back. Yes, but real turf is worth the efort, surely? Well, I have a postage stamp sized lawn in my front garden, which is a lumpy bumpy nightmare that needs cutting by hand (too small for a lawnmower) every week in growing season, so it often looks horribly unkempt. I also have two dogs. Net efect? Something that’s ugly, unhygienic and not remotely verdant. But doesn’t artificial grass always look obviously fake? It certainly used to, and there are a lot of diferent products out there and a lot of confusion, but some companies have invested a huge amount of time and energy creating something that’s a long way from the lurid, scratchy plastic of a decade

ago. Part of this is down to the way that it’s manufactured. For example, if you looked at leading Brit brand Wonderlawn’s grass (wonderlawn.com) with a magnifying glass, you’d see that the individual blades are cut into various diferent X, C, U or V-like shapes. Well that’s nice, but I can’t see how a fancy profile is going to help the grass... The shapes each have diferent properties. Softness, resilience against flattening and so on. And flattening is a big deal. A lot of the products of lore looked pretty good for the first five minutes, but as soon as you walked on them they went flat and stayed that way. Let alone what they looked like if you let loose small children or dogs on them. Great recovery is down to the way the product is made, but a lot lies in the installation too. You install it yourself, don’t you? I mean I’ve seen it sold by the metre? You could, but it’s really not a DIY job. Plus many of the commonly available, cheap faux turfs are shipped in from the Far East, and they often have a Latex rubber backing making them completely unrecyclable. They also won’t weather well, quickly flattening and discolouring so when you have to replace it, it would go straight to landfill. But it can’t be that hard to put down, surely? Don’t you just roll it out like

a carpet? Well, as Mel Wright, managing director of Wonderlawn, puts it: ‘The success of artificial turf really lies in the base that it’s laid upon. Our method involves a sevenstep process that results in a lawn we’ll guarantee for ten years but, realistically, should look great for the next 15–20 years.’ Seven steps! That sounds a bit excessive, spell it out for me. First, they remove the existing grass and dig down about 10–15 centimetres. Then the ground is carefully levelled and a layer of crushed granite added, which is compacted down to make a firm underlayer. A commercial grade membrane goes on top of that to prevent weed growth, and only then does your Wonderlawn of choice go on top, followed by a fine layer of a special sand infill. Then they clean everything down, take away all the excavated soil, and leave you to admire your new lawn. I’m not sure about the sand part, won’t I be able to see it? I want a lawn, not a sandpit. They use a dedicated machine to spread it on in the first place and another special brush-like tool to shake it down. It’s very fine and pours right down to the base of the blades, the point being it not only holds the lawn securely in place, but it ensures the blades don’t flatten over time – the key to a really natural look. Most ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 93


Style | G A R D E N I N G

The original sorry-looking patch of lawn

First, even out the lumps and bumps and level

Next, a crushed-granite underlayer goes on

companies secure their turf to the ground with a timber frame, which is all well and good, until it rots. But what about dog pee? Faux turf might look nice but won’t it just end up being a stinky plastic mess after a while? Again, Wonderlawn is somewhat pioneering here as you can specify its additional ‘Petfill’ infill, which is specially designed to absorb urine odours and trap them until it rains. Oh great, so when it rains my whole garden will smell of wee? No! The infill is made of a clever organic material that looks like sand. It reacts with the sodium in rainwater to neutralise the ammonia in wee (the bit that makes it smell). This then flushes into the earth and the infill is ready to do its job again. It’s environmentally friendly and no risk whatsoever to children or animals. Caveat: it’s important to ensure it’s liberally applied as a run of dry, hot weather might strain the absorption quotient a little. And dare I ask, what about poop? Pick it up as normal! But you can also use household cleaners if required. And because there’s no dense rootzone, as is common in many off-the-peg artificial grasses, dirt doesn’t get caught deep down where it can’t be cleaned. You can just wipe down and go! And how does the water drain away? The grass and the membrane both allow water to drain straight through to the soil below, so rain will never sit on the grass. This means no more mucky paws or muddy knees, and a space you can use come rain or shine.

And what of the birds and bees, aren’t they upset by all this fakery? Actually, data suggests that people who have artificial turf end up spending more time tending their borders, because the grass saves them so much time. So if these can include beeand bird-friendly plants, all will be well. But how do I know this isn’t all cobbled together from a press release? Because I challenged Wonderlawn to do its best with my unholy patch, and the pictures (left) speak for themselves. I can also testify that one energetic toddler and two boisterous hounds have already tried to destroy it, but the lawn just keeps bouncing back. Result (wonderlawn.com).

FA S T FA C T S

My lawn is 12 square metres Wonderlawn removed about three-quarters of a tonne of soil It took two men half a day to lay Cost: £1,500 (including a ninesquare-metre back patio) A typical lawn is 45 square metres This would involve removing about two tonnes of material Two to three tonnes of material would be put back It’d take about a day Average cost: £3,240

ILLUSTRATION: BABETH LAFON

THE PROJECT STEP BY STEP

FIVE PERFECT PLANTS F O R P O L L I N AT O R S

Lawn is rolled on top of a weed-busting membrane

A fine layer of sand infill is spread onto the lawn

The finished maintenance-free product!

94 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

1 Verbascum (‘Flush of White’) A cottage garden favourite with spikes of white flowers, verbascum can tolerate many soil types that other plants might struggle with. Plant now for blooms next May to June. 2 Hollyhocks (Alcea cabaret) Impressive spikes of bold coloured flowers, growing over 120 centimetres high. A hardy perennial that flowers June to August. 3 Verbena Waterfall Lavender blue, purple and white tufts of tiny flowers that bring a soft feel to borders. Tends to spread to produce a carpet of blooms. 4 Primroses (Primula vulgaris) One of the UK’s best-loved native blooms, heralding spring with clusters of pale lemon flowers. Perfect for shady areas. 5 Safron Crocus Plant now for autumn blooming, and as the name implies, you can even gather strands of safron from the flowers. All plants available from Suttons Seeds (suttons.co.uk) E D

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Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

ROCK OUT The ‘Cone’ phone stand created by Nendo for Italian firm Marsotto comprises a precision-milled block of marble (white Carrara or black Marquina) with a conical hollowedout void that naturally amplifies the music from your phone’s speaker. The piece joins the ‘Marsotto Edizioni’, a collection of exquisite marble designs by the likes of Jasper Morrison, David Chipperfield and Konstantin Grcic. £144, Twentytwentyone (twentytwenty one.com).

BIGGER PICTURE Despite its tongue-twister of a name, Sony’s ‘BRAVIA KD100ZD9’ 4K TV is a masterclass in pared-down design, promising to bring cinema-quality visuals to your home. While the show-stopping 100-inch model (above; £60,000) would suit an LA-style mansion with sliding glass walls and an infinity pool, the range also includes 65- and 75-inch models for those who like their living room to contain more than just a screen. From £4,000 (sony.co.uk). Buy this! Until the day that parcels are dropped down your chimney by drones, the ‘Video Doorbell’ by Ring should prove useful. The simple, stylish device comes in four colours and allows you to remotely chat to guests or delivery drivers (via a free smartphone video app) even when you are not home. It’s battery-powered (a single charge can last for up to a year) and can be installed in minutes. £159, Selfridges (selfridges.com; ring.com).

Basements, bathrooms, that one corner of the kitchen – every home has a Wi-Fi black spot. But no more! Unlike your router, where the signal can be hampered by walls, the stylish ‘Pods’ by Plume plug into sockets in every one of your rooms, spreading ultra-fast Wi-Fi everywhere. The ‘Pods’ track Wi-Fi usage across all of your devices, ensuring your Netflix binges are never slowed down by bufering. £175 for a set of six ‘Pods’; available October (plumewifi.com). 96 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

The trend for high-tech restaurant dining is coming home, with this futuristic kitchen table. Made of a wafer-thin ceramic, the SapienStone ‘Smart Slab’ heats food, cools drinks and can wirelessly charge compatible smartphones (iPhones will need an adapter). Circular heating elements positioned under guests’ dinner plates keep them at precisely 42.5 degrees Celsius (as recommended by Italian three-star Michelin chef Massimo Bottura), while a central strip of cooling panels can chill wine. It even has a cooking panel for whipping up dishes at the table. Available December (sapienstone.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY

C H E F ’ S TA B L E

THE WI-FI REVOLUTION


Style | D E S I G N

STYLE ICON ANGELO DONGHIA

Dubbed ‘the Saint Laurent of sofas’, American designer ceilings; he was fond of cutting wallpapers into squares and Angelo Donghia (1935–1985) might now be a household name layering them to create elaborate textures. His major projects like his great friend, Ralph Lauren, had he not died aged just included a Moroccan-inspired, heavily patterned showroom for 50 from an AIDS-related illness. Halston, a gleaming stainless-steel home cinema for film composer The son of an Italian immigrant tailor, Donghia was born in and conductor Marvin Hamlisch, and an all-white Fifth Avenue Vandergrift, Pennsylvania and studied interior design at Parsons apartment with jungle greenery for Ralph Lauren. School of Design in New York. He graduated in 1959 and launched Donghia’s own homes reflected his love of entertaining – he his career just as the Big Apple was hitting its hippest era: fashion was known to hold impromptu dinner parties in his bedroom, designers Halston and Ralph Lauren moving aside the bed and gathering became friends and clients, as did Liza guests in front of the fire. His New York Donghia’s motto was Minnelli, Diana Ross and Vogue editortownhouse had an Art Deco look that simple: ‘You should feel at in-chief Grace Mirabella. Dressed in was influenced by the work of French Ralph Lauren suits and driving a cream all times that what is around designer Jean-Michel Frank, but he Mercedes, the charismatic Donghia won also owned a Florida home with a much you is attractive... and a deserved place in the International more casual feel: it had white-painted Best Dressed List Hall of Fame and was wooden walls, pieces of bamboo furniture that you are attractive’ a regular fixture in style magazines and zebra skins on the floors. His motto throughout the 1970s and 1980s. was simple: ‘You should feel at all times that what is around you What makes him an icon? At a time when big fashion designers is attractive… and that you are attractive.’ were just cottoning on to the potential of licensing products such Donghia made a gentlemen’s agreement with Ralph Lauren as perfume and sunglasses, Donghia was already carving out that he would not design fashion and Lauren would not go into a multimillion dollar empire selling bedlinen at Bloomingdale’s, furniture, which was honoured until Donghia’s death. Today, the as well as fabric and furniture ranges across the US. His style was designer’s eponymous company is owned by Venetian textile all about luxurious craftsmanship, relaxed, ‘fat’ lounge seating manufacturer Rubelli, and still sells his luxurious furniture, (often in his favourite grey flannel), and shimmery silver-leaf fabrics and wallcoverings (donghia.com). 98 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

The decorator to the stars of 1970s New York, whose client list included Grace Mirabella and Diana Ross


Style | C O L O U R

VERMILION

A full red, usually slightly on the cool side, vermilion is shrouded in mystery and romance

Medieval alchemists kept the recipe for this brilliant red a guarded secret

Vermilion might just be the colour of magic. A full red, usually slightly on the cool side, it is so saturated that it seems to pulsate. And, because bright hues, and reds in particular, have been in demand since prehistory, it is shrouded in mystery and romance. Also known as cinnabar and, if you’re a chemist, mercury sulphide, vermilion is a naturally occurring chemical compound, but it is relatively rare. The Roman writer Pliny the Elder wrote that it had ‘sacred associations’ and was smeared on the faces of statues of Jupiter on holy days. In the early decades of the 1st century AD, around 2,000 pounds of Spanish cinnabar was sent, under guard, to Rome each year. Luckily for early colour lovers, a method for manufacturing synthetic vermilion was discovered as early as the 4th century BC in China, where it was used to make lacquers and was associated with the vermilion bird, a beautiful mythical creature similar to a phoenix that represented summer and the element fire. It took many centuries for the method to become common knowledge in Europe, however, because the alchemists who made it guarded the formula so jealously. Nevertheless, by the 12th century, the secret was out. Around 1122, a Benedictine monk named Theophilus wrote a treatise that described the process like a witch’s spell. Precise amounts of sulphur and mercury were weighed out and mixed, then put into a carefully sealed jar and buried in hot coals. ‘You will hear a crashing noise inside,’ he wrote, ‘as the mercury unites with the blazing sulphur’. For those who could get their hands on vermilion, it became a crucial, even revered, pigment, despite an occasional tendency to blacken in humid air. It was the red beloved by medieval illuminators, and can be seen in all its strident glory in Masaccio’s Saints Jerome and John the Baptist (1428–29) at the National Gallery. Its powerful, look-at-me character has also made it a favourite for 3D structures and objects, too. It was the pigment frequently used to colour lipstick-red Chinese lacquerware from the 3rd century BC (this is the reason for yet another alias of vermilion’s: Chinese red). The ancient Fushimi Inari Taisha temple in Kyoto is famous for its pathways studded with thickets of vermilion-painted torii, or gates. More recently, Anish Kapoor has used the colour in his wax-based works, such as the personal My Red Homeland (2003). It was also the colour Sir Anthony Caro chose for his iconic abstract sculpture Early One Morning (1962). This piece represented a radical departure for the artist and the colour was crucial. It made the sculpture ‘look straightforward’, Caro said, totally unlike the bronzes and marbles so beloved by traditionalists. It was a bold statement, and vermilion was the ideal colour with which to make it. Paints to try ‘Vermilion’ matt emulsion, £21.50 per 940 milliletres, Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoore.com). ‘Emperor’s Silk’ chalk paint, £18.95 for one litre, Annie Sloan (anniesloan.com)

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WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR PICTURE: GETTY

PANTONE Æ 179C


H OW TO DECO R ATE

Our guide to what works with what!

Mix pattern and colour with confidence

FA B R I C WA L L PA P E R PA I N T AUTUMN/WINTER 2 016 Styling ALEX KRISTAL Photography ADRIAN BRISCOE Styling Assistants STEPHANIE ILES, CHLOE SCOTT, ANNA PARRY

S TAT E M E N T P I E C E

‘ E R M I TA G E ’ BY DEDAR Inspired by the detailed illustrations in antique books, this wonderfully detailed silk and cotton fabric is embossed with metallic accents that produce a distinctive shimmer and texture. £181.50 per metre (dedar.com) ➤


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

HOW TO D E C O R AT E We all love print, pattern and colour, but combining them can be daunting. That’s why we have decided not just to show you the very best of the new season’s fabrics, wallpapers and paints, but also how you can use them in your home. With inspirational room sets, beautiful moodboards, statement designs and the brands to know, plus our ultimate step-by-step guide to organising a big decorating project, it’s everything you need to create your dream interior

S TAT E M E N T P I E C E

‘ L A R I S A’ B Y ARMANI/CASA Float away on a calming breeze as you admire this Chinese-inspired canneté cotton fabric by Rubelli for Armani/Casa. Its restful colours of grey and faded blossom are inspired by a Japanese velvet from the Rubelli archive. £180 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com) ➤


‘Oxygen’ wallpaper, £74.50 per ten-metre roll, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk)

‘Limerence’ wallpaper in ‘Ink’, £145 per ten-metre roll, House of Hackney (houseohackney.com)

‘Flaxen Grey’ paint, £41 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk)

‘Prisma’ silk wallpaper, £23.60 per metre, Arte (arte-international.com)

‘Edgewood’ silk-mix curtain, £120 per metre, Margo Selby (margoselby.com)

‘Jangala’ linen-mix curtain, £144 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

ROOM SET #1

C U T T H E M U S TA R D FURNISHINGS FROM LEFT ‘Hip-Hop’ cotton-mix fabric on ottoman, £100 per metre, Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com). ‘Auping’ daybed by AR Cordemijer, £860, Førest London (forestlondon.com); upholstered in ‘Marble’ trevira, £65 per metre, Swafer (swafer.co.uk). Bolster cushion covered in ‘Spitalfield Silk’ fabric, £125 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com). Grey cushion covered in ‘Wire’ fabric in ‘Liquorice’, £65 per metre, Kirkby Design (kirkbydesign.com). Green cushion, £116, Zuzunaga (zuzunaga.com). Yellow cushion covered in ‘Prickly Pear’ fabric by Donghia, £232 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com). ‘Multi-Lite’ pendant light by Louis Weisdorf, £406, Gubi (gubi.dk). Armchair upholstered in ‘Leighton’ velvet, £120 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com). Cushion covered in ‘Anza’ silk-mix fabric, £89 per metre, Jane Churchill at Colefax and Fowler (colefax.com). ‘Isoceles’ tables by Maz Sauze, £390 for two, Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk). Glass teacup by Arcopal, £14, Hopscotch (hopscotchlondon.com). Jug, £49, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). Black vase by House Doctor, £24; ‘Aerin’ vase, £310, both Amara (amara.com). ‘Van Gogh’ vinyl flooring (throughout), £34.99 per square metre, Karndean (karndean.com) ➤


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‘Everett’ fabric by Hodsoll Mckenzie, £100 per metre, Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com)

MOODBOARD #1

SUNNY SHADES 1 ‘Reykjavik’ and ‘Plantain Yellow’ paint, both £42.49 for 2.5 litres, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com) 2 ‘Akina’ wallpaper in ‘Oasis’, £49 per ten-metre roll, Villa Nova (villanova.co.uk) 3 ‘Linnea Lagoon’ viscose-mix fabric in ‘Aqua/Lime’, £67.50 per metre, Kai (kaidistribution.co.uk) 4 ‘Spitalfields Silk’ fabric in ‘La Seine’, £125 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com) 5 ‘Hampton’ embroidered silk in ‘Taupe’, £55 per square metre, Olivia Bard (oliviabard.co.uk) 6 ‘Gentle’ paint, £42.49 for 2.5 litres, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com) ➤

‘Calypso’ fabric in Blue by Nina Campbell, £55 per metre, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com)

‘Barnard’ viscose-mix fabric in ‘Chartreuse’, £44 per square metre, Olivia Bard (oliviabard.co.uk)

‘Rosa’ wallpaper, £75 per ten-metre roll, Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com)

‘Pure Willow Bough’ cotton-mix fabric in ‘Wild Mint’, £110 per metre, Morris & Co (william-morris.co.uk)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G


ROOM SET #2

INDIGO DREAMS FURNISHINGS FROM LEFT ‘Anvia’ pendant light by JJM Hoogervorst, £1,200, Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk). Beech and walnut daybed by Pierre Paulin, £2,398, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com); upholstered in ‘Washed’ linen in Lilac (bottom), £26 per metre, The Hackney Draper (thehackneydraper.co.uk) and ‘Origami’ fabric in ‘Atmosphere’ and ‘Blue Iris’ (back), both £101 per metre, Nobilis (nobilis.fr). ‘Gradient Green’ tray by Bloomingville, £17; ‘Palm Beach’ birch tray in Cobalt by Mariska Meijers, £35, both Amara (amara.co.uk). ‘Tela’ glass carafe, £39; tumbler, £9, both by Wrong for Hay, Liberty (liberty.co.uk). ‘Marie’ vase by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrence, £111, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com). ‘Mariee’ cushion by Jean-Paul Gaultier, £105, Lelievre (lelievre.eu). ‘Pixie’ merino-lambswool throw by Raf Simons, £292, Kvadrat (kvadratrafsimons.com). ‘Colonial’ armchair by Ole Wanscher, £1,508, Carl Hansen & Søn; upholstered in ‘Leonita’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Indigo’ (bottom), £54.94 per metre, Kai (kaidistribution.co.uk); and ‘Bologna’ fabric (back), £196 per metre, Gainsborough (gainsborough.co.uk). ‘Charmeuse’ cushion by Jean-Paul Gaultier, £88, Lelievre (lelievre.eu) ➤

‘Rivage’ polyester curtain in ‘Orchis’, £51 per metre, Camengo (camengo.com)

‘Laurie’ linen-mix curtain in ‘Light Amethyst’, £65 per metre, Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com)

‘Amoret’ linen-mix curtain in ‘Rose Quartz’, £84 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com)

‘Épure-Pachira’ burlap wallpaper by Élitis, £173.80 per metre, Abbott + Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk)

‘Heliodor in Cube’ natural plant-fibre wallpaper, £98 per metre, Arte (arte-international.com)

‘Marianne’ wallpaper, £59 per ten-metre roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

‘Crystalline’ paint, from £18 per litre, Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoore.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G


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‘Hollywood Vine’ silk-mix fabric in ‘White Tie’ by Pollack, £374 per metre, Altfield (altfield.com)

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‘Luce Handwoven Ikat’ silk-mix fabric, £375 per metre, Madeline Weinrib (madelineweinrib.com)

‘Spolvero’ wallpaper in ‘21500’, £136 per ten-metre roll, Lizzo (lizzo.net)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

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‘Oak Brendon White’ wood flooring, from £69.85 per square metre, Ecora (ecora.co.uk)

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MOODBOARD #2

D E L I C AT E B L U E S 1 ‘Hicks Blue’ paint, £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 2 ‘Itaya’ wallpaper in ‘75400’, £129 per ten-metre roll, Arte (arte-international.com) 3 ‘Slaked Lime’ and ‘James’ paint, both £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 4 ‘Blake Border’ linen-mix fabric, £75 per metre, Bert & May (bertandmay.com) 5 ‘Epilogue’ linen-mix fabric in Navy, £62.50 per metre, Casamance (casamance.com) 6 ‘Flower & Bees’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Charcoal’ by Tord Boontje, £85 per metre, Christopher Farr (christopherfarrcloth.com) 7 ‘Kelso Embroidery’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Sandstone’, £125 per metre, Romo (romo.com) 8 ‘Rufolo’ embroidered silk-mix fabric in Indigo, £175 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) ➤


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

BRAND TO KNOW

COLE & SON The wallpaper company is known for its archive patterns and modern reinventions

Pattern ‘Giselle’ wallpaper featuring Cole & Son’s streaked ‘Jaspe’ design, £80 per ten-metre roll Archive pictures Pink flock is applied to wallpaper and wood blocks are used to create intricate designs

DID YOU KNOW? 1 The brand’s prestigious archive features examples of patterns inherited from JC Crace and Son, a company that printed wallpapers for many important buildings, including London’s Palace of Westminster, which was refurbished in the 1840s. It features the ‘Gothic Lily’ design created by Augustus Pugin, who assisted with the restoration. 2 According to legend, Cole & Son’s many printing blocks were wrapped in damp blankets and safeguarded in a Sufolk barn during the Blitz. 3 Cole & Son has used a number of innovative techniques throughout its history. John Perry pioneered the use of ground mica to give papers a silk-like sheen, and the subtle streaked efect on one of its first designs, ‘Jaspe’, was achieved using badger hair brushes. The factory also developed special pans to form multi-coloured stripes: these were made from long pieces of wood with openings for dye at the bottom. 4 The company produces collections celebrating the work of Italian surrealist artist Piero Fornasetti, with many designs adapted from the original papers created for his family’s house in Milan. For example, ‘Mediterranea’, a hypnotic cityscape of roofs, adorned the walls of Fornasetti’s entrance hall in the late 1940s. ➤

WORDS: SARAH SLADE

Cole & Son’s wallpaper expertise goes back to 1875, when John Perry founded his hand-block printing factory in Islington, north London. The first designs were created using a revived version of the flocking process – applying short fibres to paper – originally invented in Holland in 1680. As his many competitors fell by the wayside, Perry acquired a substantial block archive and began printing for big manufacturers like Sanderson. AP Cole, proprietor of Cole & Son Wallpapers, bought the business in 1941; he went on to open one of the earliest screen-printing studios in Europe in 1949, giving rise to Michael Clarke’s iconic ‘Woods’ forest repeat print. A Royal Warrant followed in 1961. Today, Cole & Son’s workshop is still based in north London and its collections are overseen by creative director Shauna Dennison. They are produced using traditional and digital printing methods, and each piece can be custom-coloured and finished to suit your home. Showroom at Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, Lots Road, London SW10 (cole-and-son.com)


ROOM SET #3

FLORAL GEMS FURNISHINGS FROM LEFT ‘Soho’ ottoman, £1,848, George Smith (georgesmith.co.uk). ‘Copacabana’ chair by Mathieu Matégot, from £1,029, Gubi (gubi.dk); upholstered in ‘Xanadu Dark’ velvet, £120 per metre, Witch and Watchman (witchandwatchman.com). ‘Oscar’ sofa, £2,000; upholstered in ‘Serpentine’ silk in ‘Blue Malachite’, £82 per metre, both Zofany (zofany.com). Burgundy cushion covered in ‘Paislig’ fabric in ‘Purple Pepper’, £120.50 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com). Blue cushions (two pictured) covered in ‘Lyon’ fabric by Armani/Casa, £172 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com). Dark green cushion (on floor), £116, Zuzunaga (zuzunaga.com). White cushion (on floor) covered in ‘Lyon’ fabric by Armani/Casa, £172 per metre; purple cushion (on floor) covered in ‘Victoria’ fabric in ‘Ametista’, £143 per metre, both Rubelli (rubelli.com) ➤

‘Palma’ wallpaper, £114 per ten-metre roll, Charlotte Frances London (charlottefranceslondon.com)

‘Xanadu Dark’ wallpaper, £240 per ten-metre roll, Witch and Watchman (witchandwatchman.com)

‘Fonteyn’ wallpaper in ‘Stone’, £85 per ten-metre roll, Cole & Son (cole-and-son.com)

‘Black Pepper Sorrel’ limewash paint, £49.50 for 2.5 litres, Bert & May (bertandmay.com)

‘Pure Ceiling Embroidery 236068’ fabric in ‘Flax’, £115 per metre, Morris & Co (william-morris.co.uk)

'Rouche’ silk-mix curtain in ‘Prussian Blue’, £96 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

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‘Bureau’ silk-mix fabric, £89 per metre, Evitavonni (evitavonni.com) ‘Marble’ fabric in ‘02FR’, £65 per metre, Swafer (swafer.co.uk)

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‘Marquetry Bas Relief’ wallpaper, £180 per metre, De Gournay (degournay.com)

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‘Drippy’ cotton jacquard-weave fabric, £298 per metre, Martyn Thompson (martynthompsonstudio.com)

‘Cirrus’ wallpaper in ‘Veil’, £227 per square metre, Calico Wallpaper (calicowallpaper.com)

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MOODBOARD #3

RUST AND STEEL 1 ‘German Grey’ paint; 2 ‘Silver Stone’ and ‘Kirby’ paint, all £42 for 2.5 litres, Konig Colours (konigcolours.co.uk) 3 ‘Fossil Reversible’ fabric by Donghia, £184 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com) 4 ‘Mazarin’ cotton-mix fabric in ‘Copper’, £112 per metre, Chase Erwin (chase-erwin.com) 5 ‘Sillon M1’ trevira in ‘Terre de Sienne’, £134 per metre, Lelievre (lelievre.eu) 6 ‘Paisley’ cotton in ‘Sand, Apricot and Anthracite’ by Karen Beauchamp, £274 per metre, Gainsborough Silks (gainsborough.co.uk) ➤


ROOM SET #4

H E AV E N LY PA S T E L S FURNISHINGS FROM LEFT ‘Nest’ sofa by Paola Navone, from £2,800, Erco (ercol.com); upholstered in ‘Ruben’ cotton-mix fabric, £123.20 per metre, Nya Nordiska (nya.com). Cushions (two pictured) covered in ‘Coco and Duck Egg Blue’ linen, £29.95 per metre, Annie Sloan (anniesloan.com). Textured cushion covered in ‘Fraser’ velvet by Blithfield & Co, £130 per metre, Tissus d’Hélène (tissusdhelene.co.uk). ‘Underwood Mop stick’ ladder, £135, Sebastian Cox (sebastiancox.co.uk). ‘Crossroad’ blue wool throw, £100, Forestry Wool (forestrywool.com). ‘Plum’ linen throw, £115, Once Milano (oncemilano.com). ‘Bayleaf’ daybed, £3,950, Sebastian Cox (sebastiancox.co.uk); upholstered in ‘Fable’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Duck Egg’, £59.90 per metre, Linwood (linwoodfabric.com). Vases (two pictured), £17.19 each, Hübsch (hubsch-interior.com). Pink cushion covered in ‘Otto’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Briar Rose’, £65 per metre, Romo (romo.com). White cushion covered in ‘Hip-Hop’ fabric, £106 per metre, Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com). ‘Triangle’ wool throw, £100, Forestry Wool (forestrywool.com). Footstool upholstered in ‘Gatsby’ fabric, £85 per metre, Jane Churchill at Colefax and Fowler (janechurchill.com) ➤

‘Filigrana’ viscose-mix curtain, £99 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com)

‘Horizon’ cotton-mix curtain in ‘Grotto’ by Sally Sirkin Lewis, £169.20 per metre, J Robert Scott (jrobertscott.com)

‘Masterpiece’ wallpaper, £355 for a set of seven panels, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk)

‘Chromatic’ wallpaper in ‘Mauve Madness’, from £65.28 per 11-metre roll, Phillip Jefries (phillipjefries.com)

‘Duke’s House’ paint, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk)

‘Quadro’ wallpaper by Ansty, £46 per ten-metre roll, Harlequin (harlequin.uk.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G


‘Numisma Bronze’ viscose-mix fabric, £140 per metre, Sicis (sicis.com)

‘Vertige’ wallpaper in ‘Anthracite’, £78.30 per ten-metre roll, Casamance (casamance.com)

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‘Promenade Au Faubourg Jacquard’ cotton-mix fabric by Nigel Peake, £434 per metre, Hermès (hermes.com)

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‘Damascus’ linen-mix fabric in ‘207’, £64 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

‘Tchin’ trevira, £121 per metre, Lelievre (lelievre.eu)

‘Midnight’ wood finish, £15 per square metre, Basin (basinuk.co.uk)

MOODBOARD #4

EARTH TONES 1 ‘Holbein Chamber’ paint, £42 per 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk) 2 ‘Foglie di Vite’ wall panel, £464 per 2.8x3-metre panel, Lizzo (lizzo.net) 3 ‘Millbank’ and ‘Crace’ paint, both £42 per 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk) 4 ‘Ramona’ linen-mix fabric, £140 per metre, Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com) 5 ‘Rigatto’ linen-mix fabric, £122.40 per metre, Dominique Kiefer by Rubelli (rubelli.com) 6 ‘Landseer’ silk-nylon fabric in ‘Prussian Blue’, £84 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com) ➤


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

BRAND TO KNOW

ROMO This fabric and wallpaper expert specialises in versatile plains, intricate embroideries and metallic finishes Romo was established by Robert Mould in 1902 as a small furniture producer in Nottinghamshire. By the 1930s, however, the company’s main focus had shifted to furnishing fabrics, and in the 1980s the addition of an in-house studio transformed Romo into the design-led fabric and wallpaper brand it is today. Still based in Kirkby-in-Ashfield, the business now employs 250 people in the creation and marketing of furnishing and upholstery fabrics, wallcoverings and trimmings for residential and commercial interiors. There are six design houses under the Romo umbrella: Romo, Black Edition, Mark Alexander, Kirkby Design, Villa Nova and Zinc Textile. Showroom at Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, Lots Road, London SW10 (romo.com)

DID YOU KNOW?

Pattern ‘Mariola’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Blush’, £55 per metre Archive images Loom creating fabric. Romo founder Robert Mould. Today’s Mould family, still in charge of the business. The original factory ➤

WORDS: KATIE TREGGIDEN

1 The word ‘Romo’ is an amalgam of the first name and surname of founder Robert Mould. It remains a family business and is now run by Robert’s great grandson, Jonathan Mould, and his children Felicity, Emily and Jordan, plus niece Lindsay. 2 You can spot Zinc Textile’s ‘Halston Velvet’ and ‘Ziggurat Velvet’ fabrics by Romo throughout the Mayfair Hotel in London, and Romo’s distinctive ‘Xilia Magenta Jacquard Weave’ at Soho’s stylish Ham Yard Hotel. 3 Romo donates a share of its profits to Oxfam, in order to fund educational equipment, teacher training and the renovation of schools in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 4 In 2014, artist Jessica Zoob won the Best British Pattern category at the ELLE Decoration British Design Awards for her ‘Big Smile’ design, created for Romo. It was adapted from one of her paintings inspired by water, reflections, space and tranquillity. 5 Another successful collaboration, this time between Kirkby Design and doodle artist Jon Burgerman, resulted in a collection of 46 fabrics and a range of cushions. Burgerman’s brilliantly named patterns, drawn using markers, crayons and cut-outs, include ‘Wobblepotamus’, ‘Rainbow Scrawl’ and ‘Spaghetti Yeti’.


‘Wild Silk’ paint, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper (paint-paper.co.uk)

‘Brasilia’ wallpaper by Lorenzo de Grandis for Wall & Decò, £100 per square metre, Interior Supply (interiorsupply.co.uk)

‘TC-63702’ wallpaper by Tomita, £64 per metre, Lizzo (lizzo.net) ‘Husk’ wallpaper in ‘Deep Indigo’, from £132.60 per 11-metre roll, Phillip Jefries (phillipjefries.com)

‘Ajiro Fanfare’ Paulownia wood wallpaper by Maya Romanof, £3,300 per 11-metre roll, Altfield (altfield.com)

‘Primitive’ linen in ‘Tarragon’, £130 per metre, De Le Cuona (delecuona.com)

‘Liana’ linen curtain by Herbert Parkinson, £22 per metre, John Lewis (johnlewis.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

ROOM SET #5

NIGHT IN THE FOREST FURNISHINGS FROM LEFT ‘Katakana’ footstool by Dare Studio, £1,200, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk); upholstered in ‘Royal Garden’ velvet, £115 per metre, GP & J Baker (gpjbaker.com). Large cushion covered in ‘Dorian Gray’ fabric, £185 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com). Small cushion covered in ‘Rafu’ fabric, £69 per metre, Romo (romo.com). ‘Slit’ side table by Hay, £119, Amara (amara.com). ‘Karui’ trays by Skultuna, £69 each, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Maguelone’ pitcher by Jars, £27; ‘Japan Stripe’ cup by Pols Potten, £33 for four, both Amara (amara.co.uk). Pink vase, £40 for a set of five, Hübsch (hubsch-interior.com). ‘Katakana’ sofa by Dare Studio, £4,490, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk); upholstered in ‘Duccio’ fabric by Nina Campbell, £85 per metre, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com). Dark green cushions covered in ‘Forest’ fabric by Pedroso & Osorio, £58 per metre, Swafer (swafer.co.uk). White cushions covered in ‘Samphire’ linen, £84 per metre, Chase Erwin (chase-erwin.com). Patterned cushions covered in ‘Netnet’ fabric by Dominique Kiefer, £155 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com). Large velvet cushions covered in ‘Allure’ velvet by Carlucci di Chivasso, £51.10 per metre, JAB Anstoetz (jab-uk.co.uk). Pendant light, £45.71, Hübsch (hubsch-interior.com) ➤


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‘Oberon’ linen-mix fabric in ‘White Opal’, £125 per metre, Zofany (zofany.com)

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‘Waterford’ wallpaper in ‘Charcoal’, £66 per 8.2-metre roll, Thibaut (thibautdesign.com)

‘Bellano’ linen in ‘Slate’, £49 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

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‘Dalston’ wool in ‘Pebble’, £180 per metre, Ralph Lauren (ralphlauren.co.uk)

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MOODBOARD #5

SHOTS OF CHARTREUSE 1 ‘White Floret’ paint; 2 ‘Nutty Shitake’ and ‘Rhubarb Stalk’ paint, all by Paint by Conran, £36 for two litres, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) 3 ‘Brecon’ wool-mix fabric in ‘Citrine’, £60 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 4 ‘Allure’ velvet in ‘030’ by Carlucci di Chivasso, £51.10 per metre, JAB Anstoetz (jab.de) 5 ‘Netnet’ cotton-mix fabric by Dominique Kiefer, £155 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com) 6 ‘Charades’ fabric in ‘Chartreuse/Silver’, £85 per metre, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) 7 ‘Paislig’ fabric in ‘Lemongrass’, £120.50 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) 8 ‘Sufi’ cotton-mix fabric, £51 per metre, Clarke & Clarke (clarke-clarke.com) 9 ‘Wood’ tile in ‘Naturale’, £180 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.com) ➤


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

BRAND TO KNOW

C O L E FA X A N D FOWLER Founded in the 1940s, this company’s speciality is classic English fabrics and wallpaper in a sophisticated colour palette

DID YOU KNOW? 1 As well as the shop, Nancy Lancaster took over the rooms on the first floor of the Brook Street building. She and Fowler decorated them with flair – the most famous space was the Yellow Room (above), a sunny drawing room painted in a rich buttercup hue. 2 One of the brand’s earliest and still popular prints, ‘Bowood’ (left) is inspired by a document possibly discovered at the famous Grade I-listed Wiltshire house of the same name. 3 Colefax and Fowler and its decorating arm, Sibyl Colefax & John Fowler, are now part of a larger luxury fabric group that includes Jane Churchill, Manuel Canovas, Larsen and Kingcome Sofas. 4 The ‘Snow Tree’ design (far left) was inspired by an 18th-century wallpaper from Drottningholm Court Theatre in Sweden, a piece of which was given to Nancy Lancaster by the country’s king. 5 Lancaster and Fowler’s business relationship was tumultuous. Lancaster’s formidable aunt, Lady Nancy Astor, the first British female MP, once referred to them as ‘the unhappiest unmarried couple in England’. Patterns, from left ‘Snow Tree’ linen, £98 per metre. ‘Bowood’ wallpaper, £75 per ten-metre roll Archive images, from top The Yellow Room. Nancy Lancaster. The brand’s old Brook Street store in London, where the Yellow Room was located. John Fowler ➤

WORDS: RACHEL WARD PICTURE: SIMON UPTON

The story of this esteemed English fabric and wallpaper brand begins in 1938, when a young artisan, John Fowler, was invited to work for interior decorator and socialite Lady Colefax at her Bruton Street shop in London’s Mayfair (in 1944, the head oice moved to Brook Street). World War II and diicult times followed, and the company may have floundered had American heiress Nancy Lancaster not purchased Sibyl Colefax’s shares in 1944. She made Fowler a partner in the company and so began a collaboration that, while notoriously combative, was hugely creative. Working on the interiors of some of the country’s finest residences, they popularised the country-house style that put comfort on a par with elegance. In 1960, interior decorator Tom Parr came on board as a partner and commercialised the business, helping it to launch its first fabric and wallpaper collections. Floated on the stock market in 1988, Colefax and Fowler continues to launch at least one collection a year and currently has showrooms in London, New York, Paris, Munich and Milan. 110 Fulham Road, London SW3 (colefax.com)


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

Decorating made easy Embarking on a big home revamp? Confused about what to do first? Follow our step-by-step guide to make the process as pain-free as possible

1

Start with a clear sense of what you want to achieve. ‘For a big project you need to begin planning at least four to six months before you start the work,’ says Helen Parker, creative director at Devol Kitchens.

your research. Visit showrooms, order 2 Do brochures and test paint samples in the spaces where they will be used (this helps you to see the colour in the correct light). ‘Speak to tradespeople and suppliers as early as possible – good ones are in high demand,’ warns interior designer Martin Brudnizki. Rebecca Hitchman, designer at bathroom brand CP Hart, adds: ‘Get at least three quotations so that you can compare them to each other. And ask for a breakdown of the works entailed, so that you know you are comparing like with like.’

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Work out your timings. Find out the lead time for delivery on all key items, such as carpets and bathroom fittings. ‘You should allow four to six weeks for products to arrive, and longer for any specialist pieces,’ explains Hitchman. Some things will take longer: a bespoke kitchen can take up to three months to be made. Checking this now means you can sketch a timetable for what you need to order when, so that your project runs smoothly.

forget the legal stuf! ‘If you are working 4 Don’t on a larger, structural project you should ensure that every legal requirement is dealt with before you start, from listed building consent to party wall agreements,’ says Emma Oldham, director of Solange Design. ‘Be aware that it takes around 12 weeks to get planning permission – and that’s without any hold-ups.’

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Once builders are on site, get the messiest jobs out of the way first – for example, moving walls, adding anything structural or stripping out old fixtures. If you are replacing cornicing, ceiling roses or fireplaces, now’s the time to do it. ‘At this point it’s also wise to ensure that your supplier double-checks all measurements,’ advises Oldham.

‘CORALITE’ BY HARLEQUIN The repeating cell-like diamond pattern of this fabric from the ‘Fragments’ collection is beautifully delicate – especially in this blue-green ‘Seaway’ colour. The subtle lines and the spot within each check lend it the illusion of texture. £35 per metre (harlequin.uk.com).

it’s time to get all of the wiring and the 6 Next, piping in place. This is called the ‘first fix’. Chris Eaton, associate director at Stif & Trevillion Architects, says: ‘It might seem early in the job, but it’s important to know the layouts of the rooms – where the bed or sofa will be and their dimensions. Knowing this means that the positioning of sockets, light fixtures and radiators will be right. ➤

WORDS: KARA O’REILLY

S TAT E M E N T P I E C E


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

Decorating made easy…

7

Create a clean canvas. Once the wiring and pipework is complete, you need to get everything closed up. This entails getting plasterboard and plaster on the walls and putting down sub-floors. ‘Once everything is contained you build out from there,’ explains Eaton. It’s also at this point that any new windows, doors, cupboards, shelves and wardrobes, plus the kitchen and bathroom, get their final measure up.

Lay the groundwork. By this we mean laying 8 any hard flooring (timber boards and tiles), but also tiling the bathroom and kitchen, and getting the decorating (painting and wallpapering) 90 per cent complete. ‘You want all of this work out of the way as much as possible before you start bringing in expensive elements such as custom-made joinery, because you don’t want these getting damaged,’ explains Eaton.

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Speaking of painting, this is the order in which to work. If your wall is raw plaster, we suggest applying two mist coats (watered-down emulsion) that will prevent later coats of paint from peeling of the wall. Then, you’re ready to apply your chosen shades. Joa Studholme, international colour consultant at Farrow & Ball, advises: ‘Start at the top – whether that’s of the house or the room. So paint the ceiling, then do any plaster detailing, such as ceiling roses and cornicing, followed by the walls.’ You will need to do at least two coats on everything. But be aware: ‘If you have chosen a light colour to paint over a dark one, it might take another coat to get proper coverage.’ The final space you decorate should always be the hallway.

the big additions. This includes 10 Install any new radiators, as well as your bathroom and kitchen. ‘We recommend that the kitchen is installed at the end of a project to ensure that the builders are not still doing work that could damage it,’ says Parker.

11 S TAT E M E N T P I E C E

‘NETNET’ BY DOMINIQUE KIEFFER The embroidered hash marks on this cotton-mix fabric by Dominique Kiefer create a charming craft-like appearance and a wonderful texture. We especially love this moody blue colourway, but if you’re looking for something more neutral, try the colourway pictured on Moodboard #5. £155 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com)

Now for the final sweep. This is all about the finishing touches. ‘Remember decorative items like carpets, light fittings and furniture can vary in lead times from the standard six weeks to 18 or more,’ warns Oldham. Be aware that things can still need tweaking at this stage, so have your builder on-hand to do any final touch-ups. The last job is carpets. As with painting, ‘homes should be carpeted top to bottom – starting with the upper floor,’ says Heather Taylor, floorcoverings buyer at John Lewis. ‘Finally you do the halls, stairs and landings.’

Move your furniture into place, 12 Etsit voila! back, relax, enjoy. Hopefully you will have come in on budget and to the timetable you set out with at the start. But most importantly, you should have a truly individual home that you will cherish. ➤


Sourcebook | D E C O R A T I N G

S TAT E M E N T P I E C E

‘ N I G E L’ S TA R TA N ’ B Y NIGEL PEAKE British artist Nigel Peake has updated traditional Scottish tartan. The larger checks allow you to appreciate the detail of his free-hand drawing of stitch marks, done using watercolour paints. £368 per ten-metre roll, Hermès (hermes.com). E D


ELLE Decoration | B R I T I S H

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the ELLE Decoration British Design Awards, which celebrates and rewards the best of the UK’s emerging talent. From hundreds of submissions by you, our readers, we’ve selected winners in five categories: print and pattern, furniture, lighting, craft and accessories. All are up-and-coming designers who have been working for less than five years and have made a big impact in the last 12 months. Here they are with their latest creations Words KATIE TREGGIDEN

PICTURE: MARK LILIUS

AND EMMA LOVE

WINNER PRINT AND PAT T E R N LISA TODD DESIGNS

DESIGN

We loved this designer’s prints for their colourful vibrancy and authentic African inspiration An accident resulting in a debilitating neuromuscular condition proved pivotal in interior designer Lisa Todd’s career. ‘I had to rethink what I could do and so I started painting,’ she says. ‘I have always been a pattern maker at heart and fell in love with the versatility and infinite possibilities of surface-pattern design.’ Although she describes overcoming her condition as the hardest part of getting started in her second career as a pattern designer, the results are stunning. Informed by a childhood spent in South Africa, her ‘Ndebele’ collection (above) references the bold patterns typical of the tribe. ‘I have always been inspired by African decorative arts and traditional skills, in particular those of the Ndebele people,’ she says. The collection – a subtle take on the current revival of the 1980s ‘tribal’ trend – is painted by hand in Lisa’s Windsor studio before being printed in England onto linen and cotton (which is made into cushions and tea towels), and also organic melamine and birch wood trays in Sweden. ‘Commissioning an African women’s art collective to create a beaded version was a dream come true,’ adds Todd. With the collection already stocked in Liberty and ceramics, rugs, tiles and wall finishes in the pipeline, it sounds like plenty more dreams will be fulfilled for this irrepressible designer (@LisaToddDesign; lisatodddesigns.com). ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 141


ELLE Decoration | B R I T I S H

PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

WINNER CRAFT FOREST + FOUND

This duo impressed us with their respect for natural materials and modern-rustic aesthetic East London-based studio Forest + Found is a partnership between Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, who specialise in hand-carved wooden products and naturally dyed, hand-stitched quilts. ‘At the heart of everything we do is our relationship with each other and our practice,’ says Abigail. But it’s their connection to the woodlands – they work with the City of London Forestry Commission to source sustainable timber from Epping Forest – and a commitment to traditional craft techniques using hand tools that sets them apart. ‘There is an inherent beauty in natural materials,’ says Abigail. ‘Our dyes come from natural tannins

DESIGN

in wood and produce an aged colour palette of soft browns and pale greys. By hand-stitching our textiles, the material takes on a texture that can’t be reproduced on a machine. We want our products to feel as if they have existed for a hundred years.’ The duo’s collection, which includes large wooden vessels, utensils and contemporary quilts, is inspired by research into craft cultures worldwide and through history. ‘We are interested in the rituals that surround objects’ use,’ says Abigail. Describing themselves as ‘humbled’ by the ELLE Decoration British Design Award, they have plans for a public art commission next, so it’s unlikely we’ve heard the last of Forest + Found (@forestandfound; forest-and-found.com). ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 143


WINNER FURNITURE H FURNITURE

144 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

DESIGN

Combining traditional crafts with innovative shapes, this brand is definitely one to watch Describing itself as ‘London-based but with a global outlook,’ H Furniture was founded by Mexican-born architect and designer Alejandro Villarreal in 2014 out of a desire to combine craft and industry. ‘I love making furniture because it is a powerful way of communicating ideas and beliefs and enhancing people’s lives,’ he says. The brand’s ‘Corner’ table (above) makes use of computer-controlled cutting to produce a precisely angled look, and the recently launched ‘WW’ chair is a modern reinterpretation of the classic Windsor chair in which the typical wooden spindles are replaced with metal rods that connect

the backrest to the underside of the seat. We also love the ‘Belt’ hanging rack by Munich-based designer Jessica Nebel, a wooden clothes rail suspended from the wall by two leather straps. ‘Having worked on a lot of mass-produced items, I was keen to explore natural materials and craft,’ explains Nebel. ‘The warmth of leather and wood reflects today’s desire for authenticity.’ In response to winning an ELLE Decoration British Design Award, Villarreal says: ‘It came as a beautiful surprise. I really respect the talent that has been acknowledged before and it is reassuring to know that the British community supports different approaches to design and creativity.’ (@hfurnitureuk; hfurniture.co). ➤

PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

ELLE Decoration | B R I T I S H


WINNER ACCESSORIES S I LV I A K

146 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

DESIGN

This potter’s colour-splashed designs are an artisanal take on graphic pattern Brighton-based Silvia Kamodyova’s Slovakian heritage is integral to her ceramics. ‘My debut ‘Harvest’ collection was inspired by the old wooden vessels used in Slovakia to gather produce from the fields,’ she says. ‘I decorated the pieces with tiny lines and dots that represent the plough lines and marks left on the ground from farming.’ For her second, current collection, ‘Terracotta Heritage’ (above), Kamodyova switched techniques. ‘Before, I worked with decorative slip; now I use tin glaze.’ She saved up for a kiln and found studio space in Brighton four years ago, while studying for a masters in 3D design and craft at Brighton

University. Her smaller tableware is slip cast in terracotta clay and produced in batches – the large platters and bowls are press moulded in speckled terracotta clay (it’s stronger, so the shapes don’t warp). Both have a blue/grey glaze and decorative top colours – from a selection of eight shades. ‘I found a fragment of a kitschy Slovakian vase decorated with flowers and tested 60 shades based on that,’ says Kamodyova. ‘I add leather handles as I feel they complement the terracotta and reference the utilitarian origins of peasant culture.’ Silvia also has ranges for The Conran Shop and March, a store in San Francisco. ‘I like working with retailers to feed my creativity,’ she adds (@silviakceramics; silviakceramics.co.uk). ➤

PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

ELLE Decoration | B R I T I S H


WINNER LIGHTING B E RT F R A N K

148 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

DESIGN

This London duo’s work caught our eye for its mix of mid-century and industrial styles A chance meeting between Robbie Llewellyn and Adam Yeats on a lighting job three years ago led to the formation of Bert Frank. At the time Llewellyn was working at London lighting shop Hector Finch. ‘At university, I wasn’t that interested in lighting, but at Hector Finch I fell in love with the mid-century, rustic industrial style,’ he says. Yeats has a Birmingham factory that produces high-end metalwork. ‘I showed Adam some designs I had and we decided to work together.’ The result was the ‘Shear’ desk lamp, the company’s first product – now there are four collections. ‘We’re taking inspiration from the 1950s but making

the lights our own way,’ adds Llewellyn. The latest pieces include the ‘Stasis’ table lamp with a copper shade; the ‘Messina’ wall light, which has an opal-glass drum; and a supersized pendant version of the ‘Shear’ light – the original ‘Shear’ table light is pictured above, third from left. The brand also makes bespoke lights to order and has plans to branch out into other products soon. ‘We might make a hat rack; I can’t find anything I like!’ says Llewellyn. ‘That’s always how we’ve approached lighting: we make what we like.’ How do they feel about winning an ELLE Decoration British Design Award? ‘Surprised and honoured. If you’re going to win an award, there aren’t many better.’(@BertFrankLights; bertfrank.co.uk). E D

PICTURE: SUKI DHANDA

ELLE Decoration | B R I T I S H


THE LONDON LOOK THE CA PITA L’S MOST INSPIR ING HOMES


Words EMMA LOVE Photography BEN ANDERS

THE LONDON LOOK

THE BESPOK E HOUSE

Handcrafted details and quality materials make this stunning new-build home in Bloomsbury a RIBA award winner


Exterior The new-build property has a façade of honey-hued handmade bricks that are consistent with the Victorian mews houses that surround it Hallway A ‘Bertoia’ chair by Harry Bertoia for Knoll and an ‘AJ’ floor lamp by Louis Poulsen (try Skandium) decorate the space Stockist details on p290 ➤


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nyone who watched last year’s Channel 4 television series Grand Designs: RIBA House of the Year will recall this shortlisted bronze-and-brick house in London’s Bloomsbury. It belongs to hotel consultant Peter Zenneck and his partner Troels Levring, a former architect-turned-developer. The pair were thinking of buying a traditional Georgian property nearby when they spotted a car-repair garage with planning permission to be converted into four flats for sale. ‘We contacted the planner to ensure that we would be able to obtain permission to build just one house on the land, then put in a sealed bid,’ Troels says. ‘It’s such a glorious spot. A lot of sites in London are between two properties, but here the house feels detached because it’s on a corner.’ In 2008 the couple commissioned their friend and architect Jamie Fobert to work on the five-year project and, from the beginning, they formed a close collaborative team. ‘The architecture was all Jamie, but we pushed for a few things – a lazy client and architect does not make a good building,’ Troels says. ‘Having a rapport with Jamie raised the bar.’ A glance at the specifications for the 450-square-metre, four-floor house reveals why it was named a 2015 RIBA National Award Winner. From the façade of narrow, handmade, honey-hued Danish bricks that reveal the thumbprints of the craftspeople that made them, to the dovetailed corner of the exterior wall and the gleaming bronze

The beauty of this house is all in the details. The carbonised steel banister is inspired by the work of Spanish artist Eduardo Chillida roof, the beauty of this house is all in the details. Inside, concrete ceilings, walls and pillars serve as the backbone of the building and connect the double-height spaces that surround a central glass-encased lightwell. ‘Having so much daylight is the biggest luxury of this house,’ says Troels. It’s not just the layout that is bespoke, though. The oak staircase in the corner of the open-plan house has a carbonised steel banister inspired by an artwork by Spanish sculptor Eduardo Chillida (a favourite of both the architect and the owners) and the trio travelled to Italy just to understand how diferent grades of Carrara marble might be used in the bathroom. Peter and Troels both work at home, with one oice upstairs and the other downstairs. Troels’ study features specially made geometric window shutters divided into diferent sized sections, all of which open individually. Like functional works of art, they can be opened in many configurations to provide light or privacy. ‘I wanted the shutters in my study to be translucent, so we ended up designing a kind of Japanese shoji screen,’ says Troels. ‘The children from the nearby school like them; if I slide the main section open, they wave as they walk past.’ The couple have lunch in the kitchen or on one of the terraces and enjoy going for a swim in their very own luxurious marble-clad 14-metre indoor pool, which is situated in the basement. ‘We imagined using the pool mostly in the morning, but we actually take a dip around 5pm, at cocktail hour,’ says Peter. ‘It’s a great way to end the working day.’

Portrait Homeowners Peter Zenneck (left) and Troels Levring (right) Swimming pool The marble-clad 14-metre pool in the basement is lit in two ways: a glass-walled lightwell that cuts through the centre of the house, and spotlights that line the sides of the pool ➤

ARCHITECT’S GUIDE BUILDING BESPOKE

Jamie Fobert talks us through three of the details that make this home unique The brickwork We wanted to create a bold and contemporary building, but one that blended seamlessly into this historic area of London. Most of the properties in the mews are built from London stock brick (handmade bricks produced before the advent of machinery) so we chose a brick that, from a distance, looks consistent. When you approach the house you can see the thumbprint of the man who made each brick in the stone, made when they were pushed out of the moulds. The eco-heating Peter and Troels wanted a swimming pool, but to heat this using electricity from the grid would have been a massive waste of energy. To avoid this we dug 180 metres into the ground using five bore holes to extract ground-heat, which is piped into the house [the free and sustainable heat source can be used for radiators, under-floor heating and warm air heating systems]. The only downside is that this kind of project is a huge investment [£13,000 to £20,000 according to the Energy Saving Trust; energysavingtrust.org.uk]. The joinery We waited until it was possible to stand in each of the rooms before designing the joinery, so that we could get a sense of the space and how the light fell across the interior. We designed the house in layers, adding the joinery as we went. It’s important to get recommendations for a joiner. Make a shortlist, go and see their workshop and be specific in your brief. A joiner is expensive [expect to pay £20 to £25 per hour for carpentry], so ensure that you’re working with the right person. jamiefobertarchitects.com

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Dining area The ‘Judas’ table by Finn Juhl (try 1st Dibs for originals) is paired with a set of ‘Aluminium Group’ chairs by Charles and Ray Eames for Vitra Kitchen The white cabinetry was designed by Opus Magnum and the freestanding units are by Islington designer James Plant Stockist details on p290 ➤


TERRACE

LIVING ROOM

SECOND FLOOR

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COURTYARD

KITCHEN

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ATRIUM DINING ROOM

MAIN BEDROOM

STUDY

FIRST FLOOR

ATRIUM

GARAGE

HALLWAY

STUDY GROUND FLOOR

SWIMMING POOL

ATRIUM

SPA

‘ We designed the house in layers, adding bespoke joinery as we went and ensuring there was the maximum amount of storage’

BASEMENT

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Staircase The geometric banister echoes an art print by Spanish sculptor Eduardo Chillida. The welding marks have been left on the carbonised steel to add character Study The adjustable-height teak desk was designed by Jamie Fobert Architects ➤


Living area A ‘243 Volage’ sofa by Philippe Starck for Cassina sits opposite a pair of rattan ‘Handkerchief’ chairs by Massimo and Lella Vignelli for Knoll. The rug is from Tufenkian Carpets and the cofee table is a 1970s plexiglass model Stockist details on p290 ➤


Study The unique translucent shutters in this room were designed to look like a Japanese shoji screen Bedroom Above the ‘Talomo’ bed by Zanotta is an Andy Warhol artwork from a series called ‘Ladies and Gentlemen’. A 1960s Swedish bureau doubles up as a bedside table and the ‘PP250 Valet’ chair is by Hans J Wegner for PP Møbler (try Twentytwentyone). The powder-blue floor light is by Foster+Partners for Lumina. The geometric window shutters all open individually for a fully customisable look Stockist details on p290


T R O E L S A N D P ET E R’ S ADDRESS BOOK The duo reveal their essential London shopping venues The Modern Warehouse Rob and David, the owners of this Hackneybased warehouse, have an ever-changing collection of Scandinavian mid-century pieces. We have purchased a Swedish desk and some Hans J Wegner pieces from them. There’s always a treasure to be found here. 3 Trafalgar Mews, E3 (themodernwarehouse.com)

MR Moioli Gallery Angelo Moioli has a tremendous passion for mid-century Italian furniture, lighting and glass. We bought a blue Fontana Arte mirror for the entrance hall from here. 661 Fulham Road, SW6 (moioligallery.com) Opus Magnum Jon Baulkwill and his team of furniture makers produced all of our joinery, plus the sliding window shutters, Troels’ desk and the teak dining room credenza. They are real craftspeople, innovative and excited to work with diferent materials. 313 Merton Road, SW18 (opusmagnum.co.uk)

The People’s Supermarket Although the produce sold here is sometimes mismatched and deformed (as it should be), this community-based food cooperative sells the most delicious fruit and vegetables from small farmers and traders. 72–76 Lambs Conduit Street, WC1 (thepeoplessupermarket.org) Bloomsbury Auctions This venue in Mayfair is excellent for contemporary art and specialist sales. We bought our ‘Judas’ dining table by Finn Juhl here. (bloomsburyauctions.com) E D

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Garden room Expanses of green Verde Fantastico marble from Antolini Luigi are teamed with mahogany doors and ebony parquet ooring. The wall lights are by Venini (try 1st Dibs), the seating was sourced from Gallery 25, and the Chinese cofee table is an antique piece Stockist details on p290 ➤


THE LONDON LOOK

Home to a London jeweller, this townhouse is a treasure trove of luxurious stones, accented with gold, bronze and vintage Murano glass lighting Words RACHEL WARD Photography HELENIO BARBETTA Styling CHIARA DAL CANTO


Living space Tall swirl-grain mahogany doors stretch up to an exaggerated architrave; the walls are finished in a burgundy lacquer. The furniture and figurines are all antiques that the family sourced across Europe, while the wall lights are bespoke designs


ocated south of the River Thames with views over Clapham Common, this five-storey townhouse stands on a smart Regency terrace. There is nothing about the façade that sets it apart as extraordinary. Step inside, however, and you enter another world, one of unbridled luxury. The interior, decorated with coloured marble, exotic wood and precious Murano glass, is a testament to what an architect can achieve when the finest of finishes are within budget. It is an inspiration, even to those of us who can only hope to emulate elements of the look. Murray Groves and Adriana Natcheva, founders of Groves Natcheva Architects, created the interior for a British couple, both jewellers, who have three children. The design is daring, spilling out from a central double-height dome encasing a spiral staircase. The beauty of marble The staircase is simple and white, a calming pause before you enter the luxurious stone-clad rooms. The house is decorated with 12 diferent premium marbles – all selected by the architects for their intense colour and veining. ‘Marble is such a familiar material, but when used on a grand scale it is incredibly surprising,’ says Adriana. The creamy white Italian Calacatta Viola that adorns the main bathroom and dramatic dark blue Chilean Lapis Lazuli in the cloakroom are striking examples of how stone can create impact. ‘The efect is one of complete immersion in the material,’ says Adriana. ‘It’s like stepping into a daydream.’ In the garden room an unusual greyish green Verde Fantastico marble

clads the walls, punctured by panels of mirror that reflect the light. The edge of the ornamental pond in the garden is clad in a complementary ‘Brazilian Greenland’ marble from Antolini Luigi with a leathered finish (created by lightly scoring the surface) that adds texture and, usefully, grip. In the subterranean swimming pool, the palette switches to granite. Blue-grey in colour, the stone was selected for its swirling vein that brings to mind the appearance of flowing water. ‘The space feels like a cave,’ Adriana says. ‘It is natural lit by a skylight above.’ The warmth of wood Two types of wood complement the marble: American brown ebony for the floors, and Cuban mahogany, which is used for much of the joinery. The mahogany is cut in three diferent veneers: straight, curl and swirl. The straight grain (the simplest design) is used in the wine cellar and the kitchen. The most dramatic swirl design features on the panels that line the dining room walls and ceiling, creating a sense of theatre. The more modest curl veneer (taken from where the limb of a tree intersects with the trunk, it has a feather-like pattern) is used upstairs on the bedroom doors. Overall, the interior of the house recalls the refined decadence of the Art Deco age. ‘It’s hard in the contemporary era to give a space a sense of opulence without making it feel like a pastiche of the past,’ says Adriana. ‘There’s a lot of influence from architects Adolf Loos and Carlo Scarpa, but what we have created is something diferent – a new design dialect. It’s a style we call aristocratic minimalism.’ ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 171


THE LOWDOWN ON MURANO GLASS

Lighting is the jewellery of the home, and in this trinket box of a property only the best would do. We take a closer look at this Italian export

This page Examples of Murano glass lights in the house Dining room The floor is made from book-matched ‘Imperial Gold’ marble from Antolini Luigi and the bespoke mahogany table is inset with triangles of antique mirror. The chairs are by Philippe Hurel and the chandelier is by Barovier & Toso Stockist details on p290 ➤

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

Where is it from? The island of Murano in Venice, Italy. The area has been a hub for glassmaking since 1291, when the Venetian glass masters were ordered to move their foundries to Murano because the authorities feared that a fire caused by their furnaces would destroy the city’s wooden buildings. How is it made? The dominant ingredient is silica sand, which is heated in a furnace until it liquefies. As it cools down, makers shape the glass, either by blowing air through a long tube or using iron tools. What makes Murano glass so special is the techniques used to create it, such as murrine, where coloured liquid glass is layered and stretched into long canes and sliced to reveal the pattern. Murano’s famous millefiori (multi-coloured) glass is created by adding small amounts of minerals to the silica sand. For example, aquamarine is made by adding copper and cobalt compounds to the mix. When did Murano become famous for lighting? Its glassmakers began to produce chandeliers in the 18th century. Known as ciocca (‘a bouquet of flowers’), they were a huge success and became the grand lighting of choice for palaces and theatres. Often, the chandeliers are technically complex: many feature lots of colours, which are mixed and heated separately. One of the boldest mid-century makers of chandeliers was Dino Martens, a painter-turnedartistic director at the Aureliano Toso foundry. What are the brands to know? A handful of companies have been making Murano glass for centuries: Seguso, since 1397 (seguso.com); Salviati, founded in 1859 (salviati.com); and Venini (venini.com), which was established in 1921. One of the most famous contemporary glass artists is Venetian Massimo Micheluzzi. Where can I buy Murano glass? The island is a 20-minute water taxi from Venice, and once there you can visit showrooms, foundries, and the Murano Glass Museum, which has the largest historical collection of Murano glass in the world. For vintage lighting and other Murano glass products, try dealers such as Alfies Antiques Market (alfiesantiques.com) and 1st Dibs (1stdibs.com). Always remember to look for the oicial Murano glass trademark symbol – find it at muranoglass.com.


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GET THE LOOK Marble comes in a rainbow of colours. Match the opulence of this home with our pick of the best, from honey tones to deep green and blue

‘Chilean Lapis Blue Premium’ marble clads a whole wall and floor, making a bold, striking statement in this family cloakroom

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1 ‘Rosso Francia’ marble, from £498 per square metre, Lapicida (lapicida.com) 2 Calacatta Viola polished marble, from £90 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) 3 ‘Forest Green’ marble, £330 per square metre, Lapicida (lapicida.com) 4 ‘Black Fossil’ polished marble, from £200 per square metre, The Stone Collection (thestonecollection.co.uk) 5 ‘Giallo Siena’ yellow marble, from approx £301 per square metre, Salvatori (salvatori.it) 6 ‘Kenya Blackwave’ grey and silver marble, from £200 per square metre, The Stone Collection (thestonecollection.co.uk) 7 ‘Pulcino’ honed yellow marble, £1,038 per square metre, Lapicida (lapicida.com) 8 ‘Blue Bahia’ marble, £1,080 per square metre, De Ferranti (deferranti.com)


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STYLING: STEPHANIE ILES

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Top The main bathroom is lavished with Italian ‘Calacatta Viola’ white marble with beautiful veining. It is ofset with mahogany Above This ‘Grand Fossils’ marble includes a fossilised ammonite Stockist details on p290 ➤

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Kitchen White Antico Bianco marble flooring is edged with ‘Brazilian Greenland’ marble, both by Antolini Luigi. The bespoke kitchen features ‘Cosmos’ marble worktops and splashbacks, and Murano glass pendant lights by Barovier & Toso. The mahogany and leather chairs are from Retro Modern Design Stockist details on p290 ➤


‘IT CAN BE HARD TO GIVE A SPACE A SENSE OF OPULENCE WITHOUT MAKING IT FEEL LIKE A PASTICHE OF THE PAST. HERE WE HAVE CREATED A NEW DESIGN DIALECT’

Patio The garden is kitted out with comfortable wicker lounge chairs (try Dedon for similar). A set of bronze steps lead up to the main garden Detail The bespoke table, designed by the architects, features a fascinating Grande Fossils marble top (try Pietra di Erfoud marble from London Granite for similar in the UK) Stockist details on p290 ➤

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UNDERNEATH THE GARDEN LIES A SWIMMING POOL, CHISELLED OUT OF STONE AND LIT BY A SINGLE DRAMATIC SKYLIGHT

Swimming pool The basement pool is enveloped in granite and naturally lit by a skylight. The stainless-steel ladder disappears through a hole in the ceiling, appearing to extend forever Garden The 278-square-metre space is clad in leather-finished ‘Brazilian Greenland’ marble from Antolini Luigi. Glass skylights filter light into the pool area below Stockist details on p290 E D

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PINK PERFECTION From soft pastels to bold corals, this season it’s time to think pink. Pair with pale wood and soft greys for a contemporary look Styling HANNAH BORT Photography MIKKEL MORTENSEN Styling assistant ANNA SHERIDAN

LIVING ROOM From left ‘Scarpa’ stool, £37.10, House Doctor (housedoctor.dk). ‘Research No.6’ cofee cup by Kirstie van Noort, £25.50; ‘Beige’ tumbler by Mette Duedahl, £25.50, both Stilleben (stilleben.dk). Coral tumbler, £4.50, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘OW150’ daybed by Ole Wanscher, £2,319, Carl Hansen & Søn (carlhansen.com). ‘Puncta’ pale pink cushion by AYTM, £98, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). Bright pink cushion, £35, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Velours Lavé’ patterned cushion, £58, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Bologna Powder’ pink rug, £449, Linie Design (liniedesign.dk). ‘Brick’ pouf, £280, Hem (hem.com). ‘Haiku Low’ sofa by Gam Fratesi, £3,720, Fredericia (fredericia.com). ‘Imprimés’ cushion, £67, Caravane (caravane.fr). Orange cushion, £45, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Hamilton’ spotted cushion, £130; ‘Hamish’ blanket in ‘Rosette’, £260, both Aiayu (aiayu.com). ‘Paper’ side table by Gam


Fratesi, £289, Gubi (gubi.com). ‘Royal System’ shelving by Poul Cadovius for DK3, from £398 for a shelf and rail, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Moles’ sculpture, £21.59; tray, £27, both by AYTM, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). ‘Acrobat’ table light by Normann Copenhagen, £219, Houseology (houseology.com). Pink bowls, £8 each; raia carafe, £42.50, both The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Elliot White’ rug, £279, Linie Design (liniedesign.dk). ‘Venice’ pink chair, £630, Softline (softline.dk). ‘Signpalma 40-Ro’ cushion, £33, Tine K Home (tinekhome.com). ‘Antelope’ vinyl flooring, £28 per square metre, The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk). Walls painted in (from left) ‘Brick’, £41.50 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk). ‘Cinder Rose (246)’, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com). ‘Covent Garden Floral’, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk) ➤


DINING ROOM From left ‘Soledade 73540384’ wallpaper (on screen), £70.40 per ten-metre roll, Casamance (casamance.com). ‘Form’ table by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, £1,000, Houseology (houseology.com). ‘Triwood’ chairs by Tord Boontje, £1,536 each, Porta Romana (portaromana.co.uk). ‘Join’ serving bowl, £13; plates, £13 each; side bowl, £13, all Petite Friture (petitefriture.com). Bamboo tumblers, £4.50 each; ‘Opak’ pitcher, £230, all The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Aura’ pendant lights, from £171 each, Petite Friture (petitefriture.com). ‘Silk Lines’ rug in ‘Blush’, £9,450, Knots Rugs (knotsrugs.co.uk). ‘Orla’ sofa by Jasper Morrison for Cappellini, £3,625, Poltrona Frau (poltronafraugroup.com). ‘Simple’ aubergine cushion cover, £8, House Doctor (housedoctor.dk). ‘Heather’ pale pink cushion, £150, Aiayu (aiayu.com). Striped cushion cover, £65; coral cushion, £35, both The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Yeah’ wall


hanging by Mae Engelgeer, £820, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Langley’ wooden stool by David Chipperfield for E15, £628, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Lavastone’ tray by File Under Pop, £49; ‘Research No.6’ cofee cup by Kirstie van Noort, £25.50; ‘Beige’ cup by Mette Duedahl, £25.50, all Stilleben (stilleben.dk). Terracotta cup, £1, House Doctor (housedoctor.dk). ‘Enoki’ cofee table by Philipp Mainzer for E15, £824, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Gutta’ jewellery box by AYTM, £75.82, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). ‘Hexagon’ vase, £27, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Antelope’ vinyl flooring, £28 per square metre, The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk). Walls painted in (from left) ‘Brick’ and ‘Red Ochre’, both £41.50 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk). ‘Cinder Rose 246’, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) ➤


BEDROOM From left Ceramic headboard made of ‘Eclipse’ tiles by Marianne Smink, £7.50 per tile or £954 for a mural set, Smink Things (sminkthings.com). ‘Tight Space’ king-size bed, £545; ‘Putty Broadweave’ valance, £295, both Loaf (loaf.com). ‘Rem’ duvet cover, £479; pillowcases, £119 for a pair, all Society Limonta (societylimonta.com). ‘Ecaille’ throw, £181, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Loombet75-Ro’ cushion cover, £22, Tine K Home (tinekhome.com). ‘Sinnerlig’ basket by Ilse Crawford, £10, Ikea (ikea.co.uk). ‘Dee’ cushion, £86, Aiayu (aiayu.com). ‘Vice-Versa’ throw, £260, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). Pink basket, £45, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Hank’ mirror, £43, Llot Llov (llotllov.de). ‘Graphic Powder’ rug, £380, Linie Design (liniedesign.dk). ‘Allegory’ desk


by GamFratesi, £1,688, Wiener GTV Design (gebruederthonetvienna.com). ‘Fiber’ side chair by Muuto, £175, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Beta’ table light by Parachilna, £690, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Hexagon’ vase, £27, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). Lavastone tray by File Under Pop, £49; ‘Red Leaf’ print (on wall) by Tapet-Café, £51.50, both Stilleben (stilleben.dk). ‘Pinorama’ pinboard by Inga Sempé, £109, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Antelope’ vinyl flooring, £28 per square metre, The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk). Walls painted in (from left) ‘Brick’ and ‘Red Ochre’, both £41.50 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk). ‘Cinder Rose 246’, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) E D


A LIFE IN As Sir Terence Conran celebrates his 85th birthday, we look at a new book charting the

M I D - C E N T U R Y PAT T E R N

R ES TA U R A N T S

H A B I TAT

T H E CO N R A N S H O P

M I D - C E N T U RY PAT T E R N Fabrics, ceramics and tiles were key elements of Conran’s early career, which he embarked on after

studying textile design at Central School of Arts and Crafts in London – the only man in a class of 33 women. Shown here are his ‘Chequers’ (1957) and ‘Nature Study’ (1955) prints, which were applied to fabric for David Whitehead and china for Midwinter. R E S TA U R A N T S In the 1980s and ’90s, Conran was a pioneer of the restaurant as a place not merely to dine, but to see and be seen. His venues – such as Quaglino’s and Alcazar, both pictured above – are as much about the interior as they are about the food. F U R N I T U R E ‘In my heart, I have always considered myself a furniture maker,’ says Conran. One of his biggest achievements in this area is Benchmark Furniture, a company founded with designer Sean Sutclife in 1984. Known for its handcrafted wooden pieces (such as the designs shown here), its factory is in the grounds of Barton Court, Conran’s country home in Berkshire. H A B I TAT ‘The first Habitat store opened in May 1964 and grew out of my frustration with British retailers in the early 1960s,’ says Conran. Suddenly, it was possible to buy furniture and take it straight home rather than waiting for it to be made. Shown here are Habitat’s inspirational catalogues of the 1970s and 80s, which were sold on newsstands alongside magazines.


DESIGN rise of the man who transformed Britain’s shopping habits and dining experiences

FURNITURE

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

BOOKS T H E C O N R A N S H O P Habitat’s more luxurious sibling, which opened in 1974, stocked products that were, in Conran’s words, ‘perceived as too expensive or unusual for the typical Habitat customer’. Its flagship store on London’s Fulham Road is housed in a brilliantly spacious former tyre warehouse dating from 1910, which was painstakingly restored by Conran – it’s still there today. B O O K S Titles on diverse subjects including cookery, DIY, gardening, London, France, colour, storage and eco design have flowed from Conran’s pen over the decades. ‘I suppose they all add up to what I call a “style of life”,’ he says. Now, Terence Conran: My Life in Design can be added to the growing library.

ELLE Decoration readers can buy Terence Conran: My Life in Design by Sir Terence Conran (Conran Octopus, £30) for the special price of just £21, with free UK P&P. To order, please call 01903 828503 quoting reference: Design/CON556. Ofer subject to availability, please allow seven days for delivery. ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 189


THE CONR Sir Terence Conran has had a huge impact on British style. Here, design critic

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o a certain generation, the name Conran evokes very specific images and ideas. Domestic liberation through the emergence of modular shelving, a fresh utopia of beanbags and director’s chairs, a paradisiac world of perpetual lunch under spotlights or in bright sunshine. A glass of French country wine in a Paris goblet. Terence understood the word ‘design’ to mean pleasant objects used in pursuit of pleasure. And who would argue with that? For 20 years after Conran’s Habitat opened in 1964, its catalogue revealed a world as lost to us now as the Incas: men in flares, plumcoloured Shetland wool polo necks and aviator shades look longingly at girls in miniskirts on sofas. Perhaps the girl is holding salad servers and grinning. Habitat ofered a kind of redemption for people who had to buy their own furniture. Another generation thinks of Terence Conran as the serial restaurateur of the 1990s who assumed the character of Michelin’s own Monsieur Bibendum: a jovial, inflated figure with a cigar to hand and a glass of something delicious not too far away. Chelsea’s eponymous Bibendum restaurant, a heroic restoration of the neglected Michelin Building, began the transformation of British dining in 1987, but Quaglino’s in St James was the true marker here: a spirited revival of a neglected establishment that turned a restaurant into theatrical spectacle. Never mind that its roots were in the great brasseries of Montparnasse or Alexander Girard’s Manhattan restaurants of the 1960s, Quaglino’s was a local revolution. Still, cultural historian Fiona MacCarthy acidly described it as a ‘deprived child’s vision of glamour’. Maybe, but it changed London’s expectations of eating out: a lot of deprived children who had become prosperous needed

definitions of glamour and Terence was able to satisfy them. Now, yet another generation thinks of Terence as patron of the Design Museum, perhaps his greatest monument and one in which I had a hand [Bayley was the first director of the Design Museum from 1979 to 1989]. Here was a shopkeeper and restaurateur accessing ‘culture’. Terence realised that he was never going to be a great designer, so, with genius, he shifted paradigms. He turned design from being an activity into a commodity. No longer being something people do, such as whittle a stick, it became something you could buy in his shops or experience in his restaurants. With the creation of a Design Museum, he acquired, at least for a while, intellectual ownership of design as well. The slow ingestion of European values has defined British material culture since 1945. In France, a young Terence found the combination of sensualism and earthy practicality that define him. It is not true that Terence invented the baguette, but he did sell the first duvets in Britain. However, it was not enough to pioneer continental quilts: Terence had to claim he changed the nation’s sex life, too. For Terence, the connection between food and design is essential and blurred into a lovely douceur de vivre. British cookery writer Elizabeth David was not his sole influence: in 1950s London,


AN STORY Stephen Bayley takes an intimate look at the design icon’s eventful career

PICTURES: REX, GETTY, DANNY ELWES

From left Inside The Conran Shop; Conran the designer at work in his studio; winning an award for Outstanding Contribution To Design at the ELLE Decoration British Design Awards 2009; Conran the restaurateur, the man who introduced the joy of dining to the UK

revolution was in the kitchen Italy was also an influence. Terence had admired Giò Ponti’s work air, and food was fast becoming at the Triennales in Milan. Here he also saw the work of Franco radicalised. In their 1957 book Albini, whose interiors were boldly austere. Albini would, for Plats du Jour Patience Gray example, display a Baroque painting out of its frame and attach and Primrose Boyd gave it to a simple grey wall. In a similar way, Habitat turned products advice beyond a reliable recipe into celebrities. At Habitat, as in an exhibition or a gallery, special for boeuf bourguignon or attention was paid to the lighting. cotriade which extended into The Design Museum, though, may be Terence’s greatest legacy. what we would nowadays call ‘design’. Seven years before Habitat It opened in August 1989 when his business empire was starting opened, they comment on a Danish casserole: ‘This design expresses to face diiculties [this included Habitat, Mothercare and BHS]. clearly, in terms of use, the abolition of the barrier between kitchen Thus there is a haunting paradox: Terence Conran paid for a museum and dining room in the open-planning of about creativity at just the time when his own a modern house or flat.’ This was because ‘one called into question. But he remains a true HE UNDERSTOOD was cannot separate the plat du jour from the vessel hero to everyone who cares about the nature it is cooked in’. That was a connection Terence of things. Students and young designers still THE WORD cleverly exploited: it was a short step from inspired by his example and enthralled ‘DESIGN’ TO MEAN become wanting to cook the perfect ratatouille to wanting by personal contact. a Provençal kitchen to cook it in. We hear a little less about him nowadays, not PLEASANT OBJECTS surprising for a man who will be turning 85 in Other influences on Habitat came from time USED IN PURSUIT October. Terence never designed a masterpiece spent on 1950s photoshoots for Robert Harling’s OF PLEASURE House & Garden. Here Terence had seen the way chair, nor a widget. Instead, he had a larger photographers lit their subjects and how stylists vision of his subject. The Italian word disegno assembled meaningful objects in meaningful ways. As a magazine not only means drawing, but also intention. Terence intended to editor, Harling had an eclectic eye, juxtaposing old and new while make design a matter of daily routine, not of privilege. Department emphasising the importance of colour and simplicity; this was stores now sell Modernist classics that were once recondite museum revolutionary at the time. Like Sir Jack Cohen’s Tesco, which opened pieces: that’s his influence. If your local pub is serving pâté and not its first supermarket in Essex in 1956, Terence learnt how to pile pickled eggs, that’s his influence too. Every Briton who can remember it high, if not sell it especially cheap. Impressive stacks of goods grey food and brown furniture should be very grateful for Terence’s cheerful intentions and colourful interventions. E D had ‘that irresistible feeling of plenty you find on market stalls’. OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 191


THE LONDON LOOK

COSMOPOLITAN CALM A palette of blush pink, polished concrete and pale wood creates a peaceful oasis amid the urban regeneration of New Cross, south London Words TRISH LORENZ Photography MICHAEL SINCLAIR


Blush strokes The walls resemble raw plaster but are in fact painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Setting Plaster’, an on-trend blush pink applied in sweeps to create this distressed efect. ‘The colour palette was inspired by a trip to Marrakesh,’ says the architect Merlin Eayrs of Chan + Eayrs. The chair, designed by his grandfather, is a treasured family heirloom, as is the rug – try 1st Dibs for similar furniture and The Orientalist for rugs. By the window, there’s a four-metre-long seat cast from poured concrete and covered in a bespoke linen cushion (try Tinsmiths for a similar fabric). Stockist details on p290


This 90-square-metre loft-style apartment, a former garage in London’s New Cross, Lewisham, is a symbol of the creative energy that is reinvigorating the area. The suburb is the latest gentrification hotspot, thanks in part to the East London Line overground trains linking it to Shoreditch and the City, and the growing impact of the art school, Goldsmiths, which is just around the corner. Completed earlier this year, this building is the vision of architects Zoe Chan and Merlin Eayrs of Chan + Eayrs. ‘We used to live in west London, which is very beautiful, but we were drawn by the raw pulse of the south-east and the chance to add something to the urban fabric of the area,’ says Zoe. The exterior of the property, which is clad in grey Belgian bricks arranged in a herringbone pattern, looks contemporary amid the tall red-brick houses that surround it. Yet it has a softened aesthetic that somehow suits the neighbourhood. ‘You can’t just build an alien-looking box in the middle of a street, you have to consider what is around it,’ says Merlin. ‘We used brick to reflect London’s vernacular architecture, but we didn’t want to pretend that the house had been here a long time, which is why we chose the herringbone design.’ There is an aura of calm inside the apartment, thanks to the light that floods in from windows on three sides of the building. A pale yet warm scheme of plaster pink paint, polished concrete (used on the staircase) and oiled oak floors complements the couple’s pared-back, mostly 20th-century, furniture. ‘London is urban, frantic and largely artificial, so we wanted to counter the chaos with a calm, natural palette,’ says Zoe. ‘This apartment is simple and luxurious.’ chanandeayrs.com

Exterior Clad in grey Wienerberger bricks made in Belgium, which are set in a decorative herringbone pattern, the house is modern but suits the neighbourhood Staircase Located within the glass side extension, the concrete stairwell has strong architectural lines ➤

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Into the groove Tongue-and-groove panelling clads several of the walls and complements the painted Shaker-style kitchen units by British Standard. The wood panels have been painted using ‘Rolling Fog’ by Little Greene, a warm neutral tone that works wonderfully with the dusky pink on the walls. The floor is oiled engineered oak, which echoes the lines of the wall panelling – try Dinesen for a similar design. The dining table is a vintage piece (try The Old Cinema for similar), as are the Bavarian chairs, which were unearthed at Townhouse, a gallery and antiques shop in London’s Spitalfields. For a similar industrial-style light, try Trainspotters. Stockist details on p290 ➤


Cool concrete The bright glass-ceilinged atrium to the side of the building houses a concrete staircase – Concreations can produce something similar. Teamed with the distressed pink walls, the concrete lends the interior a raw, industrial aesthetic that’s enhanced by a factory-style pendant light (try Trainspotters). Stockist details on p290 ➤

ZOE AND MERLIN’S ADDRESS BOOK The architects reveal their secret design destinations Rose Uniacke A great store in Pimlico, London, that has a changing selection of beautiful antiques, which are always very good quality. 76–84 Pimlico Road, London SW1 (roseuniacke.com) Jamb This is another must-visit in Pimlico. It sells antiques, reproduction fireplaces and lighting. We found amazing lanterns here. 95–97 Pimlico Road, London SW1 ( jamb.co.uk) Oliver Gustav This is the first place we go when visiting Copenhagen. The showroom has some amazing contemporary pieces displayed in a simplistic Scandi setting. Strandstraede 9, 1255 Copenhagen, Denmark (olivergustav.com) Marché aux Puces de St-Ouen We love this famous market in Paris for its eclectic mix of antiques – it is massive and a great place to lose yourself while searching for treasure. (marcheauxpuces-saintouen.com)

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‘London is urban, frantic and largely artificial, so we wanted to counter the chaos with a calm, natural palette’


Vintage vibe The apartment is furnished with wood furniture and well-worn vintage finds. The armchair in the bedroom (below) is a mid-century piece bought from Ebay (try Lovely & Co for vintage seating). It rests in front of a steel-framed window that fills the space with light (consider Crittall for a similar look). An Anglepoise wall light, placed above the bed, negates the need for bedside cabinets. The bedding is by Calvin Klein Stockist details on p290 ➤


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Rough blush Want to mimic the perfect marriage of plaster tones and concrete shown in Zoe and Merlin’s London home? Use these beautiful imitation surfaces to get the look Styling HANNAH BORT Photography JAKE CURTIS Styling assistant ANNA SHERIDAN

From left ‘Panbeton Vertical Planks’ foam and concrete wall panel, £80 per square metre, Concrete LCDA (concrete-beton.com). ‘351’ floor lamp by Aage Petersen for Le Klint, £668, The Modern Warehouse (themodernwarehouse.com). ‘Plywood’ wallpaper (on floor) by Piet Hein Eek for NLXL, £199 per ten-metre roll, Design Wharf (designwharf.com). Daybed by Hans J Wegner for Getama, £1,895, The Modern Warehouse (themodernwarehouse.com). ‘CS-134’ pink striped cushion, £72; ‘CS-091’ lilac cushion, £72, both Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Painted Stripe’ grey cushion by Evan James Design, £95, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Vice Versa’ throw, £260, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Burlap’ tadelakt pink wall finish on doorway, £140 per square metre, Tadelakt London (tadelaktlondon.co.uk). ‘White Tiles’ wallpaper, £30 per square metre, Mr Perswall (mrperswall.co.uk). ‘ISO B’ side table, £283, Petite Friture (petitefriture.com). Concrete bowl by Stephan Schulz, £109 for set of three, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Stoneware’ teapot, £36, Native & Co (nativeandco.com). Plant pot by Lisa Stockham, £1,000, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘T.T.A’ dining table by Mikal Harrsen and Adam Hall for MA/U Studio, £1,856, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk).


Candleholder, £35, Native & Co (nativeandco.com). ‘White Cracked Slip Wayward’ vase by Matthias Kaiser, £748, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). Wooden bowl, £550; fragments (in bowl), £480, Puckhaber (puckhaberdecorativeantiques.com). ‘Paulownia’ tea caddy, £30, Native & Co (nativeandco.com). Water jug, £91, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). ‘White Flat’ plates by Kasper Wurtz, £50 each, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com). ‘Porcelain’ bowls (two shown) by Nadia Pignatone, from £65 each, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Perigord’ water glass, £66 for a set of six; ‘Perigord’ flute glass, £51 for a set of six, both Pentreath & Hall (pentreath-hall.com). ‘Primitive Swedish’ chair, £780, Puckhaber (puckhaberdecorativeantiques.com). ‘Smooth’ grey clay plaster (on wall), £20 per square metre, Clay Works (clay-works.com). ‘Hat’ pendant light, £347, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). ‘Modified Carver’ vintage chair, £210, Retrouvius (retrouvius.com). ‘Plaster V’ white paint (on wall), £42.50, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Argento Larch’ porcelain plank tiles (two pictured), £47 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com). ‘N2 Gardenia’ large vase by Jaime Hayón, £269, BD Barcelona (bdbarcelona.com) E D


THE LONDON LOOK (IN FR ANCE)

We celebrate Carolyn Quartermaine, the British designer who takes an artistic approach to life and work Words DINAH HALL Photography LUKE WHITE

From left The tools used to create Quartermaine’s painterly designs. Carolyn Quartermaine in her home in the south of France, where vintage furniture and a gilded wood and crystal chandelier, found at an antiques market in Nice, add romantic detail to the predominantly white interior ➤

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arolyn Quartermaine, as ethereal as her gossamer-like fabrics, is hard to pin down. She is somewhere between an artist and designer, her life divided between her homes in London and Provence. She has been a constant presence on the interiors scene and on magazine front covers around the world for over 30 years, yet her style has never dated. It’s a style that was born of childhood memories of antiques-filled Regency Cheltenham houses and an early teenage passion for the romantic hazy photographs of Deborah Turbeville and Sarah Moon, illuminated with a spark of the postpunk anarchic energy that characterised 1980s design. Quartermaine is at an age when she can look back and see quite clearly the thread that pulls her life and work together. She had a peripatetic childhood: her father’s work uprooted the family from Cheltenham to live in Holland and France, so that every couple of years she changed not only schools but languages. This disruption places a significance on the home and the stability it represents. She remembers her obsession with dolls houses: ‘I would create my own rooms on planks of wood. In a sense what I did later – making flexible spaces, moving walls, changing environments through textiles and colour – is what I did as a child’. When Quartermaine was 17, the family moved back to England and she found the place where she truly belonged: art school in Cheltenham. Here she received a grounding in practical skills like welding and woodwork as well as applied arts. At the Royal College of Art she developed her trademark style of collage and layering, and after graduating worked hard to get her pieces seen. ‘You have to tread the streets, and it’s tough – people aren’t going to come to you. I recall boarding a coach to Paris and lugging my work round all the beautiful decorating shops to ask them to look at it,’ she says. A meeting with Richard Stuart-Liberty in 1986 led to her being given an entire floor of Liberty to show her painted tables, neobaroque metal furniture and exquisite calligraphy fabrics. In the mid 1990s, Joseph Ettedgui, the late fashion entrepreneur, gave her a shop in his basement in Sloane Street, London. But her home has always been the most important creative launchpad for her

work. The flat in Earls Court, where she has lived for thirty years, and her 17th-century house in France are like living moodboards, reflecting subtle changes in her art. ‘It’s never about filling a space,’ she says. ‘It’s about looking at a chair as you would a painting. I can’t bear “girly pretty” so I would put a stronger object like a rock next to the chair,’ she explains. This experimentation at home fed into designs for Donna Karan, paperweights for Baccarat, and packaging for Fortnum and Mason. There have also been interiors for hotels and restaurants – most notably the breathtaking interior of Glade at Sketch, a collaboration with former lover, Belgian artist Didier Mahieu. Next year a collection of her work will be on display at the beautiful Fragonard Museum in Grasse, France. Since recovering from breast cancer five years ago Quartermaine’s work has become more reflective. ‘I may look strong and focused to the outside world, but the doubt is always there. The fear of something not being good enough, the desire to do something better. That’s what drives me.’ carolynquartermaine.com

From top Carolyn Quartermaine beside the pool at her home in Provence. This 17th-century house is the perfect backdrop to her canvases, fabrics and the vignettes of inspirational objects that decorate tables and shelves ➤

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From left Vintage furniture and the designer’s large watercolour canvases add colour and character to her home. A collection of paperweights designed by Quartermaine for French brand Baccarat. An example of the designer’s hand-painted fabrics, which are distillations of her paintings. Photography is a great inspiration to Quartermaine, who casually displays her favourite images (here taped to the wall) throughout her home ➤

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Quartermaine’s signature palette of floral pinks and watery pastel blues also adds splashes of painterly colour to her home in Provence. Trailing ivy and carefully placed posies of roses complement the dreamy colours E D

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Think you’ve looked at London from every angle? Think again. Join us on a vibrant, pattern-filled journey of discovery that charts the history and creativity of our capital through its fascinating floors Words JACKIE DALY Photography SEBASTIAN ERRAS/BASSET IMAGES Production PIXART PRINTING

1 Hudson Shoes Hotfoot it to this store on Hoxton Square to check out its wares and floors. 20 Hoxton Square, N1 (hudsonshoes.com) 2 Bank of England Take the virtual tour on its website – sadly, you won’t be allowed inside the building itself. The floors are the work of Russian artist Boris Anrep (1883–1969), with mosaics depicting designs from ancient coins. This one of Saint George slaying the dragon is from the reverse of the Henry VIII George Noble coin (1526). Threadneedle Street, EC2 (bankofengland.co.uk) 3 Dishoom Curry connoisseurs should sneak a peek under the table at these hexagonal tiles. 7 Boundary Street, E2 (dishoom.com) 1

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4 Aesop Amble to Aussie skin and haircare brand Aesop’s Covent Garden store, where the serene interior is enlivened by green ‘Dandelion’ tiles by Claesson Koivisto Rune for Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.co.uk). 7 King Street, WC2 (aesop.com) 5 Duck & Waffle This fabulous eatery is on the 40th floor of the Heron Tower, but its mismatched blue tiles are as impressive as the view of the London skyline. Try Alhambra Tiles for similar (alhambrahome.co.uk). 110 Bishopsgate, EC2 (duckandwaffle.com) 6 Tate Britain Seek out the spiral staircase – this floor stretches around it, a vision in monochrome. Millbank, SW1 (tate.org.uk)


EAST & CENTRAL LONDON FOLLOW OUR FOOTSTEPS AROUND THE HOTSPOTS OF THESE TWO N E I G H B O U R H O O D S , W H E R E T I L E S W I L L C AT C H Y O U R E Y E ( I F Y O U K N O W W H E R E T O L O O K )

7 Hispania If you’re wondering whether a statement geometric design would work in your home, see how to clash patterns with confidence at this tapas restaurant. Find similar tiles at Bert & May (bertandmay.com). 72 Lombard Street, EC3 (hispanialondon.com) 8 Bloomsbury Cofee House Before heading downstairs to have a flat white at this trendy basement café, stop at the doorway above to admire this strikingly colourful sunburst mosaic. 20 Tavistock Place, WC1 (bloomsburycofeehouse.co.uk) 9 O’Dell’s Tom O’Dell’s lifestyle store sports this fantastic original Victorian floor. 24 Calvert Avenue, E2 (odellsstore.com) 7

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10 Lima Floral Head to this fashionable Peruvian restaurant, which has a backdrop of bare brick walls, soft lighting and this bold, blue tiled floor. You’ll notice that the same tile is used here as in Aesop (4). 14 Garrick Street, WC2 (limalondongroup.com) 11 Sketch This 18th-century tearoom and cocktail bar has long been a place to glean interior ideas. Each of its rooms has a theme: including artist Carolyn Quartermaine’s enchanted forest (see Carolyn’s own home on p204). 9 Conduit Street, W1 (sketch.london) 12 Honey & Co In this restaurant the menu and the flooring have Middle Eastern influences. 25a Warren Street, W1 (honeyandco.co.uk) ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 213


TAKE THE TILE TOUR… NORTH LONDON JOIN THE WELL-HEELED RESIDENTS OF PRIMROSE HILL AND MAIDA VA L E F O R C U P C A K E S , C R A F T B E E R S , A N D M O R E I N S P I R AT I O N A L F L O O R S 13 Cabana Ofering a taste of Brazil in Islington, this eatery is a feast for the eyes thanks to its tiles. 56 Upper Street, N1 (cabana-brasil.com) 14 Primrose Bakery Sample the delights of the famed Primrose Bakery amid its playful sorbet-hued interior, which is complemented by the beautifully delicate mosaic flagstone floor at the entrance. 69 Gloucester Avenue, NW1 (primrose-bakery.co.uk) 15 Pepitos Close to King’s Cross Station, this venue claims to be London’s first sherry bar. Its intricate and wonderfully mismatched tiled floor certainly conjures a Mediterranean mood. 3 Varnishers Yard, Regents Quarter, N1 (primrose-bakery.co.uk)

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16 Warrington Hotel Moving west into Maida Vale, take in the incredible mosaic at the entrance of the renowned Warrington Hotel (also a brilliant restaurant) before tasting its fine craft beers. 93 Warrington Crescent, W9 ( faucetinn.com/warrington) 17 Thyme & Lemon Just a short way along Upper Street is this trendy tapas bar, where the relaxed mood is set by bare brick walls. Its elevated booths are complemented by this decorative blue tiled floor. 139 Upper Street, N1 (thymeandlemon.co.uk) 18 The Gardens Community Garden, Haringey This urban oasis is managed by local volunteers, who also run seasonal events. This nature-inspired mosaic can be found at the entrance. Doncaster Gardens, of Stanhope Gardens, N4 (haringey.gov.uk)


W E S T L O N D O N S E E T H E S I G H T S O F P O R T O B E L L O R O A D , H O L L A N D PA R K A N D C H E L S E A I N A W H O L E N E W L I G H T, B Y D I R E C T I N G Y O U R G A Z E D O W N WA R D S 19 Leighton House Visit Holland Park’s Grade II-listed Leighton House. Now a museum, it’s a must-see for its Arab Hall, built to house owner Lord Leighton’s collection of tiles from the Middle East. 12 Holland Park Road, W14 (leightonhouse.co.uk) 20 Anthropologie The intricately patterned floor suits the wares in this boho store. 131–141 King’s Road, SW3 (anthropologie.com) 21 Michelin House Commissioned by the Michelin Tyre Company in 1909, this building was later reimagined by Sir Terence Conran and Paul Hamlyn as Bibendum restaurant. The Michelin Man is still in residence. 81 Fulham Road, SW3 (bibendum.co.uk)

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22 Kupp For a shot of Scandinavian chic, visit this all-day eatery next to Paddington station. Hexagonal tiles in blues and greys punctuate the industrial concrete floor. Unit 53, 5 Merchant Square, W2 ( kupp.co) 23 Stella McCartney The designer’s second London store, housed in an 18th-century building, is as striking as her creations and sports this pink herringbone parquet floor. 91–97 Fulham Road, SW3 (stellamccartney.com) 24 Electric Diner This detailed mosaic adds an Art Deco-inspired edge to this delicious Portobello Road French/ American eatery, located in members’ club Electric House. 191 Portobello Road, W11 (electricdiner.com) E D OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 215


THE LONDON LOOK

NEW LOFT LIVING Located in London’s Square Mile, this 18th-century warehouse once brimmed with the treasures of The East India Company. Today, it’s all about comfort Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography RAUL CANDALES/LIVING INSIDE Styling SUSANA OCANA


Living area ‘Shell’ chairs by Hans J Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn sit on top of a ‘Star Silk’ rug by Helen Amy Murray for The Rug Company. The cofee tables are the ‘Fat Fat’ design by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia . For similar cork-topped glassware try Muuto or Ikea Stockist details on p290 ➤


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ewellery designer Matthew Calvin’s home, situated in a Grade II-listed, 18th-century warehouse, was constructed during the glory days of The East India Company, when the trade in exotic imports was booming. Built in 1771, The Tapestry Building was one of a series of vast properties, all located between Leadenhall and Spitalfields, that brimmed with treasures gathered from far-flung shores. It housed textiles, silks and spices from India and the Orient. Other warehouses nearby once stored everything from ostrich feathers and cigars to clocks, perfumes and tea. The Tapestry Building’s 14 apartments feature exposed brickwork, vaulted timber ceilings, cast-iron columns and large cargo doors (originally used to load imported goods directly into the upstairs spaces). ‘I fell in love with its functional feel,’ says Matthew, who also cites his home’s central location as a huge attraction. The apartment is just a short stroll from Spitalfields Market and the commotion and aromas of the curry houses on Brick Lane. ‘I can be on the tube at Liverpool Street station in under a minute, and walk to work at my studio in Shoreditch in seven minutes. That’s almost unheard of in London,’ he says. Matthew’s fourth-floor flat features an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, plus two large bedrooms. He purchased the property in 2014 and commissioned architect Christian Sintes of LUV Architecture & Design to update the interior. The dark Austrian oak floorboards are a new addition, replacing the garish peach laminate flooring that greeted Matthew when he moved in. It contrasts beautifully with the white-painted brick walls and beams. Christian designed the white lacquer cupboards and cabinets in the living area and created a bespoke kitchen using sumptuously dark Emperador marble and walnut veneer. He also helped Matthew source elegant design pieces, many mid-century in style, from lounge chairs by Carl Hansen & Søn and Charles and Ray Eames to contemporary seating by brands such as B&B Italia. The palette throughout the apartment is muted, a mix of whites and greys punctuated by monochrome artworks and an occasional splash of yellow from bright wool throws and bedding. Understated Roman blinds and delicate linen curtains frame the windows, the latter softening the former warehouse’s functional look. ‘The best thing about living here is having a really luxurious, open-plan space right in the centre of the city,’ Matthew says. ‘My favourite spot is my bedroom. It’s surprisingly peaceful at the back of the building, away from the hustle and bustle outside. Walking into the apartment after a long day at work is very relaxing – the calming colours help me to unwind.’ matthewcalvin.com; luv-projects.com

The dark Austrian oak floorboards, a new addition, contrast beautifully with the whitepainted exposed brick walls and original beams

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The palette throughout the apartment is muted, a calming mix of whites and greys punctuated by occasional splashes of yellow

Living area A corner sofa from B&B Italia is paired with a lounge chair and ottoman by Charles and Ray Eames (available from Skandium). A black ‘AJ’ floor lamp by Arne Jacobsen for Louis Poulsen (try The Conran Shop) sits in the corner. The tables are all ‘45° Tavolini’ designs by Ron Gilad for Molteni. For similar throws, try Toast Stockist details on p290 ➤

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‘The best thing about living here is having a really luxurious, open-plan space right in the centre of the city’

Dining area The ‘Xilos’ dining table by Antonio Citterio and ‘Doyl’ chairs by Gabriele and Oscar Buratti are all from B&B Italia. ‘Aplomb’ pendant lights by Lucidi-Pevere for Foscarini (available at Nest) hang above. For similar stylishly simple ceramics, try Mud Australia Stockist details on p290 ➤

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Kitchen Created by architect Christian Sintes of LUV Architects, this bespoke design combines walnut veneer cabinetry and brown marble, used to clad sections of the island and walls (try Stone Age). John Lewis sells similar waffle-patterned tea towels Stockist details on p290 ➤

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DESIGN DECODED

The ‘Husk’ armchair by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia is the ideal piece of furniture for the most relaxed room in this apartment Patricia Urquiola’s deeply-padded ‘Husk’ armchair and ottoman tempt you to sit and snuggle in sofa-like sumptuousness. Indeed, Urquiola said when creating the ‘Husk’ for B&B Italia in 2011 that ‘those who look at a sofa must visually perceive a sense of both mental and physical comfort’. The chair’s moulded recycled plastic shell cradles the body, while quilted cushions (available in either cotton or leather) provide extra comfort. It can come with a fixed or swivel base (ofered in natural oak, grey or black lacquered wood) and there’s also an outdoor version for those who love to luxuriate in the garden. The ‘Husk’ was shortlisted for a Compasso d’Oro (Golden Compass Design Award) in the year it was made and scooped the IMM Cologne Best of Best Interior Innovation Award in 2012. It’s easy to see why. The ‘Husk’ is the height of comfort. Chair, £1,933; stool, £1,000, both B&B Italia (bebitalia.com).


M AT T H EW ’ S ADDRESS BOOK A guide to shopping in east London Captured-By A lovely shop featuring iconic homewares and pieces by local designers. It’s the perfect place to browse when visiting the Columbia Road flower market (held every Sunday morning). 95 Columbia Road, E2 (captured-by.com) Triangle This is one of my favourite stores. It has a really interesting, welledited collection of homewares – and it stocks my jewellery! 81 Chatsworth Road, E5 (trianglestore.co.uk) Taylor Street Baristas This trendy little place serves the best cofee in town. 1A New Street, EC2 (taylor-st.com) Lee Broom Broom’s studio is just a short walk along Shoreditch High Street from my studio, so I pop in often. It’s beautifully laid out and full of great pieces. 95 Rivington Street, EC2 (leebroom.com) Blixen This is a gorgeous restaurant in a fantastic east London setting with a beautifully designed interior. It’s a great spot for an indulgent weekend brunch! 65A Brushfield Street, E1 ( blixen.co.uk)

Bedroom A ‘Zigzag’ lamp by Jieldé stands beside the ‘Husk’ armchair and ottoman by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia. The rug is Neisha Crosland’s ‘Diagonal Blue Bead’ design for The Rug Company. For similar slouchy bedlinen try Society Limonta Bathroom Sori Yanagi’s ‘Butterfly’ stool sits in front of bespoke walnut and stone cabinetry by LUV Architects Stockist details on p290 E D

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What is British design? Like our culture, it’s a beautiful melting pot. From heritage pieces made according to tradition to new pieces by British designers (and those that have made the UK their home), there’s plenty to be excited about. Here, we pick the very best Photography DAMIAN RUSSELL Styling SUZANNE STANKUS Styling Assistant ELLA MCCABE BARTON


From left ‘Single Board’ elm desk with polished steel trestles, from £6,100, Jeremy Pitts (jeremypitts.co.uk). ‘Perching’ stool by Studioilse, £405, Artifort (artifort.com). Selection of books by Phaidon (phaidon.com), Thames & Hudson (thamesandhudson.com), Tate Publishing (shop.tate.org.uk) and Artifice (artificebooksonline.com). ‘Tate Modern Brick’ sculpture by Herzog & de Meuron, £1,450, Tate Shop (shop.tate.org.uk). ‘Agate’ bowl, £950, Dale Rogers Ammonite (dalerogersammonite.com). ‘Green Marble Sthan’ ornament, £135, To & From (toandfrom.co). Constable: Fenn Lane, East Bergholt print, from £25, Tate Shop (shop.tate.org.uk). Postcards, stylist’s own. ‘Soren’ pendant light, £795, Pinch (pinchdesign.com). ‘Sherlock’ umbrella, £145, London Undercover (londonundercover.co.uk) ➤


COOL BRITANNIA From left ‘Single Board’ elm desk, from £6,100, Jeremy Pitts (jeremypitts.co.uk). ‘Original 1227’ desk lamp, £235, Anglepoise (anglepoise.com). ‘Olio’ black bowl by Barber & Osgerby, £70, Royal Doulton (royaldoulton.co.uk). Water jug by Arran Street East, £64.50; ‘Marmoreal Black’ boards by Max Lamb, £214.50 each, all Makers & Brothers (makersandbrothers.com). Nesting bowls, £60; terracotta beaker, £35, both Billy Lloyd (billylloyd.co.uk). Selection of handcarved spoons, from £18 each, Grain & Knot (grainandknot.com). Large white jug by Lisa Stockham, £180, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘Olio’ black jug by Barber & Osgerby, £50, Royal Doulton (royaldoulton.co.uk). White matcha bowls (two pictured), £60 each, Billy Lloyd (billylloyd.co.uk). ‘Pourer’ small green jug by Arran Street East, £24, Makers & Brothers (makersandbrothers.com). Hand-turned wooden bowls (four pictured), from £16 each, Leoni Bullcock (leonibullcock.com). ‘Marble Makrana’ large white bowl, from £130, To & From (toandfrom.co)


From left Welsh Ram print, price on request, Paul Barton (paulbartondop.com); printed by White City Signs (whitecitysigns.com). Tiled table by Bert & May in collaboration with Novocastrian, £1,400, (bertandmay.com). ‘Plaster Ball’ sphere, price on request; pestle and mortar, £1,200, both by Malgorzata Bany, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Milking stool, £80, Leoni Bullcock (leonibullcock.com). ‘Ochre’ bowl by Matthew Warner, £180, Contemporary Applied Arts (caa.org.uk). Rose plant from Wisley Garden Centre, £9.99, Royal Horticultural Society (rhs.org.uk/gardens/wisley). ‘Black Shape’ sculpture by Malgorzata Bany, price on request, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Crillon’ chair, £5,525, Soane (soane.com) ➤


COOL BRITANNIA From top ‘Verona’ rug, £9,840, Luke Irwin (lukeirwin.com). ‘Walnut Darby’ table, £7,450, Benchmark Furniture (benchmarkfurniture.com). ‘Perching’ stool by Studioilse £405, Artifort (artifort.com). Boots and shoes, from £435 for a pair, Grenson (grenson.com). On table, left to right from top British Artists: Bernard Leach book by Edmund de Waal, £14.99, Tate Publishing (shop.tate.org.uk). Plate by Bernard Leach, £32, David Mellor Design (davidmellordesign.com). A Book Of Things book, £43, Jasper Morrison (jaspermorrison.com). ‘Green Marble Thali’ platter, £70, To & From (toandfrom.com). ‘Hobart’ nutcracker, £34; candlestick, £40, both Robert Welch (robertwelch.com). The Wooden Bowl book, £24.95, Robin Wood (robin-wood.co.uk). Wooden spoons by Robin Wood, £45 each, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Linen napkins by Irish Linen Mills, £15.50 each, Makers & Brothers (makersandbrothers.com). Italian blue ladle, £52, Spode (spode.co.uk). Robert Welch - Design: Craft And Industry book, £30, Robert Welch (robertwelch.com). Luke Irwin rug catalogues (lukeirwin.com). Plain Simple Useful: The Essence Of Conran Style book by Terence Conran, £25, Octopus (octopusbooks.co.uk). Black basalt bowls by Max Lamb: small, £30; large, £35, both SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Ilse’ brass bowl, £105; candleholder, £85, both by Ilse Crawford for Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). China Granite Project book by Max Lamb, £18, Makers & Brothers (makersandbrothers.com). Stone spice grinder, £85; Dixonary book by Tom Dixon, £35, both Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net). A Frame For Life book by Ilse Crawford, £35, RIBA (ribabookshops.com). One By One book, £20, Barber & Osgerby(barberosgerby.com)


From left ‘Verona’ rug, £9,840, Luke Irwin (lukeirwin.com). ‘Slatted’ bench by Robin Day, £1,250, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Beauty’ mirror, £1,375, Michael Anastassiades (michaelanastassiades.com). ‘Solid’ table lamp by Terence Woodgate, £295, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Malus Royal Beauty’ tree from Wisley Garden Centre, £45, Royal Horticultural Society (rhs.org.uk/gardens/wisley). ‘Huge’ pot by Kyra Cane, £2,030, Contemporary Applied Arts (caa.org.uk) ➤


COOL BRITANNIA From left ‘Swivel’ chair by Robin Day, £250, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Missed’ daybed by Michael Marriott, £3,790, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Roly Poly’ chair, £6,600, Faye Toogood (fayetoogood.com). Silk wall hanging, stylist’s own. ‘Piton’ stool by Barber & Osgerby, £440, Knoll (knoll.com). ‘Kingston’ blue chair by William Plunkett, £1,118, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). Evening Star reproduction canvas by JMW Turner from ‘The National Gallery Collection’, from £170, Surface View (surfaceview.co.uk). ‘Cross Leg’ lounge chair by Magnus Long , £2,000, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) ➤


COOL BRITANNIA From left ‘Crillon’ leather chairs (two pictured), from £5,525 each, Soane (soane.com). ‘Roly-Poly’ daybed, £27,360, Faye Toogood (fayetoogood.com). ‘3 Legs’ chair, from £1,750, Jack Draper (jackdraper.com). ‘Walnut Darby’ table, £7,450, Benchmark Furniture (benchmarkfurniture.com). ‘Pilotis’ platter by Malgorzata Bany, £435, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Slate Pyala’ raised tray, £245, To & From (toandfrom.co). ‘Ilse’ vase by Ilse Crawford, £72, Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). A Waterfall in Tahiti reproduction print by William Hodges from the ‘National Maritime Museum’ collection, from £120, Surface View (surfaceview.co.uk). ‘450’ bench by Studioilse, from £1,278, De La Espada (delaespada.com). ‘3 Legs’ chair (as before). ‘Mirror Ball’ floor light, from £285, Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net). ‘Low Bench’ by Studioilse for Zanat, available September, MDF Agencies (mdfagencies.com). ‘U’ bowl by Nicola Tassie, £1,200, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Watering can by Barber & Osgerby (special project handmade at Salone del Mobile 2010). ‘Green Marble Sthan’ ornament, £70, To & From (toandfrom.co) E D


In conversation with

Kelly Hoppen With a new book about to come out chronicling Hoppen’s 40 years in the business, Editor in Chief Michelle Ogundehin joins the designer to reminisce about what got her started and where she’s going I’ve read that when you were a child, you loved to play with pop-up books, the kind that open up like a 3D world. It strikes me that this is all about stage-setting, which is a lot of what home-making is too. How early on did you realise that your life path had to be design and interiors? Very early. My mother said that at 13 years old I was in the bathroom laying out my bottles and making everything beautiful. But I was obsessed with those pop-up books from much younger. I always wanted to get into the back of them. I was really into the structure of how things worked. I’d even cut out pieces and move them around inside. But a pivotal moment for me came when I was about 11. I was allowed to redecorate my bedroom, which was very pink! My mother said I could change it if I knew what I wanted, which I absolutely did. Firstly, I wanted to swap rooms with my brother because he was at boarding school, and then I asked for cream shag-pile carpet, chocolate-brown felt trimmed with chrome for the walls, white shutters on all the cupboards and a silver Robin Day chair with holes in it that I’d seen; my brother still has it in his studio today. The only dodgy thing was the duvet cover, which was brown and white. I wanted this sort of modern Pop-Art bedroom. What about your parents? Were they into design and interiors? I’m intrigued to understand whether your talent is innate, inherited or learnt. When I was growing up I was surrounded by this very bohemian London lifestyle, with my mother and all her literary, artist and sculptor friends, and my father’s fashion business.

I was very much included in it, always at dinners, listening to people, soaking it all up like a sponge. But my mother’s style was incredibly varied. Her study was amazing, all metal and smoked brown glass from Ciancimino. The dining room was not my thing, very green and white with a trellis, like the inside of a conservatory, but still stylish, as was my parents’ bedroom. It had a low bed covered with zebra-print fabric – very modern and cool – and then her living room was traditional with an amazing collection of glass bells. It was great for me because I was exposed to all these diferent looks and she loved it, and it was warm and inviting. I was very house-proud, though, and my mum was quite messy, which she’ll hate me for saying but it’s true. She’d go out and I’d somehow convince the au pair to help me move furniture across the room. When other kids were watching TV shows, I was moving furniture around. On weekends, my mum would ask me what I wanted to do, and I’d say I wanted to go and look at show flats. In those days they were really prevalent, and they’d always have open days. My mum loved interiors and art, so we’d have great fun together. We’d go to museums and art galleries all the time, too, so from an early age my childhood was incredibly informative in the arts. I also had a great aunt who lived in a beautiful six-storey house one street away from us. Most days after school I’d go and see her. She had this incredible study with love seats upholstered in bright orange velvet, an amazing Amtico floor that looked like marble with brass inlays, and a pair of drinks cabinets with mirrored glass


PICTURES: PAL HANSEN, MEL YATES

‘When other kids were watching TV shows, I was moving furniture around’

that looked like they went on forever. We used to sit down and just talk about her house – she was a larger-than-life character with amazing taste. I was obsessed with her style. So that’s where my love for home came in. I was fortunate to be able to go into homes like those of my mother’s extraordinary mix of friends. But it came from me; nobody said, ‘Go and do interiors’. But for you to be celebrating 40 years of practice, you must have started work incredibly young, and with no time for any formal training? Yes! I got my first project through my stepfather when I was 16½. He had a friend who wanted a kitchen doing. It was in Elvaston Place in London. The friend was an alcoholic, but somehow we managed to get some builders through him who were the same. It was a disaster! I mean, it was hideous, but what mattered was I made a job happen. And then the next project came when I was 17½, through a girlfriend of mine who knew Guy Edwards, the Grand Prix racing driver. He asked me to do up his house in The Boltons, and that was the beginning of my career. I was very lucky to be given the chance based on my own flat that he had seen. And you had no doubts? Surely you were scared? It seems an incredibly audacious thing to be doing up people’s homes as a teenager. I was just so happy to be out of school and in control. By the age of 17 I’d bought and done up my own apartment in Chelsea and set up an oice there. The kitchen was pretty awful – I painted it peacock blue – but the living room and the bedroom were good. I remember, I’d bought this Chinese lacquered trunk at Portobello market, so my love of East meets West was already starting. And I had my first proper studio, at 134 Lots Road, about two years later. I feel so fortunate to have been so young when I started this process. Back then, everything came from a real intrigue and

experience, rather than what I feel people do today, which is just to open up a book and copy from it. My style evolved in a very organic way – it was real and intuitive. I was developing my thing and building my team. Also, since I was a little girl, I’d travelled during every half term and holiday, seeing old buildings, art and museums all over Europe, then every year going back to stay in South Africa, so I had this very diferent, international perspective. And then, of course, my love for the East became an obsession. You have the most incredible recall for detail. And when you design, you’ve often said it comes straight from the heart, that you distil everything you’ve seen, heard, smelt and felt into a singular and tangible vision. How does this work? The interesting thing is I’m very dyslexic, but I only found out when my daughter Natasha was diagnosed. I couldn’t read out loud at school. I couldn’t copy anything; the spelling would be wrong, even if I tried as hard as I could. However, if you showed me a page with lots of pictures on it and I looked at it for ten or 15 minutes, ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 239


I would have memorised it. So, visually, my IQ is way of the charts, but writing and reading are impossible. My brain just works in a diferent way. For example, I can walk into a room and scan it in five minutes and know what to do to make it better. I see a blank canvas and lines start to appear. And as I’m describing it, I can literally see it. So when I’m designing, I can physically visualise a space in three dimensions before it’s built. I can take things out and move them around in my mind’s eye, too. I think this really helps me because I’m never jailed by the floor plan. I start with no assumptions of what can and can’t be done. I’ll make the space work for me. Whereas if you go in with restrictions from day one, you’ll never really stretch your imagination, and my imagination is the greatest gift I’ve ever been given. We often talk about the best homes being someone’s personally curated corner of the world, their home as their life, and the idea that a space like that is created slowly over years. Yet your role is to efectively craft this feeling more immediately. How is this possible? When you build a home for someone, some don’t really know what they want; all they can know is how they want to feel in it. For me, it’s a process of understanding that. It’s an art and it doesn’t happen immediately. It’s hard. Getting into someone’s head is intriguing and brilliant, and I love that part. That, for me, is what good design is all about. You have to dig away to get the words, and then the words have to be attached to something tangible. And you have to be completely selfless, so you can guide someone with style to fulfil their dream. When I first started, I definitely had more of an ego. I wanted to impose what I thought was best, but now the process is much more organic – with no ego! What I won’t let go of, though, is making everything beautiful.

How have you navigated the evolution of taste over the years since you started, from the vagaries of showpiece homes and extravagantly swagged window treatments in the early 1980s, via the pure minimalist look, to current ideas of home as a cocoon of security and warmth? The thing is, I don’t take notice of trends. It’s weird. Maybe it’s because I’m so busy and always in my own head, but my influences come from things like art, fashion, vintage pieces, music, people and conversation. I tend to look at trends and where things are going a bit like fashion – it’s there and it’s not, and it’s not substantial enough to make it important to me. I remember when minimalism came in, though. I steered very far away from it because it didn’t feel like me, and when people called me a minimalist, it would drive me mad. I consider myself a purist. John Pawson is the greatest minimalist of all time, and what he does is incredible, but I wouldn’t know how to do it. It wouldn’t be natural to me, and I wouldn’t enjoy it. I know what I love and what excites me about design, and I can design something so quickly when it’s true to me. If I was influenced by trends, I don’t think I would have lasted so long in this business. So where do you get your inspiration from? I know your style is based on several core seams of inspiration, from the natural world to Eastern influences, but what fires your imagination on a daily basis? My brain is continually collating bits of information from everywhere. I always get inspired by things that have nothing to do with design. I’ll give you an example: in Ibiza one year, I’d been on holiday for nearly a month, which is very unusual for me, and as it came towards the end of the holiday, I drove past this typically Ibizan house with a run of ochre yellow down the side and I remember consciously thinking, I’ve got to clock that because it gives me an idea for a job that I’m doing. And then suddenly, boom! It was the moment I came out of holiday mode and all the things that I’d seen in the last three-and-a-half weeks started filtering back into the virtual filing system in my head. It was when I realised


‘When people called me a minimalist, it would drive me mad. I consider myself a purist. I know what I love and what excites me about design’

PICTURES: PAL HANSEN, JON SYRETT *UK ONLY – PLEASE ADD £2.50 IF

The cover of new book House of Hoppen (left), on sale in October

that I needed downtime to restock my brain in order to be able to use it. There are certain places that have influenced me, too, like Paris, but it’s the essence of the city, rather than a specific detail – the feeling of the place, flea markets, the way Parisians dress, the flirtation, their use of unexpected pieces and the juxtaposition of fabrics – that je ne sais quoi. I know a lot of people find Swedish and Danish design very inspiring, but that was never me. Italy, though, is a big influence. The Italians have a way of putting things together that on paper really shouldn’t work, but they pull it of. And New York: it’s the fast pace and the way they live. I like scale, I’m never frightened of it, even in small buildings. New York is very inspiring in every way. Vintage furniture, too, is inspirational. I think you can create a whole room around one piece, rather than the other way around. I also have a lot of photographs, and a box of tearsheets that I’ve kept for years in my studio. Plus, collections of things: a belt buckle I loved, a picture of bare flesh against silk sheets. I just keep logging those references in the basement of my brain, which is huge. I don’t think I ever discard anything, so I can just pull things back up. And when my head gets full, I go away again for a week. You’ve said that the art of design is about using space, light and texture to engender good feelings. Do you think that a well-designed room can be beneficial for your wellbeing, or even improve your health? Absolutely, 100 per cent. I’ve been into homes that were dark and felt wrong in every way, so much so

that I needed to get out, so if you lived in a space like that, it’s surely going to have an efect on you. But today anybody can paint their walls white and make their home look brighter. It’s just not necessary to live in places that don’t feel right. No matter what budget you’re on, you can brighten up your home. I’d like to think that I can make people happier in their own environments, and hopefully from that, if they had some sort of ailment, they might begin to heal. After all, being positive about yourself in mind, body and spirit can definitely make you healthier. What you eat makes you healthier, so what you look at, what you touch, your environment, the music you listen to have all got to have an efect as well. And finally, after 40 years, how do you feel about beige and taupe? Are you still in love with neutrals? I do use colour, but it’s more accents of colour. I like the way a neutral room feels and then the way a colour will sharpen it. But if we think of some of the greats, like David Hicks (his book on interiors was the first one I ever bought), he was a genius at pattern, and I couldn’t do that. The great traditionalists, like John Stefanidis, they owned their style. Terence Conran – you know who he is: a genius. Philippe Starck, Kelly Wearstler, whether you like it or not, they own their style. That’s what I admire. So I’m not frightened of using colour but neutrals are who I am. It’s worked for 40 years – it was needed – and I’ll continue in the ‘Hoppen’ style. E D ELLE Decoration readers get 20% of new book House of Hoppen. Pre-order it now for £40 including p&p* (RRP: Jacqui Small, £50). Phone 01903 828503 and quote the ofer code KH2016. OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 241


THE LONDON LOOK

URBAN How do you update a Modernist landmark for contemporary living? We visit an apartment at the Barbican to find out


ICON Words JO FROUDE Photography TOM MANNION Styling ENRICO DONADELLO


L

ondon’s Brutalist Barbican Estate is architectural Marmite, and has divided opinion since it was first built during the 1960s and 1970s. It was conceived as a utopia of functional living by architecture firm Chamberlin, Powell and Bon, and built as a trio of concrete high rises with terraced housing blocks. The Barbican Arts Centre was added in 1982 and opened by the Queen, who declared it ‘one of the wonders of the modern world’. Since then, many have marvelled at the building’s gritty modernity, while others deride it as an eyesore. Barbican resident Ben Ashworth, who works in publishing, is firmly in the former camp. He moved into the Grade II-listed Lauderdale Tower in 2004 and, happy in his home, only considered updating the interior of his 100-square-metre apartment last year. He commissioned Bert Rozeman, an architect who had worked on another apartment on the Estate. ‘Initially I had only contemplated a simple refurbishment, but Bert could see the potential here and came up with so many ideas for creating extra space that we ended up overhauling the entire flat,’ Ben says of the five-month project. Their updates created an open-plan interior lined with custommade storage and painted in two bold colours: red and blue. The two statement shades were mixed using RAL colours (see our Insider Guide on p247) and were chosen to visually divide the functional spaces of the flat from areas for relaxation. The walls in the bedroom, meditation room, living and dining rooms, which all have windows overlooking the balcony, are painted red, while blue appears in the kitchen, bathroom and utility room. Much of the furniture is by Vitsœ (and, hence, British made) and is teak, conjuring a mid-century sensibility that references the history of the building. During the redesign two formerly spare bedrooms were turned into a study and meditation room, a move that makes the updated apartment much more tailored to Ben’s lifestyle. The meditation room was a particular priority for Ben, to help him de-stress and re-energise, and is lit by a bespoke biodynamic lighting system that varies the brightness and colour of the artificial light to replicate natural daylight. It’s thought to stimulate the body’s biological clock and help to regulate hormone and cortisone levels. The creation of a spacious kitchen in what was once a pokey, enclosed galley space has also had a huge impact on Ben’s quality of life. ‘When I cook, I have views across London, which makes the entire flat feel more open and inviting,’ he says. ‘For me, the Barbican is the ideal location for stress-free living. Almost everything I need can be found on my doorstep, from the gym to supermarkets and bars, as well as some of the best restaurants in the city. I don’t use the car for weeks on end and the gardens are an oasis – it’s easy to forget you’re in the heart of the financial district.’ rozeman.co.uk

LIVING & DINING ROOM

KITCHEN

MEDITATION ROOM

STUDY

BA

LC O NY

WRITING NOOK

Writing nook The walls, shelving and ceiling are painted ‘Stone Grey’ (RAL 7030) to complement the Barbican’s concrete façade, and the resin floor (by Stratum UK) is a similar hue. The wall light is the ‘Foglio’ by Tobia Scarpa for Flos (available from David Village Lighting) Stockist details on p290 ➤

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INSIDER GUIDE RAL COLOURS

What those mysterious codes actually mean RAL is a colour matching system regarded as the European standard for paint and coating colours in architecture, construction and road safety. Each colour in a RAL collection has a four-digit number so that it can be accurately identified and reproduced. The first three numbers of the code are a key: the first digit is the degree of hue, the second is its lightness and the third digit is the intensity (chroma) of the colour. Each shade also has a more evocative name that changes from country to country, for example ‘Oxide Red’. The RAL system was devised in 1927 by Germany’s Imperial Commission for Delivery Terms and Quality Assurance (or ReichsAusschuss für Lieferbedingungen und Gütesicherung, which the abbreviation RAL derived from). Initially a set of 40 numbered colours were produced under the name RAL 840. Prior to this, manufacturers and customers had to exchange samples to describe a tint, which could be viewed diferently depending on the light. The four-digit system was introduced in 1930 for matt paint (and renamed RAL 840 R), and revised again in the 1960s as more shades were added. In the 1980s, a further 193 colours for gloss surfaces were introduced (RAL 841-GL). Today, the RAL system includes over 1,800 colours – including the blue and red used in this home.

Living area The walls are painted ‘Oxide Red’ (RAL 3009), with the warm colour enhanced by teak shelving, window shutters and a dining table designed by the architect. The rug is by Larusi, as is the fabric for the curtains made by Alan James. The leather armchair, footstool and side tables are all designed by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ. The light that hangs above the dining table is the ‘Owala 7000’ by Secto Design and the ‘Catifa’ dining chairs are by Arper, upholstered in fabric from Kvadrat Stockist details on p290 ➤

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DARK BLUE PAINT (RAL 7030) IS USED ON THE WALLS IN THE KITCHEN AND NOOK (ABOVE). ITS UNDERTONE OF GREY RECALLS THE CONCRETE FAÇADE OF THE BARBICAN


Kitchen The teak island is custom-made to resemble a vintage Danish sideboard. The cupboard doors are painted in ‘Iron Grey’ (RAL 7011) and the worktops are made of Corian. Find similar accessories at The Conran Shop Detail (opposite) The shelves in the writing nook are decorated with the homeowner’s collection of chess sets from Malaysia, Peru and Kenya Stockist details on p290 ➤

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Meditation room Bespoke biodynamic lighting by Basis is built into the ceiling. The cabinets, designed by the architect, are painted in ‘Rouge Noir’ (RAL 3007) and lined with teak. The carpet is by Kasthall from Sinclair Till Study Painted ‘Pure White’ (RAL 9010) and lined with Vitsœ shelving, this room includes a bespoke teak desk topped with red linoleum. The carpet is by Kasthall and the chair is from Larusi Stockist details on p290 ➤

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DARK ‘OXIDE RED’ (RAL 3009) WALLS AND WARDROBE AND CUPBOARD DOORS PAINTED IN ‘ROUGE NOIR’ (RAL 3007) GIVE THIS SPACE A WARM INTENSITY


Bedroom Bespoke cabinetry, lacquered in rich aubergine-hued ‘Rouge Noir’ (RAL 3007) paint, complements the ‘Oxide Red’ (RAL 3009) walls. LED lighting lines the ceiling, giving the room an ethereal glow at night. The bedlinen and chair are by Larusi, and the grey carpet is by Kasthall Stockist details on p290 E D

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A RTS • CULTUR E • BOOKS • TR AV EL

ESCAPE

DISCOVER A SECRET ISLAND RETREAT

PICTURE: GETTY

Dubbed Brighton for Berliners, the charming resort of Sellin, with its traditional pier (above), is just one of the reasons to travel to Rügen, a little German island with a whole lot to ofer. Find out more on p265.

F O R M O R E P L A C E S T O E X P L O R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / E S C A P E


Escape | N E W S

OLD MASTERS, NEW ARTIST London’s landmark antiques and decorative arts archive, The Wallace Collection, opens a contemporary exhibition this month that will bring even the most modern art fan to its door. ‘The Middle’ by Tom Ellis sees the British artist present site-specific work alongside the collection’s ancient artefacts in the Front State Room, the exhibition galleries, and on the front lawn of its Hertford House home in Marylebone. Ellis’ pieces include oil paintings and furniture; keep an eye out for ‘transformative’ tables and chairs that echo the upstairs Boudoir Room’s writing table (right) by 18th-century furniture maker Jean-François Leleu, which starts in one form and opens up to become something else. 15 September–27 November (wallacecollection.org).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ROB MURRAY, JAMES HARRIS, THE WALLACE COLLECTION

OUT OF OFFICE You may wish to wave this new cofee-table book under your boss’s nose. Keen to investigate some of the world’s hippest workspaces, independent Irish publisher Roads secured access to a variety of international oices, photographed them, and produced new title The Creative Workplace (Roads Publishing, £25). The book’s introduction looks at the productivity stats behind Google’s infamous new setup, which involves free breakfasts, Lego ‘play stations’ for employees and Broadway-themed conference rooms, alongside London designer Andy Stevens’ wry observation of the diference between work areas that fulfil creative requirements, and those that just ‘look creative’. Our favourite case study is Parisian data consultancy Ekimetrics (far left): its rooms have original frescoed ceilings and are filled with playful pine house-like structures. We also love the mix of old ruins and slick contemporary additions in Casa Rex, Brazil (left).

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Escape | N E W S

MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME

THE SOUPED-UP SHED The Pig hotels are boutique venues loved by city and country dwellers alike for their simple-but-stylish ‘restaurant with rooms’ philosophy. At the original outpost in the New Forest, tile supremo Bert & May has created a new type of self-catering room: a single-storey wooden cabin called ‘Bert’s Box’, nestled in the hotel’s idyllic grounds. The bijou homestead has its own kitchen, a log-burning stove and, of course, striking chevron flooring that lends a modern edge to the interior. From £360 per night (thepighotel.com).

THE TREETOP PENTHOUSE Guests breakfasting on the balconies of the new treehouses at Kent’s Port Lympne nature reserve (founded in 1976 by John Aspinall) can expect to spot creatures great and small, from swooping eagles to girafes poking their heads above the canopy. You can stay in the Edwardian manor house hotel, a cottage or wooden lodges, but the ten new arboreal cabins created by interior designer Tara Bernerd have an extra-special charm. From £300 per night for a four-person treehouse and entry to the reserve (aspinallfoundation.org).

THE SPA STOPOVER The Daylesford brand’s supremely sophisticated take on rural life, which includes an organic farm shop, clothing and beauty lines, translates perfectly to a chic Gloucestershire wellness retreat, the Bamford Haybarn Spa. Now, the launch of two ‘Cotswold Cottages’ – think limestone, white-washed walls, pine beams and high-threadcount sheets – means spa junkies from further afield can make a weekend of it. Intersperse walks with mindfulness workshops or a massage and finish with dinner at the Bamford-owned Wild Rabbit pub. From £450 for a two-night stay for two (thewildrabbit.co.uk).

THE GOOD LIFE GETAWAY Surrounded by the majestic Shropshire Hills, West Redford Farm Barns was derelict until it was bought by husband-and-wife interior design duo Rupert and Jude Hunt. Both accommodation options – Ludlow Barn, which sleeps eight, and Tenbury Cottage, which sleeps four – have roll-top baths and welcome well-behaved dogs. Visitors can collect freshly laid eggs from the hens, cook in the outdoor kitchen and make the most of the games room – a former stable with a logburning stove and pool table. Barn £1,095 for three nights, cottage £600 for three nights (redfordfarmbarns.co.uk).

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: DL ACKEN

Prefer a hands-on holiday to five-star pampering? Take your pick from these four cool new self-catering boltholes in the UK’s most picturesque spots


FIVE OF THE BEST NEW EXHIBITIONS

This season’s top picks are all either curated by or centred on women in the art world 1. THE BLOCKBUSTER ‘Men put me down as the best woman painter… I think I’m one of the best painters,’ Georgia O’Keefe once said. In 2014, her ‘Jimson Weed/ White Flower No 1’ canvas (right) fetched the highest price ever paid for a work of art by a female artist, more than doubling the previous record. However, no UK public art collection owns a single O’Keefe. London’s Tate Modern has therefore managed a major coup with its new retrospective, which shows over 100 paintings on loan from around the world. Until 30 October (tate.org.uk). 2. THE PHOTOGRAPHER At Hastings’ Jerwood Gallery, alongside rarely seen works by Picasso, are photographs by his friend, Vogue correspondent and war photographer Lee Miller, in a new show called ‘Bitten By Picasso’, organised by Miller’s son, Antony 2 Penrose. Until 9 October ( jerwoodgallery.org). 3. THE WEARABLE ART Who knew that 20th-century American sculptor Alexander Calder also designed necklaces, brooches and earrings? Artists’ jewellery is gallerist Louisa Guinness’ speciality – her Mayfair gallery has shown pieces by figures from Picasso to Man Ray. Geometric, handcrafted and striking in scale, designs that echo Calder’s famous mobiles will be exhibited in her autumn exhibition ‘The Boldness of

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: EDWARD C. ROBISON III, ESTATE OF EVELYN HOFER, REBECCA MORRIS, COURTESY THE NAPOLEONE COLLECTION

Calder’. Also on show will be intriguing archive photographs of notable women wearing his pieces, from Peggy Guggenheim to Anjelica Huston (above). 27 September–5 November (louisaguinnessgallery.com).

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4. THE FASHIONABLE SCULPTOR Nicole Farhi started her fashion career at French Connection during the 1970s before launching her eponymous label. Today she’s no longer associated with it, instead focusing on her other talent: her exhibition of a series of hands sculpted in bronze, entitled ‘The Human Hand’, opens at London’s Bowman Sculpture gallery this month. 13–30 September (bowmansculpture.com). 5. THE PRIVATE COLLECTOR Valeria Napoleone, an Italian living in London, is one of the world’s leading collectors of art by female artists. As part of Sheield’s ‘Going Public’ initiative, which exhibits Europe’s top private collections, her portfolio will be on show at Graves Gallery until 1 October. It will then transfer to Touchstones Rochdale (museum-sheield.org.uk).

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DESIGN MEETS BEAUTY New York’s Malin + Goetz is the aesthete’s skincare brand of choice. A focus on organic healing ingredients comes from co-founder Matthew Malin, who struggled with over-the-counter lotions for his eczema, while the design kudos is thanks to his other half, Andrew Goetz, who used to work for Vitra. Now it has opened not one, but two stores in London. Located in Islington’s Upper Street and Covent Garden’s cobbled Monmouth Street, both are in Victorian buildings that have been beautifully converted by British architects Jonathan Tuckey Design. The Islington store (above right) has an Edwardian apothecary étagére cabinet. Monmouth Street (above left) is more minimal, with plywood walls. 6 Monmouth Street, London WC2; 146 Upper Street, London N1 (malinandgoetz.com). Visit this The Fashion and Textile Museum’s new show, ‘1920s Jazz Age Fashion & Photographs’, is devoted to the golden era of jazz. A glittering Great Gatsby-evoking mix of frocks will be on display – think fringed flapper dresses and marabou-feather headdresses – as well as original Cecil Beaton photographs of partygoers with daring bob haircuts and cigarette holders. 23 September–15 January 2017 ( ftmlondon.org).

C A P I TA L C U I S I N E

M A D R I D In the La Moraleja neighbourhood lies Los Peñotes garden and landscape design centre, which has converted three greenhouses into a café and brasserie called El Invernadero (‘greenhouse’ in Spanish). Peckish plant shoppers can order botanically inspired breakfast, lunch or dinner from a comfy seat on the wicker chairs or cork-topped stools atop white terrazzo floors (elinvernaderodelospenotes.es).

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B E R L I N Potsdamer Strasse’s new restaurant and bar, Panama, is named after the children’s story Oh Wie Schön Ist Panama (Oh How Beautiful Panama Is) by author and illustrator Janosch. German ingredients are mixed with flavours from the restaurant’s Caribbean namesake. The interior, masterminded by designers Nora Witzigmann and Karo Butzert, combines local art with cacti from Arizona (oh-panama.com).

PA R I S Madame Thiou is Paris’ authority on modern Thai cooking, and her restaurant’s new home on a leafy avenue with impressive views of Les Invalides is a must-visit. Designer Laura Gonzalez (who shares her insider tips on p67) aimed to create the feeling of being in Ms Thiou’s own dining room. From velvet chairs and brass lights to a fresco by super-cool wood muralists Atelier Roma, it’s a delight (restaurant-thiou.fr).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: DIRK LINDNER, PHILIPP LANGENHEIM AND CORINA SCHADENDORF

Heading to one of these destinations on a city break? Be sure to book a table at its hottest new restaurant


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GERMANY’S ISLAND PARADISE The coastal towns and verdant forests of Rügen are a well-kept secret (until now) We’re sure we can’t be the only Brits never to have heard of Rügen, the largest island of Germany and known in some quarters as Brighton for Berliners. Lying in the Baltic Sea, its coastal resort towns draw crowds of holidaying Germans in the summer, but it also makes a pleasingly peaceful getaway in the cooler months. We recommend venturing beyond the tourist spots to the forests of elm, poplar and chestnut, or the deserted white-sand beaches and chalky clifs made famous by the 19th-century German Romantic painter Caspar David Friedrich. Here are our tips for making the most of this intriguing island, which has the most sunshine and lowest rainfall in Germany. D O Trek from the town of Sassnitz through forests

along the coast and hunt for shards of Baltic amber. You can swim in the sea or hit the waves aboard a boat from the sailing school (segelschule-ruegen.de). Alternatively, cycle around the agricultural heartland of cornfields, meadows and beech groves. Red deer and eagle nests abound in the Jasmund National Park’s lush vegetation (nationalpark-jasmund.de). For something more urban, meander through Sassnitz’ old town alleyways and craft shops.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GETTY, ALAMY

S TAY Urlaubsarchitektur, known in English as Holiday Architecture, is the brainchild of German architect Jan Hamer, who, in a bid to bring an end to bland holiday rentals, has compiled an online list of inspiring places to stay. There are several venues in Rügen on the list: our favourite is Kornspeicher Mauritz, a red-brick granary built in 1904 that has been beautifully converted by Berlin architecture practice ZWO4 into several airy apartments. It hosts yoga courses, has a sauna and bicycles, and is two kilometres from a bird sanctuary and the sea (two-person apartments from £55 per night; urlaubsarchitektur.de).

From top Sellin’s traditional illuminated pier. The idyllic cobbled streets of Sassnitz. A pared-back self-catered apartment at Kornspeicher Mauritz. The breathtaking white clifs of Rügen’s quiet coastline

E AT Fresh and smoked fish abound on the menus here – try Fischerhütte, which serves delicious catches of the day near charming seaside town Sellin’s beach (fischerhuette-moritzdorf.de). For a spectacular setting, dinner in the restaurant at the end of Sellin’s illuminated pier (top), Seebrücke, is a must: local scallops with pink salt, sesame and seaweed can be enjoyed either in the Art Nouveau-inspired restaurant or out on the deck (seebrueckesellin.de). Locals swear by sea buckthorn juice as a life-giving liquor. Available in most food shops, it can contain up to 15 times the amount of Vitamin C as orange juice, plus omega oils.

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MARVELLOUS MAPS Why do we need maps when most of us have GPS on our phones? It’s all about delivering more than just directions. These three pocket maps are charmingly illustrated and carefully curated to lead you to the best corners of a city. Plus, they’ll never run out of battery! 1 . L O N D O N Derek Lamberton set up his publishing company Blue Crow Media in 2010 and, collaborating with specialists, has so far published a wine map of London, a cofee map of Berlin and maps of the Brutalist buildings in London. His latest is another gem for architecture fans: a foldable atlas of Art Deco buildings in London. Highlighting landmarks such as Charles Holden tube stations and Broadcasting House, it’s printed on recycled paper and is striking enough to frame and hang on the wall (£8; bluecrowmedia.com). 2 . L I V E R P O O L The Independent Map Co is a team of Liverpool-based cartographers who run a finely edited website that gathers the best independent shops and cafés in cities around the world. Its first paper project is a map of its hometown, which is minimal in its design but rich as a resource (£7; independentmap.co). 3 . PA R I S ‘Ever been out in Paris at night and had the distinct feeling that somewhere something wonderful is happening?,’ asked Frenchman Marin Montagut. He has created two new foldaway maps, one for Paris by day and one for night, which lay out his secret addresses for the curious and crowd-averse – from enigmatic wine bars behind unremarkable doors to a ritzy Art Nouveau bistro that serves piping hot poule au pot until 5am. Local knowledge in your pocket (Flammarion, £6.50).

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DO THE LOCOMOTIVE Hark back to the glory days of rail travel with a trip on Ireland’s first-ever luxury touring train, the Grand Hibernian. Run by travel specialist Belmond, the new locomotive takes just 40 guests in its 20 spacious carriages. Travellers can take either a two, four or six night journey, all of which start and finish in Dublin. London interior design firm James Park Associates masterminded the train’s classic interior. Threecourse dinners, indulgent afternoon teas and stop-ofs at points of interest are all included in the eye-watering price, but the star is the Emerald Isle’s magnificent scenery. From £2,640 for a two-night journey (belmond.com). 266 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Visit this Modern Shows, the selling fair where you can find everything from 1930s French mirrors to iconic Danish chairs, is always worth a visit. There are two planned for this autumn: Midcentury East (9 October), in the Ernő Goldfinger-designed Haggerston School, and Dulwich College (20 November). Each will be split into four furniture categories – Bauhaus, Deco, Industrial and Modernism. Advance tickets £9 (Modernshows.com).


LONDON DESIGN FESTIVAL This September the capital comes alive with design shows, workshops and installations. With so much going on, it’s hard to pick out the gems. Luckily, you don’t have to! Here’s Team ED’s guide to the must-see events

R I V ER SIDE & S OU T H Features Writer Charlotte Brook discovers events that mix creativity and cuisine in Bankside, plus the very best of Brixton THE SMILE (UNTIL 12 OCTOBER)

Not strictly in Bankside, but beside the river further west at Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Millbank, you’ll find this extraordinary 36-metre-long ‘megatube’ installation by architect Alison Brooks. Despite only balancing on the ground at one central point, the curved structure is safe to stroll along. At night it will be lit from within, with its glow bright enough to be seen from across the River Thames (alisonbrooksarchitects.com).

‘BLACK TO WHITE AND BACK AGAIN’ AT L O N D O N G L A S S B L O W I N G G A L L E RY (16 SEPTEMBER–8 OCTOBER)

Tucked away in Bermondsey, this venue is celebrating founder Peter Layton’s 80th birthday and his 40th year of glassblowing in London with an open-submissions exhibition. It will showcase 55 beautiful works by established and emerging artists, including Yoshiko Okada (Danse de Nuit, pictured; londonglassblowing.co.uk).

‘ I N - H A B I T ’ AT A N I M A L I DOMESTICI (17–25 SEPTEMBER)

Usually by appointment only and one of Brixton’s best-kept design secrets, this Italian furniture store, cabinetry workshop and set designers’ collective is housed in a Grade II-listed hall on Saltoun Road. It will operate as an ‘open house’ during the festival and is part of the Brixton Design Trail, a series of events and pop-ups (ceramics by Fausto Salvi, right; brixtondesigntrail.com).

HOT SPOT LONDON DESIGN BIENNALE (7–27 SEPTEMBER)

Taking over the whole of Somerset House, London’s first Design Biennale will see creatives from over 35 countries come together under the theme ‘Utopia by Design’, including British duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, whose kinetic sculpture (pictured) will be in the Edmond J Safra Fountain Court (londondesignbiennale.com).

OXO TOWER WHARF (17–25 SEPTEMBER)

The iconic building is a hive of activity: we’ll be heading there to see Designersblock’s showcase of 100 creatives’ work and homeware brand Designed in Colour’s new ‘British Colour Standard’ collection. The hues for the latter are taken from the 1931 British Colour Council rulebook, created to regulate shades of uniforms and flags across the British Empire (oxotower.co.uk). W I N E A N D T Y P E TA S T I N G W O R K S H O P AT L A I T H WA I T E ’ S ( 2 2 S E P T E M B E R )

Imagine the study of fonts to be a dry subject? Think again, thanks to a wine-tasting-meets-typeface-masterclass in Laithwaite’s warehouse and shop under Southwark’s arches. Led by the engaging Sarah Hyndman – graphic designer, TED talker and expert in the psychology of typography – pupils will un-learn the habit of judging a bottle by its label. £30 (typetasting.com). ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 269


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B R OM P T ON & C H E L S E A Features Director Amy Bradford finds a wealth of Italian, Scandinavian and British design in west London

‘ S O A K , S T E A M , D R E A M : R E I N V E N T I N G B AT H I N G C U LT U R E ’ AT R O C A L O N D O N G A L L E RY ( 1 6 S E P T E M B E R – 2 8 J A N U A RY 2 0 1 7 )

Projects by Kengo Kuma, Raumlabor (above) and Something & Son Architects form part of this exhibition exploring ways that contemporary architecture has reimagined bathing for the 21st century. See ancient bathing cultures and cutting-edge smart water technology collide (rocalondongallery.com). ‘ R E N E V O L U T I O N ’ AT P O LT R O N A F R A U ( 1 7 – 2 5 S E P T E M B E R )

Chinese studio Neri&Hu gets creative at the Italian brand’s Fulham Road showroom with an installation of its wood, brass and leather ‘Ren’ tables, which are based on a Chinese ideogram. Thirty-two of the tables will be arranged in a formation inspired by Qin Shi Huang’s Terracotta Army (poltronafrau.com).

HOT SPOT V&A MUSEUM (17–25 SEPTEMBER)

The V&A is once again the hub of the London Design Festival, with events around the museum. We’ll be heading straight for French designer Mathieu Lehanneur’s installation ‘Liquid Marble’ (above), which sees a piece of black marble sculpted into ocean-like waves; and London studio Glithero’s ‘Green Room’ (below), a timepiece made from veils of coloured string created with luxury watchmaker Panerai (vam.ac.uk; londondesignfestival.com). ➤

B J Ø R N W I I N B L A D AT S K A N D I U M (17–25 SEPTEMBER)

The Scandinavian design store celebrates this midcentury Danish ceramicist, famed for his folksy designs featuring elfin characters on vases and tableware (‘Flowerpot Julian’, right). On the opening night, there will be a short talk about his legacy (skandium.com). ‘ F R O M M I L A N T O L O N D O N ’ AT P O L I F O R M (17–23 SEPTEMBER)

French architect Jean-Marie Massaud is the star here as his new ‘Mondrian’ sofa and cofee tables (clean-lined designs inspired by the paintings of the Dutch artist) arrive at the King’s Road showroom. Also on show is the dreamily soft ‘Kelly’ upholstered bed by Emanuel Gallina (poliformuk.com).

PICTURE: LASSE SEHESTED SKAFTE

B & B I TA L I A ( 1 7 – 2 5 S E P T E M B E R )

See the latest collection by the world-famous brand for the first time in the UK, as it celebrates its 50th anniversary at its spacious Brompton Road showroom. Highlights include the ‘Edouard’ sofa by Antonio Citterio and London duo Doshi Levien’s shapely ‘Do-Maru’ lounge chair (right). There will also be a special display dedicated to the company’s history, as well as a daily screening of its new documentary (bebitalia.com). OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 271


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BROMPTON & CHELSEA CONTINUED... ‘ B R E AT H L E S S : T H E E S S E N C E O F GLASS’ (17–24 SEPTEMBER)

Ever wanted to try your hand at glass blowing? Now you can, as a mobile glass furnace is transported from Prague to North Terrace, Kensington, courtesy of Czech glassmakers Dechem Studio, creative collective OKOLO and Czech Centre London. Michael Anastassiades and Tomas Alonso will be crafting unique pieces and there will also be a glass museum (below; czechcentre.org.uk).

HOT SPOT DECOREX

CASSINA (17–25 SEPTEMBER)

Alongside a display of its latest collections, the Italian manufacturer will present a playful installation at its Brompton Road showroom focusing on Patricia Urquiola’s new ‘Gender’ chair (below), which changes identity based on its colourway and materials (cassina.com/london).

The Syon Park fair is open to the public on 20 September. Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs picks his top four highlights BENCHMARK FURNITURE

The British furnituremaker is launching three exciting collaborations on its stand this year: the ‘Lear’ timber sideboard (above) by Daniel Schofield, who won last year’s ELLE Decoration British Design Award for accessories; the ‘Holworth’ chair by Nathalie Deval; and Terence Conran’s new ‘Firefly’ storage collection, which will be a real talking point. Stand H34 (benchmarkfurniture.com). ‘ F U T U R E H E R I TA G E ’

This craft-focused exhibition displays work by 14 designer-makers who are using materials in innovative ways. Look out for pieces made from jesmonite, a composite that we’re seeing more of this year: Phil Cuttance and Silo Studio (bowls, above) both use it in their work. Don’t miss Vezzini & Chen’s ceramic and glass lighting (top) and Mark Laban’s Japanese-inspired wood furniture (detail, right; decorex.com).

Three names that you might not immediately associate with one another come together to create an installation at Farr’s new, bigger space in Chelsea Wharf. Boontje has created a new collection of textiles, wallpapers, rugs and furniture on the theme of the English garden in collaboration with Farr and Italian brand Moroso. We understand that flowers, bees and horses abound: we can’t wait to see it! (christopherfarr.com). 272 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

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The rug designer will launch her new collection of nature-inspired pieces, including the watery ‘Stream’ design (above right). Stand C27 (taniajohnsondesign.com). T H E R U G C O M PA N Y

Stop by the flooring brand’s stand to see new hand-knotted rugs by both the in-house team and big designer names. Our top picks include a pink and gold design by Vivienne Westwood, and Kelly Wearstler’s painterly ‘Staccato’ (right). Stand C34 (therugcompany.com). ➤

PICTURES: TOMÁŠ SOUCEK, BILL BATTEN, SYLVAIN DELEU

C H R I S T O P H E R FA R R , M O R O S O AND STUDIO TORD BOONTJE (17–30 SEPTEMBER)


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D E S IG N C E N T R E C H E L S E A H A R B OU R Europe’s largest one-stop resource for interior designers, architects and enthusiastic home-lovers is a must-see during London Design Festival. Here’s who to visit and what to see At over 13,000 square metres, Design Centre Chelsea Harbour is the largest dedicated destination in Europe for interiors brands to showcase their wares, with 120 showrooms and 600 international companies covering everything from fabrics and wallpapers to kitchens, bathrooms, leather, trimmings, tiles, carpets and rugs. All located under striking glass domes, minutes away from London’s King’s Road, and with in-house cafés and an excellent bookshop to boot, it’s ELLE Decoration’s favourite place to get the inside track on what’s new, now and next! And right now is the perfect time to visit, as it hosts Focus 16, a week of talks, workshops and interactive demonstrations for the London Design Festival. There’s even a complimentary Mercedes shuttle service operating from opposite Sloane Square station direct to the Harbour. 18–21 September, trade only; 22–23 September, all welcome (dcch.co.uk).

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POLIFORM

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Why visit? You step into another world when you enter the Armani/Casa store at Chelsea. Softly lit, gently fragranced, beautifully arranged, this is the place to go for high couture Italian luxe. Everything from accessories to beds and linens is on show. Look out for The limited edition ‘Club’ cocktail cabinet (pictured), which is handmade using pearl-gold fabric, lacquer and brass. It is on show as part of a series of 50. The details First floor, South Dome (020 7079 1930; armanicasa.com)

Why visit? It features a snapshot of the full range on show at its flagship King’s Road store, from super-slick storage systems to new furniture collections (‘Mondrian’ by JeanMarie Massaud, pictured) and its Varenna kitchens. Did you know? It ofers a free design service. The details Ground floor, South Dome (020 7352 0064; poliformuk.com)

Why visit? This is the first handmade rug showroom in the UK to present the work of award-winning designers Jan Kath, Zoê Luyendijk and Michaela Schleypen. Think art for your floor. Did you know? All rugs are made by skilled weavers using fine materials like Tibetan highland wool and Chinese silk. Luyendijk’s new ‘Tofino’ collection (‘Sea to Sea Morning’, pictured) is inspired by sailing trips of the West Coast of Canada. The details? Second floor, South Dome (020 7376 3355; frontrugs.com)

Why visit? Established in 1968, Porada is driven by its passion for, and expertise in, working with wood. A favourite type is the gorgeous Canaletto walnut (‘Jenny’ table, pictured). Look out for A new range of ingenious floor lamps by Tarcisio Colzani (pictured), which feature gold-lined grey shades atop articulated walnut stems set into Carrara marble. The details First floor, South Dome (020 3155 3065; porada.it)

T H E M O S T A N T I C I PAT E D E V E N T S AT F O C U S 1 6 INSIDER TOURS & TRAILS Join a Champagne Curated Tour and get an exclusive view of the show, including the most talked about pieces and bespoke installations.

DESIGN WORKSHOPS KLC School of Design will host design workshops on subjects including everyday sustainability and design psychology.

RESTORE & REVIVE With so much to see and do, unwind at the ‘Gin O’Clock’ bar by Williams Chase or have a free Jo Malone London hand massage.

ART & INTERIORS An exhibition of contemporary art chosen by leading luminaries in design, including Kit Kemp and David Collins Studio. ➤

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CHELSEA HARBOUR CONTINUED… CECCOTTI COLLEZIONI

GIORGETTI

Why visit? One of the latest brands to join the Harbour club, Ceccotti Collezioni is renowned for its artisanal approach to furniture making combined with contemporary flair. Think lots of natural wood, alongside leather, brass and stone. Look out for New launches including Giuseppe Casarosa’s fabulous modular screens in solid ash, covered in mirror, leather or fabric and available with accessories such as shelves, hangers and a valet stand (pictured). The details First floor, Centre Dome (020 3538 2780; ceccotticollezioni.it)

Why visit? Founded in 1898, Giorgetti may well be one of the oldest yet least well-known Italian furniture brands around, ofering furniture that’s all about quality finishes and attention to detail (pictured: ‘Drive’ sofa by Carlo Colombo and ‘Memos’ table by Roberto Lazzeroni). Did you know? It’s just launched a range of kitchens, which marry luxurious Italian style with cutting-edge industrial technology. The details First floor, Centre Dome (020 8616 9100; giorgetti.eu)

WIRED CUSTOM LIGHTING Why visit? This company creates ‘illuminated art’ using cutting-edge techniques and expert craftsmanship (customdesigned pieces, pictured). Did you know? Some of their lights even include semi-precious stones, famed for their ethereal iridescence once illuminated. The details Second floor, Centre Dome (020 7352 2921; wired-designs.com)

FLEXFORM

Why visit? The signature look of this esteemed Italian house sees a playful update this season by virtue of a collection with architect Daniel Libeskind. Did you know? Libeskind wanted to be a professional musician before he turned to architecture. Perhaps that’s why his sofa range is called ‘Adagio’ (pictured). Look out for Statement side tables (‘Vito’, top; ‘Cogito’, bottom) The details Ground floor, South Dome (020 7376 5272; interdesignuk.com)

T H E M O S T A N T I C I PAT E D E V E N T S AT F O C U S 1 6 THE POWER OF PORADA In conversation with Stefano Bigi, hosted by ELLE Decoration and Porada. The Italian designer talks to Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs about his latest collaboration with the Italian brand. Monday 19 September, 4pm.

MEET THE DESIGNER Showcasing maker expertise and skilled techniques, the meet-the-designer sessions invite you to ask questions and join panel discussions. Featured guests include artist Alexander Hamilton at Lewis & Wood, and Romo’s design studio team.

CONVERSATIONS IN DESIGN Influential global names will share their knowledge and design know-how on the main stage throughout the festival. The lineup includes Patrizia Moroso, Neisha Crosland, Ben Pentreath and Ashley Hicks.

ACCESS ALL AREAS These ‘open studio’ events will see showrooms ofering behind-the-scenes insights into product design, materials and craftsmanship. Participating showrooms include Fromental, Savoir Beds, Cole & Son and Turnstyle Designs.

For more information on any of these events Visit dcch.co.uk or call 020 7225 9166 Event location: Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, Lots Road,London SW10 ➤

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HOT SPOT DESIGNJUNCTION (22–25 SEPTEMBER)

K I N G ’ S C R O S S & N O RT H Designjunction’s move to this area has cemented its credentials as a creative quarter. Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan finds plenty more to see and do ISLINGTON DESIGN DISTRICT TRAIL (17–25 SEPTEMBER)

Set aside an hour or two for this walk, which takes you from Amwell Street along Camden Passage to Upper Street; if you get a stamp from every one of the participating stores then you’ll be entitled to free gifts and special ofers. Look out for Quill London’s fantastic paper flowers display by A Petal Unfolds, and the new CTO Lighting showroom (pictured). Be sure to stop of at SMUG for a cofee (islingtondesigndistrict.com).

PICTURES: SIMON BROWN

H O M E & PA N T RY U P C Y C L I N G WORKSHOP (19 SEPTEMBER)

To celebrate its first year taking part in London Design Festival, London homeware and lifestyle brand Home & Pantry will be running a ‘Design Upcycle Workshop’ from 6–9pm at its Islington High Street shop. Ticketholders will learn how to transform an old piece of furniture and use Annie Sloan’s gorgeous chalkbased paints during the class – tickets include complimentary refreshments. (homeandpantry.com).

‘MARKER’ BY BARBER & O S G E R B Y AT TWENTYTWENTYONE (21–25 SEPTEMBER)

As you arrive at Granary Square,this design fair’s new spacious location, ten pop-up ‘Monopoly houses’ (above) will catch your eye, each ofering a taster of what’s in store at one of the festival’s biggest events. Make a beeline for Cubitt House: two floors of furniture, accessories and lighting from the likes of Another Country, Dyke & Dean, Native Union, and Brokis. And look out for ‘Dyslexic Design’, an exhibition of products by dyslexic designers including Terence Woodgate, Sebastian Bergne (decanter, right) and Tom Raield (light, below), which explores the relationship between the learning diiculty and creativity. Visit The Canopy for a spot of shopping before you leave – you’re unlikely to see such a great selection of textiles, jewellery, accessories and furniture brands under one roof again until next year (designjunction.com). ➤

To launch their new ‘Marker’ pendant light, British design duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby have curated a special exhibition at Twentytwentyone’s River Street showroom. Alongside the new lantern will be a selection of 20 objects that give insight into the popular pair’s work and inspiration (twentytwentyone.com). OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 279


Escape | L O N D O N

D E S I G N F E S T I VA L

S HO R E DI T C H D E S IG N TR IA NGLE & EA ST Homes Editor Jackie Daly heads east for an edgy take on new design at a host of independent venues REDCHURCH STREET

This vibrant graiti-lined street adjacent to Brick Lane has many gems for design lovers to explore: Monologue (no.93) is a mecca for exclusive collections (pieces by lighting brand Parachilna and marble magician Budri will launch at LDF), while Klaus Haapaniemi & Co (no.81) will unveil its limited-edition carpets in collaboration with Moooi, inspired by the work of Finnish writer and artist Rosa Liksom. Also stop by ceramicist Reiko Kaneko’s exhibition at Elementary store (no.77; pictured). For event dates see shoreditchdesigntriangle.com.

HOT SPOT L O N D O N D E S I G N FA I R AT T H E O L D T R U M A N B R E W E RY (22–25 SEPTEMBER)

SHOREDITCH HIGH STREET

POP-UP TOUR

This is the pulsing artery of the Shoreditch Design Triangle, and the Ace Hotel (no.100; pictured) is the heart. It will present ‘Ready Made Go 2’, a series of products by London-based European designers, throughout the festival. From here, turn on to Rivington Street, where Lee Broom (no.95) plans to wow the LDF crowds with his ‘Opticality’ exhibition featuring his latest ‘Optical’ collection. Next, hook right onto Curtain Street for design destination SCP and its showcase of the work of Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek (no.135– 139; shoreditchdesigntriangle.com).

Pop-ups are often the high points of London Design Festival. This year, our top picks include Rothschild & Bickers’ lighting showroom in Old Street Station and Rockett St George’s transformation of the Hoxton Hotel’s courtyard into a pop-up paradise inspired by Indian summers: diners can reserve tables surrounded by its new pieces (81 Great Eastern Street). Meanwhile, Vitra (pictured) is hosting a temporary co-working space at its Hack workstations, where visitors are invited to hot-desk or refuel at its café (4 Hollywell Lane; shoreditchdesigntriangle.com).

280 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

PICTURE: SHANNON TOFTS

Tent London and its sister show Super Brands London are both being held in this iconic east London building, which will accommodate 250 independent designers and 200 global brands, including No-Mad 97% India (above). There will also be 15 country pavilions: our pick is ‘100% Norway’, a smorgåsbord of Scandinavian design curated by Max Fraser (textiles by Anderssen & Voll for Røros Tweed, bottom), but other highlights include Scotland’s Craft and Design area (ceramics by Lara Scobie, below) and the British Craft Pavilion (Blue Weight sculpture by Harry Morgan, right; londondesignfair.co.uk). ➤


Escape | L O N D O N

D E S I G N F E S T I VA L

CL ER K EN W EL L DE SIGN QUA RTER Photography Editor James Williams finds a mix of the traditional and the modern in this corner of east London ‘ T H E B A R E M I N I M U M ’ AT V I A D U C T (12 AND 19–24 SEPTEMBER)

‘Less is more’, architect Mies van der Rohe once said, and contemporary furniture store Viaduct seems to agree. It’s staging two events during the festival: an exhibition of minimalist designs by Michael Anastassiades and Muller Van Severen (‘Mesh’ furniture, pictured), amongst others; and Danish designer and architect Nina Tolstrup of StudioMama will erect a full-scale model of a tiny 13-square-metre home to showcase her belief that small can be smart and beautiful (viaduct.com).

‘ 1 0 Y E A R S W I T H J A I M E H AY Ó N ’ AT BD BARCELONA (19–24 SEPTEMBER)

The recently opened showroom on Berry Street specialises in furniture by Spanish icons Antoni Gaudí and Salvador Dali. For the festival, the store will celebrate its ten-year collaboration with Jaime Hayón with a special retrospective. Highlights include the ‘King Kong’ mirror (above) and ‘Red Monkey’ side table (right). There will also be a chance to meet the maximalist maestro, as he will be hosting a special talk on the afternoon of Wednesday 21 September (bdbarcelona.com).

‘ B E L O W S TA I R S ’ AT S I R J O H N S O A N E ’ S M U S E U M (13 SEPTEMBER–4 MARCH 2017)

For the first time ever this museum – housed in the former home of famed 18th-century architect Soane – will showcase its recently renovated Regency kitchen. Curators Rachael Barraclough and Zoë Wilkinson have invited contemporary designers Jasper Morrison, Martino Gamper (vases, pictured) and Paul Cocksedge to exhibit an array of their designs, which they hope will form a fascinating dialogue within the Georgian domestic space (soane.org).

QU EEN’S PA R K Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin discovers two interesting studios to visit in this leafy corner of north-west London BILL AMBERG STUDIO (19–23 SEPTEMBER)

The leather expert takes visitors on a history tour in new exhibition ‘Timeless Material’ (left). Pieces dating from 300BC to the present day will be on display, and the studio will also showcase two brand-new designs (a bench and a bar stool) added to its sleek and colourful ‘Common Collection’ (billamberg.com). R U P E R T B E VA N ( 2 0 – 2 3 A N D 2 5 S E P T E M B E R )

Take a look at the latest dazzling decorative glass and mirror finishes by this bespoke furniture maker, developed in his Shropshire studio. To show you their potential, Bevan is giving his cocktail cabinet, first designed for Soho Beach House Miami, a glamorous makeover. Pop by at the right time and the team might whip you up a cocktail! (rupertbevan.com). E D 282 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016


ICONIC BRITISH HOUSES TO VISIT NOW

From Scotland to Hampshire, Britain is awash with inspiring architecture. Here are our seven top 20th-century homes that you can explore, or even stay in Words JAMES WILLIAMS

1900

BLACKWELL, CUMBRIA BY M A C K AY H U G H B A I L L I E S C O T T

Baillie Scott’s design is one of the best examples of Arts and Crafts architecture in the UK. Built as a holiday home for Manchester brewery owner Sir Edward Holt, this welcoming retreat is nestled on the picturesque Lake Windermere in the Lake District. The Grade II*-listed building is a marvel of decorative details: rare hessian wallhangings in the grand dining room, leaf-shaped door handles, stained-glass windows and intricate carved-wood panelling by fine furniture maker Simpson of Kendal make every room a feast for the eyes. Scott also created much of the furniture himself, including the famous semi-circular oak-and-ebony ‘Barrel’ chair. Open all year round (blackwell.org.uk).


Escape | A R C H I T E C T U R E

1969

PICTURES: ALAMY, RICHARD POWERS/ARCAID

DR ROGERS HOUSE, LONDON BY RICHARD ROGERS British architect Richard Rogers has helped define the landscape of the modern era, with the Pompidou Centre in Paris and Lloyd’s Building in London just two of the contemporary icons in his portfolio. The house he built in Wimbledon, south-west London for his parents is regarded as one of the finest and most important modern homes in England. The single-storey property consists of a simple yellow square steel frame glazed at both ends, with moveable internal walls inside allowing for various configurations of the interior space – it was groundbreaking for its time. Complementing its bold exterior, many of the furnishings are finished in vibrant greens, yellows and pinks. In 2015, Rogers donated the house to the Harvard University Architecture School, allowing this innovative icon to be enjoyed by future generations. Open days planned for 2017 (harvard.edu). ➤ OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 285


ICONIC BRITISH HOUSES…

1903 HILL HOUSE, SCOTLAND BY CHARLES RENNIE MACKINTOSH Regarded as Mackintosh’s finest residential creation, sitting high on a picturesque hill in Helensburgh overlooking the River Clyde, this castle-like property is a treasure trove of Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau and Scottish Baronial styles. The exterior is imposing yet conservative (matching the grey of the Scottish sky), which is in total contrast to the adventurous interior. Built for Glaswegian publisher Walter Blackie and his family, the home contains a mixture of light, feminine and dark, masculine rooms. Of particular note are the Edwardian and Japanese textiles and the famously highbacked chairs, which later featured in many more of Mackintosh’s buildings. Open 25 March–31 October (nts.org.uk).

2 WILLOW ROAD, LONDON BY ERNÖ GOLDFINGER Hungarian-born architect and designer Goldfinger needs no introduction for Londoners: he created some of the capital’s most iconic Brutalist landmarks, including the striking Trellick and Balfron Towers. His own home, however, nestled in leafy Hampstead, north London, is less imposing. It’s the central portion of a Modernist terrace, constructed from reinforced concrete and clad in red brick. A spiral staircase sits at the heart of the home, designed by Danish-born British engineer Ove Arup, while a mixture of furniture designed by Goldfinger lines the minimalist interior. Like his artsit wife Ursula, Goldfinger loved modern art and had a collection of 20th-century work by the likes of Duchamp and Henry Moore, which is still on view today. Open Wednesday to Sunday (nationaltrust.org.uk).

PICTURES: DAVID ROBERTSON/THE NATIONAL TRUST FOR SCOTLAND, ALAMY, DENNIS GILBERT

1939


Escape | A R C H I T E C T U R E

1961

SPENCE HOUSE, HAMPSHIRE BY BASIL SPENCE

Basil Spence was one of the most talented and experimental architects of the 1960s and 1970s. His work ranges from the controversial postwar restoration of Coventry Cathedral (he built a new modern structure beside the ruins of the bombed Gothic original) to the Hyde Park Cavalry Barracks, with its lofty tower that looks out over the central London park. A keen boatman, Spence chose this site in Beaulieu, Hampshire for his weekend abode – partly due to its easy connection to a local river and the Solent (a strait connecting the Isle of Wight to mainland England). The house is a simple timber box supported on two parallel white brick walls. Modernist and romantic at the same time, it fuses a mixture of diferent architectural styles in one elegant building. The interior is largely Scandinavian in feel, with its Swedish redwood ceilings and simple furniture; the large open-plan living room is perhaps the star of this tranquil space, featuring a striking bushhammered concrete fireplace. Tours available (basilspence.org.uk). ➤

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ICONIC BRITISH HOUSES…

1939 THE HOMEWOOD, SURREY B Y PAT R I C K G W Y N N E Architect Sir Denys Lasdun (the man behind our Architectural Icon on p90) once said that The Homewood was ‘the great love of [Gwynne’s] life’, and it’s easy to see why. This family home is a modern masterpiece, and Gwynne spent a lifetime fine-tuning it until his death in 2003. He fell in love with the picturesque woodland near Esher in Surrey, and, inspired by Modernist architect Le Corbusier, created a house similar to the iconic Villa Savoye in France. The fivebedroom building is incredibly spacious and open-plan, with floor-to-ceiling windows ofering beautiful views of the forest. The interior features neutral tones of chocolate brown and cream to complement the rural location. Pre-booked tours available from April to October (nationaltrust.org.uk).


Escape | A R C H I T E C T U R E

1900

PICTURES: ©NTPL/STUART COX, JOHN MILLER, DENNIS GILBERT

GODDARDS, SURREY BY EDWIN LUTYENS Hailed as the greatest British architect of his time, Lutyens was chiefly responsible for redeveloping much of British colonial India, including the capital New Delhi, as well as some notable London landmarks such as the Cenotaph in Whitehall. Goddards is one of his most intriguing works and perhaps the definition of an English country house. Both grand and simple in its design, it has two wings joined by a large open common room (believed to have been modelled on a medieval hall, with its vast stone fireplace and exposed beams). Lutyens’ friend, celebrated garden designer Gertrude Jekyll, worked closely with him on the design, creating the house’s stunning landscaped gardens. Available to rent from The Landmark Trust, from £1,619 for four nights – your money goes towards the restoration of historic houses in need of care and attention (landmarktrust.org.uk). E D OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 289


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SWOON EDITIONS Swoon Editions is an online furniture retailer specialising in beautiful, hand-crafted furniture at honest, reasonable prices. Mid-century storage with Scandinavian simplicity, the Otto ofers plenty of stowaway space in a sleek, stylish design – just £499 including delivery. Readers also save 15% on all orders with voucher code ELLEDECORATION. To order simply go to swooneditions.com/elledecoration or call 020 3137 2464. Ofer expires 06.10.16.

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS PILLOWS COLLECTION INJECT SOME COOL SCANDINAVIAN STYLE With Nuastyle’s Leather Rug range. The collection features contemporary geometric patterns hand-crafted by artisans with an expert eye for detail and a skill for matching the best tonal shades, using only the highest quality hides. Leather Rugs from £549 with free delivery. Elle Decoration readers get 10% of all leather rugs with discount code LEATHER10 valid until 31.10.16. www.nuastyle.com or call 020 3394 0134.

EDWARD BULMER NATURAL PAINT A beautiful collection of natural paints. Introducing a new breed of paint, made using only natural pigments and ingredients, by interior designer Edward Bulmer. Discover their unrivalled colour with extraordinary depth and response to light which synthetic paint simply cannot replicate. Our paints are healthy for the home and the environment and we declare all our ingredients. Find inspiration at www.edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk and colour with a conscience – why compromise?

The name of each pillow (each deadly sin is represented by an animal): • Pride (Orgueil): A Peacock • Lust (Luxure): A Tiger • Greed (Gourmandise): Snakes • Desire (Envie): An Octopus • Anger (Colère): A Lion • Laziness (Paresse): A Cat • Avarice (Avarice): A Magpie It is the collection Spring Summer 2016, Boudoir des Lubies HOME and Made in France. We used velvet as material and the back is embroidered with gold thread. www.boudoirdeslubies.com


ADVERTISING FEATURE

DANUSKA Explore the unique world of DANUSKA handcrafted light creations. These breathtaking designer chandeliers and light installations are individual works of art. With a passion for exquisite design and an appreciation of superior quality materials, DANUSKA creates beautiful, timeless pieces with exceptional care, skill and traditional craftsmanship. Whether the design is a simple, elegant long drop pendant, vaulted ceiling light installation, striking hotel foyer piece, or the most luxurious classical chandelier, the sophistication and extraordinary aesthetic characteristics of a DANUSKA light will make it the focal point of any space. To experience the myriad designs and ideas visit www.danuska.com or to discuss the endless possibilities of a bespoke lighting project call us on 0800 909 8488.

J SMITH WOODWORK

VINTERIOR

Tucked away between the Dorset and Somerset border sits an idyllic rustic farm building which houses J Smith Woodwork: a young creative couple who design and hand make beautiful bespoke kitchens and furniture in a classic Shaker style. They carefully handpick their materials from local sources guaranteeing every kitchen or furniture piece will be built to last using traditional techniques to ensure exceptional quality in both build and finish. www.jsmithwoodwork.co.uk

Discover a world of stylish preloved furniture and browse thousands of modern, vintage and antique pieces all in one place. Vinterior carefully curate their suppliers and products to ensure that shoppers can easily find the designs they want, with efortless delivery. Whether you love Scandinavian Modern, Mid Century or Shabby Chic, Vinterior has it all… and more! Save £20 on your first order by visiting www.vinterior.co/elledecoration

UPHOLSTERY WORKSHOPS IN CENTRAL LONDON Discover non-accredited beginners upholstery workshops at our bright and inspirational studio near the Shard. Choose from evening, weekend or year-long courses teaching the traditional and modern upholstery techniques required by professional upholsterers, in a friendly environment. www.thegoodlifecentre.co.uk Tel: 020 7760 7613.


Classifieds | N E W

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DESIGNER

CHARLIE PIE DESIGNS A contemporary British brand creating beautifully unique printed home textiles.

Exhibiting at Best of Britannia Holborn, London 30th September 2nd October.

www.charliepiedesigns.co.uk @CharliePieStyle

mapsofjoy.com

Abby is a freelance illustrator who, as well as working commercially, has designed a range of prints and stationery based on her love of the British Countryside and its wildlife.

Have your story retold through beautiful illustrations and personalised icons when, together, we make your memories last a lifetime… Your joy ~ mapped!

www.abbycook.bigcartel.com

LUXURY HAND PAINTED WALLPAPER AND HOME ACCESSORIES

I N K A

L ON D ON

Bea utifu l ly cu rated g ift boxes

INKALONDONGIFTING.COM THELOFTANDUS.COM

DORGLAZE ® VISION PANEL KITS FOR DOORS

@ i n ka l o n d o n g ifti n g

@ I n ka _ Lo n d o n

Björk Haraldsdóttir Contemporary Handbuilt Ceramics

www.ceramicsbybjork.com

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

296 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016


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Classifieds | N E W

DESIGNER

C O N T E M P O R A R Y F LO R A L D ES I G N

View the collection at w w w.irisandbee.co.uk

Contemporary bespoke poster art prints by graphic designer Kenny Frame.

www.postermode.com

home and deskware

BEAD R T

Beads...Colour...Art Something different for your Wall

www.bead-art.co.uk

OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 297


Classifieds | A – Z GARDEN ART & GLASS ROOMS

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260 FABRICS & INTERIORS

www.extex.co.uk

+44 (0)1634 718871

Original Window Mirrors for the Home and Garden. Include a Heritage piece in your Home.

aldgatehome.com shop@aldgatehome.com Tel: 07785 296830

Smart furniture for smart people www.ivydesign-furniture.com

298 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

Picture Table Model Classic


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Classifieds | A – Z INTERIORS

TRANSFORM YOUR STAIRCASE IN 48 HOURS We make it easier than ever to create a new or renovate your existing staircase. Give it a complete design makeover – in as little as 48 hours. Make a statement in your home.

BUY NOW

Call 0800 612 8681 or visit www.jamesgrace.co.uk for our latest brochure

N o11 Swan Street, Bawtry, Doncaster.

OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 299


Classifieds | A – Z DANISH FURNITURE & LIGHTING

300 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

LIGHTING

R U B Y

WA T T S

I NS T AGRA M | T WI T T ER:

L I G HT I NG

EST A B L I SHE D

@RUBY WAT T S L I GHT S

201 4

+4 4 (0 )1 2 7 3

WWW. R U B Y WA T T S. C O . UK

1 2 6 C

H I G H

S T,

H U R S T P I E R P O I N T,

W E S T

S U S S E X ,

B N 6

5 6 7 0 8 0

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avivo

Product Code: PD1305-3C • Range Name: Link

3 Tier, Linked Halo, LED, Diamond Cut Crystal, Manufactured and Designed by Avivo Lighting Ltd. M O D E R N G L A S S L I G H T I N G , H A N D M A D E I N N E W YO R K

w w w. a vivo l ig ht ing . co . uk info@avivolighting.co.uk

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 301


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FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

THE

Elmley S O FA O R S O FA B E D

from £909 or £1,093

MAKE THEM FEEL AT HOME. SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS YOUR GUESTS WILL LOVE. Call us on 0845 468 0577 or visit our London showroom |

willowandhall.co.uk

THE ORIGINAL AND STILL THE BEST. We have been specialising in making the very finest wooden loo seats for 38 years. Manufactured entirely in Britain by hand. Tosca & Willoughby Ltd. Aston Rowant, Oxford. OX49 5ST.

vintage style, contemporary edge www.skultuna.com

302 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

www.moseyhome.co.uk

Tel: 01844 353477 or visit our new website at www.looseats.com and download or browse our brochure


Classifieds | A – Z

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FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

Sofas and Beds Handmade in Britain, in any Fabric in the World

Alwinton small sofa in Walloon Red

0808 178 3211

Stores Nationwide

sofasandstuff.com OCTOBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 303


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HOME INTEREST

BATHROOMS

Sofas | Chairs | Lighting

What makes an Albion bath unique? AW16 Collection

Our exclusive bath material creates a difference you can feel.... Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

calversandsuvdal.com | Save 10% with ELLEOCT

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ALBION

Handmade bathrooms directly from our factory

PR ACTICA L CAN BE BEAU TIFU L INDOORS OR OUT W.H. Hulley Handcrafted Wooden Steps and Ladders

www.hulleyheritage.co.uk

460 years of combined creative heritage DESIGN CENTRE, CHELSEA HARBOUR SAMUEL-HEATH.CO.UK MADE IN ENGLAND

304 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016


THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal our current home obsessions, plus the products and projects we’ve been testing and tackling this month

‘Sketched out on the back of a beermat and built using old joists and boards, our new treehouse may be small but its reward is enormous. My four-year-old imagines fantasy worlds with sharks circling and storms raging as he looks out from the tower, and there are shelves on the ground floor for the baby to play with. It’s very sturdy, and everything was sanded down to avoid splinters’ Flora Bathurst,

T E S T I N G P E T- H A I R B U S T I N G VA C U U M CLEANERS

Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin stopped her testing at hello with the Dyson ‘Cinetic Big Ball Animal’ (see her Editor’s Letter on p29). But in the interests of further research, she also called up some sister magazine expertise courtesy of the Good Housekeeping Institute, to see what else she might reasonably recommend As such, the Vorwerk ‘Kobold VK200’ (from £749; vorwerk.com) was voted ‘outstanding’ for pet hair pick up; and the Miele ‘C3 Total Solution Powerline’ model (£249, AO; ao.com) also scored very highly. As did the Shark ‘Powered Lift-Away True Pet NV680’ (£380, Littlewoods; littlewoods.com). All machines come with specific attachments designed to banish pet hair from furniture and floors. I also tried the rather more modestly priced Sticky Buddy brush (£14.99, Lakeland; lakeland.com), which is a super handy, no-plug required, back-up option for speedy fur-be-gone fixes.

Photography Director LISTEN IN

‘Where can I buy the “Bake Of” oven?’ – The ELLE Decoration Subs Desk are coveting that slick ‘hideaway’ door and, of course, a proving drawer. The model used on the hit TV show, we are reliably informed, is from the ‘Slide and Hide’ range by Nef. The brand also sells a warming drawer. ‘Single Slide and Hide B57VS24N0B’ oven, £919; ‘N17HH20N0B’ warming drawer (not pictured), £413, John Lewis (johnlewis.com)

‘I want to get this linen-coated lighting flex for my new house, because its natural finish is so much nicer than a plastic wire’ Features Director Amy Bradford favours this neutral colourway. £5 per metre, Olive & The Fox (oliveandthefox.co.uk) 306 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2016

A recent convert to podcasts, Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan tells us about ‘99% Invisible’ Free design podcast 99% Invisible is my new favourite. This week I’ve learnt about the concept of ‘unpleasant design’ (how items can be designed with deterrence in mind); heard Eero Saarinen discuss whether an architect should always yield to his clients; and discovered the story of Edith Macefield, an elderly New Yorker who refused to sell her bungalow to property developers and became a national name as a skyscraper was built around her. It can be tricky to find a full hour to listen to something during the week, but these 20–30 minute episodes are easy to fit in (99percent invisible.org).


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