Page 1

SEPT 2016

T H

E

H

O

M

E

D

E

S

I

G

N

M

A G A

Z I

N

E

ICONIC STYLE: CENTRAL PARK WEST VIEWS MADISON SQUARE LOFT PARK AVE TOWER WESTCHESTER CLASSIC

NEWYORKSPACES.COM

O

F

M

E

T R O

P

O

L I T A

N

N

E

W

Y O

R

K


OUR MODERN EVOLUTION FALL 2016 COLLECTION

FEATURING: BRONSON SOFA, ALDEN SWIVEL CHAIR, PRESLEY CHAIR, GRAMERCY SQUARE COCKTAIL TABLE AND SIDE TABLES, LINCOLN PULL-UP TABLE, ADDIE PULL-UP TABLE, TESSA LAMPS, ASTON MIRRORS, GOLD KNOTS, ANGLED CONE VASE, AMAZE RUG, BELGIAN LINEN-OATMEAL DRAPES WITH BLACK NICKEL HARDWARE


introducing > A NEW LAYER OF LUXURY Our brilliant collection of draperies & hardware. See the following pages for more details.

NEW YORK CITY | MANHASSET | PARAMUS | GREENWICH | MGBWHOME.COM


CLAUDIA 03

From $8,500 to $175,000


The world’s most comfortable bed, hand made in London

Downtown - 54 Greene Street, NY 10013 - 212 226 3640 Uptown - 223 East 59th Street, NY 10022 - 646 767 9935

London

Paris

Düsseldorf

St Petersburg

Beijing

Shanghai

Hong Kong

Seoul

Taipei

New York


greenwich table & goldie chair - designed by manzoni & tapinassi oompa-loompa lamp - designed by g. carollo glory console - designed by manzoni & tapinassi showroom - two hundred lexington avenue, new york, ny 10016 +1 (212) 696 0211 www.atelier-nyc.com info@atelier-nyc.com


exclusively at


“Our sumptuous collection of exclusive draperies and hardware provides the perfect finishing touch—and it’s all designed to synergize. The signature velvets and certified Belgian Linens can be used on our upholstery and pillows for a truly cohesive look.”

FEATURING: DRAPERIES IN SPENCER PATTERN, AVIGNON VELVET, KINGSLEY SEMI-SHEER, LEGACY STRIE, NOBLE SHEER, BELGIAN LINEN; OPPOSITE: CO-FOUNDERS WITH MELROSE BAR CART, MAJOR CHAIR, AND AVIGNON VELVET DRAPES WITH POLISHED CHROME AND ACRYLIC HARDWARE


NEW YORK CITY | MANHASSET | PARAMUS | GREENWICH | MGBWHOME.COM


ĂŠditionspĂŠciale $8,890*

French Art de Vivre

Nonchalance. Corner composition in leather, design Roche Bobois Studio.

instead of $11,007

Photo Michel Gibert. *Edition Speciale offer valid in the USA until 12.31.16 and may not be used in conjunction with any other offer. 1Conditions apply, contact store for more details. 2Quick Ship Program available on selected items, offer subject to availability.


*$ 8,890 instead of $11,007 until 12.31.16 for composition as shown including one 3 seat 1 arm unit with folding armrest and 1 lounge chair with folding armrest. Dimensions: 140.5» / 80.3»L. x 29.5»H. x 39.4»D. Upholstered in Toundra, two-tone buffalo leather, pigmented corrected grain. Price includes 3 large rectangular back cushions and 1 adjustable mechanism in each armrest, and excludes toss cushions. Other dimensions available. Agrafe console, cocktail table and end table, design Cristián Mohaded. Full Moon lamp and floor lamp, design Cédric Ragot. Manufactured in Europe.

VISIT US DURING OUR 8 DAYS OF TEMPTATION EVENT FROM SEPTEMBER 17 TO 25

· Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service 1 · Quick Ship program available 2


CONTENTS

SE PTE MBE R 2016 | VOLU M E 13 | N U M B ER 5 COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN GRUEN INTERIOR DESIGN BY MATTHEW PATRICK SMYTH

100

41

DEPARTMENTS 24 41 44

EDITOR'S SPACE

41 50

STATEMENTS High design with a luxurious allure ARCHITECTURE Herzog & de Meuron's glass tower stands tall in low-rise TriBeCa

50

SHOWROOM STYLE Kelly Wearstler brings her unique sense of style to the New York Design Center

54 60 64

CLIQUE Fill your fall design diary with edgy-chic amusements PLACES Iconic New York

NEIGHBORHOOD The historic village of Rhinebeck

72 79 126 132

SHOP Spanish style at Tresserra

TOP 50 50 Names you need to know in Metro New York design RESOURCES

FINAL TAKE Bill Cunningham

12

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

FEATURES 92

BELLA NATURA Italian architect and designer, Achille Salvagni, infuses a piedà-terre with natural shapes and beautiful textures

100

WEST SIDE JUMP Kathryn Scott and architect David Wolf create an industrial-chic abode softened by a palette of neutrals and comfortable designs

106

SHADES OF GRAY John Barman creates an uber-luxurious Park Avenue apartment with subtle shades of gray, midcentury forms, and bold colors

114

FAMILY PLAN John Douglas Eason instills a heightened sense of sophistication and practicality into a young family's Westchester home

120

ENTR’ACTE Design icon Vicente Wolf outfits a home for a Manhattan couple with designs of his own making and a soothing palette


arclinea.com


SEPTEMBER 2016

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR DECORATING EDITOR DESIGN EDITOR STYLE EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

DIGITAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

G. JASON KONTOS JIYON SON DEBORAH L. MARTIN BETSY MARX NICOLE HADDAD ROBIN LONG MAYER JACQUELINE GONNET LINDA SHERIDAN JILL SIERACKI ROBERT REYNOLDS

DAVLER MEDIA GROUP CEO MANAGEMENT

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

EDITORIAL INQUIRIES

DAVID L. MILLER JANET Z. BARBASH LISA BEN-ISVY DAVID FRIEDMAN HEATHER GAMBARO THOMAS K. HANLON MICHAEL KRESS JACQUELINE MAJERS LACHMAN SHERI LAPIDUS ELI MARCUS REBECCA STOLCZ ELIZABETH TEAGARDEN VINCENT TIMPONE RAY WINN To subscribe, change an address, or purchase a back copy, please call 917-720-5764, email nyspaces@davlermedia.com or visit our website newyorkspaces.com NEW YORK SPACES 498 Seventh Avenue 10th Floor New York, NY 10018 212.315.0800

FOR THE LATEST NEWS AND DESIGN INFORMATION FROM NEW YORK SPACES: ONLINE: newyorkspaces.com FACEBOOK: facebook.com/newyorkspacesmagazine TWITTER: @nyspacesmag PINTEREST: nyspacesmag INSTAGRAM: nyspacesmag

460 years of combined creative heritage SAMUEL-HEATH.COM MADE IN ENGLAND

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: NEWYORKSPACES.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Davler Media Group www.davlermedia.com


30 E 10th Street, NY, NY 10003 t.212.777.8209 · f.212.777.8302 BGAntiques@mac.com www.BGoecklerAntiques.com

“ARCHITETTURA” CABINET, Piero Fornasetti, ITALY, 1960’s DECORATIVE ALABASTER OBJECTS, Angelo Mangiarotti, ITALY, 1980 BOX, Line Vautrin, FRANCE, 1940s ART DECO BOX, Puiforcat,

Photo: Keith Scott-Morton

FRANCE, 1930


Sign up for the FREE

SEPTEMBER 2016

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER sinterviews with top designers sdesign highlights and projects

PUBLISHER

HEAD OF MARKETING

LISA BEN-ISVY

JACQUELINE MAJERS LACHMAN

sdesign news sevents & happenings

newyorkspaces.com/newsletter

MARKETING MANAGER

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, EVENTS

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

OPERATIONS COORDINATORS

DIRECTOR OF TRAFFIC TRAFFIC MANAGER

JAIME GRAHAM

REBECCA STOLCZ

RAY WINN

LEONARD PORTER RAY GUEDEZ

HEATHER GAMBARO ALEXIS BROWER

WEB EDITOR

NICOLE HADDAD

CONTROLLER

DAVID FRIEDMAN

CREDIT MANAGER

CREDIT

ADMINISTRATIVE

ADVERTISING OFFICE

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES

ELIZABETH TEAGARDEN

ROSA MEINHOFER DIEDRA SMITH

BARBARA BYRD

NEW YORK SPACES DAVLER MEDIA GROUP 498 Seventh Avenue New York, NY 10018 212.315.0800

Please contact LISA BEN-ISVY 917.338.2211

DAVLER MEDIA GROUP, LLC PUBLISHERS OF NEW YORK SPACES MITZVAH MARKET CITY GUIDE NY METRO PARENTS

NEWYORKSPACES.COM MITZVAHMARKET.COM CITYGUIDENY.COM NYMETROPARENTS.COM

Davler Media Group www.davlermedia.com No portion of this magazine, including without limitation, articles, listings, may be reproduced without the expressed written permission of the publishers Copyright: 2016 by Davler Media Group LLC (212) 315-0800. All rights reserved.


Twilight Circle - Blue – made to custom sizes and colors

D&D Building I 979 Third Avenue | Suite 1203 New York | 212 546 0944 I warpandweft.com


Liebherr has a heritage of sophisticated product design and precision engineering – renowned for ultimate luxury.

Turning any kitchen into an elegant and functional space, the beautiful HCB 2060 seamless, cabinet-depth refrigeratPS JT full PG innovative features, such as DuoCooling, SuperCool, SuperFrost, and BioFresh. The main goal: better food preservation! Add your own personal style with custom panels to complement your kitchen layout and design. Cabinetry panels discreetly hide the appliance, allowing a room´s unique panache to take center stage. Plus the new compact, yet efficient, UPR 503 underUIF counter pull-out refrigerator drawer will GMawlessly fit within your kitchen´s personalized design. With Liebherr style, function and technology complement unique kitchen environments that reflect the lifestyle of the design savvy, health-conscious food lover.


Your Kitchen’s Best Kept Secret German Engineering. Seamless Design. Better Food Preservation.

liebherr-appliances.com


TA K E A C L O S E R L O O K AT Luxury.


CES.CO

M

TO P

2016 -201 7

THE DESIG

NERS’ FA VORITE

RESOUR CES

EDITOR'S SPACE

THE NAMES YOU NEED

TO KNOW

An architectural gem on the Upper West Side looks out over Central Park, and an Italian masterpiece has an Upper East perspective on the same treetops. Kelly Wearstler goes full fashion in the New York Design Center; Kelly Hoppen's plush plum armchair is deluxe.

N E W YO

R K S PA

50

de si gn er s

HIGH STYLE TOP TO BOTTOM:

I’M ALWAYS

sorry to see summer go, but it’s time to fall in love with New York City all over again. This is the season when fashion and design kick into high gear! At FIT, take in the dresses and accessories belonging to Marcel Proust's muse and 19th-century fashion icon Countess Greffulhe—fabulous in any century. Looking for Modern Love? David Bowie’s art collection will be exhibited here before being auctioned by Sotheby’s London in November. His reach extended from music and fashion to art and design. We spend all year curating, editing, and debating, to present the top influencers in our design world. Perhaps you will agree with our choices and possibly you won’t. But I’m sure we can all agree that personal style continues to intrigue and delight. We know our readers love design as much as we do, and we love hearing from you. Who knows where we will find the next design icon in the making! Fall is a perfect time to visit Kelly Wearstler’s new showroom in the New York Design Center, and our lineup of homes includes a Park Avenue apartment filled with sexy Italian brio, and a loft-like gem on the Upper West Side. And finally, we celebrate the life of iconic fashion photographer Bill Cunningham. The corner of 57th and 5th is “Bill Cunningham Corner,” and we will forever see him there, capturing real New York style.

Jason Kontos Editorial Director PS: A rousing cheer for our publisher, Lisa Ben-Isvy, who was nominated in the Entrepreneur category at the Folio: Top Women in Media awards. Congratulations, Lisa! FOR THE LATEST NEWS AND DESIGN INFORMATION FROM NEW YORK SPACES: ONLINE: newyorkspaces.com · INSTAGRAM: nyspacesmag FACEBOOK: facebook.com/newyorkspacesmagazine · TWITTER: @nyspacesmag · PINTEREST: nyspacesmag

24

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


ELGOT FINDS “CLEAN AND CONTEMPORARY” NOW MOST-SELECTED DESIGN BY MANHATTANITES Clean and contemporary, now considered a classic design, is the most requested kitchen style in Manhattan, says Ellen Elias, Owner of Elgot, a family-run business that has been designing and installing New York kitchens and baths since 1945. Elgot features a wide variety of cabinetry from high-quality manufacturers including Craft-Maid, Ultracraft, and Canada’s Irpinia Kitchens, capturing the very essence of today’s contemporary style. Cabinetry manufactured in North America allows Elgot to ensure quality control, reduced lead times and flexibility in design. Irpinia cabinetry (pictured here), with maximized storage always at the forefront, comes in a variety of styles with uncluttered lines –– from a traditional soft white finish to the more cutting-edge aluminum-edged doors with recessed pulls. Craft-Maid cabinetry (also shown here) features luxurious, clean designs with a flare for tradition. More clients have been requesting quartz or porcelain countertops today,” Elias adds, so Elgot offers Neolith, a thin and extremely durable porcelain slab know for even coloration that allows for longer and slimmer surfaces. Elgot’s beautifully-designed kitchens can be seen at elgotkitchens.com or in their showroom on Third Avenue (between 74th and 75th streets).


Refined Styling for a Timeless New York Look

Visit our new showroom 1296 Third Avenue, NY, NY • 212-879-1200 • elgot.com Between 74th and 75th Streets

For over 70 years, Manhattan’s Premier Kitchen & Bath Designers


Warm regards,

Lisa Ben-Isvy Publisher New York Spaces

28

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

TOP 50 DESIGNERS PARTY PHOTOS BY RYAN MONROE AND ERIC SCHLEYER

PUBLISHER’S LETTER

WHAT’S NOT TO LOVE

about September? Now that summer has come to a close, the changing colors of fall are working their magic. The streets are abuzz with excitement, our calendars are already filled with everything from home design and fashion shows to art and museum openings, and to top it all off, our highly anticipated New York Spaces Top 50 Designers event! As New Yorkers we believe in celebrating each other’s successes and talents. We truly love throwing a great party and this industry knows how to make that happen. At New York Spaces, recognizing our peers for their innovation and excellence in interior design and architecture is one of the most rewarding aspects of our work. Every year, we look forward to our annual party at Mitchel Gold + Bob Williams’ flagship SoHo store. It has become the fall kick-off event for the design industry. Our Top 50 Designers issue is one of the most coveted of the year, and it resonates as a source for the “who’s who” among our community of designers and architects. Our readers can explore each of the designer’s preferred sources, and in fact, do so. I consistently hear from our advertising partners and readers about how they value this issue as a resource. We, of course, are thrilled. And speaking of thrilled, this year I was nominated in the Entrepreneur category for the Folio: Top Women in Media. I am grateful to our devoted advertising partners for helping me achieve this goal and the wonderful team at New York Spaces who continue to support me. And now it’s time to support the influential individuals who are on this year’s Top 50 Designer list. We cannot wait to see our readers, advertising partners, and colleagues at our party. So let’s raise our glasses to them and to beautiful autumn in New York!


/VTLH[SHZ[

-3,?-694 5,>@692 ,HZ[[O:[YLL[ 5L^@VYR<:( ;LS PUMV'MSL_MVYTU`JVT ^^^MSL_MVYTU`JVT

.96<5+70,*, :,*;065(3:6-(

KLZPNUI` (U[VUPV*P[[LYPV

-3,?-694 ^^^MSL_MVYTP[


Artesso

Y O U R H O M E S AY S A L O T A B O U T Y O U . W E ’ R E H E R E TO L I S T E N . Your home is a reflection of you. Ferguson’s product experts are here to listen to every detail of your vision, and we’ll work alongside you and your designer, builder or remodeler to bring it to life. Our product experts will help you find the perfect products from the finest bath and kitchen brands in the world. Request an appointment with your own personal Ferguson product expert and let us discover the possibilities for your next project. Visit FergusonShowrooms.com to get started.

A&D BUILDING SOHO FARMINGDALE ©2016 Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. 0616 208396

(212) 688-5990 (212) 680-9000 (631) 391-9506

MASPETH MT KISCO GREENVALE

(718) 937-9500 (914) 666-5127 (516) 953-1700

FergusonShowrooms.com


THE BEST IS YET TO COME

SHOWROOM EXPANSION C O M I N G F A L L 2 016

979 3rd Ave. , Suite 538 New York, NY 10022 212.758.0472 nyc@walterswicker.com www.waltersnyc.com


FENDI CASA BENTLEY HOME TRUSSARDI CASA HERITAGE COLLECTION BUGATTI HOME RITZ PARIS HOME COLLECTION PAUL MATHIEU LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

MILAN

PARIS

LONDON

LUXURY LIVING NEW YORK SHOWROOM 153, Madison Avenue - New York NY - 10016 USA Tel +1 646 596 9610 - newyork@luxurylivingusa.com www.luxurylivingusa.com


STATEMENTS

PRODUCED BY NICOLE HADDAD

1

2

3

LUXURIOUS ALLURE HIGH DESIGN COMES HOME

4

1

BAUHAUS-INSPIRED SA Baxter's Modern Wall sconce features clean, sharp lines and a sleek glass shade. SABAXTER.COM

2 CASA BLISS Fendi Casa's ultra-chic Kathy armchair's solid beech wood structure is layered with rich cushioning upholstered in a luxurious cognac-toned leather. LUXURYLIVINGGROUP.COM

3

LIT JEWEL DShop's copper-plated Otero pendant, designed by Larose Guyon, revisits 19th-century decadence. Part of the Belle Époque collection. Total height: 128". SHOP.THEDPAGES.COM

4

PLUSH BEAUTY Kelly Hoppen's Kelly occasional chair for Resource Decor exudes comfort with its rich velvet upholstery. RESOURCEDECOR.COM

5 ELEGANT The Casa de Campo collection of new alpaca textiles from Sandra Jordan Prima Alpaca includes six new textures ranging from soft, deep piled weaves to more tailored looks. SANDRAJORDAN.COM

6 STYLE + COMFORT Carlo Colombo's Isabel collection for Flexform now includes a sofa designed to sink into (shown here), two new armchairs, and the original dining chair. FLEXFORMNY.COM

5

7 SOPHISTICATED AKDO's Chevron tile, designed by Jay DeMauro, features large-scale stripes of alternating silk and verre églomisé finishes. Shown in Warm Silver and Champagne. AKDO.COM CONTINUED

6

7 N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

41


STATEMENTS

8

9

10

11

8 NATURE'S BOUNTY Phoenix Gallery's pair of vintage-style, rock crystal lamps with polished brass frames are surefire stunners. 27"H. PHOENIXGALLERYNY.COM

9

MIX N' MATCH William Yeoward's creations for Designers Guild include the stylized rose blooms of the Marmorata fabric. The design pairs perfectly with the Torca jacquard velvet and Seborga herringbone fabrics. DESIGNERSGUILD.COM

10

SQUARED Euclid is a stunning mosaic in a classic three-dimensional box motif shown here as a custom design in honed marble. The neutral palette consists of Cream, Lagos Gold, and Sylvia Gold. Available in two more graphic colorways. STUDIUMNYC.COM

11

GOLD MEDAL Resource Furniture's Apelle dining chair features a leather hide seat and a steel frame. Shown here in a Facepowder Pink seat and a Pink Gold frame with arms. RESOURCEFURNITURE.COM

12 STRIKING The Tondo hand-carved decorative bowl from Anna New York by RabLabs comes in various sizes and as a vase. ANNANEWYORK.COM

13 GEOMETRIC APPEAL Juan Montoya's Bridge console features a macassar ebony top and sides and a curved section in lacquered steel. 72 1/2"L.

BIASICATANI.COM

14 CONTEMPORARY Antonia Citerrio's Richard sectional sofa for B&B Italia includes five optional pillows for an eclectic appeal and a choice of leather or fabric upholstery. BEBITALIA.COM SEE RESOURCES

12

13

14 42

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


ARCHITECTURE

BOX STEPS CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: 56 Leonard, Herzog & de Meuron’s “Jenga-like” skyscraper, offers its residents eye-in-the-sky views as far as the eye can see; Hudson River Park has reinvented Manhattan’s far western edge; among the brick and cast iron, glass stands out; New Yorkers push boundaries, stretching the upper limits of habitation and cultivation to the rooftops.

TOWER POWER

AMONG TRIBECA’S LOW-RISES AND LANDMARKS, HERZOG & DE MEURON’S IRREGULAR, 60-STORY, GLASS TOWER STANDS UP—AND OUT TE X T J U DITH NASATIR

·

PHOTOG R APHY PETE R MARGONE LLI

EVER SINCE PETER MINUIT traded $24 of trinkets to the Canarsie tribe for Manhattan, generation after generation of developers, architects, and real estate mavens have grappled with political will, civic needs, economic and commercial trends, and technologies to re-resolve Manhattan’s upward thrust, density, and hard edges. The city’s fabric documents this reweaving with a time warp of older structures and a ghost-busting weft of new construction. A neighborhood can change so incrementally that difference escapes our notice—until it doesn’t. Or it can change with a big, architectural bang—a dazzlingly different skyscraper like 56 Leonard, Herzog & de Meuron’s 60-story residential condominium, a fabulously welcome amenity like Hudson River Park, an entirely new district such as Hudson Yards—can instantly seem to shift the character of everything within (and beyond) CONTINUED its radius.

44

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


ARCHITECTURE

TRACE ELEMENTS TOP From Staple Street’s two blocks and Hudson River Park, Manhattan’s built chronology emerges. MIDDLE ROW: Harrison Street’s Federal-era houses include three original to the site and three moved from Washington Street in the ‘70s. Tribeca pushes to the island’s edge. Duane Street survivors include the Whalebone building (1860). BELOW: 18 Leonard Street’s converted 19th-century structures once housed the dry goods store and warehouse of Augustus D. and Helen Juilliard, benefactors of the Juilliard School. BOTTOM: The converted Grabler Building dates to 1896. ROW:

Through the centuries, TriBeCa has morphed from residential haven to thriving commercial center, from desuetude to residential mecca and one of the city’s priciest zip codes. So how does Herzog & de Meuron’s tower, now almost complete, affect TriBeCa’s core? From street after street, this structural conundrum of irregularly stacked glass-box manses transfixes the eye ever upward, an object lesson in starchitectural power. So far, so great. Like its height, its glass cladding (and that of its immediate neighbor, the low-rise New York Law School) is a notable anomaly among the ‘hood’s landmarked swathes of cast iron, masonry, and cobblestone. Interestingly, the stretch of Leonard Street that both buildings occupy is an interstice in a gap between Tribeca’s four historic districts, which jigsaw together between Canal, Broadway, West, and Chambers or Vesey Streets. Nancy J. Ruddy of CetraRuddy, a New York-based architecture firm, takes a long, down-to-earth view of good architecture’s transformative effects. Her firm authored One Madison, a lithe, 50-story glass tower on 23rd Street, and has done substantial work in TriBeCa, including the conversion of 433 Greenwich, an 1880s factory, into a 53-unit condominium. She says of 56 Leonard, “It’s not in TriBeCa proper, where value generates from the landmarked historic, low-rise context and cobblestone streets. But it brings high-rise, view-oriented architecture to downtown—a positive addition and a future focal point.” She adds that it may come to bridge TriBeCa and the adjacent City Hall neighborhood. Change is a given, so we shall see. SEE RESOURCES

46

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


Talk about Style

ŠWilliam Wegman

knows how to put it together

mosaic, stone, porcelain and other fine surfaces

150 East 58th Street, 7th Floor, NYC | 212.486.1811 | www.studiumnyc.com


Production: Roberto Nishimura

By ap p o i nt m e nt : 2 7 0 La f a y e t t e S t r e et , S u i t e 8 1 0 , N ew Yo rk , N Y, 1 0 0 1 2 , P h o n e: 2 1 2 . 4 7 2 . 6 4 8 8 w w w. y a el s o n i a . co m


SPANISH GREY AND WHITE MARBLE

WESTBROOK INTERIORS

BOSTON CHICAGO CONNECTICUT NAPLES PALM BEACH LOS ANGELES

NEW YORK SHOWROOM A&D BUILDING 212.644.2782

7TH FLOOR, SUITE 701 888.845.3487

150 EAST 58TH STREET

www.parisceramicsusa.com


SHOWROOM STYLE

GLOBAL GLAM “We’re seeing conversational statement pieces from accessories to furniture as a favorite for the NYC customer,” says Kelly Wearstler of her debut Manhattan showroom at the New York Design Center. “Chairs in particular have been very popular.” Shown here, a living room vignette featuring pieces from Wearstler’s collection with EJ Victor, including the Sonara swivel chair, Lucien sofa, and shearling-and-leather Larchmont chair.

KELLY'S BAG WEST COAST DESIGNER KELLY WEARSTLER OPENS HER FIRST STANDALONE SHOWROOM IN THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER TE X T JILL SIE R ACKI

NEW YORK CITY is a hub for creative inspiration,” says Los Angeles-based designer, decorator, and author, Kelly Wearstler, who this spring opened her first Manhattan showroom in Midtown’s New York Design Center. “I’ve had my store in Bergdorf Goodman for several years and it’s been an exceptional opportunity to exclusively present my brand and aesthetic for an audience of discerning design lovers from

around the world. Launching a showroom in NYC in the metropolitan area was an organic next step.” Located on the building's eighth floor, the to-the-trade showroom features standouts from Wearstler’s furniture collections, made in collaboration with storied furniture maker EJ Victor (which also distributes collections from fashionable names like Kate Spade and AERIN’s Aerin Lauder). CONTINUED

CASE STUDIES LEFT TO RIGHT: Dillon cabinet; Crescent dresser; Trousdale cocktail table.

50

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


ALAIN SAINT-JOANIS ALBERTO PINTO ALICE GOLDSMITH ANNA WEATHERLY DESIGNS AUBRY CADORET ORFÈVRES BAUSCHER-HEPP INC. CAPDECO CHRISTOFLE COUZON CRISTAL DE PARIS DENBY DESHOULIÈRES DEVINE CORP DOGALE VENITIAN GLASS DONNA KARAN LENOX ERCUIS SILVER PORZELLANMANUFAKTUR FÜRSTENBERG GIOBAGNARA GODINGER GROUP GREGGIO SILVER HERDMAR FLATWARE HEREND PORCELAIN HERING-BERLIN HERMÈS IITTALA J.L. COQUET J. SEIGNOLLES JARS FRANCE JAUNE DE CHROME JULIA WATTS LLC JULISKA KATE SPADE NEW YORK KIM SEYBERT PORCELAIN KIYASA SIGNATURE TABLE AND BATH ACCESSORIES KOSTA BODA LEHMANN GLASS LENOX L'OBJET LSA INTERNATIONAL MARCHESA BY LENOX MARIOLUCA GUSTI MEDARD DE NOBALT MICHAEL ARAM MICHAEL WAINWRIGHT MOSER CRYSTAL MOTTAHEDEH & CO. NAMBÉ ODIOT ORREFORS KOSTA BODA PICKARD CHINA POC A POC PORCEL FINE BONE CHINA USA PROUNA FINE BONE CHINA PUIFORCAT RALPH LAUREN HOME RAYNAUD PORCELAIN REED & BARTON RICCI ARGENTERI RICHARD GINORI 1735 RIEDEL CRYSTAL ROBERT HAVILAND & C. PARLON ROSENTHAL ROYAL COPENHAGEN ROYAL CROWN DERBY ROYAL LIMOGES SAINT-LOUIS SAMBONET TL SCAFATI LLC SCALAMANDRÉ BY LENOX SIEGER BY FURSTENBERG THERESIENTHAL VARGA ART CRYSTAL VERSACE VIETRI, INC. VILLEROY & BOCH VISTA ALEGRE WATERFORD WATERFORD INTERIORS WEDGWOOD WILLIAM YEOWARD CRYSTAL

THE NEW YORK TABLETOP SHOW ® SEPTEMBER 27 - 30, 2016 | APRIL 4 - 7, 2017 OPEN DAILY BY APPOINTMENT

DIRECT

D E S I GAN C CE E SR S STRICTLY TO THE TRADE

95 PERMANENT TABLETOP SHOWROOMS BESPOKE | CHINA | CRYSTAL | DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES | DINNERWARE FLATWARE | GLASSWARE | LIGHTING | OBJET D’ART

212.686.1203

|

A RUDIN BUILDING

|

41MADISON.COM


SHOWROOM STYLE

STYLE SCENE TOP LEFT AND RIGHT: Wearstler’s furniture collections include modern pieces for the dining room, including the textured oak Trousdale dining table, accented with Sonara armchairs, as well as storage solutions as creative as they are convenient, such as the multilayered Pacific credenza, shown here with the Dune by Marks artwork. BELOW LEFT AND RIGHT: Wearstler, the designer’s Turmont bench and Souffle chair.

52

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

PORTRAIT BY NICK HUDSON.

Peppered throughout the space are Wearstler showstoppers, such as the Crescent cabinet, Souffle and Laurel lounge chairs, whimsical Foot stool, and the Melange coffee table and side table. The room is punctuated with artful displays of the designer’s home accents and sculptural work, like the burnished bronze-and-gunmetal Double Chain Link sculpture and wood with quartz Gemma tray. Despite its use of signature Wearstler elements, the showroom’s softer aesthetic and neutral color palette is a departure from the designer’s Melrose Avenue flagship and shop-in-shop at Bergdorf Goodman, open since 2007, which features stronger colors and bolder patterns. “Neutrals allow the eye to focus beyond color and experience the silhouettes, textures, materiality, artisanal details, and other aspects of the individual pieces without distraction,” says Wearstler. “Customizing the pieces with bold colors and textural fabric selections enhances the beauty that is inherent in the designs." SEE RESOURCES


CLIQUE

AUTUMN SONATA FALL HAS ARRIVED AND IT’S TIME TO FILL YOUR DIARY WITH EDGYCHIC AMUSEMENTS, FROM FASHION AND ART TO MUSIC AND DESIGN

METHOD ACT The Cappellini Method, published this year, is a book of stories, inspirations, and notes, amassed over Giulio Cappellini’s 40-year design career. Organized in encyclopedic fashion, it is a documentation of the iconic designer’s own personal style and experiences, and how they have influenced the identity and development of the influential Italian brand. The 192-page tome is organized into four major themes: Identity, encounters, places, and products. Also new this year is the Drum chair designed by Mac Stopa for Cappellini. The sculptural and high-tech chair is covered in stretch fabric with a geometric tessellation pattern that is a tribute to hexagonal drum pads popular in the 1980s. CAPPELLINI.IT

MODERN LOVE There is no disputing the fact that David Bowie was a talented musician who shaped a musical generation and broke all the rules, even while he was writing new ones. And yet he was so much more: Artist, shape shifter, trendsetter, philanthropist, husband, father, icon. His impact continues even after his death. It doesn’t seem to be a coincidence that 2016 started taking a turn for the bizarre after Bowie’s death on January 10th. And to this list of accomplishments we can add yet another: David Bowie, art collector. In November, Sotheby’s London will stage Bowie/Collector, a three-part auction of his private art collection. Approximately 400 works will be on the block, and in preparation for that massive event, an exhibit will travel to Los Angeles, Hong Kong, and this month will be shown at Sotheby’s New York headquarters (1334 York Ave.). The collection includes works by Frank Auerbach, Marcel Duchamp, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Damien Hirst. In addition, there will be furniture by post-modernist designer Ettore Sottsass and his Milan-based Memphis Group, as well as an unconventional record player by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. In a 1998 New York Times article, Bowie said, “Art was, seriously, the only thing I’d ever wanted to own. The same work can change me in different ways, depending on what I am going through.” Bowie/Collector will be open to the public from September 26 through 29. SOTHEBYS.COM

À LA MODE The Museum at FIT presents Proust’s Muse, The Countess Greffulhe (September 23-January 7), featuring the legendary wardrobe of French fashion icon Élisabeth de Caraman-Chimay. She was the inspiration for Oriane, the Duchesse de Guermantes, in Marcel Proust’s À la recherché du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time). Organized by Dr. Valerie Steele, director and chief curator of the Museum at FIT, in cooperation with Olivier Saillard, director of the Palais Galliera, the exhibit features photography and dresses from such notable designers as House of Worth, Jean Lanvin, and Nina Ricci. Says Steele, “The Countess Greffulhe believed in the artistic significance of fashion, and although she patronized the greatest couturiers of her time, her style was very much her own.” FITNYC.EDU/MUSEUM CONTINUED

54

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

FAR LEFT TOP AND BOTTOM: GAVIN EVANS (PORTRAIT); SOTHEBY’S LONDON (CASABLANCA SIDEBOARD, 1981). FIT EXHIBITION: NADAR/GALLIERA/ROGER-VIOLLET (COUNTESS AND DRESS).

PRODUCED BY DE BOR AH L . MARTIN


CLIQUE GODLIS NATION

COLOR SURGE Cuevas Tilleard on Henry Street is launching an exhibition of emerging artist Sebastian Vallejo’s new works, entitled In Search of Asphodels. Vallejo, born and raised in Puerto Rico, is inspired, in part, by the brilliant colors and light of the Caribbean. The new series, whose title is drawn from the works of William Carlos Williams (Asphodel that Greeny Flower), Greek mythology, and Leonard Cohen’s poem Satan of Westmount, symbolizes the struggle and sacrifice of the artist to create beauty. Working in floral fabrics that are an ode to his home country, Vallejo layers paint and other materials onto the canvas, resulting in riotous color and depth. There will be an opening reception on September 7th and the exhibition continues through October 9th. CUEVASTILLEARD.COM

SOARING VICTORIAN Lower Manhattan is abuzz with new development: celebrity chefs, luxury shopping, and boutique hotels are all vying for the spotlight in Manhattan’s oldest neighborhood. The latest in exciting openings is The Beekman Hotel. Built in 1881, it is one of New York City’s oldest skyscrapers, and the centerpiece of this historic building is its nine-story atrium and pyramidal skylight. Architects Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel have lovingly restored the Victorian masterpiece and the elegantly appointed interior is the work of Martin Brudnizki Design Studio. Boasting not one, but two James Beard award-winning restaurateurs, Tom Colicchio and Keith McNally will make this a worthy addition to the star-studded Lower Manhattan food scene. THEBEEKMAN.COM 56

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

PHOTOGRAPHY TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF GODLIS. SEBASTIAN VALLEJO IN STUDIO BY MATTHEW WILLIAMS. PHOTOGRAPH, BOTTOM RIGHT: RICHARD BARNES (ATRIUM); TIM WILLIAMS (FAÇADE).

In 1976, David Godlis was onto something. “I always thought, if I walk into a scene I hope I recognize it.” In a dive club on Bowery, Godlis found his moment and 40 years later, his book, History is Made at Night, has finally come together. Inspired by the street photography of George Brassai, Robert Frank, and Diane Arbus among others, Godlis spent most nights from 1976 through 1979 inside CBGB and out on the street. The nightly lineup included people such as Richard Hell, Patti Smith, The Ramones, and Blondie, and devotees like Andy Warhol and fledgling filmmaker Jim Jarmusch. It was an analog time, and Godlis took his photos in a most analog way: at night, without flash. They are grainy, with bursts of light and movement, and they capture the anarchy and the urgency of the moment. “New York exists on the street. These people weren’t looking to make something pretty. I tried to capture that.” Starchitects and high fashion have replaced restaurant supply stores, flophouses, and that legendary awning, but the documentary evidence remains. History is an artful tribute, not just to now-famous musicians, but to a time and place like no other. “There hasn’t been another set of people like Patti or Richard who have come up with a better plan. I’m just glad I was there.” On September 10, Agnès b. Galerie Boutique (50howardstreet.com) will host an opening reception and exhibit of the photographs. GODLIS.COM


COLOR YOUR CLIENTS HAPPY. It’s easy when you use ColorSnap®, the powerful new system of integrated color tools and technology from Sherwin-Williams. No matter where you start your color journey — in-office, on-site, online or in-store — you can move back and forth intuitively between tools, ultimately making color specification quick, easy and accurate. Discover more at swcolorsnap.com.

Contact your Sherwin-Williams Designer Account Executive Sabina Jahic 125 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011 Sabina.Jahic@sherwin.com 347-271-0914


half court. reinvented.

day T night

/VPWPMJPMB4PGB2VFFO8BMM#FE]"MUFB#PPL*OUFSNFEJBUF8BMM#FE]$MPTFUBOE4UPSBHF4ZTUFN])PNF0GåDF]#SFBL%FTL$IBJS

Homework + half court + bedroom for two = one powerfully functional room, both day and night. Change the way you use your space with Nuovoliola and Altea Book, two of 60+ customizable solutions : the global leader in transformable furniture design for over 50 years. designed and made in Italy by Exclusively from Resource Furniture. College basketball scholarship not included. Lifetime warranty on all Clei mechanisms. Many items available for immediate delivery. 969 Third Avenue @ 58th Street | 4th Floor | NYC | 212.753.2039 314 North Crescent Heights Blvd. @ Beverly Blvd. | LA | 323.655.0115 300 Kansas Street | Suite 105 | 16th Street Entrance | SF | 415.872.9350 3340 Cady’s Alley NW | Georgetown | DC | 202.750.6327 resourcefurniture.com New York | Los Angeles | San Francisco | Washington, D.C. | Toronto | Vancouver | Calgary | Montreal | Mexico City


Product Shown: Aquarella, ST6023 and Petite Sisal, NZ0729

Available Through

SONIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PLACE The Paper Muse Collection is produced under license by York Wallcoverings

www.StacyGarciaNewYork.com

D&D Building, Suite #1001 979 Third Avenue New York, NY 10022


PLACES

4 BR, 3.5 BATHS

It would be difficult, if not impossible, to come up with a more legendary and iconic New York building than the Dakota, constructed in 1880–1884 by architect Henry Janeway Hardenbergh, who also designed The Plaza Hotel. Outside, the main entrance is large enough for the horse-drawn carriages that once came through. Inside, this newly renovated apartment has seven fireplaces and plenty of the outstanding and original architectural details. The corner living room alone is 30 feet by 19 feet and faces north and west. Along with the enormous formal dining room and fully modernized kitchen–which includes a huge eat-in breakfast room—it’s the ultimate living and entertaining space. LISTED AT $14,995,000 CONTACT: JARED SELIGMAN, DOUGLAS ELLIMAN, 212.891.7104; ELLIMAN.COM

PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE IN NEW YORK CITY SOME BUILDINGS ARE MORE THAN JUST REBAR AND STEEL… SOME ARE ICONS

138 PIERREPONT STREET

4 BR, 3 BATHS; APPROX. 2,911 SQ. FT.

The Brooklyn Trust Company Building, designed by York and Sawyer in 1913, has been enhanced for today’s market by Barry Rice Architects. The light-filled, open-plan layout features dark stained white oak floors and 10 foot ceilings. Beautiful exterior details such as leaded-glass windows and a limestone facade happily coexist with amenities such as radiant heat floors in the master bath and top tier appliances in the kitchen. LISTED AT $4,366,000 CONTACT: VANESSA CONNELLY, BROWN HARRIS STEVENS, 718.797.9409; BHSUSA.COM.

740 PARK AVENUE, APT. 6/7A

4 BR, 6.5 BATHS

Who wouldn’t jump at the chance to live in the childhood home of Jacqueline Onassis? This storied duplex is in the celebrated 1929 landmark building by architect Rosario Candela on the Upper East Side. The large living room faces Park Avenue and leads to a paneled library (all original) and enviably large dining room. Modern upgrades include a state-of-the-art kitchen with breakfast room and staff quarters. On the second floor, the master suite is so large that the couple who shares it need never share: it has two marble baths, two dressing rooms, and two offices. LISTED AT $32,500,000 CONTACT: STAN PONTE AND MAX COLLINS, SOTHEBY’S, 60

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

212.606.4109/212.606.7720; SOTHEBYHOMES.COM

CONTINUED

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOUGLAS ELLIMAN PR (THE DAKOTA); SCOTT WINTROW (740 PARK AVENUE)

THE DAKOTA, APT. 66


PLACES PIERHOUSE, 90 FURMAN STREET, BROOKLYN HEIGHTS 5 BR, 4 BATHS; APPROX. 4,287 SQ. FT. With unparalleled views from the Brooklyn Heights waterfront, this sprawling duplex is sustainably designed by Marvel Architects. The floors are 600-year-old reclaimed heartwood. Energy-efficient solar shades in every room cut down on heat gain. Luxury finishes include Calacatta marble counters in the kitchen and Fosso Piccolo marble floors in the spa bath. The property has a private outdoor space, and residents can also enjoy amenities at the adjacent 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge. LISTED AT $10,490,000

515 W. 23RD STREET 2 BR, 3 BATHS; APPROX. 2,633 SQ. FT.

The LEED-certified Gold building on the High Line is by architect Neil Denari with interiors by Thomas Juul-Hansen. The open-plan space features a cantilevered steel frame containing a curtain wall of glass and stainless panels, giving residents a unique view through sloping floor-to-ceiling windows. The south-facing living and dining rooms flow into an eat-in kitchen wrapped by banquettes. The home is equipped with motorized shades and a multi-zoned heating and cooling system. LISTED AT $10,500,000 CONTACT: NORAH P. BURDEN, BROWN HARRIS STEVENS, 212-588-5617; BHSUSA.COM.

7 E. 76TH STREET 9 BR, 5 FULL BATHS, 4 HALF BATHS; APPROX. 14,000 SQ. FT.

This 1898 mansion by Parish and Schroeder in neo-Renaissance style features an Italianate façade with iron balcony and clay-tiled mansard roof, carefully updated in the late 1990s. An addition in the 1920s brings the 24.5-foot-wide home up to 14,000-square-feet of elevatorserviced splendor. The layout includes two en-suite staff rooms a back service staircase, and modern amenities such as a fully equipped gym. Once the home of famous (and notorious) art dealer Sam Salz, its walls are ready to be lined anew. LISTED AT $50,000,000 CONTACT: STAN PONTE AND MAX COLLINS, SOTHEBY’S, 212.606.4109/212.606.7720; SOTHEBYHOMES.COM 62

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOLL BROTHERS CITY LIVING (90 FURMAN STREET); TRAVIS MARK (7 E. 76TH STREET)

CONTACT: DEBORAH RIEDERS, CORCORAN, 718.923.8001; CORCORAN.COM


Turn-of-the-century style gets a contemporary, masculine edge. The Rook™ Bath Collection by Brizo® blurs the lines between past and present—creating an arresting, modern interpretation of a stately aesthetic. Available exclusively in showrooms. brizo.com


NEIGHBORHOOD

NEW YORK HOME SNAPSHOTS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A view of the Hudson Valley from the tower in Ferncliff Forest. The Gothic Revival-style Henry Delamater House was built in 1844 and now serves as an inn. Rhinebeck is full of architectural gems. The Church of the Good Shepherd on Mulberry Street. Hundred Mile on Mill Street offers furniture, lighting, and designed objects. Terrapin, a farm-to-table restaurant helmed by chef Josh Kroner is located in the site of an old church built in 1825. The Beekman Arms is America's oldest continuously operated hotel. A view of Market Street.

PRODUCED BY NICOLE HADDAD

RHINEBECK

64

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

GETTING THERE

Take Amtrak from Penn Station to the Rhinecliff Station which is two miles away from Rhinebeck's center. The fastest train will get you there in 1 hour and 33 minutes.

WHERE TO EAT

In spite of its diminutive size, Rhinebeck has a surprising variety of cuisines to choose from. Enjoy Thai food at Aroi Thai Restaurant, Indian at Cinnamon Indian Cuisine, Japanese at Osaka, or fine French food at Le Petit Bistro. Some of our other favorites include: Dining under the cathedral ceilings of an old church-turnedrestaurant, Terrapin; Pizzeria Posto; Gigi's Trattoria; Bread Alone; and The Tavern at the Beekman Arms. CONTINUED

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICOLE HADDAD.

SINCE HENRY HUDSON sailed up the Hudson River in 1609, the lush landscape of the Hudson Valley has attracted a bevy of politicians, artists, architects, socialites, and more throughout the years. The historic village of Rhinebeck, nestled within its own eponymous town, holds more of an allure than most, especially at only a two hour drive from Manhattan. Its varying architectural styles, old world charm, and tree-lined village center full of artisanal and specialty shops are just the start. This Dutchess county gem is chock-full of history and has the buildings to prove it. From its start as an important post during the Revolutionary War, to its historic riverfront properties dating back to the Gilded Age, and to its history as a mass producer of violets, Rhinebeck never fails to intrigue and delight.


NEIGHBORHOOD

AROUND TOWN CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Hudson River. The Wilderstein estate offers tours Thursday through Sunday. Rhinebeck's historic post office contains murals depicting local history—President Franklin Delano Roosevelt oversaw the design of the exterior. The landmark 1890 Foster's Coach House Restaurant and Tavern. Sweet Repeats Thrift Shop. The Rhinebeck Reformed Church was founded in 1731 by the Dutch. The present structure was built in 1808 to replace the the original.

Not interested in a full meal? Visit Grand Cru Beer and Cheese Market to indulge in one of their cheese and charcuterie boards while enjoying your pick from over 200 styles of craft beer or a seasonal wine list. For dessert: Hit Krause's Chocolates for over 50 varieties of chocolate; Pick up a vegan, organic chocolate bar at Oliver Kita Chocolates; Indulge in a decadent confection at Samuel's Sweet Shop.

ACT LOCAL

SHOP BELOW, TOP LEFT AND RIGHT: A peek inside the Antique Market, a multi-dealer antique emporium. Oliver Kita offers artisan fine chocolates. BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: Antique Market is nestled behind the Beekman Arms in a classic red barn. Market Street is full of shops including the Portly Pug Antiques, fashion store Willow Wood, and Samuel's Sweet Shop. I Kneeded This offers great massage therapy. The SugarPlum Boutique on East Market Street carries fashion, jewelry, and cosmetics.

Take a pottery class at Hudson Valley Pottery or enjoy an art class in watercolor or drawing at Betsy Jacaruso Studio—it is part of the area that inspired the Hudson River School of art after all! Go fishing, skiing, camping, hiking, or biking at Ferncliff Forest—a 200acre game refuge and forest preserve. Climb the Ferncliff Forest Tower for beautiful views of the Hudson Valley and the Catskills. Upstate Films, opened in 1972, showcases a wonderful mix of foreign, independent, and classic films. Shop at the Antiques Market or Hammertown, a home decor store right next to a village favorite, Oblong Books and Music—or visit Sawkille for hand-built furniture. The Hudson Valley Wine & Food Fest is being held September 10–11 at the Dutchess County Fairgrounds. Over 50 local wineries offer tastings.

VISIT

The 35-room Queen Anne-style Wilderstein Historic Site was once the home of Margaret Suckley, Franklin D. Roosevelt's cousin and apparent frequent correspondent as seen in the movie about their friendship, Hyde Park on Hudson. The home tour, which includes the grounds designed by Calvert Vaux, offers a snapshot of the American decorative arts of the period. The Beekman Arms, America's oldest continuously operated hotel, helped host the American Revolution. The 4th Regiment of the Continental Army often drilled on its front lawn before the war in 1775. George Washington is rumored to have slept there.

TRIVIA

From the late 1800s to the mid-20th century, Rhinebeck was known as the “Violet Capital of the World.” The town was said to provide nearly 25% of the United States’ violets. SEE RESOURCES


Plumbing Supply Inc. KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN CENTER

Bath | Kitchen | Medicine Cabinets Lighting | Accessories | Faucets Hardware | Vanities | Countertops Fixtures | Mirrors | Shower Doors

196 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 516.599.6655 candlplumbingsupply.com


west nyc home

:LWK D TXDOLW\ DQG DHVWKHWLF WKDW LV RIWHQ PLPLFNHG EXW QHYHU PDWFKHG 3RUUR FORVHW V\VWHPV DUH WDLORUHG WR Ä&#x2020;W \RXU VSDFH DV ZHOO DV \RXU OLIHVW\OH 3RUURèV VWDWHRIWKHDUW SURGXFWLRQ IDFLOLW\ IXVHVWKHODWHVWWHFKQRORJ\ZLWKWKHLUWLPHKRQRUHGWUDGLWLRQRIFOHDQVLPSOHDQGIXQFWLRQDOGHVLJQ

CLOSETS & STORAGE | ARCHITECTURAL SYSTEMS | BOOKCASES | FURNITURE AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT

WEST | NYC HOME westnyc-home.com Ä&#x2020;IWKDYHQXH#WKVWUHHW FRQWDFW#ZHVWQ\FKRPHFRP 

WEST | OUT EAST ZHVWRXWHDVWFRP QHZWRZQODQHHDVWKDPSWRQ FRQWDFW#ZHVWRXWHDVWFRP 

live well. live modern.


Estatuario Polsihed

Strata Argentum

Beton, Estatuario

FLATIRON RESOURCE CENTER 28 W. 25th Street, New York, NY 10010 • 212.964.0900 www.hgstones.com • info@hgstones.com


SHOP

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF TRESSERRA.

MEDITERRANEAN LUXE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The Secreter Carpett was Tresserra’s inaugural piece, inspired by a traditional English secretary, in white walnut with interior details in sycamore; The collection is handcrafted down to the smallest detail; Leather is hand cut and burnished; The 58th Street showroom; Sensual Fandango candleholders; Tresserra designs each piece beginning with detailed sketches; The Cabinet Samuro in white walnut; The curvaceous Armchair Casablanca with silver nickel fittings, comes in velveteen or leather.

SPANISH SEDUCTION FOR 30 YEARS, JAIME TRESSERRA HAS BEEN CRAFTING FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES THAT ARE DESTINED TO BECOME MODERN HEIRLOOMS TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN

IN HIS 58TH street showroom, Tresserra, Jaime Tresserra’s museumquality, butterscotch-smooth pieces beckon seductively. Tresserra takes design cues from a wide-ranging palette of inspiration. Born into a family of actors and fashion designers in Barcelona, he was exposed to design at an early age. After one year of law school and a quick tour in advertising, he settled on interior architecture. He began to create furniture designs for clients, and in 1987 he presented his first collection at the Valencia International Furniture Fair, where he won the award for best modern furniture design. International acclaim followed. The collection, which includes over one hundred styles, is primarily made with white walnut. Brass hardware that can be chromed or silver-plated adds subtle shine, and pieces are upholstered in natural cotton or buttery calfskin. Several pieces are included in the collections of the International Design Museum of Munich, and the Museum of Decorative Arts in Barcelona. In addition to the fine craftsmanship of the furniture design, Tresserra has introduced a gallery collection of artistic forms and objets. “Aiming to free the part of my imagination which is so often repressed by the functional limitations of furniture design, I imagined and started this series of special pieces using the idea of furniture as a reference.” SEE RESOURCES

72

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


MANHATTAN

ARCHITECTURAL SURFACING

Q U A R T Z

U LT R A C O M PA C T

COSENTINO CITY MANHATTAN 150 E 58TH STREET A&D BUILDING | 3RD FLOOR NEW YORK, NY 10155 646.891.3653 | MANHATTAN@COSENTINO.COM

G R A N I T E

M A R B L E

N AT U R A L

S T O N E

Flooring Facades Wall Cladding Interior And Exterior Countertops


Aaron Basha Boutique ͻ 673 Madison Avenue Paris ͻ Dubai

ͻ

Hong Kong

ͻ

Italy

ͻ

ͻ

Kiev

New York

ͻ

212.644.1970

London

ͻ

Moscow

ͻ

ͻ

ͻ

Qatar

www.aaronbasha.com ͻ

Tokyo

ͻ

Toronto


Hot Water (Hydronic)

Steam

Electric

The Fine Art of Radiators From baseboards to wall panels, to elegant curves and towel radiators, Runtal manufactures the perfect welded steel radiators for hot water (hydronic), electric and steam heating systems. For more information or a dealer near you, please call 1-800-526-2621 or visit us online at: www.runtalnorthamerica.com


SHAWN HENDERSON

ANDREW KOTCHEN, MATTHEW BERMAN

BENJAMIN NORIEGA-ORTIZ

CARRIER AND COMPANY

TO P

50

NAMES TO KNOW IN METRO NEW YORK DESIGN EVE ROBINSON ASSOCIATES INC.

THE BEST ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS, AND DECORATORS BRING COLOR, FORM, COMFORT, AND DELIGHT TO THE ENVIRONMENTS WE INHABIT MATTHEW PATRICK SMYTH, INC.

ZACK MCKOWN

FRANCINE MONACO

CALVIN TSAO

CARL Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AQUINO KATIE RIDDER

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

79


TO P

50 ELIAS ASSOCIATES

AMANDA NISBET DESIGN, INC. DAVID SCOTT INTERIORS

ALEX PAPACHRISTIDIS INTERIORS

CARRIER AND COMPANY

ALEX PAPACHRISTIDIS 300 East 57th Street, Suite 1C New York, NY 10022 212.588.1777; alexpapachristidis.com

JESSE CARRIER, MARA MILLER 315 East 91st Street, 5 Floor South New York, NY 10128 212.706.1025; carrierandcompany.com

TRADEMARK: Exuberant, imaginative, uniquely sophisticated approach to luxurious old-world elegance

TRADEMARK: Perfectly balanced, brilliantly edited, positively chic, and consummately livable interiors

AMANDA NISBET DESIGN, INC.

CC INTERIOR DESIGN, INC.

AMANDA NISBET 1326 Madison Avenue, Suite 64 New York, NY 10128 212.860.9133; amandanisbetdesign.com

CHRISTOPHER COLEMAN 55 Washington Street, Suite 707 Brooklyn, NY 11201 718.222.8984; ccinteriordesign.com

TRADEMARK: Joyful, colorful, expressive rooms enlivened with quality materials, comfortable furnishings, and unexpected details

TRADEMARK: Captivatingly bold use of modern materials, bracing color, and touch-me textures

ANTHONY BARATTA, LLC ANTHONY BARATTA 267 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1002 New York, NY 10016 212.966.8892; anthonybaratta.com

Smart rooms for modern living layered with decoration’s dazzling, dizzying eye candy of mixed palettes, pattern on pattern, and historical flourishes TRADEMARK:

BNO DESIGN ALEX PAPACHRISTIDIS INTERIORS

BENJAMIN NORIEGA-ORTIZ 30 Vesey Street, Suite 500 New York, NY 10007 212.343.9709; bnodesign.com TRADEMARK: Sensuous, romantic, witty, ornamented modern spaces that delight in the dramatic

BRIAN J. MCCARTHY INC. BRIAN MCCARTHY 140 West 57th Street, Suite 5B New York, NY 10019 212.308.7600; bjminc.com

Beautifully organized, perfectly architected, art-filled and artful rooms layered with originality and personality TRADEMARK:

D’AQUINO MONACO INC. CARL D’AQUINO, FRANCINE MONACO 214 West 29th Street New York, NY 10001 212.929.9787; daquinomonaco.com TRADEMARK: Distinctive, rigorous, imaginative visions thoughtfully and innovatively orchestrated to the nth detail

DAVID EASTON, INC. DAVID EASTON 5 Union Square West, 3rd Floor New York, NY 10003 212.334.3820; davideastoninc.com TRADEMARK: Mastery of design history and the full spectrum of styles, informed by a lifetime of practice, travel, and limitless curiosity, all in the service of the client

DAVID KLEINBERG DESIGN ASSOCIATES DAVID KLEINBERG 330 East 59th Street New York, NY 10022 212.754.9500; dkda.com TRADEMARK: Ultra-refined, highly disciplined eye focused on creating nuanced sophistication and luxurious modernity


DAVID SCOTT INTERIORS DAVID SCOTT 150 East 58th Street, 25th Floor New York, NY 10155 212.829.0703; davidscottinteriors.com TRADEMARK: Memorable, relaxed, sensuous spaces marked by notes of grandeur

DELROSE DESIGN GROUP KERRY DELROSE 410 East 59th Street, Suite 1B New York, NY 10022 212.593.8081; delrosedesigngroup.com TRADEMARK: Fresh, chic, contemporary interiors with innovative applications and clean lines

DRAKE/ANDERSON JAMIE DRAKE, CALEB ANDERSON

JAMIE DRAKE, CALEB ANDERSON 67 Irving Place, 12th Floor New York, NY 10003 212.754.3099; drakeanderson.com

MARY FOLEY, MICHAEL COX

Boldly luxurious, artfully urbane environments saturated with wit, elegance, and sophistication

TRADEMARK:

ELIAS ASSOCIATES EDDA ELIAS 105 Madison Avenue, Suite 303 New York, NY 10016 212.685.1550; eliasinteriors.com TRADEMARK: Timeless in architecture, art, and design with modern design elements that push the limits for true individualization

EVE ROBINSON ASSOCIATES INC. EVE ROBINSON 2091 Broadway, 3rd Floor New York, NY 10023 212.595.0661; everobinson.net TRADEMARK: Fresh, lovely, modern interiors of determined thoughtfulness, with unexpected furnishings and details that surprise

DELROSE DESIGN GROUP

FOLEY&COX MARY FOLEY, MICHAEL COX 135 West 29th Street, Suite 900 New York, NY 10001 212.529.5800; foleyandcox.com TRADEMARK: Design with a singular, transformative point of view that makes the classic modern and the modern classic CONTINUED ANTHONY BARATTA BRIAN J. MCCARTHY INC.

DAVID EASTON

DAVID KLEINBERG DESIGN ASSOCIATES

CHRISTOPHER COLEMAN


TO P

50 GLENN GISSLER

RUSSELL GROVES

THOMAS JAYNE

FOX-NAHEM ASSOCIATES, LLC

JEFFREY BEERS INTERNATIONAL

JOE NAHEM 4 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor New York, NY 10010 212.358.1411; foxnahem.com TRADEMARK: Ultra-personal, artful spaces with flair and glamour that welcome the comforts of the everyday

JEFFREY BEERS 156 Fifth Avenue, West Penthouse New York, NY 10010 212.352.2020; jeffreybeers.com TRADEMARK: A passionate attention to detail with an emphasis on color and form

GLENN GISSLER DESIGN JOHN BARMAN, INC.

GLENN GISSLER 1123 Broadway #1100 New York, NY 10010 212.228.9880; gissler.com TRADEMARK: JUAN MONTOYA DESIGN

Architecturally driven with an emphasis on fine arts, artisan-made custom furnishings, and unique textiles

GROVES & CO. RUSSELL GROVES 210 Eleventh Avenue, Suite 502 New York, NY 10001 212.929.5221; grovesandco.com TRADEMARK: Visually dynamic yet timeless designs that appeals to a fashion-driven clientele

HARIRI & HARIRI ARCHITECTURE DPC. GISUE HARIRI, MOJGAN HARIRI 520 West 27th Street, Suite 702 New York, NY 10001 212.727.0338; haririandhariri.com TRADEMARK: Imaginative, cuttingedge, and alluring solutions to designs for living at every scale HARIRI & HARIRI ARCHITECTURE DPC.

JAYNE DESIGN STUDIO, INC.

JOHN BARMAN 500 Park Avenue New York, NY 10022 212.838.9443; johnbarman.com TRADEMARK: Lively, graphic use of form and color in rooms full of glamour and allure

JOHN DOUGLAS EASON INTERIORS JOHN DOUGLAS EASON 610 West 42nd Street, Suite 42K New York, NY 10036 212.414.8544; johndouglaseason.com TRADEMARK: Sophisticated and modern spaces that are saturated with texture yet softened with organic forms and unexpected colors

JUAN MONTOYA DESIGN JUAN MONTOYA 330 East 59th Street New York, NY 10022 212.421.2400; juanmontoyadesign.com TRADEMARK: Multicultural, worldly interiors marked by refinement, sophistication, and elegance

KATIE RIDDER INC.

THOMAS JAYNE 36 East 12th Street, Suite 702 New York, NY 10003 212.838.9080; jaynedesignstudio.com

KATIE RIDDER 136 Madison Avenue, 11th Floor New York, NY 10016 212.779.9080; katieridder.com

TRADEMARK: Steeped in history, versed in modern, environments that honor tradition yet are dressed for today

TRADEMARK: Classically informed, ultradetailed rooms that enrich daily life with unexpected palettes, patterns, and a touch of the exotic CONTINUED

JEFFREY BEERS JOHN BARMAN, INC.

FOX-NAHEM ASSOCIATES, LLC

82

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

JOHN DOUGLAS EASON INTERIORS


TO P

50 MARTIN RAFFONE LLC

M (GROUP) ARCHITECTURE AND DECORATION

M (GROUP) ARCHITECTURE AND DECORATION HERMES MALLEA, AIA, PC; CAREY MALONEY 336 West 37th Street, Suite 850 New York, NY 10018 212.874.0773; mgrouponline.com TRADEMARK: Strong, subtle, sophisticated environments with artfully complex layers and surprising wit POL G. THEIS

DAVID MANN

MARTIN RAFFONE LLC MARTIN RAFFONE 10 East 16th Street, Suite 15 New York, NY 10003 212.243.2027; martinraffone.com TRADEMARK: Seasoned use of forms in happily modern rooms that celebrate the artisanal

MATTHEW PATRICK SMYTH, INC. MATTHEW PATRICK SMYTH 136 East 57th Street, Suite 901 New York, NY 10022 212.333.5353; matthewsmyth.com

MILES REDD, LLC

MR ARCHITECTURE + DECOR DAVID MANN 245 West 29th Street, 10th Floor New York, NY 10001 212.989.9300; mrarch.com TRADEMARK: Artful minimalism of great glamour, sensuality, and allure, incorporating familiar materials parlayed into beauty

NEAL BECKSTEDT STUDIO NEAL BECKSTEDT 134 West 26th Street, Suite 1140 New York, NY 10001 212.924.0700 ext. 100; nbeckstedtstudio.com

MESSANA O’RORKE

P&T INTERIORS

BRIAN MESSANA, TOBY O’RORKE 223 East 10th Street #12 New York, NY 10003 212.807.1960; messanaororke.com

POL G. THEIS The Arts Building, 336 West 37th Street, Suite 420 New York, NY 10018 212.679.4125; pandtinteriors.com

NEAL BECKSTEDT STUDIO

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

TRADEMARK: Decisive interior spaces with chic details that embrace quirkiness and coziness

TRADEMARK: Melding of rich textures and tailored details, creating modern, comfortable and inviting spaces infused with warmth and ease

TRADEMARK: An artful combination of architecture, contemporary culture and current technology for a truly individualized living space

84

MILES REDD 236 West 26th St. Suite 802 New York, NY 10001 212.674.0902; milesredd.com

Expressive, thoughtful, fully grounded living spaces, artfully detailed and emphasizing quality above all TRADEMARK:

MESSANA O’RORKE

MILES REDD, LLC

TRADEMARK: Highly disciplined spaces that welcome a distinctive, often edgy mix of art, antiques, and accessories CONTINUED


DAS H IN G

FA B R I C S

|

TRIMMINGS

|

H A R DWA R E

|

WA L LCOV E R I N G S

|

FINISHED

PRODUCTS

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM D&D BUILDING 9TH FLOOR SUITE 915 NEW YORK 212.838.5253 FABRICUT.COM


TO P

50 SERGIO MERCADO DESIGN

PETER PENNOYER

SARA STORY

ROBERT COUTURIER INC.

PETER PENNOYER ARCHITECTS PETER PENNOYER 136 Madison Avenue, 11th Floor New York, NY 10016 212.779.9765; ppapc.com

Classicism translated for today into specific, imaginative living spaces that honor local and historical context TRADEMARK:

ROBERT COUTURIER INC. ROBERT COUTURIER 69 Mercer Street New York, NY 10012 212.463.7177; robertcouturier.com

Contemporized traditional interiors that cast a wide net over global design to bring international accents home TRADEMARK:

SHELTON, MINDEL & ASSOCIATES SISKIN VALLS INTERIOR DESIGN

SARA STORY DESIGN SARA STORY 54 Thompson Street, Suite 202 New York, NY 10012 212.228.6007; sarastorydesign.com

SEBORN RAGSDALE

SERGIO MERCADO DESIGN SERGIO MERCADO 195 Chrystie Street, Studio 303D New York, NY 10002 212.920.6750; sergiomercadodesign.com TRADEMARK: Enduring, contemporary interiors made unique with a signature blend of interesting and unexpected materials

SHAWN HENDERSON INTERIOR DESIGN, INC. SHAWN HENDERSON 1133 Broadway, Suite 623 New York, NY 10010 212.253.8473; shawnhenderson.com TRADEMARK: Luxe, harmonious, characterful environments that emphasize craftsmanship and employ sustainable materials whenever possible

SHELTON, MINDEL & ASSOCIATES LEE F. MINDEL, FAIA 56 West 22nd Street, 12th Floor New York, NY 10010 212.206.6406; sheltonmindel.com

TRADEMARK:

Polished, savvy, well-designed spaces that support the well-lived life

TRADEMARK: The complex, luxurious, fascinating world of modern simplicity, perfectly executed

SEBORN RAGSDALE INTERIORS

SISKIN VALLS INTERIOR DESIGN

SEBORN RAGSDALE 27 East 21st Street, 7th Floor New York, NY 10010 212.741.1435; sebornragsdaleinteriors.com

PAUL SISKIN 21 West 58th Street New York, NY 10019 212.752.3790; siskinvalls.com

TRADEMARK: Bold statements featuring a love of color, energetic scale and classically traditional lines

TRADEMARK: Flexible, evolving rooms that meld old and new to withstand the test of time CONTINUED


TO P

50 WILLIAM T. GEORGIS ARCHITECT

VICENTE WOLF ASSOCIATES, INC.

MATTHEW WHITE, FRANK WEBB

TARA SEAWRIGHT

TARA SEAWRIGHT INC./ INTERIOR DESIGN TARA SEAWRIGHT 120 East 86th Street New York, NY 10028 212.289.9991; taraseawright.com

Personalized spaces that are casually elegant while never compromising comfort or functionality TRADEMARK:

TSAO & MCKOWN ARCHITECTS CALVIN TSAO, ZACK MCKOWN 242 Third Street Brooklyn, NY 11215 212.337.3800; tsao-mckown.com

Rooms that speak to a universal, global language of design and modernity, and a fearless, ultra-refined approach to living TRADEMARK:

WEST CHIN ARCHITECTS & INTERIOR DESIGNERS WILLIAM MCINTOSH DESIGN, INC.

VICENTE WOLF ASSOCIATES, INC. VICENTE WOLF 333 West 39th Street, 10th Floor New York, NY 10018 212.464.0590; vicentewolf.com TRADEMARK: Serene spaces of preternatural calm and elegance, informed by travel and a remarkable, searching eye

WEST CHIN ARCHITECTS & INTERIOR DESIGNERS WEST CHIN 137 Fifth Avenue, 12th Floor New York, NY 10010 212.242.4945; wcarchitect.com TRADEMARK: Uber-fluid, light-filled, modern interiors that sing with clean, disciplined, minimal lines

88

WHITE WEBB MATTHEW WHITE, FRANK WEBB 105 East 34th Street, Suite 116 New York, NY 10016 212.889.2900; whitewebb.com TRADEMARK: Exuberant interiors that balance history and tradition with modern living

WILLIAM MCINTOSH DESIGN, INC. WILLIAM MCINTOSH 54 West 21st Street, Suite 609 New York, NY 10010 212.807.8030; williammcintoshdesign.com TRADEMARK: Intelligent, personable spaces of quiet confidence, bold style, and discernment

WILLIAM T. GEORGIS ARCHITECT WILLIAM T. GEORGIS 233 East 72nd Street New York, NY 10021 212.288.6280; williamtgeorgis.com TRADEMARK: Imaginative rooms that occasionally shock and often awe through melding of architecture, unusual furnishings, bold art, and accents

WORKSHOP/APD MATTHEW BERMAN, ANDREW KOTCHEN 39 West 38th Street, 7th Floor New York, NY 10018 212.273.9712; workshopapd.com TRADEMARK: Sophisticatedly minimal modern interiors, often with sustainable materials, unexpected details, and elements of surprise

For image information, SEE RESOURCES


Starlit Latticeâ&#x201E;¢ Genuine Seashell and Beadazzled Glass Bead Tiles New York D&D Building Order Samples MAYA RO MA NO FF.CO M


INTERIOR DESIGN: VINCENT WOLF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER MARGONELLI

SEPTEMBER 2016

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

91


BELLA NATURA ITALIAN ARCHITECT AND DESIGNER ACHILLE SALVAGNI IMBUES A LONG ISLAND COUPLE’S PIED-À-TERRE WITH NATURAL FORMS AND A LUXURIOUS SHIMMER ARCHITEC TU RE AND INTERIOR DESIG N ACHILLE SALVAG NI TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN PHOTOG R APHY PAOLO PETRIG NANI

92

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


PARKS DEPARTMENT The view of Central Park takes center stage, accented by red leather lounge chairs by Jacques Adnet (1950), and an ebony games table. On the FontanaArte side table, a Nemo table lamp from the Achille Salvagni Atelier collection, in onyx and bronze.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

81


CHIC CHAMBERS ABOVE: The silk, hand-knotted rug designed by Salvagni and crafted in Tibet adds structure, and is ďŹ&#x201A;anked by a Hobbit console in bronze and glass and Tomaso Buzzi side chairs with parchment legs and velvet upholstery. The peacock wall sconce by Herve Van der Straeten is from Maison Gerard. OPPOSITE, TOP: The breakfast table was designed by Salvagni for the client and is surrounded by sculptural chairs by Jean Royère. The Artic Pear chandelier from Ochre hovers above. OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: A cabinet by Salvagni is inspired by the Roman Colosseum.

94

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


WHEN A LONG ISLAND COUPLE wanted a pied-à-terre in the city they turned to Italian architect and designer Achille Salvagni. This was his first full project in the United States, and to it he brought a distinctly European flair. “I started my career in Rome, but I also worked in Sweden and was influenced by the organic design and natural shapes used by people like Alvar Aalto.” Salvagni continues, “Using natural shapes is really in my DNA.” The roughly 1,500-square-foot apartment is on Fifth Avenue facing Central Park. “The amazing view is really the trophy here, it truly exemplifies the adage: location, location, location.” Salvagni adds, “It was important to echo the natural beauty outside, with beautiful textures and shapes inside.” CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

95


ENTRARE ABOVE: The living room flows into the dining area to the left and the foyer to the right. Gio cabinet from the Achille Salvagni Atelier collection rests under an undulating Venetian-style verre églomisé mirror, created by artist Miriam Ellner. It reflects a pop of red from a painting by Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale (1954), that is a focal point in the room. Side chairs circa 1925 by Tomaso Buzzi are covered in velvet.

96

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


The architectural layout of the apartment, which Salvagni created, has three main destinations accessible from a main foyer area. “I created balance in the living room, between the entrance to the kitchen on the left and the foyer on the right, and I framed the connections between all the spaces with dark lines." The three main areas flow organically: The “night” area includes the master bedroom, bath, and closet; the living area connects to a den that can be used as a guest bedroom; and

the kitchen and dining area is an open room that allows the view to take center stage. The furnishings and color scheme create a relaxing environment, one that echoes the chicness and attitudes of the clients. “The lady of the house dresses in a calming and soft palette, with a dash of vibrant color in a scarf, shoes, or clutch. I did the same in the design details such as the persimmon pillows in the living room, pops of red in artworks, and the colors of the linens in CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

97


98

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


LIVING ART OPPOSITE, TOP: The classical entryway has a modern twist, with the designer’s Ovo cabinet and Lucy mirror. The Barovier&Toso chandelier is from 1920. OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: The master bedroom echoes a Mondrian painting with blocks of color in Fanfara silks by Dedar. The Valentina desk was designed by Salvagni and named for his wife. THIS PAGE, TOP AND BOTTOM: The wall in the den is white oak with a textural finish. Salvagni designed the zebra pouf for the client. The verre églomisé mirrored panels by Miriam Ellner create elegant luminosity. A niche in the bathroom lined with zebrino marble and accents of black marble set into a bronze frame.

the bedroom.” He adds, “The bed looks like a Mondrian.” The lighting and accessories inspired his first collection for Maison Gerard. “I went to my Roman roots and hired the best craftsmen and stone workers. I took materials inspired by heritage and together with these artisans turned it into a new language for the future.” Conical table lamps crafted of onyx and bronze with finials shaped like tree branches, mirrors that undulate with organic lines, lampshades that curve seductively, all create a dialogue with natural beauty of Central Park, just outside the windows. SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

99


100

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


50 SHADES OF CHIC Foley and Scott exposed the metal trusses throughout the space, adding unexpected elements of interest while also instilling a loft-like vibe. The duo custom-designed and installed two hanging steel benches in the living room's dormer windows to take advantage of the Central Park views. For peak enjoyment, Scott outfitted them with an ultra-comfortable window seat cushion upholstered in an Ivory fabric from Holly Hunt. The fireplace was given a modern makeover with elegant gray stone while sofas covered in fabric from Holly Hunt add a place to relax and converse.

WEST SIDE JUMP NTERIOR DESIGNER KATHRYN SCOTT AND ARCHITECT DAVID FOLEY HELP AN EAST SIDE COUPLE CHANGE MORE THAN JUST THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD ARCHITEC TU RE DAVID FOLE Y INTERIOR DESIG N K ATHRYN SCOT T TE X T NICOLE HADDAD PHOTOG R APHY E LLE N MCDE RMOT T

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

101


LAIDBACK ELEGANCE CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Scott created two seating areas in the living room with sofas positioned back to back. A Clubcu console table separates them while shapely limestone lamps from Oly Studio add a sophisticated note. Stone steps progress into a metal staircase that leads up to the daughter's bedroom. Underneath the stairs a more rustic vignette featuring an antique console nicely balances out the ultra-sleek materials. "When you combine contemporary design with more rustic pieces and introduce some patina, everything becomes more interesting," says Scott. The window seat offers wonderful views of Central Park. A round ottoman with nailhead trim from Lee Industries serves as a coffee table. OPPOSITE: The terrace, landscaped by Gunn Landscape Architect, can be reached directly from the dining area and master bedroom.

102

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


FOR MANY NEW YORKERS the jump across town is a weighty decision. There are East Siders and there are West Siders. But for one family hoping to make a dramatic change from their traditional Upper East Side dwelling, it only took a look at a three-bedroom, two-floor Upper West Side penthouse in a landmarked Beaux-Arts Building to do so. “They wanted a complete departure from their previous residence,” says interior designer Kathryn Scott. “They had been living with a collection of antiques for so long, they wanted something very contemporary, neutral, and open.” Together with architect David Foley, Scott faced the unusual challenge of opening up a space hidden underneath a sloping mansard roof with a round corner tower. First order of business: Scott and Foley exposed the roof’s supporting framework to give the space a more loft-like and industrial feel. Next, a wall was knocked down to open up the kitchen to the living and dining areas, creating an open-plan layout on the almost L-shaped first floor—a round corner room underneath the cupola became a two-floor library connected by spiral stairs. Bedrooms flank each end of the first floor, with the master bedroom and dining area opening up to a beautiful interior garden terrace separated by large-scale, steel-and-glass sliding doors. CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

103


104

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


SERENE RETREAT OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A Richard Serra-inspired sculpture fabricated by metal worker Jake Ducharme houses a banquette Scott had custom designed. Scott also conceived the design for the dining chairs to bring in another curved element with character. Kathryn Scott. In the kitchen, a dated copper wall was knocked down to open up the space. A zinc bar blends seamlessly with the gray limestone flooring from Stone Source. The clients introduced pendants from their previous dwelling to add a warm, sentimental note. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: In the library, Scott modified the wood finish so the effect wasn't so overwhelming—the original built-in bookshelves had an orange tint. A zinctopped table continues with the language of the rest of the apartment. Stairs lead up to the second floor of the library. In the master bedroom, Scott created the pattern of the side table's embossed leather, and the bathroom features original art she designed to cover the medicine cabinets. "I started as an artist," says Scott, "so whenever I can't find what I need, I design it myself."

Behind the dining area, stairs lead directly to the daughter's bedroom which is suspended over the living room on the second floor. The cupola, which has become a retreat of sorts for the family, has views of the library below and leads out to a small balcony. To take advantage of the views and to keep with the industrial chic theme, Scott and Foley had two hanging benches made out of raw steel placed in the curve of the living room’s Central Park-facing dormer windows. A thick cushion in ivory Holly Hunt fabric adds more comfort than meets the eye. Foley, in conjunction with metal worker Jake Ducharme, designed a Richard Serra-inspired, curved zinc wall that Scott softened with a custom-made banquette perfect to dine in and enjoy the terrace tableau. Scott went with a neutral palette of beiges and grays throughout the space, employing soft but durable fabrics that can withstand the owners’ beloved pets. The result is an unencumbered space that is both luxurious and comfortable. It went from dated to modern, with a flow that is visually open and functions well. As for the clients? Both Foley and Scott are in sync again. “They loved it.” SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

105


LUXE LIFE In the living room, gray is glamorous with colorful accents in the graphic pillows, red glass objets, and a curvy painting by Karin Davie. Sectional sofa from Holly Hunt is upholstered in fabric from Pollack. A white lamb bench from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams adds a touch of glam, and a sexy side table from Holly Hunt adds sculptural interest.

106

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


JOHN BARMAN TAKES MODERN TO NEW HEIGHTS WITH A MIX OF MIDCENTURY FORMS, BOLD COLOR ACCENTS, AND SUBTLE SHINE INTERIOR DESIG N JOHN BARMAN

·

TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN

·

PHOTOG R APHY ANASTASSIOS ME NTIS

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

107


CHIC RETREAT THIS PAGE: Dunbar-style chairs in bright orange fabric from Knoll, a contemporary mirrored screen, and midcentury-style architectural sconces from Lost City Arts, all add to the elegance of the living room. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The black-and-white stone flooring in the entryway is a dramatic graphic element; A view into the study draws the eye with a splash of red; The bar area glistens and leads into the cobalt library.

108

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

FOR A 5,000-SQUARE-FOOT PARK AVENUE apartment, designer John Barman wanted to refresh the rooms, keep it contemporary, but give the space an uber-luxurious feel. “The apartment was previously very modern, with concrete floors and lots of sharp edges. It felt outdated to me.” Barman chose tones of gray as his base color, with dramatic splashes of color throughout, along with mirrored finishes and sculptural shapes. “I love color, but I was holding back a bit,” says Barman. “I chose gray as opposed to beige because it feels more contemporary luxe, and vibrant colors look so beautiful against it.” The living room had no architectural focal point so Barman placed a curved, mirrored, midcentury-style screen behind the sofa. It floats against the windows and light pours in around it. “The apartment has almost too many windows, and no architectural moment like a fireplace to ground the room.” Many of the pieces, such as the mirrored screen, are evocative of midcentury design, but are contemporary pieces that are scaled for modern life. The sconces in the living room provide reflected light up to the high-gloss ceiling, adding drama and height. The Karin Davie painting over the Holly Hunt sectional sofa adds dramatic color and CONTINUED


N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

109


TOP LEFT AND RIGHT PHOTOGRAPHS BY PETER MURDOCK

OPTICAL ILLUSION THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A corner niche in the dining room beckons with a pale blue banquette by the designer; A vintage 40s French bar fits perfectly in a corner of the living room; In the bathrooms, wallpaper from Romo mimics brilliantly colored slabs of marble. OPPOSITE: The cobalt blue library is vibrant, with textural and graphic accents in the curly lamb-covered vintage chair and ottoman, the side table by Paul Ferrante, and the zebrastriped pillows in Hermès silk.

110

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


movement, and the sculptural occasional table, also by Holly Hunt, echoes the painting’s curvaceous lines. In the dining room, Barman dropped and rounded the ceiling creating the illusion of a circular room, and then painted it a high-gloss yellow. The walls are slightly curved and that created a cozy corner niche holding a banquette designed by Barman. “I wanted to change the geometry in this room, adding architectural interest with a traditional round shape.” Vintage Dunbar chairs upholstered in blue surround a custom metal-and-wood table, CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

111


and the midcentury sideboard by Tommi Parzinger adds tailored flair. The vibrant colors from the contemporary art and sculptural objets are reflected in the ceiling above. “Gray can become very dull if you don’t introduce color.” The designer chose a carefully mixed cobalt for the library. “Blues are difficult to get right because there is so much variation. I wanted a bright blue that didn’t turn black at night.” The overall aesthetic is contemporary, but not cold. “Contemporary today is not necessarily stark, it is much more luxe than it was 15 or 20 years ago.” The designer continues, “The mix of midcentury and modern pieces, vibrant color and neutrals, metallics and warm woods, feels more modern today, and is the way people live.” SEE RESOURCES

112

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


IN THE ROUND OPPOSITE: Barman created a new geometry by adding gently rounded walls and a circular ceiling to the dining room. The table, a mix of wood and metal, contrasts with the midcentury Dunbar chairs upholstered in blue Houlès fabric. Paintings by Kelly Stuart Graham (over sideboard) and Agathe de Bailliencourt add vibrant color and a modern feel. THIS PAGE, TOP AND BOTTOM: The kitchen is subdued but elegant, with matching marble countertops and backsplashes; The master bedroom is tailored and elegant with bright red linens from E. Braun & Co., and a vintage night table by George Nelson.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

113


114

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


ATTAINABLE ELEGANCE The living room’s refi ned aesthetic was achieved without extravagance by relying on practically priced fabrics (the custom sofas’ Fabricut cotton velvet, various Schumacher linens on the curtains, ottoman and slipper chairs) and carefully selected rack pieces from Hickory Chair (cocktail table, Le Clerc side chair), Bungalow 5 (tall display case), and Arteriors (mirror).

FAMILY PLAN DESIGNER JOHN DOUGLAS EASON BRINGS SOPHISTICATION AND SENSIBLENESS TO A YOUNG FAMILY’S RENOVATED WESTCHESTER VICTORIAN INTERIOR DESIG N JOHN DOUG L AS E ASON ·

TE X T JORG E S . AR ANGO

· PHOTOG R APHY JODY KIVORT

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

115


TO PETRARCH’S ASSERTION that “The aged love what is practical while impetuous youth longs only for what is dazzling,” John Douglas Eason suggests a middle ground. When referred to a young “fairly traditional” couple who’d just renovated a 3,500-square-foot Victorian in Pelham in Westchester County, he offered this proposal: “I wanted to respect the period of the house while making it more modern for a young family, but also add some punch and panache.” The clients asked Eason to work with the palette of neutrals they had used on interior walls (mostly grays and beiges). “I would not normally take on a project where the wall colors were predetermined because it’s such a key component in setting the tone for the space,” concedes Eason. But he accepted the challenge and headed to showrooms—paint chips in hand—with the intent to vary and personalize the palette with other design choices. “I like colors to complement who lives in the house,” says Eason, who settled on a predominantly blue scheme that played beautifully against the wife’s fair-skinned Irish complexion and red hair. CONTINUED

116

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


GLAM FACTORS OPPOSITE: Details such as nailhead trim on the entry alcove’s pouf add pizzazz to comfy, cushy furnishings. ABOVE: The dining room’s flair comes from a Bungalow 5 mirrored chest, E.F. Chapman chandelier from Visual Comfort and midcentury glass from Culture Object. Pared-down classic forms of Bungalow 5 Annette chairs and custom host wing chairs (in a Hines & Co. stripe), evoke period provenance in a contemporary way.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

117


RETHINKING HISTORY THIS PAGE: Simplified traditional forms update bygone genres. BELOW: Diner-style barstools from Chair Up enhance the kitchen’s existing retro aesthetic. OPPOSITE, TOP : In the entry, Arteriors’s Chen console and John Richard’s beaded mirror recall historic Chinese and Deco styles with a fresh edge. OPPOSITE, BOTTOM : More Bungalow 5 chairs around a Hickory Chair Hudson table reinterpret Louis XVI, and the rug, from Carpet Trends in Rye, refers obliquely to the Victorian diamond-paned windows.

Then Eason began pursuing a simultaneously pragmatic and glamorous track. The couple had two young children and a modest budget, so, he says, “I knew this was not the sort of job where we were going to spend $200 or $300 a yard on fabric.” Instead, he mixed linen with fabrics like faux leather and cotton (versus silk) velvets that telegraphed a luxe—but level-headed—aesthetic. In keeping with the kid-friendly concept, Eason nixed the idea of a carpet in the dining room but compensated for that missing warmth and

118

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

texture by covering the ceiling with grass cloth that also emanates a subtly stylish sheen. Equally out of children’s reach in this room are a crystal chandelier and sconces. (Any rugs he did use were washable wool with graphic patterns that provided a modern punch.) Furniture silhouettes are typically cleaner, contemporary takes on classical forms that “evoke a time and period without being too precious”—Louis-style chairs in the dining room and around a game table in the living room, a


neoclassical caned chair in one of the living room seating areas. Details throughout elevate rooms to a more sophisticated level: nailhead trim, a navy blue border on curtains, midcentury glass pieces, jewelry-like mirrors. “The kids did and still do play in the living room,” says Eason. “But you learn where you can get a lot of bang for not a lot of buck. It’s comfortable, yet there’s also a very rich look here.” SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

119


ENTR’ACTE VICENTE WOLF DESIGNS A UNIQUELY PERSONAL HOME FOR A MANHATTAN COUPLE USING A SUBTLE PALETTE AND HIS OWN STRIKING DESIGNS INTERIOR DESIG N VICE NTE WOLF

120

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

·

TE X T ARLE NE HIRST

·

PHOTOG R APHY PETE R MARGONE LLI


ZEN PALETTE An Andy Warhol painting over the ďŹ replace looks onto the living room of this penthouse apartment, furnished mainly with furniture and accessories by Vicente Wolf. A Bas armchair from Holly Hunt is a rare exception.

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

121


122

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


LIVING LUXE OPPOSITE, TOP AND BOTTOM: On one side of the living room, a vintage Chinese stone-topped coffee table sits atop a cowhide rug from Edelman Leather. The custom l-shaped sofa is upholstered in mohair from VW Home. The other side of the room is arranged for television viewing. A recessed alcove contains a custom steel lighting fixture that directs light up and provides reflected light below. A skirted suede ottoman in front of the sofa is topped with a tray from VW Home. THIS PAGE, RIGHT: An extendable rollaway dining table is stationed in front of the (just visible) piano corner.

A PENTHOUSE APARTMENT with a roof terrace near Madison Square Park provided the perfect stage for a virtuoso performance by iconic designer Vicente Wolf. The 1,800-square-foot space—in a converted turnof-the-20th century building—had astonishing views of the park and the Met Life building’s famed clock tower. The clients, an Upper East Side couple embarking on a new life in a second marriage for both wanted a very personal space to begin again. “It felt special,” says David Rogal, an associate in Wolf’s office for 18 years, who brought the project in. He is a childhood friend of the woman’s son, and he collaborated with Wolf on the job. “It had a youthful feel to it that they liked.” CONTINUED

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

123


The couple had just two requests; they wanted space for a grand piano and two separate seating areas in the living room. Wolf deftly created two independent but equal zones; one facing the fireplace, the other the built-in wall that houses the television. Both are furnished with seductive sectional sofas

124

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

designed by Wolf who created virtually all of the furniture because the couple wanted the apartment to be customized to their tastes and needs. And because they wanted flexibility, Wolf added pull-up chairs from Holly Hunt that would be easy to move from one zone to the other. Because they rarely eat at home,


SHADES OF PALE The master bedroom is a study in softness. The wall behind the bed is dressed in wool fabric from Knoll Luxe; Wall-towall carpet from Fox Floors provides a soothing platform for the custom bed covered in fabric from Zimmer + Rohde. The desk, upholstered in Shagreen leather provides the wife with a luxurious workspace; A niche at the bedroom’s entrance is fitted with a semainier and bust.

the dining table is an extendable rollaway, part of Wolf’s furniture collection for Ralph Pucci. For the master bedroom, the designer used a paler shade of blue to create a more romantic atmosphere. The wall behind the bed is completely covered in tufted panels of blue wool, a Wolf signature.

Softness is everywhere, from the custom upholstered bed to the cozy wool wall-to-wall carpet. Translucent Roman shades cover all of the windows to reduce glare but keep the views accessible. Everyone is happy with the outcome. Says Wolf: “The apartment reflects both of their lives and the way they want to live." SEE RESOURCES

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

125


RESOURCES

FontanaArte, fontanaarte.com. Nemo table lamp from the Achille Salvagni Atelier Collection, achille salvagni.com. Red leather Jacques Adnet chairs from Maison Gerard, 53 E. 10th St., NYC 10003; maisongerard.com. (pages 94–95) Silk rug and Hobbit console designed by Achille Salvagni. P.C. Richard & Son, pcrichard.com. Candlestick holders by Herve Van der Straeten. Nemo table lamps and Gio cabinet from Achille Salvagni Atelier Collection. Edition of six chairs by Tomaso Buzzi. Wall sconce by Herve Van der Straeten from Maison Gerard, maisongerard.com. Side tables by FontanaArte, fontanaarte.com. Breakfast table designed by Achille Salvagni. Oak and velvet chairs by Jean Royère. Arctic Pear chandelier from Ochre, ochre.net. Cupboard designed by Achille Salvagni. Chair is by Jules Leleu from Maison Gerard, maisongerard.com. (pages 96–97) Silk rug designed by Achille Salvagni. Gio cabinet from Achille Salvagni Atelier Collection. Verre eglomisé mirror created by Miriam Ellner, miriamellner.com. (pages 98–99) Silk rug and Ovo cabinet designed by Achille Salvagni. Lucy mirror from the Achille Salvagni Atelier Collection. Chandelier from

STATEMENTS (Pages 41–42): SA Baxter,

55 E. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.1114;

Barovier&Toso, barovier.com. Valentina desk, silk

sabaxter.com. Fendi Casa, luxurylivinggroup.com.

aroirestaurant.com. Cinnamon Indian Restaurant,

rug, upholstered bed, and wall mirror all designed

DShop, shop.thedpages.com. Kelly Hoppen at

51 Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.7510;

by Achille Salvagni. Devil table mirror from the

Resource Decor, resourcedecor.com. Sandra

cinnamoncuisine.com. Osaka, 22 Garden St.,

Aldus Collection, aldusroma.com. Framed photo

Jordan Prima Alpaca, sandrajordan.com. Flexform,

Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.7338; osakasushi.net.

by Mapplethorpe. Cushions in the bed are lined in

flexformny.com. AKDO, akdo.com. Phoenix Gallery,

Le Petit Bistro, 8 E. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY

Fanfara silk by Dedar (T). Silk wallcovering also by

phoenixgalleryny.com. Designers Guild (T),

12572; 845.876.7400; lepetitbistro.com. Pizzeria

Dedar at Jerry Pair Associates (T), 979 Third Ave.,

designersguild.com. STUDIUM, studiumnyc.com.

Posto, 43 E. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572;

Suite 502, NYC 10022; 212.546.9001; jerrypair.com.

Resource Furniture (T), resourcefurniture.com.

845.876.3500. Gigi's Trattoria, 6422 Mongtomery

Silk rug and Zebra pouf designed by Achille

ANNA New York by RabLabs, annanewyork.com.

St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.1007;

Salvagni. Doors inlaid with verre églomisé by

Biasi Catani, biasicatani.com. B&B Italia,

gigihudsonvalley.com. Bread Alone, 45 E.

Miriam Ellner, miriamellner.com. Photo on the wall

bebitalia.com.

Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.3108;

by Massimo Listri, massimolistri.com. Bathroom:

breadalone.com. Grand Cru Beer & Cheese Market,

Designed by Achille Salvagni. Wings candleholder

SHOWROOM STYLE (Page 50): Kelly Wearstler

6384 Mill St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.6992;

from Aldus Collection, aldusroma.com.

(T), 200 Lexington Ave., Suite 816, NYC 10016;

grandcrurhinebeck.com. Krause's Chocolates,

212.679.4341; kellywearstler.com.

6423 Mongtomery St., Suite 9, Rhinebeck, NY

WEST SIDE JUMP (Pages 100–105): Interior Design:

12572; 845.876.3909; krauseschocolates.com.

Kathryn Scott Design Studio, 126 Pierrepont St.,

Oliver Kita, 18 W. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572;

Brooklyn, NY 11201; 718.935.0425;

845.876.2665; oliverkita.com. Samuel's Sweet

info@kathrynscott.com; kathrynscott.com.

Shop, 42 E. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572;

Architecture: David Foley of Foley Fiore

845.876.5312; samuelssweetshop.com. Hudson

Architecture, 316 Cambridge St., Cambridge,

Valley Pottery, 18 Garden St., Rhinebeck, NY

MA 02141; 617.547.8002; info@foleyfiore.com;

12572; 845.876.3190; hudsonvalleypottery.com.

foleyfiore.com. (pages 100–101)

Betsy Jacaruso, The Rhinebeck Courtyard, 43-2 E. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.516.4435; betsyjacarusoartist.com. Upstate Films, 6415 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.2515; upstatefilms.org. Antique Market, 24 W. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572. Hammertown, 6420 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.1450; hammertown.com. Oblong Books & Music, 6422 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.0500; oblongbooks.com. Sawkille, 31 W. Market St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.2228; sawkille.com. Hudson Valley Wine & Food Fest, hudsonvalleywinefest.com. Wilderstein Historic Site, 330 Morton Road, Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.4818; wilderstein.org. NEIGHBORHOOD (Pages 64–66): Ferncliff Forest, ferncliffforest.org. Delamater Inn,

SHOP (Pages 72): Tresserra, 53 E. 58th St., NYC

beekmandelamaterinn.com. The Church of the

10022; 212.644.1600; tresserra.com.

Good Shepherd, gsrhinebeck.com. Hundred Mile, 6738 Mill St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.516.4522;

126

BELLA NATURA (Pages 92–99): Architecture

100mileny.com. Terrapin, 6426 Montgomery

and interior design: Achille Salvagni Architetti,

St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.3330;

salvagniarchitetti.net. Achille Salvagni Collection,

terrapinrestaurant.com. The Beekman Arms,

achillesalvagni.com. Paint throughout is by Farrow

6387 Mill St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572; 845.876.7077;

& Ball, us.farrow-ball.com. (pages 92–93) Silk

beekmandelamaterinn.com. Aroi Thai Restaurant,

rug designed by Achille Salvagni. Side table by

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

CONTINUED


PROTECT YOUR FURNISHINGS AND ART COLLECTION FROM FADING Applied to the interior surface of your windows, Sunshield Energy Control Systems’ invisible coating offers the state-of-the-art in protecting your fine furnishings, fabrics and artwork from the destructive effects of sunlight. Their proprietary preservation products have been utilized in the world’s finest homes as well as the most prestigious museum environments. Energy conservation benefits are additionally realized through solar heat and glare reduction. Sunshield’s knowledge and expertise will ensure that your valuable investments will be kept safe for future generations to enjoy.

SE CS

Sunshield Energy Control Systems

www.sunshieldusa.com 914.633.5853

SUSAN M. NI BL O INTERIOR D E S I G N

WINDOW TREATMENTS . UPHOLSTERY . WALL COVERINGS . NEW CONSTRUCTION . STAGING . FLOOR PLANNING . DECORATIVE FINISHES . CONSULTING

233 ROUTE 17 TUXEDO PARK, NY 10987

845.915.3221


RESOURCES

Sofa from Cisco Brothers, ciscobrothers.com. Sofa

dransfieldandross.com. Walls in Chelsea Grey from

table from Clubcu, clubcu.com. Hector table lamp

Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Kitchen:

from Oly (T), olystudio.com. Custom window seat

Design by David Foley, foleyfiore.com. High

made out of raw steel with cushion fabricated by

table from Clubcu, clubcu.com. Julen bar stools

EF + LM (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 903, NYC 10022;

from Cisco Brothers, ciscobrothers.com. Stool

212.758.5000; ef-lm.com. Fabric on the cushion is

fabric from Casamance, casamance.com. Library:

from Holly Hunt (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 503/605,

Zinc table top. Master bedroom: Custom zebra

NYC 10022; 212.755.6555; hollyhunt.com. Window

wood bed and bedside table by Kathryn Scott,

seat fabricated our of raw steel by Jake Ducharme.

kathrynscott.com. Sconce from Roman Thomas (T),

(pages 102–103) Sofa fabric is from Great

501 Madison Ave., 23 Fl., NYC 10022; 212.473.6774;

Outdoors at Holly Hunt (T), hollyhunt.com. Throw

romanthomas.com. Carpet from Woven New York,

pillow fabric in fabric from Rogers & Goffigon

wovennewyork.com. Upholstered wall behind

(T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 1718, 212.888.3242;

bed from Jerry Pair (T), jerrypair.com. Bathroom:

rogersandgoffigon.com. Round ottoman from

Faucet from Waterworks, waterworks.com.

Lee Industries, leeindustries.com. Ottoman fabric

Walls in San Antonio Grey from Benjamin Moore,

in Criss Cross from Jerry Pair Associates (T),

benjaminmoore.com. Sconces from Visual Comfort,

jerrypair.com. Window Seat: Stump side table

visualcomfort.com. Original art by Kathryn Scott,

from Phillips Collection (T), 200 Lexington

kathrynscott.com.

Ave., Suite 603, NYC 10016; 336.884.9271; phillipscollection.com. Vignette: Antique console

SHADES OF GRAY (Pages 106–113): Interior

from Clubcu, clubcu.com. Walls are in Chelsea Grey

design: John Barman, 500 Park Ave., NYC 10022;

from Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com.

212.838.9443; johnbarman.com. Kelly Graham,

Terrace: Landscaping by Gunn Landscape

the creative design director at John Barman,

Architecture, 345 7th Ave., Suite 502, NYC 10001;

johnbarman.com. (pages 106–107) Painting by

Sculptural occasional table from Holly Hunt (T),

gunnlandscapes.com. (pages 104–105) Banquette

Karin Davie, karindavie.com. Side table and

hollyhunt.com. Carpeting from Stark (T),

designed by David Foley and fabricated by Jake

sectional sofa from Holly Hunt (T), hollyhunt.com.

979 Third Ave., Suite 1102, NYC 10022;

Ducharme. Banquette cushion fabricated by EF

Sofa is upholstered in fabric from Pollack (T),

212.752.9000; starkcarpet.com. Foyer: Large

+ LM (T) in frame fabric from Holly Hunt (T),

979 Third Ave., Suite 1722, NYC 10022;

painting by Norbert Bisky, norbertbisky.com.

hollyhunt.com. Cushion fabric in Brownstone from

212.421.8755; pollackassociates.com. White lamb

Stone floor from Studium (T), 150 E. 58th St.,

Duralee (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 620, NYC 10022;

bench from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, 210

7th Fl., NYC 10155; 212.486.1811; studiumnyc.

212.752.4040; duralee.com. Dining chairs are

Lafayette St., NYC 10012; 212.431.2575; mgbwhome.

com. (pages 110–111) Corner dining banquette is

custom by Kathryn Scott, kathrynscott.com. Dining

com. Round end table is vintage Knoll (T), knoll.

custom by John Barman. Bench upholstery from

chair fabric is Montauk from Nancy Corzine (T),

com. Coffee tables with white milk glass by Paul

Houlès (T), houlès.com. 1940s French Bar Chest.

nancycorzine.com. Pillows from Dransfield & Ross,

McCobb. Midcentury Italian chair from Lorin

Wallpaper on ceiling by Romo (T), romo.com.

Marsh (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 720, NYC 10022;

Painting over chest by Paco Pomet, pacopomet.es.

212.759.8700; lorinmarsh.com.

Vintage chair upholstered in fabric from Hermès,

(pages 108–109) Sconces from Lost City Arts,

hermes.com. Bathroom: Red bath in wallpaper

18 Cooper Sq., NYC 10003; 212.375.0500;

from Romo (T), romo.com. Photography by Basil

lostcityarts.com. Vintage Milo Baughman sofa

Hyman. Blue bathroom also in wallpaper from

is upholstered in wool flannel from Loro Piana

Romo (T), romo.com. Library: Custom sofa by

(T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 820, NYC 10022;

John Barman upholstered in wool flannel from

212.594.9663; loropiana.com. Vintage Dunbar

Loro Piana (T), loropiana.com. Blue wool carpet

chairs on left in fabric from Holly Hunt (T),

from Stark (T), starkcarpet.com. Pillow in silk from

hollyhunt.com. Pair of vintage chairs in center by

Hermès, hermes.com. Painting by Lisa Milroy,

Pace in fabric from Romo (T), romo.com. Sheer

lisamilroy.net. Side table by Paul Ferrante,

curtain fabric from Jim Thompson at Jerry Pair &

paulferrante.com. White lamp on vintage chair is

Associates (T), jimthompson.com. Orange fabric on

from Stark (T), starkcarpet.com. (pages 112–113)

vintage chairs is from Knoll (T), knoll.com.

Custom dining table by John Barman, johnbarman.com. Vintage Dunbar dining chairs from Wright Auction House, wright20.com. Dining chairs in fabric from Houlès, houles.com. Vintage sideboard Tommi Parzinger. Painting on right over the sideboard is by Kelly Stuart Graham, kellystuartgraham.com. Painting on left by Agathe de Bailliencourt, agathedeb.com. Vintage chandelier by Claude Ferre. Sconces are from Donzella, donzella.com. Wool carpet by Stark Carpet (T), starkcarpet.com. Kitchen by Bilotta (T), 150 E. 58th St., NYC 10155; 212.486.6338; bilotta.com. Bedroom: Painting by Kelly Stuart Graham, kellystuartgraham.com. Linens from E. Braun & Co., ebraunnewyork. com. Vintage night table by George Nelson for Herman Miller, hermanmiller.com. CONTINUED

128

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M


selects SPECIAL PROMOTION

C&L PLUMBING SUPPLY INC. DXV by American Standard Established in 1980, C&L Plumbing Supply is a retail destination representing a wide variety of kitchen and bath brands. Trusted by professionals and homeowners for over 30 years, C&L is proud to announce the opening of its newly renovated kitchen and bath showroom. New to C&L is DXV by American Standard, a flagship luxury bathroom and kitchen brand that celebrates and draws on the storied plumbing company’s rich history. The Lyndon Suite by DXV is an elegant and restrained style of contemporary furniture, perfect for today’s transitional bathroom. Visit C&L’s exciting new showroom to see the Lyndon Collection by DXV firsthand. 516-599-6655. www.candlplumbingsupply.com.

KRAVET Modern Dining II Collection Kravet Furniture introduces Modern Dining II – a beautiful assortment of dining furniture with a unique and contemporary appeal. Blended with classic elements and fresh new frames and hardware, Modern Dining II offers an exuberant selection of customizable designs, from tables and seating to buffets and display pieces. Discover the limitless options of Kravet Dining. www.kravet.com


RESOURCES

Visual Comfort, visualcomfort.com. Malcom Iron

Cowhide rugs from Edelman Leather (T),

table from Made Goods, madegoods.com.

edelmanleather.com. Woven leather area rug

Vintage midcentury glass vase Culture Object,

from Lance Wovens, lancewovens.com. Dining

cultureobject.com. Dining room: Ceiling in a

area: Drop Leaf dining table in ebonized wood

grasscloth from Donghia (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite

and stainless steel is a custom design by

700, NYC 10022; 212.935.3713; donghia.com.

Vicente Wolf through Ralph Pucci International,

Curtain fabric is Alba from Jane Churchill at

44 West 18th Street, NYC 10011; 212.633.0452;

Cowtan & Tout (T), cowtan.com. Annette dining

ralphpucci.net. Dining chairs from Holly Hunt

chairs and Marie mirrored chest and mirror

upholstered in Water Buffalo in Bayou from

from Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. Faux leather

Edelman Leather (T), edelmanleather.com.

on dining room chairs from Schumacher (T),

(pages 124–125) Wall upholstery is Tudor in

fschumacher.com. Custom host dining chair fabric

Glaciar from Knoll Luxe (T), knoll.com. Ottoman

from Hines & Co. (T), hinescompany.com. E.F.

and desk chair upholstered in Back to Basics

Chapman crystal cube chandelier from Visual

from Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com. Custom curved

Comfort, visualcomfort.com. Vintage midcentury

wood bed upholstered in Tendo from Zimmer +

glass vases from Culture Object, cultureobject.com.

Rohde (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 932, NYC

(pages 118–119) Kitchen: Summer Palace Fret

10022; 212.758.7925; zimmer-rohde.com.

shade fabric from Schumacher (T). Kitchen bar

Carpet from Fox Floors, foxfloors.com. Pendant

stools from Chair Up, chairup.com. Kitchen faux

light and desk lamp from MSK Illumination,

leather stool fabric from Schumacher (T). Entry:

shop.mskillumination.com. Roman shade at niche

Chen console from Arteriors (T), arteriors.com.

in fabric from Dedar (T), dedar.com. Crystal table

Beaded mirror from John Richard, johnrichard.com.

lamp from Restoration Hardware, 935 Broadway,

Stairway rug from Carpet Trends, carpetrends.com.

NYC 10010; 212.260.9479; restorationhardware.

Vintage midcentury Empoli glass vase from Culture

com. Roman shade at window in fabric from VW

Object, cultureobject.com. Seating area: Hudson

Home, vicentewolf.com.

FAMILY PLAN (Pages 114–119): Interior design: John

table from Hickory Chair (T), hickorychair.com.

Douglas Eason, 610 W. 42nd St., Suite 42K, NYC

Chairs from Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. Rug from

10036; 212.414.8544; john@johndouglaseason.com;

Carpet Trends, carpetrends.com.

johndouglaseason.com. (pages 114–115) Custom sofas by John Douglas Eason, johndouglaseason.

ENTR'ACTE (Pages 120–125): Interior design:

com. Sofa on fabric is Hot House Flowers Linen

Vicente Wolf Associates, 333 W. 39th St., NYC

from Schumacher (T) (fschumacher.com) and

10018; 212.465.0590; vicentewolf.com.

Bellagio cut velvet from Fabricut (T), 979 Third

(pages 120–121) Custom curved back club chair

Ave., Suite 915, NYC 10022; 212.838.5253;

upholstered in Stonewashed Flax linen by Savel

fabricut.com. Living room curtain fabric from

Fabrics, savelinc.com. Custom L-shaped

Schumacher (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 832, NYC

sofa upholstered in Gomera mohair in Rain

10022; 212.415.3900; fschumacher.com.

Color from VW Home, vicentewolf.com.

Sabre leg side table from Scott Thomas,

Armchairs in wood and leather from Holly Hunt

scottthomasfurniture.com. Ottoman in

(hollyhunt.com), upholstered in Edelman Leather

Corsica Weave fabric from Schumacher (T),

(T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 207, NYC 10022;

fschumacher.com. Baldwin-style slipper chairs by

212.751.3339; edelmanleather.com. Rectangular

Elan Upholstery, 631.563.0650. Slipper chair fabric

pillow in vintage cloth from VW Home,

from Schumacher (T). Le Hutton cocktail table,

vicentewolf.com. Throw pillows in fabric from

Hudson game table, and Le Clerc painted side

Norbar Fabrics (norbarfabrics.com) and Edgar

chair from Hickory Chair (T), hickorychair.com. Le

Fabrics (edgarfabrics.com). Bronze candlesticks

Clerc side chair fabric is Gainsborough velvet from

from VW Home, vicentewolf.com. Woven leather

Schumacher (T). Antique brass lamp with paper

area rug from Lance Wovens, lancewovens.com.

shade from Visual Comfort, visualcomfort.com.

Think Concrete, black wood side table, and all

All pillows in fabric from Schumacher (T). Pillow

accessories from VW Home, vicentewolf.com.

trim is from Lee Jofa (T), 979 Third Ave., Suite 234,

Pharmacy lamp from MSK Illumination,

NYC 10022; 212.688.0444; leejofa.com. Game table

shop.mskillumination.com. (pages 122–123)

chairs from Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. Chair fabric is from Schumacher (T). Drapery hardware is from Vesta Drapery Hardware, ivesta.com. Area rug from Carpet Trends, carpetrends.com. Papyrus weave window shades from Hartmann & Forbes, hfshades.com. Piedmont display case from Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. Four-drawer chest from Modern History, modernhistoryhome.com. Sunburst mirror from Arteriors (T), 200 Lexington

FOR THE LATEST NEWS AND DESIGN INFORMATION FROM NEW YORK SPACES: ONLINE: newyorkspaces.com FACEBOOK: facebook.com/newyorkspacesmagazine TWITTER: @nyspacesmag PINTEREST: nyspacesmag INSTAGRAM: nyspacesmag

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: NEWYORKSPACES.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Ave., Suite 608, NYC 10016; 646.797.3620; arteriorshome.com. Vintage midcentury Empoli glass vases from Culture Object, 917.640.5287; info@cultureobject.com; cultureobject.com. (pages 116–117) Alcove: Fabric on custom chairs and on pouf from Cowtan & Tout (T), Suite 1022, NYC 1022; 212.753.4488; cowtan.com. Cut velvet pillow fabric and sheer curtain fabric from Hines & Co. (T), hinescompany.com. Leather cord on pillows from Samuel & Sons (T), 983 Third Ave., NYC 10022; 212.704.8000; samuelandsons.com. Area rug from Carpet Trends, carpetrends.com. Metal and grosgrain trim on curtains is from Kravet (T) Calvin Klein Collection. Swing arm lamps from

130

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

A (T) indicates “to the trade” companies usually located in design center buildings with concierges available to assist the public in locating a designer or designer product. This is Volume 13, Issue 5 ©2016 by Davler Media Group. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.95 per year for 7 issues. Canadian and Foreign Subscriptions: US $45. Single copies, $6.99. Newsstand distribution by Comag Marketing Group. Printed in Canada. New York Spaces (ISSN 1552-9762 and USPS 023-365) is published 5 times a year plus two Special Issues by Davler Media Group, 498 Seventh Avenue, 10th Fl., New York, NY 10018.

/ Send address changes to Subscription Department, Davler Media Group, 498 Seventh Avenue, 10th Fl., New York, NY 10018. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices.

postmaster


home design in pixels Read NEW YORK SPACES anywhere, anytime, on your iPad, Mac and PC. www.zinio.com/ipad

powered by


FINAL TAKE

CLOTHES ENCOUNTER DISCOVERING TRENDS AND CELEBRATING INDIVIDUALITY WAS ALL IN A DAY’S WORK FOR JOURNALIST BILL CUNNINGHAM TE X T DE BOR AH L . MARTIN

132

N E W YO R K S PAC E S . CO M

FIRST THOUGHT FILMS/ZEITGEIST FILMS.

ON JUNE 25TH

of this year, the media world got a little bit smaller. That’s the date we lost New York Times photojournalist, Bill Cunningham, at the age of 87. Bill was a fixture on the streets of New York, and in the pages of the paper, for decades. His columns, “On the Street” and “Evening Hours” were widely read by bold-faced names such as Anna Wintour and Iris Apfel, and they frequently appeared in those columns, but they weren’t really the point. Cunningham often said that he didn’t much care for celebrities. In the 2010 documentary by Zeitgeist Films, Bill Cunningham New York, he said, “I don’t really see people. I see clothes.” Rarely spotted without his blue jacket, bicycle, and camera, he became as much a New York landmark as Patience and Fortitude in front the 42nd Street library, the Empire State Building, or Carnegie Hall, where Cunningham lived in the Carnegie Hall apartments for decades. (In fact, in 2009 Cunningham was named a New York Living Landmark by the city landmarks commission.) In 2002, he penned his story for the Times entitled, “Bill Cunningham on Bill Cunningham.” In it he wrote, “I had just the most marvelous time with that camera. Everybody I saw I was able to record, and that’s what it’s all about. I realized that you didn’t know anything unless you photographed the shows and the street, to see how people interpreted what designers hoped they would buy. I realized that the street was the missing ingredient.” After his death, the intersection of 57th Street and 5th Avenue, where the dapper lensman often set up shop, was temporarily renamed Bill Cunningham corner. And although the process of renaming streets in New York is a complicated one, there is a movement afoot to make that a permanent tribute to a man who loved New Yorkers, and their clothes.


2016 lee jofa ®

11sdsdc  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you