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CONTENTS OCTOBER 2016

FEATURES PHOTOGRAPH: MICHAEL PAUL

37 Readers’ Travel Awards 2016 126 Chad The results are in, revealing where and how you like to travel – from your favourite islands to top spas

Once a year the nomadic Wodaabe tribe gather in a remote location for a beauty pageant like no other: we join the party

106

134 Faroe Islands

116 Mallorca

146 Calabria

Hotels A star-studded preview of Chic Stays: Condé Nast Traveller's Favourite People on their Favourite Places, our new book with Assouline Late-summer sun is only a short hop away. Head to the island's untouched north-east for a low-key Balearic break

With its curious food scene and down-home aesthetic, the rugged archipelago is a far-flung new frontier of Scandi cool This often overlooked Italian region of endless beaches and fiery flavours whizzes along at its own Vespa speed

SONG SAA PRIVATE ISLAND IN CAMBODIA October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 7


COCO CRUSH RINGS IN DIAMONDS, WHITE AND YELLOW GOLD 173 NEW BOND STREET - LONDON W1 SELFRIDGES WONDER ROOM - LONDON W1

HARRODS FINE JEWELLERY & WATCH ROOM - LONDON SW1

FOR ALL ENQUIRIES PLEASE TELEPHONE 020 7499 0005

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CONTENTS

OCTOBER 2016

66

IN THIS ISSUE 12 Editor’s letter 16 Contributors 23 Word of mouth The places and people creating a stir around the world, from New York to Cambodia

60 Way of life Why the pioneering founder of Design Hotels has gone to ground on a farm in Ibiza

66 Snapshot Architects throw their support behind mind-bending bridges

69 Where to stay Exclusive review

92

A first look at The Pig in Devon. Bed-hopping with Greg Kinnear. France The Ritz Paris unveiled after its revamp. The Weekender Killiehuntly Farmhouse & Cottage, Scotland

156 Around the world with Black Swan star Mila Kunis

158 In Britain Leave Brighton to day-trippers and linger in Hove

171 Flavour hunter Table to book A lager bar in Stockholm. World on a plate Figs. Chef’s secret supplies April Bloomfield. Taste buzz Salted-egg-yolk croissant. Sip trip Mezcal. Eat the street Lima

193 Events Coming up Meet the great adventurer Colonel John Blashford-Snell. The lowdown Railway tales from Michael Portillo

232 The view from here Soneva Jani, Maldives

82 Road trip Hairpinning around Tenerife in a McLaren 570GT

85 Style file Shopping in the hip ON THE COVER Song Saa Private Island, Cambodia Photographed by Michael Paul

heart of Melbourne. Go-getter, jet-setter A knitwear designer with a twist, plus the coolest labels. Beauty with January Jones. Men’s Spear fishing in Rhodes. Perfume New scents for the hottest destinations. Hotel on the scene Four Seasons Hotel Seoul

105 Trendwatch Another angle on crowdfunding as design projects get off the ground in cities across the globe 10 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

CHIC STAYS: CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER'S FAVOURITE PEOPLE ON THEIR FAVOURITE PLACES A brand-new book featuring Kate Moss, Eddie Redmayne, Sofia Coppola and more. Order now at assouline.com/chicstays

PHOTOGRAPHS: MATTHIAS HEIDERICH; JAMES MERRELL

69 99

158


EDITOR’S LETTER

The kind navajo is dealing with the overflowing loo. Which happens to have a poo in it. Other than his shuffling to and fro and the occasional sound of the plunger, all is quiet in the roadside motel outside Monument Valley, Utah. The children are hushed, a kind of embarrassed, unnatural quiet. I smile at him in a stretched, beseeching way, but it’s mostly a simple showing of teeth. Each time he reappears from the bathroom, he throws up his arms in a fountain movement, ‘This is what happened?’ he asks, arms upturned and circling wildly, ‘It just went… whoosh?’ It has been a long day. The previous night we had been camping on the reservation. But we had arrived late, in a phenomenal storm that saw forks of lightning dart around us like angry broken shards of celestial spears. We managed to find the two Native American brothers who were supposed to be meeting us there, just as they were leaving in their truck. ‘Please don’t go!’ I pleaded, trying to work out what would be my best tactic. ‘We’ve driven four hours to be here, and we want to camp more than anything.’ The brothers look at each other. They say nothing. After what may have been two minutes the more chatty one says, ‘You can go with my brother. You can camp at his house. You can camp where we grew up. Have your steaks there. Be with nature.’ ‘Brilliant!’ I shout, in that over-extended English way. Half an hour later we are with the less chatty brother on the top of a most beautiful rock, looking down on the absurd majesty of Monument Valley’s range of prehistoric earth flourishes. ‘This is fantastic, Will,’ I say to him. ‘We can camp here. We will be very happy.’ Will is silent. I can sense a rage building inside Marcus, my husband. ‘The sun is setting, kind of like, now, so if we don’t make a decision soon, I have a feeling we will be in complete darkness in minutes. Besides which,’ he adds pointedly, ‘I can see these logs, which are obviously from K-Mart, are now soaking and won’t light easily.’ Will ignores him. He looks meaningfully from horizon to horizon. Eventually he says, ‘This is not good. It is not a good place for camping. People will see the fire.’ My teenager does that face, eyes wide so the pupils are like lone fried eggs in a pan, and her mouth brought in tight, like the tongue has retreated. ‘Anywhere you want, Will, anywhere is good for us! We just need to set up camp!’ Which is why, another half an hour later, light failing, we find ourselves outside Will’s trailer. Except something has happened. ‘We have been too busy to feed the dogs recently,’ says Will. ‘So they have attacked the rubbish bags looking for food.’ Indeed, there is a startling amount of rubbish everywhere, cans trodden into the dirt, plastic bags stuck in the bushes, microwave cartons wheeling in the wind. Curiously, a detached plastic baby’s arm is pushed into a puddle. The smell is significant. And now camping is over and we’re here at the motel to regroup but we’re tired. And there’s the poo situation. ‘Well, well,’ says the Navajo manager, appearing for the last time. ‘All fixed. If it whooshes again, let me know.’ ‘Brilliant!’ I say, to the children, in that over-extended parental way. We drag them across the road for supper, to a tiny shack in the middle of nowhere. It turns out to be a complete find. There is cool typography on the menu! There is cool banjo music playing on the box! There is cheese! We order cold drinks. The middle one keeps tipping her glass so the ice rushes down the side and into her mouth. It gives her a shock and she does a little jump. She tips the glass again and again, each time the shock of it followed by a little jump. She starts to giggle. We all start to giggle. Suddenly, we’re adrift on a river of giggling, the tension of holding it all together slipping out of us like water in a cracked bucket. This is the new issue of Condé Nast Traveller. For those who know that road trips are a marathon not a sprint.

MELINDA STEVENS EDITOR MelindaLP

WINNER PPA COLUMNIST OF THE YEAR 2016 All information and travel details are correct at the time of going to press and may no longer be so on the date of publication. Unless otherwise stated, hotel prices are low-season rates and restaurant prices are for a three-course meal for two without drinks 12 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


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CONTRIBUTORS This month, we ask our writers and photographers where they go for a last blast of summer sun

Colin Thubron Writer, Explorers’ journals (p26)

Fiona Kerr Commissioning editor, Chic Stays (p106)

‘Malta is a magnificently arid-island destination. In the splendidly named British Hotel in the capital Valletta, modest rooms overlook the most superb fortified harbour. I simply sit back on my balcony and gape.’ Colin is an award-winning novelist and his new book ‘Night of Fire’ is out now

‘There’s nothing like opening a bottle of Provençal rosé in the afternoon sunshine. So I’d fly south to Tourrettes-sur-Loup in the Alpes-Maritimes and wander down to La Cave de Tourrettes, a wine bar with a terrace hanging over the valley.’ Fiona Kerr is Condé Nast Traveller’s features editor

Øivind Haug Photographer, Faroe Islands (p134)

James Merrell Photographer, The Pig (p69)

‘I love the relaxed atmosphere of L’Ile-Rousse on the north coast of Corsica. It has the feel of a faded Riviera town. The beach is a short walk from the city, and fish dishes in any of the restaurants are a triumph.’ Oslo-based Øivind is working on a book of his favourite 100 images he has shot around the world

‘Because I travel so much, I holiday in the UK. The Lugger in Cornwall is a delightful hotel right on the water’s edge in the tiny village of Portloe, near Truro. It’s the perfect place from which to take walks along the cliffs.’ James is a photographer based in Surrey and is fond of his houseboat and motorcycles

Tara Stevens Writer, Mallorca (p116)

Kate Eshelby Writer, Chad (p126)

‘To escape it all, I head up to Dar el Mandar, a tiny boutique hotel and farm about 30 minutes from the centre of Fez. There’s an infinity pool with views of the Saïss plains, and dotted throughout are Berber tents filled with carpets and cushions for afternoon snoozes after lunch.’ Tara splits her time between Barcelona and Fez

‘Tarifa, in southern Spain, is where I go for quick recharge. The Moroccan-style streets in the old town and endless, wild beaches are wonderful. I always stay at Hurricane Hotel, and lunch at Tangana is a must – it’s laid-back and a real suntrap.’ Kate is a travel writer with a long-time interest in nomadic tribes

16 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


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EDITOR

MELINDA STEVENS FEATURES ASSISTANT/PA TO THE EDITOR Tabitha Joyce SENIOR EDITOR Peter Browne DEPUTY EDITOR Issy von Simson ACTING DEPUTY EDITOR Michelle Jana Chan MANAGING EDITOR Paula Maynard FEATURES EDITOR Fiona Kerr ACTING FEATURES EDITOR Ianthe Butt EDITOR-AT-LARGE Steve King FASHION AND BEAUTY DIRECTOR Fiona Joseph WATCH & JEWELLERY EDITOR Jessica Diamond MEN’S EDITOR David Annand RETAIL EDITOR Thea Darricotte ART DIRECTOR Pete Winterbottom DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Paula Ellis SENIOR DESIGNER Nitish Mandalia PHOTOGRAPHIC EDITOR Matthew Buck PICTURE EDITOR Karin Mueller CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Rick Jordan DEPUTY CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Gráinne McBride SENIOR SUB-EDITOR Roxy Mirshahi ONLINE EDITOR Laura Fowler DEPUTY ONLINE EDITOR Hazel Lubbock ONLINE ASSOCIATE Alice Riley-Smith DIGITAL PICTURE EDITOR Sharon Forrester

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jonathan Bastable, Horatio Clare, Ondine Cohane, Sophie Dahl, Sophie Dening, E Jane Dickson, Helen Fielding, Daisy Finer (Health & Spa), Giles Foden, Michelle Jana Chan, Jeremy King, Emma Love, Kate Maxwell, Lee Marshall, Thomasina Miers, Reggie Nadelson, Harriet O’Brien, Timothy O’Grady, Tom Parker Bowles, Harry Pearson, Adriaane Pielou (Health & Spa), Antonia Quirke, Paul Richardson, Anthony Sattin, Nicholas Shakespeare, Sally Shalam, Stanley Stewart CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS James Bedford, Mirjam Bleeker, David Crookes, Squire Fox, Alice Gao, Philip Lee Harvey, Ken Kochey, David Loftus, Martin Morrell, Tom Parker, Michael Paul, Bill Phelps, Richard Phibbs, Oliver Pilcher, Kristian Schuller, Alistair Taylor-Young, Jenny Zarins DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND RIGHTS Harriet Wilson EDITORIAL BUSINESS MANAGER Camilla Fitz-Patrick SYNDICATION syndication@condenast.co.uk INTERNATIONAL PERMISSIONS MANAGER Eleanor Sharman DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Nicky Eaton DEPUTY PUBLICITY DIRECTOR Harriet Robertson PUBLICITY MANAGER Richard Pickard

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

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WORD OF MOUTH ALL THAT’S NEW AND GROUND-BREAKING IN TRAVEL EDITED BY IANTHE BUTT

JUMP AROUND ADRENALIN RUSHES GO UP A LEVEL

PHOTOGRAPH: AURORA PHOTOS/ALAMY

The roots for parkour – the sport that blends dexterous, monkey-like gymnastics with urban environments – began in the Caribbean in the 1900s. Leading an evacuation on Martinique after a volcanic eruption, naval lieutenant Georges Hébert noted how gracefully the islanders moved over the terrain, unlike the Europeans, who stumbled over obliterated man-made paths. His observations formed The Natural Method, a discipline using obstacle courses to recreate the outdoor landscape. In the 1950s, this was developed by the French Special Forces into a training regime known as parcours du combattant, or ‘the path of the warrior’. Fast-forward to the 1980s in Lisses, on the outskirts of Paris, and modern parkour was born. It was started by a group called the Yamakasi, whose founders include David Belle and Sébastien Foucan. Belle was taught Hébert’s techniques by his father, a French Special Forces veteran. The sport has since appeared on endless YouTube videos and films such as Casino Royale, which saw Daniel Craig in hot pursuit of bomb-maker Mollaka (played by Foucan), who perilously runs, jumps and climbs along a crane. Squads have sprung up worldwide, featuring on advertising billboards and even at an Alexander Wang catwalk show. Now, tour operators are also getting in on the action. In Berlin, Wildfitness launches a four-day urban retreat with a parkour focus this month. Guests will have the chance to learn techniques in the city’s green spaces. Sri Lanka’s Tri hotel will open a holistic circuit in late autumn, incorporating existing natural structures – tree roots and fallen bamboo – into the course. Meanwhile in Mexico, Pennsylvanian action-sports expert Camp Woodward has partnered with the Hard Rock Riviera Maya to create a bespoke training facility for the hotel, which will open in early 2017. TOBIAS MEWS wildfitness.com; trilanka.com; hrhrivieramaya.com

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 23


WORD OF MOUTH

THE FAMILY HIT ALILA VILLAS KOH RUSSEY

LAY IT ON THE LINE

Joining the extraordinary Song Saa next summer is another island retreat on nearby Koh Russey. A 15-minute boat ride from the coast, this is Alila’s first all-villa retreat outside Bali. The sleek and contemporary spaces each have their own private terrace, pool and garden. And with the option of a four-bedroom villa plus a kids’ club, this will suit the entire adventurous crew. kohrussey.com

For backpackers, Cambodia means chaotic markets and temple pilgrimages. But the country has a thriving contemporary scene, with new rail routes and this trio of smart hotels providing a fresh angle

THE HEALTH KICK

THE HIGH FLYER

SIX SENSES KRABEY ISLAND

ROSEWOOD PHNOM PENH

The Six Senses group has chosen 30-acre Koh Krabey off the south coast for its debut in Cambodia, just a short water transfer from the mainland near Ream National Park. With 40 plunge-pool villas, the hideaway opens in spring 2017 and will have a spa – with a focus on traditional healing treatments – as well as an observatory for stargazing. sixsenses.com

At the end of this year, Rosewood arrives on the top 14 floors of the capital’s tallest building: a 187-metre tower, designed to resemble the arched back of a dragon. The interiors are by Melbourne-based Bar Studio, and there will be 175 rooms, including 27 serviced residences, a Japanese izakaya and the country’s highest skybar set on a cantilevered terrace, with panoramic views of the Mekong. rosewoodhotels.com

24 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


With vintage typewriters hanging from the ceilings and quotes lining the walls, The Press Hotel draws inspiration from its past as the Portland Press Herald. In a story of rebirth, journalist Ani Tzenkova explores a one-of-a-kind Old Port experience you can only ďŹ nd in the Autograph Collection.ÂŽ Watch this story and explore our collection of independent hotels at AutographHotels.com


WORD OF MOUTH

ROBIN HANBURY-TENISON HOWARD CARTER

CHARLES EVANS

RANULPH FIENNES

doodle bug

JAN BRANDES

As an evocative compendium of explorers’ journals and sketchbooks is published, award-winning author Colin Thubron has a few observations of his own

ROALD AMUNDSEN

ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT

JOHN AULDJO WALLY HERBERT

EDMUND HILLARY 26 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

WILLIAM HEATON COOPER

PHOTOGRAPHS: EDMUND HILLARY ARCHIVE/AUCKLAND WAR MEMORIAL MUSEUM TAMAKI PAENGA HIRA MS-2010-1; GRIFFITH INSTITUTE UNIVERISTY OF OXFORD; THE LAST JOURNALS OF DAVID LIVINGSTONE IN CENTRAL AFRICA (LONDON: JOHN MURRAY 1874)

DAVID LIVINGSTONE

The battered sketchbooks and field diaries of explorers and naturalists – inscribed with pencil or paintbrush on the spot – possess a mystique all their own. They differ crucially from finished work. They are its raw materials. Often composed in hardship or danger, they have the magic of a pristine moment: the sighting of a caiman, the logging of a day’s trek, the physiognomy of a Mongol face. Above all they celebrate a quality of rapt attention. Quite different from the easy camera snapshot, such notes and artworks are the product of time-consuming observation, and are often filled with telling detail, with the passion to hold and record what the casual eye might lose. In these worn journals we seem to be witnessing the process of discovery itself, whether of an Arctic ice-floe or the coat of the tamarin monkey. Even the humdrum logbook or weather chart – bald figures and practical notes – carries the aura of its written moment, unmediated by print or digital reproduction. If such visual notes were transferred to a computer broadsheet, the magic would be gone. These are the closest we will ever come to sharing Shackleton’s Antarctic ordeal or the journeys of Livingstone. It is the sense of the immediate – the exhausted journal entry, the scrupulous paintstroke – that touches us with awe. Such artefacts have an odd resonance now. They once brought back to Europe first-hand knowledge of species or regions or peoples previously unknown. In one sense they have the smell of freshness and urgency about them; on another they have become timeless. ‘Explorers’ Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure’ by Huw Lewis-Jones and Kari Herbert is published by Thames & Hudson, £29.95. Colin Thubron’s new novel, ‘Night of Fire’, is published by Chatto & Windus, £16.99


WORD OF MOUTH AURORA AKSNES She’s a 20-year-old songstress who hails from remote Norway, an hour from Bergen. She taught herself how to play the piano aged six. Why we love her For her enchanting folk-fairy-tale melodies: a bewitching tangle of the blissful and dystopian. Aksnes could be the next Björk. ‘Don’t I know her from somewhere?’ She provided the ethereal vocals in Half the World Away, the song in the 2015 John Lewis Christmas advert. Aksnes’s Bergen haunts Muskedunder: ‘A hip, dark and tiny bar with long wooden tables and beautiful lamps. The honeycoloured shandy is a delicious mix of IPA, lemon and Norwegian sparkling water.’ Ichiban: ‘Eating fish feels homely. I used to go to this takeaway joint every day when recording my album – the salmon-and-mango sushi is such a temptress.’ Robotbutikken: ‘I’m a big believer in supporting independent bookshops. This one sells vinyl too and is in the cool Skostredet area. The last record I bought was Ænima by Tool.’ Ole Bull’s villa: ‘Ole Bull is thought to be the country’s first pop star from the 1800s. Fans even bought his bottled bath water. His house on Lysøen Island looks like it has frozen in time.’ Aurora tours the UK this month. Her debut album ‘All My Demons Greeting Me as a Friend’ is out now

SOUND CHECK

With French band Christine and the Queens and Canadian Alessia Cara taking the music scene by storm, 2016 has been the year of the international fierce frontwoman. We tune into two rising stars’ travel tips

28 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: KENNY MCCRACKEN; TOM NEWTON FOR INTO THE GLOSS

JULIA CUMMING The Brooklynite – also 20 years old – is the singer and bassist in edgy band Sunflower Bean. Why we love her She’s a vintage-fashion aficionado and delivers sassy psych rock with attitude. ‘Don’t I know her from somewhere?’ Multi-talented Cumming is a model too; she has fronted campaigns for Saint Laurent. Cumming’s vintage picks Urban Jungle, NYC: ‘You can buy a new outfit for £15 here. I found a pair of gold-velvet, knee-high boots, which I wore for the first show I ever played.’ Kilo Shop, Paris: ‘The price is right and there are a lot of those suede mini skirts that look good on everyone. There’s nothing like wearing one down a Parisian street, sipping espresso and trying to forget you spent eight hours in a van getting there.’ Hunky Dory Vintage, London: ‘For Londoners this might be cheesy since Brick Lane is so popular, but it’s nice to get a bagel for £1 then check out all the shops.’ Rose Bowl Flea Market, LA: ‘This happens once a month in a huge stadium. I always buy so many things: paintings, gifts, antiques and kimonos.’ Sunflower Bean is touring the UK now


THE MOUN TAINS ARE CALLING

ANYTHING ELSE IS JUST A HOLIDAY

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WORD OF MOUTH

MINE BENDING

See the extraordinary flipside of the world’s most mineral-rich lands through the eyes of a green photographer Known for his large-scale landscape shots showing the impact humans have had on the planet, Canadian Edward Burtynsky stands out as a heavyweight talent among photographers with an eco message. For more than 30 years, he has created spectacular, thought-provoking images of industrialised scenes, from quarries in China and Australia’s mining country to the USA’s oil fields. In theory, these should paint a bleak picture of how our environment has been pillaged, but many are unexpectedly, confusingly gorgeous. They often verge on painterly abstraction, including epic aerial landscape images and close-ups of mines and dams. ‘I do not believe that my images can change individual behaviour or political policy,’ says Burtynsky. ‘However, I do believe that artists are the storytellers of our time and as such can help raise awareness.’ SOPHY GRIMSHAW ‘Edward Burtynsky: Essential Elements’, edited by William A Ewing, is published on 15 September (Thames & Hudson, £45). ‘Essential Elements’ and ‘Salt Pans’ are displayed at London’s Flowers gallery (flowersgallery.com) from 16 September to 29 October 30 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: EDWARD BURTYNSKY. IMAGES COURTESY OF FLOWERS GALLERY, LONDON/NICHOLAS METIVIER, TORONTO

Clockwise from left: Pivot Irrigation, High Plains, Texas Panhandle; Xiluodu Dam, Yangtze River, China; Stepwell, Panna Meena, Amber, India; Thjorsá River, southern Iceland


WORD OF MOUTH

TICK ALL THE RIGHT BOXES

The Tiny House movement, a trend sweeping across the USA, is making a big impact just outside New York City

Where can New Yorkers find refuge from their long working hours and hungry social-media feeds? For a city of apartment dwellers, the answer is, surprisingly, somewhere with even less square footage: enter the micro cabin. Recently opened a mere two hours outside New York are four tiny mobile houses, which are set in countryside locations for easy communing with nature. Made by start-up company Getaway and designed by Harvard Graduate School of Design students, the high-spec, one-room retreats first opened in the Boston area last year. All are small on floor space but big on stargazing, daydreaming and escapism. These hideaways chime with a wider anti-holiday trend: breaks that require little travel or planning so you can decamp for just an evening – even mid-week – and, once you’re there, time offline. The digital detox has evolved from a Crackberry-era fad to a sensible sidestep from the everyday grind. Still, we can’t help but think it’s fine to Instagram a few photos of your digs – just before you switch off. SOPHY GRIMSHAW getaway.house. From about £75

THE EVOLUTION OF THE AMERICAN CABIN CHOP CHOP Seventeenth-century Scandinavian settlers on the East Coast build cosy lodges, just like home. MAN UP In the 1930s, unemployed labourers live in bachelor cabins, which are less man cave and more Great Depression. BLONDE AMBITION Dolly Parton grew up with 10 siblings in a two-room hut in Tennessee,

which has been replicated in her theme park Dollywood. GLORY DAYS As the 20th century rolls on, the gentrified log cabin becomes a highly desirable holiday home; #cabinporn gains a cult following and coffee-table books are published. LOG OFF Millennial hipsters reclaim lumberjack fashion, and cabin retreats catch on as digital detoxes.

The trends taking off and those running out of fuel DURIAN

NETFLIX AND CHILL

The famously putrid fruit is hitting London’s mocktail scene – the brave can try the Durian Cream Soda at Hoppers restaurant in Soho.

There’s a wacky new workout at LA’s Shape House, which places you in a 70ºC blanket in front of Netflix for an intense 55-minute sweat.

EDIBLE GARDENS

LOST MAIL

Swale, a shipping-barge-turned-floating-farm has arrived in Brooklyn’s public waterways, inviting people to forage their five-a-day for free.

British start-up What3Words has replaced obscure addresses in Mongolia (by the lamppost near the tall blue building anyone?) with three-word geocodes.

HOTELS INSIDE HOTELS

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Think Russian doll-style places to stay. Inside Eden Roc Miami Beach is a Nobu Hotel and there’s The Canyon Suites within The Phoenician in Arizona.

Uber China users will soon be able to hire hot-air balloons and boats via the app, making it a one-stop-shop for travellers on the move.

32 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


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READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

THE WORLD’S BEST

PELION, GREECE, PHOTOGRAPHED BY TOM PARKER

COUNTRIES + ISLANDS + CITIES +HOTELS + VILLAS + TOUR OPERATORS AIRLINES + AIRPORTS + CRUISE LINES +SPAS + SKI RESORTS

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 37


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

HOTELS

at The Datai Langkawi is the most accomplished around, and the modern design at Hong Kong’s Upper House deserved special mention. When it comes to AUSTRALASIA & THE SOUTH PACIFIC, the allure of French Polynesia proved too hard to resist and you sent The St Regis Bora Bora Resort straight to the top of the class for its location on a tiny islet on the edge of Bora Bora’s limpid lagoon and also for its romantic atmosphere. Runner-up One&Only Hayman Island on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef was roundly applauded for its facilities, and handsome Huka Lodge in New Zealand for its design. Your favourite place to stay in EUROPE, TURKEY & RUSSIA is Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc on the French Riviera, which you say has the most beautiful location and delivers the best service, while the atmosphere at the Belmond Hotel Cipriani in Venice is just what the doctor ordered. When it comes to food, the menus at Belmond Hotel Splendido in Portofino are close to perfection.

OVERSEAS HOLIDAY HOTELS This year the recently revamped Eden Rock – St Barths was so ahead of the game in THE AMERICAS & CARIBBEAN that it jetted to the number-one spot in our ‘best of the best’ Top 100. You are crazy about its food and facilities, but when it comes to location and looks, the Post Ranch Inn in California’s Big Sur cannot be beaten, so much so that you 38 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

awarded it BEST HOTEL IN THE WORLD FOR DESIGN. In THE MIDDLE EAST, AFRICA & THE INDIAN OCEAN Singita Grumeti rose to the top, at least in part thanks to its spectacular location on the edge of the mighty Serengeti, while your long-time Maldives favourite, One&Only Reethi Rah, ticked all the right boxes for service, and North Island

in the Seychelles blew you away for its royally approved bedrooms. Over in ASIA & THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT, you couldn’t resist giving the Taj Lake Palace in Udaipur exceptionally high scores for everything, but decided it should settle at number one for both its dreamy atmosphere and stunning location on Lake Pichola. Elsewhere, you decided the service

1 EDEN ROCK – ST BARTHS 94.73 2 Post Ranch Inn, Big Sur, California 93.57 3 Cheval Blanc St-Barth Isle de France, St Barth’s 91.76 4 Banyan Tree Mayakoba, Mexico 91.57 5 Crosby Street Hotel, New York 90.06 6 Anse Chastanet, St Lucia 90.04 7 The Beverly Hills Hotel, Los Angeles 88.04 8 COMO Parrot Cay, Turks & Caicos 86.54 9 Sugar Beach, A Viceroy Resort, St Lucia 84.73 10 Carlisle Bay, Antigua 83.36 11 The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands 82.94 12 Montpelier Plantation & Beach, Nevis, West Indies 80.98 13 Auberge du Soleil Resort, Napa Valley, California 80.51 14 Explora Patagonia, Chile 78.52 15 One&Only Ocean Club, Bahamas 76.43 16 Hotel Bel-Air, Los Angeles 75.82 17 Delano South Beach, Miami 75.32 18 The Inn at English Harbour, Antigua 74.86 19 The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel, New York 74.77 20 Sandy Lane, Barbados 73.34

THIS PAGE: EDEN ROCK – ST BARTHS (PHOTOGRAPHED BY SEAN GLEASON). OPPOSITE: SINGITA GRUMETI; TAJ LAKE PALACE

THE AMERICAS & CARIBBEAN


THE MIDDLE EAST, AFRICA & THE INDIAN OCEAN 1 SINGITA GRUMETI, TANZANIA 92.72 2 One&Only Reethi Rah, Maldives 92.63 3 Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve & Wellness Retreat, South Africa 90.96 4 Fregate Island Private, Seychelles 89.27 5 North Island, Seychelles 88.00 6 La Mamounia, Marrakech 87.68 7 Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa 87.58 8 Soneva Fushi, Maldives 87.51 9 Four Seasons Resort Maldives at Landaa Giraavaru 85.72 10 Ellerman House, Cape Town 84.94 11 The Oberoi, Mauritius 84.51 12 Denis Private Island, Seychelles 83.65 13 Londolozi Game Reserve, South Africa 82.97 14 Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel, Cape Town 81.60 15 Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru, Maldives 81.41 16 The Chedi Muscat, Oman 81.15 17 The St Regis Mauritius Resort 80.54 18 Qasr Al Sarab Desert Resort by Anantara, Abu Dhabi 79.62 19 One&Only The Palm, Dubai 79.11 20 Cape View Clifton, Cape Town 78.47

ASIA & THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT 1 TAJ LAKE PALACE, UDAIPUR 92.64 2 The Datai Langkawi, Malaysia 91.04 3 Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok 89.41 4 The Oberoi Udaivilas, Udaipur 87.95 5 Raffles Singapore 87.20 6 The Upper House, Hong Kong 85.91 7 Wildflower Hall, Shimla in the Himalayas, India 84.66 8 Alila Villas Uluwatu, Bali 84.55 9 The Leela Goa, India 83.98 10 Banyan Tree Bangkok 82.38 11 The Sarojin, Khao Lak, Thailand 80.93

12 Four Seasons Resort Langkawi, Malaysia 80.50 13 Rambagh Palace, Jaipur, India 79.46 14 The Fullerton Hotel Singapore 78.41 15 Cape Weligama, Sri Lanka 77.20 16 Taj Falaknuma Palace, Hyderabad, India 75.81 17 Amanpulo, Philippines 74.15 18 Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai, Thailand 73.26 19 Amankila, Bali 72.96 20 Song Saa Private Island, Cambodia 72.70

WHAT ARE ALL THESE NUMBERS? They are an index of satisfaction, scored out of a maximum of 100. In our Readers’ Travel Awards 2016 questionnaire posted at cntraveller.com from 3 March to 5 May, you were asked to choose the best that the travel world has to offer – from hotels and spas to airlines and airports. You were then asked to rate your choices according to various criteria, such as service, design and value for money. From your responses, we calculated the average mark on each criterion, and used this to provide the overall satisfaction percentage figure that you see on these pages and in The World’s Top 100 on page 56.


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016 AUSTRALASIA & THE SOUTH PACIFIC 1 THE ST REGIS BORA BORA RESORT, FRENCH POLYNESIA 88.86 2 One&Only Hayman Island, Australia 87.18 3 Huka Lodge, Taupo, New Zealand 85.71 4 Southern Ocean Lodge, Kangaroo Island, Australia 85.10 5 The Byron at Byron Resort & Spa, Australia 84.97 6 Blanket Bay, Glenorchy, New Zealand 83.36 7 Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley Resort & Spa, Australia 83.14 8 The Langham, Sydney 81.96 9 Otahuna Lodge, Christchurch, New Zealand 81.93 10 Freycinet Lodge, Tasmania 80.73 11 Four Seasons Resort Bora Bora, French Polynesia 80.43 12 Qualia, Hamilton Island, Australia 80.38 13 Longitude 131º, Uluru, Australia 79.25 14 Halcyon House, New South Wales, Australia 78.22 15 Kauri Cliffs, Matauri Bay, New Zealand 76.58 16 QT Sydney, Australia 76.17 17 Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort & Spa, French Polynesia 74.79 18 Eagles Nest, Bay of Islands, New Zealand 74.26 19 The Brando, French Polynesia 73.22 20 Laucala Island, Fiji 72.55

EUROPE, TURKEY & RUSSIA 1 HOTEL DU CAP-EDEN-ROC, ANTIBES, FRANCE 91.54 2 Belmond Hotel Cipriani, Venice 91.24 3 Anassa, Cyprus 89.93 4 The Gritti Palace, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Venice 88.97 5 The Capri Palace Hotel & Spa, Italy 87.67 6 Le Bristol Paris 86.37 7 Belmond Hotel Splendido, Portofino, Italy 85.43 8 Le Meurice, Paris 83.70 9 Mandarin Oriental, Bodrum, Turkey 82.81 10 Le Royal Monceau – Raffles Paris 81.05 40 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

11 Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon 80.40 12 Grand Hotel a Villa Feltrinelli, Lake Garda, Italy 79.37 13 W Barcelona 77.58 14 Hotel de Russie, Rome 76.85 15 Six Senses Douro Valley, Portugal 75.14 16 Belmond La Residencia, Mallorca 75.00 17 Amanzoe, Porto Heli, Greece 74.77 18 Conservatorium Hotel, Amsterdam 73.16 19 Belmond Grand Hotel Timeo, Sicily 72.61 20 Ett Hem, Stockholm 71.67


OVERSEAS BUSINESS HOTELS Once again you determined that the Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong is the one to beat, insisting it has by far the best location, food and bedrooms. But when it comes to smooth-running business trips abroad, The Peninsula Hong Kong, across the harbour, is a sure-fire winner: it gained the highest score for service of all the hotels surveyed, walking away with the award for BEST HOTEL IN THE WORLD FOR SERVICE.

UK HOLIDAY HOTELS

THIS PAGE: CHEWTON GLEN; MANDARIN ORIENTAL HONG KONG (PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREW ROWAT). OPPOSITE: THE ST REGIS BORA BORA (PHOTOGRAPHED BY JON WHITTLE); HOTEL DU CAP-EDEN-ROC (CAMERA PRESS/FIGARO)

Hampshire’s Chewton Glen Hotel & Spa is back at number one, a position it has attained twice before, thanks to steady-as-you-go consistency in all eight criteria in this category. The Soho Hotel sashayed into second place for its design and atmosphere and last year’s winner, The Pig in the New Forest, was singled out for its garden-to-plate food. 1 CHEWTON GLEN HOTEL & SPA, HAMPSHIRE 88.20 2 The Soho Hotel, London 87.47 3 The Pig, Hampshire 86.89 4 Cliveden House, Berkshire 85.45 5 Ham Yard Hotel, London 83.59 6 The Gleneagles Hotel, Perthshire 83.46 7 Coworth Park, Berkshire 83.26 8 Lime Wood, Hampshire 82.03 9 Babington House, Somerset 81.11 10 The Kensington, London 80.71 11 The Gainsborough Bath Spa 80.10 12 Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, Oxfordshire 78.93 13 Malmaison Cheltenham 77.62 14 The Pig on the Beach, Dorset 77.24 15 Covent Garden Hotel, London 76.14 16 Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa, Wiltshire 75.03 17 The Scarlet Hotel, Cornwall 73.16 18 The Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa, Bath 72.68 19 Barnsley House, Gloucestershire 71.23 20 Soho Farmhouse, Oxfordshire 70.04

UK BUSINESS HOTELS When it comes to sealing the deal, you think Rosewood London is top for design, facilities and food. Claridge’s impresses for its Mayfair location and service and The Ritz for its rarefied atmosphere. Of the three hotels in the Top 15 outside the capital, you most appreciate the design at Manchester’s Radisson Blu Edwardian and the service at the Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh – The Caledonian. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

ROSEWOOD LONDON 86.62 Claridge’s, London 84.86 Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London 84.50 The Dorchester, London 84.09 The Ritz London 83.81 The Connaught, London 82.40 The Langham, London 81.95 Corinthia Hotel London 80.23 The Savoy, London 79.08 Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh –The Caledonian 78.87 Radisson Blu Edwardian Manchester 77.86 The Berkeley, London 76.49 Four Seasons Hotel London at Park Lane 76.13 The Lowry Hotel, Manchester 75.56 The May Fair Hotel, London 75.00

1 MANDARIN ORIENTAL, HONG KONG 91.43 2 The Peninsula Hong Kong 89.66 3 Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris 89.15 4 Armani Hotel Dubai 87.91 5 JW Marriott Hotel Hong Kong 86.79 6 Hôtel Plaza Athénée, Paris 86.10 7 The St Regis Doha, Qatar 85.57 8 Waldorf Astoria New York 84.16 9 The Westbury, Dublin 82.41 10 Jumeirah Emirates Towers, Dubai 81.11

11 Park Hyatt Tokyo 79.24 12 Hotel Principe di Savoia, Milan 77.86 13 Four Seasons Hotel New York 76.46 14 Shangri-La Hotel Singapore 76.07 15 Hotel Astoria, St Petersburg 75.47 16 The Peninsula Bangkok 74.63 17 Hotel Adlon Kempinski, Berlin 73.71 18 The Plaza, New York 73.38 19 Grosvenor House, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Dubai 72.01 20 The Taj Mahal Palace, Mumbai 70.42


BEST OVERSEAS CITY FOR RESTAURANTS AND BARS CAPE TOWN This year you gave South Africa’s Mother City the highest mark of all international destinations for its restaurants and bars, ahead of New York and even Paris, making it the best place to eat and drink in the world for 2016. Mulberry & Prince, one of a number of innovative new restaurants in Cape Town, photographed by Karl Rogers

42 CondĂŠ Nast Traveller October 2016


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

BEST HOTEL IN THE WORLD FOR SERVICE THE PENINSULA HONG KONG With its fleet of Rolls-Royce Phantoms and private helipad, this flagship of the Peninsula Hotels group quite simply sets the standard of service that every other hotel in the world aspires to. Prepare to be amazed. Felix restaurant, designed by Philippe Starck, on the 28th floor of The Peninsula Hong Kong, photographed by Mark Parren Taylor


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

DESTINATIONS ISLANDS What is it about the Maldives that most tickles your fancy? Well, it’s not rocket science: you reckon it has the best beaches in the world and also, you insist, the most fantastic places to stay. Elsewhere, the primordial forests and pounding surf of the Seychelles gave those tropical isles high marks for scenery and, closer to home, Sicily was singled out for its superb food, followed by the Greek Islands. Finally, you think the people of Malta give visitors the warmest welcome imaginable. MALDIVES 93.72 Greek Islands 93.27 Balearic Islands 91.83 Sicily 91.06 Seychelles 89.63 St Lucia 88.62 Bali 88.45

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Koh Samui 87.30 Malta 86.84 St Barth’s 85.69 Jamaica 83.89 Sardinia 82.23 Hawaiian Islands 81.41 Mauritius 80.50

15 16 17 18 19 20

Cuba 79.02 Tasmania 78.43 Capri 77.82 Antigua 76.84 Barbados 75.74 Anguilla 75.57

SONEVA FUSHI, MALDIVES (PHOTOGRAPHED BY JENNY ZARINS)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

44 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


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UK CITIES There’s very little not to love about London. According to you, it has the liveliest nightlife, unrivalled places to stay, and this year it also picked up the award for best UK city for restaurants and bars along the way. But in truth, Newcastle affords visitors the friendliest welcome of any city in the country, while Cambridge and Oxford scored a double first for culture and Bath won plenty of admirers for its beautiful Georgian architecture.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

GREECE 92.51 Italy 92.46 USA 91.26 South Africa 90.46 France 89.92 Spain 89.60 India 88.40 Australia 86.95 Thailand 86.07 Mexico 85.74

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

New Zealand 84.78 Portugal 84.27 Canada 82.53 Argentina 81.34 Sri Lanka 80.05 Morocco 79.44 Indonesia 78.22 Ireland 78.04 Japan 76.25 Vietnam 74.35

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

LONDON 86.22 Edinburgh 85.83 Bath 84.89 Glasgow 84.58 Salisbury 83.55 Cambridge 82.59 Newcastle 81.55 Oxford 79.94

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Leeds 79.21 York 78.02 Liverpool 77.09 Cardiff 75.49 Belfast 73.65 Manchester 73.18 Cheltenham 72.22

THIS PAGE: PATMOS, GREECE (PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALISTAIR TAYLOR-YOUNG); LONDON SCENE (STOCKSY). OPPOSITE: COURCHEVAL (ODILE NOEL/IMAGEBRIEF); ROME (SERENA ELLER)

COUNTRIES You really can’t get enough of Greece, which continues to capture your imagination with crowd-pleasing scores across the board and, this year, top marks for its kind-hearted people. You think Italy produces the best food (closely followed by France), the USA has the finest places to stay and South Africa is fantastic when it comes to value for money. Yet when it comes to scenery, it seems no other destination can touch the vast open spaces and dramatic coastlines of Australia.


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

SKI RESORTS This year for the first time we asked you to rate your favourite ski resorts in the world according to five criteria. It turns out Courchevel in the French Alps is a shoo-in thanks to its exceptional restaurants and bars, and also brilliant hotels and chalets. As for quality of runs, nothing can touch the 8,000 acres of slopes at Whistler in British Columbia in Canada. Switzerland’s Zermatt, set below the snow-capped Matterhorn, hit just the right note for atmosphere.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

COURCHEVEL, FRANCE 84.41 Whistler, Canada 82.98 Zermatt, Switzerland 81.42 Aspen, USA 80.44 Gstaad, Switzerland 79.16 Lech, Austria 78.93 Verbier, Switzerland 77.36 Méribel, France 76.89 Val d’Isère, France 76.72 Vail, Colorado, USA 75.43 Chamonix, France 75.41 St Moritz, Switzerland 75.35 St Anton, Austria 74.57 Morzine, France 74.25 Banff, Canada 74.00

OVERSEAS CITIES It seems a Roman holiday is just the ticket. The Italian capital scored phenomenally well on all six criteria, but ultimately rose to the top thanks to indomitable marks for both architecture and culture. This year’s runner-up, Cape Town, scored highest for places to stay (no mean feat considering New York was in the running) and managed to upset the apple cart by snatching the coveted award for BEST OVERSEAS CITY FOR RESTAURANTS AND BARS. But when it boils down to the friendliness of the people you meet, easy-going Sydney is a real charmer. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

ROME 89.01 Cape Town 87.60 New York 87.24 Paris 85.76 Venice 84.38 Barcelona 84.31 Berlin 83.35 Sydney 82.21 Amsterdam 80.83 Dublin 79.25

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Tokyo 78.33 Madrid 77.21 Vienna 75.72 Budapest 75.42 Melbourne 75.13 Singapore 73.87 Dubai 73.32 Toronto 72.41 Buenos Aires 70.78 Los Angeles 69.21

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 47


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

OVERSEAS HOTEL SPAS

DESTINATION SPAS Thailand’s Chiva-Som is your favourite destination spa in the world, thanks to its therapists, just ahead of runner-up The Original FX Mayr Health Center, which ultimately drew ahead of the competition for its range of treatments. But you reckon you get the best night’s sleep anywhere in the bedrooms of the COMO Shambhala Estate on Bali.

UK HOTEL SPAS This year we asked you to rate your favourite hotel and destination spas according to just four criteria: therapists, range of treatments, programmes and bedrooms. And there’s nowhere better for pampering par excellence in London than The Spa at Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, which you scored top for therapists, programmes and bedrooms, leaving its near-neighbour the Bulgari Hotel to shine through for the range of treatments available at its Bulgari Spa, closely followed by the always resourceful ESPA Life at Corinthia. 48 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

1 CHIVA-SOM, HUA HIN, THAILAND 91.15 2 The Original FX Mayr Health Center, Austria 90.46 3 COMO Shambhala Estate, Bali, Indonesia 90.33 4 Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa, Baden-Baden, Germany 89.04 5 Clinique La Prairie, Switzerland 87.90 6 Espace Henri Chenot, Palace Merano, Italy 87.56 7 VIVAMAYR Resort Altaussee, Austria 86.18 8 SHA Wellness Clinic, Alicante, Spain 84.30 9 Vana Malsi Estate, India 82.75 10 Ananda in the Himalayas, India 82.70

1 THE SPA AT MANDARIN ORIENTAL HYDE PARK, LONDON 87.52 2 The Bulgari Spa, Bulgari Hotel & Residences, London 85.72 3 ESPA Life at Corinthia, Corinthia Hotel London 84.15 4 Spa Village Bath, The Gainsborough Bath Spa 82.63 5 The Spa, Chewton Glen, Hampshire 80.90 6 The Dorchester Spa, The Dorchester, London 79.25 7 ESPA Life, The Gleneagles Hotel, Perthshire 77.82 8 Sequoia at The Grove, Watford 76.15

11 Cal-a-Vie Health Spa, California, USA 81.65 12 Les Sources de Caudalie, Bordeaux, France 80.05 13 Mii Amo at Enchantment Resort, Arizona, USA 79.17 14 Parkhotel Igls, Austria 78.44 15 Monart Spa, Co Wexford, Ireland 77.52 16 Terme di Saturnia Spa & Golf Resort, Italy 76.18 17 L’Institut Guerlain, Paris 75.55 18 BodyHoliday, St Lucia 75.23 19 Grand Resort Bad Ragaz, Switzerland 73.93 20 Canyon Ranch in Lenox, Massachusetts, USA 73.27

9 Cowshed Spa, Babington House, Somerset 75.28 10 Aman Spa, The Connaught, London 74.63 11 The Spa, Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa, Wiltshire 74.60 12 C-Side Spa, Cowley Manor, Gloucestershire 72.96 13 The Spa at Coworth Park, Coworth Park, Berkshire 72.30 14 Herb House, Lime Wood, Hampshire 72.09 15 House Spa, Dormy House, Worcestershire 71.58

You heap praise on the One&Only Spa by ESPA at Reethi Rah in the Maldives for its range of treatments, and Royal Mansour Marrakech’s The Spa for having brilliant bedrooms and therapists; but when it comes to programmes, look no further than the innovative Oriental Spa at the Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok. 1 ONE&ONLY SPA BY ESPA, ONE&ONLY REETHI RAH, MALDIVES 90.24 2 The Spa, Royal Mansour Marrakech 88.40 3 The Oriental Spa, Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok 87.23 4 Six Senses Spa, Six Senses Zighy Bay, Oman 85.90 5 Thalassa Spa, Anassa, Cyprus 84.59 6 COMO Shambhala Retreat, COMO Parrot Cay, Turks & Caicos 83.34 7 The Spa & Ayurvedic Retreat, Four Seasons Resort Maldives at Landaa Giraavaru 83.14 8 The Spa, The Nam Hai, Hoi An, Vietnam 82.26 9 Banyan Tree Spa, Banyan Tree Phuket, Thailand 80.79 10 One&Only Spa by ESPA, One&Only Le Saint Géran, Mauritius 80.48 11 Spa Le Bristol by La Prairie, Le Bristol Paris 80.00 12 Spa My Blend by Clarins, Le Royal Monceau – Raffles Paris 79.99 13 Sense, A Rosewood Spa, Rosewood Mayakoba, Mexico 78.24 14 The Datai Spa, The Datai Langkawi, Malaysia 76.53 15 LIME Spa, Per Aquum Huvafen Fushi, Maldives 74.80 16 Six Senses Spa, Six Senses Laamu, Maldives 74.37 16 Cheval Blanc Spa, Cheval Blanc St-Barth Isle de France, St Barth’s 74.37 18 One&Only Spa, One&Only Hayman Island, Australia 72.89 19 The Spa, Twelve Apostles Hotel & Spa, Cape Town 71.47 20 Spa Village Pangkor Laut, Pangkor Laut Resort, Malaysia 70.73

CHIVA-SOM (PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRIS WISE)

SPAS


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

ON THE MOVE AIRLINES If you’re off on a SHORT-HAUL holiday, you would rather fly with British Airways than any other airline, mainly because you think it has the best airport lounges and loyalty reward schemes, although Swiss International Air Lines is possibly more punctual and Turkish Airlines is likely to serve tastier food. British Airways also stirs your loyalty for LONG-HAUL holidays with its range of routes on offer, while Emirates impresses for service and Qatar Airways for lounges, which is partly why it has come up trumps for BUSINESS trips, along with your assertion that it is the most punctual of all the airlines you have flown with.

SHORT-HAUL HOLIDAY

5 6 7 8 9 10

BRITISH AIRWAYS 82.20 Turkish Airlines 81.85 EasyJet 80.78 Swiss International Air Lines 79.94 Lufthansa 79.34 Aer Lingus 77.87 Air France 76.89 SAS 75.71 KLM 75.56 Finnair 74.15

AIRPORTS London’s Heathrow taxied into first place thanks to its impressive restaurants and shops, while Chhatrapati Shivaji International in Mumbai stood out for its innovative design, London City Airport for its handy location and Hong Kong International for efficiency of security checks.

LONG-HAUL HOLIDAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

BRITISH AIRWAYS 83.65 Emirates 82.73 Qatar Airways 81.58 Virgin Atlantic 81.03 Singapore Airlines 79.14 Cathay Pacific 78.65 Etihad Airways 77.86 Qantas 77.30 Air New Zealand 76.01 KLM 74.61

BUSINESS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

QATAR AIRWAYS 84.54 Emirates 84.06 British Airways 83.27 Etihad Airways 81.39 Singapore Airlines 80.36 Turkish Airlines 79.04 Qantas 78.12 Swiss International Air Lines 77.03 9 Virgin Atlantic 76.93 10 Cathay Pacific 75.09 50 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

CRUISE LINES

LARGE SHIPS

Regent Seven Seas rules the waves for LARGE SHIPS (more than 500 passengers), especially for design and itineraries, while Holland America Line is unassailable for food and service. In the SMALL SHIPS category, Seabourn Cruise Line won top scores for design, facilities and cabins, while you showed a healthy appetite for the food on Silversea Cruises and the itineraries available on Viking Cruises.

SMALL SHIPS

1 REGENT SEVEN SEAS CRUISES 89.59 2 Holland America Line 88.86 3 Crystal Cruises 87.47 4 Celebrity Cruises 86.16 5 Cunard Line 84.91

1 SEABOURN CRUISE LINE 82.22 2 Silversea Cruises 80.87 3 Viking Cruises 80.74 4 Oceania Cruises 80.72 5 SeaDream Yacht Club 79.76

1 HEATHROW AIRPORT, LONDON 81.64 2 Changi Airport, Singapore 80.14 3 Dubai International Airport 80.07 4 Hong Kong International Airport 79.86 5 Hamad International Airport, Doha, Qatar 79.48 6 Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport, Mumbai 77.99 7 London City Airport 77.78 8 Incheon International Airport, Seoul, South Korea 77.20 9 Sydney Airport 76.20 10 Amsterdam Airport Schiphol 75.33 11 Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Malaysia 74.44 12 Zürich Airport 74.11 13 Copenhagen Airport 73.97 14 Munich Airport 73.76 15 Frankfurt Airport 72.72

PHOTOGRAPH: LES CUNLIFFE/WWW.AGEFOTOSTOCK

1 2 3 4


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

BEST HOTEL IN THE WORLD FOR DESIGN POST RANCH INN, BIG SUR, CALIFORNIA This is an astonishing hotel. Created by the modernist architect Mickey Muennig, the Post Ranch Inn is a cluster of buildings soaring high above the Pacific coast. From the grass-roofed, glass-fronted Ocean Houses to rooms cantilevered up and suspended over the cliffs, this, you are quite adamant, is what the high life is all about. Post Ranch Inn photographed by Kodiak Greenwood


BEST UK CITY FOR RESTAURANTS AND BARS LONDON For the second year in a row, you decided that no other city in the UK stirs your appetite like London, a compulsion that has once again propelled the capital into prime position as the best city in the UK to eat and drink for 2016. SHOT, a new restaurant near St Paul’s with a scientific approach to clean, healthy eating, photographed by Nicholas Worley

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 53


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

ORGANISERS TOUR OPERATORS 1 CARRIER 83.49 2 Elegant Resorts 82.89 3 The Turquoise Holiday Company 82.74 4 Trailfinders 82.08 5 Abercrombie & Kent 81.75 6 British Airways Holidays 81.03 7 ITC Luxury Travel 79.69 8 Virgin Holidays 79.29 9 Kuoni 78.60 10 Kenwood Travel 77.68 11 Cox & Kings 77.30 12 Red Savannah 76.52 13 The Ultimate Travel Company 75.73 14 Black Tomato 75.66 15 Tauck 74.43

SPECIALIST TOUR OPERATORS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SCOTT DUNN 85.21 Cazenove+Loyd 84.93 Healing Holidays 83.37 Powder Byrne 83.24 Greaves Travel 82.96 Audley Travel 82.71 Africa Travel 81.35 Natural World Safaris 81.08 Journey Latin America 80.79 Bridge & Wickers 79.45

VILLA RENTAL COMPANIES What is it about this year’s winner, The Thinking Traveller, that makes you so happy? Well, just about everything, it seems, as you gave it exceptionally high marks across the board, making unshakeable consistency its speciality Elsewhere, you particularly appreciated the range of villas on offer from runner-up Abercrombie & Kent Villas and the on-the-groundsupport supplied when you book a house through Scott Dunn Villas.

54 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

THE THINKING TRAVELLER 83.05 Abercrombie & Kent Villas 82.48 Scott Dunn Villas 82.32 CV Villas 80.88 SJ Villas 80.33 Simpson Travel 79.24 James Villas 78.38 HomeAway 77.77 Tuscany Now & More 77.40 Airbnb 76.65

OSAKA (PHOTOGRAPHED BY SHARYN CAIRNS); VILLA MAISTROS, SKOPELOS

TOUR OPERATORS Carrier is your preferred tour operator thanks to the variety of its locations and range of places to stay, but you ranked Elegant Resorts high for first-hand knowledge of destinations and The Turquoise Holiday Company for service and reliability. In the SPECIALIST TOUR OPERATOR category, the winner is Scott Dunn, which you say is best for range of places to stay, but Cazenove+Loyd knows its subject astoundingly well and spa specialist Healing Holidays has a reputation for service.


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Official fuel consumption figures in mpg (l/100km) for the Ford S-MAX Vignale range: urban 27.4-50.4 (10.3-5.6), extra urban 43.5-61.4 (6.5-4.6), combined 35.8-56.5 (7.9-5.0). Official CO2 emissions 180-129g/km. The mpg figures quoted are sourced from official EU-regulated test results (EU Directive and Regulation 692/2008), are provided for comparability purposes and may not reflect your actual driving experience.


READERS’ TRAVEL AWARDS 2016

1 EDEN ROCK – ST BARTHS 94.73

2 Maldives 93.72 3 Post Ranch Inn, California 93.57 4 Greek Islands 93.27 5 Singita Grumeti, Tanzania 92.72 6 Taj Lake Palace, Udaipur 92.64 7 One&Only Reethi Rah, Maldives 92.63 8 Greece 92.51 9 Italy 92.46 10 Balearic Islands 91.83 11 Cheval Blanc St-Barth Isle de France, St Barth’s 91.76 12 Banyan Tree Mayakoba, Mexico 91.57 13 Hôtel du Cap-EdenRoc, Antibes, France 91.54

14 Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong 91.43 15 USA 91.26 16 Belmond Hotel Cipriani, Venice 91.24 17 Chiva-Som, Hua Hin, Thailand 91.15 18 Sicily 91.06 19 The Datai Langkawi, Malaysia 91.04 20 Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve & Wellness Retreat, South Africa 90.96 21 The Original FX Mayr Health Center, Austria 90.46 21 South Africa 90.46 23 COMO Shambhala Estate, Bali 90.33 24 One&Only Spa by ESPA, One&Only Reethi Rah, Maldives 90.24

25 Crosby Street Hotel, New York 90.06 26 Anse Chastanet, St Lucia 90.04 27 Anassa, Cyprus 89.93 28 France 89.92 29 The Peninsula Hong Kong 89.66 30 Spain 89.63 30 Seychelles 89.63 32 Regent Seven Seas Cruises 89.59 33 Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok 89.41 34 Fregate Island Private, Seychelles 89.27 35 Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris 89.15 36 Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa, Baden-Baden, Germany 89.04 37 Rome 89.01 38 The Gritti Palace, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Venice 88.97 39 Holland America Line 88.86 39 The St Regis Bora Bora Resort, French Polynesia 88.86 41 St Lucia 88.62 42 Bali 88.45 43 The Spa, Royal Mansour Marrakech 88.40 43 India 88.40 45 Chewton Glen Hotel & Spa, Hampshire 88.20 46 The Beverly Hills Hotel, Los Angeles 88.04 47 North Island, Seychelles 88.00 48 The Oberoi Udaivilas, Udaipur 87.95 49 Armani Hotel Dubai 87.91

50 Clinique La Prairie, Switzerland 87.90 51 La Mamounia, Marrakech 87.68 52 The Capri Palace Hotel & Spa, Italy 87.67 53 Cape Town 87.60 54 Singita Sabi Sand, South Africa 87.58 55 Espace Henri Chenot, Palace Merano, Italy 87.56 56 The Spa at Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London 87.52 57 Soneva Fushi, Maldives 87.51 58 The Soho Hotel, London 87.47 58 Crystal Cruises 87.47 60 Koh Samui 87.30 61 New York 87.24 62 The Oriental Spa, Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok 87.23 63 Raffles Singapore 87.20 64 One&Only Hayman Island, Australia 87.18 65 Australia 86.95 66 The Pig, Hampshire 86.89 67 Malta 86.84 68 JW Marriott Hotel Hong Kong 86.79 69 Rosewood London 86.62 70 COMO Parrot Cay, Turks & Caicos 86.54 71 Le Bristol Paris 86.37 72 London 86.22 73 VIVAMAYR Resort Altaussee, Austria 86.18 74 Celebrity Cruises 86.16 75 Hôtel Plaza Athénée, Paris 86.10 76 Thailand 86.07

77 The Upper House, Hong Kong 85.91 78 Six Senses Spa, Six Senses Zighy Bay, Oman 85.90 79 Edinburgh 85.83 80 Paris 85.76 81 Mexico 85.74 82 The Bulgari Spa, Bulgari Hotel & Residences, London 85.72 82 Four Seasons Resort Maldives at Landaa Giraavaru 85.72 84 Huka Lodge, Taupo, New Zealand 85.71 85 St Barth’s 85.69 86 The St Regis Doha, Qatar 85.57 87 Cliveden House, Berkshire 85.45 88 Belmond Hotel Splendido, Portofino, Italy 85.43 89 Scott Dunn 85.21 90 Southern Ocean Lodge, Kangaroo Island, Australia 85.10 91 The Byron at Byron Resort & Spa, Australia 84.97 92 Ellerman House, Cape Town 84.94 93 Cazenove+Loyd 84.93 94 Cunard Line 84.91 95 Bath 84.89 96 Claridge’s, London 84.86 97 New Zealand 84.78 98 Sugar Beach, A Viceroy Hotel, St Lucia 84.73 99 Wildflower Hall, Shimla in the Himalayas, India 84.66 100 Thalassa Spa, Anassa, Cyprus 84.59

HOW OUR QUESTIONNAIRE PRODUCED YOUR ‘BEST OF THE BEST’ LIST Questionnaires were posted at cntraveller.com from 3 March to 5 May 2016. The results were collated and analysed by an independent market-research company called Market Management. The 25 categories for nominations are listed below, with the criteria by which they were judged. Figures for all criteria and the Top 100 are percentages representing overall average levels of satisfaction. Countries Scenery • Food • Culture • Places to stay • Value for money • People Islands Beaches • Scenery • Food • Places to stay • People • Value for money UK & overseas cities Architecture • Culture • Restaurants and bars • Nightlife • People • Places to stay Ski resorts Restaurants and bars • Hotels and chalets • Atmosphere • Range and quality of runs • Lift system/efficiency UK holiday hotels Design • Value for money • Food • Location • Service • Rooms • Facilities • Atmosphere UK & overseas business hotels Design • Value for money • Food • Location • Service • Rooms • Facilities • Atmosphere Overseas holiday hotels: Europe, Turkey & Russia; the Americas & Caribbean; the Middle East, Africa & the Indian Ocean; Asia & the Indian subcontinent; Australasia & the South Pacific Design • Value for money • Food • Location • Service • Rooms • Facilities • Atmosphere Airlines: short- & long-haul holidays Food • Airport lounge • Service • Punctuality • Range of routes • Loyalty reward schemes Airlines: business travel Food • Airport lounge • Service • Punctuality • Range of routes • Loyalty reward schemes Airports Design • Flight information • Restaurants • Location • Shops • Efficiency of security checks Cruise lines: small & large ships Design • Facilities • Food • Cabins • Service • Entertainment • Itinerary Tour operators & specialist tour operators Reliability • Variety of destinations/focus on single destinations • Service • Ranges of places to stay • First-hand knowledge of destination Villa rental companies Range of villas • Range of destinations/focus on single destinations • Value for money • Presentation of villas • On-the-ground support Spas in UK & overseas hotels; destination spas Therapists • Range of treatments • Programmes • Bedrooms

56 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

EDEN ROCK – ST BARTHS (PHOTOGRAPH BY SEAN GLEASON)

THE WORLD’S TOP 100


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION Esterni Terrazza, Relais San Lorenzo Hotel, Bergamo

A secret to be shared

Rosa Absolute, Molton Brown’s new fragrance – have you met yet?

C

lassic Italian red rose extracted in its purest and most concentrated form makes for the new fragrance from Molton Brown: Rosa Absolute. A dramatic new floral, it is inspired by the ancient Italian tradition of “sub rosa”, which denotes secrecy. But this, in fact, is one secret not to be kept. “Blackcurrant, raspberry and strawberry evoke a rich magenta shade, spiced up by red berries, cinnamon and clove,” reveals creator of Fragrances Essentielles, Nathalie Koobus. Intoxicating rose absolute and violet leaf further unfold into cedarwood, patchouli and sandalwood. “The potency of patchouli and labdanum give a longlasting finish,” adds Koobus. Voluptuous, dramatic and impassioned. Sub rosa, translated in Latin as “under the rose”, relays as the Renaissance period practice of painting roses on the ceilings of banquet halls to serve as a reminder that the spoken word should remain confidential. Most poignantly, it can be seen via the mysterious paintings of the Lombardy region: their deep hues and hidden symbolism a direct correlation with the intriguing and voluptuous Molton Brown blend – and home to the newly renovated Relais San Lorenzo Hotel led by architect Adolfo Natalini. Just like Rosa Absolute, here, it’s a combination of the contemporary with the historic, the luxurious with the pure: 30 rooms and suites equipped with Molton Brown toiletries that overlook the tranquil cloisters and the neighbouring church; a gourmet restaurant, bar and terrace, sensual spa – a peaceful Lombardy retreat in one of the area’s prettiest towns, Bergamo. Consider this your invitation. Discover the fragrance; discover the city. And to celebrate this impassioned fragrance, Molton Brown, supplier of toiletries to Her Majesty The Queen, is proudly displaying the Royal Arms for the first time in polished silver ink on its bottles, making this collection a truly luxurious indulgence.

Rosa Absolute Eau de Toilette, £39; Rosa Absolute Bath & Shower Gel, £20; Rosa Absolute Body Lotion, £25, moltonbrown.co.uk


WAY OF LIFE

FIRESTARTER One of the travel world’s most progressive figures has stayed several steps ahead of the game for years, exploring the possibilities that rave culture and tribal festival gatherings unlocked and helping change the way we think about hotels. Now he’s opened a farm on Ibiza – but keep it quiet BY RICK JORDAN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEVE HERUD

60 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


The mezcal bar at La Granja on Ibiza. Opposite, the living room in the main farmhouse


WAY OF LIFE

SUPERSTAR DJS, HERE WE GO. Driving from Ibiza’s airport takes you past billboards of nightlife grandees. David Guetta and Paul Van Dyk stare heroically into the distance like election candidates. Flyers for Summer of Love revivals flap in the breeze and after almost 30 years of wide-eyed antics, Space is gearing up for one last hurrah. There’s a new club on the island, though, that doesn’t host foam parties or sell own-brand day-glo running vests. It doesn’t even have a sign outside. La Granja is embedded in the beetle-dry pine forest in the hills way above San Antonio, near a hamlet called Buscastell. This is out-of-earshot, gone-to-ground Ibiza; the setting for something fresh: a members’-club agriturismo with nine bedrooms in a restored farmhouse, a Riviera-chic pool and mezcal bar, and rippling, ripening rows of vegetables. ‘The idea,’ says Claus Sendlinger, ‘is to invite the most interesting people on the island and make this a place for them to share ideas.’ Claus has the beard and hair of a Seventies-era Beach Boy, and a mischievous sense of humour. As with many 62 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

characters on Ibiza, his route here was unconventional. The son of a toyshop owner from a small town near Munich, he joined the German air force in the mid 1980s – ‘the Cold War, Top Gun years’ – before leaving to organise raves, inspired by nights at such era-defining clubs as the Hacienda, Ministry of Sound and Pacha. Then, sensing a growing desire for small hotels defined by individual style, he founded a far-sighted outfit that would bring together like-minded properties. Design Hotels now has 290 members around the world, as disparate as London’s Ham Yard and the monastic Eremito in Umbria. Like André Balazs and Ian Schrager, Claus’s club background proved essential when it came to tracking the shifting chimera of travel trends. ‘Design Hotels was really a result of that youth culture,’ he says. ‘Places like New York’s Paramount and the Metropolitan in London – where many of the DJs I knew hung out – were the catalyst.’ Right now, he’s fired up by an emerging evolutionary hybrid: the hotel as meeting point for a nomadic creative class, drawn not so much by Panton chairs and polished 


WAY OF LIFE



concrete as by a shared experience – whether that’s psychedelic electronica, biodynamic food or vinyasa yoga – stage-managed with the attitude and makeshift playfulness of the festival scene. When it came to creating his own place to stay, it was unlikely to feature anything so traditional as valet parking. Claus came to Ibiza from Tulum, where he had moved in 2011 to open Papaya Playa, a string of loose-limbed, driftwood cabanas that surfed the coast’s hippy mindset and captured that feeling of staying in a Thai beach shack in your 20s. The crew from Berlin’s minimal-house Kater Holzig club worked the soundsystem. There were full-moon parties and free-flowing tequila. Other projects followed: a summer clubhouse in Rio’s Santa Teresa district; and the stunning San Giorgio collaboration on Mykonos, which began as a pop-up hotel but solidified into something permanent, with esoteric performances at its low-key beach club. Then Claus was approached by the owner of an Ibizan farmhouse. ‘He had

‘I used to spend winters in Koh Tao, which is where Alex Garland wrote The Beach,’ says Claus. ‘In the book, the main guy describes his utopia as a beach resort for people who don’t like beach resorts, which really stuck with me. I wanted La Granja to have no sign, just a black rock and a gate that slid back mysteriously, for people to walk through and see the other side of Ibiza – the one before all the craziness happened.’ La Granja was open house for a while before becoming a hangout for members drawn from Ibiza’s various tribes. Insiders from the nightlife scene, galleries and eco projects – even hippies who settled here decades ago – have found their way here (taxis tend to get lost, but guests are sent a WhatsApp video showing the way). There are farmer’s-table meals, and talks and performances that range from Burning Man to gamelan. A Citroën Méhari will be kitted out with blankets and picnic baskets; a local newspaper editor has been asked to source a library of Ibizan literature.

IN THE FUTURE, NO DOUBT, THERE WILL BE MORE PLACES LIKE LA GRANJA AS WE FLIP THE WAY WE WORK AND TAKE HOLIDAYS the notion of turning it into an art hotel, with Tom Dixon lights everywhere, but I thought this could be different.’ The finca, which dates back to the 18th century, has thick rocky walls crusted with brilliant white plaster. There’s a Moorish attitude towards light and shadow. Bedrooms are pockets of twilight, cool as a badger’s burrow; open a shutter and the sunlight will almost knock you over. Walls are painted the dark grey of unfired clay, and the simple composition of lamps, wooden tables and stools resembles a Dutch still life. Days at La Granja are lazy. Claus’s two sons play tag around the garden, fishing nets pirouetting in the air. Pickle-like geckos flick out from cacti, and aubergines seem to inflate like balloons as you watch. Coco the pig provides the raw materials for Andy the farmer’s compost-tea, which bubbles in a barrel by a ramshackle shed. Boxes of leafy radishes and heritage tomatoes are carried up to the kitchen. In the afternoons, the pace shifts. The bar, built around the trunk of a carob tree, is opened by Pancho Ortenzi, who spins tales of his mezcal adventures around Mexico and serves the rootsy spirit with worm-salt-strewn plates of fruit. 64 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

Leftfield ideas have always flourished on this island, and Claus’s enthusiasm is infectious. ‘Listen to this!’ he exclaims, as a trouser-suited young woman, who dropped by for lunch, casually explains the science behind a process that rejigs water’s molecular structure to speed up plant growth. Later, he talks of how more places like La Granja will emerge in the future, as megacities bulge ever bigger and people flip the way they work and holiday. On the weekend I’m here, a hit-and-run festival collective, Habitas, have landed from LA, bringing in musicians and wellness practitioners. A breathing-meditation class blurs into a DJ session under the trees, our instructor’s white fedora bobbing up and down as ululating African chants rise over fluid basslines. ‘It’s like how the island was 30 years back,’ reckons one Ibiza regular. But this isn’t a rewind. As Ibiza grows ever more exposed, La Granja is helping it reinvent itself with a wholesome hedonism and valuable thinking space. With the music taking hold, Claus moves through the grounds like a pied piper, observing the crowd and making connections. lagranjaibiza.com; from about £18,265 for three nights (sleeps 18)


AUTUMN 2017


SNAPSHOT

bridges PHOTOGRAPHS: BENJAMIN HOSKING; MIRAN KAMBIC; ZORAN KANLIC; ANGUS MARTIN; RICHTERS; RO&AD ARCHITECTEN; ANDREW ROWAT; STEVE SPELLER

Once simply a way of getting to the other side, they are now destinations in their own right Top row, from left: The Rolling Bridge resembles a mechanical caterpillar as it curls to allow boats to pass in Paddington, London; aluminium panels create a geometric pattern on a pedestrian crossing from Toronto’s Delta hotel; linking the mountain road across the Schanerloch gorge in the Austrian Alps; the enclosed structure of the Høse bridge amplifies the sounds of Norway’s Suldalslågen river, which can be seen below through grates; the Garden of 10,000 Bridges in Xi’an, China, actually contains just five – rising like snakes from the grass as part of a nature trail. Middle row, from left: made from timber planks and shingles, Slovenia’s Sara River Bridge is used as a cycle path; nocturnal LED lighting showcases the DNA-inspired structure of Singapore’s Helix Bridge; so as not to impact on the landscape, a sunken structure glides below the surface of a moat surrounding the 17th-century Fort de Roovere in the Netherlands; part of the Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park, this glass pavilion punctuates a riverside boardwalk in Tasmania; the footbridge from the Delta hotel was built to shelter pedestrians from extreme weather conditions experienced during Toronto’s winter. Bottom row, from left: a tubular lattice construction connects the old centre of La-Roche-sur-Yon with newer districts across the TGV railway tracks; the Laguna Garzon Bridge slows traffic enabling drivers to take in the lagoon views on Uruguay’s southern coast; in Norway, locals are able to fish from the sides of the Tintra footbridge; the Festina Lente in Sarajevo, looped in the middle to create a curved shelter, was designed by three students from the Academy of Fine Arts; a bright yellow pedestrian pathway connects the Central Station in Rotterdam with a rooftop vegetable garden and a new park. TABITHA JOYCE October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 67


WHERE TO STAY

THE SMARTEST HOTEL UPDATES AND THE FRESHEST REVIEWS EDITED BY PETER BROWNE

EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK

RARE BREED The Pig hotels are a frisky phenomenon that have batted the country-house concept into the long grass and gathered a band of loyal followers. So how does its new one, in Devon, match up? BY SALLY SHALAM PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES MERRELL

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 69


Clockwise from bottom left: The Pig at Combe’s private dining room in the Georgian kitchen; the drawing room; The Folly, for drinks and informal food; view from the hill where Arab horses graze; the bay-window bath in Room 16. Previous page, a stag’s head presides over the dining room

A

fter rounding one more blind bend on a narrow Devon lane, the village of Gittisham comes into view, with cottages of cob and thatch and a narrow bridge spanning a stream. The Pig hotel has just swung open its doors in what was Combe House, an Elizabethan manor of gabled austerity. It overlooks a combe, or valley, of extraordinary peacefulness and when I first visited in the late 1990s, I fell in love with it. Stepping straight into the ancient Great Hall, softly lit, fire crackling in an enormous grate, panelled walls dark and shiny as liquorice, there was a sense of being spirited back in time. Now it has become The Pig at Combe, the fifth and most westerly of the hotels opened by Robin and Judy Hutson, with business partner David Elton. The first arrived in Hampshire in 2011, soon joined by others in Somerset

70 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

and Dorset. Each occupies a building of historic interest (Combe is Listed Grade I, as is The Pig at Studland). Elton takes care of landscaping – no mean feat, against the ticking clock of a launch, if grounds are to provide alluring vistas and tumultuous planting – while the Hutsons focus on the hotel itself. The couple are true innovators: even before we quite know what we want next in a hotel, they capture it. In 1994, with Master of Wine, Gerard Basset, they mixed together a love of wine, casual bistro dining and boutique bedrooms to create Hotel du Vin, a highly successful string of city hotels, sold 10 years later. Robin Hutson, former chairmain of Soho House, then stepped in at Lime Wood hotel in the New Forest, bringing in chef Angela Hartnett to deconstruct the country-house restaurant to represent what he called ‘fun dining’. The Hutson


WHERE TO STAY

THE COOLEST ORANGERY THIS SIDE OF PORT ELIOT HAS BEEN PRESSED INTO SERVICE AS A BAR, COMPLETE WITH SCANDINAVIAN STOVE AND WOOD-FIRED OVEN magic blender went into operation again five years ago and out came The Pig, their modern rendition of relaxed country style which has no truck with five-star pomp. Bedrooms and public spaces are nothing short of splendid, but staff – many nurtured through the ranks and all fiercely loyal to the Hutsons – scoot about in jeans and Converse trainers. The food is determinedly unfussy and artisanal and you don’t have to take out a second mortgage to stay. The Great Hall’s panelling is now stripped, with deliberate roughness – a backdrop to warm colour, pattern and clever things such as beautiful lampshades made from vintage sari silks. Daylight filters through coloured wineglasses behind the bar, boldly positioned along one side of the Great Hall, perhaps stealing something of its thunder, although probably not for a

first-timer. The former restaurant has become a drawing room and library. The drama of decorative plasterwork and intricate woodcarving rubs along with oversized sofas, Timorous Beasties wallpaper and a sideboard laden with cakes on vintage stands, as though one were dropping in to see a relative for tea. Now relieved of whispering diners, they are charming and relaxed places to loll about in. While no two Pigs are identical, common elements connect them like silken thread. Each has an abundant kitchen garden, for example, central to the ethos of freshness and localism, here steeply terraced behind the house. In all of them, Bamford spa treatments are delivered in the seclusion of either a shepherd hut or, as at Combe, in a rustic outbuilding. The restaurant occupies the former  lounge bar and a function room,


WHERE TO STAY Clockwise from left: the restaurant terrace at The Pig at Combe; room 15, one of 17 in the main house; The Horsebox suite, which occupies the former stable stalls

PIG FANCIER Chef Mark Hix knows a thing or two about reimagining British classics. Here’s his view of the hotel 

which has been knocked through and given an uplifting coat of pale paint, with tumbling pots of fresh herbs and cheery, bright nasturtiums. It is fabulously inviting, not least at breakfast, when possibly the best buffet in Britain appears on mismatched china, but more so at dinner, when tiny candles flicker on wooden tables. Small producers are key on a 25mile menu of unceremonious simplicity – chilled pea soup with caramelised onion bun, cylindra beetroot with crispy chickpeas and Cox apple, and a main dish of unctuous braised featherblade with a summery potato salad. The real reason Combe is going to be hangout of the season, though, is The Folly, across the lawn. The coolest orangery this side of Port Eliot has been pressed into service as a bar complete with Scandinavian stove and wood-fired oven. There are 17 bedrooms in the main house, suffused with light from westfacing stone-mullion windows. Judy Hutson’s interiors layer luscious velvet, virginal cotton, old leather and polished wood. Nothing screams for attention. The Attic is the cosiest and, in truth, a suite; number 18 has a terrace overlooking the expansive lawn that unfurls from the vegetable beds down to the entrance. The 10 stableyard rooms behind, some with second bedrooms and bunks, are reached through an aromatic herb garden and afford greater privacy. The

72 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

Horsebox is the most unapologetically rustic of all: it retains the original stalls, now reimagined as room partitions. While The Pig may have airbrushed out any unwelcome realities of rural life – muddy floors, rampant weeds, wasps’ nests – I wake on satin-smooth linen, to birdsong, and feel right at home, as though this really isn’t a hotel at all. I have been successfully, almost imperceptibly, fast-tracked to the rejuvenating joys of the English countryside. More than a restaurantwith-rooms, yet with no pretensions to be a posh country-house hotel, The Pig has slid into the space between with absolute accuracy. Pack your trainers, a healthy appetite, and get in with The Pig crowd.

+44 345 225 9494; THEPIGHOTEL.COM. DOUBLES FROM £145. DINNER FOR TWO ABOUT £70 WITHOUT WINE

‘The new Pig is almost on the doorstep of my seaside weekend escape in Devon. Every time one opens it moves on from the last, and I must say The Pig at Combe is defiantly my favourite of them all – so much so I’ve almost forgotten the details of the others. Robin and Judy Hutson and their team should be proud of it. I suppose if you have a structure like Combe it makes the creativity in the rooms and public spaces extremely exciting. The old stable rooms are astonishing in a simple way and the laundry room, where I stayed, is totally inspirational – they rescued a big old copper bath tub from the previous hotel. I love creating new interiors myself and spend a lot of time in salvage yards, as do Robin and Judy, bringing back to life historic pieces of architecture and artefacts. When I was here I spent a lot of time in the sympathetically restored outbuilding The Folly, which serves flatbreads and light meals. It’s going to be a massive draw for locals and their families. The kitchen gardens are immaculate and Ollie Hutson – Robin and Judy’s son – has culinary green fingers; he grows herbs, fruits and vegetables which guests can see on a stroll through the grounds. The menus at all their properties show off local producers and artisans, which sets them apart from the normal country house hotel. In fact, the Pigs are way ahead of the game when it comes to relaxed breaks in the country.’


WHERE TO STAY

BED-HOPPING WITH GREG KINNEAR The Oscar-nominated star of As Good As It Gets and Little Miss Sunshine talks to Francesca Babb THE LOWELL NEW YORK ‘This hotel is beautiful. It’s on the Upper East Side and it’s small, so when you check in there’s no plastic key card; you get an actual key attached to a big wooden key ring. The rooms and food are great too. It’s a weird thing to run a hotel because you’re dealing with so many different personalities. Shout out to the proprietor here, Dina De Luca Chartouni, who does a fantastic job keeping it running smoothly.’ lowellhotel.com. Doubles from about £605

‘PIERCE BROSNAN WALKED THROUGH THE HOTEL IN TIGHTY WHITIES AND COWBOY BOOTS’

OLD COURSE HOTEL, ST ANDREWS SCOTLAND ‘My mum and dad taught me to play golf when I was a kid in Indiana and if you’re a golfer, it’s just unbelievable to stay in a room overlooking the most historic course on the planet. Everyone funnels into the tiny pub in the hotel after 18 holes. To see Rory McIlroy sipping a Guinness with his father – that’s pretty cool.’ oldcoursehotel.co.uk. Doubles from £240 THE ROMANOS, A LUXURY COLLECTION RESORT GREECE ‘I grew up in the USA, but my father worked for the State Department, so we travelled overseas and I went to high school in Greece. We used to go to a camp in the Peloponnese where the beaches are incredible. I’ve great memories of those trips. So last summer I went back with my wife and kids and stayed at this wonderful hotel, which blends naturally into the landscape.’ romanos costanavarino.com. Doubles from about £330 Greg Kinnear stars in ‘Little Men’, released on 23 September 74 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

CAMINO REAL POLANCO MEXICO CITY ‘I stayed here for a couple of months when I did a movie called The Matador. I don’t know if it’s the best hotel in the world, but it’s very good. And if you ever want to see Pierce Brosnan walking through a hotel in a pair of tighty whities and cowboy boots, watch the film and you’ll get a sense of the place. It was built in 1968, but the architecture was ahead of its time; it really pioneered that indoor-outdoor idea. And the colours are so bright you know you’re in Mexico City.’ caminoreal.com. Doubles from about £105

PHOTOGRAPH: MAARTEN DE BOER/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

GUANA ISLAND BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS ‘This tucked-away place is wildly understated and absolutely magical. There are bungalows up on the hillside with drop-dead-gorgeous views of the ocean and the landscape. The island itself is about the same size as Central Park and it’s just perfect. We’ve taken our children here for many years, and it’s always nice to go back to what I am convinced is the best beach in the British Virgin Islands. I’m reluctant to put that secret out there, but it’s true.’ guana.com. Doubles from about £630


WHERE TO STAY

RING MY BELLE It has appeared in three Audrey Hepburn films. One of its suites is a national monument. Now after a four-year revamp and a fire setback, the Ritz Paris is finally back in the room BY ANTONIA QUIRKE

76 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


PHOTOGRAPHS: ERIC MARTIN/FIGAROPHOTO; ANDREAS MEICHSNER

Clockwise from this picture: Bar Hemingway; the Windsor Suite; the hotel façade. Opposite, afternoon tea in the new Salon Proust

In 1971 the american tv show 60 Minutes broadcast a feature on the Ritz Paris in which a guest asked the concierge to get his heirloom paperweight re-plated in silver, immediately (‘absolument, monsieur’). Spruce doormen staggered punch-drunkenly under the weight of colossal floral arrangements. And a Russian-Spanish marquesa – immensely old, swathed in shining black feathers like an oil-slicked but still exotic bird – praised the hotel staff for not blanching when they found her pet boa constrictor sharing her breakfast. ‘There must exist one little island!’ she cried to camera, where people such as herself might feel welcome and swaddled. ‘And that island is the Ritz.’ Four years ago, the hotel – which was first opened in 1898 by Swiss-born César Ritz – announced it was closing for a €400million refurbishment, triggering panic among its many regular guests, and more generally in the Place Vendôme. To close the Ritz. Not even the Nazis did that. The Luftwaffe motored straight here on Occupation and made it their headquarters. After Liberation, Ernest Hemingway rushed up the stairs, thrilled to be back in the building he most loved (when one of his trunks was found in the hotel’s storeroom decades later, it contained an original manuscript for A Moveable Feast). Coco Chanel loved it too, so 


WHERE TO STAY

From left: Bar Hemingway, named after the novelist who drank here; the hotel's landscaped gardens; L’Espadron restaurant



much so she lived here for 34 years. And F Scott Fitzgerald, Cole Porter, Rudolph Valentino, Churchill, Proust, Chopin. The French chef Auguste Escoffier invented melba toast in its kitchens. And Mohamed Al-Fayed, the hotel’s doting owner since 1979, is often seen accosting passers-by in the lobby for a chat and a reminisce, like the ancient mariner. But a refurbishment was long due. Time was when guests forked their dinners under intermittently working lightbulbs, too in love with the historical atmosphere

people as they passed, just as you were there to be looked at as you sat. So one could while away hours by those windows pondering the mystery of the power of luxury and heritage over the most fastidious of businessmen or the very greatest of geniuses, and feeling… a little entombed. Now light floods in. Dainty, incandescent paint colours – called Hail Storm and Noodle, created Willy Wonka-ishly by the painter-decorator Pierre Finkelstein – complement any original mouldings

its diamond and handbag boutiques, to find the shop selling 1820s snuff boxes and antique pipes carved in the shape of Beethoven’s head: a little nod to the very Parisian genius with flea markets. Wall-mounted gold clocks in the bedrooms chime on the hour, only with a curiously muffled and wholly unmechanical subtlety, as though the passage of time were simply a suggestion. The sweep up to the Ritz’s Place Vendôme entrance has always been peerless for Paris thrills (with perhaps

to think of complaining. But in recent years, all of Paris’s major hotels have had to clear their throats, each one undertaking massive investments to keep up with a new broom of Asian-owned competitors. More than €800 million was spent on the Peninsula Paris alone. The Hôtel de Crillon, Hôtel Plaza Athénée and Le Bristol have thoroughly rejuvenated their decor. And new venues, such as the devilishly handsome La Réserve off the ChampsElysées and the Shangri-La in the 16th arrondissement, have increased the brutal competition for business still further. But which of them has the effortless head start of the Ritz Paris? When I was last here five years ago, the high windows of the entrance halls were swagged with thick curtains. Traditionally it was a place for promenading – for you to look at 78 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

of wobble-thighed cherubs offering blooms to angels. All the parts of the building that date to the 1700s and were designed by royal architects look both crisp and opulently blithe. New glass roofs covering the terrace of the Bar Vendôme and L’Espadon restaurant peel back on fine days, and a hidden Grand Jardin mimicks Versailles, full of many lovely things: sage-green topiary, honeysuckle. While very few grand hotels feel like a place you might actually choose to drink in (too effortful and tense), the bars here are full. New head bartender Aurélie Pezet rejects the sweet variety of cocktails (‘too girly’, she frowns) in favour of headlolling tea infusions. Anyone passing is encouraged to perhaps take a walk, like Marie Antoinette, along the pale oak and glass ground-floor gallery, with

the exception of Le Meurice, with its views onto the Jardin des Tuileries and the Louvre). Only now the effect is even more exhilarating. The entire square, including the 1699 Vendôme column, has been cleaned specifically to coincide with the reopening of the hotel. ‘Only the Ministry of Justice is letting the side down,’ someone sniffed of still-sooty Number 13. And this is key: there is a sense of the whole area straightening its tie, as though the Ritz Paris were its own highly quixotic arrondissement. No other hotel in Europe has quite that potency. There must exist one little island.

THE RITZ PARIS (+33 1 43 16 30 30; RITZPARIS.COM). DOUBLES FROM ABOUT £840

PHOTOGRAPHS: ERIC MARTIN/FIGAROPHOTO; ANDREAS MEICHSNER

ALL OF PARIS'S MAJOR HOTELS HAVE HAD TO CLEAR THEIR THROATS TO KEEP UP WITH THE COMPETITION. BUT NONE HAS HAD THE RITZ'S EFFORTLESS HEAD START


WHERE TO STAY

THE WEEKENDER

KILLIEHUNTLY FARMHOUSE & COTTAGE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS

WHY NOW? To exercise your right to roam in autumnal Highland splendour, before that playful wee nip in the air turns into a full-blooded bite. BEHIND THE SCENES Danish proprietor Anders Povlsen is the second-largest private landowner in Scotland, after the Duke of Buccleuch. His wife Anne is responsible for the luscious interiors. SLEEP There are four double rooms upstairs in the farmhouse, a hayloft above the steadings and a self-catering cottage that sleeps five. Two of the farmhouse rooms have en-suite bathrooms, which, if nothing else, increases your sense of being at home rather than in a hotel; but all are decorated with great flair and subtlety. The style is a charming Scandi-Scot hybrid, combining modern Danish design with a stodgy, four-square farmhouse vernacular. Hence you’ll find your Bamse chair sprouting a shaggy Shetland sheepskin, pale linen curtains framing your shuttered sash windows and thickly knotted rugs in elegantly hushed tones to soften and 80 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

warm the bare wooden floorboards. In short, not a trace of the usual Victorian tartan-and-antlers kitsch.

WE LIKE The way a packed lunch of a sandwich and flapjack is neatly wrapped in greaseproof paper and tied up with string.

EAT In the farmhouse, breakfast is served in a light-flooded kitchen, between an Aga and an elaborate espresso machine. If the weather is fair, sitting outside among wildflowers is an option. Supper (hot-smoked salmon with black bread and sour cream; venison with berry sauce) is served in a book-lined dining room. Guests can avail themselves of a wellstocked bar (several varieties of excellent Scottish gin and top-notch tonics, as well as the requisite single-malt whiskies). Lunch, if required, consists of a simple homemade ‘piece’: a snack to stuff in the pocket of your Barbour jacket. Should self-caterers in the cottage or hayloft wish to eat in the farmhouse, space may also be made for them at the dinner table.

WE DON’T LIKE The unavoidable fact that quaint old buildings, however lovingly renovated, can be bangy and stompy, especially early in the morning.

WHO COMES HERE? Lovers of the great outdoors who also admire the great indoors and know their Finn Juhl from their Arne Jacobsen. To some extent, old-school huntin’-shootin’-fishin’ types who come north to menace the wildlife, although staff are even happier to arrange deer-stalking expeditions in which stags are shot with cameras instead of rifles.

CONTACT +44 1540 661619; killie huntly.scot. Doubles from £120 STEVE KING

OUT AND ABOUT Explore the neighbouring estate of Glenfeshie, which is also owned by Povlsen. Parts of The Queen were filmed here. But what is really remarkable about the grounds is the rapidly regenerating population of Caledonian pines – a lovely reminder of how this part of the Highlands must have looked a long time ago.

PHOTOGRAPHS: ROSS DICKIE; MARTIN KAUFMANN

WHAT IS IT? An impeccably renovated 17th-century farmhouse plus outbuildings on a 4,000-acre estate near Kingussie, south of Inverness.


T H E S A N D A L S O F T O M O R R O W. ®

TODAY.

2015

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ROAD TRIP

All packed for this three-day adventure: a couple of holdalls, a picnic of cucumber sandwiches, ďŹ zzy pop and salty treats from Fortnum & Mason, a pre-programmed satnav, and some trusty tunes. Tough.

We drive from the seaside town of Candelaria up to the summit of El Teide, which is home to the largest solar observatory in the world. Above the cloud line, we watch solar ares through the amazing telescopes.

The road swings from left to right, rising up to the deserted mountains of Parque Rural de Teno in the north-west, with its heathland and laurel forests, towards the sleepy town of Buenavista del Norte.

Close to the beach near the village of San Juan, The Ritz-Carlton, Abama hotel sits on a clifftop among subtropical gardens and banana plantations overlooking the neighbouring island of La Gomera.


THE ROUTE A LOOP OF TENERIFE

THE CAR MCLAREN 570GT

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID LOFTUS

After the twisting-turning roads of Teide and Teno national parks in the central region, we arrive back at the coast with its steep bluffs, rocky coves and aquamarine waters.

The lighthouse on the craggy headland of Punta de Teno is the most westerly point on the island. It is one of seven such beacons dotted along the hazardous shores of Tenerife.

The landscape here is otherworldly. An 80-metre-wide crater at El Teide. The misty pine forests of Valle de Güímar. Volcanic, black-sand beaches. We lunch on octopus a la plancha, anchovies and home-baked beans.

Other than Dukes of Hazzard-style – through rolled-down windows – this is surely the best way to get out of a car. Hit a button and dihedral doors scissor open. It’s a looker, this one. October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 83


A M EMBER OF S MALL L UXURY H OTELS OF T HE W ORLD

SECRET SANCTUARY "Experience traditional Thai elegance in a contemporary living space …with only nature at your doorstep"

Pimalai is one of those rare resorts whose architecture has been designed entirely around the natural contours and lush vegetation of over one hundred acres of grounds leading to 900 meters of pristine sandy beach. Indulge in luxury in one of our elegantly designed pool villas, set high in the lush hillside allowing you to be as close as possible to nature. From your villa, all you will see is what has been there for thousands of years; virgin forest enveloping steep hills climbing into a blue sky. The tranquility of the place, the abundance of flora, the exquisite views, the fiery sunsets, all combine to maximize the sensation of being in a heavenly place. Indeed the name of the resort “Pimalai” translates as heavenly. Enjoy a private romantic dinner on your terrace, sip champagne while dipping in your pool, or perhaps a soothing massage* in your villa’s sala… Live, laugh, love and indulge in moments that will be remembered long after the holiday is over. *Complimentary in villa massage for guests who stay in March & April 2016, and from May to December 20th, 2016

PIMALAI RESORT & SPA

KOH LANTA

KRABI

THAILAND

www.pimalai.com


STYLE FILE

FASHION-FORWARD NOTES FOR ALL SEASONS

TAKE IT AWAY For many a year, fashion-conscious country folk have found themselves faced with a dilemma: how to put together a wardrobe rigorous enough to withstand dreich days in Dumfries, but sufficiently stylish that you can go to 10 Corso Como without seeming clodhopperish. To their rescue come Stella Tennant and Isabella Cawdor, a pair of industry-stalwart aristo-internationalists who live in Scotland and know much about hacking through the heather in a swirling thunder-plump. Tasked with refreshing venerable Holland & Holland, they have created a debut collection for the brand that takes hard-wearing tweeds and thick wools, and integrates them into a design-savvy Euro-modernist aesthetic, all sharp lines and cleverly off-kilter cuts. Equally suited for walking in the Scottish Lowlands and strutting about the backstreets, hidden corners and terrace eyries of Morocco’s Chefchaouen.

SHOT AT LINA RYAD & SPA, CHEFCHAOUEN, MOROCCO. PHOTOGRAPH, ELIZAVETA PORODINA. MODEL, MAGGIE MAURER AT IMG. HAIR, HALLEY BRISKER. MAKE-UP, STELLA VON SENGER

Cashmere cape, £1,700; cashmere top, £430; houndstooth culottes, £540; walking boots, £870; cashmere socks, £270, all Holland & Holland (hollandandholland.com)

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 85


This page, Bar Americano. Opposite, clockwise from top left: Et Al boutique; Adelphi Hotel; carrot cake with cream-cheese ice cream at Tonka; the Adelphi; bagel and coffee at Bowery to Williamsburg; Pollon florist

86 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


STYLE FILE

SHOPPING IN... MELBOURNE The most progressive, most creative city in the southern hemisphere has given us the best baristas and smartest rooftop bars outside Manhattan, along with innovative events from book slams to secret dining clubs. Flinders Lane, in the once grungy garment district, is the perfect reection of Melbourne’s design aesthetic and taste for the good life: concrete-and-steel interiors, hidden bars and rule-smashing food. BY BRIGID DELANEY. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JESSIE EVANS


STYLE FILE

Clockwise from this picture: Sole Devotion shoe shop; Tonka restaurant off Flinders Lane; a display of laces at Sole Devotion; Lord Coconut men’s jewellery shop

FASHION

ET AL Want bright colours? Go to Sydney. Melbourne is a city that favours monochrome. This homegrown brand, founded nearly 30 years ago, has a cult following for its classic pieces with fluid lines and exceptional tailoring designed to be worn by anyone of any age, size or gender. 1B, 268 Flinders Lane (etal-melbourne.com) ALPHA60 More black. Brother-and-sister design duo Alex and Georgie Cleary launched their label in 2005 – and it is a uniquely Melbourne look, pared-back but with quirky touches: flared sleeves, appliqué, collarless coats and practical, stylish bags. The Clearys are big Jean-Luc Godard fans; his portrait is stencilled across the entire back wall of the shop and the store itself is named after his sci-fi film Alphaville. 201 Flinders Lane (alpha60.com.au)

SKINCARE

AESOP Local hairdresser Dennis Paphitis started this company in 1987, and it has become a huge success around the world. But it is not a chain; no two shops are 88 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

the same. The Flinders Lane outlet might not be the original, but it is the most Instagrammed. The walls are a work of art in themselves; a paper sculpture, created from more than 1,000 cardboard sheets,

TRACK IT DOWN YOU WON’T FIND THIS AT HOME Most of the objects made by the Craft Victoria collective come with anecdotal information about the artists, who are all Aboriginals from the state of Victoria, including weaver Donna Blackall from the Yorta Yorta community. You’ll also find leather pouches, possum-skin armbands and porcelain latte cups with graphic designs. 31 Flinders Lane (craft.org.au)

curves and bends along the length of the space. Staff are very switched-on. When I entered one cold Melbourne morning, they gave me a cup of rosehip tea before laying out a range of moisturisers appropriate to my skin type in the trademark low-key, medicinal-style packaging. Shop 1C, 268 Flinders Lane (aesop.com/au)

ONE-STOP FIXES

INCU In this eclectic menswear shop on Flinders Lane, APC sits alongside Maison Kitsuné and Common Projects. There are also tailored jackets and baseball caps, watches and belts, headphones and shaving kits. Another larger and more airy outpost nearby in the QV Building has a carefully curated mix of both men’s and womenswear labels, including Rag & Bone, Alexander Wang and Kenzo. Shop 6A, 274 Flinders Lane and Shop ACL 12, Albert Coates Lane (incu.com) ZOMP Shoppers entering this shoe boutique are greeted by rows of beautiful flats and heels, as well as a great men’s section. Operating in Australia since 1972, it stocks dozens of on-trend brands such


Moment The Team Members of LUX* help people to celebrate life with the most simple, fresh and sensory hospitality in the world. M AU R I T I U S R E U N I O N M A L D I V E S C H I N A U . A . E T U R K E Y | L U X R E S O R T S. C O M


STYLE FILE taken from old mixologists’ books and a constantly changing menu. The space can only fit in a handful of customers at a time – but that just adds to the bar’s otherworldly charm. 20 Presgrave Place (baramericano.com)

STAYING OVER

ADELPHI This 34-room property is the original Melbourne boutique hotel and much loved by swimmers for its rooftop pool that hangs over the street nine floors below. The pool deck is due for a spruce-up later this year. Meanwhile, a recent candy-inspired refurb indoors has brought liquorice-allsorts colours into the main bar and lobby, and mini macarons are delivered to your room at turndown. A breakfast of avocado on toast with chilli jam and feta is the perfect way to start the day. 187 Flinders Lane (adelphi.com.au). Doubles from about £150

Clockwise from this picture: Tonka restaurant; cuff links at Lord Coconut; Adelphi Hotel; the interior at Incu

LOCAL KNOW-HOW SIAN SCOTT-CLASH FROM BLACK INC BOOKS

‘Wander up Bourke Street to find The Paperback Bookshop, a ramshackle store packed with the best titles. Melbourne is a UNESCO City of Literature and a book-lovers’ paradise.’ paperbackbooks.com.au

as Nylon, Josephine and Opening Ceremony. Sale time is particularly good. 277 Flinders Lane (zomp.com.au)

FLOWERS

POLLON A fixture in the neighbourhood for 10 years, this florist specialises in arrangements of Australian native blooms, including wattle, bottlebrush and fresh eucalyptus. It’s also the only premises on the street – slap-bang in the heart of the Central Business District – with a gothic façade and an arched, stained-glass window. Shop 1, 199 Flinders Lane (pollonflowers.com.au)

PITSTOPS

DUKES You’d have to be really unlucky to find a bad cup of coffee in this part of town but Dukes – in the communityowned Ross House heritage building – is a favourite, serving creamy flat whites. It 90 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

sources beans from single estates and small farming communities all over the world and roasts them here in the city. There are also pastries from Mosaic bakery, made using rich Belgian butter, served in the cosy interiors which are fitted out with recycled tiles and reclaimed timber. 247 Flinders Lane (dukescoffee.com.au) BAR AMERICANO There are lots of great small independent shops, cafés and bars all around the alleyways of central Melbourne. You have to use a maps app to locate addresses as many of them have minimal or no signage. This tiny, Italian-style bar has wood panelling and a chequered floor; espresso is drunk the proper way, while standing at the bar. But it’s the Negronis and Old Fashioneds that people come here for, served in gorgeous glassware, with classic recipes

‘I’ve seen the most original Australian contemporary art in the Anna Schwartz Gallery, set within a majestic oblong space of concrete and white walls.’ annaschwartzgallery.com ‘My favourite bar has no sign. Ring the doorbell on Flinders Lane and someone will take you up to Hihou – Japanese for ‘secret treasure’ – for an elaborate plum-wine cocktail.’ hihou.com.au ‘I love to have supper at Cumulus Up. The interiors are by Pascale Gomes-McNabb who has added gritty elegance to the industrial shell.’ cumulusinc.com.au/up ‘For a snack, I turn off Flinders Lane into Oliver Street for Bowery to Williamsburg, a little-known Jewish deli with the best bagels and pickles, and major understated charm.’ +61 3 9077 0162 blackincbooks.com.au


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STYLE FILE

Tuva sweater, £670; pompom-embellished skirt, £595, both Tabula Rasa (matchesfashion.com). Amira bikini, £380, Tabula Rasa (shopsuperstreet.com)

GO-GETTER, JET-SETTER EMILY DIAMANDIS After years exploring India and the Himalayas, the New York-based designer has created a boho label that fuses interiors and fashion On her holiday wardrobe ‘Because I am obsessed with crochet, I love the platform sandals by Robert Clergerie. I live in old Levi’s cut-offs when I’m not working and Green Fingers Market is the place to find the perfect pair in New York City. An oversized T-shirt is another holiday staple: IRO is my current hot label. And I always pack my pink vintage Chanel all-in-one. For swimwear I like Lisa Marie Fernandez’s use of fabrics and old Hollywood silhouettes. Vita Kin’s kaftans are wonderful for travelling because they are so versatile, and the rope shoes by Brazilian designer Lane Marinho are works of art.’

On markets ‘I’ve spent a lot of time shopping at Osaki-jinja Otakara antique market in Tochigi, two hours

WE’RE LOVING...

Huggy boots, £195, Russell & Bromley (russellandbromley.co.uk)

north of Tokyo. As a textile collector, I always try to time my trips to coincide with it. I’ve found beautiful embroidered obis (sashes) there over the years. When I lived in Hong Kong, I often went to Bangkok for weekend getaways. Chatuchak is such a fun place to spend the day. It’s unbelievable what you find there, from vintage denim to hill-tribe outfits. Chor Bazaar in Mumbai is a favourite. On my last visit I bought some vintage Bollywood posters, a Twenties metallic bag and two old heart models you might find in a school science room – I still have no idea why I wanted them. Brimfield in Massachusetts only opens three times a year. There are endless fields of collectibles but you need to arrive early. Last time I made the pilgrimage there, I picked up Bitossi ceramics and a mid-century rocking chair.’

On shops ‘Warm in Manhattan nails the laid-back, surfer-chic lifestyle, with a fresh edit of accessories, swimwear and books. Tiina the Store in Amagansett in the Hamptons stocks an incredible mix of fashion and homeware, and the Surf Bazaar in Montauk’s Surf Lodge is packed with beachwear finds. Hot Pink, the store owned by jewellery designer Marie-Hélène de Taillac, is located inside the Amber fort in Jaipur and carries pieces from India’s hottest labels. When I’m there I stay at The Farm art hotel. Mouki Mou in London was a recent discovery for its slow-fashion approach.’

On design inspiration ‘The aim with my knitwear brand Tabula Rasa was to re-create that feeling of being at home

Put the slippers away as biker boots weigh in for autumn

Dawson leather boots, £795, Jimmy Choo (jimmychoo.com)

England brogue boot, £580, Mulberry (mulberry.com)

Leather and stud boots, £980, Prada (prada.com)

Faux patent-leather boots, £830, Stella McCartney (net-a-porter.com)


BREAK-OUT STARS The new names shaking up the rails this month

MIRA MIKATI

Far left: a swing at The Farm hotel, Jaipur. Above, cushions at Warm boutique in New York City

The London-based Lebanese designer has really committed to the patch trend. Her embroidered emoticons and slogans have set the playful tone for her collection of bomber jackets, coats and now trainers. Each season she collaborates with artists including Darcel and Kaws. miramikati.com

Aeroplane coat, £1,010; Bomber jacket, £855; Off Duty coat, £685, all Mira Mikati (net-a-porter.com)

wherever I was in the world. Hand-fringing has become a signature: the macramé indoor swing took more than a month to hand-knot. It is the little imperfections that make this process unique. A collection will invariably be influenced by a journey; the Thar Desert in Rajasthan inspired the colour palette of a past season, and the macramé patterns in the A/W 16 range took cues from Mongolian yurts. My father is from Bangladesh, which used to be a hub for weaving. Our house was always full of textiles when I was growing up.’

PHOTOGRAPH: SHUTTERSTOCK

Pool-side playlist Arthur Russell, This is How We Walk on the Moon ‘His music was so experimental.’ Roy Ayers, Everybody Loves the Sunshine ‘Impossible not to include this.’ Dennis Brown, The Exit. ‘A reggae legend.’ Don Carlos, Lazer Beam. ‘This tune always pops up when I’m at the beach.’ Tabula Rasa (tabularasa-ny.com) is available exclusively in the UK from matchesfashion.com. Swimwear is launching in November

JACQUEMUS Fashion shows in which a horse is led across the stage and a child rolls a ball of red string down the catwalk: all part of the curious behaviour of this French talent. He describes his current collection, above, as being ‘about fruit and vegetables and rolling in the grass’. We are transfixed. jacquemus.com

PALOMA BLUE

Biker boots, £795, Burberry (burberry.com)

Platform desert boots, £1,000, Louis Vuitton (louisvuitton.co.uk)

This label by Ariana Stein channels life in the sunshine. Her beatnik, sandwashed silk designs of jumpsuits, micro shorts, camisoles and asymmetric dresses have already been spotted on Kate Hudson. Look out for kimonos launching this winter. paloma-blue.com

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 93


STYLE FILE

TRAVELS WITH MY WASHBAG

JANUARY JONES The Mad Men star reveals her beauty stash to Tabitha Joyce

‘When I take time off it’s spontaneous, so I never have enough of a heads-up to get myself looking especially hot.’

Where is the best place you’ve travelled to for work? ‘I’ve shot a few different movies in London, including Love Actually and X-Men, and always find the pub atmosphere so fun. My mum’s family are English so I feel at home here. Last time I stayed at the Covent Garden Hotel, which is charming.’

What make-up is in your hand luggage? ‘Chanel mascara is the best: it doesn’t leave clumps. Clé de Peau Beauté makes a great concealer. I also keep a Charlotte Tilbury pressed powder in my purse and I like the By Terry tinted lip balm.’

What’s your routine on a long-haul flight? ‘I leave on the Sisley Black Rose moisture mask for the whole journey, although it often ends up on my travel pillow. Elizabeth Arden’s Eight Hour Cream is also unbeatable.’

Are you a spa junkie? ‘I adore massages; I try to get one every two weeks for two hours. I go to a place in LA but it’s a woman’s office – it’s not like a spa spa. I recently went to the Montage Beverly Hills. It’s beautiful.’

Do you watch what you eat? ‘I like food a lot but I don’t have a huge sweet tooth, which probably helps me stay in shape. I’m careful in the sense that I take lots of vitamins and eat loads of vegetables, but that’s because I have a four-year-old so I’m constantly getting sick. And I do love those spicy juices with ginger and cayenne. I think they’re good for your digestion. Other than that, I’m not really strict about my diet.’

How do you stay fit? ‘I hike a lot as I live in the mountains. I actually like to be a little round – a tiny bit fat. Although I just discovered cardio barre: it’s good for toning.’

How do you protect your hair on a flight? ‘Kérastase Nutritive Masquintense is an amazing treatment after a flight when hair has dried out.’

What fragrance do you pack? ‘I don’t wear perfume a lot unless I’m going out. If I do, it’s either Chanel’s Sycomore or Comme des Garçons.’

Do you like to sunbathe? ‘Living in LA I have to be careful because it’s so sunny. I enjoy going to the beach but I’m very fair so I use a Sisley sunscreen that I order from Europe – it’s SPF 50+.’ January Jones is the face of Kérastase Nutritive

From left: Dimensions de Chanel mascara, £25, Chanel (chanel.com). Air Brush Flawless Finish, £33, Charlotte Tilbury (charlottetilbury.com). Eight Hour Cream, £27, Elizabeth Arden (boots.com). Black Rose Cream Mask, £95.50, Sisley (sisley-paris.co.uk). Super Soin Solaire Facial Sun Care SPF 50+, £109, Sisley (as before). Nutritive Masquintense, £29, Kérastase (kerastase.co.uk) 94 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: VINCENT PETERS

Do you do anything extra to get in shape before a holiday?


...THAT CAN’T BE IMITATED – ONLY EXPERIENCED!

S ON BUN YOL A Mallorca

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U LU SA BA South Africa

THE R O O F GAR DE NS United Kingdom

MA HA L I MZ URI Kenya

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MONT ROC HELLE South Africa

NE CKE R B E LLE British Virgin Islands

K A SBA H TA M ADO T Morocco

GET TO KNOW VIRGIN LIMITED EDITION, Sir Richard Branson’s extraordinary collection of luxury retreats. From one of the world’s most exclusive private islands to thrilling safaris via two stunning Mallorcan villas, each location is designed to be your home away from home. This is your holiday with added personality!

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STYLE FILE EDITED BY DAVID ANNAND

MAN ON a MISSION THE MAN: ED BAINES In his youth, the ex-Armani model and dare-devil chef behind Soho’s Randall & Aubin liked to live life on the edge: running with bulls and driving supercars. Now he prefers the safety of the kitchen.

MILES TRAVELLED LAST YEAR 54,500 WEIRDEST PLACE YOU’VE BEEN ‘Chengdu, in central China. It’s about as alien as it gets. They eat anything that has a spine, and their customs are always a complete surprise.’ MUST PACK ‘Floss, Rennie and a Swiss army knife.’

T

he speedboat is travelling at obviously illegal speeds. I’m in the back, armed with a spear gun, readying myself to free dive and shoot fish. Alongside me are a cameraman and a producer. We’re making a pilot film on a small budget for a large broadcaster to find the hidden culture of Rhodes, where health and safety doesn’t exist and the people invent their own laws. My friend, David Hockley, who owns a bar on the Greek island, has convinced local big man and character Panagiotis to take us under his wing and arrange time on this super-charged boat. We reach a reef and someone throws oxygen tanks overboard. They’re marked with flags and weighted so they sit on the sea bed, meaning once underwater we won’t have to come up for air – we can just swim up to them and breathe in a lungful through regulators attached to the tanks. This goes against every rule of diving, but it’s the way they do it here and we feel obliged to do it too. Our cameraman joins us in the water and we shoot a grouper at least four-feet long. That night we cook it and celebrate with lashings of wine – everyone apart from the cameraman, who looks like he’s got a mild case of the bends. Panagiotis has been talking up our project, and our group seems to be growing all the time. A bunch of us go in search of wild honey, the music pumping as we drive to some remote hives in the forest. Speaking to the

‘THE MUSIC IS CRAZY AND THE OUZO IS FLOWING. EVERYTHING IS BEING SMASHED INTO PIECES’ camera, I explain the need to approach them calmly and peacefully. The beekeeper unexpectedly tells me to open a hive. I have no kit – no gloves, no hat. I gently pick up the lid and a black ball emerges. Somebody shouts ‘RUN’ and everyone legs it, terrified of the hum behind us. I throw myself through the truck’s open window, screaming ‘drive, drive, drive!’. Bodies fly in and there are bees everywhere. The driver floors it and I look at my friend and laugh – neither of us has been stung. The cameraman, however, is covered in welts. The following day we film the hunt for sea urchins in the rough sea. As I cut them from stone, the poor cameraman is smashed against the rocks, filling his bee stings with dozens of sea-urchin spines. He tries to put on a brave face, but the island is beating him down. Panagiotis tells us we won’t find the real Rhodes unless we go to a bouzouki club, where piles of plates are smashed to show appreciation for the singers. As we sit in the club, one of the party surreptitiously passes me a power tool and tells me to detach the furniture that has been screwed to the floor. The music is crazy and the ouzo is flowing. Panagiotis stands up and throws a stack of plates across the room. Our group starts picking up the unscrewed tables and chairs and proceeds to smash everything into pieces. It’s bedlam. Eventually we’re thrown out, bouzouki singer too, and we cram into the car to drive unsteadily home. The cameraman won’t get in. Rhodes has proved too much. Back in London, the commissioner has seen the rushes; it’s the most reckless footage he’s ever seen. There will be no show. randallandaubin.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: CROOKES & JACKSON; JOACHIM LADEFOGED/GALLERY STOCK; WAYNE LEVIN; MONDADORI PORTFOLIO VIA GETTY IMAGES

THE MISSION A week-long, hunter-gatherer odyssey to find the secret heart of wild Rhodes: booze, killer bees, broken plates and one much-maligned cameraman.


R ome

A POSTCARD FROM

It’s 6pm. My wife is luxuriating in the bath. I am pounding the pavements, annotated map in hand, scouting out the concierge’s list of local restaurant recommendations. I reach the fourth and concede that none of them does small plates. They all have cutlery that matches. None of the menus seem to be informed by the latest offal micro-trend. Most of the time I am absurdly and paranoically obsessed with presenting myself as outside my exemplary generational grouping – tattoos, Twitter feeds and transitional neighbourhoods – but I can tell already that this is one of those moments when I’m forced to confront how much I conform to the stereotype. Despite the knowledge scrawled on my map, I realise I’m not after a genuine Tridente-district experience. I want a Roman version of a restaurant I’d go to at home, something that authenticates the way I live my life. We end up in the concierge’s first suggestion. The walls are dark wood. The waiters wear those white smock jackets that make them look vaguely like butchers. It’s all very ‘When in Rome...’. The meal is, you know, fine. Pasta. Fish. Meat. Classic Italian food unchanged for, I don’t know, millennia. It’s exactly the kind of place people like me pretend to like because it supposedly represents the eternal virtues supposedly lacking in our contemporary cohort. Back in London we go to Lardo in Hackney, with its exposed industrial light fittings and heavily inked waitresses. We eat sprout tops with pangritata and polenta with fried eggs. I savour a pistachio panna cotta, conscious that for however much I tell myself I travel to expand my horizons, what I really want is an affirmation of my own self-image, East End affectations and all.

From top: Tangomat GMT watch, £3,100, Nomos Glashütte (nomos-glashuette.com). Coat, £1,320, Neil Barrett (brownsfashion. com). Holdall, £1,470, Berluti (berluti.com). Card-holder, £175, Valextra (matches fashion.com). Eating Rome, £12.99, published by St Martin’s Griffin (amazon.co.uk). Scarf, £140, Acne Studios (mrporter.com). Boots, £395, O’Keeffe (mrporter.com). Sunglasses, £260, Garrett Leight California Optical (brownsfashion.com)

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 97


STYLE FILE

PUMP UP THE JAM Follow your nose around the world to track down the sassiest new spritzes. We conjure up the women and destinations that neatly pack the attitude of each potion in a bottle

CALIFORNIA WHO SHE IS: The Creative California Dreamer WHERE TO FIND HER: By the pool at the Ace Hotel in Palm Springs, at a recording studio in the middle of the desert, or at the film set Club Ed, where she’s working on an art-house project. WHAT’S HER HAUL? Vegan snacks and retro vinyl. POP, £42, Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com)

NEW YORK

WORDS BY: EVIE LEATHAM. PHOTOGRAPHS: MATTHEW BUCK; NICOLE FRANZEN; SHANNON GREER; MATTHIAS HEIDERICH; JENNY ZARINS

WHO SHE IS: The Smart City Nomad WHERE TO FIND HER: At SoulCycle classes before cocktails at Moby’s in East Hampton. WHAT’S HER HAUL? A Mara Hoffman yoga mat and her boyfriend’s lurcher dog. Les Parfums, £160, Louis Vuitton (available exclusively at Louis Vuitton boutiques)

MARRAKECH WHO SHE IS: The Modern Gypsetter WHERE TO FIND HER: Shopping for colourful kaftans at Norya Ayron boutique and checking in at the Selman. WHAT’S HER HAUL? Cactus fruit and spices from the weekly market in Tnine Ourika, a village high in the Atlas mountains. Galop d’Hermès, £183, Hermès (hermes.com)

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 99


STYLE FILE

LONDON WHO SHE IS: The Soho House Hobo WHERE TO FIND HER: Long lunches in Tom Dixondesigned Bronte and kicking back on weekend escapes at Soho Farmhouse, Oxfordshire. WHAT’S HER HAUL? The boot of her four-wheel-drive is stashed with both muddy wellies and Aquazzura heels. Basil & Neroli Cologne, £86, Jo Malone London (jomalone.co.uk)

ST BARTH’S WHO SHE IS: The Bohemian Island Hopper WHERE TO FIND HER: On her sail boat off secluded Colombier beach. WHAT’S HER HAUL? Sea urchins she’s caught herself and a bottle of beer. Chanel No.5 L’Eau, £68, Chanel (chanel.com)

HYDRA BERLIN

PHOTOGRAPHS: MATTHIAS HEIDERICH; MICHAEL KAHN; OLIVER PILCHER

WHO SHE IS: The Urban Culture Vulture WHERE TO FIND HER: Gigging at Tempodrom before chilling in cafés on graffitied backstreets. WHAT’S HER HAUL? Handsome young DJs she’s discovered on the underground techno scene. Note di Colonia, £280, Acqua di Parma (available exclusively at harrods.com)

WHO SHE IS: The Euro Eccentric WHERE TO FIND HER: Curating projects at the Old Slaughterhouse on this arty Greek island. WHAT’S HER HAUL? She makes her own skincare from local ingredients and her arms jangle with jewellery made by friends. Aventus for Her, £120, House of Creed (creedfragrances.co.uk)

100 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


STYLE FILE Shearling scarf, £1,750, Louis Vuitton (louis vuitton.com)

Exfoliating scrub, £35, Tom Ford (mrporter.com). Alpha 1S robot, £499, Ubtech (harrods.com)

HOTEL ON THE SCENE: FOUR SEASONS HOTEL SEOUL THE MOOD: FUTURE PEOPLE With its head in the clouds and feet firmly in the financial hub of Seoul’s Gwanghwamun district, this skyscraper hotel is the city’s powerhouse pit stop. In the busy lobby, head-swivelling art installations and origami-like displays by top florist Nicolai Bergmann are framed by huge slabs of marble, so glossy and strokable it’s hard to resist pressing a cheek up against one. Hovering at mid level, the panoramic pool and spa have views out to the emerald peaks of the Bukhansan National Park. Captains of industry recharge here with jaw-lifting facials and traditional Korean body scrubs. Come the witching hour, guests throng to Kioku Japanese restaurant, a lofty space of latticed bamboo screens housing private booths, where sashimi sourced straight from Jeju Island are served with local crab the size of dinner plates. For a late-night drink, seek out the secret entrance to the Charles H bar, a New York-style speakeasy hidden in the basement. The elaborate cocktail list pays tribute to 100-year-old recipes collected by Charles H Baker Jnr, an American writer and drinking buddy of Ernest Hemingway. Sip on Sins of the Flesh, made with tongue-tingling heukcho pomegranate vinegar, before going back up the ivory tower to one of the Four Seasons’ super-comfortable beds. OLIVIA FALCON +82 2 6388 5000; fourseasons.com. Doubles from about £305

Monster cat-intarsia sweater, £400, Fendi (fendi.com)

EDITOR’S PICK

Burlington leather backpack, £895, Smythson (smythson.com)

Raw-hem jeans, £890, Vetements (matches fashion.com)

‘Get rid of the iPhone from your pillow; this cool new alarm does the job with a delicious scent. How brilliant to wake up to the smell of fresh-baked croissants or just-brewed coffee.’ FIONA JOSEPH, FASHION DIRECTOR Olfactory alarm clock, £78, Sensorwake (harrods.com)

Technical nylon and suede trainers, £395, Burberry (burberry.com)

102 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

Greenwich carry-on bag, £1,295, Smythson (as before)

Leather belt, £275, Tod’s (tods.com). 315 sunglasses, £185, Movitra (matches fashion.com)


Announcing

Arriving April A PERSONAL TOUCH With less than 300 suites, Silver Muse will be the epitome of Silversea excellence. A small, intimate ship with uncompromised levels of service, comfort, design and accommodation, she will offer tailor-made experiences to last a lifetime.

OUTDOOR LIVING From tranquil niches and observation areas to an unprecedented spacious pool deck, outdoor lounges and three open-air restaurants, our tailor-made outdoor spaces have been conceived so that time spent aboard is most

CULINARY EXCELLENCE Soak up the ambience and award-winning gastronomic pedigree of what is surely the most comprehensive dining experience at sea. Eight superb restaurants mean more choice than ever while our unrivalled culinary excellence raises the bar in offshore dining.

To discover more about Silver Muse’s exciting inaugural itineraries or to book, call 0845 835 0069 or visit Silvermuse.info

Discover Silver Muse at silvermuse.info


TRENDWATCH HUSTLE & FLOW A new wave of crowdfunded design projects are changing our cityscapes

PHOTOGRAPH: STEPHAN ZIRWES

Despite the term being coined around a decade ago, crowdfunding – financing ventures by raising a sum of money from a large number of people – isn’t new. Authors in the 1700s were early adopters, writing new works when enough subscribers expressed an interest. At the end of the century, Mozart offered copies of manuscripts in return for contributions towards the cost of a live performance. The Statue of Liberty is a little-known example: its granite base was paid for by more than 160,000 citizens when government cash fell short in the 1800s. More recently, the internet propelled crowdfunding into the mainstream, creating a platform for easy-to-use websites, including Kickstarter and Indiegogo, to get propositions viewed by millions of people. Press coverage of this tended to be monopolised by the ridiculous, with headlines such as ‘the man who raised more $55,000 to make potato salad’, but in 2016 it has evolved into something more serious. A surge of heavyweight design ideas set to come to fruition in the coming years will impact

the physical and cultural landscapes of communities, from Tanzania to New York. Starchitect Bjarke Ingels, the creator of this year’s Serpentine Pavilions, recently raised almost £23,000 for a smoke-ring-blowing chimney that will sit atop a vast new power plant in Copenhagen, while in Colombia the world’s first crowdfunded skyscraper is nearing completion. No less than three city lidos are in the pipeline too. In about five years time, +Pool will arrive in New York, backed tile-by-tile, with each piece bearing the name of the benefactor. It will be NYC’s first water-filtering, floating pool. In London, plans are afoot for two public lidos – one in Peckham and the other in the Thames. Other small-scale, big-impact projects include mini cabins placed on top of existing buildings in Berlin, and sustainable earth homes in Tanzania, which will make age-old building techniques relevant for a new generation. IANTHE BUTT October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 105


STAYING POWER

PHOTOGRAPHS: JAMES BEDFORD; SQUIRE FOX

CONDE´ NAST TRAVELLER HAS JOINED FORCES WITH ASSOULINE TO PUBLISH A BOOK OF THE WORLD’S MOST BRILLIANT HOTELS AS CHOSEN BY OUR LOVELIEST WANDERERS. HERE’S A SNEAK PEEK

107


EDDIE REDMAYNE LE SIRENUSE, ITALY The first time my wife Hannah and I stayed at Le Sirenuse, our minds were blown. We were spending a week or two on the Amalfi Coast to attend the Giffoni Film Festival, and many friends had suggested that we visit this gem of a hotel. You’ll find that when people speak about Le Sirenuse, it tends to be in quite breathless tones. It is the family business of Antonio Sersale – his grandfather was one of four Neapolitan siblings who turned their summer house into a hotel back in 1951 – who now runs it with his wife Carla. His reputation precedes him: his effervescent ebullience, his warmth, his kindness. Le Sirenuse is set up at the top of Positano like a clam clutching onto the rock. It has the most formidable restaurant, but when we arrived Hannah and I had been fantasising about the simplest of dishes: pasta, Caprese salad and a cold glass of white wine. They made this for us, off menu, and that dream of simplicity was exactly what came. It couldn’t have been more delicious, eaten on the terrace overlooking that beautiful coast. My shoulders dropped by about five centimetres at that moment. In all the rooms there’s a little book beside the bed containing an article written by John Steinbeck when he stayed in 1953. Reading it, you can feel the embedded history of the place, the romance of the story of the Sirens and the overwhelming seduction of this part of the world. There’s an intimacy to Le Sirenuse, a wonderful quietness. One window frames the town’s duomo with its colourful tin-tiled roof, and it looks just like a painting. But do see if you can get in Antonio’s good books and grab a moment on the hotel’s vintage Riva. Step down past the little church and onto the most beautiful boat, which putters off beyond the tiny Li Galli islands, once owned by the director Franco Zeffirelli. Then head out into the middle of nowhere, drop anchor and take a dive into the azure sea. The water feels too blue for Europe – even a colour-blind person like me can see the vividness. And then Antonio serves Piscines: Champagne over ice. That’s one of the most blissful memories I have. 108


KATE WINSLET EILEAN SHONA, SCOTLAND

PHOTOGRAPHS: JAMES BEDFORD; PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; TOM MUNRO; OLIVER PILCHER; DANIEL WARD

Luxury. Some of us are comforted by that word, some of us are deeply panicked by it, and others live in the hope of one day finding it. However, the majority of people I know are enthralled by the idea of luxury well earned at the end of an adventure-filled day and the uncertainty of the wild outdoors – the perfect combination of which can be found on Eilean Shona’s magnificent isolated shores. A spectacularly beautiful isle on the west coast of Scotland, from which Eigg, Muck and Rum can be seen in the distance like giant sea monsters emerging from below, it has been owned and loved by Vanessa Branson and Robert Devereux for more than two decades. Their friends, children and children’s friends have filled every crack and peak with memories over the years, the presence of which can be keenly felt as you wander through Peter Pan forests and throw yourself against strong winds on remote white-sand beaches. This is the kind of magic one longs for, looks for and seldom finds. To reach it, leave your car behind on the mainland and hop aboard the island boat, for there are no roads on Shona. There are a few tracks here and there, but be prepared to carve your own pathways to adventure. Will those be from the main house or from one of the six cottages? Or why not take the whole island for yourself? With all the wisdom of Vanessa and Robert’s vast travels thrown in for good measure, Shona has one foot in today’s culture and the other firmly rooted in a mystical past. Modern art mixes with old, and Moroccan plates and rugs adorn cupboards and floorboards of the recently renovated Old Schoolhouse, from where I write this. All I can hear is the sound of an excitable stream, babbling down the hillside to the loch, and the wind whipping gently through the valley. A faint pop and creak comes from the wood-burning stove in the corner of the whitewashed kitchen, upon which we just fried up some fish. And if I were to describe the cauldrons of mussels we cooked on the beach, washed down with Chablis we chilled in the sea, you probably wouldn’t believe me. So if you feel the need for extreme peace, look no further. If you long to look at your mobile phone and see that it constantly says no service, this is the sanctuary you have been searching for. Eilean Shona is heaven on earth.

KATE MOSS AMILLA FUSHI, MALDIVES I love the Maldives – the beauty, the peacefulness, the wildlife, the privacy – but mostly the water; the water here is like nowhere else in the world. It’s an overused phrase in these islands, but Amilla Fushi really is paradise, the most idyllic and relaxing place on earth. Some people worry that there’s nothing to do in the Maldives, but I never have a dull moment at this hotel: snorkelling with turtles and sharks, fishing, a boat trip at sunset, all sorts of water sports. Under, over and on that astonishing water, there’s so much going on. Of course, when it comes to eating, the fish here is incredible too. I have sushi at Wok almost every day: spicy yellowfin-tuna sashimi, local reef-fish tempura. But there are lots of lovely places to choose from, including a brilliant restaurant from Australian chef Luke Mangan. I love the variety. Amilla Fushi was co-founded by innovative businessman Tom McLoughlin, and he’s everything that makes his hotels great: generous, with great taste and amazing ideas. There’s none of the usual thatched villas and Robinson Crusoe castaway vibe here; instead, there are sharp, modern houses as white as the sand on the beaches. Our smiley butler Saddam is so fabulous I always want to pack him up in my suitcase and take him home. Or even better, just stay here forever, drinking Piña Coladas on the beach and looking out across the infinite blue water from the deck of our home on stilts. That’s the dream.


LIVIA FIRTH SONG SAA, CAMBODIA Song Saa means ‘the sweethearts’, and the story of it is a rare tale of love over greed. When Melita Hunter and her husband Rory first discovered this pair of islands in the untouched Koh Rong archipelago, they fell in love with the place and immediately vowed to protect it. With their Song Saa Foundation, they created the first-ever marine reserve in Cambodia. They have involved the local community from the start, and it’s truly a model sustainable business. My husband Colin and I have been lucky enough to stay in wonderful hotels around the world. But the true soul of Song Saa makes it different from other places. Melita and Rory describe it as luxury that treads lightly, and it’s a lovely way of putting it. Real luxury today should be all about integration. Everything here has been produced with local materials and recycled and upcycled when possible. The rooms are so private and beautiful that you are tempted to never leave your cocoon and instead just languish in the pool overlooking the sea. But when you emerge, the people who run the hotel immediately feel like family. You want to spend time with them, listening to their stories. One day we took part in a very special Buddhist blessing ceremony and now, a few months later, I’m still grateful to wear the red string they put around my wrist. All the meals on the island are, well, spectacular. Each night it’s a different location: a table on the beach; another under a tree, with millions of tealights; even a feast in the middle of the pool. The spa also offers unforgettable rituals. Under a pagoda on the sea all you hear is the water and the birds in the trees. There is an Italian expression, ‘mal d’Africa’, or ‘Africa sickness’, used to describe the longing you feel for Africa once you leave it. Well, the day we left Song Saa, hugging and kissing everyone, we knew we had ‘mal di Song Saa’. We long to be back there.


PHOTOGRAPHS: DICK PAGE & JAMES GIBBS; MICHAEL PAUL; STEFANO SCATA

SOFIA COPPOL A PALAZZO MARGHERITA, ITALY There’s a certain parallel between directing a film and creating a hotel. I think that’s why my father is so good at making hotels: he knows that they have a story and how to create an atmosphere; he has that director’s eye for detail. Palazzo Margherita is an old noble family’s house, built in 1892, in the very south of Italy. It sits on a square in the town of Bernalda, a little Eden behind these huge wooden doors. My great-grandfather moved from the town to New York over a century ago, and it still feels like Italy from another era, with grandmas’ laundry hanging from balconies and old men sitting on the sidewalk all day. Slip off the street, through the gates and into the gardens, and

Palazzo Margherita is its own magical world. I could sit in the courtyard all day or by the pool with a book, where the wonderful staff bring platters of fresh fruit – plums, apricots – on crushed ice. In the summer, when it gets really hot, I wander into the kitchen and feast on incredible pasta or a salad of fresh tuna, handfuls of rocket and fine red onions, served on beautiful, hand-painted blue-and-white dishes that my mother chose from a nearby town. Then I pull up a seat at the Cinecittà Bar, named after the legendary Italian movie studio, and drink iced coffee while the jukebox plays old tunes, or wander into town for gelato at Gelateria Novecento. I love to stay in Suite Four,

my room, all pretty pinks and greys, with a balcony overlooking the courtyard and a clawfoot tub in the bathroom. Every room in the palazzo has its own personality. The architect, Jacques Grange, restored a lot of original details: beautiful murals, intricate tiling and frescoes on the ceilings. And upstairs, there’s a big salon with a movie screen where my father has put the whole Martin Scorsese collection of the history of Italian cinema. I remember one time watching a comedy called Sedotta e Abbandonata (Seduced and Abandoned) from 1964. There’s something very romantic about seeing these old Italian films, in this old Italian house – it makes you feel like you’ve stepped into another life. 111


SEBASTIAN FAULKS Sri Lanka wasn’t always a tea island. Until 1870, the hills were covered in coffee plants. Almost overnight, a fungus wiped out every bush and took away the livelihoods of thousands. Nothing daunted, the planters, led by an Englishman named James Taylor, started to import tea plants from China and India. Within a decade, Ceylon, as it was then, forgot coffee and became one of the world’s leading exporters of Broken Orange Pekoe, English Breakfast and all the other varieties of this durable and easy-going plant. ‘The tea fields of Ceylon are as true a monument to courage as is the lion at Waterloo,’ said Sir Arthur Conan Doyle when he considered this response to adversity. I first visited Sri Lanka in 1981 when I was part of the Guardian newspaper cricket team. Every single man in that bunch of dreamers, cranks and prima donnas fell in love with the place. Up in the tea country, at Nuwara Eliya, we stayed at the Hill Club. It was like a boarding house in post-war Bexhill – on the bedside table was an AA gazetteer from 1952. You had to wear a tie in the dining room, and the dignified white-coated Sinhalese butler was called Andrews, a name he had inherited from a previous retainer. I was back in tea country recently with my wife, in the nearby plantations of Bogawantalawa, which radiate from a huge reservoir. You can stay overnight in four of the old planters’ bungalows, which together comprise the Tea Trails hotel, brought up to date but still giving a good sense of what the colonial life must have felt like. Pretty good, I’d say. We stayed in Castlereagh, a bungalow on the water, and in Tientsin, higher in the hills, named after a Chinese tea village. Tientsin has the more authentic planter feel, but Castlereagh the shimmering lake view. A hundred years ago, you might have grown bored if you were up-country for more than a few months, itching for a bit of Colombo nightlife. But for a visitor today, the combination of long vistas, bright light and local food is irresistible.

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PHOTOGRAPHS: CAMERA PRESS; SQUIRE FOX; TOM PARKER; MANOLO YLLERA

CEYLON TEA TRAILS, SRI LANKA


BETH DITTO ACE HOTEL PORTLAND I moved to Portland in 2003, back when I thought of it as a big little city. It’s a bigger little city now, and getting bigger and bigger. In my time here, it’s gone from being this under-the-radar place in Oregon to being the byword for hipsterdom. The TV series Portlandia, which satirises the city, is funny because it’s so true! But all the reasons why it’s funny are why it’s amazing to live here. It’s an incredible place if you’re vegetarian or vegan, for activism and body positivity, to be queer – it’s a mecca for any kind of alternative lifestyle. My home is in North Portland and I often hang out here in an area they’ve now christened Alberta Arts District. It’s so crazy when you’re like, ‘It’s an arts district all of a sudden?’ But there are so many funky neighbourhoods and different pockets in Portland, each with its own buzzing street. Ace opened its second hotel in downtown Portland back in 2007 – the original is farther up the West Coast, in Seattle – and it’s still a perennially cool place to be; there’s a fresh, young vibe to it. Even though there are now Ace hotels all over – I especially love the one in London – each one has a very Pacific Northwest attitude. And they’ll always cut a deal for a band to stay, which is very cool. The music scene is really alive in Portland. There are a million great places to see live acts: the Crystal Ballroom, in an old 1914 dance hall, is an institution. There’s also brilliant record shopping and so many little DJ nights, since DJs are now the new bands. But the real reason Portland is such a beautiful, sweet place to me? It’s home.

ROSAMUND PIKE AMAN SUMMER PALACE, BEIJING This place is a glorious, surprising hymn to everything that is beautiful and mysterious about China. Leaving behind the thrilling dusty hit of Beijing proper, the first thing that always strikes me about this hotel is the delicate smell of incense and perfumed oils that makes you want to drink the air. It is built around courtyards, which, according to Chinese design, give a sense of balance to those living within them. While being driven by rickshaw and carriage to your room, the eye wanders over carved wooden architecture, a subtle interplay of reds and blues, a miniature lake with overhanging willows and people enjoying incredibly beautiful tea. There’s a little bit of adventure and mystery about everything here: the mind-boggling gorgeousness of the Imperial Suite, where the simplicity and flow of its many rooms make it seem like it goes on forever; dinners in secret rooms or under the stars that feel like pieces of theatre in which you are part of the production; dishes that overwhelm in their deliciousness, beautifully presented and excitingly unfamiliar; the sensational art of Chinese dry massage, where your body is expertly rearticulated through dark-blue silk pyjamas. The hotel discreetly offers privileged access to the gardens of the Summer Palace next door. At dawn the only souls joining you on the banks of Kunming Lake to take in the pleasure gardens built for Empress Dowager Cixi are local joggers and fearless year-round swimmers. At the end of the day, you can return to breathe in the scent of peonies in full riotous bloom, and watch the sun setting over the marble boat before knocking on a wall to escape through a hidden door back into the sanctuary of the hotel. On the last night, a delicate miniature padlock – possibly reminiscent of a Qing Dynasty safety pin – is left on the pillow in my beautiful vaulted bedroom. Perhaps it’s asking me to keep some of the Aman Summer Palace’s secrets. I will. But I can say that they are worth unlocking for yourself. This is a place of enchantment like no other.


FLORENCE WELCH CHATEAU MARMONT, LOS ANGELES I remember the first time I stayed here. It seemed like the haunted hotel ride at Disneyland and had an air of faded glamour about it – a sense of being lost and found at the same time. I remember singing at the piano one night, in the darkened living room, and I had the distinct impression that all the Chateau’s hallways and passages led to rooms that were full of bright and brilliant yet chaotic people, all of whom had somehow converged at this one place on Sunset Boulevard: half sanctuary, half madhouse. I love the big, beautiful blue rooms on the top floor, with their plush sofas and fires that I can never figure out how to turn on. I was at the Chateau around the time of the Grammys one year, and we all went to one of the after-parties, an occasion that resulted in me lying face down in a bathtub – luckily it was empty. My other memory from that night is of Baz Luhrmann doing a spectacular Mick Jagger impression far too close to the balcony for my liking. Then a few days later, we managed to miss all the Oscars after-parties, and I ended up back in my room at the Chateau dressed like a superhero unicorn from a Seventies sci-fi series. There was another occasion, a rather embarrassing moment, when I ended up doing squat thrusts in front of Josh Hartnett. The garden is a great place to people-watch, to see which producer or actress or model or befuddled pop star (i.e. me) is sitting out there. I once even bumped into the guy who wrote ‘You’ve Got the Love’. So my advice is to head here after you check in, jet-lagged and feeling pretty weird; it settles you nicely into LA. Then you should check out Musso & Frank’s, on Hollywood Boulevard. The tuna salads are to die for. At the Chateau I usually have arancini and fresh lemonade. When we’re being civilised, the band and I drink dirty Martinis, though there have been nights when we’ve ordered oversized bottles of vodka at ungodly hours. Oh, how I’d like to thank and apologise to all those lovely members of staff who catered to us on those somewhat saturated mornings! As for sleep, well, if there has been a big party, I leave a little shaken, though shaken up in a good way. 114


BILL NIGHY THE CARLYLE, NEW YORK New York City is a theatre town. I always seem to be working here, which is such a marvellous way to see the city – you really become part of the language of a place rather than just swinging by. The first time I did a play in New York it was Christmas, and people kept telling me how cold it was going to get. Being from London, I was very sniffy. And then it got cold – it got really cold. It’s a wonderful time to be here but nothing beats New York in the spring. On a crisp spring day that skyline is the most exciting in the world. For me, The Carlyle is a specific expression of New York City and the only place to stay. I don’t

really feel comfortable in a lot of the modern hotels; they seem to get things wrong in terms of aesthetic. But The Carlyle has a sense of history. It’s elegant and attractive without being over the top. I can’t help but think of JFK and Marilyn Monroe and Frank Sinatra singing something like ‘The Very Thought of You’. It transports me to the 1940s, when everybody dressed so well. Things seem to have gone downhill since then, but The Carlyle remains. I always stay in Suite 1103, which is the best way to arrive in New York. It’s spectacular in its quiet way, with thick carpets, an enormous comfy bed and a living

room I could actually see myself living in. Most of all I like the fact that there’s a piano in Bemelmans Bar. Not that I play the piano – I just like living with one. There’s a very sweet little room right next to the bar called the Gallery. I leave the bar to younger men and have a soda water in there. I might go crazy and have a burger too, but without the bun, which is all very rock ’n’ roll. In the morning all I need is an espresso and scrambled eggs. I’ll take a stroll one block to Central Park. Then I’ll find a good bookshop because there isn’t a nicer way to spend a day in New York.

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOM BEARD; MATTHEW BUCK; RICHRD POWERS

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Slow burn bling-bling seekers should stick to the other side of Mallorca. After spending all her childhood summers here on the mellow north-east coast, Tara Stevens dips back into her old secret haunts to find them just as compelling as ever PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID CROOKES


I met an old man who had never drunk anything but water from the spring. He looked about 30


While the rest of Mallorca has been set on becoming cooler, snappier and simply more commercial in the last decade, the north-eastern corner, with its soft golden light, gnarled olive groves and super-sized azalea bushes, has quietly pottered along. How or why it has managed to remain under the radar is a mystery. It’s here you’ll find the most astonishing beaches on the island. Cala Agulla is probably its worst-kept secret, but I always take the 30-minute walk from the undulating dunes at Cala Mesquida past goats nibbling on whiskery beach grass to tiny, turquoise Cala Moltó, where the sun-dried posidonia seaweed makes the comfiest bed for a snooze. This is the Spain of my childhood, where suppers of barbecued fish were cooked up on the sand and locals drew their water from mountain springs. Tucked into the bluff of the Albarca hills, Cala Torta bay is not marked on most maps, but I see with some foreboding that it is newly signposted. Funnelling its way inland, the sea rages wildly from booming waves one minute to mirrorflat the next. And here, right in the middle of it all, is Manolo and Dolores’s magnificent Cala Torta beach bar, a tiny shack on the shore I first stumbled upon 10 years ago. I ate a platter of simple but sensational seafood then and it hasn’t changed a bit. There are still mountainous piles of crayfish and prawns, cuttlefish, mussels and razor clams served with Torta’s top-secret sauce, but some say the fish is even better over the hills at Colònia de Sant Pere. Although the old fishing port is now mostly filled with bobbing yachts, it’s still celebrated for its unique vivers. These ingenious sand-and-limestone seawater pools are carved into the rock along the front, allowing local restaurants to keep their catch fresh for as long as possible. The snapper ceviche, wild red-tuna sashimi and Balearic classic of salt-baked seabass at Sa Xarxa is faultless; next door at Es Vivers, skate escabeche, mussels steamed with lemon and whole-baked turbot take top billing. One time after lunch I stopped to collect water from the Sa Bernadeta spring near Betlem and met an old man in the village who had never drunk anything else. He looked about 30 years old. Given that water is second only to God when it comes to growing the plumpest, juiciest produce, it is no surprise that food here is so good. Life in Artà, the little capital of the region with its hilltop fortress of Santuari de Sant Salvador, usually moves at a sleepy pace, but thrums on Tuesday when the market is in full swing. Mallorquins stock up on basketfuls of sun-warmed fruit, still-muddy vegetables and hefty empanadas before a pre-lunch aperitif. Villa owners mooch around stockpiling ikat-style telas de lenguas textiles and abstract artworks such as the salt-drenched seascapes found in Joan Peix’s gallery. There was talk of reopening the railway to connect Artà with Palma, but it petered out. Now the station has become a showcase for local handicrafts and products, including the super-strong licor de hierbas, and the unused tracks form a 29km-long bike path that goes as far south as Manacor. There are bicycles for hire, but if you don’t want to pedal back, a van will pick you up for the wave of a five-euro note. At lunch, feast on paprika-laced tortilla and sweet red-onionand-tomato salads at Artà’s La Mar de Vins, where a rabbit-hole corridor leads to a walled garden thick with hibiscus blooms and citrus trees bearing lemons as big as melons. Venture to

the edge of town to find farm-to-fork food at Finca es Serral, where they grow organic produce, rear pigs and lay the table with old-fashioned glazed terracotta pots. I come back here time and time again for the pa amb oli (bread slathered with garlic mayonnaise) and delicious sobrasada (spreadable spiced-pork sausage) drizzled with honey. For something a little more refined, the Michelin-starred restaurant at Predi Son Jaumell hotel is a 10-minute drive away in Cala Ratjada. Headed by young Mallorcan chef Andreu Genestra, who not only grows his own vegetables but makes olive oil and wine too, the restaurant serves up brilliant food: bread warmed on hot stones; squid doused in duck juice and smoky aubergines; berries with beetroot and white chocolate. There are huge bedrooms to collapse in afterwards, each with contemporary straw baskets and rugs by local interior designer Marga Rotger.  In the living rooms are log fires for chilly evenings and the

Above, the sitting room at Predi Son Jaumell hotel. Opposite, ancient stone crenellations in Capdepera. Previous pages, a secluded spot on Cala Agulla beach 119


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Clockwise from this picture: a surfer on Canyamel beach; Cala Torta beach bar near ArtĂ ; the gardens at Son Gener; olive groves at Hotel Can Simoneta; a suite at Predi Son Jaumell; one of its private outdoor terraces; La Mar de Vins restaurant; wild ďŹ gs at Son Gener


FUNNELLING ITS WAY INLAND, THE SEA RAGES WILDLY FROM


BOOMING WAVES ONE MINUTE TO MIRROR-FLAT THE NEXT


wisteria-covered terraces have rocking chairs from which to drink in the herb-scented air. But Son Jaumell isn’t the only charming place to stay. This entire stretch of coastline has plenty of lovely little hotels. To the east, Can Simoneta stretches languidly across a cliff top on a carpet of manicured lawn with hammocks strung between the palms. Follow the path down to the shore to find four-poster day beds; go the other way and a staircase corkscrewed into the rock leads to a private beach. There’s a sauna tucked away in the woods, a Natura Bissé spa with incredible vitamin-C facials and two sea-facing swimming pools. At dinnertime, there’s bread served with truffle butter, sole meunière and white asparagus and a tender shoulder of suckling lamb. It’s quiet at Can Simoneta, the silence only interrupted by chirruping cicadas. Perhaps it’s because those with children in tow tend to gravitate towards Son Gener, which – unbelievably, given its crisp-looking aesthetic – hasn’t been renovated since it opened 18 years ago. Stripped-back original 18th-century beams, cool stone floors, terracotta tiles, straw mats and fine linen curtains – all made locally – keep the hotel looking marvellously fresh. There’s a warm breeze during the 5pm yoga class with Paco, which blows through the olive groves. Birds call out like choirboys. I wasn’t surprised to learn that a mother of four checks in here three times a year with nothing but a stack of books for company. The more low-key Cap Vermell Beach Hotel is cut into a rock face and celebrated island-wide for its fantastic lobster dishes. Built in 1934 by the grandfather of Tomeu Llull, who now runs it as a sweet and simple guesthouse with a dozen bright bedrooms, it’s unlike the vast majority of hotels in these parts (rooms 101 to 105 have large balconies that jut straight over the sea). The reason the north-eastern tip has remained so unspoiled is that much of it falls within the Parc Natural de la Península de Llevant. Hotels outside of beach towns such as Cala Mesquida, which in itself is remarkably civilised, are mostly upcycled farmhouses or breezy seaside villas. Guests return year after year like old friends, and so the arrival of the Park Hyatt Mallorca has caused a few ripples of consternation. It is a tiny bit disconcerting to be confronted by something on such a large scale. Part of a grand plan by Grupo Cap Vermell – which owns this as well as the nearby Cap Vermell Beach Hotel – to transform the area, the hotel’s seven bars and restaurants, three pools and enormous spa and wellness centre opened in June. ‘It’s not as if a spaceship has landed,’ assures general manager John Beveridge, who has overseen the opening of several Park Hyatts in the Middle East. ‘We are totally committed to this community and its environment.’ And actually it’s going to work out fine: stonemasons have created the hotel’s gorgeous cladding, which recalls the honeycoloured villages of the island; food comes from local farmers and fishermen, and if you want to go to the Blue Flag bay at Canyamel five minutes away or the more secluded cove of Cala Albardans with its perfumed pines, you can just pedal off on a borrowed sit-up-and-beg bike. So that is exactly what I do, and in a way it’s a little like going back in time. I cycle beyond Can Simoneta, past pretty, finca-style villas scattered throughout



the landscape to the tiny, scallop-shaped beach at Cala Rotja I used to call my own. There was one small change since the last time I’d been here. Flanked by terraces carved into cliffs shallow enough to induce even scaredy-cats like me to jump in, some thoughtful soul has added swimming pool ladders to aid a more graceful exit from the water. Apart from that, not much else is different, and long may it remain so. BOOK IT British Airways (ba.com) flies from London to Palma from £91. Park Hyatt Mallorca (mallorca.park. hyatt.com) has doubles from about £230; Cap Vermell Beach Hotel (capvermellbeachhotel.com) from about £60; Hotel Can Simoneta (cansimoneta.com) from about £175; Son Gener (songener.com) from about £250; Predi Son Jaumell (hotel sonjaumell.com) from about £235

Above, Hotel Can Simoneta at night. Opposite, lunch alfresco at restaurant Finca es Serral. Previous pages, cliffs at Cap Vermell near Canyamel 125


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GAME FACE

NOMADIC TRIBES GATHER IN CHAD FOR AN EXTRAORDINARY BEAUTY PAGEANT MORE FIERCELY COMPETED THAN MISS WORLD. THE TWIST? IT’S THE MEN WHO BATTLE IT OUT FOR SUPREMACY IN FRONT OF FEMALE JUDGES BY KATE ESHELBY. PHOTOGRAPHS BY TOM CRAIG


there are throngs of women and children riding cows with horns the size of giant tusks, all piled high with calabashes, mats and painted poles; goat herds whirl past in miniature dust storms; men ride on horseback like cowboys; an old woman trots by on a donkey, a multitude of enormous gold hoops in her ears. I’m in Chad for the Gerewol festival, more famously held in neighbouring Niger, where it has largely become a show for Westerners. Yet Gerewols are found wherever the Wodaabe (a tribe of nomadic cattle herders) wander. Chad sprawls between its uneasy neighbours, a mammoth, landlocked country where the isolation created by years of conflict in the region has helped keep its rich tribal traditions intact. The Gerewols here are genuine affairs, glorious beauty pageants in which men rather than women dress up, apply make-up and perform to attract a mate, find love, marriage or – truth be told – a single night of passion. This country is no pushover – it is hot and harsh, especially during the dry season. Water and pasture are scarce so the Wodaabe move constantly, covering huge distances – often every few days – in isolated family bands. The Gerewol is the only time they all gather together during the year, although it is by no means a certainty: if the rainy season has been bad, it doesn’t happen at all. It’s a miracle – when we hear this one is going ahead – that we find the spot, hidden in a vast expanse of bush without any gesture of civilisation for miles. When we arrive the festival is in the process of relocating after the chief has told everyone to move on. There isn’t enough water. When we finally reach the new location it’s late afternoon and the last rays of sunlight are fading to buttercup. Everywhere, concealed among the thorny bushes and acacias, are little camps or wuros: Wodaabe homes resembling hand-carved wooden bunk beds painted in strong geometric patterns. More and more camps pop up like primary coloured artworks piled high with vivaciously decorated baskets. As night falls, groups of singers gather around campfires; men sit on mats and brew tea over hot embers; others dance, bodies etched against the flames. The singing is hypnotic as they slowly spiral around, the white of their turbans shining under a bright moon. The next day we wake early, but the Wodaabe are already up and armed with pocket mirrors, coating their faces with red ochre, daubing on white dots in floral formations, applying black lipstick. The preening lasts for hours. A small battered suitcase lies open, spewing sequins. One man helps another tie bright leather rectangles into his hair with safety pins. There’s a warrior dressed in a long pink floral robe, another wears gold-glitter sunglasses and carries a handbag fashioned from cigarette lighters. But beneath the decorative attire, these men are tough. Women sit under a tree giggling as they begin to dance in a long line, arms interlinked, eyes wide open in mock surprise. ‘Va va va va va,’ they chant, baring their extra-white teeth in chattering smiles like Batman’s Joker on acid. There’s menace in the air,  129


THE MEN CHANT, BARING THEIR TEETH IN CHATTERING SMILES LIKE BATMAN’S JOKER


ON ACID. THEY CHARGE FORWARD IN A TWINKLE OF RAINBOW-BRIGHT SEQUINS


 an undeniable tension. The sound the men make is disturbing, almost unhuman. Their mouths appear as if they’re speaking, but who to? With a gentle bounce and a bend of their knees, they sway their heads, moving backwards and forward like crazy, long-legged birds. Suddenly an old lady races towards them, jeering and waving a cloth, whipping up the fervour. She’s loving it; they’re loving it. The men stamp their feet and charge forward in a twinkle of rainbow-bright sequins. Everyone is going wild. The audience shines torches on particularly expressive performers. Suddenly an incredible face is illuminated, framed by towering ostrich plumes rising from a sparkly crown, gilded by the fire’s glow. The women watch in huddles of graceful poises, a swarm of black clothes contrasting with the men’s affront of colour. They gossip and drape arms around each other, their fringes sculpted into horn-shaped quiffs. The frantic dancing continues through each night with the help of a specially fermented tree-bark concoction, but the mornings are calm. In the soft-peach dawn light, women sit quietly milking cows, or rhythmically sloshing warm milk in huge calabashes. The scent of wood smoke fills the air. A man lies with his head on a woman’s lap as she plaits his hair. Others walk by wearing smudged, morning-after make-up, taking their cows off to graze. One day I come across a group of women dancing. They collapse laughing when I join them, plying me with necklaces and bracelets to wear. They stamp and clap in a circle, lifting their arms like evangelicals. One woman brings her children to meet me. ‘They have never seen a white person,’ she says. On the final night of the festival, three winners are chosen by three marriageable women, after observing the men – swaggering like peacocks – for the past few days. The Sudokae, one of the many Wodaabe clans, have been the hosts of this Gerewol. They have invited guests from other clans, as well as other tribes, such as the turbaned Arabs who rock up on motorbikes, to mix the bloodlines. The three young women walk slowly along the line of dancers, displaying no emotion. Wodaabe follow a set of rules known as pulaaku, and one of the most important is not to show any feelings. The air is thick with suspense. Then each quickly taps their favourite man. Everyone races in to congratulate the winners. To be selected is a huge honour. The women will now go back to their camps and wait. If the chosen men like the girls, they will follow. The next day everyone piles all their worldly possessions onto cows and scatters like seeds into the savannah. One girl is eyeing up some empty film canisters. I hand them over and she beams. I’m certain they will soon be brimming with beads and glitter.

Native Eye (+44 20 3286 5995; nativeeyetravel.com) offers an eight-day tailor-made trip from £2,800 per person, or £1,749 to travel in a group. Ethiopian Airlines (ethiopianairlines.com), Turkish Airlines (turkishairlines. com) and Air France (airfrance.co.uk) all fly to N’Djamena 133


DIZZY RASCAL

WITH ITS DYED-IN-THE-WOOL WAYS, THE FAROE ISLANDS WAS DOING HOMESPUN WAY BEFORE IT BECAME HIP. THE REST OF THE WORLD MAY HAVE ITS EVERY INCH SURVEYED BY GOOGLE STREET VIEW, BUT THE MISTY ARCHIPELAGO HAS JUST LAUNCHED ITS OWN MAPPING SYSTEM – WITH CAMERAS ATTACHED TO SOME OF ITS 8O,OOO SHEEP BY HARRY PEARSON. PHOTOGRAPHS BY OIVIND HAUG


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W

hen the british author wg collingwood chanced upon the Faroe Islands while sailing to Iceland in 1897, he thought them enchanted, declaring the archipelago a natural paradise. Looking out across the rocks – speckled with green, grey and rust lichen like balls of Donegal tweed – towards the red, blue and cream houses of the village of Gjógv, the waves of Djupini Sound thrashing against the surrounding cliffs, the white-etched peaks of Kalsoy barely visible through the spray, it’s easy to see what Collingwood meant. Admittedly, it’s not the sort of paradise in which people could comfortably live while wearing an apron of fig leaves. The breezes off the North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea are rarely balmy, the local rivers prefer a roar to a babble, and even in mid-May the snow drives across the peak of Slaettaratindur and forms in three-foot drifts upon which mountain hares, still in their winter coats, scamper. No, this is the sort of ascetic paradise the early Celtic Christian monks – who preached to seals and allowed blackbirds to nest in the palms of their hands – would have recognised when they arrived here in the seventh century. Like the British islands of Iona and Lindisfarne, the Faroes are green, isolated, wild and numinous, purified by salt winds. It’s a place where you feel small in a large universe. Standing in the lashing rain by the turf-roofed church in Saksun, watching waterfalls cascade down the craggy knolls that surround it, mist swirling up from the river Dalsa and the foaming sea pounding into the tidal lagoon, you wouldn’t be at all surprised if Odin appeared before you in the form of a raven. I live not far from Lindisfarne, a part of England the Roman legionaries thought was the end of the world. If Emperor Hadrian’s soldiers were filled with a sense of existential

IT’S THE SORT OF ASCETIC PARADISE WHERE SEVENTH-CENTURY MONKS PREACHED TO SEALS AND ALLOWED BLACKBIRDS TO NEST IN THEIR HANDS

Clockwise from top left: a hen in Tórshavn; Gudrun & Gudrun shop; yarn at the store; Barbara Fish House; a cod dish at Anna and Oli Rubeksen’s home; local flora; Barbara Fish House; ham and cheese at Koks; cliffs near Stóra Dímun. Previous pages, an old church in Saksun. Following pages, the village of Hvannasund

dread at the sight of Northumberland, then they’d likely have suffered a total nervous collapse if they’d ever got to the island of Stóra Dímun in the southern Faroes. A splinter of tall, grassy land dropped into the North Atlantic, it is the smallest of the 17 inhabited Faroe Islands. It’s roughly 500 miles from Norway, 450 from Iceland, and the nearest foreign town is Lerwick in Shetland. Not much more than a mile long by half-a-mile wide, Stóra Dímun is the home to 450 sheep, nine people and – during term times – a teacher. I arrive by helicopter, a journey shared with five primary schoolchildren, their music teacher and a live cockerel. The seats are slung canvas and the cargo bay is loaded up with nets of potatoes and tinned provisions. The helicopter is generally viewed as a playboy-type vehicle, but on the Faroe Islands they are used like buses. You half expect somebody to ring a bell to be put down at the next stop. Until the inception of helicopter flights in the 1980s, Stóra Dímun was accessible only by boat. The sole landing stage sits at the foot of a towering cliff, the ascent from it achieved using rope ladders. In winter the island was cut off for weeks on end. Even by air the approach is forbidding. Flying in from the west, your first view is of a 1,000ft rock face looming up out of the sea, topped by a grass slope that is only a dozen or so degrees below the vertical. Adventurous sheep and lambs graze precariously on the mossy surface among puffin burrows and circling fulmars. The helicopter swings around the southern edge of the island to reveal a flat, triangular plateau. At the tip of the south-western cliff a red-and-white lighthouse looks out across the North Atlantic in the general direction of Reykjavík. A farmhouse and its outbuildings stand in the lee of a high slope, protected on three sides by the thick stone walls of a shieling. Washing flaps on the line in the garden, the cockerel’s new harem clucking around beneath. The helipad is next to the ruins of the old church. In the farmhouse, Jógvan Jón Petersen and his wife Eva are having breakfast with the teacher and the children. There are bowls of eggs, slices of rye bread and Thermos jugs of coffee and tea (tea drinking is one of the legacies of the British CONTINUED ON PAGE 142 137


AT CERTAIN TIMES A CLOUD COMES AND LANDS ON THE TOP OF THE


MOUND-SHAPED NEIGHBOURING ISLAND LIKE SOMETHING FROM THE MOOMINS


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ON A HELICOPTER TRIP TO A REMOTE OUTPOST, I SHARE THE JOURNEY WITH FIVE PRIMARY SCHOOLCHILDREN, THEIR TEACHER AND A LIVE COCKEREL


occupation during World War II, the other, perhaps more surprising, is a national passion for the mint-flavoured Viscount biscuit). In pride of place on the table sits the Faroe Islands’ great sustaining delicacy: a leg of wind-dried, aged and fermented lamb, skerpikjøt. Nearly every Faroese home has a hjallur (drying shed). People even make them on the balconies of the new apartment blocks. Built on stone or concrete bases, the walls are wooden slats, a finger’s width between each, so the wind can rush through. Meat – lamb and the local heather-fed goose, occasionally pork imported from Denmark – hangs inside; fish outside, from wires strung beneath the eaves. Skerpikjøt has a feisty reputation. It’s generally handed to the foreign visitor with a warning. It has the sort of pungent odour you can smell through a door. The meat is the dark red favoured by Francis Bacon, marbled with greyish fat. The taste is gamey with a hint of gorgonzola, the texture leathery like serrano ham. The fish dries so hard it has to be laid on a flat stone and struck with a hammer to break it into edible flakes. You can savour both these delicacies in refined form at Koks. Voted the best restaurant in the Nordic countries in 2015, it’s in a village outside the Faroe Islands’ capital, Tórshavn. The fish flakes here are lightly fried and served in a rack made of cod bones. Fermented lamb fat comes on a small cheese biscuit topped with crumbs of cured fish. Both are far tastier than any description can make them sound. Neither can compare, however, with the signature dish: fresh local langoustine tail grilled on hot stones, smoked with pine needles and lightly dusted with black salt made from seaweed. When the great chef René Redzepi of Noma tried it for the first time, he says he wept with joy.

THE COUNTRY’S PRIME MINISTER LIVES AMONG A JUMBLE OF WOODEN, GRASS-ROOFED HOUSES IN THE CAPITAL. HIS SECURITY IS AN INTERCOM Koks’ rise into the gastronomic stratosphere owes much to the economic and cultural changes that swept over the Faroe Islands six years ago. When fashion designer Gudrun Ludvig (who made that jumper for The Killing) returned home from Denmark, she found the country in the grip of the same import craze that had seized nearby Iceland. ‘All the clothes were coming from Italy or were made in China,’ she recalls, sitting amid great piles of knitwear in the room above her shop, Gudrun & Gudrun, in central Tórshavn, just up from the jumble of wooden, grass-roofed houses where the country’s prime minister lives (his security is an intercom). ‘The knitwear from the Faroes is unique. At one time every family had its own pattern made using only the natural colours of the sheep. The wool was once so valuable it was called Faroese gold, but suddenly there was so little interest that our farmers couldn’t sell the fleeces. They were burning them.’ The subsequent economic collapse put a stop to imports. People began to look inwards again. There was a huge revival of Faroese knitting, which had once been a cash crop as important to the farmers as the netting of seabirds (prized by the locals like grouse and woodcock are by British foodies). Ludvig’s designs were selling all over the world even before The Killing thrust them onto TV screens, and last year the knitting festival in Fuglafjørdur attracted 400 visitors – more than 100 of them from overseas – to seminars and workshops held in the cottages of the little fishing port. Jón Tyril, who organises Hoyma, a music event in which 10 houses in the village of Gota host concerts over the course of a winter’s day, says the financial crisis made the Faroese reconsider their lives. ‘It sparked a change. People in the islands became more interested in their heritage: in knitting, in food and in music.’ The Faroese have a great tradition of unaccompanied singing (a shortage of wood meant it was difficult to make musical instruments and the first church organ didn’t arrive until the 1850s). They sang on fishing boats, and while mending nets in the harbour. At Anna and Oli Rubeksen’s elegant house in Velbastadur, where the couple cooks five-course meals for small groups of visitors, the local choir files into the living room 142

Clockwise from top left: a church in Vidareidi; beach stones; the shore in Sandur; smoked langoustine at Koks; a house in Tórshavn; Gásadalur waterfall; lamb roll; Jógvan Jón at Stóra Dímun; Etika Sushi restaurant in the capital. Previous pages, from left: sea urchin at Koks; the islands’ dramatic scenery


to sing a song about a maid going off to milk the cows. I listen and gaze out through the picture window. Almost every place you stand in the Faroes has an amazing view – even the islands’ only jail looks down the length of a fjord – but with the sun slowly setting, this is one of the best. Across the Hestsfjørdur, today as placid as cream, lies Hestur, an island four miles long and, from this perspective at least, apparently made up almost entirely of rock face. A tiny village of painted houses clings tenaciously to a tiny patch of barely visible flat ground between the cliffs and the sea. You feel that if you look away for a few seconds then back again, it will have fallen in and sunk. Koltur, Hestur’s near neighbour, is only a third of the size but even craggier, dominated by a massive peak that rises 1,600ft out of the water, dwarfing the one farmstead the island sustains. Beyond is the southern coast of Vágar and the mighty Traelanipa cliff, from which the Vikings used to send old or sickly slaves ‘home’ by flinging them off the edge and into the sea. As the sun slowly dips, the choir moves on to a sad tune about fishermen rowing out to sea praying for a good catch and a safe return. I feel tears pricking my eyes, partly because the song is so plaintive and partly because I have just downed a welcoming schooner of the local aquavit – distilled in Iceland using Faroese water – that kicks in at an impressive 50 per cent ABV. The food that follows is a traditional feast, based around lamb from Anna and Oli’s farm. The sheep here graze on pasture close to the sea, which gives the meat the slightly salty taste prized in lamb from the Gower or Romney Marsh. We have lamb pâté on homemade crispbread, lamb broth, pan-fried lamb’s liver, a bowl of cod with sauce made from fermented lamb fat which has a

ALMOST EVERY PLACE YOU STAND IN THE FAROES HAS AN AMAZING VIEW. EVEN THE ISLANDS’ ONLY JAIL LOOKS DOWN THE LENGTH OF A FJORD cheesy flavour, and a braised leg of lamb that has been cooked gently for so long you could probably carve it with a spoon – although Oli uses a gleaming, steel whale-killing knife that has been in his family for generations. The main course is accompanied by a dish of soft, sweet and buttery roots. There are no indigenous land mammals in the Faroe Islands (the hare was introduced from Norway) and barely anything grows above ground. Turnips, beets, radishes, swede, potatoes, carrots and Jerusalem artichokes are the vegetables produced by the farmers here. Greenery comes from herbs such as angelica and sorrel, and wild plants such as sea purslane, cuckoo flower and reindeer lichen (deep-fried and paired perfectly with scallops at Koks). As with Faroese knitwear, the palate is limited but the combinations myriad, the results striking – rather like the Faroe Islands themselves. On Stóra Dímun, Jógvan Jón and Eva finish breakfast and show me around the island: the tannery they’ve recently set up to cure sheepskins and the little schoolhouse that doubles as a holiday cottage outside term time. We stand in the walled garden, where the children are playing and a small flock of quail bumble about in a mesh run, and look across the sea at the mound-shaped neighbouring island of Lítla Dímun. At certain times a cloud comes and lands on the top of it like something from the Moomins. When Jógvan Jón goes off to radio through to the approaching helicopter I tell Eva that Stóra Dímun is like something from a children’s story. ‘Yes,’ she says with a smile, ‘Every day we feel lucky we can live here.’

THE DETAILS Left, an old house with a roof of turf, a commonly used material as it’s in plentiful supply

Hotel Foroyar (hotelforoyar.fo; doubles from about £205). Gjáargardur Guesthouse (gjaargardur.fo; doubles from about £96). Stóra Dímun (storadimun.fo; cottage from about £205, sleeps eight). Koks (koks.fo; about £230 for two). To dine at home with Anna and Oli Rubeksen email anna-r@olivant.fo or call +298 216026 (about £200 for two). Atlantic Airways (atlantic.fo) flies twice weekly from Edinburgh to the Faroe Islands (March to December) and daily from Copenhagen year round. For further details go to visitfaroeislands.com 145


Happy we’ll be,

IN THE VERY TIPTOE OF ITALY, CALABRIA IS LARGELY FORGOTTEN ABOUT BY THE SUN-SEEKING REGION IS A POMPADOURED THROWBACK TO ANOTHER ERA, WITH BEAUTIFUL BEACHES TO BASK

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beyond the sea

CROWDS WHO SKIM OVER IT ON THE MAP BETWEEN PUGLIA AND SICILY. BUT THIS RAW AND GRITTY ON AND AN ATTITUDE ALL OF ITS OWN. BY ONDINE COHANE. PHOTOGRAPHS BY OLIVER PILCHER


On a rollicking bright-yellow, glass-bottomed boat we set out to sea, a crumbling fortress anchoring the rocky cove that protects us. I am, it seems, the only paying passenger. That doesn’t faze the gold-chain-adorned, 60-something captain with a deep tan, broad smile and fading tattoos, whose attention is more focused on the exuberant mob of extended relatives he has piled onboard today. It is the first of August and that means party time on the coast of Italy. While we moor further out in the bay, a handsome nephew casts admiring looks at his girlfriend’s cleavage as they feed each other grapes. Nut-brown grandchildren cannonball into the crystal-blue water off the back of the boat. The sound system is the only concession to modernity on the beaten-up, tub-like vessel. We can’t help but dance when it blares out Italian classics: ‘L’Uccellino della Commare’, ‘Buona Sera Signorina’, ‘Tu Vuò Fa L’Americano’. Swimming off the side, I spy bodies splayed out on the hot rocks like melting caramel and  toffee, alongside them ice coolers, boom boxes, fishing rods and bright-pink lilos.

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Clockwise from this picture: a bedroom at Villa Paola; a local on Tropea beach; buildings in Tropea; red chillies. Opposite, Villa Paola. Previous pages, from left: seafood at Praia Art Resort; the pool at Villa Paola; Vecchio Granaio in Tropea; parasols on Quattro Scogli beach


From left: Bar il Faro in Capo Vaticano; pasta with tuna ventresca at Praia Art Resort. Opposite, the terrace and pool at Villa Paola

 This is Calabria, the country’s unsung and often contradictory region. Here in the deepest south, the toe of Italy’s boot, is a land of poverty and corruption and blighted over-building, but also a stretch of coastline that straddles both the Ionian and Tyrrhenian seas with sweet hilltop towns, and a culture and history proudly and profoundly its own. The long summer season and unspoilt shores have always been cherished by visitors from Milan and Rome renting coastal hideaways. But those from further afield have begun to trickle in too, tempted by images of the clear water and white sand, the portfolio of ancient art and architecture, and a new crop of smart seaside hotels. I first heard about about the region’s complex history and culinary note during long evenings at home in Tuscany from my friend Roberto Lio, who is originally from Calabria but married a woman from my town of Pienza. He periodically pulls up here after a week in his old country, the whole car stuffed with red peppers, onions, broccoli and tomatoes from his garden; his aunts’ marinated vegetables stored in glass jars to last the winter; sausages scored from farmer neighbours; wine made from his own grapes, not to mention lethal limoncello, and liquirizia (grappa flavoured with liquorice). ‘But you must try it,’ he insists as he pours glasses of slightly fizzy, highly alcoholic red wine. Together we eat plates of Calabrian cheese and ham sliced with Roberto’s pocket knife as he recounts his latest visit home: the beauty of the beaches, the undiscovered forests of the interior, the villages that cling to cliffs, and the spectacular art treasures. Soon

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our eyes fill with tears caused not only by the unbearably hot chillies and wine, but by the sheer poetry of his descriptions. ‘But you must go to my country!’ he says, clasping my hand. ‘But I must go to your country!’ I reply, hugging him goodnight. I wobble off into the Tuscan night with a clear pilgrimage in sight. Finally i am here. Hammocks are strung between poles over the lapping waves. A pine forest casts shade on daybeds draped with local textiles. Floors are laid with painted clay tiles and recycled driftwood. The long blue pool is surrounded by rattan sofas; there are cream straw mats on the grass. This is the Praia Art Resort, which opened four years ago and put the region on the style map for a new type of visitor. Owner Raffaele Vrenna had a vision for this place. ‘I was mostly attracted by the fact that it was beside the protected marine reserve of Capo Rizzuto, a corner of heaven,’ he explains. His idea was to create the atmosphere of a still authentic Italian beach holiday: a place with only a dozen rooms where you could end up just watching the sea for days. Nearby towns such as Le Castella are also worth checking out, though. Odysseus is said to have been held prisoner in the castle here, which was sacked by legendary pirate Barbarossa in the 16th century, and the structure is a reminder of Calabria’s violent past when land-hungry Greeks, Romans, Saracens and Bourbons tried to conquer it. These influences can be seen in the diverse architecture of Norman forts, Byzantine citadels 


In the perfumed gardens I tuck into sticky croissants and sun-sweetened ďŹ gs


A street in Tropea. Opposite, tartufo al cioccolato at Bar Royal in the town


Sunbathers are splayed out on the hot rocks like melting caramel


Clockwise from this picture: Santa Maria dell’Isola monastery, Tropea; a HarleyDavidson; a bedroom at Praia Art Resort; playing cards at Aquamarina beach. Opposite, from top: local owers; a sitting room at Villa Paola

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and medieval churches and in the seafood and vegetables prepared with spices rarely found in other parts of Italy. There are some similarities with Sicily, from which this region is separated by a narrow stretch of sea. Here you’ll also find grilled swordfish, spicy sausages, stewed tomatoes and aubergine. But Calabria is distinct for its use of peperoncini chillies (there are more than 150 varieties, on display at a museum in the town of Pizzo) and arancia calabrese, an orange also known as bergamot. In a garden strung with lanterns at Il Giardino di Annibale in Le Castella I eat pizza topped with sweet onion from Tropea, the red variety renowned across the country. Tropea’s Vecchio Granaio serves tagliolini with the freshest tomatoes, shrimp and clams, and at Incipit, the town’s smartest restaurant, the speciality is an excellent fish soup. Exploring the coast and the interior, I see flashes of other places: the crumbling beauty and faded buildings of Palermo, and the azure waters and cotton-coloured sands of Sardinia, and yet for all the overlap Calabria has a particular wildness and a culture more recognisable from the Italy of the 1950s.

Of all the beach

spots I discovered, Tropea has to be Calabria’s loveliest. The village is situated on a cliff 100 metres above a sandy stretch. A gorgeous monastery, Santa Maria dell’Isola, hovers on an offshore promontory. In August the bright umbrellas and beach mats look straight out of a Slim Aarons photograph, with a perfectly spaced geometric medley of yellows and reds. When I descend to the shore the atmosphere is decidedly more raucous with locals playing volleyball, gossiping and splashing in the water in barely there swimming costumes. In the evening, I sip wine and watch the passeggiata, a crowd that grows in number as midnight approaches. The idea of bedtime seems absurdly Anglo-Saxon as bambini alternate between ice-cream highs and meltdowns. That night at Villa Paola, a peaceful hideaway outside Tropea, I fall into a deep sleep. The stately 16th-century former convent has been turned into an 11-room B&B. In the morning, sitting by a small pool that overlooks the cliff and perfumed gardens, I tuck into sticky marmalade-filled croissants and sun-sweetened figs. The tables look out onto Tropea and the Mediterranean in the distance. It’s completely captivating. But Calabria is not just about the sea. Roberto made me promise I would tear myself away from the sunbeds to see the Riace bronzes in Reggio Calabria, the Greek statues of naked warriors from about 450 bc. Everyone else must be at the beach, and I am alone with these perfectly rendered, almost life-like figures. Found on the seabed by a diver on holiday in the 1970s, they are among Italy’s most important treasures. There are Norman churches at Stilo, Bivongi and Gerace; Rossano holds one of the most significant early Christian bibles, and Rende is home to paintings by Mattia Preti, Calabria’s famed artist and a follower of Caravaggio. On my first night back in Tuscany I meet Roberto in the square. He and his family gather at a table with some of his homemade rosé, eager to hear my impressions. I talk about the soft, sandy coves, the beautiful churches, the villages, the spicy food, the warmth of the people and the astonishing antiquities. By the end his eyes slowly fill with tears. It’s not just because of the wine.

THE DETAILS Ryanair (ryanair.com) flies from Stansted to Lamezia. Hire a car with Avis (avis.co.uk). Praia Art Resort (praiaartresort.com) has doubles from about £320. Villa Paola (villapaolatropea.it) has doubles from about £215


GLOBETROTTER


AROUND THE WORLD WITH

MILA KUNIS The Ukrainian Golden Globe nominee, who starred alongside Natalie Portman in Black Swan and Mark Wahlberg in Ted, admits she is a huge Trekkie and was once addicted to the online game World of Warcraft

Where have you just come back from? ‘Seattle. My husband [actor Ashton Kutcher] and I just went there for our first-year anniversary. Sleepless in Seattle is one of our favourite films and I had always wanted to go. I’ve travelled the globe and been to some incredible places, but seen so little of America. We rented a houseboat for three days and it didn’t rain, so we got the chance to walk around and explore, which was wonderful.’

Everything always centred around food, and it still does. It doesn’t matter if it’s Easter, Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year… if there’s a reason to have a big get-together, we have it.’

Name a place that’s lived up to the hype ‘I’d seen photographs of hotels with little huts over the sea and they looked like paradise, but I thought this stuff cannot exist! Then, before our daughter Wyatt was born, Ashton surprised me with a trip to a tiny island off Bora Bora. And there they were, those overwater huts with glass in the floor so you can see the fish swimming in the ocean below.’

Which is your favourite city? ‘Jerez de la Frontera in Spain is a very special place for Ashton and I. When I lived in London during the filming of Jupiter Ascending, the most fantastic discovery I made was that for almost no money you can hop on a plane or train

And one that least lived up to the hype ‘When I was 20 I thought Las Vegas was amazing, but now I just want to get in and out of that city. There are too many people in a confined space. I need air.’

PHOTOGRAPH: PAUL JASMIN

Describe your favourite view ‘Nothing is as incredible as the vista from the top of a skyscraper in New York City, whether you’re looking down at the Hudson River or over Central Park. Manhattan is so iconic; just gazing out of the window of a yellow cab you know exactly where you are in an instant.’ What do you pack first? ‘We used to travel around the world with one backpack, but having a baby changes that a lot, let me tell you. A Pack ’N’ Play playpen does not fit into a backpack. Now, almost half our daughter’s bedroom has to come with us.’ Describe a childhood holiday memory ‘Being together with all my family on any given holiday having huge feasts.

First holiday without your parents? ‘When I was 17 or 18 my girlfriends and I spent New Year’s Eve at Big Bear Lake in California. We stayed in a horrible beaten-up old shack, but we loved it.’

‘I WANT MY PIZZA CRUST PAPER-THIN AND BURNT, AND THE ONLY PLACE I CAN GET THAT IS IN ITALY’ and be anywhere in Europe in a couple of hours. We really made the most of that; every weekend we’d go somewhere different. So we flew to Seville and drove to Jerez, and it truly is a magical town. It’s thought flamenco dancing originates in this part of the country. There’s music pouring out of the bars – it’s so lovely.’ Tell us about a great little place you know ‘Black Market Liquor Bar in Studio City, which is north-west of Los Angeles, is our local for quick and delicious tapas-style food. If we want something a little more romantic, there’s Carlitos Gardel restaurant in LA.’ Smartest hotel you’ve ever stayed in? ‘It’s both the greatest and weirdest, and definitely on the smart side: 21c Museum Hotel in Kentucky. It’s a

modern-art museum, but you get to sleep in it. If we’re not travelling for work we tend to stay in Airbnb places.’ Who is the most interesting person you’ve encountered on your travels? ‘In Japan I met real ninjas – they’re like everything you’ve read about in books.’ Which foreign phrase do you use most? ‘Ciao bella, for no reason other than I think it makes me sound fancy. Even in Russia I’d be shouting “ciao bella.”’ What’s your guilty pleasure? ‘Not travelling in economy class. I don’t need purses, shoes, jewellery, but love to travel and eat, and I enjoy doing both those things well and in comfort.’ What would you like in your mini-bar? ‘Some vodka and Jim Beam bourbon.’ Favourite holiday souvenir? ‘We collect Christmas ornaments from our trips – only the tacky ones. They are small enough to pack and don’t take up space in a suitcase. Ten years from now we’ll look at them and say, “Do you remember when we went to Belgium?” That ornament will always take us back to that particular trip.’ Nominate your 8th wonder of the world ‘Pizza in Italy. It’s the way that they make it, the flour they use, the craftsmanship. I want the crust paper-thin and burnt, and the only place I can get that is in Italy.’ How do you relax? ‘Well, a good start would be waking up after 6am. If the sun is already up, I am stoked. I love massages too, although I’m not picky as to where or from who; I just find the whole thing relaxing. Anyone who is willing to give me one will do.’

Mila Kunis stars in ‘Bad Moms’, which is out in cinemas now October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 157


IN BRITAIN

Clockwise from above left: sofa at design shop Rume; a bathroom at the Artist Residence hotel; Hove beach huts; The Set restaurant at the Artist Residence; opposite, a bedroom mural at the hotel


OUR SERIES OF UK INSIDER GUIDES CONTINUES WITH...

HOVE

PHOTOGRAPH: SIMON BENSON

BY EMMA LOVE. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX BAMFORD

Ask a local if they live in Brighton and the reply is often a mock-horrified ‘Hove, actually.’ The tongue-in-cheek phrase – apparently coined by one-time Brighton resident Laurence Olivier – acknowledges the distinct differences between the two seaside spots, despite the towns uniting as a city 15 years ago. Even though I grew up only half an hour along the coast, like many new visitors to the area I discovered the bright lights of Brighton first and only later came to know the quieter, quirkier beat of Hove. This is Brighton’s less lairy little sister, considerably more laid-back and low-key. Where Brighton has crowds thronging to shops in the Lanes, only the clued-in know where to source a mid-century sideboard in Hove or find the best fish supper. Where Brighton has hip-hop and indie nightclubs, Hove has pubs championing craft beer and a café on every corner. Brighton’s seafront is dominated by the Palace Pier and the new 170-metre i360 observation tower, but reach Hove and the beach is backed by green spaces and folk playing pitch and putt. Both towns are at their best when the sun shines.

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 159


Donna Grimaldi loves the 1950s and 1960s so there is always plenty from those decades (crepe floral dresses, faux-fur leopard-print coats) but also Harris tweed, Levi’s and French denim workwear jackets, and accessories such as sunglasses and head scarves tied up around the rungs of a mini stepladder in the corner. Anyone hunting mid-century furniture – second-hand but re-upholstered – should make a beeline for Keep It Vintage. A few new pieces by Broste Copenhagen (tableware, marble-effect monochrome cushions) are scattered among the chemistry bottles, old-fashioned mixing bowls and royalblue glass vases on the shelves. At long-established furniture shop Rume, all the made-to-order cabinets and sofas are designed by co-owner Richard Baker. But even if you’re not in the market for a yellow woollen three-seater, there are other great objects from Tom Dixon candle holders to Muuto coffee makers, and cushions by illustrator Kristiana S Williams and textiles queen Donna Wilson. I Gigi is split into two boutiques: the first for 160 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

women’s fashion (navy linen dresses; suede shopper bags; embroidered blouses by Day Birger et Mikkelsen); the second interiors. Here, everything has an understated Provençal palette – from the piles of grey House Doctor plates on a cream kitchen dresser at the back, to bowls filled with putty-coloured scented soaps, plants wrapped in brown paper, hessian baskets, wooden chopping boards and fig candles. While you’re mulling over what to buy, nip up the spiral staircase to the coffee shop. bobbyand dandy.co.uk; keepitvintage.com; rume.co.uk; igigigeneralstore.com

Duck in Bray). Its five-course tasting menu changes every few weeks and has included slip sole with seaweed butter, and a pretty plate of monkfish with carrot and anise purée, pancetta, braised lettuce and dainty dollops of squid ink. Everything is handmade, from the oven-warm bread to the salted-caramel ice cream. There are eight tables, all served by affable, front-ofhouse Robert Smith who keeps everyone’s glasses nicely topped up. thelittlefish market.co.uk; about £120 for two

No trip to the seaside is complete without at least one fish supper. Wolfies of Hove by the train station is run by a father-and-son team, Dave and Danny Keston, who have made it a chippie with a difference: unusual daily specials include stone bass, soft shell crab and Moroccan spiced fishcakes; the classic fish ’n’ chips order uses a homemade gluten- and dairy-free batter on sustainably harvested fish. At the other end of the scale is The Little Fish Market, owned by chef Duncan Ray (formerly of The Fat

is crowded with sticky treats – three-tier Victoria sponge, honey flapjacks, chocolate and beetroot cheesecake – and the lunch menu is chalked up on a rolling blackboard. Freshly pressed juices (vitamin C-boosting, cleansing and detoxing) are a hit too. The interior has quirky touches: illustrations of birds and a glass butterfly cabinet on the wall and kitsch Sixties animal lights on the tables. For a caffeine hit, head to Small Batch Coffee, a South-east outfit with a branch just off Church Road (the roastery is beside the train station) where you can sip shots of espresso and 

WHERE TO EAT

One of the best-loved cafés in town is Treacle & Co, CAFE CULTURE where the wooden counter PHOTOGRAPH: GRANT ROONEY/IMAGEBRIEF.COM

Bobby & Dandy is a

WHERE treasure trove for both TO SHOP men and women. Owner


IN BRITAIN

Clockwise from opposite left: owner Donna Grimaldi outside Bobby & Dandy; design shop Rume; vintage clothes at Bobby & Dandy; The Set at the Artist Residence; Dowse gallery and shop; Small Batch Coffee


IN BRITAIN

Pork, black pudding, crispy potatoes and carrots with hay at The Set restaurant. Left, retro cool at Bobby & Dandy

 brewed-to-order filter coffee while sitting on the outside wooden decking in the sun. It also sells brewing kit and coffee beans to go, and runs barista courses from its training lab in Brighton. treacleandco. co.uk; smallbatchcoffee.co.uk

Newcomer The Urchin

WHERE has a crisp interior of TO DRINK slate-grey walls, racinggreen leather banquettes and transparent globe lights with thick ropes running across the ceiling. But what regulars come for are the 130 varieties of craft beer, from Flying Dog pale ale to Brewdog’s Albino Squid Assassin Red Rye IPA. The pub runs occasional tasting nights where beers are paired with fish dishes. The Better Half (formerly The Red Lion, before it had a refurbishment under new ownership last year) is a more traditional but equally stylish bet. A copper bar takes centre stage; there are cosy booths and witty, Victorian-style portraits of dressed-up dogs mixed in with mirrored slogans (‘How’s Your Father’ and ‘Chin Up Son’) on the walls and ceiling. The beef and ale pie and generous Sunday roasts are delicious. urchinpub.co.uk; thebetterhalfpub.co.uk 162 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

There’s a surprising lack of art galleries in Hove so thank goodness for Cameron Contemporary Art, owned by Robin Cameron, a regular at the Affordable Art Fair in London. He puts on around eight painting and sculpture exhibitions a year by emerging and established British artists who you won’t see anywhere else in the South-east. Owner Susannah Dowse opened homeware store Dowse three years ago, which now doubles up as a gallery and studio. So yes, there are pineapple-print notebooks and Nordic cookery books, but the main draw are the framed prints – architectural sketches of the Eiffel Tower, phases of the moon – and Dowse’s own geometric gold and silver jewellery, pinned to a cork board by the till. cameroncontemporaryart. com; dowsedesign.co.uk

WHAT TO SEE

The renowned Sussex County Cricket Club has regular fixtures, as well as international threedayers. Forget sitting in the stands – bag a blue-and-white deckchair (the club colours). Much of the Hove stretch of the seafront is taken up with sport: pitch and

WHAT TO DO

putt, a paddling pool, a skateboard park and tennis courts. Plus, Lagoon Watersports runs wakeboarding, windsurfing and standup-paddleboarding lessons between April and November; Hove Lagoon is a sheltered, shallow spot that’s perfect for beginners. sussexcricket.co.uk; lagoon.co.uk. For more ideas see visitbrighton.com Strictly speaking, the Artist Residence is in Brighton, but it’s only a two-minute walk from Hove and the loveliest hotel to be based in. A pink door marks it out from the rest of the terraced houses on Regency Square. The Arty rooms are all different: one has a chirpy mural of sailing boats by Jamie Brown; in another there’s a stencil of a violinist by French graffiti artist Blek Le Rat. For something more pared-back ask for a House room, which have industrial lights, reclaimed furniture and exposed brick walls. The best of the bunch is room 21, with its sea-facing balcony, modern four-poster and copper roll-top bath. Downstairs is The Set restaurant and The Cocktail Shack, where bartender Matt sports a Hawaiian shirt and there’s a jazz soundtrack. artistresidence.co.uk; doubles from £90

WHERE TO STAY


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION

ready steady

revamp

COMO Metropolitan London has recently undergone a sleeker-thansleek revamp. Check out its latest masterclass in contemporary cool

I

n February 1997, COMO Hotels and Resorts (the name behind Parrot Cay) opened COMO Metropolitan London, an instant cutting-edge hit with both Londoners and those travelling through. Hip and minimalist, it dealt in pared-back luxury and attracted an en vogue crowd. Two decades on, it remains one of the hottest addresses in town; refreshing in its modern vision, with a brilliant revamp that yet again gives it an edge. Inspired by the flora of Hyde Park (on its Park Lane doorstep), the new-look lobby serves as the hotel’s super-swish hub, while the gorgeous redesigned rooms and suites are decked out in calming hues of green and berry, with an abundance of walnut and sycamore. Frette-clad king-sized beds appear to float on a wooden base, vast windows (complete with seats) max out on the park views and gadgets galore complete the utterly modern makeover.

Some things remain the same (for good reason). The COMO Shambhala Urban Escape is as dreamy as ever. Forget about everything in this peaceful sanctuary with its Zen-instilling yoga classes and array of Asian-based treatments. Two other venues that have clocked years of wow factor and still buzz the night away are the must-prop-up Met Bar with its creative cocktails and world-renowned Nobu, one of London’s top tables. Executive Chef Mark Edwards heads up its innovative kitchen, serving melt-in-themouth Peruvian-Japanese food to a stylish clientele. For anyone on a health drive, the legendary COMO

Shambhala Cuisine is also available, served in the lobby or via room service. Using raw foods and organic produce, healthy but super-tasty recipes get rave reviews from guests. So much so, that COMO Shambhala has just launched its first-ever cookbook: The Pleasures Of Eating Well, featuring 147 recipes taken from COMO kitchens around the world. From the Caribbean to Bali, the Maldives to the mountains of Bhutan, this is a gastronomic world journey to embark on from home. For further information, visit comohotels.com/metropolitanlondon Clockwise from top: a suite with park views at COMO Metropolitan London; a treatment at the COMO Shambhala Urban Escape; The Pleasures Of Eating Well; a kiwi shot; the hotel reception


splendid

isolation

We all long for a little place in the Mediterranean from time to time. Take your pick from CV Villas’ wonderful portfolio of properties across the Greek islands and make the dream a reality – for a week or two, at least...

P

erfect days don’t have to be complicated. A late breakfast on a sunlit terrace, a long swim in an azure sea, lunch beneath a twist of vines – picture a fresh, bright salad and perhaps a glass or two of wine. In the afternoon, a walk through lush green olive groves and then home for sunset drinks and fresh fish caught straight from the sea sizzling on the barbecue. Simple pleasures. Exactly what a holiday in Greece is all about. Book a house with CV Villas and you can be assured of a holiday that feels simple, but offers a level of comfort that makes every moment a pleasure. With over 200 properties dotted through the islands and mainland, there is a house to suit whatever your needs – whether you’re plotting a romantic escape à deux, or an unforgettable house party for friends and family.

Corfu There’s a reason Corfu was the first Greek island to welcome tourists: long stretches of sparkling sea, fringed with soft-sand beaches, pine forests and olive groves that ripple inland, sleepy villages where flower-

decked houses huddle around the cobbled main square. It’s an island that delivers, whatever your holiday needs; from the bright lights and stunning architecture of Corfu town, to the quiet hillsides and unspoilt coves on the north-east coast, around Clockwise from main image: Villa Reale, Mykonos; Villa Reale, Mykonos; Iviscus, Paxos; Kalamaki Bay House, Corfu; Villa Kyklamino, Crete. All available through CV Villas. Visit cvvillas.com for more information

Kassiopi and Agni. The CV Villas story began on Corfu, and its selection of houses on the island is second to none, with 119 houses to choose from. Couples will love the waterfront Apraos Studio, while the elegant Kaminaki House, sleeping six, is ideal for


T R AVELLER AD VERT ISEM EN T FEAT U RE

of all the Greek islands. The lattice of whitewashed streets and alleys that make up Mykonos Town are scattered with chic cocktail bars and stylish eateries, the coastline is fringed with white-sand beaches, while the picturesque village of Ano Mera gives a glimpse of Mykonos life as it used to be, with a clutch of simple tavernas around the cobbled main square. Mykonos’ party atmosphere makes it ideal for house parties, and CV’s eight properties are ideal for groups of friends or extended families. Pick the spectacularly-located Villa Reale, sleeping 16, with gorgeous views to the isle of Delos, or the wonderfully private Villa Alegria, sleeping 10 with five bedrooms and an oh-so private pool.

Crete The quintessential Greek island, Crete is steeped in history and legend; the birthplace of Gods and heroes, writers, artists and political leaders. Expect soaring mountains, studded with steep ravines and lush gorges that sheer down to pine-backed

beaches looking out to the dozens of islets around the coast. Everyone has their favourite part of Crete: from the boutique-dotted streets of Chania’s Old Town to the spectacular beaches south of Akoumia, famous for their lavender-hued sunsets. CV Villas has 19 properties scattered across Crete, from beautiful stone-built houses such as Palazzetto Xenia, sleeping 10, to contemporary, high-spec villas like Villa Anemone, sleeping 10, tucked away in the mountains, with glorious sea views. Visit cvvillas.com or call 020 7563 7993

families and The Boat House, sleeping 12, is the perfect pad for raise-the-roof get-togethers. There really is something for everyone.

Paxos If you looked up the phrase ‘Mediterranean charm’ in a dictionary, you’d probably find Paxos right there; swathed in pine forests, surrounded by turquoise seas and with a pace of life that never makes it much past a gentle potter. Beloved by sailors, days can be spent drifting from cove to cove on a hired motor-boat, or strolling the streets of Gaios, home to wonderfullypreserved Venetian architecture. There are 20 elegant villas in CV’s Paxos portfolio, all of which make the most of the area’s laid-back charms. Marmari, sleeping four, is tucked away on the gentle slopes near Loggos while Kalypso, sleeping six, is ideal for families with the nearest beach just footsteps away.

Mykonos, Cyclades Once nothing more than a simple fishing community, Mykonos has become one of the most cosmopolitan


Athens may claim a near monopoly on Europe’s bi-millennial marvels – but there’s nothing backward-looking about this spectacular city. Past, present and even future unite for a truly heavenly break in the City of the Gods

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Clockwise from main image: Acropolis Museum; the bar at Zonarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; By The Glass wine bar; reception at InnAthens Hotel; Heteroclito wine bar; Athens & Epidaurus Festival, Herodes Atticus Theatre; The Erechtheion at the Acropolis

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T R AV EL L ER P R O MO T I O N

BEST BOUTIQUE HOTELS InnAthens: showcases the sleek designs of architect Dionisis Sotovikis. The AthensWas: a new luxury design hotel from the Anemi Hotels Group. The Margi: SLH member, complete with organic farm, in the Athenian Rivieraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exclusive Vouliagmeni. oldest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and with 300 indigenous grape varieties, there are plenty of world-class wine routes. Visit art galleries: the Athenian art scene has witnessed an extraordinary revival, with modern independent galleries opening everywhere from warehouses to an old ice-cream

for two Evening strolls along ancient ruins; a romantic dinner at a roof garden restaurant with views of Athenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s temple; cocktails at a hip new wine bar or beachside club and restaurant; a play at the Herodes Atticus theatre under the Acropolis; an evening screening at an open-air cinema with breathtaking views; an intimate moment beside Poseidonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Temple; endless art galleries and museums, and even a spot of designer shopping: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible not

factory. Top recommendations include The Breeder Gallery, Astrolavos Art Galleries and Titanium Yiayiannios Gallery. Stay out: watch DQRSHQDLUÇŠOPXQGHUQLJKWVNLHV at Cine Thisio â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the best outdoor FLQHPDÇ&#x2026;LQWKHZRUOGZLWKWKHÇŞRRGOLW Acropolis above, or soak up the last rays of sun over a cocktail at one of Atticaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous beach bars â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from the fabulously fun Bolivar Beach Bar to the secluded oasis of Limanakia Beach Bar, perched on a rocky promontory. ³³

to fall in love with (and in) Athens. Take an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;alternativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; walk with the Big Olive, Alternative Athens, Athens Walks or Athens Walking Tours. From the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Urban Tribes of Athensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cool Athens Shopping Tourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, these excursions are the perfect way to discover an alternative side to Athens. Go wine tasting: Greek viticulture is one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

TOP VENUES FOR COUPLES Island: celebrated among the summertime coastal clubs. Heteroclito: centrally located example of how great Athenian wine bars can be. By the Glass: 200 labels and Mediterranean dishes served in a 19th-century building. Cookoovaya: the collective creation of five genius chefs. CTC: Mediterranean â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;urban gastronomyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Zonarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: 1940s art-deco brasserie in downtown Athensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; theatre district. Vezene: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;trendiest place in townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Funky Gourmet: the name says it all â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just add two Michelin stars. Kolonaki: upscale, hip and artistic. Ermou Street: high-street favourites and global names. Monastiraki: a pedestrianised area famed for vintage goods, antiques and books.


with the family Below: family holidays at Cape Sounio luxury hotel. Bottom: The National Gardens

to gawp at; planetary movements

Mount Olympus; stand on stages

BEST FAMILY HOTELS Domotel Kastri: a historic hotel completely refurbished, with its own four-acre pinewood forest. Electra Metropolis Hotel: based in the former Ministry for Culture building, now a five-star luxury complex in Syntagma Square. Cape Sounio: set on a breathtaking headland in Attica, an hour’s drive from Athens, offering private suites and family villas, a spa and water sports.

TOP EXPERIENCES FOR FAMILIES The Acropolis and the Acropolis Museum: ancient monuments, even older than grandad – imagine that. Goulandris Museum of Natural History: Greek insects, mammals, birds, reptiles, shells and fossils, plus over 200,000 species of botanicals – and they’re still discovering more each year... Eugenides Foundation: a 280-seat planetarium with a 950-square-metre hemispherical dome, offering 3D virtual trips to the galaxy, IMAX movies and other shows. Children’s Walking Tours by Alternative Athens: whether re-enacting the feats of Athena, the goddess of wisdom, law, courage, warfare, mathematics, strength and arts, or discovering the secrets of the Greek forests and their accompanying ancient myths, these walks are guaranteed to enthrall even the shortest of attention spans. Outdoor cinema: a magical take on an old family favourite. Guided tour


T R AV E L L E R P R O M O T I O N

of the Ancient Agora: a taste of everyday life in the cradle of Western civilisation. Attica Zoological Park: a unique journey to the five continents, through the lives of over 2,000 animals from 350 species. Vouliagmeni Lake and caves: a massive cave system, white cliffs and clear, blue-green waters – perfect for a family picnic. The Athenian Riviera: gorgeous beaches and calm seas, within easy reach of the city. Day cruise around the Saronic Gulf: see three lovely islands – Aegina, Poros and Hydra – in one day. For more info go to visitgreece.co.uk or contact your favourite travel operator.

Clockwise from top: Cape Sounio lobby lounges; flamingos at Attica Zoo Park; cuisine at The Restaurant, Cape Sounio


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FLAVOUR HUNTER WHAT TO EAT AND DRINK AROUND THE WORLD RIGHT NOW EDITED BY TABITHA JOYCE

TABLE TO BOOK

PHOTOGRAPH: IDHA LINDHAG

CRAFT ALES FINALLY TAKE A BACKSEAT AS A SLICK SWEDISH BAR LURES LAGER LOVERS Stockholm’s sipsters have long had an obsession with craft beers, microbrews and pale ales sold in limited-edition batches. But the main draw at middle-European-style Bar Central is the traditional Pilsner Urquell contained in two stainless-steel tanks beneath the countertop. Made in a small Czech village since 1842, this golden lager has set the global standard for the drink. It’s still only produced in its home town, and this Swedish joint’s ‘tankovna’ system takes weekly deliveries of unpasteurised Pilsner straight from Pilsen. Classic Central European food is having a moment to match, with hearty German, Hungarian and Austrian dishes on the menu. Regulars from Spotify’s nearby headquarters pop in for salmon lángos (deep-fried Hungarian flatbread) and homemade Thüringer sausages with sauerkraut. Maybe Stockholmers will embrace the Czech tradition of drinking Pilsner for breakfast too. ERICA LANDIN barcentral.se. About £65 for two

October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 171


FIGS IN MARSALA WINE: butter a small baking dish or ovenproof pan big enough to fit the figs snugly. Halve and place into the dish cut side up. Pour the Marsala wine over the fruit until almost immersed and scatter with golden caster sugar. Halve a vanilla pod lengthways and tuck around the figs, along with a couple of sprigs of thyme. Roast at 160ºC for 10 minutes, then baste with the liquid and roast for a further five to 10 minutes or until tender and just beginning to turn golden. Carefully remove the figs from the pan and reduce the liquid over a fairly high heat on the hob until syrupy. To serve, spoon the jus over the fruit.

PHOTOGRAPH: ZAIRA ZAROTTI

THIS MONTH’S RECIPE


FLAVOUR HUNTER

WORLD ON A PLATE THE INGREDIENT: FIGS

EAT ME

DRINK ME

BY JOANNA WEINBERG

BY MALCOLM GLUCK

The last of the Mediterranean summer brings with it the wonderful possibilities of encountering a laden fig tree in all its generosity. But back at home, buying just four figs at a local market is a shock for the purse. Either way, the luscious fruit are begging to be feasted on any which way you can. Believed to be a native of western Asia, figs can be found across a huge area, stretching from eastern Iran to the Med. There are more than 750 varieties: some grow high on branches or on plants dangling from other trees; some ripen underground; others trail across the desert on low shrubs. What is unique to the genus is that the flower is enclosed inside the fruit itself. Figs have been cultivated as food for thousands of years. They were grown in King Nebuchadnezzar’s Hanging Gardens of Babylon and mentioned in The Odyssey. At one point in Ancient Greece, figs were in such high demand it was against the law to export them. Slightly more recently, the Black Mission fig was introduced to California by Spanish missionaries in the 18th century, and it’s now a significant crop in the USA. Long ago herbalists and physicians prescribed figs for almost every ailment. Pliny the Elder declared them to be the best food for those brought low by long sickness, and Greek herbalist Dioscorides devoted three chapters of his De Materia Medica to the stuff. In the Middle Ages they were thought to cleanse kidneys, counteract poisons and aid childbirth. While it is only the female fig trees that produce edible fruit, they’ve long been associated with male fertility – possibly due to their appearance. The great decision is not so much how, but whether to cook them at all. A perfect fig – just beginning to weep its ripeness in fat tears of nectar – is not for cooking. To pick, to eat? Cradle

Figs, it seems to me, are the most seductively advanced fruit one can imagine. For what is a fruit? It is a delivery system for seeds, one designed to make itself irresistibly available to any greedy mammal or bird, which in snacking off the sweetly alluring flesh also ingests the embryos of future plants and thus becomes its midwife. Nature has it all worked out. Until, that is, our chef comes into the picture and not only drowns them in Marsala but bungs them in the oven to bake. But the plant’s loss of future progeny in this wicked way is our immense gain: here we have a dish to make even a Midas giddy with lust. And that liquid purple and gold on the plate requires liquid gold in the glass. If those figs are being served at a dinner party with a goodly number of hedonists, then isn’t a magnum of sweet wine fitting?

CRADLE THEM AS YOU MIGHT A BABY’S HEAD. THEY DESERVE MORE RESPECT THAN TO BE MUNCHED OFF THE TREE them as carefully as you might a newborn baby’s head; they deserve more respect than to be munched straight off the tree. Much value lies in their shape: present them whole or halved lengthways to appreciate both their form and their hidden secrets. Paired with salty food, their natural sweetness shines; they are the original mate for cured ham. Eat with salty tangy cheese – blue, possibly goat’s – and a scattering of thyme. Those less than perfect, a little bruised or not quite sweet enough – and this is the case nine times out of 10 – are reserved for cooking. As a footnote, remember that figs like to be warm; they should never encounter a fridge in their raw state.

HERE IS A SUMPTUOUSLY PERFUMED WINE IN WHICH ANY FIG WOULD LOVE TO BE DROWNED AND BAKED I suggest a Barsac from Château Climens. The 1989 vintage would be perfect, for it was a bold year in Bordeaux, and we need a bold wine for this dish. Climens offers melodramatic layers of burnt honey, touches of butterscotch and stone fruit, and a suggestion of tangerine rind along with something I can only describe as toffeéd rosewater. It is a sumptuously perfumed wine in which any fig would be happy to be drowned, baked and then set alongside. The magnum costs £197 at Berry Bros & Rudd (bbr.com), which, for a 27-year-old sweet Sémillon in great vintage, is not an ugly price. True, it’s a gamble – a wine that old that has been sealed with a cork for so long means each bottle tells a different story. Best buy a few magnums, then, to be on the safe side. If, though, such a wine seems a bit too rich for your blood, and there are just the two of you sitting down to those figs, then a half bottle of pudding wine will certainly suffice. The one I recommend is Rustenberg Straw Wine 2015 from the Cape made from Chenin Blanc, Viognier and Crouchen Blanc grapes dried on straw mats, which concentrates the sugars mightily (£11.99 from Majestic; £9.99 if you buy more than six bottles, and £13.49 at waitrosecellar.com). The result is a raisiny, slightly sultry wine with an undertone of bitter marmalade. It has, however, one huge advantage over the Climens: it is sealed with a screw cap. There is, then, no gamble involved when you open it. Indeed, you could even lay it down for 27 years and it still ought to be drinkable. Something, alas, no wine sealed with a cork for so long can guarantee to be. October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 173


FLAVOUR HUNTER FRESHLY DUG POTATOES FROM BALLYMALOE, IRELAND

CHEF’S SECRET SUPPLIES

APRIL BLOOMFIELD AFTER 13 YEARS OF HEADING UP MICHELINSTARRED GASTROPUB THE SPOTTED PIG IN NEW YORK, APRIL IS BACK ON BRITISH SOIL TO CO-RUN A DELICIOUS FARM WITH ROOMS. SHE REVEALS HER ALL-TIME FAVOURITE GLOBAL KITCHEN FINDS

‘The owners of the Ballymaloe Cookery School are great friends, and on my last trip there I boiled some potatoes fresh from the ground for the flight back to New York. I ate them with some Irish butter, asparagus and poached salmon – so much better than your average plane food.’

JAPANESE APRON FROM TOKYO ‘I love this style of apron and have collected a few from Tokyo over the years. They’re simple, utilitarian and hard-wearing, which is exactly what I need. The one I wear most is blue with a fine pinstripe and a slit down the middle, making it easy to move around the kitchen.’

SELVAPIANA EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL FROM TUSCANY ‘One of the greatest things I took away from working at The River Café was the importance of the quality of ingredients. And the olive oil from the Selvapiana estate is the best. It’s made solely from Frantoio olives and has a peppery finish.’

STONE FRUIT FROM SAN FRANCISCO ‘This city has the most delicious peaches, plums and apricots. I try to bring back a case of the stuff from Frog Hollow Farm each time I go. It’s on the outskirts of San Francisco and it has a great farm-to-table café too.’

TAGINE FROM MOROCCO ‘It was in a souk in Marrakech that I found the best tagine pot. I bought it years ago, but miraculously still has its base intact. When I’m upstate in New York during the summer, it gets so much use I worry each time I cook with it will be the last.’

HAGGIS FROM SCOTLAND

A MISONO KNIFE FROM TSUKIJI FISH MARKET ‘The Japanese really do make the best knives – I picked one up on an early-morning trip to the market in Tokyo. It’s a western-style Japanese blade made in a town called Seki. Misono has a 750-year history in knife-crafting so there’s no doubt its artisans know what they’re doing.’

CURED MEATS FROM ITALY ‘I brought back loads of lardo and speck from a salumi course I did there – they’re just so much better than anywhere else. It’s easier to find great international produce around the world now, but nothing will ever beat cured meat from Italy.’ April is executive chef and co-owner of six restaurants in the USA, and has just opened Coombeshead Farm, a working farm with rooms and restaurant in Cornwall. coombesheadfarm.co.uk 174 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: ART + COMMERCE; DAVID LOFTUS; GRAYDON MICHAEL

‘I once brought back some haggis from a trip to northern Scotland and cooked it for people to try at the restaurant where I worked in at the time. I’d say it’s quite rare – in both the UK and the USA – to see authentic, quality haggis on a menu, so it sold out pretty quickly.’


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION

10

out of

10

Malaysia gets top marks for nature, culture, adventure, food and luxury. Discover a land of diversity

O

4 DANUM VALLEY CONSERVATION AREA

1 KUALA LUMPUR

5 TIOMAN ISLAND

No KL stopover is complete without shooting up to the top of the 88-storey twin Petronas Towers, feasting on local specialities at Jalan Alor or succumbing to some serious retail therapy.

An hour’s flight off the east coast, this jungle hideout is tear-your-passport-up territory. Twin volcanic peaks, golden sand, mountain streams and lush rainforest set the scene for a barefoot reality break.

2 CAMERON HIGHLANDS

6 KINABALU PARK

Malaysia’s hill station: its cool climate provides wonderful respite. Blue peaks, green hills, tumbling rivers and rolling tea plantations: perfect for time out, trekking and a cup of tea.

Kinabalu Park is home to Mount Kinabalu, a favourite among adventurous souls keen to scale its heights. The view from the summit is perspectivechanging, especially at sunrise.

3 LANGKAWI

7 PANGKOR LAUT

Mystery, myth and legend shroud the beautiful island of Langkawi. Trek through its 10-millionyear-old rainforest, kayak the mangroves, dive the psychedelic ocean and flop on the beach.

Private islands don’t get better than super-serene Pangkor Laut. Only a fraction of the 300 acres has been developed, the rest is wilderness where time stands as still as the ancient land.

ften overlooked in favour of its neighbours, those who off-road to this beguiling country find a destination bursting with colour, vibrancy, beauty and an almost infinite bucket list of things to do. Here are just a few of Malaysia’s highlights.

This extraordinary place far away from civilisation is worth the journey for the chance to spot the clouded leopard, orangutan, Asian elephant and extremely rare Sumatran rhinoceros.

Clockwise from top: Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park; waterfall on Tioman Island; Cameron Highlands Tea Plantation

8 BATU CAVES Put your stamina to the test and climb the 272 steps to Temple Cave. Visit during Thaipusam (February 2017) and witness one of the world’s largest religious festivals when the caves throng with Hindu devotees.

9 KABILI-SEPILOK NATURE RESERVE Trek from tropical highland forest to lowland mangrove swamp and visit Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre to get up close and personal with these incredible beasts.

10 TUNKU ABDUL RAHMAN MARINE PARK Five islands (Gaya, Manukan, Mamutik, Sapi and Sulug) attract an eco-traveller crowd for islandhopping, swimming and diving. Think Robinson Crusoe meets The Jungle Book. For further information, visit malaysia.travel


FLAVOUR HUNTER

TASTE BUZZ

SALTED-EGG-YOLK CROISSANTS The craze First New York went mad for Dominique Ansel’s cronut, then out of San Francisco came the cruffin. But the latest pastry-combo obsession is the salted-egg-yolk croissant. Gooey and flaky, the crowd-pleasing snack is made by stuffing a buttery French croissant with the salty custard from a liu sha bao – a traditional Chinese steamed bun – resulting in a satisfyingly sweet-savoury shot.

SIP TRIP

MEXICAN

MEZCAL

Drinking mezcal, Mexicans say, doesn’t make you drunk – it makes you closer to god. They also say that if you talk a load of rubbish while you’re busy getting closer to god, or if you subsequently wake up with a thumping hangover, then you weren’t taking your mezcal correctly. It was you who profaned the drink, not the other way around. A spiritual lesson to live by, my brothers and sisters. Mezcal is mostly produced in Oaxaca, by rudimentary means, in minute quantities – the hipster term for which, if you can bear it, is nano batches. The piña, or heart of the agave plant, is roasted in underground pits (hence

IF YOU WAKE UP WITH A THUMPING HANGOVER, THEN YOU WEREN’T TAKING YOUR MEZCAL CORRECTLY the smokiness), fermented in leather vats (hence the flavoursome X-factor) and distilled to proof (high to very high, hence the godliness). The Spanish conquistadors saw mezcal as a threat to their authority and banned it. In the centuries that followed, mezcaleros grew accustomed to producing it on the down-low. Today they face a far greater threat. Their outlaw hooch has suddenly become very cool and covetable. How to manage this new tilt in the balance between supply and demand? Producing more mezcal is practically out of the question – agave plants take up to 15 years to grow and each piña yields only a tiny amount of distillate. And producing bad mezcal would be, well, an affront to the almighty. STEVE KING 176 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: ADALBERTO RIOS SZALAY/AGE FOOTSTOCK; REBECCA SAW

Try IT This concoction of croissant made its debut at Urban Bakery Works in Hong Kong, where queues formed around the block on day one as the store churned out more than 1,000 of them. Then Malaysia was hooked at Le Bread Days in Kuala Lumpur and Seven Oaks Bakery Café in Johor Bahru before the trend reached Singapore. It sold out within half an hour of hitting the shelves at Flavour Flings, and has quickly spread to a handful of joints across the city. In London, meanwhile, Shotgun chef Brad McDonald has started to fill his signature 1235 doughnuts with the custard – a new hybrid of his own. CHLOE SACHDEV


T

IME PASSES SWIFTLY AT THIS LUXURY ISLAND RESORT.

ORIGINS SAFARIS AUTHENTIC AFRICAN EXPERIENCES SINCE 1963.

At Origins Safaris we are passionate about ensuring a unique and authentic safari that suits your requirements. A holiday to an African destination is a powerful experience full of excitement, adventure, exploration, romance and raw simplicity; whether you want exclusive boutique hotels with butler service & helicopter rides or the simple yet true heart of African adventure and wildlife. Origins Safaris can make your dreams come true. We are so much more than just a travel broker - our professionalism and reliability means that we go the all important extra mile, to make sure your dream safari (whether on the beach or in the bush) is safe, memorable, educational and most of all, great fun.

The Racha is Thailand’s premier sanctuary for mind, body and spirit. Located on Racha Yai, one of the Andaman Sea’s most beautiful islands, the resort offers ultra-luxurious accommodations for guests who wish to ‘get-away-from-it-all’ without taking anything away from the environment.

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FLAVOUR HUNTER

Eat the street A stash of native ingredients and razor-sharp chefs transformed Lima into a foodie powerhouse. Now leafy Avenida La Mar, in the Miraflores district, has become the culinary frontline for experiencing Peru’s raw repertoire 8am: Breakfast

El Pan de la Chola, No 918 Anglo-Peruvian Jonathan Day’s all-day bakery serves up near-perfect coffee, batons of fresh bread and his infamous pecan bars to the hordes of handsome Limeños that descend on it every morning. Slump down by the window with a piece of banana bread and watch the world go by. facebook.com/El-Pan-de-la-Chola 10am: Super snack

Punto Organico, No 718 The average Peruvian larder is a rainbow-coloured, antioxidant-abundant, super-foodie fantasy. This delightful independent health-food shop stocks all the highlights: purple sweetcorn, golden berries, pink potatoes and quinoa in every colour. Take some sugar-free carrot cake home or stop off at the raw-food café for a nutrient-packed turmeric juice. puntoorganico.com 1pm: Lunch

El Mercado (Av Hipólito Unanue 203) In Lima they take their ceviche seriously. So seriously that the top cevicherias are lunch-only affairs, ensuring the morning catch is served at its very freshest. First among many is Rafael Osterling’s El Mercado (all pictures left), tucked down a side street just off La Mar in a beautiful Art Deco townhouse. Try the tiraditos, sashimi-like sliced raw fish, or the shrimp burger. rafaelosterling.pe 4pm: pick-me-up

La Mar, No 770 This outpost of one of Peru’s top chefs, Gaston Acurio, is packed right up until its 5.30pm closing time. Perch at the bar and order its immaculate Pisco Sour, a kneebuckling blend of sugar syrup, lemon juice, stiffened egg white and three shots of Pisco. lamarcebicheria.com

Amorelado (Ignacio Merino 525) Fortify yourself for a walk along Miraflores’ epic cliff-top boardwalk (only three blocks away) with an ice cream from this cute little vendor on the corner of Ignacio Merino. The mango is joyously fruity, the pistachio exquisite. facebook.com/amorelado 8.30pm: Dinner

Pescados Capitales, No 1337 Limeños flock here for the chef’s delicious take on causa, a classic dish made from cold mashed potato and served like a California roll around prawns and avocado. Sit in the elegant courtyard and go off-piste with one of its famous fusion dishes such as Patience, a South Asian-spiced ceviche. pescadoscapitales.com DAVID ANNAND British Airways (ba.com) flies direct to Lima from Gatwick 178 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: MARCO SIMOLA/IMAGEBRIEF.COM; PHOSS

5.30pm: Ice cream


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Indulge in luxurious spa treatments and stunning sea views at the Cary Arms in Babbacombe Bay, Devon, which is offering Condé Nast Traveller readers 30% off its Short Getaway Spa & Beach Hut Package. The package includes three nights in one of the gorgeous new beach huts, as well as breakfast, dinner, a £25 spa gift voucher and a welcome bottle of fizz, from £475pp. Call 018032 327110 or email enquiries@caryarms.co.uk and quote CNT Spa Offer. Valid from 15/9/16 – 15/12/16. Terms & conditions apply.

Located in the heart of Manhattan’s Theatre District and two blocks from Times Square, The Chatwal Hotel is perfectly placed for a New York break. Although with the personal butler service, treatments at the renowned spa, a modernAmerican restaurant and a chic bar, you may find it hard to leave the hotel. Condé Nast Traveller readers can enjoy 15% off accommodation. To book email reservations@thechatwalny.com. Valid 24 June – 5 September 2017. Terms & conditions apply.

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T RAVELLER PROM OT ION

explore

in splendour

Set sail on an exotic winter voyage aboard Seabournâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ă&#x20AC;HHWRILQWLPDWHÂżYHVWDUVKLSV

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rom the mysteries of the Orient to secluded Caribbean harbours and the Amazon; when it comes to Seabournâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ultra-luxury winter cruises, there is an abundance of exotic, far-f lung destinations to choose from. Life on the intimate, allinclusive ships, Odyssey, Sojourn and Quest (plus, from December, the new Seabourn Encore, which is the latest addition to the ďŹ&#x201A;eet) feels more like staying at a chic boutique hotel than being on the water; the main difference is the constantly changing vista from the deck. Most of the spacious suites come with private verandas and all have mini-bars that are stocked with welcome champagne and your favourite tipple; service by the almost clairvoyant-like, thoughtful staff

is impeccable; and the gourmet dining options, which include a culinary collaboration with Michelin-starred chef Thomas Keller, rival the ďŹ nest restaurants anywhere. Like a private club where members share expansive open decks and inviting social spaces, you can dine where, when and with whoever you wish â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the best bit is that no one has to pick up the bill at the bar at the end of the night. One of the other joys of being onboard a ship with just 458 guests is that it can dock in ports that larger ships wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ t. So on a 14-night Thailand and Vietnam cruise from Singapore to Hong Kong, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll not only see the skyscrapers that make up the city


Clockwise from top: Amazonian water lilies; an artist impression of The Retreat onboard Seabourn Encore; Seabourn’s unique ‘caviar in the surf’ beach party; Halong Bay, Vietnam

skylines in Shanghai and Taipei but also venture deeper into the heart of Asia to discover authentic places such as Sihanoukville in Cambodia and the 1,600 limestone islands and islets that form Vietnam’s stunning Halong Bay. A 21-night Brazil and The Amazon voyage offers the chance to spend time in South America, one of the world’s most vibrant continents with colourful, colonial cities, pastel plantations and the remains of Mayan civilisation. Sail more than a thousand miles into the forested depths, on the world’s longest river, to witness the exuberant celebrations of the Caboclos people while tucking into a festive dinner on a hidden-away white-sand beach, backed by lush jungle. And in the Caribbean, a 14-night round-trip from Barbados takes in off-the-beaten track ports such as Deshaies in Guadeloupe and Jost Van Dyke on the British Virgin Islands, where watersports off the back of the ship are a must (don’t miss the delicious caviar that’s served in the surf either). On the opposite side of the world, Seabourn Encore is due to set sail for its inaugural season in Australasia where the Great Barrier Reef, the sun-swept splendour of Sydney Harbour, cosmopolitan Melbourne, Auckland and Wellington and the rustic, charming, little-visited Oban (on Stewart Island, the last inhabited

land before Antarctica where the local phonebook fits onto one typed page) are all part of the life-enriching Auckland to Sydney itinerary. This striking new ship, with contemporary interiors by design icon Adam D Tihany, has one additional deck and yet another special-occasion dining alternative, The Grill by Thomas Keller. Whichever ship you are on, though, there are opportunities to visit local markets with the chefs, taste regional wine and local food specialities, and sign up for guided tours of fascinating UNESCO World Heritage Sites (the company has a unique partnership with UNESCO, so experts also come on board to chat to guests as well as guide them) – just some of the many special experiences offered by Seabourn. A perfect way to swap dark winter days for a dose of sunshine, while travelling between a hand-picked selection of must-see exotic destinations in sumptuous yet understated style. Seabourn offers worldwide destinations for 2017 from Mediterranean and Baltic cities through to the Caribbean and Panama Canal, Asia, Australasia, Alaska and even the white continent of Antarctica. To find out more, call 0843 373 2000 or visit seabourn.co.uk


©2016 The Islands Of The Bahamas

It’s Better In The Bahamas bahamas.com

| + 44 (0) 20 7355 0800


the islands of

The Bahamas

Sun-drenched beaches, emerald-green shallows and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third-largest barrier reef make The Bahamas one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most desirable destinations: but these are just the tip of the conch shell when it comes to paradise. Discover the rich bounties of these beautiful islands, just a nine-hour direct-flight away with British Airways

PRODUCED BY I N A S S O C I AT I O N W I T H

PROMOTIONS


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: BEACH AT THE COVE ATLANTIS; DEAN'S BLUE HOLE, LONG ISLAND; MAP OF ISLANDS OF THE BAHAMAS; A SWIMMING PIG; THE EXUMAS CONCH SALAD PREPARATION AT CHAT 'N' CHILL, STOCKING ISLAND; THE WORD 'HAMMOCK' COMES FROM THE TAINO INDIANS. CENTRE: DOLPHINS CAN BE SEEN IN THE WILD

I N T R O D U CT I O N A nation of 16 main islands, hundreds of cays and islets, covering over 250,000 square kilometres; beaches among the world’s best; the clearest of waters, with visibility of over 60 metres; the world’s third-largest barrier reef; 315 days of sunshine a year – no wonder The Bahamas has become famous as one of the most quintessentially escapist destinations on earth. Indeed, its name means ‘shallow waters’, and its flag symbolises the sun, sea and sand for which it is famed.

authentic bahamas

Look beyond the gently shelving beaches and kaleidoscopic seas if you can, and these picture-postcard islands are an alluring blend of past and present; nature and nurture; recreation and relaxation; simple island style and five-star luxury. Juxtaposed between the Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea, they are steeped in tales of swashbuckling heroics (including those of their first Royal Governor); legendary lost underwater cities; mysterious natural roads on the sea bed and lovelorn inamoratas turned to stone. Gloriously enigmatic ‘blue holes’ create cavernous circles of indigo waters in the endless turquoise expanses – including Dean’s Blue Hole: plunging 202 metres into the sea, it is the deepest inland blue hole in the world. Beneath the crystalline waters, the largest known underwater cave system stretches horizontally and vertically around and even under the islands, providing a home for a multitude of fish and pelagics (here alone you can swim in the

open ocean with dolphins, dive with sharks and explore the mystery of sunken ships on a single diving holiday). It’s a watery wonderland that also provides the backdrop to a plethora of water-based pleasures, from snorkelling to scuba diving, bonefishing and power boating to sloop racing. Yet the fun continues on land: cricket, baseball, basketball, football and track and field events are all favourite national pastimes. Alternatively, you can explore the islands’ 2,400 cays by boat, plane or ferry and once on island, take a kayak, bike, horse or jeep safari. The islands’ rich past makes its presence felt at every turn: prehistoric drawings can be found in its ancient cave systems; in ruined 19th-century plantation houses, historic forts and the beautiful pink buildings of Nassau’s Parliament Square; in Georgetown’s 130-year-old St Andrews Anglican Church and the Government’s Administration Building; in the Pompey Museum of Slavery &

Emancipation and the islands’ own Versailles-inspired garden. It’s a history that still lives on in the deep-rooted Bahamian culture. Foodies can enjoy a wealth of flavours: Bahamian, Caribbean, European, Asian and even fusion. Festival lovers can get into the islands’ groove at the annual three-day Bahamian Music & Heritage Festival; the Bahamas Seafood and Heritage Festival and the annual regattas. Not to mention the various Junkanoo celebrations year-round, culminating in the Junkanoo Festival held on Boxing Day and New Year’s Day (the Bahamian equivalent of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras): a colourful extravaganza of uniquely Bahamian parades, music, drums and flamboyant costumes guaranteed to get you in the festive mood. Unsurprisingly, this is a land (and sea) that has inspired writers for decades – such as Ernest Hemingway – and provided the backdrop to countless movies (who can forget Daniel Craig

emerging from those shallow waters in Casino Royale?). Climb to a cliff-top to take in breathtaking views of Atlantic waves along the eastern coasts of the islands; flop on Harbour Island’s famous pink sands; or stargaze under the blanket of constellations and shooting stars in the vast night skies of The Bahamas’ biggest island, Andros, and you cannot fail to feel inspired, too. But The Bahamas is also about the simpler pleasures: strolling through the Straw Market for authentic Bahamian crafts; trying your luck in a well that is said to hold the key to eternal youth; kicking off your shoes, slipping on a sarong, and settling in for a Bahamian breakfast of grits and stewed fish; catching up with the everfriendly locals over conch salad or fresh lobster on the beach; watching a game of dominoes on the dock – even swimming with pigs. Yes, swimming with pigs. The Bahamas is a land full of vast new horizons in every way. ba.com/bahamas


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas N AS S A U / PA R A D I S E ISL AND Home to the capital, Nassau, New

Providence forms a natural hub for visitors to The Islands Of The Bahamas. With its central role comes the best of old and new: here you can walk in the footsteps of swashbuckling legends at the Pirates of Nassau museum; get a taste for the local tipple at a rum distillery; wander the local markets for artisan crafts (don’t miss the Straw Market on Bay Street); or enjoy a visual insight into island life at the National Art Gallery Of The Bahamas. And when you’re done shopping and sightseeing, you’re never far from the water, with water sports, harbour cruises, Atlantis’s spectacular Aquaventure water park on Paradise Island – complete with water and river slides, pools and rock climbing – and a multitude of other islands, including Eleuthera and The Exumas, an easy boat trip away. GRAND BAHAMA ISL AND Grand Bahama Island squeezes in

some impressive superlatives. Beyond its glorious beaches, divers can explore some of The Bahamas’ finest wrecks and reefs, interact with dolphins and sharks or take on marlin, tuna, wahoo, barracuda and bonefish in one of the world’s top sportfishing regions. Nature lovers will love Lucayan National Park, boasting six eco-systems and one of the world’s longest underwater limestone cave systems (the more adventurous can access the park via kayak through the mangrove creeks).

The Garden Of The Groves overflows

with birds and butterflies, flitting to a backdrop of waterfalls; jeep safaris add an off-road element to the tropical nature experience; while sailing, windsurfing and parasailing give you a ‘big blue’ view of the high seas. And when you finally come back down to earth, the island’s epicentre of culture and cuisine is its Port Lucaya Marketplace, with a wealth of local, European and fusion offerings and evening entertainment in Count Basie Square.

ISLAND

I N S I G H TS

Get a taste of food, culture and the history with the Tru Bahamian Food Tours

T H E E X U M AS

Think of a fabulous film beach scene – from Pirates Of The Caribbean to James Bond (indeed, six of these in all) – and it was almost certainly shot in The Exumas. Little wonder, then, that days here tend to revolve around the water, whether scuba diving, fishing, snorkelling,

sailing, power boating – or simply exploring the world’s first marine reserve. Clear waters (with 30-metre visibility), beautiful coral reefs and abundant marine life, including turtles and nurse sharks, come as standard: eyeballing iguanas on Allan’s Cay and the famed swimming pigs of Big Major Cay, nicknamed Pig Island, are all The Exumas’ own. So too is the magical underground Thunderball Grotto; romantic Three Sisters Beach; and Georgetown – quiet, sunny (and not far from the Tropic Of Cancer beach) and charming, whether exploring the 150-year-old buildings, perusing the Straw Market for authentic Bahamian crafts and fresh fruits or simply enjoying the views across its yacht-filled bay.


ISLAND

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: BIG JOHN’S, BIMINI; END OF THE WORLD SALOON, BIMINI; THE DELPHI CLUB AT ROLLING HARBOUR, THE ABACOS; BRENDAL'S CATCH, THE ABACOS; JUMPING BOY ON ELEUTHERA

I N S I G H TS Don't leave The Bahamas without visiting at least one of the Out Islands

the quintessential castaway island. Stumble upon one of its ancient caves systems, with prehistoric drawings and artefacts, or through the ruins of 18th-century plantations, and the sense of mystique only deepens. And then there is nature’s greatest mystery: Dean’s Blue Hole, the world’s deepest inland blue hole, its colour graduations truly spectacular whether viewed from within them or from a cliff-top above. Add serene beaches, superb deep-sea and bonefishing, fabulous ocean views from the likes of Columbus Point and the raw beauty of the isolated Columbus Lagoon – home to endangered green turtles and manta rays that swim along its drop-off – and Long Island is undoubtedly the stuff of fantasies. BIMINI

ELEUTHERA/ HARBOUR ISL AND

Three kilometres wide, Eleuthera is small but perfectly formed. Pristine nature takes centre stage here: turquoise shallows lap the perfect pink sands for which the island is famed; Ocean Hole’s indigo depths – said to have healing properties and certainly home to an impressive selection of fish and turtles – plummet beneath the turquoise shallows; while the dramatic Glass Window Bridge rock formation provides simultaneous Atlantic Ocean and Exuma Sound views. Gaze hard enough and you’ll spot one of the other glorious nearby islands, inviting exploration. One thing is certain: you will soon feel the sense of ‘freedom’ for which the island is named. A short water taxi from North Eleuthera reaches chic Harbour Island where the vibe seeps into your soul: don a kaftan, meander between conch stalls and bars, watch fishermen land their catch, then choose your spot for dancing and chilling island-style, under the stars.

LO N G I S L A N D Columbus Point, Shark Reef and Max’s Conch Bar: the names of

Long Island’s famous sites read like something straight out of an adventure novel. Wander along its gorgeous beaches and you could almost imagine you’ve been set adrift on

The sands are soft, the waters are clear, and the Bimini weather is almost always perfect. But away from the heavenly beaches, you can follow the underwater Bimini Road – natural stones leading mysteriously off from crystalline shallows into the depths – that so intrigued French explorer Jacques Cousteau. Try your luck at the Fountain Of Youth in South Bimini, first discovered

in the 16th century. Snorkel or dive the breathtaking Sapona shipwreck (originally commissioned by Henry Ford), just five metres below the surface; follow the guided 25-acre Bimini Nature Trail; peruse the Bimini Museum, home to a collection of island implements and memorabilia from past visitors, including Martin Luther King Jr and Adam Clayton Powell Jr; head to Dolphin House, a colourful and unique home created by local artist/historian Ashley Saunders; or kick back and relax in the local life of Alice Town. They say that good things come in small packages: they certainly do with Bimini.


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas ANDROS

The largest inhabited island in The Bahamas, Andros is also the least explored. Fall in love with Mother Nature as you take in the beaches, marine life and diverse topography of Andros that shelters a wealth of unique species of flora and fauna: wild orchids, pine trees, rare birds, iguanas and even land crabs flourish in the islands’ unspoiled beauty. Underwater caves and coral reefs abound, including the world’s third largest barrier reef, a haven for snorkellers and divers; marine life such as whales, dolphins and marlin can be found along the coasts. The many inland waterways and flats around the islands create outstanding fishing conditions for bonefish and tarpon. Take time to buy the handmade Androsia fabric that styles the island. And at the end of an active day, what better than to sit back, relax and savour the sight of the shooting stars that are a common occurrence here, lighting up vast night skies undiluted by civilisation’s lights. T H E A B ACO S

Just a short flight from Nassau into one of two airports, the beautiful 193-kilometres-long chain of cays that make up The Abacos epitomises laidback Bahamian living. Lazy days can be spent investigating Elbow Cay’s famous candy-striped lighthouse, opposite Hope Town – one of only three in the world still manually operated – or exploring the islands’ pretty New England-style villages created by Loyalist settlers, their traditional Bahamian pastel architecture a splash of colour against the blue seas. Alternatively, visitors can walk the spectacular fairways of the Abaco Club’s links golf course on Winding Bay; holiday house-party style at The Delphi Club at Rolling Harbour; or motor out in one of the islands’ popular little dinghies to secluded beaches, protected harbours, sand banks and the scalloped bays that fringe the coastline, then stop for a traditional Sunday barbecue on Great Guana Cay, atop a tall sand dune overlooking the magnificent 11-kilometre-long beach. OTH ER O UT ISL ANDS

With 16 main islands, every day can be different in The Bahamas. On San Salvador, you can stand on the spot

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: BAHAMA MAMA COCKTAIL; ABACO CLUB AT WINDING BAY; BEACH ON GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND; MARINE LIFE; COUPLE ON PARADISE ISLAND BEACH; ELBOW CAY LIGHTHOUSE, THE ABACOS

where Columbus first landed, and imagine how he felt upon discovering paradise personified. On Cat Island climb up Mt Alvernia to the highest point in The Bahamas to soak up spectacular sea views (and wander around The Hermitage, hand-built by Father Jerome). The Berry Islands – the ‘sportfishing capital of the

wreck of HMS Conqueror, and the colourful, 18-metre coral walls. History buffs will love Hartford Cave, home to Lucayan-Arawak Indian artefacts, and the wealth of old plantation ruins that lay testament to the island’s famed salt, sisal, pineapple and cotton trading past. And when it comes to old world charm, it’s hard to imagine a more quaint village than Port Nelson, packed with rich history. Another memory; another island: another day in paradise.

world’ – take you off the beaten track, its cluster of 30 cays offering secluded yacht harbours, swim-ashore beaches, footprint-free sands and private coves aplenty (Great Harbour Cay alone boasts 11 continuous kilometres of beach): you can spend entire days here without

seeing a soul if you so desire. And then there are the 78-square kilometres of green rolling hills, white pristine beaches and clear blue waters of Rum Cay, where nature reigns supreme. Diving enthusiasts are drawn by the deep drop-offs, the


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas

H OT E L S From small family-owned hotels to an iconic resort with the world’s largest man-made lagoon

one&only ocean club,

at l a n t i s, Pa r a d i s e i s l a n d,

Paradise Island An island named Paradise; a resort originally christened ‘Shangri-La’: it would be fair to assume you’re onto a good thing. And the legendary One&Only Ocean Club doesn’t disappoint. Think Bahamian beach chic with the polished sophistication of a private estate. Its spectacular oceanside setting is complemented by Versaillesinspired gardens, running down to the balmy azure waters. Guests can dine on the exceptional cuisine of Michelinstarred chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten at Dune; play the spectacular 18-hole, par-72 championship course designed by Tom Weiskopf; indulge in the Balineseinspired One&Only Spa, or simply relax with sublime service by the oceanfront pool. Add a world-class Fitness Centre, Har-Tru tennis courts, beach yoga, water sports, private deep-sea fishing charters and luxury yacht charters out to private islands, and the only decision here is what not to do each day.

Paradise Island Combining the mythical allure of Atlantis, the natural beauty of The Bahamas and extraordinary facilities, Atlantis has become almost as legendary as the city after which it is named. All-suite luxury of The Cove, a different dining experience for every night of the month, a championship golf course, a shopping village, a marina and the Mandara Spa and fitness centre, no two days are the same here. And that’s before you enter Aquaventure: 91 million litres of water surging through a lush 141-acre landscape, carrying tropical escapism to whole new levels – from the high of adrenaline-inducing slides to the ‘low’ of a descent through a shark-infested lagoon. You can also wander the underwater tunnels of The Dig aquarium, surrounded by more than 200 marine species; interact with the residents of Dolphin Cay, the world’s largest open-air marine habitat, and explore spectacular coral reefs – surely the epitome of Bahamian beauty.

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: THE COVE ELEUTHERA; INFINITY POOL AT BREAKER'S CAY AT GRAND LUCAYAN

P e l i c a n B ay at Lu c aya ,

Grand Bahama Island Legend has it that Pelican Bay came to life thanks to a pelican with very good taste who lost his bearings while fishing and discovered a spot of land so beautiful, he built a grand perch overlooking the harbour to watch the glorious sunsets and fish to his heart’s content. Standing by the Pelican Bay, a tropical oasis set against colourful Bahamian architecture, towering palms and the stunning Bell Channel Bay, you can hardly blame him. Inside, its waterside rooms and state rooms

combine Caribbean cheerfulness and European sophistication – not to mention glorious views – while guests can enjoy tropical fusion dining at Sabor. Outside, white-sand beaches, lush boulevards, beautiful seascapes and the charming Port Lucaya Marketplace, home to over 40 speciality stores, boutiques, restaurants and cafes are all clustered around nightly entertainment in Count Basie Square. From water sports to fairways, the Garden Of The Groves to the 40-acre Grand Bahama treasure of Lucayan National Park, Pelican Bay is the perfect place from which to experience all that the island has to offer.


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT: GRAYCLIFF HOTEL POOL; VERSAILLES-INSPIRED GARDEN AT ONE&ONLY OCEAN CLUB; SNORKEL THE RUINS, ATLANTIS, PARADISE ISLAND; BEDROOM AT CORAL SANDS, HARBOUR ISLAND

B r e a k e r ’s Cay at G r a n d Lu c aya n,

Grand Bahama Island Picture your perfect day. A massage by the sea, being cooled by a balmy breeze? Snorkelling over a kaleidoscopic underwater wonderland? Snoozing by a vast pool before a round of golf on an oceanfront course? Lingering over dinner, listening to a local steel drum band with an authentic Bahamian beat? Venturing off the beaten path to discover the island charms that first captivated explorers? Swimming with dolphins or taking on tuna in the ocean depths? Featuring three pools, a Robert Trent Jones Jr-designed golf course, tennis courts and a wealth of activities – including hiking, biking, sailing, riding and exploring Lucayan National Park’s pristine wonderland of wildlife, mangroves and underwater caves – you can be pretty confident Breaker’s Cay will have it covered. And at the end of another perfect day, what better than some traditional conch fritters, local

Goombay Punch and an open-air movie at the outdoor movie nights, under vast Bahamian night skies. B r i t i s h Co lo n i a l H i lto n, Nassau

As the only beachfront hotel in downtown Nassau, the British Colonial Hilton has prime spot in the Bahamian capital. The result is fabulous garden, city or harbour views from the comfort of the spacious rooms and suites, each one elegantly appointed in typical Hilton style. Indeed,

views reign supreme throughout: from the private white-sand beach, complete with Beach Club; from the outdoor swimming pool, with cosy cabanas – and from the restaurants, whether you are enjoying international favourites with a Caribbean flair at Aqua or more casual bar dining and cocktails in the vintage Bullion bar (boasting the largest rum selection on the island). And when you’re done gazing at the sea and harbour views, from the beach you can wonder at the cruise ship manoeuvres in the harbour – or step out to explore Nassau’s heritage or the luxurious duty-free shopping almost on the British Colonial Hilton’s doorstep. G r ayc l i f f H ot e l ,

Nassau If old-world charm and Victorian elegance is your thing, *UD\FOLд is your place. You’ll be in good company:

this beautiful 18th-century colonial mansion has played host to many of the world’s illustrious luminaries, including Sir Winston Churchill, Aristotle Onassis and The Beatles. Today, it remains one of The Bahamas’ most unique retreats, steeped in glamour, history and romance. Graycliff’s extraordinary pleasures of the palate are what makes this a must-visit for dinner. The Caribbean’s first five-star restaurant, incorporating the Graycliff Culinary Academy; one of the world’s largest private wine collections (winner of the prestigious Wine Spectator Grand Award since 1988); the 9,000-bottle Cognateque; the renowned Graycliff Cigar Company, where 16 master rollers produce handcrafted cigars; and the new Graycliff Chocolatier, offering a hands-on chocolate-making experience. Pleasures of the palate, served in paradise. Heaven.


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas

H OT E L S So many sunsets, so little time – never tire of Bahamiam evenings

Co ra l Sa n d s,

Harbour Island The Bahamas’ first capital, 300-year-old Dunmore Town is an eclectic collision of New England cosy and Caribbean colour: an intoxicating mélange of pastels, scents and people. And just on its edge is the equally eccentric, soulful Coral Sands. Perfectly perched on a grassy, flowery bluff, set in eight tropical acres on the aquamarine Atlantic, this beautiful boutique resort offers a secluded sanctuary of candy pink sands, jasmine-scented breezes, sun-drenched days and balmy nights. Luxurious yet low-key, just 38 rooms, cottages and the private Villa Carissa are spread along the Travel Channel’s ‘number one beach in the Caribbean’. Days here are spent by the heated pool; in the private, palm-thatched tiki

beach huts; enjoying non-motorised water sports – including kayaks, boogie boards, paddleboards – or exploring Dunmore Town’s quiet streets with its pretty cottages and white picket fences. The handful of restaurants, boutiques and art galleries are easily reached on foot or by golf cart. S a n da ls E m e r a l d B ay G o l f, Te n n i s & S pa R e s o rt, The Exumas

Deep within the idyllic waters of The Exumas, Sandals Emerald Bay brings romantic luxury to the easy-going rhythm of the Bahamian Out Islands. Secluded within 500 tropical acres fringed by a pristine, 1.6-kilometre long beach, its privileged enclave is designed to ensure you’ll feel like you’re the only ones there. The Bahamian-style

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: SANDALS EMERALD BAY; BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON; KAYAKING AT THE ABACOS; SANDALS EMERALD BAY SUITE BALCONY

architecture of the elegant villas and suites harmonise with the surrounding nature: choose from expansive suites, designed to showcase the best of Great Exuma; oh-so-romantic butlered villas overlooking the turquoise seas, or even the fabulous Royal Estate Beachfront Villa Suite, reminiscent of a true Bahamian manor. Seven culinary experiences encompass epicurean treasures from Tuscany to the bounties of the sea; sophisticated gastronomy to barefoot oceanside dining; refined afternoon tea to the French delights of Café de Paris – after which what better way to end another delightful day than aperitifs around a glowing fire-pit in the centre of one of the three pools? the cove Eleuthera,

Eleuthera Set on tranquil shores on the island of Eleuthera, effortlessly blending boutique urban chic with intimate island charm,

The Cove Eleuthera is the place to bask in the serenity of one of the most beautiful Bahamian islands. A cool, contemporary palette of fresh white complements the peaceful, palmfringed setting. Ensconce yourself in one of the rooms, seaside cottages or villas, with everything from 500-threadcount linens to 50in-flat-screen TVs, Nespresso coffee makers and luxury bath amenities to iPod docking stations (not to mention breathtaking views); enjoy the hilltop infinity pool, oceanfront gourmet restaurant, grill or sushi bar and fabulous spa, all just steps from your hideaway; settle in at the sunset bar, nestled on the bluff between two private beaches; or explore the island with everything from bikes to paddleboards; conchdiving excursions to kayaking the island’s hidden coves.


CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: SAILING INTO THE BLUE; 777-200 INTERIOR CABIN; BRITISH AIRWAYS 777-200

T RAVELLER PROM OT ION the islands of

the Bahamas F LY TO PA R A D I S E

Take yourself off to The Bahamas with British Airways Holidays and you could go from last-minute packing to lounging on pink sands in nine hours, thanks to British Airways’ direct flights four times a week to Nassau, New Providence – from which 15 of the other islands are but an easy plane, boat, ferry or seaplane hop away. Better still, British Airways operates an upgraded Boeing 777-200 aircraft: think a whole new level of spaciousness and comfort, with super-quiet, super-wide cabins and higher ceilings – not to mention 48 Club World (business) seats and 24 World Traveller Plus (premium economy) seats in the new aircraft. Once in Nassau, The Bahamas is your oyster, with British Airways Holidays offering a wide range of hotel and resort options across the islands to accommodate all budgets. Select from

H O W TO GET THERE Fly direct in comfort to Nassau, then do everything or do nothing at all

simple island-style idylls to luxurious resorts; halcyon hideaways to historic, old-world city havens; ‘end of the road’ escapes to unashamedly romantic retreats. Pick your dream destination today (we’ve rounded up just a few of our favourites to whet your appetite) and you could fly away tomorrow. Family holidays, honeymoons, multi-centre getaways, customised experiences: whatever you are looking for, British Airways Holidays can help you plan your escape from start to finish. And when you finally return home, you can rest assured that you can make the most of every moment of your Bahamian bliss-out, with British Airways’

evening flights enabling you to enjoy your last day in paradise to the full. Bring on The Bahamas. Reader offer

Save up to 45% at Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort & Offshore Island or Sandals Emerald Bay, Great Exuma. Offers applicable for 2016 & 2017 travel, book by 30 September 2016. Subject to availability and room category booked. Blackout dates apply.

To experience the very best of The Bahamas, visit britishairways.com/bahamas or call 0344 493 0787


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TRAVELLER EVENTS THE INSIDE TRACK ON THIS MONTH’S HAPPENINGS

THE CHANCE TO MEET

COLONEL JOHN BLASHFORD-SNELL LIFE-LONG SOLDIER, INTREPID EXPLORER AND THE AUTHOR OF 15 BOOKS

QUICK-FIRE QUESTIONS Weirdest thing in your suitcase? ‘My wife’s tights. They are very good for wearing under trousers to stop chafe when riding a Mongolian pony.’ Most interesting person you’ve met? ‘The Mudir of Rebiana of southern Libya, to whom, in 1960, I had to explain that World War II had ended.’ Most surprising country? ‘Papua New Guinea. More than 850 languages are spoken here and the terrain is amazingly varied.’ Lucky charm? ‘A small Jersey flag from my home island, which I have carried for 44 years.’ Travel hit list? ‘Siberia, Angkor Wat and – if time and technology permit – Mars.’ Desert-island book? ‘Kipling’s poems. They remind me of the best of Britain.’ Ultimate way to travel? ‘By elephant. Slow, gentle, with plenty of time to see wildlife while communicating with a highly intelligent beast.’ Favourite feast? ‘Steak-and-kidney pie at Buck’s Club in London.’

+ AN EVENING WITH MICHAEL PORTILLO

FOR INFORMATION ON FUTURE EVENTS VISIT CNTRAVELLER.COM/EVENTS October 2016 Condé Nast Trarveller 193


CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER INVITES YOU TO

AN EVENING WITH

COLONEL JOHN BLASHFORD-SNELL OBE IN ASSOCIATION WITH CLINIQUE LA PRAIRIE

HERO TO SIR RANULPH FIENNES AND BEAR GRYLLS, THIS MAVERICK EXPLORER HAS LED MORE THAN 100 EXPEDITIONS TO THE RISKIEST AND MOST REMOTE CORNERS OF THE PLANET

BOOK NOW: OCTOBER-TRAVELLERS-TALES.EVENTBRITE.CO.UK Tickets are priced £45 and include two glasses of wine and canapés. Guests will also receive a goodie bag

Our Traveller’s Tales series gives you a chance to hear behind-the-scenes-stories from some of the world’s most daring explorers and fascinating personalities in an intimate setting. This is the fifth event in the series and will take place in the Chartwell Suite at the Hyatt Regency London –The Churchill, an elegant London hotel known for its Churchill Bar & Terrace and Michelin-starred Locanda Locatelli restaurant.

6–8PM MONDAY 24 OCTOBER 2016 THE CHARTWELL SUITE AT HYATT REGENCY LONDON – THE CHURCHILL, 30 PORTMAN SQUARE, LONDON W1H 7BH

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: CLINIQUE LA PRAIRIE To celebrate its 85th anniversary this year, renowned international medical spa Clinique La Prairie, Montreux offers a six-night medical and spa package of choice for the price of five from about £10,600. To book, email reservation@laprairie.ch and quote CNT16. Offer expires 31 January 2017 and is subject to availability. laprairie.ch

PHOTOGRAPHS: ALAMY; EMMA JONES; HOWARD SOOLEY

Come and meet Colonel John Blashford-Snell in conversation with adventurers Charley Boorman and Neil Laughton. The Colonel is one of the world’s most seasoned explorers, with a travel log that is second to none. He’s discovered forgotten settlements in the jungles of South America, been to the sites of ancient harbours off Libya, crossed the perilous Darién Gap, led the first team to descend the fearsome rapids of Ethiopia’s Blue Nile, and transported a baby grand piano to a remote Amazonian tribe. After attending The Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, Blashford-Snell served in the army for 37 years and founded the Scientific Exploration Society as well as Operation Raleigh. Supported by Clinique La Prairie, Blashford-Snell will travel to the Amazonas region next year on a humanitarian aid mission to deliver a much-needed ambulance boat to a remote Colombian village.


EVENTS Condé Nast Traveller pulled up a seat with Michael Portillo in the treasure-filled gin parlour of Mr Fogg’s Residence in London’s Mayfair. Jazz music played over the speakers while guests were served mini croque monsieurs

TRAVELLER’S TALES Train of thought Politician-turned-TV-star Michael Portillo talks locomotives and the world’s most interesting railroads

Before his talk with the magazine’s David Annand, Michael Portillo chatted cheerily with fellow rail enthusiasts, who sipped on fruity bourbon cocktails courtesy of Hudson Whiskey

‘It really is for eccentrics,’ said Michael Portillo on train travel, as he sat underneath bird cages and penny farthings at Mr Fogg’s Residence in Mayfair – an appropriately quirky venue for the latest in our Traveller’s Tales series. ‘You make conversation with people in a way quite unlike any other mode of transport. It’s romantic,’ he added. Portillo cut a dapper dash in his lime-green suit jacket at this unbuttoned affair, in association with Elegant Resorts. Despite his trainspotter reputation, he denied knowing much about carriage formation and counting bogeys, and instead discussed his British, Continental and American Great Railway Journeys series, explaining how he uses train travel as a stepping-off point to tell other stories. Later, when quizzed by the crowd, talk turned to style: ‘I dress in the dark and end up in a fleet of clashing bright colours’. And in the wake of Brexit, politics: ‘Once, my highest achievement was to be a future prime minister. Then, it was former future prime minister. We recently, with enormous enthusiasm, welcomed Boris Johnson to this club.’ IANTHE BUTT

FOR INFORMATION ON MORE TRAVELLER’S TALES, VISIT CNTRAVELLER.COM/EVENTS October 2016 Condé Nast Traveller 195


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TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION REFLECTION OF THE ARCHES ON THE SIDES OF THE SHEIK ZAYED GRAND MOSQUE, ABU DHABI PRODUCED BY

PHOTOGRAPH: EDWARD ADIOS/STOCKSY

PROMOTIONS

With a host of new attractions, from mountain zip lines and mega theme parks, to world-famous galleries and shopping in shipping containers – it’s time to take another look at Arabia WORDS: JACQUELINE CASTELLUCCIA


CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: ZAYED NATIONAL MUSEUM; ART IN THE LOUVRE ABU DHABI

DESTINATION ABU DHABI

&XOWXÈDO

CONNECTION The world’s most famous galleries are heading to the artsy capital of the UAE, which is fast carving out a name for itself as the Middle East’s go-to cultural corner

I

n a major coup for the capital, Abu Dhabi’s reputation as Dubai’s more cultured cousin is set for a boost with the coming of powerhouse international galleries. First up is Louvre Abu Dhabi, which is expected to open in the coming months at Saadiyat Cultural District on Saadiyat Island. A must while here, the Abu Dhabi outpost of this iconic gallery will not only be the first of its kind, but the real deal, offering an incredible jaunt through time – covering everything from the birth of civilisation to medieval times and modern art. The exhibits will be housed in a building worthy of a visit just for the architecture alone. Designed by the award-winning Jean Nouvel, the web-patterned, floating dome allows Abu Dhabi’s year-round sunshine to filter through. Joining the Louvre is Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, which opens next year boasting an enviable collection with both an international and local focus. Meanwhile, local cultural gem Zayed National Museum, currently being constructed, will offer the chance to learn about the UAE’s history, with the space dedicated to the country’s late founding father HH Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. Another work of art, the building itself is an ode to falconry made up of steel ‘feathers’ rising 124 metres into the sky.

DIVING INTO THE PAST Delve even further into a local cultural experience on the Abu Dhabi Pearl Journey – a charming cruise on a traditional-style Arabian pearling dhow boat along the capital’s coast. It’s a fantastic way to learn all

about the country’s pearling past, which was its lifeblood long before the discovery of oil. Guides offer insights into how their Emirati forefathers risked their lives to dive the Gulf for the treasure. The tour also passes through Abu Dhabi’s

mangroves – a unique ecosystem home to herons, egrets and flamingos, and there’s the chance to open an oyster shell and find a pearl inside before trying out traditional treats such as Arabic coffee and locally grown dates.

AMONG THE DUNES No cultural experience of the UAE would be complete without a trip into the desert. Don’t miss the chance to venture to the famed Empty Quarter – a vast expanse of desert on the edge of Abu Dhabi emirate. Raw, rugged


TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION DESTINATION ABU DHABI

and beautiful, tour companies take you out among the sands on a four-wheel drive adventure. Stop at a camel farm along the way as you criss-cross the dunes, before the journey ends at a Bedouin-style camp. Tuck into a hearty traditional Arabian feast before henna painting, belly dancing, falcon displays and camel rides. Head back to the city, or camp for a night under the stars. AN ICON AT SUNSET Back in Abu Dhabi city and the jewel in the capital’s crown is without doubt the magnificent Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque. The spectacular structure is one of the largest mosques in the world and a stunning example of traditional Islamic architecture. Commissioned by late UAE president HH Sheikh Zayed bin

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: SHEIKH ZAYED GRAND MOSQUE; EMIRATES PALACE SPA; INSIDE SHEIKH ZAYED GRAND MOSQUE

Sultan Al Nahyan, the building can accommodate around 40,000 worshippers at a time, but its size compromises nothing on stunning detail. Wander among the pearlescent walls, gold-domed minarets and floral stonework – all surrounded by more than 1,000 columns. Inside the halls and foyers, seven ornate chandeliers hang above vast Persian carpets covering the floors. It’s best to take a guided tour of the mosque as the sun sets, when it truly comes into its own and is bathed in beautiful lights.

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: Saadiyat Cultural District: saadiyatculturaldistrict.ae Abu Dhabi Pearl Journey: adpearljourney.info Desert tour: Hala Abu Dhabi / +971 2 6177810 / etihad.com Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque: szgmc.ae Emirates Palace: kempinski.com

A PLACE TO STAY: EMIRATES PALACE Relax in the luxury for which the UAE is famed at Emirates Palace. Everything about this hotel is another level of opulent. Plush rooms boast stunning views of the Arabian Gulf, while there’s

a choice of two temperaturecontrolled swimming pools. The award-winning Emirates Palace Spa is not to be missed and features two Jacuzzis, two steam rooms, heated marble and an ice cave. Meanwhile, the bars and restaurants here are definitely the places to be seen in the capital. BBQ Al Qasr offers something really special. Take advantage of the beachfront setting as you feast on everything from perfectly cooked steaks to fresh seafood – all served alongside sweeping Arabian Gulf views. JUMEIRAH AT ETIHAD TOWERS Next on the list is Jumeirah at Etihad Towers. There’s a private beach and choice of three swimming pools, luxurious boutiques, sprawling suites and the renowned Talise Spa. For Abu Dhabi’s highest views, book a table in Observation Deck at 300 for a stellar meal.


TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION DESTINATION DUBAI

CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: BURJ KHALIFA; AQUAVENTURE WATER PARK; WILD WADI WATER PARK

Welcome to

The ultimate family vacation awaits in Dubai where sprawling theme parks offer a whole new world of fun in the sun

WONDERLAND

J

ust when you thought Dubai couldn’t pack in any more jaw-dropping attractions – here come the mega theme parks. Acres of the city have been transformed into high-octane playgrounds where adrenalinepumping rides and world-class entertainment come courtesy of the world’s biggest franchises. From The Hunger Games to Ghostbusters, the parks promise Hollywood magic in the heart of the Middle East. Drawing in the Marvel crowd, IMG Worlds Of Adventure is a 1.5-millionsquare-foot park in Dubailand. It’s divided into four zones – Marvel, Cartoon Network, Lost Valley: Dinosaur Adventure and IMG Boulevard, featuring characters including Spider-Man, Iron Man and Thor. There’s plenty to keep you entertained away from the rides at this fully indoors park, with 28 restaurants to choose from, shops, a 12-screen cinema and a haunted hotel. Over at Dubai Parks And Resorts in the Jebel Ali area, the thrills keep coming with an extravaganza across 25-million square feet. There’s Legoland Dubai, Legoland Water Park, Motiongate Dubai and Bollywood Parks Dubai to explore, with Motiongate Dubai bringing the best of Hollywood with studios Dreamworks Animation, Lionsgate and Sony Pictures Studios. Expect roller coasters, multimedia rides and live entertainment themed around blockbusters such as Shrek, The Hunger Games and Ghostbusters. Or try Bollywood Parks Dubai, which showcases films from Mumbai’s movie industry. Wind down at chill-out zone Riverland Dubai with some shopping and dining.

MUCH TO AMUSE Dubai is already a go-to destination for family fun. For those able to tear themselves away from The Dubai Mall, there’s the world’s tallest tower Burj Khalifa and Las Vegas-inspired water show The Dubai Fountain. Water parks are also a main feature with Wild Wadi, in the shade of iconic hotel Burj Al Arab Jumeirah, and Aquaventure Waterpark at mega-resort Atlantis, The Palm,

into clear waters for an experience you’ll never forget – swimming with these incredible mammals.

Dubai. Aquaventure has everything from zip lines to nine-storey-tall mega-slides. The highlight is Dolphin Bay where you can plunge

Elsewhere, there’s no shortage of extraordinary experiences, from marine attraction Dubai Aquarium & Underwater Zoo to Mall Of The Emirates’ winter wonderland Ski Dubai – where nothing beats the novelty of taking to snow-covered slopes in the heart of the desert. Or

get some retail therapy with a difference at BoxPark in the Al Wasl area, where brightly coloured shipping containers house quirky boutiques and eateries. Once the sun sets, there’s more for the family to enjoy with The Beach – one of the coolest ways to spend an evening. There’s a great choice of restaurants from all over the world, as well as stalls selling popcorn, ice cream and candyfloss. Then settle


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TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION DESTINATION DUBAI

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: IMG Worlds Of Adventure: imgworlds.com Dubai Parks And Resorts: dubaiparksandresorts.com Atlantis The Palm, Dubai: atlantisthepalm.com The Beach: thebeach.ae Palazzo Versace Dubai: palazzoversace.ae Rove Downtown Dubai: rovehotels.com

down to a movie at the ten-screen cinema, or outdoors cinema for a film experience with a difference, overlooking the Jumeirah coast. A PLACE TO STAY: PALAZZO VERSACE DUBAI Recently opened on the edge of Dubai Creek, Palazzo Versace Dubai is a stunning hotel that blends 16th-century Italian architecture with Arabian influences. The result is an elegant property where the signature touches you’d expect from the Italian design house blend effortlessly with a sense of the region. Bright and airy, rooms and suites have a Versace feel across furnishings and fabrics. Lagoon pools surrounded by lush gardens lend a lovely city oasis feel. All eight restaurants and bars here boast terraces to take in the creek views. ROVE DOWNTOWN DUBAI In many ways the complete opposite to Versace’s creekside palace, Rove Downtown Dubai is a funky property in the heart of the city. Quirky art

from local artists peppers the place, which offers an affordable option complete with Burj Khalifa views. MORE TO EXPLORE For those without family in tow, Dubai is just as much of a playground, with everything from fine dining to aerial adventures. No Dubai experience is complete without a trip up the world’s tallest building, Burj Khalifa. Standing at over 828 metres tall and more than 160 storeys, a visit to viewing platform At The Top is one you’ll want to check off your list. The views from this unique vantage point are incredible. See the city’s skyscrapers somehow dwarfed below as you look down to the

world’s largest mall and The Dubai Fountain. It’s a great way to get a sense of the city as the futuristic metropolis, flanked by the ocean, gives way to desert sands in the distance. Take the experience up a notch at recent addition Burj Khalifa SKY – the world’s highest outdoor observatory. Here you’ll find a VIP lounge and 360-degree Falcon’s Eye View experience. Stay for sunset as the city lights bring the scene to life, and for something unforgettable, dine at the world’s highest restaurant, At.mosphere, where gourmet international fare is the perfect accompaniment to the views. As you’d expect from a city that built its reputation on show-stopping experiences, those looking for an adrenaline fix are spoilt for choice. One of the newest to try is XLine, a 90-metre-high zip line across The Dubai Fountain that will see you soar through Downtown Dubai. Or why not take to the skies over Palm Jumeirah and the Dubai Marina for

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ROVE DOWNTOWN DUBAI RECEPTION; ARTWORK IN ROVE DOWNTOWN DUBAI; DOLPHIN BAY AT ATLANTIS, THE PALM; MOTIONGATE DUBAI

a once-in-a-lifetime Skydive Dubai adventure. Leap from a plane at 13,000ft and free fall for around a minute before the parachute is pulled and you float down to earth. Make the most of the emirate’s year-round sunshine at any one of its beachfront properties. Jumeirah Al Naseem, set to open by the end of the year, is the newest luxury hotel at the stunning Madinat Jumeirah complex. Perched on the coast, Madinat Jumeirah is a charming retreat with gourmet restaurants, Arabian bazaar-style shopping and five-star hotels, housed among a warren of traditional architecture and canals. Jumeirah Al Naseem, which means ‘sea breeze’, is the perfect spot for soaking up the sun. Set on a two-kilometre arc of pristine sand overlooking Burj Al Arab Jumeirah and the Arabian Gulf, spend an idyllic day on the beach before heading to one of the ten restaurants and bars for sunset. Then, for a night with a difference, be among the first to experience Dubai Opera – a new addition to the city’s entertainment scene. Bringing world-class acts to its stunning stage in Downtown Dubai, shows include José Carreras in his Final World Tour, a Mozart Gala and the regional premiere of Les Misérables.


DESTINATION QATAR

6XQVKLËH

CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: KATARA CULTURAL VILLAGE; MISO BLACK COD AT NOBU

CITY

The world’s most famous galleries are heading to the artsy capital of the UAE, which is fast carving out a name for itself as the Middle East’s go-to cultural corner

F

ast becoming the go-to option for those keen to kick their Middle East experience up a notch, Qatar is a destination that is guaranteed to surprise. Full of contrasts, it’s exactly the quirks that make for a fascinating stay. A somewhat smaller relation to its sprawling Arabian city cousins, the charm of capital Doha lies in its ability to sit somewhere between the past and present. With a flight that’s less than seven hours from the UK, and just an hour’s hop from Dubai or Abu Dhabi, it’s the perfect place for a city break with a difference. With a series of high-profile sporting events on the horizon, Doha is a city fast on the rise, but it’s a place that hasn’t neglected its roots. This is perhaps embodied best at The Pearl – Qatar, a five-star man-made island carved from the ocean bed in the shape of a pearl as a tribute to the country’s pearling roots. Peppered with designer stores, fine-dining restaurants and upscale accommodation, this is the place to hang out with Doha’s cool crowd. For a fantastic night out, hop on any one of the water taxis crossing the marina and cruise between the super-yachts before stopping off for a delicious meal. With everything from Lebanese to Thai, the only problem will be choosing where to settle in for a stellar feast.

international big-hitters leading the charge. Straight from the kitchens of California comes Nobu Matsuhisa’s renowned take on contemporary Japanese fare. Take your pick from no less than seven dining spaces spread over three floors at Four Seasons Doha. As you would expect, the food is sensational and combines the best of Nobu’s signatures with a dash of local influence. Don’t leave without trying the sublime signature miso black cod.

WINE AND DINE In recent years, the city’s dining scene has seen an explosion in all types of venues and cuisines. In keeping with the luxury lifestyle Qatar is known for, it’s no surprise to see a clutch of celebrity-chef restaurants and

Also joining Doha’s gathering of chef elites is the UK’s own Gordon Ramsay. The jewel in the culinary crown at The St Regis Doha, Opal By Gordon Ramsay brings a bijou bistro touch to proceedings. Having earned a reputation as one of the city’s best restaurants, this trendy spot


TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION

is ideal for a meal out that doesn’t feel too stuffy, but compromises nothing on quality and flavour. Signatures to look out for include the Opal Wagyu Burger, and the zesty Grilled Poussin. CULTURE CLUB Hit the culture trail in Doha where everything from modern art to a history of Islam is offered. Qatar has grand plans to become a regional hub for the arts and nowhere makes this more apparent than the Museum of Islamic Art, Doha. Located on its own island, this extraordinary structure is a masterpiece in its own right with a distinctive geometric design. Inside, a towering central atrium leads off into 41,000 square feet of galleries containing one of the world’s most impressive collections of Islamic art. Elsewhere, take a trip back in time at Katara Cultural Village where the traditional regional architecture houses theatres, concert halls and galleries. Or bring it back to the here and now with the new National Museum of Qatar. Scheduled to open at the end of this year, the futuristic building will host cutting-edge exhibits and displays telling the story of Qatar’s journey from desert outpost

to modern metropolis. TIME TO SPEND No trip to Qatar is complete without hitting its gleaming malls. Set to open by the end of the year is the impressive Mall Of Qatar, billed as the country’s largest shopping and entertainment destination. Packed into a sprawling 5.4 million square feet will be a staggering selection of international brands, more than 100 places to eat, a five-star Hilton hotel and 19-screen Cineplex. However the star entertainment attraction here is set to be the Mall of Qatar Live Interactive Visual Entertainment (MOQLIVE) residency show. Unique performances will take place in the heart of the mall at The Oasis – an incredible 360-degree revolving stage set amidst dancing fountains. Probably the quirkiest is Villaggio Mall, a Venetianthemed venue complete with a canal, gondolas and palazzos, while Lagoona Mall, in the affluent West Bay, is a haven for label lovers with all the major players from Tory Burch and Marc by Marc Jacobs, to Michael Kors. Elsewhere, Doha Festival City is also

to open by the end of the year, adding more than 500 stores to the local retail scene, there’s also a 4D cinema and even a snow park. Another side to shopping in Doha can be found at the city’s traditional markets, where stalls sell everything from handicrafts and textiles to spices and souvenirs. Souq Waqif is the city’s most famous and dates back at least 100 years. Fresh from a multi-million dollar restoration, it has kept many of its original features including mud-rendered and timber-beamed buildings.

A PLACE TO STAY: THE RITZ-CARLTON DOHA Where better to spend a sophisticated weekend than in a five-star hotel with its own island? There’s all the glitz you’d expect from the Ritz, plus local touches to add some regional inspiration.

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: Nobu: noburestaurants.com/doha Opal By Gordon Ramsay: opalbygordonramsaydoha.com Villagio Mall: villaggioqatar.com Lagoona Mall: lagoonamall.com City Center Doha: citycenterdoha.com Doha Festival City: festivalcitydoha.com Souq Waqif: souq-waqif-doha.com Museum Of Islamic Art, Doha: mia.org.qa Katara Cultural Village: katara.net

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: KATARA CULTURAL VILLAGE; W DOHA HOTEL & RESIDENCES; OPAL BY GORDON RAMSAY

W DOHA HOTEL & RESIDENCES In the trendy West Bay area, this is where Doha’s cool crowd gather. Michelin-star chefs are behind some of the restaurants here, while poolside Wahm Lounge is the perfect spot for sunset cocktails.


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TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION DESTINATION OMAN

Beat a

RETREAT Spectacular resorts have earned Oman a reputation as the Gulf ’s relaxation and wellness oasis

NATURE TRAIL About a two-hour drive from Muscat, Al Hoota Cave is one of Oman’s top natural attractions. Five kilometres underground, streams and springs are home to more than 100 species, and end at the spectacular 20-metredeep Cave Lake. For world-class diving, visit Al Dimaniyat Nature Reserve. Comprised of nine islands, the reserve is 18 kilometres off the coast, around 70 kilometres from Muscat. With white sandy beaches and coral reefs, it is home to sea turtles and indigenous birds. A PLACE TO STAY: DUNES BY AL NAHDA As well as a serene spa, this luxury tent resort offers a great selection of activities from its nine-hole golf course to camel rides over the sands. End the day at al-fresco restaurant Fleur, where dishes from all over the world are served alongside dramatic desert vistas.

ALILA JABAL AKHDAR Take your adventure to new heights at this stunning resort perched amongst the Al Hajar mountain range. At 2,000 metres above sea level, the location will take your breath away with rooms and suites overlooking the rugged peaks and gorges. The concierge team is on hand to help arrange experiences such as hiking to abandoned mountain settlements and trips to local villages. At Spa

W

hether you’re looking for majestic mountains, towering sand dunes or breathtaking coral reefs, Oman is the place to come. For an unforgettable desert oasis experience not far from capital Muscat, Dunes by Al Nahda adds a five-star spin to the Bedouinstyle tent experience. And it’s the tent experience that really sets Al Nahda apart from other desert oasis experiences available in the region, offering the chance to stay among the dunes in a way not too distant from the first desert people – albeit with a dash of luxury thrown in. The tents range from luxury single-standing options to opulent suites, and are about as far away from a standard camping concept as you can get. Bedecked in plush Omani-inspired décor, each tent boasts all the comforts you would expect from an exclusive hotel with private bathrooms and flat-screen televisions. While there’s no shortage of wow factor at Al Nahda, it’s the spa here that really seals the deal. Embracing the Arabian Nights-style concept, Sand Spa offers therapies drawing on ancient Egyptian techniques. Drift away in a sunken hot-sand tub where you’ll be covered in sand as chilled fruit wedges are placed on your eyes and an aloe-vera mask is lathered on your face. Then, milk, wine and oils are poured over the body as your skin soaks in the minerals and nutrients. It’s an experience like no other, guaranteed to leave you feeling like Arabian royalty before you return to your tent for a night under the desert stars. At the northern tip of the country, one of the Middle East’s most famous spa resorts, Six Senses Zighy Bay, is tucked away in a cove on the Musandam Peninsula. Make a dramatic entrance on a 4x4 drive down the scenic mountain track, or take the shortcut and paraglide down to the resort’s white sand beach. Designed just like a traditional Omani village, most guests don’t make it very far from their villa and private pool, but it’s worth tearing yourself away at least once to visit the spa. International therapists are regularly flown in for special sessions, and there’s everything on offer, from personalised treatments and nutritional advice, to yoga on the beach at dawn.

Alila, there are seven treatment rooms, including Jacuzzis and a Vichy shower room. The focus is on preserving a strong sense of local Omani culture and treatments reflect that. After a soothing session, step into the steam room where the air is filled with scents of frankincense and juniper berry, reminiscent of ancient Oman. Afterwards, take a dip in the outdoor infinity pool with spectacular views. For an

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: PRIVATE POOL AT ZIGHY BAY; JABAL VILLA, ALILA JABAL AKHDAR; ROYAL TENT AT DUNES BY AL NAHDA

evening meal you won’t forget, Juniper Restaurant’s international menu reflects Arabic influences for dining with a difference. End the evening at Rose Lounge with a drink in hand, watching the sun as it sets behind the mountains.

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: Dunes by Al Nahda: dunesbyalnahda.com Six Senses Zighy Bay: sixsenses.com Alila Jabal Akhdar: alilahotels.com


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION

a regal Visitors to Abu Dhabi can look forward to a lesson in luxury at Emirates Palace

retreat

Clockwise from top: BBQ Al Qasr; the Palace Suite bedroom; Emirates Palace Spa entrance; Sayad

I

n a country where every luxury hotel oozes opulence, Emirates Palace has no problem standing out from the rest. From the unique architecture that boasts 114 impressive domes to the staff dressed in gilded tail coats, Emirates Palace is designed to astound. Located at the far western end of Abu Dhabi Corniche, amid a beautifully landscaped park with its own private beach, Emirates Palace is a monument to luxury hospitality. From the moment you weave up the fountain-lined driveway, where a bellman greets you and the Lady in Red welcomes you in the lobby, you know you’re about to experience something special. Each one of the 394 rooms and suites has been conceived with indulgence in mind. In the hotel’s super exclusive suites, Arabian splendour abounds in the form of Swarovski crystal chandeliers, huge beds and Romanesque bathtubs. Each room also comes with 24-hour butler service, high-speed internet and the latest in-room technologies. Simply put, you couldn’t ask for more. But there is more. Much more. The impressive Emirates Palace Spa, which was awarded Best Hotel Spa in the World Spa Awards 2015, features a traditional Moroccan hammam, a Gentlemen’s

Tonic salon and Bastien Gonzalez Pedi:Mani:Cure Studio. There are also two fitness centres, two swimming pools, tennis courts, cricket and football pitches, cycling trails, a Beach Club with vast watersports facilities and a kids’ club that caters to children aged five to 12. Foodies will rejoice too, because there are 14 wonderful restaurants and bars on offer. Among them is BBQ Al Qasr, an award-winning restaurant on the beach; Mezlai, the city’s first dedicated Emirati restaurant, and seafood restaurant Sayad, which also enjoys a beautiful location by the sea. On top of all this, Emirates Palace is located in the heart of Abu Dhabi, within easy reach of the city’s main attractions, which include the striking Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque (15 minutes by car), the Heritage Village and a range of world-class shopping malls. And for those who wish to travel in style, Emirates Palace has a fleet of luxury limousines for you to whizz about the city in. For information or reservations, please call +971 2 690 8888 or email reservations@emiratespalace.ae

Reader offer Emirates Palace is offering Condé Nast Traveller readers special rates starting at AED 1,743* per double room per night, including buffet breakfast for two. The special rates are available for a stay of three nights or more between 1 October 2016 – 31 March 2017, upon quoting the promo code CNTWINTER16. Terms and conditions apply. *Rates are subject to 10% service charge and 6% tourism fee, 4% municipality fee on a nightly basis and AED 15 municipality room fee per bedroom per night.


TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION DESTINATION JORDAN

$ÈDELDË

ADVENTURE Home to some of the world’s most extraordinary scenery, there’s no better place to explore the great outdoors than Jordan

T

here’s a reason why Hollywood has so often turned to Jordan when there’s a major movie to be made. Otherworldly landscapes and dreamy vistas here are not only ripe for exploration, but are nothing short of iconic. The country’s greatest sight is the magical Nabataean capital city of Petra. Carved into pink sandstone cliffs in Jordan’s southwestern desert, the important archaeological site dates back to 300BC. A network of passages, canyons and gorges surround the city and as you emerge through the last, Al-Siq, the sight of Petra rising from the desert is one you’ll never forget. It’s less than a four-hour drive to the city from capital Amman and there’s plenty of accommodation nearby. To avoid the crowds, get there early and watch the sun rise over this spectacular site.

RED PLANET At times more alien than Arabian, the deep red hues of Jordan’s Wadi Rum desert will make you feel like you’ve been transported to another world. Also known as the Valley of the Moon, the great swathes of desert here are peppered by mountains and Bedouin encampments. Just two hours from Petra, most tours from Amman take in both areas, although one of the best ways to appreciate Wadi Rum is to camp out overnight under the stars. Go wild and take your own tent or join a tour and spend the night at campsites with food and facilities. Either choice is a wonderful way to take in the silent scene once the sun sets over the dunes.

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: Golden Tours & Travel (Petra, Wadi Rum and The Dead Sea): jordantoursmakers.com Kempinski Hotel Ishtar Dead Sea Jordan: kempinski.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: THE TREASURY AT PETRA; SALT FORMATIONS IN THE DEAD SEA; LEMON GARDEN AT KEMPINSKI HOTEL ISHTAR DEAD SEA JORDAN SPA

OCEAN OF PLENTY One of the world’s most intriguing places, the Dead Sea is a must while in Jordan. Sporting a crystal blue hue only nature can create, at 400 metres below sea level, this fascinating body of water marks the lowest point on earth. More than nine times as salty as the ocean, little survives here, but the water is famed for its healing properties and minerals. Whether bathing off its shores on a daytrip from Amman, or drinking in the atmosphere at one of the many luxury resorts that have opened in and around the area, the Dead Sea won’t disappoint. AROUND AMMAN Back in the capital, head to the city’s Jabal Al-Weibdeh neighbourhood for a great night out. A magnet for the ex-pat crowd, quirky cafés and boutique

venues have sprung up in recent years. The best way to explore is by simply taking to the walkable streets where you can soak up the historic character of the place, with its tumbling houses and leafy streets. This is also the arty part of town, with contemporary galleries Makan Art Space and Dar Al-Anda Gallery, and the Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts, within easy reach of each other. A PLACE TO STAY: KEMPINSKI HOTEL ISHTAR DEAD SEA JORDAN There is no better way to experience the Dead Sea than with this amazing five-star hotel as your base. Perched on the edge of the world-famous lake, rooms here have amazing Dead Sea vistas and are the ultimate vantage point to kick back and take in a spectacular sunset.


T RAVELLER PROM OT ION Clockwise from this image: Palazzo Versace at night; living and dining area of The Grand Suite; the Grand Lobby

Style and

substance

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ew hotels in the world evoke as much recognition and reaction as the Palazzo Versace in Dubai. Located on the shores of Dubai Creek, just ten minutes from Dubai International Airport, the hotel’s glowing façade, which was built in the style of a 16th-century Italian palace, is a captivating sight, and the magic continues from the moment you cross the Medusa-patterned driveway and enter the grand lobby. As well as the iconic Versace motif, which is incorporated into furnishings, wallpaper, chinaware and glasses, a stunning mosaic floor, gilded columns and giant chandeliers all convey the unique and flamboyant style of the brand. There are two room categories: Deluxe and Premiere; and five suite categories: Executive, Grand Executive, Grand, Signature and

Imperial. All rooms are fabulously done out with plush silk furnishings and state-of-the-art technologies, while the one-bedroom suites have dining areas, walk-in wardrobes and Hollywoodstyle vanity stations. The hotel also caters to travellers visiting for extended periods, with 169 one- to six-bedroom residence-style accommodations. In true Versace style, each comes with its own signature colour palette (from turquoise, salmon, azure or beige), and has a fully equipped kitchen, as well as swimming pool and gym access. Those with a taste for fine food are also in luck because there are several restaurants and bars on offer. Among them is signature Italian eatery Vanitas and restaurant Giardino. However, the aptly named Enigma really captures the imagination with its avant-garde concept of introducing a new chef and menu every three months. In terms of location, Palazzo Versace is perfectly situated between old and new Dubai, making it an ideal base for those who wish to explore the city. Just a 15-minute drive from Al Fahidi Historical Neighbourhood, which is famed for its traditional wind-tower architecture, visitors can discover all that this atmospheric area has to offer, before hopping on an abra (water taxi) and crossing Dubai Creek to explore the famous spice and

gold souks. Ten minutes in the opposite direction, a hotel shuttle bus transports guests to Downtown Dubai, which is home to more than its fair share of world-famous spectacles, including the Burj Khalifa, The Dubai Mall and The Dubai Fountain. For more information and reservations, please call +971 (0) 4 556 8888, email reservations@palazzoversace.ae or visit palazzoversace.ae

Reader offer Planning ahead pays. Book your stay and you’ll save up to 25% off your room or suite on a two-night minimum stay. Visit palazzoversace.ae/en/specialoffers/ advance-purchase-offer.html


TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION DESTINATION BAHRAIN

,VODËG

HOPPING From the café culture of Amwaj Islands to the historic former capital Muharraq, Bahrain’s network of more than 30 islands offers much to explore

P

robably most famous for the F1 showstopper that roars into capital Manama each year, Bahrain is a charming island archipelago packed with history, art and culture. Its main islands are each worth exploring, and have something different to offer. Bahrain Island with lively capital Manama has the customary five-star hotels and glitzy malls you’d expect from a Gulf city, but tucked away in its Adliya neighbourhood is a fast-growing bohemian centre known for its art galleries, cafés, restaurants and vibrant nightlife. Most of the galleries are grouped around the quarter’s Block 338. When the sun goes down, Adliya becomes a magnet for Bahrain’s trendy set. End your day at Café Amsterdam, one of Bahrain’s busiest nightspots with a large outdoor area and superb restaurant. Muharraq Island, the kingdom’s second largest, is the place to come for history. The city of Al Muharraq dates back some 5,000 years and nowadays its main draw is the UNESCO World Heritage Pearling Trail. The 3.5-kilometre trail was used by pearl divers until the early 1930s and is made up of historical buildings, oyster beds and a stretch of the coastline. Elsewhere the city is home to Sheikh Isa bin Ali House (Beit Sheikh Isa), where you’ll see impressive examples of Islamic architecture such as wind towers, courtyards and beautifully carved wooden doors. Other islands well worth a hop are Al Dar and Amwaj. Perfect for a day by the beach, Al Dar Islands is a picture-perfect paradise just 12km from Manama. Soak up the sunshine from the crystal clear lagoons or take a trip out into the Gulf to watch dolphins slice through the blue. Over at Amwaj Islands, it’s all about luxury living with first-class restaurants, spas, salons and shopping just 10km from the capital.

A PLACE TO STAY: ONE&ONLY BAHRAIN Due to open later this year, this stunning property is set to shake up Bahrain’s luxury resort scene. Located in Seef on the northwestern coast, the beachfront hotel is all about the exclusive with plush suites, villas, fine-dining restaurants and a sensational spa.

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: Pearling trail: culture.gov.bh Al Dar Islands: aldarislands.com Amwaj Islands: amwaj.bh One&Only Bahrain: oneandonlyresorts.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: QAL’AT AL BAHRAIN IS THE ORIGINAL CAPITAL AND PORT OF THE ISLAND OF BAHRAIN. IT IS PART OF UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE; ONE&ONLY BAHRAIN; PEARLS


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DESTINATIONS UAE · FUJAIRAH · SHARJAH

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: TEA AT WALDORF ASTORIA RAS AL KHAIMAH; SHARJAH

F

ast stepping out of the shadows of attentiongrabbing destinations Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the UAE’s other emirates are making their mark with luxurious hotels, world-class watersports and miles of pristine coastline to explore. At the top of the list is Ras Al Khaimah, tipped to be the country’s next big tourist destination. Waldorf Astoria set up camp here a few years ago and is a magnet for European travellers looking for a five-star beach stay. It’s a stunning property on the shores of the Arabian Gulf complete with spa, golf course and infinity pool. Elsewhere in the emirate, the Hajar Mountains pack in plenty with hot pools and hiking as well as the chance to take a seaplane flight over the range to take in the incredible views. By the end of this year, the world’s longest zip line is also set to open here, perched on top of one of the country’s highest peaks Jebel Jais.

A PLACE TO STAY: WALDORF ASTORIA RAS AL KHAIMAH From the indulgent poolside day beds outside to the stunning suites, you don’t have to do anything but lie back and relax at this beautiful resort. Following in Waldorf tradition around the world, there’s also a stunning lobby clock complete with local prayer timings for an authentic touch.

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EMIRATES JOURNEY TO THE PAST Taking things down a notch, but no less fascinating an emirate, is Ajman. Long stretches of golden beaches and sparkling waters make this a great getaway. In Ajman city, ancient fortresses, busy souks and the corniche offer much to explore. There’s also Ajman Museum, situated in an authentic 18th-century fort and built using coral shells and gypsum. Ajman is one of the largest dhow-building centres in the region and these majestic traditional vessels, once a vital part of the UAE’s lucrative pearl trade, can still be seen making their way in and out of the city’s harbour.

The UAE may be known the world over for its glittering mega-cities, but its lesser-known emirates are amazing destinations in their own right

DIVE IN For visitors to Fujairah, it’s all about diving, watersports and fishing along this beautiful stretch of the Gulf of Oman. A great break from the bustle of the bigger emirates, Fujairah’s laid-back atmosphere is a magnet for staycationers and international visitors. Located on the eastern

coast, there’s some excellent wreck dives to be had while back above sea level, the natural Masafi springs make for an amazing afternoon. Meanwhile, over in Sharjah, the emirate is making a name for itself as a centre for culture and the arts. Sharjah Art Area

PLAN YOUR ITINERARY: Ras Al Khaimah: rasalkhaimahtourism.com Ajman Museum: ajmantourism.ae Fujairah diving: alboomdiving.com Waldorf Astoria Ras Al Khaimah: waldorfastoria3.hilton.com Sharjah Art Area: sharjahart.org

is a charming quarter set back from the banks of Sharjah Creek. Winding walkways here are home to traditional wind tower architecture, museums, galleries and artistic spaces. The district has sprung up in one of the country’s oldest residential neighbourhoods where 18th century buildings were once home to wealthy pearl traders. A lively art scene includes Sharjah Art Museum and Sharjah Art Institute, as well as artists’ studios and exhibition spaces. Elsewhere, for a slice of shopping history, visit the city’s famous Blue Souk, a stunning building packed with traditional finds, artefacts and souvenirs.


TRAV E LLE R P R OM OTION

'LĂ&#x2C6;HFWR U\ TOUR OPERATORS QCarrier carrier.co.uk 0161 491 7630 QCazenove+Loyd cazloyd.com 020 3603 4952 QDestinology destinology.co.uk 01204 824 434 QElegant Resorts elegantresorts.co.uk 01244 897 505

QEmirates Holidays emiratesholidays.co.uk 020 8972 8951 QKenwood Travel kenwoodtravel.co.uk 020 7749 9220 QKuoni kuoni.co.uk 01306 747 002 QRed Savannah redsavannah.com 01242 787 800

QScott Dunn scottdunn.com 020 3393 8864 QSteppes Travel steppestravel.co.uk 01285 601 752 QTrailfinders trailfinders.com 020 7368 1200 QTurquoise turquoiseholidays.co.uk 020 7147 7087

QWexas wexas.com 020 7590 0610 AIRLINES: QBritish Airways britishairways.com QEmirates emirates.com QEtihad etihad.com

QGulf Air gulfair.com QOman Air omanair.com QQantas qantas.com QQatar Airways qatarairways.com QTurkish Airlines turkishairlines.com QVirgin Atlantic virgin-atlantic.com


AWARDS PARTY

Harriet Rowlinson, Sophie Montgomery, Samantha Strawford and Sara Mirza

Chris Wain, Condé Nast Traveller publisher Simon Leadsford and Frances Geoghegan

HOT LIST 2016

Mark Howard and Jeanette Harper

Rodolfo Milesi and Eduardo Novillo Astrada

Dina Gundzya and Rebekka Frost

Graham Horner

Julia Kemp and Debbie Flynn

216 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016

In association with Avis

Molly McLachlan and Catherine Lillycrop

Steve King and Jo Hartley

Mark Palmer, Paul Charles and Rick Jordan

Sam Mullen and Juliette Ottley

Michael Green and Daisy Bird

Grace Christie and Dom Joly

Rossella Beaugié and Thea Darricotte

Lady Gabriella Windsor and Astrid Muñoz

Tom Bates and Pegi Amarteifio

Hendrik Huebner

Mary-Anne Denison-Pender and Jaisal Singh

PHOTOGRAPHS: HUGO BURNAND

Amy Hearn and Condé Nast Traveller editor Melinda Stevens

This year’s celebration brought the best of the travel world to Michelin-starred Hakkasan in London’s Mayfair, where guests drank lychee Martinis and ate scallop shumai canapés. Condé Nast Traveller’s pick of the best new hotels, restaurants, beach clubs and bars included Fendi Private Suites in Rome, Bastible bistro in Dublin and Takazawabar in Tokyo. Thanks to Hakkasan Mayfair, Laurent-Perrier and Tanqueray No. Ten. To see the full list of winners, visit cntraveller.com/awards/the-hot-list


W OST WANTED Autumn arm candy...

CHAIN CHARM

BARABOUX Yolanda bag in gold python, £700, baraboux.com

CLIVEDEN Cliveden’s beautifully appointed and newly refurbished suites – not to mention the Astor Burger in The Astor Grill – make it the perfect place to retreat to at this time of year. clivedenhouse.co.uk

ALEMDARA Necklace, £2,850, alemdara.com

Audrey Bag Evolution, £850,

harveynichols.com

STYLE TAKEOVER Tune in to Condé Nast Traveller's sunshine state of mind with some of the latest experiences, places to stay and fashion and beauty picks

IMMUNOCOLOGIE Exclusive to Urban Retreat at Harrods, Immunocologie has now launched in the UK. The US brand promotes skin’s immune health for long-term anti-ageing. From £45, urbanretreat.co.uk

© ALISTAIR TAYLOR-YOUNG

SERAPIAN

THE LITTLE BLACK GALLERY The Little Black Gallery is showing Nudes by Alistair Taylor-Young, a new series of work of stunning miniature photographs. From 20 September until 8 October. thelittleblackgallery.com

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W OST WANTED

Cleanse & repair...

ELEMIS Elemis Superfood Facial Oil, £45, elemis.com

CREME DE LA MER La Mer The Micellar Cleansing Water, £65, cremedelamer.co.uk

BAMFORD Kamalaya is popping up at Bamford Haybarn Spa in the Cotswolds for a two-day exclusive event. Two-day packages (from £400 excluding accommodation) are still available along with one-day experiences and single treatments. Book now by calling 01608 731703 or emailing haybarn @bamford.co.uk

Blooming lovely CAROL JOY Pure Collagen Spray, £100, caroljoylondon.com

GIELLY GREEN Repair Mask, £34, giellygreen.co.uk

JO MALONE Throughout October Jo Malone is donating £20 from each sale of Red Roses Cologne to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. £86 for 100ml, jomalone.co.uk

COWSHED The new Anti-Ageing Facial at Cowshed combines all the benefits of their highly active plant-based products with the cleansing power of Clarisonic. £90, cowshed.com


W OST WANTED THE JOY OF BEES

Relais & Châteaux and Bompas & Parr have joined forces to present The Joy of Bees – an immersive experiential art installation dedicated to some of the rarest honeys in the world (6–8 October). All proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to The British Beekeepers Association. Tickets £9 per person, available via

billetto.co.uk

WHAT TO WEAR

to Rosewood London

Hermès Chaîne d’Ancre Punk double necklace in 18ct-gold and silver, £3,480, hermes.com

OUR MAN ON THE GROUND

Burberry London Denverhil silk-satin trench coat, £1,395, net-a-porter.com

Gucci plissé lamé mini dress, £745, net-aporter.com

from

ROSEWOOD, LONDON

CHIEF CONCIERGE ASHLEY HARMAN

J Crew leather Signet camera bag, £128, jcrew.com

PEACHY PINKS

our six favourites

Sisley Double Tenseur, £111, sisley-paris.com

Dr Sebagh Rose de Vie Hydrating Mask, £74, drsebagh.com

Guerlain Lingerie de Peau foundation, £38.50, johnlewis.com

Mavala’s new First Class Collection, £4.95 each, johnlewis.com

Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector Pressed Champagne Pop, £30, spacenk.com

Acqua di Parma Peonia Nobile, £76 for 50ml, johnlewis.com

What defines Rosewood London? A sense of place. It’s one of London’s most beautiful buildings with sympathetic design by Tony Chi. Plus, it has fantastic London-related artwork. What is your favourite cocktail in Scarfes Bar? One I particularly like is the Seine River Fizz, made with vodka, Domaine Canton, ginger, lime, Fentimans Victorian Lemonade and basil. What is the most in-demand reservation right now? Sexy Fish is still the most requested reservation at the moment. What is your most popular spa treatment? It would have to be one of our new exclusive Maison Caulières treatments. The sensory Le Temps D’un Songe is an exfoliation and massage to warm and energise the body. Which is your favourite bedroom? The Garden House – it’s one of the very few rooms in London with its own roof terrace. rosewoodhotels.com

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W OST WANTED

Picnic companions... CHAUMET The Dandy (38mm) has an 18ct pink-gold case, black galvanic dial engraved with golden vertical bayadere stripes and a carbontreated alligator strap, £11,260, chaumet.com WRIST ESSENTIALS

SHINOLA The Runwell 47mm, £515, Shinola London, 28 Foubert’s Place, London, W1F 7PR, 020 7734 5402

CARRIER Six Senses Zil Pasyon opens this September. Located on the private island of Félicité in the Seychelles, the resort offers 30 villas and 17 private residences, nestled within a dramatically beautiful and unspoiled landscape. The highlight is a spacious Six Senses Spa, hidden among the island’s towering rocks, overlooking the ocean. Currently, guests can stay 5 nights, and pay for only 3 (saving up to £2,670 per couple). Carrier offers 7 nights sharing a Hideaway Pool Villa on a bed & breakfast basis from £4,955 per person. (Price includes return flights from London Heathrow and private helicopter transfers). Offer valid for travel until 21 December 2016. Price based on departure 14 November 2016. carrier.co.uk

WILLIAM & SON Limited Edition Ferdinand Berthoud FB1, exclusive to William & Son. 18ct rose-gold case with black ceramic inter-horn elements and hand-sewn rolled-edge alligator leather strap, £160,930, williamandson.com

Take flight 444444444

THYME Thyme is set over 150 acres of Cotswold countryside and includes a boutique hotel, cottages, cookery school and bar and restaurant making it a perfect country retreat. thyme.co.uk

THAI AIRWAYS Thai Airways International has been rolling out New Royal Silk Service for Royal Silk Class passengers route by route since 2015 and it’s clearly been noticed; they have just won two coveted awards at the Skytrax 2016 World Airline Awards Ceremony. The awards were for Most Improved Airline and Best Airline Lounge Spa Facility. Their Royal Orchid Spa is at Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi Airport and has a range of spa services performed by masseuses along with steam, sauna and shower rooms so you’ll be fully refreshed wherever you’re flying to. thaiairways.com

LE MANOIR Raymond Blanc at Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons has created an Autumn Gastronomic break (for two guests sharing) which includes afternoon tea, dinner for two, kitchen and cellar tour and breakfast the following morning (Sunday to Thursday). £765 per room. belmond.com

LOUIS ROEDERER Cristal Rosé, £499, selfridges.com

DAPHNE'S Daphne’s restaurant has teamed up with Lulu Guiness to create the perfect bowl for doggy diners. £60, 020 7167 6724 daphnes-restaurant. co.uk

DIOR Basket by Dior Maison, £9,200, dior.com


Dream Destinations

EUROPE-UK DAISYBANK COTTAGE Nestled in the heart of the New Forest, Daisybank Cottage Boutique Bed and Breakfast is a luxury hideaway in a place of outstanding beauty. Daisybank offers a warm, contemporary style with some fine old-fashioned hospitality. An Arts and Crafts house, inspired by the architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh, dating back to 1901, Daisybank's 7 spacious rooms have been renovated to the highest standard, while many of the quirky original features have been preserved. Call 01590622086 or visit www.bedandbreakfast-newforest.co.uk

LA SABLONNERIE HOTEL. A convivial corner of a beautiful island. Gorgeous gardens, peace and tranquillity, birds, butterflies, flowers, horses and carriages – no cars – how could one not enjoy this amazing paradise? You will find this hotel to have a great ‘joie de vivre’ as well as terrific food. La Sablonnerie has recently received the highly coveted award from Condé Nast Johansen - ‘Small Hotel of the Year’. Visit www.sablonneriesark.com or call 01481 832 061.

BRIMSTONE HOTEL is the epitome of luxury, nestled in the very heart of the Lake District. To stay in any of the 16 rooms or suites is to escape into relaxation, enhanced by the attentive service of the host team. The beautiful scenery is enough of an incentive to visit; the food, rooms and spa are reasons to stay. 015394 38062 – www.brimstonehotel.co.uk

Dream Destinations

EUROPE

MOULIN DE LARCY: DORDOGNE FRANCE A haven of tranquillity and calm, where you can revitalise your mind, body and soul. Situated in the heart of the Dordogne valley, the apartments, which are comfortable and at the same time elegant, spacious, luxurious, span the sparkling waters of the river Dronne. They have been designed so that each one is private. Max 2 adults per apartment. Contact anita@le-moulin-de-larcy.com Tel : +33553912389 www.le-moulin-de-larcy.com

ABSALON HOTEL–ABSOLUTE HEAVEN Located in Copenhagen, one of the design capitals of the world, the recently renovated Absalon Hotel fits right in. Combining classical architecture with the colourful, modern textiles and wallpapers of award winning Designers Guild, the hotel has a contemporary yet cosy feel. For that extra bit of luxury, choose one of the superior rooms (pictured). TEL.: +45 3331 4344, E: booking@absalon-hotel.dk www.absalon-hotel.dk/en/

HOTEL TOWNHOUSE 27 Located in the beautiful historical centre of Belgrade in Serbia, Townhouse27 is an authentic boutique hotel with exceptional award winning service. Stay in Belgrade’s highest rated venue across the board, where the 21 large luxury rooms and comfortable suites exude contemporary design, peace and quiet. With a personalized approach to each guest, the impeccable service, tempting breakfast and nearby ‘must see’ sights give reason enough for your perfect city stay. The charming garden provides a special retreat during sizzling summer days, complete with homemade sweets. For nature lovers, the luxury winery offers an exceptional wine experience in the vicinity of Belgrade. T. +381 11 20 22 900 hotel@townhouse27.com www.townhouse27.com

LUXURY BED & BREAKFAST MÁLAGA A luxury holiday destination in Andalusia, close to Málaga, Marbella and the Costa del Sol. Dos Iberos was designed for luxurious pampering and privacy and offers five rooms with stunning views, tasteful décor and a refreshing infinity pool. Besides a delicious breakfast you can also enjoy lunch and dinner. The perfect base to explore the Andalusian highlights. Awarded with TripAdvisor Travellers´ Choice 2014 and 2015 and Certificate of Excellence 2016. ¡Bienvenido…welcome! www.andalucia-holidays.com Tel. +34 657 292 405

KAYAKAPI PREMIUM CAVES - CAPPADOCIA Carved into the rock face, this deluxe, premium cave hotel overlooks the beautiful town of U ̋ rgu ̈p in Cappadocia / Turkey. Offering elegantly-decorated suites with Cappadocia views, rooms and suites at the Kayakapi are traditionally decorated, with modern touches adding an element of luxury. With a large outdoor pool, spa with Turkish Bath, gym, restaurant and wine from its own cellars, Kayakapi Premium Caves - Cappadocia promises to meet your every need. www.kayakapi.com contact@kayakapi.com +90 384 341 88 77

LESARRAIL Set amongst the vineyards of the ‘Malpere’, a beautiful wine growing area in the south of France, you will find LeSarrail, a hamlet of 4 luxury houses sharing their own heated pool, with panoramic views of unspoilt countryside and a backdrop of the Pyrénées mountains. www.lesarrail.com +33 (0) 468 765 966

CHÂTEAU RIEUTORT Set in beautiful south of France, this 18th century château and wine domain offers an unforgettable escape for a maximum of 55 guests. With Chateau suites and self-catering gîtes, you can enjoy 2 swimming pools, the Hérault river and extraordinary wine. www.chateau-rieutort.fr T: +33 4 67 89 38 20

RESIDENZA TORRE COLONNA is a beautiful guest house nestled in a defensive tower built in 1247, found in the bustling heart of Rome. Thanks to its unique blend of modern luxury and medieval history, combining boutique rooms and excellent service, the property is itself a priceless piece of the Roman story and is well worth a visit. T: +3906 83600192 www.torrecolonna.it

LE CLOS DE LIGRÉ-FRANCE An elegant Bed and Breakfast located 5km south of Chinon, in a 1852 residence in the Loire Valley boasting large sunny gardens, swimming pool, courtyard and private parking. This comfortable Guest House is full of character, originality and happy surprises. Dinner available on request. www.le-clos-de-ligre.com +33 (0)2 47 93 95 59

HERITAGE LISBON HOTELS Live the Portuguese Charm and Tradition in the Historic centre of Lisbon. Stay in one of the 5 Heritage Lisbon Hotels Collection – As Janelas Verdes, Heritage Avenida Liberdade Hotel, Hotel Britania, Hotel Lisboa Plaza and Solar Do Castelo. Tel: +351 213 218 200 heritage.hotels@heritage.pt www.heritage.pt

LA BORDE is an elegant but intimate retreat in Burgundy’s rolling landscape, only 90 minutes from Paris. The personalised service you receive makes the 16th century former chateau your home for the duration of your stay. The cuisine, exquisite gardens, and timeless beauty of the manor itself are only a few reasons why La Borde is a must for anyone seeking a tranquil escape. +33 (0)386476901 www.lbmh.fr

HOTEL ALEXANDRA Like staying with a Danish design loving friend in Copenhagen, Hotel Alexandra is situated on the door step to the City Hall Square, the Latin Quarter, the main shopping area, Strøget, and the Tivoli Gardens. Probably the only spot on Earth where you can sit in, rest in, sleep in and admire so much world-famous Danish mid-century vintage furniture. The 61 rooms and hotel decor will transport you back in time to the 50’s and 60’s. www.hotelalexandra.dk Tel: +45 33744444

Dream Destinations

AFRICA & INDIAN OCEAN

THE ZANZIBAR COLLECTION Exotic, Luxurious, Zanzibar! A privately owned collection of beautiful boutique hotels, lying on one of the Top 30 Island beaches in the world. Offering a range of watersports, stunning Spas & East Africa’s only National Geographic affiliated PADI 5 star Dive Centre. The latest addition to the collection is the tranquil & stunning Zawadi Hotel, offering undoubtedly the best ocean views on the Island. Baraza Resort & Spa was voted as the No.1 Hotel in Africa & also among the Top 25 Hotels in the World on TripAdvisor Travellers' Choice Awards. www.thezanzibarcollection.com

Dream Destinations

HOTEL PRIMA DONNA Set in six acres of woodland overlooking the miles of Mediterranean sands of Patara Beach, this luxury beach hotel in Antalya, Turkey, provides the perfect secret getaway. Perfect for honeymooners, this child-free haven offers an oasis of calm. With eclectic designs, each of the six unique woodland lodges with private terrace is set in its own secluded woodland space, and the sunsets are amongst the best in the world! www.hotelprimadonna.com +90 532 13085 90

Dream Destinations

AUSTRALASIA & OCEANIA THE HUKA RETREATS www.hukaretreats.com Three sister properties in South Africa, Fiji and New Zealand – chic and understated statements of exclusivity and seclusion, all offering an exceptional hospitality experience to the world’s most discerning travellers. GRANDE PROVENCE ESTATE, South Africa, is located within a one-hour drive from Cape Town. This 300-year old heritage estate offers award-winning wines, cuisine and art gallery with superb accommodation at The Owner’s Cottage and La Provençale. T +27 (0)21 876 8600 E reservations@grandeprovence.co.za DOLPHIN ISLAND, Fiji offers 14-acres of Pacific private island beauty, romance and luxury ‘castaway’ time for a max. of 8 guests, on an exclusive-use basis. HUKA LODGE, New Zealand, is famed for its natural beauty, legendary hospitality and absolute style since the 1920’s. With just 25 rooms within 17-acres of manicured grounds. Contact: T +64 7 378 5791 E reservations@hukalodge.co.nz for both Huka Lodge & Dolphin Island reservations.


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COMING NEXT MONTH IN THE USA: Condé Nast Chairman Emeritus: S.I. Newhouse, Jr. Chairman: Charles H. Townsend President & Chief Executive Officer: Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. Artistic Director: Anna Wintour IN OTHER COUNTRIES: Condé Nast International Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Nicholas Coleridge Vice Presidents: Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Laffert and Elizabeth Schimel Chief Digital Officer: Wolfgang Blau President, Asia-Pacific: James Woolhouse President, New Markets & Editorial Director, Brand Development: Karina Dobrotvorskaya Director of Planning: Jason Miles Director of Acquisitions and Investments: Moritz von Laffert

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THE VIEW FROM HERE

PHOTOGRAPH: RICHARD WAITE

How we miss Soneva Gili, which redefined how we holiday – usually grounded, feet planted on the earth – elevating us to overwater jetties above some of the most sensational waters in the world. It raised the bar for all hotels in the Maldives and went on to become one of our global favourites alongside our other Maldives obsession, the original barefoot queen of them all, Soneva Fushi, with its vast villas hidden among tropical forest and fronting white sands as bright as light. Much of the hotel group was later sold, including Gili, but that didn’t curb our enthusiasm for the next chapter from smart, spirited Soneva. And here it is, Soneva Jani: five perfect little islands, but only one has been developed; the rest are for guests to play castaway on and find their chosen stretch of sand. The rooms are sensational too: 24 enormous overwater villas and, bigger still, a beach villa (sleeping up to 10). The look here is softer than Gili, less linear and more free-form, with snaking jetties and sweeping curves, and less indigenous than Fushi. This one is simply content to be a showstopper. Yet to temper the supersized spaces, there are split levels and small alcoves and niches – with whimsical touches such as basket swing seats, sunken sofas and catamaran-style nets around the pool, as well as portholes in the floor to watch circling reef sharks and shimmering parrot-fish. But best of all are the water slides from the top decks of some villas – whoop! splash! – into the Indian Ocean. And a heavenly innovation: in most master bedrooms there is a retractable roof that slides back for in-bed stargazing (it closes automatically when it rains). Lines blur between inside and out, making bedrooms seem even bigger and breezier. It’s a daring addition to this luscious hotel group, which is already big on imagination. This will be the most talked about hotel of the year – deservedly. And so the bar keeps rising. Cleveland Collection (+44 20 7843 3531; clevelandcollection.co.uk) offers seven nights in a one-bedroom Water Retreat from £5,995 per person, including breakfast, flights and transfers MICHELLE JANA CHAN

232 Condé Nast Traveller October 2016


CARRIER COLLECTION 2017/18 Carrier specialises in luxury tailor-made holidays worldwide. Service is personal, ďŹ&#x201A;exible and haute couture.

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WATCH SPECIAL

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES


CONTENTS 26

28 7 Global The trend: maps. A

fresh twist on old-school charts

8 Cuba Cigars, the Caribbean

island’s finest export, are on a roll

10 Geneva The little-known Swiss

institute that keeps the world ticking

12 Milan The trend: chain mail. Italian artisanry comes charging back

15 Monaco Why a garden for

Princess Grace is coming up roses

16 Greenland Capture the spirit of 20th-century polar explorers

18 Hawaii Local pro surfer Kai Lenny shares all that’s swell on Maui from hidden beaches to volcano sunsets

20 China Mythical dragons keep it real in modern high jewellery

22 Scandinavia The trend: Nordic. Minimal design in the watch realm

26 Great Britain It’s pop versus rock as The Beatles take on The Rolling Stones

28 Pilots’ watches Why this piece of captain’s kit has landed new fans

34 New York Kick back to the Roaring Twenties with dainty Art Deco

37 Mexico The trend: skulls. A cool edge to the colourful Day of the Dead

38 India There’s a rose-cut revival in the world’s diamond-polishing capital

40 Scotland The trend: tweed. A shift in texture for this most traditional fabric

42 Savile Row A centuries-old timekeeper tinkers with tailoring

44 Japan Intricate Eastern techniques move into a niche New York market

46 South Pacific Why shiny

mother-of-pearl is now dark and arty

48 Paris Glitzy arrivals and ritzy

revamps shake up the Place Vendôme

50 Rio de Janeiro Hit the waves of Copacabana – without getting wet

52 Italy Jeweller Delfina Delettrez lifts the lid on her hometown of Rome

54 Nepal A 2016 upgrade for a

historic Everest expedition model

56 Florida Flash back to victory on one of the USA’s oldest car-racing circuits

ON THE COVER: DH-88 limited edition in rose gold with alligator strap, £14,995, Bremont (bremont.com). Photographed by Magnus Torsne. Styled by Yvonne Achato Watch and Jewellery Editor: Jessica Diamond Art Director: Pete Winterbottom Deputy Art Director: Paula Ellis Senior Designer: Nitish Mandalia Picture Editor: Karin Mueller Chief Sub-Editor: Rick Jordan Deputy Chief Sub-Editor: Gráinne McBride Senior Sub-Editor: Roxy Mirshahi Managing Editor: Paula Maynard Features Assistant/PA to the Editor: Tabitha Joyce Associate Publisher: Juliette Ottley Advertisement Director: Erica Wong Advertisement Manager: Natalie Fenton Promotions Creative Director: Lee Osborne Acting Promotions Director: Amy Cole Digital Executive: Natalie Moss-Blundell Production Controller: Dawn Crosby Production Co-ordinator: Katie McGuinness

EDITOR: MELINDA STEVENS PUBLISHER: SIMON LEADSFORD MANAGING DIRECTOR: NICHOLAS COLERIDGE

2 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS: ROGER BAMBER/TOPFOTO; MAGNUS TORSNE; CARSTEN WITTE/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM

4 Editor’s letter

15


HEUER MONZA www.tagheuer.com


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES Would I like to go to Florence for the launch of Cartier’s new men’s watch, the Drive de Cartier? Er, I think so. During Pitti Uomo, I was told, when the city’s population of fashion-forward men practically doubles? OK, sounds culturally very interesting. So I found myself at Palazzo Gondi, a private house that the Maison had rented for a week, just an olive stone’s throw from the Duomo. It had rooftop views across thick terracotta tiles, higgledy chimney pots and mamma’s pants on the line, and then the heart-stopping, black-and-white striations of the cathedral and the amber embrace of the nearby Tuscan hills. And there I pretty much stayed for two days grazing on trays of Italian cheese on toast and nougat, immersed in a Cartier world of liveried waiters and Cartier table football and essentials such as a bespoke Cartier chess set and a poker box. Also there were 40 ‘Drive’ men there, recruited as ambassadors for the brand, each sporting the gorgeously soft, cushion-shaped timepiece, like a membership badge of some luxury occult. The British ‘chosen one’ was tailor Patrick Grant, whose general aura made everyone fidget with awkwardness. And it being Pitti, all 40 were beyond fashion – one looked like he was wearing my daughter’s school uniform, another had slippers made from kilims, another channelled a plantation owner who’d once been a rock star. Kilim man turned out to be a Count and at one point gave a talk on the merits of tomatoes. And then suddenly it was dinner time and I have no idea what we ate, but the long trestle tables were strewn with flower arrangements that tumbled into fruit that tumbled onto our plates and ended up down our fronts, and after that who knows. And the amazing thing about all of this? At no point did anyone mention the watch. I think someone waved it under my nose, maybe. But there was no talk of movements, or precision or manufactured this and that – although if you’re interested it’s the in-house 1904 automatic calibre. Will I remember the launch event? Yes. Because sometimes a watch is as much about technicality and fuctionality as it is about conveying a look, a lifestyle or a mood, particularly if that mood is a never-ending Florentine house party. This is Condé Nast Traveller’s third edition of Around the World in 80 Watches, in which we endeavour to provide you with a little of both.

JESSICA DIAMOND

WATCH & JEWELLERY EDITOR

MAGNUS TORSNE

TIM BARBER

YVONNE ACHATO

ROBIN SWITHINBANK

Photographer, pilots’ watches (page 28 and cover). A still-life photographer and director, Magnus has had his work appear in Vanity Fair and Elle. His job has taken him to New York, Florence, Paris and Cape Town. At his Stockholm workshop he combines photographic skills, model building and a thorough grasp of lighting techniques.

Writer, Greenland & Nepal (pages 16 and 54). In 2013, Tim, the Telegraph’s watch editor, interviewed Major Roy Homard, one of the last surviving members of the British North Greenland Expedition. He had recently rediscovered the Tudor watch given to him back in 1952 – it had lain at the back of a kitchen drawer for decades.

Stylist, pilots’ watches (page 28). The London-based creative is a skilled prop maker with a background in interior architecture and personal styling. Yvonne is driven by her fascination with the relationship between objects and space. She has styled for Bombay Sapphire, Lanson and The Gentleman’s Journal, and worked in Spain and Portugal.

Writer, pilots’ watches & Savile Row (pages 28 and 42). A specialist watch columnist for Esquire, Robin also contributes to the Financial Times, the Telegraph and International New York Times, among others. ‘Like most pilot’s watch owners,’ he says, ‘I’ve never actually flown a plane. I read Biggles as a child, though – does that count?’

Copyright © The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, 1 Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Printed in the UK by Wyndeham Roche. Colour origination by CLX Europe Media Solution Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. The title Condé Nast Traveller is registered at US Patent Office and in Great Britain as a trademark. The Mail Order Protection Scheme does not cover items featured editorially. Not to be sold separately from Condé Nast Traveller

Information is correct at time of going to press. Prices quoted may have changed by the time of publication 4 Watch Special October 2016

BIOS BY BEN ALLEN. PHOTOGRAPH: KAVI BHANSALI

CONTRIBUTORS


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

GLOBAL

THE TREND: MAPS WELL-TRAVELLED PLAYERS PLOT A COURSE FOR WORLD DOMINATION Maps: one of life’s fast-disappearing joys, like full-fat milk, handwritten letters and landline telephones with really long cords. Remember poring over the London A-Z or a well-thumbed copy of the Ordnance Survey, where your final destination was always, always down the spine or at the turn of the page? Google Maps and in-car satnavs have done away with their frustrating papery beauty. Watches, for some, have gone the same way; the progression from Swatch to G-Shock to a first mechanical – maybe a Tag or even a Rolex – has been savagely halted by the mobile phone and its digital-battery-powered timekeeping. But a slew of new pieces from some of the watch world’s biggest hitters sees cartography and horology nicely aligning, their dials adorned with maps or aerial visions of the earth. Reasons are varied, from a wearer’s loyalty to a particular region, as seen in Graff’s three GyroGraff models – showing Asia, Europe and the Middle East – carved by laser from white gold, the nuances of each landmass then finished by hand. And Montblanc’s 4810 ExoTourbillon is an ode to the golden age of travel when the brand’s three founders first crossed the Atlantic in 1906. But perhaps most fitting to the trend are models from Patek Philippe, Jaeger-LeCoultre and Christopher Ward, which illustrate arguably modern life’s most useful complication: the second time zone. For those who need time checks both at home and abroad, it’s hard to think of a more beautiful way to do so. JESSICA DIAMOND

GENTLEMAN’S WORLD TIME REF 5131R IN ROSE GOLD WITH ENAMEL DIAL, £49,390, PATEK PHILIPPE (PATEK.COM)

MONTBLANC 4810 EXOTOURBILLON SLIM 110 YEARS EDITION ASIA, £32,900, MONTBLANC (MONTBLANC.COM)

GEOPHYSIC UNIVERSAL TIME IN ROSE GOLD, £18,300, JAEGER-LECOULTRE (WATCHES-OFSWITZERLAND.CO.UK)

PHOTOGRAPH: CHRIS WALSH/GETTY IMAGES

GYROGRAFF WORLD ASIA IN WHITE GOLD AND ENAMEL, POA, GRAFF DIAMONDS (GRAFFDIAMONDS.COM)

CHRISTOPHER WARD C9 WORLDTIMER IN STEEL, £995, CHRISTOPHER WARD (CHRISTOPHERWARD.CO.UK)

October 2016 Watch Special 7


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

CUBA

YOU GOTTA ROLL WITH IT

WRAPPING UP THE COUNTRY’S BEST CIGARS IN A SMOKING-HOT DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPH: BRIAN DOBEN/GALLERY STOCK

‘Sometimes,’ Sigmund Freud admitted, presumably with extreme reluctance, ‘a cigar is just a cigar.’ But even the great philosopher of phallic symbolism might have been surprised to learn that sometimes a cigar can also be a wristwatch. Such, in any case, seems to be the thinking behind the Zenith El Primero Chronomaster 1969 Cohiba Edition. (The esteemed Swiss brand evidently prefers both its watch names and its stogies long.) The new Zenith model has been released to celebrate Cohiba’s 50th birthday. In 1966, seven years after the Cuban revolution, Fidel Castro caught a whiff of a cigar that one of his bodyguards was smoking. El Comandante liked it so much he made the local manufacturer his official cigar supplier, under the name Cohiba – recalling the word used by Christopher Columbus’s crew to refer to the tobacco leaves they discovered in the New World. Interestingly, considering the formidable reputation of Cohibas today – there are plenty of experts who insist these are the best cigars money can buy – they have only been commercially available since 1982. Until then they were reserved for the personal pleasure of Castro and a handful of his cronies. The precise nature of the connection between a Swiss watch and a Cuban cigar is perhaps best left shrouded in thick plumes of strongly scented smoke and talk of craftsmanship, tradition and brand synergy. (Yet wouldn’t it be wonderful if it turned out that both products were fabricated on the thighs of EL PRIMERO COHIBA EDITION virgins?) Nevertheless, it is perfectly true that the tobacco-brown tones of the Zenith watch’s strap and dial – cut IN ROSE GOLD WITH LEATHER through with the distinctive black-and-yellow band that likewise encircles every Cohiba – are indeed most STRAP, £14,900, ZENITH cigar-like, as is the fine wooden box that it comes in. STEVE KING (ZENITH-WATCHES.COM)

8 Watch Special October 2016


IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RAYMOND WEIL is proud to be supporting Swiss sailing team Realteam as its OfďŹ cial Timing Partner and to introduce a new freelancer able to support the crew in the most extreme sailing conditions. A nice little tip of the hat to Mr Raymond Weil who was a member of the Geneva Yacht Club. Join the discussion #RWRealteam

freelancer collection


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

GENEVA

FLYING TOURBILLON POINCON DE GENEVE, £181,000, LOUIS VUITTON (LOUISVUITTON.CO.UK)

CLEVER COGS

WHEELS WITHIN WHEELS ARE GEARED UP TO TEST THE GEEKIEST OF BOFFINS It’s all very well producing a luxury item and then making all sorts of claims about its manufacture and quality. Self-eulogising about the amazingness of the fruits of your own labour is a bit like a novelist writing her own review in the Sunday papers. But, as everyone knows, it’s what others think that really counts. Not that Louis Vuitton hasn’t produced some highly credible, complicated timepieces of late, such as the Spin Time and the Tambour Minute Repeater. But both act as precursors to its latest and most horologically punchy model: a Flying Tourbillon Poinçon de Genève, named after the industry’s centre of excellence. As it turns out, Geneva – that most sedate, benign, alpine-fresh city – has, in watch terms, the harshest, strictest most exacting institute one can possibly imagine: the Poinçon de Genève. Like a Michelin critic on steroids, it examines the manufacturing and finishing of all components that go into a watch with minute, obsessive, evangelical fervour. Firstly, every element must be designed and made in the canton of Geneva, which is now made possible for Louis Vuitton by La Fabrique du Temps, its new headquarters in the city. All aspects of the watch are then verified and certified according to a list of requirements that would tax and frustrate the most OCD of horologists (an example – ‘the escape wheel has to be light, not more than 0.16mm thick in large calibers and 0.13mm in calibers under 18mm, and its locking-faces must be polished’). Although in a rather lovely reminder that watches are also about looks and not just about brains, the Poinçon de Genève states that the surface of each and every component must be hand-finished and decorated. Which makes this Flying Tourbillon not only a technical tour de force but also a thing of great beauty. JD

10 Watch Special October 2016


CLINT J.

FROM OUR HOMETOWN TO YOURS. ALEX S.

TIARA T.

28 FOUBERT â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PL ACE, LONDON , W1F 7PR

SHINOL A .CO.UK


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

MILAN

THE TREND: CHAIN MAIL A SWASHBUCKLING MARTIAL ARTFORM IS MOUNTING A COMEBACK

SUPEROCEAN HERITAGE CHRONOWORKS, £30,410, BREITLING (BREITLING.COM)

PHOTOGRAPH: DEAGOSTINI/GETTY IMAGES

SEAMASTER PLOPROF 1200M, £7,975, OMEGA (OMEGA WATCHES.COM)

LA D DE DIOR WITH BLACK MOTHER-OFPEARL DIAL, £4,700, DIOR (DIOR.COM)

As every country’s history leaves its mark on the landscape, so the tumultuous and violent past of Italy has shaped its terrain. Those hilltop citadels, brutish castellos and fortified palazzos that dot the Italian interior are the result of centuries of medieval in-fighting between independent states fiercely guarding land, resources and trade routes. One of the most lucrative professions was armoury, vital for those who fought in the state-versus-state wars that dragged on for decades and lowered the life expectancy of a soldier to less than 25 years. Chain mail became an essential piece of kit, its supple fluidity able to protect areas where solid plate joints exposed vulnerable skin; and the furnaces of Lombardy – particularly its capital Milan – excelled in its production. Today, its contemporary derivative is the Milanese watch strap, that fine-woven metal bracelet which bridges the gap between conventional leather and the less-refined link bracelet. Its popularity peaked in the 1950s before waning in favour of a chunkier aesthetic, but these days it’s enjoying something of a revival. Its refinement and retro sensibilities have now attracted the female watch market, with both Harry Winston and Dior using a Milanese strap for the first time. The gem-cut-inspired dial of Winston’s new Emerald collection sits on either a pretty satin strap or, most successfully, a pink or white gold Milanese, just five links wide but elegant and pliant for all its slimness. Dior, endlessly seeking crosspollination between couture and watch-making, taps into Milanese’s fabric-like qualities with its La D de Dior Satine collection. The woven shiny mesh evokes a satin ribbon; as Christian Dior said portentously, ‘The little ribbon bow has always been one of the most popular accessories for women. You can use them on the sleeves, the cuffs.’ Piaget is a more seasoned master, having introduced woven straps in the 1960s. In 1957 it also took the decision to produce only watches in precious metals, and as a result the manipulation of gold is a Piaget forte. For its Limelight Gala Milanese model, a pretty, gem-set swirl of a cocktail watch, the strap is as much a part of the jewellery proposition as the embellished diamond-set bezel. As for men, well, they’re spoilt for choice: IWC’s Portofino model, for example, set on a steel mesh for a refined Riviera vibe; the chunky, utilitarian (and supposedly shark-proof) Omega Seamaster Ploprof; the wallet-friendly but sleek Shore Projects with inter-changeable Milaneses, and the Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope, all open dial and silky strap. But it’s Breitling that has really led the charge this year, adopting the centuries-old weaving technique but switching metal for rubber to create the ultimate diving watch: light, tough, waterproof, soft and comfortable. It’s a million miles from the Milanese’s battle-weary roots but proof that change is indeed good. JD

LIMELIGHT GALA MILANESE, £28,900, PIAGET (EN.PIAGET.COM)

BARRA IN STAINLESS STEEL, £135, SHORE PROJECTS (SHOREPROJECTS.COM)

PORTOFINO CHRONOGRAPH IN STAINLESS STEEL £5,300, IWC (IWC.COM)

EMERALD WATCH IN WHITE GOLD, POA, HARRY WINSTON (HARRY WINSTON.COM)

MAX BILL CHRONOSCOPE, £1,590, JUNGHANS (THEWATCHGALLERY.COM) October 2016 Watch Special 13


Celebrating 100 years of

D E AR BO EI N G , HAP PY 1 0 0 T H AN N IVER SARY. DO E SN â&#x20AC;&#x2122; T TIM E FLY. The Boeing 100 mechanical watch, limited to only 300 timepieces, recognises Boeingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading position as a defense and commercial aircraft manufacturer. The watch is manufactured from Boeing aviation-grade Ti 6-4 titanium, a special metal that is significantly stronger than commercial titanium. It also features carbon fibre composite from the historically significant and technologically advanced Boeing Dreamliner flying testbed aircraft, ZA004, which can be found integrated into the crown of each timepiece.


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

MONACO

PETAL PROJECT

PHOTOGRAPH: CARSTEN WITTE/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM

ROYAL ROOTS FOR A ROSE RENDERED IN WOOD

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: ALTIPLANO 38MM IN WHITE GOLD, WOOD AND MOTHER-OF-PEARL MARQUETRY, £52,500; ALTIPLANO 38MM IN PINK GOLD WITH HAND-ENGRAVED PINK-GOLD DIAL, £48,100; ALTIPLANO 38MM IN WHITE GOLD AND WOOD MARQUETRY, £52,500, ALL PIAGET (PIAGET.COM)

Jewellery houses love a flower. It’s the perfect expression of so much: romance, fragility and natural beauty. It’s organic and instantly recognisable yet tricky to translate into hard materials, so it’s a real challenge. In other words, it allows jewellers to show off while taking ownership of a motif that can be replicated again and again. Cartier favours orchids, Chanel adores camellias and Piaget is head over heels for the rose. In fact, such is the latter’s fervour that in 1982 the rose-growing company Meilland named a variety after Yves Piaget, the jeweller’s owner at the time. Blousy, almost peony-like, its 80 serrated blush-pink petals have lent themselves to much of Piaget’s watch and jewellery aesthetic, an unashamedly frilly bloom that’s more rambling garden than graphic re-imagining. And it’s in Monaco that the flower is best appreciated, in the Princess Grace Rose Garden, which houses 8,000 rose bushes and was expanded, restored and re-opened in 2014 with the help of Piaget to create an oasis of scent and colour amid the boxy apartment blocks of the principality. Since 2013, the Altiplano 38mm, Piaget’s slim-line watch, has featured the Yves Piaget rose on its dial, providing the perfect opportunity to collaborate with artists who render the petals in a variety of métiers d’art techniques. This year a cabinet maker (fortuitously named Rose Saneuil) was tasked with creating the impression of petalled volume from the most minute wood shavings; 96 pieces in total were assembled using marquetry methods largely unchanged since the 17th century. Three versions exist: an all-wood one (bird’s-eye maple and red and pink sycamore), and a prettier, gently iridescent design using mother-of-pearl. An engraved gold dial completes the trio, each petal painstakingly carved from the thinnest slivers, the fragility of the rose encapsulated in precious metal. JD October 2016 Watch Special 15


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

GREENLAND

ACTION STATIONS

16 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: ØIVIND HAUG

TAKE IT TO EXTREMES WITH THE TOUGHEST, EXPLORER-TESTED KIT While Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were scrambling up Mount Everest in 1953 (see page 54), another British expedition was taking Rolex-made watches into even colder and harsher climes. The British North Greenland Expedition of 1952-54 was the kind of boys’-own escapade that seems unthinkable now: a band of barely equipped servicemen and scientists scurrying around for two years amid life-threatening conditions, and sometimes 24-hour darkness, to conduct a scientific survey of a region that was almost impossibly remote and treacherous. Waved off by Queen Elizabeth II and facing constant dramas and disasters (frequently reported in the press back home), the expedition once again presented Rolex with an opportunity to prove its watches in the toughest of circumstances, and to market itself through the heroism of those wearing them. This time it was Rolex’s sibling brand, Tudor, whose watches were issued to the explorers: versions of its newest and most rugged watch, the Oyster Prince, being taken for the duration of the expedition. ‘The Tudor Oyster Prince roughs it in Greenland’ stated the brand’s ads of the time, referring to the ‘courageous men who wear these Tudor Oyster Princes [and] have unerring faith in their ability to withstand these tremendous hazards’. Recently Tudor brought out what could be seen as the modern equivalent of the Oyster Prince, with a suitably evocative name to match: the North Flag. It’s very much the modern adventurer’s watch, with an ultra-legible dial design (hints of the Rolex Explorer, in fact), power-reserve display, sporty NORTH FLAG WITH LEATHER NORTH FLAG IN looks and tough ceramic-and-steel case construction. It also has the bonus of Tudor’s first ever in-house STRAP, £2,430, TUDOR STAINLESS STEEL, £2,500, movement, a chronometer designed for rugged performance. For the modern adventurer – polar (TUDORWATCH.COM) TUDOR (AS BEFORE) or otherwise – the North Flag is more than up to the task. TIM BARBER


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

HAWAII

MY MAUI: KAI LENNY In Hawaiian, ‘Kai’ means ocean, and the windsurfing, kitesurfing, big-wave rider certainly lives up to his name – he recently won the Moloka’i-2-O’ahu Paddleboard World Championships in a record time

What’s special about Maui? ‘I was born and raised on the island and it has always been my home. It’s the place that has created who I am. What’s so special are the world-class conditions for every kind of water sport. And, above all, the island itself is one of the most stunning places on the planet, with the potential for an amazing adventure around every corner. To top it all off, we get the biggest and best waves in the world.’

Where is your favourite place on the island? ‘A spot on the north shore called Pe’ahi, also known as Jaws. It’s completely mind-blowing. There is so much energy in the atmosphere, and the landscape looks like something out of Jurassic Park. Even the trail to get down to the rocky beach is breathtaking. But, of course, the real reason I love it is because the most perfect giant wave can be found under the cathedral-like cliffs that tower 250ft above the surf. It feels like you’re in a thunderdome when you’re surfing there.’ AQUARACER 300M CALIBRE 5 ON NYLON STRAP, £1,850, TAG HEUER (TAGHEUER.COM)

AQUARACER 300M CALIBRE 5 ON STEEL BRACELET, £1,950, TAG HEUER, AS BEFORE

Is there a surf beach suitable for beginners? ‘Honolua Bay is good for the non-big-wave surfer, but there are plenty of other spots that are really fun. Ho’okipa, for example, has great waves for a variety of water sports. Plus, there are lots of brilliant local surf instructors to get you started.’

Where is the best place to watch the sunset? ‘On top of Haleakal¯a volcano. You’re 10,000ft up, so you get to see the sun sink into the middle of the Pacific through the clouds. The mana, or energy, is so strong at the top. If you can’t face the climb, anywhere on the west or south coast provides an unforgettable view.’

And a favourite place to eat? HALEMAU’U TRAIL NEAR BOTTOMLESS PIT, HALEAKALA NATIONAL PARK

18 Watch Special October 2016

‘Mama’s Fish House: everything on the menu is delicious. But it’s more than just the food: it’s the experience too. It’s very lively so I enjoy going there to celebrate, and to eat the finest fresh fish. Be sure to book well in advance, though, because it’s always busy.’


LEFT AND ABOVE LEFT: MAMA’S FISH HOUSE. ABOVE RIGHT, SELF-SERVE PINEAPPLE STAND

The best breakfast on the island? ‘Definitely at my parents’ house. They make the greatest food ever. But if I can’t make it home, and I’m on the south side of the island, I go to Kihei Caffe. On the north shore, Café des Amis and Café Mambo are recommended, and after surfing on the west coast I go to Leoda’s Kitchen and Pie Shop.’

Something to take home from Maui? ‘Because so many different sports have been developed here, I recommend buying something surf related. We have amazing artists, such as my favourite, Avi Kiriaty. His art is very representative of the Maui lifestyle.’

What would be on your 24-hour hit list?

PHOTOGRAPHS: BROWN CANNON III; DIANE COOK & LEN JENSHEL; JEN JUDGE; ZAK NOYLE; JESSICA SAMPLE

‘Maui isn’t just great for water sports, it’s also a huge destination for yoga, hiking and cycling. I’d suggest taking a drive and let the island dictate what to do. The hiking is excellent, with many beautiful waterfalls that lead to hidden beaches. It’s all about nature and being outdoors.’

Day trip from Maui? ‘Definitely the neighbouring island of La¯na’i, a short hop on the ferry. Relax on a beautiful white sandy beach, then swim with the dolphins at Manele Bay.’

Favourite possession? ‘I love my TAG Heuer Aquaracer Calibre 5; I wear it all the time. It has ridden and survived some giant waves at Jaws, it has travelled with me across open ocean channels and done just about every water sport there is. I’m stoked that it still looks brand new.’

What do you do in your spare time? ‘My time when I’m busy is no different to when I’m not. I do exactly the same thing, which is ride every type of wave I can. The ocean is the best playground there is.’

SURFBOARDS ALONG A STREET NEAR PA’IA

THE BEACH AT PIPELINE, NORTH SHORE


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

CHINA

SMOKE AND FIRE

A MIGHTY DRAGON BREATHES LIFE INTO MODERN DECO

DRAGON MYSTERIEUX IN WHITE GOLD, DIAMOND, CORAL, ONYX, EMERALD AND FIRE OPAL, POA, CARTIER (CARTIER.CO.UK) 20 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: LISSY ELLE

The cynical among you may think that the Dragon Mystérieux high jewellery watch by Cartier is a blatant attempt to hook in a certain customer base. After all, the dragon is a cultural and symbolic behemoth across much of Asia, representing power, success, strength and good luck – hence its adoption as the primary motif of imperial authority. But Cartier has tapped into the exoticism of far-flung lands since it first explored the dragon figure in the form of chimera (two-headed) bracelets in the 1920s. As well as using the abstract linear designs of Art Deco, Louis Cartier and his studio were fascinated with the mythical beasts of the Orient, a direct reflection of a shrinking world as travel became easier and external influences inspired their ever-widening aesthetic. And it’s not just the dragon symbolism that links this jewellery watch back to Cartier’s early days. The inclusion of coral, accenting the spine of the beast picked out in inky onyx, is a classic colour combination of the Art Deco period; the masculine and graphic palette was previously thought too daring, too outré to adorn a woman of significance. A central stone atop the dragon’s head – all 23.77 carats of fire opal – is another century-old Cartier signature, a large and exceptional gem as part of an integrated design. And then there’s the small matter of the Mystérieux movement that powers the watch. It is most frequently seen in mystery clocks with entirely transparent dials that give the illusion of floating hands. The style reached its peak between 1912 and 1930, so its translation into a contemporary wristwatch is a feat of miniaturised engineering, a snub to all other forms of complications, so technical as to be invisible. Dragon Mystérieux may be the ultimate expression of Cartier’s modern workshops, but it’s also proof that, as a collection of ideas, sometimes the oldest are still the best. JD


A watch with a truly global perspective, the C8 UTC Worldtimer is able to tell the time in three timezones at once. Designed in England, and built at our atelier in Switzerland, its self-winding ETA 2893-2 movement also boasts a power reserve of 42 hours. Steel 44mm ÂŁ899

Swiss movement English heart

Discover the new breed of watchmaker...

christopherward.co.uk


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

SCANDINAVIA

KOPPEL GRANDE DATE SMALL SECONDS IN STAINLESS STEEL, £2,300, GEORG JENSEN, (AS BEFORE)

THE TREND: NORDIC

VIVIANNA BANGLE IN PVD AND BLACK DIAMONDS, £2,450, GEORG JENSEN, (GEORGJENSEN.COM)

Every June hundreds of journalists descend on the small village of Almhult in Sweden. They head to IKEA for its Democratic Design Day: an annual event that offers a behind-the-scenes look at the company’s famously secretive headquarters. IKEA staff, who account for around half of Almhult’s 8,000strong population, are on hand, expounding the greatness and wisdom of their founder, Ingvar Kamprad. In Almhult he’s a Swedish Holy See, a visionary who changed the world when he offered flat pack to his flock in 1943. With Silicon Valley-style enthusiasm and near religious fervour, IKEA experts analyse how we live today and how we can live better tomorrow, thanks to Malm beds and Billy bookcases. Beyond entry-level IKEA, Scandinavian design has many other incarnations, among them Swedish textile house Svenskt Tenn, Finnish furniture maker Artek and Danish silversmith Georg Jensen. What the latter has in common with the former is not obvious. IKEA has a vast network of suppliers all over the world who shave off every last penny to keep prices down. Georg Jensen, by contrast, has been making everything from candlesticks to jewellery in Denmark, often by hand, for more than 100 years. Its silverware and watches are heirloom pieces that are passed down through the generations. What they do share, though, is a design approach that favours clean-lined functionality over ostentation. Homemakers have long hankered after this simplicity and now, in watch circles, there’s a Nordic movement in the air. Clear, uncluttered dials and minimal detailing created by Scandinavian designers are becoming increasingly popular. Last year Georg Jensen revisited its Koppel range – originally designed in 1978 by the late Danish maestro Henning Koppel – and released three new models. This year it added the Koppel Grande Date Small Seconds to the mix. Back in 1978, in a radical move, Koppel replaced the numbers of the minute track with dots and, although the latest collection has 

PHOTOGRAPHS: DITTE ISAGER

AFTER FURNITURE AND FOOD, THERE’S NOW A NEW SCANDI MOVEMENT


BW102S-W-LGR1 IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £485, BRAVUR (BRAVUR WATCHES.COM)

BW002G-W-LBR2 IN GOLD-PLATED STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £525, BRAVUR (AS BEFORE)

BW001S-G-LGR1 IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £575, BRAVUR (AS BEFORE)

October 2016 Watch Special 23


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

SCANDINAVIA



24 Watch Special October 2016

VARI FOREST GREEN IN ALUMINIUM WITH LEATHER STRAP, £135, HYGGE (HYGGE-WATCHES.COM)

LUGANO 38MM IN POLISHED STEEL WITH A STEEL MILANESE STRAP, £225, LARSSON & JENNINGS (LARSSON ANDJENNINGS.COM)

LUGANO 38MM WITH POLISHED STEEL CASE AND LEATHER STRAP, £215, LARSSON & JENNINGS (AS BEFORE)

PHOTOGRAPHS: DITTE ISAGER

modern Swiss mechanics, it stays true to his minimal aesthetic. Georg Jensen has also released the Vivianna Bangle Black Diamonds collection: a contemporary take on the original designed in 1962 by the late Swedish jeweller Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe. That timepiece had no numbers or minute hands because, she explained, ‘I didn’t want to be trapped by time. I made the watch open, shiny, and took away everything that was watch-like, so when you looked at it you saw only yourself and the second hand.’ Creating a watch without really being into watches was also a starting point for Swedish industrial designers Magnus Svensson and Johan Sahlin. The pair, who formerly designed sports and outdoor gear and medical equipment respectively, founded Bravur in 2011. ‘We couldn’t identify with any of the watch-brand stereotypes – expensive cars, yachts and so on,’ says Svensson. ‘So we set about coming up with something urban and fashionable that would accompany a person’s style, rather than something very technical.’ The word ‘bravur’ in Swedish means ‘brilliance’ and ‘ur’ is an old term for a clock. The company is wholly Scandinavian, in both execution and inspiration, and the duo are influenced by Nordic designers such as Arne Jacobsen, Poul Kjærholm and Bruno Mathsson, and, similar to them, Bravur names its collections (three so far) with an initial and a numeral. Each watch is individually numbered and comes in a leather or stainless-steel case, and each strap can be monogrammed. The signature etching on the side of every timepiece is inspired by old camera lenses. ‘Scandinavian design always takes things back to the bare necessities,’ says British watchmaker Andrew Jennings. In 2012 he founded Larsson & Jennings with his Swedish business partner Joakim Larsson. Their mission was to marry Scandinavian minimalism and British classicism, and although Jennings bought out Larsson in 2014, he still ‘takes a classic look, strips it back and adds contemporary facing and materials.’ Three collections and three stores later, the brand has not strayed from its fashion-forward, pared-back roots. Jennings is planning to release more technical watches next year, but, he says, ‘complications will only be added if they don’t compromise on minimalism’. New for autumn are numerical dials, and leather straps, which are partly made in a 140-year-old tannery in Uppsala, Sweden. The notion of lolling on the shag pile in front of a wood burner while admiring empty skies over the archipelago is summed up by the Danish word ‘hygge’. It means feelings of warmth and wellbeing, and is a semi-religious state of existence in Denmark. Japanese watchmakers P.O.S. and Danish lifestyle brand Skagen use the concept to promote their cool, fashion-led timepieces. In 2009 P.O.S. launched Hygge watches in Japan and, while the movements are Japanese, Nordic collaborators provide regular design input. Its new Väri collection – colourful, affordable and unisex – is by Helsinki-based designer Mats Lönngren. Yet despite their growing popularity, Scandinavian watches still rely on mechanics from outside the region. ‘There is no watchmaking industry in Sweden,’ says Bravur’s Svensson, who last year produced a limited edition of 50 of its BW002 model entirely in his homeland. Next year, he and Sahlin are going for ‘full Swedish assembly’ on another major model. If they achieve it, they could change the face of Scandinavian watchmaking forever. EMMA O’KELLY


L I F E

I S

A B O U T

M O M E N T S

C E L E B R AT I N G E L E G A N C E S I N C E 1 8 3 0

PETITE PROMESSE STEEL, 44 DIAMONDS 22 MM QUARTZ

www.baume-et-mercier.com

Harrods, The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

GREAT BRITAIN

THE BEATLES

T WO TIME-KEEPING GIANTS ARE RESURRECTING THE 1960S BATTLE OF So, who’s better, The Beatles or The Rolling Stones? This is one of the great conundrums of our age, right up there with determinism versus free will, general relativity versus quantum theory and Coke versus Pepsi. Possibly also Energizer versus Duracell batteries, though I think in the end the pink bunnies settled that one. Or didn’t they? At any rate, two eminent Swiss watch manufacturers have lately weighed in on the thorny old Beatles/ Stones question, and in so doing have highlighted one of the ways in which band loyalty and brand loyalty can collide. Over the years, Raymond Weil has demonstrated its love of music through numerous sponsorship and charitable initiatives – its decision to release a Beatlesthemed model is therefore less curious than it might seem. Album titles appear around the dial, and there’s a nice visual pun where, instead of a numeral, a little image of the Fab Four in silhouette appears at the four o’clock position. If only there were an alarm function to mimic the wonderful section of ‘A Day in the Life’ that begins with the sound of a ringing bell and Paul McCartney singing: ‘Woke up, fell out of bed, dragged a comb across my

THE BEATLES LIMITED EDITION MAESTRO IN STAINLESS STEEL, £975, RAYMOND WEIL (RAYMOND-WEIL.COM)


THE ROLLING STONES

THE BANDS WITH PITCH-PERFECT HITS. BUT HOW WILL IT SWING?

PHOTOGRAPHS: AKG-IMAGES; ALAMY; ALPHA; ROGER BAMBER/TOPFOTO; DAVID HURN/MAGNUM PHOTOS; PHILIP JONES GRIFFITHS/MAGNUM PHOTOS; REX FEATURES; ETHAN RUSSELL ALL RIGHTS RESERVED; MARILYN SILVERSTONE/MAGNUM PHOTOS; TOPFOTO

head‥.’ Meanwhile, Zenith has launched its El Primero Chronomaster 1969 Tribute to The Rolling Stones. In fact, it’s Zenith’s second tribute to the Stones, somewhat darker and moodier than the previous version. This time the big lips and tongue logo has been relegated to the case-back, where it provides almost the only splash of colour; otherwise it’s more ‘Paint It Black’ than ‘She’s a Rainbow’. Look carefully and you’ll notice that the hands resemble the frets of a guitar and parts of the dial are finely grooved like a record. As Zenith fans will know, 1969 was the year the brand introduced its legendary El Primero movement; and as Stones fans will know, it was, less cheerfully, the year the band’s epic American tour ended in murder at Altamont. Is either of these watches inherently Beatles-y or Stones-y? Perhaps no watch could ever embody the spirit of rock ’n’ roll. When asked a while ago why he hadn’t written his memoirs, Mick Jagger quipped that there wouldn’t be much point, since he couldn’t remember most of the 1960s. Time was on his side back then – and the time of day didn’t matter a fig. STEVE KING EL PRIMERO CHRONOMASTER TRIBUTE TO THE ROLLING STONES IN TITANIUM DLC, £9,700, ZENITH (ZENITH-WATCHES.COM)

October 2016 Watch Special 27


THIS PAGE FROM TOP: BIG CROWN PROPILOT IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £1,060, ORIS (ORIS.CH). HERITAGE PILOT TON-UP IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £5,600, ZENITH (ZENITH-WATCHES.COM). SANTOS 100 IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £7,750, CARTIER (CARTIER.CO.UK). OPPOSITE FROM TOP: TYPE XXI FLYBACK CHRONOGRAPH IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £9,900, BREGUET (BREGUET.COM). KHAKI FIELD AUTOCHRONO IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £1,345, HAMILTON (HAMILTONWATCH.COM). 1858 MANUAL SMALL SECOND IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £2,265, MONTBLANC (MONTBLANC.COM) 28


SUPERSONIC

THE PILOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WATCH IS BEING TAKEN UP A NOTCH WITH A FRESH FLEET OF FLYBOY PIECES BY ROBIN SWITHINBANK. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MAGNUS TORSNE. STYLED BY YVONNE ACHATO


A

t last year’s Baselworld watch fair in spring something odd happened. Patek Philippe, a company with ambitions firmly grounded in conservatism, unveiled a pilot’s watch. As even first-grade watch aficionados will know, Patek doesn’t do pilots’ watches. It busies itself with dressier matters, high-end complications and the like. What, watch critics asked at the time, was Patek doing? The answer was simple: Patek was following the market. Pilots’ watches are in vogue, and there’s a long list of watch companies – old and new – battling for aerial supremacy. IWC. Breitling and Bremont. Rolex. Longines and Zenith. Breguet. Bell & Ross. Hamilton. Oris. Citizen. Glycine. And now, it seems, even Patek Philippe. There’s an unbreakable bond between (mostly male) watch buyers and pilots’ watches that transcends function or aesthetic. ‘A pilot’s watch is an integral part of flying – the two are inextricably linked, and that’s quite emotive,’ says Nick English. He should know. In 2007, he and his brother Giles launched Bremont, which is already one of the first names in pilots’ watches. Now, you could argue that electronic GPS systems make that bond entirely whimsical, and

piggybacked their exploits, furnishing these front-page headline acts with timekeepers they could market as reliable, accurate and good enough for the pioneers of the day. When Louis Blériot became the first person to fly an airplane across the English Channel in 1909, he was wearing a Zenith wristwatch. He offered this useful ambassadorial nugget: ‘I am extremely satisfied with the Zenith, which I use regularly, and cannot recommend it highly enough to people in search of precision.’ Longines timed Charles Lindbergh when he completed the first successful solo transatlantic flight in 1927, and later equipped him with watches and used him in advertising campaigns. Developments during peacetime came into their own in 1939. During World War II, neutral Switzerland turned provider for opposing sides, in the process consolidating the pilot’s-watch aesthetic. The norm changed to a clean, legible, black dial with luminous hands and hour markers; steel, utilitarian cases (or aluminium when steel reserves ran low), and oversized ‘onion’ crowns that were easy to adjust and operate in the confines of a cockpit. Omega and Longines made watches for the RAF, and IWC for both Axis

design. The same decade ushered in the Longines Twenty-Four Hours, which had a 24-hour dial and was made for Swissair pilots; Breitling’s Transocean, aimed at the new generation of jet-setters; and Omega’s Speedmaster, a watch not originally intended for aviators, but considered to be the ultimate pilot’s watch because of the starring role it would go on to play in NASA’s Apollo missions. The watch-industry boom of the past 25 years has seen many of these evergreen designs updated, but it’s also spawned some fresh players. Bell & Ross was born in 1992 and made its name with oversized square-cased watches that looked like they’d been ripped from cockpit instrument panels. Today it also makes several vintage-looking, round-cased pieces. Some of the new draft are immensely technical. The current crop of Richard Mille (founded in 2001) pieces includes the devilishly complicated RM 039 Tourbillon Aviation E6-B Flyback Chronograph, a mechanical watch made from almost 1,000 parts. Among other things, it can calculate flight speed in relation to temperature and altitude. ‘The RM 039’s E6-B calculator is an essential tool for a pilot,’ says

THE ROOTS OF THIS LONG-HELD AFFECTION FOR PILOTS’ WATCHES GO BACK TO THE DAWN OF AVIATION. THEY WERE TOOLS BEFORE THEY WERE STATUS SYMBOLS to an extent you’d be right. But ask a pilot and you’ll find they still value their timepieces. ‘One of the first things you learn when training is the importance of time, both on the ground and in the air,’ says wing commander Lewis Cunningham of the RAF’s 3 (Fighter) Squadron, who wears a Breitling Aerospace. ‘There is a time check every morning at the daily briefing on the squadron – calling it wrong or being late are unacceptable. The accuracy of a wristwatch is still extremely important.’ English, a pilot himself, makes no bones about the changing role of a pilot’s watch. ‘Expectations of how this style of watch is used in the air has changed,’ he says. ‘When I learnt to fly, navigation was done using a map, a compass and, most importantly, a watch. These days it is critical on the ground – for timing take-off, for example – and essential as a fallback in the air.’ The roots of this long-held affection go back to the dawn of aviation. Long ago, mechanical watches were tools before they were status symbols. One of the first people to recognise their value was wealthy Brazilian showman Alberto Santos-Dumont, a turn-of-the-20thcentury aviator. He quickly realised that a pocket watch was all but useless when piloting a flimsy contraption that required manning the controls at all times, so he asked his friend Louis Cartier to make him a wristwatch. In 1904 Cartier delivered the first Santos, a design that lives on today. Pilots grew more adventurous, and with an enthralled world looking on, watch companies 30

and Allied forces. Oris introduced its Big Crown pilot’s watch in 1938, now its signature collection. The Swiss didn’t go it alone. Hamilton, an American company until the late 1960s, ceased production of civilian timepieces in 1942, instead cranking out one million watches to aid the war effort. Its current raft of pilots’ watches is sprinkled with Forties Americana. But it wasn’t until after the war and the dawn of the jet age that the design of pilots’ watches reached its zenith. With the genesis of transatlantic flight and commercial airliners in the 1950s, watch companies found their services in demand once again. The big challenge was to develop a watch that could show the time in more than one time zone: not just for reference, but to help intercontinental pilots combat the newly coined ailment, jet lag. The first watch to show a second time zone was made by Glycine and not, as some might remember, by Rolex. The story goes that the idea for Glycine’s original Airman watch came about on a flight between Bangkok and Calcutta in 1953, when the brand’s sales director was talking to the pilots about a watch that could simultaneously tell the time in two time zones. The Airman – still going strong today – was launched later that year. Rolex’s GMT Master, developed in partnership with Pan Am pilots, followed in 1954. The 1950s was a period of experimentation. Breitling’s Navitimer, announced in 1952, had a circular slide rule for in-flight calculations. It quickly entered watchmaking legend and is now the world’s oldest chronograph still in production and Breitling’s most recognisable

Richard Mille, founder of the eponymous company. ‘Even though most pilots use an electronic version of it, they always have a slide-rule version at hand for emergencies.’ But the young company aligning itself most closely to aviation is the aforementioned Bremont. Over the past decade, the British brand has built a collection of nostalgic pilots’ watches, many of them limited editions with parts of historically significant planes. The latest is the DH-88 Comet, which has a rotor made using wood from a de Havilland plane of the same name that won a race from England to Australia in 1934. It follows in the slipstream of watches that feature material from a Spitfire, a Mustang P-51 and, remarkably, the Wright Flyer. And then Patek came into view. Its hunch that there was a hole in the market for a high-end pilot’s watch was spot-on. Despite the fact the Calatrava Pilot Travel Time was made of white gold – far from cockpit-ready – and cost north of £30,000, it was a hit. Word is that its order book is now closed after the waiting list reached 12 years. Pilots’ watches, then, are still on the up. IWC devoted its new collection to its Pilot’s Watch family; Breitling has co-opted connected technology into its wristwatch-logbook Exospace B55; and this year Richard Mille made a flightready watch in partnership with Airbus Corporate Jets. Tempus fugit ad infinitum. Of course, the great conceit of pilots’ watches is that most people who wear them will never fly a plane, just as most divers’ watches reach their nadir in the deep end of the world’s swimming pools. We can but aspire to higher things.


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: RM 039 TOURBILLON AVIATION IN TITANIUM WITH RUBBER STRAP, £801,000, RICHARD MILLE (RICHARDMILLE.COM). TWENTYFOUR HOURS IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH ALLIGATOR STRAP, £2,070, LONGINES (LONGINES.COM). LIMITED-EDITION NAVITIMER 01 IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £6,350, BREITLING (BREITLING.COM)


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BR 126 AERONAVALE WITH CALFSKIN STRAP, £3,200, BELL & ROSS (BELLROSS.COM). MARK XVIII EDITION LE PETIT PRINCE IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £3,490, IWC (IWC.COM). GMT MASTER II IN STAINLESS STEEL, £5,950, ROLEX (ROLEX.COM). PILOT'S WATCH IN WHITE GOLD WITH LEATHER STRAP, £31,320, PATEK PHILIPPE (PATEK.COM). LIMITED-EDITION SPEEDMASTER CK2998 CHRONOGRAPH IN STAINLESS STEEL WITH LEATHER STRAP, £4,100, OMEGA (OMEGAWATCHES.COM). 33


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

NEW YORK

LINE DANCING

THE SYMMETRICAL RAZZLE-DAZZLE OF THE JAZZ AGE CONTINUES TO DELIGHT

TIFFANY ART DECO WITH PINK SAPPHIRES, £61,000; WITH SAPPHIRES, £61,000; WITH DIAMONDS, £65,000, ALL TIFFANY & CO (TIFFANY.CO.UK) 34 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: GEORGE RINHART/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

Some design movements are of the moment, such as surrealism, brutalism or even Art Nouveau. They form layers in our cultural make-up, part of an aesthetic hotchpotch gathered together over the decades. Art Deco was different: a tsunami of change that ushered in a brave, bold new template after the devastation of World War I. Its impact was universal, not only geographically but in what it touched – architecture, fashion, furniture and the decorative arts – shifting perception away from the soft, lyrical, naturalistic curves of the Belle Epoque and going headlong into the graphic, machined, linear lines that still inform so much of today’s design. The watch world did not escape its touch, and just as the pocket watch migrated to the wrist, so its shape altered, from round to square. The Cartier Tank in 1917 was one of the first, slightly ahead of the Art Deco curve. By 1931 and Jaeger LeCoultre’s Reverso – a flippable rectangular tablet of a watch – the design movement was at its height. For New York jewellers Tiffany & Co the change was seismic. As Manhattan’s skyline altered so did its proposition: from floral organic shapes to black onyx, white diamonds, coral, emeralds, baguette-cut gems, tiaras and sautoirs – long strings of beads designed to move freely on a flapper’s dress as she danced the Charleston. This year’s Blue Book, Tiffany’s annual high jewellery collection, includes a small edition of watches that capture Art Deco’s enduring influence. Slim, bejewelled, rectangular-faced, with linear number markers, punctuated with baguette diamonds and coloured gemstones, and an oblong-patterned graphic white gold strap, they look as if they’ve been plucked off the wrist of Daisy Buchanan. And yet they appear contemporary, or at least familiar to our 21st-century eye – as fresh now as 90 years ago. Which is the whole point of Art Deco: only the really brilliant survive. JD


TRIPPIN’ OUT

BUY NOW

£55

CHIC STAYS: CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER’S FAVOURITE PEOPLE ON THEIR FAVOURITE PLACES Kate Moss on Amilla Fushi. Florence Welch on Chateau Marmont. Sebastian Faulks on Ceylon Tea Trails. Beth Ditto on Ace Hotel Portland. Sir Paul Smith on Claridge’s. Kate Winslet on Eilean Shona. Cara Delevingne on Parrot Cay, and more.

PRE-ORDER NOW AT ASSOULINE.COM/CHICSTAYS


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

MEXICO

PETIT SKULL, POA, FIONA KRUGER (FIONA KRUGERTIMEPIECES.COM)

THE TREND: SKULLS STRIP IT RIGHT BACK AND GO INSANE IN THE BRAIN

BR 01-92 BURNING SKULL, £5,500, BELL & ROSS, (BELLROSS.COM)

Never has the watch world been so obsessed with the morbid kitsch of the skull in all its piratical, biker-gang, tattooed, Mexican Day of the Dead glory. It invokes fear, symbolises life after death and represents a rebellious non-conformity. Little wonder, then, that Hublot – the flamboyant watch house known for its link-ups with supercar brands and footballers – has decorated the ladies’ version of its Big Bang model with a rainbow skull, in collaboration with Swiss embroidery expert Bischoff. For her collection this year, the eponymous models by Scottish-born Fiona KrÜger have progressed to smaller timepieces with cleverly engraved faces (literally): the dials were sculpted into realistic forms using the guillochét technique. And Bell & Ross, never averse to the motif having used it first in 2009 (on its BR 01 Skull collection), has created a laughing pirate complete with crossbones – the carved steel skull set within flames etched into the square bezel. Romain Jerome, meanwhile, suspends a skull using a unique bridge design in the centre of a weighty 48mm case; the symbol was inspired by Eighties skateboard graphics. A blue substance called Super-LumiNova lights up its outline at night, creating a vision that is part Skeletor, part Terminator – and not one for the faint-hearted. JD

BIG BANG BRODERIE SUPER SKULL, £11,800, HUBLOT (HUBLOT.COM)

PHOTOGRAPH: JUDY BELLAH/IMAGEBRIEF.COM

BIG BANG BRODERIE IN STEEL, £8,600, HUBLOT, AS BEFORE

SKYLAB 48 SKULL SLN IN BLACK, £15,950, ROMAIN JEROME (HARRODS.COM) October 2016 Watch Special 37


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

INDIA

ROMANCING THE STONE

38 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: PHILIP VON HESSEN

PLAY A WINNING HAND OF DIAMONDS WITH A CENTURIES-OLD JEWEL CUT If you own a diamond, or are lucky enough to own several, chances are it will have been cut and polished in India. More than 80 per cent of the world’s supply is processed on the Asian subcontinent – in Surat, a city in the western state of Gujarat. Production is focused on the brilliant-cut; over three quarters of all diamonds sold have the characteristic 58 facets, bright sparkle and perfect proportions that have ensured its rise in popularity since 1919. Sophisticated mapping techniques allow for extraordinary precision and maximising the rough stone, with jewellerygrade diamonds the end game of the cutters’ skill. Anything less is utilised in industrial machinery and in tools used to cut the gems: after all, it takes the hardness of one diamond to cut another. But it wasn’t always about the brilliant. The rose-cut diamond, named after the facets that resemble a bud’s unfurling petals, dates back to the 16th century and was the most common cut until the Edwardian era. With less fire than a modern cut, its gentle sparkle in candlelight fell out of fashion due to a desire for the flawlessness of the brilliant. Of late, however, the rose-cut’s fortunes are on the up, its subtle, antique shine proving popular with those wanting a more low-key proposition. Jeremy Morris, managing director and principal designer of British jeweller David Morris is, in part, responsible for this, having made a rose-cut diamond wedding band for his wife Erin back in 2003. ‘I wanted to give her something no one else would have,’ he says when discussing its resurgence. ‘The facets give it an almost translucent, delicate and romantic feel.’ The ring proved significant, becoming the catalyst for the David Morris signature Rose-Cut collection, which expanded into earrings, necklaces and bracelets, and ROSE-CUT-DIAMOND most recently watches, including a 36mm timepiece with a halo of diamonds around the bezel and a hand-cut mother-ofWATCH 36MM IN ROSE pearl dial. Part vintage in feel, yet executed with all the knowledge of a 21st-century jeweller, it bridges the gap between GOLD, POA, DAVID MORRIS (DAVIDMORRIS.COM) the diamond cutters’ ancient craft and the modern desire for a more subdued aesthetic. JD


THE TREND: TWEED A THOROUGHLY MODERN MASH-UP FOLLOWS A FAMILIAR PATTERN The idea that in-house techniques and signatures should remain confined to the disciplines from which they originate does not exist at Chanel. Cross-pollination is where it’s at. Take the curtains at the newly refurbished watch and jewellery boutique on London’s Bond Street: they were hand-embroidered by Lesage, the Chanel-owned embroidery atelier that’s normally busy with the intricacies of haute couture. Or the Coco Crush fine jewellery collection unveiled last year – chunky, puffy, moulded gold, based on the quilting usually associated with Chanel’s iconic 2.55 handbag. Now tweed, traditionally used in men’s tailoring, is having its mixed-up moment as it migrates from clothing to watches. The pairing is entirely appropriate. The new Boy.Friend watch, Chanel’s latest launch for women, is designed around all the attributes normally associated with the opposite sex: a larger size, a flat chunky bezel, a black leather strap (on the original model) and an unembellished dial; thereby tapping into the continuing vogue for borrowing styles from menswear – see brogues, jeans, shirts and tailoring in general. But, of course, Chanel has been channelling its crossover since the 1920s, when Coco Chanel’s love affair with the Duke of Westminster introduced her to the country pursuits of hunting, fishing, sailing and golf, which necessitated wrapping up in sturdy Scottish tweed. Such was her instant love for the fabric, handwoven by crofters in the Highlands, that by 1924 she was working with a factory in Scotland to make a more refined, bespoke Chanel version in her chosen colours. As US Vogue put it in 1928, of this new luxury material, ‘they are no longer the rough, bulky, grimly serviceable woollens that once suggested photographs in a British pictorial paper of England on a rainy day’. The textile’s metamorphosis continues with the Boy.Friend Tweed. The criss-cross motif is stamped into the steel Milanese strap of the watch – an obvious nod to what BOY.FRIEND TWEED WITH has gone before and what will certainly endure. After all, tweed has featured in every Chanel haute couture and DIAMONDS, £5,600, CHANEL ready-to-wear collection since its first appearance some 90 years ago. Tweed’s shift is not only sideways but also WATCHES (CHANEL.COM) forwards, as a new hybrid: part metal, part textile; and one that Mademoiselle would surely have approved of. JD

BOY.FRIEND TWEED IN STAINLESS STEEL, £3,125, CHANEL WATCHES, AS BEFORE


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

SCOTLAND

FOLK HERO

YARN-BOMBING HITS A NEW HOMEGROWN COLLECTION

PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID EUSTACE

Kartel Watches, a small brand dedicated to affordable, unfussy timepieces, are designed and produced in Scotland, a country not exactly known for its horological heritage. In keeping with its Scottish roots, Kartel’s Tarbert collection utilises one of Scotland’s most famous exports: Harris tweed, handwoven by islanders on the Outer Hebrides using techniques that have remained unchanged for centuries. A white dial and a pale silvery grey case ensures the tweed really sings, while the thoughtful addition of leather backing to the straps guarantees durability and all important comfort. JD

TARBERT MODELS IN STAINLESS STEEL AND HARRIS TWEED, £110, KARTEL (KARTEL-TIME.COM) October 2016 Watch Special 41


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

SAVILE ROW

SEW SOLID CREW

42 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: BRUNO EHRS/GETTY IMAGES

THE SHARPEST LONDON TRADITION IS DRAFTED IN FOR A SWISS-MADE COLLECTION Luxury watchmaking and tailoring are increasingly joined at the hip these days – at least, so says social media. Instagram is flush with pictures of peacocking young men sporting high-end watches. Hand in glove, you might say. Dandyism aside, there is a philosophical link between the two trades. The artful dexterity of a Savile Row tailor, the artisanry of a watchmaker in Switzerland’s Vallée de Joux – they’re not interchangeable, but the old-world practice of perfecting an art form and, more than that, making it beautiful, is common to both. Vacheron Constantin’s latest Métiers d’Art Elégance Sartoriale collection makes the link tangible, stitching the two worlds together in one of the more successful craft-focused collaborations of recent times. There are five models, each with a decorative dial pattern based on a classic weave – tartan, windowpane, tennis stripe, Prince of Wales check and herringbone. The inspiration came from the fabrics of Vitale Barberis Canonico, which Vacheron’s craftsfolk replicated using a combination of grand feu enamelling and guilloché (a traditional form of engraving). What’s interesting is that Vitale Barberis Canonico is the world’s oldest textile manufacturer, and Vacheron the oldest of the Swiss watch brands never to go out of business. In each watch the time-telling function is isolated in an off-centre, full-moon-like subdial, which has a mother-of-pearl METIERS D’ART ELEGANCE rim (mimicking a shirt button), and a centre circle that’s graved, frosted and varnished so it looks unnervingly like SARTORIALE HERRINGBONE IN PINK embroidery. Under this is Vacheron’s hand-wound, hand-finished calibre 1400, and an alligator strap hand-sewn in the GOLD AND ENAMEL, £45,700, tradition of old bootmakers. ‘Recent years have seen a real resurgence in sartorial style,’ says Christian Selmoni, VACHERON CONSTANTIN Vacheron Constantin’s smartly turned-out artistic director. ‘And tailoring is a craft like watchmaking; there’s always (VACHERON-CONSTANTIN.COM) a need for balance, understatement and elegance. The collection represents the classical, but with a twist.’ RS


Simply Elegant Unmistakable face. Distinctive hands. Undeniably Swiss. The renowned Official Swiss Railways Clock skillfully reproduced as a watch.

Available from John Lewis and selected watch specialists nationwide. For an illustrated catalogue and details of your nearest stockist telephone 0116 234 4656 or email info@bml-watches.com

Lucerne


44 Watch Special October 2016


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

JAPAN

KIMONO EVERYBODY

A NATIVE NEW YORKER JOURNEYED EAST FOR NEW MATERIAL

PHOTOGRAPH: SEBASTIAN MADER/TRUNK ARCHIVE

It’s no secret that the acquisition of Harry Winston by the Swiss megabrand Swatch Group in 2013 caused a sharp intake of breath. The New York jeweller had previously been known as a small, cult proposition, producing limited quantities of archive-inspired, red-carpet-appropriate gems and a smattering of watches. It’s not that Swatch can’t do niche and the upper echelons of luxury (Breguet and Jaquet Droz are also part of the group), but would it have the sensitivity to nurture one of New York’s most treasured and individual jewellers? Well, we needn’t have worried, because three years on the Harry Winston offering feels as special and precious as ever, but is now obviously backed by significant financial backing (crucial when raw materials are so pricey), mixed with a huge injection of watchy know-how. One part of Harry Winston’s 2016 collection is the Premier Precious Weaving range, comprising four automatic timepieces. It’s a watch/jewellery tour de force, hitching a ride on the wave of Japanese-inspired creativity that shows no sign of waning. Here, the raden technique of applying shell to decorate hard surfaces is given a thorough shake up using a form of miniaturised weaving involving a tiny loom, silk threads more commonly used in kimono production and slivers of mother-of-pearl. Devilishly difficult and taking more than a year and a half to perfect, the resulting dials are gorgeously pixelated – a result of the weaving process that mixes the soft silk and the hard shell. Suitably stylised designs adorn each dial: a chrysanthemum flower (the symbol of Japan’s imperial family), the scales of an antique koi-carp motif, the weave of a couture dress and a darker, greenish pattern that Winston likens to ‘looking down from a New York skyscraper at the lights of Broadway on a rainy night’. A little reminder, in case there was a chance it might be forgotten, of the roots of this reinvigorated Manhattan jewellery house. JD

PREMIER PRECIOUS WEAVING AUTOMATIC WITH GOLD-LEAF DIAL IN MOTHER-OF-PEARL AND SILK

WITH KOI-CARP DIAL IN MOTHER-OFPEARL AND SILK

WITH CHRYSANTHEMUM DIAL IN MOTHER-OF-PEARL AND SILK

WITH KOI-CARP DIAL IN MOTHEROF-PEARL AND SILK. ALL POA, HARRY WINSTON (HARRYWINSTON.COM)

SURFING THE ZEITGEIST HOW TO MAKE A MINIATURE MASTERPIECE

VILLERET ROKUSHO THE GREAT WAVE, £118,980, BLANCPAIN (BLANCPAIN.COM)

Hokusai’s famous woodblock print The Great Wave is in the same league as Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Botticelli’s Birth of Venus and Van Gogh’s Sunflowers. All are works of art that have transcended time and familiarity; so etched are they on our subconscious that it’s impossible to really appreciate them. But The Great Wave also stands out as a clever motif for watch design, with its swirling, foamy water the perfect dynamic circle to fit within the confines of a dial. This season, Blancpain has using the Japanese rokushō technique to create a silvery soft hue on the watch face, with the silver obsidian dial submerged in salts to patinate the surface. The wave itself is carved in white gold: some parts left dull, others polished to add a gentle and subdued sparkle. JD


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

SOUTH PACIFIC


THE MOTHER LODE

SHIMMERY SHELLS MEET SUPER-SHARP TECHNIQUES IN THE LATEST HAUL OF PEARLY QUEENS Adrift thousands of nautical miles between the eastern coast of Australia and the western shores of South America, the islands of French Polynesia provide the ideal sheltered, warm and shallow waters for the cultivation of mother-of-pearl. This is believed to be the source of the finest quality of the material in the world. The native pearl oyster is harvested for the elusive jewel and the lining of its shell (mother-of-pearl). And yet for all its exotic origins, a mother-of-pearl watch dial has become ubiquitous, the go-to flourish for most brands wanting to add a hint of shimmer or a girlie touch to an otherwise ordinary design. But recently there has been a quiet revolution to elevate it to a new level with a variety of additional treatments. First Hermès, which continues the tradition of borrowing vintage designs from its extensive scarf archive and transferring them to watch dials. The Mille Fleurs du Mexique uses mother-of-pearl as a canvas for a miniature painting, its gentle iridescence the perfect foil for the minutest of brush strokes in a rainbow palette. Boucheron goes all Black Swan with its limited run of eight Epure Cypris, a gothic bird carved from black mother-of-pearl; dramatic and moody, it’s a beautiful after-dark cocktail watch. Chopard, in contrast, is a confection in blush pink – the thinnest sliver of shell set over a base dial of gold – so the palette flits between the two shades depending on the play of light. Laser-cut apertures allow diamonds to be set in relief. And Dior, increasingly the masters of dial marquetry, placed 13 rectangles of the palest shell into the rotating, oscillating weight of the Grand Bal Plissé Ruban, the technicality of the cutting (machined to one-hundreth of a millimetre) as precise and crisp as the pleats of its couture. JD

DIOR VIII MONTAIGNE GRAND BAL 36MM IN DIAMONDS, MOTHER-OFPEARL AND OPALINE WITH BLUE SHADING, £16,000, DIOR (DIOR.COM)

EPURE CYPRIS IN WHITE GOLD, MOTHER-OF-PEARL AND DIAMONDS, £54,800, BOUCHERON (BOUCHERON.COM)

DIOR VIII MONTAIGNE GRAND BAL 36MM IN DIAMONDS, MOTHER-OFPEARL AND OPALINE WITH PINK SHADING, £16,000, DIOR (AS BEFORE)

L.U.C XP 35MM ESPRIT DE FLEURIER PEONY IN ROSE GOLD, MOTHER-OF-PEARL AND DIAMONDS, POA, CHOPARD (CHOPARD.CO.UK)

SLIM D’HERMES FLEURS DU MEXIQUE IN WHITE GOLD AND MOTHER-OFPEARL, £43,560, HERMES (HERMES.COM) October 2016 Watch Special 47


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

PARIS

RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE

GRAFF VENDOME 40MM IN WHITE GOLD, FROM £27,000, GRAFF DIAMONDS (GRAFFDIAMONDS.COM)

There are some interesting facts about Paris’s 17th-century Place Vendôme. First, during the funeral of American pop artist Keith Haring and the subsequent scattering of his ashes in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, one of the guests, Yoko Ono, believed the spirit of Haring spoke to her. His instructions were specific: to pocket a handful of ashes and sprinkle them on Place Vendôme in Paris – which she duly and obediently did. Second, its most famous resident was Coco Chanel, who lived in a private apartment at the Ritz until her death in 1971 (the rooms were recently reopened as the Coco Chanel Suite, following the hotel’s four-year renovation). And third, like Trafalgar and St Mark’s and Red, it isn’t in fact a square: a fraction of each corner is missing, making Vendôme an octagon, and it is this that gave rise to the distinctive shape of the stopper of the Chanel No 5 bottle. Today it’s one of the world’s oldest and most impressive jewellery destinations (Boucheron first moved here in 1893 and has remained ever since), more elegantly uniform than London’s Bond Street, more focused than New York’s Fifth Avenue and more varied than Rome’s via dei Condotti. Its newest resident is Graff, which, despite having more than 50 stores globally, had to wait its turn for retail space, such is the demand for the cherry on the jewellery retail cake. In celebration of its newly opened boutique, designed by Peter GRAFF VENDOME 30MM Marino, the company has created an octagon-shaped watch which mirrors the distinctive floor plan of the IN WHITE GOLD AND Place – a 30mm model for women and a bold 40mm for men. Extra touches include a crown that draws DIAMONDS, FROM £20,000, influence from the unusual scallop pattern at the top of the Vendôme column, and curved hour-markers GRAFF DIAMONDS that mimic the arches of the boutique entrances, while an engraved case-back stating ‘17 Place Vendôme’, (AS BEFORE) Graff’s new address, ensures there is no doubt as to the source of its inspiration. JD

48 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: 2005 ROGER VIOLLET/TOPFOTO

THERE’S A NEW KID ON THE BLOCK AT THE TICKING HEART OF THE FRENCH CAPITAL


VISIT OUR WEBSITE

CNTRAVELLER.COM

THE COOLEST CITIES IN EUROPE MUST-VISIT RESTAURANTS IN LONDON AMSTERDAM’S MOST EXCITING NEIGHBOURHOOD HIP HANGOUTS IN VIENNA

PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID LOFTUS

LISBON’S BEST ROOFTOP BARS


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

RIO DE JANEIRO

CURVE BALL

As the official timekeeper of the Rio 2016 Olympics, Omega threw itself into creating a trio of timepieces that evoked the spirit of the games and the bold colours, forms and designs of the city itself. Omega has a long association with the Olympics, dating back to the Tenth Olympiad in Los Angeles in 1932. Rio 2016 marked the 27th occasion the company brought its pinpoint timekeeping to the most significant swimming pools, tracks and fields in the world – although the 450 tons of equipment required today far exceed the 30 chronographs used back in pre-war LA. The Seamaster Diver 300M takes the classic stainlesssteel case and polished black bezel of the Seamaster range and adds a few inspired extras. Chief of these is a dial pattern derived from the distinctive Roberto Burle Marx-designed mosaic pavements that ripple down Avenida Atlântica, alongside Copacabana Beach. Burle Marx’s designs were finished in 1970 and run the full length of the four-kilometre promenade, showcasing the organic fluidity that defines the work of this architect, designer and botanist. His influential forms are still considered a key element of Rio’s urban landscape. Burle Marx was a pioneer in many ways, not least for his nascent environmentalism, but also for his collaborations with giants of Brazilian architecture such as Lúcio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer, both of whom shared his enthusiasm for external spaces that seemed to grow out of interiors. His graphic and artistic work showed a similar passion for voluptuous forms. Fittingly, the Seamaster’s new Burle Marx-inspired dial also hints at the wave pattern introduced in the thirdgeneration Seamaster Diver 300 in 1993, a distinctive yet subtly geometric background that was a signature element of this watch. The Rio 2016 Seamaster incorporates one other key component of the modern Olympiad in its design: the blue, yellow, green, red and black of the Olympic rings, Baron de Coubertin’s timeless branding dating from 1912. To finish off the whole ensemble – and to mark this watch as an authentic piece of Olympic history – there’s an embossed Rio 2016 logo on SEAMASTER DIVER 300M RIO 2016 the back and a limited-edition run of 3,016 pieces, rather more than the number of medals to be awarded, but still a rare CO-AXIAL LIMITED EDITION, £3,520, enough piece of sporting and horological evolution. JONATHAN BELL OMEGA (OMEGAWATCHES.COM)

50 Watch Special October 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: JEREMY WALKER/GETTY IMAGES

A SPORTY NEW NUMBER GETS THE MEASURE OF SOUTH AMERICA’S MOST FAMOUS BEACH


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

ITALY

PALAZZO DELLA CIVILTA ITALIANA, FENDI’S HEADQUARTERS

THIS PICTURE AND ABOVE: VILLA BORGHESE GARDENS. LEFT, WINDOWS AT FENDI HQ

POLICROMIA WATCH IN GOLD, DIAMONDS AND LAPIS LAZULI, £25,000, DELFINA DELETTREZ FOR FENDI (FENDI.COM)


MY ROME: DELFINA DELETTREZ The maverick designer and fourth-generation Fendi is known for pioneering the single-earring trend and creating surrealist pieces – some of which are in the Louvre’s permanent jewellery collection

Why is the city so important to you? ‘I love this town, it is where I grew up and so it’s an incredible source of inspiration. It has a particular allure, a unique elegance that mixes historic sites with innovative places. I’m really fascinated by the blend of the past and the future that the city conveys through its landscapes and hidden corners.’

Where do you go for a quiet supper? ‘Al Biondo Tevere, on the banks of the Tiber river in my neighbourhood Ostiense. It feels like a magical place where time has stood still. The film director Pier Paolo Pasolini was a regular and the movie Bellissima with Anna Magnani was shot here in the 1950s. It has the most delicious pizza.’

The best place for cocktails?

PHOTOGRAPHS: STEPHEN BISGROVE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; PASCAL CHEVALIER/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM; CEDRIC LEFEBVRE/ GALLERY STOCK; PINOPACIFICO/REDA+CO/CUBO; JOHN MONTESI/IMAGEBRIEF.COM; RICCARDO SALA/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

‘Salotto 42 in Piazza di Pietra is a great spot for aperitifs. It’s just in front of the Temple of Hadrian, a small square with ancient ruins in the centre of town. Sit outside and absorb the typical Roman scenery.’

And the loveliest walk?

POLICROMIA WATCH IN GOLD, DIAMONDS AND MALACHITE, £25,000, DELFINA DELETTREZ FOR FENDI (AS BEFORE)

THE COPPEDE QUARTER

‘On the rare occasions I have some free time I always go for a stroll in the Coppedè quarter. It’s not far from the Villa Borghese gardens but feels completely different from the rest of the city. It’s full of surreal buildings and secret, private gardens to discover.’

What’s your favourite out-of-town escape? ‘My country house, on a lovely estate called I Casali del Pino.’

Something to take home from Rome? ‘You should buy something from the shops for nuns and cardinals near the Vatican in the Borgo Pio area. I usually pick up gowns and white shirts at Bianchetti on via Pigna, my favourite clerical shop.’

How has the city influenced your most recent designs? ‘The elements and materials used in this piece celebrate Rome and its eternal magnetism. My main inspiration was Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, the new Fendi headquarters in the city, with its graphic repetitive arches and the play of light as the sun shines through them. Overlapping ellipses on the watch’s dial were a nod to the architectural structure of Rome’s multi-layered streets. I also love to mix different materials, shapes and styles, hence Policromia features malachite and lapis lazuli blended together with gold, diamonds and mother-of-pearl. As well as taking inspiration from the Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, I wanted the dial to look like a perfect modern mosaic, just like the ones on the floor of the Villa of Livia. I like to create completely original designs, going beyond existing things, which is perfectly in line with Fendi’s motto that “nothing is impossible”.’

How much time do you spend here? ‘Living in this city is great but I also travel a lot. I try to find a good balance between Rome and London. The former is where my daughter and family are based. My studio is in London and I’ve recently opened a boutique on Mayfair’s Mount Street.’

DELFINA DELETTREZ’S HOME IN ROME October 2016 Watch Special 53


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

NEPAL

54 Watch Special October 2016


PEAKY BLINDER IT’S NOT JUST GRIZZLED CLIMBERS WHO HAVE BEEN CHALLENGED BY THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN ON EARTH

PHOTOGRAPH: FREDRIK SCHENHOLM

It’s easy now to overlook the extent to which Mount Everest, and the possibility of conquering it, gripped the popular imagination in the first half of the 20th century – though the deluge of honours and awards that fell upon Edmund Hillary, Tenzing Norgay and their team following their successful 1953 climb (Hillary had even been awarded a knighthood by the time he returned to Kathmandu) gives some idea. No one had been more attuned to Everest’s mystique than Hans Wilsdorf, Rolex’s founder, whose pioneering spirit applied as equally to watch making as it did to technology. He’d first produced models with ‘Everest’ on the dial in the 1930s, but by the 1950s there was an opportunity to prove the robustness of his products while tapping into the glory that would follow the first ascent of the mountain. Consequently, special Oyster Perpetual Rolexes were supplied both to a Swiss expedition in 1952 and to the successful British mission the following year. And in the wake of victory came, very swiftly, perhaps the purest encapsulation of Rolex’s brilliance there has been: the Rolex Explorer, created in tribute to Hillary’s and Norgay’s heroics and designed with adventure in mind. Extremely robust, discretely handsome, but laced with distinctive details (the famous bulbous ‘Mercedes’ hour hand, the sporty combination of baton hour markers and Arabic numerals), the watch has remained largely unchanged during the past 60 years. This year’s upgrades – Chromalight luminescence applied to the numerals, miniscule extensions to the hands – are mere dabbling at the edges of a formula whose longevity speaks for itself. There is, however, a twist in the tail. While the British expedition was indeed supplied with Rolexes – according to expedition leader John Hunt, these functioned perfectly – and images of Hillary and Norgay summiting Everest have been used to market the Explorer ever since, the question of whether Rolex was the first watch brand on top of the world remains obscure. Hillary, it turned out, also took with him a watch by the British firm Smiths, apparently wearing it to the summit (Smiths subsequently EXPLORER IN STAINLESS STEEL, made a successful model called Everest). Assuming Norgay was wearing a Rolex, the result was effectively a tie; the £4,300, ROLEX (ROLEX.COM) pre-eminence of the Rolex watch that followed, however, has never been in doubt. TB


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 WATCHES

FLORIDA

THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS

START YOUR ENGINES FOR A FULL-THROTTLE TAKE ON A CLASSIC CAR

PHOTOGRAPH: COSMO CONDINA/GETTY IMAGES

Endurance racing is unmatched in its demands on automotive engineering and driver skill. By the 1960s, the world of long-distance sports-car driving was wholly focused on three unique races: Le Mans 24 Hours, the Daytona 24 Hours, and the 12 Hours of Sebring. Together they formed motorsport’s Triple Crown, the ultimate test of driver, car and team. Built on an airfield in Florida after World War II, Sebring is one of the USA’s oldest circuits and remains a highlight in the racing calendar. Team Shelby American entered three cars in the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1963, just one year after owner Carroll Shelby had set up his specialist garage in Los Angeles. In keeping with the spirit of the new company and the potential of its new car, the AC Cobra, Shelby assembled a team of talented drivers, including Dan Gurney, Lew Spencer and Dave MacDonald. For Sebring, Shelby also created a purpose-built car, which was an unknown quantity among the well-established teams of Jaguar, Ferrari and Porsche. Of the 65 cars that started the race, 42 finished. Two of these were Shelby American, including the Cobra CSX2128. Although it was Ferrari that triumphed on the day, Shelby and his team had arrived, eventually going on to challenge CAPELAND SHELBY COBRA all the established marques. Swiss watchmakers Baume & Mercier continue their partnership with Carroll Shelby 1963 IN STEEL, £3,200, in a new edition of the Capeland Shelby Cobra watch inspired by the CSX2128. With the Cobra logo on the BAUME & MERCIER chronograph seconds hand, the race number 15 engraved on the sapphire crystal and ‘One out of 1963’ etched (BAUME-ET-MERCIER.COM) on the case, the new design harks back to the car’s no-nonsense race aesthetic and spirit of endurance. JB

56 Watch Special October 2016


Introducing neomatik from NOMOS GlashĂźtte: Watches with the automatic movement of the next generation. Incredibly slender, highly precise, outstandingly accurateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and now available with selected retailers. Find out more about the neomatik series and other NOMOS models at nomos-glashuette.com, and nomos-store.com.


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