Page 1

THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME SEPTEMBER 2016 £ 4.40

KITCHEN I N S P I R AT I O N Decorating tips, tricks and ideas to try ARCHITEC TS’ GUIDE GL ASS -BACKED EXTENSIONS What to do and how much it costs MORE LIGHT PLEASE! Shutters and sheers made easy

NEW SEASON SIMPLICITY

How to lay reclaimed parquet

GET THE LOOKS FROM OUR INSPIRING HOMES

The world’s best designs from beds to bathrooms

09 9 770957 894205


SEPTEMBER 2016 Style 23 News Two fashion names that are making waves in interiors, and our new style barometer. Plus, William Morris updated for the modern home 25 Wish list This month’s pick of afordable and investment buys 41 Decorating Lightweight sheers and our top tips on how to hang them. Plus, new ways to use shutters and a complete guide to terrazzo floors 51 Design A history of innovative superbrand B&B Italia and Marjatta Metsovaara’s psychedelic prints 56 Architecture History’s hottest chairs and a peek inside the Palais de Bulles 65 The power of pink Why it’s the hue of the moment, and what pink products you should buy now

COVER IMAGES: FABRIZIO CICCONI (PHOTOGRAPHY), FRANCESCA DAVOLI (STYLING)

68 Architects’ guide All you need to know about glass-backed extensions, from ideas and planning to pricing

77

68 THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME SEPTEMBER 2016 £ 4.40

KITCHEN I N S P I R AT I O N Decorating tips, tricks and ideas to try ARCHITEC TS’ GUIDE GL ASS -BACKED EXTENSIONS What to do and how much it costs MORE LIGHT PLEASE! Shutters and sheers made easy

NEW SEASON SIMPLICITY

How to lay reclaimed parquet

GET THE LOOKS FROM OUR INSPIRING HOMES

The world’s best designs from beds to bathrooms

ON THE COVER Two ‘Neowall’ sofas by Living Divani and chandeliers by Vibia feature in this month’s light and spacious Milan apartment: The secret garden, p106

KITCHEN

TRENDS

12 kitchens to inspire you, plus the colours, materials and finishes you need to recreate them

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 11


106 The secret garden Decorated with greenery, this Milanese apartment is modern and elegant. Find out more about its stunning parquet floor 118 Colour Renaissance This restored Italian palazzo teams original frescoes with modern furniture 128 Something old, something new Inspired by our Naples house? Here’s how to steal its style 130 The world’s best designs Celebrating the winners of 2016’s ELLE Decoration International Design Awards; plus, five top designers talk trend spotting 136 The old curiosity shop Filled with print, pattern and curios, this South African farmhouse will inspire you to be creative. Get the look with our selection of bold patterned tiles 150 The play house How one architect couple turned this former industrial unit into a versatile family home 158 Natural attraction Silver travertine and tactile oak come together in this spacious Melbourne home. Plus, our pick of durable surface finishes to try 170 In the frame Steel-glazed glass partitions bring light and privacy to this compact Cape Town apartment. Here, architect Alex Michaelis explains the tricks to try

170 Escape 183 Get out and about in the UK with our pick of walled gardens, grand cafés and British festivals. Plus, how to make everyday tasks more stylish

Finally 18 Subscribe Fantastic ofers for our most loyal readers 198 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 210 The last word Discover what #TeamED has been trying and tackling this month

196

SUBSCRIBE AND JOIN THE ELLE DECOR ATION VIP CLUB AT ELLEDECOR ATION.CO.UK Follow us on Twitter: @ELLEDecoUK 12 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Follow us on Instagram: @elledecorationuk

Find us on Facebook: ELLE Decoration


NEW SEASON SIMPLICITY The thing about a passion for design, homes and interiors is it’s addictive. Once you discover that this is where your interests lie, it can never be given up or sidelined. Your home becomes a constant arena for experimentation (new wallpaper inside the cupboards, why not?); you visit furniture stores for fun and, as for interiors programmes on TV, well you can’t get enough of them (ideas! It’s all about ideas!). At least this is the case for #TeamED. We are all self-confessed interiors nuts. Weekend projects are the subject of much discussion, the discovery of a linen-covered light flex or authentic Fornasetti tiles in a charity shop a cause for jubilation, and the launch of the new collection by Swedish supremo Ingegerd Råman at Ikea had us seriously wondering whether we could charge a white van to expenses and make haste for the superstore en masse. (See our new back page for all the other things we’ve been trying and tackling this month.) But why do our homes exert such power over us? Then again, perhaps it’s not so much an issue of power, but of control. When so much is in turbulence beyond our front doors, there is a sense that only here, at home, can we efect change on our own terms. Outside you may not be able to paint the town red, but inside you can. By rearranging the furniture

‘When so much is in turbulence beyond our front doors, there is a sense that only here, at home, can we efect change on our own terms’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

we can feel more sociable, or cosy. By tidying our closets and investing in new wall-hung storage we can feel more eicient and organised. By painting a room in pale shades of the sea we may feel relaxed and uplifted, as well as flushed with a sense of achievement. Here we did it, all by ourselves. And so it goes on. Within our four walls we can dream, and work towards becoming precisely who we wish to be. I think this is also why gardening is exerting an ever more powerful pull on our consciousness. Whether taming flowerbeds or nurturing an avocado plant from seed, we toil in service to a greater goal than self-aggrandisement. It literally grounds us. Many would say gardening is by default a very mindful activity as one seldom thinks of much else than the task in hand when weeding. We stay in the moment without efort. And that can only be a good thing. So, as a new season is on the horizon, here’s to fully embracing the plentiful joys of home and garden. In this month’s magazine there’s loads of great decorating advice, tips and tricks from our in-house experts up front; ideas to steal and inspiration from some of the world’s most beautiful homes in the middle; and exciting places to visit at the back, including a wonderful feature on five glorious walled gardens to visit (bit of a personal obsession of mine). So dive in, we know it can make you happy. And tweet me your home and decorating dilemmas too! #TeamED and I will try and answer as many as we can.

What I’ve been testing this month... cookbooks I love a cookbook that gives me more than just recipes, so Eat Beautfiul (£20, Ebury Press) by make-up artist Wendy Rowe, which promises radiant skin and youthful vitality through food is a great discovery. I’ve also always been a fan of Natasha Corrett’s super-energising alkaline way with food, so Honestly Healthy in a Hurry (£25, Hodder & Stoughton) is a godsend for speedy sustaining suppers. But, for my favourite new cookbook, see our new-look last page for a top tome that combines all of the above!

Editor-in-Chief Follow me on Twitter: @MOgundehin

Follow us on Instagram: @elledecorationuk

Check out elledecoration.co.uk

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 15


M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief

Editor’s Assistant Rosie Cave (020 7534 2522) Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

E DI T OR I A L Art Director Tony Peters (020 7534 2521) Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs (020 7439 5027) Features Director Amy Bradford (020 7534 2524) Photography Director Flora Bathurst (020 7534 2503) Deputy Art Director Philippe Blanchin (020 7534 2518) Homes Editor Jackie Daly (020 7534 2512) Decorating Editor Alex Kristal (020 7534 2527) Photography Editor James Williams (020 7534 2513) Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin (020 7534 2519) Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan (020 7439 5343) Junior Features Writer Charlotte Brook (020 7534 2522) Junior Designer Jack Melrose (207 534 2521) Decorating Intern Stephanie Iles (020 7534 2526) Associate Features Editor Emma Love Associate Editor Sarah Slade Editor-at-Large Talib Choudhry Managing Editor Debbie Morgan (020 7534 2558) Workflow Director Imogen Van Zaane (020 7534 0000) Associate Stylists Hannah Bort Sania Pell Amanda Smith-Corston Suzanne Stankus With thanks to Rebecca Rhodes

PU BL I SH I NG & A DV E RT I SI NG Group Publishing Director Jacqui Cave (020 7439 5273) Publisher’s Assistant Rosie Cave (0207 534 2522) Associate Publisher Christopher Daunt (0207 439 5175) Account Manager Octavia Thompson (020 7439 5462) Account Manager Marina Connolly (020 7439 5462) Classified Sales Executive Hannah Symondson (020 3728 6233) Director of Hearst Magazines Direct Cameron Dunn (020 7927 4699) Regional Sales Lisa Rogers (01619 629254/07702 346037) Head of Hearst Create Dan Levitt (0203 640 2184) Partnerships Director: Create Rozana Hall (0207 439 5377) Partnerships Manager: Create Siobhan Cosgrave (020 7439 5106) Art Director: Create Tanja Rusi (0207 439 5374) Art Editor: Create Leo Goddard (0207 439 5000) Project Managers: Create Richard Adams (020 7534 2596) Danielle Falco-Grimshaw (020 7439 5617) PR Executive Alice Roberta Taylor (020 7439 5047)

PRODUCT ION

CI RCU L AT ION Circulation and Marketing Director Reid Holland Head of Marketing Operations Jennifer Smith Head of Consumer Sales & Marketing James Hill Group Customer Marketing Manager Karen Sharp (020 7439 5543) Junior Consumer Marketing Manager Vicky Chandler (020 3728 7688) Subscriptions Marketing Executive Kathryn Green (020 7439 5687)

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S U K Chief Executive Oicer Anna Jones Managing Director, Brands Michael Rowley Chief Finance Oicer Claire J Blunt Director of Editorial Strategy & Content Louise Court Group Commercial Director Ella Dolphin (020 7439 5689) Chief Technical Oicer Darren Goldsby Director of Communications Lisa Quinn HR Director Surinder Simmons ELLE Decoration is published by Hearst Magazines UK, a trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd.

Production Director John Hughes (020 7439 5200) Production Manager Stephen Osborne (020 7439 5414) Production Coordinator Carl Latter (020 7439 5402)

T R A DEM A R K NO T ICE

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S I N T E R N AT ION A L Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Oicer and General Manager Simon Horne Senior Vice President/Director of Licensing and Business Development Gautam Ranji Senior Vice President/International Publishing Director Jeannette Chang Senior Vice President/Editorial Director Kim St Clair Bodden Executive Editor Eleonore Marchand Executive Creative Director Peter Yates Fashion and Entertainment Director Kristen Ingersoll

B ACK I S SU E S & SU B S CR I P T IONS Hearst Magazines UK, Tower House, Sovereign Park, Market Harborough, Leicestershire LE16 9EF To order or renew a subscription, telephone 01858 438846 or fax 01858 461739 For any other subscription enquiries, telephone 01858 438880 or email elledecoration@ subscription.co.uk. Lines open Mon–Fri 8am–9pm; Sat 8am–4pm. Standard rates for 12 issues: UK £52.80; Eire & Europe Airmail £55; USA £65; Rest Of The World £75 PRINTED BY Wyndeham Roche Ltd, St Austell COVER PRINTED BY Westdale, Cardif Paper supplied by Burgo Group DISTRIBUTION Comag, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, UB7 7QE 01895 433600 (comag.co.uk)

ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benqué CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi Brand Management of ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée SVP/International Director of ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickaël Berret Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Flora Régibier Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

OCTOBER ISSUE ON SALE SEPTEMBER 8 2016

T H I S MON T H ’ S CON T R I BU TOR S Twitter @graceallen100 Profession Writer Feature Open season, p68 Interiors style While I can appreciate the minimal look, I am mostly drawn to bright colours and patterns – if I had to furnish my flat from one shop it would be Anthropologie Design hero I love Tricia Guild. I did work experience at the Designers Guild head oice years ago and it really stuck with me – she’s got such a distinctive style Dream buy So many things! Maybe a fantastic sofa upholstered in a gorgeous Josef Frank fabric. On a larger scale, a Plain English kitchen (see Kitchen Trends, p77).

16 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Rosie Cave Twitter/Instagram @CaveRosie About Rosie is Team ED’s new Editor’s Assistant Home I’ve recently moved into a three-storey terraced house in a small cul-de-sac in Borough. It’s a beautiful part of London, and I love the fact that I can see the Shard through my bedroom window. When I wake up every morning I’m reminded that I live in the greatest city in the world Interiors style I start with a neutral base then use a lot of colour – pinks, blues, greens, purples, reds – whether it’s bedding, lampshades or rugs

Claudia Baillie Twitter @claudiabaillie Profession Writer Feature Design details, p44 and Fashioned anew, p33 Home A 1930s flat in Streatham Hill. The building is beautiful, slightly Dutch-looking with a gambrel roof; my flat is bright, with skinny floorboards and an Art Deco fireplace Interiors style Cheerful and personal. All my stuf has been collected from here, there and everywhere, and has happy memories attached to it Perfect day A day where breakfast, lunch and dinner are all eaten with sand between my toes!

INTERVIEWS: SARAH MORGAN

Grace Allen


ELLE Decoration | S U B S C R I P T I O N

FREE FRAGRANCE SET WORTH £34 WHEN YOU SUBSCRIBE TODAY FOR JUST £17.50* FOUR GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE Free gift Receive a comforting candle, diffuser and handwash by Baylis & Harding, worth £34 Save over £17 across the year on the shop price Never miss an issue Free delivery, direct to your door every month Exclusive subscriber covers Plus, join the ELLE Decoration VIP Club

FREE GIFT WORTH £34

NEW SEASON SIMPLICITY GET THE LOOKS FROM OUR INSPIRING HOMES

TO SUBSCRIBE SECURELY ONLINE, VISIT OUR WEBSITE

hearstmagazines.co.uk/ec/sep16 OR CALL 0844 322 1769 QUOTING 1EC10816. LINES OPEN MON–FRI 8AM–9.30PM, SAT 8AM–4PM Terms and conditions Offer valid for new UK subscriptions by Direct Debit only. *After your first six issues, your subscription will continue at £17.50 every six issues, unless you are notified otherwise. All orders will be acknowledged and you will be advised of the start issue within 14 days. Subscriptions may be cancelled by providing 28 days’ notice. Minimum subscription term is six issues. Free gift is available for the first 190 subscribers and is subject to availability. If stock runs out, you will be offered an alternative gift of similar value. Please allow up to 28 days for delivery of your gift, which will arrive separately to your magazine. All savings are based on the basic cover price of £4.40. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packaged with the magazine. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other subscription offer and closes on 7 September 2016. For UK subscription enquiries, please call 01858 438 877. For overseas subscription rates and enquiries, please call +44 1858 438794 or visit hearstmagazines.co.uk. All information is correct at time of going to press. For our data policy, visit hearst.co.uk/dp. Calls to 0844 numbers from a UK landline cost 7p per minute plus your phone company’s access charge; calls from mobiles usually cost more.

18 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING • NA MES TO KNOW • A RCHITECTUR E

STYLE BRIGHT LIKE A DIAMOND Italian company Sicis is renowned for its breathtaking mosaics, fashioned into floors, murals, and even applied to luxurious pieces of furniture. Now, it has taken its expertise a step further by reinventing the traditional mosaic tile. Forget squares, the future is rhombus-shaped. The new ‘Diamond’ collection, inspired by the gem’s brilliance and form, uses this precisely cut shape to create dramatically complex patterns. Designs also include three-dimensional point-cut ‘diamond’ inserts that add texture and sparkle. Suitable for interior and exterior walls, floors and ceilings, the mosaic tiles are all made by expert artisans and are available in a choice of 60 colours. Mosaic panel from ‘Diamond’ collection, £490 per square metre (sicis.com).

F O R M O R E O B J E C T S O F D E S I R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / N E W S


Style | S H O P P I N G

1

2

3

4 5

6 7

8

WISH LIST PICTURE: HEARST STUDIOS

From affordable treats to investment buys and everything in between, there’s so much that #EDLoves. Here’s this month’s pick of our favourite pieces… 1 Sandager Design Studio’s ‘Fading Forest’ print is a perfectly restful shade of green. £45, Chase & Sorensen (chaseandsorensen.com) 2 Donna Wilson’s ‘Dove’, ‘Nest’ and ‘Woodpecker’ bone-china plates are handmade in Stoke-on-Trent. £24 each, SCP (scp.co.uk) 3 French brand Ligne Roset’s latest launch is a revival of the ‘Plumy’ seating range (seen here in both pink and green versions), designed by Annie Hiéronimus in 1980. Chair, £2,318; footstool, £329 (ligne-roset.com) 4 This vase by Murano glass brand Carlo Moretti features opaque ‘bubbles’ in a smoky palette. £760 (carlomoretti.com) 5 Habitat’s autumn/winter range is an homage to Jackson Pollock’s splatter prints – we love these ‘Valli’ terracotta oven-to-table dishes. Small, £15; medium, £20 (habitat.co.uk) 6 British designer Margaret Howell has added this lovely ‘Seagrass’ colourway to her Anglepoise lamp range. £130, available September (anglepoise.com) 7 Recently reissued by Vitra, this coffee table by Charles and Ray Eames was designed in 1949 for their California home. From £900, Skandium (skandium.com) 8 Designers Guild’s ‘Saraille’ wallpaper creates a wash of graduated colour – our favourite is this rose pink. £213 for a 12-metre roll (designersguild.com)

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 25


Style | N E W S

BUYING ANTIQUE FURNITURE It sells for a song at auction these days and wooden furniture has never been cooler – double win RJR.JOHN ROCHA TOWELS Our high-street steal – the cotton pintuck trim is perfect. From £2.50 (deben hams.com) LIVE PHOTOS The new camera feature on the iPhone 6S captures movements and sound in the seconds before and after you press the shutter, transforming photos into living memories MACADAMIA NUT OIL ‘The new coconut oil,’ say This Is Good founders Hannah Zussman and Nicos Sliney. Low in saturated fat, high in vitamins. £14.99 (thisisgoodoil.com)

UP AND DOWN

MAGIC METAL You can always count on Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola to push the boundaries of materials: her latest project with Danish silverware brand Georg Jensen gives a high-tech edge to humble stainless steel and rose gold. The ‘Urkiola’ collection includes pitchers, bowls, vases, candleholders and trays that feature a ribbed finish borrowed from Swedish industrial designer Sigvard Bernadotte’s classic fluted bowls and cutlery, designed in the 1930s. These are teamed with Urquiola’s trademark dramatic, asymmetrical shapes and finished using PVD, a cutting-edge technology that adds a very thin layer of film to the product and is applied in a high-vacuum chamber. As well as its decorative function, the coating provides scratch resistance and protects against corrosion. From £70 for a bowl (georgjensen.com).

NAME TO KNOW LOUIS WEISDORF Danish architect Louis Weisdorf says that he ‘specialises in versatility’: he’s worked in almost every field of design, but it’s his lighting that we really admire. He uses moveable elements to create multifunctional pieces that always shield the eye from the glare of bare bulbs. His masterful ‘Multi-Lite’ pendant lamp (right), recently released by Gubi, was first sketched in 1972 and consists of a cylinder enclosed by two semi-spherical shades and a brass hoop. The shades can be adjusted up and down to create four diferent configurations. From £405, Aram Store (aram.co.uk).

AIR PLANTS Turns out they don’t survive on air after all. Maybe that’s why ours died? COLOURING BOOKS FOR GROWN UPS Given that designer Matthew Williamson is doing one (see p33), and we love him, we should give them a pass; but we think the phenomenon has had its day. Need to wind down with a mindless activity? Try Netflix COPPER We loved it, but we’ve seen too much – Habitat is even selling a copper toilet brush! Now it’s all about rose gold and brass SNAILS Invading our gardens, leaving snail trails all over our nice clean windows – all thanks to wet summer weather

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 27


Style | N E W S

B O O K B U L L ET I N

HOME SCENT ICON ‘ TA N G E R I N E V E R T ’ C A N D L E B Y M I L L E R H A R R I S Perfumer Lyn Harris established her scent label Miller Harris in 2000, and in the years that followed it breathed new life into the British perfume industry. She particularly excels at two types of fragrance: smoky, bohemian blends and bright citruses. ‘Tangerine Vert’ is one of the latter (along with ‘Citron Citron’ and ‘Le Petit Grain’, it forms a trio of citrus heroes in the Miller Harris catalogue). Available as an eau de parfum and a candle – most recently, due to its popularity, it has been launched as a four-wick candle (£185) – ‘Tangerine Vert’ is a light-as-air fragrance. First launched in 2004, its packaging is a bright tangerine hue, but upon opening the fragrance reveals itself to be greener and more herbaceous in nature, the Italian green tangerine at its heart flanked by marjoram, grapefruit and a zingy top note of Sicilian lemon. Sweet musk and cedarwood in the base lend complexity. ‘A scented candle is as flattering to a room as perfume is to the skin,’ Harris once said. It also expresses a mood. What is ‘Tangerine Vert’ saying to us? It’s a wake-up call in a glass jar; perfect for a sunny Sunday morning. From £40 (millerharris.com).

Snap up these two stylish interiors books this month. Architect, interior designer and retailer Ben Pentreath’s English Houses (Ryland Peters & Small, £30) celebrates the individuality inherent in our country and town houses. Everything from inspirational urban apartments to idyllic pastoral palaces are on display. On a smaller scale, textile and product designer Neisha Crosland’s first book, Life of a Pattern (Merrell, £100) is a luxurious afair that takes readers on a journey through her extensive archives. Exploring ideas from initial spark to finished product, it roams across continents, cultures and eras, taking in Mughal India, 16thcentury Japan and inspirational encounters with musicians and maths whizzes.

Newsflash! Ikea has announced next year’s exciting collaborations: Tom Dixon and Hay. They follow in the footsteps of Ilse Crawford and Ingegerd Råmans, who have both created furniture and accessories for the Swedish brand that aims to democratise design (ikea.com).

THE BLACK ARTS To celebrate the 25th anniversary of designer Konstantin Grcic’s collaboration with Classicon, the brand has unveiled a new all-black collection of his most striking pieces. Tables, chairs and sofas come in a mix of matt and glossy lacquers. In addition to classic pieces, Grcic has created a new ‘Ulisse’ daybed. Together, the designs form a stylish monochromatic ensemble (classicon.com). From left ‘Diana A’ powder-coated steel side table, £802; ‘Venus’ wooden side chair, £790; ‘Ulisse’ wooden daybed, £6,253, all by Konstantin Grcic for Classicon, Aram Store (aram.co.uk)

28 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Paper artist Diana Beltran Herrera has been intrigued by birds ever since her childhood in Bogota, Colombia, where her mother and grandmother kept them as pets. ‘I wanted to portray their beauty, freedom and fragility,’ she says. That was four years ago and since then the Bristolbased creative has made a colourful flock of paper birds. Each one takes up to three weeks to make. She first makes the hollow 3D structure of the bird’s body from strips of card and then glues hand-cut paper feathers on from head to tail (the beak is always last), adding in details with paint. She also makes prints of her work. From £950 for a sculpture; from £65 for a print (dianabeltranherrera.com).

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD, EMMA LOVE ILLUSTRATION: BABETH LAFON

BIRD IN THE HAND


Style | N E W S

BAGS OF KARAKTER

We meet the American designer at his expanded London store ‘Delicious! My 8,000th cup of tea of the day,’ Jonathan Adler exclaims, perched on a daybed surveying his store on Westbourne Grove, London. It is only 10am, but there is no detectable sarcasm here: Adler seems genuinely thrilled with his porcelain cup resting on a gold-splattered saucer. In fact, his whole story started with a love of ceramics. Bitten by the pottery bug aged 12, he initially accepted the advice of ‘an evil professor’ who, on reviewing his Chanel-inspired quilted pottery, recommended an alternative career. He dragged his feet down the path of Brown University and a New York film agency, but in 1993 he quit and returned to his pottery wheel. It was a wise move – he has since opened 30 stores worldwide. A glance around the upsized Notting Hill shop (above) reveals Adler’s aesthetic: ‘I like to call it soulful glamour,’ he says. In practice, this means flamboyant-butbeautiful pieces – see below for our picks from the latest collection. The shop also ofers a new service: a team of trained interior designers are on hand to work with customers on home projects. Bold in form and colour, Adler’s designs are dramatic, but always sophisticated. ‘I’d say everything I make is super-minimalist,’ he muses. ‘But I think you should womp it all together maximalistically and…’ Go wild? ‘Exactly.’ 287–289 Westbourne Grove, London W11 ( jonathanadler.com).

From left ‘Malachite Oct’ vase, £118; ‘Antibes’ console table, £2,450; ‘Globo’ table lamp, £995; ‘Caine’ sofa, £2,125, all Jonathan Adler (jonathanadler.com)

30 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

‘Domo’ light, £429; ‘300’ chair, £539, both by Joe Colombo for Karakter, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com)

THE ANCIENT AND EXOTIC We spotted these beautifully rustic ‘Saharan Loves’ rugs in one of our houses last month and were keen to learn more about where they are from. Our hunt led us to Milan-based gallery Altai, founded in 1994 by Rafaele Carrieri and his wife Elisa. The duo responsibly source traditionally-made antique designs from tribes in Africa and Asia. From £12,000 (altai.it).

PICTURE: RICCARDO GASPERONI WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

BIGGER, BETTER, ADLER

Danish brand Karakter Copenhagen takes an internationalist approach to its mission of creating timeless, functional design. Talents from the Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany and South Africa feature in its portfolio, as well as two Italian design heroes: Achille Castiglioni and Joe Colombo. Several of the latter’s pieces from the 1960s are being re-issued, including the ‘Domo’ floor lamp (right), with a versatile shade that moves up and down on a metal stem, and the ‘300’ chair (left), an early example of flat-pack furniture. We also love the ‘Sferico’ glasses, which are intended to hold everything from wine to beer – a reminder of the hedonistic Colombo’s love of drinking and partying (karaktercopenhagen. com).


Style | N E W S

FASHIONED ANEW As fashion and homes become ever more interlinked, we meet two British style icons who have swapped catwalk fame for lifestyle design R I FAT Ö Z B E K THE LOVER OF SIMPLICITY

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

‘Fashion became so corporate. I thought, this is not my world any more’

It was a longing for the simple life that made Rifat Özbek, twice named British Fashion Council Designer of the Year, decide to duck out of the fashion spotlight. ‘After 20 hectic years, I wanted to quieten things down,’ he says. ‘When I started out in the mid 1980s the clothes were always a priority, but as years went by I was designing more handbags, sunglasses and shoes. It became so corporate. I thought, this is not my world any more. That’s when I decided to make a change.’ Having quit the catwalk in 2005, the Istanbul-born designer channelled his energy into decorating his Bodrum home. ‘At the time I was a bit directionless. My partner and I had bought a house, but couldn’t find cushions anywhere – they were all horrible, filled with kapok

(a natural fibre from the kapok tree) and liberally covered in sequins, so we made the decision to make our own.’ From there, Yastik (Turkish for ‘pillow’) was born – a range of silk-velvet and ikat cushions stufed with feather, down and aromatic Turkish lavender. Today Özbek has stores in London and Istanbul, where his cushions are displayed against white walls. ‘We didn’t want things stacked up like a bazaar. Instead it’s like an art gallery, with the cushions displayed like paintings,’ says Özbek. To mark the brand’s 10th anniversary, he has launched a pair of candles, ‘Istanbul’ and ‘London’, ‘based on where I was born and my adopted city’; and this summer he has also decorated two new floors at Loulou’s, the London nightclub owned by Robin Birley that Özbek first designed in 2012. ‘I’m very lucky with Robin, we agree on most things; and as I always said, I want to simplify my life!’ (yastikbyrifat ozbek.com).

M AT T H E W W I L L I A M S O N T H E D I G I TA L I N N O VAT O R ‘It felt like a natural evolution, both personally and professionally,’ says Matthew Williamson of the bold decision he’s made to take his entire business online. ‘We were seeing more traic to our website, and catwalk shows became less of a valuable tool in terms of branding, press and buyers. We began to recognise that a system that had worked for so long was up for question.’ Having closed his Bruton Street store and sent his last model down the runway in 2015, the British designer, known for his kaleidoscopic collections worn by the likes of Sienna Miller and Kate Moss, launched his all-singing, all-dancing website in April. It’s a one-stop shop for his fashion line and his burgeoning collection of lifestyle collaborations, which include wallpapers for Osborne & Little, furniture for Duresta and stationery for Museum & Galleries. Also in the pipeline are a colouring book with publisher Laurence King and a range of candles, boxes and bangles with Halcyon Days. Williamson’s new north London studio functions as a workspace and showroom, as well as housing an archive of previous collections. ‘In addition to going digital, the big shift is that we are transitioning to a lifestyle brand,’ says Williamson. ‘Interiors have been a passion of mine since I was a kid with a lilac bedroom and a dodgy Hammerite-sprayed radiator. I’ve always been obsessed, so I am really loving it’ (matthewwilliamson.com).

‘Interiors have been a passion of mine since I was a kid with a lilac bedroom’

From top Cards for Museum & Galleries, £36 for 15. ‘Minnelli’ chair for Duresta, £1,849; ‘Menagerie’ wallpaper for Osborne & Little, £89 per 10-metre roll

From top Cushions, from £280 each. The new ‘London’ candle, £55, is part of Yastik’s latest collection to celebrate the brand’s 10th anniversary

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 33


Style | N E W S

REDISCOVERED MASTERPIECE Pre-dating the mid-century trend for pedestal tables by two decades, the ‘Fenice’ (‘Phoenix’) by Italian architect Piero Bottoni (1903–1973) is the world’s first single-legged table. It was designed in 1936 for the dining room of Bottoni’s Villa Muggia in the northern Italian town of Imola, and cast in concrete on site. Villa Muggia’s glory days didn’t last long – the property was severely bombed during WWII and is now a picturesque ruin. Miraculously Bottoni’s table survived relatively unscathed, and can still be seen sitting on top of an abstract artwork painted onto the house’s terrazzo floor (above). Eighty years after it was created, Zanotta has put the table into production for the first time. Clad in resin cement, the new ‘Fenice’ (right) has a core of Polimex, a polymer composite that’s very lightweight. As its name suggests, this design truly is a phoenix reborn from the ashes. £4,150 (zanotta.it).

PICTURE: FABIO MANTOVANI

P L A S T I C FA N TA S T I C Can plastic ever be a refined material? Emphatically yes, says Yod Suntanaphan, one of a team behind new Hong Kong-based brand Ommo, which has just launched in the UK. Its debut collection of functional, everyday accessories, created by American designer Shane Schneck, includes the ingenious ‘Hoop’ snack bowl, a doughnut-like serving ring that can be placed over a central bowl that hides snacking waste such as nutshells or olive stones. The foldable silicon ‘Flip’ trivet is similarly smart – it contains magnets so that it can be rolled up. Best of all is the price point: every piece comes in at under £40. ‘We wanted to produce practical, simple, thoughtful pieces at democratic prices,’ says Suntanaphan (ommo.com). Clockwise from top left ‘Hub’ utensil holder, £12.95; ‘Loft’ salad bowl with server, £39.90; ‘Hoop’ serving bowl, £32.90; ‘Flip’ trivet, £18.90; ‘Buoy’ tea infusers, £16.90 each; ladle, £8.90, all by Ommo, Yod and Co (yodandco.com)

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 35


Style | N E W S

JUST WILLIAM

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

William Morris’s intricate prints gain new fans as they are reinvented in a modern, neutral palette Today, we tend to think of William Morris patterns as sitting at the have been reworked as wallpapers and fabrics. The new pieces are prettier end of the design spectrum – all those scrolling vines and coloured and screen-printed by hand in much the same way that blossoms, with woodland birds and creatures peeking out in between. Morris himself would have known. Gee also introduced fabric It can be hard to remember that when Morris was alive, his work techniques that give a heightened tactility – one design features was intended as a radical stance against blousy Victorian florals: appliqué and embroidery on linen, another a raised ‘couching’ stitch on diaphanous net (pictured above on cushions, it would time has softened and romanticised it. Beautiful as his prints are, Morris’s vibrant make a gorgeous alternative to lace curtains). colour palette can also be challenging in modern More surprising is the inclusion of metallic ‘Pure Morris’ will details and beads encrusting wallpapers to create homes, where muted shades and subtle patterns delight anyone who a lustrous efect. But they’re more authentic than prevail. Combinations of strawberry red, leafy green and cornflower blue abound in his designs has longed to use the they might seem. ‘Morris was always innovating,’ says Gee. ‘As we revisited the archive, we discovered – they are, after all, idealised representations of designer’s work in that he used crushed glass, embossing, flock and the natural world. This is why Morris & Co’s new ‘Pure Morris’ collection will come as a revelation metallic inks on wallpaper.’ a modern home to anyone who has longed to use the designer’s This collection is the most textural approach work in a contemporary setting. to Morris yet, and the most layering-friendly: every design in the ‘Pure Morris’ is the brainchild of Alison Gee, Morris & Co’s head range lends itself to mixing and matching, so it’s realistic to have of design, who has revisited the company’s archive and reworked an entirely Morris-decorated room that still feels understated. But a host of the great man’s prints in a modern, neutral palette of taupe, would Morris himself approve? ‘I believe so,’ say Gee. ‘As an interior grey, cream, gold and black. ‘The pared-back colourways open designer he created rooms with honesty and simplicity, and “Pure Morris up to a new audience,’ she says. ‘However, they retain the Morris” harnesses this spirit.’ Fabrics, from £38 per metre; wallpapers, integrity of the originals that his fans know and love. This is Morris from £52 per 10-metre roll (william-morris.co.uk). for modern living.’ The designs that Gee has selected include the famous ‘Strawberry Thief’ and ‘Bachelor’s Button’, as well as From left ‘Pure Morris’ net fabric used to cover cushions; ‘Bachelor’s Button’ print; a length of ‘Sunflower’ fabric; ‘Willow Bough’ print, all by Morris & Co a series of lesser-known papers Morris created for ceilings, which SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 37


Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

SCENT OF THE MORNING

The ‘Sensorwake’ alarm clock rouses sleeping beauties with scent rather than sound. Drop in an aroma pod – fragrance options include chocolate, espresso, croissant and mown grass – to experience an olfactory awakening. The gadget’s inventor claims it will take effect in under two minutes. Assuming, that is, you don’t have a cold. £70 for the clock and one pod, which lasts for 30 ‘awakenings’ (sensorwake.com).

MUSIC MAESTRO

The ‘Charge Tray’, a beautiful desk organiser fitted with a wireless phone charger, is the perfect way to disguise the appearance of technology in your home. Dreamed up by design agency Layer and Italian ceramics house Bitossi Ceramiche, the slip-cast tray will be available in four sizes and four glazed finishes: salt, matte, crackle and soba. Provided your phone is wireless-charging compatible (many Android models are, but iPhone users will need to buy a compatible case or accessory), you simply place the phone on to the stylish dish and watch your battery bar turn green (bitossiceramiche.it).

THE ROBOT BUTLER This wide-eyed creature is the ‘Zenbo’, a rolling, talking home robot by Asus. It may not be able to help with physical tasks, but its advanced artificial intelligence software is capable of controlling smart thermostats, ordering items from Amazon, and storing reminders (handy for appointments, medication and shopping lists). An impressive resumé, but we think its ofer to read the kids a bedtime story is a step too far. £410, out January 2017 (asus.com).

38 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURES: CHEN CHIKANG, MICHAEL WONGSO

STYLE AND POWER

You needn’t be a tech junkie to appreciate the wondrous beauty of this wireless speaker. A collaboration between industrial designer Ron Arad and Francesco Pellisari, an acoustic engineer born with perfect pitch, the ‘Zemi Aria’ blurs the line between music and art. Its bowling ball-shaped porcelain shell is finished with a choice of black or white high-gloss lacquer and houses a built-in amplifier and Apple AirPlay connectivity: you can also link your MP3 player, iPod or CD player to it. Simple to use (the remote has just three buttons), Arad says it will integrate seamlessly into your home without any technical bother. £499 (apple.com/uk).


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

SHEER DELIGHT

PICTURE: NICK ROCHOWSKI STYLING: ALEX KRISTAL

Lightweight sheer curtains create privacy and textural detail, without blocking natural light. Here are five of our favourite designs – hint: we love a touch of pattern in powdery shades – and our top tips on how to hang them

INSIDER GUIDE Rebecca Day, co-owner of bespoke curtain maker Merrick & Day shares her top tips for hanging sheers (merrick-day.com) Measure up To make your windows appear larger and maximise the height of the room, fit your curtains outside of the window frame, with the pole fixed high above the window. Start by measuring the curtain height from the desired position of the pole. For the width, account for wall space on either side of the window to allow the curtains to ‘stack back’ when open. Plan for at least 25 centimetres extra fabric and pole width on either side: any less and the fabric will obscure the glass. Choose your fittings Tracks are a great option: conceal them under a pelmet or paint them so that they blend into the wall. If it is the only curtain in a room, a simple pole will work well; nowadays you can choose anything from the most minimal metal pole to ornate designs with intricate finials. Aside from Merrick & Day, I’d recommend Walcot House (walcothouse.com), Byron & Byron (byronandbyron.com) and Silent Gliss (silentgliss.co.uk). Style the drapes There are several methods to create the ideal fold in a sheer fabric. Gathered headings create a soft efect, while pleated headings will give more structured, linear folds. Accessorise Where there is limited space either side of the window, use tie-backs to hold the curtain away from the glass. Ideally, tie-backs will match or at least complement the pole. These could be anything from decorative fabric tassels to rudimentary copper plumbing pipes fitted as hold-backs.

From left ‘Trailing Jenny’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Dusk’, £75 per metre, Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com). ‘Rivage’ pink polyester, £51 per metre, Camengo (camengo.fr). ‘Mistral’ cream linen in ‘Shell’, £175 per metre, De Le Cuona (delecuona.com). ‘Sirio’ grey polyester, £54 per metre, Sahco (sahco.com). ‘Fyn’ grey patterned polyester, £70 per metre, Villa Nova (villanova.co.uk)

Turn over for more tips on hanging sheers ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 41


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

HOW TO

1

LAYERED To balance the need for privacy and light, linen brand De Le Cuona has fixed a pair of sheers inside the window frame and a second, thicker pair to the curtain pole on the wall. For a summery look, layer two light tones.

THREE PLACES T O B U Y R E A D YMADE SHEERS Couleur Chanvre Made to order from the softest hemp fibres in 21 colours. £77.70 for a 170x275cm curtain (couleur-chanvre.com). Ada & Ina Sheer linen curtains in four natural shades, all made in the UK. From £139 for a pair (linenfabrics.co.uk).

2

DUAL ASPECT Take inspiration from textile brand Christian Fischbacher and hang diferent curtain weights in the same room. Heavier fabrics will block draughts.

42 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

3

HALF HEIGHT Mimic Nest’s modern take on net curtains, by fitting the sheer material onto a telescopic rod and mounting it halfway up the window frame.

H&M Get the look for less with curtains in neutral hues or sheerer voiles. This range is a steal, at just £14.99 for a pair (hm.com).

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURES: JON DAY (DELACUONA.COM), MIKE VAN DEN TOORN (FISCHBACHER.COM), TOMMOPHOTO (NESTDESIGN.CO.UK)

HANG SHEERS


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

FOUR OF THE BEST SHUTTER BRANDS Best for colour matching Hillarys If you want more than just a neutral or natural finish, Hillarys has over 2,000 shades to choose from. Make a statement with ombré hues in an all-white room (right), or pick a tone to match a coloured wall. £479 per square metre (plus £75 per panel to colour match). Colwick Business Park, Colwick, Nottinghamshire NG4 (hillarys.co.uk) Best for reclaimed English Salvage This is the place to go for an unbeatable range of French louvred shutters, as well as vintage Georgian and Victorian shutters in pine and oak. Prices start from as little as £45 each. North Road, Leominster HR6 (englishsalvage.co.uk)

These extra-wide shutters look bespoke, but they’re not! With a little ingenuity, you can dress your windows to impress. Here’s how… Shutters are a clean-lined, practical and low-maintenance way to dress your windows, ofering not only privacy and shade, but draught and sound-proofing too. In his Fulham home, Daniel Hill, founder of Sussex-based brassware company Studio Ore, chose extra-wide panels from The Shutter Shop’s ‘Solid Shaker’ range (from £448.80 for four panels; shuttershop.co.uk) to create this unique bespoke-looking efect (above). Rather than full height panels that fold back on themselves, Daniel opted to use two pairs of these panels on each window. A made-to-measure frame was built to sit inside the window’s architrave, to which the shutters were fixed. ‘With standard bi-folds, you end up with at least four vertical sections and lines down the centre, which can look messy. Because there was room on either side of the window for the shutters to open right back, I decided against a concertina style. I like the fact that they make a strong architectural statement.’ You don’t have to get creative, though. There are plenty of great of-the-shelf options available (see right). 44 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Best for unusually shaped windows Shutterly Fabulous If your window is an arch, circle or sunburst, Shutterly Fabulous can make a hardwood shutter to fit it. The brand also provides special hinges for easy opening in awkward spaces. From £290 per square metre. Quayside House, Basin Road South, Hove BN41 (shutterlyfabulous.com)

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: RORY GARDINER

DESIGN DETAILS: SHUTTERS

Best for bathrooms The Shutter Store Low maintenance and durable, vinyl shutters are ideal for bathrooms as they don’t react to changes in temperature or humidity. The Shutter Store has a great selection. From £218 per square metre. 162–164 High Street, Rayleigh SS6 (shutters.co.uk)


M AT E R I A L W O R L D

LET’S TALK TERRAZZO The original sustainable material (its name derives from the Latin word ‘terra’, meaning ground), terrazzo can give any room an artisanal touch. Here’s our complete guide to using it in your home

POURED TERRAZZO This home in northern Italy’s Reggio Emilia was built in the 1950s and still has the original poured terrazzo floor throughout. In pristine condition, it’s testament to the fact that this material stands the test of time


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

What is terrazzo? A composite material of marble chippings set into cement, terrazzo originated in 16th-century Italy as a way to reuse stone ofcuts. It is either poured in situ by hand or precast into blocks that can be cut to size. You can also buy it in tiles (see overleaf ), ready for applying to floors and walls. Why choose terrazzo? There are virtually unlimited colour and material options – fragments could be anything from marble to quartz, glass and metal – and it is extremely hardwearing. John Krause, managing director of stone specialist Diespeker, says that he is often called upon to restore terrazzo that’s more than 100 years old. Plus, given that it is made using ofcuts, terrazzo is also a sustainable decorating option. Where can you use terrazzo? Once sealed to ensure water resistance, it can be applied to any interior wall or floor, including kitchens and bathrooms. Terrazzo retains warmth efectively, so it is a great choice for underfloor heating. In addition, it can be poured into any moulds, so it is now being used to create furniture and homeware (see overleaf for our top picks). Is it easy to maintain? A simple steam mop or nylon scrubbing brush is all that is needed to clean it. Poured terrazzo, however, is more prone to cracking than slabs. To restore it, the floor will need to be re-ground and re-polished by a specialist. What are the latest innovations? Resin is now being used as well as the traditional cement to produce terrazzo. It is a more expensive option, but has a smoother finish and is also highly resistant to scratches and cracking. How much does it cost? Standard tiles start at £75 per square metre, while bespoke poured terrazzo will set you back £250 per square metre once it has been laid and polished (diespeker.co.uk).

TERRAZZO TILES Australian interior designer David Flack selected terrazzo to clad the bathroom floor and shower in this home near Melbourne. He opted for a ‘flamed’ textured tile by Australian brand Fibonacci Stone (fibonaccistone.com.au; flackstudio.com.au)

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURES: FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE, BROOKE HOLME, MARSHA GOLEMAC (STYLING), ANNA STATHAKI/SHOOTFACTORY.CO.UK

TERRAZZO SLABS An economical alternative to poured terrazzo, slabs are used in this north London kitchen extension. The owners and architect practice Bureau de Change sourced the slabs from London showroom In Opera, and they are laid with such precision that the joins are barely visible (in-opera.co.uk; b-de-c.com) ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

An easy way to add a splash of colour and pattern, terrazzo tiles come in a world of material mixes and finishes. Here are our favourites

‘TE012’ black cement and marble, £75 per sq m, Diespeker (diespeker.co.uk)

‘RD065’ bespoke resin terrazzo tile, £450 per sq m, Diespeker (diespeker.co.uk)

‘Ellipse’ granite, cement and marble tile, £222 per sq m, Lindsey Lang (lindseylang.co.uk)

‘Tweed’ granite, cement and marble tile, £222 per sq m, Lindsey Lang (lindseylang.co.uk)

‘Mod Terrazzo’ porcelain-mix tiles, £90 per sq m, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com)

‘Mod Terrazzo’ porcelain tiles £90 per sq m, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com)

‘Marmoreal’ marble and resin tile by Max Lamb, from £300 per sq m, Dzek (dzekdzekdzek.com)

‘Marmoreal’ marble and resin tile by Max Lamb, from £300 per sq m, Dzek (dzekdzekdzek.com)

‘Chip’ handmade cast surface, from £1,000 per sq m, Olivia Aspinall (olivia-aspinall.com)

‘Chip’ handmade cast surface, from £1,000 per sq m, Olivia Aspinall (olivia-aspinall.com)

‘Carrara’ cement and marble tile by Marmi Scala, £26 per sq m, In Opera (in-opera.co.uk)

48 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

‘Rosso Asiago’ marble/resin-mix tile by Marmi Scala, £27 per sq m, In Opera (in-opera.co.uk)

TERRAZZO H O M E WA R E If an entire terrazzo floor or wall is not for you, why not invest in one of these?

From top ‘Tu’ pendant lights, £82 each, Bentu (bentudesign.com). Slate, glass and jesmonite wall panel, from £350, Stephanie Tudor (stephanietudor.co.uk). Dining table by Max Lamb, £9,600, Dzek (dzekdzekdzek.com). Bowls by Sevak Zargarian, £120 each, 12 Thirteen Store (12thirteen-store.com). Cushion, £45, Bloomingville (bloomingville.com)

PICTURES: FRANK HÜLSBÖMER

12 OF THE BEST TERRAZZO TILES


Style | D E S I G N

H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D B & B I TA L I A

One of the world’s most innovative and creatively dynamic Italian furniture brands celebrates its 50th birthday this year. Here’s its story Astute businessman, design visionary, a single-minded and fiercely independent force… Piero Ambrogio Busnelli, founder of B&B Italia, was all of these things, as well as being dapper, whitesuited and charismatic. Busnelli was the engine behind the company’s transformation from an Italian firm with an experimental reputation to a globally renowned furniture brand. Today, Piero’s sons Giorgio (now CEO), Emanuele and Giancarlo (all pictured right) run the business in Novedrate, Italy. But until his death in 2014, aged 87, Piero was synonymous with the brand’s forward-thinking mindset. In the 1950s, he and his brother Franco co-founded armchair manufacturer Fratelli Busnelli fu Giuseppe in Brianza, Italy’s centre for handcrafted furniture. But Piero hungered to broaden his horizons by switching to mass production and conquering foreign markets. Serendipitously, at a London trade fair, he spotted rubber ducks being made by injecting cold polyurethane foam into moulds and wondered: ‘Why not try this with sofas?’ Franco wasn’t convinced and the brothers parted company. However, Cesare Cassina, co-founder of innovative firm Cassina, got wind of Piero’s idea and, in 1966, the two like-minded entrepreneurs formed C&B Italia.

Collaborating with cutting-edge designers such as Gaetano Pesce, Afra, Tobia Scarpa and Mario Bellini, the new company cemented its progressive reputation. The Scarpas’ 1966 ‘Coronado’ sofa and Bellini’s 1972 ‘Le Bambole’ sofa are made of foam that entirely envelops their metal frames. By 1973, C&B Italia’s turnover matched Cassina’s, and Busnelli bought the former outright, renaming it B&B Italia. The firm’s collaborations with internationally renowned designers have spawned many unforgettable products, from Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Bend’ sofa (pictured top, 2010) and Ettore Sottsass’s ‘Abat-Jour’ lamp (2005), to Naoto Fukasawa’s ‘Grande Papilio’ armchair (2009) and Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby’s ‘Button’ tables (2014). Time has demonstrated that Piero Busnelli’s belief in technology as an important driver of innovative design – and his vision of creating a global enterprise – weren’t just quixotic dreams, but achievable goals with continued importance (bebitalia.com).

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS

SIX THING S Y OU N EED T O KN OW ABO U T B& B ITAL IA

1

The brand’s flamboyant logo derives from one created by Bob Noorda in the 1960s for C&B Italia – ‘C’ standing for Cassina, ‘B’ for Busnelli. The logo morphed into B&B Italia when Piero bought Cassina’s share of the company.

2

One of the company’s most innovative ideas is Gaetano Pesce’s ‘Up’ furniture (above; 1969). Made of foam encased in an elastic fabric, it was delivered vacuum-packed and inflated on opening – hence the name ‘Up’.

3

Key to the brand’s success has been its bold marketing (see next page). The poster campaign for Mario Bellini’s ‘Le Bambole’ collection showed a bare-breasted Donna Jordan – sassy model and Andy Warhol ‘superstar’. ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 51


Style | D E S I G N

B & B I TA L I A A S S E E N I N A D C A M PA I G N S

We pick the brand’s most daring adverts from its new book, released to celebrate 50 years of innovation

1970s

Perhaps B&B Italia’s most provocative campaign came in 1972 with the arrival of Mario Bellini’s ‘Le Bambole’ seating range, for which blonde supermodel Donna Jordan was portrayed topless by fashion photographer Oliviero Toscani.

1980s

B&B Italia sofas have been promoted using circus artists in 1984, and a laughing baby in 1986 (to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Afra and Tobia Scarpa’s ‘Coronado’ sofa). In 1985, a TV campaign featured 21 short films, each starring a sofa.

2000s

Advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi oversees ads for the company: the invisible man sitting on Antonio Citterio’s ‘Mart’ chair, and Patricia Urquiola’s chunky ‘Tufty-Time’ sofa emerging from a foil wrapping like a giant chocolate bar.

2016

The wheel comes full circle as B&B Italia celebrates its 50th anniversary with a new campaign featuring Klaus Zaugg’s 1969 photographs of Gaetano Pesce’s ‘Up’ chair – a space-age beach shoot that still looks cool today.

From top ‘Tobi-ishi’ table by Barber & Osgerby. ‘Up’ armchair by Gaetano Pesce. ‘Le Bambole’ sofa by Mario Bellini in white and red. The Long Life of Design in Italy: B&B Italia. 50 Years and Beyond by Stefano Casciani (Skira, out October, £50)

Piero Busnelli’s pioneering spirit is evidenced by his decision to hire Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano to design the firm’s headquarters – a glass box suspended from a steel frame (see previous page). It’s seen as a blueprint for the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

52 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

5

Since 1966, the company has produced over 1,000 designs (including prototypes). Today, B&B Italia has eight flagship stores and 36 other stores around the world. Over three per cent of its sales is invested into research and development of new products.

6

To mark its 50th anniversary, the firm has made a documentary about its history called B&B Italia. Poetry in Shape. When Design Meets Industry and is taking part in ‘21st Century. Design After Design’, an exhibition at Milan’s Triennale (until September 12).

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

4


Style | D E S I G N

D E S I G N H E R O M A R J AT TA M E T S O VA A R A

of Industrial Arts, where she learned to be experimental. Marjatta Metsovaara (1927–2014) created exuberant, ultra-Pop Materials were scarce as Finland was paying postwar reparations textiles – used as home and fashion fabrics, rugs, bedlinen and to former enemy the Soviet Union, so Metsovaara resourcefully even umbrellas – from the 1950s to the early 1980s. Half-Finnish incorporated paper and birch bark into her textiles. and half-American, she was fiercely independent, choosing not After a short-lived first marriage, she began working with to collaborate with her friend Armi Ratia, founder of successful Belgian factory Van Havere in 1961, where she met her second textile brand Marimekko, despite the similarities between their husband Albert Van Havere. In the mid 1960s, she moved to styles. Perhaps this is why she is so little Belgium and the couple set up another mill, but she maintained known today. Instead, she worked from links with Finland. She also had two shops in her own mill, which she Helsinki and created textiles for the city’s bought in her home town Metsovaara’s Finlandia Hall, built in 1971 and designed by her of Urjala in 1954. Metsovaara’s fabrics vibrant, stylised friend, the architect Alvar Aalto (she later named a print after him, ‘Aalto’, which featured were often included in and eye-popping Bridget-Riley-on-acid waves). overseas exhibitions and Now, Finnish textile firm Vallila sold abroad, especially patterns were has reissued six of Metsovaara’s in North America, while her clients ranged from inspired by nature classic prints, all emblazoned on fabrics, rugs and cushions. Their US furniture brand Knoll colours have been tweaked but are inspired by and New York store Bloomingdale’s to her original palette of sulphur yellow, hot pink London’s Hilton hotel on Park Lane. The and tangerine. These should finally win her the bold patterns were also a hit in postwar fanbase she deserves (vallila.co.uk). Finland. Made into curtains, for example, her typically largescale prints were suited to the bigger windows of new urban Curtains from left ‘Aalto’; ‘Miranda’ in beige; apartments, and satisfied an appetite for modern design. ‘Miranda’ in turquoise; ‘Elle’; ‘Liliana’; Metsovaara was inspired by nature, although her motifs – ‘Valmu’ in blue and yellow; ‘Valmu’ in mainly eye-poppingly vibrant florals – are stylised and modern, pink; ‘Liliana’, all £52.90 for a 140x250cm looser and more psychedelic than Marimekko’s. Having honed curtain Products from top ‘Aalto’ her style since childhood – she designed prints for her father’s cushion covers, £13.90 each; ‘Elle’ bag, £15.90; ‘Elle’ mug, £29.90 for a set of two rug shop from the age of 10 – she attended Helsinki’s Institute 54 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURES: HENNA SORONEN

Now is the time to rediscover this 1960s Finnish textile designer’s psychedelic floral patterns


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

TIME TO DESIGN Every year, Swiss watchmaker Rolex selects seven rising talents from around the world to take part in its prestigious Mentor & Protégé Arts Initiative. The successful applicants spend a year collaborating with an expert from their industry – disciplines include dance, film, literature, music and architecture. The latter has seen the pairing of British architect Sir David Chipperfield – known for Turner Contemporary in Margate (above) and the Neues Museum in Berlin (right) – with young Swiss architect Simon Kretz (both pictured above right). Chipperfield personally selected Hertz because of his focus on projects that enhance the urban environment. We expect great things (rolexmentorprotege.com).

Having outgrown its spot near Saint Paul’s Cathedral, the Museum of London is moving to a new location – the historic Smithfield Market, a place where farmers have traded for thousands of years. The proposed new site will increase the museum’s exhibition space by one third, allowing more room for interactive exhibits that chart London’s history from as far back as 450,000 BC to the present day. Six architectural practices have been shortlisted to convert the location, including the award-winning Stanton Williams (our favourite proposal, pictured), Caruso St John and Danish architect Bjarke Ingels’ firm BIG. Each of them plan to revive this overlooked part of the city, transforming the Grade II-listed market. The early concepts are on display until September 11, and the winner will be announced later this year (museumoflondon.org.uk).

56 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

P R A C T I C E T O WAT C H TDO ARCHITECTURE Tom Lewith, Doug Hodgson and Owen Jones all met while studying at London’s Bartlett School of Architecture. In 2010, the trio set up TDO Architecture + Design Studio. Its most recent project is the Old Church Street townhouse in London (below), which features a steel and smoked oak staircase. The practice has also created one-of product designs, such as the ‘XYZ’ chair. Commissioned by Corian DuPont, this modern seat is made from three pieces of stone that slot together without any fittings or glue – turn the page for our favourite architectdesigned chairs (tdoarchitecture.com).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: BEN BLOSSOM, JOSHUA TUCKER, SIMON MENGES, ACHIM KLEUKER

A NEW HOME FOR LONDON’S PAST


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

THE HOT SEATS

ANTONI GAUDI ‘CALVET’ CHAIR (1904)

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT ‘TALIESIN WEST’ CHAIR (1946)

RICHARD NEUTRA ‘TREMAINE’ CHAIR (1948)

Fantastical and beautiful The visionary Spanish architect designed the ‘Calvet’ chair for Casa Calvet, one of the earliest of his houses. Gaudi’s fascination with curves and the aesthetics of nature often led to unusual, sometimes fanciful, designs, as seen in Casa Batlló (pictured). £7,054, BD Barcelona (bdbarcelona.com).

Complex and comfortable Fabricated from a single folded panel of laminated birch plywood, this chair looks like a work of origami. Three years prior to designing it, Wright had worked on the Guggenheim Museum in New York (pictured). Both designs express his refined, elegant style. £212 (for a miniature model), Skandium (skandium.com).

Modernist with a touch of glamour With its flexible backrest and large seat, this dining chair epitomises Neutra’s laid-back style. The architect, who emigrated to the US from Vienna in the 1920s, became famous for his spacious bungalows (pictured: his own home, VDL House), which harmonised with the landscape. £796, Neutra (neutra.vs.de).

OSCAR NIEMEYER ‘RIO’ CHAIR (1978)

NORMAN FOSTER ‘1006 NAVY’ CHAIR (2006)

TADAO ANDO ‘DREAM’ CHAIR (2013)

A reflection of Niemeyer’s signature curving lines Made from moulded plywood with a woven cane seat and leather headrest, this reclining chair is suspended above the ground by a spring-like plywood support. Its sinuous silhouette mimics the look of many of the architect’s projects, including the Niemeyer Building in Belo Horizonte (pictured). £17,636, Espasso (espasso.com).

The epitome of Foster’s ecoconscious style This slim, stackable seat is made from 80 per cent recycled aluminium. Foster’s skyscraper at St Mary Axe in London (pictured) was designed with the same eco approach – panels on the façade circulate air in the interior, reducing the tower’s reliance on air conditioning. £690, Emeco (emeco.net).

A sculptural take on Japanese design The architect’s only chair, made by Carl Hansen & Søn, is a modern take on Japanese simplicity. Ando’s Church of the Light (pictured) has a similarly minimalist aesthetic. £2,869, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com).

58 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

PICTURES: PER KNUDSEN, SNAP 36, RICHARD POWERS

The chair has long been an object of fascination for architects. As Mies van der Rohe once stated, ‘A chair is a very difficult object. A skyscraper is almost easier’. New book ‘Chairs by Architects’ by Agata Toromanoff (Thames & Hudson, £16.95) showcases over 50 examples, including famous and little-known designs. Here, we pick our top six


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

A R C H I T E C T U R A L I C O N PA L A I S B U L L E S B Y A N T T I L O VA G

Set into the rocky cliffs of the Massif de L’Esterel region west of Cannes is an unusual masterpiece that looks out over the Mediterranean. ‘Whether for economic reasons or lack of technical solutions, human beings have confined themselves to cubes full of dead ends and angles that impede our movement and break our harmony,’ Hungarian architect Antti Lovag once said. Palais Bulles was his attempt to change that. Although completed in 1989, it wasn’t until French fashion designer Pierre Cardin – best known for his avant-garde 1960s designs – bought the building in the early 1990s that it became world-renowned. The fantastical property resembles a series of organic sculptures, or primitive Aboriginal dwellings. The bubble-like spaces were constructed using steel rods and wire mesh framework, over which concrete was poured to create a smooth finish. They were then painted a rich terracotta hue. Inside, the circular rooms are intimate and cave-like, filled with 60 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

experimental materials (for the time) such as plastics, foam and polyester, and specially selected curvaceous furniture. Arched walkways blend one space into another on the 1,200-square-metre site. As well as ten bedroom suites and an impressive 28 rooms in total, the Palais has a 500-seat amphitheatre, beautiful lush flower gardens and a series of circular outdoor pools. Since Cardin bought it, the Palais has become the backdrop for countless fashion shows, parties and films. In 2015, fashion house Dior gathered the industry elite here for its 2016 Resort collection show, while this year it’s back in the spotlight as Eddie’s assistant Bubbles’ house in the recently released Absolutely Fabulous movie. This new fame comes just after the house’s recent facelift by French architect Odile Decq, who added contemporary furniture and bold new colour schemes, bringing the 1980s icon bang up to date. Boulevard de l’Estérel, 06590 Théoule-sur-Mer (palaisbulles.com)

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: MICHAËL ZINGRAF/REAL ESTATE CHRISTIE’S

The absolutely fabulous space-age abode for the French fashionable elite


Style | C O L O U R

WAT C H E T PANTONE Æ 122-10C

The watery hue favoured by English royalty through the centuries

WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR PICTURE: GETTY

The origin of watchet’s name is very much up for debate. satin suit ‘laid with silver lace, with a blew and white A glossary published in 1822 ventured the opinion that feather’. But perhaps the colour’s most devoted royal it came from ‘wadchet’, the Saxon word for woad, a blue fan was King Charles I. A stained, long-sleeved vest dye harvested from plants. Residents of Watchet, a small knitted from blue-green watchet silk, now held in the harbour town on the Somerset coast, have other ideas. archives of the Museum of London, is thought to have Some say that the colour was named after their town been worn by the monarch to his execution on 30 January because it was famous for dyeing woollen cloth a pale 1649. Since several portraits of him wearing a very similar watery colour with locally grown whortleberries. Others garment exist it was probably a comforting favourite, are of the opinion that the colour took its name from but in his final hours the king had need of this vest for the dramatic, 80-foot clifs just to the west of the town, more practical reasons. According to a memoir written which are formed from smoky alabaster. by historian Sir Thomas Herbert, the day the monarch It isn’t just watchet’s etymology that was beheaded was so cold that Charles The colour is a has proved slippery: the exact tint is wore ‘a shirt… more than ordinary’ to keep from shivering. ‘[T]he season is also surprisingly hard to pin down. It bluish grey with has been described as everything from so sharp as probably may make me ‘hyacinthine’ to sky-coloured, but is a touch of green, like shake, which some observers will now usually taken to mean a bluish proceeds from fear,’ the king the eyes of a hero in imagine grey with a touch of green, like the said. ‘I will have no such imputation. a romantic novel eyes of a hero in a romantic novel. I fear not death.’ Despite its inconstancy, the colour The colour largely fell from favour has many prestigious fans. In the rather draconian – in name at least – after the 17th century. But the Statutes at Large of 1552, King Edward VI decreed that shades between grey, green and blue remain perennial only a few colours of cloth were permitted to be sold that favourites in both fashion and interiors. Perhaps year, including scarlet, marble, ‘lion’s colour’, puke watchet’s most enduring reincarnation, though, is due (named after a dark-brown woollen fabric) and watchet. to a legendary boat race. Famous independent school An inventory of Queen Elizabeth I’s wardrobe, taken Eton College chose a similar tint in the early 19th a couple of years before her death, included a splendid- century as its sports teams’ oicial colour, and this was sounding ‘peticoate of watchet, or blew satten, adopted by Cambridge for the 1836 boat race against embroidered all over with flowers and beasts, of Venice Oxford. The colour has served them well. They have, golde, silver, and silke, like a wilderness.’ to date, won 82 races to Oxford’s 79. Watchet remained fashionable for elites for well over Paints to try ‘Celestial Blue’ matt emulsion, £19.25 per litre, a century. The fastidious Richard, Earl of Dorset, for Little Greene (littlegreene.com). ‘Ice V’ Pure Flat emulsion, example, owned a pair of embroidered silk stockings in £42.50 per 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library this hue. In 1619, just after the death of Queen Anne, (paintandpaperlibrary.com) King James wore an inappropriately jaunty watchet

62 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Style | C O L O U R

THE POWER OF PINK The coolest colour to have in your home right now? It has to be pink. We investigate its journey from style outsider to hue of the moment Words AMY BRADFORD

PICTURE: TAKUMI OTA

It’s curious how the meaning of colours changes over time. In the case of pink, it has undergone more metamorphoses than most, emerging at the start of the 21st century as one of the most semantically charged hues of the age. Few will have failed to notice, or have an opinion on, the ‘pinkification’ of products for girls and women, or the common association of pink with sugar-coated artificiality. Pink is starting to be reclaimed as a colour of high fashion (check out Chanel’s A/W16 collection, right), but it is in the context of interiors that it is truly breaking free of hackneyed gender stereotypes. Scandinavian design brands have embraced it wholeheartedly, giving us contemporary sticking-plaster and blush shades which, teamed with grey, pale wood and punchier hues like mustard, banish all connotations of Barbie’s mansion. Handled this way, pink is a colour that even men might consider for their homes. The Japanese design studio Nendo, renowned for its spare, unfussy designs, has just kitted out a hat shop at Tokyo’s Seibu Shibuya department store (far right) in powder pink and chocolate hues. Add to this the fact that Kelly Hoppen, the queen of neutrals, is designing pink products – one of her recent homeware collections is entitled ‘La Vie en Rose’ – and you can be sure that the shade is leaving its frivolous image behind. Pink’s relationship to gender has long been marked, but not always necessarily in the way that we understand now. In ancient China, blue fabric dyes were more expensive than pink ones, so they were reserved for boys’ clothing. The word ‘pink’ entered the English language in the 17th century, possibly from ➤ From top The new furniture collection by John Louis Deniot for Baker features soft pastels, from £1,547 for a side table (bakerfurniture.com). Chanel catwalk shots A/W16. The hat department in Seibu Shibuya, designed by Nendo. ‘Swan’ chair by Arne Jacobsen, £2,829, Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com)

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 65


the Dutch flower ‘pinken’ – a decidedly feminine origin. But in 18th-century Europe, the colour went unisex: it was fashionable for men as well as women to sport rosy fabrics. Segregation returned in the 19th century, but in a diferent guise. Pink was now regarded as a diminutive of warlike red, and thus best for boys; girls began to be dressed in powder blue, a paler version of the ultramarine reserved for the Virgin Mary’s robes in religious paintings. A fluctuation in the gender assignment of pink and blue continued until the 1940s, by which time marketeers had decided that pink was the shade for girls. The extent to which this strategy succeeded may be gauged by looking at 1950s movie starlet Jayne Mansfield’s Hollywood home, also known as the Pink Palace, where everything from the masonry to the shagpile-carpeted bathroom (below right) was Pepto-Bismol pink. Given the colour’s protean identity, it’s no wonder that many people are wary of it. Pink-phobes will either be cured or killed by India Mahdavi’s design for the Gallery at Sketch in London (bottom right), where swathes of marshmallow velvet are ofset with edgier patchwork marble floors, yellow-gold details and earthy David Shrigley cartoons. If this is too much, study the collections of

‘IT’S A COLOUR FOR THE PERSON WHO WANTS A MORE PERSONAL HOME. IT CAN BE VERY IN-YOURFACE OR DUSTY AND INNOCENT’ Danish brands Fritz Hansen and Muuto, where pink is applied with a delicate touch. The former recently launched Arne Jacobsen’s classic ‘Swan’ chair in a pale-pink nubuck leather (see previous page). ‘Pink brings softness and sophistication to an object,’ says Christian Andersen, the company’s head of design. ‘It goes very well with darker colours, adding life to an interior.’ Nina Bruun, design manager at Muuto, points to pink’s ‘joy and positivity. It’s a colour for the person who wants a more personal home; it can be very in-your-face or dusty and innocent.’ Mood-lifting powers are also cited by Kelly Hoppen in her assessment of light pink: ‘It’s a settling, naturally soothing colour,’ she says. ‘It can be paired with white, taupe and black, because it isn’t as harsh as blue.’ The same can’t be said for bright pinks, though, which Hoppen decries as ‘garish and unharmonious’. Gentle pinks also have the advantage of creating a complexionenhancing glow, particularly when used on walls or as lighting. Joa Studholme, international colour consultant at Farrow & Ball, self-confessed ‘colour geek’ and co-author of new book Farrow & Ball: How to Decorate (Mitchell Beazley, £30), is a fan of the brand’s newly launched ‘Peignoir’ shade. ‘It’s the softest pink with a great big dose of grey, which makes it relaxed and romantic,’ she says. ‘Although it’s warm, it’s not sugary or infantile, and its almost dusty quality proves that pink is not just for girls.’ She recommends the shade for candle-lit dining rooms as well as boudoirs. Hoppen and Studholme get to the heart of pink’s appeal, though, when they link it to a sense of calm and safety. ‘We love our homes more and more, using them as a place for escapism, a space in which to live and breathe,’ says Studholme. ‘This return to pink shades is almost instinctive – they’re life-giving, exactly the opposite of our hard-edged, flat-screened existence.’ Put like that, who could resist the power of pink? Interiors, from top Room set by Muuto including ‘Five’ pouf (£807) and ‘Oslo’ sofa (£2,695), both by Anderssen & Voll, Nest (nest.co.uk). The shagpile-carpeted bathroom in Jayne Mansfield’s Pink Palace home. India Mahdavi’s Gallery restaurant at Sketch London. Walls painted in ‘Setting Plaster’ by Farrow & Ball (£39.50 for 2.5 litres; farrow-ball.com)

66 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Pink marble and brass mix in the ‘Band Rosa’ table by Bethan Gray, £2, 460, Harrods (harrods.com)

Rounded edges and brass details make this ‘Stay’ dining chair by Nika Zupanc for Sé irresistable, £1,030 (se-collections.com)


Style | C O L O U R

Our favourite pink paint shades (from top): ‘The Petal that Falls from the Vase to the Face’, £34.38, Francesca’s Paint (francescaspaint.com). ‘Dorchester Pink’, £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com). ‘French Rose’, £40 for 2.5 litre, Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com)

H I S T O RY O F A C O L O U R P I N K 1300s–1500s Pink is used to depict rosy flesh in Renaissance paintings; the Christ child is also often shown dressed in pink. Italian Mannerist painter Jacopo Pontormo paints pink robes on both men and women.

1600s The first use in English of the word pink to describe a colour. It is possibly influenced by the colour of dianthus flowers, known as ‘pinken’ in Dutch.

1780 French queen Marie Antoinette dyes her blonde hair a rosy shade using a mixture of rhubarb, sandalwood and spices.

1937 Fashion designer Schiaparelli gives us an early example of mass-marketed pink products when she launches her perfume ‘Shocking’, served up in packaging designed by Italian-French Surrealist artist Leonor Fini.

The ‘Diaz Credenza’ sideboard, part of Kelly Hoppen’s ‘Retrospective’ collection, £2,179, and geometric vases, from £35 each (kellyhoppen.com)

Crushed linen ‘Tea Rose’ duvet cover, from £215, Volga Linen (volgalinen.co.uk)

PICTURES: PETRA BINDEL, GETTY, HEARST STUDIOS, ALAMY, MICHAEL SINCLAIR, MARCUS TONDO

1992 Still regarded as a typically feminine hue, pink – in shades from shocking to blush – becomes the oicial ribbon colour for national Breast Cancer Awareness campaigns.

2015 Autumn/winter fashion collections by the likes of Alexander McQueen (right) are awash with pastel pink, and Fritz Hansen launches a ‘dusty rose’ version of Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Swan’ chair (shown on previous page).

2016 The launch of Dyson’s ‘supersonic’ hairdryer causes slight controversy when it appears it’s only available in fuchsia pink (there is also a white/silver version). E D

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 67


OPEN SEASON We all want more light and space in our homes and the big trend right now is to get it by blurring the boundaries between inside and out with a glass-backed extension. We asked homeowners and architects to share their top tips and learnings Words GRACE ALLEN


Style | C A S E

1

STUDIES

TURN YOUR GARDEN INTO A SUNNY EXTENSION OF YOUR KITCHEN

PICTURES: BEN ANDERS

Photographer Ben Anders’ home in East Dulwich, London, has been dramatically improved with the addition of large folding doors that open in a concertina fashion, connecting his kitchen to the garden. Here, he shares the ups and downs of the project. Why did you choose folding doors? We have a relatively small garden, so to increase the feeling of space in the summer we wanted doors that could open fully, turning the outdoors and the kitchen into one large living area. What did the build involve? As we weren’t extending the footprint of the property by much, the project was completed under permitted development rights [this means Ben didn’t need planning permission. Ask your architect to see if your project complies and see planningportal.co.uk for more info]. We did have to get a party wall agreement with our neighbours [see What to know before you build, p71], but thankfully they agreed with our plans. It’s so important to keep on side with your neighbours during a big build. Were there any problems you had to overcome? The main issue we had was building over a Thames Water pipe. You have to apply for permission to do this and pay the water utility company a fee [starting from £299]. We only found out that there was a pipe once excavation work had started, so this delayed the project by a few weeks. If we had known, we would have applied for the permission to build over it during the planning stages. Is there anything you would change? In this house bi-folding doors are the perfect solution, but I love Crittall’s steel-framed windows (see the fourth project in this feature for a steel-framed glass extension; p72), so we might use them in the future. A project like this is going to be stressful at times, and there will always be surprises along the way, but the result is well worth it.

‘ We wanted doors that could open fully, turning the garden and the kitchen into one large living area in the summer’ The folding doors at this London home can be pulled back completely to connect the kitchen and garden. The blend is seamless, thanks in part to a consistent colour palette inside and out (try Farrow & Ball’s ‘Of Black’ for a similar wall colour), plus seamless poured concrete flooring throughout Stockist details on p198 ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 69


2

LET IN MORE SUNSHINE WITH CAFÉ-STYLE FOLDING WINDOWS

Looking for a smaller project that will have a big efect? Use folding window panes to welcome your garden indoors. Here, architect Henri Bredenkamp of Studio 30 and homeowner Helen talk about the diference they made to Helen’s west London townhouse. Why did you choose these windows? Henri: Bi-folding windows open in a way that doesn’t block or obscure your view of the garden at all – some have chunky head tracks and side jams, but you can cleverly hide these within the window frame if you plan in advance. They break down the barriers between the inside and outside. Those few summer days that the owners get to fully open their windows make the whole build worthwhile. What did the project involve? Henri: The process was turned around, from survey to final installation, in three to four weeks. For a fairly standard 4.5-metre by 2.5-metre five-panel window with a powder-coated aluminium frame (essential for weatherproofing) you can expect to spend between £5,000 and £7,000, including VAT and installation. But, when it comes to buying the windows, don’t just go for the cheapest option, and never go for uPVC! Keep in mind that this is a long term investment. How has it improved your home? Helen: So many Victorian terraces are dingy and sad during the colder months, but this large expanse of glass has completely changed the outlook for us. We can soak up the winter sun while we’re inside. It’s bright, warm and open. Is there anything you would change? Helen: I’d swap the rooflight for one that we can open to get even more fresh air into the kitchen. Next time, perhaps? (studio30architects.co.uk).

The five-panel window above the kitchen worktop in this Victorian terrace folds neatly back in a concertina [bi-folding] efect, bringing plenty of fresh air as well as light into the house. The homeowner repeated the same device for her upstairs extension, where similar windows open up the bedroom

70 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

3

ADD A MODERN GLASS EXTENSION TO MAXIMISE N AT U R A L L I G H T

Architect Patrick Michell reveals exactly how he transformed his dark, narrow terraced house into a bright, modern home with a clever side extension. Why did you choose this sort of extension? L-shaped Victorian terrace houses generally have very wellproportioned front rooms but narrow kitchens to the rear, with poor access to the garden. A glass side extension increases both the size and the overall brightness of the whole back of the property. What does building one involve? The initial design takes two to three months, and you should set aside eight weeks to complete the planning process. Side extensions


Style | C A S E

STUDIES

W H AT T O K N O W BEFORE YOU BUILD

Follow our simple step-by-step guide from concept to completion

Work out your available budget. Be realistic. A typical London side extension will start from £125,000 plus VAT, but you will also need to allow for consultant fees and surveys, which typically work out at around 20 per cent on top of the construction cost. Research and choose an architect – check their previous work to ensure they fit your aesthetic as well as your budget – and put together a brief detailing what you want to achieve. Research planning permission. You may be able to do a small extension under permitted development rules: for side extensions that means that it can be no wider than half the width of the original house and no higher than four metres. Rear extensions must not extend more than three metres beyond the back of the house for an attached property, and four metres for a detached building. However, most new extensions will require permission. Find out more, and apply at planningportal.co.uk; the application usually costs £172. Consider party wall issues – a party wall is one shared between neighbours, so if you want to build on, or of, it, you’ll need their permission. You must alert your neighbour of any work taking place on or near a party wall at least two months before work commences – letter templates are available at gov.co.uk. They must then reply within 14 days. If they agree, perfect, but make sure you have consent in writing. If they do not, you will need to appoint a surveyor (your neighbour can also choose to appoint their own) who will agree the Party Wall Award – a document detailing what work will be done, when, and who will be responsible for all of the costs (including surveyor fees). Technical designs Your architect will lead this stage, which normally takes about two months. The detailed technical aspects of the project will be drawn up and given to potential builders. Construction This can take between eight and 12 months depending on the complexity of the project. Your architect will administer the building contract and inspect the builder’s work. ➤

PICTURES: SAM PEACH

This glass-walled side extension has brought light, space and contemporary style to the narrow kitchen in this Victorian terrace

are particularly complex projects from a planning perspective as they often require Party Wall Awards and build-over licenses for the underground drainage [if you are building over or within three metres of a public sewer you’ll need to apply to your water provider for permission and pay upwards of £299]. Construction takes eight to 12 months, depending on the complexity of the project. In London, side extensions generally cost around £125,000 plus VAT for the construction work. How has it improved your home? Watching the morning light come in and enjoying a fantastic view out onto the garden has definitely given me a sense of joy. The extension has transformed the traditional dark, narrow rear wing of the house into the best part of my home. Even rainstorms become an event when you have a glass roof (platform5architects.com).

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 71


4

G E T T H E W O W FA C T O R W I T H A R T D E C O - S T Y L E STEEL-FRAMED WINDOWS

One name springs to mind when you see these industrial-look windows and that’s Crittall. This heritage firm has seen a surge in popularity of late. Here Alan West, design director of glass extension specialist Trombé Ltd, discusses the enduring appeal of steel and talks us through this striking side and rear extension project. Why are Crittall windows so popular? Beloved of interiors fans and architects, these Art Deco-style steel-framed windows (the company also sells sliding doors) usually have a striking black edge, although other colours are available. The overall efect is very appealing – bright, light spaces and a well-designed glass extension create a room that everyone gravitates towards. The windows used in this property are particularly detailed, with a multitude of glazing bars, but Crittall windows can also be simpler and more modern in appearance (crittall-windows.co.uk). What would this build involve? The build time for a project like this one is generally between 12 and 20 weeks, depending on the size of the building. The cost of the project pictured here would have been in the region of £75,000 – you can produce a similar efect by spending upwards of £20,000, not including builder’s fees. Most extensions require planning and if you are building within a metre of a party wall, then a Party Wall Award will be required (see What to know before you build previous page) – don’t be afraid of these processes, as they’re there to protect you as much as your neighbour! Are there any downsides to a glass side extension? There’s a great deal of illinformed opinion on glass extensions – the classic being that they make your home too hot in summer and too cold in winter. Don’t let this put you of! There are loads of solutions to address both of these issues, such as high-performance double glazing – glass that cleverly reflects solar heat while retaining internal heat (trombe.co.uk).

‘A well-designed glass extension will enhance family life, creating a room that everyone gravitates towards’

This side and rear extension features Crittall steel-glazed windows and doors. The British firm is the original maker of this type of window, which has an industrial yet Art Deco look

72 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Style | C A S E

STUDIES

T H E D E TA I L S W I N D O W S A N D D O O R S

We take a closer look at some more inspiring projects, from swivelling doors to stylish box windows The new bay windows A smaller alternative to traditional conservatories, box windows make perfect spots to soak up the sun. These two projects, one by Trombé Ltd (top; trombe.co.uk) using sleek steel-framed glass and another by McLaren Excell (below; mclarenexcell.com), are all about adding light and space. The façade of the McLaren Excell project is clad in rust-efect Corten steel and the interior joinery is made from grey elm. In each one, a generous ledge runs around the inside of the box window, providing a perfect spot to sit and gaze out over your garden. Tip: the box seat is also a great place to sneak in extra storage. Two clever types of patio doors How they open is just as important as how they look...

PICTURES: JAKE FITZJONES, ANGUS LEADLEY BROWN, NICK GUTTRIDGE

Pivoting This swivelling door, designed by architecture firm Alma-nac, provides a grand entrance to the garden. It is 3.3 metres high, framed with stained accoya (a highly durable wood) and fitted with doubleglazing. Its height means that, from the upper kitchen level, views of the outdoors are not hindered (alma-nac.com). Wraparound Architecture firm Bradley Van Der Straeten has turned this garden door into a dramatic feature that stretches around the corner of the extension. The design has two elements – a bi-folding door on the right and a smaller pane of glass on the left, which can be folded back against the wall (b-vds.co.uk). E D For even more inspiration catch up on Channel 4 show ‘Inside Out Homes’, featuring architect Zac Munro and our own Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin – available to watch now on All4 SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 73


KITCHEN TRENDS

Simple or statement? Bespoke or off-theshelf? Traditional or modern? Designing a kitchen can be overwhelming, but Team ED is here to help! We’ve narrowed all the latest kitchen designs down to 12 key looks and found all the colours, materials and finishes you need to master them Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

MARBLE MINIMALISM Marble can be understated. Here, a swathe of white metro-style tiles make a pared-back counterpoint to the dark cabinetry by Plain English. The brand uses 19th-century techniques to create this ‘Osea’ island and ‘Spitalfields’ cupboards (full kitchens from £60,000; plainenglishdesign.co.uk). The walls above the tiles are painted in ‘Blackened’ by Farrow & Ball (£39.50 for 2.5 litres; farrow-ball.com), and the island in ‘Lamp Black’ by Little Greene (£19.25 for one litre; littlegreene.com). For similar tiles, try Fired Earth’s ‘East Hampton Marble’ (£1.09 each; firedearth.com). ➤


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

DARKEST BOHEMIA Spectacular splashbacks are a big trend this year. Here, it’s all about the contrast of paint and marble In this Peckham home, Arabascato marble (you can buy similar at Landford Stone; landfordstone.co.uk) stands out against the cupboards of the ‘Classic English’ kitchen by Devol (from £25,000; devolkitchens.co.uk). Be aware, however, that marble is a porous material that requires extra attention to protect it from stains. For peace of mind, coat it with a marble sealant. Finally, to get the full English eccentric efect, use Dulux’s ‘Buckingham’ paint (£27.98 for 2.5 litres; dulux.co.uk) and reclaimed pendant lights from Skinflint (skinflintdesign.co.uk). ➤


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

Show of statement furniture by keeping everything else in the room as simple as possible. By paring the décor back, the owners of this kitchen in Montpellier let their marble ‘Tulip’ table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll (£3,492, Skandium; skandium.com), vintage Baumann chairs (try 1st Dibs; 1stdibs.com) and mother-of-pearl ‘Fun 11DM’ pendant light by Verner Panton (£1,284, Twentytwentyone; twentytwentyone.com) take centre stage. Get the minimalist look with Molteni & C Dada’s ‘Vela’ kitchen, which has glossy units (from £30,000; moltenigroup.com) and try Senso for colour-matched resin flooring: non-porous and wipe-clean, it really will stay this pristine (sensofloor.co.uk). ➤

80 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

PICTURE: NICOLAS MATTHEWS

I M M A C U L AT E R E C E P T I O N


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

TIMBER LAND

PICTURE: GYRITHE LEMCHE

A new take on traditional timber, heavy grains bring warmth to this kitchen by Danish furniture studio KBH Møbelsnedkeri (kbhsnedkeri.dk), which features knotted oak cabinetry. For a bespoke design like this one, contact Blakes London (from £21,600 for cabinetry; blakeslondon.com). Alternatively, Schmidt’s ‘Arcos’ kitchen is available in 12 wood efects, including rough-hewn (from £10,000; schmidt-kitchens.com). And don’t forget the details: try Vola’s ‘KV1’ for a similar tap (£927; en.vola.com), and head to Temper Studio for rustic chopping boards (from £50 each; temperstudio.com). ➤


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

S MOOT H M I N I M A L The mixed-material look has had a sleek, contemporary update. This ‘HT50’ kitchen, designed by Massimo Castagna for Italian kitchen brand Rossana, mixes rich metals and distinctive finishes. Standout features include glass shelves, lacquered grey handleless cabinets, a raw burnished-brass splashback and a glowing cabinet – the back of the cabinet is painted yellow and lit from above to make the tinted glass give of this brilliant neon shine (kitchen from £75,000; rossana.uk.com). ➤

84 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

C A NDY C RUS H

Palest plaster pink is the colour of the moment. Give it some punch with touches of chalky blue This is the first kitchen designed by multi-disciplinary Swedish collective Note Design Studio (notedesignstudio.se) and it exemplifies the trend for dreamy colour pairings. Whichever shades you decide to use, be sure to then keep accessories and details minimal. The rounded curves of the ‘Beetle’ chairs and ‘Ronde’ pendant light, both by Gubi (£689 and £309, both Nest; nest.co.uk) perfectly complement this serene space. Try Little Greene’s ‘Blue Verditer’ for a similar pastel blue (£19.25 for one litre; littlegreene.com) and Farrow & Ball’s ‘Pink Ground’ for a warm yet dusty pink (£39.50 for 2.5 litres; farrow-ball.com). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 87


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

Marble isn’t the only luxurious splashback option – this glittering wall is made from a single piece of hand-patinated brass

88 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

This lustrous splashback, made from brass that’s been tarnished using chemicals, was created by British brand Naked Kitchens (from £18,000 for cabinetry and splashback; nakedkitchens.com). For a finish like this, leave brass to age naturally and develop a rusted patina. Once you are happy, fix the patina by applying a layer of beeswax or polyurethane lacquer. The ‘Invisible Green’ paint by Little Greene, shown here on the walls and units (£54.50 for 2.5 litres; littlegreene.com), allows the splashback wall to shine. ➤


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

BRIGHT IDEAS White waxed birch plywood is big news right now. It’s great at reflecting incoming natural light, as shown in this home near Stockholm designed by Swedish firm Kolman Boye Architects (kolmanboye.com). In the UK, Uncommon Projects specialises in plywood and can make you a similar kitchen on a bespoke basis (uncommonprojects.co.uk). A smaller trend to tap into here is the single hanging storage rail (Ikea’s ‘Grundtal’ is an afordable option, from £4.50; ikea.com). Increasingly used in contemporary kitchens, it’s proof that industrial style can work in the home. Keep accessories neutral and tightly edited to avoid overcrowding. ➤

90 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

PUT ON A SHOW This ‘Vision’ kitchen from Tisettanta is a fine example of the trend for open shelving – just make sure your pots and pans are up to scratch! Metal shelving lacquered with an anthracite efect keeps utensils and cookbooks organised (£85,000 as pictured; tisettanta.it). The island features walnut cabinets, which have discreet side lighting (John Cullen Lighting can install strip lights into existing cupboards; johncullenlighting.co.uk), and a worktop and cupboard fronts made from Iranian marble. To get the look in a lightweight material, consider Silestone quartz by Cosentino (£400 per square metre; silestone.co.uk). ➤


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

C RY S TA L C A S T L E Who knew a large-grain crystal would be the next big thing in worktops? Vincent Van Duysen, newly appointed creative director at Molteni & C Dada, has used porphyry crystal rock (prized for its strength – it was used to build monuments in ancient Rome) to create a standout worktop and splashback for this kitchen, his first design for the brand. He has retained Molteni & C Dada’s signature clean lines and simple shapes, but also improved upon the ease of use, adding shock-absorbent hinges that prevent slamming and cupboard doors that pivot 180 degrees – meaning no more stretching into dark corners (kitchens from £15,000; moltenigroup.com). ➤

94 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

THE AL L BLACK

Take inspiration from the clean lines, handleless doors and muted colours of this Japanese-inspired kitchen. Top-end Italian manufacturer Schiini (schiini.com) produces similarly seamless styles in black, or for a customfitted ebony worktop try Corian at Dupont (dupont.co.uk). For black paint, Farrow & Ball has the best selection (farrow-ball.com), while Habitat’s black ‘Turini’ cutlery would fit beautifully into this scheme. (£72 for a 16-piece set; habitat.co.uk). ➤

PICTURE: NINA HOLST/STYLIZIMO

Consider matt black on everything from cupboards to accessories for a look that’s dark and dramatic


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N S

M I X Y O U R M E TA L S For an ultra-modern approach to metallics, which have become ubiquitous in kitchen design, combine diferent types and finishes

PICTURE: STELTON (STELTON.COM)

Why not team burnished cabinets with a brass pendant light, stainlesssteel canisters and copper tap? There’s no need to stick to just one type of metal. Roundhouse (roundhousedesign.com) can fit a similarly dreamy mixed-materials kitchen – the team recently created a stunning stainlesssteel design for Yotam Ottolenghi – and also ofers concrete finishes if you’re inspired to try an industrial look. For just a hint of sheen, take a look at Porcelanosa’s range of metal-efect ceramic wall tiles (porcelanosa.com). And, for a similar stone worktop, try Lundhs (lundhs.co.uk). E D


F O R M O R E S T Y L I S H I N T E R I O R S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / I N S P I R AT I O N S


This elegant Milanese apartment brings the beauty and comfort of the countryside right into the heart of the city Words RACHEL WARD Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


troll through Milan’s artistic and upmarket Brera district and you will likely spot the beautifully grand 19th-century façade of the home of banker-turned-chef Antonella Grampa and her husband Angelo, a physicist working in software development. The couple live in the building’s airy top-floor apartment, which has views of the city’s famous cathedral. ‘We were drawn to its high ceilings,’ says Angelo. ‘However, the space facing the inner courtyard was dark and divided into small rooms: it had to be completely rethought.’ The couple entrusted the renovation work to architects Corinna Cappa and Stefania Martinelli, who spent two years revising the 250-square-metre home. ‘We wanted to increase the usefulness of the main living areas by connecting them in a continuous circular layout,’ explains Stefania. As such, the kitchen, dining room, lounge, study and bedroom now flow one into the next, each accessed via large double doors that slide into the walls and out of sight, albeit the doors usually sit open, framing the view of the balcony garden. Landscape architect Gianluigi Cristiano was commissioned to create ‘a small, wild piece of countryside’ on the balcony. The result

is a verdant miniature paradise that instils a sense of being far from the city. ‘The daylight peeks through the flowers and plants into the rooms beyond, producing a magical atmosphere that reminds me of a 19th-century greenhouse,’ says Antonella. Numerous houseplants bring the beauty of the balcony indoors, as if the wild garden has spread to quiet reading corners and along tabletops. The architects also added botanically themed artworks and an occasional piece of garden furniture (see the metal bistro-style chairs in the kitchen and the vintage garden table used in the living room) to enhance the indoor/outdoor feel. A neutral backdrop of reclaimed wood parquet floor and soft grey walls flows throughout, helping to tie the look of the interior together. ‘We wanted to create continuity and emphasise the simplicity of the house,’ says Stefania. Classic designs, such as the cream-coloured ‘Neowall’ sofas by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani, are skilfully mixed with family heirlooms and a number of standout pieces, including a Steinway & Sons piano and a bespoke Corian-topped dining table, to lend the apartment its sophisticated feel. ‘This home is our modern interpretation of comfortable elegance,’ says Stefania.

Hallway For similar plant pots to the ones sat on the antique Chinese console, try Cox & Cox. The Chandelier and Mirror Company sells similar Baroque-style mirrors Dining room The white iron dining table is a bespoke piece. It is teamed with 19th-century chairs and sits on top of a rug from Altai. The ‘Wireflow’ pendant lights are by Arik Levy for Vibia Stockist details on p198 ➤

108 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Living room The ‘Neowall’ sofas by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani (available at Twentytwentyone) are dressed with silk cushions by Federica Tondato for Fedora Design. By the Steinway & Sons piano sit two armchairs – family heirlooms reupholstered in fabric from The Natural Linen Company – as well as a vintage garden table and a ‘Birdy’ floor light by Birger Dahl for Northern Lighting Stockist details on p198 ➤


A R C H I T E C T ’ S G U I D E R E C L A I M E D PA R Q U E T It might look like a period feature, but the elegant floor in this home is actually a new addition. Here, architect Stefania shares all you need to know about finding and installing your own. Why did you choose reclaimed flooring? The aged wood has a beautiful foot-worn finish and, once laid, appears as if it was original to this 19th-century property. How did you work out how much you needed? We used an online calculator [homebase.co.uk has an easy-to-follow one that shows you exactly what to measure and does the sums for you], but it’s a good idea to buy 10 per cent more than you need, just in case. What should I consider when selecting a wooden floor? The pattern, dimension and the direction of the grain, as well as the finish, can help to create a sense of spaciousness or, conversely, a warm, cosy ambience. In this house we wanted a natural efect that worked with the overall scheme, so the wood was sanded to achieve a consistent colour. After laying the floor, the tone was adjusted by hand and a protective coat of wax added. What are its practical benefits? Reclaimed wood is durable and long lasting. If it’s well maintained and cared for, there should be no problems. It’s not suited to wet spaces, though – that’s why we used a selection of patterned tiles in the bathroom instead. So, what maintenance does it need? Vacuum regularly to remove dust and clean it with a dry mop, then buf the floors to restore the shine. Wood floors should not be over-waxed – you should only need to reseal them once every three to five years, but re-sand and refinish every few decades. To avoid unnecessary wear and tear, place rugs over busy areas, such as entrance halls. Where can I buy it? These blocks were bought at I Vassalletti, a retailer based in Tuscany. In the UK, the ELLE Decoration team suggests heading to Bert & May (bertandmay.com), Victorian Woodworks (victorianwoodworks.co.uk) or The Reclaimed Flooring Co (reclaimedflooringco.com). All of these brands will help you with installation, however for a more tailored solution you can speak to reclaimed flooring expert Martin Starlet (starletbuilding.co.uk). Looking for a total bargain? Find the details for your local salvage yard at Salvo (salvo.co.uk).

Living room The marble fireplace is a reclaimed French antique dating from the Louis XVI period (for similar finds, try Lassco). It was added, along with the reclaimed parquet flooring (see above) during the renovation. The bookcase was designed by the architects and made by Milan-based artisan Flavio Caglio. The rug is from Altai Stockist details on p198 ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 113


Kitchen The large La Cornue range cooker lends this inner-city apartment a country home feel, as does the ‘Rehbeintisch’ table by Gebrüder Thonet Vienna and bistro-style chairs (for similar try Garden Trading). The kitchen cabinets were custom-made, with a Carrara marble worktop and splashback. The ‘Wireflow’ pendant light by Arik Levy for Vibia is available at Viaduct in the UK Stockist details on p198 ➤


116 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Bathroom Cement tiles by Carocim add a hit of pattern, while the ‘Angelus’ chandelier by Forestier provides a touch of luxury. The bath is by Devon & Devon and the ‘Loos Cafe’ chair is by Adolf Loos for Gebrüder Thonet Vienna Bedroom The bed is a vintage piece dressed in bedlinen from Society Limonta. A ‘Kelvin’ table light by Antonio Citterio for Flos sits on one of the custom-made iron bedside tables Stockist details on p198 E D


Past and present collide in this 18th-century Italian palazzo, where preserved frescoes convey timeless elegance amid contemporary furnishings and architectural accents Words EMMA LOVE Photography ANTONIO MARTINIELLO Styling MARIA DE MORAIS

Living room Newly painted frescoes inspired by ancient designs found at Pompeii create a dramatic backdrop to this ‘Frighetto Line’ sofa by Estel. For a similar sofa try the ‘Chester’ corner sofa in ‘Sage Green’ by Habitat. Use ‘Orange Aurora’ paint by Little Greene to recreate this intense wall colour. The floor lamp is a vintage design from Italian brand Reggiani (try 1st Dibs for similar) Stockist details on p198 ➤


Library Red acrylic doors slide open to reveal a triptych by Brazilian photographer Salvino Campos on the wall. The white ‘Bubble Club’ chairs are by Philippe Starck for Kartell. Behind them (inset) sits an iron table made by the homeowner and a red ‘DSW’ chair by Charles and Ray Eames (new editions available from The Conran Shop) Kitchen The original floor tiles were preserved and the walls painted a dusky shade of pink (try ‘Setting Plaster’ by Farrow & Ball). For a similar stainless-steel kitchen island try Schiini at Design Space London. A ‘Tolomeo’ light by Artemide sits above the worktop Portrait Homeowner Antonio poses lying on an original tiled floor Stockist details on p198


nly the fortunate few can hope to live in an 18th-century palazzo adorned with original frescoes, but for Italian architect Antonio Giuseppe Martiniello it is a joyous reality. ‘This building has so much detail, it is a beautiful space,’ he enthuses. Experienced in the restoration of ancient buildings, he makes the perfect guardian for this property in Naples, which had remained untouched for 80 years until he bought it in 2004. The task of restoring the interior was considerable: many of the original doors and fragments of flooring had been destroyed or stolen, and the apartment had no electricity. ‘The worst part was the sight of the ruined frescoes, but the space still captivated me,’ Antonio says. ‘The light seeping through the broken glass of the windows was incredible and I could imagine filling the library with books.’ ‘THE ONLY WAY TO FURNISH THE Antonio retained the APARTMENT WAS TO BALANCE house’s existing layout of fluid enfilades [a series of THE BUILDING’S HISTORY WITH rooms connected in a row CONTEMPORARY ELEMENTS’ rather than arranged along hallways] but decided to split the apartment in two: two-thirds of the interior was largely destroyed, so we created given over to his personal quarters and one third to his a new fresco based on examples studio, meeting rooms and oices. from Pompeii,’ Antonio explains. The elements that had survived, such as wallpaper dating Elsewhere, he balanced the back to the 1850s and the original paintwork, were all florid detailing of his home’s preserved. ‘It is such a rarity to find these traditional paint backdrop with modern materials colours, and they still feel so contemporary,’ he says. ‘Every and furniture. Where the flooring room has its own story. Where patches of paper were missing, was irreparable, he introduced I simply left the base colour in tact; it serves as a memory timber, poured resin and mismatched tiles, and he used red of what was there before.’ Skilled artisans restored the walls acrylic sliding doors as a striking replacement for the missing (incredibly, the entire project only took a year) and where originals. The furniture here is a mix of design classics by there was nothing left to work with they recreated the past. the likes of Charles and Ray Eames and Verner Panton; ‘The original details of the red room, my living room, were custom pieces (the iron table and suspended cabinets in the library) and bold statements, such as Joe Colombo’s fibreglass armchairs, upholstered in faux leather. ‘The only way to furnish the apartment was to balance the building’s history with contemporary elements,’ he says. ‘I like to think of it as a modern home inside an old shell.’ kellerarchitettura.it ➤ SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 121


‘WHERE PATCHES OF PAPER WERE MISSING, I LEFT THE BASE COLOUR INTACT; IT SERVES AS A MEMORY OF WHAT WAS THERE BEFORE’

Kitchen The ‘M7’ suspension light is from Viabizzuno. Italian artist Stefano Dordiglione created the religious artwork Meeting room Clients sit on ‘Panton’ chairs by Verner Panton for Vitra. The large table is from Pallucco Stockist details on p198 ➤


S E C R ET A D D R E S S B O O K

Antonio reveals his favourite places to shop and eat in Naples

Meeting room (left) The peeling hand-painted wallpaper dates back to the 1850s. In the adjoining room sits a ‘Lady’ armchair by Marco Zanuso for Cassina Oice (above) The original tiled floor and delicate wallpaper (detail top) give this workspace a sense of faded grandeur Model-making room (right) A selection of vintage chairs add colour to this room Stockist details on p198

Made in Cloister This was the first urban regeneration project of its kind in Naples. I was the architect on the team that transformed the abandoned convent (attached to a 16th-century church) into a cultural centre housing a bookshop, bar and restaurant. 46 Piazza Enrico de Nicola, 80139 (madeincloister.it) Dino Morra An excellent contemporary art gallery that is renowned for championing the work of young and up-and-coming artists. Piazza Enrico de Nicola, 80139 (00 39 081 187 45462) Pasticceria Carraturo This pastry shop is an institution. It sells the best sfogliatella, which is traditional shell-shaped puf pastry filled with cream and dusted with icing sugar. 97 Via Casanova, 80139 (00 39 081 554 5364) La Smorfia A store owned by artisan Fabio Paolella (a trained restorer), who uses 18th-century techniques to make terracotta figurines and church decorations. I treasure the silver votive that I bought from this shop. 23 Via Anticaglia, 80139 (00 39 081 29 38 12) Colonnese This bookshop is a great source for new, used and out-of-print titles. It also has a selection of 18th- and 19th-century literature that derives from Naples. 32–33 Via San Pietro a Maiella, 80138 (00 39 081 45 98 58) ➤ SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 125


Bedroom The original tiles on the floor contrast beautifully with the blue wall – try Farrow & Ball’s ‘St Giles Blue’ for similar. The bed was designed by the homeowner, who also created the screen that divides this space from the bathroom. The cabinets are from Pallucco and the lights are by Droog. The painting is by artist Mario Pellegrino Stockist details on p198 E D


THE FURNITURE IS AN EXCITING MIX OF DESIGN CLASSICS, CUSTOM-MADE PIECES AND BOLD STATEMENTS


Inspired by the combination of modern and period furnishings in Antonio’s Naples home, but lacking original frescoes? Work the look using traditional prints instead

From left ‘D2021’ rug by Golran, £4,080, Moroso (moroso.co.uk). ‘Stilla’ pouf by AYTM, £269, Dopo Domani (dopo-domani.com). ‘Petite Applique Radieuse’ wall light, £96, Maison Sarah Lavoine (maisonsarahlavoine.com). ‘Lady’ armchair by Marco Zanuso, £2,820, Cassina (cassina.com). ‘4338 Ikat’ patterned cushion, £164.50, Yastik by Rifat Özbek (yastikbyrifatozbek.com). ‘Taher’ striped cushion by Lindell & Co, £130, Pentreath & Hall (pentreath-hall.com). ‘D.555.1’ coffee table by GiÒ Ponti, £1,967, Molteni & C Dada (moltenidada.co.uk). ‘Base & Cuppino’ large vase by Aldo Cibic for Paula C, £385, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘LP5 True Colour’ blue vase, £169; ‘LP2 True Colour’ pink vase, £199, both by Lex Pott, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Sicilia’ cup, £15; ‘Large Radieuse’ wall light, £130, both Maison Sarah Lavoine (maisonsarahlavoine.com). ‘Paper Planes’ chair by Doshi Levien, £2,760, Moroso (moroso.co.uk). ‘Solvorn’ bed, from

STYLING ASSISTANT: ANNA SHERIDAN

Photography JAKE CURTIS Styling HANNAH BORT


£260, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘Double Harris’ headboard, £339, The Headboard Workshop (theheadboardworkshop.co.uk). Bed and headboard covered in ‘Enchanted Wood’ fabric by Sheila Coombes, £79 per metre, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk). ‘Russet’ and ‘Polar Ice’ pillowcases, £48 each; ‘Russet’ duvet cover, £264; throw, £174, all Larusi (larusi.com). ‘2007 Ikat’ bolster cushion, £280, Yastik by Rifat Özbek (yastikbyrifatozbek.com). ‘Flauti Le Amethist 1’ pendant light, £1,333; ‘Flauti Le Amber 2’ pendant light, £1,287, both by Giopato & Coombes, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk) Backgrounds from left ‘Trilogy’ emulsion paint (on walls); ‘The Botanist’ Pure Flat emulsion paint (on border), both £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Brocatello’ wallpaper (on top border) in Rose Gold, £90 per 10-metre roll, Zofany (zofany.com). ‘Badminton’ wallpaper (behind bed), £736 per panel (as pictured), De Gournay (degournay.com) E D


T H E WOR L D ’ S BE ST DE S IG N S Introducing the winners of the ELLE Decoration International Design Awards 2016. Selected by our 25 sister titles around the world, these are the pieces you need to know about. Plus, we asked five established names to give us their take on the trends Interviews MARZIA NICOLINI Captions AMY BRADFORD Portraits VALENTINA SOMMARIVA

B E S T I N TA B L E WA R E ‘Voyage en Ikat’ collection by Hermès This jewel-like tableware, inspired by the ikat fabric-dyeing technique originating in central Asia, brings East and West together. From £106 for a small bowl (uk.hermes.com). BEST IN KITCHENS ‘Finesse’ kitchen by Tokujin Yoshioka for Toyo Kitchen Style The cabinets are fronted with smoked glass, celebrating the beauty of translucency – a hallmark of Yoshioka’s work. Not available in UK (toyokitchen.co.jp/en). BEST IN OUTDOOR FURNITURE ‘Palissade’ collection (chair) by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Hay Unfussy and well priced, this range is refreshingly pareddown in a category that’s often overdesigned. £159, Utility (utilitydesign.co.uk). BEST IN FURNITURE ‘Kaari’ table by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Artek This piece deploys classic Artek materials – wood and steel banding – in a new way, fusing them with glossy laminate and linoleum. From £1,488 for 200x85cm, Skandium (skandium.com). BEST IN FLOOR COVERINGS ‘Cementiles’ by India Mahdavi for Bisazza Mahdavi has modernised the traditional patterned cement tile with peppy, graphic motifs. From £162 per square metre (bisazza.com).


Talking trends

STUDIO JOB The maverick Antwerp-based duo who have remade gothic style for the 21st century What trends have you spotted recently? Nowadays it’s all about getting more and more personal in your own creations. We’re in a kind of design Renaissance period: people have had enough of corporate ideology and want to follow their own inspiration, not be mainstream. What changes have you seen in the design world? Designers are less obsessed with what is trendy. The word ‘trend’ implies that a lot of people are doing the same thing. It’s better to have many designers creating with their own minds, thinking outside of the box, which is what we always try to do. Are there any upcoming talents you admire? We are generally fascinated by the contamination of diferent fields – art, architecture, fashion… make them converge and you will see great ideas. What are you working on next? We’ve just presented a new book about our work and we’ll soon be in New York for an exhibition of our designs at the Museum of Arts and Design. We don’t like spending too much time in front of the computer: we prefer real life to the internet (studiojob.be). Portrait In front of ‘Industry Amber’ mosaic by Studio Job, £860 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.com) ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 131


T H E WOR L D ’ S BE ST DE SIGNS D E S I G N E R O F T H E Y E A R J A I M E H AY Ó N Who is he? Charismatic Spanish designer Jaime Hayón sprang onto the design scene in 2003 with his ‘Mediterranean Digital Baroque’ universe, a dreamlike world populated by exaggerated cactus shapes and surreal animals. Now an internationally respected figure, his witty and whimsical style has lately been pared down a little, and he has been exploring art as an inspiration for his work. Why did he win? This year he has created a wallpaper range for Swedish brand Eco (pictured) that strips his illustrations back to ultra-simple lines, dots and circles. His ‘Réaction Poétique’ collection of black-stained ash objects (see below) for Cassina

Talking trends

SEBASTIAN HERKNER This German designer has enjoyed a meteoric rise to fame, coming to the design world’s attention in 2012 with his ‘Bell’ table for Classicon (below, £1,977, Aram Store; aram.co.uk)

was inspired by the organic shapes of Le Corbusier murals and buildings; and his ‘Palette’ tables for &Tradition (see below) reference the forms of Alexander Calder’s kinetic sculptures. Hayón has also been the subject of a retrospective at Israel’s Design Museum Holon, entitled ‘Funtastico’, which looks back on a decade of his achievements. The maverick has come of age (hayonstudio.com). What should I buy? ‘Palette’ table for &Tradition, from £995, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). Wallpaper, from £45 per roll, Eco (eco.se). ‘Réaction Poétique’ table, £1,068, Cassina (cassina.com)

What trends have you spotted recently? I’ve seen lots of projects featuring wood, metal and marble – often combined in unexpected ways. What changes have you seen in the design world? Increasing attention to simplicity and eiciency. Items need to be beautiful, of course, but also have a clear purpose.

What are you working on next? I’m doing some interior projects in Hamburg and thinking about new collections with my own company. All the travelling is great for getting new ideas – I keep my eyes wide open (sebastianherkner.com). Portrait With ‘Gemma’ bathroom accessories collection for Agape, available Winter 2016 (agapedesign.it)


Talking trends

P A O L A N AV O N E The Italian designer is famed for her work with brands such as Baxter and Rubelli, and her art direction at Gervasoni

PORTRAIT: JAMES CORBETT

What trends have you spotted recently? There are more trends coexisting than ever before. I see more self-confidence in designers. It happened in fashion years ago, and now in design too: people feel happier launching their own trend. What changes have you seen in the design world? I’m seeing a great mix of expertise in young designers: they seem able to master new technologies and at the same time manually produce highly refined objects. What are you working on next? New products and some interior and architecture projects in Asia. I can’t say much yet but they are really promising (gervasoni1882.it). ➤

Y O U N G D E S I G N TA L E N T O F T H E Y E A R &NEW Who are they? We’re thrilled that new British design duo &New – aka Mirka Grohn (left) and Jo Wilton (right) – have won this award, following on from their gong for ‘Best Furniture Design’ at the ELLE Decoration British Design Awards last year. Why did they win? The delicate lines and grown-up palette of their powder-coated metal shelves and tables have recently been complemented by limited editions in granite and brass; all combine modern minimalism with a retro aesthetic inspired by mid-century Scandinavian design. What should I buy? The minimalist ‘A’ clothes rail in pink, £474 (andnew.co.uk) SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 133


T H E WOR L D ’ S BE ST DE SIGNS B E S T I N WA L L C O V E R I N G S ‘Numi’ tiles by Konstantin Grcic for Mutina Grcic’s debut tile range for the Italian company creates geometric patterns using embossed and glazed finishes. From £208 per square metre, Domus (domustiles.co.uk). BEST IN BEDDING ‘Majal’ bed by Carlo Colombo for Flou The wide, cushioned headboard was inspired by Colombo’s observations of Indian women wringing out dye from fabric. From £4,080, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). B E S T I N B AT H R O O M S ‘Axor One’ shower control by Barber & Osgerby for Axor-Hansgrohe This sleek, brushed brass element turns multiple water outlets on or of with a touch of the hand or elbow, as well as adjusting temperature on a central dial and regulating water volume with a dinky lever. £747 (hansgrohe.co.uk). BEST IN LIGHTING ‘Superloon’ floor lamp by Jasper Morrison for Flos A ring of tiny LED bulbs around the edge of the shade send light across the adjustable translucent white disc – its silvery glow is as magical as moonlight. £3,045 (flos.com). B E S T I N S E AT I N G ‘Targa’ seating collection by Gam Fratesi for Wiener GTV Design Why choose between canework and upholstery when you can have both? This armchair is a modern twist on bentwood furniture. From £4,428 (gebruederthonetvienna.com). B E S T I N FA B R I C S Kvadrat/Raf Simons collection From the man who made futuristic couture for the house of Dior comes this ultra-simple yet dynamic range of cushions and fabrics. Cushions from £111 (kvadratrafsimons.com).

Talking trends

DIMORE STUDIO Emiliano Salci and Britt Moran founded their Milan-based studio in 2003. Their work embraces many fields, from interior design to products, art and fashion

What changes have you seen in the design world recently? We’re seeing less furniture design and more decoration. Increasing attention is now being paid to wallpapers, textiles and patterns instead of single pieces of furniture. Are there any upcoming talents you admire? We really like the work of Formafantasma,

an Italian duo who are based in Amsterdam. What are you working on next? Currently we are working on several apartment projects in Italy, and bedlinen brand Frette’s new London store, which opens soon (dimorestudio.eu). Portrait With ‘Lampada 090’ pendant lights (prototypes) by Dimore Studio


Talking trends

DOSHI LEVIEN London husband-and-wife duo Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien are renowned for their eclectic designs fusing their Indian and British heritage What trends have you spotted recently? There’s a major emphasis on the quality of design products. Maybe in the past it was more about loud ideas, colour and eccentricity, but now we feel that the urge to be dramatic has gone. What changes have you seen in the design world? Companies are giving precedence to thoughtful, quieter design, and are focusing on great manufacturing quality, proportions and details. Are there any upcoming talents you admire? [Doshi] The Japanese fashion designer Tsumori Chisato. I love her vibrant style and often wear her clothes. What are you working on next? A new collection for Danish textile brand Kvadrat and a big range for a British company that we can’t reveal yet. It’s going to be an exciting year! (doshilevien.com). Portrait Jonathan sits on ‘Do-Maru’ chair by Doshi Levien, £1,891; Nipa sits on ‘Tabour’ pouf, £1,339, both B&B Italia (bebitalia.com) E D

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 135


TH E OLD CU R IOSIT Y SHOP Be inspired by the owners of this South African farmhouse, who mix pattern and collectibles with unique confidence and style Words KERRYN FISCHER Photography ELSA YOUNG/FRANK FEATURES Production LUANNE TOMS


Living room The bookshelves and dressers that line the walls of the living area are old apothecary cabinets and ornate units that homeowner Neville bought in France and painted black. The linen sofas, the focus of the room, are also vintage, and the wooden floor is made from 150-yearold pit-sawn yellowwood, usually salvaged from old barns ➤


A

s a freelance creative director, Neville Trickett is a maverick soul with a home to match his spirit. The 165-year-old Dargle Valley farmhouse where he and his wife Sharon raised their children is crammed with their collections. Sharon and Neville have since moved to Durban, but have kept the former family home. Today it overflows with objects, materials, vibrant patterned tiles and ephemera gathered on impulse and arranged with artful expression. The result is an intense curatorial experience that whisks you from Tokyo to England, Africa and beyond at a single glance. ‘It’s pretty radical to have such a mixed selection of things in a home,’ Neville says. ‘Sharon and I have always collected stuf. It’s not always expensive, just things we like.’ Sharon has a gift for gardening – the couple own a plant business, Saint Verde Botanicals – and her passion is evident in the abundance of greenery on show, including rare succulents, cacti and agaves. ‘Without a doubt, she’s the brains behind our 35-year partnership,’ Neville says. ‘Sharon has a strict criteria when it comes to aesthetics while I don’t, but the marriage of the two works.’

There’s a place for every piece, from old X-rays transformed into wall lights to a staggering array of minutiae such as pen knives, old syringes and vintage handmade silk flowers A quick scan of the house reveals a rich mix of vintage French and English furniture, antique Japanese slipware, original Danish Kobenstyle enamelware, vintage fabrics and religious iconography. ‘Often, when we buy, we buy en masse, so it’s never just one thing but 50,’ says Neville. Somehow the couple manage to continue to find a place for each piece, from old X-rays transformed into wall lights to a staggering array of minutiae such as pen knives, old syringes and vintage handmade silk flowers, which are beautifully presented and backlit in display cupboards that line the walls of the living space. Sharon’s sense of order prevents even the most curious displays becoming cluttered and there is no hint of this becoming a museum – although the house is in a constant state of flux as the couple continually edit the furnishings. ‘Our home is a creative project that promotes ideas for our work. Working on the house helps to clear our minds and gives us distance from the madness of the real world,’ says Neville. @saintverdebotanicals Verandah Homeowner Neville walks with five of the couple’s nine dogs along their enclosed sun room. The floor tiles are made from slate and marble

138 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Living room The exposed brickwork and timber beams are enhanced by historic lighting (try Jamb in the UK for similar). Try Romo for an excellent range of yellow and chartreuse linen. The side tables, from South African store Weylandts, have an enamel finish Stockist details on p198 ➤


‘It’s pretty radical to have such a mixed selection of things in a home. We have always collected stuf ’

Living room Knick knacks, greenery and collectibles occupy every surface. The black-and-white artwork of skeletons above the fireplace depicts a series of illustrations by French scientist Jean-Baptiste De Panafieu from the book Evolution. The floating iron staircase is a striking Modernist statement next to the farmhouse’s rustic architecture ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 141


A sense of order prevents even the most curious displays becoming cluttered, and there is no hint of this house becoming a museum

Kitchen The inside of the dressers have been painted a rich Prussian Blue (try Benjamin Moore for a similar paint colour) and the homeowners have also added lighting within the cabinets – the result is that their collections of enamelware appear to glow in the dark. The horn chairs were bought at The Conran Shop 15 years ago, and the table is covered in a printed cloth from Babylonstoren ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 143


The new Portuguese terrazzo tiles on the conservatory floor echo the colour of the cast-iron walls

Conservatory and garden Homeowner Sharon has been collecting succulents for 38 years and has amassed over 2,000 varieties. The couple built the conservatory from scratch by turning antique cast-iron railings into panels that were then welded together. The tiles are from South African brand Union Tiles and wire stools are from Mr Price Home. The rattan sun loungers were bought at auction Stockist details on p198 ➤

144 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Guesthouse The family calls this separate annex ‘the blue cottage’ – it is connected to the house by a glass-covered walkway. Virtually all the furnishings were sourced on a trip to Morocco, except the peacock chair, which is from India. For similar tiles, try Encaustic Tiles Ltd and team with gold poufs from Moroccan Bazaar Stockist details on p198 ➤


GET THE LOOK Inspired by this South African home to be more bold with colour and pattern? Here’s our selection of pick ’n’ mix tiles that you can buy now

1

Patterned tiles add decorative flourishes all over this farmhouse, from strong slate and marble on the verandah to the subtle rounded design in the conservatory. ‘We love the diversity of pattern and colour,’ says Neville. The brightest tiles are in the guesthouse (right). ‘The palette is blue, but we mixed up the patterns to make it more interesting.’ 2

1 Encaustic tiles, from £130 per square metre, all Bert & May (bertandmay.com) 2 ‘Palmblad’ and ‘Essaouira’ tiles, £90 per square metre, Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.se) 3 ‘Vintage’ tile, £30 per square metre, The Baked Tile Company (bakedtiles.co.uk) 4 ‘Osborn’ tile, £184 per square metre, Original Style (originalstyle.com) 5 ‘Provence ’ tiles, £90 per square metre, Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.se) 6 ‘Batik Patchwork’ tiles, £45 per square metre, Topps Tiles (toppstiles.co.uk) 3

4

5

STYLING: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

6

Bedroom The bed was bought at an antique store in Paris, and the other furnishings are a mix of vintage finds and pieces from the homeowners’ shop in Johannesburg. Ikea is a good port of call for a wide range of indoor planters Stockist details on p198 E D


‘The palette here is blue, but we mixed up the patterns to make things a bit more interesting’


Living space A runway of wooden panels cuts through the concrete floor – beneath them lies plenty of practical storage space. Below the mezzanine level is a cosy play corner with a table-tennis table and a swing ➤


Y A L T HE P H O US E We discover how one architect couple turned this industrial workshop into a fun, adaptable space for their growing family Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography MONICA SPEZIA/LIVING INSIDE Production FRANCESCA SIRONI


S

ara Bergami and her husband Luca Bertacchi live in a former car repair workshop in Bologna, Italy. Sara was pregnant with their first child, Bianca (pictured, now four), when they moved into the property and the couple transformed the interior of the building with their two daughters (Anita was born last year) in mind. ROOM TO GROW ‘We bought this property just a week after we viewed it. Spaces this industrial aren’t usually available in Bologna,’ Luca says. The couple quickly set about rewiring and reconfiguring the building to turn it into a habitable home. They also ensured it was fully insulated and installed energy-eicient ‘BIANCA IS BECOMING A MORE ADAPTABLE, windows. ‘Our bills are now lower than they were ADVENTUROUS CHILD BECAUSE OF THE WAY in our old apartment, despite the fact that it was WE LIVE HERE. SHE LOVES TO PLAY’ a quarter of the size!’ The couple made good use of the house’s soaring ceilings by adding in a mezzanine floor. ‘We think of it as our promenade,’ Luca says. On this new level is a main bedroom, with UTILITY ROOM a picture window overlooking the living space; a bedroom shared by the couple’s two daughters; and an area above the kitchen that evolves with their changing needs as a family. ‘First it was a bedroom, then a playground, and now it’s a place where we relax in the evening, after KITCHEN AND dinner. We call it our decompression zone,’ says Luca. LIVING AREA Back on the ground floor, the open-plan interior flows from the kitchen (where a huge antique tailor’s table serves as a social spot for food preparation and dining) to a play zone with a swing and a table-tennis table, and out to the courtyard garden. ‘Bianca loves playing in every part of the house,’ Luca says. ‘We think she is becoming MEZZANINE FLOOR a more adventurous, adaptable child because of the way we live here. She spends hours on the indoor swing and her bicycle.’ The house has had a positive efect on Luca and Sara’s wellbeing, too. ‘We feel physically and psychologically free here,’ Luca says. ‘It’s GROUND FLOOR not a finished space, though. It will continue to grow and adapt with us.’

152 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Living space There is plenty of room on the ground floor for Bianca to ride her bike, both indoors and outside in the decked courtyard. Try Habitat’s ‘Viena’ furniture collection for similar outdoor chairs and Ikea for a similar yellow dining chair. The ‘Quadrato’ table, designed by Vico Magistretti for De Padova (available from Twentytwentyone), is large enough to host lots of friends and family The pendant light above the table is the stunning ‘Vertigo’ design by Petite Friture (available from Heal’s in the UK) Stockist details on p198 ➤


‘OUR ANTIQUE KITCHEN TABLE IS THE HEART OF THE HOME. IT’S WHERE OUR FAMILY COMES TOGETHER’ Kitchen The double-width tailor’s table is from an antiques market in Parma: it’s a worktop, play space and dining table all in one. The ‘Tripp Trapp’ high chair is by Stokke (available at Mothercare) and Urban Cottage Industries sells similar pendant lights. Try Ikea for a good selection of similar sofas and monochrome rugs Stockist details on p198 ➤


ARCHITECT’S GUIDE MEZZANINE FLOORS

Homeowner and architect Luca Bertacchi shares his essential checklist of what to consider before you build Height You need a ceiling height of at least 4.2 metres to build a mezzanine level to avoid the floor below feeling cramped. Planning permission In Italy there are strict regulations relating to earthquake-proofing new floors [in the UK, planning permission is not required unless the house is listed, but the structure must comply with building regulations and the involvement of a structural engineer is essential to ensure safety. If the work afects a party wall, you must notify your neighbours in writing. If you are a leaseholder, you will need permission from the freeholder for any structural changes]. Structural support In the UK, you can use existing walls and partitions to support a new floor, but Italian regulations do not allow this so our structure is self-supporting. In the event of an earthquake, the movement of our mezzanine will never interfere with that of the main building. Using a steel frame also reduced the number of columns required to support the structure. It was easy to install and gave us the industrial aesthetic we wanted. Access Our staircase is made from steel and wood and simply attached to the steel structure. Spiral staircases are a good space-saving solution. Budget The mezzanine floor cost almost 40 per cent of our entire renovation budget [we estimate the construction costs for a basic mezzanine level – one that involves the removal of a flat ceiling with a loft space above – to start at around £2,000]. Timings The steel frame was built on site in two weeks, a timeframe that included the installation of the underfloor heating. However, the project took around three months in total.

156 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Mezzanine ‘We built the mezzanine because we wanted to create a more intimate, liveable space within the building,’ says Luca. ‘Also, we love sharing our home with friends and clients, but we also wanted a private area that was just for us. By completing the project we have added almost 80 square metres to the floorplan.’ The main bedroom has a huge picture window that overlooks the living space – perfect for keeping an eye on the children. The homeowners can also pull a screen across the window for privacy E D


Living room Silver travertine (from Multiform Stone Industries) and stained oak clad the walls, while reclaimed chestnut boards cover the floor. The scheme is softened by oversized rugs (try John Lewis). A table by Isamu Noguchi for Herman Miller (available at The Conran Shop) sits with a ‘PP225 Flag Halyard’ armchair by Hans J Wegner for PP Møbler (try Twentytwentyone) Stockist details on p198 ➤


Lavish stone and dark woods are combined to brilliant effect in this Melbourne home, designed for entertaining Words TRISH LORENZ Photography TESS KELLY


RICHLY VEINED SILVER TRAVERTINE IS USED IN KEY AREAS OF THE HOUSE TO ADD TONE AND TEXTURE ‘I love the height of this house, it’s incredible,’ says homeowner Philippa Head of her three-storey new-build. ‘We have rooftop views that stretch to Melbourne’s city skyline.’ Over the course of a year, Philippa and her property developer husband Steve’s home was built on land just a few minutes’ walk from the boutiques and cafes of Toorak village – an area dubbed Australia’s Rodeo Drive. They commissioned interior designer Lauren Macer of Sisällä to create its contemporary but convivial interior. The couple moved in just three days before Christmas Day in December 2015, which was serendipitous given that their home is perfectly designed for entertaining friends and family. Design details ‘We wanted a modern look but didn’t want to live in a steel box,’ Philippa says. Slabs of stone inject texture and create focal points in key areas: for instance, silver travertine clads both the kitchen island and the large central fireplace. The rich veins of the stone (a mix of grey, silver, black and gold) are accented by dark ‘Wormy Chestnut’ wood floors (a type of reclaimed flooring that is milled from old barn boards) and stained oak kitchen cabinets. Black steel details tie the scheme together, with any hard edges softened by sheer curtains, large rugs and luxurious accessories, such as the sheepskin throw draped across the ‘Flag Halyard’ armchair. Open approach The 393-square-metre ground floor is divided into a large open-plan kitchen and living areas. The rear of the house leads to an outdoor dining space arranged around a fountain – the constant babble of water creates a peaceful soundtrack. The first and second floors provide places of retreat: there are three guest bedrooms and a library on the first floor, plus a main bedroom, bathroom, dressing room and private outdoor terrace on the upper level. ‘You have a sense of living in the treetops when you’re up here,’ Philippa says. sisalla.com.au


Kitchen This is the hub of the open-plan living space. Its focal point is an island clad in silver travertine – sourced from the same place as the stone on the fireplace (see previous spread). The worktops are ‘Super White’, a natural quartzite stone from Stone Italiana. The bar stools are the ‘Dita’ design from Grazia and Co Stockist details on p198 ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 161


‘WE WANTED A MODERN LOOK BUT DIDN’T WANT TO LIVE IN A STEEL BOX’

Kitchen The bespoke cabinets are covered in an oak timber veneer that has been stained brown-black. For similar track lighting try Mr Resistor Dining area The stained beech ‘Jutland’ table by Mads Johansen for Ton is surrounded by ‘Merano’ dining chairs by Alex Gufler, also for Ton. The ‘Bubble’ pendant is from Lucretia Lighting Stockist details on p198 ➤


Living room A ‘Jasper’ sofa from King Living sits in front of the floor-to-ceiling windows. A ‘Réaction Poétique’ side table by Jaime Hayón for Cassina is placed by the arm of the sofa. For a similar sheepskin throw to the one draped over the ‘PP225 Flag Halyard’ armchair, try The Fabulous Fleece Company Stockist details on p198 ➤


THE HOUSE’S LARGE OPEN-PLAN GROUND FLOOR IS THE PERFECT SPACE FOR ENTERTAINING


1

GET THE LOOK

2

Inspired by the silver travertine and darkstained timber in this house, we’ve sought out the latest stylish yet durable surface materials

3

£112 per square metre, Domus Tiles (domustiles.co.uk) 2 Striata travertine, £106.74 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) 3 ‘Norm’ tombak by Norm Architects, from £64 for a 40x10cm drawer front, Reform (reformcph.com) 4 Dekton by Cosentino in ‘Kadum’, from £450 per square metre, Dekton (dekton.co.uk) 5 Black American walnut veneer, from £135 per square metre, Naked Kitchens (nakedkitchens.com) 6 ‘Allmarble’ ceramic tile in ‘Travertino’, from £50 per square metre, Marazzi (marazzitile.co.uk) 7 ‘Par Ker Hampton Brown’ ceramic tile in ‘Walnut’, £109 per square metre, Porcelanosa (porcelanosa.com)

WORDS AND STYLYING: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURE: HEARST STUDIOS

4 1 ‘Coppersmith’ wood flooring,


6

INSIDER GUIDE MODERN FINISHES Not all of the surfaces pictured here are real stone or timber, but each one of them looks luxurious and is able to stand up to the demands of a busy home. From simple ceramic tiles that mimic the veins and grains of wood and marble to composite materials, the modern alternatives pictured here are both easier and more economical to apply than heavy slabs of stone. They are also simpler to clean and maintain. Here, we introduce three that fit this home’s scheme perfectly...

5

7

Ceramic tiles These porcelain fakes (6, 7), which come in stone and wood-efect versions, have the distinct advantage of being highly resistant to wear and tear. Acidic substances such as orange juice, which would pose a threat to a marble surface, will not stain or damage ceramic. Also, unlike timber or travertine, ceramic is not very porous, making it a more durable choice for wet zones such as kitchens and bathrooms. Of course, installing tiles is also much simpler than fitting a large, heavy slab of natural stone. Dekton by Cosentino This versatile material (4), made from a mixture of compacted raw manufacturing materials such as glass and quartz, can be made to mimic the colour and texture of stone or wood. The perfect material for kitchens, it’s strong and resistant to scratches, stains and scorch marks. It can also be used to clad virtually any surface, so would be a great option to create a seamless finish from worksurface to splashback. Tombak Norm Architects has used this highly malleable metal alloy (3) to envelop the MDF cupboard doors on its beautiful new Ikea hack kitchen for Danish brand Reform (head to elledecoration.co.uk to see it). It doesn’t tarnish easily, but instead will patinate beautifully over time, developing a golden shine in areas of wear and tear.

Top The worksurface is ‘Super White’, a quartzite stone from Stone Italiana. The ‘Benton’ mosaic tiles by Ann Sacks are a good match for this splashback (£586 per square metre; annsacks.com) Above The black Nero Marquina marble mosaic tiles in this space are from Bespoke tiles and Stone. ‘La Palma’ arrow tiles by Ann Sacks are similar (£255 per square metre; annsacks.com) ➤

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 167


THE BEDROOM AT THE TOP OF THE HOUSE PROVIDES A PLACE OF RETREAT FROM THE SOCIAL SPACES BELOW

S E C R ET A D D R E S S B O O K Homeowner Philippa reveals the best places in Melbourne to shop for interiors Jardan This family-owned furniture business has an in-house design team with great room sets. It’s a brilliant place to source locally made furniture, with showrooms in Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney. (jardan.com.au) Loose Leaf Located in an old warehouse this hip plant studio brims with flowers and greenery. Owners Wona Bae and Charlie Lawler also run plant-related workshops. 31 Sackville Street, Collingwood, 3066 (looseleafstore.com.au) Mr Kitly Part gallery space, part shop, this is a great place to find pieces by local makers and designers, alongside finds from Japan. 381 Sydney Road, Brunswick, 3056 (mrkitly.com.au) Willie Weston Founded by Jessica Booth and Laetitia Prunetti, this studio works with Australian Indigenous artists to create digitally printed fabrics. (willieweston.com) Anchor Ceramics Handmade tiles, lighting and accessories by Australian architect and ceramicist Bruce Rowe. 27 Hayes Street, Northcote, 3070 (anchorceramics.com)

168 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Bedroom Dressed with sheer curtains and a soft grey carpet, this is a peaceful retreat. The linen bedding is from Australian brand, Bedouin Societe (try Society Limonta for similar). The pink armchair reflected in the large vintage mirror is the ‘Casting Chair’ from Grazia and Co. The white armchair is an ‘R160’ chair by Grant Featherston, an Australian mid-century designer. In the en suite bathroom, the ‘Aura’ tub by Caroma (try Duravit for similar) is placed by the window, so that bathers can soak in the views. For a similar bulb pendant light try Olive & The Fox Stockist details on p198 E D


Carefully arranged to maximise light, glass partitions, this Cape Town home Words HANNAH BOOTH Styling SVEN ALBERDING


with an open-plan layout and steel-framed is ideal for displaying its owners’ artwork Photography GREG COX/GAP INTERIORS

Living room A monochrome palette is warmed by the home’s original polished floorboards and flourishes of greenery, creating a gallery-like space. For a similar low-slung sofa, try The Sofa & Chair Company; Ikea sells similar cabinets and cowhide rugs Stockist details on p198 ➤


he Wellington Fruit Growers building in Cape Town is a narrow, three-storey terracotta edifice adorned with carvings of heraldic shields, and with stone pillars that stand in line like sentries. It is home to entrepreneurs Justin Rhodes, a native New Yorker, and his partner Cameron Munro, from South Africa, who share a spacious apartment on the building’s second floor. They were drawn to the property’s grand dimensions – its wooden floors, high ceilings and white walls lend it a distinctly European feel. ‘We both have a thing for architecturally interesting houses with a strong sense of history,’ says Justin. Arranged for art Striking sculptures and ‘THE HOUSE artworks fill the apartment, ITSELF IS many by artists who Justin represents at his nearby RELATIVELY gallery, Whatiftheworld. UNADORNED, ‘The art was actually our starting point,’ he says. ‘The WHICH ALLOWS house itself is relatively OUR WORKS unadorned, which allows the pieces to sing.’ Most of OF ART TO SING’ the works are by leading and emerging South African artists, and include a pair of vast stainless-steel abstract sculptures by Rodan Kane Hart and Jonathan Freemantle. Nothing is as it seems: what looks like a lemon-yellow jerry can is in fact a ceramic sculpture by Johannesburg-based artist Michele Mathison, and in the kitchen there’s a wooden drinks cabinet designed to look like a retro fridge by Durban artist Cameron Platter. The apartment also plays host to exhibitions, and often provides a temporary home to visiting artists. From top The exterior of the striking terracotta Wellington Fruit Growers building. Homeowners Justin Rhodes and Cameron Munro. In the living room, a ladder shelving unit (try Loaf’s ‘Pisa’ for similar) is filled with artwork and collectibles. The colours and shapes of the abstract painting by John Murray are echoed in the ‘Flo’ side table by Patrcia Urquiola for Driade Stockist details on p198

172 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

Zoned interiors The apartment is essentially one long, slim living space, running from the front door at one end to the building’s arched windows at the other. The whole home is gloriously open-plan, with just a separate main bedroom and bathroom located to one side of the entrance hall. Thanks to interior designer Liam Mooney, who collaborated with the couple, the layout is intelligently configured into separate zones using grouped furniture and artworks, plus a pair of steel-and-glass dividers that serve as partitions. In the far corner of the dining area sits a guest bedroom encased in a steelframed glass box that was in-situ when the couple bought the apartment. It’s a smart way to add a useful extra room without blocking out any of the light from the large window behind it. Simple statements The interior colour scheme is mostly muted – greys, whites and blacks – but punctuated by shocks of primary colour, including an orange vintage Anglepoise lamp, a yellow pouf and an electric blue sofa. There are also strong African elements, from giant palm trees to pieces by Nigerian fashion photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo. ‘This influence is restrained rather than full-blown,’ says Justin. ‘We wanted to reflect the work we do, and the country we live in, but in a refined way.’ liammooney.co.za; whatiftheworld.com


Living room The feature wall is filled with charcoal sketches by Durban artist Cameron Platter: they reflect the homeowners’ humorous, playful side. The contemporary ‘Clockwatcher’ grandfather clock is one of several pieces by Cape Town-based product designer Gregor Jenkin. Find a similar pouf on Etsy Stockist details on p198 ➤


THE LAYOUT IS INTELLIGENTLY CONFIGURED INTO SEPARATE ZONES USING GROUPED FURNITURE AND GLASS PARTITIONS


Kitchen A black steel dining table and a blue chair, both by Gregor Jenkin, are teamed with a set of chairs covered in simple white slips. Crockery and glassware is curated on open shelving, with accents of gold adding a luxe touch. A steel-framed glass cube encases the guest bedroom ➤


ARCHITECT’S GUIDE G L A S S PA RT I T I O N S

Alex Michaelis, co-founder of London firm Michaelis Boyd, explains why glass partitions are a clever design choice Why create a glass partition? Although open-plan living suits our contemporary lifestyle, there is still a demand for areas that can be sectioned of as private zones within a larger space. This could be a utility room within a kitchen, or a study or play room within a larger living area. A glazed box like this one provides privacy as well as a visual connection to the rest of the house. Plus, it maximises light, making it a great architectural device in areas where daylight might otherwise be blocked by a solid wall [in the example below by Michaelis Boyd, glass is used to divide the living room from the hallway]. Will it suit my property? Steel-glazed panelling is a classic design – Crittall, the original British maker of steel-glazed windows, was founded in 1849 – that can be used in both modern and traditional homes. The most important thing to ensure is that the proportions of the glazed panels work with your property’s design aesthetic. A traditional house lends itself to thin panels; the metalwork should have a slim profile to complement cornicing and finishes. Thicker metalwork and larger glass panels look good with materials that are popular in contemporary homes, such as exposed brick and concrete. How is it installed? The perimeter of the glazed panels is fixed into the floor, walls and ceiling, then a concealed timber surround is required to fix the steel frame onto. If the glazed panels are large and the floor above requires extra support, an intermediary column can be installed and decorated to closely match the steel glazing.

Where can I buy them? Team ED: it depends on your project. For restorations and refurbishments, as well as new installations, we recommend contacting Associated Steel Window Services (asws.co.uk). For the classic look, try D&R Design, an oicial stockist of Crittall steel-framed windows (dandrdesign.co.uk). Finally, kitchen brand Plain English can create a bespoke design for you that will suit your home’s style (plainenglishdesign.co.uk). michaelisboyd.com

176 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PORTRAIT: ED REEVE

What’s the cost? You should allow for a spend of approximately £1,100 per square metre. This will also cover the cost of fixed glazing and opening doors.

Attached to the inner frame is a curtain pole, which allows the bedroom to be screened of for privacy. Find a similar chevron rug at The Rug Company, and try Tori Murphy for soft wool throws Stockist details on p198 ➤


178 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


THE INTERIOR SCHEME IS MOSTLY MUTED WHITES, GREYS AND BLACKS, PUNCTUATED WITH SHOTS OF PRIMARY COLOUR

Bathroom The frameless shower and the crisp white metro tiles (try Fired Earth) act to increase the sense of space in this compact suite Bedroom The citrus hue is carried through from the bathroom, injecting a playful twist. The lamp is by Dokter & Misses, and the artworks are by South African artists Michael Taylor, Zander Blom and Rodan Kane Hart. For similar steel cabinets, try Ikea Stockist details on p198 E D


A RTS • CULTUR E • BOOKS • TR AV EL

ESCAPE A PASSAGE TO INDIA

PICTURE: PRARTHNA SING

Explore India through a design lens with encyclopaedic new book Sar: The Essence of Indian Design (Phaidon, £49.95), which takes the reader through the country’s colourful culture by way of 200 objects. Chapters include Vishwas (religion-focused design), Aana Jaana (travel; Hindustan Motors, pictured), Aaraam Karna (relaxing), Khaana Peena (food and drink) and Pehenna (wearing). London-based Tiipoi, one of our favourite continent-crossing young brands, has its handcrafted copper and neemwood milk pourer featured in the food chapter, and there is an entry for Bata tennis shoes – primary school PE class staples in India for over 70 years and now stocked at London’s fashionable Dover Street Market.

F O R M O R E P L A C E S T O E X P L O R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / E S C A P E


Escape | N E W S

SUMMER IN THE CITY Aperol spritz season isn’t over yet! Here’s our pick of four bars in London ofering delicious drinks in a summery environment 1 Mr Fogg’s The Victoriana extravaganza sees lush foliage mixed with marble-topped tables. The ambiance is deliberately colonial – think rattan furniture and ceiling fans – and the signature cocktail is a Hendrick’s gin teapot. 15 Bruton Lane, London W1 (mr-foggs.com). 2 The Harcourt This glorious new restaurant has a Scandi-British theme. Embrace the Swedish cofee-and-buns custom fika at afternoon tea time, or enjoy a bittersweet aquavit cocktail later on, served in the ivy-cloaked Garden Room. 32 Harcourt Street, London W1 (theharcourt.com). 3 67 Pall Mall A jewel palette of teals, plum and moss green creates a luxe shelter from the rain at this new members’ club specifically for wine lovers. The double-height hall is decorated with modern British furniture, Persian antique rugs, and Roll and Hill’s contemporary chandeliers. 67 Pall Mall, St James’s, London SW1 (67pallmall.co.uk). 4 Devonshire Club Mid-century glamour meets a 19th-century Regency warehouse near Liverpool Street in this super-luxe members’ club. The ground-floor brasserie boasts an elegant garden retreat. 4 Devonshire Square, London EC2 (devonshire.club).

2

3

1

4

SCENTED PLEASURES

PICTURES: PAUL WINCH-FURNESS, LAZAROS IORDANIDIS

Embark on an olfactory adventure through the history of scent with French fragrance brand Fragonard In the 16th century, it was fashionable among European nobility to wear scented leather gloves. After the Earl of Oxford gave Elizabeth I an Italian pair imbued with ambergris and orange flower, the trend took of in England, by which time in France they had become a part of everyday attire – to the extent that most glove-makers were also trained perfumers. In 1926, Frenchman Eugène Fuchs chose to name his maison du parfum after Grasse-born 18th-century painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard, himself the descendent of a glover-perfumer dynasty. Nine decades on, the brand has blossomed, but inheritance remains at its heart: it is run by Fuchs’ sisters Anne, Agnès and Francoise Costa. It has an inclusive attitude – no clandestine trade secrets here – and visitors are welcomed into its ‘open house’ museums in Paris and Grasse. In time for its 90th anniversary this year, Fragonard has opened a new Musée du Parfum in a former theatre near Paris’ Palais Garnier, which displays a comprehensive history of perfume. Highlights of the debut exhibition include a ‘planisphere’ with 17 interactive maps that take the visitor on a journey through the history of fragrance, from Ancient Egypt to the present day, with duskily lit ‘curio cabinets’ filled with gilt pomanders, measuring instruments and botanical illustrations. Particularly evocative is the apothecary and perfume-making apparatus. The rooms segue from medieval to modern, making the museum a visual and aromatic treat for anyone interested in perfume (until 31 October; fragonard.com; nouveaumuseefragonard.com). SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 185


Escape | N E W S

THREE OF THE BEST B R I T I S H F E S T I VA L S

Celebrate art, literature and music in beautiful locations

It’s your last chance to see two fascinating exhibitions on life in the home. ‘At Home in Britain’ at London’s Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a study of British homes that is interesting socially as well as architecturally. Six practices have drawn on RIBA Collections (which includes Almere Poort house, right) to reimagine three stalwarts of our national landscape: the cottage, the terraced house and the flat. Jamie Fobert Architects’ treatment of a cottage – ‘traditionally an afordable dwelling for the working class, but which has since been romanticised’ – is particularly intriguing (until 29 August; architecture.com). Zooming in on specific rooms is ‘Dimensione Domestica’, a new project at Fondazione Achille Castiglioni in Milan, the institution set up in the name of the 20th-century design icon and his architect brother Pier Giacomo. The first display is ‘Ambiente di Soggiorno’ (living room; top), a modern mise-en-scène of the brothers’ household designs that includes a TV, shelving (both pictured) and the iconic ‘Sella’ for Zanotta – a bicycle seat wittily repurposed as a ‘telephone stool’ for taking quick calls from the landline. Until 30 October (fondazioneachillecastiglioni.it).

S K I L L E D S ET Learn a new craft at Leicestershire workshop Studio NL. Founder Roxanna Webster organises classes including origami lampshademaking, lino printing and – our top pick – a masterclass with jewellers The Workbench. Design and hammer out your own silver ring, and founders Kirstie Maclaren and Katie Woodward will have them finished and hand-polished for you. Lino printing, £30; lampshademaking, £25; ring-carving, £55 (studionl.co.uk). 186 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

FESTIVAL NO.6 This music festival in the Italianate village of Portmeirion, Wales, lures more people every year. Poetry, sea shanties, film screenings and bands can be heard throughout the village (September 1–4; weekend ticket £180; festivalnumber6.com).

WRITE ON KEW The literary festival will see all manner of talks in marquees, cottages and conservatories across London’s botanical gardens. Book to see Evening Standard editor Sarah Sands in conversation with Kew’s head of trees, Tony Kirkham (from £18 per event; kew.org).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: LISA FLEMMING/NATIONAL GALLERIES OF SCOTLAND

DOMESTIC SCIENCE

EDINBURGH ART FESTIVAL Obeat young artists will exhibit in studios such as The Number Shop, and institutions like the Scottish National Portrait Gallery (above), which is celebrating six centuries of self-portraiture (until 28 August; edinburghartfestival.com).


Escape | N E W S

RETURN OF THE GRAND CAFÉ

1 2

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: PAUL WINCH-FURNES

Ofering cofee and conversation in elegant settings, these glamorous venues are all the rage. We celebrate their history and reveal our favourites Although steaming cups of cofee have been served in Austrian kafeehäuser since the 17th century, it was towards the end of the 19th century that Vienna’s cafés came into their own as the beating heart of street society. Frequented by the likes of Sigmund Freud and Gustav Klimt, such establishments tended to be majestically proportioned and extravagantly corniced, yet served afordable refreshments to all. The concept spread across Europe, from Paris to Oslo and London, where the Café Royal (2), located of Regent Street, opened in 1865. The modern vogue for airy, minimal eateries threatened the reign of the grand café. But, joyously, it seems London has not lost its appetite for elegance. The highest-grossing non-chain restaurant in the UK since its opening in 2003, The Wolseley (3) on Piccadilly has been instrumental in reviving the capital’s grand café culture. Housed in an ornate former car showroom built in 1921, its geometric marble floors, baroque ➤ 1 The Ivy Chelsea Garden, 197 Kings Road, London SW3 (the-ivy.co.uk) 2 Hotel Café Royal, 68 Regent Street, London W1 (hotelcaferoyal.com) 3 The Wolseley, 160 Piccadilly, London W1 (thewolseley.com) 4 The Delaunay, 55 Aldwych, London WC2 (thedelaunay.com)

3

4

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 189


Escape | N E W S

5

RETURN OF THE GRAND CAFÉ

7 5 Savini, 224 Piccadilly, London W1 (saviniatcriterion.co.uk) 6 Thames Foyer at the Savoy, Strand, London WC2 (fairmont.com/savoylondon) 7 Bellanger, 9 Islington Green, London N1 (bellanger.co.uk) 8 The Grand Cafe, 84 High Street, Oxford OX1 (thegrandcafe.co.uk) 9 Grand Ferdinand, Schubertring 10–12, Vienna (grandferdinand.com)

190 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

DESIGN CHECKLIST HOW TO RECOGNISE A GRAND CAFÉ • Vaulted ceiling • Brass fittings • Leather banquettes • An Art Nouveau logo • Wall-sized mirrors • Staf uniform of waistcoat and bow tie • Bentwood chairs • Marble-topped tables • Newspapers for customers • No music playing 8

Why are we still charmed by the grand café? The old-school ritziness, certainly, is part of it designed by Brady Williams Studio to evoke the Belle Époque, with glossy wood panelling, ornate plasterwork and antique lamps. Meanwhile, coming full circle, Vienna itself has a stylish new hotel and brasserie. Grand Ferdinand (9) is a contemporary take on the city’s cofee houses in a landmark building on the Ringstrasse. It aims to be ‘traditional, but with none of the anachronistic exclusivity associated with grandness’. The owners proudly point out that at the bar, a guest can sip the finest champagne for €16, or a Viennese beer for €1.50, making for an agreeably democratic café atmosphere. 9

PICTURES: ALAMY, ADRIAN HOUSTON, RICHARD BRYANT/ARCAID

6

ironwork and elaborate Byzantine light fittings remained crucial to the 2003 redesign overseen by David Collins Studio. ‘We used a lot of dark-stained woods, rich marbles, textured leathers, hints of metal and a deep palette,’ says David Collins’ creative director Simon Rawlings. The venue also eschews piped music. ‘Traditionally, these places thrive on the buzz of conversation,’ says Rawlings. But why are we still charmed by the grand café? The old-school ritziness, certainly, is part of it. ‘We love the idea of flexibility – most of these cafés serve food all day – and eating in a room which makes you feel important on arrival,’ says Rawlings. This last sentiment perfectly describes Savini at Criterion (5), a lavish building on Piccadilly with a gold mosaic ceiling, marble walls and staf in bow ties. In Islington, Bellanger (7) has been


Escape | N E W S

2

NEW VINTAGE Vineyard visits are officially in vogue. How else to explain the growing number of beautifully designed wineries across Europe? Here’s a quick guide to our top four

1 4

1 Franz Anton Mayer is located in Austria’s picturesque wine region. The estate commissioned local design studio March Gut to convert one of its wine cellars into a shop and tasting tavern (pictured). Plus, the roof doubles up as terraced seating, from where customers can enjoy the views of the vineyard (franzantonmayer.at). 2 Holg, a 50-year-old vineyard in Austria’s Wachau grape-growing region, has a tasting hall with a steeply pitched roof designed to echo the region’s traditional houses (weingut-hoegl.at). 3 Château Margaux, an historic vineyard near Bordeaux, has opened its new building designed by Foster + Partners. The barn-like tiled roof and branch-shaped steel supports resonate beautifully with the surroundings (chateau-margaux.com). 4 Alves de Sousa, perched on a hillside in the lunar landscape of Portugal’s Baixo Corgo, has buildings designed to minimise the visual impact on the landscape (alvesdesousa.com).

PICTURES: FERNANDO GUERRA, ELMAR LUDESCHER, NIGEL YOUNG

3

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 193


Escape | N E W S

HIDDEN OASIS In a bucolic region overlooked by craggy mountains 40 minutes from Cape Town, South Africa, lies Babylonstoren, a 17th-century farm, guesthouse and gardens. This summer, the owners restored another farmhouse in the grounds of the Cape Dutch manor house, meaning nine further suites and a new spa, swimming pool and library. Each suite contains a wood-burning stove, four-poster bed and a mix of locally made furniture. Be sure to wander around the eight-acre gardens, which were designed by French architect Patrice Taravella. Formally structured with box hedges, they contain more than 300 kinds of flora and fauna – from berries and blooms to a prickly-pear maze and a pond planted with edible lotus flowers. From £203 per night (babylonstoren.com).

TA K E A G Y M C L A S S

FIX A PUNCTURE

H AV E A N E Y E T E S T

GET A HAIRCUT

Housed in a converted tram depot fitted with lush plants, modern art and a concrete ceiling, is new exercise destination Blok. Designed by studio Daytrip, the spaces where classes are held (no membership required) have raw brickwork and wooden floorboards, a welcome contrast to the sterile suites in regular gyms. There’s even a smoothie bar (above). 38–40 Upper Clapton Road, London E5 (bloklondon.com).

Look Mum, No Hands! in Clerkenwell is a favourite on London’s cycle scene for its eicient repair service and myriad add-ons – a cofee bar, talks, speed-dating nights and even knitting classes. It has now joined forces with Brixton Cycles, opening a community bike workshop and café – think vintage prints of the Giro D’Italia on the walls. 296–298 Brixton Road, London SW9 (lookmumnohands.com).

Cubitts is an exceptional alternative to the eyecare giants. Book an eye test here and have your prescription transformed into beautiful spectacles at its workshop; each of the frames are named after a street in the area, and the pins are inspired by the wrought-iron ‘butterfly’ rivets found outside Victorian engineer Lewis Cubitt’s Granary building (now Central Saint Martin’s art school). 9 Park Street, London SE1 (cubitts.co.uk).

While a hairdresser’s appointment ought always to be more of a pleasure than a chore, Myla and Davis endeavours to make its three branches in south London – East Dulwich, Herne Hill and Brixton – less highly perfumed ‘beauty salons’ and more independent design stores. Big bunches of eucalyptus and gold jugs holding succulents decorate the space (mylaanddavis.co.uk).

194 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

PICTURE: DOOK

E L E VA T E T H E E V E R Y D AY A wave of new businesses in London are making taking care of life’s necessities much more stylish


GARDENS OF PLENTY Walled gardens are some of the most romantic outdoor spaces you can visit – especially as summer eases into autumn. Take a trip to our five favourites, all in the UK Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

1

HIGHGROVE G ARDENS, GLOUCESTERSHIRE

The Prince of Wales’ private gardens (below) are not what one might expect. His Georgian neoclassical-style manor house looks quintessentially British, but the gardens are worldly, obeat and innovative. They are developed and maintained by 14 gardeners, led by Debs Goodenough. ‘The garden is literally a canvas for HRH’s ideas,’ she says. These include a Transylvanian wildflower meadow, Turkish-rug inspired flower beds, an avenue of golden-yew topiary hedges and a working walled kitchen garden: in poor repair at the time of purchase, it is now a beguiling mix of industry and tranquillity. ‘The kitchen garden embodies the Prince of Wales’ view that a garden should “feed the soul, warm the heart and delight the eye”,’ Goodenough says. ‘It is a combination of good form and function, and encourages beneficial wildlife into a very intimate space.’ Lettuce seedlings may be planted into the pattern of St George’s and St Andrew’s flags, but the focus is on fruitfulness: Charlotte potatoes and leeks abound in autumn, and greengage trees are heavy with fruit. The tunnel of apple trees cultivates rare breeds, and surplus harvest is sent to nearby Tetbury Hospital (highgrovegardens.com).

PICTURES: GAP PHOTOS/HIGHGROVE, A BUTLER. DESIGNED BY HRH AND LADY SALISBURY, TOBY STRONG, COLIN DILCOCK

With their handsome stone borders hiding luscious greenery, walled gardens appeal to the architecturally curious as much as to the green fingered. An invention of medieval England, these enclosed plots were designed to keep out pests and trap warm air, thus creating a microclimate warm enough to grow fruits and vegetables from milder climes. Most walls were fashioned from bricks and lime mortar, into which nails could be hammered to train fruit trees to grow against them (according to gardener and author Susan Campbell, Queen Victoria’s 31-acre kitchen garden at Windsor grew asparagus at Christmas, and pineapples and grapes all year round). Amazingly, heated walls became common as early as the 18th century: the warmth from small fires was dispersed via chimney flues within the walls in order to defend fruit blossom from spring frosts. A number of walled gardens survive today, though some have been repurposed: Piet Oudolf’s modern grasses grace Scampston Hall’s former kitchen garden (scampston.co.uk) and Thornham Estate in Sufolk now boasts an open-air sculpture space (thornhamestate.com). But many, such as the 18thcentury Community Garden on the Scottish isle of Islay (islayhouse.co.uk), rely on volunteers to continue life as productive potagers. Here are five we recommend visiting.

196 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


Escape | G A R D E N S

2

THE LOST GARDENS OF H E L I G A N, C O R N W A L L The fascinating 18th-century garden, which contained a trailblazing pineapple-growing ‘pit’ in the 1800s, fell into disrepair after WWI – over half of its gardening staf never returned from the battlefields. Following a thrilling discovery of the ground plans in 1990, the gardens have been brought back to life. Autumn is a particularly magical season here: expect to find pumpkins, figs and bananas, plus feathered visitors including redwings and bramblings (heligan.com).

4

HOLKHAM HALL, NORFOLK

The new eighth Earl of Leicester and his family keep their spectacular Palladian pile evolving. Retired barns were converted into studios in 2015 ( jeweller Monica Vinader’s studio is in one) and now the focus is on the six-acre walled garden, which has received funding for redevelopment. Visit now to explore the Victorian greenhouses, see the new vineyard and admire the original pear trees (holkham.co.uk).

3

H E L M S L E Y W A L L E D G A R D E N, NORTH YORKSHIRE

Built in 1758 to supply its owners, the Feversham family, with vegetables and fresh flowers, this garden lay derelict after WWII, until green-fingered local Alison Ticehurst revived it in the 1990s. It is now a centre for horticultural therapy, with a community allotment, an orchard, and an excellent cafe in a greenhouse full of grapevines (helmsleywalledgarden.org.uk).

5

E A S T O N E S TAT E , LINCOLNSHIRE

Ursula Cholmeley, whose family has owned and managed the Easton Estate since 1561, has been working on reviving its gardens for the past 12 years. The results thus far include a ‘velvet border’ that celebrates the texture rather than the colour of flowers, and a contemporary reinterpretation of the walled garden containing a turf maze, yew tunnel and mature trees (visiteaston.co.uk). SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 197


ELLE Decoration | A D D R E S S

A

B

C

D

E

F

12 Thirteen Store (12thirteen-store.com) 1st Dibs (1stdibs.com) Ada & Ina (linenfabrics.co.uk) Altai (altai.it) Anglepoise (anglepoise.com) Ann Sacks (annsacks.com) Apple (apple.com/uk) Aram Store (aram.co.uk) Artemide (artemide.com) Asus (asus.com) AYTM (aytm.dk) B&B Italia (bebitalia.com) Baker (bakerfurniture.com) Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoore.com) Bentu (bentudesign.com) Bert & May (bertandmay.com) Bethan Gray (bethangray.com) Bitossi (bitossiceramiche.it) Blakes London (blakeslondon.com) Bloomingville (bloomingville.com) Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk) Camengo (camengo.fr) Carlo Moretti (carlomoretti.com) Carocim (carocim.com) Caroma (caroma.com.au) Cassina (cassina.com) Chase & Sorensen (chaseandsorensen.com) Classicon (classicon.com) Couleur Chanvre (couleur-chanvre.com) Cox & Cox (coxandcox.co.uk) Crittall (crittall-windows.co.uk) De Gournay (degournay.com) De Le Cuona (delecuona.com) De Padova (depadova.com) Debenhams (debenhams.com) Dekton (dekton.co.uk) Designers Guild (designersguild.com) Devol (devolkitchens.co.uk) Devon & Devon (devon-devon.com) Diana Beltran Herrera (dianabeltranherrera.com) Diespeker (diespeker.co.uk) Dokter And Misses (dokterandmisses.com) Domus (domustiles.co.uk) Dopo Domani (dopo-domani.com) Droog (droog.com) Dulux (dulux.co.uk) Dupont (dupont.co.uk) Duravit (duravit.co.uk) Duresta (duresta.com) Dzek (dzekdzekdzek.com) Encaustic Tiles Ltd (encaustictiles.net) English Salvage (englishsalvage.co.uk) Estel (estel.com) Etsy (etsy.com) Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) Fedora Design (fedoradesign.com) Fibonacci Stone (fibonaccistone.com.au) Fired Earth (firedearth.com) Flos (flos.com) Forestier (forestier.fr) Francesca’s Paint (francescaspaint.com) Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com)

G Garden Trading

H

I J

K

L

M

N

198 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

(gardentrading.co.uk) Gebrüder Thonet Vienna (gebruederthonetvienna.com) Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com) Golran (golran.com) Grazia and Co (graziaandco.com.au) Gubi (gubi.com) H&M (hm.com) Habitat (habitat.co.uk) Harrods (harrods.com) Heal’s (heals.com) Herman Miller (hermanmiller.co.uk) Hillarys (hillarys.co.uk) Ikea (ikea.com) In Opera (in-opera.co.uk) Jamb ( jamb.co.uk) John Cullen Lighting ( johncullenlighting.co.uk) John Lewis ( johnlewis.com) Jonathan Adler ( jonathanadler.com) Karakter (karakter-copenhagen.com) Kartell (kartell.com) Kelly Hoppen (kellyhoppen.com) La Cornue (lacornue.com) Landford Stone (landfordstone.co.uk) Larusi (larusi.com) Lassco (lassco.co.uk) Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com) Lindell & Co (lindellandco.com) Lindsey Lang (lindseylang.co.uk) Little Greene (littlegreene.com) Living Divani (livingdivani.it) Lundhs (lundhs.co.uk) Maison Sarah Lavoine (maisonsarahlavoine.com) Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) Marazzi (marazzitile.co.uk) Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.se) Matthew Williamson (matthewwilliamson.com) Miller Harris (millerharris.com) Molteni Group (moltenigroup.com) Monologue (monologuelondon.com) Moroccan Bazaar (moroccanbazaar.com) Moroso (moroso.co.uk) Morris & Co (william-morris.co.uk) Mothercare (mothercare.com) Mr Price Home (mrphome.com) Mr Resistor (mr-resistor.co.uk) Multiform Stone Industries (multiformstone.com.au) Museum & Galleries (museumsgalleries.co.uk) Muuto (muuto.com) Naked Kitchens (nakedkitchens.com) Nest (nest.co.uk) Norm Architects (normcph.com) Northern Lighting (northernlighting.no)

O Olive & The Fox

P

R

S

(oliveandthefox.co.uk) Olivia Aspinall (olivia-aspinall.com) Ommo (ommo.com) Original Style (originalstyle.com) Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) Pallucco (pallucco.com) Pentreath & Hall (pentreath-hall.com) Petite Friture (petitefriture.com) Plain English (plainenglishdesign.co.uk) Porcelanosa (porcelanosa.com) PP Møbler (pp.dk) Reform (reformcph.com) Romo (romo.com) Rossana (rossana.uk.com) Roundhouse (roundhousedesign.com) Sahco (sahco.com) Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com) Schiini (schiini.it) Schmidt (schmidt-kitchens.com) SCP (scp.co.uk) Sé (se-collections.com) Senso (sensofloor.co.uk) Shutterly Fabulous (shutterlyfabulous.com) Sicis (sicis.com) Silestone (silestone.co.uk) Skandium (skandium.com) Skinflint (skinflintdesign.co.uk) Society Limonta (societylimonta.com) Stephanie Tudor (stephanietudor.co.uk) Stokke (stokke.com) Stone Italiana (stoneitaliana.com)

T Temper Studio (temperstudio.com)

U V

Y

Z

The Baked Tile Company (bakedtiles.co.uk) The Chandelier & Mirror Company (chandeliersandmirrors.co.uk) The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) The Fabulous Fleece Company (thefabulousfleececompany.co.uk) The Headboard Workshop (theheadboardworkshop.co.uk) The Natural Linen Company (naturallinencompany.com) The Rug Company (therugcompany.com) The Shutter Shop (shuttershop.co.uk) The Shutter Store (shutters.co.uk) The Sofa & Chair Company (thesofaandchair.co.uk) Tisettanta (tisettanta.it) Ton (ton.eu) Topps Tiles (toppstiles.co.uk) Tori Murphy (torimurphy.com) Trombé Ltd (trombe.co.uk) Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) Union Tiles (uniontiles.co.za) Urban Cottage Industries (urbancottageindustries.com) Viabizzuno (viabizzuno.com) Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk) Vibia (vibia.com) Villa Nova (villanova.co.uk) Vitra (vitra.com) Vola (en.vola.com) Volga Linen (volgalinen.co.uk) Yastik by Rifat Özbek (yastikbyrifatozbek.com) Yod and Co (yodandco.com) Zanotta (zanotta.it) Zoffany (zofany.com)

PHOTOGRAPHY: FABRIZIO CICCONI STYLING: FRANCESCA DAVOLI

Stockists

BOOK


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Design your home this month SCANDINAVIAN SURFACE Brand new! Scandinavian Surface proudly presents the mural «Bohemian Birds, pale blue» from the new collection Nordic Moods. The beautiful exotic looking nordic bird Bohemian Waxwing swings playfully among nude graphic branches on a weathered pale blue/beige background. The design also comes in a version with lush branches and pale beige background. Have a closer look on the new collection at www. scandinaviansurface.com Scandinavian Surface mural designs are to be found in public spaces and private homes all over the world. The designers are: Åsne Midtgarden, Ann-Tove Engenes and Kristine Dybwad. Order at www.photowall.co.uk (or the webshop for your country) and check out their outstanding customer service!

THE KYOTO CORNER SOFA BY NUASTYLE The Kyoto Corner Sofa by Nuastyle ofers chic urban style without the high price tag. Fluid lines and distinctive metal feet combine to create a sofa with true contemporary elegance. Available in many beautiful fabrics, the Kyoto is also available in Armchair and Sofa sizes. From £1495 including delivery. Elle Decoration Readers get £250 of with Discount Code ELLE250 valid until 30.09.16 www.nuastyle.com or call 020 3394 0134 for free fabric samples.

CLASSIC AND ELEGANT CUTLERY DESIGNED FOR MODERN LIVING

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS PILLOWS COLLECTION The name of each pillow (each deadly sin is represented by an animal): • Pride (Orgueil): A Peacock • Lust (Luxure): A Tiger • Greed (Gourmandise): Snakes • Desire (Envie): An Octopus • Anger (Colère): A Lion • Laziness (Paresse): A Cat • Avarice (Avarice): A Magpie It is the collection Spring Summer 2016, Boudoir des Lubies HOME and Made in France. We used velvet as material and the back is embroidered with gold thread. www.boudoirdeslubies.com

This delightful range is Old English mirror finish stainless steel with dishwasher safe cream handled knives. Exclusive price – Set for six people at £300, this includes six seven-piece place settings (as shown) and two table spoons. A set for four people costs £220. Prices include VAT and UK delivery. www.glazebrook.com Tel: 020 7731 7135.

VINTERIOR Discover a world of stylish preloved furniture and browse thousands of modern, vintage and antique pieces all in one place. Vinterior carefully curate their suppliers and products to ensure that shoppers can easily find the designs they want, with efortless delivery. Whether you love Scandinavian Modern, Mid Century or Shabby Chic, Vinterior has it all… and more! Save £20 on your first order by visiting www.vinterior.co/elledecoration


ADVERTISING FEATURE

SABRINA SHAH HAKIM Sabrina Shah Hakim has launched her first home décor collection inspired by London’s Art Deco architecture. The Deco homeware collection is made up of a beautifully designed range of plates, cushions and wall prints with more products to follow in the coming months. Sabrina also welcomes interested parties for collaborative and bespoke work. For sales and general enquiries email info@sabrinashahhakim. co.uk or call 07766 076502.

SWOON EDITIONS Swoon Editions is an online furniture retailer specialising in beautiful, hand-crafted furniture at honest, reasonable prices. The Russell sideboard fuses a simple shape with rich rosewood and hairpin legs that really make it stand out – just £549, including delivery. Readers also save 15% on all orders with voucher code ELLEDECORATION. To order simply go to swooneditions.com/elledecoration or call 020 3137 2464. Ofer expires 02.09.16.

HUNTLANDS FARM BED & BREAKFAST AND UPHOLSTERY Situated on the Herefordshire/ Worcestershire border, Huntlands Farm ofers upholstery classes in an idyllic, rural setting on a working farm. Your hosts, a custom upholsterer and a passionate cook, guarantee you a comfy stay with individual upholstery tuition and freshly prepared, local food to enjoy. Tel: 01886 821955. huntlandsfarm.co.uk/upholstery

BOTTEGA YU Textile designer and weaver, Mayumi, creates hand woven designs using Japanese paper yarn. Drawing inspiration from nature, she employs Japanese Origami techniques to bring her designs to life. Her use of folded forms creates strength, as well as beautiful visual efects. Featured is her signature paper yarn woven light covering. To find out more, visit www.bottega-yu.net or call 01749 840602.


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

COURSES

Choose the interior design school whose graduates have many fans In 2015, 13 Inchbald graduates were LQFOXGHGLQ+RXVH *DUGHQ·V Leading Interior Designers A high standard of teaching is central to our interior design school’s success and on which our reputation has been built over the past 40 years.

YEARS

CAREERS

55

CREATING

Whether it’s a graduate, part time or online course you will receive guidance from the same high quality tutors.

So whether you are aiming for a successful career in interior design or simply looking to improve your own home you won’t find a better established or more renowned school than the Inchbald.

Full time, part time or change of career time design courses.

In association with:

E S T A B L I S H E D

020 7730 5508 | kate@inchbald.co.uk | www.inchbald.co.uk

202 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

1 9 6 0


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z INTERIORS & LIGHTING

LIGHTING FURNITURE ELECTRICITY H A R D W A R E / D OOR ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES

LEV ER H A N D LE

BUSTERANDPUNCH.COM @BUSTERANDPUNCH

pedigree lamps, mongrel prices

www.pooky.com

TIMELESS BESPOKE LIGHTING

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 203


Classifieds | A – Z OUTDOOR ART, TRAVEL & HOLIDAYS

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260 FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

Inspirational and beautifully British handmade furniture without the high street price tag

Hurry...our summer savings have been extended!

Call us on 0845 468 0577 or visit willowandhall.co.uk Or cosy up on sofas, sofa beds and beds in our London showroom

5 characterful luxury rooms and suites on the edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds. Relax in tranquil surrounding, indulged with every attention and comfort. www.elmtree.co.uk 01790 753534 enquiries@elmtree.co.uk 204 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

Classic and contemporary furniture, lighting, accessories and vintage finds from Blue Isle. Visit our online boutique store at www.blueisle.co.uk 01425 653031

M SU

M

ER

LE A S

Now we know where we stand, let’s be sure of where we sit. Fairmont large sofa in Faroes Roman Purple

Sofas & Beds Handmade in Britain, in any Fabric in the World 0808 178 3211 Stores Nationwide sofasandstuff.com SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 205


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

HEADBOARDS, BEDS & BEDDING

Visit www.theheadboardworkshop.co.uk or call us on 01291 628216

all natural

The finest organic beds and mattresses crafted by hand in Devon

206 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

01392 877 247

www.naturalmat.co.uk

For the best night life.

www.buttonandsprung.com 03333 201 801


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z DANISH FURNITURE & HOME INTEREST

The Footstool Wo rkshop

www.thefootstoolworkshop.co.uk 01443 831981

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 207


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

HOME INTEREST

What makes an Albion bath unique? Our exclusive bath material creates a diference you can feel.... Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

01282 813235 | esse.com

ALBION

Handmade bathrooms directly from our factory

ESSEs have been tried, tested and trusted across the world for more than 160 years. Beautifully designed to the last detail, these cast iron range cookers are available in a range of sizes, all fuel types and over 20 stunning colours. ESSE EL13 pictured here in a DeVOL Kitchen.

DORGLAZE ® VISION PANEL KITS FOR DOORS

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

home and deskware

Björk Haraldsdóttir Contemporary Handbuilt Ceramics

www.ceramicsbybjork.com @charlesdedman

www.charlesdedman.co.uk

blockdesign.co.uk

CHARLES DEDMAN

208 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z BATHROOM ACCESSORIES

SEPTEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 209


THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal our current home obsessions and the products and projects we’ve been testing and tackling this month B I N FA S H I O N

Features Director Amy Bradford tests the ‘Totem’ by Joseph Joseph Given the number of ways we are now asked to sort our rubbish – recycling in one bin, paper and card in another, food waste in yet another – it’s astonishing that bins remain so stubbornly unsophisticated. Our hunt for a stylish multifunctional bin yielded but one contender: the ‘Totem’, designed by Brit duo PearsonLloyd for Joseph Joseph. It’s available in three sizes (48, 58 or 60 litres), but the largest is the best, with a pull-out recycling unit at the bottom and a general rubbish section at the top; there’s also a separate caddy for food waste that sits neatly inside. An activated-carbon odour filter and well-sealed push-and-click lid eliminate bad smells. The only downside is the price: the ‘Totem 60’ is £219. However, I think it’s worth the money for something you’re unlikely to want to replace for many years ( josephjoseph.com).

‘I’m loving tropical prints and have just bought a roll of banana leaf fabric from Etsy for my bathroom curtain – it goes so well with my House of Hackney wallpaper (right)’ Jackie Daly, Homes Editor

MINDFUL COOKING

Editor in Chief Michelle Ogundehin has been delving into ‘The Naturalista’ cookbook

‘Totem 60’ bin by PearsonLloyd, £219, Joseph Joseph (joseph joseph.com)

T RY DY E Decorating Intern Steph Iles tries shibori dyeing Inspired by the feature in our July 2016 issue, I took textile artist Mandy Southan’s shibori dyeing class at West Dean College. My results (above) were somewhat random, but the examples from the experts are exquisite. Look out for Southan’s next course at West Dean, silk painting; December 16 and 18, £242 (westdean.org.uk; mandysouthan.com).

‘Where can you buy a nice, simple curtain pole? It’s becoming the bane of my life’ – Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs is on the hunt for stylish curtain rails. Turn to p45 for the answer, plus a guide to sheers 210 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2016

There are loads of ‘healthy eating’ cookbooks and, quite frankly, there’s a point at which you really don’t need another chocolate avocado mousse recipe. But this book by Xochi Balfour (£25, Headline) is aimed at the reader who wants to find a more holistic way to protect their body from the stresses of the 21st century. It has chapters on making your own beauty products and mindful living (with tools and techniques for everyday mindfulness), alongside great dairyand gluten-free recipes.


5sdcsdc  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you